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Sample records for plasmid-encoded ceftazidime-hydrolyzing ctx-m-53

  1. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  2. Nonconjugative Plasmids Encoding Sulfanilamide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Susumu; Inoue, Kunio; Inoue, Matsuhisa

    1977-01-01

    Nonconjugative plasmids encoding sulfanilamide (Sa) resistance were demonstrated at a high frequency in Shigella and Escherichia coli strains resistant to sulfanilamide. These Sa plasmids were all compatible with the standard plasmids used in compatibility testing. The sizes of seven Sa plasmids were measured by electron microscopy and ranged from 1.79 to 2.08 μm, corresponding to 3.5 to 3.9 megadaltons. Images PMID:334067

  3. Characterization of a plasmid-encoded urease gene cluster found in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, S E; Collins, C M

    1993-03-01

    Plasmid-encoded urease gene clusters found in uropathogenic isolates of Escherichia coli, Providencia stuartii, and Salmonella cubana demonstrated DNA homology, similar positions of restriction endonuclease cleavage sites, and manners of urease expression and therefore represent the same locus. DNA sequence analysis indicated that the plasmid-encoded urease genes are closely related to the Proteus mirabilis urease genes. PMID:8449894

  4. Chromosome- and Plasmid-Encoded β-Lactamases in Capnocytophaga spp.

    PubMed Central

    Handal, Trude; Giraud-Morin, Chantal; Caugant, Dominique A.; Madinier, Isabelle; Olsen, Ingar; Fosse, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Chromosome- and plasmid-encoded CfxA2 and CfxA3 β-lactamases were detected in Capnocytophaga spp. from oral sources in France, Norway, and the United States. Unidentified chromosome-encoded β-lactamases were present in Capnocytophaga sputigena. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the CfxA3-encoding plasmid from C. ochracea revealed an unreported insertion sequence (ISCoc1) upstream of the cfxA gene. PMID:16127077

  5. Toxin–antitoxin systems are ubiquitous and plasmid-encoded in vancomycin-resistant enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Elizabeth M.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are common hospital pathogens that are resistant to most major classes of antibiotics. The incidence of VRE is increasing rapidly, to the point where over one-quarter of enterococcal infections in intensive care units are now resistant to vancomycin. The exact mechanism by which VRE maintains its plasmid-encoded resistance genes is ill-defined, and novel targets for the treatment of VRE are lacking. In an effort to identify novel protein targets for the treatment of VRE infections, we probed the plasmids obtained from 75 VRE isolates for the presence of toxin–antitoxin (TA) gene systems. Remarkably, genes for one particular TA pair, the mazEF system (originally identified on the Escherichia coli chromosome), were present on plasmids from 75/75 (100%) of the isolates. Furthermore, mazEF was on the same plasmid as vanA in the vast majority of cases (>90%). Plasmid stability tests and RT-PCR raise the possibility that this plasmid-encoded mazEF is indeed functional in enterococci. Given this ubiquity of mazEF in VRE and the deleterious activity of the MazF toxin, disruption of mazEF with pharmacological agents is an attractive strategy for tailored antimicrobial therapy. PMID:17190821

  6. Diversity of plasmids encoding histidine decarboxylase gene in Tetragenococcus spp. isolated from Japanese fish sauce.

    PubMed

    Satomi, Masataka; Furushita, Manabu; Oikawa, Hiroshi; Yano, Yutaka

    2011-07-15

    Nineteen isolates of histamine producing halophilic bacteria were isolated from four fish sauce mashes, each mash accumulating over 1000 ppm of histamine. The complete sequences of the plasmids encoding the pyruvoyl dependent histidine decarboxylase gene (hdcA), which is harbored in histamine producing bacteria, were determined. In conjunction, the sequence regions adjacent to hdcA were analyzed to provide information regarding its genetic origin. As reference strains, Tetragenococcus halophilus H and T. muriaticus JCM10006(T) were also studied. Phenotypic and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses identified all isolates as T. halophilus, a predominant histamine producing bacteria present during fish sauce fermentation. Genetic analyses (PCR, Southern blot, and complete plasmid sequencing) of the histamine producing isolates confirmed that all the isolates harbored approximately 21-37 kbp plasmids encoding a single copy of the hdc cluster consisting of four genes related to histamine production. Analysis of hdc clusters, including spacer regions, indicated >99% sequence similarity among the isolates. All of the plasmids sequenced encoded traA, however genes related to plasmid conjugation, namely mob genes and oriT, were not identified. Two putative mobile genetic elements, ISLP1-like and IS200-like, respectively, were identified in the up- and downstream region of the hdc cluster of all plasmids. Most of the sequences, except hdc cluster and two adjacent IS elements, were diverse among plasmids, suggesting that each histamine producers harbored a different histamine-related plasmid. These results suggested that the hdc cluster was not spread by clonal dissemination depending on the specific plasmid and that the hdc cluster in tetragenococcal plasmid was likely encoded on transformable elements. PMID:21616548

  7. A Shigella flexneri virulence plasmid encoded factor controls production of outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sidik, Saima; Kottwitz, Haila; Benjamin, Jeremy; Ryu, Julie; Jarrar, Ameer; Garduno, Rafael; Rohde, John R

    2014-12-01

    Shigella spp. use a repertoire of virulence plasmid-encoded factors to cause shigellosis. These include components of a Type III Secretion Apparatus (T3SA) that is required for invasion of epithelial cells and many genes of unknown function. We constructed an array of 99 deletion mutants comprising all genes encoded by the virulence plasmid (excluding those known to be required for plasmid maintenance) of Shigella flexneri. We screened these mutants for their ability to bind the dye Congo red: an indicator of T3SA function. This screen focused our attention on an operon encoding genes that modify the cell envelope including virK, a gene of partially characterized function. We discovered that virK is required for controlled release of proteins to the culture supernatant. Mutations in virK result in a temperature-dependent overproduction of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). The periplasmic chaperone/protease DegP, a known regulator of OMV production in Escherichia coli (encoded by a chromosomal gene), was found to similarly control OMV production in S. flexneri. Both virK and degP show genetic interactions with mxiD, a structural component of the T3SA. Our results are consistent with a model in which VirK and DegP relieve the periplasmic stress that accompanies assembly of the T3SA. PMID:25378474

  8. A Shigella flexneri Virulence Plasmid Encoded Factor Controls Production of Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sidik, Saima; Kottwitz, Haila; Benjamin, Jeremy; Ryu, Julie; Jarrar, Ameer; Garduno, Rafael; Rohde, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Shigella spp. use a repertoire of virulence plasmid-encoded factors to cause shigellosis. These include components of a Type III Secretion Apparatus (T3SA) that is required for invasion of epithelial cells and many genes of unknown function. We constructed an array of 99 deletion mutants comprising all genes encoded by the virulence plasmid (excluding those known to be required for plasmid maintenance) of Shigella flexneri. We screened these mutants for their ability to bind the dye Congo red: an indicator of T3SA function. This screen focused our attention on an operon encoding genes that modify the cell envelope including virK, a gene of partially characterized function. We discovered that virK is required for controlled release of proteins to the culture supernatant. Mutations in virK result in a temperature-dependent overproduction of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). The periplasmic chaperone/protease DegP, a known regulator of OMV production in Escherichia coli (encoded by a chromosomal gene), was found to similarly control OMV production in S. flexneri. Both virK and degP show genetic interactions with mxiD, a structural component of the T3SA. Our results are consistent with a model in which VirK and DegP relieve the periplasmic stress that accompanies assembly of the T3SA. PMID:25378474

  9. Molecular cloning, purification, and properties of a plasmid-encoded chloramphenicol acetyltransferase from Staphylococcus haemolyticus.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, S; Cardoso, M

    1991-01-01

    A small chloramphenicol resistance (Cmr) plasmid of approximately 3.75 kb, designated pSCS5, was isolated from Staphylococcus haemolyticus. This plasmid encoded an inducible chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT; EC 2.3.1.28). The cat gene of pSCS5 was cloned into the Escherichia coli plasmid vector pBluescript SKII+. It differed in its nucleotide sequence and deduced amino acid sequence from the cat genes described previously in staphylococci and other gram-positive bacteria. The CAT enzyme was purified from cell-free lysates by ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography, and fast protein liquid chromatography. The native enzyme had an Mr of 70,000 and was composed of three identical subunits, each with an Mr of approximately 23,000. Its isoelectric point was at pH 6.15. CAT from pSCS5 exhibited Km values of 2.81 and 51.8 microM for chloramphenicol and acetyl coenzyme A, respectively. The optimum pH for activity was 7.8. CAT encoded by pSCS5 proved to be relatively heat stable, but sensitive to mercury ions. The observed differences in the nucleotide sequence and the biochemical characteristics of the enzyme allowed the identification of the pSCS5-encoded CAT from S. haemolyticus as a CAT variant different from those described previously in gram-positive bacteria. Images PMID:1929282

  10. Plasmid-encoding vasostatin inhibited the growth and metastasis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xing-Chen; Wang, Ming; Chen, Xu-Xia; Liu, Jing; Xiao, Gui-Hua; Liao, Hong-Li

    2014-10-01

    The growth and metastasis of solid tumors depends on angiogenesis. Anti-angiogenesis therapy may represent a promising therapeutic option. Vasostatin, the N-terminal domain of calreticulin, is a very potent endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth. In this study, we attempted to investigate whether plasmid-encoding vasostatin complexed with cationic liposome could suppress the growth and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo and discover its possible mechanism of action. Apoptosis induction of pSecTag2B-vasostatin plasmid on murine endothelial cells (MS1) was examined by flow cytometric analysis in vitro. Nude mice bearing HCCLM3 tumor received pSecTag2B-vasostatin, pSecTag2B-Null, and 0.9 % NaCl solution, respectively. Tumor net weight was measured and survival time was observed. Microvessel density within tumor tissues was determined by CD31 immunohistochemistry. H&E staining of lungs and TUNEL assay of primary tumor tissues were also conducted. The results displayed that pSecTag2B-vasostatin could inhibit the growth and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts and prolong survival time compared with the controls in vivo. Moreover, histologic analysis revealed that pSecTag2B-vasostatin treatment increased apoptosis and inhibited angiogenesis. The present data may be of importance to the further exploration of this new anti-angiogenesis approach in the treatment of hepatocellular cancer. PMID:24997628

  11. A Host-Specific Factor is Necessary for Efficient Folding of the Autotransporter Plasmid-Encoded Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Nemec, Kathleen N.; Scaglione, Patricia; Navarro-García, Fernando; Huerta, Jazmín; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Autotransporters are the most common virulence factors secreted from Gram-negative pathogens. Until recently, autotransporter folding and outer membrane translocation were thought to be self-mediated events that did not require accessory factors. Here, we report that two variants of the autotransporter plasmid-encoded toxin are secreted by a lab strain of Escherichia coli. Biophysical analysis and cell-based toxicity assays demonstrated that only one of the two variants was in a folded, active conformation. The misfolded variant was not produced by a pathogenic strain of enteroaggregative E. coli and did not result from protein overproduction in the lab strain of E. coli. Our data suggest a host-specific factor is required for efficient folding of plasmid-encoded toxin. PMID:19944129

  12. Structural Characteristics of the Plasmid-Encoded Toxin from Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli†

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Patricia; Nemec, Kathleen N.; Burlingame, Kaitlin E.; Grabon, Agnieszka; Huerta, Jazmin; Navarro-García, Fernando; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Intoxication by the plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli requires toxin translocation from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cytosol. This event involves the quality control system of ER-associated degradation (ERAD), but the molecular details of the process are poorly characterized. For many structurally distinct AB-type toxins, ERAD-mediated translocation is triggered by the spontaneous unfolding of a thermally unstable A chain. Here we show that Pet, a non-AB toxin, engages ERAD by a different mechanism that does not involve thermal unfolding. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements demonstrated that Pet maintains most of its secondary and tertiary structural features at 37°C, with significant thermal unfolding only occurring at temperatures ≥50°C. Fluorescence quenching experiments detected the partial solvent exposure of Pet aromatic amino acid residues at 37°C, and a cell-based assay suggested these changes could activate an ERAD-related event known as the unfolded protein response. We also found that HEp-2 cells were resistant to Pet intoxication when incubated with glycerol, a protein stabilizer. Altogether, our data are consistent with a model in which ERAD activity is triggered by a subtle structural destabilization of Pet and the exposure of Pet hydrophobic residues at physiological temperature. This was further supported by computer modeling analysis, which identified a surface-exposed hydrophobic loop among other accessible nonpolar residues in Pet. From our data it appears that Pet can promote its ERAD-mediated translocation into the cytosol by a distinct mechanism involving partial exposure of hydrophobic residues rather than the substantial unfolding observed for certain AB toxins. PMID:18702515

  13. Plasmid-encoded toxin of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli is internalized by epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Navarro-García, F; Canizalez-Roman, A; Luna, J; Sears, C; Nataro, J P

    2001-02-01

    We have previously described a 104-kDa protein termed Pet (for plasmid-encoded toxin) secreted by some strains of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC). Through an unknown mechanism, this toxin (i) raises transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc) and decreases the electrical resistance of rat jejunum mounted in the Ussing chamber, (ii) causes cytoskeletal alterations in HEp-2 cells and HT29/C1 cells, and (iii) is required for histopathologic effects of EAEC on human intestinal mucosa. Pet is a member of the autotransporter class of secreted proteins and together with Tsh, EspP, EspC, ShMu, and SepA proteins comprises the SPATE subfamily. Here, we show that Pet is internalized by HEp-2 cells and that internalization appears to be required for the induction of cytopathic effects. Evidence supporting Pet internalization includes the facts that (i) the effects of Pet on epithelial cells were inhibited by brefeldin A, which interferes with various steps of intracellular vesicular transport; (ii) immunoblots using anti-Pet antibodies detected Pet in the cytoplasmic fraction of intoxicated HEp-2 cells; (iii) Pet was detected inside HEp-2 cells by confocal microscopy; and (iv) a mutant in the passenger domain cleavage site, which prevents Pet release from the bacterial outer membrane, did not produce cytopathic effects on epithelial cells, whereas the release of mutant Pet from the outer membrane with trypsin yielded active toxin. We have also shown that the Pet serine protease motif is required to produce cytopathic effects but not for Pet secretion. Our results suggest an intracellular mode of action for the Pet protease and are consistent with we our recent report suggesting an intracellular mode of action for Pet. PMID:11160002

  14. Emergence of Staphylococcus aureus carrying multiple drug resistance genes on a plasmid encoding exfoliative toxin B.

    PubMed

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Fudaba, Yasuyuki; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kato, Fuminori; Kayama, Shizuo; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2013-12-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence and analysis of pETBTY825, a Staphylococcus aureus TY825 plasmid encoding exfoliative toxin B (ETB). S. aureus TY825 is a clinical isolate obtained from an impetigo patient in 2002. The size of pETBTY825, 60.6 kbp, was unexpectedly larger than that of the archetype pETBTY4 (∼30 kbp). Genomic comparison of the plasmids shows that pETBTY825 has the archetype pETBTY4 as the backbone and has a single large extra DNA region of 22.4 kbp. The extra DNA region contains genes for resistance to aminoglycoside [aac(6')/aph(2″)], macrolide (msrA), and penicillin (blaZ). A plasmid deletion experiment indicated that these three resistance elements were functionally active. We retrospectively examined the resistance profile of the clinical ETB-producing S. aureus strains isolated in 1977 to 2007 using a MIC determination with gentamicin (GM), arbekacin (ABK), and erythromycin (EM) and by PCR analyses for aac(6')/aph(2″) and msrA using purified plasmid preparations. The ETB-producing S. aureus strains began to display high resistance to GM, which was parallel with the detection of aac(6')/aph(2″) and mecA, after 1990. Conversely, there was no significant change in the ABK MIC during the testing period, although it had a tendency to slightly increase. After 2001, isolates resistant to EM significantly increased; however, msrA was hardly detected in ETB-producing S. aureus strains, and only five isolates were positive for both aac(6')/aph(2″) and msrA. In this study, we report the emergence of a fusion plasmid carrying the toxin gene etb and drug resistance genes. Prevalence of the pETBTY825 carrier may further increase the clinical threat, since ETB-producing S. aureus is closely related to more severe impetigo or staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS), which requires a general antimicrobial treatment. PMID:24080652

  15. Neutralization of venom-induced hemorrhage by equine antibodies raised by immunization with a plasmid encoding a novel P-II metalloproteinase from the lancehead pitviper Bothrops asper.

    PubMed

    Arce-Estrada, Viviana; Azofeifa-Cordero, Gabriela; Estrada, Ricardo; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Flores-Díaz, Marietta

    2009-01-14

    In this work, the cDNA encoding a novel P-II type metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper venom glands was cloned, sequenced and used for DNA immunization of animals with accelerated DNA-coated tungsten microparticles and the helius Gene Gun system. Specific antibodies against B. asper venom antigens were induced in mice co-immunized with the plasmid encoding the P-II metalloproteinase together with an expression plasmid encoding the murine IL-2. Similarly, specific antibodies against B. asper venom antigens were also induced in a horse co-immunized with the plasmid encoding the P-II metalloproteinase, together with a plasmid encoding the equine IL-6. The equine antibodies induced by immunization with the P-II metalloproteinase encoding plasmid cross react with several proteins of B. asper, Crotalus durissus durissus, and Lachesis stenophrys venoms in western blot, demonstrating antigenic similarity between the cloned metalloproteinase and other metalloproteinases present in these venoms. Furthermore, the equine antibodies induced by immunization with the P-II metalloproteinase encoding plasmid completely neutralized the hemorrhagic activity of the whole B. asper venom and partially the hemorrhagic activity of C. durissus durissus venom. The neutralizing ability of the produced antibodies raises, for the first time, the possibility of developing therapeutic antivenoms in horses by DNA immunization using tungsten microparticles. PMID:19013207

  16. The Multidrug Resistance IncA/C Transferable Plasmid Encodes a Novel Domain-swapped Dimeric Protein-disulfide Isomerase*

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Neyer, Simon; Schembri, Mark A.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C conjugative plasmids disseminate antibiotic resistance genes among clinically relevant enteric bacteria. A plasmid-encoded disulfide isomerase is associated with conjugation. Sequence analysis of several IncA/C plasmids and IncA/C-related integrative and conjugative elements (ICE) from commensal and pathogenic bacteria identified a conserved DsbC/DsbG homolog (DsbP). The crystal structure of DsbP reveals an N-terminal domain, a linker region, and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A DsbP homodimer is formed through domain swapping of two DsbP N-terminal domains. The catalytic domain incorporates a thioredoxin-fold with characteristic CXXC and cis-Pro motifs. Overall, the structure and redox properties of DsbP diverge from the Escherichia coli DsbC and DsbG disulfide isomerases. Specifically, the V-shaped dimer of DsbP is inverted compared with EcDsbC and EcDsbG. In addition, the redox potential of DsbP (−161 mV) is more reducing than EcDsbC (−130 mV) and EcDsbG (−126 mV). Other catalytic properties of DsbP more closely resemble those of EcDsbG than EcDsbC. These catalytic differences are in part a consequence of the unusual active site motif of DsbP (CAVC); substitution to the EcDsbC-like (CGYC) motif converts the catalytic properties to those of EcDsbC. Structural comparison of the 12 independent subunit structures of DsbP that we determined revealed that conformational changes in the linker region contribute to mobility of the catalytic domain, providing mechanistic insight into DsbP function. In summary, our data reveal that the conserved plasmid-encoded DsbP protein is a bona fide disulfide isomerase and suggest that a dedicated oxidative folding enzyme is important for conjugative plasmid transfer. PMID:24311786

  17. Identification of UreR binding sites in the Enterobacteriaceae plasmid-encoded and Proteus mirabilis urease gene operons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, V J; Collins, C M

    1999-03-01

    The closely related Proteus mirabilis and Enterobacterlaceae plasmid-encoded urease genes are positively regulated by the AraC-like transcriptional activator UreR. In the presence of the effector molecule urea, UreR promotes transcription of ureD, the initial gene in the urease operon, and increases transcription of the divergently transcribed ureR. Here, we identify UreR-specific binding sites in the ureRp-ureDp intergenic regions. Recombinant UreR (rUreR) was expressed and purified, and gel shift and DNase I protection assays were performed with this protein. These analyses indicated that there are two distinct rUreR binding sites in both the plasmid-encoded and P. mirabilis ureRp-ureDp intergenic regions. A consensus binding site of TA/GT/CA/TT/GC/TTA/TT/AATTG was predicted from the DNase I protection assays. Although rUreR bound to the specific DNA binding site in both the presence and the absence of urea, the dissociation rate constant k-1 of the rUreR-DNA complex interaction was measurably different when urea was present. In the absence of urea, the dissociation of the protein-DNA complexes, for both ureRp and ureDp, was complete at the earliest time point, and it was not possible to determine a rate. In the presence of urea, dissociation was measurable with a k-1 for the rUreR-ureRp interaction of 1.2 +/- 0.2 x 10(-2) s-1 and a k-1 for the rUreR-ureDp interaction of 2.6 +/- 0.1 x 10(-3) s-1. This corresponds to a half-life of the ureRp-rUreR interaction of 58 s, and a half-life of the ureDp-rUreR interaction of 4 min 26 s. A model describing a potential role for urea in the activation of these promoters is proposed. PMID:10200962

  18. Chlamydial Plasmid-Encoded Virulence Factor Pgp3 Neutralizes the Antichlamydial Activity of Human Cathelicidin LL-37

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shuping; Dong, Xiaohua; Yang, Zhangsheng; Li, Zhongyu; Liu, Quanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection in the lower genital tract can ascend to and cause pathologies in the upper genital tract, potentially leading to severe complications, such as tubal infertility. However, chlamydial organisms depleted of plasmid or deficient in the plasmid-encoded Pgp3 are attenuated in ascending infection and no longer are able to induce the upper genital tract pathologies, indicating a significant role of Pgp3 in chlamydial pathogenesis. We now report that C. trachomatis Pgp3 can neutralize the antichlamydial activity of human cathelicidin LL-37, a host antimicrobial peptide secreted by both genital tract epithelial cells and infiltrating neutrophils. Pgp3 bound to and formed stable complexes with LL-37. We further showed that the middle region of Pgp3 (Pgp3m) was responsible for both the binding to and neutralization of LL-37, suggesting that Pgp3m can be targeted for attenuating chlamydial pathogenicity or developed for blocking LL-37-involved non-genital-tract pathologies, such as rosacea and psoriasis. Thus, the current study has provided significant information for both understanding the mechanisms of chlamydial pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic agents. PMID:26416907

  19. Regulation of plasmid-encoded isoprene metabolism in Rhodococcus, a representative of an important link in the global isoprene cycle.

    PubMed

    Crombie, Andrew T; Khawand, Myriam El; Rhodius, Virgil A; Fengler, Kevin A; Miller, Michael C; Whited, Gregg M; McGenity, Terry J; Murrell, J Colin

    2015-09-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) form an important part of the global carbon cycle, comprising a significant proportion of net ecosystem productivity. They impact atmospheric chemistry and contribute directly and indirectly to greenhouse gases. Isoprene, emitted largely from plants, comprises one third of total VOCs, yet in contrast to methane, which is released in similar quantities, we know little of its biodegradation. Here, we report the genome of an isoprene degrading isolate, Rhodococcus sp. AD45, and, using mutagenesis shows that a plasmid-encoded soluble di-iron centre isoprene monooxygenase (IsoMO) is essential for isoprene metabolism. Using RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to analyse cells exposed to isoprene or epoxyisoprene in a substrate-switch time-course experiment, we show that transcripts from 22 contiguous genes, including those encoding IsoMO, were highly upregulated, becoming among the most abundant in the cell and comprising over 25% of the entire transcriptome. Analysis of gene transcription in the wild type and an IsoMO-disrupted mutant strain showed that epoxyisoprene, or a subsequent product of isoprene metabolism, rather than isoprene itself, was the inducing molecule. We provide a foundation of molecular data for future research on the environmental biological consumption of this important, climate-active compound. PMID:25727256

  20. A plasmid-encoded nicotinamidase (PncA) is essential for infectivity of Borrelia burgdorferi in a mammalian host.

    PubMed

    Purser, Joye E; Lawrenz, Matthew B; Caimano, Melissa J; Howell, Jerrilyn K; Radolf, Justin D; Norris, Steven J

    2003-05-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, a spirochaete that causes Lyme borreliosis, contains 21 linear and circular plasmids thought to be important for survival in mammals or ticks. Our results demonstrate that the gene BBE22 encoding a nicotinamidase is capable of replacing the requirement for the 25 kb linear plasmid lp25 during mammalian infection. Transformation of B. burgdorferi lacking lp25 with a shuttle vector containing the lp25 gene BBE22 (pBBE22) restored infectivity in mice to a level comparable to that of wild-type Borrelia. This complementation also restored the growth and host adaptation of lp25-B. burgdorferi in dialysis membrane chambers (DMCs) implanted in rats. A single Cys to Ala conversion at the putative active site of BBE22 abrogated the ability of pBBE22 to re-establish infectivity or growth in DMCs. Additional Salmonella typhimurium complementation studies and enzymatic analysis demonstrated that the BBE22 gene product has nicotinamidase activity and is most probably required for the biosynthesis of NAD. These results indicate that some plasmid-encoded products fulfil physiological functions required in the enzootic cycle of pathogenic Borrelia. PMID:12694619

  1. Skin Electroporation of a Plasmid Encoding hCAP-18/LL-37 Host Defense Peptide Promotes Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Lam, Martin C; Jacobsen, Frank; Porporato, Paolo E; Chereddy, Kiran Kumar; Becerikli, Mustafa; Stricker, Ingo; Hancock, Robert EW; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Sonveaux, Pierre; Préat, Véronique; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Host defense peptides, in particular LL-37, are emerging as potential therapeutics for promoting wound healing and inhibiting bacterial growth. However, effective delivery of the LL-37 peptide remains limiting. We hypothesized that skin-targeted electroporation of a plasmid encoding hCAP-18/LL-37 would promote the healing of wounds. The plasmid was efficiently delivered to full-thickness skin wounds by electroporation and it induced expression of LL-37 in the epithelium. It significantly accelerated reepithelialization of nondiabetic and diabetic wounds and caused a significant VEGFa and interleukin (IL)-6 induction. IL-6 was involved in LL-37–mediated keratinocyte migration in vitro and IL-6 neutralizing antibodies delivered to mice were able to suppress the wound healing activity of the hCAP-18/LL-37 plasmid. In a hindlimb ischemia model, electroporation of the hCAP-18/LL-37 plasmid increased blood perfusion, reduced muscular atrophy, and upregulated the angiogenic chemokines VEGFa and SDF-1a, and their receptors VEGF-R and CXCR-4. These findings demonstrate that a localized gene therapy with LL-37 is a promising approach for the treatment of wounds. PMID:24394186

  2. Regulation of plasmid-encoded isoprene metabolism in Rhodococcus, a representative of an important link in the global isoprene cycle

    PubMed Central

    Crombie, Andrew T; Khawand, Myriam El; Rhodius, Virgil A; Fengler, Kevin A; Miller, Michael C; Whited, Gregg M; McGenity, Terry J; Murrell, J Colin

    2015-01-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) form an important part of the global carbon cycle, comprising a significant proportion of net ecosystem productivity. They impact atmospheric chemistry and contribute directly and indirectly to greenhouse gases. Isoprene, emitted largely from plants, comprises one third of total VOCs, yet in contrast to methane, which is released in similar quantities, we know little of its biodegradation. Here, we report the genome of an isoprene degrading isolate, Rhodococcus sp. AD45, and, using mutagenesis shows that a plasmid-encoded soluble di-iron centre isoprene monooxygenase (IsoMO) is essential for isoprene metabolism. Using RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to analyse cells exposed to isoprene or epoxyisoprene in a substrate-switch time-course experiment, we show that transcripts from 22 contiguous genes, including those encoding IsoMO, were highly upregulated, becoming among the most abundant in the cell and comprising over 25% of the entire transcriptome. Analysis of gene transcription in the wild type and an IsoMO-disrupted mutant strain showed that epoxyisoprene, or a subsequent product of isoprene metabolism, rather than isoprene itself, was the inducing molecule. We provide a foundation of molecular data for future research on the environmental biological consumption of this important, climate-active compound. PMID:25727256

  3. Enhanced Delivery of Plasmid Encoding Interleukin-12 Gene by Diethylene Triamine Penta-Acetic Acid (DTPA)-Conjugated PEI Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dehshahri, Ali; Sadeghpour, Hossein; Keykhaee, Maryam; Khalvati, Bahman; Sheikhsaran, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    Recombinant therapeutic proteins have been considered as an efficient category of medications used for the treatment of various diseases. Despite their effectiveness, there are some reports on the systemic adverse effects of recombinant therapeutic proteins limiting their wide clinical applications. Among different cytokines used for cancer immunotherapy, interleukin-12 (IL-12) has shown great ability as a powerful antitumor and antiangiogenic agent. However, significant toxic reactions following the systemic administration of IL-12 have led researchers to seek for alternative approaches such as the delivery and local expression of the IL-12 gene inside the tumor tissues. In order to transfer the plasmid encoding IL-12 gene, the most extensively investigated polycationic polymer, polyethylenimine (PEI), was modified by diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) to modulate the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance of the polymer as well as its toxicity. DTPA-conjugated PEI derivatives were able to form complexes in the size range around 100-180 nm with great condensation ability and protection of the plasmid against enzymatic degradation. The highest gene transfer ability was achieved by the DTPA-conjugated PEI at the conjugation degree of 0.1 % where the level of IL-12 production increased up to twofold compared with that of the unmodified PEI. Results of the present study demonstrated that modulation of the surface positive charge of PEI along with the improvement of the polymer hydrophobic balance could be considered as a successful strategy to develop safe and powerful nanocarriers. PMID:26801817

  4. X-ray crystal structure of the passenger domain of plasmid encoded toxin(Pet), an autotransporter enterotoxin from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo Meza-Aguilar, J.; Fromme, Petra; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Hernandez-Chiñas, Ulises; Arreguin-Espinosa de los Monteros, Roberto A.; and others

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • X-ray crystal structure of the passenger domain of Plasmid encoded toxin at 2.3 Å. • Structural differences between Pet passenger domain and EspP protein are described. • High flexibility of the C-terminal beta helix is structurally assigned. - Abstract: Autotransporters (ATs) represent a superfamily of proteins produced by a variety of pathogenic bacteria, which include the pathogenic groups of Escherichia coli (E. coli) associated with gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections. We present the first X-ray structure of the passenger domain from the Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) a 100 kDa protein at 2.3 Å resolution which is a cause of acute diarrhea in both developing and industrialized countries. Pet is a cytoskeleton-altering toxin that induces loss of actin stress fibers. While Pet (pdb code: 4OM9) shows only a sequence identity of 50% compared to the closest related protein sequence, extracellular serine protease plasmid (EspP) the structural features of both proteins are conserved. A closer structural look reveals that Pet contains a β-pleaded sheet at the sequence region of residues 181–190, the corresponding structural domain in EspP consists of a coiled loop. Secondary, the Pet passenger domain features a more pronounced beta sheet between residues 135 and 143 compared to the structure of EspP.

  5. In vivo electroporation of plasmids encoding GM-CSF or interleukin-2 into existing B16 melanomas combined with electrochemotherapy induces long-term antitumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Heller, L; Pottinger, C; Jaroszeski, M J; Gilbert, R; Heller, R

    2000-12-01

    When cancer cells, including melanoma cells, are genetically altered to secrete cytokines, irradiated and injected into subjects, long-term antitumour immunity is induced. Optimally, existing melanomas induced to produce cytokines in vivo could stimulate this same immune response. Although in vivo electroporation enhances plasmid expression, electroporation of plasmids encoding granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-2 (IL2) into B16 mouse melanomas did not significantly alter tumour growth at the concentration tested. Electrochemotherapy, which causes short-term, complete regressions of treated tumour but no resistance to challenge, was combined with plasmid delivery. The combination treatment resulted in the induction of long-term immunity to recurrence and resistance to challenge in up to 25% of mice. PMID:11198480

  6. Limited Dissemination of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase– and Plasmid-Encoded AmpC–Producing Escherichia coli from Food and Farm Animals, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Ny, Sofia; Egervärn, Maria; Bergström, Jakob; Rosengren, Åsa; Englund, Stina; Löfmark, Sonja; Byfors, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)– and plasmid-encoded ampC (pAmpC)–producing Enterobacteriaceae might spread from farm animals to humans through food. However, most studies have been limited in number of isolates tested and areas studied. We examined genetic relatedness of 716 isolates from 4,854 samples collected from humans, farm animals, and foods in Sweden to determine whether foods and farm animals might act as reservoirs and dissemination routes for ESBL/pAmpC-producing Escherichia coli. Results showed that clonal spread to humans appears unlikely. However, we found limited dissemination of genes encoding ESBL/pAmpC and plasmids carrying these genes from foods and farm animals to healthy humans and patients. Poultry and chicken meat might be a reservoir and dissemination route to humans. Although we found no evidence of clonal spread of ESBL/pAmpC-producing E. coli from farm animals or foods to humans, ESBL/pAmpC-producing E. coli with identical genes and plasmids were present in farm animals, foods, and humans. PMID:26982890

  7. The 2microm-plasmid-encoded Rep1 and Rep2 proteins interact with each other and colocalize to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Y T; Wu, X L; Biswal, S; Velmurugan, S; Volkert, F C; Jayaram, M

    1997-01-01

    The efficient partitioning of the 2microm plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at cell division requires two plasmid-encoded proteins (Rep1p and Rep2p) and a cis-acting locus, REP3 (STB). By using protein hybrids containing fusions of the Rep proteins to green fluorescent protein (GFP), we show here that fluorescence from GFP-Rep1p or GFP-Rep2p is almost exclusively localized in the nucleus in a cir+ strain. Nuclear localization of GFP-Rep1p and GFP-Rep2p, though discernible, is less efficient in a cir(0) host. GFP-Rep2p or GFP-Rep1p is able to promote the stability of a 2microm circle-derived plasmid harboring REP1 or REP2, respectively, in a cir(0) background. Under these conditions, fluorescence from GFP-Rep2p or GFP-Rep1p is concentrated within the nucleus, as is the case in cir+ cells. This characteristic nuclear accumulation is not dependent on the expression of the FLP or RAF1 gene of the 2microm circle. Nuclear colocalization of Rep1p and Rep2p is consistent with the hypothesis that the two proteins directly or indirectly interact to form a functional bipartite or high-order protein complex. Immunoprecipitation experiments as well as baiting assays using GST-Rep hybrid proteins suggest a direct interaction between Rep1p and Rep2p which, in principle, may be modulated by other yeast proteins. Furthermore, these assays provide evidence for Rep1p-Rep1p and Rep2p-Rep2p associations as well. The sum of these interactions may be important in controlling the effective cellular concentration of the Rep1p-Rep2p complex. PMID:9393716

  8. Role of the 85-Kilobase Plasmid and Plasmid-Encoded Virulence-Associated Protein A in Intracellular Survival and Virulence of Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Giguère, Steeve; Hondalus, Mary K.; Yager, Julie A.; Darrah, Patricia; Mosser, David M.; Prescott, John F.

    1999-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages and a cause of pneumonia in young horses (foals) and immunocompromised people. Isolates of R. equi from pneumonic foals typically contain large, 85- or 90-kb plasmids encoding a highly immunogenic virulence-associated protein (VapA). The objective of this study was to determine the role of the 85-kb plasmid and VapA in the intracellular survival and virulence of R. equi. Clinical isolates containing the plasmid and expressing VapA efficiently replicated within mouse macrophages in vitro, while plasmid-cured derivatives of these organisms did not multiply intracellularly. An isolate harboring the large plasmid also replicated in the tissues of experimentally infected mice, whereas its plasmid-cured derivative was rapidly cleared. All foals experimentally infected with a plasmid-containing clinical isolate developed severe bronchopneumonia, whereas the foals infected with its plasmid-cured derivative remained asymptomatic and free of visible lung lesions. By day 14 postinfection, lung bacterial burdens had increased considerably in foals challenged with the plasmid-containing clinical isolate. In contrast, bacteria could no longer be cultured from the lungs of foals challenged with the isogenic plasmid-cured derivative. A recombinant, plasmid-cured derivative expressing wild-type levels of VapA failed to replicate in macrophages and remained avirulent for both mice and foals. These results show that the 85-kb plasmid of R. equi is essential for intracellular replication within macrophages and for development of disease in the native host, the foal. However, expression of VapA alone is not sufficient to restore the virulence phenotype. PMID:10377138

  9. DNA based vaccination with a cocktail of plasmids encoding immunodominant Leishmania (Leishmania) major antigens confers full protection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sami Ben Hadj; Touihri, Leila; Chtourou, Yessine; Dellagi, Koussay; Bahloul, Chokri

    2009-01-01

    Despite the lack of effective vaccines against parasitic diseases, the prospects of developing a vaccine against leishmaniasis are still high. With this objective, we have tested four DNA based candidate vaccines encoding to immunodominant leishmania antigens (LACKp24, TSA, LmSTI1 and CPa). These candidates have been previously reported as capable of eliciting at least partial protections in the BALB/c mice model of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis. When tested under similar experimental conditions, all of them were able to induce similar partial protective effects, but none could induce a full protection. In order to improve the level of protection we have explored the approach of DNA based vaccination with different cocktails of plasmids encoding to the different immunodominant Leishmania antigens. A substantial increase of protection was achieved when the cocktail is composed of all of the four antigens; however, no full protection was achieved when mice were challenged with a high dose of parasite in their hind footpad. The full protection was only achieved after a challenge with a low parasitic dose in the dermis of the ear. It was difficult to determine clear protection correlates, other than the mixture of immunogens induced specific Th1 immune responses against each component. Therefore, such an association of antigens increased the number of targeted epitopes by the immune system with the prospects that the responses are at least additive if not synergistic. Even though, any extrapolation of this approach when applied to other animal or human models is rather hazardous, it undoubtedly increases the hopes of developing an effective leishmania vaccine. PMID:18951941

  10. Synergistic and Additive Effects of Chromosomal and Plasmid-Encoded Hemolysins Contribute to Hemolysis and Virulence in Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Amable J.; Balado, Miguel; Lemos, Manuel L.

    2013-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae causes infections and fatal disease in marine animals and in humans. Highly hemolytic strains produce damselysin (Dly) and plasmid-encoded HlyA (HlyApl). These hemolysins are encoded by plasmid pPHDD1 and contribute to hemolysis and virulence for fish and mice. In this study, we report that all the hemolytic strains produce a hitherto uncharacterized chromosome-encoded HlyA (HlyAch). Hemolysis was completely abolished in a single hlyAch mutant of a plasmidless strain and in a dly hlyApl hlyAch triple mutant. We found that Dly, HlyApl, and HlyAch are needed for full hemolytic values in strains harboring pPHDD1, and these values are the result of the additive effects between HlyApl and HlyAch, on the one hand, and of the synergistic effect of Dly with HlyApl and HlyAch, on the other hand. Interestingly, Dly-producing strains produced synergistic effects with strains lacking Dly production but secreting HlyA, constituting a case of the CAMP (Christie, Atkins, and Munch-Petersen) reaction. Environmental factors such as iron starvation and salt concentration were found to regulate the expression of the three hemolysins. We found that the contributions, in terms of the individual and combined effects, of the three hemolysins to hemolysis and virulence varied depending on the animal species tested. While Dly and HlyApl were found to be main contributors in the virulence for mice, we observed that the contribution of hemolysins to virulence for fish was mainly based on the synergistic effects between Dly and either of the two HlyA hemolysins rather than on their individual effects. PMID:23798530

  11. Effects of DDA, CpG-ODN, and plasmid-encoded chicken IFN-gamma on protective immunity by a DNA vaccine against IBDV in chickens.

    PubMed

    Roh, Ha Jung; Sung, Haan Woo; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2006-12-01

    This study examined the adjuvant effects of dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN), and chicken interferon-gamma (ChIFN-gamma) on a DNA vaccine (pcDNA-VP243) against the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). A plasmid encoding chicken IFN-ã was constructed. Twice at 2-week intervals, two-week-old chickens were injected intramuscularly and intraperitoneally with either a DNA vaccine alone or a DNA vaccine together with the respective adjuvants. On week 2 after the second immunization, the chickens were orally challenged with the highly virulent IBDV. The groups that received the DNA vaccines plus either DDA or CpG-ODN showed significantly lower survival rates than the group that received the DNA vaccine alone. However, the survival rates for the DNA vaccine alone and for the DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-gamma were similar. The chickens had no detectable antibodies to the IBDV before the challenge but all the surviving chickens in all groups except for the normal control group showed the induction of antibodies to the IBDV at day 10 after the challenge. As judged by the lymphocyte proliferation assays using the a WST-8 solution performed on the peripheral blood and splenic lymphocytes, the stimulation indices (SI) of the peripheral blood lymphocytes in all groups except for the normal control group were similar immediately before the challenge. At 10 days post-challenge, the SI for DNA vaccine plus either CpG-ODN or ChIFN-gamma was similar to that of the DNA vaccine control group. For splenic lymphocytes, the SI in the DNA vaccine plus CpG-ODN and DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-gamma groups were higher than for the DNA vaccine control. These results suggest that DDA actually compromises the protection against the IBDV by DNA vaccine, and CpG-ODN and IFN-gamma had no significant effect. PMID:17106228

  12. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae Major Virulence Factors Dly, Plasmid-Encoded HlyA, and Chromosome-Encoded HlyA Are Secreted via the Type II Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Amable J.; Vences, Ana; Husmann, Matthias; Lemos, Manuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae is a marine bacterium that causes septicemia in marine animals and in humans. Previously, we had determined a major role of pPHDD1 plasmid-encoded Dly (damselysin) and HlyA (HlyApl) and the chromosome-encoded HlyA (HlyAch) hemolysins in virulence. However, the mechanisms by which these toxins are secreted remain unknown. In this study, we found that a mini-Tn10 transposon mutant in a plasmidless strain showing an impaired hemolytic phenotype contained an insertion in epsL, a component of a type II secretion system (T2SS). Reconstruction of the mutant by allelic exchange confirmed the specific involvement of epsL in HlyAch secretion. In addition, mutation of epsL in a pPHDD1-harboring strain caused an almost complete abolition of hemolytic activity against sheep erythrocytes, indicating that epsL plays a major role in secretion of the plasmid-encoded HlyApl and Dly. This was further demonstrated by analysis of different combinations of hemolysin gene mutants and by strain-strain complementation assays. We also found that mutation of the putative prepilin peptidase gene pilD severely affected hemolysis, which dropped at levels inferior to those of epsL mutants. Promoter expression analyses suggested that impairment of hemolysin secretion in epsL and pilD mutants might constitute a signal that affects hemolysin and T2SS gene expression at the transcriptional level. In addition, single epsL and pilD mutations caused a drastic decrease in virulence for mice, demonstrating a major role of T2SS and pilD in P. damselae subsp. damselae virulence. PMID:25583529

  13. Novel mechanisms of controlling the activities of the transcription factors Spo0A and ComA by the plasmid-encoded quorum sensing regulators Rap60-Phr60 in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Boguslawski, Kristina M.; Hill, Patrick A.; Griffith, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacillus subtilis and its closest relatives have multiple rap-phr quorum sensing gene pairs that coordinate a variety of physiological processes with population density. Extra-chromosomal rap-phr genes are also present on mobile genetic elements, yet relatively little is known about their function. In this work, we demonstrate that Rap60-Phr60 from plasmid pTA1060 coordinates a variety of biological processes with population density including sporulation, cannibalism, biofilm formation and genetic competence. Similar to other Rap proteins that control sporulation, Rap60 modulates phosphorylation of the transcription factor Spo0A by acting as a phosphatase of Spo0F~P, an intermediate of the sporulation phosphorelay system. Additionally, Rap60 plays a noncanonical role in regulating the autophosphorylation of the sporulation-specific kinase KinA, a novel activity for Rap proteins. In contrast, Rap proteins that modulate genetic competence interfere with DNA binding by the transcription factor ComA. Rap60 regulates the activity of ComA in a unique manner by forming a Rap60–ComA–DNA ternary complex that inhibits transcription of target genes. Taken together, this work provides new insight into two novel mechanisms of regulating Spo0A and ComA by Rap60 and expands our general understanding of how plasmid-encoded quorum sensing pairs regulate important biological processes. PMID:25598361

  14. Co-administration of plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases human immunodeficiency virus-1 DNA vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Vinicius Canato; Almeida, Rafael Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Ferreira, Luís Carlos de Souza; Kalil, Jorge; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2015-01-01

    T-cell based vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) generate specific responses that may limit both transmission and disease progression by controlling viral load. Broad, polyfunctional, and cytotoxic CD4+T-cell responses have been associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV-1 replication, supporting the inclusion of CD4+ T-cell epitopes in vaccine formulations. Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (pGM-CSF) co-administration has been shown to induce potent CD4+ T-cell responses and to promote accelerated priming and increased migration of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells. However, no study has shown whether co-immunisation with pGM-CSF enhances the number of vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells. Our group has previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding conserved, multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR binding HIV-1 subtype B peptides, which elicited broad, polyfunctional and long-lived CD4+ T-cell responses. Here, we show that pGM-CSF co-immunisation improved both magnitude and quality of vaccine-induced T-cell responses, particularly by increasing proliferating CD4+ T-cells that produce simultaneously interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2. Thus, we believe that the use of pGM-CSF may be helpful for vaccine strategies focused on the activation of anti-HIV CD4+ T-cell immunity. PMID:26602876

  15. Co-administration of plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases human immunodeficiency virus-1 DNA vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Santana, Vinicius Canato; Almeida, Rafael Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Ferreira, Luís Carlos de Souza; Kalil, Jorge; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2015-12-01

    T-cell based vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) generate specific responses that may limit both transmission and disease progression by controlling viral load. Broad, polyfunctional, and cytotoxic CD4+T-cell responses have been associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV-1 replication, supporting the inclusion of CD4+ T-cell epitopes in vaccine formulations. Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (pGM-CSF) co-administration has been shown to induce potent CD4+ T-cell responses and to promote accelerated priming and increased migration of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells. However, no study has shown whether co-immunisation with pGM-CSF enhances the number of vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells. Our group has previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding conserved, multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR binding HIV-1 subtype B peptides, which elicited broad, polyfunctional and long-lived CD4+ T-cell responses. Here, we show that pGM-CSF co-immunisation improved both magnitude and quality of vaccine-induced T-cell responses, particularly by increasing proliferating CD4+ T-cells that produce simultaneously interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2. Thus, we believe that the use of pGM-CSF may be helpful for vaccine strategies focused on the activation of anti-HIV CD4+ T-cell immunity. PMID:26602876

  16. Novel mechanisms of controlling the activities of the transcription factors Spo0A and ComA by the plasmid-encoded quorum sensing regulators Rap60-Phr60 in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Kristina M; Hill, Patrick A; Griffith, Kevin L

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis and its closest relatives have multiple rap-phr quorum sensing gene pairs that coordinate a variety of physiological processes with population density. Extra-chromosomal rap-phr genes are also present on mobile genetic elements, yet relatively little is known about their function. In this work, we demonstrate that Rap60-Phr60 from plasmid pTA1060 coordinates a variety of biological processes with population density including sporulation, cannibalism, biofilm formation and genetic competence. Similar to other Rap proteins that control sporulation, Rap60 modulates phosphorylation of the transcription factor Spo0A by acting as a phosphatase of Spo0F∼P, an intermediate of the sporulation phosphorelay system. Additionally, Rap60 plays a noncanonical role in regulating the autophosphorylation of the sporulation-specific kinase KinA, a novel activity for Rap proteins. In contrast, Rap proteins that modulate genetic competence interfere with DNA binding by the transcription factor ComA. Rap60 regulates the activity of ComA in a unique manner by forming a Rap60-ComA-DNA ternary complex that inhibits transcription of target genes. Taken together, this work provides new insight into two novel mechanisms of regulating Spo0A and ComA by Rap60 and expands our general understanding of how plasmid-encoded quorum sensing pairs regulate important biological processes. PMID:25598361

  17. Replicon typing of plasmids encoding resistance to newer beta-lactams.

    PubMed

    Carattoli, Alessandra; Miriagou, Vivi; Bertini, Alessia; Loli, Alexandra; Colinon, Celine; Villa, Laura; Whichard, Jean M; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2006-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-based replicon typing represents a novel method to describe the dissemination and follow the evolution of resistance plasmids. We used this approach to study 26 epidemiologically unrelated Enterobacteriaceae and demonstrate the dominance of incompatibility (Inc) A/C or Inc N-related plasmids carrying some emerging resistance determinants to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. PMID:16836838

  18. Replicon Typing of Plasmids Encoding Resistance to Newer β-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Miriagou, Vivi; Bertini, Alessia; Loli, Alexandra; Colinon, Celine; Villa, Laura; Whichard, Jean M.; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction–based replicon typing represents a novel method to describe the dissemination and follow the evolution of resistance plasmids. We used this approach to study 26 epidemiologically unrelated Enterobacteriaceae and demonstrate the dominance of incompatibility (Inc) A/C or Inc N-related plasmids carrying some emerging resistance determinants to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. PMID:16836838

  19. Genetic analysis of a novel plasmid encoded durancin locus in Enterococcus durans 41D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterococcus durans is commonly found in the intestinal tract in humans and animals and several strains are known to produce bacteriocins. Durancin GL, a novel bacteriocin of Enterococcus durans 41D with antilisterial activity was isolated from artisanal cheese samples and its genetic determinants ...

  20. Plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance: acquisition and transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, P M

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria have existed on Earth for three billion years or so and have become adept at protecting themselves against toxic chemicals. Antibiotics have been in clinical use for a little more than 6 decades. That antibiotic resistance is now a major clinical problem all over the world attests to the success and speed of bacterial adaptation. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in bacteria are varied and include target protection, target substitution, antibiotic detoxification and block of intracellular antibiotic accumulation. Acquisition of genes needed to elaborate the various mechanisms is greatly aided by a variety of promiscuous gene transfer systems, such as bacterial conjugative plasmids, transposable elements and integron systems, that move genes from one DNA system to another and from one bacterial cell to another, not necessarily one related to the gene donor. Bacterial plasmids serve as the scaffold on which are assembled arrays of antibiotic resistance genes, by transposition (transposable elements and ISCR mediated transposition) and site-specific recombination mechanisms (integron gene cassettes). The evidence suggests that antibiotic resistance genes in human bacterial pathogens originate from a multitude of bacterial sources, indicating that the genomes of all bacteria can be considered as a single global gene pool into which most, if not all, bacteria can dip for genes necessary for survival. In terms of antibiotic resistance, plasmids serve a central role, as the vehicles for resistance gene capture and their subsequent dissemination. These various aspects of bacterial resistance to antibiotics will be explored in this presentation. PMID:18193080

  1. Plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance: acquisition and transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bennett, P M

    2008-03-01

    Bacteria have existed on Earth for three billion years or so and have become adept at protecting themselves against toxic chemicals. Antibiotics have been in clinical use for a little more than 6 decades. That antibiotic resistance is now a major clinical problem all over the world attests to the success and speed of bacterial adaptation. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in bacteria are varied and include target protection, target substitution, antibiotic detoxification and block of intracellular antibiotic accumulation. Acquisition of genes needed to elaborate the various mechanisms is greatly aided by a variety of promiscuous gene transfer systems, such as bacterial conjugative plasmids, transposable elements and integron systems, that move genes from one DNA system to another and from one bacterial cell to another, not necessarily one related to the gene donor. Bacterial plasmids serve as the scaffold on which are assembled arrays of antibiotic resistance genes, by transposition (transposable elements and ISCR mediated transposition) and site-specific recombination mechanisms (integron gene cassettes).The evidence suggests that antibiotic resistance genes in human bacterial pathogens originate from a multitude of bacterial sources, indicating that the genomes of all bacteria can be considered as a single global gene pool into which most, if not all, bacteria can dip for genes necessary for survival. In terms of antibiotic resistance, plasmids serve a central role, as the vehicles for resistance gene capture and their subsequent dissemination. These various aspects of bacterial resistance to antibiotics will be explored in this presentation. PMID:18193080

  2. Chromosomal and Plasmid-Encoded Factors of Shigella flexneri Induce Secretogenic Activity Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shea-Donohue, Terez; Barry, Eileen M.; Kaper, James B.; Fasano, Alessio; Nataro, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen that causes millions of cases of watery or bloody diarrhea annually, resulting in significant global mortality. Watery diarrhea is thought to arise in the jejunum, and subsequent bloody diarrhea occurs as a result of invasion of the colonic epithelium. Previous literature has demonstrated that Shigella encodes enterotoxins, both chromosomally and on the 220 kilobase virulence plasmid. The Shigella Enterotoxins 1 and 2 (ShET1 and ShET2) have been shown to increase water accumulation in the rabbit ileal loop model. In addition, these toxins increase the short circuit current in rabbit tissue mounted in Ussing chambers, which is a model for the ion exchange that occurs during watery diarrhea. In this study, we sought to validate the use of mouse jejunum in Ussing chamber as an alternative, more versatile model to study bacterial pathogenesis. In the process, we also identified enterotoxins in addition to ShET1 and ShET2 encoded by S. flexneri. Through analysis of proteins secreted from wildtype bacteria and various deletion mutants, we have identified four factors responsible for enterotoxin activity: ShET1 and Pic, which are encoded on the chromosome; ShET2 (encoded by sen or ospD3), which requires the type-III secretion system for secretion; and SepA, an additional factor encoded on the virulence plasmid. The use of mouse jejunum serves as a reliable and reproducible model to identify the enterotoxins elaborated by enteric bacteria. Moreover, the identification of all Shigella proteins responsible for enterotoxin activity is vital to our understanding of Shigella pathogenicity and to our success in developing safe and effective vaccine candidates. PMID:23166804

  3. Plasmid-encoded genes influence exosporium assembly and morphology in Bacillus megaterium QM B1551 spores

    PubMed Central

    Manetsberger, Julia; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.; Christie, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus megaterium QM B1551 are encased in a morphologically distinctive exosporium. We demonstrate here that genes encoded on the indigenous pBM500 and pBM600 plasmids are required for exosporium assembly and or stability in spores of this strain. Bioinformatic analyses identified genes encoding orthologues of the B. cereus-family exosporium nap and basal layer proteins within the B. megaterium genome. Transcriptional analyses, supported by electron and fluorescent microscopy, indicate that the pole-localized nap, identified here for the first time in B. megaterium QM B1551 spores, is comprised of the BclA1 protein. The role of the BxpB protein, which forms the basal layer of the exosporium in B. cereus spores, is less clear since spores of a null mutant strain display an apparently normal morphology. Retention of the localized nap in bxpB null spores suggests that B. megaterium employs an alternative mechanism to that used by B. cereus spores in anchoring the nap to the spore surface. PMID:26316548

  4. Production of plasmid-encoding NDM-1 in clinical Raoultella ornithinolytica and Leclercia adecarboxylata from China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fengjun; Yin, Zhe; Feng, Jiao; Qiu, Yefeng; Zhang, Defu; Luo, Wenbo; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Xia, Peiyuan; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Raoultella ornithinolytica YNKP001 and Leclercia adecarboxylata P10164, which harbor conjugative plasmids pYNKP001-NDM and pP10164-NDM, respectively, were isolated from two different Chinese patients, and their complete nucleotide sequences were determined. Production of NDM-1 enzyme by these plasmids accounts for the carbapenem resistance of these two strains. This is the first report of blaNDM in L. adecarboxylata and third report of this gene in R. ornithinolytica. pYNKP001-NDM is very similar to the IncN2 NDM-1-encoding plasmids pTR3, pNDM-ECS01, and p271A, whereas pP10164-NDM is similar to the IncFIIY blaNDM-1-carrying plasmid pKOX_NDM1. The blaNDM-1 genes of pYNKP001-NDM and pP10164-NDM are embedded in Tn125-like elements, which represent two distinct truncated versions of the NDM-1-encoding Tn125 prototype observed in pNDM-BJ01. Flanking of these two Tn125-like elements by miniature inverted repeat element (MITE) or its remnant indicates that MITE facilitates transposition and mobilization of blaNDM-1 gene contexts. PMID:26052314

  5. Plasmid-Encoded Phthalate Catabolic Pathway in Arthrobacter keyseri 12B†

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Several 2-substituted benzoates (including 2-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro-, 2-bromo-, 2-iodo-, 2-nitro-, 2-methoxy-, and 2-acetyl-benzoates) were converted by phthalate-grown Arthrobacter keyseri (formerly Micrococcus sp.) 12B to the corresponding 2-substituted 3,4-dihydroxybenzoates (protocatechuates). Because these products lack a carboxyl group at the 2 position, they were not substrates for the next enzyme of the phthalate catabolic pathway, 3,4-dihydroxyphthalate 2-decarboxylase, and accumulated. When these incubations were carried out in iron-containing minimal medium, the products formed colored chelates. This chromogenic response was subsequently used to identify recombinant Escherichia coli strains carrying genes encoding the responsible enzymes, phthalate 3,4-dioxygenase and 3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrophthalate dehydrogenase, from the 130-kbp plasmid pRE1 of strain 12B. Beginning with the initially cloned 8.14-kbp PstI fragment of pRE824 as a probe to identify recombinant plasmids carrying overlapping fragments, a DNA segment of 33.5 kbp was cloned from pRE1 on several plasmids and mapped using restriction endonucleases. From these plasmids, the sequence of 26,274 contiguous bp was determined. Sequenced DNA included several genetic units: tnpR, pcm operon, ptr genes, pehA, norA fragment, and pht operon, encoding a transposon resolvase, catabolism of protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoate), a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter, a possible phthalate ester hydrolase, a fragment of a norfloxacin resistance-like transporter, and the conversion of phthalate to protocatechuate, respectively. Activities of the eight enzymes involved in the catabolism of phthalate through protocatechuate to pyruvate and oxaloacetate were demonstrated in cells or cell extracts of recombinant E. coli strains. PMID:11371533

  6. Borrelia burgdorferi supercoiled plasmids encode multicopy tandem open reading frames and a lipoprotein gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Porcella, S F; Popova, T G; Akins, D R; Li, M; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1996-01-01

    DNA sequencing and Southern blot analyses of a Borrelia burgdorferi DNA fragment encoding a signal sequence led to the discovery of a genetic locus, designated 2.9, which appears to be present in at least seven copies in virulent B. burgdorferi 297. DNA sequence analysis of these regions revealed that each 2.9 locus contained an operon of four genes (ABCD) and open reading frames designated rep+ (positive strand) and rep- (negative strand) which encoded multiple repeat motifs. Downstream of the rep+ gene(s) in six of the completely cloned and sequenced 2.9 loci also were lipoprotein (LP) genes possessing highly similar signal sequences but encoding variable mature polypeptides. The lipoproteins could he separated into two classes on the basis of hydrophilicity profiles, sequence similarities, and reactivity with specific antibodies. The 2.9 loci were localized to two (20- and 30-kb) supercoiled plasmids in B. burgdorferi 297. Northern (RNA) blot analysis established that the 2.9 ABCD operon was only minimally expressed, whereas the rep- gene(s) and at least three of the seven LP genes were expressed by B. burgdorferi in vitro. A single putative promoter element was identified by RNA primer extension analysis upstream of the ABCD operon, whereas a number of potential promoter regions existed upstream of the LP genes. The combined data indicate that the ABCD operon, rep+ and rep- genes, and LP genes are separately transcribed during in vitro growth. The 2.9 loci possess a repetitiveness, diversity, and complexity not previously described for B. burgdorferi; differential expression of these genes may facilitate the spirochete's ability to survive in diverse host environments. PMID:8655511

  7. Chromosomal and plasmid-encoded factors of Shigella flexneri induce secretogenic activity ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Faherty, Christina S; Faherty, Christina; Harper, Jill M; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Barry, Eileen M; Kaper, James B; Fasano, Alessio; Nataro, James P

    2012-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen that causes millions of cases of watery or bloody diarrhea annually, resulting in significant global mortality. Watery diarrhea is thought to arise in the jejunum, and subsequent bloody diarrhea occurs as a result of invasion of the colonic epithelium. Previous literature has demonstrated that Shigella encodes enterotoxins, both chromosomally and on the 220 kilobase virulence plasmid. The ShigellaEnterotoxins 1 and 2 (ShET1 and ShET2) have been shown to increase water accumulation in the rabbit ileal loop model. In addition, these toxins increase the short circuit current in rabbit tissue mounted in Ussing chambers, which is a model for the ion exchange that occurs during watery diarrhea. In this study, we sought to validate the use of mouse jejunum in Ussing chamber as an alternative, more versatile model to study bacterial pathogenesis. In the process, we also identified enterotoxins in addition to ShET1 and ShET2 encoded by S. flexneri. Through analysis of proteins secreted from wildtype bacteria and various deletion mutants, we have identified four factors responsible for enterotoxin activity: ShET1 and Pic, which are encoded on the chromosome; ShET2 (encoded by sen or ospD3), which requires the type-III secretion system for secretion; and SepA, an additional factor encoded on the virulence plasmid. The use of mouse jejunum serves as a reliable and reproducible model to identify the enterotoxins elaborated by enteric bacteria. Moreover, the identification of all Shigella proteins responsible for enterotoxin activity is vital to our understanding of Shigella pathogenicity and to our success in developing safe and effective vaccine candidates. PMID:23166804

  8. Bacillus anthracis pXO1 plasmid encodes a putative membrane-bound bacteriocin

    PubMed Central

    Perlińska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary advantages over cousin cells in bacterial pathogens may decide about the success of a specific cell in its environment. Bacteria use a plethora of methods to defend against other cells and many devices to attack their opponents when competing for resources. Bacteriocins are antibacterial proteins that are used to eliminate competition. We report the discovery of a putative membrane-bound bacteriocin encoded by the Bacillus anthracis pathogenic pXO1 plasmid. We analyze the genomic structure of the bacteriocin operon. The proposed mechanisms of action predestine this operon as a potent competitive advantage over cohabitants of the same niche. PMID:25426338

  9. Xylella fastidiosa plasmid-encoded PemK toxin is an endoribonuclease.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable inheritance of pXF-RIV11 in Xylella fastidiosa is conferred by the pemI/pemK plasmid addiction system. PemK serves as a toxin inhibiting bacterial growth; PemI is the corresponding antitoxin that blocks activity of PemK toxin by direct binding. PemK toxin and PemI antitoxin were over-expre...

  10. Identification of pTiC58 plasmid-encoded proteins for virulence in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Hagiya, M; Close, T J; Tait, R C; Kado, C I

    1985-01-01

    Analyses were made of the host-dependent-variation (hdv) locus of the virulence (vir) region of the pTiC58 plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The hdv locus is comprised of at least four genes that encode polypeptides of 13, 15, 29, and 28 kDa. Insertion of transposon Tn5 in the first gene abolishes the expression of all four genes in vitro and in vivo. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the hdv locus revealed four open reading frames tandemly arranged with spacer sequences having no promoter-like sequences and lacking the ability to bind A. tumefaciens RNA polymerase. These studies suggest that the hdv locus is comprised of at least four genes arranged in an operon in the vir region. The protein products of these genes are likely to function in some aspect of the host-range determination of A. tumefaciens. Images PMID:2986128

  11. Plasminogen activator/coagulase gene of Yersinia pestis is responsible for degradation of plasmid-encoded outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sodeinde, O A; Sample, A K; Brubaker, R R; Goguen, J D

    1988-01-01

    The related family of virulence plasmids found in the three major pathogens of the genus Yersinia all have the ability to encode a set of outer membrane proteins. In Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis, these proteins are major constituents of the outer membrane when their synthesis is fully induced. In contrast, they have been difficult to detect in Y. pestis. It has recently been established that Y. pestis does synthesize these proteins, but that they are rapidly degraded due to some activity determined by the 9.5-kilobase plasmid commonly found in Y. pestis strains. We show that mutations in the pla gene of this plasmid, which encodes both the plasminogen activator and coagulase activities, blocked this degradation. A cloned 1.4-kilobase DNA fragment carrying pla was also sufficient to cause degradation in the absence of the 9.5-kilobase plasmid. Images PMID:2843471

  12. Analysis of a 30 kbp plasmid encoding histidine decarboxylase gene in Tetragenococcus halophilus isolated from fish sauce.

    PubMed

    Satomi, Masataka; Furushita, Manabu; Oikawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa-Takahashi, Miwako; Yano, Yutaka

    2008-08-15

    In order to analyze the genes related to the histamine production, a strain of histamine producing halophilic bacteria, referred to as strain H, was isolated using enrichment culture and dilution-to-extinction methods with histidine broth inoculated from the fish sauce mashes. The two Japanese fish sauce mashes used, accumulate over 1000 mg/l of histamine. Phenotypic and 16 S rRNA gene sequence analyses identified strain H as Tetragenococcus halophilus, the predominant histamine producing bacteria present during fish sauce fermentation. Genetic analyses (PCR and Southern blot) of the histamine producing strain confirmed that the strain harbored a 30 kbp plasmid (pHDC) encoding a single copy of the pyruvoyl dependent histidine decarboxylase gene (hdc). A comparison of hdcA that is a structural gene of histidine decarboxylase among strain H, Lactobacillus hilgardii 0006, L. sakei LTH2076, Oenococcus oeni 9204, T. halophilus and T. muriaticus JCM10006 (T) indicated >99% sequence similarity. The hdc gene cluster consisted of 4 ORFs, hdcP, hdcA, hdcB, and hdcRS, and were almost identical to that of L. hilgardii 0006 with 99% sequence similarity including the structural hdc spacer region. However, the approximately 500 bp regions upstream and downstream of the hdc gene were different between that of strain H and L. hilgardii 0006. The complete sequence of pHDC revealed 29,924 nucleotides including 28 ORFs, two pairs of IR (inverted repeat), similar sequence of plasmid conjugative elements, and a theta-type replicon. These results suggested that hdc could be encoded on transformable elements among lactic acid bacteria. PMID:18573560

  13. Bacteriolytic activity caused by the presence of a novel lactococcal plasmid encoding lactococcins A, B, and M.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, S; Ross, R P; Hill, C

    1995-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis DPC938 was identified as a bacteriocin-producing strain which exhibited a bacteriolytic effect on other lactococci. Lysis of such target strains was associated with decreases in optical density and release of the intracellular enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. DPC938 exhibits cross-immunity to L. lactis subsp. cremoris 9B4 (M.J. van Belkum, B.J. Hayema, A. Geis, J. Kok, and G. Venema, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 55:1187-1191, 1989), a strain which produces the bacteriocins lactococcins A, B, and M. Genetic analyses revealed that a 15.5-kb region of DNA encoding these bacteriocins is highly conserved in 9B4, DPC938, and DPC3286, an overproducing derivative of DPC938. This region is located on a 72- and a 78-kb nonmobilizable plasmid in DPC938 and DPC3286, respectively. The bacteriolytic effect exhibited by DPC938 and DPC3286 on sensitive cultures is most probably due to the concerted action of all three bacteriocins. Since these cultures exhibit a lytic effect on lactococci, they have a potential application in the dairy industry as accelerators of starter lysis and hence accelerators of cheese ripening. PMID:7487031

  14. Degradation of trichloroethene by a linear-plasmid-encoded alkene monooxygenase in Rhodococcus corallinus (Nocardia corallina) B-276.

    PubMed

    Saeki, H; Akira, M; Furuhashi, K; Averhoff, B; Gottschalk, G

    1999-07-01

    Rhodococcus corallinus (formerly Nocardia corallina) B-276, isolated with propene as sole carbon and energy source, is able to oxidize trichloroethene (TCE). Glucose- or propene-grown R. corallinus B-276 cells exhibited no difference in TCE degradation efficiency. TCE degradation was found to be growth-phase-dependent and maximum rates were monitored with stationary-phase cells. K(m) and Vmax values for TCE degradation of R. corallinus B-276 grown in nutrient broth medium in the presence of glucose were 187 microM and 2.4 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1, respectively. Escherichia coli recombinants harbouring and expressing the alkene monooxygenase genes of R. corallinus B-276 exhibited the ability to degrade TCE. This result provides clear evidence that the alkene monooxygenase of R. corallinus B-276 catalyses TCE oxidation. R. corallinus B-276 was shown to contain four linear plasmids, pNC10 (70 kb), pNC20 (85 kb), pNC30 (185 kb) and pNC40 (235 kb). The observation that pNC30-deficient strains had lost the ability to grow on propene suggested that the genes of the propene degradation pathway are encoded by the linear plasmid pNC30. Southern blot analysis with cloned alkene monooxygenase genes from R. corallinus B-276 revealed a positive hybridization signal with the linear plasmid pNC30. This result clearly shows that the alkene monooxygenase is encoded by the linear plasmid pNC30. Eleven short-chain-alkene-oxidizing strains were screened for the presence of linear plasmids. Among these, four propene-oxidizing Rhodococcus strains and one ethene-oxidizing Mycobacterium strain were found to contain linear megaplasmids. Southern blot analysis with the alkene monooxygenase revealed positive signals with linear plasmids of two propene-oxidizing Rhodococcus ruber strains. These results indicate that homologous alkene monooxygenases are encoded by linear plasmids in R. ruber strains. PMID:10439411

  15. The IncP plasmid-encoded cell envelope-associated DNA transfer complex increases cell permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Daugelavicius, R; Bamford, J K; Grahn, A M; Lanka, E; Bamford, D H

    1997-01-01

    IncP-type plasmids are broad-host-range conjugative plasmids. DNA translocation requires DNA transfer-replication functions and additional factors required for mating pair formation (Mpf). The Mpf system is located in the cell membranes and is responsible for DNA transport from the donor to the recipient. The Mpf complex acts as a receptor for IncP-specific phages such as PRD1. In this investigation, we quantify the Mpf complexes on the cell surface by a phage receptor saturation technique. Electrochemical measurements are used to show that the Mpf complex increases cell envelope permeability to lipophilic compounds and ATP. In addition it reduces the ability of the cells to accumulate K+. However, the Mpf complex does not dissipate the membrane voltage. The Mpf complex is rapidly disassembled when intracellular ATP concentration is decreased, as measured by a PRD1 adsorption assay. PMID:9260964

  16. Evidence for plasmid-encoded virulence factors in the phytopathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB382.

    PubMed Central

    Meletzus, D; Bermphol, A; Dreier, J; Eichenlaub, R

    1993-01-01

    The tomato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB382, which causes bacterial wilt, harbors two plasmids pCM1 (27.5 kb) and pCM2 (72 kb). After curing of the plasmids, bacterial derivatives were still proficient in the ability to colonize the host plant and in the production of exopolysaccharides but exhibited a reduced virulence. When one of the two plasmids is lost, there is a significant delay in the development of wilting symptoms after infection and a plasmid-free derivative is not able to induce disease symptoms. By cloning of restriction fragments of both plasmids in the plasmid-free strain CMM100, two DNA fragments which restored the virulent phenotype were identified. Further analysis suggested that a fragment of plasmid pCM1 encodes an endocellulase which is involved in the expression of the pathogenic phenotype. Images PMID:8458855

  17. Transcriptome Reprogramming by Plasmid-Encoded Transcriptional Regulators Is Required for Host Niche Adaption of a Macrophage Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, Garry B.; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Aleksandra A.; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Wang, Xiaoguang; Oliver, Jenna; Willingham-Lane, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages, relying on the presence of a conjugative virulence plasmid harboring a 21-kb pathogenicity island (PAI) for growth in host macrophages. The PAI encodes a family of 6 virulence-associated proteins (Vaps) in addition to 20 other proteins. The contribution of these to virulence has remained unclear. We show that the presence of only 3 virulence plasmid genes (of 73 in total) is required and sufficient for intracellular growth. These include a single vap family member, vapA, and two PAI-located transcriptional regulators, virR and virS. Both transcriptional regulators are essential for wild-type-level expression of vapA, yet vapA expression alone is not sufficient to allow intracellular growth. A whole-genome microarray analysis revealed that VirR and VirS substantially integrate themselves into the chromosomal regulatory network, significantly altering the transcription of 18% of all chromosomal genes. This pathoadaptation involved significant enrichment of select gene ontologies, in particular, enrichment of genes involved in transport processes, energy production, and cellular metabolism, suggesting a major change in cell physiology allowing the bacterium to grow in the hostile environment of the host cell. The results suggest that following the acquisition of the virulence plasmid by an avirulent ancestor of R. equi, coevolution between the plasmid and the chromosome took place, allowing VirR and VirS to regulate the transcription of chromosomal genes in a process that ultimately promoted intracellular growth. Our findings suggest a mechanism for cooption of existing chromosomal traits during the evolution of a pathogenic bacterium from an avirulent saprophyte. PMID:26015480

  18. Transcriptome reprogramming by plasmid-encoded transcriptional regulators is required for host niche adaption of a macrophage pathogen.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Garry B; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Aleksandra A; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Wang, Xiaoguang; Oliver, Jenna; Willingham-Lane, Jennifer M; Meijer, Wim G; Hondalus, Mary K

    2015-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages, relying on the presence of a conjugative virulence plasmid harboring a 21-kb pathogenicity island (PAI) for growth in host macrophages. The PAI encodes a family of 6 virulence-associated proteins (Vaps) in addition to 20 other proteins. The contribution of these to virulence has remained unclear. We show that the presence of only 3 virulence plasmid genes (of 73 in total) is required and sufficient for intracellular growth. These include a single vap family member, vapA, and two PAI-located transcriptional regulators, virR and virS. Both transcriptional regulators are essential for wild-type-level expression of vapA, yet vapA expression alone is not sufficient to allow intracellular growth. A whole-genome microarray analysis revealed that VirR and VirS substantially integrate themselves into the chromosomal regulatory network, significantly altering the transcription of 18% of all chromosomal genes. This pathoadaptation involved significant enrichment of select gene ontologies, in particular, enrichment of genes involved in transport processes, energy production, and cellular metabolism, suggesting a major change in cell physiology allowing the bacterium to grow in the hostile environment of the host cell. The results suggest that following the acquisition of the virulence plasmid by an avirulent ancestor of R. equi, coevolution between the plasmid and the chromosome took place, allowing VirR and VirS to regulate the transcription of chromosomal genes in a process that ultimately promoted intracellular growth. Our findings suggest a mechanism for cooption of existing chromosomal traits during the evolution of a pathogenic bacterium from an avirulent saprophyte. PMID:26015480

  19. Functional role of the Ti plasmid-encoded catabolic mannopine cyclase in mannityl opine catabolism by Agrobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S B; Farrand, S K

    1994-01-01

    Catabolic mannopine (MOP) cyclase encoded by Ti or Ri plasmids lactonizes MOP to agropine (AGR). The gene of the octopine-type Ti plasmid pTi15955 encoding the catabolic MOP cyclase enzyme previously was localized to a 1.6-kb segment within a cosmid clone, pYDH208. A subclone containing only this region complemented the AGR catabolism-negative phenotype conferred by a derivative of the octopine-type plasmid pTiB6S3 containing a Tn7 insertion in the region encoding the MOP cyclase enzyme. Uptake assays of strains harboring pRiA4 or pArA4a, along with complementation analyses, indicate that MOP cyclase is not sufficient for catabolism of AGR but that the strains must also express an AGR transport system. To determine the requirement for MOP cyclase in opine catabolism unequivocally, a site-specific, nonpolar deletion mutation abolishing only MOP cyclase activity was introduced into pYDH208, a cosmid clone that confers utilization of MOP, AGR, and mannopinic acid (MOA). Strains harboring this MOP cyclase-negative mutant clone, pYDPH208, did not utilize AGR but continued to utilize MOP. Growth on AGR was restored in this strain upon introduction of clones encoding the pTi15955-derived catabolic or anabolic MOP cyclase genes. The induction pattern of MOA catabolism shown by strain NT1 harboring the MOP cyclase-deficient pYDPH208 suggests that AGR is converted into MOP by MOP cyclase and that MOP, but not AGR, induces catabolism of MOA. Genetic and biochemical analyses of MOP and AGR metabolism suggest that only the conversion of AGR to MOP is directly involved in catabolism of AGR, even though the reaction catalyzed by MOP cyclase predominantly lies in the lactonization of MOP to AGR. Images PMID:8206835

  20. Purification of F plasmid-encoded native TraC from Escherichia coli by affinity chromatography on calmodulin Sepharose.

    PubMed

    Hellstern, Simon; Mutzel, Rupert

    2016-06-01

    We have enriched several native bacterial proteins from Escherichia coli by chromatography on the immobilized eukaryotic Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. These bacterial proteins bound in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner to calmodulin, and were released by the addition of the Ca(2+)-chelator, EGTA, similar to many eukaryotic calmodulin-binding proteins. One of the bacterial proteins, F factor-encoded TraC, was purified to apparent homogeneity by an additional chromatographic step, anion exchange chromatography on MonoQ. Experiments with four chemically distinct calmodulin antagonists (R24571, Compound 48/80, melittin, and W7) showed that all of these substances inhibited the binding of purified TraC to calmodulin at effective concentrations comparable to those required for inhibiting in vitro binding of eukaryotic calmodulin-binding proteins. Three further bacterial proteins were identified as calmodulin-binding proteins: SecA, GlpD, and GlpC. We suggest that also these native bacterial proteins might be isolated by the unusual purification procedure including affinity chromatography on calmodulin Sepharose. Whether the identified proteins bind to, and are regulated by, putative bacterial calmodulin-like proteins in Escherichia coli remains to be established. PMID:26892535

  1. A plasmid-encoded two-component regulatory system involved in copper-inducible transcription in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Khunajakr, N; Liu, C Q; Charoenchai, P; Dunn, N W

    1999-03-18

    Two regulatory genes (lcoR and lcoS) were identified from a plasmid-borne lactococcal copper resistance determinant and characterized by transcriptional fusion to the promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat). RT-PCR analysis indicates that lcoR and lcoS are organized within an operon, controlling the transcription of cat in a copper-inducible manner. The amino acid sequences deduced from lcoR and lcoS show homology to the response and sensor proteins of known two-component regulatory systems. Deletion within either lcoS or both genes inactivated the copper-dependent activity, suggesting the presence of no trans-acting lcoR and lcoS homologs in the lactococcal host chromosome. The transcription start site involved in copper induction was mapped by primer extension. PMID:10095123

  2. Evidence of a plasmid-encoded oxidative xylose-catabolic pathway in Arthrobacter nicotinovorans pAO1.

    PubMed

    Mihasan, Marius; Stefan, Marius; Hritcu, Lucian; Artenie, Vlad; Brandsch, Roderich

    2013-01-01

    Due to its high abundance, the D-xylose fraction of lignocellulose provides a promising resource for production of various chemicals. Examples of efficient utilization of d-xylose are nevertheless rare, mainly due to the lack of enzymes with suitable properties for biotechnological applications. The genus Arthrobacter, which occupies an ecological niche rich in lignocellulosic materials and containing species with high resistance and tolerance to environmental factors, is a very suitable candidate for finding D-xylose-degrading enzymes with new properties. In this work, the presence of the pAO1 megaplasmid in cells of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans was directly linked to the ability of this microorganism to ferment D-xylose and to sustain longer log growth. Three pAO1 genes (orf32, orf39, orf40) putatively involved in degradation of xylose were identified and cloned, and the corresponding proteins purified and characterized. ORF40 was shown to be a homotetrameric NADP(+)/NAD(+) sugar dehydrogenase with a strong preference for d-xylose; ORF39 is a monomeric aldehyde dehydrogenase with wide substrate specificity and ORF32 is a constitutive expressed transcription factor putatively involved in control of the entire catabolic pathway. Based on analogies with other pentose degradation pathways, a putative xylose oxidative pathway similar to the Weimberg pathway is postulated. PMID:23063486

  3. Plasmid-Encoded RepA Proteins Specifically Autorepress Individual repABC Operons in the Multipartite Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Genome

    PubMed Central

    Żebracki, Kamil; Koper, Piotr; Marczak, Małgorzata; Skorupska, Anna; Mazur, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia commonly have very complex genomes with a chromosome and several large plasmids that possess genes belonging to the repABC family. RepA and RepB are members of the ParA and ParB families of partitioning proteins, respectively, whereas RepC is crucial for plasmid replication. In the repABC replicons, partitioning and replication functions are transcriptionally linked resulting in complex regulation of rep gene expression. The genome of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii TA1 (RtTA1) consists of a chromosome and four plasmids (pRleTA1a-d), equipped with functional repABC genes. In this work, the regulation of transcription of the individual repABC cassettes of the four RtTA1 plasmids was studied. The involvement of the RepA and RepB as well as parS-like centromere sites in this process was depicted, demonstrating some dissimilarity in expression of respective rep regions. RtTA1 repABC genes of individual plasmids formed operons, which were negatively regulated by RepA and RepB. Individual RepA were able to bind to DNA without added nucleotides, but in the presence of ADP, bound specifically to their own operator sequences containing imperfect palindromes, and caused operon autorepression, whereas the addition of ATP stimulated non-specific binding of RepA to DNA. The RepA proteins were able to dimerize/oligomerize: in general dimers formed independently of ATP or ADP, although ATP diminished the concentration of oligomers that were produced. By the comprehensive approach focusing on a set of plasmids instead of individual replicons, the work highlighted subtle differences between the organization and regulation of particular rep operons as well as the structures and specificity of RepA proteins, which contribute to the fine-tuned coexistence of several replicons with similar repABC cassettes in the complex bacterial genome. PMID:26147968

  4. In Vivo Expression of and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to the Plasmid-Encoded Virulence-Associated Proteins of Rhodococcus equi in Foals▿

    PubMed Central

    Jacks, Stephanie; Giguère, Steeve; Prescott, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes pneumonia in foals but does not induce disease in adult horses. Virulence of R. equi depends on the presence of a large plasmid, which encodes a family of seven virulence-associated proteins (VapA and VapC to VapH). Eradication of R. equi from the lungs depends on gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production by T lymphocytes. The objectives of the present study were to determine the relative in vivo expression of the vap genes of R. equi in the lungs of infected foals, to determine the recall response of bronchial lymph node (BLN) lymphocytes from foals and adult horses to each of the Vap proteins, and to compare the cytokine profiles of proliferating lymphocytes between foals and adult horses. vapA, vapD, and vapG were preferentially expressed in the lungs of infected foals, and expression of these genes in the lungs was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that achieved during in vitro growth. VapA and VapC induced the strongest lymphoproliferative responses for foals and adult horses. There was no significant difference in recall lymphoproliferative responses or IFN-γ mRNA expression by bronchial lymph node lymphocytes between foals and adults. In contrast, interleukin 4 (IL-4) expression was significantly higher for adults than for foals for each of the Vap proteins. The ratio of IFN-γ to IL-4 was significantly higher for foals than for adult horses for most Vap proteins. Therefore, foals are immunocompetent and are capable of mounting lymphoproliferative responses of the same magnitude and cytokine phenotype as those of adult horses. PMID:17301216

  5. Complete Sequence of pOZ176, a 500-Kilobase IncP-2 Plasmid Encoding IMP-9-Mediated Carbapenem Resistance, from Outbreak Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa 96

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jianhui; Alexander, David C.; Ma, Jennifer H.; Déraspe, Maxime; Low, Donald E.; Jamieson, Frances B.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa 96 (PA96) was isolated during a multicenter surveillance study in Guangzhou, China, in 2000. Whole-genome sequencing of this outbreak strain facilitated analysis of its IncP-2 carbapenem-resistant plasmid, pOZ176. The plasmid had a length of 500,839 bp and an average percent G+C content of 57%. Of the 618 predicted open reading frames, 65% encode hypothetical proteins. The pOZ176 backbone is not closely related to any plasmids thus far sequenced, but some similarity to pQBR103 of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 was observed. Two multiresistant class 1 integrons and several insertion sequences were identified. The blaIMP-9-carrying integron contained aacA4→blaIMP-9→aacA4, flanked upstream by Tn21 tnpMRA and downstream by a complete tni operon of Tn402 and a mer module, named Tn6016. The second integron carried aacA4→catB8a→blaOXA-10 and was flanked by Tn1403-like tnpRA and a sul1-type 3′ conserved sequence (3′-CS), named Tn6217. Other features include three resistance genes similar to those of Tn5, a tellurite resistance operon, and two pil operons. The replication and maintenance systems exhibit similarity to a genomic island of Ralstonia solanacearum GM1000. Codon usage analysis suggests the recent acquisition of blaIMP-9. The origins of the integrons on pOZ176 indicated separate horizontal gene transfer events driven by antibiotic selection. The novel mosaic structure of pOZ176 suggests that it is derived from environmental bacteria. PMID:23716048

  6. Antibiotic Trapping by Plasmid-Encoded CMY-2 β-Lactamase Combined with Reduced Outer Membrane Permeability as a Mechanism of Carbapenem Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van der Bij, Akke K.; van Boxtel, Ria; Pitout, Johann D. D.; van Ulsen, Peter; Melles, Damian C.; Tommassen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    A liver transplant patient was admitted with cholangitis, for which meropenem therapy was started. Initial cultures showed a carbapenem-susceptible (CS) Escherichia coli strain, but during admission, a carbapenem-resistant (CR) E. coli strain was isolated. Analysis of the outer membrane protein profiles showed that both CS and CR E. coli lacked the porins OmpF and OmpC. Furthermore, PCR and sequence analysis revealed that both CS and CR E. coli possessed blaCTX-M-15 and blaOXA-1. The CR E. coli strain additionally harbored blaCMY-2 and demonstrated a >15-fold increase in β-lactamase activity against nitrocefin, but no hydrolysis of meropenem was detected. However, nitrocefin hydrolysis appeared strongly inhibited by meropenem. Furthermore, the CMY-2 enzyme demonstrated lower electrophoretic mobility after its incubation either in vitro or in vivo with meropenem, indicative of its covalent modification with meropenem. The presence of the acyl-enzyme complex was confirmed by mass spectrometry. By transformation of the CMY-2-encoding plasmid into various E. coli strains, it was established that both porin deficiency and high-level expression of the enzyme were needed to confer meropenem resistance. In conclusion, carbapenem resistance emerged by a combination of elevated β-lactamase production and lack of porin expression. Due to the reduced outer membrane permeability, only small amounts of meropenem can enter the periplasm, where they are trapped but not degraded by the large amount of the β-lactamase. This study, therefore, provides evidence that the mechanism of “trapping” by CMY-2 β-lactamase plays a role in carbapenem resistance. PMID:23733461

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of nlpH, encoding a novel, surface-exposed, polymorphic, plasmid-encoded 33-kilodalton lipoprotein of Borrelia afzelii.

    PubMed Central

    Theisen, M

    1996-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato organisms, comprising B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelii, and Borrelia garinii, are tick-borne pathogens causing Lyme borreliosis in humans. To identify putative virulence determinants, a B. afzelii DNA library was screened for Congo red dye binding, a property associated with virulence in pathogenic bacteria. One clone was found to carry a 663-nucleotide-long open reading frame encoding a Congo red dye-binding protein with a calculated molecular mass of 25,660 Da. The amino acid sequence deduced from its nucleotide sequence was found to include a consensus bacterial lipidation site present at residues 15 to 18 (Leu-Ser-Gly-Cys). The lipoprotein nature was demonstrated by incorporation of radioactive palmitate; hence, this protein has been termed NlpH, for new lipoprotein H. NlpH is located on the surface of B. afzelii, and the nlpH gene is found on a circular plasmid. The nlpH gene is also found in B. burgdorferi sensu stricto and B. garinii. Immediately upstream of nlpH is located a smaller reading frame encoding a polypeptide containing the casein kinase II phosphorylation recognition sequence, (Ser/Thr)-X-Y-(Glu/Asp), repeated 10 times. PMID:8932298

  8. Flexibility of KorA, a plasmid-encoded, global transcription regulator, in the presence and the absence of its operator.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, Karthik V; Lovering, Andrew L; Dancea, Felician; Scott, David J; Harris, Sarah A; Bingle, Lewis E H; Roessle, Manfred; Thomas, Christopher M; Hyde, Eva I; White, Scott A

    2016-06-01

    The IncP (Incompatibility group P) plasmids are important carriers in the spread of antibiotic resistance across Gram-negative bacteria. Gene expression in the IncP-1 plasmids is stringently controlled by a network of four global repressors, KorA, KorB, TrbA and KorC interacting cooperatively. Intriguingly, KorA and KorB can act as co-repressors at varying distances between their operators, even when they are moved to be on opposite sides of the DNA. KorA is a homodimer with the 101-amino acid subunits, folding into an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain. In this study, we have determined the structures of the free KorA repressor and two complexes each bound to a 20-bp palindromic DNA duplex containing its consensus operator sequence. Using a combination of X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, SAXS and molecular dynamics calculations, we show that the linker between the two domains is very flexible and the protein remains highly mobile in the presence of DNA. This flexibility allows the DNA-binding domains of the dimer to straddle the operator DNA on binding and is likely to be important in cooperative binding to KorB. Unexpectedly, the C-terminal domain of KorA is structurally similar to the dimerization domain of the tumour suppressor p53. PMID:27016739

  9. Safety of a non-viral plasmid-encoding dual isoforms of hepatocyte growth factor in critical limb ischemia patients: a phase I study.

    PubMed

    Henry, T D; Hirsch, A T; Goldman, J; Wang, Y L; Lips, D L; McMillan, W D; Duval, S; Biggs, T A; Keo, H H

    2011-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate in a phase I dose-escalation study, the safety of intramuscular injections of a novel non-viral plasmid DNA expressing two isoforms of human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) (VM202) in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). In total, 12 patients with CLI and unsuitable for revascularization were consecutively assigned to increasing doses (2 to 16 mg) of VM202 administered into the ischemic calf muscle at days 1 and 15. Patients were evaluated for safety and tolerability, changes in ankle- and toe brachial index (ABI and TBI), and pain severity score using a visual analog scale (VAS) throughout a 12-month follow-up period. Median age was 72 years and 53% of the patients were male. VM202 was safe and well tolerated with no death during the 12-month follow-up. Median ABI and TBI significantly increased from 0.35 to 0.52 (P=0.005) and from 0.15 to 0.24 (P=0.01) at 12 months follow-up. Median VAS decreased from 57.5 to 16.0 mm at 6 months follow-up (P=0.03). In this first human clinical trial, VM202, which expresses two isoforms of human HGF, appear to be safe and well tolerated with encouraging clinical results and thus supports the performance of a phase II randomized controlled trial. PMID:21430785

  10. Construction of a new shuttle vector and its use for cloning and expression of two plasmid-encoded bacteriocins from Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei BGSJ2-8.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Milan; Lozo, Jelena; Jovcic, Branko; Strahinic, Ivana; Fira, Djordje; Topisirovic, Ljubisa

    2010-06-15

    A new shuttle-cloning vector, pA13, was constructed and successfully introduced into Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Lactococcus strains. It showed high segregational and structural stability in all three hosts. The natural plasmid pSJ2-8 from L. paracasei subsp. paracasei BGSJ2-8 was cloned into pA13 using BamHI to obtain the construct, pB5. Sequencing and in silico analysis of pB5 revealed fifteen open reading frames (ORF). Plasmid pSJ2-8 harbours genes encoding the production of two bacteriocins, BacSJ and acidocin 8912. Combined N-terminal amino acid sequencing of BacSJ in combination with DNA sequencing of the bacSJ2-8 gene enabled determination of the primary structure of bacteriocin BacSJ. The bacSJ2-8 gene encodes 68-amino-acid peptide with a double-glycine leader peptide consisting of 18 amino acids, followed by the orf2 (bacSJ2-8i) which encodes the immunity protein of BacSJ. The production and functional expression of BacSJ in homologous and heterologous hosts suggest that bacSJ2-8 and bacSJ2-8i together with the genes encoding the ABC transporter and accessory protein are the minimal requirements for production of BacSJ. Biochemical and genetic analyses showed that BacSJ belongs to class II bacteriocins. PMID:20439125

  11. Enhancement of the immunogenicity of an infectious laryngotracheitis virus DNA vaccine by a bicistronic plasmid encoding glycoprotein B and interleukin-18.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Ying; Zhao, Li; Wei, Zhan-Yong; Cui, Bao-An; Wang, Zhen-Ya; Li, Xin-Sheng; Xia, Ping-An; Liu, Jin-Peng

    2010-08-01

    A DNA vaccine against infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) can induce specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity. However, compared to conventional vaccines, DNA vaccines usually induce poor antibody responses. To determine if co-expression of a cytokine can result in a more potent ILTV DNA vaccine, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a monocistronic vector encoding the glycoprotein B (gB) of ILTV was compared to that of a bicistronic vector separately encoding the gB and chicken interleukin-18. Humoral and cellular responses induced by the DNA vaccines administered to the quadriceps muscle of chickens were evaluated. There were significant differences in antibody levels elicited by either monocistronic or bicistronic DNA vaccines as determined by ELISA. The percentages of CD3(+), CD3(+)CD8(+) and CD3(+)CD4(+) subgroups of peripheral blood T-lymphocytes in chickens immunized with the bicistronic DNA vaccine were higher than those in chickens immunized with monocistronic DNA vaccine. When chickens were challenged with a virulent CG strain of ILTV, the protective efficacy was enhanced significantly after immunization with the bicistronic DNA vaccine. These results demonstrated that co-expression of an adjuvant cytokine from a bicistronic DNA vaccine may be an effective approach to increasing ILTV DNA vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:20553764

  12. Flexibility of KorA, a plasmid-encoded, global transcription regulator, in the presence and the absence of its operator

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekar, Karthik V.; Lovering, Andrew L.; Dancea, Felician; Scott, David J.; Harris, Sarah A.; Bingle, Lewis E.H.; Roessle, Manfred; Thomas, Christopher M.; Hyde, Eva I.; White, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The IncP (Incompatibility group P) plasmids are important carriers in the spread of antibiotic resistance across Gram-negative bacteria. Gene expression in the IncP-1 plasmids is stringently controlled by a network of four global repressors, KorA, KorB, TrbA and KorC interacting cooperatively. Intriguingly, KorA and KorB can act as co-repressors at varying distances between their operators, even when they are moved to be on opposite sides of the DNA. KorA is a homodimer with the 101-amino acid subunits, folding into an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain. In this study, we have determined the structures of the free KorA repressor and two complexes each bound to a 20-bp palindromic DNA duplex containing its consensus operator sequence. Using a combination of X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, SAXS and molecular dynamics calculations, we show that the linker between the two domains is very flexible and the protein remains highly mobile in the presence of DNA. This flexibility allows the DNA-binding domains of the dimer to straddle the operator DNA on binding and is likely to be important in cooperative binding to KorB. Unexpectedly, the C-terminal domain of KorA is structurally similar to the dimerization domain of the tumour suppressor p53. PMID:27016739

  13. A Recombinant DNA Plasmid Encoding the sIL-4R-NAP Fusion Protein Suppress Airway Inflammation in an OVA-Induced Mouse Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Fu, Guo; Ji, Zhenyu; Huang, Xiabing; Ding, Cong; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Xiaolong; Du, Mingxuan; Wang, Ting; Kang, Qiaozhen

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease. It was prevalently perceived that Th2 cells played the crucial role in asthma pathogenesis, which has been identified as the important target for anti-asthma therapy. The soluble IL-4 receptor (sIL-4R), which is the decoy receptor for Th2 cytokine IL-4, has been reported to be effective in treating asthma in phase I/II clinical trail. To develop more efficacious anti-asthma agent, we attempt to test whether the Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a novel TLR2 agonist, would enhance the efficacy of sIL-4R in anti-asthma therapy. In our work, we constructed a pcDNA3.1-sIL-4R-NAP plasmid, named PSN, encoding fusion protein of murine sIL-4R and HP-NAP. PSN significantly inhibited airway inflammation, decreased the serum OVA-specific IgE levels and remodeled the Th1/Th2 balance. Notably, PSN is more effective on anti-asthma therapy comparing with plasmid only expressing sIL-4R. PMID:27209195

  14. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of pGA45, a 140,698-bp IncFIIY Plasmid Encoding bla IMI-3-Mediated Carbapenem Resistance, from River Sediment.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingjun; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid pGA45 was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River using Escherichia coli CV601 (gfp-tagged) as recipients and indigenous bacteria from sediment as donors. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to imipenem which belongs to carbapenem group. Plasmid pGA45 was fully sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system. The complete sequence of plasmid pGA45 was 140,698 bp in length with an average G + C content of 52.03%. Sequence analysis shows that pGA45 belongs to IncFIIY group and harbors a backbone region which shares high homology and gene synteny to several other IncF plasmids including pNDM1_EC14653, pYDC644, pNDM-Ec1GN574, pRJF866, pKOX_NDM1, and pP10164-NDM. In addition to the backbone region, plasmid pGA45 harbors two notable features including one bla IMI-3-containing region and one type VI secretion system region. The bla IMI-3-containing region is responsible for bacteria carbapenem resistance and the type VI secretion system region is probably involved in bacteria virulence, respectively. Plasmid pGA45 represents the first complete nucleotide sequence of the bla IMI-harboring plasmid from environment sample and the sequencing of this plasmid provided insight into the architecture used for the dissemination of bla IMI carbapenemase genes. PMID:26941718

  15. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins. PMID:27599513

  16. Evaluation of Selected Borrelia burgdorferi lp54 Plasmid-Encoded Gene Products Expressed during Mammalian Infection as Antigens To Improve Serodiagnostic Testing for Early Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Zachary P.; Crew, Rebecca M.; Brandt, Kevin S.; Ullmann, Amy J.; Schriefer, Martin E.; Molins, Claudia R.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of Lyme disease is performed primarily by serologic assays and is accurate for detection beyond the acute stage of the infection. Serodiagnostic assays to detect the early stages of infection, however, are limited in their sensitivity, and improvement is warranted. We analyzed a series of Borrelia burgdorferi proteins known to be induced within feeding ticks and/or during mammalian infection for their utility as serodiagnostic markers against a comprehensive panel of Lyme disease patient serum samples. The antigens were assayed for IgM and IgG reactivity in line immunoblots and separately by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with a focus on reactivity against early Lyme disease with erythema migrans (EM), early disseminated Lyme neuroborreliosis, and early Lyme carditis patient serum samples. By IgM immunoblotting, we found that recombinant proteins BBA65, BBA70, and BBA73 reacted with early Lyme EM samples at levels comparable to those of the OspC antigen used in the current IgM blotting criteria. Additionally, these proteins reacted with serum samples from patients with early neuroborreliosis and early carditis, suggesting value in detecting early stages of this disease progression. We also found serological reactivity against recombinant proteins BBA69 and BBA73 with early-Lyme-disease samples using IgG immunoblotting and ELISA. Significantly, some samples that had been scored negative by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-recommended 2-tiered testing algorithm demonstrated positive reactivity to one or more of the antigens by IgM/IgG immunoblot and ELISA. These results suggest that incorporating additional in vivo-expressed antigens into the current IgM/IgG immunoblotting tier in a recombinant protein platform assay may improve the performance of early-Lyme-disease serologic testing. PMID:26376927

  17. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of pGA45, a 140,698-bp IncFIIY Plasmid Encoding blaIMI-3-Mediated Carbapenem Resistance, from River Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Bingjun; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid pGA45 was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River using Escherichia coli CV601 (gfp-tagged) as recipients and indigenous bacteria from sediment as donors. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to imipenem which belongs to carbapenem group. Plasmid pGA45 was fully sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system. The complete sequence of plasmid pGA45 was 140,698 bp in length with an average G + C content of 52.03%. Sequence analysis shows that pGA45 belongs to IncFIIY group and harbors a backbone region which shares high homology and gene synteny to several other IncF plasmids including pNDM1_EC14653, pYDC644, pNDM-Ec1GN574, pRJF866, pKOX_NDM1, and pP10164-NDM. In addition to the backbone region, plasmid pGA45 harbors two notable features including one blaIMI-3-containing region and one type VI secretion system region. The blaIMI-3-containing region is responsible for bacteria carbapenem resistance and the type VI secretion system region is probably involved in bacteria virulence, respectively. Plasmid pGA45 represents the first complete nucleotide sequence of the blaIMI-harboring plasmid from environment sample and the sequencing of this plasmid provided insight into the architecture used for the dissemination of blaIMI carbapenemase genes. PMID:26941718

  18. Presence of pathogenicity island related and plasmid encoded virulence genes in cytolethal distending toxin producing Escherichia coli isolates from diarrheal cases

    PubMed Central

    Oloomi, Mana; Javadi, Maryam; Bouzari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Context: Mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, bacteriophages, insertion elements, and genomic islands play a critical role in virulence of bacterial pathogens. These elements transfer horizontally and could play an important role in the evolution and virulence of many pathogens. A broad spectrum of gram-negative bacterial species has been shown to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (CDT). On the other hand, Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli are the one carry virulence genes such as stx 1 and stx 2 (Shiga toxin) and these genes can be acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of other virulence associated genes among CDT producing E. coli strains. Materials and Methods: Thirty CDT positive strains isolated from patients with diarrhea were characterized. Thereafter, the association with virulent genetic elements in known pathogenicity islands (PAIs) was assessed by polymerase chain reaction. Results: In this study, it was shown that the most CDT producing E. coli isolates express Shiga toxin. Moreover, the presence of prophages framing cdt genes (like P2 phage) was also identified in each cdt-type genomic group. Flanked regions of cdt-I, cdt-IV, and cdt-V-type was similar to plasmid sequences while cdt-II and cdt-III-type regions similarity with hypothetical protein (orf3) was observed. Conclusion: The occurrence of each cdt-type groups with specific virulence genes and PAI genetic elements is indicative of horizontal gene transfer by these mobile genetic elements, which could lead to diversity among the isolates. PMID:26539367

  19. A Bivalent Typhoid Live Vector Vaccine Expressing both Chromosome- and Plasmid-Encoded Yersinia pestis Antigens Fully Protects against Murine Lethal Pulmonary Plague Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Carrasco, Jose A.; Lloyd, Scott A.; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Franco, Olga; Buskirk, Amanda D.; Nataro, James P.; Pasetti, Marcela F.

    2014-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria hold great promise as multivalent mucosal vaccines against a variety of pathogens. A major challenge of this approach has been the successful delivery of sufficient amounts of vaccine antigens to adequately prime the immune system without overattenuating the live vaccine. Here we used a live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain to create a bivalent mucosal plague vaccine that produces both the protective F1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis and the LcrV protein required for secretion of virulence effector proteins. To reduce the metabolic burden associated with the coexpression of F1 and LcrV within the live vector, we balanced expression of both antigens by combining plasmid-based expression of F1 with chromosomal expression of LcrV from three independent loci. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine were assessed in mice by using a heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy and compared to those of a conventional strain in which F1 and LcrV were expressed from a single low-copy-number plasmid. The serum antibody responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced by the optimized bivalent vaccine were indistinguishable from those elicited by the parent strain, suggesting an adequate immunogenic capacity maintained through preservation of bacterial fitness; in contrast, LPS titers were 10-fold lower in mice immunized with the conventional vaccine strain. Importantly, mice receiving the optimized bivalent vaccine were fully protected against lethal pulmonary challenge. These results demonstrate the feasibility of distributing foreign antigen expression across both chromosomal and plasmid locations within a single vaccine organism for induction of protective immunity. PMID:25332120

  20. Cloning of a Recombinant Plasmid Encoding Thiol-Specific Antioxidant Antigen (TSA) Gene of Leishmania majorand Expression in the Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Fatemeh, Ghaffarifar; Fatemeh, Tabatabaie; Zohreh, Sharifi; Abdolhosein, Dalimiasl; Mohammad Zahir, Hassan; Mehdi, Mahdavi

    2012-01-01

    Background: TSA (thiol-specific antioxidant antigen) is the immune-dominant antigen of Leishmania major and is considered to be the most promising candidate molecule for a recombinant or DNA vaccine against leishmaniasis. The aim of the present work was to express a plasmid containing the TSA gene in eukaryotic cells. Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted, and the TSA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR product was cloned into the pTZ57R/T vector, followed by subcloning into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3 (EcoRI and HindIII sites). The recombinant plasmid was characterised by restriction digest and PCR. Eukaryotic Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected with the plasmid containing the TSA gene. Expression of the L. major TSA gene was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. Results: The plasmid containing the TSA gene was successfully expressed, as demonstrated by a band of 22.1 kDa on Western blots. Conclusion: The plasmid containing the TSA gene can be expressed in a eukaryotic cell line. Thus, the recombinant plasmid may potentially be used as a DNA vaccine in animal models. PMID:22977370

  1. Plasmid-Encoded RepA Proteins Specifically Autorepress Individual repABC Operons in the Multipartite Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Genome.

    PubMed

    Żebracki, Kamil; Koper, Piotr; Marczak, Małgorzata; Skorupska, Anna; Mazur, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia commonly have very complex genomes with a chromosome and several large plasmids that possess genes belonging to the repABC family. RepA and RepB are members of the ParA and ParB families of partitioning proteins, respectively, whereas RepC is crucial for plasmid replication. In the repABC replicons, partitioning and replication functions are transcriptionally linked resulting in complex regulation of rep gene expression. The genome of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii TA1 (RtTA1) consists of a chromosome and four plasmids (pRleTA1a-d), equipped with functional repABC genes. In this work, the regulation of transcription of the individual repABC cassettes of the four RtTA1 plasmids was studied. The involvement of the RepA and RepB as well as parS-like centromere sites in this process was depicted, demonstrating some dissimilarity in expression of respective rep regions. RtTA1 repABC genes of individual plasmids formed operons, which were negatively regulated by RepA and RepB. Individual RepA were able to bind to DNA without added nucleotides, but in the presence of ADP, bound specifically to their own operator sequences containing imperfect palindromes, and caused operon autorepression, whereas the addition of ATP stimulated non-specific binding of RepA to DNA. The RepA proteins were able to dimerize/oligomerize: in general dimers formed independently of ATP or ADP, although ATP diminished the concentration of oligomers that were produced. By the comprehensive approach focusing on a set of plasmids instead of individual replicons, the work highlighted subtle differences between the organization and regulation of particular rep operons as well as the structures and specificity of RepA proteins, which contribute to the fine-tuned coexistence of several replicons with similar repABC cassettes in the complex bacterial genome. PMID:26147968

  2. DNA vaccination of mice with a plasmid encoding Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid protein mimics the B-cell response induced by virus infection.

    PubMed

    Koletzki, D; Schirmbeck, R; Lundkvist, A; Meisel, H; Krüger, D H; Ulrich, R

    2001-11-17

    Inoculation of naked DNA has been applied for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against different viral infections. To study the humoral immune response induced by DNA vaccination we cloned the entire nucleocapsid protein-encoding sequence of the Puumala hantavirus strain Vranica/Hällnäs into the CMV promoter-driven expression unit of the plasmid pcDNA3, generating pcDNA3-VR1. A single dose injection of 50 microg of plasmid DNA into each M. tibialis anterior of BALB/c mice induced a high-titered antibody response against the nucleocapsid protein as documented 6 and 11 weeks after immunisation. PEPSCAN analysis of a serum pool of the pcDNA3-VR1-vaccinated animals revealed antibodies reacting with epitopes covering the whole nucleocapsid protein. The epitope-specificity of the immune response induced by DNA vaccination seems to reflect the antibody response in experimentally virus-infected bank voles (the natural host of the Puumala virus) and humans. The data suggest that DNA vaccination could be used for the identification of highly immunogenic epitopes in viral proteins. PMID:11035190

  3. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the plasmid-encoded genes for the two-component 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas cepacia 2CBS.

    PubMed

    Haak, B; Fetzner, S; Lingens, F

    1995-02-01

    The two-component nonheme iron dioxygenase system 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas cepacia 2CBS catalyzes the double hydroxylation of 2-halobenzoates with concomitant release of halogenide and carbon dioxide, yielding catechol. The gene cluster encoding this enzyme, cbdABC, was localized on a 70-kbp conjugative plasmid designated pBAH1. The nucleotide sequences of cbdABC and flanking regions were determined. In the deduced amino acid sequence of the large subunit of the terminal oxygenase component (CbdA), a conserved motif proposed to bind the Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster was identified. In the NADH:acceptor reductase component (CbdC), a putative binding site for a chloroplast-type [2Fe-2S] center and possible flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NAD-binding domains were identified. The cbdABC sequences show significant homology to benABC, which encode benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (52% identity at the deduced amino acid level), and to xylXYZ, which encode toluate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 (51% amino acid identity). Recombinant pkT231 harboring cbdABC and flanking regions complemented a plasmid-free mutant of wild-type P. cepacia 2CBS for growth on 2-chlorobenzoate, and it also allowed recombinant P. putida KT2440 to metabolize 2-chlorobenzoate. Functional NADH:acceptor reductase and oxygenase components of 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase were enriched from recombinant Pseudomonas clones. PMID:7530709

  4. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the plasmid-encoded genes for the two-component 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas cepacia 2CBS.

    PubMed Central

    Haak, B; Fetzner, S; Lingens, F

    1995-01-01

    The two-component nonheme iron dioxygenase system 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas cepacia 2CBS catalyzes the double hydroxylation of 2-halobenzoates with concomitant release of halogenide and carbon dioxide, yielding catechol. The gene cluster encoding this enzyme, cbdABC, was localized on a 70-kbp conjugative plasmid designated pBAH1. The nucleotide sequences of cbdABC and flanking regions were determined. In the deduced amino acid sequence of the large subunit of the terminal oxygenase component (CbdA), a conserved motif proposed to bind the Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster was identified. In the NADH:acceptor reductase component (CbdC), a putative binding site for a chloroplast-type [2Fe-2S] center and possible flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NAD-binding domains were identified. The cbdABC sequences show significant homology to benABC, which encode benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (52% identity at the deduced amino acid level), and to xylXYZ, which encode toluate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 (51% amino acid identity). Recombinant pkT231 harboring cbdABC and flanking regions complemented a plasmid-free mutant of wild-type P. cepacia 2CBS for growth on 2-chlorobenzoate, and it also allowed recombinant P. putida KT2440 to metabolize 2-chlorobenzoate. Functional NADH:acceptor reductase and oxygenase components of 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase were enriched from recombinant Pseudomonas clones. PMID:7530709

  5. PLASMID-ENCODED PHTHALATE CATABOLIC PATHWAY IN ARTHROBACTER KEYSERI 12B: BIOTRANSFORMATIONS OF 2-SUBSTITUTED BENZOATES AND THEIR USE IN CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PHTHALATE CATABOLISM GENES AND GENE PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several 2-substituted benzoates (including 2-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro-, 2-bromo-, 2-iodo-, 2-nitro-, 2-methoxy-, and 2-acetyl-benzoates) were converted by phthalate-grown Arthrobacter keyseri 12B to the corresponding 2-substituted 3,4-dihydroxybenzoates (protocatechuates)...

  6. Characterization of pKP-M1144, a Novel ColE1-Like Plasmid Encoding IMP-8, GES-5, and BEL-1 β-Lactamases, from a Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 252 Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Dolejska, Monika; Izdebski, Radoslaw; Dobiasova, Hana; Studentova, Vendula; Esteves, Francisco J.; Derde, Lennie P. G.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Hrabák, Jaroslav; Gniadkowski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    IMP-8 metallo-β-lactamase was identified in Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 252 (ST252), isolated in a Portuguese hospital in 2009. blaIMP-8 was the first gene cassette of a novel class 3 integron, In1144, also carrying the blaGES-5, blaBEL-1, and aacA4 cassettes. In1144 was located on a ColE1-like plasmid, pKP-M1144 (12,029 bp), with a replication region of limited nucleotide similarity to those of other RNA-priming plasmids, such as pJHCMW1. In1144 and pKP-M1144 represent an interesting case of evolution of resistance determinants in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26033721

  7. Characterization of pKP-M1144, a Novel ColE1-Like Plasmid Encoding IMP-8, GES-5, and BEL-1 β-Lactamases, from a Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 252 Isolate.

    PubMed

    Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Dolejska, Monika; Izdebski, Radoslaw; Dobiasova, Hana; Studentova, Vendula; Esteves, Francisco J; Derde, Lennie P G; Bonten, Marc J M; Hrabák, Jaroslav; Gniadkowski, Marek

    2015-08-01

    IMP-8 metallo-β-lactamase was identified in Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 252 (ST252), isolated in a Portuguese hospital in 2009. blaIMP-8 was the first gene cassette of a novel class 3 integron, In1144, also carrying the blaGES-5, blaBEL-1, and aacA4 cassettes. In1144 was located on a ColE1-like plasmid, pKP-M1144 (12,029 bp), with a replication region of limited nucleotide similarity to those of other RNA-priming plasmids, such as pJHCMW1. In1144 and pKP-M1144 represent an interesting case of evolution of resistance determinants in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26033721

  8. Molecular analysis of plasmid encoded multi-drug resistance (MDR) in Salmonella enterica animal isolates by PFGE, replicon typing, and DNA microarray screening followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The development of Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Salmonella is of global concern. MDR Salmonella genes can be transmitted in a number of ways including transfer of plasmids. To understand how MDR plasmids develop and are transmitted, their genetics must be thoroughly described. To achieve t...

  9. The anguibactin biosynthesis and transport genes are encoded in the chromosome of Vibrio harveyi: a possible evolutionary origin for the pJM1 plasmid-encoded system of Vibrio anguillarum?

    PubMed

    Naka, Hiroaki; Actis, Luis A; Crosa, Jorge H

    2013-02-01

    Many Vibrio anguillarum serotype O1 strains carry 65-kb pJM1-type plasmids harboring genes involved in siderophore anguibactin biosynthesis and transport. The anguibactin system is an essential factor for V. anguillarum to survive under iron-limiting conditions, and as a consequence, it is a very important virulence factor of this bacterium. Our comparative analysis of genomic data identified a cluster harboring homologs of anguibactin biosynthesis and transport genes in the chromosome of Vibrio harveyi. We have purified the putative anguibactin siderophore and demonstrated that it is indeed anguibactin by mass spectrometry and specific bioassays. Furthermore, we characterized two genes, angR and fatA, in this chromosome cluster that, respectively, participate in anguibactin biosynthesis and transport as determined by mutagenesis analysis. Furthermore, we found that the V. harveyi FatA protein is located in the outer membrane fractions as previously demonstrated in V. anguillarum. Based on our data, we propose that the anguibactin biosynthesis and transport cluster in the V. anguillarum pJM1 plasmid have likely evolved from the chromosome cluster of V. harveyi or vice versa. PMID:23335587

  10. Activation of transcription at divergent urea-dependent promoters by the urease gene regulator UreR.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, S E; Thomas, V; Collins, C M

    1996-08-01

    The Proteus mirabilis and plasmid-encoded urease loci contain seven contiguous structural and accessory genes (ureDABCEFG) and the divergently transcribed ureR, which codes for an AraC-like transcriptional activator. Previously, it was shown that the plasmid-encoded ureR to ureD intergenic region contained divergent promoters (ureRp and ureDp). Transcription from these promoters required both the effector molecule urea and the activator protein UreR. In this report, we demonstrate that the P. mirabilis urease gene cluster contains similar divergent urea- and UreR-dependent promoters. The ureR gene products from either urease locus were able to activate transcription at both the plasmid-encoded and P. mirabilis promoters. The minimal concentration of urea required to activate transcription at ureRp or ureDp from either gene cluster was approximately 4 mM. The transcriptional start sites for the plasmid-encoded and P. mirabilis divergent promoters were similar in an Escherichia coli DH5 alpha background, as determined by primer-extension analysis. However, in P. mirabilis HI4320, transcription of ureR initiated predominately at an alternative site. Physical mapping and inhibition studies were used to localize the UreR-binding sites within the plasmid-encoded ureRp and ureDp intergenic sequences to regions of 68 bp and 86 bp, respectively. Gel shift analysis demonstrated that UreR bound to a 135 bp fragment in the approximate centre of the plasmid-encoded ureR to ureD intergenic region. The results presented here suggest that the P. mirabilis and plasmid-encoded urease gene clusters utilize similar mechanisms of transcriptional activation in response to urea. PMID:8866486

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Kerstersia gyiorum CG1, Isolated from a Leg Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Greninger, Alexander L.; Kozyreva, Varvara; Truong, Chau-Linda; Longoria, Rose

    2015-01-01

    We report the first draft genome sequence of Kerstersia gyiorum from a leg ulcer of a patient with diabetes and osteomyelitis. The 3.94-Mb genome assembly included 3,428 annotated coding sequences with an N50 of 223,310 bp and a plasmid encoding a type IV secretion system gene and two antitoxin genes. PMID:26358603

  12. SURVIVAL AND DEGRADATIVE CAPACITY OF PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA INDUCED OR CONSTITUTIVELY EXPRESSING PLASMA-MEDIATED DEGRADATION OF 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXYACETATE (TFD) IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The survival of genetically altered Pseudomonas putida strains harboring an inducible plasmid, PRO101, or a constitutive plasmid, PRO103, was compared. hese plasmids encode for the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (TFD) to 2-chloromaleylacetate, and the maintenance of ei...

  13. SURVIVAL AND DEGRADATIVE CAPACITY OF PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA INDUCED OR CONSTITUTIVELY EXPRESSING PLASMID-MEDIATED DEGRADATION OF 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXYACETATE (TFD) IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Survival of genetically altered Pseudonomas putida strains harboring an inducible plasmid, pRO101, or a constitutive plasmid, pRO103, was compared. hese plasmids encoded for the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (TFD) to 2-chloromaleylacetate, and the maintenance of eithe...

  14. Expression of recombinant organophosphorus hydrolase in the original producer of the enzyme, Sphingobium fuliginis ATCC 27551.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kosuke; Ohmori, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Satoshi; Iwata, Natsumi; Seto, Yasuo; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    The plasmid encoding His-tagged organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) cloned from Sphingobium fuliginis was modified to be transferred back to this bacterium. The replication function of S. amiense plasmid was inserted at downstream of OPH gene, and S. fuliginis was transformed with this plasmid. The transformant produced larger amount of active OPH with His-tag than E. coli. PMID:26784883

  15. Analysis of Protein Localization and Secretory Pathway Function Using the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallen, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of mutants has been crucial in understanding a number of processes in the field of cell biology. In this exercise, students examine the effects of mutations in the secretory pathway on protein localization. Yeast strains deficient for synthesis of histidinol dehydrogenase are transformed with a plasmid encoding a…

  16. Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 bares the characteristics of both enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) and enteroaggregative (EAEC) E. coli. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga...

  17. 78 FR 35155 - Establishing a List of Qualifying Pathogens Under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... (e.g., plasmids encoding relevant enzymes, etc.). Given the temporal limitations on infectious... resistance encoded on transferable plasmids (Ref. 24). Because Campylobacter infections are common, any... numerous `antibacterial drugs' as a result of the acquisition of multidrug-resistant plasmids. For...

  18. Suppression of ITGB4 Gene Expression in PC-3 Cells with Short Interfering RNA Induces Changes in the Expression of β-Integrins Associated with RGD-Receptors.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, E N; Nyushko, K M; Alekseev, B Ya; Samatov, T R; Shkurnikov, M Yu

    2015-08-01

    We studied the effect of transfection of PC-3 prostate cancer cells with a plasmid encoding shRNA complimentary to a fragment of integrin β4 (ITGB4). The results attest to considerable changes in the transcriptome of transfected cells. For instance, compensatory changes in the expression of integrin family genes were found. PMID:26395630

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A gene electrotransfer promotes angiogenesis in a porcine model of cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bulysheva, A A; Hargrave, B; Burcus, N; Lundberg, C G; Murray, L; Heller, R

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to assess safety and therapeutic potential of gene electrotransfer (GET) as a method for delivery of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) to ischemic myocardium in a porcine model. Myocardial ischemia was induced by surgically occluding the left anterior descending coronary artery in swine. GET following plasmid encoding VEGF-A injection was performed at four sites in the ischemic region. Control groups either received injections of the plasmid without electrotransfer or injections of the saline vehicle. Animals were monitored for 7 weeks and the hearts were evaluated for angiogenesis, myocardial infarct size and left ventricular contractility. Arteriograms suggest growth of new arteries as early as 2 weeks after treatment in electrotransfer animals. There is a significant reduction of infarct area and left ventricular contractility is improved in GET-treated group compared with controls. There was no significant difference in mortality of animals treated with GET of plasmid encoding VEGF-A from the control groups. Gene delivery of plasmid encoding VEGF-A to ischemic myocardium in a porcine model can be accomplished safely with potential for myocardial repair and regeneration. PMID:27078083

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae Strain ATCC 700603

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Alysha G.; Ganesamoorthy, Devika; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae strain ATCC 700603, formerly known as K. pneumoniae K6, is known for producing extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes that can hydrolyze oxyimino-β-lactams, resulting in resistance to these drugs. We herein report the complete genome of strain ATCC 700603 and show that the ESBL genes are plasmid-encoded. PMID:27231369

  1. Weapons of mass destruction: virulence factors of the global killer enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Turner, Susan M; Scott-Tucker, Anthony; Cooper, Lisa M; Henderson, Ian R

    2006-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common cause of food and water-borne E. coli-mediated human diarrhoea worldwide. The incidence in developing countries is estimated at 650 million cases per year, resulting in 800 000 deaths, primarily in children under the age of five. ETEC is also the most common cause of diarrhoea among travellers, including the military, from industrialized nations to less developed countries. In addition, ETEC is a major pathogen of animals, being responsible for scours in cattle and neonatal and postweaning diarrhoea in pigs and resulting in significant financial losses. Studies on the pathogenesis of ETEC infections have concentrated on the plasmid-encoded heat-stable and heat-labile enterotoxins and on the plasmid-encoded antigenically variable colonization factors. Relatively little work has been carried out on chromosomally encoded virulence factors. Here, we review the known virulence factors of ETEC and highlight the future for combating this major disease. PMID:16958845

  2. Expression and transfer of engineered catabolic pathways harbored by Pseudomonas spp. introuduced into activated sludge microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Nublein, K.; Maris, D.; Timmis, K.; Dwyer, D.F. )

    1992-10-01

    Two genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs), Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 FR1(pFRC20P) (FR120) and Pseudomonas putida KT2440(pWWO-EB62) (EB62), were introduced into activated sludge microcosms that had the level of aeration, nutrient makeup, and microbial community structure of activated sludge reactors. FR120 contains an experimentally assembled ortho cleavage route for simultaneous degradation of 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) and 4-methyl benzoate (4MB); EB62 contains a derivative TOL plasmid-encoded degradative pathway for toluene experimentally evolved so that it additionally processes 4-ethyl benzoate (4EB). Experiments assessed survival of the GEMs, their ability to degrade target substrates, and lateral transfer of plasmid-encoded recombinant DNA.

  3. Genetic analysis of Escherichia coli urease genes: evidence for two distinct loci.

    PubMed

    Collins, C M; Falkow, S

    1990-12-01

    Studies with two uropathogenic urease-producing Escherichia coli strains, 1021 and 1440, indicated that the urease genes of each are distinct. Recombinant plasmids encoding urease activity from E. coli 1021 and 1440 differed in their restriction endonuclease cleavage sites and showed minimal DNA hybridization under stringent conditions. The polypeptides encoded by the DNA fragments containing the 1021 and 1440 urease loci differed in electrophoretic mobility under reducing conditions. Regulation of urease gene expression differed in the two ureolytic E. coli. The E. coli 1021 locus is probably chromosomally encoded and has DNA homology to Klebsiella, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, and Serratia species and to about one-half of the urease-producing E. coli tested. The E. coli 1440 locus is plasmid encoded; plasmids with DNA homology to the 1440 locus probe were found in urease-producing Salmonella spp., Providencia stuartii, and two E. coli isolates. In addition, the 1440 urease probe was homologous to Proteus mirabilis DNA. PMID:2174868

  4. Widening the Spaces of Selection: Evolution along Sublethal Antimicrobial Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Coque, Teresa M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The work of Gullberg et al. (E. Gullberg, L. M. Albrecht, C. Karlsson, L. Sandegren, D. I. Andersson, mBio 5:e01918-14, 2014) indicates that extremely low concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals are able to compensate for the cost of harboring a plasmid encoding resistances to these inhibitors. Therefore, the “spaces of selection” for plasmids encoding antibiotic or metal resistance along gradients of antimicrobial agents might be huge, and in wide spaces a high number of bacterial cells are exposed to the selective effects. These spaces are even broader if several inhibitors are simultaneously present. Probably very small inhibitor concentrations in the environment, including in sewage and other water bodies, are sufficient to ensure the maintenance and spread of this kind of multiresistance plasmid. PMID:25491358

  5. Genome Sequence of Avian Escherichia coli Strain IHIT25637, an Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli Strain of ST131 Encoding Colistin Resistance Determinant MCR-1

    PubMed Central

    Göttig, Stephan; Bülte, Maria; Fiedler, Sophie; Tietgen, Manuela; Leidner, Ursula; Heydel, Carsten; Bauerfeind, Rolf; Semmler, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Sequence type 131 (ST131) is one of the predominant Escherichia coli lineages among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) that causes a variety of diseases in humans and animals and frequently shows multidrug resistance. Here, we report the first genome sequence of an ST131-ExPEC strain from poultry carrying the plasmid-encoded colistin resistance gene mcr-1. PMID:27587807

  6. Complete Sequences of Four Plasmids of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 Reveal Extensive Adaptation to the Dairy Environment†

    PubMed Central

    Siezen, Roland J.; Renckens, Bernadet; van Swam, Iris; Peters, Sander; van Kranenburg, Richard; Kleerebezem, Michiel; de Vos, Willem M.

    2005-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis strains are known to carry plasmids encoding industrially important traits. L. lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 is widely used by the dairy industry in cheese making. Its complete plasmid complement was sequenced and found to contain the plasmids pSK11A (10,372 bp), pSK11B (13,332 bp), pSK11L (47,165 bp), and pSK11P (75,814 bp). Six highly homologous repB-containing replicons were found, all belonging to the family of lactococcal theta-type replicons. Twenty-three complete insertion sequence elements segment the plasmids into numerous modules, many of which can be identified as functional units or containing functionally related genes. Plasmid-encoded functions previously known to reside on L. lactis SK11 plasmids were now mapped in detail, e.g., lactose utilization (lacR-lacABCDFEGX), the proteolytic system (prtM-prtP, pepO, pepF), and the oligopeptide permease system (oppDFBCA). Newly identified plasmid-encoded functions could facilitate the uptake of various cations, while the pabA and pabB genes could be essential for folate biosynthesis. A competitive advantage could be obtained by using the putative flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase and oxalate:formate antiporter for enhanced ATP synthesis, while the activity of the predicted α-acetolactate decarboxylase may contribute to the formation of an additional electron sink. Various stress response proteins are plasmid encoded, which could enhance strain robustness. A substantial number of these “adaptation” genes have not been described before on L. lactis plasmids. Moreover, several genes were identified for the first time in L. lactis, possibly reflecting horizontal gene transfer. PMID:16332824

  7. Genome Sequence of Avian Escherichia coli Strain IHIT25637, an Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli Strain of ST131 Encoding Colistin Resistance Determinant MCR-1.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Christa; Göttig, Stephan; Bülte, Maria; Fiedler, Sophie; Tietgen, Manuela; Leidner, Ursula; Heydel, Carsten; Bauerfeind, Rolf; Semmler, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Sequence type 131 (ST131) is one of the predominant Escherichia coli lineages among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) that causes a variety of diseases in humans and animals and frequently shows multidrug resistance. Here, we report the first genome sequence of an ST131-ExPEC strain from poultry carrying the plasmid-encoded colistin resistance gene mcr-1. PMID:27587807

  8. Understanding the role of the catalase/peroxide genes in H2O2 resistance of E. coli serotype O157:H7 biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 defenses against H2O2 include the peroxiredoxin AhpC and three catalases: KatG (catalase-peroxidase), KatE (catalase), and the plasmid-encoded KatP (catalase/peroxidase). AhpC, KatG, and KatP are induced by OxyR in exponential phase, while KatE is indu...

  9. Peroxide resistance in Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 biofilms is regulated by both RpoS dependent and independent mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 strains, defenses against peroxide damage include the peroxiredoxin AhpCF and three catalases: KatG (catalase-peroxidase), KatE (catalase), and the plasmid-encoded KatP (catalase/peroxidase). AhpC, KatG, and KatP are induced by OxyR /s70 in exponential phase...

  10. High-level plasmid-mediated gentamicin resistance and pheromone response of plasmids present in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Shiojima, M; Tomita, H; Tanimoto, K; Fujimoto, S; Ike, Y

    1997-01-01

    Eleven pheromone-responding plasmids encoding erythromycin or gentamicin resistance were isolated from multiresistant clinical Enterococcus faecalis isolates. The plasmids were classified into six types with respect to their pheromone responses. The three erythromycin resistance plasmids responded to different pheromones. Of the eight gentamicin resistance plasmids, four plasmids responded to same pheromone. Southern hybridization studies showed that the genes involved in regulation of the pheromone response were conserved in the drug resistance plasmids. PMID:9056018

  11. Complete sequences of four plasmids of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 reveal extensive adaptation to the dairy environment.

    PubMed

    Siezen, Roland J; Renckens, Bernadet; van Swam, Iris; Peters, Sander; van Kranenburg, Richard; Kleerebezem, Michiel; de Vos, Willem M

    2005-12-01

    Lactococcus lactis strains are known to carry plasmids encoding industrially important traits. L. lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 is widely used by the dairy industry in cheese making. Its complete plasmid complement was sequenced and found to contain the plasmids pSK11A (10,372 bp), pSK11B (13,332 bp), pSK11L (47,165 bp), and pSK11P (75,814 bp). Six highly homologous repB-containing replicons were found, all belonging to the family of lactococcal theta-type replicons. Twenty-three complete insertion sequence elements segment the plasmids into numerous modules, many of which can be identified as functional units or containing functionally related genes. Plasmid-encoded functions previously known to reside on L. lactis SK11 plasmids were now mapped in detail, e.g., lactose utilization (lacR-lacABCDFEGX), the proteolytic system (prtM-prtP, pepO, pepF), and the oligopeptide permease system (oppDFBCA). Newly identified plasmid-encoded functions could facilitate the uptake of various cations, while the pabA and pabB genes could be essential for folate biosynthesis. A competitive advantage could be obtained by using the putative flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase and oxalate:formate antiporter for enhanced ATP synthesis, while the activity of the predicted alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase may contribute to the formation of an additional electron sink. Various stress response proteins are plasmid encoded, which could enhance strain robustness. A substantial number of these "adaptation" genes have not been described before on L. lactis plasmids. Moreover, several genes were identified for the first time in L. lactis, possibly reflecting horizontal gene transfer. PMID:16332824

  12. Noncontact microsurgery of cell membranes using femtosecond laser pulses for optoinjection of specified substances into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Il'ina, I V; Ovchinnikov, A V; Chefonov, O V; Sitnikov, D S; Agranat, Mikhail B; Mikaelyan, A S

    2013-04-30

    IR femtosecond laser pulses were used for microsurgery of a cell membrane aimed at local and short-duration change in its permeability and injection of specified extracellular substances into the cells. The possibility of noncontact laser delivery of the propidium iodide fluorescent dye and the pEGFP plasmid, encoding the green fluorescent protein, into the cells with preservation of the cell viability was demonstrated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  13. Analysis of plasmids cloned from a virulent avian Escherichia coli and transformed into Escherichia coli DH5 alpha.

    PubMed

    Wooley, R E; Gibbs, P S; Dickerson, H W; Brown, J; Nolan, L K

    1996-01-01

    Three of four plasmids from a virulent wild-type avian Escherichia coli were cloned or transformed into an avirulent laboratory recipient E. coli DH5 alpha and tested for the ability to confer a virulence phenotype. The three plasmids transformed into E. coli DH5 alpha were 5, 6, and 56 kb. A fourth plasmid of 64 kb was not successfully transformed. Parameters used to measure virulence included presence of type 1 pili and a smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) layer, motility, production of Colicin V, resistance to host complement, and embryo lethality. The 5-kb plasmid encoded for ampicillin resistance, whereas the 6-kb plasmid encoded for tetracycline resistance. The 56-kb plasmid encoded for streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline resistance. Twelve-day embryos inoculated with 467 colony-forming units of E. coli DH5 alpha containing the 56-kb plasmid had increased death rates (45%) in the embryo lethality assay and a decreased weight of surviving embryos with cranial hemorrhages as compared with embryos inoculated with similar amounts of E. coli DH5 alpha (0%) and phosphate-buffered saline (0%). Embryos inoculated with the wild-type virulent E. coli had 90% deaths. The 56-kb plasmid also had homology with a probe for Colicin V production (cvaC). No differences in LPS layer, complement resistance, motility, Colicin V activity, type 1 pili, cell-free supernatant proteins, or outer membrane proteins were observed in the transformants when compared with nontransformed E. coli DH5 alpha. PMID:8883780

  14. Mycobacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Suggests Important Role of Plasmids in the Radiation of Type VII Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Emilie; Christina Boritsch, Eva; Vandenbogaert, Mathias; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C.; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Caro, Valerie; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Heym, Beate; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Brosch, Roland; Sapriel, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In mycobacteria, various type VII secretion systems corresponding to different ESX (ESAT-6 secretory) types, are contributing to pathogenicity, iron acquisition, and/or conjugation. In addition to the known chromosomal ESX loci, the existence of plasmid-encoded ESX systems was recently reported. To investigate the potential role of ESX-encoding plasmids on mycobacterial evolution, we analyzed a large representative collection of mycobacterial genomes, including both chromosomal and plasmid-borne sequences. Data obtained for chromosomal ESX loci confirmed the previous five classical ESX types and identified a novel mycobacterial ESX-4-like type, termed ESX-4-bis. Moreover, analysis of the plasmid-encoded ESX loci showed extensive diversification, with at least seven new ESX profiles, identified. Three of them (ESX-P clusters 1–3) were found in multiple plasmids, while four corresponded to singletons. Our phylogenetic and gene-order-analyses revealed two main groups of ESX types: 1) ancestral types, including ESX-4 and ESX-4-like systems from mycobacterial and non-mycobacterial actinobacteria and 2) mycobacteria-specific ESX systems, including ESX-1-2-3-5 systems and the plasmid-encoded ESX types. Synteny analysis revealed that ESX-P systems are part of phylogenetic groups that derived from a common ancestor, which diversified and resulted in the different ESX types through extensive gene rearrangements. A converging body of evidence, derived from composition bias-, phylogenetic-, and synteny analyses points to a scenario in which ESX-encoding plasmids have been a major driving force for acquisition and diversification of type VII systems in mycobacteria, which likely played (and possibly still play) important roles in the adaptation to new environments and hosts during evolution of mycobacterial pathogenesis. PMID:26748339

  15. Expression screening of bacterial libraries of recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants for candidates with thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, Varsha; Gierczak, Richard F; Sheffield, William P

    2013-12-01

    Exhaustive mutagenesis studies of the reactive centre loop (RCL), a key structural component of proteins belonging to the serpin superfamily of protease inhibitors, are complicated by the size of the RCL, serpin conformational complexity, and, for most serpins, the lack of a serpin-dependent phenotype of expressing cells. Here, we describe a thrombin capture assay that distinguished thrombin-inhibitory recombinant human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API M358R) from non-inhibitory API variants in Escherichia coli lysates prepared from either single clones or pools. Binding of API proteins in the lysates to thrombin immobilized on microtiter plate wells was quantified via colour generated by a peroxidase-coupled anti-API antibody. Bacterial expression plasmids encoding inhibitory API M358R were mixed 1:99 with plasmids encoding non-inhibitory API T345R/M358R and the resulting library screened in pools of 10. All above-background signals arising from pools or subsequently re-probed single clones were linked to the presence of plasmids encoding API M358R. Screening of a portion of another expression library encoding hypervariable API with all possibilities at codons 352-358 also yielded only novel, thrombin-inhibitory variants. Probing a smaller library expressing all possible codons at Ala347 yielded the wild type, 6 different functional variants, one partially active variant, and two variants with no thrombin-inhibitory activity. API antigen levels varied considerably less among Ala347 variants than activity levels, and comparison of rate constants of inhibition of purified API variants to their corresponding thrombin capture assay lysate values was used to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. The results indicate that the approach is sufficiently robust to correctly identify functional versus non-functional candidates in API expression libraries, and could be of value in systematically probing structure/function relationships not only in the API

  16. Mycobacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Suggests Important Role of Plasmids in the Radiation of Type VII Secretion Systems.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Emilie; Christina Boritsch, Eva; Vandenbogaert, Mathias; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Caro, Valerie; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Heym, Beate; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Brosch, Roland; Sapriel, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    In mycobacteria, various type VII secretion systems corresponding to different ESX (ESAT-6 secretory) types, are contributing to pathogenicity, iron acquisition, and/or conjugation. In addition to the known chromosomal ESX loci, the existence of plasmid-encoded ESX systems was recently reported. To investigate the potential role of ESX-encoding plasmids on mycobacterial evolution, we analyzed a large representative collection of mycobacterial genomes, including both chromosomal and plasmid-borne sequences. Data obtained for chromosomal ESX loci confirmed the previous five classical ESX types and identified a novel mycobacterial ESX-4-like type, termed ESX-4-bis. Moreover, analysis of the plasmid-encoded ESX loci showed extensive diversification, with at least seven new ESX profiles, identified. Three of them (ESX-P clusters 1-3) were found in multiple plasmids, while four corresponded to singletons. Our phylogenetic and gene-order-analyses revealed two main groups of ESX types: 1) ancestral types, including ESX-4 and ESX-4-like systems from mycobacterial and non-mycobacterial actinobacteria and 2) mycobacteria-specific ESX systems, including ESX-1-2-3-5 systems and the plasmid-encoded ESX types. Synteny analysis revealed that ESX-P systems are part of phylogenetic groups that derived from a common ancestor, which diversified and resulted in the different ESX types through extensive gene rearrangements. A converging body of evidence, derived from composition bias-, phylogenetic-, and synteny analyses points to a scenario in which ESX-encoding plasmids have been a major driving force for acquisition and diversification of type VII systems in mycobacteria, which likely played (and possibly still play) important roles in the adaptation to new environments and hosts during evolution of mycobacterial pathogenesis. PMID:26748339

  17. Induction of a Protective Response in Mice by the Dengue Virus NS3 Protein Using DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Simone M.; Yorio, Anna Paula; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Vidale, Mariana M.; Costa, Emmerson C. B.; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Motta, Marcia A.; Freire, Marcos S.; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2011-01-01

    The dengue non-structural 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein, containing a serino-protease domain, located at the N-terminal portion, and helicase, NTPase and RTPase domains present in the C-terminal region. This protein is considered the main target for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses during dengue infection, which may be involved in protection. However, few studies have been undertaken evaluating the use of this protein as a protective antigen against dengue, as well as other flavivirus. In the present work, we investigate the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on the NS3 protein from DENV2. Different recombinant plasmids were constructed, encoding either the full-length NS3 protein or only its functional domains (protease and helicase), fused or not to a signal peptide (t-PA). The recombinant proteins were successfully expressed in transfected BHK-21 cells, and only plasmids encoding the t-PA signal sequence mediated protein secretion. Balb/c mice were immunized with the different DNA vaccines and challenged with a lethal dose of DENV2. Most animals immunized with plasmids encoding the full-length NS3 or the helicase domain survived challenge, regardless of the presence of the t-PA. However, some mice presented clinical signs of infection with high morbidity (hind leg paralysis and hunched posture), mainly in animal groups immunized with the DNA vaccines based on the helicase domain. On the other hand, inoculation with plasmids encoding the protease domain did not induce any protection, since mortality and morbidity rates in these mouse groups were similar to those detected in the control animals. The cellular immune response was analyzed by ELISPOT with a specific-CD8+ T cell NS3 peptide. Results revealed that the DNA vaccines based on the full-length protein induced the production of INF-γ, thus suggesting the involvement of this branch of the immune system in the protection. PMID:22031819

  18. Clostridium perfringens type A–E toxin plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Theoret, James R.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell. PMID:25283728

  19. Delivery of recombinant vaccines against bovine herpesvirus type 1 gD and Babesia bovis MSA-2c to mice using liposomes derived from egg yolk lipids.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Anabel E; Zamorano, Patricia; Wilkowsky, Silvina; Torrá, Florencia; Ferreri, Lucas; Dominguez, Mariana; Florin-Christensen, Mónica

    2013-06-01

    Liposomes prepared from total egg yolk lipid extracts were used to deliver experimental DNA vaccines to mice consisting of pCI-neo plasmids encoding bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) gD or Babesia bovis MSA-2c. A significantly higher proportion of mice in the B. bovis MSA-2c group, but not those in the BoHV-1 gD group, developed detectable immunoglobulin G responses when vaccinated with liposome encapsulated DNA in comparison with mice vaccinated with naked DNA. In both groups, antibody titres were similar between mice vaccinated with liposome encapsulated DNA and naked DNA. PMID:23183017

  20. Characterization of ampicillin resistance plasmids from Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed Central

    Totten, P A; Handsfield, H H; Peters, D; Holmes, K K; Falkow, S

    1982-01-01

    Seven strains of Haemophilus ducreyi from diverse geographic origins were analyzed for their plasmid content. All strains were multiply resistant, but only resistance to ampicillin was transferred to Escherichia coli by transformation. The H. ducreyi plasmids encoding for ampicillin resistance were 7.4, 5.7, and 3.6 megadaltons and encoded for part or all of TnA, and ampicillin transposon. The relatedness of these plasmids was examined by restriction endonuclease digestion and DNA-DNA homology with isolated DNA fragments from TnA. Images PMID:6282212

  1. Pseudorabies Virus Glycoprotein M Inhibits Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, Barbara G.; Nixdorf, Ralf; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    A transient transfection-fusion assay was established to investigate membrane fusion mediated by pseudorabies virus (PrV) glycoproteins. Plasmids expressing PrV glycoproteins under control of the immediate-early 1 promoter-enhancer of human cytomegalovirus were transfected into rabbit kidney cells, and the extent of cell fusion was quantitated 27 to 42 h after transfection. Cotransfection of plasmids encoding PrV glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH, and gL resulted in formation of polykaryocytes, as has been shown for homologous proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) (A. Turner, B. Bruun, T. Minson, and H. Browne, J. Virol. 72:873–875, 1998). However, in contrast to HSV-1, fusion was also observed when the gD-encoding plasmid was omitted, which indicates that PrV gB, gH, and gL are sufficient to mediate fusion. Fusogenic activity was enhanced when a carboxy-terminally truncated version of gB (gB-008) lacking the C-terminal 29 amino acids was used instead of wild-type gB. With gB-008, only gH was required in addition for fusion. A very rapid and extended fusion was observed after cotransfection of plasmids encoding gB-008 and gDH, a hybrid protein consisting of the N-terminal 271 amino acids of gD fused to the 590 C-terminal amino acids of gH. This protein has been shown to substitute for gH, gD, and gL function in the respective viral mutants (B. G. Klupp and T. C. Mettenleiter, J. Virol. 73:3014–3022, 1999). Cotransfection of plasmids encoding PrV gC, gE, gI, gK, and UL20 with gB-008 and gDH had no effect on fusion. However, inclusion of a gM-expressing plasmid strongly reduced the extent of fusion. An inhibitory effect was also observed after inclusion of plasmids encoding gM homologs of equine herpesvirus 1 or infectious laryngotracheitis virus but only in conjunction with expression of the gM complex partner, the gN homolog. Inhibition by PrV gM was not limited to PrV glycoprotein-mediated fusion but also affected fusion induced by the F protein of bovine

  2. Cloning and expression of a plasmid-linked pediocin determinant trait of Pediococcus acidilactici F.

    PubMed

    Osmanağaoğlu, O; Beyatli, Y; Gündüz, U

    2000-01-01

    Plasmid DNA from Pediococcus acidilactici F was prepared by lysozyme-mutanolysin method and purified by cesium chloride-ethidium bromide (CsCl-EtBr) density gradient ultracentrifugation. Agarose gel electrophoresis of plasmid DNA and plasmid-curing experiments suggested that bacteriocin activity was harboured on a small plasmid of approximately 9.1 kb (kilobasepair) in Pediococcus acidilactici F. Plasmid encoding bacteriocin production in P. acidilactici F was examined for restriction enzyme cleavage patterns and its map has been constructed. An Escherichia coli strain transformed with the recombinant plasmid, pQE322, produced and, most probably, secreted pediocin F. PMID:10746198

  3. Evaluation of Affinity-Tagged Protein Expression Strategies using Local and Global Isotope Ratio Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hervey, IV, William Judson; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Lankford, Patricia K; Owens, Elizabeth T; McKeown, Catherine K; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Foote, Linda J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; McDonald, W Hayes; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B

    2009-01-01

    Protein enrichments of engineered, affinity-tagged (or bait ) fusion proteins with interaction partners are often laden with background, non-specific proteins, due to interactions that occur in vitro as an artifact of the technique. Furthermore, the in vivo expression of the bait protein may itself affect physiology or metabolism. In this study, intrinsic affinity purification challenges were investigated in a model protein complex, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), encompassing chromosome- and plasmid-encoding strategies for bait proteins in two different microbial species: Escherichia coli and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Isotope ratio measurements of bait protein expression strains relative to native, wild-type strains were performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to assess bait protein expression strategies in each species. Authentic interacting proteins of RNAP were successfully discerned from artifactual co-isolating proteins by the isotopic differentiation of interactions as random or targeted (I-DIRT) method (A. J. Tackett et al. J. Proteome Res. 2005, 4 (5), 1752-1756). To investigate broader effects of bait protein production in the bacteria, we compared proteomes from strains harboring a plasmid that encodes an affinity-tagged subunit (RpoA) of the RNAP complex with the corresponding wild-type strains using stable isotope metabolic labeling. The ratio of RpoA abundance in plasmid strains versus wild type was 0.8 for R. palustris and 1.7 for E. coli. While most other proteins showed no appreciable difference, proteins significantly increased in abundance in plasmid-encoded bait-expressing strains of both species included the plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance protein, GenR and proteins involved in amino acid biosynthesis. Together, these local, complex-specific and more global, whole proteome isotopic abundance ratio measurements provided a tool for evaluating both in vivo and in vitro effects of plasmid-encoding

  4. Novel Ambler Class A Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing β-Lactamase from a Pseudomonas fluorescens Isolate from the Seine River, Paris, France▿

    PubMed Central

    Girlich, Delphine; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    A Pseudomonas fluorescens isolate (PF-1) resistant to carbapenems was recovered during an environmental survey performed with water from the Seine River (Paris). It expressed a novel Ambler class A carbapenemase, BIC-1, sharing 68 and 59% amino acid identities with β-lactamases SFC-1 from Serratia fonticola and the plasmid-encoded KPC-2, respectively. β-Lactamase BIC-1 hydrolyzed penicillins, carbapenems, and cephalosporins except ceftazidime and monobactams. The blaBIC-1 gene was chromosomally located and was also identified in two other P. fluorescens strains isolated from the Seine River 3 months later. PMID:19901091

  5. Exposing Plasmids as the Achilles’ Heel of Drug-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Julia J.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Many multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens harbor large plasmids that encode proteins conferring resistance to antibiotics. While the acquisition of these plasmids often enables bacteria to survive in the presence of antibiotics, it is possible that plasmids also represent a vulnerability that can be exploited in tailored antibacterial therapy. This review highlights three recently described strategies designed to specifically combat bacteria harboring such plasmids: Inhibition of plasmid conjugation, inhibition of plasmid replication, and exploitation of plasmid-encoded toxin-antitoxin systems. PMID:18625335

  6. Studying newt brain regeneration following subtype specific neuronal ablation.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Matthew; Joven, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The realization that neuronal injury does not result in permanent functional or cellular loss in all vertebrates has fascinated regenerative biologists. Neuronal regeneration occurs in a subset of species, including lizards, teleost fish, axolotls, and newts. One tool for studying neuronal regeneration in the adult brain is intraventricular injection of selective neuronal toxins, which leads to loss of subpopulations of neurons. To trace cells involved in the regeneration process, plasmids encoding reporter proteins can be electroporated in vivo into the cells of interest. This protocol describes methods to label the ependymoglial cells of the brain of the red spotted newt Notophthalmus viridescens and follow their response after ablation of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25740479

  7. Proteasome activity or expression is not altered by activation of the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1 in cultured fibroblasts or myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David M; Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Minotti, Sandra; Durham, Heather D

    2005-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) with chaperoning function work together with the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to prevent the accumulation of misfolded, potentially toxic proteins, as well as to control catabolism of the bulk of cytoplasmic, cellular protein. There is evidence for the involvement of both systems in neurodegenerative disease, and a therapeutic target is the heat shock transcription factor, Hsf1, which mediates upregulation of Hsps in response to cellular stress. The mechanisms regulating expression of proteasomal proteins in mammalian cells are less well defined. To assess any direct effect of Hsf1 on expression of proteasomal subunits and activity in mammalian cells, a plasmid encoding a constitutively active form of Hsf1 (Hsf1act) was expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Hsf1 and in cultured human myoblasts. Plasmid encoding an inactivatible form of Hsf1 (Hsf1inact) served as control. In cultures transfected with plasmid hsf1act, robust expression of the major stress-inducible Hsp, Hsp70, occurred but not in cultures transfected with hsf1inact. No significant changes in the level of expression of representative proteasomal proteins (structural [20Salpha], a nonpeptidase beta subunit [20Sbeta3], or 2 regulatory subunits [19S subunit 6b, 11 Salpha]) or in chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, and caspaselike activities of the proteasome were measured. Thus, stress-induced or pharmacological activation of Hsf1 in mammalian cells would upregulate Hsps but not directly affect expression or activity of proteasomes. PMID:16184768

  8. Survival and replication of Rhodococcus equi in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hondalus, M K; Mosser, D M

    1994-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterium of macrophages that can cause serious pneumonia in both young horses and immunocompromised people. Essential to understanding rhodococcus pathogenesis is a quantitative documentation of the intracellular events that follow macrophage phagocytosis of the organism. By using a bacterial immunofluorescence staining assay, we verified the intracellular survival and replicative potential of R. equi in both murine peritoneal macrophages and equine alveolar macrophages in vitro. Following an initial lag period of 6 to 12 h, the intracellular numbers of R. equi begin to rise, often reaching macrophage-compromising levels by 48 h. A quantitative determination of bacterial growth by a novel image analysis cytometry technique confirmed our fluorescence microscopic results. By 48 h postinfection, bacterial numbers had increased by more than fivefold, and the majority of infected macrophages in the monolayer contained 10 or more bacteria per cell. The intracellular organisms were viable, as evidenced by the ability to incorporate radiolabeled uracil. The use of these techniques has identified differences in the in vitro replicative capacities of a virulent strain and an avirulent strain of R. equi. A clinical isolate of R. equi expressing a 17-kDa virulence-associated plasmid-encoded antigen was able to survive and replicate within macrophages, whereas an avirulent, non-plasmid-containing strain replicated poorly. These results suggest that plasmid-encoded bacterial virulence factors may contribute to the ability of R. equi to replicate within its host cell, the macrophage. Images PMID:7927672

  9. Modulation of Cytokine Response of Pneumonic Foals by Virulent Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Giguère, Steeve; Wilkie, Bruce N.; Prescott, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of Rhodococcus equi to induce pneumonia in foals depends on the presence of an 85- to 90-kb plasmid. In this study, we evaluated whether plasmid-encoded products mediate virulence by modulating the cytokine response of foals. Foals infected intrabronchially with a virulence plasmid-containing strain of R. equi had similar gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) p35 but significantly higher IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12 p40, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA expression in lung tissue compared to foals infected with the plasmid-cured derivative. IFN-γ mRNA expression levels in CD4+ T lymphocytes isolated from bronchial lymph nodes (BLN) were similar for the two groups of R. equi-infected foals on day 3 postinfection. However, on day 14, in association with pneumonia and marked multiplication of virulent R. equi but with complete clearance of the plasmid-cured derivative, IFN-γ mRNA expression in BLN CD4+ T lymphocytes was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in foals infected with the plasmid-cured derivative. These results suggests an immunomodulating role for R. equi virulence plasmid-encoded products in downregulating IFN-γ mRNA expression by CD4+ T lymphocytes. PMID:10496876

  10. Plasmid pORF-hTRAIL targeting to glioma using transferrin-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Li, Jianfeng; Jiang, Chen; Hong, Bo; Hao, Bing

    2016-01-01

    A gene drug delivery system for glioma therapy based on transferrin (Tf)-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) was prepared. Gene drug, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (hTRAIL)-encoding plasmid open reading frame (pORF-hTRAIL, Trail), was condensed by Tf-modified PAMAM to form nanoparticles (NPs). PAMAM-PEG-Tf/DNA NPs showed higher cellular uptake, in vitro gene expression, and cytotoxicity than PAMAM-PEG/DNA NPs in C6 cells. The in vivo targeting efficacy of NPs was visualized by ex vivo fluorescence imaging. Tf-modified NPs showed obvious glioma-targeting trend. Plasmid encoding green fluorescence protein (GFP) was also condensed by modified or unmodified PAMAM to evaluate the in vivo gene expression level. The PAMAM-PEG-Tf/plasmid encoding enhanced green fluorescence protein (pEGFP) NPs exhibited higher GFP expression level than PAMAM-PEG/pEGFP NPs. TUNEL assay revealed that Tf-modified NPs could induce much more tumor apoptosis. The median survival time of PAMAM-PEG-Tf/Trail-treated rats (28.5 days) was longer than that of rats treated with PAMAM-PEG/Trail (25.5 days), temozolomide (24.5 days), PAMAM-PEG-Tf/pEGFP (19 days), or saline (17 days). The therapeutic effect was further confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. This study demonstrated that targeting gene delivery system had potential application for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26719669

  11. Surrogate reporter-based enrichment of cells containing RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease-induced mutations.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Suresh; Cho, Seung Woo; Kim, Sojung; Song, Myungjae; Gopalappa, Ramu; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    RNA-guided endonucleases (RGENs), which are based on the clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) system, have recently emerged as a simple and efficient tool for genome editing. However, the activities of prepared RGENs are sometimes low, hampering the generation of cells containing RGEN-induced mutations. Here we report efficient methods to enrich cells containing RGEN-induced mutations by using surrogate reporters. HEK293T cells are cotransfected with the reporter plasmid, a plasmid encoding Cas9 and a plasmid encoding crRNA and tracrRNA, and subjected to flow cytometric sorting, magnetic separation or hygromycin selection. The selected cell populations are highly enriched with cells containing RGEN-induced mutations, by a factor of up to 11-fold as compared with the unselected population. The fold enrichment tends to be high when RGEN activity is low. We envision that these reporters will facilitate the use of RGEN in a wide range of biomedical research. PMID:24569644

  12. Distinct Mutations Led to Inactivation of Type 1 Fimbriae Expression in Shigella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Verónica; Puhar, Andrea; Sansonetti, Philippe; Parsot, Claude; Toro, Cecilia S.

    2015-01-01

    Shigella spp. are responsible for bacillary dysentery in humans. The acquisition or the modification of the virulence plasmid encoding factors promoting entry of bacteria into and dissemination within epithelial cells was a critical step in the evolution of these bacteria from their Escherichia coli ancestor(s). Incorporation of genomic islands (GI) and gene inactivation also shaped interactions between these pathogens and their human host. Sequence analysis of the GI inserted next to the leuX tRNA gene in S. boydii, S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. sonnei and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) suggests that this region initially carried the fec, yjhATS and fim gene clusters. The fim cluster encoding type I fimbriae is systematically inactivated in both reference strains and clinical isolates and distinct mutations are responsible for this inactivation in at least three phylogenetic groups. To investigate consequences of the presence of fimbriae on the outcome of the interaction of Shigella with host cells, we used a S. flexneri strain harboring a plasmid encoding the E. coli fim operon. Production of fimbriae by this recombinant strain increased the ability of bacteria to adhere to and enter into epithelial cells and had no effect on their ability to disseminate from cell to cell. The observations that production of type I fimbriae increases invasion of epithelial cells and that independent mutations abolish fimbriae production in Shigella suggest that these mutations correspond to pathoadaptive events. PMID:25811616

  13. DNA supercoiling and the anaerobic and growth phase regulation of tonB gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, C J; Barr, G C; Bhriain, N N; Higgins, C F

    1988-01-01

    We show that several interacting environmental factors influence the topology of intracellular DNA. Negative supercoiling of DNA in vivo is increased by anaerobic growth and is also influenced by growth phase. The tonB promoter of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium was found to be highly sensitive to changes in DNA supercoiling. Expression was increased by novobiocin, an inhibitor of DNA gyrase, and was decreased by factors which increase DNA superhelicity. Expression of the plasmid-encoded tonB gene was enhanced by gamma delta insertions in cis in a distance- and orientation-independent fashion. Both the res site and the TnpR protein of gamma delta, which is known to function as a type I topoisomerase, were required for this activation. tonB expression increased during the growth cycle and was reduced by anaerobiosis. There was excellent correlation between tonB expression from a plasmid and the level of supercoiling of that plasmid under a wide range of conditions. The chromosomal tonB gene was regulated in a manner identical to that of the plasmid-encoded gene. Thus, the physiological regulation of tonB expression in response to anaerobiosis and growth phase appears to be mediated by environmentally induced changes in DNA superhelicity. Images PMID:2836373

  14. Irradiation, Cisplatin, and 5-Azacytidine Upregulate Cytomegalovirus Promoter in Tumors and Muscles: Implementation of Non-invasive Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kamensek, Urska; Sersa, Gregor; Vidic, Suzana; Tevz, Gregor; Kranjc, Simona

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter is one of the most commonly used promoters for expression of transgenes in mammalian cells. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of methylation and upregulation of the CMV promoter by irradiation and the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin in vivo using non-invasive fluorescence in vivo imaging. Procedures Murine fibrosarcoma LPB and mammary carcinoma TS/A cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding CMV and p21 promoter-driven green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. Solid TS/A tumors were induced by subcutaneous injection of fluorescent tumor cells, while leg muscles were transiently transfected with plasmid encoding GFP under the control of the CMV promoter. Cells, tumors, and legs were treated either by DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine, irradiation, or cisplatin. GFP expression was determined using a fluorescence microplate reader in vitro and by non-invasive fluorescence imaging in vivo. Results Treatment of cells, tumors, and legs with 5-azacytidine (re)activated the CMV promoter. Furthermore, treatment with irradiation or cisplatin resulted in significant upregulation of GFP expression both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions Observed alterations in the activity of the CMV promoter limit the usefulness of this widely used promoter as a constitutive promoter. On the other hand, inducibility of CMV promoters can be beneficially used in gene therapy when combined with standard cancer treatment, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. PMID:20396957

  15. Antibiotic resistance in Providencia stuartii isolated in hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    McHale, P J; Keane, C T; Dougan, G

    1981-01-01

    A total of 238 isolates of Providencia stuartii obtained from infected patients in six Dublin hospitals were grouped by using serological and bacteriocin typing methods and tested for sensitivity to a number of antimicrobial agents. Most isolates were resistant to several of these agents. Resistance to tetracycline, resistance to penicillin, resistance to polymyxin, and probably resistance to nitrofurantoin was intrinsic. Plasmid screening coupled with resistance transfer studies showed that both chromosome-encoded and plasmid-coded resistance mechanisms were clinically important. Ampicillin resistance was both chromosomally and plasmid encoded, whereas resistance to kanamycin and resistance to carbenicillin were exclusively plasmid encoded. Gentamicin resistance was more common than kanamycin resistance, and although gentamicin-resistant strains contained aminoglycoside acetyltransferase activity, no association could be demonstrated with plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid in the strains tested. Unlike minimal inhibitory concentrations for kanamycin, minimal inhibitory concentrations for gentamicin varied over a wide range. P. stuartii isolated obtained from several different countries were tested for comparison. As a group, these strains were less resistant, but they did exhibit similar resistance properties. Images PMID:7251830

  16. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V.; Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H.; Murzin, Alexey G.; Meijer, Wim G.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins. PMID:25084333

  17. Toxin plasmids of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2013-06-01

    In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  18. Electrotransfer parameters as a tool for controlled and targeted gene expression in skin.

    PubMed

    Kos, Spela; Blagus, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Lampreht Tratar, Ursa; Stimac, Monika; Prosen, Lara; Dolinsek, Tanja; Kamensek, Urska; Kranjc, Simona; Steinstraesser, Lars; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Préat, Véronique; Sersa, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Skin is an attractive target for gene electrotransfer. It consists of different cell types that can be transfected, leading to various responses to gene electrotransfer. We demonstrate that these responses could be controlled by selecting the appropriate electrotransfer parameters. Specifically, the application of low or high electric pulses, applied by multi-electrode array, provided the possibility to control the depth of the transfection in the skin, the duration and the level of gene expression, as well as the local or systemic distribution of the transgene. The influence of electric pulse type was first studied using a plasmid encoding a reporter gene (DsRed). Then, plasmids encoding therapeutic genes (IL-12, shRNA against endoglin, shRNA against melanoma cell adhesion molecule) were used, and their effects on wound healing and cutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors were investigated. The high-voltage pulses resulted in gene expression that was restricted to superficial skin layers and induced a local response. In contrast, the low-voltage electric pulses promoted transfection into the deeper skin layers, resulting in prolonged gene expression and higher transgene production, possibly with systemic distribution. Therefore, in the translation into the clinics, it will be of the utmost importance to adjust the electrotransfer parameters for different therapeutic approaches and specific mode of action of the therapeutic gene. PMID:27574782

  19. Plasmid pORF-hTRAIL targeting to glioma using transferrin-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Li, Jianfeng; Jiang, Chen; Hong, Bo; Hao, Bing

    2016-01-01

    A gene drug delivery system for glioma therapy based on transferrin (Tf)-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) was prepared. Gene drug, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (hTRAIL)-encoding plasmid open reading frame (pORF-hTRAIL, Trail), was condensed by Tf-modified PAMAM to form nanoparticles (NPs). PAMAM-PEG-Tf/DNA NPs showed higher cellular uptake, in vitro gene expression, and cytotoxicity than PAMAM-PEG/DNA NPs in C6 cells. The in vivo targeting efficacy of NPs was visualized by ex vivo fluorescence imaging. Tf-modified NPs showed obvious glioma-targeting trend. Plasmid encoding green fluorescence protein (GFP) was also condensed by modified or unmodified PAMAM to evaluate the in vivo gene expression level. The PAMAM-PEG-Tf/plasmid encoding enhanced green fluorescence protein (pEGFP) NPs exhibited higher GFP expression level than PAMAM-PEG/pEGFP NPs. TUNEL assay revealed that Tf-modified NPs could induce much more tumor apoptosis. The median survival time of PAMAM-PEG-Tf/Trail-treated rats (28.5 days) was longer than that of rats treated with PAMAM-PEG/Trail (25.5 days), temozolomide (24.5 days), PAMAM-PEG-Tf/pEGFP (19 days), or saline (17 days). The therapeutic effect was further confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. This study demonstrated that targeting gene delivery system had potential application for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26719669

  20. Identification and analysis of the genes coding for the putative pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex in Acholeplasma laidlawii.

    PubMed Central

    Wallbrandt, P; Tegman, V; Jonsson, B H; Wieslander, A

    1992-01-01

    A monospecific antibody recognizing two membrane proteins in Acholeplasma laidlawii identified a plasmid clone from a genomic library. The nucleotide sequence of the 4.6-kbp insert contained four sequential genes coding for proteins of 39 kDa (E1 alpha, N terminus not cloned), 36 kDa (E1 beta), 57 kDa (E2), and 36 kDa (E3; C terminus not cloned). The N termini of the cloned E2, E1 beta, and native A. laidlawii E2 proteins were verified by amino acid sequencing. Computer-aided searches showed that the translated DNA sequences were homologous to the four subenzymes of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes from gram-positive bacteria and humans. The plasmid-encoded 57-kDa (E2) protein was recognized by antibodies against the E2 subenzymes of the pyruvate and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes from Bacillus subtilis. A substantial fraction of the E2 protein as well as part of the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzymatic activity was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane in A. laidlawii. In vivo complementation with three different Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase-defective mutants showed that the four plasmid-encoded proteins were able to restore pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in E. coli. Since A. laidlawii lacks oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and most likely branched-chain dehydrogenase enzyme complex activities, these results strongly suggest that the sequenced genes code for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Images PMID:1735725

  1. Identification of Candidate Tolerogenic CD8+ T Cell Epitopes for Therapy of Type 1 Diabetes in the NOD Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cailin; Burns, Jeremy C.; Robinson, William H.; Utz, Paul J.; Ho, Peggy P.; Steinman, Lawrence; Frey, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which insulin-producing pancreatic islet β cells are the target of self-reactive B and T cells. T cells reactive with epitopes derived from insulin and/or IGRP are critical for the initiation and maintenance of disease, but T cells reactive with other islet antigens likely have an essential role in disease progression. We sought to identify candidate CD8+ T cell epitopes that are pathogenic in type 1 diabetes. Proteins that elicit autoantibodies in human type 1 diabetes were analyzed by predictive algorithms for candidate epitopes. Using several different tolerizing regimes using synthetic peptides, two new predicted tolerogenic CD8+ T cell epitopes were identified in the murine homolog of the major human islet autoantigen zinc transporter ZnT8 (aa 158–166 and 282–290) and one in a non-β cell protein, dopamine β-hydroxylase (aa 233–241). Tolerizing vaccination of NOD mice with a cDNA plasmid expressing full-length proinsulin prevented diabetes, whereas plasmids encoding ZnT8 and DβH did not. However, tolerizing vaccination of NOD mice with the proinsulin plasmid in combination with plasmids expressing ZnT8 and DβH decreased insulitis and enhanced prevention of disease compared to vaccination with the plasmid encoding proinsulin alone. PMID:27069933

  2. Evaluation of protective efficacy and immune mechanisms of using a non-structural protein NS1 in DNA vaccine against dengue 2 virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Fen; Liao, Ching-Len; Lin, Yi-Ling; Yeh, Chia-Tsui; Chen, Li-Kuang; Huang, Yung-Feng; Chou, Hsin-Ying; Huang, Jau-Ling; Shaio, Men-Fang; Sytwu, Huey-Kang

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the potential of DNA vaccine against dengue (DEN) infection, we characterize the protective efficacy and immune responses of mice intramuscularly injected with plasmid encoding DEN-2 non-structural protein 1 (NS1). Intravenously challenged by lethal DEN-2, mice vaccinated with NS1-DNA exhibited a delay onset of paralysis, a marked decrease of morbidity, and a significant enhancement of survival. In addition to a moderate increase of NS1-specific antibody titer from immunized mice measured by ELISA, a strong priming effect on anti-NS1 response was also noticed in plasmid NS1-vaccinated mice by radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) or immunoblot analysis. Interestingly, newborn mice from NS1-DNA-immunized dam showed stronger resistance to viral challenge, as compared to those from vector DNA or PBS-immunized dams, indicating the protective role of NS1-specific antibody. In contrast to humoral immune response, DNA immunization can elicit strong cellular immune responses, including NS1-specific T cell proliferation and cytolytic activity. The NS1-DNA-induced protection can be further augmented by co-injection of plasmid encoding interleukin 12 (IL-12), suggesting an effector role of Th1 immunity against DEN infection. In summary, our results suggest the potential of NS1-DNA vaccine against DEN infection, and indicate both NS1-specific humoral and cellular immune responses contribute to the protection. PMID:12922127

  3. Transgene expression in the striatum following intracerebral injections of DNA nanoparticles encoding for human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, A M; Kowalczyk, T H; Padegimas, L; Cooper, M J; Yurek, D M

    2011-10-27

    A goal of our studies is to develop a potential therapeutic for Parkinson's disease (PD) by a human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (hGDNF) expression plasmid administered to the rat striatum as a compacted DNA nanoparticle (DNP) and which will generate long-term hGDNF expression at biologically active levels. In the present study, we used a DNA plasmid encoding for hGDNF and a polyubiquitin C (UbC) promoter that was previously shown to have activity in both neurons and glia, but primarily in glia. A two-fold improvement was observed at the highest plasmid dose when using hGDNF DNA incorporating sequences found in RNA splice variant 1 compared with splice variant 2; of note, the splice variant 2 sequence is used in most preclinical studies. This optimized expression cassette design includes flanking scaffold matrix attachment elements (S/MARs) as well as a CpG-depleted prokaryotic domain and, where possible, eukaryotic elements. Stable long-term GDNF activity at levels 300-400% higher than baseline was observed following a single intracerebral injection. In a previous study, DNP plasmids encoding for reporter genes had been successful in generating long-term reporter transgene activity in the striatum (>365 days) and in this study produced sustained GDNF activity at the longest assessed time point (6 months). PMID:21839809

  4. A Multiple siRNA-Based Anti-HIV/SHIV Microbicide Shows Protection in Both In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Raulji, Payal; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) are the etiologic agents of AIDS. Most HIV-1 infected individuals worldwide are women, who acquire HIV infections during sexual contact. Blocking HIV mucosal transmission and local spread in the female lower genital tract is important in preventing infection and ultimately eliminating the pandemic. Microbicides work by destroying the microbes or preventing them from establishing an infection. Thus, a number of different types of microbicides are under investigation, however, the lack of their solubility and bioavailability, and toxicity has been major hurdles. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional chitosan-lipid nanocomplexes that can effectively deliver plasmids encoding siRNA(s) as microbicides without adverse effects and provide significant protection against HIV in both in vitro and in vivo models. Chitosan or chitosan-lipid (chlipid) was complexed with a cocktail of plasmids encoding HIV-1-specific siRNAs (psiRNAs) and evaluated for their efficacy in HEK-293 cells, PBMCs derived from nonhuman primates, 3-dimensional human vaginal ectocervical tissue (3D-VEC) model and also in non-human primate model. Moreover, prophylactic administration of the chlipid to deliver a psiRNA cocktail intravaginally with a cream formulation in a non-human primate model showed substantial reduction of SHIV (simian/human immunodeficiency virus SF162) viral titers. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the potential of chlipid-siRNA nanocomplexes as a potential genetic microbicide against HIV infections. PMID:26407080

  5. A Multiple siRNA-Based Anti-HIV/SHIV Microbicide Shows Protection in Both In Vitro and In Vivo Models.

    PubMed

    Boyapalle, Sandhya; Xu, Weidong; Raulji, Payal; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) are the etiologic agents of AIDS. Most HIV-1 infected individuals worldwide are women, who acquire HIV infections during sexual contact. Blocking HIV mucosal transmission and local spread in the female lower genital tract is important in preventing infection and ultimately eliminating the pandemic. Microbicides work by destroying the microbes or preventing them from establishing an infection. Thus, a number of different types of microbicides are under investigation, however, the lack of their solubility and bioavailability, and toxicity has been major hurdles. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional chitosan-lipid nanocomplexes that can effectively deliver plasmids encoding siRNA(s) as microbicides without adverse effects and provide significant protection against HIV in both in vitro and in vivo models. Chitosan or chitosan-lipid (chlipid) was complexed with a cocktail of plasmids encoding HIV-1-specific siRNAs (psiRNAs) and evaluated for their efficacy in HEK-293 cells, PBMCs derived from nonhuman primates, 3-dimensional human vaginal ectocervical tissue (3D-VEC) model and also in non-human primate model. Moreover, prophylactic administration of the chlipid to deliver a psiRNA cocktail intravaginally with a cream formulation in a non-human primate model showed substantial reduction of SHIV (simian/human immunodeficiency virus SF162) viral titers. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the potential of chlipid-siRNA nanocomplexes as a potential genetic microbicide against HIV infections. PMID:26407080

  6. BclA and toxin antigens augment each other to protect NMRI mice from lethal Bacillus anthracis challenge.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Susanne M; Baillie, Les W; Beyer, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    While proving highly effective in controlling Anthrax in farm animals all over the world currently attenuated live anthrax vaccines employed in a veterinary context suffer from drawbacks such as residual virulence, short term protection, variation in quality and, most importantly, lack of efficacy if administered simultaneously with antibiotics. These limitations have stimulated the development of non-living component vaccines which induce a broad spectrum immune response capable of targeting both toxaemia (as in the case of PA based vaccines) and bacteraemia. To contribute to this several new approaches were tested in outbred NMRI mice for antibody titres and protectiveness. Plasmids encoding a recombinant toxin derived fusion peptide and a spore surface derived peptide were tested as DNA-vaccines in comparison to their protein counterparts utilising two adjuvant approaches and two DNA-vector backbones. The combination of two plasmids encoding LFD1PAD4-mIPS1 and TPA-BclAD1D3-LAMP1, when delivered by GeneGun, protected 90% of the animals against a lethal challenge with 25LD50 spores of the Ames strain of Bacillus anthracis. Single applications of either antigen component showed significantly lower protection rates, indicating the beneficial interaction between anti-spore and anti-toxin components for an acellular vaccine formulation. PMID:25917676

  7. Coadministration of cruzipain and GM-CSF DNAs, a new immunotherapeutic vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Natacha; Sánchez Alberti, Andrés; Bivona, Augusto E; De Marzi, Mauricio C; Frank, Fernanda M; Cazorla, Silvia I; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic vaccine research and development are especially important in Chagas disease considering the characteristics of the chronic infection and the number of people in the Americas living with a parasite infection for decades. We have previously reported the efficacy of attenuated Salmonella enterica (S) carrying plasmid encoding cruzipain (SCz) to protect against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In the present work we investigated whether Cz DNA vaccine immunotherapy could be effective in controlling an ongoing T. cruzi infection in mice. We here report the intramuscular administration of naked Cz DNA or the oral administration of Salmonella as Cz DNA delivery system as therapeutic vaccines in mice during acute or chronic infection. The coadministration of a plasmid encoding GM-CSF improved vaccine performance, indicating that the stimulation of innate immune cells is needed in the event of an ongoing infection. These therapeutic vaccines were able to address the response to a protective and sustained Th1 biased profile not only against Cz but also against a variety of parasite antigens. The combined therapeutic vaccine during the chronic phase of infection prevents tissue pathology as shown by a reduced level of enzyme activity characteristic of tissue damage and a tissue status compatible with normal tissue. The obtained results suggest that immunotherapy with Cz and GM-CSF DNAs, either alone or in combination with other drug treatments, may represent a promising alternative for Chagas disease therapy. PMID:26312947

  8. Cleavage of Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Enhances Inflammatory Signaling.

    PubMed

    Londino, James D; Gulick, Dexter; Isenberg, Jeffrey S; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-12-25

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) is a membrane glycoprotein immunoreceptor abundant in cells of monocyte lineage. SIRPα ligation by a broadly expressed transmembrane protein, CD47, results in phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs, resulting in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling in macrophages. Here we observed that proteolysis of SIRPα during inflammation is regulated by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10), resulting in the generation of a membrane-associated cleavage fragment in both THP-1 monocytes and human lung epithelia. We mapped a charge-dependent putative cleavage site near the membrane-proximal domain necessary for ADAM10-mediated cleavage. In addition, a secondary proteolytic cleavage within the membrane-associated SIRPα fragment by γ-secretase was identified. Ectopic expression of a SIRPα mutant plasmid encoding a proteolytically resistant form in HeLa cells inhibited activation of the NF-κB pathway and suppressed STAT1 phosphorylation in response to TNFα to a greater extent than expression of wild-type SIRPα. Conversely, overexpression of plasmids encoding the proteolytically cleaved SIRPα fragments in cells resulted in enhanced STAT-1 and NF-κB pathway activation. Thus, the data suggest that combinatorial actions of ADAM10 and γ-secretase on SIRPα cleavage promote inflammatory signaling. PMID:26534964

  9. Distinct mutations led to inactivation of type 1 fimbriae expression in Shigella spp.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Verónica; Puhar, Andrea; Sansonetti, Philippe; Parsot, Claude; Toro, Cecilia S

    2015-01-01

    Shigella spp. are responsible for bacillary dysentery in humans. The acquisition or the modification of the virulence plasmid encoding factors promoting entry of bacteria into and dissemination within epithelial cells was a critical step in the evolution of these bacteria from their Escherichia coli ancestor(s). Incorporation of genomic islands (GI) and gene inactivation also shaped interactions between these pathogens and their human host. Sequence analysis of the GI inserted next to the leuX tRNA gene in S. boydii, S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. sonnei and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) suggests that this region initially carried the fec, yjhATS and fim gene clusters. The fim cluster encoding type I fimbriae is systematically inactivated in both reference strains and clinical isolates and distinct mutations are responsible for this inactivation in at least three phylogenetic groups. To investigate consequences of the presence of fimbriae on the outcome of the interaction of Shigella with host cells, we used a S. flexneri strain harboring a plasmid encoding the E. coli fim operon. Production of fimbriae by this recombinant strain increased the ability of bacteria to adhere to and enter into epithelial cells and had no effect on their ability to disseminate from cell to cell. The observations that production of type I fimbriae increases invasion of epithelial cells and that independent mutations abolish fimbriae production in Shigella suggest that these mutations correspond to pathoadaptive events. PMID:25811616

  10. Clinical isolate of a porinless Salmonella typhi resistant to high levels of chloramphenicol.

    PubMed Central

    Toro, C S; Lobos, S R; Calderón, I; Rodríguez, M; Mora, G C

    1990-01-01

    We studied a clinical isolate of Salmonella typhi (strain 1895) characterized by resistance to 200 micrograms of chloramphenicol per ml despite the absence of chloramphenicol-inactivating activity. The outer membrane protein profile analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated a deficiency of one of the major protein species which may serve as a porin for entry of chloramphenicol. When the strain was transformed with a plasmid encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, chloramphenicol added to the culture was not inactivated, suggesting a drastic reduction of permeability towards the drug. Moreover, transformants bearing a plasmid coding for the Escherichia coli OmpF porin became considerably more susceptible to chloramphenicol (40 micrograms/ml). On the other hand, transformants carrying a plasmid encoding the Salmonella typhi ompC gene remained as resistant to the drug as the parental strain, even though they overexpressed OmpC. These findings indicate that the lack of OmpF plays a major role in the resistance to chloramphenicol in strain 1895. Images PMID:2285283

  11. Autocrine production of interleukin-8 confers cisplatin and paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Qu, Ye; Niu, Xiu Long; Sun, Wei Jia; Zhang, Xiao Lei; Li, Ling Zhi

    2011-11-01

    It has been widely reported that interleukin-8 (IL-8) is overexpressed in ovarian cyst fluid, ascites, serum, and tumor tissue from ovarian cancer (OVCA) patients, and elevated IL-8 expression correlates with a poor final outcome and chemosensitivity. However, the role of IL-8 expression in the acquisition of the chemoresistance phenotype and the underlining mechanisms of drug resistance in OVCA cells are not yet fully understood. Here we show that both exogenous (a relatively short period of treatment with recombination IL-8) and endogenous IL-8 (by transfecting with plasmid encoding for sense IL-8) induce cisplatin and paclitaxel resistance in non-IL-8-expressing A2780 cells, while deleting of endogenous IL-8 expression in IL-8-overexpressing SKOV-3 cells (by transfecting with plasmid encoding for antisense IL-8) promotes the sensitivity of these cells to anticancer drugs. IL-8-mediated resistance of OVCA cells exhibits decreased proteolytic activation of caspase-3. Meanwhile, the further study demonstrates that the chemoresistance caused by IL-8 is associated with increased expression of both multidrug resistance-related genes (MDR1) and apoptosis inhibitory proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and XIAP), as well as activation of PI3K/Akt and Ras/MEK/ERK signaling. Therefore, modulation of IL-8 expression or its related signaling pathway may be a promising strategy of treatment for drug-resistant OVCA. PMID:21742513

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of cationic nanomicelles for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandke, Rhishikesh Subhash

    The goal of proposed study was to contribute towards the development of a nano size, high efficiency and low toxicity non-viral polymeric vector for gene delivery in vitro and in vivo. A series of fatty acid grafted low-molecular-weight chitosan (N-acyl LMWCs) were synthesized, purified and characterized for their physicochemical properties using various analytical techniques such as infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis and dynamic light scattering. The formulation parameters including pH, sonication duration, and filtration altered the physicochemical characteristics of N-acyl LMWC nanomicelles. The acyl chain length and degree of unsaturation in fatty acids also had an impact on the physicochemical properties and the transfection efficiency of nanomicelles. N-acyl LMWC nanomicelles showed efficient in vitro transfection as visualized and quantified using a reporter plasmid (encoding green fluorescent protein), and therapeutic plasmids (encoding for interleukin-4 and interleukin-10), respectively. The in vitro transfection efficiencies of N-acyl LMWCs with 18:1 and 18:2 grafts (oleic and linoleic acids) were comparable with FuGENERTM HD (marketed non-viral vector) but were ˜8-fold and 35-fold higher as compared to LMWC and naked DNA, respectively. The in vivo transfection efficiency of N-acyl LMWC to deliver plasmids individually encoding IL-4 and IL-10 as well as a bicistronic plasmid encoding both IL-4 and IL-10 was studied in a multiple, low-dose streptozotocin induced diabetic mouse model. The transfection efficiency of pDNA/N-acyl LMWC polyplexes injected via intramuscular route showed significant improvement (p<0.05) over passive (naked DNA) or positive (FuGENE HD) controls. Additionally, a sustained and efficient expression of IL-4 and IL-10 was observed, accompanied by a reduction in interferon-gamma (INF-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels. The pancreas of pDNA/N-acyl LMWC polyplex treated animals exhibited protection from

  13. Unique Activity Spectrum of Colicin FY: All 110 Characterized Yersinia enterocolitica Isolates Were Colicin FY Susceptible

    PubMed Central

    Bosák, Juraj; Micenková, Lenka; Vrba, Martin; Ševčíková, Alena; Dědičová, Daniela; Garzetti, Debora; Šmajs, David

    2013-01-01

    Colicin FY is a plasmid encoded toxin that recognizes a yersinia-specific outer membrane protein (YiuR) as a receptor molecule. We have previously shown that the activity spectrum of colicin FY comprises strains of the genus Yersinia. In this study, we analyzed the activity of colicin FY against 110 Yersinia enterocolitica isolates differing in geographical origin and source. All isolates were characterized through analysis of 16S rRNA genes, serotyping, biotyping, restriction profiling of genomic DNA, detection of virulence markers and susceptibility to antibiotics. This confirmed the broad variability of the collection, in which all 110 Y. enterocolitica isolates, representing 77 various strains, were inhibited by colicin FY. Although isolates showed variable levels of susceptibility to colicin FY, it was not associated with any strain characteristic. The universal susceptibility of Y. enterocolitica strains to colicin FY together with the absence of activity towards strains outside the Yersinia genus suggests potential therapeutic applications for colicin FY. PMID:24339971

  14. A Reference Proteomic Database of Lactobacillus plantarum CMCC-P0002

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wanhong; Yu, Gang; Liu, Xiankai; Wang, Jie; Feng, Erling; Zhang, Xuemin; Chen, Bei; Zeng, Ming; Wang, Hengliang

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a widespread probiotic bacteria found in many fermented food products. In this study, the whole-cell proteins and secretory proteins of L. plantarum were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis method. A total of 434 proteins were identified by tandem mass spectrometry, including a plasmid-encoded hypothetical protein pLP9000_05. The information of first 20 highest abundance proteins was listed for the further genetic manipulation of L. plantarum, such as construction of high-level expressions system. Furthermore, the first interaction map of L. plantarum was established by Blue-Native/SDS-PAGE technique. A heterodimeric complex composed of maltose phosphorylase Map3 and Map2, and two homodimeric complexes composed of Map3 and Map2 respectively, were identified at the same time, indicating the important roles of these proteins. These findings provided valuable information for the further proteomic researches of L. plantarum. PMID:21998671

  15. Attenuation of Vaccinia Tian Tan Strain by Removal of Viral TC7L-TK2L and TA35R Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Shifu; Wang, Yuhang; Sun, Lili; Jia, Peng; Qi, Yanxin; Su, Jiaqiang; Liu, Lei; Yang, Guohua; Liu, Liming; Wang, Zhuoyue; Wang, Jinhui; Liu, Guangchen; Jin, Ningyi; Li, Xiao; Ding, Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia Tian Tan (VTT) was attenuated by deletion of the TC7L-TK2L and TA35R genes to generate MVTT3. The mutant was generated by replacing the open reading frames by a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) flanked by loxP sites. Viruses expressing EGFP were then screened for and purified by serial plaque formation. In a second step the marker EGFP gene was removed by transfecting cells with a plasmid encoding cre recombinase and selecting for viruses that had lost the EGFP phenotype. The MVTT3 mutant was shown to be avirulent and immunogenic. These results support the conclusion that TC7L-TK2L and TA35R deletion mutants can be used as safe viral vectors or as platform for vaccines. PMID:22363781

  16. Expression of the F plasmid ccd toxin-antitoxin system in Escherichia coli cells under nutritional stress.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Ramírez, Marisela; Ramírez-Santos, Jesús; Van Melderen, Laurence; Gómez-Eichelmann, M Carmen

    2006-01-01

    The ccd system of the F plasmid encodes CcdB, a protein toxic to DNA-gyrase, and CcdA, its antitoxin. The function attributed to this system is to contribute to plasmid stability by killing bacteria that lose the plasmid during cell division. However, the function of ccd in resting bacteria is not clear. Results presented show that ccd transcription increases as bacteria enter stationary phase and that the amount of the Ccd proteins is higher in bacteria under nutritional stress than in growing bacteria. Moreover, an increase in the frequency of Lac+ "adaptive" mutations was observed in stationary-phase bacteria that over-express the Ccd proteins. PMID:16541156

  17. Plasmid maintenance and protein overproduction in selective recycle bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Ogden, K L; Davis, R H

    1991-02-20

    A new plasmid construct has been used in conjunction with selective recycle to successfully maintain otherwise unstable plasmid-bearing E. coli cells in a continuous bioreactor and to produce significant amounts of the plasmid-encoded protein beta-lactamase. The plasmid is constructed so that pilin expression, which leads to bacterial flocculation, is under control of the tac operon. The plasmid-bearing cells are induced to flocculate in the separator, whereas cell growth and product synthesis occur in the main fermentation vessel without the inhibiting effects of pilin production. Selective recycle allows for the maintenance of the plasmid-bearing cells by separating flocculent, plasmid-bearing cells from nonflocculent, segregant cells in an inclined settler, and recycling only the plasmid-bearing cells to the reactor. As a result, product expression levels are maintained that are more than ten times the level achieved without selective recycle. All experimental data agree well with theoretical predictions. PMID:18597374

  18. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell line SCA3.A11.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Susanne K; Borland, Helena; Hasholt, Lis F; Tümer, Zeynep; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Rasmussen, Mikkel A; Nielsen, Troels T; Stummann, Tina C; Fog, Karina; Hyttel, Poul

    2016-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG-repeat expanding mutation in ATXN3. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a SCA3 patient by electroporation of dermal fibroblasts with episomal plasmids encoding L-MYC, LIN28, SOX2, KLF4, OCT4 and short hairpin RNA targeting P53. The resulting iPSCs had normal karyotype, were free of genomically integrated episomal plasmids, expressed pluripotency markers, could differentiate into the three germ layers in vitro and retained the disease-causing ATXN3 mutation. This iPSC line could be useful for the investigation of SCA3 disease mechanisms. PMID:27346190

  19. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell line SCA3.B11.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Susanne K; Borland, Helena; Hasholt, Lis F; Tümer, Zeynep; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Rasmussen, Mikkel A; Nielsen, Troels T; Stummann, Tina C; Fog, Karina; Hyttel, Poul

    2016-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion of the CAG-repeat in ATXN3. In this study, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from SCA3 patient dermal fibroblasts by electroporation with episomal plasmids encoding L-MYC, LIN28, SOX2, KLF4, OCT4 and short hairpin RNA targeting P53. The resulting iPSCs had normal karyotype, were free of integrated episomal plasmids, expressed pluripotency markers, could differentiate into the three germ layers in vitro and retained the disease-causing ATXN3 mutation. Potentially, this iPSC line could be a useful tool for the investigation of SCA3 disease mechanisms. PMID:27346191

  20. Association of Composite IS26-sul3 Elements with Highly Transmissible IncI1 Plasmids in Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Clones from Humans▿

    PubMed Central

    Curiao, Tânia; Cantón, Rafael; Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; de la Cruz, Fernando; Baquero, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M.

    2011-01-01

    The association of an IS440-sul3 platform with Tn21 class 1 integrons carried by IncI1 plasmids encoding extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs; mainly SHV-12 and CTX-M-14) among worldwide Escherichia coli clones of phylogroups A (ST10, ST23, and ST46), B1 (ST155, ST351, and ST359), and D/B2 (ST131) is reported. An in silico comparative analysis of sul3 elements available in the GenBank database shows the evolution of sul3 platforms by hosting different transposable elements facilitating the potential genesis of IS26 composite transposons and further insertion element-mediated promoted arrangements. PMID:21343460

  1. Acquired Class D β-Lactamases

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Nuno T.; Fisher, Jed F.

    2014-01-01

    The Class D β-lactamases have emerged as a prominent resistance mechanism against β-lactam antibiotics that previously had efficacy against infections caused by pathogenic bacteria, especially by Acinetobacter baumannii and the Enterobacteriaceae. The phenotypic and structural characteristics of these enzymes correlate to activities that are classified either as a narrow spectrum, an extended spectrum, or a carbapenemase spectrum. We focus on Class D β-lactamases that are carried on plasmids and, thus, present particular clinical concern. Following a historical perspective, the susceptibility and kinetics patterns of the important plasmid-encoded Class D β-lactamases and the mechanisms for mobilization of the chromosomal Class D β-lactamases are discussed. PMID:27025753

  2. Simultaneous coexpression of Borrelia burgdorferi Erp proteins occurs through a specific, erp locus-directed regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed

    El-Hage, Nazira; Stevenson, Brian

    2002-08-01

    An individual Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium can encode as many as 13 different Erp (OspE/F-related) proteins from mono-and bicistronic loci that are carried on up to 10 separate plasmids. We demonstrate through multilabel immunofluorescence analyses that individual bacteria simultaneously coexpress their entire Erp protein repertoire. While it has been proposed that B. burgdorferi controls expression of Erp and other plasmid-encoded proteins through changes in DNA topology, we observed regulated Erp expression in the absence of detectable differences in DNA supercoiling. Likewise, inhibition of DNA gyrase had no detectable effect on Erp expression. Furthermore, expression of loci physically adjacent to erp loci was observed to be independently regulated. It is concluded that Erp expression is regulated by a mechanism(s) directed at erp loci and not by a global, plasmid-wide mechanism. PMID:12142424

  3. Contribution of the highly conserved EaeH surface protein to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Alaullah; Luo, Qingwei; Roy, Koushik; Shabaan, Salwa; Kumar, Pardeep; Qadri, Firdausi; Fleckenstein, James M

    2014-09-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are among the most common causes of diarrheal illness worldwide. These pathogens disproportionately afflict children in developing countries, where they cause substantial morbidity and are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Although these organisms are important targets for enteric vaccines, most development efforts to date have centered on a subset of plasmid-encoded fimbrial adhesins known as colonization factors and heat-labile toxin (LT). Emerging data suggest that ETEC undergoes considerable changes in its surface architecture, sequentially deploying a number of putative adhesins during its interactions with the host. We demonstrate here that one putative highly conserved, chromosomally encoded adhesin, EaeH, engages the surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells and contributes to bacterial adhesion, LT delivery, and colonization of the small intestine. PMID:24935979

  4. Novel antigens for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James; Sheikh, Alaullah; Qadri, Firdausi

    2014-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common bacterial pathogens causing diarrhea in developing countries where they lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths, mostly in children. These organisms are a leading cause of diarrheal illness in travelers to endemic countries. ETEC pathogenesis, and consequently vaccine approaches, have largely focused on plasmid-encoded enterotoxins or fimbrial colonization factors. To date these approaches have not yielded a broadly protective vaccine. However, recent studies suggest that ETEC pathogenesis is more complex than previously appreciated and involves additional plasmid and chromosomally encoded virulence molecules that can be targeted in vaccines. Here, we review recent novel antigen discovery efforts, potential contribution of these proteins to the molecular pathogenesis of ETEC and protective immunity, and the potential implications for development of next generation vaccines for important pathogens. These proteins may help to improve the effectiveness of future vaccines by making them simpler and possibly broadly protective because of their conserved nature. PMID:24702311

  5. Design of environment-responsive biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Masuo; Niimi, T.; Haruyama, T.; Kobatake, E.

    1996-02-01

    Two different types of biomolecular network systems have been designed to respond to the environmental conditions. One is the calmodulin and enzyme (phosphodiesterase, PDE) that activates phosphodiesterase through the conformational change in responding calcium ion. Calmodulin was genetically engineered to be fused with glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Calmodulin/GST fused protein was self-assembled on the gold surface through glutathione. The calmodulin/GST protein layer exhibited an ability to modulate the PDE activity in a solution phase depending on the calcium ion concentration. The other is the engineered gene structure that produces firefly luciferase in responding environmental pollutants. A TOL plasmid, encoding a binding protein xyl R for xyline and a marker enzyme firefly luciferase, has been implemented in a bacterial cell. The whole cell responded to environmentally hazardous substances such as xylene in emitting light.

  6. Dendritic cell-targeting DNA-based mucosal adjuvants for the development of mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish effective mucosal immunity against various mucosal pathogens, vaccines must be delivered via the mucosal route and contain effective adjuvant(s). Since mucosal adjuvants can simply mix with the antigen, it is relatively easy to adapt them for different types of vaccine development. Even in simple admixture vaccines, the adjuvant itself must be prepared without any complications. Thus, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or plasmids encoding certain cDNA(s) would be potent mucosal adjuvant candidates when compared with other substances that can be used as mucosal adjuvants. The strategy of a DNA-based mucosal adjuvant facilitates the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells, and thus is an effective and safe approach. It would also provide great flexibility for the development of effective vaccines for various mucosal pathogens. PMID:19722892

  7. A Molecular Mucosal Adjuvant To Enhance Immunity Against Pneumococcal Infection In The Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Ikeda, Yorihiko; Ohori, Junichiro; Sugita, Gen; Aso, Kazuyoshi; Fujihashi, Keiko; Briles, David E.; McGhee, Jerry R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) causes a major upper respiratory tract infection often leading to severe illness and death in the elderly. Thus, it is important to induce safe and effective mucosal immunity against this pathogen in order to prevent pnuemocaccal infection. However, this is a very difficult task to elicit protective mucosal IgA antibody responses in older individuals. A combind nasal adjuvant consisting of a plasmid encoding the Flt3 ligand cDNA (pFL) and CpG oligonucleotide (CpG ODN) successfully enhanced S. pneumoniae-specific mucosal immunity in aged mice. In particular, a pneumococcal surface protein A-based nasal vaccine given with pFL and CpG ODN induced complete protection from S. pneumoniae infection. These results show that nasal delivery of a combined DNA adjuvant offers an attractive potential for protection against the pneumococcus in the elderly. PMID:25713504

  8. Roles of the 2 microns gene products in stable maintenance of the 2 microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, A E; Murray, A W; Szostak, J W

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the replication and segregation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 2 microns circle. The amplification of the plasmid at low copy numbers requires site-specific recombination between the 2 microns inverted repeat sequences catalyzed by the plasmid-encoded FLP gene. No other 2 microns gene products are required. The overexpression of FLP in a strain carrying endogenous 2 microns leads to uncontrolled plasmid replication, longer cell cycles, and cell death. Two different assays show that the level of Flp activity decreases with increasing 2 microns copy number. This regulation requires the products of the REP1 and REP2 genes. These gene products also act together to ensure that 2 microns molecules are randomly segregated between mother and daughter cells at cell division. Images PMID:3316982

  9. Specific detection of the pesticide chlorpyrifos by a sensitive genetic-based whole cell biosensor.

    PubMed

    Whangsuk, Wirongrong; Thiengmag, Sirinthra; Dubbs, James; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Loprasert, Suvit

    2016-01-15

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti chpA promoter is highly induced in the presence of the pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) through the action of the transcriptional activator, ChpR. A whole-cell biosensor for the detection of CPF was developed and is composed of an Escherichia coli strain carrying a chpR expression vector and a chpA promoter-atsBA transcriptional fusion plasmid encoding sulfatase (atsA) and formylglycine generating enzyme (atsB) from Klebsiella sp. The sulfatase is posttranslationally activated by formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE) and then converts 4-methylumbelliferyl sulfate (4-MUS) to the fluorescent product, 4-methyllumbelliferone (4-MU). This biosensor system exhibited a linear response range from 25 to 500 nM CPF. PMID:26452613

  10. Production of immunologically active surface antigens of hepatitis B virus by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, P; Pasek, M; Magazin, M; Kovacic, R T; Allet, B; Stahl, S; Gilbert, W; Schaller, H; Bruce, S A; Murray, K

    1981-01-01

    Several plasmids have been constructed which direct the synthesis of hepatitis B virus surface antigens in Escherichia coli either as the native polypeptide or fused to other plasmid encoded polypeptides. When injected into rabbits, extracts from bacteria carrying some of these plasmids induced the synthesis of antibodies to the antigens even though the extracts did not give satisfactory positive results in radioimmunoassay for them. Either the NH2-terminal segment or the COOH-terminal segment of the surface antigens alone was sufficient to elicit the immune response, but antibodies against the two segments showed different specificities. The results emphasize the value of an in vivo assay for the presence of antigens in crude cell extracts and illustrate the feasibility of this type of screening with laboratory animals. PMID:6170067

  11. A reference proteomic database of Lactobacillus plantarum CMCC-P0002.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Hu, Wei; Liu, Datao; Tian, Wanhong; Yu, Gang; Liu, Xiankai; Wang, Jie; Feng, Erling; Zhang, Xuemin; Chen, Bei; Zeng, Ming; Wang, Hengliang

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a widespread probiotic bacteria found in many fermented food products. In this study, the whole-cell proteins and secretory proteins of L. plantarum were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis method. A total of 434 proteins were identified by tandem mass spectrometry, including a plasmid-encoded hypothetical protein pLP9000_05. The information of first 20 highest abundance proteins was listed for the further genetic manipulation of L. plantarum, such as construction of high-level expressions system. Furthermore, the first interaction map of L. plantarum was established by Blue-Native/SDS-PAGE technique. A heterodimeric complex composed of maltose phosphorylase Map3 and Map2, and two homodimeric complexes composed of Map3 and Map2 respectively, were identified at the same time, indicating the important roles of these proteins. These findings provided valuable information for the further proteomic researches of L. plantarum. PMID:21998671

  12. Rescue of recombinant Newcastle disease virus from cDNA.

    PubMed

    Ayllon, Juan; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the prototype member of the Avulavirus genus of the family Paramyxoviridae(1), is a non-segmented, negative-sense, single-stranded, enveloped RNA virus (Figure 1) with potential applications as a vector for vaccination and treatment of human diseases. In-depth exploration of these applications has only become possible after the establishment of reverse genetics techniques to rescue recombinant viruses from plasmids encoding their complete genomes as cDNA(2-5). Viral cDNA can be conveniently modified in vitro by using standard cloning procedures to alter the genotype of the virus and/or to include new transcriptional units. Rescue of such genetically modified viruses provides a valuable tool to understand factors affecting multiple stages of infection, as well as allows for the development and improvement of vectors for the expression and delivery of antigens for vaccination and therapy. Here we describe a protocol for the rescue of recombinant NDVs. PMID:24145366

  13. Recombinant expression and phenotypic screening of a bioactive cyclotide against α-synuclein-induced cytotoxicity in baker’s yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jagadish, Krishnappa; Gould, Andrew; Borra, Radhika; Majumder, Subhabrata; Mushtaq, Zahid; Shekhtman, Alexander; Camarero, Julio A.

    2015-01-01

    We report for the first time the recombinant expression of fully folded bioactive cyclotides inside live yeast cells by using intracellular protein trans-splicing in combination with a highly efficient split-intein. This approach was successfully used to produce the naturally occurring cyclotide MCoTI-I and the engineered bioactive cyclotide MCoCP4. Cyclotide MCoCP4 was shown reduce the toxicity of human α-synuclein in live yeast cells. Cyclotide MCoCP4 was selected by phenotypic screening from cells transformed with a mixture of plasmids encoding MCoCP4 and inactive cyclotide MCoTI-I in a ratio of 1 to 5×104. This demonstrates the potential for using yeast to perform phenotypic screening of genetically-encoded cyclotide-based libraries in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26096948

  14. Production of complex nucleic acid libraries using highly parallel in situ oligonucleotide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michele A; Kilian, Kristopher; Wang, Yanqun; Bradshaw, Jeff; Cavet, Guy; Ge, Wei; Kulkarni, Amit; Paddison, Patrick J; Chang, Kenneth; Sheth, Nihar; Leproust, Eric; Coffey, Ernest M; Burchard, Julja; McCombie, W Richard; Linsley, Peter; Hannon, Gregory J

    2004-12-01

    Generation of complex libraries of defined nucleic acid sequences can greatly aid the functional analysis of protein and gene function. Previously, such studies relied either on individually synthesized oligonucleotides or on cellular nucleic acids as the starting material. As each method has disadvantages, we have developed a rapid and cost-effective alternative for construction of small-fragment DNA libraries of defined sequences. This approach uses in situ microarray DNA synthesis for generation of complex oligonucleotide populations. These populations can be recovered and either used directly or immortalized by cloning. From a single microarray, a library containing thousands of unique sequences can be generated. As an example of the potential applications of this technology, we have tested the approach for the production of plasmids encoding short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting numerous human and mouse genes. We achieved high-fidelity clone retrieval with a uniform representation of intended library sequences. PMID:15782200

  15. Monitoring the Localization of MAP1LC3B by Indirect Immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ktistakis, Nicholas T

    2015-08-01

    The autophagy protein MAP1LC3B (microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B, hereafter referred to as LC3B), which is one of several mammalian homologs of yeast Atg8, is one of the most popular markers for autophagosome formation because its distribution changes from cytosolic/diffuse to punctate upon the induction of autophagy. In many settings, plasmids encoding fluorescently tagged LC3B are introduced into cells, and the subsequent autophagy response is monitored. However, for a variety of reasons, it would be desirable also to have a protocol to monitor the localization of endogenous LC3B under various conditions. This protocol provides such a methodology for the staining of endogenous LC3B by indirect immunofluorescence, such that autophagy responses can be monitored in mammalian cells. PMID:26240409

  16. Construction of a compatible Gateway-based co-expression vector set for expressing multiprotein complexes in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Salim, Loubna; Feger, Claire; Busso, Didier

    2016-11-01

    We report the construction of a versatile Gateway-based co-expression vector set for producing multiprotein complexes in Escherichia coli. The set consists of two groups of three vectors (pCoGW and pCo0GW), each having a specific antibiotic resistance gene, a compatible origin of replication and allowing cloning of up to two genes, each under control of its own T7 promoter. To validate the set, 33 (co-)expression plasmids encoding fluorescent protein (GFP, DsRed and ECFP) have been generated. Protein expression levels were quantified and (co-)expression visualized by fluorescent microscopy. The results illustrate the applicability of these vectors in co-expression studies. PMID:27558914

  17. Recombinant Expression and Phenotypic Screening of a Bioactive Cyclotide Against α-Synuclein-Induced Cytotoxicity in Baker's Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, Krishnappa; Gould, Andrew; Borra, Radhika; Majumder, Subhabrata; Mushtaq, Zahid; Shekhtman, Alexander; Camarero, Julio A

    2015-07-13

    We report for the first time the recombinant expression of fully folded bioactive cyclotides inside live yeast cells by using intracellular protein trans-splicing in combination with a highly efficient split-intein. This approach was successfully used to produce the naturally occurring cyclotide MCoTI-I and the engineered bioactive cyclotide MCoCP4. Cyclotide MCoCP4 was shown to reduce the toxicity of human α-synuclein in live yeast cells. Cyclotide MCoCP4 was selected by phenotypic screening from cells transformed with a mixture of plasmids encoding MCoCP4 and inactive cyclotide MCoTI-I in a ratio of 1:5×10(4). This demonstrates the potential for using yeast to perform phenotypic screening of genetically encoded cyclotide-based libraries in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26096948

  18. Aptazyme-based riboswitches and logic gates in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yoko; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes a screening strategy to engineer synthetic riboswitches that can chemically regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Riboswitch libraries are constructed by randomizing the key nucleotides that couple the molecular recognition function of an aptamer with the self-cleavage activity of a ribozyme. The allosteric ribozyme (aptazyme) candidates are cloned in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of a reporter gene mRNA. The plasmid-encoded riboswitch candidates are transfected into a mammalian cell line to screen for the desired riboswitch function. Furthermore, multiple aptazymes can be cloned into the 3' UTR of a desired gene to obtain a logic gate response to multiple chemical signals. This screening strategy complements other methods to engineer robust mammalian riboswitches to control gene expression. PMID:25967059

  19. Control of infection with multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria in a hospital renal unit: the value of plasmid characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, C. S.; Barrett, S. P.; Threlfall, E. J.; Cheasty, T.

    1995-01-01

    An outbreak of infections due to multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria took place over a period of approximately 18 months in a renal unit. Strains of Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp. were involved, and a variety of antibiotic resistances was encountered. Closely related plasmids encoding resistance to aztreonam, ceftazidime and piperacillin, possibly derived from an archetypal plasmid of 105 kb were found in the majority of isolates examined. After limiting the use of aztreonam the incidence of new patient isolates of multiple-resistant organisms was greatly reduced. This study demonstrated how molecular studies can contribute to the control of an outbreak situation in a hospital unit by providing an impetus to reduce the use of specific antibiotics. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7641839

  20. Bacteriocin release protein-mediated secretory expression of recombinant chalcone synthase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Iffah Izzati; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2011-09-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites synthesized by plants shown to exhibit health benefits such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor effects. Thus, due to the importance of this compound, several enzymes involved in the flavonoid pathway have been cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. However, the formation of inclusion bodies has become a major disadvantage of this approach. As an alternative, chalcone synthase from Physcomitrella patens was secreted into the medium using a bacteriocin release protein expression vector. Secretion of P. patens chalcone synthase into the culture media was achieved by co-expression with a psW1 plasmid encoding bacteriocin release protein in E. coli Tuner (DE3) plysS. The optimized conditions, which include the incubation of cells for 20 h with 40 ng/ml mitomycin C at OD(600) induction time of 0.5 was found to be the best condition for chalcone synthase secretion. PMID:21633820

  1. Transgene vaccination using Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-1) for targeted mucosal immunization against HIV-1 envelope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhai; Kochetkova, Irina; Haddad, Asmahan; Hoyt, Teri; Hone, David M; Pascual, David W

    2005-05-31

    Receptor-mediated gene transfer using an M cell ligand has been shown to be an efficient method for mucosal DNA immunization. To investigate further into alternative M cell ligands, the plant lectin, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-1), was tested. UEA-1 binds to human intestinal Caco-2 cells, and these cells can be transfected with poly-l-lysine (PL)-conjugated UEA-1 for expression of reporter cDNAs. When tested in vivo, mice nasally immunized with UEA-1-PL complexed to plasmid encoding HIV-1 envelope showed elevated systemic and mucosal antibody responses, and these were supported by tissue antibody-forming cells. Likewise, elevated envelope-specific CTLs were induced. Thus, UEA-1 mediated DNA delivery represents an alternative mucosal formulation for inducing humoral and cellular immunity against HIV-1. PMID:15893622

  2. Providencia stuartii Isolates from Greece: Co-Carriage of Cephalosporin (blaSHV-5, blaVEB-1), Carbapenem (blaVIM-1), and Aminoglycoside (rmtB) Resistance Determinants by a Multidrug-Resistant Outbreak Clone.

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Olga; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Phee, Lynette M; Betts, Jonathan; Mevius, Dik; Wareham, David W

    2016-07-01

    Providencia stuartii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen. We describe an outbreak due to a multidrug-resistant strain over a 4-month period in a critical care unit in Athens. Molecular typing revealed each of the isolates to be clonally related with coresistance to cephalosporins, carbapenems, aminoglycosides, and quinolones. Each isolate contained a 220-kb multi-replicon (IncA/C and IncR) conjugative plasmid encoding TEM-1, SHV-5, VEB-1, and VIM-1 β-lactamases and the 16S rDNA methylase RmtB. Antimicrobial therapy was unsuccessful in 3 of 6 cases, and resistance was readily transmissible to susceptible strains of Escherichia coli by transformation and conjugation. This highlights the clinical importance of P. stuartii and its ability to disseminate critical resistance determinants to other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27380549

  3. Xenopus LAP2β protein knockdown affects location of lamin B and nucleoporins and has effect on assembly of cell nucleus and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Dubińska-Magiera, Magda; Chmielewska, Magdalena; Kozioł, Katarzyna; Machowska, Magdalena; Hutchison, Christopher J; Goldberg, Martin W; Rzepecki, Ryszard

    2016-05-01

    Xenopus LAP2β protein is the single isoform expressed in XTC cells. The protein localizes on heterochromatin clusters both at the nuclear envelope and inside a cell nucleus. The majority of XLAP2β fraction neither colocalizes with TPX2 protein during interphase nor can be immunoprecipitated with XLAP2β antibody. Knockdown of the XLAP2β protein expression in XTC cells by synthetic siRNA and plasmid encoded siRNA resulted in nuclear abnormalities including changes in shape of nuclei, abnormal chromatin structure, loss of nuclear envelope, mislocalization of integral membrane proteins of INM such as lamin B2, mislocalization of nucleoporins, and cell death. Based on timing of cell death, we suggest mechanism associated with nucleus reassembly or with entry into mitosis. This confirms that Xenopus LAP2 protein is essential for the maintenance of cell nucleus integrity and the process of its reassembly after mitosis. PMID:26209045

  4. Long-term transgene expression in the central nervous system using DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yurek, David M; Fletcher, Anita M; Smith, George M; Seroogy, Kim B; Ziady, Assem G; Molter, Joseph; Kowalczyk, Tomasz H; Padegimas, Linas; Cooper, Mark J

    2009-04-01

    This study demonstrates proof of concept for delivery and expression of compacted plasmid DNA in the central nervous system. Plasmid DNA was compacted with polyethylene glycol substituted lysine 30-mer peptides, forming rod-like nanoparticles with diameters between 8 and 11 nm. Here we show that an intracerebral injection of compacted DNA can transfect both neurons and glia, and can produce transgene expression in the striatum for up to 8 weeks, which was at least 100-fold greater than intracerebral injections of naked DNA plasmids. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) of injected animals at the 11th postinjection week revealed significantly higher transgene activity in animals receiving compacted DNA plasmids when compared to animals receiving naked DNA. There was minimal evidence of brain inflammation. Intrastriatal injections of a compacted plasmid encoding for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (pGDNF) resulted in a significant overexpression of GDNF protein in the striatum 1-3 weeks after injection. PMID:19223866

  5. Rescue of Recombinant Newcastle Disease Virus from cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Ayllon, Juan; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the prototype member of the Avulavirus genus of the family Paramyxoviridae1, is a non-segmented, negative-sense, single-stranded, enveloped RNA virus (Figure 1) with potential applications as a vector for vaccination and treatment of human diseases. In-depth exploration of these applications has only become possible after the establishment of reverse genetics techniques to rescue recombinant viruses from plasmids encoding their complete genomes as cDNA2-5. Viral cDNA can be conveniently modified in vitro by using standard cloning procedures to alter the genotype of the virus and/or to include new transcriptional units. Rescue of such genetically modified viruses provides a valuable tool to understand factors affecting multiple stages of infection, as well as allows for the development and improvement of vectors for the expression and delivery of antigens for vaccination and therapy. Here we describe a protocol for the rescue of recombinant NDVs. PMID:24145366

  6. The Dynamics of DNA Topoisomerase IIα in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Daum, John R.; Mo, Yin Yuan; Gorbsky, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe methods to prepare a mammalian expression plasmid encoding EGFP fused to the amino terminus of human DNA topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα). This plasmid is transfected into LLC-Pk cells, a porcine epithelial cell line that remains relatively flat during mitosis. After selection for stable integration, cells are cloned by serial dilution in microwells and used to grow a stable cell line expressing EGFP-TopoIIα. This line is termed LPk-GT2. Using photobleaching methods with conventional and patterned photobleaching LPk-GT2 cells are used demonstrate the rapid dynamics of TopoIIα exchange in both interphase nuclei and mitotic chromosomes. These rapid dynamics are dependent on enzyme activity since ICRF159 a catalytic inhibitor of TopoIIα, slows dynamics significantly. PMID:19763954

  7. Identification of Two Laminin-Binding Fimbriae, the Type 1 Fimbria of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and the G Fimbria of Escherichia coli, as Plasminogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kukkonen, Maini; Saarela, Sirkku; Lähteenmäki, Kaarina; Hynönen, Ulla; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita; Rhen, Mikael; Korhonen, Timo K.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains carrying recombinant plasmids encoding either the type 1 fimbria of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or the G fimbria of E. coli exhibited binding of human 125I-Glu-plasminogen and enhanced the tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. Purified type 1 or G fimbriae similarly bound plasminogen and enhanced its activation. The binding of plasminogen did not involve the characteristic carbohydrate-binding property of the fimbriae but was inhibited at low concentrations by the lysine analog ɛ-aminocaproic acid. Because these fimbrial types bind to laminin of basement membranes (M. Kukkonen et al., Mol. Microbiol. 7:229–237, 1993; S. Saarela et al., Infect. Immun. 64:2857–2860, 1996), the results demonstrate a structural unity in the creation and targeting of bacterium-bound proteolytic plasmin activity to basement membranes. PMID:9746604

  8. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylase: possible role of the substrate "propeptide" as an intracellular recognition site.

    PubMed Central

    Suttie, J W; Hoskins, J A; Engelke, J; Hopfgartner, A; Ehrlich, H; Bang, N U; Belagaje, R M; Schoner, B; Long, G L

    1987-01-01

    The liver microsomal vitamin K-dependent carboxylase catalyzes the posttranslational conversion of specific glutamate residues to gamma-carboxyglutamate residues in a limited number of proteins. A number of these proteins have been shown to contain a homologous basic amino acid-rich "propeptide" between the leader sequence and the amino terminus of the mature protein. Plasmids encoding protein C, a vitamin K-dependent protein, containing or lacking a propeptide region were constructed and the protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein products were assayed as substrates in an in vitro vitamin K-dependent carboxylase system. Only proteins containing a propeptide region were substrates for the enzyme. These data support the hypothesis that this sequence of the primary gene product is an important recognition site for this processing enzyme. PMID:3543932

  9. AQUA Cloning: A Versatile and Simple Enzyme-Free Cloning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Hannes M.; Gonschorek, Patrick; Samodelov, Sophia L.; Meier, Matthias; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly cloning is increasingly replacing conventional restriction enzyme and DNA-ligase-dependent cloning methods for reasons of efficiency and performance. Here, we describe AQUA (advanced quick assembly), a simple and versatile seamless assembly cloning approach. We demonstrate the applicability and versatility of AQUA Cloning in selected proof-of-principle applications including targeted insertion-, deletion- and site-directed point-mutagenesis, and combinatorial cloning. Furthermore, we show the one pot de novo assembly of multiple DNA fragments into a single circular plasmid encoding a complex light- and chemically-regulated Boolean A NIMPLY B logic operation. AQUA Cloning harnesses intrinsic in vivo processing of linear DNA fragments with short regions of homology of 16 to 32 bp mediated by Escherichia coli. It does not require any kits, enzymes or preparations of reagents and is the simplest assembly cloning protocol to date. PMID:26360249

  10. Detection of CMY-2 AmpC β-lactamase-producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 from outbreak strains in a nursery school in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Yabata, Junko; Nomura, Yasuharu; Tominaga, Kiyoshi

    2015-07-01

    In 2013, an outbreak of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 occurred in a nursery school in Japan. The outbreak affected 12 school children and five members of their families. All 17 isolates obtained from these individuals were found to be clonal, as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis and multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis. The antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the isolates to 20 drugs were examined, with three isolates showing resistance to the extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC) and cephamycin, including cefotaxime, ceftazidime, and cefminox. The resistant isolates carried the blaCMY-2 AmpC β-lactamase gene. It is proposed that the ESC-resistant EHEC O157:H7 isolates might have acquired the resistance plasmid encoding the blaCMY-2 gene during human to human infection in the nursery school. PMID:25835518

  11. The genes for secretion and maturation of lactococcins are located on the chromosome of Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    PubMed Central

    Venema, K; Dost, M H; Beun, P A; Haandrikman, A J; Venema, G; Kok, J

    1996-01-01

    Southern hybridization and PCR analysis were used to show that Lactococcus lactis IL1403, a plasmid-free strain that does not produce bacteriocin, contains genes on its chromosome that are highly homologous to lcnC and lcnD and encode the lactococcin secretion and maturation system. The lcnC and lcnD homologs on the chromosome of IL1403 were interrupted independently by Campbell-type integrations. Both insertion mutants were unable to secrete active lactococcin. Part of the chromosomal lcnC gene was cloned and sequenced. Only a few nucleotide substitutions occurred, compared with the plasmid-encoded lcnC gene, and these did not lead to changes in the deduced amino acid sequence. No genes homologous to those for lactococcin A, B, or M could be detected in IL1403, and the strain does not produce bacteriocin activity. PMID:8633867

  12. Expression of duplicate msa genes in the salmonid pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Linda D; Coady, Alison M; Strom, Mark S

    2002-11-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a gram-positive bacterium responsible for bacterial kidney disease of salmon and trout. R. salmoninarum has two identical copies of the gene encoding major soluble antigen (MSA), an immunodominant, extracellular protein. To determine whether one or both copies of msa are expressed, reporter plasmids encoding a fusion of MSA and green fluorescent protein controlled by 0.6 kb of promoter region from msa1 or msa2 were constructed and introduced into R. salmoninarum. Single copies of the reporter plasmids integrated into the chromosome by homologous recombination. Expression of mRNA and protein from the integrated plasmids was detected, and transformed cells were fluorescent, demonstrating that both msa1 and msa2 are expressed under in vitro conditions. This is the first report of successful transformation and homologous recombination in R. salmoninarum. PMID:12406741

  13. Expression of Duplicate msa Genes in the Salmonid Pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Linda D.; Coady, Alison M.; Strom, Mark S.

    2002-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a gram-positive bacterium responsible for bacterial kidney disease of salmon and trout. R. salmoninarum has two identical copies of the gene encoding major soluble antigen (MSA), an immunodominant, extracellular protein. To determine whether one or both copies of msa are expressed, reporter plasmids encoding a fusion of MSA and green fluorescent protein controlled by 0.6 kb of promoter region from msa1 or msa2 were constructed and introduced into R. salmoninarum. Single copies of the reporter plasmids integrated into the chromosome by homologous recombination. Expression of mRNA and protein from the integrated plasmids was detected, and transformed cells were fluorescent, demonstrating that both msa1 and msa2 are expressed under in vitro conditions. This is the first report of successful transformation and homologous recombination in R. salmoninarum. PMID:12406741

  14. AQUA Cloning: A Versatile and Simple Enzyme-Free Cloning Approach.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Hannes M; Gonschorek, Patrick; Samodelov, Sophia L; Meier, Matthias; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-01-01

    Assembly cloning is increasingly replacing conventional restriction enzyme and DNA-ligase-dependent cloning methods for reasons of efficiency and performance. Here, we describe AQUA (advanced quick assembly), a simple and versatile seamless assembly cloning approach. We demonstrate the applicability and versatility of AQUA Cloning in selected proof-of-principle applications including targeted insertion-, deletion- and site-directed point-mutagenesis, and combinatorial cloning. Furthermore, we show the one pot de novo assembly of multiple DNA fragments into a single circular plasmid encoding a complex light- and chemically-regulated Boolean A NIMPLY B logic operation. AQUA Cloning harnesses intrinsic in vivo processing of linear DNA fragments with short regions of homology of 16 to 32 bp mediated by Escherichia coli. It does not require any kits, enzymes or preparations of reagents and is the simplest assembly cloning protocol to date. PMID:26360249

  15. Antitumoral effect of IL-12 gene transfected via liposomes into B16F0 cells.

    PubMed

    Speroni, Lucía; Gasparri, Julieta; de los A Bustuoabad, Victoria; Chiaramoni, Nadia S; Smagur, Andrzej; Szala, Stanisław; Taira, María C; del V Alonso, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Murine melanoma B16F0 cells were transfected with SA:DPPC:DOPE (2:1:1 molar ratio) liposomes associated with a plasmid encoding murine IL-12. Stearylamine, a cationic lipid, showed a greater transfection efficiency compared to DOTAP-containing liposomes. The lipid:DNA ratio was 2:1 (w/w). Control groups were mock transfected or transfected with an empty plasmid (pNeo). pNeo or IL-12 transfected cells and controls were inoculated intradermically into the dorsal region of the foot or the lateral flank of C57BL6 mice. Results showed that IL-12 expression had a marked effect on in vivo growth of B16 melanoma tumors developed in both anatomic sites, significantly retarding their growth and prolonging host survival. PMID:19421429

  16. Promoter analysis of influenza virus RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Parvin, J D; Palese, P; Honda, A; Ishihama, A; Krystal, M

    1989-01-01

    Influenza virus polymerase, which was prepared depleted of viral RNA, was used to copy small RNA templates prepared from plasmid-encoded sequences. Template constructions containing only the 3' end of genomic RNA were shown to be efficiently copied, indicating that the promoter lay solely within the 15-nucleotide 3' terminus. Sequences not specific for the influenza virus termini were not copied, and, surprisingly, RNAs containing termini identical to those from plus-sense cRNA were copied at low levels. The specificity for recognition of the virus sense promoter was further defined by site-specific mutagenesis. It was also found that increased levels of viral protein were required in order to catalyze both the cap endonuclease-primed and primer-free RNA synthesis from these model templates, as well as from genomic-length RNAs. This finding indicates that the reconstituted system has catalytic properties very similar to those of native viral ribonucleoprotein complexes. Images PMID:2585601

  17. Burkholderia cenocepacia Differential Gene Expression during Host–Pathogen Interactions and Adaptation to the Host Environment

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, Eoin P.; Sokol, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are important in medical, biotechnological, and agricultural disciplines. These bacteria naturally occur in soil and water environments and have adapted to survive in association with plants and animals including humans. All Bcc species are opportunistic pathogens including Burkholderia cenocepacia that causes infections in cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease patients. The adaptation of B. cenocepacia to the host environment was assessed in a rat chronic respiratory infection model and compared to that of high cell-density in vitro grown cultures using transcriptomics. The distribution of genes differentially expressed on chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 was relatively proportional to the size of each genomic element, whereas the proportion of plasmid-encoded genes differentially expressed was much higher relative to its size and most genes were induced in vivo. The majority of genes encoding known virulence factors, components of types II and III secretion systems and chromosome 2-encoded type IV secretion system were similarly expressed between in vitro and in vivo environments. Lower expression in vivo was detected for genes encoding N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase CepI, orphan LuxR homolog CepR2, zinc metalloproteases ZmpA and ZmpB, LysR-type transcriptional regulator ShvR, nematocidal protein AidA, and genes associated with flagellar motility, Flp type pilus formation, and type VI secretion. Plasmid-encoded type IV secretion genes were markedly induced in vivo. Additional genes induced in vivo included genes predicted to be involved in osmotic stress adaptation or intracellular survival, metal ion, and nutrient transport, as well as those encoding outer membrane proteins. Genes identified in this study are potentially important for virulence during host–pathogen interactions and may be associated with survival and adaptation to the host environment during chronic lung infections. PMID:22919581

  18. Inclusion of the Bovine Neutrophil Beta-Defensin 3 with Glycoprotein D of Bovine Herpesvirus 1 in a DNA Vaccine Modulates Immune Responses of Mice and Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie-Dyck, Sarah; Kovacs-Nolan, Jennifer; Snider, Marlene; Babiuk, Lorne A.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) causes recurrent respiratory and genital infections in cattle and predisposes them to lethal secondary infections. While modified live and killed BoHV-1 vaccines exist, these are not without problems. Development of an effective DNA vaccine for BoHV-1 has the potential to address these issues. As a strategy to enhance DNA vaccine immunity, a plasmid encoding the bovine neutrophil beta-defensin 3 (BNBD3) as a fusion with truncated glycoprotein D (tgD) and a mix of two plasmids encoding BNBD3 and tgD were tested in mice and cattle. In mice, coadministration of BNBD3 on the separate plasmid enhanced the tgD-induced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response but not the antibody response. BNBD3 fused to tgD did not affect the antibody levels or the number of IFN-γ-secreting cells but increased the induction of tgD-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). In cattle, the addition of BNBD3 as a fusion construct also modified the immune response. While the IgG and virus-neutralizing antibody levels were not affected, the number of IFN-γ-secreting cells was increased after BoHV-1 challenge, specifically the CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells, including CD8+ IFN-γ+ CD25+ CTLs. While reduced virus shedding, rectal temperature, and weight loss were observed, the level of protection was comparable to that observed in pMASIA-tgD-vaccinated animals. These data show that coadministration of BNBD3 with a protective antigen as a fusion in a DNA vaccine strengthened the Th1 bias and increased cell-mediated immune responses but did not enhance protection from BoHV-1 infection. PMID:24451331

  19. Molecular description of plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases among nosocomial isolates of Escherichia coli & Klebsiella pneumoniae from six different hospitals in India

    PubMed Central

    Mohamudha, Parveen R.; Harish, B.N.; Parija, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Plasmid mediated AmpC β-lactamase (PMABL) resistance in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. is an emerging problem worldwide. Phenotypic methods are commonly used for detection of PMABL production in Gram-negative isolates, but molecular data about the prevalence of plasmid-mediated AmpC-type resistance at the national level are needed. Hence, a prospective study was undertaken to determine the occurrence of PMABL gene and its types among clinical isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae obtained from six different hospitals in India. Methods: A total of 241 nosocomial isolates of K. pneumoniae (n=109) and E.coli (n=132) from six geographically distant hospitals in India were included. These were screened for cefoxitin resistance. AmpC disk test and modified three dimensional extraction test were used for phenotypic detection of PMABL production. Molecular types were determined by a multiplex PCR. Results: Among the 241 isolates, 187 (77.5%) were found to be cefoxitin resistant (K. pneumoniae n=83, E. coli n=104). AmpC activity was detectable in 153 (63.4%) isolates, (K. pneumoniae n=69, E. coli n=84). By PCR, the plasmid encoded AmpC genes were found in 92 (38.1%) isolates and the molecular types of the genes detected predominantly were DHA, CIT followed by MOX and ACC types. Interpretation & conclusions: A high percentage of plasmid-encoded AmpC enzymes was noted in E. coli and K. pneumonia isolates obtained from different parts of the country. Phenotypic methods alone may not reflect the true number of PMABL producers. Genotypic methods need to be employed in national surveillance studies. PMID:22382192

  20. Characterization of Halomonas sp. ZM3 isolated from the Zelazny Most post-flotation waste reservoir, with a special focus on its mobile DNA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Halomonas sp. ZM3 was isolated from Zelazny Most post-flotation mineral waste repository (Poland), which is highly contaminated with heavy metals and various organic compounds. Mobile DNA of the strain (i.e. plasmids and transposons) were analyzed in order to identify genetic information enabling adaptation of the bacterium to the harsh environmental conditions. Results The analysis revealed that ZM3 carries plasmid pZM3H1 (31,370 bp), whose replication system may be considered as an archetype of a novel subgroup of IncU-like replicons. pZM3H1 is a narrow host range, mobilizable plasmid (encodes a relaxase of the MOBV family) containing mercury resistance operon (mer) and czcD genes (mediate resistance to zinc and cobalt), which are part of a large truncated Tn3 family transposon. Further analysis demonstrated that the phenotypes determined by the pZM3H1 resistance cassette are highly dependent on the host strain. In another strand of the study, the trap plasmid pMAT1 was employed to identify functional transposable elements of Halomonas sp. ZM3. Using the sacB positive selection strategy two insertion sequences were identified: ISHsp1 - representing IS5 group of IS5 family and ISHsp2 - a distinct member of the IS630 family. Conclusions This study provides the first detailed description of mobile DNA in a member of the family Halomonadaceae. The identified IncU plasmid pZM3H1 confers resistance phenotypes enabling adaptation of the host strain to the Zelazny Most environment. The extended comparative analysis has shed light on the distribution of related IncU plasmids among bacteria, which, in many cases, reflects the frequency and direction of horizontal gene transfer events. Our results also identify plasmid-encoded modules, which may form the basis of novel shuttle vectors, specific for this group of halophilic bacteria. PMID:23497212

  1. Viral load and clinical disease enhancement associated with a lentivirus cytotoxic T lymphocyte vaccine regimen

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; Wagner, Bettina; Horohov, David W.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2009-01-01

    Effective DNA-based vaccines against lentiviruses will likely induce CTL against conserved viral proteins. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infects horses worldwide, and serves as a useful model for lentiviral immune control. Although attenuated live EIAV vaccines have induced protective immune responses, DNA-based vaccines have not. In particular, DNA-based vaccines have had limited success in inducing CTL responses against intracellular pathogens in the horse. We hypothesized that priming with a codon-optimized plasmid encoding EIAV Gag p15/p26 with co-administration of a plasmid encoding an equine IL-2/IgG fusion protein as a molecular adjuvant, followed by boosting with a vaccinia vector expressing Gag p15/p26, would induce protective Gag-specific CTL responses. Although the regimen induced Gag-specific CTL in four of seven vaccinated horses, CTL were not detected until after the vaccinia boost, and protective effects were not observed in EIAV challenged vaccinates. Unexpectedly, vaccinates had significantly higher viral loads and more severe clinical disease, associated with the presence of vaccine-induced CTL. It was concluded that 1.) further optimization of the timing and route of DNA immunization was needed for efficient CTL priming in vivo, 2.) co-administration of the IL-2/IgG plasmid did not enhance CTL priming by the Gag p15/p26 plasmid, 3.) vaccinia vectors are useful for lentivirus-specific CTL induction in the horse, 4.) Gag-specific CTL alone are either insufficient or a more robust Gag-specific CTL response is needed to limit EIAV viremia and clinical disease, and 5.) CTL-inducing vaccines lacking envelope immunogens can result in lentiviral disease enhancement. Although the mechanisms for enhancement associated with this vaccine regimen remain to be elucidated, these results have important implications for development of lentivirus T cell vaccines. PMID:19368787

  2. Bm86 antigen induces a protective immune response against Boophilus microplus following DNA and protein vaccination in sheep.

    PubMed

    De Rose, R; McKenna, R V; Cobon, G; Tennent, J; Zakrzewski, H; Gale, K; Wood, P R; Scheerlinck, J P; Willadsen, P

    1999-11-30

    Vaccination of sheep with a plasmid bearing the full length gene for the tick antigen Bm86 either alone or co-administered with plasmid carrying the ovine genes for the cytokines, granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin (IL)-1beta induced a relatively low level of protection against subsequent tick infestation. This tick damage reached statistical significance only for the groups which were vaccinated with plasmid encoding for Bm86, co-administered with plasmid encoding for ovine GM-CSF. Antibody titres measured against Bm86 were also low in all groups injected with the Bm86 DNA vaccine. Antibody production and anti-tick effect were significantly less than that achieved by two vaccinations with recombinant Bm86 protein. In all cases only a low level of antigen-specific stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes was recorded, as measured either by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine or the release of IFN-gamma. Injection of DNA encoding for Bm86, either alone or with co-administered cytokine genes, did however prime for a strong subsequent antibody response following a single injection of recombinant Bm86 protein in adjuvant. Antibody production nevertheless appeared to be slightly less effective than following two vaccinations with recombinant protein. The persistence of antibody following vaccination was the same regardless of the method of primary sensitization. In all cases the half-life of the antibody response was approximately 40-50 days indicating that, in contrast to results reported in mice, DNA vaccination in sheep did not result in sustained antibody production. PMID:10587297

  3. Comparative Genomics of an IncA/C Multidrug Resistance Plasmid from Escherichia coli and Klebsiella Isolates from Intensive Care Unit Patients and the Utility of Whole-Genome Sequencing in Health Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, Tracy H.; Zhao, LiCheng; Boutin, Mallory A.; Stancil, Angela; Robinson, Gwen; Harris, Anthony D.; Rasko, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The IncA/C plasmids have been implicated for their role in the dissemination of β-lactamases, including gene variants that confer resistance to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, which are often the treatment of last resort against multidrug-resistant, hospital-associated pathogens. A blaFOX-5 gene was detected in 14 Escherichia coli and 16 Klebsiella isolates that were cultured from perianal swabs of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) of the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) in Baltimore, MD, over a span of 3 years. Four of the FOX-encoding isolates were obtained from subsequent samples of patients that were initially negative for an AmpC β-lactamase upon admission to the ICU, suggesting that the AmpC β-lactamase-encoding plasmid was acquired while the patient was in the ICU. The genomes of five E. coli isolates and six Klebsiella isolates containing blaFOX-5 were selected for sequencing based on their plasmid profiles. An ∼167-kb IncA/C plasmid encoding the FOX-5 β-lactamase, a CARB-2 β-lactamase, additional antimicrobial resistance genes, and heavy metal resistance genes was identified. Another FOX-5-encoding IncA/C plasmid that was nearly identical except for a variable region associated with the resistance genes was also identified. To our knowledge, these plasmids represent the first FOX-5-encoding plasmids sequenced. We used comparative genomics to describe the genetic diversity of a plasmid encoding a FOX-5 β-lactamase relative to the whole-genome diversity of 11 E. coli and Klebsiella isolates that carry this plasmid. Our findings demonstrate the utility of whole-genome sequencing for tracking of plasmid and antibiotic resistance gene distribution in health care settings. PMID:24914121

  4. A live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis secreting detoxified heat labile toxin enhances mucosal immunity and confers protection against wild-type challenge in chickens.

    PubMed

    Lalsiamthara, Jonathan; Kamble, Nitin Machindra; Lee, John Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) capable of constitutively secreting detoxified double mutant Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (dmLT) was developed. The biologically adjuvanted strain was generated via transformation of a highly immunogenic SE JOL1087 with a plasmid encoding dmLT gene cassette; the resultant strain was designated JOL1641. A balanced-lethal host-vector system stably maintained the plasmid via auxotrophic host complementation with a plasmid encoded aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (asd) gene. Characterization by western blot assay revealed the dmLT subunit proteins in culture supernatants of JOL1641. For the investigation of adjuvanticity and protective efficacy, chickens were immunized via oral or intramuscular routes with PBS, JOL1087 and JOL1641. Birds immunized with JOL1641 showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) increases in intestinal SIgA production at the 1(st) and 2(nd) weeks post-immunization via oral and intramuscular routes, respectively. Interestingly, while both strains showed significant splenic protection via intramuscular immunization, JOL1641 outperformed JOL1087 upon oral immunization. Oral immunization of birds with JOL1641 significantly reduced splenic bacterial counts. The reduction in bacterial counts may be correlated with an adjuvant effect of dmLT that increases SIgA secretion in the intestines of immunized birds. The inclusion of detoxified dmLT in the strain did not cause adverse reactions to birds, nor did it extend the period of bacterial fecal shedding. In conclusion, we report here that dmLT could be biologically incorporated in the secretion system of a live attenuated Salmonella-based vaccine, and that this construction is safe and could enhance mucosal immunity, and protect immunized birds against wild-type challenge. PMID:27262338

  5. High dose of plasmid IL-15 inhibits immune responses in an influenza non-human primates immunogenicity model

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Jiangmei; Dai Anlan; Laddy, Dominick J.; Yan Jian; Arango, Tatiana; Khan, Amir S.; Lewis, Mark G.; Andersen, Hanne; Kutzler, Michele A.; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Weiner, David B.; Boyer, Jean D.

    2009-10-10

    Interleukin (IL)-15, is a cytokine that is important for the maintenance of long-lasting, high-avidity T cell response to invading pathogens and has, therefore, been used in vaccine and therapeutic platforms as an adjuvant. In addition to pure protein delivery, plasmids encoding the IL-15 gene have been utilized. However, it is critical to determine the appropriate dose to maximize the adjuvanting effects. We immunized rhesus macaques with different doses of IL-15 expressing plasmid in an influenza non-human primate immunogenicity model. We found that co-immunization of rhesus macaques with a Flu DNA-based vaccine and low doses of plasmid encoding macaque IL-15 enhanced the production of IFN-gamma (0.5 mg) and the proliferation of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells, as well as T{sub CM} levels in proliferating CD8{sup +} T cells (0.25 mg). Whereas, high doses of IL-15 (4 mg) decrease the production of IFN-gamma and the proliferation of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells and T{sub CM} levels in the proliferating CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells. In addition, the data of hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titer suggest that although not significantly different, there appears to be a slight increase in antibodies at lower doses of IL-15. Importantly, however, the higher doses of IL-15 decrease the antibody levels significantly. This study demonstrates the importance of optimizing DNA-based cytokine adjuvants.

  6. Antibodies from women urogenitally infected with C. trachomatis predominantly recognized the plasmid protein pgp3 in a conformation-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongyu; Zhong, Youmin; Lei, Lei; Wu, Yimou; Wang, Shiping; Zhong, Guangming

    2008-01-01

    Background C. trachomatis organisms carry a cryptic plasmid that encodes 8 open reading frames designated as pORF1 to 8. It is not clear whether all 8 pORFs are expressed during C. trachomatis infection in humans and information on the functionality of the plasmid proteins is also very limited. Results When antibodies from women urogenitally infected with C. trachomatis were reacted with the plasmid proteins, all 8 pORFs were positively recognized by one or more human antibody samples with the recognition of pORF5 protein (known as pgp3) by most antibodies and with the highest titers. The antibody recognition of the pORFs was blocked by C. trachomatis-infected HeLa but not normal HeLa cell lysates. The pgp3 fusion protein-purified human IgG detected the endogenous pgp3 in the cytosol of C. trachomatis-infected cells with an intracellular distribution pattern similar to that of CPAF, a chlamydial genome-encoded protease factor. However, the human antibodies no longer recognized pgp3 but maintained recognition of CPAF when both antigens were linearized or heat-denatured. The pgp3 conformation is likely maintained by the C-terminal 75% amino acid sequence since further deletion blocked the binding by the human antibodies and two conformation-dependent mouse monoclonal antibodies. Conclusion The plasmid-encoded 8 proteins are both expressed and immunogenic with pgp3 as the most immunodominant antigen during chlamydial infection in humans. More importantly, the human anti-pgp3 antibodies are highly conformation-dependent. These observations have provided important information for further understanding the function of the plasmid-encoded proteins and exploring the utility of pgp3 in chlamydial diagnosis and vaccination. PMID:18541036

  7. Origin-of-transfer sequences facilitate mobilisation of non-conjugative antimicrobial-resistance plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Frances G; Yui Eto, Karina; Murphy, Riley J T; Fairhurst, Heather M; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Grubb, Warren B; Ramsay, Joshua P

    2015-09-18

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of hospital, community and livestock-associated infections and is increasingly resistant to multiple antimicrobials. A significant proportion of antimicrobial-resistance genes are plasmid-borne, but only a minority of S. aureus plasmids encode proteins required for conjugative transfer or Mob relaxase proteins required for mobilisation. The pWBG749 family of S. aureus conjugative plasmids can facilitate the horizontal transfer of diverse antimicrobial-resistance plasmids that lack Mob genes. Here we reveal that these mobilisable plasmids carry copies of the pWBG749 origin-of-transfer (oriT) sequence and that these oriT sequences facilitate mobilisation by pWBG749. Sequences resembling the pWBG749 oriT were identified on half of all sequenced S. aureus plasmids, including the most prevalent large antimicrobial-resistance/virulence-gene plasmids, pIB485, pMW2 and pUSA300HOUMR. oriT sequences formed five subfamilies with distinct inverted-repeat-2 (IR2) sequences. pWBG749-family plasmids encoding each IR2 were identified and pWBG749 mobilisation was found to be specific for plasmids carrying matching IR2 sequences. Specificity of mobilisation was conferred by a putative ribbon-helix-helix-protein gene smpO. Several plasmids carried 2-3 oriT variants and pWBG749-mediated recombination occurred between distinct oriT sites during mobilisation. These observations suggest this relaxase-in trans mechanism of mobilisation by pWBG749-family plasmids is a common mechanism of plasmid dissemination in S. aureus. PMID:26243776

  8. Immunogenicity of a Bovine Herpesvirus 1 Glycoprotein D DNA Vaccine Complexed with Bovine Neutrophil Beta-Defensin 3

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie-Dyck, Sarah; Latimer, Laura; Atanley, Ethel; Kovacs-Nolan, Jennifer; Attah-Poku, Sam; Babiuk, Lorne A.

    2014-01-01

    Protective efficacy against bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) has been demonstrated to be induced by a plasmid encoding bovine neutrophil beta-defensin 3 (BNBD3) as a fusion construct with truncated glycoprotein D (tgD). However, in spite of the increased cell-mediated immune responses induced by this DNA vaccine, the clinical responses of BoHV-1-challenged cattle were not reduced over those observed in animals vaccinated with the plasmid encoding tgD alone; this might have been because the vaccine failed to improve humoral responses. We hypothesized that an alternative vaccine design strategy that utilized the DNA vaccine pMASIA-tgD as a complex with BNBD3 might improve humoral responses while maintaining robust Th1-type cell-mediated responses. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with pMASIA-tgD complexed with 0, 0.01875, 0.1875, or 1.875 nmol of a stable synthesized analog of BNBD3 (aBNBD3). The best results were seen in mice immunized with the vaccine composed of pMASIA-tgD complexed to 0.1875 nmol aBNBD3. In this group, humoral responses were improved, as evidenced by increased virus neutralization, tgD-specific early IgG1, and later IgG2a titers, while the strong cell-mediated immune responses, measured based on specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting cells, were maintained relative to pMASIA-tgD. Modulation of the immune response might have been due in part to the effect of BNBD3 on dendritic cells (DCs). In vitro studies showed that murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) pretreated with aBNBD3 were activated, as evidenced by CD11c downregulation, and were functionally mature, as shown by increased allostimulatory ability. Native, synthetic, and analog forms of BNBD3 were equally capable of inducing functional maturation of BMDCs. PMID:25378352

  9. The bof gene of bacteriophage P1: DNA sequence and evidence for roles in regulation of phage c1 and ref genes.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, T S; Hays, J B

    1990-01-01

    The C1 repressor of bacteriophage P1 acts via 14 or more distinct operators. This repressor represses its own synthesis as well as the synthesis of other gene products. Previously, mutation of an auxiliary regulatory gene, bof, has been shown to increase expression of some C1-regulated P1 genes (e.g., ref) but to decrease expression of others (e.g., ban). In this study the bof gene was isolated on the basis of its ability to depress stimulation of Escherichia coli chromosomal recombination by the P1 ref gene, if and only if a source of C1 was present. C1 alone, but not Bof alone, was partially effective. The bofDNA sequence encodes an 82-codon reading frame that begins with a TTG codon and includes the sites of the bof-1(Am) mutation and a bof::Tn5 null mutation. Expression of ref::lacZ and cl::lacZ fusion genes was partially repressed in trans by a P1 bof-1 prophage or by plasmid-encoded C1 alone, which was in agreement with effects on Ref-stimulated recombination and with previous indirect evidence for c1 autoregulation. Repression of both fusion genes by plasmid-encoded C1 plus Bof or by a P1 bof+ prophage was more complete. When the C1 source also included a 0.7-kilobase region upstream from C1 which encodes the coi gene, repression of both c1::lacZ and ref::lacZ by C1 alone or by C1 plus Bof was much less effective, as if Coi interfered with C1 repressor function. PMID:2345146

  10. Liver Gene Transfer of Interkeukin-15 Constructs That Become Part of Circulating High Density Lipoproteins for Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Maria C.; Fioravanti, Jessica; Duitman, Erwin H.; Medina-Echeverz, Jose; Palazon, Asis; Arina, Ainhoa; Dubrot, Juan; Alfaro, Carlos; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Murillo, Oihana; Hervas-Stubbs, Sandra; Prieto, Jesus

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I) is a major component of high density lipoproteins (HDL) that transport cholesterol in circulation. We have constructed an expression plasmid encoding a chimeric molecule encompassing interleukin-15 (IL-15) and Apo A-I (pApo-hIL15) that was tested by hydrodynamic injections into mice and was co-administered with a plasmid encoding the sushi domain of IL-15Rα (pSushi) in order to enhance IL-15 trans-presentation and thereby bioactivity. The pharmacokinetics of the Apo A-I chimeric protein were much longer than non-stabilized IL-15 and its bioactivity was enhanced in combination with IL-15Rα Sushi. Importantly, the APO-IL-15 fusion protein was incorporated in part into circulating HDL. Liver gene transfer of these constructs increased NK and memory-phenotype CD8 lymphocyte numbers in peripheral blood, spleen and liver as a result of proliferation documented by CFSE dilution and BrdU incorporation. Moreover, the gene transfer procedure partly rescued the NK and memory T-cell deficiency observed in IL-15Rα−/− mice. pApo-hIL15+ pSushi gene transfer to the liver showed a modest therapeutic activity against subcutaneously transplanted MC38 colon carcinoma tumors, that was more evident when tumors were set up as liver metastases. The improved pharmacokinetic profile and the strong biological activity of APO-IL-15 fusion protein holds promise for further development in combination with other immunotherapies. PMID:23285013

  11. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    SciTech Connect

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V.; Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H.; Murzin, Alexey G.; Meijer, Wim G.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2014-08-01

    VapD is one of a set of highly homologous virulence-associated proteins from the multi-host pathogen Rhodococcus equi. The crystal structure reveals an eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel fold and a glycine rich ‘bald’ surface. Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins.

  12. Liver gene transfer of interkeukin-15 constructs that become part of circulating high density lipoproteins for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Maria C; Fioravanti, Jessica; Duitman, Erwin H; Medina-Echeverz, Jose; Palazon, Asis; Arina, Ainhoa; Dubrot, Juan; Alfaro, Carlos; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Murillo, Oihana; Hervas-Stubbs, Sandra; Prieto, Jesus; Berraondo, Pedro; Melero, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I) is a major component of high density lipoproteins (HDL) that transport cholesterol in circulation. We have constructed an expression plasmid encoding a chimeric molecule encompassing interleukin-15 (IL-15) and Apo A-I (pApo-hIL15) that was tested by hydrodynamic injections into mice and was co-administered with a plasmid encoding the sushi domain of IL-15Rα (pSushi) in order to enhance IL-15 trans-presentation and thereby bioactivity. The pharmacokinetics of the Apo A-I chimeric protein were much longer than non-stabilized IL-15 and its bioactivity was enhanced in combination with IL-15Rα Sushi. Importantly, the APO-IL-15 fusion protein was incorporated in part into circulating HDL. Liver gene transfer of these constructs increased NK and memory-phenotype CD8 lymphocyte numbers in peripheral blood, spleen and liver as a result of proliferation documented by CFSE dilution and BrdU incorporation. Moreover, the gene transfer procedure partly rescued the NK and memory T-cell deficiency observed in IL-15Rα(-/-) mice. pApo-hIL15+ pSushi gene transfer to the liver showed a modest therapeutic activity against subcutaneously transplanted MC38 colon carcinoma tumors, that was more evident when tumors were set up as liver metastases. The improved pharmacokinetic profile and the strong biological activity of APO-IL-15 fusion protein holds promise for further development in combination with other immunotherapies. PMID:23285013

  13. Genome sequences and phylogenetic analysis of K88- and F18-positive porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Sara M; Danzeisen, Jessica L; Isaacson, Richard E; Seemann, Torsten; Achtman, Mark; Johnson, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    Porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) continues to result in major morbidity and mortality in the swine industry via postweaning diarrhea. The key virulence factors of ETEC strains, their serotypes, and their fimbrial components have been well studied. However, most studies to date have focused on plasmid-encoded traits related to colonization and toxin production, and the chromosomal backgrounds of these strains have been largely understudied. Here, we generated the genomic sequences of K88-positive and F18-positive porcine ETEC strains and examined the phylogenetic distribution of clinical porcine ETEC strains and their plasmid-associated genetic content. The genomes of porcine ETEC strains UMNK88 and UMNF18 were both found to contain remarkable plasmid complements containing known virulence factors, potential novel virulence factors, and antimicrobial resistance-associated elements. The chromosomes of these strains also possessed several unique genomic islands containing hypothetical genes with similarity to classical virulence factors, although phage-associated genomic islands dominated the accessory genomes of these strains. Phylogenetic analysis of 78 clinical isolates associated with neonatal and porcine diarrhea revealed that a limited subset of porcine ETEC lineages exist that generally contain common toxin and fimbrial profiles, with many of the isolates belonging to the ST10, ST23, and ST169 multilocus sequencing types. These lineages were generally distinct from existing human ETEC database isolates. Overall, most porcine ETEC strains appear to have emerged from a limited subset of E. coli lineages that either have an increased propensity to carry plasmid-encoded virulence factors or have the appropriate ETEC core genome required for virulence. PMID:22081385

  14. Origin-of-transfer sequences facilitate mobilisation of non-conjugative antimicrobial-resistance plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Frances G.; Yui Eto, Karina; Murphy, Riley J. T.; Fairhurst, Heather M.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Grubb, Warren B.; Ramsay, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of hospital, community and livestock-associated infections and is increasingly resistant to multiple antimicrobials. A significant proportion of antimicrobial-resistance genes are plasmid-borne, but only a minority of S. aureus plasmids encode proteins required for conjugative transfer or Mob relaxase proteins required for mobilisation. The pWBG749 family of S. aureus conjugative plasmids can facilitate the horizontal transfer of diverse antimicrobial-resistance plasmids that lack Mob genes. Here we reveal that these mobilisable plasmids carry copies of the pWBG749 origin-of-transfer (oriT) sequence and that these oriT sequences facilitate mobilisation by pWBG749. Sequences resembling the pWBG749 oriT were identified on half of all sequenced S. aureus plasmids, including the most prevalent large antimicrobial-resistance/virulence-gene plasmids, pIB485, pMW2 and pUSA300HOUMR. oriT sequences formed five subfamilies with distinct inverted-repeat-2 (IR2) sequences. pWBG749-family plasmids encoding each IR2 were identified and pWBG749 mobilisation was found to be specific for plasmids carrying matching IR2 sequences. Specificity of mobilisation was conferred by a putative ribbon-helix-helix-protein gene smpO. Several plasmids carried 2–3 oriT variants and pWBG749-mediated recombination occurred between distinct oriT sites during mobilisation. These observations suggest this relaxase-in trans mechanism of mobilisation by pWBG749-family plasmids is a common mechanism of plasmid dissemination in S. aureus. PMID:26243776

  15. Clinical trial in healthy malaria-naïve adults to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity and efficacy of MuStDO5, a five-gene, sporozoite/hepatic stage Plasmodium falciparum DNA vaccine combined with escalating dose human GM-CSF DNA

    PubMed Central

    Richie, Thomas L.; Charoenvit, Yupin; Wang, Ruobing; Epstein, Judith E.; Hedstrom, Richard C.; Kumar, Sanjai; Luke, Thomas C.; Freilich, Daniel A.; Aguiar, Joao C.; Sacci, Jr., John B.; Sedegah, Martha; Nosek, Jr., Ronald A.; De La Vega, Patricia; Berzins, Mara P.; Majam, Victoria F.; Abot, Esteban N.; Ganeshan, Harini; Richie, Nancy O.; Banania, Jo Glenna; Baraceros, Maria Fe B.; Geter, Tanya G.; Mere, Robin; Bebris, Lolita; Limbach, Keith; Hickey, Bradley W.; Lanar, David E.; Ng, Jennifer; Shi, Meng; Hobart, Peter M.; Norman, Jon A.; Soisson, Lorraine A.; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Rogers, William O.; Doolan, Denise L.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    When introduced in the 1990s, immunization with DNA plasmids was considered potentially revolutionary for vaccine development, particularly for vaccines intended to induce protective CD8 T cell responses against multiple antigens. We conducted, in 1997−1998, the first clinical trial in healthy humans of a DNA vaccine, a single plasmid encoding Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), as an initial step toward developing a multi-antigen malaria vaccine targeting the liver stages of the parasite. As the next step, we conducted in 2000–2001 a clinical trial of a five-plasmid mixture called MuStDO5 encoding pre-erythrocytic antigens PfCSP, PfSSP2/TRAP, PfEXP1, PfLSA1 and PfLSA3. Thirty-two, malaria-naïve, adult volunteers were enrolled sequentially into four cohorts receiving a mixture of 500 μg of each plasmid plus escalating doses (0, 20, 100 or 500 μg) of a sixth plasmid encoding human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF). Three doses of each formulation were administered intramuscularly by needle-less jet injection at 0, 4 and 8 weeks, and each cohort had controlled human malaria infection administered by five mosquito bites 18 d later. The vaccine was safe and well-tolerated, inducing moderate antigen-specific, MHC-restricted T cell interferon-γ responses but no antibodies. Although no volunteers were protected, T cell responses were boosted post malaria challenge. This trial demonstrated the MuStDO5 DNA and hGM-CSF plasmids to be safe and modestly immunogenic for T cell responses. It also laid the foundation for priming with DNA plasmids and boosting with recombinant viruses, an approach known for nearly 15 y to enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:23151451

  16. Virulence Plasmids of Spore-Forming Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vicki; Li, Jihong; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Moore, Robert J; McClane, Bruce A; Rood, Julian I

    2014-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded virulence factors are important in the pathogenesis of diseases caused by spore-forming bacteria. Unlike many other bacteria, the most common virulence factors encoded by plasmids in Clostridium and Bacillus species are protein toxins. Clostridium perfringens causes several histotoxic and enterotoxin diseases in both humans and animals and produces a broad range of toxins, including many pore-forming toxins such as C. perfringens enterotoxin, epsilon-toxin, beta-toxin, and NetB. Genetic studies have led to the determination of the role of these toxins in disease pathogenesis. The genes for these toxins are generally carried on large conjugative plasmids that have common core replication, maintenance, and conjugation regions. There is considerable functional information available about the unique tcp conjugation locus carried by these plasmids, but less is known about plasmid maintenance. The latter is intriguing because many C. perfringens isolates stably maintain up to four different, but closely related, toxin plasmids. Toxin genes may also be plasmid-encoded in the neurotoxic clostridia. The tetanus toxin gene is located on a plasmid in Clostridium tetani, but the botulinum toxin genes may be chromosomal, plasmid-determined, or located on bacteriophages in Clostridium botulinum. In Bacillus anthracis it is well established that virulence is plasmid determined, with anthrax toxin genes located on pXO1 and capsule genes on a separate plasmid, pXO2. Orthologs of these plasmids are also found in other members of the Bacillus cereus group such as B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. In B. thuringiensis these plasmids may carry genes encoding one or more insecticidal toxins. PMID:26104459

  17. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  18. Mobile CRISPR/Cas-Mediated Bacteriophage Resistance in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Anne M.; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Romero, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a biotechnological workhorse for food fermentations and potentially therapeutic products and is therefore widely consumed by humans. It is predominantly used as a starter microbe for fermented dairy products, and specialized strains have adapted from a plant environment through reductive evolution and horizontal gene transfer as evidenced by the association of adventitious traits with mobile elements. Specifically, L. lactis has armed itself with a myriad of plasmid-encoded bacteriophage defensive systems to protect against viral predation. This known arsenal had not included CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins), which forms a remarkable microbial immunity system against invading DNA. Although CRISPR/Cas systems are common in the genomes of closely related lactic acid bacteria (LAB), none was identified within the eight published lactococcal genomes. Furthermore, a PCR-based search of the common LAB CRISPR/Cas systems (Types I and II) in 383 industrial L. lactis strains proved unsuccessful. Here we describe a novel, Type III, self-transmissible, plasmid-encoded, phage-interfering CRISPR/Cas discovered in L. lactis. The native CRISPR spacers confer resistance based on sequence identity to corresponding lactococcal phage. The interference is directed at phages problematic to the dairy industry, indicative of a responsive system. Moreover, targeting could be modified by engineering the spacer content. The 62.8-kb plasmid was shown to be conjugally transferrable to various strains. Its mobility should facilitate dissemination within microbial communities and provide a readily applicable system to naturally introduce CRISPR/Cas to industrially relevant strains for enhanced phage resistance and prevention against acquisition of undesirable genes. PMID:23240053

  19. Feedback regulation of the spc operon in Escherichia coli: translational coupling and mRNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    Mattheakis, L C; Nomura, M

    1988-01-01

    The spc operon of Escherichia coli encodes 10 ribosomal proteins in the order L14, L24, L5, S14, S8, L6, L18, S5, L30, and L15. This operon is feedback regulated by S8, which binds near the translation start site of L5 and inhibits translation of L5 directly and that of the distal genes indirectly. We constructed plasmids carrying a major portion of the spc operon genes under lac transcriptional control. The plasmids carried a point mutation in the S8 target site which abolished regulation and resulted in overproduction of plasmid-encoded ribosomal proteins upon induction. We showed that alteration of the AUG start codon of L5 to UAG decreased the synthesis rates of plasmid-encoded distal proteins, as well as L5, by approximately 20-fold, with a much smaller (if any) effect on mRNA synthesis rates, indicating coupling of the distal cistrons' translation with the translation of L5. This conclusion was also supported by experiments in which S8 was overproduced in trans. In this case, there was a threefold reduction in the synthesis rates of chromosome-encoded L5 and the distal spc operon proteins, but no decrease in the mRNA synthesis rate. These observations also suggest that transcription from ribosomal protein promoters may be special, perhaps able to overcome transcription termination signals. We also analyzed the state of ribosomal protein mRNA after overproduction of S8 in these experiments and found that repression of ribosomal protein synthesis was accompanied by stimulation of processing (and degradation) of spc operon mRNA. The possible role of mRNA degradation in tightening the regulation is discussed. Images PMID:3049533

  20. Microneedle-based vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Mikszta, John A.; Cormier, Michel; Andrianov, Alexander K.

    2010-01-01

    The threat of pandemic influenza and other public health needs motivates development of better vaccine delivery systems. To address this need, microneedles have been developed as micron-scale needles fabricated using low-cost manufacturing methods that administer vaccine into the skin using a simple device that may be suitable for self-administration. Delivery using solid or hollow microneedles can be accomplished by (i) piercing the skin and then applying a vaccine formulation or patch onto the permeabilized skin, (ii) coating or encapsulating vaccine onto or within microneedles for rapid, or delayed, dissolution and release in the skin and (iii) injection into the skin using a modified syringe or pump. Extensive clinical experience with smallpox, TB and other vaccines has shown that vaccine delivery into the skin using conventional intradermal injection is generally safe and effective and often elicits the same immune responses at lower doses compared to intramuscular injection. Animal experiments using microneedles have shown similar benefits. Microneedles have been used to deliver whole, inactivated virus; trivalent split antigen vaccines; and DNA plasmid encoding the influenza hemagglutinin to rodents and found strong antibody responses. In addition, ChimeriVax™-JE against yellow fever was administered to non-human primates and generated protective levels of neutralizing antibodies more than seven times greater than subcutaneous delivery; DNA plasmid encoding hepatitis B surface antigen was administered to mice and generated antibody and T cell responses at least as strong as hypodermic injections; recombinant Protective Antigen of Baccilus anthracis was administered to rabbits and provided complete protection from lethal aerosol anthrax spore challenge at a lower dose than intramuscular injection; and DNA plasmid encoding four vaccinia virus genes administered to mice in combination with electroporation generated neutralizing antibodies that apparently

  1. Design of different strategies of multivalent DNA-based vaccination against rabies and canine distemper in mice and dogs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the vaccination campaigns, puppies younger than 3 months old are not targeted and remain unvaccinated for at least the first year of their lives. Almost half of the reported rabid dogs are 6 months or younger. Hence, we should recommend the vaccination against rabies of young puppies. Unfortunately, owing to the exposure of puppies to infections with either canine parvovirus (CPV) or distemper virus (CDV) after the intervention of the vaccinators, owners are reluctant to vaccinate puppies against rabies. Therefore, it is necessary to include the CPV and CDV valences in the vaccine against rabies. Multivalent DNA-based vaccination in dogs, including rabies and distemper valences, could help in raising vaccine coverage. Methods We have designed monovalent and multivalent DNA-based vaccine candidates for in vitro and in vivo assays. These plasmids encode to the rabies virus glycoprotein and/or the canine distemper virus hemagglutinin. The first strategy of multivalent DNA-based vaccination is by mixing plasmids encoding to a single antigen each. The second is by simply fusing the genes of the antigens together. The third is by adding the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A oligopeptide gene into the antigen genes. The last strategy is by the design and use of a bicistronic plasmid with an “Internal Ribosome Entry Site” (IRES) domain. Results The monovalent construct against canine distemper was efficiently validated by inducing higher humoral immune responses compared to cell-culture-derived vaccine both in mice and dogs. All multivalent plasmids efficiently expressed both valences after in vitro transfection of BHK-21 cells. In BALB/c mice, the bicistronic IRES-dependant construct was the most efficient inducer of virus-neutralizing antibodies against both valences. It was able to induce better humoral immune responses compared to the administration of either cell-culture-derived vaccines or monovalent plasmids. The FMDV 2A was also efficient

  2. Identification and sequence determination of recombinant Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin by use of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hitoshi; Inoue, Masaharu; Tomiki, Masayoshi; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Komoriya, Tomoe; Kimata, Junko; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Kohno, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Only a few methods exist for simple, sensitive and rapid detection of alpha-toxin in clinical and biological samples. The aim of our study was to establish a procedure for the production of an antibody against a recombinant antigen with confirmed sequence identity. We applied a noble approach based on proteomics using a mass spectrometer for the conclusive identification of the recombinant alpha-toxin that was subsequently used as an antigen. The recombinant alpha-toxin was produced in Escherichia coli. A clinical isolate of Clostridium perfringens GAI 94074 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequently, cloning was performed. Three different fragments were cloned using a pET100/D-TOPO vector. These fragments coded for a ribosome binding site, a signal peptide and the alpha-toxin gene, respectively. Recombinant pET100 plasmids were cloned into TOP 10 cells and the isolated plasmids were transferred into BL21 Star (DE3) cells. Their expression was then induced with isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Recombinant E. coli transformed with a plasmid encoding the alpha-toxin gene alone produced a biologically inactive protein. On the other hand, E. coli carrying the plasmid encoding the toxin sequence and its native signal peptide sequence, or the toxin sequence along with the ribosome binding sequence and the signal peptide sequence secreted an active alpha-toxin with phospholipase activity. Accordingly, the C. perfringens gene encoding the alpha-toxin protein along with its signal peptide was successfully cloned, expressed, and secreted by E. coli. Furthermore, without consideration of its activity, we used mass spectrometry to confirm that the expressed protein was indeed the alpha-toxin. Thus, the identification of alpha-toxin protein using both the biological activity testing and the mass spectrometry analysis is expected to verify the significant production of C. perfringens antibody. The study for the analysis of recombinant alpha

  3. Evaluation of CTX-M steady-state mRNA, mRNA half-life and protein production in various STs of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Chelsie N.; Fowler, Randal C.; Johnson, James R.; Johnston, Brian; Weissman, Scott J.; Hawkey, Peter; Hanson, Nancy D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives High levels of β-lactamase production can impact treatment with a β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combination. Goals of this study were to: (i) compare the mRNA and protein levels of CTX-M-15- and CTX-M-14-producing Escherichia coli from 18 different STs and 10 different phylotypes; (ii) evaluate the mRNA half-lives and establish a role for chromosomal- and/or plasmid-encoded factors; and (iii) evaluate the zones of inhibition for piperacillin/tazobactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam. Methods Disc diffusion was used to establish zone size. RNA analysis was accomplished using real-time RT–PCR and CTX-M protein levels were evaluated by immunoblotting. Clinical isolates, transformants and transconjugants were used to evaluate mRNA half-lives. Results mRNA levels of CTX-M-15 were up to 165-fold higher compared with CTX-M-14. CTX-M-15 protein levels were 2–48-fold less than their respective transcript levels, while CTX-M-14 protein production was comparable to the observed transcript levels. Nineteen of 25 E. coli (76%) had extended CTX-M-15 mRNA half-lives of 5–15 min and 16 (100%) CTX-M-14 isolates had mRNA half-lives of <2–3 min. Transformants had mRNA half-lives of <2 min for both CTX-M-type transcripts, while transconjugant mRNA half-lives corresponded to the half-life of the donor. Ceftolozane/tazobactam zone sizes were ≥19 mm, while piperacillin/tazobactam zone sizes were ≥17 mm. Conclusions CTX-M-15 mRNA and protein production did not correlate. Neither E. coli ST nor phylotype influenced the variability observed for CTX-M-15 mRNA or protein produced. mRNA half-life is controlled by a plasmid-encoded factor and may influence mRNA transcript levels, but not protein levels. PMID:26612874

  4. Modulation of the immune response to DNA vaccine by co-delivery of costimulatory molecules

    PubMed Central

    Fló, J; Tisminetzky, S; Baralle, F

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated methods for modulating immune responses, against herpes simplex virus (HSV), generated from DNA vaccination by co-delivery of genes encoding costimulatory molecules.A strong delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction was induced in mice co-injected via the intradermal (i.d.) route with a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding the CD80 molecule (pCD80) and a plasmid encoding the glycoprotein D of the HSV-2 (pgD). Furthermore, when spleen cells from these mice were cultured in the presence of inactivated HSV, a significant increase in the expression of interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) was observed in the CD4 subset compared with mice immunized only with pgD. Analysis of cytokine synthesis at the single-cell level indicated that CD80 genes induce a significant increase in the number of interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-, IL-2- and IL-4-secreting cells in the spleen. On the other hand, co-administration of the CD80 gene via the intramuscular (i.m.) route did not induce an increase in the cell-mediated immune response. When a plasmid carrying the CD86 gene (pCD86) was co-injected via the i.m. route with the pgD plasmid, a small decrease in the number of IFN-γ-secreting cells was observed. This down-regulation of the immune response was also observed when eukaryotic expression cassettes for CD80 and for CD86 were coadministered with the pgD plasmid via the i.d. route. However, co-injection of pCD86 via the i.m. route produced a small increase in the number of IL-4-secreting cells. When immunized mice were challenged intravaginally with 100 plaque-forming units of virus, only co-injection of the CD80 gene by the i.d. route provoked an adjuvant effect compared with mice immunized with pgD alone. A reduction in the titres of HSV in vaginal washings was observed together with a decrease in the lesion score PMID:10886404

  5. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I transcription by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in fetal rat bone cells through an element within exon 1: protein kinase A-dependent control without a consensus AMP response element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Thomas, M. J.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1995-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a locally synthesized anabolic growth factor for bone. IGF-I synthesis by primary fetal rat osteoblasts (Ob) is stimulated by agents that increase the intracellular cAMP concentration, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Previous studies with Ob cultures demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGF-I transcription through selective use of IGF-I promoter 1, with little effect on IGF-I messenger RNA half-life. Transient transfection of Ob cultures with an array of promoter 1-luciferase reporter fusion constructs has now allowed localization of a potential cis-acting promoter element(s) responsible for cAMP-stimulated gene expression to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of IGF-I exon 1, within a segment lacking a consensus cAMP response element. Our evidence derives from three principal observations: 1) a transfection construct containing only 122 nucleotides (nt) of promoter 1 and 328 nt of the 5'-UTR retained full PGE2-stimulated reporter expression; 2) maximal PGE2-driven reporter expression required the presence of nt 196 to 328 of exon 1 when tested within the context of IGF-I promoter 1; 3) cotransfection of IGF-I promoter-luciferase-reporter constructs with a plasmid encoding the alpha-isoform of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) produced results comparable to those seen with PGE2 treatment, whereas cotransfection with a plasmid encoding a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA that cannot bind cAMP blocked PGE2-induced reporter expression. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting of the 5'-UTR of exon 1 demonstrated protected sequences at HS3A, HS3B, and HS3D, three of six DNA-protein binding sites previously characterized with rat liver nuclear extracts. Of these three regions, only the HS3D binding site is located within the functionally identified hormonally responsive segment of IGF-I exon 1. These results directly implicate PKA in the control of IGF-I gene transcription by PGE2 and identify a segment of

  6. Characterization of denitrifying activity by the alphaproteobacterium, Sphingomonas wittichii RW1

    PubMed Central

    Cua, Lynnie S.; Stein, Lisa Y.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 has no reported denitrifying activity yet encodes nitrite and nitric oxide reductases. The aims of this study were to determine conditions under which S. wittichii RW1 consumes nitrite (NO−2) and produces nitrous oxide (N2O), examine expression of putative genes for N-oxide metabolism, and determine the functionality of chromosomal (ch) and plasmid (p) encoded quinol-dependent nitric oxide reductases (NorZ). Batch cultures of wildtype (WT) and a norZch mutant of S. wittichii RW1 consumed NO−2 and produced N2O during stationary phase. The norZch mutant produced N2O, although at significantly lower levels (c.a. 66–87%) relative to the WT. Rates of N2O production were 2–3 times higher in cultures initiated at low relative to atmospheric O2 per unit biomass, although rates of NO−2 consumption were elevated in cultures initiated with atmospheric O2 and 1 mM NaNO2. Levels of mRNA encoding nitrite reductase (nirK), plasmid-encoded nitric oxide dioxygenase (hmpp) and plasmid-encoded nitric oxide reductase (norZp) were significantly higher in the norZch mutant over a growth curve relative to WT. The presence of NO−2 further increased levels of nirK and hmpp mRNA in both the WT and norZch mutant; levels of norZp mRNA compensated for the loss of norZch expression in the norZch mutant. Together, the results suggest that S. wittichii RW1 denitrifies NO−2 to N2O and expresses gene products predicted to detoxify N-oxides. So far, only S. wittichii strains within four closely related taxa have been observed to encode both nirK and norZ genes, indicating a species-specific lateral gene transfer that may be relevant to the niche preference of S. wittichii. PMID:25147547

  7. BenR, a XylS Homologue, Regulates Three Different Pathways of Aromatic Acid Degradation in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Cowles, Charles E.; Nichols, Nancy N.; Harwood, Caroline S.

    2000-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida converts benzoate to catechol using two enzymes that are encoded on the chromosome and whose expression is induced by benzoate. Benzoate also binds to the regulator XylS to induce expression of the TOL (toluene degradation) plasmid-encoded meta pathway operon for benzoate and methylbenzoate degradation. Finally, benzoate represses the ability of P. putida to transport 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) by preventing transcription of pcaK, the gene encoding the 4-HBA permease. Here we identified a gene, benR, as a regulator of benzoate, methylbenzoate, and 4-HBA degradation genes. A benR mutant isolated by random transposon mutagenesis was unable to grow on benzoate. The deduced amino acid sequence of BenR showed high similarity (62% identity) to the sequence of XylS, a member of the AraC family of regulators. An additional seven genes located adjacent to benR were inferred to be involved in benzoate degradation based on their deduced amino acid sequences. The benABC genes likely encode benzoate dioxygenase, and benD likely encodes 2-hydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzoate dehydrogenase. benK and benF were assigned functions as a benzoate permease and porin, respectively. The possible function of a final gene, benE, is not known. benR activated expression of a benA-lacZ reporter fusion in response to benzoate. It also activated expression of a meta cleavage operon promoter-lacZ fusion inserted in an E. coli chromosome. Third, benR was required for benzoate-mediated repression of pcaK-lacZ fusion expression. The benA promoter region contains a direct repeat sequence that matches the XylS binding site previously defined for the meta cleavage operon promoter. It is likely that BenR binds to the promoter region of chromosomal benzoate degradation genes and plasmid-encoded methylbenzoate degradation genes to activate gene expression in response to benzoate. The action of BenR in repressing 4-HBA uptake is probably indirect. PMID:11053377

  8. Fusion to the Lysosome Targeting Signal of the Invariant Chain Alters the Processing and Enhances the Immunogenicity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Starodubova, E. S.; Isaguliants, M. G.; Kuzmenko, Y. V.; Latanova, A. A.; Krotova, O. A.; Karpov, V. L.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular processing of the antigen encoded by a DNA vaccine is one of the key steps in generating an immune response. Immunization with DNA constructs targeted to the endosomal-lysosomal compartments and to the MHC class II pathway can elicit a strong immune response. Herein, the weakly immunogenic reverse transcriptase of HIV-1 was fused to the minimal lysosomal targeting motif of the human MHC class II invariant chain. The motif fused to the N-terminus shifted the enzyme intracellular localization and accelerated its degradation. Degradation of the chimeric protein occurred predominantly in the lysosomal compartment. BALB/c mice immunized with the plasmid encoding the chimeric protein demonstrated an enhanced immune response, in the form of an increased antigen-specific production of Th1 cytokines, INF-γ and IL-2, by mouse splenocytes. Moreover, the majority of the splenocytes secreted both cytokines; i.e., were polyfunctional. These findings suggest that retargeting of the antigen to the lysosomes enhances the immune response to DNA vaccine candidates with low intrinsic immunogenicity. PMID:24772328

  9. Non-classical export of an adenovirus structural protein.

    PubMed

    Trotman, Lloyd C; Achermann, Dominik P; Keller, Stephan; Straub, Monika; Greber, Urs F

    2003-06-01

    The icosahedral capsids of Adenoviruses (Ads) consist of the hexon and stabilizing proteins building the facettes, and of the vertex protein penton base (Pb) anchoring the protruding fibers. The fibers bind to the Coxsackie virus B Ad cell surface receptor (CAR) and Pb to integrins. Here we describe a novel property of the Ad2 Pb. Pb was found to leave the infected cell and, upon exit, it attached to the surrounding noninfected cells forming a radial gradient with highest Pb levels on cells adjacent to the infected cell. The producer cells remained intact until at least 30 h post infection. At this point, Pb was not recovered from the extracellular medium, suggesting that its cell-cell spread might not involve free Pb. When viral particles were released at late stages of infection, soluble Pb was found in the extracellular medium and it randomly bound to noninfected cells. Nonlytic export of Pb occurred upon transient transfection with plasmid DNA, but plasmid-encoded fiber was not exported, indicating that cell-cell spread of Pb is autonomous of infection. Pb export was not affected by Brefeldin A-induced disruption of the Golgi apparatus, suggesting that it occurred via a nonclassical mechanism. Interestingly, the coexpression of Pb and fiber leads to both Pb and fiber export, termed 'protein abduction'. We suggest that fiber abduction might support viral dissemination in infected tissues by interfering with tissue integrity. PMID:12753648

  10. REST-VP16 activates multiple neuronal differentiation genes in human NT2 cells.

    PubMed

    Immaneni, A; Lawinger, P; Zhao, Z; Lu, W; Rastelli, L; Morris, J H; Majumder, S

    2000-09-01

    The RE1-silencing transcription factor (REST)/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) can repress transcription of a battery of neuronal differentiation genes in non-neuronal cells by binding to a specific consensus DNA sequence present in their regulatory regions. However, REST/NRSF(-/-) mice suggest that the absence of REST/NRSF-dependent repression alone is not sufficient for the expression of these neuronal differentiation genes and that the presence of other promoter/enhancer-specific activators is required. Here we describe the construction of a recombinant transcription factor, REST-VP16, by replacing repressor domains of REST/NRSF with the activation domain of a viral activator VP16. In transient transfection experiments, REST-VP16 was found to operate through RE1 binding site/neuron-restrictive enhancer element (RE1/NRSE), activate plasmid-encoded neuronal promoters in various mammalian cell types and activate cellular REST/NRSF target genes, even in the absence of factors that are otherwise required to activate such genes. Efficient expression of REST-VP16 through adenoviral vectors in NT2 cells, which resemble human committed neuronal progenitor cells, was found to cause activation of multiple neuronal genes that are characteristic markers for neuronal differentiation. Thus, REST-VP16 could be used as a unique tool to study neuronal differentiation pathways and neuronal diseases that arise due to the deregulation of this process. PMID:10954611

  11. Therapeutic Potential of Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs) and Cationic Polymers for Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Lemamy, Guy Joseph; Nielsen, Peter. E; Cova, Lucyna

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Because current anti-HBV treatments are only virostatic, there is an urgent need for development of alternative antiviral approaches. In this context, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and cationic polymers, such as chitosan (CS), appear of particular interest as nonviral vectors due to their capacity to facilitate cellular delivery of bioactive cargoes including peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) or DNA vaccines. We have investigated the ability of a PNA conjugated to different CPPs to inhibit the replication of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV infection. The in vivo administration of PNA-CPP conjugates to neonatal ducklings showed that they reached the liver and inhibited DHBV replication. Interestingly, our results indicated also that a modified CPP (CatLip) alone, in the absence of its PNA cargo, was able to drastically inhibit late stages of DHBV replication. In the mouse model, conjugation of HBV DNA vaccine to modified CS (Man-CS-Phe) improved cellular and humoral responses to plasmid-encoded antigen. Moreover, other systems for gene delivery were investigated including CPP-modified CS and cationic nanoparticles. The results showed that these nonviral vectors considerably increased plasmid DNA uptake and expression. Collectively promising results obtained in preclinical studies suggest the usefulness of these safe delivery systems for the development of novel therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B. PMID:26633356

  12. Feline Leukemia Virus DNA Vaccine Efficacy Is Enhanced by Coadministration with Interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-18 Expression Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Linda; Argyle, David; Bain, Derek; Nicolson, Lesley; Dunham, Stephen; Golder, Matthew C.; McDonald, Michael; McGillivray, Christine; Jarrett, Oswald; Neil, James C.; Onions, David E.

    2001-01-01

    The expectation that cell-mediated immunity is important in the control of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection led us to test a DNA vaccine administered alone or with cytokines that favored the development of a Th1 immune response. The vaccine consisted of two plasmids, one expressing the gag/pol genes and the other expressing the env gene of FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. The genetic adjuvants were plasmids encoding the feline cytokines interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-18, or gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Kittens were immunized by three intramuscular inoculations of the FeLV DNA vaccine alone or in combination with plasmids expressing IFN-γ, IL-12, or both IL-12 and IL-18. Control kittens were inoculated with empty plasmid. Following immunization, anti-FeLV antibodies were not detected in any kitten. Three weeks after the final immunization, the kittens were challenged by the intraperitoneal inoculation of FeLV-A/Glasgow-1 and were then monitored for a further 15 weeks for the presence of virus in plasma and, at the end of the trial, for latent virus in bone marrow. The vaccine consisting of FeLV DNA with the IL-12 and IL-18 genes conferred significant immunity, protecting completely against transient and persistent viremia, and in five of six kittens protecting against latent infection. None of the other vaccines provided significant protection. PMID:11507187

  13. Antibiotic-free production of a herpes simplex virus 2 DNA vaccine in a high yield cGMP process

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jared; Rodriguez, Stephen; Finlayson, Neil; Williams, Jim; Carnes, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Two DNA vaccine plasmids encoding Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D, NTC8485-O2-gD2 and NTC8485-O2-UgD2tr, were produced at large scale under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) for use in a Phase I human clinical trial. These DNA vaccines incorporate the regulatory agency compliant, minimal, antibiotic-free (AF) NTC8485 mammalian expression vector. Plasmid yields of > 1 g/L were achieved using the HyperGRO™ fed-batch fermentation process, with successful scale up from 10 L process development scale to 320 L culture volume for cGMP production. The DNA vaccines were purified using a low residence time, high shear lysis process and AIRMIXTM technology, followed by chromatographic purification. This combination of optimized plasmid vector, high yield upstream production, and efficient downstream purification resulted in purified HSV-2 DNA vaccines with > 99% total supercoiled plasmid, ≤ 0.2% RNA, ≤ 0.1% host cell genomic DNA, and ≤ 0.1 endotoxin units per mg. PMID:23899469

  14. Display of Peptides and Proteins on the Surface of Bacteriophage λ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Nat; Hoess, Ronald H.

    1995-02-01

    The display of peptides or proteins on the surface of viruses is an important technology for studying peptides or proteins and their interaction with other molecules. Here we describe a display vehicle based on bacteriophage λ that incorporates a number of features distinct from other currently used display systems. Fusions of peptides or protein domains have been made to the amino terminus of the 11-kDa D protein of the λ capsid. These fusions assemble onto the viral capsid and appear to be accessible to ligand interactions, based on the ability of a monoclonal antibody to recognize an epitope fused to the D protein on phage heads. To produce large D fusion display libraries and yet avoid the cumbersome task of cloning many fragments into λ DNA, we have used the Cre-loxP site-specific recombination system in vivo to incorporate plasmids encoding the D fusions into the phage genome. Finally, we show that D fusion proteins can be added in vitro to phage lacking D protein and be assembled onto the viral capsid.

  15. Identification of Plasmid-Free Chlamydia muridarum Organisms Using a Pgp3 Detection-Based Immunofluorescence Assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoqun; Zhong, Guangming; Ren, Lin; Lu, Chunxue; Li, Zhonggyu; Wu, Yimou

    2015-10-01

    Chlamydia possesses a conserved 7.5 kb plasmid that is known to play an important role in chlamydial pathogenesis, since some chlamydial organisms lacking the plasmid are attenuated. The chlamydial transformation system developed recently required the use of plasmid-free organisms. Thus, the generation and identification of plasmid-free organisms represent a key step in understanding chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms. A tricolor immunofluorescence assay for simultaneously detecting the plasmid-encoded Pgp3 and whole organisms plus DNA staining was used to screen C. muridarum organisms selected with novobiocin. PCR was used to detect the plasmid genes. Next-generation sequencing was then used to sequence the genomes of plasmid-free C. muridarum candidates and the parental C. muridarum Nigg strain. We generated five independent clones of plasmid-free C. muridarum organisms by using a combination of novobiocin treatment and screening plaque-purified clones with anti-Pgp3 antibody. The clones were confirmed to lack plasmid genes by PCR analysis. No GlgA protein or glycogen accumulation was detected in cells infected with the plasmid-free clones. More importantly, whole-genome sequencing characterization of the plasmid-free C. muridarum organism and the parental C. muridarum Nigg strain revealed no additional mutations other than loss of the plasmid in the plasmid-free C. muridarum organism. Thus, the Pgp3-based immunofluorescence assay has allowed us to identify authentic plasmid-free organisms that are useful for further investigating chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:26059520

  16. Asymmetric mutations in the tetrameric R67 dihydrofolate reductase reveal high tolerance to active-site substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Maximilian C C J C; Morley, Krista L; Volpato, Jordan P; Schmitzer, Andreea R; Pelletier, Joelle N

    2015-01-01

    Type II R67 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a bacterial plasmid-encoded enzyme that is intrinsically resistant to the widely-administered antibiotic trimethoprim. R67 DHFR is genetically and structurally unrelated to E. coli chromosomal DHFR and has an unusual architecture, in that four identical protomers form a single symmetrical active site tunnel that allows only one substrate binding/catalytic event at any given time. As a result, substitution of an active-site residue has as many as four distinct consequences on catalysis, constituting an atypical model of enzyme evolution. Although we previously demonstrated that no single residue of the native active site is indispensable for function, library selection here revealed a strong bias toward maintenance of two native protomers per mutated tetramer. A variety of such “half-native” tetramers were shown to procure native-like catalytic activity, with similar KM values but kcat values 5- to 33-fold lower, illustrating a high tolerance for active-site substitutions. The selected variants showed a reduced thermal stability (Tm ∼12°C lower), which appears to result from looser association of the protomers, but generally showed a marked increase in resilience to heat denaturation, recovering activity to a significantly greater extent than the variant with no active-site substitutions. Our results suggest that the presence of two native protomers in the R67 DHFR tetramer is sufficient to provide native-like catalytic rate and thus ensure cellular proliferation. PMID:25401264

  17. Identification of genes and gene products necessary for bacterial bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1984-07-01

    Expression of luminescence in Escherichia coli was recently achieved by cloning genes from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. One DNA fragment on a hybrid plasmid encoded regulatory functions and enzymatic activities necessary for light production. We report the results of a genetic analysis to identify the luminescence genes (lux) that reside on this recombinant plasmid. lux gene mutations were generated by hydroxylamine treatment, and these mutations were ordered on a linear map by complementation in trans with a series of polar transposon insertions on other plasmids. lux genes were defined by complementation of lux gene defects on pairs of plasmids in trans in E. coli. Hybrid plasmids were also used to direct the synthesis of polypeptides in the E. coli minicell system. Seven lux genes and the corresponding gene products were identified from the complementation analysis and the minicell programing experiments. These genes, in the order of their position on a linear map, and the apparent molecular weights of the gene products are luxR (27,000), luxI (25,000), luxC (53,000), luxD (33,000), luxA (40,000), luxB (38,000), and luxE (42,000). From the luminescence phenotypes of E. coli containing mutant plasmids, functions were assigned to these genes: luxA, luxB, luxC, luxD, and luxE encode enzymes for light production and luxR and luxI encode regulatory functions. PMID:6377310

  18. LPS impairs oxygen utilization in epithelia by triggering degradation of the mitochondrial enzyme Alcat1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chunbin; Synan, Matthew J; Li, Jin; Xiong, Sheng; Manni, Michelle L; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Bill B; Zhao, Yutong; Shiva, Sruti; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Jiang, Jianfei; Lee, Janet S; Das, Sudipta; Ray, Anuradha; Ray, Prabir; Kagan, Valerian E; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2016-01-01

    Cardiolipin (also known as PDL6) is an indispensable lipid required for mitochondrial respiration that is generated through de novo synthesis and remodeling. Here, the cardiolipin remodeling enzyme, acyl-CoA:lysocardiolipin-acyltransferase-1 (Alcat1; SwissProt ID, Q6UWP7) is destabilized in epithelia by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) impairing mitochondrial function. Exposure to LPS selectively decreased levels of carbon 20 (C20)-containing cardiolipin molecular species, whereas the content of C18 or C16 species was not significantly altered, consistent with decreased levels of Alcat1. Alcat1 is a labile protein that is lysosomally degraded by the ubiquitin E3 ligase Skp-Cullin-F-box containing the Fbxo28 subunit (SCF-Fbxo28) that targets Alcat1 for monoubiquitylation at residue K183. Interestingly, K183 is also an acetylation-acceptor site, and acetylation conferred stability to the enzyme. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) interacted with Alcat1, and expression of a plasmid encoding HDAC2 or treatment of cells with LPS deacetylated and destabilized Alcat1, whereas treatment of cells with a pan-HDAC inhibitor increased Alcat1 levels. Alcat1 degradation was partially abrogated in LPS-treated cells that had been silenced for HDAC2 or treated with MLN4924, an inhibitor of Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases. Thus, LPS increases HDAC2-mediated Alcat1 deacetylation and facilitates SCF-Fbxo28-mediated disposal of Alcat1, thus impairing mitochondrial integrity. PMID:26604221

  19. Transferability of a tetracycline resistance gene from probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri to bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of humans.

    PubMed

    Egervärn, Maria; Lindmark, Hans; Olsson, Johan; Roos, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    The potential of Lactobacillus reuteri as a donor of antibiotic resistance genes in the human gut was investigated by studying the transferability of the tetracycline resistance gene tet(W) to faecal enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. In a double-blind clinical study, seven subjects consumed L. reuteri ATCC 55730 harbouring a plasmid-encoded tet(W) gene (tet(W)-reuteri) and an equal number of subjects consumed L. reuteri DSM 17938 derived from the ATCC 55730 strain by the removal of two plasmids, one of which contained the tet(W) gene. Faecal samples were collected before, during and after ingestion of 5 x 10(8) CFU of L. reuteri per day for 14 days. Both L. reuteri strains were detectable at similar levels in faeces after 14 days of intake but neither was detected after a two-week wash-out period. After enrichment and isolation of tetracycline resistant enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli from each faecal sample, DNA was extracted and analysed for presence of tet(W)-reuteri using a real-time PCR allelic discrimination method developed in this study. No tet(W)-reuteri signal was produced from any of the DNA samples and thus gene transfer to enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli during intestinal passage of the probiotic strain was non-detectable under the conditions tested, although transfer at low frequencies or to the remaining faecal bacterial population cannot be excluded. PMID:19997864

  20. The opportunistic marine pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus becomes virulent by acquiring a plasmid that expresses a deadly toxin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Te; Chen, I-Tung; Yang, Yi-Ting; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Huang, Jiun-Yan; Huang, Ming-Fen; Lin, Shin-Jen; Chen, Chien-Yu; Lin, Shih-Shun; Lightner, Donald V.; Wang, Han-Ching; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Wang, Hao-Ching; Hor, Lien-I; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is a severe, newly emergent penaeid shrimp disease caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus that has already led to tremendous losses in the cultured shrimp industry. Until now, its disease-causing mechanism has remained unclear. Here we show that an AHPND-causing strain of V. parahaemolyticus contains a 70-kbp plasmid (pVA1) with a postsegregational killing system, and that the ability to cause disease is abolished by the natural absence or experimental deletion of the plasmid-encoded homologs of the Photorhabdus insect-related (Pir) toxins PirA and PirB. We determined the crystal structure of the V. parahaemolyticus PirA and PirB (PirAvp and PirBvp) proteins and found that the overall structural topology of PirAvp/PirBvp is very similar to that of the Bacillus Cry insecticidal toxin-like proteins, despite the low sequence identity (<10%). This structural similarity suggests that the putative PirABvp heterodimer might emulate the functional domains of the Cry protein, and in particular its pore-forming activity. The gene organization of pVA1 further suggested that pirABvp may be lost or acquired by horizontal gene transfer via transposition or homologous recombination. PMID:26261348

  1. Involvement of the pagR gene of pXO2 in anthrax pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xudong; Zhang, Enmin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wei, Jianchun; Li, Wei; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Bingxiang; Dong, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. Specifically, the anthrax toxins and capsules encoded by the pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids, respectively, are the major virulence factors. We previously reported that the pXO1 plasmid was retained in the attenuated strain of B. anthracis vaccine strains even after subculturing at high temperatures. In the present study, we reinvestigate the attenuation mechanism of Pasteur II. Sequencing of pXO1 and pXO2 from Pasteur II strain revealed mutations in these plasmids as compared to the reference sequences. Two deletions on these plasmids, one each on pXO1 and pXO2, were confirmed to be unique to the Pasteur II strain as compared to the wild-type strains. Gene replacement with homologous recombination revealed that the mutation in the promoter region of the pagR gene on pXO2, but not the mutation on pXO1, contributes to lethal levels of toxin production. This result was further confirmed by RT-PCR, western blot, and animal toxicity assays. Taken together, our results signify that the attenuation of the Pasteur II vaccine strain is caused by a mutation in the pagR gene on its pXO2 plasmid. Moreover, these data suggest that pXO2 plasmid encoded proteins are involved in the virulence of B. anthracis. PMID:27363681

  2. The indigenous Pseudomonas plasmid pQBR103 encodes plant-inducible genes, including three putative helicases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Xian; Lilley, Andrew K; Bailey, Mark J; Rainey, Paul B

    2004-12-27

    Plasmid pQBR103 ( approximately 400 kb) is representative of many self-transmissible, mercury resistant plasmids observed in the Pseudomonas community colonising the phytosphere of sugar beet. A promoter trapping strategy (IVET) was employed to identify pQBR103 genes showing elevated levels of expression on plant surfaces. Thirty-seven different plant-inducible gene fusions were isolated that were silent in laboratory media, but active in the plant environment. Three of the fusions were to DNA sequences whose protein products show significant homology to DNA-unwinding helicases. The three helicase-like genes, designated helA, helB and helC, are restricted to a defined group of related Pseudomonas plasmids. They are induced in both the root and shoot environments of sugar beet seedlings. Sequence analysis of the three plasmid-encoded helicase-like genes shows that they are phylogenetically distinct and likely to have independent evolutionary histories. The helA gene is predicted to encode a protein of 1121 amino acids, containing conserved domains found in the ultraviolet (UV) resistance helicase, UvrD. A helA knockout mutant was constructed and no phenotypic changes were found with plasmid-conferred UV resistance or plasmid conjugation. The other 34 fusions are unique with no homologues in the public gene databases, including the Pseudomonas genomes. These data demonstrate the presence of plant responsive genes in plasmid DNA comprising a component of the genomes of plant-associated bacteria. PMID:16329852

  3. [IncP-7 plasmids' classification based on structural diversity of their basic replicons].

    PubMed

    Volkova, O V; Panov, A V; Kosheleva, I A; Boronin, A M

    2013-01-01

    The structural diversity of basic replicons and repB gene of the IncP-7 plasmids' collection was firstly assessed on the basis of PCR, restriction analysis and partial sequencing. It has been revealed that DNA fragment containing gene for UvrD-like helicase RepB is a part of all known P-7 replicons, but often serves as hot place for diverse IS-elements invasion. The first system of P-7 plasmids' classification has been worked out on the basis of determined repA-oriV-par WABC nucleotide divergency. Most degradation plasmids established to be belonging to large beta-subgroup, streptomycin resistance plasmid Rms148 (IncP-7 archetype)--to alpha-subgroup, carbazole degradation plasmid pCAR1 and NAH/SAL-plasmids from pY-line (Yamal oil deposits)--to gamma-subgroup and CAP-plasmid pBS270 with potentially reduced P-7 replicon--to delta-subgroup. It has been observed that the type of IncP-7 basic replicon molecular organization does not correlate with fixed phenotypic character in most cases, that is plasmids encoding different phenotypic markers could be members of the same P-7 subgroup. PMID:23808156

  4. A Novel Ty1-Mediated Fragmentation Method for Native and Artificial Yeast Chromosomes Reveals That the Mouse Steel Gene Is a Hotspot for Ty1 Integration

    PubMed Central

    Dalgaard, J. Z.; Banerjee, M.; Curcio, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for the physical analysis of genomes called Ty1-mediated chromosomal fragmentation and have used the method to map 24 retrotransposon insertions into two different mouse-derived yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). Expression of a plasmid-encoded GAL1:Ty1 fusion element marked with the retrotransposition indicator gene, ade2AI, resulted in a high fraction of cells that sustained a single Ty1 insertion marked with ADE2. Strains in which Ty1ADE2 inserted into a YAC were identified by cosegregation of the ADE2 gene with the URA3-marked YAC. Ty1ADE2 elements also carried a site for the endonuclease I-DmoI, which we demonstrate is not present anywhere in the yeast genome. Consequently, I-DmoI cleaved a single chromosome or YAC at the unique site of Ty1ADE2 insertion, allowing rapid mapping of integration events. Our analyses showed that the frequency of Ty1ADE2 integration into YACs is equivalent to or higher than that expected based on random insertion. Remarkably, the 50-kb transcription unit of the mouse Steel locus was shown to be a highly significant hotspot for Ty1 integration. The accessibility of mammalian transcription units to Ty1 insertion stands in contrast to that of yeast transcription units. PMID:8725218

  5. Dual control of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid virulence genes.

    PubMed Central

    Close, T J; Rogowsky, P M; Kado, C I; Winans, S C; Yanofsky, M F; Nester, E W

    1987-01-01

    The virulence genes of nopaline (pTiC58) and octopine (pTiA6NC) Ti plasmids are similarly affected by the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ros mutation. Of six vir region complementation groups (virA, virB, virG, virC, virD, and virE) examined by using fusions to reporter genes, the promoters of only two (virC and virD) responded to the ros mutation. For each promoter that was affected by ros, the level of expression of its associated genes was substantially elevated in the mutant. This increase was not influenced by Ti plasmid-encoded factors, and the mutation did not interfere with the induction of pTiC58 vir genes by phenolic compounds via the VirA/VirG regulatory control mechanism. The effects of the ros mutation and acetosyringone were cumulative for all vir promoters examined. The pleiotropic characteristics of the ros mutant include the complete absence of the major acidic capsular polysaccharide. Images PMID:3667525

  6. Ces locus embedded proteins control the non-ribosomal synthesis of the cereulide toxin in emetic Bacillus cereus on multiple levels

    PubMed Central

    Lücking, Genia; Frenzel, Elrike; Rütschle, Andrea; Marxen, Sandra; Stark, Timo D.; Hofmann, Thomas; Scherer, Siegfried; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The emetic toxin cereulide produced by Bacillus cereus is synthesized by the modular enzyme complex Ces that is encoded on a pXO1-like megaplasmid. To decipher the role of the genes adjacent to the structural genes cesA/cesB, coding for the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), gene inactivation- and overexpression mutants of the emetic strain F4810/72 were constructed and their impact on cereulide biosynthesis was assessed. The hydrolase CesH turned out to be a part of the complex regulatory network controlling cereulide synthesis on a transcriptional level, while the ABC transporter CesCD was found to be essential for post-translational control of cereulide synthesis. Using a gene inactivation approach, we show that the NRPS activating function of the phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPtase) embedded in the ces locus was complemented by a chromosomally encoded Sfp-like PPtase, representing an interesting example for the functional interaction between a plasmid encoded NRPS and a chromosomally encoded activation enzyme. In summary, our results highlight the complexity of cereulide biosynthesis and reveal multiple levels of toxin formation control. ces operon internal genes were shown to play a pivotal role by acting at different levels of toxin production, thus complementing the action of the chromosomal key transcriptional regulators AbrB and CodY. PMID:26528255

  7. Role of YopK in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Resistance against Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Defense

    PubMed Central

    Thorslund, Sara E.; Ermert, David; Fahlgren, Anna; Erttmann, Saskia F.; Nilsson, Kristina; Hosseinzadeh, Ava; Urban, Constantin F.

    2013-01-01

    The enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis can survive in the harsh environment of lymphoid compartments that abounds in immune cells. This capacity is dependent on the plasmid-encoded Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) that are delivered into the host cell via a mechanism involving the Yersinia type III secretion system. We show that the virulence protein YopK has a role in the mechanism by which Y. pseudotuberculosis avoids the polymorphonuclear leukocyte or neutrophil (PMN) defense. A yopK mutant, which is attenuated in the mouse infection model, where it fails to cause systemic infection, was found to colonize Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes more rapidly than the wild-type strain. Further, in mice lacking PMNs, the yopK mutant caused full disease with systemic spread and typical symptoms. Analyses of effects on PMNs revealed that both the wild-type strain and the yopK mutant inhibited internalization and reactive oxygen species production, as well as neutrophil extracellular trap formation by PMNs. However, the wild-type strain effectively avoided induction of PMN death, whereas the mutant caused a necrosis-like PMN death. Taken together, our results indicate that YopK is required for the ability of Yersinia to resist the PMN defense, which is critical for the virulence of the pathogen. We suggest a mechanism whereby YopK functions to prevent unintended Yop delivery and thereby PMN disruption, resulting in necrosis-like cell death, which would enhance the inflammatory response favoring the host. PMID:23090955

  8. Autolysis of Lactococcus lactis caused by induced overproduction of its major autolysin, AcmA.

    PubMed Central

    Buist, G; Karsens, H; Nauta, A; van Sinderen, D; Venema, G; Kok, J

    1997-01-01

    The optical density of a culture of lactococcus lactis MG1363 was reduced more than 60% during prolonged stationary phase. Reduction in optical density (autolysis) was almost absent in a culture of an isogenic mutant containing a deletion in the major autolysin gene, acmA. An acmA mutant carrying multiple coples of a plasmid encoding AcmA lysed to a greater extent than the wild-type strain did. Intercellular action of AcmA was shown by mixing end-exponential-phase cultures of an acmA deletion mutant and a tripeptidase (pepT) deletion mutant. PepT, produced by the acmA mutant, was detected in the supernatant of the mixed culture, but no PepT was present in the culture supernatant of the acmA mutant. A plasmid was constructed in which acmA, lacking its own promoter, was placed downstream of the inducible promoter/operator region of the temperate lactococcal bacteriophage r1t. After mitomycin induction of an exponential-phase culture of L. lactis LL302 carrying this plasmid, the cells became subject to autolysis, resulting in the release of intracellular proteins. PMID:9212419

  9. Rainbow Vectors for Broad-Range Bacterial Fluorescence Labeling.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Mariette; Damron, F Heath

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fluorescent proteins have been widely used to study protein function, localization or interaction, promoter activity and regulation, drug discovery or for non-invasive imaging. They have been extensively modified to improve brightness, stability, and oligomerization state. However, only a few studies have focused on understanding the dynamics of fluorescent proteins expression in bacteria. In this work, we developed a set plasmids encoding 12 fluorescent proteins for bacterial labeling to facilitate the study of pathogen-host interactions. These broad-spectrum plasmids can be used with a wide variety of Gram-negative microorganisms including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Shigella flexneri or Klebsiella pneumoniae. For comparison, fluorescent protein expression and physical characteristics in Escherichia coli were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and in vivo imaging. Fluorescent proteins derived from the Aequorea Victoria family showed high photobleaching, while proteins form the Discosoma sp. and the Fungia coccina family were more photostable for microscopy applications. Only E2-Crimson, mCherry and mKeima were successfully detected for in vivo applications. Overall, E2-Crimson was the fastest maturing protein tested in E. coli with the best overall performance in the study parameters. This study provides a unified comparison and comprehensive characterization of fluorescent protein photostability, maturation and toxicity, and offers general recommendations on the optimal fluorescent proteins for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:26937640

  10. Successful transfer of plasmid DNA into in vitro cells transfected with an inorganic plasmid-Mg/Al-LDH nanobiocomposite material as a vector for gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffri Masarudin, Mas; Yusoff, Khatijah; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Zobir Hussein, Mohd

    2009-01-01

    The delivery of a full plasmid, encoding the green fluorescent protein gene into African monkey kidney (Vero3) cells, was successfully achieved using nanobiocomposites based on layered double hydroxides. This demonstrated the potential of using the system as an alternative DNA delivery vector. Intercalation of the circular plasmid DNA, pEGFP-N2, into Mg/Al-NO3- layered double hydroxides (LDH) was accomplished through anion exchange routes to form the nanobiocomposite material. The host was previously synthesized at the Mg2+ to Al3+ molar ratio Ri = 2 and subsequently intercalated with plasmid DNA. Size expansion of the interlamellae host from 8.8 Å in LDH to 42 Å was observed in the resulting nanobiocomposite, indicating stable hybridization of the plasmid DNA. The powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD) results, supplemented with Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, compositional and electrophoresis studies confirmed the encapsulation episode of the biomaterial. In order to elucidate the use of this resulting nanobiocomposite as a delivery vector, an MTT assay was performed to determine any cytotoxic effects of the host towards cells. The intercalated pEGFP-N2 anion was later successfully recovered through acidification with HNO3 after treatment with DNA-degrading enzymes, thus also showing the ability of the LDH host to protect the intercalated biomaterial from degradation. Cell transfection studies on Vero3 cells were then performed, where cells transfected with the nanobiocomposite exhibited fluorescence as early as 12 h post-treatment compared to naked delivery of the plasmid itself.

  11. Sustained activity and spectrum of selected extended-spectrum beta-lactams (carbapenems and cefepime) against Enterobacter spp. and ESBL-producing Klebsiella spp.: report from the SENTRY antimicrobial surveillance program (USA, 1997-2000).

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Biedenbach, Douglas J; Gales, Ana C

    2003-01-01

    Enterobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. are important clinical pathogens that frequently exhibit resistance to third-generation cephalosporins. In Enterobacter spp. strains, resistance is usually due to derepression of the Amp C locus, whereas plasmid-encoded extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) are primarily responsible for resistance in Klebsiella spp. Here we report the results from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program concerning the rates and trends of resistance to extended-spectrum beta-lactams and other antimicrobial agents in Enterobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. isolated between 1997 and 2000 in participating hospitals in the United States. Among Enterobacter spp., resistance (MIC>or=32 mg/l) to aztreonam, ceftazidime and ceftriaxone ranged from 12.3 to 21.2% over the 4 years, whereas resistance in Klebsiella (MIC>or=2 mg/l) ranged from 5.9 to 6.8%. There was no trend toward increased resistance to these beta-lactam agents over the monitored period. Carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem) and cefepime had excellent activity against both ceftazidime-susceptible and -resistant Enterobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. (>99% susceptible), although the minimum inhibitory concentration values of cefepime were higher in ceftazidime-resistant isolates compared with ceftazidime-susceptible isolates. Co-resistance to other antimicrobial agents was common in both tested genus groups. PMID:12507831

  12. Role of the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in voltage generation and Na(+) extrusion in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Vorburger, Thomas; Nedielkov, Ruslan; Brosig, Alexander; Bok, Eva; Schunke, Emina; Steffen, Wojtek; Mayer, Sonja; Götz, Friedrich; Möller, Heiko M; Steuber, Julia

    2016-04-01

    For Vibrio cholerae, the coordinated import and export of Na(+) is crucial for adaptation to habitats with different osmolarities. We investigated the Na(+)-extruding branch of the sodium cycle in this human pathogen by in vivo (23)Na-NMR spectroscopy. The Na(+) extrusion activity of cells was monitored after adding glucose which stimulated respiration via the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR). In a V. cholerae deletion mutant devoid of the Na(+)-NQR encoding genes (nqrA-F), rates of respiratory Na(+) extrusion were decreased by a factor of four, but the cytoplasmic Na(+) concentration was essentially unchanged. Furthermore, the mutant was impaired in formation of transmembrane voltage (ΔΨ, inside negative) and did not grow under hypoosmotic conditions at pH8.2 or above. This growth defect could be complemented by transformation with the plasmid encoded nqr operon. In an alkaline environment, Na(+)/H(+) antiporters acidify the cytoplasm at the expense of the transmembrane voltage. It is proposed that, at alkaline pH and limiting Na(+) concentrations, the Na(+)-NQR is crucial for generation of a transmembrane voltage to drive the import of H(+) by electrogenic Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. Our study provides the basis to understand the role of the Na(+)-NQR in pathogenicity of V. cholerae and other pathogens relying on this primary Na(+) pump for respiration. PMID:26721205

  13. Biosafety of biotechnologically important microalgae: intrinsic suicide switch implementation in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Čelešnik, Helena; Tanšek, Anja; Tahirović, Aneja; Vižintin, Angelika; Mustar, Jernej; Vidmar, Vita; Dolinar, Marko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, photosynthetic autotrophic cyanobacteria have attracted interest for biotechnological applications for sustainable production of valuable metabolites. Although biosafety issues can have a great impact on public acceptance of cyanobacterial biotechnology, biosafety of genetically modified cyanobacteria has remained largely unexplored. We set out to incorporate biocontainment systems in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Plasmid-encoded safeguards were constructed using the nonspecific nuclease NucA from Anabaena combined with different metal-ion inducible promoters. In this manner, conditional lethality was dependent on intracellular DNA degradation for regulated autokilling as well as preclusion of horizontal gene transfer. In cells carrying the suicide switch comprising the nucA gene fused to a variant of the copM promoter, efficient inducible autokilling was elicited. Parallel to nuclease-based safeguards, cyanobacterial toxin/antitoxin (TA) modules were examined in biosafety switches. Rewiring of Synechocystis TA pairs ssr1114/slr0664 and slr6101/slr6100 for conditional lethality using metal-ion responsive promoters resulted in reduced growth, rather than cell killing, suggesting cells could cope with elevated toxin levels. Overall, promoter properties and translation efficiency influenced the efficacy of biocontainment systems. Several metal-ion promoters were tested in the context of safeguards, and selected promoters, including a nrsB variant, were characterized by beta-galactosidase reporter assay. PMID:27029902

  14. Prenyl Ammonium Salts – New Carriers for Gene Delivery: A B16-F10 Mouse Melanoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Grecka, Emilia; Statkiewicz, Malgorzata; Gorska, Agnieszka; Biernacka, Marzena; Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Masnyk, Marek; Chmielewski, Marek; Gawarecka, Katarzyna; Chojnacki, Tadeusz; Swiezewska, Ewa; Malecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prenyl ammonium iodides (Amino-Prenols, APs), semi-synthetic polyprenol derivatives were studied as prospective novel gene transfer agents. Methods AP-7, -8, -11 and -15 (aminoprenols composed of 7, 8, 11 or 15 isoprene units, respectively) were examined for their capacity to form complexes with pDNA, for cytotoxicity and ability to transfect genes to cells. Results All the carriers were able to complex DNA. The highest, comparable to commercial reagents, transfection efficiency was observed for AP-15. Simultaneously, AP-15 exhibited the lowest negative impact on cell viability and proliferation—considerably lower than that of commercial agents. AP-15/DOPE complexes were also efficient to introduce pDNA to cells, without much effect on cell viability. Transfection with AP-15/DOPE complexes influenced the expression of a very few among 44 tested genes involved in cellular lipid metabolism. Furthermore, complexes containing AP-15 and therapeutic plasmid, encoding the TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 2 (TIMP2), introduced the TIMP2 gene with high efficiency to B16-F10 melanoma cells but not to B16-F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice, as confirmed by TIMP2 protein level determination. Conclusion Obtained results indicate that APs have a potential as non-viral vectors for cell transfection. PMID:27088717

  15. Epidemiology of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii in Mediterranean Countries

    PubMed Central

    Djahmi, Nassima; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Pantel, Alix; Dekhil, Mazouz; Sotto, Albert; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and global spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii are of great concern to health services worldwide. These β-lactamases hydrolyse almost all β-lactams, are plasmid-encoded, and are easily transferable among bacterial species. They are mostly of the KPC, VIM, IMP, NDM, and OXA-48 types. Their current extensive spread worldwide in Enterobacteriaceae is an important source of concern. Infections caused by these bacteria have limited treatment options and have been associated with high mortality rates. Carbapenemase producers are mainly identified among Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and A. baumannii and still mostly in hospital settings and rarely in the community. The Mediterranean region is of interest due to a great diversity and population mixing. The prevalence of carbapenemases is particularly high, with this area constituting one of the most important reservoirs. The types of carbapenemase vary among countries, partially depending on the population exchange relationship between the regions and the possible reservoirs of each carbapenemase. This review described the epidemiology of carbapenemases produced by enterobacteria and A. baumannii in this part of the world highlighting the worrisome situation and the need to screen and detect these enzymes to prevent and control their dissemination. PMID:24955354

  16. Correlation between the presence of sequences homologous to the vir region of Salmonella dublin plasmid pSDL2 and the virulence of twenty-two Salmonella serotypes in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Roudier, C; Krause, M; Fierer, J; Guiney, D G

    1990-01-01

    Large plasmids encoding important virulence properties have been found in several Salmonella serotypes. We have studied the relationship between the presence of a highly conserved 4-kilobase (kb) EcoRI fragment from the plasmid virulence region and pathogenicity for mice of 53 isolates representing 22 serotypes of Salmonella. Only strains possessing the homologous 4-kb region were virulent for mice. In addition, we transferred the virulence plasmid from S. dublin into nine different serotypes, including S. typhi and S. paratyphi A, that lack a native virulence plasmid. Only S. heidelberg and S. newport were rendered mouse virulent by the introduction of the S. dublin plasmid. This study demonstrates that plasmid-mediated virulence sequences are required for Salmonella virulence in mice, but many strains, including the agents of human typhoid fever, also lack chromosomal genes necessary to produce lethal systemic disease in mice. Since all the major Salmonella strains that are host-adapted to animals carry virulence plasmids, it appears that these plasmids are important in mediating systemic infection in animals and may contribute to septicemic, nontyphoid salmonellosis in humans. Images PMID:2323813

  17. Expression of multiple tfb genes in different Halobacterium salinarum strains and interaction of TFB with transcriptional activator GvpE.

    PubMed

    Bleiholder, Anne; Frommherz, Regina; Teufel, Katharina; Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2012-04-01

    Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 contains multiple TBP and TFB proteins required for the recruitment of RNA polymerase for transcription initiation. The presence and the expression of genes encoding TFB were investigated in the two Hbt. salinarum strains NRC-1 and PHH1 and the mutant strain PHH4. The plasmid-encoded tfbC and tfbE genes of NRC-1 were lacking in PHH1 and PHH4. The 5'-end of the tfbF transcript was determined and contained a 5'-untranslated region of 39 nucleotides able to form a stem-loop structure. The expression of these tfb genes was studied in cultures growing at 15, 37°C and under heat shock conditions. Cold temperatures reduced growth and except for tfbF also the amounts of all tfb transcripts. However, the formation of gas vesicles increased in PHH1 and NRC-1. Heat shock reduced growth of PHH1 and NRC-1, but PHH4 was not affected. A 100-fold increase in tfbA and tfbB mRNA was observed in PHH1 and PHH4, whereas NRC-1 reduced the amounts of these transcripts and increased the expression of tfbG. All TFB proteins tested were able to interact with the transcription activator GvpE involved in gas vesicle formation that thus is able to recruit TFB to the gvp promoter. PMID:21969032

  18. Pet, an Autotransporter Enterotoxin from Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Eslava, Carlos; Navarro-García, Fernando; Czeczulin, John R.; Henderson, Ian R.; Cravioto, Alejandro; Nataro, James P.

    1998-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging cause of diarrheal illness. Clinical data suggest that diarrhea caused by EAEC is predominantly secretory in nature, but the responsible enterotoxin has not been described. Work from our laboratories has implicated a ca. 108-kDa protein as a heat-labile enterotoxin and cytotoxin, as evidenced by rises in short-circuit current and falls in tissue resistance in rat jejunal tissue mounted in an Ussing chamber. Here we report the genetic cloning, sequencing, and characterization of this high-molecular-weight heat-labile toxin. The toxin (designated the plasmid-encoded toxin [Pet]) is encoded on the 65-MDa adherence-related plasmid of EAEC strain 042. Nucleotide sequence analysis suggests that the toxin is a member of the autotransporter class of proteins, characterized by the presence of a conserved C-terminal domain which forms a β-barrel pore in the bacterial outer membrane and through which the mature protein is transported. The Pet toxin is highly homologous to the EspP protease of enterohemorrhagic E. coli and to EspC of enteropathogenic E. coli, an as yet cryptic protein. In addition to its potential role in EAEC infection, Pet represents the first enterotoxin within the autotransporter class of secreted proteins. We hypothesize that other closely related members of this class may also produce enterotoxic effects. PMID:9632580

  19. Introduction of protein or DNA delivered via recombinant Salmonella typhimurium into the major histocompatibility complex class I presentation pathway of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Catic, A; Dietrich, G; Gentschev, I; Goebel, W; Kaufmann, S H; Hess, J

    1999-02-01

    Recombinant (r) Salmonella typhimurium aroA strains which display the hen egg ovalbumin OVA(257-264) peptide SIINFEKL in secreted form were constructed. In addition, attenuated rS. typhimurium pcDNA-OVA constructs harbouring a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding complete OVA were used to introduce the immunodominant OVA(257-264) epitope into the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation pathway. Both modes of antigen delivery (DNA and protein) by Salmonella vaccine carriers stimulated OVA(257-264)-specific CD8 T-cell hybridomas. An in vitro infection system was established that allowed both rSalmonella carrier devices to facilitate MHC class I delivery of OVA(257-264) by coexpression of listeriolysin (Hly) or by coinfection with rS. typhimurium Hlys (Hess J., Gentschev I., Miko D., Welzel M., Ladel C., Goebel W., Kaufmann S.H.E., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93 (1996) 1458-1463). Coexpression of Hly and coinfection with rS. typhimurium Hlys slightly improved MHC class I processing of OVA. Our data provide further evidence for the feasibility of attenuated, Hly-expressing rS. typhimurium carriers secreting heterologous antigens or harbouring heterologous DNA as effective vaccines for stimulating CD8 T cells in addition to CD4 T cells. PMID:10594975

  20. Evaluation of Different DNA Vaccines against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Stefano; Ramadori, Giorgio; Villa, Riccardo; Borghetti, Paolo; de Angelis, Elena; Cantoni, Anna Maria; Corradi, Attilio; Amici, Augusto; Ferrari, Maura

    2013-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, there have been different experiences with the plasmid DNA vaccination. In this area and with the hypothesis to demonstrate the effectiveness of different plasmids encoding porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome (PRRS), five DNA vaccines against PRRS were evaluated for their innocuity and efficacy in pigs. Eighteen animals were divided into five groups which were injected with five (A, B, C, D, E) different DNA vaccines. Albeit, none of the proposed vaccines were able to protect the animals against PRRS virus. Only vaccines A and B were able to reduce the clinical signs of the infection. ELISA IgM were detected 30 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine A or B. ELISA IgG were detected 90 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine B or C. Neutralizing antibody were detected Post Challenge Days 61 (PCD) in all groups. In the pigs inoculated with Vaccine C, IFN-γ were detected 90 days after first vaccination, and after challenge exposure they increased. In the other groups, the IFN-γ were detected after challenge infection. Pigs injected with each of the vaccines A, B, C, D and E showed a significantly higher level of CD4−CD8+ lymphocytes (p < 0.001) after infection in comparison with their controls. PMID:26344342

  1. Functional participation of a nifH-arsA2 chimeric fusion gene in arsenic reduction by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Gavini, Nara

    2008-04-04

    The NifH (dimer) and ArsA proteins are structural homologs and share common motifs like nucleotide-binding domains, signal transduction domains and also possible similar metal center ligands. Given the similarity between two proteins, we investigated if the NifH protein from Azotobacter vinelandii could functionally substitute for the ArsA1 half of the ArsA protein of Escherichia coli. The chimeric NifH-ArsA2 protein was expressed and detected in the E. coli strain by Western blotting. Growth comparisons of E. coli strains containing plasmids encoding for complete ArsA, partial ArsA (ArsA2) or chimeric ArsA (NifH-ArsA2) in media with increasing sodium arsenite concentrations (0-5 mM) showed that the chimeric NifH-ArsA2 could substitute for the ArsA. This functional complementation demonstrated the strong conservation of essential domains that have been maintained in NifH and ArsA even after their divergence to perform varied functions.

  2. An amino-terminal domain of Enterococcus faecalis aggregation substance is required for aggregation, bacterial internalization by epithelial cells and binding to lipoteichoic acid.

    PubMed

    Waters, Christopher M; Hirt, Helmut; McCormick, John K; Schlievert, Patrick M; Wells, Carol L; Dunny, G M

    2004-05-01

    Aggregation substance (AS), a plasmid-encoded surface protein of Enterococcus faecalis, plays important roles in virulence and antibiotic resistance transfer. Previous studies have suggested that AS-mediated aggregation of enterococcal cells could involve the binding of this protein to cell wall lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Here, a method to purify an undegraded form of Asc10, the AS of the plasmid pCF10, is described. Using this purified protein, direct binding of Asc10 to purified E. faecalis LTA was demonstrated. Equivalent binding of Asc10 to LTA purified from INY3000, an E. faecalis strain that is incapable of aggregation, was also observed. Surprisingly, mutations in a previously identified aggregation domain from amino acids 473 to 683 that abolished aggregation had no effect on LTA binding. In frame deletion analysis of Asc10 was used to identify a second aggregation domain located in the N-terminus of the protein from amino acids 156 to 358. A purified Asc10 mutant protein lacking this domain showed reduced LTA binding, while a purified N-terminal fragment from amino acids 44-331 had high LTA binding. Like the previously described aggregation domain, the newly identified Asc10((156-358)) aggregation domain was also required for efficient internalization of E. faecalis into HT-29 enterocytes. Thus, Asc10 possess two distinct domains required for aggregation and eukaryotic cell internalization: an N-terminal domain that promotes binding to LTA and a second domain located near the middle of the protein. PMID:15130132

  3. DNA/polyethyleneimine/hyaluronic acid small complex particles and tumor suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoko; Yoshihara, Chieko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Koyama, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    The highest barriers for non-viral vectors to an efficient in vivo gene transfection would be (1) non-specific interaction with biological molecules, and (2) large size of the DNA complex particles. Protective coating of the DNA/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes by hyaluronic acid (HA) effectively diminished the adverse interactions with biological molecules. Here we found HA also protected the DNA/PEI complexes against aggregation and inactivation through lyophilization-and-rehydration procedures. It allows us to prepare the concentrated very small DNA complex particles (<70 nm) suspension by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by lyophilized-and-rehydrated to a small volume. In vivo gene expression efficiency of the small complex was examined with mice subcutaneously inoculated with B16 melanoma cells. These formulations showed high reporter-gene expression level in tumor after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice. Small complex was then made of the plasmid encoding GM-CSF gene, and injected into the mice bearing subcutaneous solid B16 tumor. After intravenous injection, it induced apparent tumor growth suppression in 50% of the mice. Notably, significant therapeutic effect was detected in the mice that received intratumoral injection, and 75% of the mice were completely cured with disappearance of tumor. PMID:20047759

  4. Novel Antitumor Strategy Utilizing a Plasmid Expressing a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen as a “Danger Signal” to Block Immune Escape of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Yoshihara, Chieko; Ito, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Immune escape of tumor cells is one of the main obstacles hindering the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. We developed a novel strategy to block immune escape by transfecting tumor cells in vivo with genes of pathogenic antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). This induces presentation of the TB antigen on tumor cell surfaces, which can be recognized by antigen presenting cells (APCs) as a “danger signal” to stimulate antitumor immune response. This strategy is also expected to amplify the immune response against tumor-associated antigens, and block immune escape of the tumor. DNA/PEI/chondroitin sulfate ternary complex is a highly effective non-viral gene vector system for in vivo transfection. A therapeutic complex was prepared using a plasmid encoding the TB antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6). This was injected intratumorally into syngeneic tumor-bearing mice, and induced significant tumor growth suppression comparable to or higher than similar complexes expressing cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). Co-transfection of the cytokine-genes and the ESAT-6-gene enhanced the antitumor efficacy of either treatment alone. In addition, complete tumor regression was achieved with the combination of ESAT-6 and IL-2 genes. PMID:26213962

  5. Effects of Efflux Transporter Genes on Susceptibility of Escherichia coli to Tigecycline (GAR-936)

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Takahiro; Saito, Asami; Nishino, Kunihiko; Tamura, Norihisa; Yamaguchi, Akihito

    2004-01-01

    The activity of tigecycline, 9-(t-butylglycylamido)-minocycline, against Escherichia coli KAM3 (acrB) strains harboring plasmids encoding various tetracycline-specific efflux transporter genes, tet(B), tet(C), and tet(K), and multidrug transporter genes, acrAB, acrEF, and bcr, was examined. Tigecycline showed potent activity against all three Tet-expressing, tetracycline-resistant strains, with the MICs for the strains being equal to that for the host strain. In the Tet(B)-containing vesicle study, tigecycline did not significantly inhibit tetracycline efflux-coupled proton translocation and at 10 μM did not cause proton translocation. This suggests that tigecycline is not recognized by the Tet efflux transporter at a low concentration; therefore, it exhibits significant antibacterial activity. These properties can explain its potent activity against bacteria with a Tet efflux resistance determinant. Tigecycline induced the Tet(B) protein approximately four times more efficiently than tetracycline, as determined by Western blotting, indicating that it is at least recognized by a TetR repressor. The MICs for multidrug efflux proteins AcrAB and AcrEF were increased fourfold. Tigecycline inhibited active ethidium bromide efflux from intact E. coli cells overproducing AcrAB. Therefore, tigecycline is a possible substrate of AcrAB and its close homolog, AcrEF, which are resistance-modulation-division-type multicomponent efflux transporters. PMID:15155219

  6. Subtractive Hybridization Yields a Silver Resistance Determinant Unique to Nosocomial Pathogens in the Enterobacter cloacae Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The heterogeneity and the increasing clinical importance of the Enterobacter cloacae complex have often been discussed. However, little is known about molecular factors causing pathogenicity within this nomenspecies. Here, we analyzed the genetic differences between an avirulent plant isolate and a pathogenic strain causing an outbreak with septicemia in three patients. We identified an IncHI-2 plasmid as a major difference between these two strains. Besides resistance to several antibiotics, this plasmid encoded a silver resistance determinant. We further showed that this sil determinant was present not only in the analyzed outbreak strain but also in the vast majority of clinical isolates of the E. cloacae complex, predominantly in (sub)species that frequently cause nosocomial infections. The identified sil determinant was highly conserved within the E. cloacae complex and mediated resistance to up to 600 μM silver nitrate. As silver is often used as a disinfectant and treatment for burn wounds, we present here an important fitness factor within the clinically most prevalent subspecies of the E. cloacae complex. This provides a possible explanation for their unequal involvement in nosocomial and especially burn wound infections. PMID:22837330

  7. Deletion of the Aconitase Gene in Corynebacterium glutamicum Causes Strong Selection Pressure for Secondary Mutations Inactivating Citrate Synthase▿†

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Meike; Mustafi, Nurije; Krug, Andreas; Bott, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The aconitase gene acn of Corynebacterium glutamicum is regulated by four transcriptional regulators, indicating that the synthesis of this enzyme is carefully controlled. To understand the causes for this elaborate regulation, the properties of the Δacn-1 deletion mutant were analyzed in detail. The mutant was glutamate auxotrophic in glucose minimal medium, showed a strong growth defect, and secreted large amounts of acetate. None of these phenotypes could be complemented by plasmid-encoded aconitase, suggesting the presence of a secondary mutation. In fact, a point mutation within the gltA gene encoding citrate synthase was identified that caused the instability of the protein and an almost complete lack of its enzymatic activity. Subsequently, 27 further, independent Δacn clones were isolated, and 15 of them were found to contain distinct mutations in gltA, causing the loss of citrate synthase activity. A similar result was observed for mutants lacking the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene icd. In this case, 8 of 24 Δicd clones contained additional mutations in gltA. Indirect evidence was obtained that elevated intracellular citrate concentrations could be the cause of this selection pressure. Accordingly, the careful control of aconitase synthesis might have evolved due to the necessity to avoid inhibitory cytoplasmic citrate levels on the one hand and to prevent the excessive synthesis of an oxygen-sensitive protein requiring both iron and sulfur on the other hand. PMID:21984793

  8. Protein-Nanocrystal Conjugates Support a Single Filament Polymerization Model in R1 Plasmid Segregation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Charina L.; Claridge, Shelley A.; Garner, Ethan C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2008-07-15

    To ensure inheritance by daughter cells, many low-copy number bacterial plasmids, including the R1 drug-resistance plasmid, encode their own DNA segregation systems. The par operon of plasmid R1 directs construction of a simple spindle structure that converts free energy of polymerization of an actin-like protein, ParM, into work required to move sister plasmids to opposite poles of rod-shaped cells. The structures of individual components have been solved, but little is known about the ultrastructure of the R1 spindle. To determine the number of ParM filaments in a minimal R1 spindle, we used DNA-gold nanocrystal conjugates as mimics of the R1 plasmid. Wefound that each end of a single polar ParM filament binds to a single ParR/parC-gold complex, consistent with the idea that ParM filaments bind in the hollow core of the ParR/parC ring complex. Our results further suggest that multifilament spindles observed in vivo are associated with clusters of plasmidssegregating as a unit.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Macrococcus caseolyticus strain JCSCS5402, [corrected] reflecting the ancestral genome of the human-pathogenic staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Baba, Tadashi; Kuwahara-Arai, Kyoko; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Ito, Teruyo; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2009-02-01

    We isolated the methicillin-resistant Macrococcus caseolyticus strain JCSC5402 from animal meat in a supermarket and determined its whole-genome nucleotide sequence. This is the first report on the genome analysis of a macrococcal species that is evolutionarily closely related to the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis. The essential biological pathways of M. caseolyticus are similar to those of staphylococci. However, the species has a small chromosome (2.1 MB) and lacks many sugar and amino acid metabolism pathways and a plethora of virulence genes that are present in S. aureus. On the other hand, M. caseolyticus possesses a series of oxidative phosphorylation machineries that are closely related to those in the family Bacillaceae. We also discovered a probable primordial form of a Macrococcus methicillin resistance gene complex, mecIRAm, on one of the eight plasmids harbored by the M. caseolyticus strain. This is the first finding of a plasmid-encoding methicillin resistance gene. Macrococcus is considered to reflect the genome of ancestral bacteria before the speciation of staphylococcal species and may be closely associated with the origin of the methicillin resistance gene complex of the notorious human pathogen methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:19074389

  10. Direct transfer of transforming growth factor beta 1 gene into arteries stimulates fibrocellular hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Nabel, E G; Shum, L; Pompili, V J; Yang, Z Y; San, H; Shu, H B; Liptay, S; Gold, L; Gordon, D; Derynck, R

    1993-01-01

    The arterial wall responds to thrombosis or mechanical injury through the induction of specific gene products that increase cellular proliferation and connective tissue formation. These changes result in intimal hyperplasia that is observed in restenosis and the early phases of atherosclerosis. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is a secreted multi-functional protein that plays an important role in embryonal development and in repair following tissue injury. However, the function of TGF-beta 1 in vascular cell growth in vivo has not been defined. In this report, we have evaluated the role of TGF-beta 1 in the pathophysiology of intimal and medial hyperplasia by gene transfer of an expression plasmid encoding active TGF-beta 1 into porcine arteries. Expression of TGF-beta 1 in normal arteries resulted in substantial extracellular matrix production accompanied by intimal and medial hyperplasia. Increased procollagen, collagen, and proteoglycan synthesis in the neointima was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry relative to control transfected arteries. Expression of TGF-beta 1 induced a distinctly different program of gene expression and biologic response from the platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF B) gene: procollagen synthesis induced by TGF-beta 1 was greater, and cellular proliferation was less prominent. These findings show that TGF-beta 1 differentially modulates extracellular matrix production and cellular proliferation in the arterial wall in vivo and could play a reparative role in the response to arterial injury. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8248168

  11. Multiple factors affect immunogenicity of DNA plasmid HIV vaccines in human clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xia; Morgan, Cecilia; Yu, Xuesong; DeRosa, Stephen; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Montefiori, David C.; Kublin, James; Corey, Larry; Keefer, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmid DNA vaccines have been licensed for use in domesticated animals because of their excellent immunogenicity, but none have yet been licensed for use in humans. Here we report a retrospective analysis of 1218 healthy human volunteers enrolled in 10 phase I clinical trials in which DNA plasmids encoding HIV antigens were administered. Elicited T-cell immune responses were quantified by validated intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) stimulated with HIV peptide pools. HIV-specific binding and neutralizing antibody activities were also analyzed using validated assays. Results showed that, in the absence of adjuvants and boosting with alternative vaccines, DNA vaccines elicited CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell responses in an average of 13.3% (95% CI: 9.8% to 17.8%) and 37.7% (95% CI: 31.9% to 43.8%) of vaccine recipients, respectively. Three vaccinations (versus 2) improved the proportion of subjects with antigen-specific CD8+ responses (p=0.02), as did increased DNA dosage (p=0.007). Furthermore, female gender and participants having a lower Body Mass Index were independently associated with higher CD4+ T-cell response rate (p=0.001 and p=0.008, respectively). These vaccines elicited minimal neutralizing and binding antibody responses. These findings of the immunogenicity of HIV DNA vaccines in humans can provide guidance for future clinical trials. PMID:25820067

  12. Synthetic Consensus HIV-1 DNA Induces Potent Cellular Immune Responses and Synthesis of Granzyme B, Perforin in HIV Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection. PMID:25531694

  13. Piezoelectric permeabilization of mammalian dermal tissue for in vivo DNA delivery leads to enhanced protein expression and increased immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Kate E; Kardos, Thomas; McCoy, Jay R; Fons, Michael P; Kemmerrer, Stephen; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2011-01-01

    Electropermeabilization of mammalian cells is a technique that has been used for the delivery of therapeutics, such as DNA plasmids or DNA vaccines. Typically, delivery via electropermeabilization occurs through injection of the substance into the tissue of interest followed by the insertion of electrodes at the site and the application of brief electrical pulses. Here we detail a novel and innovative contactless electropermeabilization method to deliver DNA plasmids to dermal tissue in vivo. This process has the advantage of eliminating the insertion of additional needles that serve as electrodes to facilitate the application of electric pulses in conventional electroporation processes. Plasmid encoding GFP was injected into guinea pig skin and pulsed with the novel contactless electropermeabilization method. Three days following treatment, robust GFP expression was observed on the skin of pulsed animals. Strong humoral immune responses were also achieved when a DNA vaccine expressing the influenza antigen NP was delivered and pulsed using the novel device in comparison to naked injection alone. This delivery method has the advantage of being contactless and suggests that gene transfer via this mode warrants further development. PMID:21263230

  14. Synthetic consensus HIV-1 DNA induces potent cellular immune responses and synthesis of granzyme B, perforin in HIV infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection. PMID:25531694

  15. Plasmid-based gene transfer ameliorates visceral storage in a mouse model of Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Katsuyama, Kayoko; Suzuki, Kyoko; Kosaka, Kenji; Aoki, Ichiro; Yamanaka, Shoji

    2003-03-01

    Sandhoff disease is a severe neurodegenerative disorder with visceral involvement caused by mutations in the HEXB gene coding for the beta subunit of the lysosomal hexosaminidases A and B. HEXB mutations result in the accumulation of undegraded substrates such as GM2 and GA2 in lysosomes. We evaluated the efficacy of cationic liposome-mediated plasmid gene therapy using the Sandhoff disease mouse, an animal model of a human lysosomal storage disease. The mice received a single intravenous injection of two plasmids, encoding the human alpha and beta subunits of hexosaminidase cDNAs. As a result, 10-35% of normal levels of hexosaminidase expression, theoretically therapeutic levels, were achieved in most visceral organs, but not in the brain, 3 days after injection with decreased levels by day 7. Histochemical staining confirmed widespread enzyme activity in visceral organs. Both GA2 and GM2 were reduced by almost 10% and 50%, respectively, on day 3, and by 60% and 70% on day 7 compared with untreated age-matched Sandhoff disease mice. Consistent with the biochemical results, a reduction in GM2 was observed in liver cells histologically as well. These initial findings support further development of the plasmid gene therapy against lysosomal diseases with visceral pathology. PMID:12682727

  16. A peptide factor secreted by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius exhibits properties of both bacteriocins and virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Piejko, Marcin; Bzowska, Monika; Pieta, Piotr; Krzysik, Monika; Mazurek, Łukasz; Guevara-Lora, Ibeth; Bukowski, Michał; Sabat, Artur J; Friedrich, Alexander W; Bonar, Emilia; Międzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Mak, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a common commensal bacterium colonizing the skin and mucosal surfaces of household animals. However, it has recently emerged as a dangerous opportunistic pathogen, comparable to S. aureus for humans. The epidemiological situation is further complicated by the increasing number of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius infections and evidence of gene transmission driving antibiotic resistance between staphylococci colonizing human and zoonotic hosts. In the present study, we describe a unique peptide, BacSp222, that possesses features characteristic of both bacteriocins and virulence factors. BacSp222 is secreted in high quantities by S. pseudintermedius strain 222 isolated from dog skin lesions. This linear, fifty-amino-acid highly cationic peptide is plasmid-encoded and does not exhibit significant sequence similarities to any other known peptides or proteins. BacSp222 kills gram-positive bacteria (at doses ranging from 0.1 to several micromol/l) but also demonstrates significant cytotoxic activities towards eukaryotic cells at slightly higher concentrations. Moreover, at nanomolar concentrations, the peptide also possesses modulatory properties, efficiently enhancing interferon gamma-induced nitric oxide release in murine macrophage-like cell lines. BacSp222 appears to be one of the first examples of multifunctional peptides that breaks the convention of splitting bacteriocins and virulence factors into two unrelated groups. PMID:26411997

  17. ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Africa – a non-systematic literature review of research published 2008–2012

    PubMed Central

    Storberg, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Enterobacteriaceae producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) has been found all over the world, and risk factors for acquiring these bacteria involve hospital care and antibiotic treatment. Surveillance studies are present in Europe, North America, and Asia, but there is no summarizing research published on the situation in Africa. Aim This review aims to describe the prevalence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in hospital and community settings in Africa and the ESBL genes involved. Method A non-systematic literature search was performed in PubMed. All articles published between 2008 and 2012 were screened and read in full text. Relevant articles were assessed for quality of evidence and included in the review. Articles were divided into regional areas in Africa and tabulated. Results ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in hospitalized patients and in communities varies largely between countries and specimens but is common in Africa. ESBLs (class A and D) and plasmid-encoded AmpC (pAmpC) were regularly found, but carbapenemases were also present. Conclusion ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in hospital and community settings in Africa is common. Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance needs to be implemented in Africa to tailor interventions targeted at stopping the dissemination of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:24765249

  18. Pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of mitofusin-2 via PI3K/Akt signaling in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    MA, LI; CHANG, YUAN; YU, LONG; HE, WENBO; LIU, YUEPING

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial GTPase mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) gene is a novel gene characterized as a cell proliferation inhibitor. Mfn2 has previously been reported to play a role in regulating cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation in a number of cell types. However, there are no studies on the effect of Mfn2 in breast cancer. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the function and mechanism of Mfn2 in breast cancer. A plasmid encoding the complete Mfn2 open reading frame (pEGFP-Mfn2) was used to infect breast cancer cells. The effect of Mfn2 on proliferation was assessed by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation analyses. Flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and western blot analyses were used to test the effects of Mfn2 on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis. Additionally, the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway was analyzed after pEGFP-Mfn2 was transfected into MCF-7 cells. The results revealed that Mfn2 suppressed the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by regulating more cells at the G0/G1 phase and decreasing proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cyclin A expression. The results also demonstrated that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in Mfn2-regulated proliferation and apoptosis. Taken together, this indicates that Mfn2 mediates MCF-7 cell proliferation and apoptosis via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Mfn2 may thus be a significant therapeutic target in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26788214

  19. The complete genome sequence for putative H₂- and S-oxidizer Candidatus Sulfuricurvum sp., assembled de novo from an aquifer-derived metagenome.

    PubMed

    Handley, Kim M; Bartels, Daniela; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Williams, Kenneth H; Trimble, William L; Skinner, Kelly; Gilbert, Jack A; Desai, Narayan; Glass, Elizabeth M; Paczian, Tobias; Wilke, Andreas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios; Kemner, Kenneth M; Meyer, Folker

    2014-11-01

    We reconstructed the complete 2.4 Mb-long genome of a previously uncultivated epsilonproteobacterium, Candidatus Sulfuricurvum sp. RIFRC-1, via assembly of short-read shotgun metagenomic data using a complexity reduction approach. Genome-based comparisons indicate the bacterium is a novel species within the Sulfuricurvum genus, which contains one cultivated representative, S. kujiense. Divergence between the species appears due in part to extensive genomic rearrangements, gene loss and chromosomal versus plasmid encoding of certain (respiratory) genes by RIFRC-1. Deoxyribonucleic acid for the genome was obtained from terrestrial aquifer sediment, in which RIFRC-1 comprised ∼ 47% of the bacterial community. Genomic evidence suggests RIFRC-1 is a chemolithoautotrophic diazotroph capable of deriving energy for growth by microaerobic or nitrate-/nitric oxide-dependent oxidation of S°, sulfide or sulfite or H₂oxidation. Carbon may be fixed via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. Consistent with these physiological attributes, the local aquifer was microoxic with small concentrations of available nitrate, small but elevated concentrations of reduced sulfur and NH(4)(+) /NH₃-limited. Additionally, various mechanisms for heavy metal and metalloid tolerance and virulence point to a lifestyle well-adapted for metal(loid)-rich environments and a shared evolutionary past with pathogenic Epsilonproteobacteria. Results expand upon recent findings highlighting the potential importance of sulfur and hydrogen metabolism in the terrestrial subsurface. PMID:24628880

  20. Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Attila; Xu, Yunfeng; Bauchan, Gary R; Shelton, Daniel R; Nou, Xiangwu

    2016-07-16

    The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolated during the 2011 European outbreak expresses Shiga toxin 2a and possess virulence genes associated with the enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) pathotype. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga-toxin adsorption, but it is not clear whether the AAF/I fimbriae are involved in the colonization and biofilm formation on food and environmental matrices such as the surface of fresh produce. We deleted the gene encoding for the AAF/I fimbriae main subunit (AggA) from an outbreak associated E. coli O104:H4 strain, and evaluated the role of AAF/I fimbriae in the adherence and colonization of E. coli O104:H4 to spinach and abiotic surfaces. The deletion of aggA did not affect the adherence of E. coli O104:H4 to these surfaces. However, it severely diminished the colonization and biofilm formation of E. coli O104:H4 on these surfaces. Strong aggregation and biofilm formation on spinach and abiotic surfaces were observed with the wild type strain but not the isogenic aggA deletion mutant, suggesting that AAF/I fimbriae play a crucial role in persistence of O104:H4 cells outside of the intestines of host species, such as on the surface of fresh produce. PMID:27099984

  1. Structural Basis of APH(3)-IIIa-Mediated Resistance to N1-Substituted Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, D.; Berghuis, A

    2009-01-01

    Butirosin is unique among the naturally occurring aminoglycosides, having a substituted amino group at position 1 (N1) of the 2-deoxystreptamine ring with an (S)-4-amino-2-hydroxybutyrate (AHB) group. While bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides can be ascribed chiefly to drug inactivation by plasmid-encoded aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, the presence of an AHB group protects the aminoglycoside from binding to many resistance enzymes, and hence, the antibiotic retains its bactericidal properties. Consequently, several semisynthetic N1-substituted aminoglycosides, such as amikacin, isepamicin, and netilmicin, were developed. Unfortunately, butirosin, amikacin, and isepamicin are not resistant to inactivation by 3'-aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferase type IIIa [APH(3')-IIIa]. We report here the crystal structure of APH(3')-IIIa in complex with an ATP analog, AMPPNP [adenosine 5'-(?,{gamma}-imido)triphosphate], and butirosin A to 2.4-A resolution. The structure shows that butirosin A binds to the enzyme in a manner analogous to other 4,5-disubstituted aminoglycosides, and the flexible antibiotic-binding loop is key to the accommodation of structurally diverse substrates. Based on the crystal structure, we have also constructed a model of APH(3')-IIIa in complex with amikacin, a commonly used semisynthetic N1-substituted 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycoside. Together, these results suggest a strategy to further derivatize the AHB group in order to generate new aminoglycoside derivatives that can elude inactivation by resistance enzymes while maintaining their ability to bind to the ribosomal A site.

  2. Optimization of cerebellar purkinje neuron cultures and development of a plasmid-based method for purkinje neuron-specific, miRNA-mediated protein knockdown.

    PubMed

    Alexander, C J; Hammer, J A

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple and efficient method to knock down proteins specifically in Purkinje neurons (PN) present in mixed mouse primary cerebellar cultures. This method utilizes the introduction via nucleofection of a plasmid encoding a specific miRNA downstream of the L7/Pcp2 promoter, which drives PN-specific expression. As proof-of-principle, we used this plasmid to knock down the motor protein myosin Va, which is required for the targeting of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) into PN spines. Consistent with effective knockdown, transfected PNs robustly phenocopied PNs from dilute-lethal (myosin Va-null) mice with regard to the ER targeting defect. Importantly, our plasmid-based approach is less challenging technically and more specific to PNs than several alternative methods (e.g., biolistic- and lentiviral-based introduction of siRNAs). We also present a number of improvements for generating mixed cerebellar cultures that shorten the procedure and improve the total yield of PNs, and of transfected PNs, considerably. Finally, we present a method to rescue cerebellar cultures that develop large cell aggregates, a common problem that otherwise precludes the further use of the culture. PMID:26794514

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the fadR gene, a multifunctional regulator of fatty acid metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    DiRusso, C C

    1988-01-01

    The Escherichia coli fadR gene is a multifunctional regulator of fatty acid and acetate metabolism. In the present work the nucleotide sequence of the 1.3 kb DNA fragment which encodes FadR has been determined. The coding sequence of the fadR gene is 714 nucleotides long and is preceded by a typical E. coli ribosome binding site and is followed by a sequence predicted to be sufficient for factor-independent chain termination. Primer extension experiments demonstrated that the transcription of the fadR gene initiates with an adenine nucleotide 33 nucleotides upstream from the predicted start of translation. The derived fadR peptide has a calculated molecular weight of 26,972. This is in reasonable agreement with the apparent molecular weight of 29,000 previously estimated on the basis of maxi-cell analysis of plasmid encoded proteins. There is a segment of twenty amino acids within the predicted peptide which resembles the DNA recognition and binding site of many transcriptional regulatory proteins. Images PMID:2843809

  4. Deletion of fusion peptide or destabilization of fusion core of HIV gp41 enhances antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Chen Xi; Jiang Shibo Chen Yinghua

    2008-11-07

    The human monoclonal antibody 4E10 against the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 demonstrates broad neutralizing activity across various strains, and makes its epitope an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. Although the contiguous epitope of 4E10 has been identified, attempts to re-elicit 4E10-like antibodies have failed, possibly due to the lack of proper conformation of the 4E10 epitope. Here we used pIg-tail expression system to construct a panel of eukaryotic cell-surface expression plasmids encoding the extracellular domain of gp41 with deletion of fusion peptide and/or introduction of L568P mutation that may disrupt the gp41 six-helix bundle core conformation as DNA vaccines for immunization of mice. We found that these changes resulted in significant increase of the antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope. This information is thus useful for rational design of vaccines targeting the HIV-1 gp41 MPER.

  5. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sofia Santos; Viveiros, Miguel; Amaral, Leonard; Couto, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of infections caused by multi- or pan-resistant bacteria in the hospital or in the community settings is an increasing health concern. Albeit there is no single resistance mechanism behind multiresistance, multidrug efflux pumps, proteins that cells use to detoxify from noxious compounds, seem to play a key role in the emergence of these multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. During the last decades, experimental data has established their contribution to low level resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria and their potential role in the appearance of MDR phenotypes, by the extrusion of multiple, unrelated compounds. Recent studies suggest that efflux pumps may be used by the cell as a first-line defense mechanism, avoiding the drug to reach lethal concentrations, until a stable, more efficient alteration occurs, that allows survival in the presence of that agent. In this paper we review the current knowledge on MDR efflux pumps and their intricate regulatory network in Staphylococcus aureus, a major pathogen, responsible from mild to life-threatening infections. Particular emphasis will be given to the potential role that S. aureus MDR efflux pumps, either chromosomal or plasmid-encoded, have on resistance towards different antimicrobial agents and on the selection of drug - resistant strains. We will also discuss the many questions that still remain on the role of each specific efflux pump and the need to establish appropriate methodological approaches to address all these questions. PMID:23569469

  6. Lung Gene Therapy with Highly Compacted DNA Nanoparticles that Overcome the Mucus Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Soo; Kim, Anthony J.; Trehan, Kanika; Schneider, Craig S.; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Woodward, Owen M.; Boylan, Nicholas J.; Boyle, Michael P.; Lai, Samuel K.; Guggino, William B.; Hanes, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled gene carriers must penetrate the highly viscoelastic and adhesive mucus barrier in the airway in order to overcome rapid mucociliary clearance and reach the underlying epithelium; however, even the most widely used viral gene carriers are unable to efficiently do so. We developed two polymeric gene carriers that compact plasmid DNA into small and highly stable nanoparticles with dense polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface coatings. These highly compacted, densely PEG-coated DNA nanoparticles rapidly penetrate human cystic fibrosis (CF) mucus ex vivo and mouse airway mucus ex situ. Intranasal administration of the mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles greatly enhanced particle distribution, retention and gene transfer in the mouse lung airways compared to conventional gene carriers. Successful delivery of a full-length plasmid encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was achieved in mouse lungs and airway cells, including a primary culture of mucus-covered human airway epithelium grown at air-liquid interface, without causing acute inflammation or toxicity. Highly compacted mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles hold promise for lung gene therapy. PMID:24440664

  7. Single Cell Transfection through Precise Microinjection with Quantitatively Controlled Injection Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Yu Ting; Chen, Shuxun; Wang, Ran; Liu, Chichi; Kong, Chi-wing; Li, Ronald A.; Cheng, Shuk Han; Sun, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Cell transfection is a technique wherein foreign genetic molecules are delivered into cells. To elucidate distinct responses during cell genetic modification, methods to achieve transfection at the single-cell level are of great value. Herein, we developed an automated micropipette-based quantitative microinjection technology that can deliver precise amounts of materials into cells. The developed microinjection system achieved precise single-cell microinjection by pre-patterning cells in an array and controlling the amount of substance delivered based on injection pressure and time. The precision of the proposed injection technique was examined by comparing the fluorescence intensities of fluorescent dye droplets with a standard concentration and water droplets with a known injection amount of the dye in oil. Injection of synthetic modified mRNA (modRNA) encoding green fluorescence proteins or a cocktail of plasmids encoding green and red fluorescence proteins into human foreskin fibroblast cells demonstrated that the resulting green fluorescence intensity or green/red fluorescence intensity ratio were well correlated with the amount of genetic material injected into the cells. Single-cell transfection via the developed microinjection technique will be of particular use in cases where cell transfection is challenging and genetically modified of selected cells are desired. PMID:27067121

  8. Targeted mutagenesis in chicken using CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Isao; Yoshii, Kyoko; Miyahara, Daichi; Kagami, Hiroshi; Tagami, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple and powerful tool for genome editing in various organisms including livestock animals. However, the system has not been applied to poultry because of the difficulty in accessing their zygotes. Here we report the implementation of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene targeting in chickens. Two egg white genes, ovalbumin and ovomucoid, were efficiently (>90%) mutagenized in cultured chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) by transfection of circular plasmids encoding Cas9, a single guide RNA, and a gene encoding drug resistance, followed by transient antibiotic selection. We transplanted CRISPR-induced mutant-ovomucoid PGCs into recipient chicken embryos and established three germline chimeric roosters (G0). All of the roosters had donor-derived mutant-ovomucoid spermatozoa, and the two with a high transmission rate of donor-derived gametes produced heterozygous mutant ovomucoid chickens as about half of their donor-derived offspring in the next generation (G1). Furthermore, we generated ovomucoid homozygous mutant offspring (G2) by crossing the G1 mutant chickens. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple and effective gene-targeting method in chickens. PMID:27050479

  9. Identification and characterization of B-cell epitopes of IpaC, an invasion-associated protein of Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Phalipon, A; Arondel, J; Nato, F; Rouyre, S; Mazie, J C; Sansonetti, P J

    1992-05-01

    Invasion plasmid antigen C (IpaC) is a 43-kDa plasmid-encoded protein associated with the ability of shigellae to invade epithelial cells. This protein is consistently strongly recognized by sera from convalescent patients and monkeys experimentally infected with shigellae. The strong immunogenicity of IpaC in the course of natural infection makes it a good candidate as a potentially protective antigen. To map the B-cell epitopes of this protein, the gene encoding IpaC was cloned and expressed at a high level in Escherichia coli. The partially purified recombinant protein was used to raise rabbit polyclonal antisera and murine monoclonal antibodies. A lambda gt11 ipaC gene library was screened with the antisera and antibodies. Recombinant DNA clones producing specific antigenic determinants were isolated, and the sequence of their DNA inserts was determined. The amino acid sequence of each determinant was deduced from the minimal overlap of DNA inserts of multiple antibody-positive DNA clones. Two distinct epitopes, located between amino acid residues 25 and 33 and 90 and 97, were identified. Two additional B-cell epitopes which were located between residues 297 and 349, near the carboxy-terminal end of the protein, were characterized. Each of these epitopes was also recognized by sera from convalescent humans and monkeys. Therefore, it seems likely that these epitopes are relevant to the humoral response against IpaC during natural infection. PMID:1373401

  10. Characterization of B-cell epitopes on IpaB, an invasion-associated antigen of Shigella flexneri: identification of an immunodominant domain recognized during natural infection.

    PubMed

    Barzu, S; Nato, F; Rouyre, S; Mazie, J C; Sansonetti, P; Phalipon, A

    1993-09-01

    The invasion plasmid antigen B (IpaB), a 62-kDa plasmid-encoded protein associated with the ability of shigellae to invade epithelial cells, is the bacterial antigen most strongly and consistently recognized by the host during infection. The strong systemic and mucosal immune responses observed against this invasin prompted us to map its B-cell epitopes. For this purpose, IpaB was first overexpressed in Shigella flexneri and used to raise rabbit polyclonal antiserum and murine monoclonal antibodies, which were subsequently used to screen a lambda gt11 ipaB library. Inserts of recombinant DNA clones that were specifically recognized by the antisera and antibodies were sequenced, and three distinct determinants were identified. Further characterization of these determinants showed that they were recognized by sera from patients convalescent from shigellosis, suggesting that they are relevant to the humoral response during natural infection. Moreover, the IpaB region comprising the three determinants was systematically recognized by all sera from infected patients that we tested, whereas other regions of the protein were not. These data suggest that this region, located between amino acid residues 147 and 258, is the major immunogenic domain of the invasin in the course of natural infection. PMID:7689541

  11. The mechanism and control of DNA transfer by the conjugative relaxase of resistance plasmid pCU1

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Rebekah Potts; Habibi, Sohrab; Cheng, Yuan; Lujan, Scott A.; Redinbo, Matthew

    2010-11-15

    Bacteria expand their genetic diversity, spread antibiotic resistance genes, and obtain virulence factors through the highly coordinated process of conjugative plasmid transfer (CPT). A plasmid-encoded relaxase enzyme initiates and terminates CPT by nicking and religating the transferred plasmid in a sequence-specific manner. We solved the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of the relaxase responsible for the spread of the resistance plasmid pCU1 and determined its DNA binding and nicking capabilities. The overall fold of the pCU1 relaxase is similar to that of the F plasmid and plasmid R388 relaxases. However, in the pCU1 structure, the conserved tyrosine residues (Y18,19,26,27) that are required for DNA nicking and religation were displaced up to 14 {angstrom} out of the relaxase active site, revealing a high degree of mobility in this region of the enzyme. In spite of this flexibility, the tyrosines still cleaved the nic site of the plasmid's origin of transfer, and did so in a sequence-specific, metal-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, the pCU1 relaxase lacked the sequence-specific DNA binding previously reported for the homologous F and R388 relaxase enzymes, despite its high sequence and structural similarity with both proteins. In summary, our work outlines novel structural and functional aspects of the relaxase-mediated conjugative transfer of plasmid pCU1.

  12. Regulation of Neuronal Morphogenesis and Positioning by Ubiquitin-Specific Proteases in the Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Anckar, Julius; Bonni, Azad

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin signaling mechanisms play fundamental roles in the cell-intrinsic control of neuronal morphogenesis and connectivity in the brain. However, whereas specific ubiquitin ligases have been implicated in key steps of neural circuit assembly, the roles of ubiquitin-specific proteases (USPs) in the establishment of neuronal connectivity have remained unexplored. Here, we report a comprehensive analysis of USP family members in granule neuron morphogenesis and positioning in the rodent cerebellum. We identify a set of 32 USPs that are expressed in granule neurons. We also characterize the subcellular localization of the 32 USPs in granule neurons using a library of expression plasmids encoding GFP-USPs. In RNAi screens of the 32 neuronally expressed USPs, we uncover novel functions for USP1, USP4, and USP20 in the morphogenesis of granule neuron dendrites and axons and we identify a requirement for USP30 and USP33 in granule neuron migration in the rodent cerebellar cortex in vivo. These studies reveal that specific USPs with distinct spatial localizations harbor key functions in the control of neuronal morphogenesis and positioning in the mammalian cerebellum, with important implications for our understanding of the cell-intrinsic mechanisms that govern neural circuit assembly in the brain. PMID:25607801

  13. Feasibility of Genome-Wide Screening for Biosafety Assessment of Probiotics: A Case Study of Lactobacillus helveticus MTCC 5463.

    PubMed

    Senan, S; Prajapati, J B; Joshi, C G

    2015-12-01

    Recent years have witnessed an explosion in genome sequencing of probiotic strains for accurate identification and characterization. Regulatory bodies are emphasizing on the need for performing phase I safety studies for probiotics. The main hypothesis of this study was to explore the feasibility of using genome databases for safety screening of strains. In this study, we attempted to develop a framework for the safety assessment of a potential probiotic strain, Lactobacillus helveticus MTCC 5463 based on genome mining for genes associated with antibiotic resistance, production of harmful metabolites, and virulence. The sequencing of MTCC 5463 was performed using GS-FLX Titanium reagents. Genes coding for antibiotic resistance and virulence were identified using Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database and Virulence Factors Database. Results indicated that MTCC 5463 carried antibiotic resistance genes associated with beta-lactam and fluoroquinolone. There is no threat of transfer of these genes to host gut commensals because the genes are not plasmid encoded. The presence of genes for adhesion, biofilm, surface proteins, and stress-related proteins provides robustness to the strain. The presence of hemolysin gene in the genome revealed a theoretical risk of virulence. The results of in silico analysis complemented the in vitro studies and human clinical trials, confirming the safety of the probiotic strain. We propose that the safety assessment of probiotic strains administered live at high doses using a genome-wide screening could be an effective and time-saving tool for identifying prognostic biomarkers of biosafety. PMID:26223907

  14. Electroporation-Mediated Gene Transfer Directly to the Swine Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hargrave, Barbara; Downey, Harre; Strange, Robert; Murray, Len; Cinnamond, Cade; Lundberg, Cathryn; Israel, Annelise; Chen, Yeong-Jer; Marshall, William; Heller, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In vivo gene transfer to the ischemic heart via electroporation holds promise as a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of heart disease. In the current study, we investigated the use of in vivo electroporation for gene transfer using 3 different penetrating electrodes and one non-penetrating electrode. The hearts of adult male swine were exposed through a sternotomy. Eight electric pulses synchronized to the rising phase of the R wave of the ECG were administered at varying pulse widths and field strengths following an injection of either a plasmid encoding luciferase or one encoding green fluorescent protein. Four sites on the anterior wall of the left ventricle were treated. Animals were euthanized 48 hours after injection and electroporation and gene expression was determined. Results were compared to sites in the heart that received plasmid injection but no electric pulses or were not treated. Gene expression was higher in all electroporated sites when compared to injection only sites demonstrating the robustness of this approach. Our results provide evidence that in vivo electroporation can be a safe and effective non-viral method for delivering genes to the heart, in vivo. PMID:22456328

  15. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  16. Functional Capacity of Shiga-Toxin Promoter Sequences in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mejías, María P.; Fernández-Brando, Romina J.; Panek, Cecilia A.; Ramos, Maria V.; Fernández, Gabriela C.; Isturiz, Martín; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D.; Palermo, Marina S.

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxins (Stx) are the main virulence factors in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infections, causing diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The genes encoding for Shiga toxin-2 (Stx2) are located in a bacteriophage. The toxin is formed by a single A subunit and five B subunits, each of which has its own promoter sequence. We have previously reported the expression of the B subunit within the eukaryotic environment, probably driven by their own promoter. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of the eukaryotic machinery to recognize stx2 sequences as eukaryotic-like promoters. Vero cells were transfected with a plasmid encoding Stx2 under its own promoter. The cytotoxic effect on these cells was similar to that observed upon incubation with purified Stx2. In addition, we showed that Stx2 expression in Stx2-insensitive BHK eukaryotic cells induced drastic morphological and cytoskeletal changes. In order to directly evaluate the capacity of the wild promoter sequences of the A and B subunits to drive protein expression in mammalian cells, GFP was cloned under eukaryotic-like putative promoter sequences. GFP expression was observed in 293T cells transfected with these constructions. These results show a novel and alternative way to synthesize Stx2 that could contribute to the global understanding of EHEC infections with immediate impact on the development of treatments or vaccines against HUS. PMID:23451160

  17. The extended regulatory networks of SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements and IncA/C conjugative plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Poulin-Laprade, Dominic; Carraro, Nicolas; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, healthcare systems are challenged by a major worldwide drug resistance crisis caused by the massive and rapid dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and associated emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria, in both clinical and environmental settings. Conjugation is the main driving force of gene transfer among microorganisms. This mechanism of horizontal gene transfer mediates the translocation of large DNA fragments between two bacterial cells in direct contact. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family (SRIs) and IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are responsible for the dissemination of a broad spectrum of antibiotic resistance genes among diverse species of Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae. The biology, diversity, prevalence and distribution of these two families of conjugative elements have been the subject of extensive studies for the past 15 years. Recently, the transcriptional regulators that govern their dissemination through the expression of ICE- or plasmid-encoded transfer genes have been described. Unrelated repressors control the activation of conjugation by preventing the expression of two related master activator complexes in both types of elements, i.e., SetCD in SXT/R391 ICEs and AcaCD in IncA/C plasmids. Finally, in addition to activating ICE- or plasmid-borne genes, these master activators have been shown to specifically activate phylogenetically unrelated mobilizable genomic islands (MGIs) that also disseminate antibiotic resistance genes and other adaptive traits among a plethora of pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica. PMID:26347724

  18. Insights into Dynamics of Mobile Genetic Elements in Hyperthermophilic Environments from Five New Thermococcus Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Krupovic, Mart; Gonnet, Mathieu; Hania, Wajdi Ben; Forterre, Patrick; Erauso, Gaël

    2013-01-01

    Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1), with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles. PMID:23326305

  19. Functional amyloids as inhibitors of plasmid DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Molina-García, Laura; Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Moreno-Del Álamo, María; Fernández-Tresguerres, M Elena; Moreno-Díaz de la Espina, Susana; Lurz, Rudi; Giraldo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated to constrain the genetic material within strict spatiotemporal boundaries and copy numbers. Bacterial plasmids are autonomously replicating DNA molecules of much clinical, environmental and biotechnological interest. A mechanism used by plasmids to prevent over-replication is 'handcuffing', i.e. inactivating the replication origins in two DNA molecules by holding them together through a bridge built by a plasmid-encoded initiator protein (Rep). Besides being involved in handcuffing, the WH1 domain in the RepA protein assembles as amyloid fibres upon binding to DNA in vitro. The amyloid state in proteins is linked to specific human diseases, but determines selectable and epigenetically transmissible phenotypes in microorganisms. Here we have explored the connection between handcuffing and amyloidogenesis of full-length RepA. Using a monoclonal antibody specific for an amyloidogenic conformation of RepA-WH1, we have found that the handcuffed RepA assemblies, either reconstructed in vitro or in plasmids clustering at the bacterial nucleoid, are amyloidogenic. The replication-inhibitory RepA handcuff assembly is, to our knowledge, the first protein amyloid directly dealing with DNA. Built on an amyloid scaffold, bacterial plasmid handcuffs can bring a novel molecular solution to the universal problem of keeping control on DNA replication initiation. PMID:27147472

  20. Cellular and humoral immune effector mechanisms required for sterile protection against sporozoite challenge induced with the novel malaria vaccine candidate CelTOS.

    PubMed

    Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Legler, Patricia M; Savranskaya, Tatyana; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Angov, Evelina

    2011-08-11

    The malarial protein CelTOS, for cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites, from Plasmodium berghei has been shown to mediate malarial invasion of both vertebrate and insect host cells and is required for establishing their successful infections. In the vertebrate host, Plasmodium sporozoites traverse via a complex passage through cellular barriers in the skin and the liver sinusoid to infect hepatocytes. Induction of immunity targeted to molecules involved in sporozoite motility and migration into hepatocytes may lead to abrogation of hepatocyte infection. We have previously demonstrated the potential of CelTOS as a target antigen for a pre-erythrocytic vaccine. The objective of the current study was to determine the potency of different vaccine platforms to induce protective immunity and determine the mode of action in protective immune responses. To this end, inbred Balb/c and outbred ICR mice were immunized with either the recombinant protein adjuvanted with Montanide ISA-720 or with a pCI-TPA plasmid encoding the P. berghei CelTOS (epidermal delivery by gene-gun) and assessed for the induction of protective responses against a homologous P. berghei challenge. Humoral and cellular immune responses induced by the various immunization regimens were evaluated in an effort to establish immune correlates. The results confirm that the CelTOS antigen is a potentially interesting pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidate and demonstrate that both arms of the adaptive immune system are required to mediate complete sterile protection against sporozoite challenge. PMID:21722682

  1. Identification of barriers to rotation of DNA segments in yeast from the topology of DNA rings excised by an inducible site-specific recombinase.

    PubMed Central

    Gartenberg, M R; Wang, J C

    1993-01-01

    Controlled excision of DNA segments to yield intracellular DNA rings of well-defined sequences was utilized to study the determinants of transcriptional supercoiling of closed circular DNA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In delta top1 top2ts strains of S. cerevisiae expressing Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I, accumulation of positive supercoils in intracellular DNA normally occurs upon thermal inactivation of DNA topoisomerase II because of the simultaneous generation of positively and negatively supercoiled domains by transcription and the preferential relaxation of the latter by the bacterial enzyme. Positive supercoil accumulation in DNA rings is shown to depend on the presence of specific sequence elements; one likely cause of this dependence is that the persistence of oppositely supercoiled domains in an intracellular DNA ring requires the presence of barriers to rotation of the DNA segments connecting the domains. Analysis of the S. cerevisiae 2-microns plasmid partition system by this approach suggests that the plasmid-encoded REP1 and REP2 proteins are involved in forming such a barrier in DNA containing the REP3 sequence. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8248138

  2. Construtcion of Neisseria gonorrhoeae porin B plasmid recombinant and its expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Song, Qifa; Liao, Fang; Ye, Siying; Cui, Bing; Xiong, Ping

    2005-01-01

    A prokaryotic expression recombinant plasmid pET-PIB to express porin B (PIB) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in E. coli DE3 was constructed in order to provide a basis of research in detection, prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine against the pathogen infection. The gene encoding PIB was amplified by PCR from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and cloned into prokaryotic expression plasmid pET-28a(+) to construct a pET-PIB recombinant, which was verified by restriction endonuclease and DNA sequencing. Protein PIB was expressed in E. coli DE3 induced with IPTG. The antigenicity of the expressed protein was evaluated by indirect ELISA. Rabbits were immunized with the protein and serum was collected after immunization. To assess the immunogenicity of the protein, the titer of serum to protein PIB was determined by ELISA. DNA sequence analysis showed that the nucleic acid sequence of PIB gene was 99.28% of homology compared with that (NGPIB18) published in GenBank. A 41 kD fused protein was detected by SDS-PAGE and was proven to have reactivity with anti-PIB polyclonal antibody from mouse. A polyclonal antibody to PIB of 1:4000 titer determined by indirect EISA was obtained from rabbit immunized with the purified product. Recombinant plasmid encoding PIB of Neisseria gonorrhoeae was constructed. Protein PIB with antigenicity and immunogenicity was successfully expressed. PMID:16201262

  3. Vaccination with a fusion DNA vaccine encoding hepatitis B surface antigen fused to the extracellular domain of CTLA4 enhances HBV-specific immune responses in mice: implication of its potential use as a therapeutic vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng; Peng, Guoping; Jin, Xiaoli; Tang, Jie; Chen, Zhi

    2010-11-01

    Fusion of specific antigens to extracellular domain of cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) represents a promising approach to increase the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. We evaluated this interesting approach for its enhancement on HBV-specific immune responses and its antiviral effects in HBV transgenic mice. A fusion plasmid encoding the extracellular domain of CTLA4 linked with HBsAg was constructed. Mice were immunized by this fusion plasmid. Vaccination with the CTLA4-fused DNA not only induced much higher level of anti-HBs antibody, but also increased HBsAg-specific CD8+ response as well as CTL response in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, both Th1 and Th2 responses were augmented. In HBV transgenic mice, the levels of circulating HBsAg and HBV DNA replication were down-regulated by induction of higher anti-HBs antibody and HBsAg-specific CD8+ response after vaccination with the fusion plasmid. Thus, the CTLA4-fused DNA vaccine led to breakdown of immune tolerance to viral infection in HBV transgenic mice, which might be used as a therapeutic vaccine in HBV infection. PMID:20692873

  4. A peptide factor secreted by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius exhibits properties of both bacteriocins and virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Piejko, Marcin; Bzowska, Monika; Pieta, Piotr; Krzysik, Monika; Mazurek, Łukasz; Guevara-Lora, Ibeth; Bukowski, Michał; Sabat, Artur J.; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Bonar, Emilia; Międzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Mak, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a common commensal bacterium colonizing the skin and mucosal surfaces of household animals. However, it has recently emerged as a dangerous opportunistic pathogen, comparable to S. aureus for humans. The epidemiological situation is further complicated by the increasing number of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius infections and evidence of gene transmission driving antibiotic resistance between staphylococci colonizing human and zoonotic hosts. In the present study, we describe a unique peptide, BacSp222, that possesses features characteristic of both bacteriocins and virulence factors. BacSp222 is secreted in high quantities by S. pseudintermedius strain 222 isolated from dog skin lesions. This linear, fifty-amino-acid highly cationic peptide is plasmid-encoded and does not exhibit significant sequence similarities to any other known peptides or proteins. BacSp222 kills gram-positive bacteria (at doses ranging from 0.1 to several micromol/l) but also demonstrates significant cytotoxic activities towards eukaryotic cells at slightly higher concentrations. Moreover, at nanomolar concentrations, the peptide also possesses modulatory properties, efficiently enhancing interferon gamma-induced nitric oxide release in murine macrophage-like cell lines. BacSp222 appears to be one of the first examples of multifunctional peptides that breaks the convention of splitting bacteriocins and virulence factors into two unrelated groups. PMID:26411997

  5. Highly efficient RNA-guided genome editing in human cells via delivery of purified Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sojung; Kim, Daesik; Cho, Seung Woo; Kim, Jungeun; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2014-01-01

    RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) derived from the prokaryotic adaptive immune system known as CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat)/Cas (CRISPR-associated) enable genome editing in human cell lines, animals, and plants, but are limited by off-target effects and unwanted integration of DNA segments derived from plasmids encoding Cas9 and guide RNA at both on-target and off-target sites in the genome. Here, we deliver purified recombinant Cas9 protein and guide RNA into cultured human cells including hard-to-transfect fibroblasts and pluripotent stem cells. RGEN ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) induce site-specific mutations at frequencies of up to 79%, while reducing off-target mutations associated with plasmid transfection at off-target sites that differ by one or two nucleotides from on-target sites. RGEN RNPs cleave chromosomal DNA almost immediately after delivery and are degraded rapidly in cells, reducing off-target effects. Furthermore, RNP delivery is less stressful to human embryonic stem cells, producing at least twofold more colonies than does plasmid transfection. PMID:24696461

  6. Advances in the Function and Regulation of Hydrogenase in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803

    PubMed Central

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Veaudor, Théo; Chauvat, Franck

    2014-01-01

    In order to use cyanobacteria for the biological production of hydrogen, it is important to thoroughly study the function and the regulation of the hydrogen-production machine in order to better understand its role in the global cell metabolism and identify bottlenecks limiting H2 production. Most of the recent advances in our understanding of the bidirectional [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase (Hox) came from investigations performed in the widely-used model cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 where Hox is the sole enzyme capable of combining electrons with protons to produce H2 under specific conditions. Recent findings suggested that the Hox enzyme can receive electrons from not only NAD(P)H as usually shown, but also, or even preferentially, from ferredoxin. Furthermore, plasmid-encoded functions and glutathionylation (the formation of a mixed-disulfide between the cysteines residues of a protein and the cysteine residue of glutathione) are proposed as possible new players in the function and regulation of hydrogen production. PMID:25365180

  7. Role of dimerization in yeast aspartyl-tRNA synthetase and importance of the class II invariant proline.

    PubMed Central

    Eriani, G; Cavarelli, J; Martin, F; Dirheimer, G; Moras, D; Gangloff, J

    1993-01-01

    Cytoplasmic aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (AspRS; EC 6.1.1.12) from yeast is, as are most class II synthetases, an alpha 2 dimer. The only invariant amino acid in signature motif 1 of this class is Pro-273; this residue is located at the dimer interface. To understand the role of Pro-273 in the conserved dimeric configuration, we tested the effect of a Pro-273-->Gly (P273G) substitution on the catalytic properties of homo- and heterodimeric AspRS. Heterodimers of AspRS were produced in vivo by overexpression of their respective subunit variants from plasmid-encoded genes and purified to homogeneity in one HPLC step. The homodimer containing the P273G shows an 80% inactivation of the enzyme and an affinity decrease for its cognate tRNA(Asp) of one order of magnitude. The P273G-mutated subunit recovered wild-type enzymatic properties when associated with a native subunit or a monomer otherwise inactivated having an intact dimeric interface domain. These results, which can be explained by the crystal structure of the native enzyme complexed with its substrates, confirm the structural importance of Pro-273 for dimerization and clearly establish the functional interdependence of the AspRS subunits. More generally, the dimeric conformation may be a structural prerequisite for the activity of mononucleotide binding sites constructed from antiparallel beta strands. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8248175

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Macrococcus caseolyticus Strain JSCS5402, Reflecting the Ancestral Genome of the Human-Pathogenic Staphylococci▿

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Tadashi; Kuwahara-Arai, Kyoko; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Ito, Teruyo; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    We isolated the methicillin-resistant Macrococcus caseolyticus strain JCSC5402 from animal meat in a supermarket and determined its whole-genome nucleotide sequence. This is the first report on the genome analysis of a macrococcal species that is evolutionarily closely related to the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis. The essential biological pathways of M. caseolyticus are similar to those of staphylococci. However, the species has a small chromosome (2.1 MB) and lacks many sugar and amino acid metabolism pathways and a plethora of virulence genes that are present in S. aureus. On the other hand, M. caseolyticus possesses a series of oxidative phosphorylation machineries that are closely related to those in the family Bacillaceae. We also discovered a probable primordial form of a Macrococcus methicillin resistance gene complex, mecIRAm, on one of the eight plasmids harbored by the M. caseolyticus strain. This is the first finding of a plasmid-encoding methicillin resistance gene. Macrococcus is considered to reflect the genome of ancestral bacteria before the speciation of staphylococcal species and may be closely associated with the origin of the methicillin resistance gene complex of the notorious human pathogen methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:19074389

  9. Molecular analysis of the replication region of the theta-replicating plasmid pUCL287 from Tetragenococcus (Pediococcus) halophilus ATCC33315.

    PubMed

    Benachour, A; Frère, J; Flahaut, S; Novel, G; Auffray, Y

    1997-08-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the 8.7-kb theta-replicating plasmid pUCL287 from Tetragenococcus halophilus (formerly Pediococcus halophilus) ATCC33315 has been determined. The replication region was identified and analyzed. Its nucleotide sequence contains an untranslated region, the replication origin, followed by two open reading frames (ORFs) encoding two proteins of 311 (RepA287) and 168 (RepB287) amino acids, respectively. Evidence is presented to show that RepA287 represents the plasmid replication protein. RepB287, which is non-essential for replication, is involved in the plasmid copy-number control and segregational stability. The roles of lactococcal proteins homologous to RepB287 have not been defined so far. Nevertheless, the structural organization of the pUCL287 replication region is remarkably similar to those of well known theta-replicating lactococcal plasmids despite the absence of homology of the replication origin and of the replication protein, and this suggests that pUCL287 uses the same mechanism of replication. Nucleotide sequence comparisons show that pSMB74, a pediococcal plasmid encoding bacteriocin production, is a member of the pUCL287 replicon family. PMID:9294035

  10. Immunogenicity and efficacy of a plasmid DNA rabies vaccine incorporating Myd88 as a genetic adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Ullas, Padinjaremattathil Thankappan; Desai, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (Myd88), a ubiquitous Toll-like receptor adaptor molecule, has been reported to play important roles in B cell responses to infections and vaccination. The present study evaluated the effects of genetic adjuvanting with Myd88 on the immune responses to a plasmid DNA rabies vaccine. Materials and Methods Plasmids encoding rabies glycoprotein alone (pIRES-Rgp) or a fragment of Myd88 gene in addition (pIRES-Rgp-Myd) were constructed and administered intramuscularly or intrademally in Swiss albino mice (on days 0, 7, and 21). Rabies virus neutralizing antibody (RVNA) titres were estimated in the mice sera on days 14 and 28 by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. The protective efficacy of the constructs was evaluated by an intracerebral challenge with challenge virus standard virus on day 35. Results Co-expression of Myd88 increased RVNA responses to pIRES-Rgp by 3- and 2-folds, following intramuscular and intradermal immunization, respectively. pIRES-Rgp protected 80% of the mice following intramuscular and intradermal immunizations, while pIRES-Rgp-Myd afforded 100% protection following similar administrations. Conclusion Genetic adjuvanting with Myd88 enhanced the RVNA responses and protective efficacy of a plasmid DNA rabies vaccine. This strategy might be useful for rabies vaccination of canines in the field, and needs further evaluation. PMID:25003094

  11. Quinolone Resistance: Much More than Predicted

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Alvaro; Sánchez, María B.; Martínez, José L.

    2011-01-01

    Since quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, it was predicted that mutations in target genes would be the only mechanism through which resistance could be acquired, because there will not be quinolone-resistance genes in nature. Contrary to this prediction, a variety of elements ranging from efflux pumps, target-protecting proteins, and even quinolone-modifying enzymes have been shown to contribute to quinolone resistance. The finding of some of these elements in plasmids indicates that quinolone resistance can be transferable. As a result, there has been a developing interest on the reservoirs for quinolone-resistance genes and on the potential risks associated with the use of these antibiotics in non-clinical environments. As a matter of fact, plasmid-encoded, quinolone-resistance qnr genes originated in the chromosome of aquatic bacteria. Thus the use of quinolones in fish-farming might constitute a risk for the emergence of resistance. Failure to predict the development of quinolone resistance reinforces the need of taking into consideration the wide plasticity of biological systems for future predictions. This plasticity allows pathogens to deal with toxic compounds, including those with a synthetic origin as quinolones. PMID:21687414

  12. Evaluating quantitative methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Shay; Paulsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The life of plasmids is a constant battle against fluctuations: failing to correct copy number fluctuations can increase the plasmid loss rate by many orders of magnitude, as can a failure to more evenly divide the copies between daughters at cell division. Plasmids are therefore long-standing model systems for stochastic processes in cells, much thanks to the efforts of Kurt Nordström to whose memory this issue is dedicated. Here we analyze a range of experimental methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells, focusing on challenges, trade-offs and necessary experimental controls. In particular we analyze published and unpublished strategies to infer copy numbers from expression of plasmid-encoded reporters, direct labeling of plasmids with fluorescent probes or DNA binding proteins fused to fluorescent reporters, PCR based methods applied to single cell lysates, and plasmid-specific replication arrest. We conclude that no method currently exists to measure plasmid copy numbers in single cells, and that most methods instead inadvertently measure various types of experimental noise. We also discuss how accurate methods can be developed. PMID:22305922

  13. An efficient protocol for incorporation of an unnatural amino acid in perdeuterated recombinant proteins using glucose-based media.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Vincenzo; Fawzi, Nicolas L; Clore, G Marius

    2012-03-01

    The in vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins is a well-established technique requiring an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair specific for the unnatural amino acid that is incorporated at a position encoded by a TAG amber codon. Although this technology provides unique opportunities to engineer protein structures, poor protein yields are usually obtained in deuterated media, hampering its application in the protein NMR field. Here, we describe a novel protocol for incorporating unnatural amino acids into fully deuterated proteins using glucose-based media (which are relevant to the production, for example, of amino acid-specific methyl-labeled proteins used in the study of large molecular weight systems). The method consists of pre-induction of the pEVOL plasmid encoding the tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair in a rich, H(2)O-based medium prior to exchanging the culture into a D(2)O-based medium. Our protocol results in high level of isotopic incorporation (~95%) and retains the high expression level of the target protein observed in Luria-Bertani medium. PMID:22350951

  14. The explosive-degrading cytochrome P450 XplA: biochemistry, structural features and prospects for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Rylott, Elizabeth L; Jackson, Rosamond G; Sabbadin, Federico; Seth-Smith, Helena M B; Edwards, James; Chong, Chun Shiong; Strand, Stuart E; Grogan, Gideon; Bruce, Neil C

    2011-01-01

    XplA is a cytochrome P450 that mediates the microbial metabolism of the military explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). It has an unusual structural organisation comprising a heme domain that is fused to its flavodoxin redox partner. XplA along with its partnering reductase XplB are plasmid encoded and the gene xplA has now been found in divergent genera across the globe with near sequence identity. Importantly, it has only been detected at explosives contaminated sites suggesting rapid dissemination of this novel catabolic activity, possibly within the 50-year period since the introduction of RDX into the environment. The X-ray structure of XplA-heme has been solved, providing fundamental information on the heme binding site. Interestingly, oxygen is not required for the degradation of RDX, but its presence determines the final degradation products, demonstrating that the degradation chemistry is flexible with both anaerobic and aerobic pathways resulting in the release of nitrite from the substrate. Transgenic plants expressing xplA are able to remove saturating levels of RDX from soil leachate and may provide a low cost sustainable remediation strategy for contaminated military sites. PMID:20624490

  15. Detection of Gene Expression in Genetically Engineered Microorganisms and Natural Phytoplankton Populations in the Marine Environment by mRNA Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Scott L; Paul, John H

    1991-06-01

    A simple method that combines guanidinium isothiocyanate RNA extraction and probing with antisense and sense RNA probes is described for analysis of microbial gene expression in planktonic populations. Probing of RNA sample extracts with sense-strand RNA probes was used as a control for nonspecific hybridization or contamination of mRNA with target DNA. This method enabled detection of expression of a plasmid-encoded neomycin phosphotransferase gene (nptII) in as few as 10Vibrio cells per ml in 100 ml of seawater. We have used this method to detect expression of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large-subunit gene (rbcL) in Synechococcus cultures and natural phytoplankton populations in the Dry Tortugas, Florida. During a 36-h diel study, rbcL expression of the indigenous phytoplankton was greatest in the day, least at night (1100, 0300, and 0100 h), and variable at dawn or dusk (0700 and 1900 h). These results are the first report of gene expression in natural populations by mRNA isolation and probing. This methodology should be useful for the study of gene expression in microorganisms released into the environment for agricultural or bioremediation purposes and indigenous populations containing highly conserved target gene sequences. PMID:16348507

  16. Rational plasmid design and bioprocess optimization to enhance recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) productivity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Emmerling, Verena V; Pegel, Antje; Milian, Ernest G; Venereo-Sanchez, Alina; Kunz, Marion; Wegele, Jessica; Kamen, Amine A; Kochanek, Stefan; Hoerer, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Viral vectors used for gene and oncolytic therapy belong to the most promising biological products for future therapeutics. Clinical success of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) based therapies raises considerable demand for viral vectors, which cannot be met by current manufacturing strategies. Addressing existing bottlenecks, we improved a plasmid system termed rep/cap split packaging and designed a minimal plasmid encoding adenoviral helper function. Plasmid modifications led to a 12-fold increase in rAAV vector titers compared to the widely used pDG standard system. Evaluation of different production approaches revealed superiority of processes based on anchorage- and serum-dependent HEK293T cells, exhibiting about 15-fold higher specific and volumetric productivity compared to well-established suspension cells cultivated in serum-free medium. As for most other viral vectors, classical stirred-tank bioreactor production is thus still not capable of providing drug product of sufficient amount. We show that manufacturing strategies employing classical surface-providing culture systems can be successfully transferred to the new fully-controlled, single-use bioreactor system Integrity(TM) iCELLis(TM) . In summary, we demonstrate substantial bioprocess optimizations leading to more efficient and scalable production processes suggesting a promising way for flexible large-scale rAAV manufacturing. PMID:26284700

  17. Oral multicomponent DNA vaccine delivered by attenuated Salmonella elicited immunoprotection against American trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, Silvia I; Matos, Marina N; Cerny, Natacha; Ramirez, Carolina; Alberti, Andrés Sanchez; Bivona, Augusto E; Morales, Celina; Guzmán, Carlos A; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-03-01

    We have reported that attenuated Salmonella (S) carrying plasmids encoding the cysteine protease cruzipain (Cz) protects against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Here, we determined whether immunoprotection could be improved by the oral coadministration of 3 Salmonella carrying the plasmids that encode the antigens Cz, Tc52, and Tc24. SCz+STc52+STc24-immunized mice presented an increased antibody response against each antigen compared with those in the single antigen-immunized groups, as well as higher trypomastigotes antibody-mediated lyses and cell invasion inhibition compared with controls. SCz+STc52+STc24-immunized and -challenged mice rendered lower parasitemia. Weight loss after infection was detected in all mice except those in the SCz+STc52+STc24 group. Moreover, cardiomyopathy-associated enzyme activity was significantly lower in SCz+STc24+STc52-immunized mice compared with controls. Few or no abnormalities were found in muscle tissues of SCz+STc24+STc52-immunized mice, whereas controls presented with inflammatory foci, necrosis, and amastigote nests. We conclude that a multicomponent approach that targets several invasion and metabolic mechanisms improves protection compared with single-component vaccines. PMID:25160983

  18. Host cell heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans are ligands for OspF-related proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Bhowmick, Rudra; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M

    2015-10-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, spreads from the site of the tick bite to tissues such as heart, joints and the nervous tissues. Host glycosaminoglycans, highly modified repeating disaccharides that are present on cell surfaces and in extracellular matrix, are common targets of microbial pathogens during tissue colonization. While several dermatan sulfate-binding B. burgdorferi adhesins have been identified, B. burgdorferi adhesins documented to promote spirochetal binding to heparan sulfate have not yet been identified. OspEF-related proteins (Erps), a large family of plasmid-encoded surface lipoproteins that are produced in the mammalian host, can be divided into the OspF-related, OspEF-leader peptide (Elp) and OspE-related subfamilies. We show here that a member of the OspF-related subfamily, ErpG, binds to heparan sulfate and when produced on the surface of an otherwise non-adherent B. burgdorferi strain, ErpG promotes heparan sulfate-mediated bacterial attachment to the glial but not the endothelial, synovial or respiratory epithelial cells. Six other OspF-related proteins were capable of binding heparan sulfate, whereas representative OspE-related and Elp proteins lacked this activity. These results indicate that OspF-related proteins are heparan sulfate-binding adhesins, at least one of which promotes bacterial attachment to glial cells. PMID:25864455

  19. Crystallization of CcdB in complex with a GyrA fragment.

    PubMed

    Dao-Thi, Minh Hoa; Van Melderen, Laurence; De Genst, Erwin; Buts, Lieven; Ranquin, An; Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy

    2004-06-01

    Plasmid addiction systems consist of a plasmid-encoded toxin-antidote pair that serves to stabilize low-copy-number plasmids in bacterial populations. CcdB, the toxin from the ccd system on the Escherichia coli F plasmid, acts as a gyrase poison. A 14 kDa fragment of gyrase, GyrA14, was found to bind to the toxin CcdB with an affinity of 1.75 x 10(-8) M. Crystals of the (GyrA14)(2) dimer in its free state belong to space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 86.4, c = 89.4 angstroms, and diffract to 2.4 angstroms. Crystals of the (GyrA14)(2)-(CcdB)(2) complex belong to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with a = 52.1, b = 83.3, c = 110.9 angstroms, and diffract to 2.8 angstroms resolution. PMID:15159578

  20. Virus-induced gene silencing in Catharanthus roseus by biolistic inoculation of tobacco rattle virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Carqueijeiro, I; Masini, E; Foureau, E; Sepúlveda, L J; Marais, E; Lanoue, A; Besseau, S; Papon, N; Clastre, M; Dugé de Bernonville, T; Glévarec, G; Atehortùa, L; Oudin, A; Courdavault, V

    2015-11-01

    Catharanthus roseus constitutes the unique source of several valuable monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, including the antineoplastics vinblastine and vincristine. These alkaloids result from a complex biosynthetic pathway encompassing between 30 and 50 enzymatic steps whose characterisation is still underway. The most recent identifications of genes from this pathway relied on a tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach, involving an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of plasmids encoding the two genomic components of the virus. As an alternative, we developed a biolistic-mediated approach of inoculation of virus-encoding plasmids that can be easily performed by a simple bombardment of young C. roseus plants. After optimisation of the transformation conditions, we showed that this approach efficiently silenced the phytoene desaturase gene, leading to strong and reproducible photobleaching of leaves. This biolistic transformation was also used to silence a previously characterised gene from the alkaloid biosynthetic pathway, encoding iridoid oxidase. Plant bombardment caused down-regulation of the targeted gene (70%), accompanied by a correlated decreased in MIA biosynthesis (45-90%), similar to results obtained via agro-transformation. Thus, the biolistic-based VIGS approach developed for C. roseus appears suitable for gene function elucidation and can readily be used instead of the Agrobacterium-based approach, e.g. when difficulties arise with agro-inoculations or when Agrobacterium-free procedures are required to avoid plant defence responses. PMID:26284695

  1. Colonization of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus), by endophytes encoding gfp marker.

    PubMed

    Torres, Adalgisa Ribeiro; Araújo, Welington Luiz; Cursino, Luciana; de Barros Rossetto, Priscilla; Mondin, Mateus; Hungria, Mariangela; Azevedo, João Lúcio

    2013-07-01

    This study reports the introduction of gfp marker in two endophytic bacterial strains (Pantoea agglomerans C33.1, isolated from cocoa, and Enterobacter cloacae PR2/7, isolated from citrus) to monitor the colonization in Madagascar perinwinkle (Catharanthus roseus). Stability of the plasmid encoding gfp was confirmed in vitro for at least 72 h of bacterial growth and after the colonization of tissues, under non-selective conditions. The colonization was observed using fluorescence microscopy and enumeration of culturable endophytes in inoculated perinwinkle plants that grew for 10 and 20 days. Gfp-expressing strains were re-isolated from the inner tissues of surface-sterilized roots and stems of inoculated plants, and the survival of the P. agglomerans C33:1gfp in plants 20 days after inoculation, even in the absence of selective pressure, suggests that is good colonizer. These results indicated that both gfp-tagged strains, especially P. agglomerans C33.1, may be useful tools to deliver enzymes or other proteins in plant. PMID:23695435

  2. Overexpression, refolding, and purification of the histidine-tagged outer membrane efflux protein OprM of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Charbonnier, F; Köhler, T; Pechère, J C; Ducruix, A

    2001-10-01

    This paper describes the overproduction and purification of the C-terminus polyhistidine-tagged outer membrane protein OprM, which is a part of the MexA-MexB-OprM active efflux system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Renaturation of the protein from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli was achieved using guanidine-HCl as denaturing agent and n-octylpolyoxyethylene (C8POE) and n-octyltetraoxyethylene (C8E4) as nonionic detergents. The refolded protein was purified by ion-exchange and nickel-affinity chromatography. The final yield was 6 mg of pure histidine-tagged OprM per liter of E. coli culture. Renaturation was monitored by the effects of heating prior to SDS-PAGE, using a typical and exclusive property of outer membrane proteins. Immunoblotting revealed that the recombinant protein is addressed to the outer membrane of E. coli, after maturation by excision of its N-terminal signal sequence. Complementation of an oprM deletion mutant with the plasmid encoded histidine-tagged OprM protein restored antibiotic susceptibilities to wild-type levels, demonstrating functionality of recombinant OprM. PMID:11570853

  3. Complete genome sequence of Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum KG16-1, isolated from vacuum-packaged vegetable sausages.

    PubMed

    Andreevskaya, Margarita; Hultman, Jenni; Johansson, Per; Laine, Pia; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum is a predominant lactic acid bacterium (LAB) in spoilage microbial communities of different kinds of modified-atmosphere packaged (MAP) food products. So far, only one genome sequence of a poultry-originating type strain of this bacterium (LMG 18811(T)) has been available. In the current study, we present the completely sequenced and functionally annotated genome of strain KG16-1 isolated from a vegetable-based product. In addition, six other vegetable-associated strains were sequenced to study possible "niche" specificity suggested by recent multilocus sequence typing. The genome of strain KG16-1 consisted of one circular chromosome and three plasmids, which together contained 2,035 CDSs. The chromosome carried at least three prophage regions and one of the plasmids encoded a galactan degradation cluster, which might provide a survival advantage in plant-related environments. The genome comparison with LMG 18811(T) and six other vegetable strains suggests no major differences between the meat- and vegetable-associated strains that would explain their "niche" specificity. Finally, the comparison with the genomes of other leuconostocs highlights the distribution of functionally interesting genes across the L. gelidum strains and the genus Leuconostoc. PMID:27274361

  4. Conjugal transfer and characterization of bacteriocin plasmids in group N (lactic acid) streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Neve, H; Geis, A; Teuber, M

    1984-01-01

    Thirteen bacteriocin-producing strains of group N (lactic acid) streptococci were screened for their potential to transfer this property by conjugation to Streptococcus lactis subsp. diacetylactis Bu2-60. Bacteriocin production in three strains was plasmid encoded as shown by conjugal transfer and by analysis of cured, bacteriocin-negative derivatives of the donor strains and the transconjugants. With Streptococcus cremoris strains 9B4 and 4G6 and S. lactis subsp. diacetylactis 6F7 as donors, bacteriocin-producing transconjugants were isolated with frequencies ranging from ca. 2 X 10(-2) to 2 X 10(-1) per recipient cell. Bacteriocin-producing transconjugants had acquired a 39.6-megadalton plasmid from the donor strains 9B4 and 4G6, and a 75-megadalton plasmid from the donor strain 6F7. As shown by restriction endonuclease analysis, the plasmids from strains 9B4 and 4G6 were almost identical. The plasmid from strain 6F7 yielded some additional fragments not present in the two other plasmids. In hybridization experiments any of the three plasmids strongly hybridized with each other and with some other bacteriocin but nontransmissible plasmids from other S. cremoris strains. Homology was also detected to a variety of cryptic plasmids in lactic acid streptococci. Images PMID:6321437

  5. Origin pairing ('handcuffing') and unpairing in the control of P1 plasmid replication.

    PubMed

    Das, Nilangshu; Chattoraj, Dhruba K

    2004-11-01

    The P1 plasmid origin has an array of five binding sites (iterons) for the plasmid-encoded initiator protein RepA. Saturation of these sites is required for initiation. Iterons can also pair via their bound RepAs. The reaction, called handcuffing, is believed to be the key to control initiation negatively. Here we have determined some of the mechanistic details of the reaction. We show that handcuffed RepA-iteron complexes dissociate when they are diluted or challenged with cold competitor iterons, suggesting spontaneous reversibility of the handcuffing reaction. The complex formation increases with increased RepA binding, but decreases upon saturation of binding. Complex formation also decreases in the presence of molecular chaperones (DnaK and DnaJ) that convert RepA dimers to monomers. This indicates that dimers participate in handcuffing, and that chaperones are involved in reversing handcuffing. They could play a direct role by reducing dimers and an indirect role by increasing monomers that would compete out the weaker binding dimers from the origin. We propose that an increased monomer to dimer ratio is the key to reverse handcuffing. PMID:15491371

  6. Replication-induced transcription of an autorepressed gene: The replication initiator gene of plasmid P1

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Chattoraj, Dhruba K.

    2000-01-01

    The replication origin of plasmid P1 contains an array of five repeats (iterons) that bind the plasmid-encoded initiator RepA. Within the array lies the repA promoter, which becomes largely repressed on RepA binding (autorepression). One might expect that extra iterons produced on plasmid replication would titrate RepA and release the repression. The promoter, however, is induced poorly by extra iterons. The P1 copy number is reduced by extra iterons in the presence of the autorepressed repA gene but not when additional RepA is provided from constitutive sources. It has been proposed that the iteron-bound RepA couples with the promoter-bound RepA and thereby maintains repression. Although not the product of replication, we find that the act of replication itself can renew RepA synthesis. Replication apparently cleans the promoter of bound RepA and provides a window of opportunity for repA transcription. We propose that replication-induced transcription is required to ensure initiator availability in a system that is induced poorly when challenged with additional initiator binding sites. PMID:10840063

  7. Host cell heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans are ligands for OspF-related proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Bhowmick, Rudra; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi , the agent of Lyme disease, spreads from the site of the tick bite to tissues such as heart, joints and the nervous system. Host glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), highly modified repeating disaccharides that are present on cell surfaces and in extracellular matrix, are common targets of microbial pathogens during tissue colonization. While several dermatan sulfate-binding B. burgdorferi adhesins have been identified, B. burgdorferi adhesins documented to promote spirochetal binding to heparan sulfate have not yet been identified. OspEF-related proteins (Erps), a large family of plasmid-encoded surface lipoproteins that are produced in the mammalian host, can be divided into the OspF-related, OspEF leader peptide (Elp), and OspE-related subfamilies. We show here that a member of the OspF-related subfamily, ErpG, binds to heparan sulfate, and when produced on the surface of an otherwise nonadherent B. burgdorferi strain, ErpG promotes heparan sulfate-mediated bacterial attachment to glial but not endothelial, synovial or respiratory epithelial cells. Six other OspF-related proteins were capable of binding heparan sulfate, whereas representative OspE-related and Elp proteins lacked this activity. These results indicate that OspF-related proteins are heparan sulfate-binding adhesins, at least one of which promotes bacterial attachment to glial cells. PMID:25864455

  8. Effect of the MotB(D33N) mutation on stator assembly and rotation of the proton-driven bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Minamino, Tohru; Kami-ike, Nobunori; Kudo, Seishi; Namba, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor generates torque by converting the energy of proton translocation through the transmembrane proton channel of the stator complex formed by MotA and MotB. The MotA/B complex is thought to be anchored to the peptidoglycan (PG) layer through the PG-binding domain of MotB to act as the stator. The stator units dynamically associate with and dissociate from the motor during flagellar motor rotation, and an electrostatic interaction between MotA and a rotor protein FliG is required for efficient stator assembly. However, the association and dissociation mechanism of the stator units still remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the speed fluctuation of the flagellar motor of Salmonella enterica wild-type cells carrying a plasmid encoding a nonfunctional stator complex, MotA/B(D33N), which lost the proton conductivity. The wild-type motor rotated stably but the motor speed fluctuated considerably when the expression level of MotA/B(D33N) was relatively high compared to MotA/B. Rapid accelerations and decelerations were frequently observed. A quantitative analysis of the speed fluctuation and a model simulation suggested that the MotA/B(D33N) stator retains the ability to associate with the motor at a low affinity but dissociates more rapidly than the MotA/B stator. We propose that the stator dissociation process depends on proton translocation through the proton channel.

  9. Single Cell Transfection through Precise Microinjection with Quantitatively Controlled Injection Volumes.

    PubMed

    Chow, Yu Ting; Chen, Shuxun; Wang, Ran; Liu, Chichi; Kong, Chi-Wing; Li, Ronald A; Cheng, Shuk Han; Sun, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Cell transfection is a technique wherein foreign genetic molecules are delivered into cells. To elucidate distinct responses during cell genetic modification, methods to achieve transfection at the single-cell level are of great value. Herein, we developed an automated micropipette-based quantitative microinjection technology that can deliver precise amounts of materials into cells. The developed microinjection system achieved precise single-cell microinjection by pre-patterning cells in an array and controlling the amount of substance delivered based on injection pressure and time. The precision of the proposed injection technique was examined by comparing the fluorescence intensities of fluorescent dye droplets with a standard concentration and water droplets with a known injection amount of the dye in oil. Injection of synthetic modified mRNA (modRNA) encoding green fluorescence proteins or a cocktail of plasmids encoding green and red fluorescence proteins into human foreskin fibroblast cells demonstrated that the resulting green fluorescence intensity or green/red fluorescence intensity ratio were well correlated with the amount of genetic material injected into the cells. Single-cell transfection via the developed microinjection technique will be of particular use in cases where cell transfection is challenging and genetically modified of selected cells are desired. PMID:27067121

  10. Crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticle assisted photothermal delivery into cells using CW near-infrared laser beam

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ling; Koymen, Ali R.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery of impermeable exogenous material such as small molecules, proteins, and plasmids into cells in culture as well as in vivo is of great importance for drug, vaccine and gene delivery for different therapeutic strategies. Though advent of optoporation by ultrafast laser microbeam has allowed spatial targeting in cells, the requirement of high peak power to create holes on the cell membrane is not practical and also challenging in vivo. Here, we report development and use of uniquely non-reactive crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticles (CMCNPs) for photothermal delivery (PTD) of impermeable dyes and plasmids encoding light-sensitive proteins into cells using low power continuous wave near-infrared (NIR) laser beam. Further, we utilized the magnetic nature of these CMCNPs to localize them in desired region by external magnetic field, thus minimizing the required number of nanoparticles. We discovered that irradiation of the CMCNPs near the desired cell(s) with NIR laser beam leads to temperature rise that not only stretch the cell-membrane to ease delivery, it also creates fluid flow to allow mobilization of exogenous substances to the delivery. Due to significant absorption properties of the CMCNPs in the NIR therapeutic window, PTD under in vivo condition is highly possible. PMID:24870227

  11. Synthetic virus seeds for improved vaccine safety: Genetic reconstruction of poliovirus seeds for a PER.C6 cell based inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; Edo-Matas, Diana; Papic, Natasa; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Custers, Jerome H H V

    2015-10-13

    Safety of vaccines can be compromised by contamination with adventitious agents. One potential source of adventitious agents is a vaccine seed, typically derived from historic clinical isolates with poorly defined origins. Here we generated synthetic poliovirus seeds derived from chemically synthesized DNA plasmids encoding the sequence of wild-type poliovirus strains used in marketed inactivated poliovirus vaccines. The synthetic strains were phenotypically identical to wild-type polioviruses as shown by equivalent infectious titers in culture supernatant and antigenic content, even when infection cultures are scaled up to 10-25L bioreactors. Moreover, the synthetic seeds were genetically stable upon extended passaging on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. Use of synthetic seeds produced on the serum-free PER.C6 cell platform ensures a perfectly documented seed history and maximum control over starting materials. It provides an opportunity to maximize vaccine safety which increases the prospect of a vaccine end product that is free from adventitious agents. PMID:26362098

  12. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Analysis of the Wild-type Commensal Escherichia coli Strain SE11 Isolated from a Healthy Adult

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kenshiro; Toh, Hidehiro; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Sasamoto, Hiroyuki; Morita, Hidetoshi; Park, Sang-Hee; Ooka, Tadasuke; Iyoda, Sunao; Taylor, Todd D.; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Itoh, Kikuji; Hattori, Masahira

    2008-01-01

    We sequenced and analyzed the genome of a commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain SE11 (O152:H28) recently isolated from feces of a healthy adult and classified into E. coli phylogenetic group B1. SE11 harbored a 4.8 Mb chromosome encoding 4679 protein-coding genes and six plasmids encoding 323 protein-coding genes. None of the SE11 genes had sequence similarity to known genes encoding phage- and plasmid-borne virulence factors found in pathogenic E. coli strains. The comparative genome analysis with the laboratory strain K-12 MG1655 identified 62 poorly conserved genes between these two non-pathogenic strains and 1186 genes absent in MG1655. These genes in SE11 were mostly encoded in large insertion regions on the chromosome or in the plasmids, and were notably abundant in genes of fimbriae and autotransporters, which are cell surface appendages that largely contribute to the adherence ability of bacteria to host cells and bacterial conjugation. These data suggest that SE11 may have evolved to acquire and accumulate the functions advantageous for stable colonization of intestinal cells, and that the adhesion-associated functions are important for the commensality of E. coli in human gut habitat. PMID:18931093

  13. Crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticle assisted photothermal delivery into cells using CW near-infrared laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Koymen, Ali R.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery of impermeable exogenous material such as small molecules, proteins, and plasmids into cells in culture as well as in vivo is of great importance for drug, vaccine and gene delivery for different therapeutic strategies. Though advent of optoporation by ultrafast laser microbeam has allowed spatial targeting in cells, the requirement of high peak power to create holes on the cell membrane is not practical and also challenging in vivo. Here, we report development and use of uniquely non-reactive crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticles (CMCNPs) for photothermal delivery (PTD) of impermeable dyes and plasmids encoding light-sensitive proteins into cells using low power continuous wave near-infrared (NIR) laser beam. Further, we utilized the magnetic nature of these CMCNPs to localize them in desired region by external magnetic field, thus minimizing the required number of nanoparticles. We discovered that irradiation of the CMCNPs near the desired cell(s) with NIR laser beam leads to temperature rise that not only stretch the cell-membrane to ease delivery, it also creates fluid flow to allow mobilization of exogenous substances to the delivery. Due to significant absorption properties of the CMCNPs in the NIR therapeutic window, PTD under in vivo condition is highly possible.

  14. The trkB Tyrosine Protein Kinase Is a Receptor for Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Neurotrophin-3

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Rüdiger; Nanduri, Venkata; Jing, Shuqian; Lamballe, Fabienne; Tapley, Peter; Bryant, Sherri; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Jones, Kevin R.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Barbacid, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    Summary trkB is a tyrosine protein kinase gene highly related to trk, a proto-oncogene that encodes a receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3). trkB expression is confined to structures of the central and peripheral nervous systems, suggesting it also encodes a receptor for neurotrophic factors. Here we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and NT-3, but not NGF, can induce rapid phosphorylation on tyrosine of gp145trkB, one of the receptors encoded by trkB. BDNF and NT-3 can induce DNA synthesis in quiescent NIH 3T3 cells that express gp145trkB. Cotransfection of plasmids encoding gp145trkB and BDNF or NT-3 leads to transformation of recipient NIH 3T3 cells. In these assays, BDNF elicits a response at least two orders of magnitude higher than NT-3. Finally, 125I-NT-3 binds to NIH 3T3 cells expressing gp145trkB; binding can be competed by NT-3 and BDNF but not by NGF. These findings indicate that gp145trkB may function as a neurotrophic receptor for BDNF and NT-3. PMID:1649702

  15. Structural analysis of RNA molecules involved in plasmid copy number control.

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, J; Polisky, B

    1983-01-01

    DNA replication of the plasmid ColE1 and its relatives is controlled mainly by a small plasmid-encoded transcript known as RNA11. We have studied the conformation of RNA1 molecules from two related but compatible plasmids, ColE1 and RSF1030, using T1 ribonuclease, S1 nuclease, cobra venom nuclease, and diethyl pyrocarbonate modification as probes for secondary structure. Both RNA1 molecules contain three double-stranded stems, three single-stranded loops, and an exposed 5' tail. All loops in both molecules show similar sensitivities to the probes used, as do stems 1 and 3. The region comprising stem 2 of each RNA1 molecule contains the most sequence differences as well as the most structural changes of any region in the two molecules. The structure of the RNA1 molecule encoded by a recessive high copy number mutant of ColE1 was also investigated. Structural alterations involving the first stem and loop of the molecule are proposed to be responsible for the inability of the mutant RNA1 to function in vivo. Images PMID:6194508

  16. Cloning and orientation of the gene encoding polynucleotide phosphorylase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Crofton, S; Dennis, P P

    1983-01-01

    Mutations which affect the activity of polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) map near 69 min on the bacterial chromosome. This region of the chromosome has been cloned by inserting the kanamycin-resistant transposon Tn5 near the argG and mtr loci at 68.5 min. Large SalI fragments of chromosomal DNA containing the Tn5 element were inserted into pBR322, and selection was made for kanamycin-resistant recombinant plasmids. Two of these plasmids were found to produce high levels of PNPase activity in both wild-type and host strains lacking PNPase activity. The pnp gene was further localized and subcloned on a 4.8 kilobase HindIII-EcoRI fragment. This fragment was shown to encode an 84,000-molecular weight protein which comigrated with purified PNPase during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The orientation of the pnp gene was determined by insertion of Tn5 into the 4.8 kilobase fragment cloned in pBR322. Some of the insertions had lost the ability to elevate the level of PNPase activity in the host bacterium. Restriction mapping of the positions of the Tn5 insertions and analysis of plasmid-encoded polypeptides in UV-irradiated maxi-cells indicated that the pnp gene is oriented in the counterclockwise direction on the bacterial chromosome. Images PMID:6300041

  17. Analysis of Two Complementary Single-Gene Deletion Mutant Libraries of Salmonella Typhimurium in Intraperitoneal Infection of BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia A; Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C; Desai, Prerak; Valenzuela, Camila; Porwollik, Steffen; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A; McClelland, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Two pools of individual single gene deletion (SGD) mutants of S. Typhimurium 14028s encompassing deletions of 3,923 annotated non-essential ORFs and sRNAs were screened by intraperitoneal (IP) injection in BALB/c mice followed by recovery from spleen and liver 2 days post infection. The relative abundance of each mutant was measured by microarray hybridization. The two mutant libraries differed in the orientation of the antibiotic resistance cassettes (either sense-oriented Kan(R), SGD-K, or antisense-oriented Cam(R), SGD-C). Consistent systemic colonization defects were observed in both libraries and both organs for hundreds of mutants of genes previously reported to be important after IP injection in this animal model, and for about 100 new candidate genes required for systemic colonization. Four mutants with a range of apparent fitness defects were confirmed using competitive infections with the wild-type parental strain: ΔSTM0286, ΔSTM0551, ΔSTM2363, and ΔSTM3356. Two mutants, ΔSTM0286 and ΔSTM2363, were then complemented in trans with a plasmid encoding an intact copy of the corresponding wild-type gene, and regained the ability to fully colonize BALB/c mice systemically. These results suggest the presence of many more undiscovered Salmonella genes with phenotypes in IP infection of BALB/c mice, and validate the libraries for application to other systems. PMID:26779130

  18. Metabolic Characteristics of a Glucose-Utilizing Shewanella oneidensis Strain Grown under Electrode-Respiring Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Gen; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Hirose, Atsumi; Kasai, Takuya; Yoshida, Gen; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    In bioelectrochemical systems, the electrode potential is an important parameter affecting the electron flow between electrodes and microbes and microbial metabolic activities. Here, we investigated the metabolic characteristics of a glucose-utilizing strain of engineered Shewanella oneidensis under electrode-respiring conditions in electrochemical reactors for gaining insight into how metabolic pathways in electrochemically active bacteria are affected by the electrode potential. When an electrochemical reactor was operated with its working electrode poised at +0.4 V (vs. an Ag/AgCl reference electrode), the engineered S. oneidensis strain, carrying a plasmid encoding a sugar permease and glucose kinase of Escherichia coli, generated current by oxidizing glucose to acetate and produced D-lactate as an intermediate metabolite. However, D-lactate accumulation was not observed when the engineered strain was grown with a working electrode poised at 0 V. We also found that transcription of genes involved in pyruvate and D-lactate metabolisms was upregulated at a high electrode potential compared with their transcription at a low electrode potential. These results suggest that the carbon catabolic pathway of S. oneidensis can be modified by controlling the potential of a working electrode in an electrochemical bioreactor. PMID:26394222

  19. DNA interference: DNA-induced gene silencing in the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica

    PubMed Central

    Omotezako, Tatsuya; Onuma, Takeshi A.; Nishida, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference is widely employed as a gene-silencing system in eukaryotes for host defence against invading nucleic acids. In response to invading double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), mRNA is degraded in sequence-specific manner. So far, however, DNA interference (DNAi) has been reported only in plants, ciliates and archaea, and has not been explored in Metazoa. Here, we demonstrate that linear double-stranded DNA promotes both sequence-specific transcription blocking and mRNA degradation in developing embryos of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica. Introduced polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products or linearized plasmids encoding Brachyury induced tail malformation and mRNA degradation. This malformation was also promoted by DNA fragments of the putative 5′-flanking region and intron without the coding region. PCR products encoding Zic-like1 and acetylcholine esterase also induced loss of sensory organ and muscle acetylcholinesterase activity, respectively. Co-injection of mRNA encoding EGFP and mCherry, and PCR products encoding these fluorescent proteins, induced sequence-specific decrease in the green or red fluorescence, respectively. These results suggest that O. dioica possesses a defence system against exogenous DNA and RNA, and that DNA fragment-induced gene silencing would be mediated through transcription blocking as well as mRNA degradation. This is the first report of DNAi in Metazoa. PMID:25904672

  20. Purification, morphology, and genetics of a new fimbrial putative colonization factor of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O159:H4.

    PubMed Central

    Tacket, C O; Maneval, D R; Levine, M M

    1987-01-01

    The ability to colonize the small intestine is essential for the pathogenesis of diarrhea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). Colonization is mediated by fimbriae (pili), of which there are several antigenically distinct types, including colonization factor antigen I, colonization factor antigen II (CS1, CS2, and CS3), and PCF8775 (CS4, CS5, and CS6). These fimbriae are associated with certain ETEC O serogroups. Serogroup O159 has had no known colonization factor. We found a distinct plasmid-encoded fimbria composed of 19-kilodalton protein subunits associated with ETEC serotype O159:H4. Rabbit antibody against this purified fimbria reacted with a single 19-kilodalton protein band as seen by Western immunoblot of sheared-cell preparations. The rabbit antibody, treated with colloidal-gold-labeled goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulin G, bound specifically to fimbriae when cells were examined with an electron microscope. Of 10 available ETEC O159:H4 strains from Europe, Bangladesh, and Kenya, 6 expressed this type of fimbria; its true prevalence among ETEC strains is unknown. This putative colonization factor of O159:H4 joins other ETEC fimbriae as potentially useful immunogens against human diarrhea. Images PMID:2883122

  1. Structure of the Antibiotic Resistance Factor Spectinomycin Phosphotransferase from Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, D.; Lemke, C; Huang, J; Xiong, B; Berghuis, A

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) constitute a diverse group of enzymes that are often the underlying cause of aminoglycoside resistance in the clinical setting. Several APHs have been extensively characterized, including the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of two APH(3{prime}) isozymes and an APH(2{double_prime}) enzyme. Although many APHs are plasmid-encoded and are capable of inactivating numerous 2-deoxystreptmaine aminoglycosides with multiple regiospecificity, APH(9)-Ia, isolated from Legionella pneumophila, is an unusual enzyme among the APH family for its chromosomal origin and its specificity for a single non-2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside substrate, spectinomycin. We describe here the crystal structures of APH(9)-Ia in its apo form, its binary complex with the nucleotide, AMP, and its ternary complex bound with ADP and spectinomycin. The structures reveal that APH(9)-Ia adopts the bilobal protein kinase-fold, analogous to the APH(3{prime}) and APH(2{double_prime}) enzymes. However, APH(9)-Ia differs significantly from the other two types of APH enzymes in its substrate binding area and that it undergoes a conformation change upon ligand binding. Moreover, kinetic assay experiments indicate that APH(9)-Ia has stringent substrate specificity as it is unable to phosphorylate substrates of choline kinase or methylthioribose kinase despite high structural resemblance. The crystal structures of APH(9)-Ia demonstrate and expand our understanding of the diversity of the APH family, which in turn will facilitate the development of new antibiotics and inhibitors.

  2. Generation of Rag1-knockout immunodeficient rats and mice using engineered meganucleases.

    PubMed

    Ménoret, Séverine; Fontanière, Sandra; Jantz, Derek; Tesson, Laurent; Thinard, Reynald; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; Fraichard, Alexandre; Anegon, Ignacio

    2013-02-01

    Despite the recent availability of gene-specific nucleases, such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like nucleases (TALENs), there is still a need for new tools to modify the genome of different species in an efficient, rapid, and less costly manner. One aim of this study was to apply, for the first time, engineered meganucleases to mutate an endogenous gene in animal zygotes. The second aim was to target the mouse and rat recombination activating gene 1 (Rag1) to describe, for the first time, Rag1 knockout immunodeficient rats. We microinjected a plasmid encoding a meganuclease for Rag1 into the pronucleus of mouse and rat zygotes. Mutant animals were detected by PCR sequencing of the targeted sequence. A homozygous RAG1-deficient rat line was generated and immunophenotyped. Meganucleases were efficient, because 3.4 and 0.6% of mouse and rat microinjected zygotes, respectively, generated mutated animals. RAG1-deficient rats showed significantly decreased proportions and numbers of immature and mature T and B lymphocytes and normal NK cells vs. littermate wild-type controls. In summary, we describe the use of engineered meganucleases to inactivate an endogenous gene with efficiencies comparable to those of ZFNs and TALENs. Moreover, we generated an immunodeficient rat line useful for studies in which there is a need for biological parameters to be analyzed in the absence of immune responses. PMID:23150522

  3. The 2 micrometer plasmid stability system: analyses of the interactions among plasmid- and host-encoded components.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, S; Ahn, Y T; Yang, X M; Wu, X L; Jayaram, M

    1998-12-01

    The stable inheritance of the 2 micrometer plasmid in a growing population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent on two plasmid-encoded proteins (Rep1p and Rep2p), together with the cis-acting locus REP3 (STB). In this study we demonstrate that short carboxy-terminal deletions of Rep1p and Rep2p severely diminish their normal capacity to localize to the yeast nucleus. The nuclear targeting, as well as their functional role in plasmid partitioning, can be restored by the addition of a nuclear localization sequence to the amino or the carboxy terminus of the shortened Rep proteins. Analyses of deletion derivatives of the Rep proteins by using the in vivo dihybrid genetic test in yeast, as well as by glutathione S-transferase fusion trapping assays in vitro demonstrate that the amino-terminal portion of Rep1p (ca. 150 amino acids long) is responsible for its interactions with Rep2p. In a monohybrid in vivo assay, we have identified Rep1p, Rep2p, and a host-encoded protein, Shf1p, as being capable of interacting with the STB locus. The Shf1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli can bind with high specificity to the STB sequence in vitro. In a yeast strain deleted for the SHF1 locus, a 2 micrometer circle-derived plasmid shows relatively poor stability. PMID:9819432

  4. The 2μm Plasmid Stability System: Analyses of the Interactions among Plasmid- and Host-Encoded Components

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Soundarapandian; Ahn, Yong-Tae; Yang, Xian-Mei; Wu, Xu-Li; Jayaram, Makkuni

    1998-01-01

    The stable inheritance of the 2μm plasmid in a growing population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent on two plasmid-encoded proteins (Rep1p and Rep2p), together with the cis-acting locus REP3 (STB). In this study we demonstrate that short carboxy-terminal deletions of Rep1p and Rep2p severely diminish their normal capacity to localize to the yeast nucleus. The nuclear targeting, as well as their functional role in plasmid partitioning, can be restored by the addition of a nuclear localization sequence to the amino or the carboxy terminus of the shortened Rep proteins. Analyses of deletion derivatives of the Rep proteins by using the in vivo dihybrid genetic test in yeast, as well as by glutathione S-transferase fusion trapping assays in vitro demonstrate that the amino-terminal portion of Rep1p (ca. 150 amino acids long) is responsible for its interactions with Rep2p. In a monohybrid in vivo assay, we have identified Rep1p, Rep2p, and a host-encoded protein, Shf1p, as being capable of interacting with the STB locus. The Shf1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli can bind with high specificity to the STB sequence in vitro. In a yeast strain deleted for the SHF1 locus, a 2μm circle-derived plasmid shows relatively poor stability. PMID:9819432

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of an Erwinia sp. gene encoding diphenyl ether cleavage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, H J; Srinivasan, V R

    1989-01-01

    A 2.1-kilobase fragment obtained by restriction enzyme HindIII digestion of Erwinia sp. genomic DNA was cloned into plasmid pUC19 and introduced into Escherichia coli by transformation. The transformants with diphenyl ether cleaving activity (Dpe+) were selected on agar plates with a specially designed medium (LTFN) containing 4-nitrodiphenyl ether. The positive clones showed a clear zone around the colonies. Analysis of mutants obtained by transposon mini-Mu dI(lacZ Kmr) mutagenesis indicated the coding region of the gene (dpe) and the utilization of a lacZ promoter of pUC19 for transcription of dpe. Clones with dpe in the opposite orientation in pUC19 were not expressed, confirming the need for a lacZ promoter. Utilization of a lacZ promoter in pUC19 was further confirmed by the observation that the degradation of 4-nitrodiphenyl ether was enhanced in the presence of isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside. Expression of dpe was also found in pDPE7321, generated from cloning this gene into another plasmid, pSP73. Analysis of the plasmid-encoded proteins by the maxicell technique showed a polypeptide of 21,000 molecular weight as the product of dpe. Images PMID:2679381

  6. TrbK, a small cytoplasmic membrane lipoprotein, functions in entry exclusion of the IncP alpha plasmid RP4.

    PubMed Central

    Haase, J; Kalkum, M; Lanka, E

    1996-01-01

    TrbK is the only plasmid-encoded gene product involved in entry exclusion of the broad-host-range plasmid RP4. The corresponding gene, trbK, coding for a protein of 69 amino acid residues maps in the Tra2 region within the mating pair formation genes. TrbK carries a lipid moiety at the N-terminal cysteine of the mature 47-residue polypeptide. The mutant protein TrbKC23G cannot be modified or proteolytically processed but still acts in entry exclusion with reduced efficiency. An 8-amino-acid truncation at the C terminus of TrbK results in a complete loss of the entry exclusion activity but still allows the protein to be processed. TrbK localizes predominately to the cytoplasmic membrane. Its function depends on presence in the recipient cell but not in the donor cell. TrbK excludes plasmids of homologous systems of the P complex; it is inert towards the IncI system. The likely target for TrbK action is the mating pair formation system, because DNA or any of the components of the relaxosome were excluded as possible targets. PMID:8955288

  7. Drug Delivery and Cell Transfection Using Shock Waves Produced by Nanothermites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2009-06-01

    Shock waves have non-destructive life science applications in cell transfection and drug delivery. Based on molecular dynamics simulations, the shockwave causes transient compression of the cell membrane, which causes the hydrophobic interior of the lipid bilayer to become thinner. This allows diffusion of water molecules across the membrane. Recently, the nanothermite composition consisting of CuO nanorods and Al nanoparticles was shown to propagate at velocities in the same range as metallic azides and fulminates; however, the CuO/Al mixture produces lower pressure levels. An in vitro testing system was developed to deliver shock waves produced by nanothermites into cell suspensions and/or tissues. The plasmid encoded for production of green-fluorescent protein was delivered into cells including, among other types, chicken cardiomyocytes, cell lines (T47-D and Ins-1), and Arabidopsis plant cells. It was found that the nanothermite pressure impulses induced transfection resulting in production of green fluorescent protein in 99% of the cardiomyocytes. Additionally, transfected cell survival was evaluated, and the pressure impulses did not produce any elevated levels of cell death compared with control cell suspensions.

  8. Therapeutic Potential of Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs) and Cationic Polymers for Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Lemamy, Guy Joseph; Nielsen, Peter E; Cova, Lucyna

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Because current anti-HBV treatments are only virostatic, there is an urgent need for development of alternative antiviral approaches. In this context, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and cationic polymers, such as chitosan (CS), appear of particular interest as nonviral vectors due to their capacity to facilitate cellular delivery of bioactive cargoes including peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) or DNA vaccines. We have investigated the ability of a PNA conjugated to different CPPs to inhibit the replication of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV infection. The in vivo administration of PNA-CPP conjugates to neonatal ducklings showed that they reached the liver and inhibited DHBV replication. Interestingly, our results indicated also that a modified CPP (CatLip) alone, in the absence of its PNA cargo, was able to drastically inhibit late stages of DHBV replication. In the mouse model, conjugation of HBV DNA vaccine to modified CS (Man-CS-Phe) improved cellular and humoral responses to plasmid-encoded antigen. Moreover, other systems for gene delivery were investigated including CPP-modified CS and cationic nanoparticles. The results showed that these nonviral vectors considerably increased plasmid DNA uptake and expression. Collectively promising results obtained in preclinical studies suggest the usefulness of these safe delivery systems for the development of novel therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B. PMID:26633356

  9. The influenza A virus PB2 polymerase subunit is required for the replication of viral RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Perales, B; Ortín, J

    1997-01-01

    The transcription and replication of influenza virus RNA (vRNA) were reconstituted in vivo. The experimental approach involved the transfection of plasmids encoding the viral subunits of the polymerase and the nucleoprotein into cells infected with a vaccinia virus recombinant virus expressing the T7 RNA polymerase. As templates, one of two model RNAs was transfected: vNSZ or cNSZ RNA. The RNAs were 240 nucleotides in length, contained the terminal sequences of the NS viral segment, and were of negative or positive polarity, respectively. The accumulation of cRNA and mRNA in cells transfected with vNSZ RNA and the accumulation of vRNA and mRNA in cells transfected with cNSZ RNA were determined by RNase protection assays with labeled vNSZ-L or cNSZ-L probes. The patterns of protected bands obtained indicated that both cRNA replication intermediate and mRNA accumulated when the system was reconstituted with vNSZ RNA. Likewise, both vRNA and mRNA accumulated after reconstitution with cNSZ RNA. The reconstitution of incomplete systems in which any of the subunits of the polymerase or the model RNA were omitted was completely negative for the accumulation of cRNA or vRNA, indicating that the presence of the PB2 subunit in the polymerase is required for replication of vRNA. PMID:8995663

  10. CRISPR-Cas9 mediated efficient PD-1 disruption on human primary T cells from cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shu; Hu, Bian; Shao, Jie; Shen, Bin; Du, Juan; Du, Yinan; Zhou, Jiankui; Yu, Lixia; Zhang, Lianru; Chen, Fangjun; Sha, Huizi; Cheng, Lei; Meng, Fanyan; Zou, Zhengyun; Huang, Xingxu; Liu, Baorui

    2016-01-01

    Strategies that enhance the function of T cells are critical for immunotherapy. One negative regulator of T-cell activity is ligand PD-L1, which is expressed on dentritic cells (DCs) or some tumor cells, and functions through binding of programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor on activated T cells. Here we described for the first time a non-viral mediated approach to reprogram primary human T cells by disruption of PD-1. We showed that the gene knockout of PD-1 by electroporation of plasmids encoding sgRNA and Cas9 was technically feasible. The disruption of inhibitory checkpoint gene PD-1 resulted in significant reduction of PD-1 expression but didn’t affect the viability of primary human T cells during the prolonged in vitro culture. Cellular immune response of the gene modified T cells was characterized by up-regulated IFN-γ production and enhanced cytotoxicity. These results suggest that we have demonstrated an approach for efficient checkpoint inhibitor disruption in T cells, providing a new strategy for targeting checkpoint inhibitors, which could potentialy be useful to improve the efficacy of T-cell based adoptive therapies. PMID:26818188

  11. Angiogenic inhibitors delivered by the type III secretion system of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium safely shrink tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Yu, Bin; Cai, Chun-Hui; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Despite of a growing number of bacterial species that apparently exhibit intrinsic tumor-targeting properties, no bacterium is able to inhibit tumor growth completely in the immunocompetent hosts, due to its poor dissemination inside the tumors. Oxygen and inflammatory reaction form two barriers and restrain the spread of the bacteria inside the tumors. Here, we engineered a Salmonella typhimurium strain named ST8 which is safe and has limited ability to spread beyond the anaerobic regions of tumors. When injected systemically to tumor-bearing immunocompetent mice, ST8 accumulated in tumors at levels at least 100-fold greater than parental obligate anaerobic strain ST4. ST8/pSEndo harboring therapeutic plasmids encoding Endostatin fused with a secreted protein SopA could target vasculature at the tumor periphery, can stably maintain and safely deliver a therapeutic vector, release angiogenic inhibitors through a type III secretion system (T3SS) to interfere with the pro-angiogenic action of growth factors in tumors. Mice with murine CT26 colon cancer that had been injected with ST8/pSEndo showed efficient tumor suppression by inducing more severe necrosis and inhibiting blooding vessel density within tumors. Our findings provide a therapeutic platform for indirectly acting therapeutic strategies such as anti-angiogenesis and immune therapy. PMID:27558018

  12. Utility of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Generation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Curran, Joanne E.; Glahn, David C.; Blangero, John

    2016-01-01

    A large number of EBV immortalized LCLs have been generated and maintained in genetic/epidemiological studies as a perpetual source of DNA and as a surrogate in vitro cell model. Recent successes in reprograming LCLs into iPSCs have paved the way for generating more relevant in vitro disease models using this existing bioresource. However, the overall reprogramming efficiency and success rate remain poor and very little is known about the mechanistic changes that take place at the transcriptome and cellular functional level during LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming. Here, we report a new optimized LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming protocol using episomal plasmids encoding pluripotency transcription factors and mouse p53DD (p53 carboxy-terminal dominant-negative fragment) and commercially available reprogramming media. We achieved a consistently high reprogramming efficiency and 100% success rate using this optimized protocol. Further, we investigated the transcriptional changes in mRNA and miRNA levels, using FC-abs ≥ 2.0 and FDR ≤ 0.05 cutoffs; 5,228 mRNAs and 77 miRNAs were differentially expressed during LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming. The functional enrichment analysis of the upregulated genes and activation of human pluripotency pathways in the reprogrammed iPSCs showed that the generated iPSCs possess transcriptional and functional profiles very similar to those of human ESCs. PMID:27375745

  13. Measuring initiator caspase activation by bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Melissa J; Bouchier-Hayes, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Initiator caspases, including caspase-2, -8, and -9, are activated by the proximity-driven dimerization that occurs after their recruitment to activation platforms. Here we describe the use of caspase bimolecular fluorescence complementation (caspase BiFC) to measure this induced proximity. BiFC assays rely on the use of a split fluorescent protein to identify protein-protein interactions in cells. When fused to interacting proteins, the fragments of the split fluorescent protein (which do not fluoresce on their own) can associate and fluoresce. In this protocol, we use the fluorescent protein Venus, a brighter and more photostable variant of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), to detect the induced proximity of caspase-2. Plasmids encoding two fusion products (caspase-2 fused to either the amino- or carboxy-terminal halves of Venus) are transfected into cells. The cells are then treated with an activating (death) stimulus. The induced proximity (and subsequent activation) of caspase-2 in the cells is visualized as Venus fluorescence. The proportion of Venus-positive cells at a single time point can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. Alternatively, the increase in fluorescence intensity over time can be evaluated by time-lapse confocal microscopy. The caspase BiFC strategy described here should also work for other initiator caspases, such as caspase-8 or -9, as long as the correct controls are used. PMID:25561623

  14. Borrelia burgdorferi BBA74, a Periplasmic Protein Associated with the Outer Membrane, Lacks Porin-Like Properties▿

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Vishwaroop; Caimano, Melissa J.; Liveris, Dionysios; Desrosiers, Daniel C.; Radolf, Justin D.; Schwartz, Ira

    2007-01-01

    The outer membrane of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, contains very few integral membrane proteins, in contrast to other gram-negative bacteria. BBA74, a Borrelia burgdorferi plasmid-encoded protein, was proposed to be an integral outer membrane protein with putative porin function and designated as a 28-kDa outer membrane-spanning porin (Oms28). In this study, the biophysical properties of BBA74 and its subcellular localization were investigated. BBA74 is posttranslationally modified by signal peptidase I cleavage to a mature 25-kDa protein. The secondary structure of BBA74 as determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy consists of at least 78% α-helix with little β-sheet structure. BBA74 in intact B. burgdorferi cells was insensitive to proteinase K digestion, and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy showed that BBA74 was not exposed on the cell surface. Triton X-114 extraction of outer membrane vesicle preparations indicated that BBA74 is not an integral membrane protein. Taken together, the data indicate that BBA74 is a periplasmic, outer membrane-associated protein that lacks properties typically associated with porins. PMID:17189354

  15. Borrelia burgdorferi BBA74, a periplasmic protein associated with the outer membrane, lacks porin-like properties.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Vishwaroop; Caimano, Melissa J; Liveris, Dionysios; Desrosiers, Daniel C; Radolf, Justin D; Schwartz, Ira

    2007-03-01

    The outer membrane of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, contains very few integral membrane proteins, in contrast to other gram-negative bacteria. BBA74, a Borrelia burgdorferi plasmid-encoded protein, was proposed to be an integral outer membrane protein with putative porin function and designated as a 28-kDa outer membrane-spanning porin (Oms28). In this study, the biophysical properties of BBA74 and its subcellular localization were investigated. BBA74 is posttranslationally modified by signal peptidase I cleavage to a mature 25-kDa protein. The secondary structure of BBA74 as determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy consists of at least 78% alpha-helix with little beta-sheet structure. BBA74 in intact B. burgdorferi cells was insensitive to proteinase K digestion, and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy showed that BBA74 was not exposed on the cell surface. Triton X-114 extraction of outer membrane vesicle preparations indicated that BBA74 is not an integral membrane protein. Taken together, the data indicate that BBA74 is a periplasmic, outer membrane-associated protein that lacks properties typically associated with porins. PMID:17189354

  16. Local Gene Transfer and Expression Following Intramuscular Administration of FGF-1 Plasmid DNA in Patients With Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Iris; Chronos, Nicolas; Comerota, Anthony; Henry, Timothy; Pasquet, Jean-Paul; Finiels, François; Caron, Anne; Dedieu, Jean-François; Pilsudski, Richard; Delaère, Pia

    2009-01-01

    NV1FGF is an expression plasmid encoding sp.FGF-121–154 currently under investigation for therapeutic angiogenesis in clinical trials. NV1FGF plasmid distribution and transgene expression following intramuscular (IM) injection in patients is unknown. The study involved six patients with chronic critical limb ischemia (CLI) planned to undergo amputation. A total dose of 0.5, 2, or 4 mg NV1FGF was administered as eight IM injections (0.006, 0.25, or 0.5 mg per injection) 3–5 days before amputation. Injected sites (30 cm3) were divided into equally sized smaller pieces to assess spatial distribution of NV1FGF sequences (PCR), NV1FGF mRNA (reverse transcriptase-PCR), and fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF-1)-expressing cells (immunohistochemistry). Data indicated gene expression at all doses. The distribution area was within 5–12 cm for NV1FGF sequences containing the expression cassette, up to 5 cm for NV1FGF mRNA, and up to 3 cm for FGF-1-expressing myofibers. All FGF receptors were detected indicating robust potential for bioactivity after NV1FGF gene transfer. Circulating levels of NV1FGF sequences were shown to decrease within days after injection. Data support demonstration of plasmid-mediated gene transfer and expression in muscles from patients with CLI. FGF-1 expression was shown to be limited to injection sites, which supports the concept of multiple-site injection for therapeutic use. PMID:19240689

  17. Investigation of plasmid-induced growth defect in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jia; Sydow, Anne; Schempp, Florence; Becher, Daniela; Schewe, Hendrik; Schrader, Jens; Buchhaupt, Markus

    2016-08-10

    Genetic engineering in bacteria mainly relies on the use of plasmids. But despite their pervasive use for physiological studies as well as for the design and optimization of industrially used production strains, only limited information about plasmid induced growth defects is available for different replicons and organisms. Here, we present the identification and characterization of such a phenomenon for Pseudomonas putida transformants carrying the pBBR1-derived plasmid pMiS1. We identified the kanamycin resistance gene and the transcription factor encoding rhaR gene to be causal for the growth defect in P. putida. In contrast, this effect was not observed in Escherichia coli. The plasmid-induced growth defect was eliminated after introduction of a mutation in the plasmid-encoded rep gene, thus enabling construction of the non-toxic variant pMiS4. GFP reporters construct analyses and qPCR experiments revealed a distinctly lowered plasmid copy number for pMiS4, which is probably the reason for alleviation of the growth defect by this mutation. Our work expands the knowledge about plasmid-induced growth defects and provides a useful low-copy pBBR1 replicon variant. PMID:27287537

  18. Cell transfection in vitro and in vivo with nontoxic TAT peptide-liposome-DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Levchenko, Tatyana S.; Rammohan, Ram; Volodina, Natalia; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; D'Souza, Gerard G. M.

    2003-02-01

    Liposomes modified with TAT peptide (TATp-liposomes) showed fast and efficient translocation into the cell cytoplasm with subsequent migration into the perinuclear zone. TATp-liposomes containing a small quantity (10 mol %) of a cationic lipid formed firm noncovalent complexes with DNA. Here, we present results demonstrating both in vitro and in vivo transfection with TATp-liposome-DNA complexes. Mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and rat H9C2 cardiomyocytes were transfected with such complexes in vitro. The transfection with the TATp-liposome-associated pEGFP-N1 plasmid encoding for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was high, whereas the cytotoxicity was lower than that of commonly used cationic lipid-based gene-delivery systems. Intratumoral injection of TATp-liposome-DNA complexes into the Lewis lung carcinoma tumor of mice also resulted in an expression of GFP in tumor cells. This transfection system should be useful for various protocols of cell treatment in vitro or ex vivo as well as for localized in vivo gene therapy.

  19. A New Reporter Cell Line to Monitor HIV Infection and Drug Susceptibility in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervaix, Alain; West, Daniel; Leoni, Lorenzo M.; Richman, Douglas D.; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Corbeil, Jacques

    1997-04-01

    Determination of HIV infectivity in vitro and its inhibition by antiretroviral drugs by monitoring reduction of production of p24 antigen is expensive and time consuming. Such assays also do not allow accurate quantitation of the number of infected cells over time. To develop a simple, rapid, and direct method for monitoring HIV infection, we generated a stable T-cell line (CEM) containing a plasmid encoding the green fluorescent protein (humanized S65T GFP) driven by the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. Clones were selected that displayed low constitutive background fluorescnece, but a high level of GFP expression upon infection with HIV. HIV-1 infection induced a 100- to 1,000-fold increase in relative fluorescence of cells over 2 to 4 days as monitored by fluorescence microscopy, cytofluorimetry, and flow cytometry. Addition of inhibitors of reverse transcriptase, protease, and other targets at different multiplicities of infection permitted the accurate determination of drug susceptibility. This technique also permitted quantitation of infectivity of viral preparations by assessment of number of cells infected in the first round of infection. In conclusion, the CEM-GFP reporter cell line provides a simple, rapid, and direct method for monitoring HIV infectivity titers and antiretroviral drug susceptibility of syncytium-inducing strains.

  20. Optical tracking of organically modified silica nanoparticles as DNA carriers: A nonviral, nanomedicine approach for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Indrajit; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y.; Bharali, Dhruba J.; Pudavar, Haridas E.; Mistretta, Ruth A.; Kaur, Navjot; Prasad, Paras N.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports a multidisciplinary approach to produce fluorescently labeled organically modified silica nanoparticles as a nonviral vector for gene delivery and biophotonics methods to optically monitor intracellular trafficking and gene transfection. Highly monodispersed, stable aqueous suspensions of organically modified silica nanoparticles, encapsulating fluorescent dyes and surface functionalized by cationic-amino groups, are produced by micellar nanochemistry. Gel-electrophoresis studies reveal that the particles efficiently complex with DNA and protect it from enzymatic digestion of DNase 1. The electrostatic binding of DNA onto the surface of the nanoparticles, due to positively charged amino groups, is also shown by intercalating an appropriate dye into the DNA and observing the Förster (fluorescence) resonance energy transfer between the dye (energy donor) intercalated in DNA on the surface of nanoparticles and a second dye (energy acceptor) inside the nanoparticles. Imaging by fluorescence confocal microscopy shows that cells efficiently take up the nanoparticles in vitro in the cytoplasm, and the nanoparticles deliver DNA to the nucleus. The use of plasmid encoding enhanced GFP allowed us to demonstrate the process of gene transfection in cultured cells. Our work shows that the nanomedicine approach, with nanoparticles acting as a drug-delivery platform combining multiple optical and other types of probes, provides a promising direction for targeted therapy with enhanced efficacy as well as for real-time monitoring of drug action. nonviral vector | ORMOSIL nanoparticles | confocal microscopy

  1. Fabrication of silicon nanowire arrays by near-field laser ablation and metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodoceanu, D.; Alhmoud, H. Z.; Elnathan, R.; Delalat, B.; Voelcker, N. H.; Kraus, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present an elegant route for the fabrication of ordered arrays of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires with tunable geometry at controlled locations on a silicon wafer. A monolayer of transparent microspheres convectively assembled onto a gold-coated silicon wafer acts as a microlens array. Irradiation with a single nanosecond laser pulse removes the gold beneath each focusing microsphere, leaving behind a hexagonal pattern of holes in the gold layer. Owing to the near-field effects, the diameter of the holes can be at least five times smaller than the laser wavelength. The patterned gold layer is used as catalyst in a metal-assisted chemical etching to produce an array of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires. This approach combines the advantages of direct laser writing with the benefits of parallel laser processing, yielding nanowire arrays with controlled geometry at predefined locations on the silicon surface. The fabricated VA-SiNW arrays can effectively transfect human cells with a plasmid encoding for green fluorescent protein.

  2. Facile Construction of Random Gene Mutagenesis Library for Directed Evolution Without the Use of Restriction Enzyme in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Eung; Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; You, Chun; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-09-01

    A foolproof protocol was developed for the construction of mutant DNA library for directed protein evolution. First, a library of linear mutant gene was generated by error-prone PCR or molecular shuffling, and a linear vector backbone was prepared by high-fidelity PCR. Second, the amplified insert and vector fragments were assembled by overlap-extension PCR with a pair of 5'-phosphorylated primers. Third, full-length linear plasmids with phosphorylated 5'-ends were self-ligated with T4 ligase, yielding circular plasmids encoding mutant variants suitable for high-efficiency transformation. Self-made competent Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) showed a transformation efficiency of 2.4 × 10(5) cfu/µg of the self-ligated circular plasmid. Using this method, three mutants of mCherry fluorescent protein were found to alter their colors and fluorescent intensities under visible and UV lights, respectively. Also, one mutant of 6-phosphorogluconate dehydrogenase from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica was found to show the 3.5-fold improved catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) on NAD(+) as compared to the wild-type. This protocol is DNA-sequence independent, and does not require restriction enzymes, special E. coli host, or labor-intensive optimization. In addition, this protocol can be used for subcloning the relatively long DNA sequences into any position of plasmids. PMID:27367290

  3. Single Cell Transfection through Precise Microinjection with Quantitatively Controlled Injection Volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Yu Ting; Chen, Shuxun; Wang, Ran; Liu, Chichi; Kong, Chi-Wing; Li, Ronald A.; Cheng, Shuk Han; Sun, Dong

    2016-04-01

    Cell transfection is a technique wherein foreign genetic molecules are delivered into cells. To elucidate distinct responses during cell genetic modification, methods to achieve transfection at the single-cell level are of great value. Herein, we developed an automated micropipette-based quantitative microinjection technology that can deliver precise amounts of materials into cells. The developed microinjection system achieved precise single-cell microinjection by pre-patterning cells in an array and controlling the amount of substance delivered based on injection pressure and time. The precision of the proposed injection technique was examined by comparing the fluorescence intensities of fluorescent dye droplets with a standard concentration and water droplets with a known injection amount of the dye in oil. Injection of synthetic modified mRNA (modRNA) encoding green fluorescence proteins or a cocktail of plasmids encoding green and red fluorescence proteins into human foreskin fibroblast cells demonstrated that the resulting green fluorescence intensity or green/red fluorescence intensity ratio were well correlated with the amount of genetic material injected into the cells. Single-cell transfection via the developed microinjection technique will be of particular use in cases where cell transfection is challenging and genetically modified of selected cells are desired.

  4. Molecular characterization of quinolone resistance mechanisms and extended-spectrum β-lactamase production in Escherichia coli isolated from dogs.

    PubMed

    Meireles, D; Leite-Martins, L; Bessa, L J; Cunha, S; Fernandes, R; de Matos, A; Manaia, C M; Martins da Costa, P

    2015-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistances is now a worldwide problem. Investigating the mechanisms by which pets harboring resistant strains may receive and/or transfer resistance determinants is essential to better understanding how owners and pets can interact safely. Here, we characterized the genetic determinants conferring resistance to β-lactams and quinolones in 38 multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from fecal samples of dogs, through PCR and sequencing. The most frequent genotype included the β-lactamase groups TEM (n=5), and both TEM+CTX-M-1 (n=5). Within the CTX-M group, we identified the genes CTX-M-32, CTX-M-1, CTX-M-15, CTX-M-55/79, CTX-M-14 and CTX-M-2/44. Thirty isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin presented two mutations in the gyrA gene and one or two mutations in the parC gene. A mutation in gyrA (reported here for the first time), due to a transversion and transition (TCG→GTG) originating a substitution of a serine by a valine in position 83 was also detected. The plasmid-encoded quinolone resistance gene, qnrs1, was detected in three isolates. Dogs can be a reservoir of genetic determinants conferring antimicrobial resistance and thus may play an important role in the spread of antimicrobial resistance to humans and other co-habitant animals. PMID:25999092

  5. α1-Antichymotrypsin inactivates staphylococcal cysteine protease in cross-class inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Kozik, Agata J; Bukowski, Michal; Rojowska, Anna; Kantyka, Tomasz; Dubin, Grzegorz; Dubin, Adam

    2011-05-01

    Staphylococcal cysteine proteases are implicated as virulence factors in human and avian infections. Human strains of Staphylococcus aureus secrete two cysteine proteases (staphopains A and B), whereas avian strains express staphopain C (ScpA2), which is distinct from both human homologues. Here, we describe probable reasons why the horizontal transfer of a plasmid encoding staphopain C between avian and human strains has never been observed. The human plasma serine protease inhibitor α(1)-antichymotrypsin (ACHT) inhibits ScpA2. Together with the lack of ScpA2 inhibition by chicken plasma, these data may explain the exclusively avian occurrence of ScpA2. We also clarify the mechanistic details of this unusual cross-class inhibition. Analysis of mutated ACHT variants revealed that the cleavage of the Leu383-Ser384 peptide bond results in ScpA2 inhibition, whereas hydrolysis of the preceding peptide bond leads to ACHT inactivation. This evidence is consistent with the suicide-substrate-like mechanism of inhibition. PMID:21296644

  6. Diversity and Global Distribution of IncL/M Plasmids Enabling Horizontal Dissemination of β-Lactam Resistance Genes among the Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Adamczuk, Marcin; Zaleski, Piotr; Dziewit, Lukasz; Wolinowska, Renata; Nieckarz, Marta; Wawrzyniak, Pawel; Kieryl, Piotr; Plucienniczak, Andrzej; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance determinants are frequently associated with plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, which simplifies their horizontal transmission. Several groups of plasmids (including replicons of the IncL/M incompatibility group) were found to play an important role in the dissemination of resistance genes encoding β-lactamases. The IncL/M plasmids are large, broad host range, and self-transmissible replicons. We have identified and characterized two novel members of this group: pARM26 (isolated from bacteria inhabiting activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant) and pIGT15 (originating from a clinical strain of Escherichia coli). This instigated a detailed comparative analysis of all available sequences of IncL/M plasmids encoding β-lactamases. The core genome of these plasmids is comprised of 20 genes with conserved synteny. Phylogenetic analyses of these core genes allowed clustering of the plasmids into four separate groups, which reflect their antibiotic resistance profiles. Examination of the biogeography of the IncL/M plasmids revealed that they are most frequently found in bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae originating from the Mediterranean region and Western Europe and that they are able to persist in various ecological niches even in the absence of direct antibiotic selection pressure. PMID:26236726

  7. Effective immunotherapy of weakly immunogenic solid tumours using a combined immunogene therapy and regulatory T-cell inactivation.

    PubMed

    Whelan, M C; Casey, G; MacConmara, M; Lederer, J A; Soden, D; Collins, J K; Tangney, M; O'Sullivan, G C

    2010-07-01

    Obstacles to effective immunotherapeutic anti-cancer approaches include poor immunogenicity of the tumour cells and the presence of tolerogenic mechanisms in the tumour microenvironment. We report an effective immune-based treatment of weakly immunogenic, growing solid tumours using a locally delivered immunogene therapy to promote development of immune effector responses in the tumour microenvironment and a systemic based T regulatory cell (Treg) inactivation strategy to potentiate these responses by elimination of tolerogenic or immune suppressor influences. As the JBS fibrosarcoma is weakly immunogenic and accumulates Treg in its microenvironment with progressive growth, we used this tumour model to test our combined immunotherapies. Plasmids encoding GM-CSF and B7-1 were electrically delivered into 100 mm(3) tumours; Treg inactivation was accomplished by systemic administration of anti-CD25 antibody (Ab). Using this approach, we found that complete elimination of tumours was achieved at a level of 60% by immunogene therapy, 25% for Treg inactivation and 90% for combined therapies. Moreover, we found that these responses were immune transferable, systemic, tumour specific and durable. Combined gene-based immune effector therapy and Treg inactivation represents an effective treatment for weakly antigenic solid growing tumours and that could be considered for clinical development. PMID:20186173

  8. Antigen-specific CD8{sup +} T cells induced by the ubiquitin fusion degradation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Takashi; Duan Xuefeng; Hisaeda, Hajime; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2008-01-25

    We have developed a DNA vaccine encoding a fusion protein of ubiquitin (Ub) and target proteins at the N-terminus for effective induction of antigen-specific CD8{sup +} T cells. A series of expression plasmids encoding a model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), fused with mutated Ub, was constructed. Western blotting analyses using COS7 cells transfected with these plasmids revealed that there were three types of amino acid causing different binding capacities between Ub and OVA. Natural Ub with a C-terminal glycine readily dissociated from OVA; on the other hand, artificially mutated Ub, the C-terminal amino acid of which had been exchanged to valine or arginine, stably united with the polypeptide, while Ub with a C-terminal alanine partially dissociated. The ability of DNA vaccination to induce OVA-specific CD8{sup +} T cells closely correlated with the stability of Ub fusion to OVA. Our strategy could be used to optimize the effect of genetic vaccines on the induction of CD8{sup +} T cells.

  9. Genetic immunization based on the ubiquitin-fusion degradation pathway against Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Bin; Hiromatsu, Kenji; Hisaeda, Hajime; Duan, Xuefeng; Imai, Takashi; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2010-02-12

    Cytotoxic CD8{sup +} T cells are particularly important to the development of protective immunity against the intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. We have developed a new effective strategy of genetic immunization by activating CD8{sup +} T cells through the ubiquitin-fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. We constructed expression plasmids encoding the amastigote surface protein-2 (ASP-2) of T. cruzi. To induce the UFD pathway, a chimeric gene encoding ubiquitin fused to ASP-2 (pUB-ASP-2) was constructed. Mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 presented lower parasitemia and longer survival period, compared with mice immunized with pASP-2 alone. Depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells abolished protection against T. cruzi in mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 while depletion of CD4{sup +} T cells did not influence the effective immunity. Mice deficient in LMP2 or LMP7, subunits of immunoproteasomes, were not able to develop protective immunity induced. These results suggest that ubiquitin-fused antigens expressed in antigen-presenting cells were effectively degraded via the UFD pathway, and subsequently activated CD8{sup +} T cells. Consequently, immunization with pUB-ASP-2 was able to induce potent protective immunity against infection of T. cruzi.

  10. Cloning of a carbofuran hydrolase gene from Achromobacter sp. strain WM111 and its expression in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Tomasek, P H; Karns, J S

    1989-01-01

    A 14-kilobase-pair (kbp) EcoRI DNA fragment that encodes an enzyme capable of rapid hydrolysis of N-methylcarbamate insecticides (carbofuran hydrolase) was cloned from carbofuran-degrading Achromobacter sp. strain WM111. When used to probe Southern blots containing plasmid and total DNAs from WM111, this 14-kbp fragment hybridized strongly to a 14-kbp EcoRI fragment from the greater than 100-kbp plasmid harbored by this strain but weakly to EcoRI-digested total DNA from Achromobacter sp. strain WM111, indicating that the gene for N-methylcarbamate degradation (mcd) is plasmid encoded. Further subcloning localized the mcd gene on a 3-kbp ScaI-ClaI fragment. There was little or no expression of this gene in the alternative gram-negative hosts Pseudomonas putida, Alcaligenes eutrophus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and Achromobacter pestifer. Western blotting (immunoblotting) of the protein products produced by low-level expression in P. putida confirmed that this 3-kbp fragment encodes the two 70+-kilodalton protein products seen in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified carbofuran hydrolase. Images PMID:2661544

  11. A comparative study of non-viral gene delivery techniques to human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell.

    PubMed

    Abdul Halim, Nur Shuhaidatul Sarmiza; Fakiruddin, Kamal Shaik; Ali, Syed Atif; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold tremendous potential for therapeutic use in stem cell-based gene therapy. Ex vivo genetic modification of MSCs with beneficial genes of interest is a prerequisite for successful use of stem cell-based therapeutic applications. However, genetic manipulation of MSCs is challenging because they are resistant to commonly used methods to introduce exogenous DNA or RNA. Herein we compared the effectiveness of several techniques (classic calcium phosphate precipitation, cationic polymer, and standard electroporation) with that of microporation technology to introduce the plasmid encoding for angiopoietin-1 (ANGPT-1) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) into human adipose-derived MSCs (hAD-MSCs). The microporation technique had a higher transfection efficiency, with up to 50% of the viable hAD-MSCs being transfected, compared to the other transfection techniques, for which less than 1% of cells were positive for eGFP expression following transfection. The capability of cells to proliferate and differentiate into three major lineages (chondrocytes, adipocytes, and osteocytes) was found to be independent of the technique used for transfection. These results show that the microporation technique is superior to the others in terms of its ability to transfect hAD-MSCs without affecting their proliferation and differentiation capabilities. Therefore, this study provides a foundation for the selection of techniques when using ex vivo gene manipulation for cell-based gene therapy with MSCs as the vehicle for gene delivery. PMID:25162825

  12. Functional amyloids as inhibitors of plasmid DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Molina-García, Laura; Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Moreno-del Álamo, María; Fernández-Tresguerres, M. Elena; Moreno-Díaz de la Espina, Susana; Lurz, Rudi; Giraldo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated to constrain the genetic material within strict spatiotemporal boundaries and copy numbers. Bacterial plasmids are autonomously replicating DNA molecules of much clinical, environmental and biotechnological interest. A mechanism used by plasmids to prevent over-replication is ‘handcuffing’, i.e. inactivating the replication origins in two DNA molecules by holding them together through a bridge built by a plasmid-encoded initiator protein (Rep). Besides being involved in handcuffing, the WH1 domain in the RepA protein assembles as amyloid fibres upon binding to DNA in vitro. The amyloid state in proteins is linked to specific human diseases, but determines selectable and epigenetically transmissible phenotypes in microorganisms. Here we have explored the connection between handcuffing and amyloidogenesis of full-length RepA. Using a monoclonal antibody specific for an amyloidogenic conformation of RepA-WH1, we have found that the handcuffed RepA assemblies, either reconstructed in vitro or in plasmids clustering at the bacterial nucleoid, are amyloidogenic. The replication-inhibitory RepA handcuff assembly is, to our knowledge, the first protein amyloid directly dealing with DNA. Built on an amyloid scaffold, bacterial plasmid handcuffs can bring a novel molecular solution to the universal problem of keeping control on DNA replication initiation. PMID:27147472

  13. Rainbow Vectors for Broad-Range Bacterial Fluorescence Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Mariette; Damron, F. Heath

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fluorescent proteins have been widely used to study protein function, localization or interaction, promoter activity and regulation, drug discovery or for non-invasive imaging. They have been extensively modified to improve brightness, stability, and oligomerization state. However, only a few studies have focused on understanding the dynamics of fluorescent proteins expression in bacteria. In this work, we developed a set plasmids encoding 12 fluorescent proteins for bacterial labeling to facilitate the study of pathogen-host interactions. These broad-spectrum plasmids can be used with a wide variety of Gram-negative microorganisms including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Shigella flexneri or Klebsiella pneumoniae. For comparison, fluorescent protein expression and physical characteristics in Escherichia coli were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and in vivo imaging. Fluorescent proteins derived from the Aequorea Victoria family showed high photobleaching, while proteins form the Discosoma sp. and the Fungia coccina family were more photostable for microscopy applications. Only E2-Crimson, mCherry and mKeima were successfully detected for in vivo applications. Overall, E2-Crimson was the fastest maturing protein tested in E. coli with the best overall performance in the study parameters. This study provides a unified comparison and comprehensive characterization of fluorescent protein photostability, maturation and toxicity, and offers general recommendations on the optimal fluorescent proteins for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:26937640

  14. Defining pathogenic verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) from cases of human infection in the European Union, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Messens, W; Bolton, D; Frankel, G; Liebana, E; McLAUCHLIN, J; Morabito, S; Oswald, E; Threlfall, E J

    2015-06-01

    During 2007-2010, 13 545 confirmed human verocytotoxin (VT)-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) infections were reported in the European Union, including 777 haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) cases. Clinical manifestations were reported for 53% of cases, 64% of which presented with diarrhoea alone and 10% with HUS. Isolates from 85% of cases were not fully serotyped and could not be classified on the basis of the Karmali seropathotype concept. There is no single or combination of phenotypic or genetic marker(s) that fully define 'pathogenic' VTEC. Isolates which contain the vtx2 (verocytotoxin 2) gene in combination with the eae (intimin-encoding) gene or aaiC (secreted protein of enteroaggregative E. coli) and aggR (plasmid-encoded regulator) genes have been associated with a higher risk of more severe illness. A molecular approach targeting genes encoding VT and other virulence determinants is thus proposed to allow an assessment of the potential severity of disease that may be associated with a given VTEC isolate. PMID:25921781

  15. Ribosomal proteins produced in excess are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Reitsma, Justin M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-09-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential process that consumes prodigious quantities of cellular resources. Ribosomal proteins cannot be overproduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because the excess proteins are rapidly degraded. However, the responsible quality control (QC) mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of multiple proteins of the small and large yeast ribosomal subunits is suppressed. Rpl26 overexpressed from a plasmid can be detected in the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, but it largely fails to assemble into ribosomes and is rapidly degraded. However, if the endogenous RPL26 loci are deleted, plasmid-encoded Rpl26 assembles into ribosomes and localizes to the cytosol. Chemical and genetic perturbation studies indicate that overexpressed ribosomal proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and not by autophagy. Inhibition of the proteasome led to accumulation of multiple endogenous ribosomal proteins in insoluble aggregates, consistent with the operation of this QC mechanism in the absence of ribosomal protein overexpression. Our studies reveal that ribosomal proteins that fail to assemble into ribosomes are rapidly distinguished from their assembled counterparts and ubiquitinated and degraded within the nuclear compartment. PMID:27385339

  16. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-03-15

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3'-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5'ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis. PMID:26980190

  17. Unexpected Enzyme TEM-126: Role of Mutation Asp179Glu

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, J.; Robin, F.; Bittar, F.; Chanal, C.; Bonnet, R.

    2005-01-01

    The clinical isolate Escherichia coli CF884 exhibited low-level resistance to ceftazidime (4 μg/ml) by a positive double-disk synergy test and apparent susceptibility to cefuroxime, cefotaxime, cefepime, cefpirome, and aztreonam. The enzyme implicated in this phenotype was a novel 180-kb plasmid-encoded TEM-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase designated TEM-126 which harbors the mutations Asp179Glu and Met182Thr. TEM-126 exhibited significant hydrolytic activity (kcat, 2 s−1) and a Km value of 82 μM against ceftazidime. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the substitution Asp179Glu induces subtle conformational changes to the omega loop which may favor the insertion of ceftazidime in the binding site and the correct positioning of the crucial residue Glu166. Overall, these results highlight the remarkable plasticity of TEM enzymes, which can expand their activity against ceftazidime by the addition of one carbon atom in the side chain of residue 179. PMID:16189109

  18. Phage shock protein PspA of Escherichia coli relieves saturation of protein export via the Tat pathway.

    PubMed

    DeLisa, Matthew P; Lee, Philip; Palmer, Tracy; Georgiou, George

    2004-01-01

    Overexpression of either heterologous or homologous proteins that are routed to the periplasm via the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway results in a block of export and concomitant accumulation of the respective protein precursor in the cytoplasm. Screening of a plasmid-encoded genomic library for mutants that confer enhanced export of a TorA signal sequence (ssTorA)-GFP-SsrA fusion protein, and thus result in higher cell fluorescence, yielded the pspA gene encoding phage shock protein A. Coexpression of pspA relieved the secretion block observed with ssTorA-GFP-SsrA or upon overexpression of the native Tat proteins SufI and CueO. A similar effect was observed with the Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 PspA homologue, VIPP1, indicating that the role of PspA in Tat export may be phylogenetically conserved. Mutations in Tat components that completely abolish export result in a marked induction of PspA protein synthesis, consistent with its proposed role in enhancing protein translocation via Tat. PMID:14702305

  19. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  20. Cloning and expression of two Pasteurella multocida genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Manoha, F; Chevalier, G; Wróblewski, H; Delamarche, C

    1994-01-01

    A library of cloned Pasteurella multocida (toxigenic strain 9222, serotype D2) genomic sequences was constructed in Escherichia coli by incorporating TaqI digestion fragments into the plasmid vector pUC19. Immunological screening with antibodies directed against porin H, the major protein of the P multocida outer membrane, allowed the identification of a recombinant plasmid containing a 2.9-kbp DNA insert. This plasmid encoded the synthesis of two polypeptides, p25 (25 kDa) and p28 (28 kDa) which were detected in the different compartments of the E coli transformant. The peptide p25 was more abundant in the periplasm whereas p28 was mainly found in the cell envelope and in the cytosol. Immunological analysis indicates that p25, in contrast to p28, is antigenically related to porin H of P multocida. The expression in E coli of the gene encoding p28 was enhanced by induction of the lac promoter. PMID:8031908

  1. Mobility of gentamicin resistance genes from staphylococci isolated in the United States: identification of Tn4031, a gentamicin resistance transposon from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, W D; Archer, G L

    1989-01-01

    Homologous genes encoding resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin through the bifunctional acetylating [AAC(6')] and phosphorylating [APH(2")] aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme were identified in staphylococci isolated from patients in the United States. The mobility of gentamicin resistance (Gmr) genes found on a prototype conjugative plasmid (pGO1) was compared with that of genes cloned from chromosomal sites. Plasmid-encoded Gmr genes and flanking sequences were introduced onto a temperature-sensitive plasmid (pRN3208) from pGO1 by homologous recombination between insertion sequence-like elements present on both replicons. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus strains containing the temperature-sensitive recombinant (pGO161) at the nonpermissive temperature for plasmid replication (42 degrees C) revealed no translocation of Gmr from its plasmid location. A transposon (Tn551) resident on the same replicon did translocate. Chromosomal Gmr determinants were cloned, together with the gene for trimethoprim resistance (dfrA), from three geographically distinct S. epidermidis isolates; two were subcloned onto temperature-sensitive Escherichia coli-S. aureus shuttle plasmids as 7.2-kilobase BglII fragments. Growth of both recombination-deficient and-proficient S. aureus strains containing the cloned genes at 42 degrees C allowed detection of transposition of Gmr sequences and identification of insertion into random chromosomal sites. We have designated this 5-kilobase transposon from S. epidermidis as Tn4031. Images PMID:2552907

  2. CRISPR-Cas9 mediated efficient PD-1 disruption on human primary T cells from cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Su, Shu; Hu, Bian; Shao, Jie; Shen, Bin; Du, Juan; Du, Yinan; Zhou, Jiankui; Yu, Lixia; Zhang, Lianru; Chen, Fangjun; Sha, Huizi; Cheng, Lei; Meng, Fanyan; Zou, Zhengyun; Huang, Xingxu; Liu, Baorui

    2016-01-01

    Strategies that enhance the function of T cells are critical for immunotherapy. One negative regulator of T-cell activity is ligand PD-L1, which is expressed on dentritic cells (DCs) or some tumor cells, and functions through binding of programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor on activated T cells. Here we described for the first time a non-viral mediated approach to reprogram primary human T cells by disruption of PD-1. We showed that the gene knockout of PD-1 by electroporation of plasmids encoding sgRNA and Cas9 was technically feasible. The disruption of inhibitory checkpoint gene PD-1 resulted in significant reduction of PD-1 expression but didn't affect the viability of primary human T cells during the prolonged in vitro culture. Cellular immune response of the gene modified T cells was characterized by up-regulated IFN-γ production and enhanced cytotoxicity. These results suggest that we have demonstrated an approach for efficient checkpoint inhibitor disruption in T cells, providing a new strategy for targeting checkpoint inhibitors, which could potentialy be useful to improve the efficacy of T-cell based adoptive therapies. PMID:26818188

  3. Novel Antitumor Strategy Utilizing a Plasmid Expressing a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen as a "Danger Signal" to Block Immune Escape of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Yoshihara, Chieko; Ito, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Immune escape of tumor cells is one of the main obstacles hindering the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. We developed a novel strategy to block immune escape by transfecting tumor cells in vivo with genes of pathogenic antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). This induces presentation of the TB antigen on tumor cell surfaces, which can be recognized by antigen presenting cells (APCs) as a "danger signal" to stimulate antitumor immune response. This strategy is also expected to amplify the immune response against tumor-associated antigens, and block immune escape of the tumor. DNA/PEI/chondroitin sulfate ternary complex is a highly effective non-viral gene vector system for in vivo transfection. A therapeutic complex was prepared using a plasmid encoding the TB antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6). This was injected intratumorally into syngeneic tumor-bearing mice, and induced significant tumor growth suppression comparable to or higher than similar complexes expressing cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). Co-transfection of the cytokine-genes and the ESAT-6-gene enhanced the antitumor efficacy of either treatment alone. In addition, complete tumor regression was achieved with the combination of ESAT-6 and IL-2 genes. PMID:26213962

  4. Antigenic variation with a twist--the Borrelia story.

    PubMed

    Norris, Steven J

    2006-06-01

    A common mechanism of immune evasion in pathogenic bacteria and protozoa is antigenic variation, in which genetic or epigenetic changes result in rapid, sequential shifts in a surface-exposed antigen. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Dai et al. provide the most complete description to date of the vlp/vsp antigenic variation system of the relapsing fever spirochaete, Borrelia hermsii. This elaborate, plasmid-encoded system involves an expression site that can acquire either variable large protein (vlp) or variable small protein (vsp) surface lipoprotein genes from 59 different archival copies. The archival vlp and vsp genes are arranged in clusters on at least five different plasmids. Gene conversion occurs through recombination events at upstream homology sequences (UHS) found in each gene copy, and at downstream homology sequences (DHS) found periodically among the vlp/vsp archival genes. Previous studies have shown that antigenic variation in relapsing fever Borrelia not only permits the evasion of host antibody responses, but can also result in changes in neurotropism and other pathogenic properties. The vlsE antigenic variation locus of Lyme disease spirochaetes, although similar in sequence to the relapsing fever vlp genes, has evolved a completely different antigenic variation mechanism involving segmental recombination from a contiguous array of vls silent cassettes. These two systems thus appear to represent divergence from a common precursor followed by functional convergence to create two distinct antigenic variation processes. PMID:16796669

  5. Comparison of DNA-lipid complexes and DNA alone for gene transfer to cystic fibrosis airway epithelia in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Zabner, J; Cheng, S H; Meeker, D; Launspach, J; Balfour, R; Perricone, M A; Morris, J E; Marshall, J; Fasbender, A; Smith, A E; Welsh, M J

    1997-01-01

    Cationic lipids show promise as vectors for transfer of CFTR cDNA to airway epithelia of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, previous studies have not compared the effect of DNA-lipid to DNA alone. Recently, we developed a formulation of plasmid encoding CFTR (pCF1-CFTR) and cationic lipid (GL-67:DOPE) that generated greater gene transfer in mouse lung than previously described DNA-lipid vectors. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-lipid complexes were more effective than DNA alone at transferring CFTR cDNA to airway epithelia in vivo. We administered complexes of DNA-lipid to one nostril and DNA alone to the other nostril in a randomized, double-blind study. Electrophysiologic measurements showed that DNA-lipid complexes partially corrected the Cl- transport defect. Importantly, the pCF1-CFTR plasmid alone was at least as effective as complexes of DNA with lipid. Measurements of vector-specific CFTR transcripts also showed gene transfer with both DNA-lipid and DNA alone. These results indicate that nonviral vectors can transfer CFTR cDNA to airway epithelia and at least partially restore the Cl- transport defect characteristic of CF. However, improvements in the overall efficacy of gene transfer are required to develop a treatment for CF. PMID:9294121

  6. Biosynthesis of Auxin by the Gram-Positive Phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians Is Controlled by Compounds Specific to Infected Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Vandeputte, Olivier; Öden, Sevgi; Mol, Adeline; Vereecke, Danny; Goethals, Koen; El Jaziri, Mondher; Prinsen, Els

    2005-01-01

    The role and metabolism of indole-3-acetic acid in gram-negative bacteria is well documented, but little is known about indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis and regulation in gram-positive bacteria. The phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians, a gram-positive organism, incites diverse developmental alterations, such as leafy galls, on a wide range of plants. Phenotypic analysis of a leafy gall suggests that auxin may play an important role in the development of the symptoms. We show here for the first time that R. fascians produces and secretes the auxin indole-3-acetic acid. Interestingly, whereas noninfected-tobacco extracts have no effect, indole-3-acetic acid synthesis is highly induced in the presence of infected-tobacco extracts when tryptophan is not limiting. Indole-3-acetic acid production by a plasmid-free strain shows that the biosynthetic genes are located on the bacterial chromosome, although plasmid-encoded genes contribute to the kinetics and regulation of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis. The indole-3-acetic acid intermediates present in bacterial cells and secreted into the growth media show that the main biosynthetic route used by R. fascians is the indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway with a possible rate-limiting role for indole-3-ethanol. The relationship between indole-3-acetic acid production and the symptoms induced by R. fascians is discussed. PMID:15746315

  7. Efficient Production of Optically Pure d-Lactic Acid from Raw Corn Starch by Using a Genetically Modified l-Lactate Dehydrogenase Gene-Deficient and α-Amylase-Secreting Lactobacillus plantarum Strain▿

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Kenji; Zhang, Qiao; Shinkawa, Satoru; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve direct and efficient fermentation of optically pure d-lactic acid from raw corn starch, we constructed l-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL1)-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum and introduced a plasmid encoding Streptococcus bovis 148 α-amylase (AmyA). The resulting strain produced only d-lactic acid from glucose and successfully expressed amyA. With the aid of secreting AmyA, direct d-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished. After 48 h of fermentation, 73.2 g/liter of lactic acid was produced with a high yield (0.85 g per g of consumed sugar) and an optical purity of 99.6%. Moreover, a strain replacing the ldhL1 gene with an amyA-secreting expression cassette was constructed. Using this strain, direct d-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics. This is the first report of direct d-lactic acid fermentation from raw starch. PMID:19011066

  8. Efficient production of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch by using a genetically modified L-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient and alpha-amylase-secreting Lactobacillus plantarum strain.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Zhang, Qiao; Shinkawa, Satoru; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve direct and efficient fermentation of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch, we constructed L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL1)-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum and introduced a plasmid encoding Streptococcus bovis 148 alpha-amylase (AmyA). The resulting strain produced only D-lactic acid from glucose and successfully expressed amyA. With the aid of secreting AmyA, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished. After 48 h of fermentation, 73.2 g/liter of lactic acid was produced with a high yield (0.85 g per g of consumed sugar) and an optical purity of 99.6%. Moreover, a strain replacing the ldhL1 gene with an amyA-secreting expression cassette was constructed. Using this strain, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics. This is the first report of direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw starch. PMID:19011066

  9. Ultrafast laser assisted microinjection enables distinct spatial localization pattern in cells and retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, L.; Shivalingaiah, S.; Mohanty, S. K.

    2011-03-01

    Laser microbeam has enabled highly precise non-contact delivery of exogenous materials into targeted cells, which has been a highly challenging task while using traditional methods without compromising cell viability. We report distinct spatial localization of impermeable substances into mammalian cells and goldfish retinal cells in explants subsequent to ultrafast laser microbeam assisted injection, realized by focusing a near infrared tunable Ti: sapphire laser beam. Introduction of impermeable dye into the cell through localized pore formation was confirmed by distinct fluorescence at the site of pore formation on the membrane and its spatiotemporal diffusion pattern through the nucleus. Indirect optoporation by bubble formation, external to cell, led to a similar spatial diffusion pattern but with a larger time constant for injection. Using optimized laser intensity, exposure and spatial irradiation pattern, desired spatial transfection patterns in goldfish retina explants were achieved as confirmed by expression of injected plasmids encoded for light-activable channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) ion channel tagged with fluorescent protein. Laser assisted delivery of exogenous material into specific area of three-dimensional neuronal tissue, such as the retina, will help to understand the functioning of neuronal circuitry of normal and degenerated retina.

  10. Targeted microinjection into cells and retina using optoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-12-01

    The laser microbeam has enabled highly precise noncontact delivery of exogenous materials into targeted cells without compromising cell viability, which has been a highly challenging task for traditional methods. Here, we report targeted delivery of impermeable substances into mammalian cells and goldfish retinal explants subsequent to ultrafast laser microbeam assisted injection. Introduction of impermeable dye into the cell through localized pore formation was confirmed by distinct fluorescence at the site of pore formation on the membrane and its spatiotemporal diffusion pattern through the nucleus. Indirect optoporation by bubble formation, external to cell, led to a similar spatial diffusion pattern but with a larger time constant for injection. Using optimized laser intensity, exposure, and a spatial irradiation pattern, desired spatial transfection patterns in goldfish retina explants were achieved as confirmed by the expression of injected plasmids encoded for light-activable channelrhodopsin-2 ion-channel, tagged with fluorescent protein. Laser assisted delivery of exogenous material into a specific area of three-dimensional neuronal tissue, such as the retina, will help to understand the functioning of neuronal circuitry of normal and degenerated retina.

  11. Construction and Functional Characterization of a Fusion Protein Interleukin-21/Immunoglobulin for Long-Term In Vivo Biodisponibility.

    PubMed

    Gassen, Rodrigo Benedetti; Romão, Pedro Roosevelt T; Freitas, Deise Nascimentode; Rodrigues Junior, Luiz Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-21 has been intensively studied for use in therapy of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and chronic viruses due to its immunomodulatory properties, especially on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. The objective of this study was to produce an optimized form of IL-21 with improved stability. Plasmids encoding the murine IL-21 alone (pIL-21) or IL-21 genetically fused to portions from mouse IgG3 (pIL-21/Ig) were constructed, and the efficiency of expression, protein kinetics, biodisponibility, and function were analyzed. The genetic constructions of pIL-21 and pIL-21/Ig were transfected into HEK 293 cells, and significant levels of functional IL-21 were obtained. The amino acid of murine IL-21 and IgG3 cloned showed 100% identity with correspondent published sequences. At 24 h of incubation, increased levels of IL-21 were detected in the supernatants of pIL-21. At 72 h of culture, the levels of IL-21 in the supernatant of cells transfected with pIL-21/Ig were significantly higher than those secreted by pIL-21-transfected cells. Furthermore, the data showed that our chimeric IL-21/Ig present improved systemic disponibility in BALB/c mice and conserved the intrinsic ability to increase the frequency of CD4(+) T cells, NKT cells, and CD8(+) T cells. PMID:26720885

  12. Analysis of the Mechanism of Action of the Antisense RNA That Controls the Replication of the repABC Plasmid p42d ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Rivera, Ramón; Romero-López, Cristina; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; Cevallos, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Replication and segregation of the Rhizobium etli symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) depend on the presence of a repABC operon, which carries all the plasmid-encoded elements required for these functions. All repABC operons share three protein-encoding genes (repA, repB, and repC), an antisense RNA (ctRNA) coding gene, and at least one centromere-like region (parS). The products of repA and repB, in conjunction with the parS region, make up the segregation system, and they negatively regulate operon transcription. The last gene of the operon, repC, encodes the initiator protein. The ctRNA is a negative posttranscriptional regulator of repC. In this work, we analyzed the secondary structures of the ctRNA and its target and mapped the motifs involved in the complex formed between them. Essential residues for the effective interaction localize at the unpaired 5′ end of the antisense molecule and the loop of the target mRNA. In light of our results, we propose a model explaining the mechanism of action of this ctRNA in the regulation of plasmid replication in R. etli. PMID:20435728

  13. Characterization of WRSs2 and WRSs3, new second-generation virG(icsA)-based Shigella sonnei vaccine candidates with the potential for reduced reactogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Barnoy, S.; Jeong, K.I.; Helm, R.F.; Suvarnapunya, A.E.; Ranallo, R.T.; Tzipori, S.; Venkatesan, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Live, attenuated Shigella vaccine candidates, such as Shigella sonnei strain WRSS1, Shigella flexneri 2a strain SC602, and Shigella dysenteriae 1 strain WRSd1, are attenuated principally by the loss of the VirG(IcsA) protein. These candidates have proven to be safe and immunogenic in volunteer trials and in one study, efficacious against shigellosis. One drawback of these candidate vaccines has been the reactogenic symptoms of fever and diarrhea experienced by the volunteers, that increased in a dose-dependent manner. New, second-generation virG(icsA)-based S. sonnei vaccine candidates, WRSs2 and WRSs3, are expected to be less reactogenic while retaining the ability to generate protective levels of immunogenicity seen with WRSS1. Besides the loss of VirG(IcsA), WRSs2 and WRSs3 also lack plasmid-encoded enterotoxin ShET2-1 and its paralog ShET2-2. WRSs3 further lacks MsbB2 that reduces the endotoxicity of the lipid A portion of the bacterial LPS. Studies in cell cultures and in gnotobiotic piglets demonstrate that WRSs2 and WRSs3 have the potential to cause less diarrhea due to loss of ShET2-1 and ShET2-2 as well as alleviate febrile symptoms by loss of MsbB2. In guinea pigs, WRSs2 and WRSs3 were as safe, immunogenic and efficacious as WRSS1. PMID:19932216

  14. Conditional-suicide containment system for bacteria which mineralize aromatics

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, A.; Ramos, J.L. ); Molin, S. )

    1991-05-01

    A model conditional-suicide system to control genetically engineered microorganisms able to degrade substituted benzoates is reported. The system is based on two elements. One element consists of a fusion between the promoter of the Pseudomonas putide TOL plasmid-encoded meta-cleavage pathway operon (P{sub m}) and the lacI gene encoding Lac repressor plus sylS, coding for the positive regulator of P{sub m}. The other element carries a fusion between the P{sub tac} promoter and the gef gene, which encodes a killing function. In the absence of effectors, expression of the P{sub tac}::gef cassette is no longer prevented and a high rate of cell killing is observed. The substitution of XylS for XylSthr45, a mutant regulator with altered effector specificity and increased affinity for benzoates, allows the control of populations able to degrade a wider range of benzoates at micromolar substrate concentrations. Given the wide effector specificity of the key regulators, the wild-type and mutant ZylS proteins, the system should allow the control of populations able to metabolize benzoate; methyl-, dimethyl-, chloro-, dichloro-, ethyl-, and methoxybenzoates; salicylate; and methyl- and chlorosalicylates. A small population of genetically engineered microorganisms became Gef resistant; however, the mechanism of such survival remains unknown.

  15. Improvement of the live vaccine strain Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Ty21a for antigen delivery via the hemolysin secretion system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hotz, Christian; Fensterle, Joachim; Goebel, Werner; Meyer, Susanne R; Kirchgraber, Gabriel; Heisig, Martin; Fürer, Andreas; Dietrich, Guido; Rapp, Ulf R; Gentschev, Ivaylo

    2009-02-01

    The attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain Ty21a (Ty21a) is the only attenuated live oral vaccine against typhoid fever. Ty21a is also an attractive carrier for the delivery of heterologous antigens. We have used Ty21a for antigen delivery via the hemolysin (HlyA) secretion system of Escherichia coli, the prototype of the type I secretion system (T1SS). In this study, we identified by genetic complementation that the specific mutation of rpoS correlated with the hemolysin production of strain Ty21a. We furthermore showed that complementation with a plasmid encoding rfaH, which is described to be a downstream target of rpoS, led to increased expression and secretion of hemolysin. Finally, we demonstrated a significant enhancement of antibody responses against the heterologous HlyA antigen of Ty21a after immunization of mice with rfaH complemented S. typhi strain secreting HlyA compared with the same strain without rfaH plasmid. PMID:18706861

  16. Release of Plasmid DNA from Intravascular Stents Coated with Ultrathin Multilayered Polyelectrolyte Films

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, Christopher M.; Zhang, Jingtao; Fredin, Nathaniel J.; Wolff, Matthew R.; Hacker, Timothy A.; Lynn, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Materials that permit control over the release of DNA from the surfaces of topologically complex implantable devices, such as intravascular stents, could contribute to the development of new approaches to the localized delivery of DNA. We report the fabrication of ultrathin, multilayered polyelectrolyte films that permit both the immobilization and controlled release of plasmid DNA from the surfaces of stainless steel intravascular stents. Our approach makes use of an aqueous-based, layer-by-layer method for the assembly of nanostructured thin films consisting of alternating layers of plasmid DNA and a hydrolytically degradable polyamine. Characterization of coated stents using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated that stents were coated uniformly with an ultrathin film ca. 120 nm thick that adhered conformally to the surfaces of stent struts. These ultrathin films did not crack, peel, or delaminate substantially from the surface after exposure to a range of mechanical challenges representative of those encountered during stent deployment (e.g., balloon expansion). Stents coated with eight bilayers of degradable polyamine and a plasmid encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein sustained the release of DNA into solution for up to four days when incubated in phosphate buffered saline at 37 °C, and coated stents were capable of mediating the expression of EGFP in a mammalian cell line without the aid of additional transfection agents. The approach reported here could, with further development, contribute to the development of localized gene-based approaches to the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or related conditions. PMID:16961308

  17. Worldwide Diversity of Klebsiella pneumoniae That Produce β-Lactamase blaKPC-2 Gene1

    PubMed Central

    Cuzon, Gaëlle; Truong, HaVy; Villegas, Maria-Virginia; Wisell, Karin T.; Carmeli, Yehuda; Gales, Ana. C.; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Quinn, John P.; Nordmann, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates that produce carbapenemases (KPCs) are rapidly disseminating worldwide. To determine their genetic background, we investigated 16 blaKPC-2-harboring K. pneumoniae isolates from 5 countries. The isolates were multidrug resistant, possessed the blaKPC-2 gene, and differed by additional β-lactamase content. They harbored a naturally chromosome-encoded bla gene (blaSHV-1 [12.5%], blaSHV-11 [68.7%], or blaOKP-A/B [18.8%]) and several acquired and plasmid-encoded genes (blaTEM-1 [81.3%], blaCTX-M-2 [31.3%], blaCTX-M-12 [12.5%], blaCTX-M-15 [18.7%], and blaOXA-9 [37.5%]). The blaKPC-2 gene was always associated with 1 of the Tn4401 isoforms (a, b, or c). Tn4401 was inserted on different-sized plasmids that belonged to different incompatibility groups. Several blaKPC-containing K. pneumoniae clones were found: 9 different pulsotypes with 1 major (sequence type 258) and 7 minor distinct allelic profiles. Different clones harboring different plasmids but having identical genetic structure, Tn4401, could be at the origin of the worldwide spread of this emerging resistance gene. PMID:20735917

  18. Sonic hedgehog gene therapy increases the ability of the dystrophic skeletal muscle to regenerate after injury.

    PubMed

    Piccioni, A; Gaetani, E; Palladino, M; Gatto, I; Smith, R C; Neri, V; Marcantoni, M; Giarretta, I; Silver, M; Straino, S; Capogrossi, M; Landolfi, R; Pola, R

    2014-04-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a crucial regulator of muscle development during embryogenesis. We have previously demonstrated that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) regulates postnatal myogenesis in the adult skeletal muscle both directly, by acting on muscle satellite cells, and indirectly, by promoting the production of growth factors from interstitial fibroblasts. Here, we show that in mdx mice, the murine equivalent of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans, progression of the dystrophic pathology corresponds to progressive inhibition of the Hh signaling pathway in the skeletal muscle. We also show that the upregulation of the Hh pathway in response to injury and during regeneration is significantly impaired in mdx muscle. Shh treatment increases the proliferative potential of satellite cells isolated from the muscles of mdx mice. This treatment also increases the production of proregenerative factors, such as insulin-like growth factor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor, from fibroblasts isolated from the muscle of mdx mice. In vivo, overexpression of the Hh pathway using a plasmid encoding the human Shh gene promotes successful regeneration after injury in terms of increased number of proliferating myogenic cells and newly formed myofibers, as well as enhanced vascularization and decreased fibrosis. PMID:24572787

  19. Protein Hydrolysates from Non-bovine and Plant Sources Replaces Tryptone in Microbiological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathan, Yamini; Patel, Shifa; Pasupuleti, Vijai K.; Meganathan, R.

    Tryptone (pancreatic digest of casein) is a common ingredient in laboratory and fermentation media for growing wild-type and genetically modified microorganisms. Many of the commercially manufactured products such as human growth hormone, antibiotics, insulin, etc. are produced by recombinant strains grown on materials derived from bovine sources. With the emergence of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) and the consequent increase in Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, elimination of materials of bovine origin from fermentation media is of paramount importance. To achieve this objective, a number of protein hydrolysates derived from non-bovine animal and plant sources were evaluated. Tryptone in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth was replaced with an equal quantity of alternate protein hydrolysates. Four of the six hydrolysates (one animal and three from plants) were found to efficiently replace the tryptone present in LB-medium as measured by growth rate and growth yield of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain. In addition, we have determined plasmid stability, inducibility and activity of the plasmid encoded β-galactosidase in the recombinant strain grown in the presence of various protein hydrolysates.

  20. Vault nanoparticles containing an adenovirus-derived membrane lytic protein facilitate toxin and gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cheng-Yu; Wiethoff, Chris M; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Rome, Leonard H; Nemerow, Glen R

    2009-03-24

    Nonviral methods of gene delivery possess several advantages over that of viral-based vectors, including having increased safety. However, the ability to achieve effective transport of therapeutic molecules across host cell membranes via nonviral methods remains a significant goal. Cell-derived nanoparticles known as vaults have been proposed as novel candidate transfer vehicles for various foreign molecules. Recombinant vault particles enter cells via macropinocytosis or phagocytosis but lack demonstrable membrane penetrating activity. To explore the feasibility of improving vault penetration into target cells, we incorporated the membrane lytic domain of adenovirus protein VI (pVI) into the interior of recombinant vault particles via fusion to the vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP) interaction domain. The membrane lytic activity of the pVI domain was retained upon incorporation into vault particles. Moreover, internalization of vault-pVI complexes into murine macrophages promoted co-delivery of a soluble ribotoxin or a cDNA plasmid encoding GFP. These findings indicate that vault particles can be modified to enhance cell transfer of selected biomolecules. PMID:19226129

  1. Role of bacteriophages in STEC infections: new implications for the design of prophylactic and treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Jaime H.; Del Cogliano, Manuel E.; Fernandez-Brando, Romina J.; Bilen, Marcos F.; Jesus, Monica R.; Luiz, Wilson B.; Palermo, Marina S.; Ferreira, Rita C.C.; Servat, Esteban G.; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D.; Ferreira, Luis C.S; Bentancor, Leticia V.

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is considered the main virulence factor in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. Previously we reported the expression of biologically active Stx by eukaryotic cells in vitro and in vivo following transfection with plasmids encoding Stx under control of the native bacterial promoter 1,2. Since stx genes are present in the genome of lysogenic bacteriophages, here we evaluated the relevance of bacteriophages during STEC infection. We used the non-pathogenic E. coli C600 strain carrying a lysogenic 933W mutant bacteriophage in which the stx operon was replaced by a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Tracking GFP expression using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS), we detected fluorescence in liver, kidney, and intestine of mice infected with the recombinant E. coli strain after treatment with ciprofloxacin, which induces the lytic replication and release of bacteriophages. In addition, we showed that chitosan, a linear polysaccharide composed of d-glucosamine residues and with a number of commercial and biomedical uses, had strong anti-bacteriophage effects, as demonstrated at in vitro and in vivo conditions. These findings bring promising perspectives for the prevention and treatment of haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) cases. PMID:25580222

  2. Tumor paint: a chlorotoxin:Cy5.5 bioconjugate for intraoperative visualization of cancer foci.

    PubMed

    Veiseh, Mandana; Gabikian, Patrik; Bahrami, S-Bahram; Veiseh, Omid; Zhang, Miqin; Hackman, Robert C; Ravanpay, Ali C; Stroud, Mark R; Kusuma, Yumiko; Hansen, Stacey J; Kwok, Deborah; Munoz, Nina M; Sze, Raymond W; Grady, William M; Greenberg, Norman M; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Olson, James M

    2007-07-15

    Toward the goal of developing an optical imaging contrast agent that will enable surgeons to intraoperatively distinguish cancer foci from adjacent normal tissue, we developed a chlorotoxin:Cy5.5 (CTX:Cy5.5) bioconjugate that emits near-IR fluorescent signal. The probe delineates malignant glioma, medulloblastoma, prostate cancer, intestinal cancer, and sarcoma from adjacent non-neoplastic tissue in mouse models. Metastatic cancer foci as small as a few hundred cells were detected in lymph channels. Specific binding to cancer cells is facilitated by matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) as evidenced by reduction of CTX:Cy5.5 binding in vitro and in vivo by a pharmacologic blocker of MMP-2 and induction of CTX:Cy5.5 binding in MCF-7 cells following transfection with a plasmid encoding MMP-2. Mouse studies revealed that CTX:Cy5.5 has favorable biodistribution and toxicity profiles. These studies show that CTX:Cy5.5 has the potential to fundamentally improve intraoperative detection and resection of malignancies. PMID:17638899

  3. [Therapeutic angiogenesis using genetic transfection. An in vitro quantitative and functional study after gene code transfer for vascular endothelial growth factor].

    PubMed

    Zaric, V; Weltin, D; Stephan, D

    2000-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene transfer is a new therapeutic approach in clinical situations where insufficient angiogenesis may impair processes that require vessel formation, such as myocardial ischemia or peripheral vascular disease. The feasibility of this strategy was addressed in vitro by (i) optimisation of DNA transfection into cultured cells using a cationic liposome, (ii) study of the transgene production and it's angiogenic properties. An expression plasmid encoding VEGF165 was used to transfect endothelial cells (EAhy-926) in vitro. Different amounts of the cationic liposome were complexed to the plasmid DNA in order to achieve increasing ratios (1/1, 2/1, 3/1, 4/1, 5/1). Maximal gene expression was obtained when the cationic liposome was mixed to plasmid DNA in a 3/1 ratio. Using this optimised liposome/plasmid DNA formulation, VEGF expression measured by ELISA, reached a maximum of 60 ng/mL 24 hours after gene transfer then rapidly decreased. Conditioned media from transfected cells (CMVEGF) significantly increased the proliferation rate of endothelial cells. The maximal mitogenic effect was observed when the cell media was supplemented with 25% of CMVEGF, corresponding to 10 ng/mL of recombinant VEGF. Addition of the VEGF165 peptide into the cell media showed a similar mitogenic effect. The angiogenic property of the transgene was assessed by the demonstration of its ability to stimulate capillary tubes formation in a tridimensional biologic gel. PMID:10989743

  4. Engineering of methionine chain elongation part of glucoraphanin pathway in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Nadia; Crocoll, Christoph; Erik Olsen, Carl; Ann Halkier, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    The methionine-derived glucosinolate glucoraphanin is associated with the health-promoting properties of broccoli. This has developed a strong interest in producing this compound in high amounts from a microbial source. Glucoraphanin synthesis starts with a five-gene chain elongation pathway that converts methionine to dihomo-methionine, which is subsequently converted to glucoraphanin by the seven-gene glucosinolate core structure pathway. As dihomo-methionine is the precursor amino acid for glucoraphanin production, a first challenge is to establish an expression system for production of dihomo-methionine. In planta, the methionine chain elongation enzymes are physically separated within the cell with the first enzyme in the cytosol while the rest are located in the chloroplast. A de-compartmentalization approach was applied to produce dihomo-methionine by expression of the respective plant genes in Escherichia coli cytosol. Introduction of two plasmids encoding the methionine chain elongation pathway into E. coli resulted in production of 25mgL(-1) of dihomo-methionine. In addition to chain-elongated methionine products, side-products from chain elongation of leucine were produced. Methionine supplementation enhanced dihomo-methionine production to 57mgL(-1), while keeping a steady level of the chain-elongated leucine products. Engineering of the de-compartmentalized pathway of dihomo-methionine in E. coli cytosol provides an important first step for microbial production of the health-promoting glucoraphanin. PMID:26410451

  5. Targeted mutagenesis in chicken using CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Isao; Yoshii, Kyoko; Miyahara, Daichi; Kagami, Hiroshi; Tagami, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple and powerful tool for genome editing in various organisms including livestock animals. However, the system has not been applied to poultry because of the difficulty in accessing their zygotes. Here we report the implementation of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene targeting in chickens. Two egg white genes, ovalbumin and ovomucoid, were efficiently (>90%) mutagenized in cultured chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) by transfection of circular plasmids encoding Cas9, a single guide RNA, and a gene encoding drug resistance, followed by transient antibiotic selection. We transplanted CRISPR-induced mutant-ovomucoid PGCs into recipient chicken embryos and established three germline chimeric roosters (G0). All of the roosters had donor-derived mutant-ovomucoid spermatozoa, and the two with a high transmission rate of donor-derived gametes produced heterozygous mutant ovomucoid chickens as about half of their donor-derived offspring in the next generation (G1). Furthermore, we generated ovomucoid homozygous mutant offspring (G2) by crossing the G1 mutant chickens. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple and effective gene-targeting method in chickens. PMID:27050479

  6. The product of the ataxia-telangiectasia group D complementing gene, ATDC, interacts with a protein kinase C substrate and inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Brzoska, P M; Chen, H; Zhu, Y; Levin, N A; Disatnik, M H; Mochly-Rosen, D; Murnane, J P; Christman, M F

    1995-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive human genetic disease characterized by immunological, neurological, and developmental defects and an increased risk of cancer. Cells from individuals with AT show sensitivity to ionizing radiation, elevated recombination, cell cycle abnormalities, and aberrant cytoskeletal organization. The molecular basis of the defect is unknown. A candidate AT gene (ATDC) was isolated on the basis of its ability to complement the ionizing radiation sensitivity of AT group D fibroblasts. Whether ATDC is mutated in any AT patients is not known. We have found that the ATDC protein physically interacts with the intermediate-filament protein vimentin, which is a protein kinase C substrate and colocalizing protein, and with an inhibitor of protein kinase C, hPKCI-1. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis of cultured cells transfected with a plasmid encoding an epitope-tagged ATDC protein localizes the protein to vimentin filaments. We suggest that the ATDC and hPKCI-1 proteins may be components of a signal transduction pathway that is induced by ionizing radiation and mediated by protein kinase C. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7644499

  7. Employment of Salmonella in Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary limitations of cancer gene therapy is lack of selectivity of the therapeutic gene to tumor cells. Current efforts are focused on discovering and developing tumor-targeting vectors that selectively target only cancer cells but spare normal cells to improve the therapeutic index. The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative-anaerobic bacteria are capable of multiplying selectively in tumors and inhibiting their growth. In this study, we exploited attenuated Salmonella as a tumoricidal agent and a vector to deliver genes for tumor-targeted gene therapy. Attenuated Salmonella, carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding an anti-angiogenic gene, was used to evaluate its' ability for tumor targeting and gene delivery in murine tumor models. We also investigated the use of a polymer to modify or shield Salmonella from the pre-existing immune response in the host in order to improve gene delivery to the tumor. These results suggest that tumor-targeted gene therapy using Salmonella carrying a therapeutic gene, which exerts tumoricidal and anti-angiogenic activities, represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors. PMID:26846804

  8. Propagation of pSC101 plasmids defective in binding of integration host factor.

    PubMed Central

    Biek, D P; Cohen, S N

    1992-01-01

    Integration host factor (IHF), a multifunctional protein of E. coli, normally is required for the replication of plasmid pSC101. T. T. Stenzel, P. Patel, and D. Bastia (Cell 49:709-717, 1987) have reported that IHF binds to a DNA locus near the pSC101 replication origin and enhances a static bend present in this region; mutation of the IHF binding site affects the plasmid's ability to replicate. We report here studies indicating that the requirement for IHF binding near the pSC101 replication origin is circumvented partially or completely by (i) mutation of the plasmid-encoded repA (replicase) gene or the chromosomally encoded topA gene, (ii) the presence on the plasmid of the pSC101 partition (par) locus, or (iii) replacement of the par locus by a strong transcriptional promoter. With the exception of the repA mutation, the factors that substitute for a functional origin region IHF binding site are known to alter plasmid topology by increasing negative DNA supercoiling, as does IHF itself. These results are consistent with the proposal that IHF binding near the pSC101 replication origin promotes plasmid replication by inducing a conformational change leading to formation of a repA-dependent DNA-protein complex. A variety of IHF-independent mechanisms can facilitate formation of the putative replication-initiation complex. PMID:1310092

  9. Dominant lethality by expression of a catalytically inactive class I tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, E; Schimmel, P

    1993-01-01

    Alignment-guided mutagenesis was used to create an inactive, but toxic, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. An Asp-96-->Ala (D96A) replacement in the nucleotide binding fold of the class I Escherichia coli isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase inactivates the enzyme without disrupting its competence for binding isoleucine tRNA. Expression of plasmid-encoded mutant enzyme in a cell with a wild-type ileS chromosomal allele resulted in cell death. Introduction of a second K732T substitution previously shown to weaken tRNA binding gives an inactive D96A/K732T double mutant. Expression of the double mutant is not lethal to E. coli. D96A but not the double mutant significantly inhibited in vitro charging of isoleucine tRNA by the wild-type enzyme. The results suggest a dominant tRNA binding-dependent arrest of cell growth caused by a reduction in the pool of a specific tRNA. Specific tRNA binding drugs may have therapeutic applications for treatment of microbial pathogens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8346197

  10. Involvement of the pagR gene of pXO2 in anthrax pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xudong; Zhang, Enmin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wei, Jianchun; Li, Wei; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Bingxiang; Dong, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. Specifically, the anthrax toxins and capsules encoded by the pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids, respectively, are the major virulence factors. We previously reported that the pXO1 plasmid was retained in the attenuated strain of B. anthracis vaccine strains even after subculturing at high temperatures. In the present study, we reinvestigate the attenuation mechanism of Pasteur II. Sequencing of pXO1 and pXO2 from Pasteur II strain revealed mutations in these plasmids as compared to the reference sequences. Two deletions on these plasmids, one each on pXO1 and pXO2, were confirmed to be unique to the Pasteur II strain as compared to the wild-type strains. Gene replacement with homologous recombination revealed that the mutation in the promoter region of the pagR gene on pXO2, but not the mutation on pXO1, contributes to lethal levels of toxin production. This result was further confirmed by RT-PCR, western blot, and animal toxicity assays. Taken together, our results signify that the attenuation of the Pasteur II vaccine strain is caused by a mutation in the pagR gene on its pXO2 plasmid. Moreover, these data suggest that pXO2 plasmid encoded proteins are involved in the virulence of B. anthracis. PMID:27363681

  11. Novel mutations in the RB1 gene from Chinese families with a history of retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leilei; Jia, Renbing; Zhao, Junyang; Fan, Jiayan; Zhou, YiXiong; Han, Bing; Song, Xin; Wu, Li; Zhang, He; Song, Huaidong; Ge, Shengfang; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-04-01

    Retinoblastoma is an aggressive eye cancer that develops during infancy and is divided into two clinical types, sporadic and heritable. RB1 has been identified as the only pathological gene responsible for heritable retinoblastoma. Here, we identified 11 RB1 germline mutations in the Han pedigrees of 17 bilateral retinoblastoma patients from China. Four mutations were nonsense mutations, five were splice site mutations, and two resulted in a frame shift due to an insertion or a deletion. Three of the mutations had not been previously reported, and the p.Q344L mutation occurred in two generations of retinoblastoma patients. We investigated phenotypic-genotypic relationships for the novel mutations and showed that these mutations affected the expression, location, and function of the retinoblastoma protein. Abnormal protein localization was observed after transfection of the mutant genes. In addition, changes in the cell cycle distribution and apoptosis rates were observed when the Saos-2 cell line was transfected with plasmids encoding the mutant RB1 genes. Our findings expand the spectrum of known RB1 mutations and will benefit the investigation of RB1 mutation hotspots. Genetic counseling can be offered to families with heritable RB1 mutations. PMID:25424699

  12. An optimized mRFP-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation system for the detection of protein-protein interactions in planta.

    PubMed

    Zilian, Eva; Maiss, Edgar

    2011-06-01

    An existing bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) system, based on a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP), has been optimized for the investigation of protein-protein interactions in planta. The expression plasmids, encoding the N-terminal amino acids (aa) 1-168 and the C-terminal aa 169-225 of the mRFP, allow N- or C-terminal fusion of a split mRFP, with the genes of interest. Two major improvements over the original vectors have been made. Firstly, the coding sequence of a GGGSGGG-linker has been integrated between mRFP sequences and the genes of interest. Secondly, a modified mini binary vector (∼3.5 kb) was introduced as the backbone for the plant expression plasmids. Based on the results of yeast two-hybrid studies with plant viral proteins, interaction of viral proteins was tested in Nicotiana benthamiana plants and monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Plum pox virus coat protein and mutants thereof served as controls. The system was validated using the N-protein of Capsicum chlorosis virus for which a self-interaction was shown for the first time, the Tobacco mosaic virus coat protein and BC1 and BV1 of the Tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus. This optimized BiFC system provides a convenient alternative to other BiFC, as well as yeast two-hybrid assays, for detecting protein-protein interactions. PMID:21473882

  13. Disruption of a toxin gene by introduction of a foreign gene into the Chromosome of Clostridium perfringens using targetron induced mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Caruso, Lori; McClane, Bruce; Fisher, Derek; Gupta, Phalguni

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) has been developed as a potential oral delivery vehicle to deliver antigens or therapeutic compounds to Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissue (GALT). However, this recombinant C. perfringens carries a plasmid-encoded expression system, which raises several safety concerns regarding possible horizontal plasmid transfer and spread of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistant genes. Furthermore, this bacterium produces the extracellular theta toxin, which poses a potential safety issue for general administration. Using a Clostridium-specific-targetron-donor plasmid, we inserted the Simian Immunodefiency Virus (SIV) p27 gene into the theta toxin gene (pfoA) on the C. perfringens chromosome, which simultaneously inactivated the theta gene and introduced SIV p27 gene onto bacterial chromosome. Such mutant C. perfringens without an input plasmid or antibiotic resistant gene stably produced a large amount of SIV p27 protein during sporulation and did not produce theta toxin. Upon oral feeding of the mutant bacteria to mice, intact p27 protein was detected in the lower GI tract. The re-engineered C. perfringens provides a biosafe efficient oral vehicle to deliver antigen to gastrointestinal tract. PMID:17553563

  14. Most Enterobacter aerogenes Strains in France Belong to a Prevalent Clone

    PubMed Central

    Bosi, Claude; Davin-Regli, Anne; Bornet, Charleric; Mallea, Monique; Pages, Jean-Marie; Bollet, Claude

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the distribution in France of the Enterobacter aerogenes prevalent clone isolated in the hospitals of the Marseille area (A. Davin-Regli, D. Monnet, P. Saux, C. Bosi, R. Charrel, A. Barthelemy, and C. Bollet, J. Clin. Microbiol. 34:1474–1480, 1996). A total of 123 E. aerogenes isolates were collected from 23 hospital laboratories and analyzed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR to determine their epidemiological relatedness. Molecular typing revealed that 21 of the 23 laboratories had isolated this prevalent clone harboring the plasmid encoding for extended-spectrum β-lactamase of the TEM-24 type. Most isolates were susceptible only to imipenem and gentamicin. Their dissemination seems to be clonal and was probably the result of the general use of broad-spectrum cephalosporins and quinolones. Four isolates showed an alteration of their outer membrane proteins, causing decrease of susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins and imipenem and leading to the critical situation of having no alternative therapeutic. The large dissemination of the E. aerogenes prevalent clone probably results from its good adaptation to the antibiotics administered in France and the hospital environment, particularly in intensive care units. PMID:10364580

  15. Experimental Rhodococcus equi and equine infectious anemia virus DNA vaccination in adult and neonatal horses: effect of IL-12, dose, and route.

    PubMed

    Mealey, R H; Stone, D M; Hines, M T; Alperin, D C; Littke, M H; Leib, S R; Leach, S E; Hines, S A

    2007-10-23

    Improving the ability of DNA-based vaccines to induce potent Type1/Th1 responses against intracellular pathogens in large outbred species is essential. Rhodoccocus equi and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) are two naturally occurring equine pathogens that also serve as important large animal models of neonatal immunity and lentiviral immune control. Neonates present a unique challenge for immunization due to their diminished immunologic capabilities and apparent Th2 bias. In an effort to augment R. equi- and EIAV-specific Th1 responses induced by DNA vaccination, we hypothesized that a dual promoter plasmid encoding recombinant equine IL-12 (rEqIL-12) would function as a molecular adjuvant. In adult horses, DNA vaccines induced R. equi- and EIAV-specific antibody and lymphoproliferative responses, and EIAV-specific CTL and tetramer-positive CD8+ T lymphocytes. These responses were not enhanced by the rEqIL-12 plasmid. In neonatal foals, DNA immunization induced EIAV-specific antibody and lymphoproliferative responses, but not CTL. The R. equi vapA vaccine was poorly immunogenic in foals even when co-administered with the IL-12 plasmid. It was concluded that DNA immunization was capable of inducing Th1 responses in horses; dose and route were significant variables, but rEqIL-12 was not an effective molecular adjuvant. Additional work is needed to optimize DNA vaccine-induced Th1 responses in horses, especially in neonates. PMID:17889970

  16. The replication initiation protein of the broad-host-range plasmid RK2 is activated by the ClpX chaperone.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, I; Helinski, D R

    1997-12-23

    Initiation and control of replication of the broad-host-range plasmid RK2 requires two plasmid-encoded elements, the replication origin (oriV) and the initiation protein TrfA. Purified TrfA is largely in the form of a dimer; however, only the monomeric form of the protein can bind specifically to the direct repeats (iterons) at the RK2 origin. The largely dimeric form of wild-type TrfA is inactive in the initiation of replication of RK2 in an in vitro replication system reconstituted from purified components. However, preincubation of the TrfA protein with the ClpX molecular chaperone isolated from Escherichia coli activates the initiator protein for replication in the purified system. We further observed that ClpX, in an ATP-dependent reaction, greatly increases the proportion of TrfA monomers and, therefore, the ability of this protein to bind to iterons localized within RK2 origin. Finally, a copy-up mutant of the TrfA protein which is largely in the monomer form is active in the reconstituted in vitro replication system, and its activity is not affected by ClpX. PMID:9405620

  17. N. meningitidis 1681 is a member of the FinO family of RNA chaperones.

    SciTech Connect

    Chaulk, S.; Lu, J.; Tan, K.; Arthur, D.; Edwards, R.; Frost, L.; Joachimiak, A.; Glover, J.

    2010-11-01

    The conjugative transfer of F-like plasmids between bacteria is regulated by the plasmid-encoded RNA chaperone, FinO, which facilitates sense - antisense RNA interactions to regulate plasmid gene expression. FinO was thought to adopt a unique structure, however many putative homologs have been identified in microbial genomes and are considered members of the FinO-conjugation-repressor superfamily. We were interested in determining whether other members were also able to bind RNA and promote duplex formation, suggesting that this motif does indeed identify a putative RNA chaperone. We determined the crystal structure of the N. meningitidis MC58 protein NMB1681. It revealed striking similarity to FinO, with a conserved fold and a large, positively charged surface that could function in RNA interactions. Using assays developed to study FinO-FinP sRNA interactions, NMB1681, like FinO, bound tightly to FinP RNA stem-loops with short 5-foot and 3-foot single-stranded tails but not to ssRNA. It also was able to catalyze strand exchange between an RNA duplex and a complementary single-strand, and facilitated duplexing between complementary RNA hairpins. Finally, NMB1681 was able to rescue a finO deficiency and repress F plasmid conjugation. This study strongly suggests that NMB1681 is a FinO-like RNA chaperone that likely regulates gene expression through RNA-based mechanisms in N. meningitidis.

  18. Characterization and transcriptional regulation of the 2'-N-acetyltransferase gene from Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed Central

    Rather, P N; Orosz, E; Shaw, K J; Hare, R; Miller, G

    1993-01-01

    We have cloned the chromosomally encoded 2'-N-acetyltransferase gene [aac(2')-Ia] from Providencia stuartii. DNA sequence analysis of the cloned insert identified a single open reading frame, which is capable of encoding a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 20,073 Da. The deduced AAC(2')-Ia protein showed no significant homology to other proteins, including all of the AAC(3) and AAC(6') proteins. Primer extension analysis was used to identify the aac(2')-Ia promoter, which contained an unusual sequence (CTTTTT) at the -35 region. Expression of the aac(2')-Ia gene occurs at low levels in wild-type P. stuartii strains; therefore, they are aminoglycoside susceptible. We have isolated mutants with high-level AAC(2')-Ia expression at a frequency of 4.8 x 10(-6). Detailed analysis of one mutant demonstrated a 12.2-fold increase in the accumulation of aac(2')-Ia mRNA. In addition, the levels of beta-galactosidase expression from a plasmid-encoded aac(2')-lacZ transcriptional fusion were increased 11.5-fold in this mutant relative to those in an isogenic wild-type strain. These results suggested that a trans-acting factor, designated aar (for aminoglycoside acetyltransferase regulator), controls AAC(2')-Ia expression in P. stuartii. Images PMID:8407825

  19. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication.

    PubMed

    Carr, Stephen B; Phillips, Simon E V; Thomas, Christopher D

    2016-03-18

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  20. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Bacterial Conjugation Factor PsiB, a Negative Regulator of RecA

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Vessela; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; George, Nicholas P.; McCaslin, Darrell; Cox, Michael M.; Keck, James L.

    2012-03-16

    During bacterial conjugation, genetic material from one cell is transferred to another as single-stranded DNA. The introduction of single-stranded DNA into the recipient cell would ordinarily trigger a potentially deleterious transcriptional response called SOS, which is initiated by RecA protein filaments formed on the DNA. During F plasmid conjugation, however, the SOS response is suppressed by PsiB, an F-plasmid-encoded protein that binds and sequesters free RecA to prevent filament formation. Among the many characterized RecA modulator proteins, PsiB is unique in using sequestration as an inhibitory mechanism. We describe the crystal structure of PsiB from the Escherichia coli F plasmid. The stucture of PsiB is surprisingly similar to CapZ, a eukaryotic actin filament capping protein. Structure-directed neutralization of electronegative surfaces on PsiB abrogates RecA inhibition whereas neutralization of an electropositive surface element enhances PsiB inhibition of RecA. Together, these studies provide a first molecular view of PsiB and highlight its use as a reagent in studies of RecA activity.

  1. Genomic fingerprinting of bacteriocin-producer strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Janaína dos S; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; de Oliveira, Selma S; Ceotto, Hilana; dos Santos, Kátia Regina N; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de F

    2005-09-01

    Among 363 strains of Staphylococcus aureus, 21 were shown to produce bacteriocins (Bac), antimicrobial peptides with potential biotechnological applications. This collection includes strains which are either isolated from food, patients and healthy cattle, or are involved in subclinical bovine mastitis. From these 21 strains, 17 were shown to carry closely-related 8.0-kb Bac plasmids encoding bacteriocins either identical to or similar to aureocin A70, a bacteriocin able to inhibit strains of Listeria monocytogenes, a food-borne pathogen. Such findings prompted us to investigate the genetic relationships among these Bac+ strains. To obtain more discriminatory results, a combined analysis of AP-PCR, rep-PCR, and a modified PCR technique that we designated SD-PCR was employed. The 17 Bac+ strains harboring 8.0-kb Bac plasmids exhibited seven fingerprint patterns. One such genotype was composed of 8 out of the 11 strains associated with bovine mastitis, which suggests the prevalence of a clone of Bac+ strains involved in this animal infection carrying 8.0-kb Bac plasmids. Our data support the assumption that Bac+ strains of S. aureus carrying genetically related 8.0-kb Bac plasmids do not belong to a single clone. It seems, therefore, that 8.0-kb Bac plasmids have spread horizontally among different S. aureus strains. There also seems to be genetic diversity among the remaining Bac+ strains analyzed. PMID:16171981

  2. Evolution of MS lesions to black holes under DNA vaccine treatment.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Athina; von Felten, Stefanie; Traud, Stefan; Rahman, Amena; Quan, Joanne; King, Robert; Garren, Hideki; Steinman, Lawrence; Cutter, Gary; Kappos, Ludwig; Radue, Ernst Wilhelm

    2012-07-01

    Persistent black holes (PBH) are associated with axonal loss and disability progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this work was to determine if BHT-3009, a DNA plasmid-encoding myelin basic protein (MBP), reduces the risk of new lesions becoming PBH, compared to placebo, and to test if pre-treatment serum anti-MBP antibody levels impact on the effect of BHT-3009 treatment. In this retrospective, blinded MRI study, we reviewed MRI scans of 155 MS patients from a double-blind, randomized, phase II trial with three treatment arms (placebo, 0.5 and 1.5 mg BHT-3009). New lesions at weeks 8 and 16 were tracked at week 48 and those appearing as T1-hypointense were classified as PBH. A subset of 46 patients with available pre-treatment serum anti-MBP IgM levels were analyzed separately. Overall, there was no impact of treatment on the risk for PBH. However, there was a significant interaction between anti-MBP antibodies and treatment effect: patients receiving 0.5 mg BHT-3009 showed a reduced risk of PBH with higher antibody levels compared to placebo (p < 0.01). Although we found no overall reduction of the risk for PBH in treated patients, there may be an effect of low-dose BHT-3009, depending on the patients' pre-treatment immune responses. PMID:22222856

  3. DNA vaccine containing the mycobacterial hsp65 gene prevented insulitis in MLD-STZ diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Rubens R; Sartori, Alexandrina; Lima, Deison S; Souza, Patrícia RM; Coelho-Castelo, Arlete AM; Bonato, Vânia LD; Silva, Célio L

    2009-01-01

    Background Our group previously demonstrated that a DNA plasmid encoding the mycobacterial 65-kDa heat shock protein (DNA-HSP65) displayed prophylactic and therapeutic effect in a mice model for tuberculosis. This protection was attributed to induction of a strong cellular immunity against HSP65. As specific immunity to HSP60 family has been detected in arthritis, multiple sclerosis and diabetes, the vaccination procedure with DNA-HSP65 could induce a cross-reactive immune response that could trigger or worsen these autoimmune diseases. Methods In this investigation was evaluated the effect of a previous vaccination with DNA-HSP65 on diabetes development induced by Streptozotocin (STZ). C57BL/6 mice received three vaccine doses or the corresponding empty vector and were then injected with multiple low doses of STZ. Results DNA-HSP65 vaccination protected mice from STZ induced insulitis and this was associated with higher production of IL-10 in spleen and also in the islets. This protective effect was also concomitant with the appearance of a regulatory cell population in the spleen and a decreased infiltration of the islets by T CD8+ lymphocytes. The vector (DNAv) also determined immunomodulation but its protective effect against insulitis was very discrete. Conclusion The data presented in this study encourages a further investigation in the regulatory potential of the DNA-HSP65 construct. Our findings have important implications for the development of new immune therapy strategies to combat autoimmune diseases. PMID:19754943

  4. Nanoparticles of compacted DNA transfect postmitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ge; Li, DeShan; Pasumarthy, Murali K; Kowalczyk, Tomasz H; Gedeon, Christopher R; Hyatt, Susannah L; Payne, Jennifer M; Miller, Timothy J; Brunovskis, Peter; Fink, Tamara L; Muhammad, Osman; Moen, Robert C; Hanson, Richard W; Cooper, Mark J

    2003-08-29

    Charge-neutral DNA nanoparticles have been developed in which single molecules of DNA are compacted to their minimal possible size. We speculated that the small size of these DNA nanoparticles may facilitate gene transfer in postmitotic cells, permitting nuclear uptake across the 25-nm nuclear membrane pore. To determine whether DNA nanoparticles can transfect nondividing cells, growth-arrested neuroblastoma and hepatoma cells were transfected with DNA/liposome mixtures encoding luciferase. In both models, growth-arrested cells were robustly transfected by compacted DNA (6,900-360-fold more than naked DNA). To evaluate mechanisms responsible for enhanced transfection, HuH-7 cells were microinjected with naked or compacted plasmids encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein. Cytoplasmic microinjection of DNA nanoparticles generated a approximately 10-fold improvement in transgene expression as compared with naked DNA; this enhancement was reversed by the nuclear pore inhibitor, wheat germ agglutinin. To determine the upper size limit for gene transfer, DNA nanoparticles of various sizes were microinjected into the cytoplasm. A marked decrease in transgene expression was observed as the minor ellipsoidal diameter approached 25 nm. In summary, suitably sized DNA nanoparticles productively transfect growth arrested cells by traversing the nuclear membrane pore. PMID:12807905

  5. Role of the Yersinia YopJ protein in suppressing interleukin-8 secretion by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Justin L; Hasenkrug, Aaron M; Shannon, Jeffrey G; Kobayashi, Scott D; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes, in addition to their direct bactericidal activities, produce cytokines involved in the activation and regulation of the innate and adaptive immune response to infection. In this study we evaluated the cytokine response of human PMNs following incubation with the pathogenic Yersinia species. Yersinia pestis strains with the pCD1 virulence plasmid, which encodes cytotoxic Yop proteins that are translocated into host cells, stimulated little or no cytokine production compared to pCD1-negative strains. In particular, PMNs incubated with pCD1-negative Y. pestis secreted 1000-fold higher levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8 or CXCL8), a proinflammatory chemokine important for PMN recruitment and activation. Deletion of yopE, -H, -T, -M or ypkA had no effect on pCD1-dependent inhibition, whereas deletion of yopJ resulted in significantly increased IL-8 production. Like Y. pestis, the enteropathogenic Yersinia species inhibited IL-8 secretion by PMNs, and strains lacking the virulence plasmid induced high levels of IL-8. Our results show that virulence plasmid-encoded effector Yops, particularly YopJ, prevent IL-8 secretion by human PMNs. Suppression of the chemotactic IL-8 response by Y. pestis may contribute to the delayed PMN recruitment to the infected lymph node that typifies bubonic plague. PMID:26361732

  6. [SPECIFIC FEATURES OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FRONTOPSYLLA LUCULENTA LUCULENTA (JORDAN ET ROTHSCHILD, 1923) FLEA AND THE PLAGUE PATHOGEN WITH DIFFERENT PLASMID COMPOSITION].

    PubMed

    Tokmakova, E G; Bazanova, L P; Voronova, G A; Balakhonov, S V

    2016-01-01

    It was experimentally established that plague pathogen strains with different plasmid composition variously suppressed the viability of Frontopsylla luculenta luculenta fleas. Dead insects were most frequently observed among those infected with a virulent strain having the cryptic plasmid pTP33. The presence of the avirulent and apesticinogenic plasmid I-3480 in the fleas less deteriorated their state. Biofilm formation by different F.l.luculenta strains in the body was characterized by quantitative and qualitative differences. The strains that had the cryptic plasmid and were able to form the biofilm in the F.l.Iuculenta fleas surpassed the three-plasmid strain I-3230 and their formned aggregates achieved very large sizes and frequently persisted until the end of the experiment. Small solitary masses were generally observed in the insects infected with the three-plasmid strain. Thus, the pTP33 plasmid potentiated the pYT plasmid-encoded ability to colonize the F.l.Iuculenta fleas with the plague pathogen; in this case the products of the pYV and pYP plasmids (or one of them) are toxic to ectoparasites. PMID:27029144

  7. CRISPR/Cas9-induced disruption of gene expression in mouse embryonic brain and single neural stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kalebic, Nereo; Taverna, Elena; Tavano, Stefania; Wong, Fong Kuan; Suchold, Dana; Winkler, Sylke; Huttner, Wieland B; Sarov, Mihail

    2016-03-01

    We have applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system in vivo to disrupt gene expression in neural stem cells in the developing mammalian brain. Two days after in utero electroporation of a single plasmid encoding Cas9 and an appropriate guide RNA (gRNA) into the embryonic neocortex of Tis21::GFP knock-in mice, expression of GFP, which occurs specifically in neural stem cells committed to neurogenesis, was found to be nearly completely (≈90%) abolished in the progeny of the targeted cells. Importantly, upon in utero electroporation directly of recombinant Cas9/gRNA complex, near-maximal efficiency of disruption of GFP expression was achieved already after 24 h. Furthermore, by using microinjection of the Cas9 protein/gRNA complex into neural stem cells in organotypic slice culture, we obtained disruption of GFP expression within a single cell cycle. Finally, we used either Cas9 plasmid in utero electroporation or Cas9 protein complex microinjection to disrupt the expression of Eomes/Tbr2, a gene fundamental for neocortical neurogenesis. This resulted in a reduction in basal progenitors and an increase in neuronal differentiation. Thus, the present in vivo application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in neural stem cells provides a rapid, efficient and enduring disruption of expression of specific genes to dissect their role in mammalian brain development. PMID:26758805

  8. Molecular Analysis of Virulence Profiles and Shiga Toxin Genes in Food-Borne Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Slanec, T.; Fruth, A.; Creuzburg, K.; Schmidt, H.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, 75 Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains originating from foods (n = 73) and drinking water (n = 2) were analyzed for their stx genotype, as well as for further chromosome-, phage-, and plasmid-encoded virulence factors. A broad spectrum of stx genes was detected. Fifty-three strains (70.7%) contained stx2 or stx2 variants, including stx2d, mucus-activatable stx2d, stx2e, and stx2g. Seven strains (9.3%) harbored stx1 or stx1c, and 15 strains (20.0%) carried both stx2 and/or stx2 variants and stx1 or stx1c. Beside stx, the most abundant accessory virulence markers in STEC food isolates were iha (57.3%), ehxA (40.0%), espP (28.0%), and subAB (25.3%). Only four strains were eae positive; three of these belonged to the serogroups O26, O103, and O157 and contained a typical enterohemorrhagic E. coli virulence spectrum. The results of this study show that a number of STEC strains that occur in foods appear to be pathogenic for humans, based on their virulence profiles. Analysis of stx subtypes and detection of additional virulence factors in eae-negative strains may help to better assess the risk of such strains for causing human infection. PMID:19684176

  9. Characterization of the genes coding for the putative sigma factor AlgU and its regulators MucA, MucB, MucC, and MucD in Azotobacter vinelandii and evaluation of their roles in alginate biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Salazar, J M; Moreno, S; Nájera, R; Boucher, J C; Espín, G; Soberón-Chávez, G; Deretic, V

    1996-01-01

    The study of the biosynthesis of alginate, the exopolysaccharide produced by Azotobacter vinelandii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has biotechnological and medical significance. We report here the identification of the A. vinelandii genes coding for the putative sigma factor AlgU and its negative regulators MucA and MucB through the suppression of the highly mucoid phenotype of an A. vinelandii strain by a plasmid encoding MucA and MucB. The sequences of the A. vinelandii algU, mucA, and mucB genes are highly homologous to those of the corresponding P. aeruginosa genes, AlgU shows 93% identity, and MucA and MucB are 64.4 and 63.9% identical, respectively. Forming part of the same operon as algU, mucA, and mucB, two additional genes (mucC and mucD) were identified and sequenced; the product of the former gene is homologous to ORF4 of Photobacterium sp. strain SS9, and that of the latter gene belongs to the HtrA serine protease family. Interestingly, the nonmucoid A. vinelandii UW136 had a 0.9-kb insertion within the algU gene. A strong correlation between AlgU activity and alginate production by A. vinelandii was also found, as reflected in the level of algD transcription. PMID:8606151

  10. Allergy Vaccines Using a Mycobacterium-Secreted Antigen, Ag85B, and an IL-4 Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Yusuke; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, the prevalence of allergic diseases, including bronchial asthma, airway hypersensitivity, hay fever, and atopic dermatitis, has been increasing in the industrialized world, and effective treatments probably require manipulating the inflammatory response to pathogenic allergens. T helper (Th) 2 cells are thought to play a crucial role in the initiation, progression, and persistence of allergic responses in association with production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-13. Therefore, a strategy of a shift from Th2- to Th1-type immune response may be valuable in the prophylaxis and management of allergic diseases. It is also necessary to develop prophylactic and therapeutic treatment that induces homeostatic functions in the multifaceted allergic environment, because various factors including innate and adaptive immunity, mucosal immune response, and functional and structural maintenance of local tissue might be involved in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders. We review herein recent findings related to the curative effect for mouse models of asthma and atopic dermatitis using DNA-, virus-, and protein-based vaccines of a Mycobacterium secretion antigen, Ag85B, and a plasmid encoding cDNA of antagonistic IL-4 mutant. PMID:27076163

  11. Genomic analyses of Clostridium perfringens isolates from five toxinotypes.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Karl A; Elbourne, Liam D H; Tetu, Sasha G; Melville, Stephen B; Rood, Julian I; Paulsen, Ian T

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens can be isolated from a range of environments, including soil, marine and fresh water sediments, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals and humans. Some C. perfringens strains have attractive industrial applications, e.g., in the degradation of waste products or the production of useful chemicals. However, C. perfringens has been most studied as the causative agent of a range of enteric and soft tissue infections of varying severities in humans and animals. Host preference and disease type in C. perfringens are intimately linked to the production of key extracellular toxins and on this basis toxigenic C. perfringens strains have been classified into five toxinotypes (A-E). To date, twelve genome sequences have been generated for a diverse collection of C. perfringens isolates, including strains associated with human and animal infections, a human commensal strain, and a strain with potential industrial utility. Most of the sequenced strains are classified as toxinotype A. However, genome sequences of representative strains from each of the other four toxinotypes have also been determined. Analysis of this collection of sequences has highlighted a lack of features differentiating toxinotype A strains from the other isolates, indicating that the primary defining characteristic of toxinotype A strains is their lack of key plasmid-encoded extracellular toxin genes associated with toxinotype B to E strains. The representative B-E strains sequenced to date each harbour many unique genes. Additional genome sequences are needed to determine if these genes are characteristic of their respective toxinotypes. PMID:25445567

  12. Characterization of Klebsiella sp. strain 10982, a colonizer of humans that contains novel antibiotic resistance alleles and exhibits genetic similarities to plant and clinical Klebsiella isolates.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Tracy H; Zhao, LiCheng; Sahl, Jason W; Robinson, Gwen; Harris, Anthony D; Rasko, David A; Johnson, J Kristie

    2014-01-01

    A unique Klebsiella species strain, 10982, was cultured from a perianal swab specimen obtained from a patient in the University of Maryland Medical Center intensive care unit. Klebsiella sp. 10982 possesses a large IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid encoding a novel FOX AmpC β-lactamase designated FOX-10. A novel variant of the LEN β-lactamase was also identified. Genome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that this isolate contains genes associated with nitrogen fixation, allantoin metabolism, and citrate fermentation. These three gene regions are typically present in either Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates or Klebsiella nitrogen-fixing endophytes but usually not in the same organism. Phylogenomic analysis of Klebsiella sp. 10982 and sequenced Klebsiella genomes demonstrated that Klebsiella sp. 10982 is present on a branch that is located intermediate between the genomes of nitrogen-fixing endophytes and K. pneumoniae clinical isolates. Metabolic features identified in the genome of Klebsiella sp. 10982 distinguish this isolate from other Klebsiella clinical isolates. These features include the nitrogen fixation (nif) gene cluster, which is typically present in endophytic Klebsiella isolates and is absent from Klebsiella clinical isolates. Additionally, the Klebsiella sp. 10982 genome contains genes associated with allantoin metabolism, which have been detected primarily in K. pneumoniae isolates from liver abscesses. Comparative genomic analysis of Klebsiella sp. 10982 demonstrated that this organism has acquired genes conferring new metabolic strategies and novel antibiotic resistance alleles, both of which may enhance its ability to colonize the human body. PMID:24395222

  13. Novel host-specific iron acquisition system in the zoonotic pathogen Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Pajuelo, David; Lee, Chung-Te; Roig, Francisco J; Hor, Lien-I; Amaro, Carmen

    2015-06-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a marine bacterium associated with human and fish (mainly farmed eels) diseases globally known as vibriosis. The ability to infect and overcome eel innate immunity relies on a virulence plasmid (pVvbt2) specific for biotype 2 (Bt2) strains. In the present study, we demonstrated that pVvbt2 encodes a host-specific iron acquisition system that depends on an outer membrane receptor for eel transferrin called Vep20. The inactivation of vep20 did not affect either bacterial growth in human plasma or virulence for mice, while bacterial growth in eel blood/plasma was abolished and virulence for eels was significantly impaired. Furthermore, vep20 is an iron-regulated gene overexpressed in eel blood during artificially induced vibriosis both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, homologues to vep20 were identified in the transferable plasmids of two fish pathogen species of broad-host range, Vibrio harveyi (pVh1) and Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (pPHDD1). These data suggest that Vep20 belongs to a new family of plasmid-encoded fish-specific transferrin receptors, and the acquisition of these plasmids through horizontal gene transfer is likely positively selected in the fish-farming environment. Moreover, we propose Ftbp (fish transferrin binding proteins) as a formal name for this family of proteins. PMID:25630302

  14. Analysis of Two Complementary Single-Gene Deletion Mutant Libraries of Salmonella Typhimurium in Intraperitoneal Infection of BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia A.; Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C.; Desai, Prerak; Valenzuela, Camila; Porwollik, Steffen; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A.; McClelland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Two pools of individual single gene deletion (SGD) mutants of S. Typhimurium 14028s encompassing deletions of 3,923 annotated non-essential ORFs and sRNAs were screened by intraperitoneal (IP) injection in BALB/c mice followed by recovery from spleen and liver 2 days post infection. The relative abundance of each mutant was measured by microarray hybridization. The two mutant libraries differed in the orientation of the antibiotic resistance cassettes (either sense-oriented KanR, SGD-K, or antisense-oriented CamR, SGD-C). Consistent systemic colonization defects were observed in both libraries and both organs for hundreds of mutants of genes previously reported to be important after IP injection in this animal model, and for about 100 new candidate genes required for systemic colonization. Four mutants with a range of apparent fitness defects were confirmed using competitive infections with the wild-type parental strain: ΔSTM0286, ΔSTM0551, ΔSTM2363, and ΔSTM3356. Two mutants, ΔSTM0286 and ΔSTM2363, were then complemented in trans with a plasmid encoding an intact copy of the corresponding wild-type gene, and regained the ability to fully colonize BALB/c mice systemically. These results suggest the presence of many more undiscovered Salmonella genes with phenotypes in IP infection of BALB/c mice, and validate the libraries for application to other systems. PMID:26779130

  15. Non-histone protein HMGB1 inhibits the repair of damaged DNA by cisplatin in NIH-3T3 murine fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yusein-Myashkova, Shazie; Ugrinova, Iva; Pasheva, Evdokia

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear non-histone protein high mobility group box (HMGB) 1 is known to having an inhibitory effect on the repair of DNA damaged by the antitumor drug cisplatin in vitro. To investigate the role of HMGB1 in living cells, we studied the DNA repair of cisplatin damages in mouse fibroblast cell line, NIH-3T3. We evaluated the effect of the post-synthetic acetylation and C-terminal domain of the protein by overexpression of the parental and mutant GFP fused forms of HMGB1. The results revealed that HMGB1 had also an inhibitory effect on the repair of cisplatin damaged DNA in vivo. The silencing of HMGB1 in NIH-3T3 cells increased the cellular DNA repair potential. The increased levels of repair synthesis could be “rescued” and returned to less than normal levels if the knockdown cells were transfected with plasmids encoding HMGB1 and HMGB1 K2A. In this case, the truncated form of HMGB1 also exhibited a slight inhibitory effect. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 99-104] PMID:24325815

  16. Inhibition of the Type I Interferon Response by the Nucleoprotein of the Prototypic Arenavirus Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Zúñiga, Elina I.; Rosario, Debralee; García-Sastre, Adolfo; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a formidable battle horse for the study of viral immunology, as well as viral persistence and associated diseases. Investigations with LCMV have uncovered basic mechanisms by which viruses avoid elimination by the host adaptive immune response. In this study we show that LCMV also disables the host innate defense by interfering with beta interferon (IFN-β) production in response to different stimuli, including infection with Sendai virus and liposome-mediated DNA transfection. Inhibition of IFN production in LCMV-infected cells was caused by an early block in the IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) activation pathway. This defect was restored in cells cured of LCMV, indicating that one or more LCMV products are responsible for the inhibition of IRF-3 activation. Using expression plasmids encoding individual LCMV proteins, we found that expression of the LCMV nucleoprotein (NP) was sufficient to inhibit both IFN production and nuclear translocation of IRF-3. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of an IFN-counteracting viral protein in the Arenaviridae family. Inhibition of IFN production by the arenavirus NP is likely to be a determinant of virulence in vivo. PMID:16940530

  17. Cationic Surface Modification of PLG Nanoparticles Offers Sustained Gene Delivery to Pulmonary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    BAOUM, ABDULGADER; DHILLON, NAVNEET; BUCH, SHILPA; BERKLAND, CORY

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles are currently being explored as a nonviral gene delivery system; however, many obstacles impede the translation of these nanomaterials. For example, nanoparticles delivered systemically are inherently prone to adsorbing serum proteins and agglomerating as a result of their large surface/volume ratio. What is desired is a simple procedure to prepare nanoparticles that may be delivered locally and exhibit minimal toxicity while improving entry into cells for effectively delivering DNA. The objective of this study was to optimize the formulation of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles for gene delivery performance to a model of the pulmonary epithelium. Using a simple solvent diffusion technique, the chemistry of the particle surface was varied by using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (~200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80–90%) and slowly released the same for 2 weeks. In A549 alveolar lung epithelial cells, high levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least 2 weeks. In contrast, PEI gene expression ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. PMID:19911425

  18. VCL-CB01, an injectable bivalent plasmid DNA vaccine for potential protection against CMV disease and infection

    PubMed Central

    Schleiss, Mark R

    2010-01-01

    Vaccines for the prevention of human CMV (hCMV) infection and disease are a major public health priority. Immunization with DNA vaccines encoding key proteins involved in the immune response to hCMV has emerged as a major focus of hCMV vaccine research. Validation of the protective effect of DNA vaccination in animal models has provided support for clinical trials. VCL-CB01, under development byVical Inc for the prevention of hCMV infection and disease, is a poloxamer-formulated, bivalent DNA vaccine that contains plasmids encoding hCMV tegument phosphoprotein 65 and the major hCMV surface glycoprotein B. In a phase I trial in healthy adults, VCL-CB01 was well tolerated. In interim results from a phase II trial in hCMV-seropositive hematopoietic cell transplant recipients, VCL-CB01 increased T-cell responses compared with placebo. The final results from the phase II trial will be of value for developing strategies to prevent hCMV disease in hCMV-seropositive transplant recipients, and may lead to other trials of VCL-CB01 or related vaccines for the prevention of congenital hCMV infection. PMID:19806506

  19. Why Close a Bacterial Genome? The Plasmid of Alteromonas Macleodii HOT1A3 is a Vector for Inter-Specific Transfer of a Flexible Genomic Island

    PubMed Central

    Fadeev, Eduard; De Pascale, Fabio; Vezzi, Alessandro; Hübner, Sariel; Aharonovich, Dikla; Sher, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequencing is rapidly becoming a staple technique in environmental and clinical microbiology, yet computational challenges still remain, leading to many draft genomes which are typically fragmented into many contigs. We sequenced and completely assembled the genome of a marine heterotrophic bacterium, Alteromonas macleodii HOT1A3, and compared its full genome to several draft genomes obtained using different reference-based and de novo methods. In general, the de novo assemblies clearly outperformed the reference-based or hybrid ones, covering >99% of the genes and representing essentially all of the gene functions. However, only the fully closed genome (∼4.5 Mbp) allowed us to identify the presence of a large, 148 kbp plasmid, pAM1A3. While HOT1A3 belongs to A. macleodii, typically found in surface waters (“surface ecotype”), this plasmid consists of an almost complete flexible genomic island (fGI), containing many genes involved in metal resistance previously identified in the genomes of Alteromonas mediterranea (“deep ecotype”). Indeed, similar to A. mediterranea, A. macleodii HOT1A3 grows at concentrations of zinc, mercury, and copper that are inhibitory for other A. macleodii strains. The presence of a plasmid encoding almost an entire fGI suggests that wholesale genomic exchange between heterotrophic marine bacteria belonging to related but ecologically different populations is not uncommon. PMID:27014193

  20. A single-component multidrug transporter of the major facilitator superfamily is part of a network that protects E scherichia coli from bile salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Stephanie; Alegre, Kamela O; Holdsworth, Scarlett R; Rice, Matthew; Brown, James A; McVeigh, Paul; Kelly, Sharon M; Law, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to high concentrations of bile salts in the human intestinal tract is vital for the survival of enteric bacteria such as E scherichia coli. Although the tripartite AcrAB–TolC efflux system plays a significant role in this resistance, it is purported that other efflux pumps must also be involved. We provide evidence from a comprehensive suite of experiments performed at two different pH values (7.2 and 6.0) that reflect pH conditions that E . coli may encounter in human gut that MdtM, a single-component multidrug resistance transporter of the major facilitator superfamily, functions in bile salt resistance in E . coli by catalysing secondary active transport of bile salts out of the cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, assays performed on a chromosomal ΔacrB mutant transformed with multicopy plasmid encoding MdtM suggested a functional synergism between the single-component MdtM transporter and the tripartite AcrAB–TolC system that results in a multiplicative effect on resistance. Substrate binding experiments performed on purified MdtM demonstrated that the transporter binds to cholate and deoxycholate with micromolar affinity, and transport assays performed on inverted vesicles confirmed the capacity of MdtM to catalyse electrogenic bile salt/H+ antiport. PMID:24684269

  1. Prophage-Encoded Peroxidase in 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' Is a Secreted Effector That Suppresses Plant Defenses.

    PubMed

    Jain, Mukesh; Fleites, Laura A; Gabriel, Dean W

    2015-12-01

    'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' is transmitted by psyllids and causes huanglongbing (HLB), a lethal disease of citrus. Most pathogenic 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strains carry two nearly identical prophages similar to SC1 and SC2 in strain UF506. SC2 was observed to replicate as a moderately high-copy excision plasmid encoding a reactive oxygen species-scavenging peroxidase (SC2_gp095), a predicted lysogenic conversion factor. SC2_gp095 was expressed at significantly higher levels in periwinkle than in citrus and was suppressed in psyllids. SC2_gp095 was cloned in a shuttle vector and transformed into Escherichia coli and Liberibacter crescens, a culturable proxy for 'Ca. L. asiaticus'. Transformed L. crescens cells showed 20 to 25% enhanced resistance to H₂O₂on agar plates, 47% greater enzymatic activity, and enhanced growth in liquid cultures. A nonclassical secretion potential was predicted for SC2_gp095 and secretion from L. crescens was confirmed by enzymatic and Western blot analyses. Transient expression of SC2_gp095 in planta resulted in strong transcriptional downregulation of RbohB, the key gatekeeper of the H₂O₂-mediated defense signaling in plants, helping explain the surprisingly long incubation period (years) before HLB symptoms appear in 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected citrus. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' peroxidase is likely a secreted, horizontally acquired effector that suppresses host symptom development, a tactic used by most biotrophic plant pathogens. PMID:26313412

  2. Isolation and screening of plasmids from the epilithon which mobilize recombinant plasmid pD10.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, K E; Weightman, A J; Fry, J C

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the potential of bacteria from river epilithon to mobilize a recombinant catabolic plasmid, pD10, encoding 3-chlorobenzoate degradation and kanamycin resistance. Fifty-four mobilizing plasmids were exogenously isolated by triparental matings between strains of Pseudomonas putida and epilithic bacteria from the River Taff (South Wales, United Kingdom). Frequencies for mobilization ranged from 1.7 x 10(-8) to 4.5 x 10(-3) per recipient at 20 degrees C. The sizes of the mobilizing plasmids isolated ranged from 40 kb to over 200 kb, and 19 of 54 were found to encode mercury resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance to tetracycline and streptomycin was also found but not resistance to UV light or various heavy metals. Eight plasmids of epilithic bacteria, analyzed by comparing restriction fragmentation patterns, showed significant differences between those isolated from different independent matings. Optimal temperatures for mobilization of pD10 were between 15 and 25 degrees C. Four mercury resistance plasmids were found to be broad host range, transferring mercury resistance and mobilizing pD10 readily to representative species of beta- and gamma-purple bacteria. In general, frequencies of pD10 mobilization by plasmids of epilithic bacteria were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than conjugal transfer frequencies. Thus, there is a high potential for exchange of recombinant genes introduced into the epilithon by mobilization between a variety of bacterial species. Images PMID:1599248

  3. The anorexic effect of Ex4/Fc through GLP-1 receptor activation in high-fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Ma, Duan; Li, Yiming; Hu, Renming; Peng, Yongde; Wang, Qinghua

    2014-08-01

    Exendin-4 (Ex4), a peptide initially found in the saliva of the Gila monster, can activate the signaling pathway of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) through the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). We previously reported that a chimera protein consisting of Ex4 and mouse IgG heavy chain constant regions (Ex4/Fc) can exert biological effects of GLP-1, such as improving glycemic control and ameliorating manifestations in diabetic mice. The aim of this study was to determine whether Ex4/Fc is effective in modulating energy homeostasis in mice. Our results showed that in vivo expression of Ex4/Fc by intramuscular injection of the plasmid encoding Ex4/Fc followed by local electroporation effectively decreased food intake in the mice on high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. In addition, the reduced energy intake was associated with the decreased excrements from the Ex4/Fc-treated HFD mice but not the Fc control mice. Remarkably, the Ex4/Fctreated HFD mice displayed significantly lower triglyceride (TG) levels when compared with the control mice. Interestingly, while the leptin levels were not changed, the circulating ghrelin levels were higher in Ex4/Fc mice than those in the Fc control mice. These results suggested that Ex4/Fc can improve energy metabolism and lipid metabolism through GLP-1R in mice under excessive nutrition conditions. PMID:24951724

  4. Gene Gun-Mediated DNA Immunization Primes Development of Mucosal Immunity against Bovine Herpesvirus 1 in Cattle†

    PubMed Central

    Loehr, B. I.; Willson, P.; Babiuk, L. A.; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S.

    2000-01-01

    Vaccination by a mucosal route is an excellent approach to the control of mucosally acquired infections. Several reports on rodents suggest that DNA vaccines can be used to achieve mucosal immunity when applied to mucosal tissues. However, with the exception of one study with pigs and another with horses, there is no information on mucosal DNA immunization of the natural host. In this study, the potential of inducing mucosal immunity in cattle by immunization with a DNA vaccine was demonstrated. Cattle were immunized with a plasmid encoding bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) glycoprotein B, which was delivered with a gene gun either intradermally or intravulvomucosally. Intravulvomucosal DNA immunization induced strong cellular immune responses and primed humoral immune responses. This was evident after BHV-1 challenge when high levels of both immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA were detected. Intradermal delivery resulted in lower levels of immunity than mucosal immunization. To determine whether the differences between the immune responses induced by intravulvomucosal and intradermal immunizations might be due to the efficacy of antigen presentation, the distributions of antigen and Langerhans cells in the skin and mucosa were compared. After intravulvomucosal delivery, antigen was expressed early and throughout the mucosa, but after intradermal administration, antigen expression occurred later and superficially in the skin. Furthermore, Langerhans cells were widely distributed in the mucosal epithelium but found primarily in the basal layers of the epidermis of the skin. Collectively, these observations may account for the stronger immune response induced by mucosal administration. PMID:10846091

  5. Real-time PCR quantification of a green fluorescent protein-labeled, genetically engineered Pseudomonas putida strain during 2-chlorobenzoate degradation in soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gejiao; Gentry, Terry J; Grass, Gregor; Josephson, Karen; Rensing, Christopher; Pepper, Ian L

    2004-04-15

    The potential for real-time PCR (RTm-PCR) detection of the genetically engineered strain Pseudomonas putida GN2 was studied during 2-chlorobenzoate (2-CB) degradation in three different soils. The strain contained the constructed plasmid pGN2 which encoded genes for 2-CB oxidation (cbdA) and the green fluorescent protein (gfp). P. putida GN2 numbers were assessed by plating onto 2-CB minimal media and also by RTm-PCR detection of cbdA and gfp. Addition of P. putida GN2 decreased the time required to degrade 2-CB in all tested soils by more than 7 days. The RTm-PCR estimations of P. putida GN2 numbers strongly correlated with those obtained from plate count methods during active 2-CB degradation. However, after 2-CB degradation in the soils had ceased, RTm-PCR estimations of cbdA and gfp genes were generally one order of magnitude lower than those from plate counts. These results indicate the potential for RTm-PCR to rapidly determine degrader numbers in soil following bioaugmentation but also the need to exercise caution when attempting to determine cell numbers of degraders from the RTm-PCR quantification of plasmid encoded genes after substrate is depleted. PMID:15063501

  6. DNA interference: DNA-induced gene silencing in the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica.

    PubMed

    Omotezako, Tatsuya; Onuma, Takeshi A; Nishida, Hiroki

    2015-05-22

    RNA interference is widely employed as a gene-silencing system in eukaryotes for host defence against invading nucleic acids. In response to invading double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), mRNA is degraded in sequence-specific manner. So far, however, DNA interference (DNAi) has been reported only in plants, ciliates and archaea, and has not been explored in Metazoa. Here, we demonstrate that linear double-stranded DNA promotes both sequence-specific transcription blocking and mRNA degradation in developing embryos of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica. Introduced polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products or linearized plasmids encoding Brachyury induced tail malformation and mRNA degradation. This malformation was also promoted by DNA fragments of the putative 5'-flanking region and intron without the coding region. PCR products encoding Zic-like1 and acetylcholine esterase also induced loss of sensory organ and muscle acetylcholinesterase activity, respectively. Co-injection of mRNA encoding EGFP and mCherry, and PCR products encoding these fluorescent proteins, induced sequence-specific decrease in the green or red fluorescence, respectively. These results suggest that O. dioica possesses a defence system against exogenous DNA and RNA, and that DNA fragment-induced gene silencing would be mediated through transcription blocking as well as mRNA degradation. This is the first report of DNAi in Metazoa. PMID:25904672

  7. Identification of Escherichia coli region III flagellar gene products and description of two new flagellar genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D H; Matsumura, P

    1984-01-01

    Region III flagellar genes in Escherichia coli are involved with the assembly and rotation of the flagella, as well as taxis. We subcloned the flaB operon from a lambda fla transducing phage onto plasmid pMK2004. Two additional genes were found at the flaB locus, and we subdivided the flaB gene into flaB1, flaBII, and flaBIII. The cheY suppressor mutations which have previously been mapped to flaB were further localized to flaB11 (Parkinson et al., J. Bacteriol. 155:265-274, 1983). Until now, gene product identification has not been possible for these genes because of their low levels of gene expression. Overexpression of the flagellar genes was accomplished by placing the flaB operon under the control of the lacUV5 or tac promoters. Plasmid-encoded proteins were examined in a minicell expression system. By correlating various deletions and insertions in the flaB operon with the ability to complement specific flagellar mutants and code for polypeptides, we made the following gene product assignments: flaB 1, 60 kilodaltons; flaB 11, 38 kilodaltons; flaB111, 28 kilodaltons; flaC, 56 kilodaltons; fla0, 16 kilodaltons; and flaE, 54 kilodaltons. Images PMID:6094477

  8. Identification and characterization of the products of six region III flagellar genes (flaAII.3 through flaQII) of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Homma, M; Iino, T; Macnab, R M

    1988-01-01

    A portion of flagellar region III of the Salmonella typhimurium genome has been cloned and shown to contain six genes: flaAII.3, flaAIII, flaS, flaR, flaQI, and flaQII. Of these, all but flaQI were known to exist from mutant studies; the former flaQ has been renamed flaQII. The genes were shown by minicell analysis to encode proteins with apparent molecular masses of 28, 48, 15, 46, 17, and 37 kilodaltons, respectively. The presence of a flagellar-gene-specific promoter in the vicinity of flaQI was established by testing expression of the plasmid-encoded tetracycline resistance gene in artificial constructions. In minicell preparations, the flaAII.3 and flaR products were found principally in the cytoplasmic fraction; the rest were found principally in the membrane fraction. A comparison between the homologous genes of S. typhimurium and Escherichia coli confirmed that their genomic organizations were similar and that their products had similar molecular masses and isoelectric points. Images PMID:2834334

  9. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Stephen B.; Phillips, Simon E.V.; Thomas, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  10. Immunization of Pigs with a Particle-Mediated DNA Vaccine to Influenza A Virus Protects against Challenge with Homologous Virus

    PubMed Central

    Macklin, Michael D.; McCabe, Dennis; McGregor, Martha W.; Neumann, Veronica; Meyer, Todd; Callan, Robert; Hinshaw, Virginia S.; Swain, William F.

    1998-01-01

    Particle-mediated delivery of a DNA expression vector encoding the hemagglutinin (HA) of an H1N1 influenza virus (A/Swine/Indiana/1726/88) to porcine epidermis elicits a humoral immune response and accelerates the clearance of virus in pigs following a homotypic challenge. Mucosal administration of the HA expression plasmid elicits an immune response that is qualitatively different than that elicited by the epidermal vaccination in terms of inhibition of the initial virus infection. In contrast, delivery of a plasmid encoding an influenza virus nucleoprotein from A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) to the epidermis elicits a strong humoral response but no detectable protection in terms of nasal virus shed. The efficacy of the HA DNA vaccine was compared with that of a commercially available inactivated whole-virus vaccine as well as with the level of immunity afforded by previous infection. The HA DNA and inactivated viral vaccines elicited similar protection in that initial infection was not prevented, but subsequent amplification of the infection is limited, resulting in early clearance of the virus. Convalescent animals which recovered from exposure to virulent swine influenza virus were completely resistant to infection when challenged. The porcine influenza A virus system is a relevant preclinical model for humans in terms of both disease and gene transfer to the epidermis and thus provides a basis for advancing the development of DNA-based vaccines. PMID:9445052

  11. Complete genome and comparative analysis of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Oligotropha carboxidovorans OM5

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Oligotropha carboxidovorans OM5 T. (DSM 1227, ATCC 49405) is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of utilizing CO (carbon monoxide) and fixing CO2 (carbon dioxide). We previously published the draft genome of this organism and recently submitted the complete genome sequence to GenBank. Results The genome sequence of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Oligotropha carboxidovorans OM5 consists of a 3.74-Mb chromosome and a 133-kb megaplasmid that contains the genes responsible for utilization of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen. To our knowledge, this strain is the first one to be sequenced in the genus Oligotropha, the closest fully sequenced relatives being Bradyrhizobium sp. BTAi and USDA110 and Nitrobacter hamburgiensis X14. Analysis of the O. carboxidovorans genome reveals potential links between plasmid-encoded chemolithoautotrophy and chromosomally-encoded lipid metabolism. Comparative analysis of O. carboxidovorans with closely related species revealed differences in metabolic pathways, particularly in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as well as transport pathways. Conclusion Oligotropha, Bradyrhizobium sp and Nitrobacter hamburgiensis X14 are phylogenetically proximal. Although there is significant conservation of genome organization between the species, there are major differences in many metabolic pathways that reflect the adaptive strategies unique to each species. PMID:20863402

  12. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step. PMID:27416742

  13. Dielectrophoresis-assisted 3D nanoelectroporation for non-viral cell transfection in adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lingqian; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Zhao, Xi; Bertani, Paul; Yang, Zhaogang; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Malkoc, Veysi; Shi, Junfeng; Sen, Chandan K; Odonnell, Lynn; Yu, Jianhua; Lu, Wu; Lee, L James

    2015-08-01

    Current transfection technologies lead to significant inter-clonal variations. Previously we introduced a unique electrotransfection technology, Nanochannel-Electroporation (NEP), which can precisely and benignly transfect small cell populations (~100-200 cells) with single-cell resolution. Here we report on the development of a novel 3D NEP system for large scale transfection. A properly-engineered array of nanochannels, capable of handling/transfecting ~60 000 cells cm(-2), was fabricated using cleanroom technologies. Positive dielectrophoresis was used to selectively position cells on the nanochannels, thus allowing highly efficient transfection. Single-cell dosage control was demonstrated using both small and large molecules, and different cell types. The potential clinical relevance of this system was tested with difficult-to-transfect natural killer cell suspensions, and plasmids encoding for the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), a model of high relevance for adoptive immunotherapy. Our results show significantly higher CAR transfection efficiencies for the DEP-NEP system (>70% vs. <30%), as well as enhanced cell viabilities. PMID:26105628

  14. OXA-235, a Novel Class D β-Lactamase Involved in Resistance to Carbapenems in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Llarena, Francisco J.; Zander, Esther; Fernández, Ana; Bou, Germán; Seifert, Harald

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism of carbapenem resistance in 10 Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from the United States and Mexico between 2005 and 2009. The detection of known metallo-β-lactamase or carbapenem-hydrolyzing oxacillinase (OXA) genes by PCR was negative. The presence of plasmid-encoded carbapenem resistance genes was investigated by transformation of A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Shotgun cloning experiments and sequencing were performed, followed by the expression of a novel β-lactamase in A. baumannii. Three novel OXA enzymes were identified, OXA-235 in 8 isolates and the amino acid variants OXA-236 (Glu173-Val) and OXA-237 (Asp208-Gly) in 1 isolate each. The deduced amino acid sequences shared 85% identity with OXA-134, 54% to 57% identities with the acquired OXA-23, OXA-24, OXA-58, and OXA-143, and 56% identity with the intrinsic OXA-51 and, thus, represent a novel subclass of OXA. The expression of OXA-235 in A. baumannii led to reduced carbapenem susceptibility, while cephalosporin MICs were unaffected. Genetic analysis revealed that blaOXA-235, blaOXA-236, and blaOXA-237 were bracketed between two ISAba1 insertion sequences. In addition, the presence of these acquired β-lactamase genes might result from a transposition-mediated mechanism. This highlights the propensity of A. baumannii to acquire multiple carbapenem resistance determinants. PMID:23439638

  15. A pangenomic study of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yongjun; Li, Zhaolong; Liu, Jiucheng; Shu, Changlong; Wang, Xumin; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Duojun; Liu, Guiming; Hu, Songnian; Zhang, Jie; Al-Mssallem, Ibrahim; Yu, Jun

    2011-12-20

    Bacillus thuringiensis (B. thuringiensis) is a soil-dwelling Gram-positive bacterium and its plasmid-encoded toxins (Cry) are commonly used as biological alternatives to pesticides. In a pangenomic study, we sequenced seven B. thuringiensis isolates in both high coverage and base-quality using the next-generation sequencing platform. The B. thuringiensis pangenome was extrapolated to have 4196 core genes and an asymptotic value of 558 unique genes when a new genome is added. Compared to the pangenomes of its closely related species of the same genus, B. thuringiensis pangenome shows an open characteristic, similar to B. cereus but not to B. anthracis; the latter has a closed pangenome. We also found extensive divergence among the seven B. thuringiensis genome assemblies, which harbor ample repeats and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The identities among orthologous genes are greater than 84.5% and the hotspots for the genome variations were discovered in genomic regions of 2.3-2.8Mb and 5.0-5.6Mb. We concluded that high-coverage sequence assemblies from multiple strains, before all the gaps are closed, are very useful for pangenomic studies. PMID:22196399

  16. The Identification of Novel Diagnostic Marker Genes for the Detection of Beer Spoiling Pediococcus damnosus Strains Using the BlAst Diagnostic Gene findEr.

    PubMed

    Behr, Jürgen; Geissler, Andreas J; Schmid, Jonas; Zehe, Anja; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-01

    As the number of bacterial genomes increases dramatically, the demand for easy to use tools with transparent functionality and comprehensible output for applied comparative genomics grows as well. We present BlAst Diagnostic Gene findEr (BADGE), a tool for the rapid prediction of diagnostic marker genes (DMGs) for the differentiation of bacterial groups (e.g. pathogenic / nonpathogenic). DMG identification settings can be modified easily and installing and running BADGE does not require specific bioinformatics skills. During the BADGE run the user is informed step by step about the DMG finding process, thus making it easy to evaluate the impact of chosen settings and options. On the basis of an example with relevance for beer brewing, being one of the oldest biotechnological processes known, we show a straightforward procedure, from phenotyping, genome sequencing, assembly and annotation, up to a discriminant marker gene PCR assay, making comparative genomics a means to an end. The value and the functionality of BADGE were thoroughly examined, resulting in the successful identification and validation of an outstanding novel DMG (fabZ) for the discrimination of harmless and harmful contaminations of Pediococcus damnosus, which can be applied for spoilage risk determination in breweries. Concomitantly, we present and compare five complete P. damnosus genomes sequenced in this study, finding that the ability to produce the unwanted, spoilage associated off-flavor diacetyl is a plasmid encoded trait in this important beer spoiling species. PMID:27028007

  17. The Identification of Novel Diagnostic Marker Genes for the Detection of Beer Spoiling Pediococcus damnosus Strains Using the BlAst Diagnostic Gene findEr

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Jonas; Zehe, Anja; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    As the number of bacterial genomes increases dramatically, the demand for easy to use tools with transparent functionality and comprehensible output for applied comparative genomics grows as well. We present BlAst Diagnostic Gene findEr (BADGE), a tool for the rapid prediction of diagnostic marker genes (DMGs) for the differentiation of bacterial groups (e.g. pathogenic / nonpathogenic). DMG identification settings can be modified easily and installing and running BADGE does not require specific bioinformatics skills. During the BADGE run the user is informed step by step about the DMG finding process, thus making it easy to evaluate the impact of chosen settings and options. On the basis of an example with relevance for beer brewing, being one of the oldest biotechnological processes known, we show a straightforward procedure, from phenotyping, genome sequencing, assembly and annotation, up to a discriminant marker gene PCR assay, making comparative genomics a means to an end. The value and the functionality of BADGE were thoroughly examined, resulting in the successful identification and validation of an outstanding novel DMG (fabZ) for the discrimination of harmless and harmful contaminations of Pediococcus damnosus, which can be applied for spoilage risk determination in breweries. Concomitantly, we present and compare five complete P. damnosus genomes sequenced in this study, finding that the ability to produce the unwanted, spoilage associated off-flavor diacetyl is a plasmid encoded trait in this important beer spoiling species. PMID:27028007

  18. Bacillus cereus G9241 S-Layer Assembly Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Anthrax-Like Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Ting; Oh, So-Young; Hendrickx, Antoni P. A.; Lunderberg, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus cereus G9241, the causative agent of anthrax-like disease, harbors virulence plasmids encoding anthrax toxins as well as hyaluronic acid (HA) and B. cereus exopolysaccharide (BPS) capsules. B. cereus G9241 also harbors S-layer genes, including homologs of Bacillus anthracis surface array protein (Sap), extractable antigen 1 (EA1), and the S-layer-associated proteins (BSLs). In B. anthracis, S-layer proteins and BSLs attach via their S-layer homology domains (SLH) to the secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP) in a manner requiring csaB, a predicted ketalpyruvate transferase. Here we used a genetic approach to analyze B. cereus G9241 S-layer assembly and function. Variants lacking the csaB gene synthesized SCWP but failed to retain Sap, EA1, and BSLs in the bacterial envelope. The B. cereus G9241 csaB mutant assembled capsular polysaccharides but displayed an increase in chain length relative to the wild-type strain. This phenotype is likely due to its inability to deposit BslO murein hydrolase at divisional septa. During growth under capsule-inducing conditions, B. cereus G9241 assembled BSLs (BslA and BslO) and the Sap S-layer protein, but not EA1, in the envelope. Finally, csaB-mediated assembly of S-layer proteins and BSLs in B. cereus G9241 contributes to the pathogenesis of anthrax-like disease in mice. PMID:23204457

  19. Characterization of KfrA proteins encoded by a plasmid of Paenibacillus popilliae ATCC 14706T

    PubMed Central

    Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Mon, Hiroaki; Mori, Kazuki; Mitsudome, Takumi; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Tashiro, Kousuke; Asano, Shin-ichiro; Yasunaga-Aoki, Chisa

    2015-01-01

    A scaffold obtained from whole-genome shotgun sequencing of Paenibacillus popilliae ATCC 14706T shares partial homology with plasmids found in other strains of P. popilliae. PCR and sequencing for gap enclosure indicated that the scaffold originated from a 15,929-bp circular DNA. The restriction patterns of a plasmid isolated from P. popilliae ATCC 14706T were identical to those expected from the sequence; thus, this circular DNA was identified as a plasmid of ATCC 14706T and designated pPOP15.9. The plasmid encodes 17 putative open reading frames. Orfs 1, 5, 7, 8, and 9 are homologous to Orfs 11, 12, 15, 16, and 17, respectively. Orf1 and Orf11 are annotated as replication initiation proteins. Orf8 and Orf16 are homologs of KfrA, a plasmid-stabilizing protein in Gram-negative bacteria. Recombinant Orf8 and Orf16 proteins were assessed for the properties of KfrA. Indeed, they formed multimers and bound to inverted repeat sequences in upstream regions of both orf8 and orf16. A phylogenetic tree based on amino acid sequences of Orf8, Orf16 and Kfr proteins did not correlate with species lineage. PMID:25853059

  20. Virulent Shigella flexneri subverts the host innate immune response through manipulation of antimicrobial peptide gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Brice; Regnault, Béatrice; Guo, Jianhua; Zhang, Zhi; Stanley, Samuel L.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Pédron, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial factors are efficient defense components of the innate immunity, playing a crucial role in the intestinal homeostasis and protection against pathogens. In this study, we report that upon infection of polarized human intestinal cells in vitro, virulent Shigella flexneri suppress transcription of several genes encoding antimicrobial cationic peptides, particularly the human β-defensin hBD-3, which we show to be especially active against S. flexneri. This is an example of targeted survival strategy. We also identify the MxiE bacterial regulator, which controls a regulon encompassing a set of virulence plasmid-encoded effectors injected into host cells and regulating innate signaling, as being responsible for this dedicated regulatory process. In vivo, in a model of human intestinal xenotransplant, we confirm at the transcriptional and translational level, the presence of a dedicated MxiE-dependent system allowing S. flexneri to suppress expression of antimicrobial cationic peptides and promoting its deeper progression toward intestinal crypts. We demonstrate that this system is also able to down-regulate additional innate immunity genes, such as the chemokine CCL20 gene, leading to compromised recruitment of dendritic cells to the lamina propria of infected tissues. Thus, S. flexneri has developed a dedicated strategy to weaken the innate immunity to manage its survival and colonization ability in the intestine. PMID:18426984

  1. Identification of a Gene within a Pathogenicity Island of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli H10407 Required for Maximal Secretion of the Heat-Labile Enterotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, James M.; Lindler, Luther E.; Elsinghorst, Eric A.; Dale, James B.

    2000-01-01

    Studies of the pathogenesis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) have largely centered on extrachromosomal determinants of virulence, in particular the plasmid-encoded heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable enterotoxins and the colonization factor antigens. ETEC causes illnesses that range from mild diarrhea to severe cholera-like disease. These differences in disease severity are not readily accounted for by our current understanding of ETEC pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that Tia, a putative adhesin of ETEC H10407, is encoded on a large chromosomal element of approximately 46 kb that shares multiple features with previously described E. coli pathogenicity islands. Further analysis of the region downstream from tia revealed the presence of several candidate open reading frames (ORFs) in the same transcriptional orientation as tia. The putative proteins encoded by these ORFs bear multiple motifs associated with bacterial secretion apparatuses. An in-frame deletion in one candidate gene identified here as leoA (labile enterotoxin output) resulted in marked diminution of secretion of the LT enterotoxin and lack of fluid accumulation in a rabbit ileal loop model of infection. Although previous studies have suggested that E. coli lacks the capacity to secrete LT, our studies show that maximal release of LT from the periplasm of H10407 is dependent on one or more elements encoded on a pathogenicity island. PMID:10768971

  2. Anti-Viral Antibody Profiling by High Density Protein Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xiaofang; Wiktor, Peter; Kahn, Peter; Brunner, Al; Khela, Amritpal; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Barker, Kristi; Yu, Xiaobo; Magee, Mitch; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Gibson, David; Rooney, Madeleine E; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections elicit anti-viral antibodies and have been associated with various chronic diseases. Detection of these antibodies can facilitate diagnosis, treatment of infection and understanding of the mechanisms of virus associated diseases. In this work, we assayed anti-viral antibodies using a novel high density-nucleic acid programmable protein array (HD-NAPPA) platform. Individual viral proteins were expressed in situ directly from plasmids encoding proteins in an array of microscopic reaction chambers. Quality of protein display and serum response was assured by comparing intra- and inter- array correlation within or between printing batches with average correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.96, respectively. HD-NAPPA showed higher signal to background (S/B) ratio compared with standard NAPPA on planar glass slides and ELISA. Antibody responses to 761 antigens from 25 different viruses were profiled among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Common as well as unique antibody reactivity patterns were detected between patients and healthy controls. We believe HD-viral-NAPPA will enable the study of host-pathogen interactions at unprecedented dimensions and elucidate the role of pathogen infections in disease development. PMID:25758251

  3. Tracking Humoral Responses Using Self Assembling Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Anderson, Karen S.; Raphael, Jacob v.; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Sibani, Sahar; Montor, Wagner R.; Pacek, Marcin; Wong, Jessica; Eljanne, Mariam; Sanda, Martin G.; Hu, Yanhui; Logvinenko, Tanya; LaBaer, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    The humoral immune response is a highly specific and adaptive sensor for changes in the body's protein milieu, which responds to novel structures of both foreign and self antigens. Although immunoglobulins represent a major component of human serum and are vital to survival, little is known about the response specificity and determinants that govern the human immunome. Historically, antigen-specific humoral immunity has been investigated using individually-produced and purified target proteins, a labor-intensive process that has limited the number of antigens that have been studied. Here, we present the development of methods for applying self-assembling protein microarrays and a related method for producing 96-well formatted macroarrays for monitoring the humoral response at the proteome scale. Using plasmids encoding full-length cDNAs for over 850 human proteins and 1700 pathogen proteins, we demonstrate that these microarrays are highly sensitive, specific, reproducible, and can simultaneously measure immunity to thousands of proteins without a priori protein purification. Using this approach, we demonstrate the detection of humoral immunity to known and novel self-antigens, cancer antigens, autoimmune antigens, as well as pathogen-derived antigens. This represents a powerful and versatile tool for monitoring the immunome in health and disease. PMID:21136799

  4. Multi-layered nanoparticles for combination gene and drug delivery to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ediriwickrema, Asiri; Zhou, Jiangbing; Deng, Yang; Saltzman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance and toxicity are major obstacles in cancer chemotherapy. Combination therapies can overcome resistance, and synergies can minimize dosing. Polymer nanocarriers are interesting vehicles for cancer therapeutics for their delivery and tumor targeting abilities. We synthesized a multilayered polymer nanoparticle (MLNP), comprising of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) with surface polyethyleneimine and functional peptides, for targeted drug and gene delivery. We confirmed the particle’s ability to inhibit tumor growth through synergistic action of the drug and gene product. MLNPs achieved transfection levels similar to lipofectamine, while maintaining minimal cytotoxicity. The particles delivered camptothecin (CPT), and plasmid encoding TNF related apoptosis inducing ligand (pTRAIL) (CT MLNPs), and synergistically inhibited growth of multiple cancer cells in vitro. The synergy of co-delivering CPT and pTRAIL via CT MLNPs was confirmed using the Chou-Talalay method: the combination index (CI) values at 50% inhibition ranged between 0.31–0.53 for all cell lines. Further, co-delivery with MLNPs resulted in a 3.1–15 fold reduction in CPT and 4.7–8.0 fold reduction in pTRAIL dosing. CT MLNPs obtained significant HCT116 growth inhibition in vivo compared to monotherapy. These results support our hypothesis that MLNPs can deliver both small molecules and genetic agents towards synergistically inhibiting tumor growth. PMID:25112935

  5. Plasmid-mediated VEGF gene transfer induces cardiomyogenesis and reduces myocardial infarct size in sheep.

    PubMed

    Vera Janavel, G; Crottogini, A; Cabeza Meckert, P; Cuniberti, L; Mele, A; Papouchado, M; Fernández, N; Bercovich, A; Criscuolo, M; Melo, C; Laguens, R

    2006-08-01

    We have recently reported that in pigs with chronic myocardial ischemia heart transfection with a plasmid encoding the 165 isoform of human vascular endothelial growth factor (pVEGF165) induces an increase in the mitotic index of adult cardiomyocytes and cardiomyocyte hyperplasia. On these bases we hypothesized that VEGF gene transfer could also modify the evolution of experimental myocardial infarct. In adult sheep pVEGF165 (3.8 mg, n=7) or empty plasmid (n=7) was injected intramyocardially 1 h after coronary artery ligation. After 15 days infarct area was 11.3+/-1.3% of the left ventricle in the VEGF group and 18.2+/-2.1% in the empty plasmid group (P<0.02). The mechanisms involved in infarct size reduction (assessed in additional sheep at 7 and 10 days after infarction) included an increase in early angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, a decrease in peri-infarct fibrosis, a decrease in myofibroblast proliferation, enhanced cardiomyoblast proliferation and mitosis of adult cardiomyocytes with occasional cytokinesis. Resting myocardial perfusion (99mTc-sestamibi SPECT) was higher in VEGF-treated group than in empty plasmid group 15 days after myocardial infarction. We conclude that plasmid-mediated VEGF gene transfer reduces myocardial infarct size by a combination of effects including neovascular proliferation, modification of fibrosis and cardiomyocyte regeneration. PMID:16572192

  6. Toxicology study assessing efficacy and safety of repeated administration of lipid/DNA complexes to mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Alton, E W F W; Boyd, A C; Cheng, S H; Davies, J C; Davies, L A; Dayan, A; Gill, D R; Griesenbach, U; Higgins, T; Hyde, S C; Innes, J A; McLachlan, G; Porteous, D; Pringle, I; Scheule, R K; Sumner-Jones, S

    2014-01-01

    For gene therapy to improve lung function in cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects, repeated administration of the gene transfer agent over the lifetime of patients is likely to be necessary. This requirement limits the utility of adenoviral and adeno-associated viral vectors (both previously evaluated in CF gene therapy trials) because of induced adaptive immune responses that render repeated dosing ineffective. For CF gene therapy trials, non-viral vectors are currently the only viable option. We previously showed that the cationic lipid formulation GL67A is the most efficient of several non-viral vectors analysed for airway gene transfer. Here, we assessed the efficacy and safety of administering 12 inhaled doses of GL67A complexed with pGM169, a CpG-free plasmid encoding human CFTR complementary DNA, into mice. We show that repeated administration of pGM169/GL67A to murine lungs is feasible, safe and achieves reproducible, dose-related and persistent gene expression (>140 days after each dose) using an aerosol generated by a clinically relevant nebuliser. This study supports progression into the first non-viral multidose lung trial in CF patients. PMID:24196086

  7. Lung gene therapy with highly compacted DNA nanoparticles that overcome the mucus barrier.

    PubMed

    Suk, Jung Soo; Kim, Anthony J; Trehan, Kanika; Schneider, Craig S; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Woodward, Owen M; Boylan, Nicholas J; Boyle, Michael P; Lai, Samuel K; Guggino, William B; Hanes, Justin

    2014-03-28

    Inhaled gene carriers must penetrate the highly viscoelastic and adhesive mucus barrier in the airway in order to overcome rapid mucociliary clearance and reach the underlying epithelium; however, even the most widely used viral gene carriers are unable to efficiently do so. We developed two polymeric gene carriers that compact plasmid DNA into small and highly stable nanoparticles with dense polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface coatings. These highly compacted, densely PEG-coated DNA nanoparticles rapidly penetrate human cystic fibrosis (CF) mucus ex vivo and mouse airway mucus ex situ. Intranasal administration of the mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles greatly enhanced particle distribution, retention and gene transfer in the mouse lung airways compared to conventional gene carriers. Successful delivery of a full-length plasmid encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was achieved in the mouse lungs and airway cells, including a primary culture of mucus-covered human airway epithelium grown at air-liquid interface, without causing acute inflammation or toxicity. Highly compacted mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles hold promise for lung gene therapy. PMID:24440664

  8. Canine distemper virus DNA vaccination of mink can overcome interference by maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Nielsen, Line; Aasted, Bent; Pertoldi, Cino; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2015-03-10

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is highly contagious and can cause severe disease against which conventional live vaccines are ineffective in the presence of maternal antibodies. Vaccination in the presences of maternal antibodies was challenged by vaccination of 5 days old and 3 weeks old mink kits with CDV DNA vaccines. Virus neutralising (VN) antibody responses were induced in mink kits vaccinated with a plasmid encoding the haemaglutinin protein (H) of CDV (n=5, pCDV-H) or a combination of the H, fusion (F) and nucleoprotein (N) of CDV (n=5, pCDV-HFN). These DNA vaccinated kits were protected against virulent experimental infection with field strains of CDV. The pCDV-H was more efficient in inducing protective immunity in the presence of maternal antibodies compared to the pCDV-HFN. The results show that DNA vaccination with the pCDV-H or pCDV-HFN (n=4) only given once at 5 days of age induces virus specific immune response in neonatal mink and protection against virulent CDV exposure later in life. PMID:25637861

  9. Functional analysis of the yeast plasmid partition locus STB

    PubMed Central

    Murray, James A. H.; Cesareni, Gianni

    1986-01-01

    Derivatives of the yeast 2μ plasmid with the cis-acting locus STB (also called REP3) are stably maintained if two plasmid-encoded proteins are present in trans. There are conflicting reports of both the extent of STB and its possible involvement in plasmid partition or copy number control. We have resolved the controversy by constructing 2µ derivatives with a conditional STB function, and showing that when STB is inactivated plasmids become concentrated in a small fraction of the population although the total number of plasmids remains unaltered. Moreover we show that STB consists of two functionally distinct domains which we call STB-proximal and STB-distal relative to the origin of replication. Although STB-proximal is sufficient for proper partitioning, this function is severely disrupted by active transcription from neighbouring sequences. STB-distal is important to protect STB-proximal and ORI from such transcription, and can be effeciently replaced by a 94-bp terminator fragment in an orientation-dependent manner. We find that STB-distal contains an additional element which depresses transcription from upstream promoters. We also describe the phenomenon of replicaton inhibition which we believe can exlain the anomalous instability of some yeast plasmids. ImagesFig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:16453734

  10. The Bacterial Actin-Like Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Carballido-López, Rut

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances have shown conclusively that bacterial cells possess distant but true homologues of actin (MreB, ParM, and the recently uncovered MamK protein). Despite weak amino acid sequence similarity, MreB and ParM exhibit high structural homology to actin. Just like F-actin in eukaryotes, MreB and ParM assemble into highly dynamic filamentous structures in vivo and in vitro. MreB-like proteins are essential for cell viability and have been implicated in major cellular processes, including cell morphogenesis, chromosome segregation, and cell polarity. ParM (a plasmid-encoded actin homologue) is responsible for driving plasmid-DNA partitioning. The dynamic prokaryotic actin-like cytoskeleton is thought to serve as a central organizer for the targeting and accurate positioning of proteins and nucleoprotein complexes, thereby (and by analogy to the eukaryotic cytoskeleton) spatially and temporally controlling macromolecular trafficking in bacterial cells. In this paper, the general properties and known functions of the actin orthologues in bacteria are reviewed. PMID:17158703

  11. Detection of Cell Surface Hydrophobicity, Biofilm and Fimbirae Genes in Salmonella Isolated from Tunisian Clinical and Poultry Meat

    PubMed Central

    BEN ABDALLAH, Fethi; LAGHA, Rihab; SAID, Khaled; KALLEL, Héla; GHARBI, Jawhar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of 15 serotypes of Salmonella to form biofilm on polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and glass surfaces. . Methods Initially slime production was assessed on CRA agar and hydrophobicity of 20 Salmonella strains isolated from poultry and human and two Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium references strains was achieved by microbial adhesion to n-hexadecane. In addition, biofilm formation on polystyrene, PVC and glass surfaces was also investigated by using MTT and XTT colorimetric assay. Further, distribution of Salmonella enterotoxin (stn), Salmonella Enteritidis fimbrial (sef) and plasmid encoded fimbrial (pef) genes among tested strains was achieved by PCR. Results Salmonella strains developed red and white colonies on CRA and they are considered as hydrophilic with affinity values to n-hexadecane ranged between 0.29% and 29.55%. Quantitative biofilm assays showed that bacteria are able to form biofilm on polystyrene with different degrees and 54.54% of strains produce a strong biofilm on glass. In addition, all the strains form only a moderate (54.54%) and weak (40.91%) biofilm on PVC. PCR detection showed that only S. Enteritidis harbour Sef gene, whereas Pef and stn genes were detected in S. Kentucky, S. Amsterdam, S. Hadar, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium. Conclusion Salmonella serotypes are able to form biofilm on hydrophobic and hydrophilic industrial surfaces. Biofilm formation of Salmonella on these surfaces has an increased potential to compromise food safety and potentiate public health risk. PMID:26005652

  12. Identification of homologues to the pathogenicity factor Pat-1, a putative serine protease of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Burger, Annette; Gräfen, Ines; Engemann, Jutta; Niermann, Erik; Pieper, Martina; Kirchner, Oliver; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Eichenlaub, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    Hybridization of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis total DNA against the pathogenicity gene pat-1 indicated the presence of pat-1 homologous nucleotide sequences on the chromosome and on plasmid pCM2. Isolation of the corresponding DNA fragments and nucleotide sequence determination showed that there are three pat-1 homologous genes: chpA (chromosome) and phpA and phpB (plasmid pCM2). The gene products share common characteristics, i.e. a signal sequence for Sec-dependent secretion, a serine protease motif, and six cysteine residues at conserved positions. Gene chpA located on the chromosome is a pseudogene since it contains a translational stop codon after 97 of 280 amino acids. In contrast to pat-1, cloning of the plasmid encoded homologs phpA and phpB into the avirulent plasmid free Cmm strain CMM100 did not result in a virulent phenotype. So far, no proteolytic activity could be demonstrated for Pat-1, however, site specific mutagenesis of pat-1 showed that the serine residue in the motif GDSGG is required for the virulent phenotype of pat-1 and thus Pat-1 could be a functional protease. PMID:16255147

  13. Cloning of cellobiose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase genes: Functional expression in recombinant Escherichia coli and identification of a putative binding region for disaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Xiaokuang; Davis, F.C.; Ingram, L.O.; Hespell, R.B.

    1997-02-01

    Genomic libraries from nine cellobiose-metabolizing bacteria were screened for cellobiose utilization. Positive clones were recovered from six libraries, all of which encode phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) proteins. Clones from Bacillus subtilis, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, and Klebsiella oxytoca allowed the growth of recombinant Escherichia coli in cellobiose-M9 minimal medium. The K. oxytoca clone, pLOI1906, exhibited an unusually broad substrate range (cellobiose, arbutin, salicin, and methylumbelliferyl derivatives of glucose, cellobiose, mannose, and xylose) and was sequenced. The insert in this plasmid encoded the carboxy-terminal region of a putative regulatory protein, cellobiose permease (single polypeptide), and phospho-{beta}-glucosidase, which appear to form an operon (casRAB). Subclones allowed both casA and casB to be expressed independently, as evidenced by in vitro complementation. An analysis of the translated sequences from the EIIC domains of cellobiose, aryl-{beta}-glucoside, and other disaccharide permeases allowed the identification of a 50-amino-acid conserved region. A disaccharide consensus sequence is proposed for the most conserved segment (13 amino acids), which may represent part of the EIIC active site for binding and phosphorylation. 63 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. A Comparative Study of Non-Viral Gene Delivery Techniques to Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Nur Shuhaidatul Sarmiza Abdul; Fakiruddin, Kamal Shaik; Ali, Syed Atif; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold tremendous potential for therapeutic use in stem cell-based gene therapy. Ex vivo genetic modification of MSCs with beneficial genes of interest is a prerequisite for successful use of stem cell-based therapeutic applications. However, genetic manipulation of MSCs is challenging because they are resistant to commonly used methods to introduce exogenous DNA or RNA. Herein we compared the effectiveness of several techniques (classic calcium phosphate precipitation, cationic polymer, and standard electroporation) with that of microporation technology to introduce the plasmid encoding for angiopoietin-1 (ANGPT-1) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) into human adipose-derived MSCs (hAD-MSCs). The microporation technique had a higher transfection efficiency, with up to 50% of the viable hAD-MSCs being transfected, compared to the other transfection techniques, for which less than 1% of cells were positive for eGFP expression following transfection. The capability of cells to proliferate and differentiate into three major lineages (chondrocytes, adipocytes, and osteocytes) was found to be independent of the technique used for transfection. These results show that the microporation technique is superior to the others in terms of its ability to transfect hAD-MSCs without affecting their proliferation and differentiation capabilities. Therefore, this study provides a foundation for the selection of techniques when using ex vivo gene manipulation for cell-based gene therapy with MSCs as the vehicle for gene delivery. PMID:25162825

  15. Effects of overexpression of Sim2 on spatial memory and expression of synapsin I in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianfang; Peng, Bin; Shi, Jing; Zheng, Yao; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Jing; Li, Lingli; Zhang, Chun

    2006-10-01

    The single-minded 2 gene (Sim2) plays a crucial role in the mental retardation of Down Syndrome (DS). To explore how Sim2 influences spatial memory, a DNA plasmid-encoding mouse Sim2 (mSim2) wrapped with liposome was bilaterally injected into the hippocampus of rats. The effect of overexpressing mSim2 on spatial learning was determined by a Morris water maze task. The expression of synapsin I was detected by reverse transcriptional-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The phosphosynapsin was also examined by immunohistochemistry. As demonstrated by RT-PCR, mSim2 was overexpressed in the hippocampus of rats, and pcDNA3/mSim2-transfected rats showed longer latency to find the hidden platform compared with pcDNA3-transfected rats (P<0.05). Synapsin I mRNA and protein expression were decreased significantly by mSim2 transfection, as demonstrated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, the expression profile of phosphosynapsin was similar to that of synapsin I. So it is concluded that Sim2 could impair the ability of learning and memory by inhibiting synaptic plasticity, and may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of DS. PMID:16963290

  16. Efflux-Mediated Drug Resistance in Bacteria: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps play a key role in drug resistance and also serve other functions in bacteria. There has been a growing list of multidrug and drug-specific efflux pumps characterized from bacteria of human, animal, plant and environmental origins. These pumps are mostly encoded on the chromosome although they can also be plasmid-encoded. A previous article (Li X-Z and Nikaido H, Drugs, 2004; 64[2]: 159–204) had provided a comprehensive review regarding efflux-mediated drug resistance in bacteria. In the past five years, significant progress has been achieved in further understanding of drug resistance-related efflux transporters and this review focuses on the latest studies in this field since 2003. This has been demonstrated in multiple aspects that include but are not limited to: further molecular and biochemical characterization of the known drug efflux pumps and identification of novel drug efflux pumps; structural elucidation of the transport mechanisms of drug transporters; regulatory mechanisms of drug efflux pumps; determining the role of the drug efflux pumps in other functions such as stress responses, virulence and cell communication; and development of efflux pump inhibitors. Overall, the multifaceted implications of drug efflux transporters warrant novel strategies to combat multidrug resistance in bacteria. PMID:19678712

  17. Vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein inhibits host cell-directed transcription of target genes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Black, B L; Lyles, D S

    1992-01-01

    Infection by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) results in a rapid inhibition of host cell transcription and translation. To determine whether the viral matrix (M) protein was involved in this inhibition of host cell gene expression, an M protein expression vector was cotransfected with a target gene vector, encoding the target gene, encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Expression of M protein caused a decrease in CAT activity in a gene dosage-dependent manner, and inhibition was apparent by 12 h posttransfection. The inhibitory effect of M protein was quite potent. The level of M protein required for a 10-fold inhibition of CAT activity was less than 1% of the level of M protein produced during the sixth hour of VSV infection. Northern (RNA) analysis of cotransfected cells showed that expression of M protein caused a reduction in the steady-state level of the vector-encoded mRNAs. Expression of both CAT and M mRNAs was reduced in cells cotransfected with a plasmid encoding M protein, indicating that expression of small amounts of M protein from plasmid DNA inhibits further expression of both M and CAT mRNAs. Nuclear runoff transcription analysis demonstrated that expression of M protein inhibited transcription of the target genes. This is the first report of a viral gene product which is capable of inhibiting transcription in vivo in the absence of any other viral component. Images PMID:1318397

  18. Diversity and Global Distribution of IncL/M Plasmids Enabling Horizontal Dissemination of β-Lactam Resistance Genes among the Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Adamczuk, Marcin; Zaleski, Piotr; Dziewit, Lukasz; Wolinowska, Renata; Nieckarz, Marta; Wawrzyniak, Pawel; Kieryl, Piotr; Plucienniczak, Andrzej; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance determinants are frequently associated with plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, which simplifies their horizontal transmission. Several groups of plasmids (including replicons of the IncL/M incompatibility group) were found to play an important role in the dissemination of resistance genes encoding β-lactamases. The IncL/M plasmids are large, broad host range, and self-transmissible replicons. We have identified and characterized two novel members of this group: pARM26 (isolated from bacteria inhabiting activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant) and pIGT15 (originating from a clinical strain of Escherichia coli). This instigated a detailed comparative analysis of all available sequences of IncL/M plasmids encoding β-lactamases. The core genome of these plasmids is comprised of 20 genes with conserved synteny. Phylogenetic analyses of these core genes allowed clustering of the plasmids into four separate groups, which reflect their antibiotic resistance profiles. Examination of the biogeography of the IncL/M plasmids revealed that they are most frequently found in bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae originating from the Mediterranean region and Western Europe and that they are able to persist in various ecological niches even in the absence of direct antibiotic selection pressure. PMID:26236726

  19. Glycoprotein-Specific Antibodies Produced by DNA Vaccination Protect Guinea Pigs from Lethal Argentine and Venezuelan Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Joseph W.; Maes, Piet; Kwilas, Steven A.; Ballantyne, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several members of the Arenaviridae can cause acute febrile diseases in humans, often resulting in lethality. The use of convalescent-phase human plasma is an effective treatment in humans infected with arenaviruses, particularly species found in South America. Despite this, little work has focused on developing potent and defined immunotherapeutics against arenaviruses. In the present study, we produced arenavirus neutralizing antibodies by DNA vaccination of rabbits with plasmids encoding the full-length glycoprotein precursors of Junín virus (JUNV), Machupo virus (MACV), and Guanarito virus (GTOV). Geometric mean neutralizing antibody titers, as measured by the 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50), exceeded 5,000 against homologous viruses. Antisera against each targeted virus exhibited limited cross-species binding and, to a lesser extent, cross-neutralization. Anti-JUNV glycoprotein rabbit antiserum protected Hartley guinea pigs from lethal intraperitoneal infection with JUNV strain Romero when the antiserum was administered 2 days after challenge and provided some protection (∼30%) when administered 4 days after challenge. Treatment starting on day 6 did not protect animals. We further formulated an IgG antibody cocktail by combining anti-JUNV, -MACV, and -GTOV antibodies produced in DNA-vaccinated rabbits. This cocktail protected 100% of guinea pigs against JUNV and GTOV lethal disease. We then expanded on this cocktail approach by simultaneously vaccinating rabbits with a combination of plasmids encoding glycoproteins from JUNV, MACV, GTOV, and Sabia virus (SABV). Sera collected from rabbits vaccinated with the combination vaccine neutralized all four targets. These findings support the concept of using a DNA vaccine approach to generate a potent pan-arenavirus immunotherapeutic. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are an important family of emerging viruses. In infected humans, convalescent-phase plasma containing neutralizing antibodies can

  20. Increasing spectrum in antimicrobial resistance of Shigella isolates in Bangladesh: resistance to azithromycin and ceftriaxone and decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Shoma, Shereen; Rashid, Harunur; El Arifeen, Shams; Baqui, A H; Siddique, A K; Nair, G B; Sack, D A

    2007-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of Shigella isolates in Bangladesh, during 2001-2002, was studied and compared with that of 1991-1992 to identify the changes in resistance patterns and trends. A significant increase in resistance to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (from 52% to 72%, p < 0.01) and nalidixic acid (from 19% to 51%, p < 0.01) was detected. High, but unchanged, resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin, and chloramphenicol, low resistance to mecillinam (resistance 3%, intermediate 3%), and to emergence of resistance to azithromycin (resistance 16%, intermediate 62%) and ceftriaxone/cefixime (2%) were detected in 2001-2002. Of 266 recent isolates, 63% were resistant to > or =3 anti-Shigella drugs (multidrug-resistant [MDR]) compared to 52% of 369 strains (p < 0.007) in 1991-1992. Of 154 isolates tested by E-test in 2001-2002, 71% were nalidixic acid-resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] > or =32 microg/mL) and had 10-fold higher MIC90 (0.25 microg/mL) to ciprofloxacin than that of nalidixic acid-susceptible strains exhibiting decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility, which were detected as ciprofloxacin-susceptible and nalidixic acid-resistant by the disc-diffusion method. These strains were frequently associated with MDR traits. High modal MICs were observed to azithromycin (MIC 6 microg/mL) and nalidixic acid (MIC 128 micdrog/mL) and low to ceftriaxone (MIC 0.023 microg/mL). Conjugative R-plasmids-encoded extended-spectrum beta-lactamase was responsible for resistance to ceftriaxone/cefixime. The growing antimicrobial resistance of Shigella is worrying and mandates monitoring of resistance. Pivmecillinam or ciprofloxacin might be considered for treating shigellosis with caution. PMID:17985817

  1. N-myc downstream regulated gene 2 overexpression reduces matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activities and cell invasion of A549 lung cancer cell line in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Seyed Nooredin; Mojtahedi, Zahra; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Takhshid, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): N-myc downstream regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) is a candidate gene for tumor suppression. The expression of NDRG2 is down-regulated in several tumors including lung cancer. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of NDRG2 overexpression on invasion, migration, and enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 (MMP-9) in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Materials and Methods: A recombinant plasmid encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged NDRG2 (pCMV6-AC-NDRG2-GFP) was used to overexpress GFP-tagged NDRG2 in A549 cells. The cells in the experimental group and those in the control group were transfected with pCMV6-AC-NDRG2-GFP and a control plasmid without NDRG2 (pCMV6-AC-GFP), respectively. Fluorescent microscopy and flowcytometry analysis of GFP expression were used to evaluate the cellular expression of GFP-tagged NDRG2 and the efficiency of transfection. The effects of NDRG2 expression on cell invasion and migration were evaluated using transwell filter migration assay. The gelatinase activity of secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 was measured by gelatin zymography. Results: Our results demonstrated the expression of GFP-tagged NDRG2 in the cytoplasm and nucleus of A549 cells. The findings of transwell assay showed that NDRG2 overexpression reduced migration and invasion of A549 cells compared to control cells. Gelatin zymography analyses revealed that NDRG2 overexpression decreased the gelatinase activity of secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9. Conclusion: These findings suggest that NDRG2 may be a new anti-invasion factor in lung cancer that inhibits MMPs activities. PMID:26557966

  2. A Shared Population of Epidemic Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus 15 Circulates in Humans and Companion Animals

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Ewan M.; Weinert, Lucy A.; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Welch, John J.; Wilson, Katherine; Morgan, Fiona J. E.; Harris, Simon R.; Loeffler, Anette; Boag, Amanda K.; Peacock, Sharon J.; Paterson, Gavin K.; Waller, Andrew S.; Parkhill, Julian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a global human health problem causing infections in both hospitals and the community. Companion animals, such as cats, dogs, and horses, are also frequently colonized by MRSA and can become infected. We sequenced the genomes of 46 multilocus sequence type (ST) 22 MRSA isolates from cats and dogs in the United Kingdom and compared these to an extensive population framework of human isolates from the same lineage. Phylogenomic analyses showed that all companion animal isolates were interspersed throughout the epidemic MRSA-15 (EMRSA-15) pandemic clade and clustered with human isolates from the United Kingdom, with human isolates basal to those from companion animals, suggesting a human source for isolates infecting companion animals. A number of isolates from the same veterinary hospital clustered together, suggesting that as in human hospitals, EMRSA-15 isolates are readily transmitted in the veterinary hospital setting. Genome-wide association analysis did not identify any host-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or virulence factors. However, isolates from companion animals were significantly less likely to harbor a plasmid encoding erythromycin resistance. When this plasmid was present in animal-associated isolates, it was more likely to contain mutations mediating resistance to clindamycin. This finding is consistent with the low levels of erythromycin and high levels of clindamycin used in veterinary medicine in the United Kingdom. This study furthers the “one health” view of infectious diseases that the pathogen pool of human and animal populations are intrinsically linked and provides evidence that antibiotic usage in animal medicine is shaping the population of a major human pathogen. PMID:24825010

  3. Phosphotransferase-mediated transport of the osmolyte 2-O-alpha-mannosyl-D-glycerate in Escherichia coli occurs by the product of the mngA (hrsA) gene and is regulated by the mngR (farR) gene product acting as repressor.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Maria-Manuel; Chevance, Fabienne; Dippel, Renate; Eppler, Tanja; Schlegel, Anja; Boos, Winfried; Lu, Ying-Jie; Rock, Charles O

    2004-02-13

    2-O-alpha-mannosyl-D-glycerate (MGs) has been recognized as an osmolyte in hyperthermophilic but not mesophilic prokaryotes. We report that MG is taken up and utilized as sole carbon source by Escherichia coli K12, strainMC4100. Uptake is mediated by the P-enolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system with the MG-inducible HrsA (now called MngA) protein as its specific EIIABC complex. The apparent Km of MG uptake in induced cells was 10 microm, and the Vmax was 0.65 nmol/min/10(9) cells. Inverted membrane vesicles harboring plasmid-encoded MngA phosphorylated MG in a P-enolpyruvate-dependent manner. A deletion mutant in mngA was devoid of MG transport but is complemented by a plasmid harboring mngA. Uptake of MG in MC4100 also caused induction of a regulon specifying the uptake and the metabolism of galactarate and glucarate controlled by the CdaR activator. The ybgG gene (now called mngB) the gene immediately downstream of mngA encodes a protein with alpha-mannosidase activity. farR, the gene upstream of mngA (now called mngR) had previously been characterized as a fatty acyl-responsive regulator; however, deletion of mngR resulted in the up-regulation of only two genes, mngA and mngB. The mngR deletion caused constitutive MG transport that became MG-inducible after transformation with plasmid expressed mngR. Thus, MngR is the regulator (repressor) of the MG transport/metabolism system. Thus, the mngR mngA mngB gene cluster encodes an MG utilizing system. PMID:14645248

  4. Identification of Novel Pathogenicity Loci in Clostridium perfringens Strains That Cause Avian Necrotic Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Valeria R.; Marri, Pradeep R.; Rosey, Everett L.; Gong, Joshua; Songer, J. Glenn; Vedantam, Gayatri; Prescott, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Type A Clostridium perfringens causes poultry necrotic enteritis (NE), an enteric disease of considerable economic importance, yet can also exist as a member of the normal intestinal microbiota. A recently discovered pore-forming toxin, NetB, is associated with pathogenesis in most, but not all, NE isolates. This finding suggested that NE-causing strains may possess other virulence gene(s) not present in commensal type A isolates. We used high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies to generate draft genome sequences of seven unrelated C. perfringens poultry NE isolates and one isolate from a healthy bird, and identified additional novel NE-associated genes by comparison with nine publicly available reference genomes. Thirty-one open reading frames (ORFs) were unique to all NE strains and formed the basis for three highly conserved NE-associated loci that we designated NELoc-1 (42 kb), NELoc-2 (11.2 kb) and NELoc-3 (5.6 kb). The largest locus, NELoc-1, consisted of netB and 36 additional genes, including those predicted to encode two leukocidins, an internalin-like protein and a ricin-domain protein. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Southern blotting revealed that the NE strains each carried 2 to 5 large plasmids, and that NELoc-1 and -3 were localized on distinct plasmids of sizes ∼85 and ∼70 kb, respectively. Sequencing of the regions flanking these loci revealed similarity to previously characterized conjugative plasmids of C. perfringens. These results provide significant insight into the pathogenetic basis of poultry NE and are the first to demonstrate that netB resides in a large, plasmid-encoded locus. Our findings strongly suggest that poultry NE is caused by several novel virulence factors, whose genes are clustered on discrete pathogenicity loci, some of which are plasmid-borne. PMID:20532244

  5. A Panel of Recombinant Mucins Carrying a Repertoire of Sialylated O-Glycans Based on Different Core Chains for Studies of Glycan Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Reeja Maria; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Jining; Karlsson, Niclas G; Holgersson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Sialylated glycans serve as key elements of receptors for many viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins. The microbial recognition and their binding specificity can be affected by the linkage of the terminal sugar residue, types of underlying sugar chains, and the nature of the entire glycoconjugate. Owing to the pathobiological significance of sialylated glycans, we have engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to secrete mucin-type immunoglobulin-fused proteins carrying terminal α2,3- or α2,6-linked sialic acid on defined O-glycan core saccharide chains. Besides stably expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse immunoglobulin G2b cDNA (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), CHO cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding glycosyltransferases to synthesize core 2 (GCNT1), core 3 (B3GNT6), core 4 (GCNT1 and B3GNT6), or extended core 1 (B3GNT3) chains with or without the type 1 chain-encoding enzyme B3GALT5 and ST6GAL1. Western blot and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of core 1, 2, 3, 4, and extended core 1 chains carrying either type 1 (Galb3GlcNAc) or type 2 (Galb4GlcNAc) outer chains with or without α2,6-linked sialic acids. This panel of recombinant mucins carrying a repertoire of sialylated O-glycans will be important tools in studies aiming at determining the fine O-glycan binding specificity of sialic acid-specific microbial adhesins and mammalian lectins. PMID:26274979

  6. A Panel of Recombinant Mucins Carrying a Repertoire of Sialylated O-Glycans Based on Different Core Chains for Studies of Glycan Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maria Cherian, Reeja; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Jining; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Holgersson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Sialylated glycans serve as key elements of receptors for many viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins. The microbial recognition and their binding specificity can be affected by the linkage of the terminal sugar residue, types of underlying sugar chains, and the nature of the entire glycoconjugate. Owing to the pathobiological significance of sialylated glycans, we have engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to secrete mucin-type immunoglobulin-fused proteins carrying terminal α2,3- or α2,6-linked sialic acid on defined O-glycan core saccharide chains. Besides stably expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse immunoglobulin G2b cDNA (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), CHO cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding glycosyltransferases to synthesize core 2 (GCNT1), core 3 (B3GNT6), core 4 (GCNT1 and B3GNT6), or extended core 1 (B3GNT3) chains with or without the type 1 chain-encoding enzyme B3GALT5 and ST6GAL1. Western blot and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of core 1, 2, 3, 4, and extended core 1 chains carrying either type 1 (Galβ3GlcNAc) or type 2 (Galβ4GlcNAc) outer chains with or without α2,6-linked sialic acids. This panel of recombinant mucins carrying a repertoire of sialylated O-glycans will be important tools in studies aiming at determining the fine O-glycan binding specificity of sialic acid-specific microbial adhesins and mammalian lectins. PMID:26274979

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium: a Prospective, Multicenter Study in South American Hospitals▿

    PubMed Central

    Panesso, Diana; Reyes, Jinnethe; Rincón, Sandra; Díaz, Lorena; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Zurita, Jeannete; Carrillo, Carlos; Merentes, Altagracia; Guzmán, Manuel; Adachi, Javier A.; Murray, Barbara E.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2010-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen worldwide, and this trend has been associated with the dissemination of a genetic lineage designated clonal cluster 17 (CC17). Enterococcal isolates were collected prospectively (2006 to 2008) from 32 hospitals in Colombia, Ecuador, Perú, and Venezuela and subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Genotyping was performed with all vancomycin-resistant E. faecium (VREfm) isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing. All VREfm isolates were evaluated for the presence of 16 putative virulence genes (14 fms genes, the esp gene of E. faecium [espEfm], and the hyl gene of E. faecium [hylEfm]) and plasmids carrying the fms20-fms21 (pilA), hylEfm, and vanA genes. Of 723 enterococcal isolates recovered, E. faecalis was the most common (78%). Vancomycin resistance was detected in 6% of the isolates (74% of which were E. faecium). Eleven distinct PFGE types were found among the VREfm isolates, with most belonging to sequence types 412 and 18. The ebpAEfm-ebpBEfm-ebpCEfm (pilB) and fms11-fms19-fms16 clusters were detected in all VREfm isolates from the region, whereas espEfm and hylEfm were detected in 69% and 23% of the isolates, respectively. The fms20-fms21 (pilA) cluster, which encodes a putative pilus-like protein, was found on plasmids from almost all VREfm isolates and was sometimes found to coexist with hylEfm and the vanA gene cluster. The population genetics of VREfm in South America appear to resemble those of such strains in the United States in the early years of the CC17 epidemic. The overwhelming presence of plasmids encoding putative virulence factors and vanA genes suggests that E. faecium from the CC17 genogroup may disseminate in the region in the coming years. PMID:20220167

  8. Genome sequencing defines phylogeny and spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a high transmission setting

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Steven Y.C.; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Nickerson, Emma K.; Cooper, Ben S.; Köser, Claudio U.; Cori, Anne; Jombart, Thibaut; Cauchemez, Simon; Fraser, Christophe; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Hongsuwan, Maliwan; Day, Nicholas P.; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of nosocomial infection. Whole-genome sequencing of MRSA has been used to define phylogeny and transmission in well-resourced healthcare settings, yet the greatest burden of nosocomial infection occurs in resource-restricted settings where barriers to transmission are lower. Here, we study the flux and genetic diversity of MRSA on ward and individual patient levels in a hospital where transmission was common. We repeatedly screened all patients on two intensive care units for MRSA carriage over a 3-mo period. All MRSA belonged to multilocus sequence type 239 (ST 239). We defined the population structure and charted the spread of MRSA by sequencing 79 isolates from 46 patients and five members of staff, including the first MRSA-positive screen isolates and up to two repeat isolates where available. Phylogenetic analysis identified a flux of distinct ST 239 clades over time in each intensive care unit. In total, five main clades were identified, which varied in the carriage of plasmids encoding antiseptic and antimicrobial resistance determinants. Sequence data confirmed intra- and interwards transmission events and identified individual patients who were colonized by more than one clade. One patient on each unit was the source of numerous transmission events, and deep sampling of one of these cases demonstrated colonization with a “cloud” of related MRSA variants. The application of whole-genome sequencing and analysis provides novel insights into the transmission of MRSA in under-resourced healthcare settings and has relevance to wider global health. PMID:25491771

  9. Mokola virus glycoprotein and chimeric proteins can replace rabies virus glycoprotein in the rescue of infectious defective rabies virus particles.

    PubMed Central

    Mebatsion, T; Schnell, M J; Conzelmann, K K

    1995-01-01

    A reverse genetics approach which allows the generation of infectious defective rabies virus (RV) particles entirely from plasmid-encoded genomes and proteins (K.-K. Conzelmann and M. Schnell, J. Virol. 68:713-719, 1994) was used to investigate the ability of a heterologous lyssavirus glycoprotein (G) and chimeric G constructs to function in the formation of infectious RV-like particles. Virions containing a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene (SDI-CAT) were generated in cells simultaneously expressing the genomic RNA analog, the RV N, P, M, and L proteins, and engineered G constructs from transfected plasmids. The infectivity of particles was determined by a CAT assay after passage to helper virus-infected cells. The heterologous G protein from Eth-16 virus (Mokola virus, lyssavirus serotype 3) as well as a construct in which the ectodomain of RV G was fused to the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of the Eth-16 virus G rescued infectious SDI-CAT particles. In contrast, a chimeric protein composed of the amino-terminal half of the Eth-16 virus G and the carboxy-terminal half of RV G failed to produce infectious particles. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to convert the antigenic site III of RV G to the corresponding sequence of Eth-16 G. This chimeric protein rescued infectious SDI-CAT particles as efficiently as RV G. Virions containing the chimeric protein were specifically neutralized by an anti-Eth-16 virus serum and escaped neutralization by a monoclonal antibody directed against RV antigenic site III. The results show that entire structural domains as well as short surface epitopes of lyssavirus G proteins may be exchanged without affecting the structure required to mediate infection of cells. PMID:7853476

  10. Multiresistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae from humans, companion animals and horses in central Hesse, Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are an emerging problem in human and veterinary medicine. This study focused on comparative molecular characterization of β-lactamase and ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates from central Hesse in Germany. Isolates originated from humans, companion animals (dogs and cats) and horses. Results In this study 153 (83.6%) of the human isolates (n = 183) and 163 (91.6%) of the animal isolates (n = 178) were confirmed as ESBL producers by PCR and subsequent sequencing of the PCR amplicons. Predominant ESBL subtypes in human and animal samples were CTX-M-15 (49.3%) and CTX-M-1 (25.8%) respectively. Subtype blaCTX-M-2 was found almost exclusively in equine and was absent from human isolates. The carbapenemase OXA-48 was detected in 19 ertapenem-resistant companion animal isolates in this study. The Plasmid-encoded quinolone resistance (PMQR) gene aac(‘6)-Ib-cr was the most frequently detected antibiotic- resistance gene present in 27.9% of the human and 36.9% of the animal ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates. Combinations of two or up to six different resistance genes (penicillinases, ESBLs and PMQR) were detected in 70% of all isolates investigated. The most frequent species in this study was Escherichia coli (74%), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (17.5%), and Enterobacter cloacae (4.2%). Investigation of Escherichia coli phylogenetic groups revealed underrepresentation of group B2 within the animal isolates. Conclusions Isolates from human, companion animals and horses shared several characteristics regarding presence of ESBL, PMQR and combination of different resistance genes. The results indicate active transmission and dissemination of multi-resistant Enterobacteriaceae among human and animal populations. PMID:25014994

  11. Functional analysis of the gene encoding immunity to lactacin F, lafI, and its use as a Lactobacillus-specific, food-grade genetic marker.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, G E; Klaenhammer, T R

    1996-01-01

    Lactacin F is a two-component class II bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus johnsonii VPI 11088. The laf operon is composed of the bacteriocin structural genes, lafA and lafX, and a third open reading frame, ORFZ. Two strategies were employed to study the function of ORFZ. This gene was disrupted in the chromosome of NCK64, a lafA729 lafX ORFZ derivative of VPI 11088. A disruption cassette consisting of ORFZ interrupted with a cat gene was cloned into pSA3 and introduced into NCK64. Manipulation of growth temperatures and antibiotic selection resulted in homologous recombination which disrupted the chromosomal copy of ORFZ with the cat gene. This ORFZ mutation resulted in loss of immunity to lactacin F but had little effect on production of LafX, which is not bactericidal without LafA. Expression of ORFZ in this ORFZ- background rescued the immune phenotype. Expression of ORFZ in a bacteriocin-sensitive derivative of VPI 11088 also reestablished immunity. These data indicate that ORFZ, renamed lafI, encodes the immunity factor for the lactacin F system. The sensitivity of various Lactobacillus strains to lactacin F was further evaluated. Lactacin F inhibited 11 strains including several members of the A1, A2, A3, A4, B1, and B2 L. acidophilus homology groups. Expression of lafI in bacteriocin-sensitive strains L. acidophilus ATCC 4356, L. acidophilus NCFM/N2, L. fermentum NCDO1750, L. gasseri ATCC 33323, and L. johnsonii ATCC 33200 provided immunity to lactacin F. Furthermore, it was shown that lactacin F production by VPI 11088 could be used to select for L. fermentum NCDO1750 transformants containing the recombinant plasmid encoding LafI. The data demonstrate that lafI is functional in heterologous hosts, suggesting that it may be a suitable food-grade genetic marker for use in lactobacillus species. PMID:8953716

  12. Surface Proteome Analysis of a Natural Isolate of Lactococcus lactis Reveals the Presence of Pili Able to Bind Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Meyrand, Mickael; Guillot, Alain; Goin, Mélodie; Furlan, Sylviane; Armalyte, Julija; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Cortes-Perez, Naima G.; Thomas, Ginette; Chat, Sophie; Péchoux, Christine; Dupres, Vincent; Hols, Pascal; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Trugnan, Germain; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Surface proteins of Gram-positive bacteria play crucial roles in bacterial adhesion to host tissues. Regarding commensal or probiotic bacteria, adhesion to intestinal mucosa may promote their persistence in the gastro-intestinal tract and their beneficial effects to the host. In this study, seven Lactococcus lactis strains exhibiting variable surface physico-chemical properties were compared for their adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. In this test, only one vegetal isolate TIL448 expressed a high-adhesion phenotype. A nonadhesive derivative was obtained by plasmid curing from TIL448, indicating that the adhesion determinants were plasmid-encoded. Surface-exposed proteins in TIL448 were analyzed by a proteomic approach consisting in shaving of the bacterial surface with trypsin and analysis of the released peptides by LC-MS/MS. As the TIL448 complete genome sequence was not available, the tryptic peptides were identified by a mass matching approach against a database including all Lactococcus protein sequences and the sequences deduced from partial DNA sequences of the TIL448 plasmids. Two surface proteins, encoded by plasmids in TIL448, were identified as candidate adhesins, the first one displaying pilin characteristics and the second one containing two mucus-binding domains. Inactivation of the pilin gene abolished adhesion to Caco-2 cells whereas inactivation of the mucus-binding protein gene had no effect on adhesion. The pilin gene is located inside a cluster of four genes encoding two other pilin-like proteins and one class-C sortase. Synthesis of pili was confirmed by immunoblotting detection of high molecular weight forms of pilins associated to the cell wall as well as by electron and atomic force microscopy observations. As a conclusion, surface proteome analysis allowed us to detect pilins at the surface of L. lactis TIL448. Moreover we showed that pili appendages are formed and involved in adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells

  13. Pestoides F, and Atypical Yersinia pestis Strain from the Former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E; Worsham, P; Bearden, S; Malfatti, S; Lang, D; Larimer, F; Lindler, L; Chain, P

    2007-01-05

    Unlike the classical Yersinia pestis strains, members of an atypical group of Y. pestis from Central Asia, denominated Y. pestis subspecies caucasica (also known as one of several pestoides types), are distinguished by a number of characteristics including their ability to ferment rhamnose and melibiose, their lacking the small plasmid encoding the plasminogen activator (pla) and pesticin, and their exceptionally large variants of the virulence plasmid pMT (encoding murine toxin and capsular antigen). We have obtained the entire genome sequence of Y. pestis Pestoides F, an isolate from the former Soviet Union that has enabled us to carryout a comprehensive genome-wide comparison of this organism's genomic content against the six published sequences of Y. pestis and their Y. pseudotuberculosis ancestor. Based on classical glycerol fermentation (+ve) and nitrate reduction (+ve) Y. pestis Pestoides F is an isolate that belongs to the biovar antiqua. This strain is unusual in other characteristics such as the fact that it carries a non-consensus V antigen (lcrV) sequence, and that unlike other Pla{sup -} strains, Pestoides F retains virulence by the parenteral and aerosol routes. The chromosome of Pestoides F is 4,517,345 bp in size comprising some 3,936 predicted coding sequences, while its pCD and pMT plasmids are 71,507 bp and 137,010 bp in size respectively. Comparison of chromosome-associated genes in Pestoides F with those in the other sequenced Y. pestis strains, reveals a series of differences ranging from strain-specific rearrangements, insertions, deletions, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and a unique distribution of insertion sequences. There is a single {approx}7 kb unique region in the chromosome not found in any of the completed Y. pestis strains sequenced to date, but which is present in the Y. pseudotuberculosis ancestor. Taken together, these findings are consistent with Pestoides F being derived from the most ancient lineage of Y. pestis yet

  14. Pestoides F, an atypical Yersinia pestis strain from the former Soviet Union.

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Emilio; Worsham, Patricia; Bearden, S.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Lang, D.; Larimer, Frank W; Lindler, L.; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2007-01-01

    Unlike the classical Yersinia pestis strains, members of an atypical group of Y. pestis from Central Asia, denominated Y. pestis subspecies caucasica (also known as one of several pestoides types), are distinguished by a number of characteristics including their ability to ferment rhamnose and melibiose, their lack of the small plasmid encoding the plasminogen activator (pla) and pesticin, and their exceptionally large variants of the virulence plasmid pMT (encoding murine toxin and capsular antigen). We have obtained the entire genome sequence of Y. pestis Pestoides F, an isolate from the former Soviet Union that has enabled us to carryout a comprehensive genome-wide comparison of this organism's genomic content against the six published sequences of Y. pestis and their Y. pseudotuberculosis ancestor. Based on classical glycerol fermentation (+ve) and nitrate reduction (+ve) Y. pestis Pestoides F is an isolate that belongs to the biovar antiqua. This strain is unusual in other characteristics such as the fact that it carries a non-consensus V antigen (lcrV) sequence, and that unlike other Pla(-) strains, Pestoides F retains virulence by the parenteral and aerosol routes. The chromosome of Pestoides F is 4,517,345 bp in size comprising some 3,936 predicted coding sequences, while its pCD and pMT plasmids are 71,507 bp and 137,010 bp in size respectively. Comparison of chromosome-associated genes in Pestoides F with those in the other sequenced Y. pestis strains reveals differences ranging from strain-specific rearrangements, insertions, deletions, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and a unique distribution of insertion sequences. There is a single approximately 7 kb unique region in the chromosome not found in any of the completed Y. pestis strains sequenced to date, but which is present in the Y. pseudotuberculosis ancestor. Taken together, these findings are consistent with Pestoides F being derived from the most ancient lineage of Y. pestis yet sequenced.

  15. Diversity of Antibody Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi in Experimentally Infected Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Grosenbaugh, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a common infection of domestic dogs in areas where there is enzootic transmission of the agent Borrelia burgdorferi. While immunoassays based on individual subunits have mostly supplanted the use of whole-cell preparations for canine serology, only a limited number of informative antigens have been identified. To more broadly characterize the antibody responses to B. burgdorferi infection and to assess the diversity of those responses in individual dogs, we examined sera from 32 adult colony-bred beagle dogs that had been experimentally infected with B. burgdorferi through tick bites and compared those sera in a protein microarray with sera from uninfected dogs in their antibody reactivities to various recombinant chromosome- and plasmid-encoded B. burgdorferi proteins, including 24 serotype-defining OspC proteins of North America. The profiles of immunogenic proteins for the dogs were largely similar to those for humans and natural-reservoir rodents; these proteins included the decorin-binding protein DbpB, BBA36, BBA57, BBA64, the fibronectin-binding protein BBK32, VlsE, FlaB and other flagellar structural proteins, Erp proteins, Bdr proteins, and all of the OspC proteins. In addition, the canine sera bound to the presumptive lipoproteins BBB14 and BB0844, which infrequently elicited antibodies in humans or rodents. Although the beagle, like most other domestic dog breeds, has a small effective population size and features extensive linkage disequilibrium, the group of animals studied here demonstrated diversity in antibody responses in measures of antibody levels and specificities for conserved proteins, such as DbpB, and polymorphic proteins, such as OspC. PMID:24695775

  16. Inhibitory effect of UvrD and DinG on the replication of ColE1-derived plasmids in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nalae; Choi, Eunsil; Kim, Sung-Gun; Hwang, Jihwan

    2015-09-01

    CspA has been identified as a major cold-shock protein in Escherichia coli. CspA binds to RNAs which are abnormally folded at low temperature and then acts as an RNA chaperone unfolding those RNAs. The dramatic expression of cspA at low temperature is contributed by posttranscriptional stability and robust translatability. Interestingly, when cspA mRNA encoding a premature nonsense codon was overexpressed at low temperature, cell growth was completely inhibited. This phenotype was termed LACE (the low temperature-dependent antibiotic effect of truncated cspA expression), and this lethality resulted from exclusive stalling of most ribosomes on mutant cspA mRNAs. In a previous study, we demonstrated that overexpression of the ATP-dependent DNA helicases, UvrD and DinG, suppressed the lethality and ribosome stalling caused by mutant cspA mRNA. In the present study, we attempted to elucidate how these two DNA helicases help recover normal growth under LACE condition. Interestingly, we found that UvrD and DinG appeared to have an ability to down-regulate the replication of pUC-based high copy plasmid. In plasmid copy number tests, the amount of pUC-based plasmid encoding mutant cspA was reduced by 3-10-fold when either UvrD or DinG was expressed. Through a β-galactosidase activity assay, we also confirmed that expression of the lacZα gene inserted into the pUC-based plasmid was significantly reduced due to down-regulation of plasmid replication. Our findings imply that UvrD and DinG, known as non-replicative helicases, play a novel role in the regulation of ColE1-like plasmid replication. PMID:26143370

  17. Prospective Genomic Characterization of the German Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O104:H4 Outbreak by Rapid Next Generation Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zentz, Emily B.; Leopold, Shana R.; Rico, Alain; Prior, Karola; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Ji, Yongmei; Zhang, Wenlan; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Henkhaus, John K.; Leopold, Benjamin; Bielaszewska, Martina; Prager, Rita; Brzoska, Pius M.; Moore, Richard L.; Guenther, Simone; Rothberg, Jonathan M.; Karch, Helge

    2011-01-01

    An ongoing outbreak of exceptionally virulent Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4 centered in Germany, has caused over 830 cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and 46 deaths since May 2011. Serotype O104:H4, which has not been detected in animals, has rarely been associated with HUS in the past. To prospectively elucidate the unique characteristics of this strain in the early stages of this outbreak, we applied whole genome sequencing on the Life Technologies Ion Torrent PGM™ sequencer and Optical Mapping to characterize one outbreak isolate (LB226692) and a historic O104:H4 HUS isolate from 2001 (01-09591). Reference guided draft assemblies of both strains were completed with the newly introduced PGM™ within 62 hours. The HUS-associated strains both carried genes typically found in two types of pathogenic E. coli, enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC). Phylogenetic analyses of 1,144 core E. coli genes indicate that the HUS-causing O104:H4 strains and the previously published sequence of the EAEC strain 55989 show a close relationship but are only distantly related to common EHEC serotypes. Though closely related, the outbreak strain differs from the 2001 strain in plasmid content and fimbrial genes. We propose a model in which EAEC 55989 and EHEC O104:H4 strains evolved from a common EHEC O104:H4 progenitor, and suggest that by stepwise gain and loss of chromosomal and plasmid-encoded virulence factors, a highly pathogenic hybrid of EAEC and EHEC emerged as the current outbreak clone. In conclusion, rapid next-generation technologies facilitated prospective whole genome characterization in the early stages of an outbreak. PMID:21799941

  18. Comparative Genomics and stx Phage Characterization of LEE-Negative Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Steyert, Susan R.; Sahl, Jason W.; Fraser, Claire M.; Teel, Louise D.; Scheutz, Flemming; Rasko, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Infection by Escherichia coli and Shigella species are among the leading causes of death due to diarrheal disease in the world. Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) that do not encode the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE-negative STEC) often possess Shiga toxin gene variants and have been isolated from humans and a variety of animal sources. In this study, we compare the genomes of nine LEE-negative STEC harboring various stx alleles with four complete reference LEE-positive STEC isolates. Compared to a representative collection of prototype E. coli and Shigella isolates representing each of the pathotypes, the whole genome phylogeny demonstrated that these isolates are diverse. Whole genome comparative analysis of the 13 genomes revealed that in addition to the absence of the LEE pathogenicity island, phage-encoded genes including non-LEE encoded effectors, were absent from all nine LEE-negative STEC genomes. Several plasmid-encoded virulence factors reportedly identified in LEE-negative STEC isolates were identified in only a subset of the nine LEE-negative isolates further confirming the diversity of this group. In combination with whole genome analysis, we characterized the lambdoid phages harboring the various stx alleles and determined their genomic insertion sites. Although the integrase gene sequence corresponded with genomic location, it was not correlated with stx variant, further highlighting the mosaic nature of these phages. The transcription of these phages in different genomic backgrounds was examined. Expression of the Shiga toxin genes, stx1 and/or stx2, as well as the Q genes, were examined with quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays. A wide range of basal and induced toxin induction was observed. Overall, this is a first significant foray into the genome space of this unexplored group of emerging and divergent pathogens. PMID:23162798

  19. Mechanisms and regulation of surface interactions and biofilm formation in Agrobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Heindl, Jason E.; Wang, Yi; Heckel, Brynn C.; Mohari, Bitan; Feirer, Nathan; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-01-01

    For many pathogenic bacteria surface attachment is a required first step during host interactions. Attachment can proceed to invasion of host tissue or cells or to establishment of a multicellular bacterial community known as a biofilm. The transition from a unicellular, often motile, state to a sessile, multicellular, biofilm-associated state is one of the most important developmental decisions for bacteria. Agrobacterium tumefaciens genetically transforms plant cells by transfer and integration of a segment of plasmid-encoded transferred DNA (T-DNA) into the host genome, and has also been a valuable tool for plant geneticists. A. tumefaciens attaches to and forms a complex biofilm on a variety of biotic and abiotic substrates in vitro. Although rarely studied in situ, it is hypothesized that the biofilm state plays an important functional role in the ecology of this organism. Surface attachment, motility, and cell division are coordinated through a complex regulatory network that imparts an unexpected asymmetry to the A. tumefaciens life cycle. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which A. tumefaciens associates with surfaces, and regulation of this process. We focus on the transition between flagellar-based motility and surface attachment, and on the composition, production, and secretion of multiple extracellular components that contribute to the biofilm matrix. Biofilm formation by A. tumefaciens is linked with virulence both mechanistically and through shared regulatory molecules. We detail our current understanding of these and other regulatory schemes, as well as the internal and external (environmental) cues mediating development of the biofilm state, including the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, nutrient levels, and the role of the plant host in influencing attachment and biofilm formation. A. tumefaciens is an important model system contributing to our understanding of developmental transitions, bacterial cell biology, and biofilm formation

  20. Transfection of Babesia bovis by Double Selection with WR99210 and Blast