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Sample records for plasmodium permits generation

  1. In Vitro Generation of Plasmodium falciparum Ookinetes

    PubMed Central

    Bounkeua, Viengngeun; Li, Fengwu; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium transmission from the human host to the mosquito depends on the ability of gametocytes to differentiate into ookinetes, the invasive form of the parasite that invades and establishes infection in the mosquito midgut. The biology of P. falciparum ookinetes is poorly understood, because sufficient quantities of this stage of this parasite species have not been obtained for detailed study. This report details methods to optimize production of P. falciparum sexual stage parasites, including ookinetes. Flow cytometric sorting was used to separate diploid/tetraploid zygotes and ookinetes from haploid gametetocytes and unfertilized gametes based on DNA content. Consistent production of 106–107 P. falciparum ookinetes per 10 mL culture was observed, with ookinete transformation present in 10–40% of all parasite forms. Transmission electron micrographs of cultured parasites confirmed ookinete development. PMID:21118920

  2. Generation of Antigenic Diversity in Plasmodium falciparum by Structured Rearrangement of Var Genes During Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Kekre, Mihir; Otto, Thomas D.; Faizullabhoy, Adnan; Rayner, Julian C.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    The most polymorphic gene family in P. falciparum is the ∼60 var genes distributed across parasite chromosomes, both in the subtelomeres and in internal regions. They encode hypervariable surface proteins known as P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) that are critical for pathogenesis and immune evasion in Plasmodium falciparum. How var gene sequence diversity is generated is not currently completely understood. To address this, we constructed large clone trees and performed whole genome sequence analysis to study the generation of novel var gene sequences in asexually replicating parasites. While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were scattered across the genome, structural variants (deletions, duplications, translocations) were focused in and around var genes, with considerable variation in frequency between strains. Analysis of more than 100 recombination events involving var exon 1 revealed that the average nucleotide sequence identity of two recombining exons was only 63% (range: 52.7–72.4%) yet the crossovers were error-free and occurred in such a way that the resulting sequence was in frame and domain architecture was preserved. Var exon 1, which encodes the immunologically exposed part of the protein, recombined in up to 0.2% of infected erythrocytes in vitro per life cycle. The high rate of var exon 1 recombination indicates that millions of new antigenic structures could potentially be generated each day in a single infected individual. We propose a model whereby var gene sequence polymorphism is mainly generated during the asexual part of the life cycle. PMID:25521112

  3. Acyclic Immucillin Phosphonates. Second-Generation Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine- Guanine-Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, Keith Z.; Ho, Meng-Chaio; Cassera, Maria B.; Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Rosario Jr., Irving; Merino, Emilio F.; Almo, Steve C.; Tyler, Peter C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2012-06-22

    We found that Plasmodium falciparum is the primary cause of deaths from malaria. It is a purine auxotroph and relies on hypoxanthine salvage from the host purine pool. Purine starvation as an antimalarial target has been validated by inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Hypoxanthine depletion kills Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture and in Aotus monkey infections. Hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) from P. falciparum is required for hypoxanthine salvage by forming inosine 5'-monophosphate, a branchpoint for all purine nucleotide synthesis in the parasite. We present a class of HGXPRT inhibitors, the acyclic immucillin phosphonates (AIPs), and cell permeable AIP prodrugs. The AIPs are simple, potent, selective, and biologically stable inhibitors. The AIP prodrugs block proliferation of cultured parasites by inhibiting the incorporation of hypoxanthine into the parasite nucleotide pool and validates HGXPRT as a target in malaria.

  4. High-Quality Genome Assembly and Annotation for Plasmodium coatneyi, Generated Using Single-Molecule Real-Time PacBio Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Jung-Ting; Pakala, Suman B.; Geraldo, Juliana A.; Lapp, Stacey A.; Humphrey, Jay C.; Barnwell, John W.; Kissinger, Jessica C.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium coatneyi is a protozoan parasite species that causes simian malaria and is an excellent model for studying disease caused by the human malaria parasite, P. falciparum. Here we report the complete (nontelomeric) genome sequence of P. coatneyi Hackeri generated by the application of only Pacific Biosciences RS II (PacBio RS II) single-molecule real-time (SMRT) high-resolution sequence technology and assembly using the Hierarchical Genome Assembly Process (HGAP). This is the first Plasmodium genome sequence reported to use only PacBio technology. This approach has proven to be superior to short-read only approaches for this species. PMID:27587810

  5. High-Quality Genome Assembly and Annotation for Plasmodium coatneyi, Generated Using Single-Molecule Real-Time PacBio Technology.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jung-Ting; Pakala, Suman B; Geraldo, Juliana A; Lapp, Stacey A; Humphrey, Jay C; Barnwell, John W; Kissinger, Jessica C; Galinski, Mary R

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium coatneyi is a protozoan parasite species that causes simian malaria and is an excellent model for studying disease caused by the human malaria parasite, P. falciparum Here we report the complete (nontelomeric) genome sequence of P. coatneyi Hackeri generated by the application of only Pacific Biosciences RS II (PacBio RS II) single-molecule real-time (SMRT) high-resolution sequence technology and assembly using the Hierarchical Genome Assembly Process (HGAP). This is the first Plasmodium genome sequence reported to use only PacBio technology. This approach has proven to be superior to short-read only approaches for this species. PMID:27587810

  6. 76 FR 61735 - Incidental Take Permit; Auwahi Wind Energy Generation Facility, Maui, HI; Draft Habitat...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Incidental Take Permit; Auwahi Wind Energy Generation Facility, Maui, HI... Boulevard, Room 3-122, Honolulu, HI 96850. You may also send comments by facsimile to (808) 792-9580....

  7. Assessing the impact of next-generation rapid diagnostic tests on Plasmodium falciparum malaria elimination strategies.

    PubMed

    Slater, Hannah C; Ross, Amanda; Ouédraogo, André Lin; White, Lisa J; Nguon, Chea; Walker, Patrick G T; Ngor, Pengby; Aguas, Ricardo; Silal, Sheetal P; Dondorp, Arjen M; La Barre, Paul; Burton, Robert; Sauerwein, Robert W; Drakeley, Chris; Smith, Thomas A; Bousema, Teun; Ghani, Azra C

    2015-12-01

    Mass-screen-and-treat and targeted mass-drug-administration strategies are being considered as a means to interrupt transmission of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, the effectiveness of such strategies will depend on the extent to which current and future diagnostics are able to detect those individuals who are infectious to mosquitoes. We estimate the relationship between parasite density and onward infectivity using sensitive quantitative parasite diagnostics and mosquito feeding assays from Burkina Faso. We find that a diagnostic with a lower detection limit of 200 parasites per microlitre would detect 55% of the infectious reservoir (the combined infectivity to mosquitoes of the whole population weighted by how often each individual is bitten) whereas a test with a limit of 20 parasites per microlitre would detect 83% and 2 parasites per microlitre would detect 95% of the infectious reservoir. Using mathematical models, we show that increasing the diagnostic sensitivity from 200 parasites per microlitre (equivalent to microscopy or current rapid diagnostic tests) to 2 parasites per microlitre would increase the number of regions where transmission could be interrupted with a mass-screen-and-treat programme from an entomological inoculation rate below 1 to one of up to 4. The higher sensitivity diagnostic could reduce the number of treatment rounds required to interrupt transmission in areas of lower prevalence. We predict that mass-screen-and-treat with a highly sensitive diagnostic is less effective than mass drug administration owing to the prophylactic protection provided to uninfected individuals by the latter approach. In low-transmission settings such as those in Southeast Asia, we find that a diagnostic tool with a sensitivity of 20 parasites per microlitre may be sufficient for targeted mass drug administration because this diagnostic is predicted to identify a similar village population prevalence compared with that currently detected using

  8. Next-generation sequencing reveals cryptic mtDNA diversity of Plasmodium relictum in the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvi, S.I.; Farias, M.E.; Lapointe, D.A.; Belcaid, M.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation 454 sequencing techniques were used to re-examine diversity of mitochondrial cytochrome b lineages of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) in Hawaii. We document a minimum of 23 variant lineages of the parasite based on single nucleotide transitional changes, in addition to the previously reported single lineage (GRW4). A new, publicly available portal (Integroomer) was developed for initial parsing of 454 datasets. Mean variant prevalence and frequency was higher in low elevation Hawaii Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) with Avipoxvirus-like lesions (P = 0·001), suggesting that the variants may be biologically distinct. By contrast, variant prevalence and frequency did not differ significantly among mid-elevation Apapane (Himatione sanguinea) with or without lesions (P = 0·691). The low frequency and the lack of detection of variants independent of GRW4 suggest that multiple independent introductions of P. relictum to Hawaii are unlikely. Multiple variants may have been introduced in heteroplasmy with GRW4 or exist within the tandem repeat structure of the mitochondrial genome. The discovery of multiple mitochondrial lineages of P. relictum in Hawaii provides a measure of genetic diversity within a geographically isolated population of this parasite and suggests the origins and evolution of parasite diversity may be more complicated than previously recognized.

  9. Next-Generation Sequencing of Plasmodium vivax Patient Samples Shows Evidence of Direct Evolution in Drug-Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Erika L.; Wang, Tina; Akbari, Ali; Corey, Victoria C.; Gunawan, Felicia; Bright, A. Taylor; Abraham, Matthew; Sanchez, Juan F.; Santolalla, Meddly L.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Rosales, Luis A.; Lescano, Andrés G.; Bafna, Vineet; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax, the parasite that causes the most widespread form of human malaria, is complicated by the lack of a suitable long-term cell culture system for this parasite. In contrast to P. falciparum, which can be more readily manipulated in the laboratory, insights about parasite biology need to be inferred from human studies. Here we analyze the genomes of parasites within 10 human P. vivax infections from the Peruvian Amazon. Using next-generation sequencing we show that some P. vivax infections analyzed from the region are likely polyclonal. Despite their polyclonality we observe limited parasite genetic diversity by showing that three or fewer haplotypes comprise 94% of the examined genomes, suggesting the recent introduction of parasites into this geographic region. In contrast we find more than three haplotypes in putative drug-resistance genes, including the gene encoding dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase and the P. vivax multidrug resistance associated transporter, suggesting that resistance mutations have arisen independently. Additionally, several drug-resistance genes are located in genomic regions with evidence of increased copy number. Our data suggest that whole genome sequencing of malaria parasites from patients may provide more insight about the evolution of drug resistance than genetic linkage or association studies, especially in geographical regions with limited parasite genetic diversity. PMID:26719854

  10. Sequence specific generation of a DNA panhandle permits PCR amplification of unknown flanking DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D H; Winistorfer, S C

    1992-01-01

    We present a novel method for the PCR amplification of unknown DNA that flanks a known segment directly from human genomic DNA. PCR requires that primer annealing sites be present on each end of the DNA segment that is to be amplified. In this method, known DNA is placed on the uncharacterized side of the sequence of interest via DNA polymerase mediated generation of a PCR template that is shaped like a pan with a handle. Generation of this template permits specific amplification of the unknown sequence. Taq (DNA) polymerase was used to form the original template and to generate the PCR product. 2.2 kb of the beta-globin gene, and 657 bp of the 5' flanking region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene, were amplified directly from human genomic DNA using primers that initially flank only one side of the region amplified. This method will provide a powerful tool for acquiring DNA sequence information. Images PMID:1371352

  11. Preconstruction schedules, costs, and permit requirements for electric power generating resources in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, P.L.; Smith, S.A.; Thurman, A.G.; Watts, R.L.; Weakley, S.A.

    1990-07-01

    This report was prepared for the Generation Programs Branch, Office of Energy Resources, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The principal objective of the report is to assemble in one document preconstruction cost, schedule, and permit information for twelve specific generating resources. The report is one of many documents that provide background information for BPA's Resource Program, which is designed to identify the type and amount of new resources that BPA may have to add over the next twenty years to maintain an adequate and reliable electric power supply in the Pacific Northwest. A predecessor to this report is a 1982 report prepared by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Northwest Power Planning Council (the Council''). The 1982 report had a similar, but not identical, content and format. 306 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

  12. Adjuvant poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) generates more efficient monoclonal antibodies against truncated recombinant histidine-rich protein2 of Plasmodium falciparum for malaria diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Reena; Ravichandran, Ramakrishnan; Jayaprakash, Naatamai S; Kumar, Ashok; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran A; Venkataraman, Krishnan

    2015-05-01

    Adjuvants play an important role in eliciting immune responses and subsequent generation of antibodies with high specificity. Recently, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm), also known as a "smart" polymer, has been proposed as a potential adjuvant for making antibodies and vaccines. This material exhibits efficient delivery, protection against degradation, and preservation of antigen epitopes. In this work, we used both CFA and smart polymer to develop a highly specific murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) against recombinant truncated histidine rich protein2 (HRP2) of Plasmodium falciparum. Our results indicate that the mAbs developed using these adjuvants were able to recognize recombinant HRP2 and native PfHRP2 protein from spent medium. The mAbs generated against recombinant truncated HRP2 showed better sensitivity to the antigen and importantly mAbs generated using PNiPAAm adjuvant were in the range of 10(8)-10(9) M(-1). The mAbs generated using PNiPAAm are very efficient and sensitive in detecting HRP2. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such comparison having been made between these two adjuvants and we propose that the smart polymer has huge potential as an alternative to CFA. Additionally, we discuss the utility of the mAbs generated through PNiPAAm for specific diagnosis of malaria caused by P. falciparum. PMID:25641957

  13. On emission permit auction vs. allocation and the structural adjustment of incumbent power generators in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Simshauser, Paul

    2008-12-15

    A one-time partial allocation of permits would not impair the economic efficiency of the emissions trading scheme, would not have the effect of redirecting existing government expenditures, would minimize transaction costs, and most importantly, would help ensure power system stability throughout this major microeconomic reform. (author)

  14. Worldwide population genetic analysis and natural selection in the Plasmodium vivax Generative Cell Specific 1 (PvGCS1) as a transmission-blocking vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Mehrizi, Akram Abouie; Dodangeh, Fatemeh; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Djadid, Navid Dinparast

    2016-09-01

    GENERATIVE CELL SPECIFIC 1 (GCS1) is one of the Transmission Blocking Vaccine (TBV) candidate antigens, which is expressed on the surface of male gametocytes and gametes of Plasmodium species. Since antigenic diversity could inhibit the successful development of a malaria vaccine, it is crucial to determine the diversity of gcs1 gene in global malaria-endemic areas. Therefore, gene diversity and selection of gcs1 gene were analyzed in Iranian Plasmodium vivax isolates (n=52) and compared with the corresponding sequences from worldwide clinical P. vivax isolates available in PlasmoDB database. Totally 12 SNPs were detected in the pvgcs1 sequences as compared to Sal-1 sequence. Five out of 12 SNPs including three synonymous (T797C, G1559A, and G1667T) and two amino acid replacements (Y133S and Q634P) were detected in Iranian pvgcs1 sequences. According to four amino acid replacements (Y133S, N575S, Q634P and D637N) observed in all world PvGCS1 sequences, totally 5 PvGCS1 haplotypes were detected in the world, that three of them observed in Iranian isolates including the PvGCS-A (133S/634Q, 92.3%), PvGCS-B (133Y/634Q, 5.8%), and PvGCS-C (133S/634P, 1.9%). The overall nucleotide diversity (π) for all 52 sequences of Iranian pvgcs1 gene was 0.00018±0.00006, and the value of dN-dS (-0.00031) were negative, however, it was not statistically significant. In comparison with global isolates, Iranian and PNG pvgcs1 sequences had the lowest nucleotide and haplotype diversity, while the highest nucleotide and haplotype diversity was observed in China population. Moreover, epitope prediction in this antigen showed that all B-cell epitopes were located in conserved regions. However, Q634P (in one Iranian isolate) and D637N (observed in Thailand, China, Vietnam and North Korea) mutations are involved in predicted IURs. The obtained results in this study could be used in development of PvGCS1 based malaria vaccine. PMID:27180894

  15. New efficient artemisinin derived agents against human leukemia cells, human cytomegalovirus and Plasmodium falciparum: 2nd generation 1,2,4-trioxane-ferrocene hybrids.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Christoph; Fröhlich, Tony; Zeino, Maen; Marschall, Manfred; Bahsi, Hanife; Leidenberger, Maria; Friedrich, Oliver; Kappes, Barbara; Hampel, Frank; Efferth, Thomas; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B

    2015-06-01

    In our ongoing search for highly active hybrid molecules exceeding their parent compounds in anticancer, antimalaria as well as antiviral activity and being an alternative to the standard drugs, we present the synthesis and biological investigations of 2nd generation 1,2,4-trioxane-ferrocene hybrids. In vitro tests against the CCRF-CEM leukemia cell line revealed di-1,2,4-trioxane-ferrocene hybrid 7 as the most active compound (IC50 of 0.01 μM). Regarding the activity against the multidrug resistant subline CEM/ADR5000, 1,2,4-trioxane-ferrocene hybrid 5 showed a remarkable activity (IC50 of 0.53 μM). Contrary to the antimalaria activity of hybrids 4-8 against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 strain with slightly higher IC50 values (between 7.2 and 30.2 nM) than that of their parent compound DHA, hybrids 5-7 possessed very promising activity (IC50 values lower than 0.5 μM) against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The application of 1,2,4-trioxane-ferrocene hybrids against HCMV is unprecedented and demonstrated here for the first time. PMID:25965779

  16. Licensed to Ill: IL-9 Generation in Immature Mast Cells Permits Food-Elicited Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Nora A; Austen, K Frank

    2015-10-20

    Food-specific IgE is central to the pathobiology of food allergy, but not sufficient to induce disease. Chen et al. (2015) demonstrate that food-elicited reactions require an immature mast cell that generates IL-9 to induce its own maturation. PMID:26488812

  17. Transcriptome sequencing of lentil based on second-generation technology permits large-scale unigene assembly and SSR marker discovery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a cool-season grain legume which provides a rich source of protein for human consumption. In terms of genomic resources, lentil is relatively underdeveloped, in comparison to other Fabaceae species, with limited available data. There is hence a significant need to enhance such resources in order to identify novel genes and alleles for molecular breeding to increase crop productivity and quality. Results Tissue-specific cDNA samples from six distinct lentil genotypes were sequenced using Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium technology, generating c. 1.38 × 106 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). De novo assembly generated a total of 15,354 contigs and 68,715 singletons. The complete unigene set was sequence-analysed against genome drafts of the model legume species Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana to identify 12,639, and 7,476 unique matches, respectively. When compared to the genome of Glycine max, a total of 20,419 unique hits were observed corresponding to c. 31% of the known gene space. A total of 25,592 lentil unigenes were subsequently annoated from GenBank. Simple sequence repeat (SSR)-containing ESTs were identified from consensus sequences and a total of 2,393 primer pairs were designed. A subset of 192 EST-SSR markers was screened for validation across a panel 12 cultivated lentil genotypes and one wild relative species. A total of 166 primer pairs obtained successful amplification, of which 47.5% detected genetic polymorphism. Conclusions A substantial collection of ESTs has been developed from sequence analysis of lentil genotypes using second-generation technology, permitting unigene definition across a broad range of functional categories. As well as providing resources for functional genomics studies, the unigene set has permitted significant enhancement of the number of publicly-available molecular genetic markers as tools for improvement of this species. PMID:21609489

  18. The generation and evaluation of recombinant human IgA specific for Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1-19 (PfMSP119)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human immunoglobulin G (IgG) plays an important role in mediating protective immune responses to malaria. Although human serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the second most abundant class of antibody in the circulation, its contribution, if any, to protective responses against malaria is not clear. Results To explore the mechanism(s) by which IgA may mediate a protective effect, we generated fully human IgA specific for the C-terminal 19-kDa region of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (PfMSP119), a major target of protective immune responses. This novel human IgA bound antigen with an affinity comparable to that seen for an epitope-matched protective human IgG1. Furthermore, the human IgA induced significantly higher NADPH-mediated oxidative bursts and degranulation from human neutrophils than the epitope-matched human IgG1 from which it was derived. Despite showing efficacy in in vitro functional assays, the human IgA failed to protect against parasite challenge in vivo in mice transgenic for the human Fcα receptor (FcαRI/CD89). A minority of the animals treated with IgA, irrespective of FcαRI expression, showed elevated serum TNF-α levels and concomitant mouse anti-human antibody (MAHA) responses. Conclusions The lack of protection afforded by MSP119-specific IgA against parasite challenge in mice transgenic for human FcαRI suggests that this antibody class does not play a major role in control of infection. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that protective capacity may have been compromised in this model due to rapid clearance and inappropriate bio-distribution of IgA, and differences in FcαRI expression profile between humans and transgenic mice. PMID:21781305

  19. Use of the atmospheric generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag-CO2 for the evaluation of in vitro Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to standard anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the cultivation system in which the proper atmospheric conditions for growing Plasmodium falciparum parasites were maintained in a sealed bag. The Genbag® system associated with the atmospheric generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag CO2® was used for in vitro susceptibility test of nine standard anti-malarial drugs and compared to standard incubator conditions. Methods The susceptibility of 36 pre-identified parasite strains from a wide panel of countries was assessed for nine standard anti-malarial drugs (chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, monodesethylamodiaquine, lumefantrine, dihydroartemisinin, atovaquone and pyrimethamine) by the standard 42-hour 3H-hypoxanthine uptake inhibition method using the Genbag CO2® system and compared to controlled incubator conditions (5% CO2 and 10% O2). Results The counts per minute values in the control wells in incubator atmospheric conditions (5% CO2 and 10% O2) were significantly higher than those of Genbag® conditions (2738 cpm vs 2282 cpm, p < 0.0001). The geometric mean IC50 estimated under the incubator atmospheric conditions was significantly lower for atovaquone (1.2 vs 2.1 nM, p = 0.0011) and higher for the quinolines: chloroquine (127 vs 94 nM, p < 0.0001), quinine (580 vs 439 nM, p < 0.0001), monodesethylamodiaquine (41.4 vs 31.8 nM, p < 0.0001), mefloquine (57.5 vs 49.7 nM, p = 0.0011) and lumefantrine (23.8 vs 21.2 nM, p = 0.0044). There was no significant difference of IC50 between the 2 conditions for dihydroartemisinin, doxycycline and pyrimethamine. To reduce this difference in term of anti-malarial susceptibility, a specific cut-off was estimated for each drug under Genbag® conditions by regression. The cut-off was estimated at 77 nM for chloroquine (vs 100 nM in 10% O2), 611 nM for quinine (vs 800 nM), 30 nM for mefloquine (vs 30 nM), 61 nM for monodesethylamodiaquine (vs 80 nM) and 1729 nM for pyrimethamine (vs 2000 nM). Conclusions The atmospheric

  20. Overexpression of Plasmodium berghei ATG8 by Liver Forms Leads to Cumulative Defects in Organelle Dynamics and to Generation of Noninfectious Merozoites

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Christiane; Ehrenman, Karen; Mlambo, Godfree; Mishra, Satish; Kumar, Kota Arun; Sacci, John B.; Sinnis, Photini

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasmodium parasites undergo continuous cellular renovation to adapt to various environments in the vertebrate host and insect vector. In hepatocytes, Plasmodium berghei discards unneeded organelles for replication, such as micronemes involved in invasion. Concomitantly, intrahepatic parasites expand organelles such as the apicoplast that produce essential metabolites. We previously showed that the ATG8 conjugation system is upregulated in P. berghei liver forms and that P. berghei ATG8 (PbATG8) localizes to the membranes of the apicoplast and cytoplasmic vesicles. Here, we focus on the contribution of PbATG8 to the organellar changes that occur in intrahepatic parasites. We illustrated that micronemes colocalize with PbATG8-containing structures before expulsion from the parasite. Interference with PbATG8 function by overexpression results in poor development into late liver stages and production of small merosomes that contain immature merozoites unable to initiate a blood infection. At the cellular level, PbATG8-overexpressing P. berghei exhibits a delay in microneme compartmentalization into PbATG8-containing autophagosomes and elimination compared to parasites from the parental strain. The apicoplast, identifiable by immunostaining of the acyl carrier protein (ACP), undergoes an abnormally fast proliferation in mutant parasites. Over time, the ACP staining becomes diffuse in merosomes, indicating a collapse of the apicoplast. PbATG8 is not incorporated into the progeny of mutant parasites, in contrast to parental merozoites in which PbATG8 and ACP localize to the apicoplast. These observations reveal that Plasmodium ATG8 is a key effector in the development of merozoites by controlling microneme clearance and apicoplast proliferation and that dysregulation in ATG8 levels is detrimental for malaria infectivity. PMID:27353755

  1. Plasmodium vivax: who cares?

    PubMed Central

    Galinski, Mary R; Barnwell, John W

    2008-01-01

    More attention is being focused on malaria today than any time since the world's last efforts to achieve eradication over 40 years ago. The global community is now discussing strategies aimed at dramatically reducing malarial disease burden and the eventual eradication of all types of malaria, everywhere. As a consequence, Plasmodium vivax, which has long been neglected and mistakenly considered inconsequential, is now entering into the strategic debates taking place on malaria epidemiology and control, drug resistance, pathogenesis and vaccines. Thus, contrary to the past, the malaria research community is becoming more aware and concerned about the widespread spectrum of illness and death caused by up to a couple of hundred million cases of vivax malaria each year. This review brings these issues to light and provides an overview of P. vivax vaccine development, then and now. Progress had been slow, given inherent research challenges and minimal support in the past, but prospects are looking better for making headway in the next few years. P. vivax, known to invade the youngest red blood cells, the reticulocytes, presents a strong challenge towards developing a reliable long-term culture system to facilitate needed research. The P. vivax genome was published recently, and vivax researchers now need to coordinate efforts to discover new vaccine candidates, establish new vaccine approaches, capitalize on non-human primate models for testing, and investigate the unique biological features of P. vivax, including the elusive P. vivax hypnozoites. Comparative studies on both P. falciparum and P. vivax in many areas of research will be essential to eradicate malaria. And to this end, the education and training of future generations of dedicated "malariologists" to advance our knowledge, understanding and the development of new interventions against each of the malaria species infecting humans also will be essential. PMID:19091043

  2. Strategies for Detection of Plasmodium species Gametocytes

    PubMed Central

    Javati, Sarah; Robinson, Leanne; Betuela, Inoni; Siba, Peter; Beck, Hans-Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Felger, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Carriage and density of gametocytes, the transmission stages of malaria parasites, are determined for predicting the infectiousness of humans to mosquitoes. This measure is used for evaluating interventions that aim at reducing malaria transmission. Gametocytes need to be detected by amplification of stage-specific transcripts, which requires RNA-preserving blood sampling. For simultaneous, highly sensitive quantification of both, blood stages and gametocytes, we have compared and optimized different strategies for field and laboratory procedures in a cross sectional survey in 315 5-9 yr old children from Papua New Guinea. qRT-PCR was performed for gametocyte markers pfs25 and pvs25, Plasmodium species prevalence was determined by targeting both, 18S rRNA genes and transcripts. RNA-based parasite detection resulted in a P. falciparum positivity of 24.1%; of these 40.8% carried gametocytes. P. vivax positivity was 38.4%, with 38.0% of these carrying gametocytes. Sensitivity of DNA-based parasite detection was substantially lower with 14.1% for P. falciparum and 19.6% for P. vivax. Using the lower DNA-based prevalence of asexual stages as a denominator increased the percentage of gametocyte-positive infections to 59.1% for P. falciparum and 52.4% for P. vivax. For studies requiring highly sensitive and simultaneous quantification of sexual and asexual parasite stages, 18S rRNA transcript-based detection saves efforts and costs. RNA-based positivity is considerably higher than other methods. On the other hand, DNA-based parasite quantification is robust and permits comparison with other globally generated molecular prevalence data. Molecular monitoring of low density asexual and sexual parasitaemia will support the evaluation of effects of up-scaled antimalarial intervention programs and can also inform about small scale spatial variability in transmission intensity. PMID:24312682

  3. In Vitro Studies with Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1): Production and Activity of an AMA1 Vaccine and Generation of a Multiallelic Response

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Michael C.; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Yanling; Miles, Aaron P.; Chitsaz, Farideh; Saul, Allan; Long, Carole A.; Miller, Louis H.; Stowers, Anthony W.

    2002-01-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) is regarded as a leading malaria blood-stage vaccine candidate. While the overall structure of AMA1 is conserved in Plasmodium spp., numerous AMA1 allelic variants of P. falciparum have been described. The effect of AMA1 allelic diversity on the ability of a recombinant AMA1 vaccine to protect against human infection by different P. falciparum strains is unknown. We characterize two allelic forms of AMA1 that were both produced in Pichia pastoris at a sufficient economy of scale to be usable for clinical vaccine studies. Both proteins were used to immunize rabbits, singly and in combination, in order to evaluate their immunogenicity and the ability of elicited antibodies to block the growth of different P. falciparum clones. Both antigens, when used alone, elicited high homologous anti-AMA1 titers, with reduced strain cross-reactivity. Similarly, sera from rabbits immunized with a single antigen were capable of blocking the growth of homologous parasite strains at levels theoretically sufficient to clear parasite infections. However, heterologous inhibition was significantly reduced, providing experimental evidence that AMA1 allelic diversity is a result of immune pressure. Encouragingly, rabbits immunized with a combination of both antigens exhibited titers and levels of parasite inhibition as good as those of the single-antigen-immunized rabbits for each of the homologous parasite lines, and consequently exhibited a broadening of allelic diversity coverage. PMID:12438374

  4. Plasmodium falciparum RuvB proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Moaz; Tuteja, Renu

    2012-01-01

    The urgent requirement of next generation antimalarials has been of recent interest due to the emergence of drug-resistant parasite. The genome-wide analysis of Plasmodium falciparum helicases revealed three RuvB proteins. Due to the presence of helicase motif I and II in PfRuvBs, there is a high probability that they contain ATPase and possibly helicase activity. The Plasmodium database has homologs of several key proteins that interact with RuvBs and are most likely involved in the cell cycle progression, chromatin remodeling, and other cellular activities. Phylogenetically PfRuvBs are closely related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae RuvB, which is essential for cell cycle progression and survival of yeast. Thus PfRuvBs can serve as potential drug target if they show an essential role in the survival of parasite. PMID:23060959

  5. Plasmodium knowlesi infection: a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lijia; Lee, Shir Ying; Koay, Evelyn; Harkensee, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi malaria is an uncommon, but highly prevalent parasitic infection in parts of Malaysia. This is the case of a 14-year-old Singaporean boy presenting to our emergency department with an 11-day history of fever following a school trip to Malaysia. Hepatosplenomegaly was the only clinical finding; laboratory tests showed thrombocytopaenia, lymphopaenia, mild anaemia and liver transaminitis. Specific malaria antigen tests were negative, but the peripheral blood film showed plasmodia with atypical features, with a parasite load of 0.5%. PCR confirmed the diagnosis of P knowlesi. The patient was successfully treated with chloroquine. The clinical course of P knowlesi malaria is indistinguishable from that of Plasmodium falciparum. This case highlights the importance of taking detailed travel history, careful examination of malaria blood films and judicious use of molecular techniques. Antigen tests alone may have missed a malaria diagnosis altogether, while blood film examination may wrongly identify the species as Plasmodium malariae or P falciparum. Third-generation PCR assays can be used to reliably identify P knowlesi. PMID:23608876

  6. Deleting the Redundant TSH Receptor C-Peptide Region Permits Generation of the Conformationally Intact Extracellular Domain by Insect Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Rong; Salazar, Larry M; McLachlan, Sandra M; Rapoport, Basil

    2015-07-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) extracellular domain (ECD) comprises a N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain and an hinge region (HR), the latter contributing to ligand binding and critical for receptor activation. The crystal structure of the leucine-rich repeat domain component has been solved, but previous attempts to generate conformationally intact complete ECD or the isolated HR component for structural analysis have failed. The TSHR HR contains a C-peptide segment that is removed during spontaneous TSHR intramolecular cleavage into disulfide linked A- and B-subunits. We hypothesized that deletion of the redundant C-peptide would overcome the obstacle to generating conformationally intact TSHR ECD protein. Indeed, lacking the C-peptide region, the TSHR ECD (termed ECD-D1) and the isolated HR (termed HR-D1) were secreted into medium of insect cells infected with baculoviruses coding for these modified proteins. The identities of TSHR ECD-D1 and HR-D1 were confirmed by ELISA and immunoblotting using TSHR-specific monoclonal antibodies. The TSHR-ECD-D1 in conditioned medium was folded correctly, as demonstrated by its ability to inhibit radiolabeled TSH binding to the TSH holoreceptor. The TSHR ECD-D1 purification was accomplished in a single step using a TSHR monoclonal antibody affinity column, whereas the HR-D1 required a multistep protocol with a low yield. In conclusion, we report a novel approach to generate the TSHR ECD, as well as the isolated HR in insect cells, the former in sufficient amounts for structural studies. However, such studies will require previous complexing of the ECD with a ligand such as TSH or a thyroid-stimulating antibody. PMID:25860033

  7. Wolbachia increases susceptibility to Plasmodium infection in a natural system

    PubMed Central

    Zélé, F.; Nicot, A.; Berthomieu, A.; Weill, M.; Duron, O.; Rivero, A.

    2014-01-01

    Current views about the impact of Wolbachia on Plasmodium infections are almost entirely based on data regarding artificially transfected mosquitoes. This work has shown that Wolbachia reduces the intensity of Plasmodium infections in mosquitoes, raising the exciting possibility of using Wolbachia to control or limit the spread of malaria. Whether natural Wolbachia infections have the same parasite-inhibiting properties is not yet clear. Wolbachia–mosquito combinations with a long evolutionary history are, however, key for understanding what may happen with Wolbachia-transfected mosquitoes after several generations of coevolution. We investigate this issue using an entirely natural mosquito–Wolbachia–Plasmodium combination. In contrast to most previous studies, which have been centred on the quantification of the midgut stages of Plasmodium, we obtain a measurement of parasitaemia that relates directly to transmission by following infections to the salivary gland stages. We show that Wolbachia increases the susceptibility of Culex pipiens mosquitoes to Plasmodium relictum, significantly increasing the prevalence of salivary gland stage infections. This effect is independent of the density of Wolbachia in the mosquito. These results suggest that naturally Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may, in fact, be better vectors of malaria than Wolbachia-free ones. PMID:24500167

  8. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Modulate Mosquito Susceptibility to Plasmodium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Giselle A.; Andersen, John F.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondria perform multiple roles in cell biology, acting as the site of aerobic energy-transducing pathways and as an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that modulate redox metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that a novel member of the mitochondrial transporter protein family, Anopheles gambiae mitochondrial carrier 1 (AgMC1), is required to maintain mitochondrial membrane potential in mosquito midgut cells and modulates epithelial responses to Plasmodium infection. AgMC1 silencing reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in increased proton-leak and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. These metabolic changes reduce midgut ROS generation and increase A. gambiae susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. Conclusion We provide direct experimental evidence indicating that ROS derived from mitochondria can modulate mosquito epithelial responses to Plasmodium infection. PMID:22815925

  9. Plasmodium-mosquito interactions: a tale of dangerous liaisons.

    PubMed

    Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2005-11-01

    To complete their life cycle, Plasmodium parasites must survive the environment in the insect host, cross multiple barriers including epithelial layers, and avoid destruction by the mosquito immune system. Completion of the Anopheles gambiae and Plasmodium falciparum genomes has opened the opportunity to apply high throughput methods to the analysis of gene function. The burst of information generated by these approaches and the use of molecular markers to investigate the cell biology of these interactions is broadening our understanding of this complex system. This review discusses our current understanding of the critical interactions that take place during the journey of Plasmodium through the mosquito host, with special emphasis on the responses of midgut epithelial cells to parasite invasion. PMID:16207241

  10. [From malaria parasite point of view--Plasmodium falciparum evolution].

    PubMed

    Zerka, Agata; Kaczmarek, Radosław; Jaśkiewicz, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is caused by infection with protozoan parasites belonging to the genus Plasmodium, which have arguably exerted the greatest selection pressure on humans in the history of our species. Besides humans, different Plasmodium parasites infect a wide range of animal hosts, from marine invertebrates to primates. On the other hand, individual Plasmodium species show high host specificity. The extraordinary evolution of Plasmodium probably began when a free-living red algae turned parasitic, and culminated with its ability to thrive inside a human red blood cell. Studies on the African apes generated new data on the evolution of malaria parasites in general and the deadliest human-specific species, Plasmodium falciparum, in particular. Initially, it was hypothesized that P. falciparum descended from the chimpanzee malaria parasite P. reichenowi, after the human and the chimp lineage diverged about 6 million years ago. However, a recently identified new species infecting gorillas, unexpectedly showed similarity to P. falciparum and was therefore named P. praefalciparum. That finding spurred an alternative hypothesis, which proposes that P. falciparum descended from its gorilla rather than chimp counterpart. In addition, the gorilla-to-human host shift may have occurred more recently (about 10 thousand years ago) than the theoretical P. falciparum-P. reichenowi split. One of the key aims of the studies on Plasmodium evolution is to elucidate the mechanisms that allow the incessant host shifting and retaining the host specificity, especially in the case of human-specific species. Thorough understanding of these phenomena will be necessary to design effective malaria treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:27259224

  11. Detectability of Plasmodium falciparum clones

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In areas of high transmission people often harbour multiple clones of Plasmodium falciparum, but even PCR-based diagnostic methods can only detect a fraction (the detectability, q) of all clones present in a host. Accurate measurements of detectability are desirable since it affects estimates of multiplicity of infection, prevalence, and frequency of breakthrough infections in clinical drug trials. Detectability can be estimated by typing repeated samples from the same host but it has been unclear what should be the time interval between the samples and how the data should be analysed. Methods A longitudinal molecular study was conducted in the Kassena-Nankana district in northern Ghana. From each of the 80 participants, four finger prick samples were collected over a period of 8 days, and tested for presence of different Merozoite Surface Protein (msp) 2 genotypes. Implications for estimating q were derived from these data by comparing the fit of statistical models of serial dependence and over-dispersion. Results The distribution of the frequencies of detection for msp2 genotypes was close to binomial if the time span between consecutive blood samples was at least 7 days. For shorter intervals the probabilities of detection were positively correlated, i.e. the shorter the interval between two blood collections, the more likely the diagnostic results matched for a particular genotype. Estimates of q were rather insensitive to the statistical model fitted. Conclusions A simple algorithm based on analysing blood samples collected 7 days apart is justified for generating robust estimates of detectability. The finding of positive correlation of detection probabilities for short time intervals argues against imperfect detection being directly linked to the 48-hour periodicity of P. falciparum. The results suggest that the detectability of a given parasite clone changes over time, at an unknown rate, but fast enough to regard blood samples taken one week

  12. 40 CFR 60.4124 - Hg budget permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hg budget permit revisions. 60.4124... Coal-Fired Electric Steam Generating Units Permits § 60.4124 Hg budget permit revisions. Except as provided in § 60.4123(b), the permitting authority will revise the Hg Budget permit, as necessary,...

  13. 40 CFR 60.4124 - Hg budget permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hg budget permit revisions. 60.4124... Coal-Fired Electric Steam Generating Units Permits § 60.4124 Hg budget permit revisions. Except as provided in § 60.4123(b), the permitting authority will revise the Hg Budget permit, as necessary,...

  14. Regulatory and Permitting Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Myer

    2005-12-01

    As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., reviewed current state and federal regulations related to carbon dioxide capture and storage within geologic formations and enhanced carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. We have evaluated and summarized the current and possible future permitting requirements for the six states that comprise the West Coast Regional Partnership. Four options exist for CO{sub 2} injection into appropriate geologic formations, including storage in: (1) oil and gas reservoirs, (2) saline formations, (3) unmineable coal beds, and (4) salt caverns. Terrestrial CO{sub 2} sequestration involves improved carbon conservation management (e.g. reduction of deforestation), carbon substitution (e.g., substitution for fossil fuel-based products, energy conservation through urban forestry, biomass for energy generation), and improved carbon storage management (e.g., expanding the storage of carbon in forest ecosystems). The primary terrestrial options for the West Coast Region include: (1) reforestation of under-producing lands (including streamside forest restoration), (2) improved forest management, (3) forest protection and conservation, and (4) fuel treatments for the reduction of risk of uncharacteristically severe fires (potentially with associated biomass energy generation). The permits and/or contracts required for any land-use changes/disturbances and biomass energy generation that may occur as part of WESTCARB's activities have been summarized for each state.

  15. Immunoregulatory alterations in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax infections.

    PubMed

    Merino, F; Layrisse, Z; Godoy, G; Volcán, G

    1986-09-01

    Studies on the immune function of patients with acute Plasmodium vivax or P. falciparum infections were performed. All subjects were residing in recent malaria endemic areas of Venezuela. Lymphopenia, reduction of peripheral blood T-lymphocytes positive for monoclonal antibody OKT4 (T helper) a decrease of in vitro mitogenic proliferative response and natural killer cell activity were observed. Serum lymphocytotoxic antibodies reactive at 37 degrees C were detected in both groups of patients as well as serum autoantibodies. The possible role of lymphocytotoxic autoantibodies in the etiology of the T-lymphocyte depletion and acquired immunological perturbations in human malaria is discussed. PMID:2947313

  16. In Vitro Alterations Do Not Reflect a Requirement for Host Cell Cycle Progression during Plasmodium Liver Stage Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Kirsten K.; March, Sandra; Ng, Shengyong; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to invading nonreplicative erythrocytes, Plasmodium parasites undergo their first obligate step in the mammalian host inside hepatocytes, where each sporozoite replicates to generate thousands of merozoites. While normally quiescent, hepatocytes retain proliferative capacity and can readily reenter the cell cycle in response to diverse stimuli. Many intracellular pathogens, including protozoan parasites, manipulate the cell cycle progression of their host cells for their own benefit, but it is not known whether the hepatocyte cell cycle plays a role during Plasmodium liver stage infection. Here, we show that Plasmodium parasites can be observed in mitotic hepatoma cells throughout liver stage development, where they initially reduce the likelihood of mitosis and ultimately lead to significant acquisition of a binucleate phenotype. However, hepatoma cells pharmacologically arrested in S phase still support robust and complete Plasmodium liver stage development, which thus does not require cell cycle progression in the infected cell in vitro. Furthermore, murine hepatocytes remain quiescent throughout in vivo infection with either Plasmodium berghei or Plasmodium yoelii, as do Plasmodium falciparum-infected primary human hepatocytes, demonstrating that the rapid and prodigious growth of liver stage parasites is accomplished independent of host hepatocyte cell cycle progression during natural infection. PMID:25416236

  17. Control of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, Mohammed Baba; Hasan, Yahya Abu; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2015-10-01

    The most significant and efficient measures against Plasmodium knowlesi outbreaks are efficient anti malaria drug, biological control in form of predatory mosquitoes and culling control strategies. In this paper optimal control theory is applied to a system of ordinary differential equation. It describes the disease transmission and Pontryagin's Maximum Principle is applied for analysis of the control. To this end, three control strategies representing biological control, culling and treatment were incorporated into the disease transmission model. The simulation results show that the implementation of the combination strategy during the epidemic is the most cost-effective strategy for disease transmission.

  18. The Plasmodium Export Element Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Hiss, Jan Alexander; Przyborski, Jude Marek; Schwarte, Florian; Lingelbach, Klaus; Schneider, Gisbert

    2008-01-01

    We performed a bioinformatical analysis of protein export elements (PEXEL) in the putative proteome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. A protein family-specific conservation of physicochemical residue profiles was found for PEXEL-flanking sequence regions. We demonstrate that the family members can be clustered based on the flanking regions only and display characteristic hydrophobicity patterns. This raises the possibility that the flanking regions may contain additional information for a family-specific role of PEXEL. We further show that signal peptide cleavage results in a positional alignment of PEXEL from both proteins with, and without, a signal peptide. PMID:18253504

  19. The Plasmodium export element revisited.

    PubMed

    Hiss, Jan Alexander; Przyborski, Jude Marek; Schwarte, Florian; Lingelbach, Klaus; Schneider, Gisbert

    2008-01-01

    We performed a bioinformatical analysis of protein export elements (PEXEL) in the putative proteome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. A protein family-specific conservation of physicochemical residue profiles was found for PEXEL-flanking sequence regions. We demonstrate that the family members can be clustered based on the flanking regions only and display characteristic hydrophobicity patterns. This raises the possibility that the flanking regions may contain additional information for a family-specific role of PEXEL. We further show that signal peptide cleavage results in a positional alignment of PEXEL from both proteins with, and without, a signal peptide. PMID:18253504

  20. The periodicity of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Grillet, María-Eugenia; El Souki, Mayida; Laguna, Francisco; León, José Rafael

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the periodicity of Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum incidence in time-series of malaria data (1990-2010) from three endemic regions in Venezuela. In particular, we determined whether disease epidemics were related to local climate variability and regional climate anomalies such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Malaria periodicity was found to exhibit unique features in each studied region. Significant multi-annual cycles of 2- to about 6-year periods were identified. The inter-annual variability of malaria cases was coherent with that of SSTs (ENSO), mainly at temporal scales within the 3-6 year periods. Additionally, malaria cases were intensified approximately 1 year after an El Niño event, a pattern that highlights the role of climate inter-annual variability in the epidemic patterns. Rainfall mediated the effect of ENSO on malaria locally. Particularly, rains from the last phase of the season had a critical role in the temporal dynamics of Plasmodium. The malaria-climate relationship was complex and transient, varying in strength with the region and species. By identifying temporal cycles of malaria we have made a first step in predicting high-risk years in Venezuela. Our findings emphasize the importance of analyzing high-resolution spatial-temporal data to better understand malaria transmission dynamics. PMID:24149288

  1. Lipoic Acid Metabolism of Plasmodium - A Suitable Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Janet; Müller, Sylke

    2012-01-01

    α-Lipoic acid (6,8-thioctic acid; LA) is a vital co-factor of α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes and the glycine cleavage system. In recent years it was shown that biosynthesis and salvage of LA in Plasmodium are necessary for the parasites to complete their complex life cycle. LA salvage requires two lipoic acid protein ligases (LplA1 and LplA2). LplA1 is confined to the mitochondrion while LplA2 is located in both the mitochondrion and the apicoplast. LplA1 exclusively uses salvaged LA and lipoylates α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase and the H-protein of the glycine cleavage system. LplA2 cannot compensate for the loss of LplA1 function during blood stage development suggesting a specific function for LplA2 that has yet to be elucidated. LA salvage is essential for the intra-erythrocytic and liver stage development of Plasmodium and thus offers great potential for future drug or vaccine development. LA biosynthesis, comprising octanoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) : protein N-octanoyltransferase (LipB) and lipoate synthase (LipA), is exclusively found in the apicoplast of Plasmodium where it generates LA de novo from octanoyl-ACP, provided by the type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS II) pathway also present in the organelle. LA is the co-factor of the acetyltransferase subunit of the apicoplast located pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), which generates acetyl-CoA, feeding into FAS II. LA biosynthesis is not vital for intra-erythrocytic development of Plasmodium, but the deletion of several genes encoding components of FAS II or PDH was detrimental for liver stage development of the parasites indirectly suggesting that the same applies to LA biosynthesis. These data provide strong evidence that LA salvage and biosynthesis are vital for different stages of Plasmodium development and offer potential for drug and vaccine design against malaria. PMID:22607141

  2. Lipoic acid metabolism of Plasmodium--a suitable drug target.

    PubMed

    Storm, Janet; Müller, Sylke

    2012-01-01

    α-Lipoic acid (6,8-thioctic acid; LA) is a vital co-factor of α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes and the glycine cleavage system. In recent years it was shown that biosynthesis and salvage of LA in Plasmodium are necessary for the parasites to complete their complex life cycle. LA salvage requires two lipoic acid protein ligases (LplA1 and LplA2). LplA1 is confined to the mitochondrion while LplA2 is located in both the mitochondrion and the apicoplast. LplA1 exclusively uses salvaged LA and lipoylates α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase and the H-protein of the glycine cleavage system. LplA2 cannot compensate for the loss of LplA1 function during blood stage development suggesting a specific function for LplA2 that has yet to be elucidated. LA salvage is essential for the intra-erythrocytic and liver stage development of Plasmodium and thus offers great potential for future drug or vaccine development. LA biosynthesis, comprising octanoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) : protein N-octanoyltransferase (LipB) and lipoate synthase (LipA), is exclusively found in the apicoplast of Plasmodium where it generates LA de novo from octanoyl-ACP, provided by the type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS II) pathway also present in the organelle. LA is the co-factor of the acetyltransferase subunit of the apicoplast located pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), which generates acetyl-CoA, feeding into FAS II. LA biosynthesis is not vital for intra-erythrocytic development of Plasmodium, but the deletion of several genes encoding components of FAS II or PDH was detrimental for liver stage development of the parasites indirectly suggesting that the same applies to LA biosynthesis. These data provide strong evidence that LA salvage and biosynthesis are vital for different stages of Plasmodium development and offer potential for drug and vaccine design against malaria. PMID:22607141

  3. In silico identification of genetically attenuated vaccine candidate genes for Plasmodium liver stage.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hirdesh; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Mair, Gunnar R; Gomes, James

    2015-12-01

    Genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) that lack genes essential for the liver stage of the malaria parasite, and therefore cause developmental arrest, have been developed as live vaccines in rodent malaria models and recently been tested in humans. The genes targeted for deletion were often identified by trial and error. Here we present a systematic gene - protein and transcript - expression analyses of several Plasmodium species with the aim to identify candidate genes for the generation of novel GAPs. With a lack of liver stage expression data for human malaria parasites, we used data available for liver stage development of Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model, to identify proteins expressed in the liver stage but absent from blood stage parasites. An orthology-based search was then employed to identify orthologous proteins in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum resulting in a total of 310 genes expressed in the liver stage but lacking evidence of protein expression in blood stage parasites. Among these 310 possible GAP candidates, we further studied Plasmodium liver stage proteins by phyletic distribution and functional domain analyses and shortlisted twenty GAP-candidates; these are: fabB/F, fabI, arp, 3 genes encoding subunits of the PDH complex, dnaJ, urm1, rS5, ancp, mcp, arh, gk, lisp2, valS, palm, and four conserved Plasmodium proteins of unknown function. Parasites lacking one or several of these genes might yield new attenuated malaria parasites for experimental vaccination studies. PMID:26348884

  4. Spatial association with PTEX complexes defines regions for effector export into Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Riglar, David T; Rogers, Kelly L; Hanssen, Eric; Turnbull, Lynne; Bullen, Hayley E; Charnaud, Sarah C; Przyborski, Jude; Gilson, Paul R; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Crabb, Brendan S; Baum, Jake; Cowman, Alan F

    2013-01-01

    Export of proteins into the infected erythrocyte is critical for malaria parasite survival. The majority of effector proteins are thought to export via a proteinaceous translocon, resident in the parasitophorous vacuole membrane surrounding the parasite. Identification of the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins and its biochemical association with exported proteins suggests it performs this role. Direct evidence for this, however, is lacking. Here using viable purified Plasmodium falciparum merozoites and three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy, we investigate remodelling events immediately following parasite invasion. We show that multiple complexes of the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins localize together in foci that dynamically change in clustering behaviour. Furthermore, we provide conclusive evidence of spatial association between exported proteins and exported protein 2, a core component of the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins, during native conditions and upon generation of translocation intermediates. These data provide the most direct cellular evidence to date that protein export occurs at regions of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane housing the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins complex. PMID:23361006

  5. Spatial association with PTEX complexes defines regions for effector export into Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Riglar, David T.; Rogers, Kelly L.; Hanssen, Eric; Turnbull, Lynne; Bullen, Hayley E.; Charnaud, Sarah C.; Przyborski, Jude; Gilson, Paul R.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Baum, Jake; Cowman, Alan F.

    2013-01-01

    Export of proteins into the infected erythrocyte is critical for malaria parasite survival. The majority of effector proteins are thought to export via a proteinaceous translocon, resident in the parasitophorous vacuole membrane surrounding the parasite. Identification of the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins and its biochemical association with exported proteins suggests it performs this role. Direct evidence for this, however, is lacking. Here using viable purified Plasmodium falciparum merozoites and three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy, we investigate remodelling events immediately following parasite invasion. We show that multiple complexes of the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins localize together in foci that dynamically change in clustering behaviour. Furthermore, we provide conclusive evidence of spatial association between exported proteins and exported protein 2, a core component of the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins, during native conditions and upon generation of translocation intermediates. These data provide the most direct cellular evidence to date that protein export occurs at regions of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane housing the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins complex. PMID:23361006

  6. Energy metabolism affects susceptibility of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium infection.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jose Henrique M; Gonçalves, Renata L S; Oliveira, Giselle A; Oliveira, Pedro L; Oliveira, Marcus F; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies showed that Anopheles gambiae L3-5 females, which are refractory (R) to Plasmodium infection, express higher levels of genes involved in redox-metabolism and mitochondrial respiration than susceptible (S) G3 females. Our studies revealed that R females have reduced longevity, faster utilization of lipid reserves, impaired mitochondrial state-3 respiration, increased rate of mitochondrial electron leak and higher expression levels of several glycolytic enzyme genes. Furthermore, when state-3 respiration was reduced in S females by silencing expression of the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), hydrogen peroxide generation was higher and the mRNA levels of lactate dehydrogenase increased in the midgut, while the prevalence and intensity of Plasmodium berghei infection were significantly reduced. We conclude that there are broad metabolic differences between R and S An. gambiae mosquitoes that influence their susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. PMID:21320598

  7. Parasite-induced ER stress response in hepatocytes facilitates Plasmodium liver stage infection.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Patricia; Zuzarte-Luís, Vanessa; Ruivo, Margarida T G; Falkard, Brie; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Rooijers, Koos; Mann, Matthias; Mair, Gunnar; Fidock, David A; Mota, Maria M

    2015-08-01

    Upon infection of a mammalian host, Plasmodium parasites first replicate inside hepatocytes, generating thousands of new parasites. Although Plasmodium intra-hepatic development represents a substantial metabolic challenge to the host hepatocyte, how infected cells respond to and integrate this stress remains poorly understood. Here, we present proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, revealing that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in host hepatocytes upon Plasmodium berghei infection. The expression of XBP1s--the active form of the UPR mediator XBP1--and the liver-specific UPR mediator CREBH is induced by P. berghei infection in vivo. Furthermore, this UPR induction increases parasite liver burden. Altogether, our data suggest that ER stress is a central feature of P. berghei intra-hepatic development, contributing to the success of infection. PMID:26113366

  8. Parasite-induced ER stress response in hepatocytes facilitates Plasmodium liver stage infection

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, Patricia; Zuzarte-Luís, Vanessa; Ruivo, Margarida TG; Falkard, Brie; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Rooijers, Koos; Mann, Matthias; Mair, Gunnar; Fidock, David A; Mota, Maria M

    2015-01-01

    Upon infection of a mammalian host, Plasmodium parasites first replicate inside hepatocytes, generating thousands of new parasites. Although Plasmodium intra-hepatic development represents a substantial metabolic challenge to the host hepatocyte, how infected cells respond to and integrate this stress remains poorly understood. Here, we present proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, revealing that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in host hepatocytes upon Plasmodium berghei infection. The expression of XBP1s—the active form of the UPR mediator XBP1—and the liver-specific UPR mediator CREBH is induced by P. berghei infection in vivo. Furthermore, this UPR induction increases parasite liver burden. Altogether, our data suggest that ER stress is a central feature of P. berghei intra-hepatic development, contributing to the success of infection. PMID:26113366

  9. GENERAL PERMITS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:This database was used to provide permit writers with a library of examples for writing general permits. It has not been maintained and is outdated and will be removed. Water Permits Division is trying to determine whether or not to recreate this databas...

  10. PERMIT COMPLIANCE SYSTEM (PCS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Permit Compliance System (PCS) is a computerized management information system which contains data on National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit-holding facilities. PCS keeps extensive records on more than 65,000 active water-discharge permits on sites loc...

  11. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Guggisberg, Ann M.; Amthor, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria kills nearly 1 million people each year, and the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum has become increasingly resistant to current therapies. Isoprenoid synthesis via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway represents an attractive target for the development of new antimalarials. The phosphonic acid antibiotic fosmidomycin is a specific inhibitor of isoprenoid synthesis and has been a helpful tool to outline the essential functions of isoprenoid biosynthesis in P. falciparum. Isoprenoids are a large, diverse class of hydrocarbons that function in a variety of essential cellular processes in eukaryotes. In P. falciparum, isoprenoids are used for tRNA isopentenylation and protein prenylation, as well as the synthesis of vitamin E, carotenoids, ubiquinone, and dolichols. Recently, isoprenoid synthesis in P. falciparum has been shown to be regulated by a sugar phosphatase. We outline what is known about isoprenoid function and the regulation of isoprenoid synthesis in P. falciparum, in order to identify valuable directions for future research. PMID:25217461

  12. Plasmodium vivax Transmission in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Howes, Rosalind E.; Reiner Jr., Robert C.; Battle, Katherine E.; Longbottom, Joshua; Mappin, Bonnie; Ordanovich, Dariya; Tatem, Andrew J.; Drakeley, Chris; Gething, Peter W.; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Smith, David L.; Hay, Simon I.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria in sub-Saharan Africa has historically been almost exclusively attributed to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf). Current diagnostic and surveillance systems in much of sub-Saharan Africa are not designed to identify or report non-Pf human malaria infections accurately, resulting in a dearth of routine epidemiological data about their significance. The high prevalence of Duffy negativity provided a rationale for excluding the possibility of Plasmodium vivax (Pv) transmission. However, review of varied evidence sources including traveller infections, community prevalence surveys, local clinical case reports, entomological and serological studies contradicts this viewpoint. Here, these data reports are weighted in a unified framework to reflect the strength of evidence of indigenous Pv transmission in terms of diagnostic specificity, size of individual reports and corroboration between evidence sources. Direct evidence was reported from 21 of the 47 malaria-endemic countries studied, while 42 countries were attributed with infections of visiting travellers. Overall, moderate to conclusive evidence of transmission was available from 18 countries, distributed across all parts of the continent. Approximately 86.6 million Duffy positive hosts were at risk of infection in Africa in 2015. Analysis of the mechanisms sustaining Pv transmission across this continent of low frequency of susceptible hosts found that reports of Pv prevalence were consistent with transmission being potentially limited to Duffy positive populations. Finally, reports of apparent Duffy-independent transmission are discussed. While Pv is evidently not a major malaria parasite across most of sub-Saharan Africa, the evidence presented here highlights its widespread low-level endemicity. An increased awareness of Pv as a potential malaria parasite, coupled with policy shifts towards species-specific diagnostics and reporting, will allow a robust assessment of the public health significance of Pv, as well

  13. Plasmodium vivax Transmission in Africa.

    PubMed

    Howes, Rosalind E; Reiner, Robert C; Battle, Katherine E; Longbottom, Joshua; Mappin, Bonnie; Ordanovich, Dariya; Tatem, Andrew J; Drakeley, Chris; Gething, Peter W; Zimmerman, Peter A; Smith, David L; Hay, Simon I

    2015-11-01

    Malaria in sub-Saharan Africa has historically been almost exclusively attributed to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf). Current diagnostic and surveillance systems in much of sub-Saharan Africa are not designed to identify or report non-Pf human malaria infections accurately, resulting in a dearth of routine epidemiological data about their significance. The high prevalence of Duffy negativity provided a rationale for excluding the possibility of Plasmodium vivax (Pv) transmission. However, review of varied evidence sources including traveller infections, community prevalence surveys, local clinical case reports, entomological and serological studies contradicts this viewpoint. Here, these data reports are weighted in a unified framework to reflect the strength of evidence of indigenous Pv transmission in terms of diagnostic specificity, size of individual reports and corroboration between evidence sources. Direct evidence was reported from 21 of the 47 malaria-endemic countries studied, while 42 countries were attributed with infections of visiting travellers. Overall, moderate to conclusive evidence of transmission was available from 18 countries, distributed across all parts of the continent. Approximately 86.6 million Duffy positive hosts were at risk of infection in Africa in 2015. Analysis of the mechanisms sustaining Pv transmission across this continent of low frequency of susceptible hosts found that reports of Pv prevalence were consistent with transmission being potentially limited to Duffy positive populations. Finally, reports of apparent Duffy-independent transmission are discussed. While Pv is evidently not a major malaria parasite across most of sub-Saharan Africa, the evidence presented here highlights its widespread low-level endemicity. An increased awareness of Pv as a potential malaria parasite, coupled with policy shifts towards species-specific diagnostics and reporting, will allow a robust assessment of the public health significance of Pv, as well

  14. Inference of the Oxidative Stress Network in Anopheles stephensi upon Plasmodium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shrinet, Jatin; Nandal, Umesh Kumar; Adak, Tridibes; Bhatnagar, Raj K.; Sunil, Sujatha

    2014-01-01

    Ookinete invasion of Anopheles midgut is a critical step for malaria transmission; the parasite numbers drop drastically and practically reach a minimum during the parasite's whole life cycle. At this stage, the parasite as well as the vector undergoes immense oxidative stress. Thereafter, the vector undergoes oxidative stress at different time points as the parasite invades its tissues during the parasite development. The present study was undertaken to reconstruct the network of differentially expressed genes involved in oxidative stress in Anopheles stephensi during Plasmodium development and maturation in the midgut. Using high throughput next generation sequencing methods, we generated the transcriptome of the An. stephensi midgut during Plasmodium vinckei petteri oocyst invasion of the midgut epithelium. Further, we utilized large datasets available on public domain on Anopheles during Plasmodium ookinete invasion and Drosophila datasets and arrived upon clusters of genes that may play a role in oxidative stress. Finally, we used support vector machines for the functional prediction of the un-annotated genes of An. stephensi. Integrating the results from all the different data analyses, we identified a total of 516 genes that were involved in oxidative stress in An. stephensi during Plasmodium development. The significantly regulated genes were further extracted from this gene cluster and used to infer an oxidative stress network of An. stephensi. Using system biology approaches, we have been able to ascertain the role of several putative genes in An. stephensi with respect to oxidative stress. Further experimental validations of these genes are underway. PMID:25474020

  15. A Case Report of Plasmodium Vivax, Plasmodium Falciparum and Dengue Co-Infection in a 6 Months Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pande, A; Guharoy, D

    2013-01-01

    India being a tropical country, parasitic infections especially with Plasmodium species are very common in this region. The present case report is that of Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium falciparum and dengue co-infection in a 6 months pregnant lady who was timely diagnosed and appropriately treated followed by a complete recovery along with feto-maternal well-being. PMID:24349838

  16. CCS Project Permit Acquisition Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Si-Yong; Zaluski, Wade; Matthews, Vince; McPherson, Brian

    2013-06-30

    Geologic carbon storage projects require a vast range of permits prior to deployment. These include land-access permits, drilling permits, seismic survey permits, underground injection control permits, and any number of local and state permits, depending on the location of the project. For the “Characterization of Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region” (RMCCS) project in particular, critical permits included site access permits, seismic survey permits, and drilling permits for the characterization well. Permits for these and other activities were acquired either prior to or during the project.

  17. Plasmodium falciparum: attenuation by irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Waki, S.; Yonome, I.; Suzuki, M.

    1983-12-01

    The effect of irradiation on the in vitro growth of Plasmodium falciparum was investigated. The cultured malarial parasites at selected stages of development were exposed to gamma rays and the sensitivity of each stage was determined. The stages most sensitive to irradiation were the ring forms and the early trophozoites; late trophozoites were relatively insensitive. The greatest resistance was shown when parasites were irradiated at a time of transition from the late trophozoite and schizont stages to young ring forms. The characteristics of radiosensitive variation in the parasite cycle resembled that of mammalian cells. Growth curves of parasites exposed to doses of irradiation upto 150 gray had the same slope as nonirradiated controls but parasites which were exposed to 200 gray exhibited a growth curve which was less steep than that for parasites in other groups. Less than 10 organisms survived from the 10(6) parasites exposed to this high dose of irradiation; the possibility exists of obtaining radiation-attenuated P. falciparum.

  18. The CAA Permit Review Process

    SciTech Connect

    Hyre, R.A.

    1995-06-01

    In the near future, all existing major sources will be required to submit an air permit application to the state or the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for review. This report details the permit review process, including information on state, EPA, affected states, judicial, and public review. It will also describe permit renewal, operational flexibility, off-permit changes, permit revisions, and permit reopenings.

  19. Major Histocompatibility Complex and Malaria: Focus on Plasmodium vivax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose

    2016-01-01

    The importance of host and parasite genetic factors in malaria resistance or susceptibility has been investigated since the middle of the last century. Nowadays, of all diseases that affect man, malaria still plays one of the highest levels of selective pressure on human genome. Susceptibility to malaria depends on exposure profile, epidemiological characteristics, and several components of the innate and adaptive immune system that influences the quality of the immune response generated during the Plasmodium lifecycle in the vertebrate host. But it is well known that the parasite’s enormous capacity of genetic variation in conjunction with the host genetics polymorphism is also associated with a wide spectrum of susceptibility degrees to complicated or severe forms of the disease. In this scenario, variations in genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) associated with host resistance or susceptibility to malaria have been identified and used as markers in host–pathogen interaction studies, mainly those evaluating the impact on the immune response, acquisition of resistance, or increased susceptibility to infection or vulnerability to disease. However, due to the intense selective pressure, number of cases, and mortality rates, the majority of the reported associations reported concerned Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Studies on the MHC polymorphism and its association with Plasmodium vivax, which is the most widespread Plasmodium and the most prevalent species outside the African continent, are less frequent but equally important. Despite punctual contributions, there are accumulated evidences of human genetic control in P. vivax infection and disease. Herein, we review the current knowledge in the field of MHC and derived molecules (HLA Class I, Class II, TNF-α, LTA, BAT1, and CTL4) regarding P. vivax malaria. We discuss particularly the results of P. vivax studies on HLA class I and II polymorphisms in relation to host susceptibility, naturally

  20. Artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Fairhurst, Rick M.; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2016-01-01

    For more than five decades, Southeast Asia (SEA) has been fertile ground for the emergence of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. After generating parasites resistant to chloroquine, sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine, quinine, and mefloquine, this region has now spawned parasites resistant to artemisinins – the world's most potent antimalarial drugs. In areas where artemisinin resistance is prevalent, artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) – the first-line treatments for malaria – are failing fast. This worrisome development threatens to make malaria practically untreatable in SEA, and threatens to compromise global endeavors to eliminate this disease. A recent series of clinical, in-vitro, genomics, and transcriptomics studies in SEA have defined in-vivo and in-vitro phenotypes of artemisinin resistance; identified its causal genetic determinant; explored its molecular mechanism; and assessed its clinical impact. Specifically, these studies have established that artemisinin resistance manifests as slow parasite clearance in patients and increased survival of early ring-stage parasites in vitro; is caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms in the parasite's ‘K13’ gene; is associated with an upregulated “unfolded protein response” pathway that may antagonize the pro-oxidant activity of artemisinins; and selects for partner drug resistance that rapidly leads to ACT failures. In SEA, clinical studies are urgently needed to monitor ACT efficacy where K13 mutations are prevalent; test whether new combinations of currently-available drugs cure ACT failures; and advance new antimalarial compounds through preclinical pipelines and into clinical trials. Intensifying these efforts should help to forestall the spread of artemisinin and partner drug resistance from SEA to Sub-Saharan Africa, where the world's malaria transmission, morbidity, and mortality rates are highest. PMID:27337450

  1. Characterization of the Plasmodium Interspersed Repeats (PIR) proteins of Plasmodium chabaudi indicates functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Yam, Xue Yan; Brugat, Thibaut; Siau, Anthony; Lawton, Jennifer; Wong, Daniel S; Farah, Abdirahman; Twang, Jing Shun; Gao, Xiaohong; Langhorne, Jean; Preiser, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium multigene families play a central role in the pathogenesis of malaria. The Plasmodium interspersed repeat (pir) genes comprise the largest multigene family in many Plasmodium spp. However their function(s) remains unknown. Using the rodent model of malaria, Plasmodium chabaudi, we show that individual CIR proteins have differential localizations within infected red cell (iRBC), suggesting different functional roles in a blood-stage infection. Some CIRs appear to be located on the surface of iRBC and merozoites and are therefore well placed to interact with host molecules. In line with this hypothesis, we show for the first time that a subset of recombinant CIRs bind mouse RBCs suggesting a role for CIR in rosette formation and/or invasion. Together, our results unravel differences in subcellular localization and ability to bind mouse erythrocytes between the members of the cir family, which strongly suggest different functional roles in a blood-stage infection. PMID:26996203

  2. Characterization of the Plasmodium Interspersed Repeats (PIR) proteins of Plasmodium chabaudi indicates functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Xue Yan; Brugat, Thibaut; Siau, Anthony; Lawton, Jennifer; Wong, Daniel S.; Farah, Abdirahman; Twang, Jing Shun; Gao, Xiaohong; Langhorne, Jean; Preiser, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium multigene families play a central role in the pathogenesis of malaria. The Plasmodium interspersed repeat (pir) genes comprise the largest multigene family in many Plasmodium spp. However their function(s) remains unknown. Using the rodent model of malaria, Plasmodium chabaudi, we show that individual CIR proteins have differential localizations within infected red cell (iRBC), suggesting different functional roles in a blood-stage infection. Some CIRs appear to be located on the surface of iRBC and merozoites and are therefore well placed to interact with host molecules. In line with this hypothesis, we show for the first time that a subset of recombinant CIRs bind mouse RBCs suggesting a role for CIR in rosette formation and/or invasion. Together, our results unravel differences in subcellular localization and ability to bind mouse erythrocytes between the members of the cir family, which strongly suggest different functional roles in a blood-stage infection. PMID:26996203

  3. Platform for Plasmodium vivax vaccine discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Sócrates Herrera; Rodríguez, Diana Carolina; Acero, Diana Lucía; Ocampo, Vanessa; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2011-08-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent malaria parasite on the American continent. It generates a global burden of 80-100 million cases annually and represents a tremendous public health problem, particularly in the American and Asian continents. A malaria vaccine would be considered the most cost-effective measure against this vector-borne disease and it would contribute to a reduction in malaria cases and to eventual eradication. Although significant progress has been achieved in the search for Plasmodium falciparum antigens that could be used in a vaccine, limited progress has been made in the search for P. vivax components that might be eligible for vaccine development. This is primarily due to the lack of in vitro cultures to serve as an antigen source and to inadequate funding. While the most advanced P. falciparum vaccine candidate is currently being tested in Phase III trials in Africa, the most advanced P. vivax candidates have only advanced to Phase I trials. Herein, we describe the overall strategy and progress in P. vivax vaccine research, from antigen discovery to preclinical and clinical development and we discuss the regional potential of Latin America to develop a comprehensive platform for vaccine development. PMID:21881773

  4. Platform for Plasmodium vivax vaccine discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    Valencia/, Sócrates Herrera; Rodríguez, Diana Carolina; Acero, Diana Lucía; Ocampo, Vanessa; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent malaria parasite on the American continent. It generates a global burden of 80–100 million cases annually and represents a tremendous public health problem, particularly in the American and Asian continents. A malaria vaccine would be considered the most cost-effective measure against this vector-borne disease and it would contribute to a reduction in malaria cases and to eventual eradication. Although significant progress has been achieved in the search for Plasmodium falciparum antigens that could be used in a vaccine, limited progress has been made in the search for P. vivax components that might be eligible for vaccine development. This is primarily due to the lack of in vitro cultures to serve as an antigen source and to inadequate funding. While the most advanced P. falciparum vaccine candidate is currently being tested in Phase III trials in Africa, the most advanced P. vivax candidates have only advanced to Phase I trials. Herein, we describe the overall strategy and progress in P. vivax vaccine research, from antigen discovery to preclinical and clinical development and we discuss the regional potential of Latin America to develop a comprehensive platform for vaccine development. PMID:21881773

  5. Should Consumers Be Priced Out of Pollution-Permit Markets?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Stefani C.; Yates, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a simple diagrammatic exposition of a pollution-permit market in which firms that generate pollution and consumers who are harmed by pollution are allowed to purchase permits at a single market price. Illustrates that the market equilibrium is efficient only if the endowment of permits is equal to the efficient level of pollution. (JEH)

  6. Buffer optimization of thermal melt assays of Plasmodium proteins for detection of small-molecule ligands.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Gregory J; Napuli, Alberto J; Thomas, Andrew P; Chung, Diana J; Kovzun, Kuzma V; Leibly, David J; Castaneda, Lisa J; Bhandari, Janhavi; Damman, Christopher J; Hui, Raymond; Hol, Wim G J; Buckner, Frederick S; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Fan, Erkang; van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2009-07-01

    In the past decade, thermal melt/thermal shift assays have become a common tool for identifying ligands and other factors that stabilize specific proteins. Increased stability is indicated by an increase in the protein's melting temperature (Tm). In optimizing the assays for subsequent screening of compound libraries, it is important to minimize the variability of Tm measurements so as to maximize the assay's ability to detect potential ligands. The authors present an investigation of Tm variability in recombinant proteins from Plasmodium parasites. Ligands of Plasmodium proteins are particularly interesting as potential starting points for drugs for malaria, and new drugs are urgently needed. A single standard buffer (100 mM HEPES [pH 7.5], 150 mM NaCl) permitted estimation of Tm for 58 of 61 Plasmodium proteins tested. However, with several proteins, Tm could not be measured with a consistency suitable for high-throughput screening unless alternative protein-specific buffers were employed. The authors conclude that buffer optimization to minimize variability in Tm measurements increases the success of thermal melt screens involving proteins for which a standard buffer is suboptimal. PMID:19470714

  7. 75 FR 55791 - Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition for Objection to State Operating Permit for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... AGENCY Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition for Objection to State Operating Permit for Alliant Energy--WPL Edgewater Generating Station AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of final order on petition to object to Clean Air Act operating permit. SUMMARY: This...

  8. Limitations of microscopy to differentiate Plasmodium species in a region co-endemic for Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In areas co-endemic for multiple Plasmodium species, correct diagnosis is crucial for appropriate treatment and surveillance. Species misidentification by microscopy has been reported in areas co-endemic for vivax and falciparum malaria, and may be more frequent in regions where Plasmodium knowlesi also commonly occurs. Methods This prospective study in Sabah, Malaysia, evaluated the accuracy of routine district and referral hospital-based microscopy, and microscopy performed by an experienced research microscopist, for the diagnosis of PCR-confirmed Plasmodium falciparum, P. knowlesi, and Plasmodium vivax malaria. Results A total of 304 patients with PCR-confirmed Plasmodium infection were enrolled, including 130 with P. knowlesi, 122 with P. falciparum, 43 with P. vivax, one with Plasmodium malariae and eight with mixed species infections. Among patients with P. knowlesi mono-infection, routine and cross-check microscopy both identified 94 (72%) patients as “P. malariae/P. knowlesi”; 17 (13%) and 28 (22%) respectively were identified as P. falciparum, and 13 (10%) and two (1.5%) as P. vivax. Among patients with PCR-confirmed P. falciparum, routine and cross-check microscopy identified 110/122 (90%) and 112/118 (95%) patients respectively as P. falciparum, and 8/122 (6.6%) and 5/118 (4.2%) as “P. malariae/P. knowlesi”. Among those with P. vivax, 23/43 (53%) and 34/40 (85%) were correctly diagnosed by routine and cross-check microscopy respectively, while 13/43 (30%) and 3/40 (7.5%) patients were diagnosed as “P. malariae/P. knowlesi”. Four of 13 patients with PCR-confirmed P. vivax and misdiagnosed by routine microscopy as “P. malariae/P. knowlesi” were subsequently re-admitted with P. vivax malaria. Conclusions Microscopy does not reliably distinguish between P. falciparum, P. vivax and P. knowlesi in a region where all three species frequently occur. Misdiagnosis of P. knowlesi as both P. vivax and P. falciparum, and vice versa, is

  9. RCRA post-closure permits

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires that hazardous waste management facilities operate in accordance with permits granted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or a State authorized to carry out the RCRA Subtitle C program. Several categories of permits (including treatment, storage, and disposal permits; research, development, and demonstration permits; post-closure permits; emergency permits; permits-by-rule; and trial burn and land treatment demonstration permits) are issued under the RCRA Subtitle C program. This Information Brief focuses on post-closure permitting requirements under 40 CFR 270.1(c).

  10. Infection of Laboratory-Colonized Anopheles darlingi Mosquitoes by Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Marta; Tong, Carlos; Guzmán, Mitchel; Chuquiyauri, Raul; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Rodriguez, Hugo; Gamboa, Dionicia; Meister, Stephan; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Maguina, Paula; Conn, Jan E.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Anopheles darlingi Root is the most important malaria vector in the Amazonia region of South America. However, continuous propagation of An. darlingi in the laboratory has been elusive, limiting entomological, genetic/genomic, and vector–pathogen interaction studies of this mosquito species. Here, we report the establishment of an An. darlingi colony derived from wild-caught mosquitoes obtained in the northeastern Peruvian Amazon region of Iquitos in the Loreto Department. We show that the numbers of eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults continue to rise at least to the F6 generation. Comparison of feeding Plasmodium vivax ex vivo of F4 and F5 to F1 generation mosquitoes showed the comparable presence of oocysts and sporozoites, with numbers that corresponded to blood-stage asexual parasitemia and gametocytemia, confirming P. vivax vectorial capacity in the colonized mosquitoes. These results provide new avenues for research on An. darlingi biology and study of An. darlingi–Plasmodium interactions. PMID:24534811

  11. Louisiana Title V General Permits

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, B.E.; Neal, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 requires federal operating permits for all major sources of air pollution. In 1992, Title 40, Part 70 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR Part 70) codified the law s requirements. These federal regulations, entitled Operating Permit Program, define the minimum requirements for state administered operating permit programs. The intent of Title V is to put into one document all requirements of an operating permit. General Permits for oil and gas facilities may be preferred if the facility can comply with all permit requirements. If greater flexibility than allowed by the General Permit is required, then the facility should apply for an individual Title V permit. General Permits are designed to streamline the permitting process, shorten the time it takes to obtain approval for initial and modified permits. The advantages of the General Permit include reduced paperwork and greater consistency because the permits are standardized. There should be less uncertainty because permit requirements will be known at the time of application. Approval times for Initial and modified General Permits should be reduced. Lengthy public notice procedures (and possible hearings) will be required for only the initial approval of the General Permit and not for each applicant to the permit. A disadvantage of General Permits is reduced flexibility since the facility must comply with the requirements of a standardized permit.

  12. Hanford Facility RCRA permit handbook

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this Hanford Facility (HF) RCRA Permit Handbook is to provide, in one document, information to be used for clarification of permit conditions and guidance for implementing the HF RCRA Permit.

  13. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  14. Development of Plasmodium berghei ookinetes to young oocysts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Syafruddin; Arakawa, R; Kamimura, K; Kawamoto, F

    1992-01-01

    The mosquito stage of Plasmodium berghei was cultivated in vitro, with special attention to ookinete transformation into early oocyst. The ookinetes were obtained by in vitro culture of gametocytes taken from infected mice, purified by density gradient of metrizoic acid or a lymphocyte separation medium, and incubated either in acellular culture or in co-cultivations with mosquito cells. In acellular culture, the ookinetes were found to aggregate with each other and transformed from banana to round shapes. Their inner pellicular membranes and subpellicular microtubules partially disappeared, indicating that development to early oocyst had occurred. Co-cultivation wtih Aedes albopictus cells (C6/36 clone) revealed that ookinetes transformed into early oocyst in the medium, or invaded the cells and then transformed to early oocysts within the cell cytoplasm as well. However all of these transformed cells failed to develop further, i.e., neither deposition of the oocyst capsule nor nuclear division was observed. Many ookinetes which failed to penetrate the Aedes cells were phagocytized within three days of culture. A significant difference between invaded and transformed oocysts and phagocytized ookinetes was seen in that the former lacked vacuole membrane. Co-cultivation with Toxorhynchites amboinensis cells (TRA-284-SFG clone) permitted transformation of ookinetes into early oocysts in the medium as in the acellular culture, but no ookinete invasion nor phagocytosis by the cell was observed. PMID:1578408

  15. Engineered Anopheles Immunity to Plasmodium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cirimotich, Chris; Souza-Neto, Jayme A.; McLean, Kyle J.; Dimopoulos, George

    2011-01-01

    A causative agent of human malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, is transmitted by Anopheles mosquitoes. The malaria parasite is under intensive attack from the mosquito's innate immune system during its sporogonic development. We have used genetic engineering to create immune-enhanced Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes through blood meal-inducible expression of a transgene encoding the IMD pathway-controlled NF-kB Rel2 transcription factor in the midgut and fat-body tissue. Transgenic mosquitoes showed greater resistance to Plasmodium and microbial infection as a result of timely concerted tissue-specific immune attacks involving multiple effectors. The relatively weak impact of this genetic modification on mosquito fitness under laboratory conditions encourages further investigation of this approach for malaria control. PMID:22216006

  16. Plasmodium vivax Malaria Endemicity in Indonesia in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Elyazar, Iqbal R. F.; Gething, Peter W.; Patil, Anand P.; Rogayah, Hanifah; Sariwati, Elvieda; Palupi, Niken W.; Tarmizi, Siti N.; Kusriastuti, Rita; Baird, J. Kevin; Hay, Simon I.

    2012-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax imposes substantial morbidity and mortality burdens in endemic zones. Detailed understanding of the contemporary spatial distribution of this parasite is needed to combat it. We used model based geostatistics (MBG) techniques to generate a contemporary map of risk of Plasmodium vivax malaria in Indonesia in 2010. Methods Plasmodium vivax Annual Parasite Incidence data (2006–2008) and temperature masks were used to map P. vivax transmission limits. A total of 4,658 community surveys of P. vivax parasite rate (PvPR) were identified (1985–2010) for mapping quantitative estimates of contemporary endemicity within those limits. After error-checking a total of 4,457 points were included into a national database of age-standardized 1–99 year old PvPR data. A Bayesian MBG procedure created a predicted PvPR1–99 endemicity surface with uncertainty estimates. Population at risk estimates were derived with reference to a 2010 human population surface. Results We estimated 129.6 million people in Indonesia lived at risk of P. vivax transmission in 2010. Among these, 79.3% inhabited unstable transmission areas and 20.7% resided in stable transmission areas. In western Indonesia, the predicted P. vivax prevalence was uniformly low. Over 70% of the population at risk in this region lived on Java and Bali islands, where little malaria transmission occurs. High predicted prevalence areas were observed in the Lesser Sundas, Maluku and Papua. In general, prediction uncertainty was relatively low in the west and high in the east. Conclusion Most Indonesians living with endemic P. vivax experience relatively low risk of infection. However, blood surveys for this parasite are likely relatively insensitive and certainly do not detect the dormant liver stage reservoir of infection. The prospects for P. vivax elimination would be improved with deeper understanding of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd) distribution, anti-relapse therapy

  17. UvrD helicase of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Jay; Tuteja, Renu

    2008-03-15

    Malaria caused by the mosquito-transmitted parasite Plasmodium is the cause of enormous number of deaths every year in the tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Among four species of Plasmodium, Plasmodium falciparum causes most fatal form of malaria. With time, the parasite has developed insecticide and drug resistance. Newer strategies and advent of novel drug targets are required so as to combat the deadly form of malaria. Helicases is one such class of enzymes which has previously been suggested as potential antiviral and anticancer targets. These enzymes play an essential role in nearly all the nucleic acid metabolic processes, catalyzing the transient opening of the duplex nucleic acids in an NTP-dependent manner. DNA helicases from the PcrA/UvrD/Rep subfamily are important for the survival of the various organisms. Members from this subfamily can be targeted and inhibited by a variety of synthetic compounds. UvrD from this subfamily is the only member present in the P. falciparum genome, which shows no homology with UvrD from human and thus can be considered as a strong potential drug target. In this manuscript we provide an overview of UvrD family of helicases and bioinformatics analysis of UvrD from P. falciparum. PMID:18242886

  18. Plasmodium knowlesi: the emerging zoonotic malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Antinori, Spinello; Galimberti, Laura; Milazzo, Laura; Corbellino, Mario

    2013-02-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi was initially identified in the 30s as a natural Plasmodium of Macaca fascicularis monkey also capable of experimentally infecting humans. It gained a relative notoriety in the mid-30s as an alternative to Plasmodium vivax in the treatment of the general paralysis of the insane (neurosyphilis). In 1965 the first natural human infection was described in a US military surveyor coming back from the Pahang jungle of the Malaysian peninsula. P. knowlesi was again brought to the attention of the medical community when in 2004, Balbir Singh and his co-workers reported that about 58% of malaria cases observed in the Kapit district of the Malaysian Borneo were actually caused by P. knowlesi. In the following years several reports showed that P. knowlesi is much more widespread than initially thought with cases reported across Southeast Asia. This infection should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of any febrile travellers coming back from a recent travel to forested areas of Southeast Asia. P. knowlesi can cause severe malaria with a rate of 6-9% and with a case fatality rate of 3%. Respiratory distress, acute renal failure, shock and hyperbilirubinemia are the most frequently observed complications of severe P. knowlesi malaria. Chloroquine is considered the treatment of choice of uncomplicated malaria caused by P. knowlesi. PMID:23088834

  19. PERMITTING HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication is a compilation of information presented at a seminar series designed to address the issues that affect the issuance of hazardous waste incineration permits and to improve the overall understanding of trial burn testing. pecifically, the document provides guidan...

  20. Permit application modifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  1. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas S.; Lisby, Michael; Salanti, Ali; Fordyce, Sarah L.; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Carter, Richard; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Theander, Thor G.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Arnot, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens undergo antigenic variation to counter host immune defense mechanisms. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal of human malaria parasites, switching of var gene expression results in alternating expression of the adhesion proteins of the Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome-wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens. PMID:24253306

  2. Energy metabolism affects susceptibility of A. gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jose Henrique M.; Gonçalves, Renata L.S.; Oliveira, Giselle A.; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies showed that A. gambiae L35 females, which are refractory (R) to Plasmodium infection, express higher levels of genes involved in redox-metabolism and mitochondrial respiration than susceptible (S) G3 females. Our studies revealed that R females have reduced longevity, faster utilization of lipid reserves, impaired mitochondrial State-3 respiration, increased rate of mitochondrial electron leak and higher expression levels of several glycolytic enzyme genes. Furthermore, when State-3 respiration was reduced in S females by silencing expression of the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), hydrogen peroxide generation was higher and the mRNA levels of lactate dehydrogenase increased in the midgut, while the prevalence and intensity of P. berghei infection were significantly reduced. We conclude that there are broad metabolic differences between R and S An. gambiae mosquitoes that influence their susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. PMID:21320598

  3. Local Adaptation and Vector-Mediated Population Structure in Plasmodium vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Ceron, Lilia; Carlton, Jane M.; Gueye, Amy; Fay, Michael; McCutchan, Thomas F.; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax in southern Mexico exhibits different infectivities to 2 local mosquito vectors, Anopheles pseudopunctipennis and Anopheles albimanus. Previous work has tied these differences in mosquito infectivity to variation in the central repeat motif of the malaria parasite's circumsporozoite (csp) gene, but subsequent studies have questioned this view. Here we present evidence that P. vivax in southern Mexico comprised 3 genetic populations whose distributions largely mirror those of the 2 mosquito vectors. Additionally, laboratory colony feeding experiments indicate that parasite populations are most compatible with sympatric mosquito species. Our results suggest that reciprocal selection between malaria parasites and mosquito vectors has led to local adaptation of the parasite. Adaptation to local vectors may play an important role in generating population structure in Plasmodium. A better understanding of coevolutionary dynamics between sympatric mosquitoes and parasites will facilitate the identification of molecular mechanisms relevant to disease transmission in nature and provide crucial information for malaria control. PMID:18385220

  4. Human antisera detect a Plasmodium falciparum genomic clone encoding a nonapeptide repeat.

    PubMed

    Koenen, M; Scherf, A; Mercereau, O; Langsley, G; Sibilli, L; Dubois, P; Pereira da Silva, L; Müller-Hill, B

    Plasmodium falciparum causes malaria infections in its human host. Its wide distribution in tropical countries is a major world health problem. Before a vaccine can be produced, the identification and characterization of parasite antigens is necessary. This can be achieved by the cloning and subsequent analysis of genes coding for parasite antigens. Recently established cDNA banks allow the expression of cDNA derived from the simian parasite Plasmodium knowlesi and P. falciparum in Escherichia coli. Recombinants encoding parasite antigens have been identified by immunodetection in both banks. Two of them contain repetitive units of 11 (ref. 7) or 12 (ref. 5) amino acids. We describe here the construction of an expression bank made directly from randomly generated fragments of P. falciparum genomic DNA. We detect several clones which react strongly with human African immune sera. One clone expresses an antigenic determinant composed of occasionally degenerated repeats of a peptide nonamer. PMID:6090935

  5. Anopheline species and their Plasmodium infection status in Aligarh, India.

    PubMed

    Saifi, Muheet Alam; Alyousif, Mohamed Saleh; Amoudi, Mikky A

    2016-09-01

    Malaria is a global issue and India contributes substantially to global malaria incidence. Information related to malaria vectors is very limited in Aligarh. The environmental and climatological situations permit the continual breeding of vectors in permanent breeding sites. This study was designed with the aim to screen all the anophelines species and possible malaria vectors in three different localities of Aligarh. Anopheles mosquitoes were collected from three different localities (Fort, Jalali and Tappal) during peak malaria transmission season (July to November) by using mouth aspirator and CDC light traps. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was done to detect Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax-210 and P. vivax-247 circumsporozoite proteins (CSP) from the collected female species. A total of 794 female anopheline mosquitoes belonging to 7 species were collected by different methods. Circumsporozoite protein-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed with 780 anopheline mosquitoes out of which 13 mosquitoes were positive in CSP-ELISA. Thus, the overall infection rate was 1.66% (13/780). Four (0.51%) mosquitoes belonging to three species were positive for P. falciparum, 7 (0.89%) mosquitoes belonging to three species were positive for VK 210 and 2 (0.25%) mosquitoes belonging to Anopheles culicifacies and Anopheles stephensi species were positive for VK 247. No mixed infection was found in this study. According to species, the highest infection rate was observed in An. culicifacies (7/288, 2.43%) followed by An. stephensi (2.40%) and Anopheles annularis (1.98%). An. culicifacies and An. stephensi were previously incriminated as malaria vectors in Aligarh. There was, however, no previous report in favor of infections in An. annularis in Aligarh. The on-going Malaria Control Program in India needs up to date information on malaria vectors. A major challenge is the lack of knowledge about vectors and their role in malaria transmission. Findings of

  6. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [(14)C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS. PMID:27270277

  7. 40 CFR 60.4123 - Hg budget permit contents and term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from the compliance account of the Hg Budget source covered by the permit. (c) The term of the Hg... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hg budget permit contents and term. 60... Coal-Fired Electric Steam Generating Units Permits § 60.4123 Hg budget permit contents and term....

  8. Construction of living cellular automata using the Physarum plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Tomohiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiguro, Shinji

    2015-04-01

    The plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is a unicellular and multinuclear giant amoeba that has an amorphous cell body. To clearly observe how the plasmodium makes decisions in its motile and exploratory behaviours, we developed a new experimental system to pseudo-discretize the motility of the organism. In our experimental space that has agar surfaces arranged in a two-dimensional lattice, the continuous and omnidirectional movement of the plasmodium was limited to the stepwise one, and the direction of the locomotion was also limited to four neighbours. In such an experimental system, a cellular automata-like system was constructed using the living cell. We further analysed the exploratory behaviours of the plasmodium by duplicating the experimental results in the simulation models of cellular automata. As a result, it was revealed that the behaviours of the plasmodium are not reproduced by only local state transition rules; and for the reproduction, a kind of historical rule setting is needed.

  9. Simple Molecular Methods for Early Detection of Chloroquine Drug Resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raksha; Urhehar, Anant Dattatraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malaria is a human disease of which causes high morbidity and mortality. In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, the resistance to antimalarial drugs, especially chloroquine (CQ) is one of the paramount factors contributing to the global increase in morbidity and mortality, due to malaria. Hence, there is a need for detection of chloroquine drug resistance genes i.e., pfcrt-o (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pfmdr-1 (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance-1) of P. falciparum and pvcrt-o (Plasmodium vivax chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pvmdr-1 (Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance-1) of P. vivax by using molecular methods to prevent mortality in malarial cases. Aim To standardize chloroquine drug sensitivity testing by molecular method so as to provide reports of chloroquine within 6-8 hours to physicians for better treatment. Materials and Methods This study was conducted over a period of one year from January to December 2014. A Total of 300 blood samples were collected from malaria suspected patient attending MGM Hospital, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, India. Out of 300 blood samples, 44 were malaria positive as assessed by Thick and Thin blood smear stained, by Leishman’s method and examination with light microscope. Chloroquine drug sensitivity testing was performed using WHO III plate method (micro test). Nested PCR was done for detection of pfcrt-o and pfmdr-1 for P. falciparum and pvcrt-o, pvmdr-1 genes for P. vivax. Results Total 44 samples were included in this study, out of which 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium falciparum and 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium vivax. Out of 22 P. falciparum 15 (68.18%) samples were chloroquine resistant. P. vivax showed chloroquine resistance to 5 samples (22.73%) by method similar to WHO III plate method (micro test) and nested PCR. Conclusion Drug resistance testing by molecular methods is useful for early detection of antimalarial drug resistance. pfmdr-1 along with

  10. Impact of enhanced malaria control on the competition between Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in India.

    PubMed

    Prosper, Olivia; Martcheva, Maia

    2013-03-01

    The primary focus of malaria research and control has been on Plasmodium falciparum, the most severe of the four Plasmodium species causing human disease. However, the presence of both P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax occurs in several countries, including India. We developed a mathematical model describing the dynamics of P. vivax and P. falciparum in the human and mosquito populations and fit this model to Indian clinical case data to understand how enhanced control measures affect the competition between the two Plasmodium species. Around 1997, funding for malaria control in India increased dramatically. Our model predicts that if India had not improved its control strategy, the two species of Plasmodium would continue to coexist. To determine which control measures contributed the most to the decline in the number of cases after 1997, we compared the fit of seven models to the 1997-2010 clinical case data. From this, we determined that increased use of bednets contributed the most to case reduction. During the enhanced control period, the best model predicts that P. vivax is out-competing P. falciparum. However, the reproduction numbers are extremely close to the invasion boundaries. Consequently, we cannot be confident that this outcome is the true future of malaria in India. We address this uncertainty by performing a parametric bootstrapping procedure for each of the seven models. This procedure, applied to the enhanced control period, revealed that the best model predicts that P. vivax outcompeting P. falciparum is the most likely outcome, whereas the remaining candidate models predict the opposite. Moreover, the predictions of the top model are counter to what one expects based on the case data alone. Although the proportion of cases due to falciparum has been increasing, the best fitting model reveals that this observation is insufficient to draw conclusions about the longterm competitive outcome of the two species. PMID:23261665

  11. Plasmepsin 4-Deficient Plasmodium berghei Are Virulence Attenuated and Induce Protective Immunity against Experimental Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Spaccapelo, Roberta; Janse, Chris J.; Caterbi, Sara; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Bonilla, J. Alfredo; Syphard, Luke M.; Di Cristina, Manlio; Dottorini, Tania; Savarino, Andrea; Cassone, Antonio; Bistoni, Francesco; Waters, Andrew P.; Dame, John B.; Crisanti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites lacking plasmepsin 4 (PM4), an aspartic protease that functions in the lysosomal compartment and contributes to hemoglobin digestion, have only a modest decrease in the asexual blood-stage growth rate; however, PM4 deficiency in the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei results in significantly less virulence than that for the parental parasite. P. berghei Δpm4 parasites failed to induce experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in ECM-susceptible mice, and ECM-resistant mice were able to clear infections. Furthermore, after a single infection, all convalescent mice were protected against subsequent parasite challenge for at least 1 year. Real-time in vivo parasite imaging and splenectomy experiments demonstrated that protective immunity acted through antibody-mediated parasite clearance in the spleen. This work demonstrates, for the first time, that a single Plasmodium gene disruption can generate virulence-attenuated parasites that do not induce cerebral complications and, moreover, are able to stimulate strong protective immunity against subsequent challenge with wild-type parasites. Parasite blood-stage attenuation should help identify protective immune responses against malaria, unravel parasite-derived factors involved in malarial pathologies, such as cerebral malaria, and potentially pave the way for blood-stage whole organism vaccines. PMID:20019192

  12. DNA Repair Mechanisms and Their Biological Roles in the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Andrew H.; Symington, Lorraine S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Research into the complex genetic underpinnings of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is entering a new era with the arrival of site-specific genome engineering. Previously restricted only to model systems but now expanded to most laboratory organisms, and even to humans for experimental gene therapy studies, this technology allows researchers to rapidly generate previously unattainable genetic modifications. This technological advance is dependent on DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR), specifically homologous recombination in the case of Plasmodium. Our understanding of DSBR in malaria parasites, however, is based largely on assumptions and knowledge taken from other model systems, which do not always hold true in Plasmodium. Here we describe the causes of double-strand breaks, the mechanisms of DSBR, and the differences between model systems and P. falciparum. These mechanisms drive basic parasite functions, such as meiosis, antigen diversification, and copy number variation, and allow the parasite to continually evolve in the contexts of host immune pressure and drug selection. Finally, we discuss the new technologies that leverage DSBR mechanisms to accelerate genetic investigations into this global infectious pathogen. PMID:25184562

  13. Multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporters are essential for hepatic development of Plasmodium sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Rijpma, Sanna R; van der Velden, Maarten; González-Pons, Maria; Annoura, Takeshi; van Schaijk, Ben C L; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Ramesar, Jai; Chevalley-Maurel, Severine; Ploemen, Ivo H; Khan, Shahid M; Franetich, Jean-Francois; Mazier, Dominique; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Serrano, Adelfa E; Russel, Frans G M; Janse, Chris J; Sauerwein, Robert W; Koenderink, Jan B; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M

    2016-03-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) belong to the C-family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins and are known to transport a variety of physiologically important compounds and to be involved in the extrusion of pharmaceuticals. Rodent malaria parasites encode a single ABC transporter subfamily C protein, whereas human parasites encode two: MRP1 and MRP2. Although associated with drug resistance, their biological function and substrates remain unknown. To elucidate the role of MRP throughout the parasite life cycle, Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium falciparum mutants lacking MRP expression were generated. P. berghei mutants lacking expression of the single MRP as well as P. falciparum mutants lacking MRP1, MRP2 or both proteins have similar blood stage growth kinetics and drug-sensitivity profiles as wild type parasites. We show that MRP1-deficient parasites readily invade primary human hepatocytes and develop into mature liver stages. In contrast, both P. falciparum MRP2-deficient parasites and P. berghei mutants lacking MRP protein expression abort in mid to late liver stage development, failing to produce mature liver stages. The combined P. berghei and P. falciparum data are the first demonstration of a critical role of an ABC transporter during Plasmodium liver stage development. PMID:26332724

  14. Vital and dispensable roles of Plasmodium multidrug resistance transporters during blood- and mosquito-stage development.

    PubMed

    Rijpma, Sanna R; van der Velden, Maarten; Annoura, Takeshi; Matz, Joachim M; Kenthirapalan, Sanketha; Kooij, Taco W A; Matuschewski, Kai; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Siebelink-Stoter, Rianne; Graumans, Wouter; Ramesar, Jai; Klop, Onny; Russel, Frans G M; Sauerwein, Robert W; Janse, Chris J; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M; Koenderink, Jan B

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins belong to the B subfamily of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters, which export a wide range of compounds including pharmaceuticals. In this study, we used reverse genetics to study the role of all seven Plasmodium MDR proteins during the life cycle of malaria parasites. Four P. berghei genes (encoding MDR1, 4, 6 and 7) were refractory to deletion, indicating a vital role during blood stage multiplication and validating them as potential targets for antimalarial drugs. Mutants lacking expression of MDR2, MDR3 and MDR5 were generated in both P. berghei and P. falciparum, indicating a dispensable role for blood stage development. Whereas P. berghei mutants lacking MDR3 and MDR5 had a reduced blood stage multiplication in vivo, blood stage growth of P. falciparum mutants in vitro was not significantly different. Oocyst maturation and sporozoite formation in Plasmodium mutants lacking MDR2 or MDR5 was reduced. Sporozoites of these P. berghei mutants were capable of infecting mice and life cycle completion, indicating the absence of vital roles during liver stage development. Our results demonstrate vital and dispensable roles of MDR proteins during blood stages and an important function in sporogony for MDR2 and MDR5 in both Plasmodium species. PMID:26991313

  15. In Vivo and In Vitro Characterization of a Plasmodium Liver Stage-Specific Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Sebastian; Annoura, Takeshi; del Portillo, Hernando A.; Khan, Shahid M.; Heussler, Volker T.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about stage-specific gene regulation in Plasmodium parasites, in particular the liver stage of development. We have previously described in the Plasmodium berghei rodent model, a liver stage-specific (lisp2) gene promoter region, in vitro. Using a dual luminescence system, we now confirm the stage specificity of this promoter region also in vivo. Furthermore, by substitution and deletion analyses we have extended our in vitro characterization of important elements within the promoter region. Importantly, the dual luminescence system allows analyzing promoter constructs avoiding mouse-consuming cloning procedures of transgenic parasites. This makes extensive mutation and deletion studies a reasonable approach also in the malaria mouse model. Stage-specific expression constructs and parasite lines are extremely valuable tools for research on Plasmodium liver stage biology. Such reporter lines offer a promising opportunity for assessment of liver stage drugs, characterization of genetically attenuated parasites and liver stage-specific vaccines both in vivo and in vitro, and may be key for the generation of inducible systems. PMID:25874388

  16. Somatically Hypermutated Plasmodium-Specific IgM(+) Memory B Cells Are Rapid, Plastic, Early Responders upon Malaria Rechallenge.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurty, Akshay T; Thouvenel, Christopher D; Portugal, Silvia; Keitany, Gladys J; Kim, Karen S; Holder, Anthony; Crompton, Peter D; Rawlings, David J; Pepper, Marion

    2016-08-16

    Humoral immunity consists of pre-existing antibodies expressed by long-lived plasma cells and rapidly reactive memory B cells (MBC). Recent studies of MBC development and function after protein immunization have uncovered significant MBC heterogeneity. To clarify functional roles for distinct MBC subsets during malaria infection, we generated tetramers that identify Plasmodium-specific MBCs in both humans and mice. Long-lived murine Plasmodium-specific MBCs consisted of three populations: somatically hypermutated immunoglobulin M(+) (IgM(+)) and IgG(+) MBC subsets and an unmutated IgD(+) MBC population. Rechallenge experiments revealed that high affinity, somatically hypermutated Plasmodium-specific IgM(+) MBCs proliferated and gave rise to antibody-secreting cells that dominated the early secondary response to parasite rechallenge. IgM(+) MBCs also gave rise to T cell-dependent IgM(+) and IgG(+)B220(+)CD138(+) plasmablasts or T cell-independent B220(-)CD138(+) IgM(+) plasma cells. Thus, even in competition with IgG(+) MBCs, IgM(+) MBCs are rapid, plastic, early responders to a secondary Plasmodium rechallenge and should be targeted by vaccine strategies. PMID:27473412

  17. No Evidence for Ape Plasmodium Infections in Humans in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Ollomo, Benjamin; Arnathau, Céline; Roche, Benjamin; Elguero, Eric; Moukodoum, Nancy Diamella; Okougha, Alain-Prince; Mve Ondo, Bertrand; Boundenga, Larson; Houzé, Sandrine; Galan, Maxime; Nkoghé, Dieudonné; Leroy, Eric M.; Durand, Patrick; Paupy, Christophe; Renaud, François; Prugnolle, Franck

    2015-01-01

    African great apes are naturally infected by a multitude of Plasmodium species most of them recently discovered, among which several are closely related to human malaria agents. However, it is still unknown whether these animals can serve as source of infections for humans living in their vicinity. To evaluate this possibility, we analysed the nature of Plasmodium infections from a bank of 4281 human blood samples collected in 210 villages of Gabon, Central Africa. Among them, 2255 were detected positive to Plasmodium using molecular methods (Plasmodium Cytochrome b amplification). A high throughput sequencing technology (454 GS-FLX Titanium technology, Roche) was then used to identify the Plasmodium species present within each positive sample. Overall, we identified with confidence only three species infecting humans in Gabon: P. falciparum, P. malariae and P. ovale. None of the species known to infect non-human primates in Central Africa was found. Our study shows that ape Plasmodium parasites of the subgenus Laverania do not constitute a frequent source of infection for humans. It also suggests that some strong host genetic barriers must exist to prevent the cross species transmission of ape Plasmodium in a context of ever increasing contacts between humans and wildlife. PMID:26039338

  18. Prevalence and distribution of human Plasmodium infection in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum are prevalent in Pakistan, yet up-to-date data on the epidemiology of malaria in Pakistan are not available. This study was undertaken to determine the current prevalence and distribution of Plasmodium species across the country. Methods A malariometric population survey was conducted in 2011 using blood samples collected from 801 febrile patients of all ages in four provinces and the capital city of Islamabad. Microscopically confirmed Plasmodium-positive blood samples were reconfirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Confirmed parasite-positive samples were subjected to species-specific PCR capable of detecting four species of human malaria. Results Of the 707 PCR-positive samples, 128 (18%) were P. falciparum, 536 (76%) were P. vivax, and 43 (6%) were mixed P. falciparum and P. vivax. Ninety-four microscopy-positive samples were PCR-negative, and Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium ovale were not detected. Prevalence of P. vivax ranged from 2.4% in Punjab Province to 10.8% in Sindh Province and prevalence of P. falciparum ranged from 0.1% in Islamabad to 3.8% in Balochistan. Conclusions Plasmodium infections in Pakistan are largely attributed to P. vivax but P. falciparum and mixed species infections are also prevalent. In addition, regional variation in the prevalence and species composition of malaria is high. PMID:23984968

  19. 75 FR 145 - Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petitions for Objection to State Operating Permit for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... Creek Generation, LLC--Cash Creek Generating Station; Henderson County, KY AGENCY: Environmental... merged prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) and title V operating permit issued by the Kentucky Division for Air Quality (KDAQ) to Cash Creek Generation, LLC for its Cash Creek Generating Station...

  20. 40 CFR 60.47Da - Commercial demonstration permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Commercial demonstration permit. 60.47Da Section 60.47Da Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Steam Generating Units § 60.47Da Commercial demonstration permit. (a) An owner or operator of...

  1. 40 CFR 60.47Da - Commercial demonstration permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commercial demonstration permit. 60.47Da Section 60.47Da Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Steam Generating Units § 60.47Da Commercial demonstration permit. (a) An owner or operator of...

  2. 40 CFR 60.47Da - Commercial demonstration permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commercial demonstration permit. 60.47Da Section 60.47Da Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Steam Generating Units § 60.47Da Commercial demonstration permit. (a) An owner or operator of...

  3. Mining the Plasmodium genome database to define organellar function: what does the apicoplast do?

    PubMed Central

    Roos, David S; Crawford, Michael J; Donald, Robert G K; Fraunholz, Martin; Harb, Omar S; He, Cynthia Y; Kissinger, Jessica C; Shaw, Michael K; Striepen, Boris

    2002-01-01

    Apicomplexan species constitute a diverse group of parasitic protozoa, which are responsible for a wide range of diseases in many organisms. Despite differences in the diseases they cause, these parasites share an underlying biology, from the genetic controls used to differentiate through the complex parasite life cycle, to the basic biochemical pathways employed for intracellular survival, to the distinctive cell biology necessary for host cell attachment and invasion. Different parasites lend themselves to the study of different aspects of parasite biology: Eimeria for biochemical studies, Toxoplasma for molecular genetic and cell biological investigation, etc. The Plasmodium falciparum Genome Project contributes the first large-scale genomic sequence for an apicomplexan parasite. The Plasmodium Genome Database (http://PlasmoDB.org) has been designed to permit individual investigators to ask their own questions, even prior to formal release of the reference P. falciparum genome sequence. As a case in point, PlasmoDB has been exploited to identify metabolic pathways associated with the apicomplexan plastid, or 'apicoplast' - an essential organelle derived by secondary endosymbiosis of an alga, and retention of the algal plastid. PMID:11839180

  4. The Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins reveals spatiotemporal dynamics of tubular extensions.

    PubMed

    Matz, Joachim M; Goosmann, Christian; Brinkmann, Volker; Grützke, Josephine; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W A

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte is an extraordinary host cell for intracellular pathogens and requires extensive remodelling to become permissive for infection. Malaria parasites modify their host red blood cells through protein export to acquire nutrients and evade immune responses. Endogenous fluorescent tagging of three signature proteins of the Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins (PTEX), heat shock protein 101, exported protein 2 (EXP2), and PTEX88, revealed motile, tubular extensions of the parasitophorous vacuole that protrude from the parasite far into the red blood cell. EXP2 displays a more prominent presence at the periphery of the parasite, consistent with its proposed role in pore formation. The tubular compartment is most prominent during trophozoite growth. Distinct spatiotemporal expression of individual PTEX components during sporogony and liver-stage development indicates additional functions and tight regulation of the PTEX translocon during parasite life cycle progression. Together, live cell imaging and correlative light and electron microscopy permitted previously unrecognized spatiotemporal and subcellular resolution of PTEX-containing tubules in murine malaria parasites. These findings further refine current models for Plasmodium-induced erythrocyte makeover. PMID:26219962

  5. The Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins reveals spatiotemporal dynamics of tubular extensions

    PubMed Central

    Matz, Joachim M.; Goosmann, Christian; Brinkmann, Volker; Grützke, Josephine; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W. A.

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte is an extraordinary host cell for intracellular pathogens and requires extensive remodelling to become permissive for infection. Malaria parasites modify their host red blood cells through protein export to acquire nutrients and evade immune responses. Endogenous fluorescent tagging of three signature proteins of the Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins (PTEX), heat shock protein 101, exported protein 2 (EXP2), and PTEX88, revealed motile, tubular extensions of the parasitophorous vacuole that protrude from the parasite far into the red blood cell. EXP2 displays a more prominent presence at the periphery of the parasite, consistent with its proposed role in pore formation. The tubular compartment is most prominent during trophozoite growth. Distinct spatiotemporal expression of individual PTEX components during sporogony and liver-stage development indicates additional functions and tight regulation of the PTEX translocon during parasite life cycle progression. Together, live cell imaging and correlative light and electron microscopy permitted previously unrecognized spatiotemporal and subcellular resolution of PTEX-containing tubules in murine malaria parasites. These findings further refine current models for Plasmodium-induced erythrocyte makeover. PMID:26219962

  6. Targeting the gyrase of Plasmodium falciparum with topoisomerase poisons.

    PubMed

    Tang Girdwood, Sonya C; Nenortas, Elizabeth; Shapiro, Theresa A

    2015-06-15

    Drug-resistant malaria poses a major public health problem throughout the world and the need for new antimalarial drugs is growing. The apicoplast, a chloroplast-like organelle essential for malaria parasite survival and with no counterpart in humans, offers an attractive target for selectively toxic new therapies. The apicoplast genome (plDNA) is a 35 kb circular DNA that is served by gyrase, a prokaryotic type II topoisomerase. Gyrase is poisoned by fluoroquinolone antibacterials that stabilize a catalytically inert ternary complex of enzyme, its plDNA substrate, and inhibitor. We used fluoroquinolones to study the gyrase and plDNA of Plasmodium falciparum. New methods for isolating and separating plDNA reveal four topologically different forms and permit a quantitative exam of perturbations that result from gyrase poisoning. In keeping with its role in DNA replication, gyrase is most abundant in late stages of the parasite lifecycle, but several lines of evidence indicate that even in these cells the enzyme is present in relatively low abundance: about 1 enzyme for every two plDNAs or a ratio of 1 gyrase: 70 kb DNA. For a spectrum of quinolones, correlation was generally good between antimalarial activity and gyrase poisoning, the putative molecular mechanism of drug action. However, in P. falciparum there is evidence for off-target toxicity, particularly for ciprofloxacin. These studies highlight the utility of the new methods and of fluoroquinolones as a tool for studying the in situ workings of gyrase and its plDNA substrate. PMID:25881748

  7. Current status of Plasmodium vivax vaccine.

    PubMed

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Chitnis, Chetan; Herrera, Sócrates

    2010-01-01

    From a total of 2.6 billion people at permanent risk of suffering malaria infection worldwide, 80-300 million experience Plasmodium vivax infections every year, with clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic to mild and chronic infection that in some cases lead to severe disease and death. The increasing P. vivax drug resistance and reports of severe and lethal cases, the relapsing parasite behavior and the existence of Plasmodium spp. co-infections must prompt more investment and greater efforts for the development of P. vivax vaccine. Currently there are only two P. vivax vaccine candidates being tested in clinical trials and few others are being assessed in preclinical studies which contrast with the numerous P. falciparum vaccines candidates under evaluation. The recent availability of the P. vivax genome and ongoing proteomic analysis are likely to accelerate P. vivax vaccine development. Recent development of human sporozoite-challenge models would contribute to move clinical development forward and to identify mechanisms of immunity. PMID:20009526

  8. Artemisinins target the SERCA of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Eckstein-Ludwig, U; Webb, R J; Van Goethem, I D A; East, J M; Lee, A G; Kimura, M; O'Neill, P M; Bray, P G; Ward, S A; Krishna, S

    2003-08-21

    Artemisinins are extracted from sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua) and are the most potent antimalarials available, rapidly killing all asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Artemisinins are sesquiterpene lactones widely used to treat multidrug-resistant malaria, a disease that annually claims 1 million lives. Despite extensive clinical and laboratory experience their molecular target is not yet identified. Activated artemisinins form adducts with a variety of biological macromolecules, including haem, translationally controlled tumour protein (TCTP) and other higher-molecular-weight proteins. Here we show that artemisinins, but not quinine or chloroquine, inhibit the SERCA orthologue (PfATP6) of Plasmodium falciparum in Xenopus oocytes with similar potency to thapsigargin (another sesquiterpene lactone and highly specific SERCA inhibitor). As predicted, thapsigargin also antagonizes the parasiticidal activity of artemisinin. Desoxyartemisinin lacks an endoperoxide bridge and is ineffective both as an inhibitor of PfATP6 and as an antimalarial. Chelation of iron by desferrioxamine abrogates the antiparasitic activity of artemisinins and correspondingly attenuates inhibition of PfATP6. Imaging of parasites with BODIPY-thapsigargin labels the cytosolic compartment and is competed by artemisinin. Fluorescent artemisinin labels parasites similarly and irreversibly in an Fe2+-dependent manner. These data provide compelling evidence that artemisinins act by inhibiting PfATP6 outside the food vacuole after activation by iron. PMID:12931192

  9. Protein phosphorylation during Plasmodium berghei gametogenesis.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Morales, Alberto; González-López, Lorena; Cázares-Raga, Febe Elena; Cortés-Martínez, Leticia; Torres-Monzón, Jorge Aurelio; Gallegos-Pérez, José Luis; Rodríguez, Mario Henry; James, Anthony A; Hernández-Hernández, Fidel de la Cruz

    2015-09-01

    Plasmodium gametogenesis within the mosquito midgut is a complex differentiation process involving signaling mediated by phosphorylation, which modulate metabolic routes and protein synthesis required to complete this development. However, the mechanisms leading to gametogenesis activation are poorly understood. We analyzed protein phosphorylation during Plasmodium berghei gametogenesis in vitro in serum-free medium using bidimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with immunoblotting (IB) and antibodies specific to phosphorylated serine, threonine and tyrosine. Approximately 75 protein exhibited phosphorylation changes, of which 23 were identified by mass spectrometry. These included components of the cytoskeleton, heat shock proteins, and proteins involved in DNA synthesis and signaling pathways among others. Novel phosphorylation events support a role for these proteins during gametogenesis. The phosphorylation sites of six of the identified proteins, HSP70, WD40 repeat protein msi1, enolase, actin-1 and two isoforms of large subunit of ribonucleoside reductase were investigated using TiO2 phosphopeptides enrichment and tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, transient exposure to hydroxyurea, an inhibitor of ribonucleoside reductase, impaired male gametocytes exflagellation in a dose-dependent manner, and provides a resource for functional studies. PMID:26008612

  10. Wildlife Researchers Running the Permit Maze

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Ellen; Sikes, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    The study of wildlife, whether in the field or in the lab, may start with a hypothesis, a literature search, or a grant proposal, but in many cases, the work will never happen unless the researcher successfully navigates a maze of permit requirements. A single project can involve multiple permits at the national and state levels, and it can take months to obtain any one permit. Therefore, permits may not have been issued at the time of protocol review, but Public Health Service Policy makes accommodations for this situation. Once in hand, however, the permits convey critical information to the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC): one or more government agencies have determined that the activity will not be detrimental to the population or that any detriment is justified by the scientific knowledge that will be generated. This paper assumes that IACUCs are reviewing all wildlife protocols involving live vertebrates, regardless of the current, albeit temporary, distinction made by Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Animal Care with regard to birds. PMID:23904528

  11. Functional analysis of erythrocyte determinants of Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Amy K.; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2012-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum parasite is an obligate intracellular pathogen whose invasion and remodeling of the human erythrocyte results in the clinical manifestations of malarial disease. The functional analysis of erythrocyte determinants of invasion and growth is a relatively unexplored frontier in malaria research, encompassing studies of natural variation of the erythrocyte, as well as genomic, biochemical and chemical biological and transgenic approaches. These studies have allowed the functional analysis of the erythrocyte in vitro, resulting in the discovery of critical erythrocyte determinants of Plasmodium infection. Here, we will focus on the varied approaches used for the study of the erythrocyte in Plasmodium infection, with a particular emphasis on erythrocyte invasion. PMID:22726752

  12. 50 CFR 665.662 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... coral MUS in any PRIA precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral Permit... surrendering to the Regional Administrator any current permit for the precious coral fishery issued under §...

  13. 50 CFR 665.662 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... coral MUS in any PRIA precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral Permit... surrendering to the Regional Administrator any current permit for the precious coral fishery issued under §...

  14. 50 CFR 665.662 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... coral MUS in any PRIA precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral Permit... surrendering to the Regional Administrator any current permit for the precious coral fishery issued under §...

  15. 50 CFR 665.662 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... coral MUS in any PRIA precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral Permit... surrendering to the Regional Administrator any current permit for the precious coral fishery issued under §...

  16. 50 CFR 665.662 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... coral MUS in any PRIA precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral Permit... surrendering to the Regional Administrator any current permit for the precious coral fishery issued under §...

  17. Plasmodium falciparum full life cycle and Plasmodium ovale liver stages in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Soulard, Valérie; Bosson-Vanga, Henriette; Lorthiois, Audrey; Roucher, Clémentine; Franetich, Jean-François; Zanghi, Gigliola; Bordessoulles, Mallaury; Tefit, Maurel; Thellier, Marc; Morosan, Serban; Le Naour, Gilles; Capron, Frédérique; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Snounou, Georges; Moreno-Sabater, Alicia; Mazier, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies of Plasmodium parasites that infect humans are restricted by their host specificity. Humanized mice offer a means to overcome this and further provide the opportunity to observe the parasites in vivo. Here we improve on previous protocols to achieve efficient double engraftment of TK-NOG mice by human primary hepatocytes and red blood cells. Thus, we obtain the complete hepatic development of P. falciparum, the transition to the erythrocytic stages, their subsequent multiplication, and the appearance of mature gametocytes over an extended period of observation. Furthermore, using sporozoites derived from two P. ovale-infected patients, we show that human hepatocytes engrafted in TK-NOG mice sustain maturation of the liver stages, and the presence of late-developing schizonts indicate the eventual activation of quiescent parasites. Thus, TK-NOG mice are highly suited for in vivo observations on the Plasmodium species of humans. PMID:26205537

  18. Plasmodium falciparum full life cycle and Plasmodium ovale liver stages in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Soulard, Valérie; Bosson-Vanga, Henriette; Lorthiois, Audrey; Roucher, Clémentine; Franetich, Jean- François; Zanghi, Gigliola; Bordessoulles, Mallaury; Tefit, Maurel; Thellier, Marc; Morosan, Serban; Le Naour, Gilles; Capron, Frédérique; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Snounou, Georges; Moreno-Sabater, Alicia; Mazier, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies of Plasmodium parasites that infect humans are restricted by their host specificity. Humanized mice offer a means to overcome this and further provide the opportunity to observe the parasites in vivo. Here we improve on previous protocols to achieve efficient double engraftment of TK-NOG mice by human primary hepatocytes and red blood cells. Thus, we obtain the complete hepatic development of P. falciparum, the transition to the erythrocytic stages, their subsequent multiplication, and the appearance of mature gametocytes over an extended period of observation. Furthermore, using sporozoites derived from two P. ovale-infected patients, we show that human hepatocytes engrafted in TK-NOG mice sustain maturation of the liver stages, and the presence of late-developing schizonts indicate the eventual activation of quiescent parasites. Thus, TK-NOG mice are highly suited for in vivo observations on the Plasmodium species of humans. PMID:26205537

  19. Population genetics of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax and asymptomatic malaria in Temotu Province, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Temotu Province, Solomon Islands is progressing toward malaria elimination. A baseline survey conducted in 2008 showed that most Plasmodium infections in the province were of low parasite density and asymptomatic infections. To better understand mechanisms underlying these malaria transmission characteristics genetic diversity and relationships among Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax populations in the province were examined. Methods Forty-five P. falciparum and 67 P. vivax samples collected in the 2008 baseline survey were successfully genotyped using eight P. falciparum and seven P. vivax microsatellite markers. Genetic diversity, relationships and distribution of both P. falciparum and P. vivax populations were analysed. Results Plasmodium falciparum population exhibited low diversity with 19 haplotypes identified and had closely related clusters indicating clonal expansion. Interestingly, a dominant haplotype was significantly associated with fever and high parasite density. In contrast, the P. vivax population was highly diverse with 58 haplotypes identified that were not closely related. Parasite populations between different islands in the province showed low genetic differentiation. Conclusion The low diversity and clonal population of P. falciparum population may partially account for clinical immunity developed against illness. However, it is possible that importation of a new P. falciparum strain was the major cause of illness. High diversity in P. vivax population and low relatedness between strains suggested clinical immunity to P. vivax may be maintained by different mechanisms. The genetic diversity, population structure and distribution of strains indicate that transmission of P. falciparum was low, but that of P. vivax was still high in 2008. These data will be useful for assessing changes in malaria transmission resulting from interventions. PMID:24261646

  20. Use of a colorimetric (DELI) test for the evaluation of chemoresistance of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax resistance to available anti-malarial drugs represents a major drawback in the control of malaria and its associated morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemoresistance profile of P. falciparum and P. vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in a malaria-endemic area in the Brazilian Amazon. Methods The study was carried out in Manaus (Amazonas state), in the Brazilian Amazon. A total of 88 P. falciparum and 178 P. vivax isolates was collected from 2004 to 2007. The sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates was determined to chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine and artesunate and the sensitivity of P. vivax isolates was determined to chloroquine and mefloquine, by using the colorimetric DELI test. Results As expected, a high prevalence of P. falciparum isolates resistant to chloroquine (78.1%) was observed. The prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance or decreased sensitivity for quinine, mefloquine and artesunate was 12.7, 21.2 and 11.7%, respectively. In the case of P. vivax, the prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance for chloroquine and mefloquine was 9.8 and 28%, respectively. No differences in the frequencies of isolates with profile of resistance or geometric mean IC50s were seen when comparing the data obtained in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007, for all tested anti-malarials. Conclusions The great majority of P. falciparum isolates in the Brazilian malaria-endemic area remain resistant to chloroquine, and the decreased sensitivity to quinine, mefloquine and artesunate observed in 10–20% of the isolates must be taken with concern, especially for artesunate. Plasmodium vivax isolates also showed a significant proportion of isolates with decreased sensitivity to chloroquine (first-line drug) and mainly to mefloquine. The data presented here also confirm the usefulness of the DELI test to generate results able to impact on public health

  1. 3D-QSAR studies on Plasmodium falciparam proteins: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Divakar, Selva; Hariharan, Sivaram

    2015-01-01

    3D-QSAR has become a very important tool in the field of Drug Discovery, especially in important areas like malarial research. The 3D-QSAR is principally a ligand-based drug design but the bioactive conformation of the ligand can also be taken into account in constructing a 3D-QSAR model. The induction of receptor-based 3D-QSAR has been proven to give more robust statistical models. In this review, we have discussed the various 3D-QSAR works done so far which were aimed at combating malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparam. We have also discussed the various enzymes/receptors (targets) in Plasmodium falciparam for which the 3D-QSAR had been generated. The enzymes - wild and mutated dihydrofolate reductase, enoyl acyl protein carrier protein reductase, farnesyltransferase, cytochrome bc1, and falcipains were the major targets for pharmacophore-based drug design. Apart from the above-mentioned targets there were many scaffolds for which the target macromolecule was undefined and could have single/multiple targets. The generated 3D-QSAR model can be used to identify hits by screening the pharmacophore against a chemical library. In this review, the hits identified against various targets of plasmodium falciparam that have been discussed along with their basic scaffold. The various software programs and chemical databases that have been used in the generation of 3D-QSAR and screening were given. From this review, we understand that there is a considerable need to develop novel scaffolds that are different from the existing ligands to overcome cross-resistance. PMID:25543683

  2. Colombian Anopheles triannulatus (Diptera: Culicidae) Naturally Infected with Plasmodium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Rosero, Doris A.; Naranjo-Diaz, Nelson; Alvarez, Natalí; Cienfuegos, Astrid V.; Luckhart, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    The role of Anopheles triannulatus as a local vector has not yet been defined for malaria-endemic regions of Colombia. Therefore, the aim of this work was to detect An. triannulatus naturally infected with Plasmodium spp., as an approximation to determining its importance as malaria vector in the country. A total of 510 An. triannulatus were collected in six malaria-endemic localities of NW and SE Colombia from January 2009 to March 2011. In the NW, two specimens were naturally infected; one with Plasmodium vivax VK247, collected biting on humans and the other with Plasmodium falciparum, collected resting on cattle. In the SE, two specimens were positive for P. falciparum. Although these results show An. triannulatus naturally infected with Plasmodium, further studies are recommended to demonstrate the epidemiological importance of this species in malaria-endemic regions of Colombia. PMID:27335865

  3. Plasmodium species: master renovators of their host cells.

    PubMed

    de Koning-Ward, Tania F; Dixon, Matthew W A; Tilley, Leann; Gilson, Paul R

    2016-08-01

    Plasmodium parasites, the causative agents of malaria, have developed elaborate strategies that they use to survive and thrive within different intracellular environments. During the blood stage of infection, the parasite is a master renovator of its erythrocyte host cell, and the changes in cell morphology and function that are induced by the parasite promote survival and contribute to the pathogenesis of severe malaria. In this Review, we discuss how Plasmodium parasites use the protein trafficking motif Plasmodium export element (PEXEL), protease-mediated polypeptide processing, a novel translocon termed the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins (PTEX) and exomembranous structures to export hundreds of proteins to discrete subcellular locations in the host erythrocytes, which enables the parasite to gain access to vital nutrients and to evade the immune defence mechanisms of the host. PMID:27374802

  4. Placental Histopathological Changes Associated with Plasmodium vivax Infection during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowski, Jamille G.; Ippólito, Vanessa; Aitken, Elizabeth H.; Valle, Suiane N.; Álvarez, José M.; Epiphânio, Sabrina; Marinho, Claudio R. F.

    2013-01-01

    Histological evidence of Plasmodium in the placenta is indicative of placental malaria, a condition associated with severe outcomes for mother and child. Histological lesions found in placentas from Plasmodium-exposed women include syncytial knotting, syncytial rupture, thickening of the placental barrier, necrosis of villous tissue and intervillositis. These histological changes have been associated with P. falciparum infections, but little is known about the contribution of P. vivax to such changes. We conducted a cross-sectional study with pregnant women at delivery and assigned them to three groups according to their Plasmodium exposure during pregnancy: no Plasmodium exposure (n = 41), P. vivax exposure (n = 59) or P. falciparum exposure (n = 19). We evaluated their placentas for signs of Plasmodium and placental lesions using ten histological parameters: syncytial knotting, syncytial rupture, placental barrier thickness, villi necrosis, intervillous space area, intervillous leucocytes, intervillous mononucleates, intervillous polymorphonucleates, parasitized erythrocytes and hemozoin. Placentas from P. vivax-exposed women showed little evidence of Plasmodium or hemozoin but still exhibited more lesions than placentas from women not exposed to Plasmodium, especially when infections occurred twice or more during pregnancy. In the Brazilian state of Acre, where diagnosis and primary treatment are readily available and placental lesions occur in the absence of detected placental parasites, relying on the presence of Plasmodium in the placenta to evaluate Plasmodium-induced placental pathology is not feasible. Multivariate logistic analysis revealed that syncytial knotting (odds ratio [OR], 4.21, P = 0.045), placental barrier thickness (OR, 25.59, P = 0.021) and mononuclear cells (OR, 4.02, P = 0.046) were increased in placentas from P. vivax-exposed women when compared to women not exposed to Plasmodium during pregnancy. A vivax-score was

  5. 77 FR 16836 - Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition for Objection to State Operating Permit for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... San Juan Citizens Alliance, and Carson Forest Watch (Petitioners) to object to the operating permit..., Region 6. BILLING CODE 6560-50-P ... Public Service Company of New Mexico, San Juan Generating Station AGENCY: Environmental Protection...

  6. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Complicating Dengue and Plasmodium vivax Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Khurram, Muhammad; Faheem, Muhammad; Umar, Muhammad; Yasin, Asif; Qayyum, Wajeeha; Ashraf, Amna; Zahid Khan, Javeria; Hasnain Yasir, Ali; Ansari, Yusra; Asad, Muhammad; Khan, Iram; Abbas, Shuja; Rasheed, Irum; Rasool, Natasha; Bushra Khar, Hamama Tul

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare disorder. Dysfunction of cytotoxic T and natural killer (NK) cells causes uncontrolled activity of lymphocytes and histiocytes which leads to HLH. Infections, malignancies, and autoimmune disorders are associated with development of HLH. Dengue and Plasmodium vivax are rare causes of HLH. We report the first ever case of a young man who developed fatal HLH that complicated Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) and Plasmodium vivax infection. PMID:26504465

  7. Avoiding Title V permitting pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Laswell, D.L.

    1993-04-01

    Title V of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments requires states to implement new air operating permit programs. States have a great deal of flexibility in developing their permit programs. Industry should work now to ensure that state programs contain the favorable aspects of the federal regulations and do not contain more stringent requirements that are not required under the Clean Air Act. This article outlines areas of the permit program that have the potential to handicap industry`s ability to expand.

  8. Rheopathologic Consequence of Plasmodium vivax Rosette Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rou; Lee, Wenn-Chyau; Lau, Yee-Ling; Albrecht, Letusa; Lopes, Stefanie C P; Costa, Fabio T M; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Nosten, Francois; Cooke, Brian M; Rénia, Laurent; Russell, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Malaria parasites dramatically alter the rheological properties of infected red blood cells. In the case of Plasmodium vivax, the parasite rapidly decreases the shear elastic modulus of the invaded RBC, enabling it to avoid splenic clearance. This study highlights correlation between rosette formation and altered membrane deformability of P. vivax-infected erythrocytes, where the rosette-forming infected erythrocytes are significantly more rigid than their non-rosetting counterparts. The adhesion of normocytes to the PvIRBC is strong (mean binding force of 440pN) resulting in stable rosette formation even under high physiological shear flow stress. Rosetting may contribute to the sequestration of PvIRBC schizonts in the host microvasculature or spleen. PMID:27509168

  9. Plasmodium falciparum: multifaceted resistance to artemisinins.

    PubMed

    Paloque, Lucie; Ramadani, Arba P; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Augereau, Jean-Michel; Benoit-Vical, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinins, the most potent and fastest acting anti-malarials, threatens malaria elimination strategies. Artemisinin resistance is due to mutation of the PfK13 propeller domain and involves an unconventional mechanism based on a quiescence state leading to parasite recrudescence as soon as drug pressure is removed. The enhanced P. falciparum quiescence capacity of artemisinin-resistant parasites results from an increased ability to manage oxidative damage and an altered cell cycle gene regulation within a complex network involving the unfolded protein response, the PI3K/PI3P/AKT pathway, the PfPK4/eIF2α cascade and yet unidentified transcription factor(s), with minimal energetic requirements and fatty acid metabolism maintained in the mitochondrion and apicoplast. The detailed study of these mechanisms offers a way forward for identifying future intervention targets to fend off established artemisinin resistance. PMID:26955948

  10. Artemisinin Action and Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Leann; Straimer, Judith; Gnädig, Nina F; Ralph, Stuart A; Fidock, David A

    2016-09-01

    The worldwide use of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) has contributed in recent years to a substantial reduction in deaths resulting from Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Resistance to artemisinins, however, has emerged in Southeast Asia. Clinically, resistance is defined as a slower rate of parasite clearance in patients treated with an artemisinin derivative or an ACT. These slow clearance rates associate with enhanced survival rates of ring-stage parasites briefly exposed in vitro to dihydroartemisinin. We describe recent progress made in defining the molecular basis of artemisinin resistance, which has identified a primary role for the P. falciparum K13 protein. Using K13 mutations as molecular markers, epidemiological studies are now tracking the emergence and spread of artemisinin resistance. Mechanistic studies suggest potential ways to overcome resistance. PMID:27289273

  11. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola.

    PubMed

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information on malaria drug resistance in Angola, is reviewed and discussed. The review aims to inform but also to encourage future research studies that monitor and update the information on anti-malarial drug efficacy and prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance, key fields in the context and objectives of elimination. PMID:26858018

  12. Rheopathologic Consequence of Plasmodium vivax Rosette Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Yee-Ling; Albrecht, Letusa; Lopes, Stefanie C. P.; Costa, Fabio T. M.; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Nosten, Francois; Cooke, Brian M.; Rénia, Laurent; Russell, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Malaria parasites dramatically alter the rheological properties of infected red blood cells. In the case of Plasmodium vivax, the parasite rapidly decreases the shear elastic modulus of the invaded RBC, enabling it to avoid splenic clearance. This study highlights correlation between rosette formation and altered membrane deformability of P. vivax-infected erythrocytes, where the rosette-forming infected erythrocytes are significantly more rigid than their non-rosetting counterparts. The adhesion of normocytes to the PvIRBC is strong (mean binding force of 440pN) resulting in stable rosette formation even under high physiological shear flow stress. Rosetting may contribute to the sequestration of PvIRBC schizonts in the host microvasculature or spleen. PMID:27509168

  13. Development of vaccines for Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Ivo; Shakri, Ahmad Rushdi; Chitnis, Chetan E

    2015-12-22

    Plasmodium vivax continues to cause significant morbidity outside Africa with more than 50% of malaria cases in many parts of South and South-east Asia, Pacific islands, Central and South America being attributed to P. vivax infections. The unique biology of P. vivax, including its ability to form latent hypnozoites that emerge months to years later to cause blood stage infections, early appearance of gametocytes before clinical symptoms are apparent and a shorter development cycle in the vector makes elimination of P. vivax using standard control tools difficult. The availability of an effective vaccine that provides protection and prevents transmission would be a valuable tool in efforts to eliminate P. vivax. Here, we review the latest developments related to P. vivax malaria vaccines and discuss the challenges as well as directions toward the goal of developing highly efficacious vaccines against P. vivax malaria. PMID:26428453

  14. The paradoxical population genetics of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Daniel L; Volkman, Sarah K; Nielsen, Kaare M; Barry, Alyssa E; Day, Karen P; Wirth, Dyann F; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2002-06-01

    Among the leading causes of death in African children is cerebral malaria caused by the parasitic protozoan Plasmodium falciparum. Endemic forms of this disease are thought to have originated in central Africa 5000-10000 years ago, coincident with the innovation of slash-and-burn agriculture and the diversification of the Anopheles gambiae complex of mosquito vectors. Population genetic studies of P. falciparum have yielded conflicting results. Some evidence suggests that today's population includes multiple ancient lineages pre-dating human speciation. Other evidence suggests that today's population derives from only one, or a small number, of these ancient lineages. Resolution of this issue is important for the evaluation of the long-term efficacy of drug and immunological control strategies. PMID:12036741

  15. Population structure and recent evolution of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Stephen M.; Ayala, Francisco J.

    2000-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the agent of malignant malaria, one of mankind's most severe maladies. The parasite exhibits antigenic polymorphisms that have been postulated to be ancient. We have proposed that the extant world populations of P. falciparum have derived from one single parasite, a cenancestor, within the last 5,000–50,000 years. This inference derives from the virtual or complete absence of synonymous nucleotide polymorphisms at genes not involved in immune or drug responses. Seeking to conciliate this claim with extensive antigenic polymorphism, we first note that allele substitutions or polymorphisms can arise very rapidly, even in a single generation, in large populations subject to strong natural selection. Second, new alleles can arise not only by single-nucleotide mutations, but also by duplication/deletion of short simple-repeat DNA sequences, a process several orders of magnitude faster than single-nucleotide mutation. We analyze three antigenic genes known to be extremely polymorphic: Csp, Msp-1, and Msp-2. We identify regions consisting of tandem or proximally repetitive short DNA sequences, including some previously unnoticed. We conclude that the antigenic polymorphisms are consistent with the recent origin of the world populations of P. falciparum inferred from the analysis of nonantigenic genes. PMID:10860962

  16. Plasmodium Drug Targets Outside the Genetic Control of the Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Drug development often seeks to find “magic bullets” which target microbiologic proteins while not affecting host proteins. Paul Ehrlich tested methylene blue as an antimalarial but this dye was not superior to quinine. Many successful antimalarial therapies are “magic shotguns” which target many Plasmodium pathways with little interference in host metabolism. Two malaria drug classes, the 8-aminoquinolines and the artemisinins interact with cytochrome P450s and host iron protoporphyrin IX or iron, respectively, to generate toxic metabolites and/or radicals, which kill the parasite by interference with many proteins. The non 8-amino antimalarial quinolines like quinine or piperaquine bind heme to inhibit the process of heme crystallization, which results in multiple enzyme inhibition and membrane dysfunction. The quinolines and artemisinins are rapidly parasiticidal in contrast to metal chelators, which have a slower parasite clearance rate with higher drug concentrations. Iron chelators interfere with the artemisinins but otherwise represent a strategy of targeting multiple enzymes containing iron. Interest has been revived in antineoplastic drugs that target DNA metabolism as antimalarials. Specific drug targeting or investigation of the innate immunity directed to the more permeable trophozoite or schizont infected erythrocyte membrane has been under explored. Novel drug classes in the antimalarial development pipeline which either target multiple proteins or unchangeable cellular targets will slow the pace of drug resistance acquisition. PMID:22973888

  17. Interactive transcriptome analysis of malaria patients and infecting Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Junya; Natori, Anna; Tolba, Mohammed E.M.; Mongan, Arthur E.; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Katayama, Toshiaki; Kawashima, Shuichi; Makalowski, Wojciech; Maeda, Ryuichiro; Eshita, Yuki; Tuda, Josef

    2014-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms of parasitism in vivo, it is essential to elucidate how the transcriptomes of the human hosts and the infecting parasites affect one another. Here we report the RNA-seq analysis of 116 Indonesian patients infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (Pf). We extracted RNAs from their peripheral blood as a mixture of host and parasite transcripts and mapped the RNA-seq tags to the human and Pf reference genomes to separate the respective tags. We were thus able to simultaneously analyze expression patterns in both humans and parasites. We identified human and parasite genes and pathways that correlated with various clinical data, which may serve as primary targets for drug developments. Of particular importance, we revealed characteristic expression changes in the human innate immune response pathway genes including TLR2 and TICAM2 that correlated with the severity of the malaria infection. We also found a group of transcription regulatory factors, JUND, for example, and signaling molecules, TNFAIP3, for example, that were strongly correlated in the expression patterns of humans and parasites. We also identified several genetic variations in important anti-malaria drug resistance-related genes. Furthermore, we identified the genetic variations which are potentially associated with severe malaria symptoms both in humans and parasites. The newly generated data should collectively lay a unique foundation for understanding variable behaviors of the field malaria parasites, which are far more complex than those observed under laboratory conditions. PMID:25091627

  18. 50 CFR 622.50 - Permits, permit moratorium, and endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.50 Permits, permit moratorium, and... Fishery Management Plan for the Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf Shrimp FMP),......

  19. 50 CFR 622.50 - Permits, permit moratorium, and endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.50 Permits, permit moratorium, and... Fishery Management Plan for the Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf Shrimp FMP),......

  20. Universal Features of Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation Are Critical for Plasmodium Zygote Development

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Gunnar R.; Lasonder, Edwin; Garver, Lindsey S.; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M. D.; Carret, Céline K.; Wiegant, Joop C. A. G.; Dirks, Roeland W.; Dimopoulos, George; Janse, Chris J.; Waters, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    A universal feature of metazoan sexual development is the generation of oocyte P granules that withhold certain mRNA species from translation to provide coding potential for proteins during early post-fertilization development. Stabilisation of translationally quiescent mRNA pools in female Plasmodium gametocytes depends on the RNA helicase DOZI, but the molecular machinery involved in the silencing of transcripts in these protozoans is unknown. Using affinity purification coupled with mass-spectrometric analysis we identify a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) from Plasmodium berghei gametocytes defined by DOZI and the Sm-like factor CITH (homolog of worm CAR-I and fly Trailer Hitch). This mRNP includes 16 major factors, including proteins with homologies to components of metazoan P granules and archaeal proteins. Containing translationally silent transcripts, this mRNP integrates eIF4E and poly(A)-binding protein but excludes P body RNA degradation factors and translation-initiation promoting eIF4G. Gene deletion mutants of 2 core components of this mRNP (DOZI and CITH) are fertilization-competent, but zygotes fail to develop into ookinetes in a female gametocyte-mutant fashion. Through RNA-immunoprecipitation and global expression profiling of CITH-KO mutants we highlight CITH as a crucial repressor of maternally supplied mRNAs. Our data define Plasmodium P granules as an ancient mRNP whose protein core has remained evolutionarily conserved from single-cell organisms to germ cells of multi-cellular animals and stores translationally silent mRNAs that are critical for early post-fertilization development during the initial stages of mosquito infection. Therefore, translational repression may offer avenues as a target for the generation of transmission blocking strategies and contribute to limiting the spread of malaria. PMID:20169188

  1. 40 CFR 72.85 - Permit reopenings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit reopenings. 72.85 Section 72.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Permit Revisions § 72.85 Permit reopenings. (a) The permitting authority shall reopen an Acid Rain permit for cause whenever: (1)...

  2. 50 CFR 665.462 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Permits. (a) Any vessel of the United States fishing for, taking, or retaining Mariana precious coral MUS in any Mariana Archipelago precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious...

  3. 50 CFR 665.262 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Any vessel of the United States fishing for, taking, or retaining Hawaii precious coral MUS in any Hawaiian Archipelago precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral Permit...

  4. 50 CFR 665.162 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... coral MUS in any American Samoa precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral... upon surrendering to the Regional Administrator any current permit for the precious coral...

  5. 50 CFR 665.162 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... coral MUS in any American Samoa precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral... upon surrendering to the Regional Administrator any current permit for the precious coral...

  6. 50 CFR 665.262 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Any vessel of the United States fishing for, taking, or retaining Hawaii precious coral MUS in any Hawaiian Archipelago precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral Permit...

  7. 50 CFR 665.462 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Permits. (a) Any vessel of the United States fishing for, taking, or retaining Mariana precious coral MUS in any Mariana Archipelago precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious...

  8. 50 CFR 665.262 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Any vessel of the United States fishing for, taking, or retaining Hawaii precious coral MUS in any Hawaiian Archipelago precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral Permit...

  9. 50 CFR 665.462 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Permits. (a) Any vessel of the United States fishing for, taking, or retaining Mariana precious coral MUS in any Mariana Archipelago precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious...

  10. 50 CFR 665.262 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Any vessel of the United States fishing for, taking, or retaining Hawaii precious coral MUS in any Hawaiian Archipelago precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral Permit...

  11. 50 CFR 665.162 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... coral MUS in any American Samoa precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral... upon surrendering to the Regional Administrator any current permit for the precious coral...

  12. 50 CFR 665.462 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Permits. (a) Any vessel of the United States fishing for, taking, or retaining Mariana precious coral MUS in any Mariana Archipelago precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious...

  13. 50 CFR 665.262 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Any vessel of the United States fishing for, taking, or retaining Hawaii precious coral MUS in any Hawaiian Archipelago precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral Permit...

  14. 50 CFR 665.162 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... coral MUS in any American Samoa precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral... upon surrendering to the Regional Administrator any current permit for the precious coral...

  15. 50 CFR 665.462 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Permits. (a) Any vessel of the United States fishing for, taking, or retaining Mariana precious coral MUS in any Mariana Archipelago precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious...

  16. 50 CFR 665.162 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... coral MUS in any American Samoa precious coral permit area must have a permit issued under § 665.13. (b) Each permit will be valid for fishing only in the permit area specified on the permit. Precious Coral... upon surrendering to the Regional Administrator any current permit for the precious coral...

  17. Permitted water use in Iowa, 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkle, D.L.; Newman, J.L.; Shields, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes where, how much and for what purpose water is allocated for use in Iowa with permits issued by the Department of Water, Air and Waste Management. In Iowa, from a total permitted water use of 855,175.45 million gallons per year, about 58 percent is from surface-water sources and about 42 percent is from ground-water sources. Streams are 80.5 percent of the total surface-water use and wells make up 80.1 percent of the total ground-water use, with 65.4 percent of ground water coming from surficial aquifers. Power generation is the use category that is permitted the largest amount of total water use, 46.6 percent, with surface water being the source of 96.7 percent and 77.9 percent of the surface water is from streams. The public water suppliers' category is the next largest use type with 15.7 percent of the total permitted water. Ground water constitutes 74.4 percent of the public water supplier category with 51.7 percent from surficial aquifers. Surface water makes up 25.6 percent of this category with 83.0 percent of the surface water withdrawn from streams. Mining comprises 13.4 percent of the total water use and is the third largest water-use category. Ground water is the source of 63.3 percent of permitted mining water use with 94.3 percent of this from quarries and sand and gravel pits. Surface water is the source of 36.7 percent of the permitted mining water use with 97.6 percent from streams. Irrigation is the fourth largest permitted use type using 12.0 percent of the total water use. Eighty-eight percent of irrigation is from ground-water sources where surficial aquifers account for 94.7 percent. Streams are 81.1 percent of irrigational surface-water use. Self-supplied industrial users are permitted 10.6 percent of the total permitted water use with 85.5 percent of this from ground-water sources and 14.5 percent from surface-water sources. Of the self-supplied industrial ground-water use, 47.9 percent comes from surficial aquifers and

  18. Maternal-foetal transfer of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax antibodies in a low transmission setting.

    PubMed

    Charnaud, Sarah C; McGready, Rose; Herten-Crabb, Asha; Powell, Rosanna; Guy, Andrew; Langer, Christine; Richards, Jack S; Gilson, Paul R; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Narum, David L; Pimanpanarak, Mupawjay; Simpson, Julie A; Beeson, James G; Nosten, François; Fowkes, Freya J I

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy immunolglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are transferred from mother to neonate across the placenta. Studies in high transmission areas have shown transfer of P. falciparum-specific IgG, but the extent and factors influencing maternal-foetal transfer in low transmission areas co-endemic for both P. falciparum and P. vivax are unknown. Pregnant women were screened weekly for Plasmodium infection. Mother-neonate paired serum samples at delivery were tested for IgG to antigens from P. falciparum, P. vivax and other infectious diseases. Antibodies to malarial and non-malarial antigens were highly correlated between maternal and neonatal samples (median [range] spearman ρ = 0.78 [0.57-0.93]), although Plasmodium spp. antibodies tended to be lower in neonates than mothers. Estimated gestational age at last P. falciparum infection, but not P. vivax infection, was positively associated with antibody levels in the neonate (P. falciparum merozoite, spearman ρ median [range] 0.42 [0.33-0.66], PfVAR2CSA 0.69; P. vivax ρ = 0.19 [0.09-0.3]). Maternal-foetal transfer of anti-malarial IgG to Plasmodium spp. antigens occurs in low transmission settings. P. vivax IgG acquisition is not associated with recent exposure unlike P. falciparum IgG, suggesting a difference in acquisition of antibodies. IgG transfer is greatest in the final weeks of pregnancy which has implications for the timing of future malaria vaccination strategies in pregnant women. PMID:26861682

  19. High prevalence and genetic diversity of Plasmodium malariae and no evidence of Plasmodium knowlesi in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Fuehrer, Hans-Peter; Swoboda, Paul; Harl, Josef; Starzengruber, Peter; Habler, Verena Elisabeth; Bloeschl, Ingrid; Haque, Rashidul; Matt, Julia; Khan, Wasif Ali; Noedl, Harald

    2014-04-01

    Although the prevalence of malaria remains high in parts of Bangladesh, there continues to be a substantial shortage of information regarding the less common malaria parasites such as Plasmodium malariae or Plasmodium knowlesi. Recent studies indicate that P. malariae may be extremely rare, and so far, there are no data on the presence (or absence) of P. knowlesi in southeastern Bangladesh. Genus- and species-specific nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene was performed to assess the presence and prevalence of P. malariae and P. knowlesi in 2,246 samples originating from asymptomatic and febrile participants of a cross-sectional and a febrile illnesses study in the Chittagong Hill Tracts in southeastern Bangladesh. P. malariae was detected in 60 samples (2.7%) corresponding to 8% of the 746 samples giving positive PCR results for Plasmodium sp., mainly because of the high prevalence (9.5%) among asymptomatic study participants testing positive for malaria. Symptomatic cases were more common (4.3% of all symptomatic malaria cases) during the dry season. Parasitemias were low (1,120-2,560/μl in symptomatic and 120-520/μl in asymptomatic carriers). Symptomatic patients presented mild to moderate symptoms like fever, chills, headache, dizziness, fatigue and myalgia.Although both the intermediate as well as the definite host are known to be endemic in southeastern Bangladesh, no evidence for the presence of P. knowlesi was found. We conclude that the role of P. malariae is highly underestimated in rural Bangladesh with major implications for malaria control and elimination strategies. PMID:24578257

  20. Maternal-foetal transfer of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax antibodies in a low transmission setting

    PubMed Central

    Charnaud, Sarah C.; McGready, Rose; Herten-Crabb, Asha; Powell, Rosanna; Guy, Andrew; Langer, Christine; Richards, Jack S.; Gilson, Paul R.; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Narum, David L.; Pimanpanarak, Mupawjay; Simpson, Julie A.; Beeson, James G.; Nosten, François; Fowkes, Freya J. I.

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy immunolglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are transferred from mother to neonate across the placenta. Studies in high transmission areas have shown transfer of P. falciparum-specific IgG, but the extent and factors influencing maternal-foetal transfer in low transmission areas co-endemic for both P. falciparum and P. vivax are unknown. Pregnant women were screened weekly for Plasmodium infection. Mother-neonate paired serum samples at delivery were tested for IgG to antigens from P. falciparum, P. vivax and other infectious diseases. Antibodies to malarial and non-malarial antigens were highly correlated between maternal and neonatal samples (median [range] spearman ρ = 0.78 [0.57–0.93]), although Plasmodium spp. antibodies tended to be lower in neonates than mothers. Estimated gestational age at last P. falciparum infection, but not P. vivax infection, was positively associated with antibody levels in the neonate (P. falciparum merozoite, spearman ρ median [range] 0.42 [0.33–0.66], PfVAR2CSA 0.69; P. vivax ρ = 0.19 [0.09–0.3]). Maternal-foetal transfer of anti-malarial IgG to Plasmodium spp. antigens occurs in low transmission settings. P. vivax IgG acquisition is not associated with recent exposure unlike P. falciparum IgG, suggesting a difference in acquisition of antibodies. IgG transfer is greatest in the final weeks of pregnancy which has implications for the timing of future malaria vaccination strategies in pregnant women. PMID:26861682

  1. The Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins component EXP2 is critical for establishing a patent malaria infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kalanon, Ming; Bargieri, Daniel; Sturm, Angelika; Matthews, Kathryn; Ghosh, Sreejoyee; Goodman, Christopher D; Thiberge, Sabine; Mollard, Vanessa; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Ménard, Robert; de Koning-Ward, Tania F

    2016-03-01

    Export of most malaria proteins into the erythrocyte cytosol requires the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins (PTEX) and a cleavable Plasmodium export element (PEXEL). In contrast, the contribution of PTEX in the liver stages and export of liver stage proteins is unknown. Here, using the FLP/FRT conditional mutatagenesis system, we generate transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites deficient in EXP2, the putative pore-forming component of PTEX. Our data reveal that EXP2 is important for parasite growth in the liver and critical for parasite transition to the blood, with parasites impaired in their ability to generate a patent blood-stage infection. Surprisingly, whilst parasites expressing a functional PTEX machinery can efficiently export a PEXEL-bearing GFP reporter into the erythrocyte cytosol during a blood stage infection, this same reporter aggregates in large accumulations within the confines of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane during hepatocyte growth. Notably HSP101, the putative molecular motor of PTEX, could not be detected during the early liver stages of infection, which may explain why direct protein translocation of this soluble PEXEL-bearing reporter or indeed native PEXEL proteins into the hepatocyte cytosol has not been observed. This suggests that PTEX function may not be conserved between the blood and liver stages of malaria infection. PMID:26347246

  2. Plasmodium vivax trophozoite-stage proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D.C.; Lapp, Stacey A.; Akinyi, Sheila; Meyer, Esmeralda V.S.; Barnwell, John W.; Korir-Morrison, Cindy; Galinski, Mary R.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the causative infectious agent of 80–300 million annual cases of malaria. Many aspects of this parasite’s biology remain unknown. To further elucidate the interaction of P. vivax with its Saimiri boliviensis host, we obtained detailed proteomes of infected red blood cells, representing the trophozoite-enriched stage of development. Data from two of three biological replicate proteomes, emphasized here, were analyzed using five search engines, which enhanced identifications and resulted in the most comprehensive P. vivax proteomes to date, with 1375 P. vivax and 3209 S. boliviensis identified proteins. Ribosome subunit proteins were noted for both P. vivax and S. boliviensis, consistent with P. vivax’s known reticulocyte host–cell specificity. A majority of the host and pathogen proteins identified belong to specific functional categories, and several parasite gene families, while 33% of the P. vivax proteins have no reported function. Hemoglobin was significantly oxidized in both proteomes, and additional protein oxidation and nitration was detected in one of the two proteomes. Detailed analyses of these post-translational modifications are presented. The proteins identified here significantly expand the known P. vivax proteome and complexity of available host protein functionality underlying the host–parasite interactive biology, and reveal unsuspected oxidative modifications that may impact protein function. Biological significance Plasmodium vivax malaria is a serious neglected disease, causing an estimated 80 to 300 million cases annually in 95 countries. Infection can result in significant morbidity and possible death. P. vivax, unlike the much better-studied Plasmodium falciparum species, cannot be grown in long-term culture, has a dormant form in the liver called the hypnozoite stage, has a reticulocyte host–cell preference in the blood, and creates caveolae vesicle complexes at the surface of the infected reticulocyte

  3. Avian Malaria ( Plasmodium spp.) in Captive Magellanic Penguins ( Spheniscus magellanicus ) from Northern Argentina, 2010.

    PubMed

    Vanstreels, Ralph Eric Thijl; Capellino, Félix; Silveira, Patricia; Braga, Érika M; Rodríguez-Heredia, Sergio Andres; Loureiro, Julio; Catão-Dias, José Luiz

    2016-07-01

    We report two cases of lethal avian malaria in Magellanic Penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) captive at San Clemente del Tuyú, Argentina, approximately 560 km north of Argentinean breeding colonies of Magellanic Penguins. Blood smears revealed both penguins were concurrently infected by Plasmodium (Haemamoeba) tejerai, Plasmodium (Huffia) sp., and Plasmodium (Novyella) sp. PMID:27285418

  4. 40 CFR 60.4121 - Submission of Hg budget permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of Hg budget permit... Times for Coal-Fired Electric Steam Generating Units Permits § 60.4121 Submission of Hg budget permit applications. (a) Duty to apply. The Hg designated representative of any Hg Budget source required to have...

  5. The proliferating cell hypothesis: a metabolic framework for Plasmodium growth and development☆

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo-Sora, J. Enrique; Caamano-Gutierrez, Eva; Ward, Stephen A.; Biagini, Giancarlo A.

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesise that intraerythrocytic malaria parasite metabolism is not merely fulfilling the need for ATP generation, but is evolved to support rapid proliferation, similar to that seen in other rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells. Deregulated glycolytic activity coupled with impaired mitochondrial metabolism is a metabolic strategy to generate glycolytic intermediates essential for rapid biomass generation for schizogony. Further, we discuss the possibility that Plasmodium metabolism is not only a functional consequence of the ‘hard-wired’ genome and argue that metabolism may also have a causal role in triggering the cascade of events that leads to developmental stage transitions. This hypothesis offers a framework to rationalise the observations of aerobic glycolysis, atypical mitochondrial metabolism, and metabolic switching in nonproliferating stages. PMID:24636355

  6. Chimpanzee Malaria Parasites Related to Plasmodium ovale in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Linda; Nerrienet, Eric; Rousset, Dominique; Sadeuh Mba, Serge Alain; Houze, Sandrine; Fourment, Mathieu; Le Bras, Jacques; Robert, Vincent; Ariey, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1970's, the diversity of Plasmodium parasites in African great apes has been neglected. Surprisingly, P. reichenowi, a chimpanzee parasite, is the only such parasite to have been molecularly characterized. This parasite is closely phylogenetically related to P. falciparum, the principal cause of the greatest malaria burden in humans. Studies of malaria parasites from anthropoid primates may provide relevant phylogenetic information, improving our understanding of the origin and evolutionary history of human malaria species. In this study, we screened 130 DNA samples from chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) from Cameroon for Plasmodium infection, using cytochrome b molecular tools. Two chimpanzees from the subspecies Pan t. troglodytes presented single infections with Plasmodium strains molecularly related to the human malaria parasite P. ovale. These chimpanzee parasites and 13 human strains of P. ovale originated from a various sites in Africa and Asia were characterized using cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase 1 mitochondrial partial genes and nuclear ldh partial gene. Consistent with previous findings, two genetically distinct types of P. ovale, classical and variant, were observed in the human population from a variety of geographical locations. One chimpanzee Plasmodium strain was genetically identical, on all three markers tested, to variant P. ovale type. The other chimpanzee Plasmodium strain was different from P. ovale strains isolated from humans. This study provides the first evidence of possibility of natural cross-species exchange of P. ovale between humans and chimpanzees of the subspecies Pan t. troglodytes. PMID:19436742

  7. Physicochemical Aspects of the Plasmodium chabaudi-Infected Erythrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Eri H.; Kobayashi, Seiki; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Membrane electrochemical potential is a feature of the molecular profile of the cell membrane and the two-dimensional arrangement of its charge-bearing molecules. Plasmodium species, the causative agents of malaria, are intracellular parasites that remodel host erythrocytes by expressing their own proteins on erythrocyte membranes. Although various aspects of the modifications made to the host erythrocyte membrane have been extensively studied in some human Plasmodium species (such as Plasmodium falciparum), details of the structural and molecular biological modifications made to host erythrocytes by nonhuman Plasmodium parasites have not been studied. We employed zeta potential analysis of erythrocytes parasitized by P. chabaudi, a nonhuman Plasmodium parasite. From these measurements, we found that the surface potential shift was more negative for P. chabaudi-infected erythrocytes than for P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. However, electron microscopic analysis of the surface of P. chabaudi-infected erythrocytes did not reveal any modifications as compared with nonparasitized erythrocytes. These results suggest that differences in the membrane modifications found herein represent unique attributes related to the pathogenesis profiles of the two different malaria parasite species in different host animals and that these features have been acquired through parasite adaptations acquired over long evolutionary time periods. PMID:26557685

  8. Implications of Glutathione Levels in the Plasmodium berghei Response to Chloroquine and Artemisinin.

    PubMed

    Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Pastrana-Mena, Rebecca; Crespo-Lladó, Keila N; Ortiz, José G; Ferrer-Rodríguez, Iván; Serrano, Adelfa E

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most devastating parasitic diseases worldwide. Plasmodium drug resistance remains a major challenge to malaria control and has led to the re-emergence of the disease. Chloroquine (CQ) and artemisinin (ART) are thought to exert their anti-malarial activity inducing cytotoxicity in the parasite by blocking heme degradation (for CQ) and increasing oxidative stress. Besides the contribution of the CQ resistance transporter (PfCRT) and the multidrug resistant gene (pfmdr), CQ resistance has also been associated with increased parasite glutathione (GSH) levels. ART resistance was recently shown to be associated with mutations in the K13-propeller protein. To analyze the role of GSH levels in CQ and ART resistance, we generated transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites either deficient in or overexpressing the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene (pbggcs) encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH biosynthesis. These lines produce either lower (pbggcs-ko) or higher (pbggcs-oe) levels of GSH than wild type parasites. In addition, GSH levels were determined in P. berghei parasites resistant to CQ and mefloquine (MQ). Increased GSH levels were detected in both, CQ and MQ resistant parasites, when compared to the parental sensitive clone. Sensitivity to CQ and ART remained unaltered in both pgggcs-ko and pbggcs-oe parasites when tested in a 4 days drug suppressive assay. However, recrudescence assays after the parasites have been exposed to a sub-lethal dose of ART showed that parasites with low levels of GSH are more sensitive to ART treatment. These results suggest that GSH levels influence Plasmodium berghei response to ART treatment. PMID:26010448

  9. Structure- and function-based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; van der Linden, Wouter A; Xie, Stanley C; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-02-11

    The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation. Compounds that target the proteasome are potentially valuable tools for the treatment of pathogens that depend on proteasome function for survival and replication. In particular, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at all stages of its life cycle. Most compounds that have been tested against the parasite also inhibit the mammalian proteasome, resulting in toxicity that precludes their use as therapeutic agents. Therefore, better definition of the substrate specificity and structural properties of the Plasmodium proteasome could enable the development of compounds with sufficient selectivity to allow their use as anti-malarial agents. To accomplish this goal, here we use a substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and P. falciparum proteasome. We design inhibitors based on amino-acid preferences specific to the parasite proteasome, and find that they preferentially inhibit the β2-subunit. We determine the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to the inhibitor using cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparum β2 active site and provide valuable information about active-site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, consistent with the recent finding that the proteasome is important for stress pathways associated with resistance of artemisinin family anti-malarials, we observe growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β2-selective inhibitor in artemisinin-sensitive and -resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrate that a parasite-selective inhibitor could be used to attenuate parasite growth in vivo without appreciable toxicity to the host. Thus, the Plasmodium proteasome is a

  10. Implications of Glutathione Levels in the Plasmodium berghei Response to Chloroquine and Artemisinin

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Pastrana-Mena, Rebecca; Crespo-Lladó, Keila N.; Ortiz, José G.; Ferrer-Rodríguez, Iván; Serrano, Adelfa E.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most devastating parasitic diseases worldwide. Plasmodium drug resistance remains a major challenge to malaria control and has led to the re-emergence of the disease. Chloroquine (CQ) and artemisinin (ART) are thought to exert their anti-malarial activity inducing cytotoxicity in the parasite by blocking heme degradation (for CQ) and increasing oxidative stress. Besides the contribution of the CQ resistance transporter (PfCRT) and the multidrug resistant gene (pfmdr), CQ resistance has also been associated with increased parasite glutathione (GSH) levels. ART resistance was recently shown to be associated with mutations in the K13-propeller protein. To analyze the role of GSH levels in CQ and ART resistance, we generated transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites either deficient in or overexpressing the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene (pbggcs) encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH biosynthesis. These lines produce either lower (pbggcs-ko) or higher (pbggcs-oe) levels of GSH than wild type parasites. In addition, GSH levels were determined in P. berghei parasites resistant to CQ and mefloquine (MQ). Increased GSH levels were detected in both, CQ and MQ resistant parasites, when compared to the parental sensitive clone. Sensitivity to CQ and ART remained unaltered in both pgggcs-ko and pbggcs-oe parasites when tested in a 4 days drug suppressive assay. However, recrudescence assays after the parasites have been exposed to a sub-lethal dose of ART showed that parasites with low levels of GSH are more sensitive to ART treatment. These results suggest that GSH levels influence Plasmodium berghei response to ART treatment. PMID:26010448

  11. Structure and function based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Xie, Stanley C.; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T.; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S.; da Fonseca, Paula C. A.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium proteasome is a chemically tractable target that could be exploited by next generation anti-malarial agents. PMID:26863983

  12. Genetic distance in housekeeping genes between Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium reichenowi and within P. falciparum.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Sakihama, Naoko; Hattori, Tetsuya; Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa; Goldman, Ira; Escalante, Ananias A; Lal, Altaf A

    2004-11-01

    The time to the most recent common ancestor of the extant populations of Plasmodium falciparum is controversial. The controversy primarily stems from the limited availability of sequences from Plasmodium reichenowi, a chimpanzee malaria parasite closely related to P. falciparum. Since the rate of nucleotide substitution differs in different loci and DNA regions, the estimation of genetic distance between P. falciparum and P. reichenowi should be performed using orthologous sequences that are evolving neutrally. Here, we obtained full-length sequences of two housekeeping genes, sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -ATPase (serca) and lactate dehydrogenase (ldh), from 11 isolates of P. falciparum and 1 isolate of P. reichenowi and estimate the interspecific genetic distance (divergence) between the two species and intraspecific genetic distance (polymorphism) within P. falciparum. Interspecific distance and intraspecific distance at synonymous sites of interspecies-conserved regions of serca and ldh were 0.0672 +/- 0.0088 and 0.0011 +/- 0.0007, respectively, using the Nei and Gojobori method. Based on the ratio of interspecific distance to intraspecific distance, the time to the most recent common ancestor of P. falciparum was estimated to be (8.30 +/- 5.40) x 10(4) and (11.62 +/- 7.56) x 10(4) years ago, assuming the divergence time of the two parasite species to be 5 and 7 million years ago, respectively. PMID:15693624

  13. Plasmodium falciparum Secretome in Erythrocyte and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Soni, Rani; Sharma, Drista; Bhatt, Tarun K

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of deadly malaria disease. It is an intracellular eukaryote and completes its multi-stage life cycle spanning the two hosts viz, mosquito and human. In order to habituate within host environment, parasite conform several strategies to evade host immune responses such as surface antigen polymorphism or modulation of host immune system and it is mediated by secretion of proteins from parasite to the host erythrocyte and beyond, collectively known as, malaria secretome. In this review, we will discuss about the deployment of parasitic secretory protein in mechanism implicated for immune evasion, protein trafficking, providing virulence, changing permeability and cyto-adherence of infected erythrocyte. We will be covering the possibilities of developing malaria secretome as a drug/vaccine target. This gathered information will be worthwhile in depicting a well-organized picture for host-pathogen interplay during the malaria infection and may also provide some clues for the development of novel anti-malarial therapies. PMID:26925057

  14. Plasmodium falciparum Secretome in Erythrocyte and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Rani; Sharma, Drista; Bhatt, Tarun K.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of deadly malaria disease. It is an intracellular eukaryote and completes its multi-stage life cycle spanning the two hosts viz, mosquito and human. In order to habituate within host environment, parasite conform several strategies to evade host immune responses such as surface antigen polymorphism or modulation of host immune system and it is mediated by secretion of proteins from parasite to the host erythrocyte and beyond, collectively known as, malaria secretome. In this review, we will discuss about the deployment of parasitic secretory protein in mechanism implicated for immune evasion, protein trafficking, providing virulence, changing permeability and cyto-adherence of infected erythrocyte. We will be covering the possibilities of developing malaria secretome as a drug/vaccine target. This gathered information will be worthwhile in depicting a well-organized picture for host-pathogen interplay during the malaria infection and may also provide some clues for the development of novel anti-malarial therapies. PMID:26925057

  15. Temperature alters Plasmodium blocking by Wolbachia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, Courtney C.; Blanford, Simon; Hughes, Grant L.; Rasgon, Jason L.; Thomas, Matthew B.

    2014-02-01

    Very recently, the Asian malaria vector (Anopheles stephensi) was stably transinfected with the wAlbB strain of Wolbachia, inducing refractoriness to the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. However, conditions in the field can differ substantially from those in the laboratory. We use the rodent malaria P. yoelii, and somatically transinfected An. stephensi as a model system to investigate whether the transmission blocking potential of wAlbB is likely to be robust across different thermal environments. wAlbB reduced malaria parasite prevalence and oocyst intensity at 28°C. At 24°C there was no effect on prevalence but a marked increase in oocyst intensity. At 20°C, wAlbB had no effect on prevalence or intensity. Additionally, we identified a novel effect of wAlbB that resulted in reduced sporozoite development across temperatures, counterbalancing the oocyst enhancement at 24°C. Our results demonstrate complex effects of temperature on the Wolbachia-malaria interaction, and suggest the impacts of transinfection might vary across diverse environments.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of the Plasmodium falciparum genome.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Michael F; Selvarajah, Shamista A; Josling, Gabrielle A; Petter, Michaela

    2014-05-01

    Recent research has highlighted some unique aspects of chromatin biology in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. During its erythrocytic lifecycle P. falciparum maintains its genome primarily as unstructured euchromatin. Indeed there is no clear role for chromatin-mediated silencing of the majority of the developmentally expressed genes in P. falciparum. However discontinuous stretches of heterochromatin are critical for variegated expression of contingency genes that mediate key pathogenic processes in malaria. These range from invasion of erythrocytes and antigenic variation to solute transport and growth adaptation in response to environmental changes. Despite lack of structure within euchromatin the nucleus maintains functional compartments that regulate expression of many genes at the nuclear periphery, particularly genes with clonally variant expression. The typical components of the chromatin regulatory machinery are present in P. falciparum; however, some of these appear to have evolved novel species-specific functions, e.g. the dynamic regulation of histone variants at virulence gene promoters. The parasite also appears to have repeatedly acquired chromatin regulatory proteins through lateral transfer from endosymbionts and from the host. P. falciparum chromatin regulators have been successfully targeted with multiple drugs in laboratory studies; hopefully their functional divergence from human counterparts will allow the development of parasite-specific inhibitors. PMID:24326119

  17. Induction of gene amplification in Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Human erythrocytic in vitro cultures of Honduras I strain of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have been stressed stepwise with increasing concentrations of methotrexate (MTX), a folate antagonist. This selection has produced a strain that is 450 times more resistant to the drug than the original culture. Uptake of sublethal doses of radiolabeled MTX by infected red blood cells was 6-36 times greater in the resistant cultures than in the nonresistant controls. DNA isolated from all of the parasites was probed by hybridization with /sup 35/S-labeled DNA derived from a clone of the yeast thymidylate synthetase (TS) gene. This showed 50 to 100 times more increased hybridization of the TS probe to the DNA from the resistant parasites is direct evidence of gene amplification because DHFR and TS are actually one and the same bifunctional enzyme in P. falciparum. Hence, the evidence presented indicates that induced resistance of the malaria parasite to MTX in this case is due to overproduction of DHFR resulting from amplification of the DHFR-TS gene.

  18. ENCOURAGING INNOVATION THROUGH UMBRELLA PERMITTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to assess the behavioral, technical, economic, and environmental effects of removing disincentives to innovation in production and pollution management through more flexible environmental permitting. The study will examine the characteristics of tra...

  19. 40 CFR 70.6 - Permit content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permit content. 70.6 Section 70.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS § 70.6 Permit content. (a) Standard permit requirements. Each permit issued...

  20. 40 CFR 70.6 - Permit content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permit content. 70.6 Section 70.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS § 70.6 Permit content. (a) Standard permit requirements. Each permit issued...

  1. 40 CFR 70.6 - Permit content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permit content. 70.6 Section 70.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS § 70.6 Permit content. (a) Standard permit requirements. Each permit issued...

  2. 40 CFR 70.6 - Permit content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit content. 70.6 Section 70.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS § 70.6 Permit content. (a) Standard permit requirements. Each permit issued...

  3. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit shield. 72.51 Section 72.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the...

  4. 40 CFR 72.85 - Permit reopenings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATION Permit Revisions § 72.85 Permit reopenings. (a) The permitting authority shall reopen an Acid Rain permit for cause whenever: (1) Any additional requirement under the Acid Rain Program becomes applicable... revoked to assure compliance with Acid Rain Program requirements. (b) In reopening an Acid Rain permit...

  5. 40 CFR 72.85 - Permit reopenings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATION Permit Revisions § 72.85 Permit reopenings. (a) The permitting authority shall reopen an Acid Rain permit for cause whenever: (1) Any additional requirement under the Acid Rain Program becomes applicable... revoked to assure compliance with Acid Rain Program requirements. (b) In reopening an Acid Rain permit...

  6. 40 CFR 72.85 - Permit reopenings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATION Permit Revisions § 72.85 Permit reopenings. (a) The permitting authority shall reopen an Acid Rain permit for cause whenever: (1) Any additional requirement under the Acid Rain Program becomes applicable... revoked to assure compliance with Acid Rain Program requirements. (b) In reopening an Acid Rain permit...

  7. 45 CFR 671.8 - Permit administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit administration. 671.8 Section 671.8 Public... Permits § 671.8 Permit administration. (a) Issuance of permits. The Director may approve an application... permit, the Director shall publish notice of the issuance or denial in the Federal Register,...

  8. 40 CFR 72.85 - Permit reopenings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATION Permit Revisions § 72.85 Permit reopenings. (a) The permitting authority shall reopen an Acid Rain permit for cause whenever: (1) Any additional requirement under the Acid Rain Program becomes applicable... revoked to assure compliance with Acid Rain Program requirements. (b) In reopening an Acid Rain permit...

  9. 40 CFR 172.5 - The permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The permit. 172.5 Section 172.5... PERMITS Federal Issuance of Experimental Use Permits § 172.5 The permit. (a) Issuance. The Experimental Use Permit shall be issued when the Administrator determines that the conditions of section 5 of...

  10. 40 CFR 172.5 - The permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The permit. 172.5 Section 172.5... PERMITS Federal Issuance of Experimental Use Permits § 172.5 The permit. (a) Issuance. The Experimental Use Permit shall be issued when the Administrator determines that the conditions of section 5 of...

  11. 40 CFR 172.5 - The permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The permit. 172.5 Section 172.5... PERMITS Federal Issuance of Experimental Use Permits § 172.5 The permit. (a) Issuance. The Experimental Use Permit shall be issued when the Administrator determines that the conditions of section 5 of...

  12. 40 CFR 172.5 - The permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The permit. 172.5 Section 172.5... PERMITS Federal Issuance of Experimental Use Permits § 172.5 The permit. (a) Issuance. The Experimental Use Permit shall be issued when the Administrator determines that the conditions of section 5 of...

  13. 21 CFR 1210.21 - Permit number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permit number. 1210.21 Section 1210.21 Food and... IMPORT MILK ACT Permit Control § 1210.21 Permit number. Each permit issued under the Federal Import Milk Act, including each temporary permit, shall bear an individual number. The right to the use of...

  14. 21 CFR 1210.21 - Permit number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permit number. 1210.21 Section 1210.21 Food and... IMPORT MILK ACT Permit Control § 1210.21 Permit number. Each permit issued under the Federal Import Milk Act, including each temporary permit, shall bear an individual number. The right to the use of...

  15. 21 CFR 1210.21 - Permit number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permit number. 1210.21 Section 1210.21 Food and... IMPORT MILK ACT Permit Control § 1210.21 Permit number. Each permit issued under the Federal Import Milk Act, including each temporary permit, shall bear an individual number. The right to the use of...

  16. 21 CFR 1210.21 - Permit number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Permit number. 1210.21 Section 1210.21 Food and... IMPORT MILK ACT Permit Control § 1210.21 Permit number. Each permit issued under the Federal Import Milk Act, including each temporary permit, shall bear an individual number. The right to the use of...

  17. 21 CFR 1210.21 - Permit number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permit number. 1210.21 Section 1210.21 Food and... IMPORT MILK ACT Permit Control § 1210.21 Permit number. Each permit issued under the Federal Import Milk Act, including each temporary permit, shall bear an individual number. The right to the use of...

  18. Optimal strategy for controlling the spread of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria: Treatment and culling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, Mohammed Baba; Hasan, Yahya Abu; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2015-05-01

    Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria is a parasitic mosquito-borne disease caused by a eukaryotic protist of genus Plasmodium Knowlesi transmitted by mosquito, Anopheles leucosphyrus to human and macaques. We developed and analyzed a deterministic Mathematical model for the transmission of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria in human and macaques. The optimal control theory is applied to investigate optimal strategies for controlling the spread of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria using treatment and culling as control strategies. The conditions for optimal control of the Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria are derived using Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. Finally, numerical simulations suggested that the combination of the control strategies is the best way to control the disease in any community.

  19. The National Solar Permitting Database

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-08-31

    "The soft costs of solar—costs not associated with hardware—remain stubbornly high. Among the biggest soft costs are those associated with inefficiencies in local permitting and inspection. A study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory estimates that these costs add an average of $0.22/W per residential installation. This project helps reduce non-hardware/balance of system (BOS) costs by creating and maintaining a free and available site of permitting requirements and solar systemmore » verification software that installers can use to reduce time, capital, and resource investments in tracking permitting requirements. Software tools to identify best permitting practices can enable government stakeholders to optimize their permitting process and remove superfluous costs and requirements. Like ""a Wikipedia for solar permitting"", users can add, edit, delete, and update information for a given jurisdiction. We incentivize this crowdsourcing approach by recognizing users for their contributions in the form of SEO benefits to their company or organization by linking back to users' websites."« less

  20. The National Solar Permitting Database

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Renic

    2014-08-31

    "The soft costs of solar—costs not associated with hardware—remain stubbornly high. Among the biggest soft costs are those associated with inefficiencies in local permitting and inspection. A study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory estimates that these costs add an average of $0.22/W per residential installation. This project helps reduce non-hardware/balance of system (BOS) costs by creating and maintaining a free and available site of permitting requirements and solar system verification software that installers can use to reduce time, capital, and resource investments in tracking permitting requirements. Software tools to identify best permitting practices can enable government stakeholders to optimize their permitting process and remove superfluous costs and requirements. Like ""a Wikipedia for solar permitting"", users can add, edit, delete, and update information for a given jurisdiction. We incentivize this crowdsourcing approach by recognizing users for their contributions in the form of SEO benefits to their company or organization by linking back to users' websites."

  1. Selective Killing of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum by a Benzylthiazolium dye

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Jane X.; Winter, Rolf W.; Braun, Theodore P.; Osei-Agyemang, Myralyn; Hinrichs, David J.; Riscoe, Michael K.

    2007-01-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. The most virulent form of the disease is caused by P. falciparum which infects hundreds of millions of people and is responsible for the deaths of 1 to 2 million individuals each year. An essential part of the parasitic process is the remodeling of the red blood cell membrane and its protein constituents to permit a higher flux of nutrients and waste products into or away from the intracellular parasite. Much of this increased permeability is due to a single type of broad specificity channel variously called the new permeation pathway (NPP), the nutrient channel, and the Plasmodial surface anion channel (PSAC). This channel is permeable to a range of low molecular weight solutes both charged and uncharged, with a strong preference for anions. Drugs such as furosemide that are known to block anion-selective channels inhibit PSAC. In this study we have investigated a dye known as benzothiocarboxypurine, BCP, which had been studied as a possible diagnostic aid given its selective uptake by P. falciparum infected red cells. We found that the dye enters parasitized red cells via the furosemide-inhibitable PSAC, forms a brightly fluorescent complex with parasite nucleic acids, and is selectively toxic to infected cells. Our study describes an antimalarial agent that exploits the altered permeability of Plasmodium-infected red cells as a means to killing the parasite and highlights a chemical reagent that may prove useful in high throughput screening of compounds for inhibitors of the channel. PMID:17266952

  2. Integrative omics analysis. A study based on Plasmodium falciparum mRNA and protein data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Technological improvements have shifted the focus from data generation to data analysis. The availability of large amounts of data from transcriptomics, protemics and metabolomics experiments raise new questions concerning suitable integrative analysis methods. We compare three integrative analysis techniques (co-inertia analysis, generalized singular value decomposition and integrative biclustering) by applying them to gene and protein abundance data from the six life cycle stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Co-inertia analysis is an analysis method used to visualize and explore gene and protein data. The generalized singular value decomposition has shown its potential in the analysis of two transcriptome data sets. Integrative Biclustering applies biclustering to gene and protein data. Results Using CIA, we visualize the six life cycle stages of Plasmodium falciparum, as well as GO terms in a 2D plane and interpret the spatial configuration. With GSVD, we decompose the transcriptomic and proteomic data sets into matrices with biologically meaningful interpretations and explore the processes captured by the data sets. IBC identifies groups of genes, proteins, GO Terms and life cycle stages of Plasmodium falciparum. We show method-specific results as well as a network view of the life cycle stages based on the results common to all three methods. Additionally, by combining the results of the three methods, we create a three-fold validated network of life cycle stage specific GO terms: Sporozoites are associated with transcription and transport; merozoites with entry into host cell as well as biosynthetic and metabolic processes; rings with oxidation-reduction processes; trophozoites with glycolysis and energy production; schizonts with antigenic variation and immune response; gametocyctes with DNA packaging and mitochondrial transport. Furthermore, the network connectivity underlines the separation of the intraerythrocytic cycle from the gametocyte and

  3. Suppression of erythroid development in vitro by Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe anaemia due to dyserythropoiesis has been documented in patients infected with Plasmodium vivax, however the mechanism responsible for anaemia in vivax malaria is poorly understood. In order to better understand the role of P. vivax infection in anaemia the inhibition of erythropoiesis using haematopoietic stem cells was investigated. Methods Haematopoietic stem cells/CD34+ cells, isolated from normal human cord blood were used to generate growing erythroid cells. Exposure of CD34+ cells and growing erythroid cells to P. vivax parasites either from intact or lysed infected erythrocytes (IE) was examined for the effect on inhibition of cell development compared with untreated controls. Results Both lysed and intact infected erythrocytes significantly inhibited erythroid growth. The reduction of erythroid growth did not differ significantly between exposure to intact and lysed IE and the mean growth relative to unexposed controls was 59.4 ± 5.2 for lysed IE and 57 ± 8.5% for intact IE. Interestingly, CD34+ cells/erythroid progenitor cells were susceptible to the inhibitory effect of P. vivax on cell expansion. Exposure to P. vivax also inhibited erythroid development, as determined by the reduced expression of glycophorin A (28.1%) and CD 71 (43.9%). Moreover, vivax parasites perturbed the division of erythroid cells, as measured by the Cytokinesis Block Proliferation Index, which was reduced to 1.35 ± 0.05 (P-value < 0.01) from a value of 2.08 ± 0.07 in controls. Neither TNF-a nor IFN-g was detected in the culture medium of erythroid cells treated with P. vivax, indicating that impaired erythropoiesis was independent of these cytokines. Conclusions This study shows for the first time that P. vivax parasites inhibit erythroid development leading to ineffective erythropoiesis and highlights the potential of P. vivax to cause severe anaemia. PMID:22624872

  4. Plasmodium vivax Diversity and Population Structure across Four Continents.

    PubMed

    Koepfli, Cristian; Rodrigues, Priscila T; Antao, Tiago; Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Van den Eede, Peter; Gamboa, Dionicia; van Hong, Nguyen; Bendezu, Jorge; Erhart, Annette; Barnadas, Céline; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Menard, Didier; Severini, Carlo; Menegon, Michela; Nour, Bakri Y M; Karunaweera, Nadira; Mueller, Ivo; Ferreira, Marcelo U; Felger, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the geographically most widespread human malaria parasite. To analyze patterns of microsatellite diversity and population structure across countries of different transmission intensity, genotyping data from 11 microsatellite markers was either generated or compiled from 841 isolates from four continents collected in 1999-2008. Diversity was highest in South-East Asia (mean allelic richness 10.0-12.8), intermediate in the South Pacific (8.1-9.9) Madagascar and Sudan (7.9-8.4), and lowest in South America and Central Asia (5.5-7.2). A reduced panel of only 3 markers was sufficient to identify approx. 90% of all haplotypes in South Pacific, African and SE-Asian populations, but only 60-80% in Latin American populations, suggesting that typing of 2-6 markers, depending on the level of endemicity, is sufficient for epidemiological studies. Clustering analysis showed distinct clusters in Peru and Brazil, but little sub-structuring was observed within Africa, SE-Asia or the South Pacific. Isolates from Uzbekistan were exceptional, as a near-clonal parasite population was observed that was clearly separated from all other populations (FST>0.2). Outside Central Asia FST values were highest (0.11-0.16) between South American and all other populations, and lowest (0.04-0.07) between populations from South-East Asia and the South Pacific. These comparisons between P. vivax populations from four continents indicated that not only transmission intensity, but also geographical isolation affect diversity and population structure. However, the high effective population size results in slow changes of these parameters. This persistency must be taken into account when assessing the impact of control programs on the genetic structure of parasite populations. PMID:26125189

  5. Plasmodium vivax Diversity and Population Structure across Four Continents

    PubMed Central

    Koepfli, Cristian; Rodrigues, Priscila T.; Antao, Tiago; Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Van den Eede, Peter; Gamboa, Dionicia; van Hong, Nguyen; Bendezu, Jorge; Erhart, Annette; Barnadas, Céline; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Menard, Didier; Severini, Carlo; Menegon, Michela; Nour, Bakri Y. M.; Karunaweera, Nadira; Mueller, Ivo; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Felger, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the geographically most widespread human malaria parasite. To analyze patterns of microsatellite diversity and population structure across countries of different transmission intensity, genotyping data from 11 microsatellite markers was either generated or compiled from 841 isolates from four continents collected in 1999–2008. Diversity was highest in South-East Asia (mean allelic richness 10.0–12.8), intermediate in the South Pacific (8.1–9.9) Madagascar and Sudan (7.9–8.4), and lowest in South America and Central Asia (5.5–7.2). A reduced panel of only 3 markers was sufficient to identify approx. 90% of all haplotypes in South Pacific, African and SE-Asian populations, but only 60–80% in Latin American populations, suggesting that typing of 2–6 markers, depending on the level of endemicity, is sufficient for epidemiological studies. Clustering analysis showed distinct clusters in Peru and Brazil, but little sub-structuring was observed within Africa, SE-Asia or the South Pacific. Isolates from Uzbekistan were exceptional, as a near-clonal parasite population was observed that was clearly separated from all other populations (FST>0.2). Outside Central Asia FST values were highest (0.11–0.16) between South American and all other populations, and lowest (0.04–0.07) between populations from South-East Asia and the South Pacific. These comparisons between P. vivax populations from four continents indicated that not only transmission intensity, but also geographical isolation affect diversity and population structure. However, the high effective population size results in slow changes of these parameters. This persistency must be taken into account when assessing the impact of control programs on the genetic structure of parasite populations. PMID:26125189

  6. Backward bifurcation and optimal control of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, Mohammed Baba; Hasan, Yahya Abu; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2014-07-01

    A deterministic model for the transmission dynamics of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria with direct transmission is developed. The model is analyzed using dynamical system techniques and it shows that the backward bifurcation occurs for some range of parameters. The model is extended to assess the impact of time dependent preventive (biological and chemical control) against the mosquitoes and vaccination for susceptible humans, while treatment for infected humans. The existence of optimal control is established analytically by the use of optimal control theory. Numerical simulations of the problem, suggest that applying the four control measure can effectively reduce if not eliminate the spread of Plasmodium Knowlesi in a community.

  7. Structure and expression of the Plasmodium falciparum SERA gene.

    PubMed

    Li, W B; Bzik, D J; Horii, T; Inselburg, J

    1989-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, strain FCR3, genomic DNA that encodes the SERA gene of P. falciparum was isolated and sequenced. The SERA gene coding region was interrupted by 3 introns, the largest number observed, so far, in any Plasmodium gene. Two SERA gene alleles, allele I and allele II, were identified in the FCR3 strain, while only allele I was found in the Honduras-1 strain. Allele I mRNA was abundant in vivo during the late trophozoite and schizont stages. Allele II mRNA was either not expressed, or it was labile. PMID:2651911

  8. The structure and role of RNA polymerases in Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Bzik, D J

    1991-08-01

    During the past few years the characterization of several Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase subunits has revealed potentially significant differences between the corresponding subunits of the host and parasite enzymes(1-3). The largest subunits of P. falciparum RNA polymerase II and III contain enlarged variable domains that separate conserved domains in these subunits. The partially characterized beta and beta '-like subunits of an organellar P. falciparum RNA polymerase also appear to be distinct from the host RNA polymerases. In this review David Bzik discusses the structure and role of RNA polymerases in Plasmodium. PMID:15463499

  9. Plasmodium knowlesi as a Threat to Global Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Wesolowski, Roland; Wozniak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Szewczyk-Golec, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a tropical disease caused by protozoans of the Plasmodium genus. Delayed diagnosis and misdiagnosis are strongly associated with higher mortality. In recent years, a greater importance is attributed to Plasmodium knowlesi, a species found mainly in Southeast Asia. Routine parasitological diagnostics are associated with certain limitations and difficulties in unambiguous determination of the parasite species based only on microscopic image. Recently, molecular techniques have been increasingly used for predictive diagnosis. The aim of the study is to draw attention to the risk of travelling to knowlesi malaria endemic areas and to raise awareness among personnel involved in the therapeutic process. PMID:26537037

  10. Replication and maintenance of the Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast genome.

    PubMed

    Milton, Morgan E; Nelson, Scott W

    2016-08-01

    Members of the phylum Apicomplexa are responsible for many devastating diseases including malaria (Plasmodium spp.), toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma gondii), babesiosis (Babesia bovis), and cyclosporiasis (Cyclospora cayetanensis). Most Apicomplexans contain a unique and essential organelle called the apicoplast. Derived from an ancient chloroplast, the apicoplast replicates and maintains a 35 kilobase (kb) circular genome. Due to its essential nature within the parasite, drugs targeted to proteins involved in DNA replication and repair of the apicoplast should be potent and specific. This review summarizes the current knowledge surrounding the replication and repair of the Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast genome and identifies several putative proteins involved in replication and repair pathways. PMID:27338018

  11. CLIP proteases and Plasmodium melanization in Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2007-07-01

    Melanization is a potent immune response mediated by phenoloxidase (PO). Multiple Clip-domain serine proteases (CLIP) regulate PO activation as part of a complex cascade of proteases that are cleaved sequentially. The role of several CLIP as key activators or suppressors of the melanization responses of Anopheles gambiae to Plasmodium berghei (murine malaria) has been established recently using a genome-wide reverse genetics approach. Important differences in regulation of PO activation between An. gambiae strains were also identified. This review summarizes these findings and discusses our current understanding of the An. gambiae melanization responses to Plasmodium. PMID:17512801

  12. Red Blood Cells Preconditioned with Hemin Are Less Permissive to Plasmodium Invasion In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gaudreault, Véronique; Wirbel, Jakob; Jardim, Armando; Rohrbach, Petra; Scorza, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease that causes severe hemolytic anemia in Plasmodium-infected hosts, which results in the release and accumulation of oxidized heme (hemin). Although hemin impairs the establishment of Plasmodium immunity in vitro and in vivo, mice preconditioned with hemin develop lower parasitemia when challenged with Plasmodium chabaudi adami blood stage parasites. In order to understand the mechanism accounting for this resistance as well as the impact of hemin on eryptosis and plasma levels of scavenging hemopexin, red blood cells were labeled with biotin prior to hemin treatment and P. c. adami infection. This strategy allowed discriminating hemin-treated from de novo generated red blood cells and to follow the infection within these two populations of cells. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of biotinylated-red blood cells revealed increased P. c. adami red blood cells selectivity and a decreased permissibility of hemin-conditioned red blood cells for parasite invasion. These effects were also apparent in in vitro P. falciparum cultures using hemin-preconditioned human red blood cells. Interestingly, hemin did not alter the turnover of red blood cells nor their replenishment during in vivo infection. Our results assign a function for hemin as a protective agent against high parasitemia, and suggest that the hemolytic nature of blood stage human malaria may be beneficial for the infected host. PMID:26465787

  13. Plasmodium AdoMetDC/ODC bifunctional enzyme is essential for male sexual stage development and mosquito transmission.

    PubMed

    Hart, Robert J; Ghaffar, Atif; Abdalal, Shaymaa; Perrin, Benjamin; Aly, Ahmed S I

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines are positively-charged organic molecules that are important for cellular growth and division. Polyamines and their synthesizing enzymes are particularly abundant in rapidly proliferating eukaryotic cells such as parasitic protozoa and cancer cells. Polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors, such as Elfornithine, are now being considered for cancer prevention and have been used effectively against Trypanosoma brucei Inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis have caused growth arrest of Plasmodium falciparum blood stages in vitro, but in P. berghei only partial inhibition has been observed. While polyamine biosynthesis enzymes are characterized and conserved in Plasmodium spp., little is known on the biological roles of these enzymes inside malaria parasite hosts. The bifunctional polyamine biosynthesis enzyme S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase/ornithine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC/ODC) was targeted for deletion in P. yoelii Deletion of AdoMetDC/ODC significantly reduced blood stage parasitemia but Anopheles transmission was completely blocked. We showed that male gametocytogenesis and male gamete exflagellation were abolished and consequently no ookinetes or oocyst sporozoites could be generated from adometdc/odc(-) parasites. Supplementation of putrescine and spermidine did not rescue the defective phenotypes of male gametocytes and gametes of the knockout parasites. These results highlight the crucial role of polyamine homeostasis in the development and functions of Plasmodium erythrocytic stages in the blood and in the mosquito vector and validate polyamine biosynthesis pathway enzymes as drug targeting candidates for malaria parasite transmission blocking. PMID:27387533

  14. Plasmodium AdoMetDC/ODC bifunctional enzyme is essential for male sexual stage development and mosquito transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Robert J.; Ghaffar, Atif; Abdalal, Shaymaa; Perrin, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyamines are positively-charged organic molecules that are important for cellular growth and division. Polyamines and their synthesizing enzymes are particularly abundant in rapidly proliferating eukaryotic cells such as parasitic protozoa and cancer cells. Polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors, such as Elfornithine, are now being considered for cancer prevention and have been used effectively against Trypanosoma brucei. Inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis have caused growth arrest of Plasmodium falciparum blood stages in vitro, but in P. berghei only partial inhibition has been observed. While polyamine biosynthesis enzymes are characterized and conserved in Plasmodium spp., little is known on the biological roles of these enzymes inside malaria parasite hosts. The bifunctional polyamine biosynthesis enzyme S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase/ornithine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC/ODC) was targeted for deletion in P. yoelii. Deletion of AdoMetDC/ODC significantly reduced blood stage parasitemia but Anopheles transmission was completely blocked. We showed that male gametocytogenesis and male gamete exflagellation were abolished and consequently no ookinetes or oocyst sporozoites could be generated from adometdc/odc(–) parasites. Supplementation of putrescine and spermidine did not rescue the defective phenotypes of male gametocytes and gametes of the knockout parasites. These results highlight the crucial role of polyamine homeostasis in the development and functions of Plasmodium erythrocytic stages in the blood and in the mosquito vector and validate polyamine biosynthesis pathway enzymes as drug targeting candidates for malaria parasite transmission blocking. PMID:27387533

  15. Elution of Re-188 from W-188/Re-188 generators with salts of weak acids permits efficient concentration to low volumes using a new tandem cation/anion exchange system

    SciTech Connect

    Guhlke, S. |; Beets, A.L.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Re-188, available from a W-188/Re-188 generator, is an important therapeutic radioisotope for bone pain palliation, cancer therapy and intravascular brachytherapy, etc. Because of the relatively low specific activity of reactor-produced W-188 (ORNL HFIR, 296-370 MBq mCi/mg W-186 for 2 cycles), methods of concentrating the Re-188 bolus (10-12 mL) from clinical scale (18.5-37 BGq W-188) generators (5-6 gm alumina) are thus very important. We demonstrate for the first time a new strategy of generator elution with salts of weak acids and specific perrhenate anion {open_quotes}trapping{close_quotes} with QMA anion columns. Re-188 perrhenate is efficiently eluted (65-75%) from the alumina-based generator with 0.15-0.3 M ammonium acetate. An acetic acid solution of Re-188 perrhenic acid is obtained by subsequent on-line passage of the generator eluant through a DOWEX AG 50Wx8 (200-400 mesh, H{sup +} form) column. Since acetic acid is not ionized (< 0.001%) at this pH (< pK{sub a} = 4.76) the perrhenate anion is then specifically trapped on a QMA {open_quotes}Light{close_quotes} anion extraction column. QMA elution with 0.9% NaCl, provides Re-188 perrhenate solution in <1 mL. Concentration of 10-20 mL of Re-188 solution (> 15 BGq) in <1 mL has been demonstrated using this simple new approach, which is also effective for concentration of Tc-99m from low specific activity Mo-99 (n,y) generators. The cation/anion tandem system is inexpensive and disposable and use can be easily automated. The availability of this very simple, efficient system is important for broad use of rhenium-188.

  16. Permitting and licensing new uranium recovery facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmann, M.; Sweeney, K.; Pugsley, C.

    2007-07-01

    With the nuclear renaissance, the uranium mining industry has undergone a dramatic renaissance, as well. This was evidenced with the 2006 National Mining Association (NMA)/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) workshop drawing its largest attendance ever, with more than 180 attendees representing both established, as well as many new junior firms. And the meeting focused, not on site closure - but on the growing industry and plans for permitting new uranium recovery facilities. With this, the program provided overviews of the programs for permitting and licensing new uranium mines, from both the State and Federal perspectives. A subsequent one-day licensing workshop presented in February 2007 by NRC at its headquarters in Rockville, Maryland drew a crowd of experienced and first-time license applicants. Modern uranium mining is both safer and more environmentally protective than past practices - due largely to the industry's maturing and continuous efforts to improve. This paper will look at the new generation of uranium mining and recovery facilities that are developing in the US, and focus primarily on US permitting and licensing requirements and trends. Understanding these trends is essential to ensuring a vibrant US uranium recovery industry; assured supplies of this important fuel for our energy and the US economy; and environmental protection. (authors)

  17. R2 PCS PERMITS GIS LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Region 2 PCS Permit Regulated Facility GIS layer contains identification (name, address, ID), and location (latitude, longitude, and locational metadata), attributes of facilities with National Polution Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES) permit(s) in Region 2 that are reg...

  18. 40 CFR 72.62 - Draft permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.62 Draft permit. (a) After the Administrator receives a complete Acid Rain permit application and any supplemental information, the Administrator...

  19. 40 CFR 72.62 - Draft permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.62 Draft permit. (a) After the Administrator receives a complete Acid Rain permit application and any supplemental information, the Administrator...

  20. 40 CFR 72.62 - Draft permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.62 Draft permit. (a) After the Administrator receives a complete Acid Rain permit application and any supplemental information, the Administrator...

  1. 40 CFR 72.62 - Draft permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.62 Draft permit. (a) After the Administrator receives a complete Acid Rain permit application and any supplemental information, the Administrator...

  2. 78 FR 43268 - Special Permit Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Special Permit Applications AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of actions on Special Permit..., special permits from the Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR Part...

  3. 30 CFR 736.25 - Permit fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... each acre of disturbed area or fraction thereof to be included in the permit area. (3) Permit issuance... review: Basic fee 1350.00 Fee per acre of disturbed area in permit area: First 1,000 acres...

  4. New insights into the Plasmodium vivax transcriptome using RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Mok, Sachel; Imwong, Mallika; Jaidee, Anchalee; Russell, Bruce; Nosten, Francois; Day, Nicholas P.; White, Nicholas J.; Preiser, Peter R.; Bozdech, Zbynek

    2016-01-01

    Historically seen as a benign disease, it is now becoming clear that Plasmodium vivax can cause significant morbidity. Effective control strategies targeting P. vivax malaria is hindered by our limited understanding of vivax biology. Here we established the P. vivax transcriptome of the Intraerythrocytic Developmental Cycle (IDC) of two clinical isolates in high resolution by Illumina HiSeq platform. The detailed map of transcriptome generates new insights into regulatory mechanisms of individual genes and reveals their intimate relationship with specific biological functions. A transcriptional hotspot of vir genes observed on chromosome 2 suggests a potential active site modulating immune evasion of the Plasmodium parasite across patients. Compared to other eukaryotes, P. vivax genes tend to have unusually long 5′ untranslated regions and also present multiple transcription start sites. In contrast, alternative splicing is rare in P. vivax but its association with the late schizont stage suggests some of its significance for gene function. The newly identified transcripts, including up to 179 vir like genes and 3018 noncoding RNAs suggest an important role of these gene/transcript classes in strain specific transcriptional regulation. PMID:26858037

  5. Genetic Diversity of MSP1 Block 2 of Plasmodium vivax Isolates from Manaus (Central Brazilian Amazon)

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Janaína; Orlandi, Patricia Puccinelli; Almeida, Maria Edilene; de Sousa, Luciana Pereira; Chaves, Yury; Barbosa-Filho, Roberto; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius; Mariuba, Luis André

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of MSP1 in both Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax is presumed be associated to parasite immune evasion. In this study, we assessed genetic diversity of the most variable domain of vaccine candidate N-terminal PvMSP1 (Block 2) in field isolates of Manaus. Forty-seven blood samples the polymorphism of PvMSP1 Block 2 generates four fragment sizes. In twenty-eight of them, sequencing indicated seven haplotypes of PvMSP1 Block 2 circulating among field isolates. Evidence of striking exchanges was observed with two stretches flanking the repeat region and two predicted recombination sites were described. Single nucleotide polymorphisms determined with concurrent infections per patient indicated that nonsynonymous substitutions occurred preferentially in the repeat-rich regions which also were predicted as B-cell epitopes. The comprehensive understanding of the genetic diversity of the promising Block 2 associated with clinical immunity and a reduced risk of infection by Plasmodium vivax would be important for the rationale of malaria vaccine designs. PMID:24741614

  6. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the η-class carbonic anhydrase from the malaria pathogen Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Daniela; Del Prete, Sonia; Fisher, Gillian M; Andrews, Katherine T; Poulsen, Sally-Ann; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-02-01

    The η-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) were recently discovered as the sixth genetic class of this metalloenzyme superfamily, and are so far known only in protozoa, including various Plasmodium species, the causative agents of malaria. We report here an inhibition study of the η-CA from Plasmodium falciparum (PfCA) against a panel of sulfonamides and one sulfamate compound, some of which are clinically used. The strongest inhibitors identified were ethoxzolamide and sulthiame, with KIs of 131-132 nM, followed by acetazolamide, methazolamide and hydrochlorothiazide (KIs of 153-198 nM). Brinzolamide, topiramate, zonisamide, indisulam, valdecoxib and celecoxib also showed significant inhibitory action against PfCA, with KIs ranging from 217 to 308 nM. An interesting observation was that the more efficient PfCA inhibitors are representative of several scaffolds and chemical classes, including benzene sulfonamides, monocyclic/bicyclic heterocyclic sulfonamides and compounds with a more complex scaffold (i.e., the sugar sulfamate derivative, topiramate, and the coxibs, celecoxib and valdecoxib). A comprehensive inhibition study of small molecules for η-CAs is needed as a first step towards assessing PfCA as a druggable target. The present work identifies the first known η-CA inhibitors and provides a platform for the development of next generation novel PfCA inhibitors. PMID:25533402

  7. Mefloquine induces ROS mediated programmed cell death in malaria parasite: Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Gunjan, Sarika; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Tanuj; Dwivedi, Hemlata; Chauhan, Bhavana Singh; Imran Siddiqi, Mohammad; Tripathi, Renu

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies pioneer the existence of a novel programmed cell death pathway in malaria parasite plasmodium and suggest that it could be helpful in developing new targeted anti-malarial therapies. Considering this fact, we evaluated the underlying action mechanism of this pathway in mefloquine (MQ) treated parasite. Since cysteine proteases play a key role in apoptosis hence we performed preliminary computational simulations to determine binding affinity of MQ with metacaspase protein model. Binding pocket identified using computational studies, was docked with MQ to identify it's potential to bind with the predicted protein model. We further determined apoptotic markers such as mitochondrial dysregulation, activation of cysteine proteases and in situ DNA fragmentation in MQ treated/untreated parasites by cell based assay. Our results showed low mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced activity of cysteine protease and increased number of fragmented DNA in treated parasites compared to untreated ones. We next tested the involvement of oxidative stress in MQ mediated cell death and found significant increase in reactive oxygen species generation after 24 h of treatment. Therefore we conclude that apart from hemozoin inhibition, MQ is competent to induce apoptosis in plasmodium by activating metacaspase and ROS production. PMID:27357656

  8. PlasmoView: A Web-based Resource to Visualise Global Plasmodium falciparum Genomic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Mark D.; Assefa, Samuel A.; Ocholla, Harold; Sutherland, Colin J.; Borrmann, Steffen; Nzila, Alexis; Michon, Pascal; Hien, Tran Tinh; Bousema, Teun; Drakeley, Christopher J.; Zongo, Issaka; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Djimde, Abdoulaye A.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Nosten, Francois; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Conway, David J.; Roper, Cally; Clark, Taane G.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a global public health challenge, with drug resistance a major barrier to disease control and elimination. To meet the urgent need for better treatments and vaccines, a deeper knowledge of Plasmodium biology and malaria epidemiology is required. An improved understanding of the genomic variation of malaria parasites, especially the most virulent Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) species, has the potential to yield new insights in these areas. High-throughput sequencing and genotyping is generating large amounts of genomic data across multiple parasite populations. The resulting ability to identify informative variants, particularly single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), will lead to the discovery of intra- and inter-population differences and thus enable the development of genetic barcodes for diagnostic assays and clinical studies. Knowledge of genetic variability underlying drug resistance and other differential phenotypes will also facilitate the identification of novel mutations and contribute to surveillance and stratified medicine applications. The PlasmoView interactive web-browsing tool enables the research community to visualise genomic variation and annotation (eg, biological function) in a geographic setting. The first release contains over 600 000 high-quality SNPs in 631 Pf isolates from laboratory strains and four malaria-endemic regions (West Africa, East Africa, Southeast Asia and Oceania). PMID:24338354

  9. Global transcriptional repression: An initial and essential step for Plasmodium sexual development.

    PubMed

    Yuda, Masao; Iwanaga, Shiroh; Kaneko, Izumi; Kato, Tomomi

    2015-10-13

    Gametocytes are nonreplicative sexual forms that mediate malaria transmission to a mosquito vector. They are generated from asexual blood-stage parasites that proliferate in the circulation. However, little is known about how this transition is genetically regulated. Here, we report that an Apetala2 (AP2) family transcription factor, AP2-G2, regulates this transition as a transcriptional repressor. Disruption of AP2-G2 in the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei did not prevent commitment to the sexual stage but did halt development before the appearance of sex-specific morphologies. ChIP-seq analysis revealed that AP2-G2 targeted ∼1,500 genes and recognized a five-base motif in their promoters. Most of these target genes are required for asexual proliferation of the parasites in the blood, suggesting that AP2-G2 blocks the program that precedes asexual replication to promote conversion to the sexual stage. Microarray analysis showed that the identified targets constituted ∼70% of the up-regulated genes in AP2-G2-depleted parasites, suggesting that AP2-G2 actually functions as a repressor in gametocytes. A promoter assay using a centromere plasmid demonstrated that the binding motif functions as a cis-acting negative regulatory element. These results suggest that global transcriptional repression, which occurs during the initial phase of gametocytogenesis, is an essential step in Plasmodium sexual development. PMID:26417110

  10. Experimental Genetics of Plasmodium berghei NFU in the Apicoplast Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Haussig, Joana M.; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W. A.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic pathogens of the phylum Apicomplexa contain a non-photosynthetic plastid, termed apicoplast. Within this organelle distinct iron-sulfur [Fe-S] cluster proteins are likely central to biosynthesis pathways, including generation of isoprenoids and lipoic acid. Here, we targeted a nuclear-encoded component of the apicoplast [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis pathway by experimental genetics in the murine malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei. We show that ablation of the gene encoding a nitrogen fixation factor U (NifU)-like domain containing protein (NFUapi) resulted in parasites that were able to complete the entire life cycle indicating redundant or non-essential functions. nfu– parasites displayed reduced merosome formation in vitro, suggesting that apicoplast NFUapi plays an auxiliary role in establishing a blood stage infection. NFUapi fused to a combined fluorescent protein-epitope tag delineates the Plasmodium apicoplast and was tested to revisit inhibition of liver stage development by azithromycin and fosmidomycin. We show that the branched apicoplast signal is entirely abolished by azithromycin treatment, while fosmidomycin had no effect on apicoplast morphology. In conclusion, our experimental genetics analysis supports specialized and/or redundant role(s) for NFUapi in the [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis pathway in the apicoplast of a malarial parasite. PMID:23805304

  11. Artesunate Tolerance in Transgenic Plasmodium falciparum Parasites Overexpressing a Tryptophan-Rich Protein▿†

    PubMed Central

    Deplaine, Guillaume; Lavazec, Catherine; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Natalang, Onguma; Perrot, Sylvie; Guillotte-Blisnick, Micheline; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Pradines, Bruno; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; David, Peter H.

    2011-01-01

    Due to their rapid, potent action on young and mature intraerythrocytic stages, artemisinin derivatives are central to drug combination therapies for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, the evidence for emerging parasite resistance/tolerance to artemisinins in southeast Asia is of great concern. A better understanding of artemisinin-related drug activity and resistance mechanisms is urgently needed. A recent transcriptome study of parasites exposed to artesunate led us to identify a series of genes with modified levels of expression in the presence of the drug. The gene presenting the largest mRNA level increase, Pf10_0026 (PArt), encoding a hypothetical protein of unknown function, was chosen for further study. Immunodetection with PArt-specific sera showed that artesunate induced a dose-dependent increase of the protein level. Bioinformatic analysis showed that PArt belongs to a Plasmodium-specific gene family characterized by the presence of a tryptophan-rich domain with a novel hidden Markov model (HMM) profile. Gene disruption could not be achieved, suggesting an essential function. Transgenic parasites overexpressing PArt protein were generated and exhibited tolerance to a spike exposure to high doses of artesunate, with increased survival and reduced growth retardation compared to that of wild-type-treated controls. These data indicate the involvement of PArt in parasite defense mechanisms against artesunate. This is the first report of genetically manipulated parasites displaying a stable and reproducible decreased susceptibility to artesunate, providing new possibilities to investigate the parasite response to artemisinins. PMID:21464256

  12. New insights into the Plasmodium vivax transcriptome using RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Mok, Sachel; Imwong, Mallika; Jaidee, Anchalee; Russell, Bruce; Nosten, Francois; Day, Nicholas P; White, Nicholas J; Preiser, Peter R; Bozdech, Zbynek

    2016-01-01

    Historically seen as a benign disease, it is now becoming clear that Plasmodium vivax can cause significant morbidity. Effective control strategies targeting P. vivax malaria is hindered by our limited understanding of vivax biology. Here we established the P. vivax transcriptome of the Intraerythrocytic Developmental Cycle (IDC) of two clinical isolates in high resolution by Illumina HiSeq platform. The detailed map of transcriptome generates new insights into regulatory mechanisms of individual genes and reveals their intimate relationship with specific biological functions. A transcriptional hotspot of vir genes observed on chromosome 2 suggests a potential active site modulating immune evasion of the Plasmodium parasite across patients. Compared to other eukaryotes, P. vivax genes tend to have unusually long 5' untranslated regions and also present multiple transcription start sites. In contrast, alternative splicing is rare in P. vivax but its association with the late schizont stage suggests some of its significance for gene function. The newly identified transcripts, including up to 179 vir like genes and 3018 noncoding RNAs suggest an important role of these gene/transcript classes in strain specific transcriptional regulation. PMID:26858037

  13. Conditional Degradation of Plasmodium Calcineurin Reveals Functions in Parasite Colonization of both Host and Vector

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Nisha; Waters, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional analysis of essential genes in the malarial parasite, Plasmodium, is hindered by lack of efficient strategies for conditional protein regulation. We report the development of a rapid, specific, and inducible chemical-genetic tool in the rodent malaria parasite, P. berghei, in which endogenous proteins engineered to contain the auxin-inducible degron (AID) are selectively degraded upon adding auxin. Application of AID to the calcium-regulated protein phosphatase, calcineurin, revealed functions in host and vector stages of parasite development. Whereas depletion of calcineurin in late-stage schizonts demonstrated its critical role in erythrocyte attachment and invasion in vivo, stage-specific depletion uncovered roles in gamete development, fertilization, and ookinete-to-oocyst and sporozoite-to-liver stage transitions. Furthermore, AID technology facilitated concurrent generation and phenotyping of transgenic lines, allowing multiple lines to be assessed simultaneously with significant reductions in animal use. This study highlights the broad applicability of AID for functional analysis of proteins across the Plasmodium life cycle. PMID:26118994

  14. In Silico Screening on the Three-dimensional Model of the Plasmodium vivax SUB1 Protease Leads to the Validation of a Novel Anti-parasite Compound*

    PubMed Central

    Bouillon, Anthony; Giganti, David; Benedet, Christophe; Gorgette, Olivier; Pêtres, Stéphane; Crublet, Elodie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Witkowski, Benoit; Ménard, Didier; Nilges, Michael; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Stoven, Véronique; Barale, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Widespread drug resistance calls for the urgent development of new antimalarials that target novel steps in the life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The essential subtilisin-like serine protease SUB1 of Plasmodium merozoites plays a dual role in egress from and invasion into host erythrocytes. It belongs to a new generation of attractive drug targets against which specific potent inhibitors are actively searched. We characterize here the P. vivax SUB1 enzyme and show that it displays a typical auto-processing pattern and apical localization in P. vivax merozoites. To search for small PvSUB1 inhibitors, we took advantage of the similarity of SUB1 with bacterial subtilisins and generated P. vivax SUB1 three-dimensional models. The structure-based virtual screening of a large commercial chemical compounds library identified 306 virtual best hits, of which 37 were experimentally confirmed inhibitors and 5 had Ki values of <50 μm for PvSUB1. Interestingly, they belong to different chemical families. The most promising competitive inhibitor of PvSUB1 (compound 2) was equally active on PfSUB1 and displayed anti-P. falciparum and Plasmodium berghei activity in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Compound 2 inhibited the endogenous PfSUB1 as illustrated by the inhibited maturation of its natural substrate PfSERA5 and inhibited parasite egress and subsequent erythrocyte invasion. These data indicate that the strategy of in silico screening of three-dimensional models to select for virtual inhibitors combined with stringent biological validation successfully identified several inhibitors of the PvSUB1 enzyme. The most promising hit proved to be a potent cross-inhibitor of PlasmodiumSUB1, laying the groundwork for the development of a globally active small compound antimalarial. PMID:23653352

  15. The Dynamics of Natural Plasmodium falciparum Infections

    PubMed Central

    Felger, Ingrid; Maire, Martin; Bretscher, Michael T.; Falk, Nicole; Tiaden, André; Sama, Wilson; Beck, Hans-Peter; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Smith, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Natural immunity to Plasmodium falciparum has been widely studied, but its effects on parasite dynamics are poorly understood. Acquisition and clearance rates of untreated infections are key elements of the dynamics of malaria, but estimating these parameters is challenging because of frequent super-infection and imperfect detectability of parasites. Consequently, information on effects of host immune status or age on infection dynamics is fragmentary. Methods An age-stratified cohort of 347 individuals from Northern Ghana was sampled six times at 2 month intervals. High-throughput capillary electrophoresis was used to genotype the msp-2 locus of all P. falciparum infections detected by PCR. Force of infection (FOI) and duration were estimated for each age group using an immigration-death model that allows for imperfect detection of circulating parasites. Results Allowing for imperfect detection substantially increased estimates of FOI and duration. Effects of naturally acquired immunity on the FOI and duration would be reflected in age dependence in these indices, but in our cohort data FOI tended to increase with age in children. Persistence of individual parasite clones was characteristic of all age-groups. Duration peaked in 5–9 year old children (average duration 319 days, 95% confidence interval 318;320). Conclusions The main age-dependence is on parasite densities, with only small age-variations in the FOI and persistence of infections. This supports the hypothesis that acquired immunity controls transmission mainly by limiting blood-stage parasite densities rather than changing rates of acquisition or clearance of infections. PMID:23029082

  16. The Plasmodium serine-type SERA proteases display distinct expression patterns and non-essential in vivo roles during life cycle progression of the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Putrianti, Elyzana D; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Arnold, Iris; Heussler, Volker T; Matuschewski, Kai; Silvie, Olivier

    2010-06-01

    Parasite proteases play key roles in several fundamental steps of the Plasmodium life cycle, including haemoglobin degradation, host cell invasion and parasite egress. Plasmodium exit from infected host cells appears to be mediated by a class of papain-like cysteine proteases called 'serine repeat antigens' (SERAs). A SERA subfamily, represented by Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, contains an atypical active site serine residue instead of a catalytic cysteine. Members of this SERAser subfamily are abundantly expressed in asexual blood stages, rendering them attractive drug and vaccine targets. In this study, we show by antibody localization and in vivo fluorescent tagging with the red fluorescent protein mCherry that the two P. berghei serine-type family members, PbSERA1 and PbSERA2, display differential expression towards the final stages of merozoite formation. Via targeted gene replacement, we generated single and double gene knockouts of the P. berghei SERAser genes. These loss-of-function lines progressed normally through the parasite life cycle, suggesting a specialized, non-vital role for serine-type SERAs in vivo. Parasites lacking PbSERAser showed increased expression of the cysteine-type PbSERA3. Compensatory mechanisms between distinct SERA subfamilies may thus explain the absence of phenotypical defect in SERAser disruptants, and challenge the suitability to develop potent antimalarial drugs based on specific inhibitors of Plasmodium serine-type SERAs. PMID:20039882

  17. 40 CFR 71.9 - Permit fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... revision, or permit renewal, including the development of an applicable requirement as part of the... administrative costs of the permit program, including transition planning, interagency coordination,...

  18. 40 CFR 52.872 - Operating permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kansas § 52.872 Operating permits. Emission limitations and related provisions which are established in Kansas operating permits as Federally...

  19. 40 CFR 52.1233 - Operating permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Minnesota § 52.1233 Operating permits. (a) Emission limitations and related provisions which are established in Minnesota permits as...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1233 - Operating permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Minnesota § 52.1233 Operating permits. (a) Emission limitations and related provisions which are established in Minnesota permits as...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1233 - Operating permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Minnesota § 52.1233 Operating permits. (a) Emission limitations and related provisions which are established in Minnesota permits as...

  2. 40 CFR 52.1233 - Operating permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Minnesota § 52.1233 Operating permits. (a) Emission limitations and related provisions which are established in Minnesota permits as...

  3. 41 CFR 102-74.500 - Can Federal agencies disapprove permit applications or cancel issued permits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... disapprove permit applications or cancel issued permits? 102-74.500 Section 102-74.500 Public Contracts and... Applications Or Cancellation of Permits § 102-74.500 Can Federal agencies disapprove permit applications or cancel issued permits? Yes, Federal agencies may disapprove any permit application or cancel an...

  4. 41 CFR 102-74.500 - Can Federal agencies disapprove permit applications or cancel issued permits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... disapprove permit applications or cancel issued permits? 102-74.500 Section 102-74.500 Public Contracts and... Applications Or Cancellation of Permits § 102-74.500 Can Federal agencies disapprove permit applications or cancel issued permits? Yes, Federal agencies may disapprove any permit application or cancel an...

  5. Plasmodium vivax Populations Are More Genetically Diverse and Less Structured than Sympatric Plasmodium falciparum Populations

    PubMed Central

    Jennison, Charlie; Arnott, Alicia; Tessier, Natacha; Tavul, Livingstone; Koepfli, Cristian; Felger, Ingrid; Siba, Peter M.; Reeder, John C.; Bahlo, Melanie; Mueller, Ivo; Barry, Alyssa E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium vivax, is proving more difficult to control and eliminate than Plasmodium falciparum in areas of co-transmission. Comparisons of the genetic structure of sympatric parasite populations may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the resilience of P. vivax and can help guide malaria control programs. Methodology/Principle findings P. vivax isolates representing the parasite populations of four areas on the north coast of Papua New Guinea (PNG) were genotyped using microsatellite markers and compared with previously published microsatellite data from sympatric P. falciparum isolates. The genetic diversity of P. vivax (He = 0.83–0.85) was higher than that of P. falciparum (He = 0.64–0.77) in all four populations. Moderate levels of genetic differentiation were found between P. falciparum populations, even over relatively short distances (less than 50 km), with 21–28% private alleles and clear geospatial genetic clustering. Conversely, very low population differentiation was found between P. vivax catchments, with less than 5% private alleles and no genetic clustering observed. In addition, the effective population size of P. vivax (30353; 13043–69142) was larger than that of P. falciparum (18871; 8109–42986). Conclusions/Significance Despite comparably high prevalence, P. vivax had higher diversity and a panmictic population structure compared to sympatric P. falciparum populations, which were fragmented into subpopulations. The results suggest that in comparison to P. falciparum, P. vivax has had a long-term large effective population size, consistent with more intense and stable transmission, and limited impact of past control and elimination efforts. This underlines suggestions that more intensive and sustained interventions will be needed to control and eventually eliminate P. vivax. This research clearly demonstrates how population genetic analyses can reveal deeper insight into transmission

  6. Malaria morbidity in Papua Indonesia, an area with multidrug resistant Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Karyana, Muhammad; Burdarm, Lenny; Yeung, Shunmay; Kenangalem, Enny; Wariker, Noah; Maristela, Rilia; Umana, Ketut Gde; Vemuri, Ram; Okoseray, Maurits J; Penttinen, Pasi M; Ebsworth, Peter; Sugiarto, Paulus; Anstey, Nicholas M; Tjitra, Emiliana; Price, Richard N

    2008-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance has emerged to both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum and yet the comparative epidemiology of these infections is poorly defined. Methods All laboratory-confirmed episodes of malaria in Timika, Papua, Indonesia, presenting to community primary care clinics and an inpatient facility were reviewed over a two-year period. In addition information was gathered from a house-to-house survey to quantify the prevalence of malaria and treatment-seeking behaviour of people with fever. Results Between January 2004 and December 2005, 99,158 laboratory-confirmed episodes of malaria were reported, of which 58% (57,938) were attributable to P. falciparum and 37% (36,471) to P. vivax. Malaria was most likely to be attributable to pure P. vivax in children under one year of age (55% 2,684/4,889). In the household survey, the prevalence of asexual parasitaemia was 7.5% (290/3,890) for P. falciparum and 6.4% (248/3,890) for P. vivax. The prevalence of P. falciparum infection peaked in young adults aged 15–25 years (9.8% 69/707), compared to P. vivax infection which peaked in children aged 1 to 4 years (9.5% 61/642). Overall 35% (1,813/5,255) of people questioned reported a febrile episode in the preceding month. Of the 60% of people who were estimated to have had malaria, only 39% would have been detected by the surveillance network. The overall incidence of malaria was therefore estimated as 876 per 1,000 per year (Range: 711–906). Conclusion In this region of multidrug-resistant P. vivax and P. falciparum, both species are associated with substantial morbidity, but with significant differences in the age-related risk of infection. PMID:18673572

  7. Genetic structure of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in the Bannu district of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum are the major causative agents of malaria. While knowledge of the genetic structure of malaria parasites is useful for understanding the evolution of parasite virulence, designing anti-malarial vaccines and assessing the impact of malaria control measures, there is a paucity of information on genetic diversity of these two malaria parasites in Pakistan. This study sought to shed some light on the genetic structure of P. vivax and P. falciparum in this understudied region. Methods The genetic diversities of P. vivax and P. falciparum populations from the densely populated, malaria-endemic Bannu district of Pakistan were evaluated by analysis of their merozoite surface protein (msp) genes by PCR-RFLP. Specifically, the Pvmsp-3α and Pvmsp-3β genes of P. vivax and the Pfmsp-1 and Pfmsp-2 genes of P. falciparum were analysed. Results In P. vivax, genotyping of Pvmsp-3α and Pvmsp-3β genes showed a high level of diversity at these loci. Four distinct allele groups: A (1.9 kb), B (1.5 kb), C (1.2 kb), and D (0.3 kb) were detected for Pvmsp-3α, type A being the most prevalent (82%). Conversely, amplification of the P. vivax msp-3β locus produced two allele groups: A (1.7-2.2 kb, 62%) and B (1.4-1.5 kb, 33%), with 5% mixed-strain infections. Restriction analysis of Pvmsp-3α and Pvmsp-3β yielded 12 and 8 distinct alleles, respectively, with a combined mixed genotype prevalence of 20%. In P. falciparum, all three known genotypes of Pfmsp-1 and two of Pfmsp-2 were observed, with MAD20 occurring in 67% and 3D7/IC in 65% of the isolates, respectively. Overall, 24% P. falciparum samples exhibited mixed-strain infections. Conclusion These results indicate that both P. vivax and P. falciparum populations in Pakistan are highly diverse. PMID:20416089

  8. Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax specific lactate dehydrogenase: genetic polymorphism study from Indian isolates.

    PubMed

    Keluskar, Priyadarshan; Singh, Vineeta; Gupta, Purva; Ingle, Sanjay

    2014-08-01

    Control and eradication of malaria is hindered by the acquisition of drug resistance by Plasmodium species. This has necessitated a persistent search for novel drugs and more efficient targets. Plasmodium species specific lactate dehydrogenase is one of the potential therapeutic and diagnostic targets, because of its indispensable role in endoerythrocytic stage of the parasite. A target molecule that is highly conserved in the parasite population can be more effectively used in diagnostics and therapeutics, hence, in the present study polymorphism in PfLDH (Plasmodiumfalciparum specific LDH) and PvLDH (Plasmodiumvivax specific LDH) genes was analyzed using PCR-single strand confirmation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and sequencing. Forty-six P. falciparum and thirty-five P. vivax samples were screened from different states of India. Our findings have revealed presence of a single PfLDH genotype and six PvLDH genotypes among the studied samples. Interestingly, along with synonymous substitutions, nonsynonymous substitutions were reported to be present for the first time in the PvLDH genotypes. Further, through amino acid sequence alignment and homology modeling studies we observed that the catalytic residues were conserved in all PvLDH genotypes and the nonsynonymous substitutions have not altered the enzyme structure significantly. Evolutionary genetics studies have confirmed that PfLDH and PvLDH loci are under strong purifying selection. Phylogenetic analysis of the pLDH gene sequences revealed that P. falciparum compared to P. vivax, has recent origin. The study therefore supports PfLDH and PvLDH as suitable therapeutic and diagnostic targets as well as phylogenetic markers to understand the genealogy of malaria species. PMID:24953504

  9. Plasmodium cellular effector mechanisms and the hepatic microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Frevert, Ute; Krzych, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the most serious health problems globally. Immunization with attenuated parasites elicits multiple cellular effector mechanisms capable of eliminating Plasmodium liver stages. However, malaria liver stage (LS) immunity is complex and the mechanisms effector T cells use to locate the few infected hepatocytes in the large liver in order to kill the intracellular LS parasites remain a mystery to date. Here, we review our current knowledge on the behavior of CD8 effector T cells in the hepatic microvasculature, in malaria and other hepatic infections. Taking into account the unique immunological and lymphogenic properties of the liver, we discuss whether classical granule-mediated cytotoxicity might eliminate infected hepatocytes via direct cell contact or whether cytokines might operate without cell–cell contact and kill Plasmodium LSs at a distance. A thorough understanding of the cellular effector mechanisms that lead to parasite death hence sterile protection is a prerequisite for the development of a successful malaria vaccine to protect the 40% of the world’s population currently at risk of Plasmodium infection. PMID:26074888

  10. The Small Ribosomal Subunit RNA Isoforms in Plasmodium Cynomolgi

    PubMed Central

    Corredor, V.; Enea, V.

    1994-01-01

    We report the isolation, characterization and analysis of the small subunit rRNA genes in Plasmodium cynomolgi (Ceylon). As in other Plasmodium species, these genes are present in low copy number, are unlinked and form two types that are distinct in sequence and are expressed stage specifically. The asexually expressed (type A) genes are present in four copies in the Ceylon(-) and in five copies in the Berok(-) strain. Surprisingly, the sexually expressed (type B) gene is present in a single copy. The vast majority of the differences between gene types is confined to the variable regions. The pattern of divergence is different from that observed in Plasmodium berghei or in Plasmodium falciparum. Analysis of the small subunit rRNA sequences of P. cynomolgi, P. berghei and P. falciparum, indicates that the two gene types do not evolve independently but rather interact (through gene conversion or some form of recombination) to such an extent as to erase whatever stage-specific sequence signatures they may have had in the last common ancestor. PMID:8005440

  11. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  16. Plasmodium-specific molecular assays produce uninterpretable results and non-Plasmodium spp. sequences in field-collected Anopheles vectors.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Genelle F; Foley, Desmond H; Rueda, Leopoldo M; Melanson, Vanessa R; Wilkerson, Richard C; Long, Lewis S; Richardson, Jason H; Klein, Terry A; Kim, Heung-Chul; Lee, Won-Ja

    2013-12-01

    The Malaria Research and Reference Reagent Resource-recommended PLF/UNR/VIR polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect Plasmodium vivax in Anopheles spp. mosquitoes collected in South Korea. Samples that were amplified were sequenced and compared with known Plasmodium spp. by using the PlasmoDB.org Basic Local Alignment Search Tool/n and the National Center for Biotechnology Information Basic Local Alignment Search Tool/n tools. Results show that the primers PLF/UNR/VIR used in this PCR can produce uninterpretable results and non-specific sequences in field-collected mosquitoes. Three additional PCRs (PLU/VIV, specific for 18S small subunit ribosomal DNA; Pvr47, specific for a nuclear repeat; and GDCW/PLAS, specific for the mitochondrial marker, cytB) were then used to find a more accurate and interpretable assay. Samples that were amplified were again sequenced. The PLU/VIV and Pvr47 assays showed cross-reactivity with non-Plasmodium spp. and an arthropod fungus (Zoophthora lanceolata). The GDCW/PLAS assay amplified only Plasmodium spp. but also amplified the non-human specific parasite P. berghei from an Anopheles belenrae mosquito. Detection of P. berghei in South Korea is a new finding. PMID:24189365

  17. Structure, Function and Inhibition of the Phosphoethanolamine Methyltransferases of the Human Malaria Parasites Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Aprajita; Lukk, Tiit; Kumar, Vidya; Choi, Jae-Yeon; Augagneur, Yoann; Voelker, Dennis R.; Nair, Satish; Mamoun, Choukri Ben

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoethanolamine methyltransferases (PMTs) catalyze the three-step methylation of phosphoethanolamine to form phosphocholine, a critical step in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine in a select number of eukaryotes including human malaria parasites, nematodes and plants. Genetic studies in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have shown that the methyltransferase PfPMT plays a critical function in parasite development and differentiation. The presence of PMT orthologs in other malaria parasites that infect humans and their absence in mammals make them ideal targets for the development of selective antimalarials with broad specificity against different Plasmodium species. Here we describe the X-ray structures and biochemical properties of PMT orthologs from Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi and show that both enzymes are inhibited by amodiaquine and NSC158011, two drugs with potent antimalarial activity. Metabolic studies in a yeast mutant that relies on PkPMT or PvPMT for survival demonstrated that these compounds inhibit phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis from ethanolamine. Our structural and functional data provide insights into the mechanism of catalysis and inhibition of PMT enzymes and set the stage for a better design of more specific and selective antimalarial drugs. PMID:25761669

  18. Structure, Function and Inhibition of the Phosphoethanolamine Methyltransferases of the Human Malaria Parasites Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Aprajita; Lukk, Tiit; Kumar, Vidya; Choi, Jae-Yeon; Augagneur, Yoann; Voelker, Dennis R.; Nair, Satish; Mamoun, Choukri Ben

    2015-03-12

    Phosphoethanolamine methyltransferases (PMTs) catalyze the three-step methylation of phosphoethanolamine to form phosphocholine, a critical step in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine in a select number of eukaryotes including human malaria parasites, nematodes and plants. Genetic studies in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have shown that the methyltransferase PfPMT plays a critical function in parasite development and differentiation. The presence of PMT orthologs in other malaria parasites that infect humans and their absence in mammals make them ideal targets for the development of selective antimalarials with broad specificity against different Plasmodium species. Here we describe the X-ray structures and biochemical properties of PMT orthologs from Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi and show that both enzymes are inhibited by amodiaquine and NSC158011, two drugs with potent antimalarial activity. Metabolic studies in a yeast mutant that relies on PkPMT or PvPMT for survival demonstrated that these compounds inhibit phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis from ethanolamine. Our structural and functional data provide insights into the mechanism of catalysis and inhibition of PMT enzymes and set the stage for a better design of more specific and selective antimalarial drugs.

  19. Structure, Function and Inhibition of the Phosphoethanolamine Methyltransferases of the Human Malaria Parasites Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garg, Aprajita; Lukk, Tiit; Kumar, Vidya; Choi, Jae-Yeon; Augagneur, Yoann; Voelker, Dennis R.; Nair, Satish; Mamoun, Choukri Ben

    2015-03-12

    Phosphoethanolamine methyltransferases (PMTs) catalyze the three-step methylation of phosphoethanolamine to form phosphocholine, a critical step in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine in a select number of eukaryotes including human malaria parasites, nematodes and plants. Genetic studies in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have shown that the methyltransferase PfPMT plays a critical function in parasite development and differentiation. The presence of PMT orthologs in other malaria parasites that infect humans and their absence in mammals make them ideal targets for the development of selective antimalarials with broad specificity against different Plasmodium species. Here we describe the X-ray structures and biochemical properties ofmore » PMT orthologs from Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi and show that both enzymes are inhibited by amodiaquine and NSC158011, two drugs with potent antimalarial activity. Metabolic studies in a yeast mutant that relies on PkPMT or PvPMT for survival demonstrated that these compounds inhibit phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis from ethanolamine. Our structural and functional data provide insights into the mechanism of catalysis and inhibition of PMT enzymes and set the stage for a better design of more specific and selective antimalarial drugs.« less

  20. 40 CFR 71.25 - Permit content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permit content. 71.25 Section 71.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS Permits for Early Reductions Sources § 71.25 Permit content. (a) Standard...

  1. 40 CFR 71.25 - Permit content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit content. 71.25 Section 71.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS Permits for Early Reductions Sources § 71.25 Permit content. (a) Standard...

  2. 40 CFR 71.25 - Permit content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permit content. 71.25 Section 71.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS Permits for Early Reductions Sources § 71.25 Permit content. (a) Standard...

  3. 40 CFR 71.25 - Permit content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permit content. 71.25 Section 71.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS Permits for Early Reductions Sources § 71.25 Permit content. (a) Standard...

  4. 40 CFR 71.25 - Permit content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permit content. 71.25 Section 71.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS Permits for Early Reductions Sources § 71.25 Permit content. (a) Standard...

  5. 10 CFR 50.23 - Construction permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Construction permits. 50.23 Section 50.23 Energy NUCLEAR... Description of Licenses § 50.23 Construction permits. A construction permit for the construction of a... part 52 of this chapter, the construction permit and operating license are deemed to be combined in...

  6. 10 CFR 50.23 - Construction permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Construction permits. 50.23 Section 50.23 Energy NUCLEAR... Description of Licenses § 50.23 Construction permits. A construction permit for the construction of a... part 52 of this chapter, the construction permit and operating license are deemed to be combined in...

  7. 10 CFR 50.23 - Construction permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Construction permits. 50.23 Section 50.23 Energy NUCLEAR... Description of Licenses § 50.23 Construction permits. A construction permit for the construction of a... part 52 of this chapter, the construction permit and operating license are deemed to be combined in...

  8. 10 CFR 50.23 - Construction permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Construction permits. 50.23 Section 50.23 Energy NUCLEAR... Description of Licenses § 50.23 Construction permits. A construction permit for the construction of a... part 52 of this chapter, the construction permit and operating license are deemed to be combined in...

  9. 40 CFR 72.62 - Draft permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Draft permit. 72.62 Section 72.62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.62 Draft permit. (a) After the Administrator receives a complete Acid Rain...

  10. 40 CFR 71.9 - Permit fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit fees. 71.9 Section 71.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS Operating Permits § 71.9 Permit fees. (a) Fee requirement. The owners or operators of part 71 sources shall pay annual fees,...

  11. 30 CFR 773.17 - Permit conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permit conditions. 773.17 Section 773.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMITS AND PERMIT...

  12. 45 CFR 670.13 - Permit administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permit administration. 670.13 Section 670.13 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Permits § 670.13 Permit administration. (a) Issuance of the permits. The Director may approve any application...

  13. Industrial-user-permitting guidance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The manual provides publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) with guidance on the development and issuance of effective industrial user permits. The manual addresses and expands upon minimum requirements and provides guidance on how to establish a permit program, procedures for permit issuance, procedures for writing a permit, and requirements for waste haulers. It is intended to assist new permit writers, experienced permit writers, and legal and administrative personnel who are involved in the implementation of an industrial user permitting program in preparing effective and enforceable industrial user permits. It provides documentation of EPA's recommendations for industrial user permit contents/structure. It contains many examples of sections and conditions of a permit, as well as complete sample permits and fact sheets. It also contains background info on requirements of the issuance process and discusses the necessary legal authority required to implement an effective program. Appendix A: Bibliography; Appendix B: List of State/Regional Pretreatment Coordinators; Appendix C: Glossary of Terms; Appendix D: Sample Sewer Use Ordinance Provisions for Permits; Appendix E: Sample Permit Application Form; Appendix F: Sample IU Permit; Appendix G: Sample Standard Conditions for Permits; Appendix H: IU Management Practices; Appendix I: Fact Sheet: Appendix J: Sample Waste Hauler Permit.

  14. 40 CFR 71.24 - Permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permit applications. 71.24 Section 71.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS Permits for Early Reductions Sources § 71.24 Permit applications. (a) Where to file. To apply for a...

  15. 40 CFR 71.24 - Permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permit applications. 71.24 Section 71.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS Permits for Early Reductions Sources § 71.24 Permit applications. (a) Where to file. To apply for a...

  16. 40 CFR 71.24 - Permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permit applications. 71.24 Section 71.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL OPERATING PERMIT PROGRAMS Permits for Early Reductions Sources § 71.24 Permit applications. (a) Where to file. To apply for a...

  17. 40 CFR 144.33 - Area permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Area permits. 144.33 Section 144.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAM Authorization by Permit § 144.33 Area permits. (a) The Director may issue a permit on an area basis, rather than...

  18. 50 CFR 660.25 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... in 50 CFR part 660, subparts C through G. (b) Limited entry permit—(1) Eligibility and registration... implementing regulations at 15 CFR part 904, subpart D, apply. (2) Mothership (MS) permit. The MS permit... 15 CFR part 904, subpart D. (2) All Shorebased IFQ Program permits (QS permit, first receiver...

  19. 50 CFR 622.90 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Red Drum Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.90 Permits. (a) Dealer permits and conditions—(1) Permits. For a dealer to first receive Gulf red drum harvested in or from the EEZ, a Gulf and South Atlantic dealer permit must be......

  20. 40 CFR 147.2906 - Emergency permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency permits. 147.2906 Section...-Class II Wells § 147.2906 Emergency permits. (a) An emergency permit may be issued if: (1) There will be an imminent health hazard unless an emergency permit is issued; or (2) There will be a...

  1. 40 CFR 147.2906 - Emergency permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emergency permits. 147.2906 Section...-Class II Wells § 147.2906 Emergency permits. (a) An emergency permit may be issued if: (1) There will be an imminent health hazard unless an emergency permit is issued; or (2) There will be a...

  2. 40 CFR 144.34 - Emergency permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emergency permits. 144.34 Section 144...) UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAM Authorization by Permit § 144.34 Emergency permits. (a) Coverage... unless a temporary emergency permit is granted; or (2) A substantial and irretrievable loss of oil or...

  3. 40 CFR 144.34 - Emergency permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency permits. 144.34 Section 144...) UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAM Authorization by Permit § 144.34 Emergency permits. (a) Coverage... unless a temporary emergency permit is granted; or (2) A substantial and irretrievable loss of oil or...

  4. Plasmodium Cysteine Repeat Modular Proteins 3 and 4 are essential for malaria parasite transmission from the mosquito to the host

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Plasmodium Cysteine Repeat Modular Proteins (PCRMP) are a family of four conserved proteins of malaria parasites, that contain a number of motifs implicated in host-parasite interactions. Analysis of mutants of the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei lacking expression of PCRMP1 or 2 showed that these proteins are essential for targeting of P. berghei sporozoites to the mosquito salivary gland and, hence, for transmission from the mosquito to the mouse. Methods In this work, the role of the remaining PCRMP family members, PCRMP3 and 4, has been investigated throughout the Plasmodium life cycle by generation and analysis of P. berghei gene deletion mutants, Δpcrmp3 and Δpcrmp4. The role of PCRMP members during the transmission and hepatic stages of the Plasmodium lifecycle has been evaluated by light- and electron microscopy and by analysis of liver stage development in HEPG2 cells in vitro and by infecting mice with mutant sporozoites. In addition, mice were immunized with live Δpcrmp3 and Δpcrmp4 sporozoites to evaluate their immunization potential as a genetically-attenuated parasite-based vaccine. Results Disruption of pcrmp3 and pcrmp4 in P. berghei revealed that they are also essential for transmission of the parasite through the mosquito vector, although acting in a distinct way to pbcrmp1 and 2. Mutants lacking expression of PCRMP3 or PCRMP4 show normal blood stage development and oocyst formation in the mosquito and develop into morphologically normal sporozoites, but these have a defect in egress from oocysts and do not enter the salivary glands. Sporozoites extracted from oocysts perform gliding motility and invade and infect hepatocytes but do not undergo further development and proliferation. Furthermore, the study shows that immunization with Δcrmp3 and Δcrmp4 sporozoites does not confer protective immunity upon subsequent challenge. Conclusions PCRMP3 and 4 play multiple roles during the Plasmodium life cycle; they are essential

  5. Targeting a Novel Plasmodium falciparum Purine Recycling Pathway with Specific Immucillins

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, L; Shi, W; Lewandowicz, A; Singh, V; Mwakingwe, A; Birck, M R; Taylor Ringia, E A; Bench, G; Madrid, D C; Tyler, P C; Evans, G B; Furneaux, R H; Schramm, V L; Kim, K

    2004-05-19

    Plasmodium falciparum is unable to synthesize purine bases and relies upon purine salvage and purine recycling to meet its purine needs. We report that purines formed as products of the polyamine pathway are recycled in a novel pathway in which 5'-methylthioinosine is generated by adenosine deaminase. The action of P. falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase is a convergent step of purine salvage, converting both 5'-methylthioinosine and inosine to hypoxanthine. We used accelerator mass spectrometry to verify that 5'-methylthioinosine is an active nucleic acid precursor in P. falciparum. Prior studies have shown that inhibitors of purine salvage enzymes kill malaria, but potent malaria-specific inhibitors of these enzymes have not previously been described. 5'-methylthio-Immucillin-H, a transition state analogue inhibitor that is selective for malarial over human purine nucleoside phosphorylase, kills P. falciparum in culture. Immucillins are currently in clinical trials for other indications and may have application as antimalarials.

  6. The Host Targeting motif in exported Plasmodium proteins is cleaved in the parasite endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Andrew R.; Speicher, Kaye D.; Tamez, Pamela A.; Bhattacharjee, Souvik; Speicher, David W.; Haldar, Kasturi

    2010-01-01

    During the blood stage of its lifecycle, the malaria parasite resides and replicates inside a membrane vacuole within its host cell, the human erythrocyte. The parasite exports many proteins across the vacuole membrane and into the host cell cytoplasm. Most exported proteins are characterized by the presence of a Host Targeting (HT) motif, also referred to as a Plasmodium Export Element (PEXEL), which corresponds to the consensus sequence RxLxE/D/Q. During export the HT motif is cleaved by an unknown protease. Here, we generate parasite lines expressing HT motif containing proteins that are localized to different compartments within the parasite or host cell. We find that the HT motif in a protein that is retained in the parasite endoplasmic reticulum, is cleaved and N-acetylated as efficiently as a protein that is exported. This shows that cleavage of the HT motif occurs early in the secretory pathway, in the parasite endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:20117149

  7. Impact of climate variability on Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria remains a public health problem in the remote and poor area of Yunnan Province, China. Yunnan faces an increasing risk of imported malaria infections from Mekong river neighboring countries. This study aimed to identify the high risk area of malaria transmission in Yunnan Province, and to estimate the effects of climatic variability on the transmission of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in the identified area. Methods We identified spatial clusters of malaria cases using spatial cluster analysis at a county level in Yunnan Province, 2005–2010, and estimated the weekly effects of climatic factors on P. vivax and P. falciparum based on a dataset of daily malaria cases and climatic variables. A distributed lag nonlinear model was used to estimate the impact of temperature, relative humidity and rainfall up to 10–week lags on both types of malaria parasite after adjusting for seasonal and long-term effects. Results The primary cluster area was identified along the China–Myanmar border in western Yunnan. A 1°C increase in minimum temperature was associated with a lag 4 to 9 weeks relative risk (RR), with the highest effect at lag 7 weeks for P. vivax (RR = 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.05) and 6 weeks for P. falciparum (RR = 1.07; 95% CI, 1.04, 1.11); a 10-mm increment in rainfall was associated with RRs of lags 2-4 weeks and 9-10 weeks, with the highest effect at 3 weeks for both P. vivax (RR = 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.04) and P. falciparum (RR = 1.04; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.06); and the RRs with a 10% rise in relative humidity were significant from lag 3 to 8 weeks with the highest RR of 1.24 (95% CI, 1.10, 1.41) for P. vivax at 5-week lag. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the China–Myanmar border is a high risk area for malaria transmission. Climatic factors appeared to be among major determinants of malaria transmission in this area. The estimated lag effects for the association between temperature and malaria are consistent with the life

  8. Plasmodium knowlesi: from Malaysia, a novel health care threat.

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Fiorino, Sirio; Manfredi, Roberto

    2012-03-01

    Epidemic foci of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria have been identified during the past ten years in Malaysia, in particular in the States of Sarawak and Sabah (Malaysia Borneo), and in the Pahang region (peninsular Malaysia). Based on a review of the available recent international literature, the authors underline the importance of molecular biology examinations, polymerase chain reactions (PCR), performed with primers specific for P. knowlesi, since the current microscopic examination (haemoscope) may fail to distinguish P. knowlesi from Plasmodium malariae, due to the very similar appearance of the two parasites. P. knowlesi has been described as the causal agent of life-threatening and lethal forms of malaria: its clinical picture is more severe when compared with that of P. malariae, since the disease is characterized by greater parasitaemia, as opposed to that documented in the course of P. malariae disease. The most effective carrier is Anopheles leucosphyrus: this mosquito is attracted by both humans and monkeys. Among primates, the natural hosts of P. knowlesi are Macaca fascicularis and Macaca nemestina, while Saimiri scirea and Macaca mulatta, which cannot become infected in nature, may be useful in experimental models. When underlining the potentially severe evolution, we note the key role played by prompt disease recognition, which is expected to be more straightforward in patients monitored in endemic countries at high risk, but should be carefully implemented for subjects being admitted to hospital in Western countries suffering from the typical signs and symptoms of malaria, after travelling in South-East Asia where they were engaged in excursions in the tropical forest (trekking, and similar outdoor activities). In these cases, the diagnosis should be prompt, and suitable treatment should follow. According to data in the literature, in non-severe cases chloroquine proves very effective against P. knowlesi, achieving the disappearance of signs and

  9. 27 CFR 71.49a - Applications for operating permits and industrial use permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... permits and industrial use permits. 71.49a Section 71.49a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL... and industrial use permits. If, on examination of an application for an operating permit or an industrial use permit, the appropriate TTB officer has reason to believe: (a) In case of an application...

  10. 27 CFR 71.48 - Operating permits and industrial use permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... industrial use permits. 71.48 Section 71.48 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... PERMIT PROCEEDINGS Grounds for Citation § 71.48 Operating permits and industrial use permits. Whenever... industrial use permit: (a) Has not in good faith complied with the provisions of 26 U.S.C. chapter 51...

  11. 27 CFR 71.49a - Applications for operating permits and industrial use permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... permits and industrial use permits. 71.49a Section 71.49a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL... and industrial use permits. If, on examination of an application for an operating permit or an industrial use permit, the appropriate TTB officer has reason to believe: (a) In case of an application...

  12. 27 CFR 71.48 - Operating permits and industrial use permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... industrial use permits. 71.48 Section 71.48 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... PERMIT PROCEEDINGS Grounds for Citation § 71.48 Operating permits and industrial use permits. Whenever... industrial use permit: (a) Has not in good faith complied with the provisions of 26 U.S.C. chapter 51...

  13. 27 CFR 71.48 - Operating permits and industrial use permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... industrial use permits. 71.48 Section 71.48 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... PERMIT PROCEEDINGS Grounds for Citation § 71.48 Operating permits and industrial use permits. Whenever... industrial use permit: (a) Has not in good faith complied with the provisions of 26 U.S.C. chapter 51...

  14. 27 CFR 71.48 - Operating permits and industrial use permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... industrial use permits. 71.48 Section 71.48 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... PERMIT PROCEEDINGS Grounds for Citation § 71.48 Operating permits and industrial use permits. Whenever... industrial use permit: (a) Has not in good faith complied with the provisions of 26 U.S.C. chapter 51...

  15. 27 CFR 71.49a - Applications for operating permits and industrial use permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... permits and industrial use permits. 71.49a Section 71.49a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL... and industrial use permits. If, on examination of an application for an operating permit or an industrial use permit, the appropriate TTB officer has reason to believe: (a) In case of an application...

  16. 27 CFR 71.49a - Applications for operating permits and industrial use permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... permits and industrial use permits. 71.49a Section 71.49a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL... and industrial use permits. If, on examination of an application for an operating permit or an industrial use permit, the appropriate TTB officer has reason to believe: (a) In case of an application...

  17. 27 CFR 71.48 - Operating permits and industrial use permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... industrial use permits. 71.48 Section 71.48 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... PERMIT PROCEEDINGS Grounds for Citation § 71.48 Operating permits and industrial use permits. Whenever... industrial use permit: (a) Has not in good faith complied with the provisions of 26 U.S.C. chapter 51...

  18. 27 CFR 71.49a - Applications for operating permits and industrial use permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... permits and industrial use permits. 71.49a Section 71.49a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL... and industrial use permits. If, on examination of an application for an operating permit or an industrial use permit, the appropriate TTB officer has reason to believe: (a) In case of an application...

  19. 40 CFR 72.32 - Permit application shield and binding effect of permit application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit application shield and binding effect of permit application. 72.32 Section 72.32 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.32 Permit application shield and binding effect...

  20. Plasmodium vivax Promiscuous T-Helper Epitopes Defined and Evaluated as Linear Peptide Chimera Immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Aguilar, Ivette; Rodríguez, Alexandra; Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio; Guzmán, Fanny; De la Vega, Patricia; Elkin Patarroyo, Manuel; Galinski, Mary R.; Moreno, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Clinical trials of malaria vaccines have confirmed that parasite-derived T-cell epitopes are required to elicit consistent and long-lasting immune responses. We report here the identification and functional characterization of six T-cell epitopes that are present in the merozoite surface protein-1 of Plasmodium vivax (PvMSP-1) and bind promiscuously to four different HLA-DRB1∗ alleles. Each of these peptides induced lymphoproliferative responses in cells from individuals with previous P. vivax infections. Furthermore, linear-peptide chimeras containing the promiscuous PvMSP-1 T-cell epitopes, synthesized in tandem with the Plasmodium falciparum immunodominant circumsporozoite protein (CSP) B-cell epitope, induced high specific antibody titers, cytokine production, long-lasting immune responses, and immunoglobulin G isotype class switching in BALB/c mice. A linear-peptide chimera containing an allele-restricted P. falciparum T-cell epitope with the CSP B-cell epitope was not effective. Two out of the six promiscuous T-cell epitopes exhibiting the highest anti-peptide response also contain B-cell epitopes. Antisera generated against these B-cell epitopes recognize P. vivax merozoites in immunofluorescence assays. Importantly, the anti-peptide antibodies generated to the CSP B-cell epitope inhibited the invasion of P. falciparum sporozoites into human hepatocytes. These data and the simplicity of design of the chimeric constructs highlight the potential of multimeric, multistage, and multispecies linear-peptide chimeras containing parasite promiscuous T-cell epitopes for malaria vaccine development. PMID:12065487

  1. Plasmodium knowlesi Genome Sequences from Clinical Isolates Reveal Extensive Genomic Dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Scott B.; Sanderson, Theo; Otto, Thomas D.; Lu, Woon Chan; Krishna, Sanjeev; Rayner, Julian C.; Cox-Singh, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a newly described zoonosis that causes malaria in the human population that can be severe and fatal. The study of P. knowlesi parasites from human clinical isolates is relatively new and, in order to obtain maximum information from patient sample collections, we explored the possibility of generating P. knowlesi genome sequences from archived clinical isolates. Our patient sample collection consisted of frozen whole blood samples that contained excessive human DNA contamination and, in that form, were not suitable for parasite genome sequencing. We developed a method to reduce the amount of human DNA in the thawed blood samples in preparation for high throughput parasite genome sequencing using Illumina HiSeq and MiSeq sequencing platforms. Seven of fifteen samples processed had sufficiently pure P. knowlesi DNA for whole genome sequencing. The reads were mapped to the P. knowlesi H strain reference genome and an average mapping of 90% was obtained. Genes with low coverage were removed leaving 4623 genes for subsequent analyses. Previously we identified a DNA sequence dimorphism on a small fragment of the P. knowlesi normocyte binding protein xa gene on chromosome 14. We used the genome data to assemble full-length Pknbpxa sequences and discovered that the dimorphism extended along the gene. An in-house algorithm was developed to detect SNP sites co-associating with the dimorphism. More than half of the P. knowlesi genome was dimorphic, involving genes on all chromosomes and suggesting that two distinct types of P. knowlesi infect the human population in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. We use P. knowlesi clinical samples to demonstrate that Plasmodium DNA from archived patient samples can produce high quality genome data. We show that analyses, of even small numbers of difficult clinical malaria isolates, can generate comprehensive genomic information that will improve our understanding of malaria parasite diversity and pathobiology. PMID:25830531

  2. Authentication codes that permit arbitration

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    Objective of authentication is to detect attempted deceptions in a communications channel. Traditionally this has been restricted to providing the authorized receiver with a capability of detecting unauthentic messages. The known codes have all left open the possibility for either the transmitter to disavow a message that he actually sent to the receiver, i.e., an authentic message, or else for the receiver to falsely attribute a message of his own devising to the transmitter. Of course the party being deceived would know that he was the victim of a deception by the other, but would be unable to ''prove'' this to a third party. Ideally, authentication should provide a means to detect attempted deceptions by insiders (the transmitter or receiver) as well as outsiders (the opponent). It has been an open question of whether it was possible to devise authentication codes that would permit a third party, an arbiter, to decide (in probability) whether the transmitter or the receiver was cheating in the event of a dispute. We answer this question in that both permits the receiver to detect outsider deceptions, as well affirmative by first constructing an example of an authentication code as permitting a designated arbiter to detect insider deceptions and then by generalizing this construction to an infinite class of such codes.

  3. PEST sequences in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum: a genomic study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, David; Bell, Angus

    2003-01-01

    Background Inhibitors of the protease calpain are known to have selectively toxic effects on Plasmodium falciparum. The enzyme has a natural inhibitor calpastatin and in eukaryotes is responsible for turnover of proteins containing short sequences enriched in certain amino acids (PEST sequences). The genome of P. falciparum was searched for this protease, its natural inhibitor and putative substrates. Methods The publicly available P. falciparum genome was found to have too many errors to permit reliable analysis. An earlier annotation of chromosome 2 was instead examined. PEST scores were determined for all annotated proteins. The published genome was searched for calpain and calpastatin homologs. Results Typical PEST sequences were found in 13% of the proteins on chromosome 2, including a surprising number of cell-surface proteins. The annotated calpain gene has a non-biological "intron" that appears to have been created to avoid an unrecognized frameshift. Only the catalytic domain has significant similarity with the vertebrate calpains. No calpastatin homologs were found in the published annotation. Conclusion A calpain gene is present in the genome and many putative substrates of this enzyme have been found. Calpastatin homologs may be found once the re-annotation is completed. Given the selective toxicity of calpain inhibitors, this enzyme may be worth exploring further as a potential drug target. PMID:12857354

  4. A Plasmodium falciparum strain expressing GFP throughout the parasite's life-cycle.

    PubMed

    Talman, Arthur M; Blagborough, Andrew M; Sinden, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for the majority of malaria-related deaths. Tools allowing the study of the basic biology of P. falciparum throughout the life cycle are critical to the development of new strategies to target the parasite within both human and mosquito hosts. We here present 3D7HT-GFP, a strain of P. falciparum constitutively expressing the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) throughout the life cycle, which has retained its capacity to complete sporogonic development. The GFP expressing cassette was inserted in the Pf47 locus. Using this transgenic strain, parasite tracking and population dynamics studies in mosquito stages and exo-erythrocytic schizogony is greatly facilitated. The development of 3D7HT-GFP will permit a deeper understanding of the biology of parasite-host vector interactions, and facilitate the development of high-throughput malaria transmission assays and thus aid development of new intervention strategies against both parasite and mosquito. PMID:20161781

  5. MOLECULAR SURVEILLANCE OF Plasmodium vivax AND Plasmodium falciparum DHFR MUTATIONS IN ISOLATES FROM SOUTHERN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    SHARIFI-SARASIABI, Khojasteh; HAGHIGHI, Ali; KAZEMI, Bahram; TAGHIPOUR, Niloofar; MOJARAD, Ehsan Nazemalhosseini; GACHKAR, Latif

    2016-01-01

    In Iran, both Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum malaria have been detected, but P. vivax is the predominant species. Point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) gene in both Plasmodia are the major mechanisms of pyrimethamine resistance. From April 2007 to June 2009, a total of 134 blood samples in two endemic areas of southern Iran were collected from patients infected with P. vivax and P. falciparum. The isolates were analyzed for P. vivax dihydrofolate reductase (pvdhfr) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) point mutations using various PCR-based methods. The majority of the isolates (72.9%) had wild type amino acids at five codons of pvdhfr. Amongst mutant isolates, the most common pvdhfr alleles were double mutant in 58 and 117 amino acids (58R-117N). Triple mutation in 57, 58, and 117 amino acids (57L/58R/117N) was identified for the first time in the pvdhfr gene of Iranian P. vivax isolates. All the P. falciparumsamples analyzed (n = 16) possessed a double mutant pfdhfrallele (59R/108N) and retained a wild-type mutation at position 51. This may be attributed to the fact that the falciparum malaria patients were treated using sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in Iran. The presence of mutant haplotypes in P. vivax is worrying, but has not yet reached an alarming threshold regarding drugs such as SP. The results of this study reinforce the importance of performing a molecular surveillance by means of a continuous chemoresistance assessment. PMID:27007559

  6. Anti-Plasmodium falciparum activity of quinoline-sulfonamide hybrids.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Luiz C S; Boechat, Núbia; Ferreira, Maria de Lourdes G; Júnior, Carlos C S; Jesus, Antônio M L; Leite, Milene M M; Souza, Nicolli B; Krettli, Antoniana U

    2015-09-01

    Fifteen quinoline-sulfonamide hybrids, with a 7-chloroquinoline moiety connected by a linker group to arylsulfonamide moieties with different substituents in the 4-position were synthesized and assayed against Plasmodium falciparum. The compounds displayed high schizonticidal blood activity in vitro, with IC50 values ranging from 0.05 to 1.63 μM, in the anti-HPR2 assay against clone W2-chloroquine-resistant; ten of them showed an IC50 (ranging from 0.05 to 0.40 μM) lower than that of chloroquine and sulfadoxine. Among them, two compounds inhibited Plasmodium berghei parasitemia by 47% and 49% on day 5 after mice inoculation. The most active, in vivo, hybrid 13 is considered to be a new prototype for the development of an antimalarial drug against chloroquine-resistant parasites. PMID:26190461

  7. Predictions of avian Plasmodium expansion under climate change

    PubMed Central

    Loiseau, Claire; Harrigan, Ryan J.; Bichet, Coraline; Julliard, Romain; Garnier, Stéphane; Lendvai, Ádám Z.; Chastel, Olivier; Sorci, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases are particularly responsive to changing environmental conditions. Diurnal temperature variation has been identified as a particularly important factor for the development of malaria parasites within vectors. Here, we conducted a survey across France, screening populations of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) for malaria (Plasmodium relictum). We investigated whether variation in remotely-sensed environmental variables accounted for the spatial variation observed in prevalence and parasitemia. While prevalence was highly correlated to diurnal temperature range and other measures of temperature variation, environmental conditions could not predict spatial variation in parasitemia. Based on our empirical data, we mapped malaria distribution under climate change scenarios and predicted that Plasmodium occurrence will spread to regions in northern France, and that prevalence levels are likely to increase in locations where transmission already occurs. Our findings, based on remote sensing tools coupled with empirical data suggest that climatic change will significantly alter transmission of malaria parasites. PMID:23350033

  8. How specific is Plasmodium falciparum adherence to chondroitin 4-sulfate?

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Suchi; Gowda, D. Channe

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection during pregnancy results in the sequestration of infected red blood cells (IRBCs) in the placenta, contributing to pregnancy associated malaria (PAM). IRBC adherence is mediated by the binding of a variant Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding protein 1 named VAR2CSA to the low sulfated chondroitin 4-sulfate (C4S) proteoglycan (CSPG) present predominantly in the intervillous space of the placenta. IRBC binding is highly specific to the level and distribution of 4-sulfate groups in C4S. Given the strict specificity of IRBC-C4S interactions, it is better to use either placental CSPG or CSPGs bearing structurally similar C4S chains in defining VAR2CSA structural architecture that interact with C4S, evaluating VAR2CSA constructs for vaccine development or studying structure-based inhibitors as therapeutics for PAM. PMID:21507719

  9. Host AMPK Is a Modulator of Plasmodium Liver Infection.

    PubMed

    Ruivo, Margarida T Grilo; Vera, Iset Medina; Sales-Dias, Joana; Meireles, Patrícia; Gural, Nil; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Mota, Maria M; Mancio-Silva, Liliana

    2016-09-01

    Manipulation of the master regulator of energy homeostasis AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity is a strategy used by many intracellular pathogens for successful replication. Infection by most pathogens leads to an activation of host AMPK activity due to the energetic demands placed on the infected cell. Here, we demonstrate that the opposite is observed in cells infected with rodent malaria parasites. Indeed, AMPK activity upon the infection of hepatic cells is suppressed and dispensable for successful infection. By contrast, an overactive AMPK is deleterious to intracellular growth and replication of different Plasmodium spp., including the human malaria parasite, P. falciparum. The negative impact of host AMPK activity on infection was further confirmed in mice under conditions that activate its function. Overall, this work establishes the role of host AMPK signaling as a suppressive pathway of Plasmodium hepatic infection and as a potential target for host-based antimalarial interventions. PMID:27568570

  10. Uncovering the transmission dynamics of Plasmodium vivax using population genetics

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Alyssa E.; Waltmann, Andreea; Koepfli, Cristian; Barnadas, Celine; Mueller, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Population genetic analysis of malaria parasites has the power to reveal key insights into malaria epidemiology and transmission dynamics with the potential to deliver tools to support control and elimination efforts. Analyses of parasite genetic diversity have suggested that Plasmodium vivax populations are more genetically diverse and less structured than those of Plasmodium falciparum indicating that P. vivax may be a more ancient parasite of humans and/or less susceptible to population bottlenecks, as well as more efficient at disseminating its genes. These population genetic insights into P. vivax transmission dynamics provide an explanation for its relative resilience to control efforts. Here, we describe current knowledge on P. vivax population genetic structure, its relevance to understanding transmission patterns and relapse and how this information can inform malaria control and elimination programmes. PMID:25891915

  11. [Plasmodium vivax, a parasite coming out of the shadows].

    PubMed

    Allgower, Andrea; Taylor, W Robert; Chappuis, François; Eperon, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    Since 2007, the incidence and mortality of malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum have declined. However, this trend has not been seen with Plasmodium vivax which has biological features. Severe vivax malaria is increasingly reported in endemic countries even though P. vivax has been thought of as a benign disease. Diagnosis is challenging: the usual rapid diagnostic tests are less sensitive in detecting P. vivax and there is no test for the detection of the dormant forms (hypnozoites). The treatment of the acute phase is an artemisinin based combination, e.g. artemetherlumefantrine. Primaquine, which is the only currently available treatment against hypnozoites for the prevention of relapses, may trigger acute haemolytic anaemia in individuals with G6PD deficiency. PMID:27323480

  12. Targeting Plasmodium liver stages: better late than never.

    PubMed

    Borrmann, Steffen; Matuschewski, Kai

    2011-09-01

    The worldwide burden of malaria can be substantially reduced using existing public health interventions. However, elimination of Plasmodium will require fundamentally different approaches. Novel experimental attenuation strategies for active immunization using knockout strains have recently stimulated renewed interest in whole-parasite vaccine approaches. Preventive drug administration during transmission of wild-type sporozoites is a complementary strategy for eliciting protective immune responses. These whole-cell immunization strategies are based on one fundamental principle: inducing protection by blocking parasite conversion from the clinically silent liver phase to the pathogenic intra-erythrocytic replication cycle. Here, we review the basis, evidence and targets for whole-cell-based vaccination strategies against the liver stage bottleneck in Plasmodium infections and discuss preclinical and clinical research opportunities. PMID:21737347

  13. 77 FR 5009 - Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition for Objection to State Operating Permit for Duke...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ...This document announces that the EPA Administrator has denied a petition from the Sierra Club, Valley Watch, and Citizen Action Coalition of Indiana (Petitioners) asking EPA to object to a Clean Air Act (Act) Title V operating permit for Duke Energy Indiana--Edwardsport Generating Station (Duke) issued by the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM). Sections 307(b) and 505(b)(2)......

  14. Plasmodium falciparum genetic crosses in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Ashley M.; Pinapati, Richard S.; Cheeseman, Ian H.; Camargo, Nelly; Fishbaugher, Matthew; Checkley, Lisa A.; Nair, Shalini; Hutyra, Carolyn A.; Nosten, François H.; Anderson, Timothy J. C.; Ferdig, Michael T.; Kappe, Stefan H. I.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic crosses of phenotypically distinct strains of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are a powerful tool for identifying genes controlling drug resistance and other key phenotypes. Previous studies relied on the isolation of recombinant parasites from splenectomized chimpanzees, a research avenue that is no longer available. Here, we demonstrate that human-liver chimeric mice support recovery of recombinant progeny for the identification of genetic determinants of parasite traits and adaptations. PMID:26030447

  15. Subinoculation as a technique in the diagnosis of avian plasmodium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Knisley, J.O.; Snyder, E.L.

    1966-01-01

    In two successive years, 1964 and 1965, blood subinoculated from wild Canada geese, negative for Plasmodium by examination of peripheral blood smears, into 5-day-old domestic geese produced 60 % infection in the recipients. Prepatent and patent periods, as well as intensity of parasitemia showed much variation. Intramuscular inoculation produced the same prevalence as the intravenous route, but longer prepatent periods and less intensity of parasitemia.

  16. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J.; Smith, Craig D.; Senkovich, Olga; Holder, Anthony A.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2011-09-26

    Vesicular trafficking may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the malaria parasite. ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are among the major components of vesicular trafficking pathways in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of ARF1 GTPase from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined in the GDP-bound conformation at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution and is compared with the structures of mammalian ARF1s.

  17. Targeting Plasmodium PI(4)K to eliminate malaria.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Case W; Lee, Marcus C S; Lim, Chek Shik; Lim, Siau Hoi; Roland, Jason; Nagle, Advait; Simon, Oliver; Yeung, Bryan K S; Chatterjee, Arnab K; McCormack, Susan L; Manary, Micah J; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Dechering, Koen J; Kumar, T R Santha; Henrich, Philipp P; Gagaring, Kerstin; Ibanez, Maureen; Kato, Nobutaka; Kuhen, Kelli L; Fischli, Christoph; Rottmann, Matthias; Plouffe, David M; Bursulaya, Badry; Meister, Stephan; Rameh, Lucia; Trappe, Joerg; Haasen, Dorothea; Timmerman, Martijn; Sauerwein, Robert W; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Russell, Bruce; Renia, Laurent; Nosten, Francois; Tully, David C; Kocken, Clemens H M; Glynne, Richard J; Bodenreider, Christophe; Fidock, David A; Diagana, Thierry T; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2013-12-12

    Achieving the goal of malaria elimination will depend on targeting Plasmodium pathways essential across all life stages. Here we identify a lipid kinase, phosphatidylinositol-4-OH kinase (PI(4)K), as the target of imidazopyrazines, a new antimalarial compound class that inhibits the intracellular development of multiple Plasmodium species at each stage of infection in the vertebrate host. Imidazopyrazines demonstrate potent preventive, therapeutic, and transmission-blocking activity in rodent malaria models, are active against blood-stage field isolates of the major human pathogens P. falciparum and P. vivax, and inhibit liver-stage hypnozoites in the simian parasite P. cynomolgi. We show that imidazopyrazines exert their effect through inhibitory interaction with the ATP-binding pocket of PI(4)K, altering the intracellular distribution of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate. Collectively, our data define PI(4)K as a key Plasmodium vulnerability, opening up new avenues of target-based discovery to identify drugs with an ideal activity profile for the prevention, treatment and elimination of malaria. PMID:24284631

  18. [A case of Plasmodium vivax malaria with findings of DIC].

    PubMed

    Takaki, K; Aoki, T; Akeda, H; Kajiwara, T; Honda, S; Maeda, Y; Okada, K; Sawae, Y

    1991-04-01

    We reported a rare case of Plasmodium vivax malaria who showed findings of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). A 50-year-old Japanese male was sent to our hospital with the diagnosis of Plasmodium vivax malaria on the 26th of April, 1990. He had stayed in the Solomon Islands from Oct. 1987 to Dec. 1989, and had febrile episodes during his stay in the island. On April 18, 1990, he complained of a high fever with chills, and showed the same episodes on the 20th, 22th and was diagnosed as malaria. He was treated successfully with the sulfadoxine 500 mg and pyrimethamine 25mg (Fansidar), following the normal temperature on the 4th day and disappearance of malarial parasites in the peripheral blood smear on the 6th day. Interestingly, he had thrombocytopenia and a high titer serum level of fibrin degradation product (FDP) supporting the questionable diagnosis of DIC. Even on the 12th day after improved thrombocytopenia by treatment with Gabexate (FOY), the serum level of FDP, D-dimer and thrombin-nati-thrombin (TAT)III complex still remained at high titer levels. One month later he was readmitted for a relapse of Plasmodium vivax malaria, when he showed thrombocytopenia but the serum level of FDP, D-dimer, TAT III complex and PM.alpha 2 PI complex were normal levels. We concluded that the thrombocytopenia and the high titer of FDP at his first admission was a manifestation of DIC. PMID:2071964

  19. Targeting Plasmodium PI(4)K to eliminate malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Case W.; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Lim, Chek Shik; Lim, Siau Hoi; Roland, Jason; Nagle, Advait; Simon, Oliver; Yeung, Bryan K. S.; Chatterjee, Arnab K.; McCormack, Susan L.; Manary, Micah J.; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Dechering, Koen J.; Kumar, T. R. Santha; Henrich, Philipp P.; Gagaring, Kerstin; Ibanez, Maureen; Kato, Nobutaka; Kuhen, Kelli L.; Fischli, Christoph; Rottmann, Matthias; Plouffe, David M.; Bursulaya, Badry; Meister, Stephan; Rameh, Lucia; Trappe, Joerg; Haasen, Dorothea; Timmerman, Martijn; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Russell, Bruce; Renia, Laurent; Nosten, Francois; Tully, David C.; Kocken, Clemens H. M.; Glynne, Richard J.; Bodenreider, Christophe; Fidock, David A.; Diagana, Thierry T.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2013-12-01

    Achieving the goal of malaria elimination will depend on targeting Plasmodium pathways essential across all life stages. Here we identify a lipid kinase, phosphatidylinositol-4-OH kinase (PI(4)K), as the target of imidazopyrazines, a new antimalarial compound class that inhibits the intracellular development of multiple Plasmodium species at each stage of infection in the vertebrate host. Imidazopyrazines demonstrate potent preventive, therapeutic, and transmission-blocking activity in rodent malaria models, are active against blood-stage field isolates of the major human pathogens P. falciparum and P. vivax, and inhibit liver-stage hypnozoites in the simian parasite P. cynomolgi. We show that imidazopyrazines exert their effect through inhibitory interaction with the ATP-binding pocket of PI(4)K, altering the intracellular distribution of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate. Collectively, our data define PI(4)K as a key Plasmodium vulnerability, opening up new avenues of target-based discovery to identify drugs with an ideal activity profile for the prevention, treatment and elimination of malaria.

  20. Watershed-based point sources permitting strategy and dynamic permit-trading analysis.

    PubMed

    Ning, Shu-Kuang; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2007-09-01

    Permit-trading policy in a total maximum daily load (TMDL) program may provide an additional avenue to produce environmental benefit, which closely approximates what would be achieved through a command and control approach, with relatively lower costs. One of the important considerations that might affect the effective trading mechanism is to determine the dynamic transaction prices and trading ratios in response to seasonal changes of assimilative capacity in the river. Advanced studies associated with multi-temporal spatially varied trading ratios among point sources to manage water pollution hold considerable potential for industries and policy makers alike. This paper aims to present an integrated simulation and optimization analysis for generating spatially varied trading ratios and evaluating seasonal transaction prices accordingly. It is designed to configure a permit-trading structure basin-wide and provide decision makers with a wealth of cost-effective, technology-oriented, risk-informed, and community-based management strategies. The case study, seamlessly integrating a QUAL2E simulation model with an optimal waste load allocation (WLA) scheme in a designated TMDL study area, helps understand the complexity of varying environmental resources values over space and time. The pollutants of concern in this region, which are eligible for trading, mainly include both biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N). The problem solution, as a consequence, suggests an array of waste load reduction targets in a well-defined WLA scheme and exhibits a dynamic permit-trading framework among different sub-watersheds in the study area. Research findings gained in this paper may extend to any transferable dynamic-discharge permit (TDDP) program worldwide. PMID:16930806

  1. 78 FR 18420 - Special Permit Applications Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Special Permit Applications Actions AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of actions on special... processing of, special permits from the Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49...

  2. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  3. Protecting capacity against malaria of chemically defined tetramer forms based on the Plasmodium falciparum apical sushi protein as potential vaccine components.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, Magnolia; Bermúdez, Adriana; Guerrero, Yuly Andrea; Cortes-Vecino, Jesús Alfredo; Curtidor, Hernando; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin; Lozano, José Manuel

    2014-08-15

    Developing novel generations of subunit-based antimalarial vaccines in the form of chemically-defined macromolecule systems for multiple antigen presentation represents a classical problem in the field of vaccine development. Many efforts involving synthesis strategies leading to macromolecule constructs have been based on dendrimer-like systems, the condensation of large building blocks and conventional asymmetric double dimer constructs, all based on lysine cores. This work describes novel symmetric double dimer and condensed linear constructs for presenting selected peptide multi-copies from the apical sushi protein expressed in Plasmodium falciparum. These molecules have been proved to be safe and innocuous, highly antigenic and have shown strong protective efficacy in rodents challenged with two Plasmodium species. Insights into systematic design, synthesis and characterisation have led to such novel antigen systems being used as potential platforms for developing new anti-malarial vaccine candidates. PMID:25063026

  4. Antibodies to a single, conserved epitope in Anopheles APN1 inhibit universal transmission of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Armistead, Jennifer S; Morlais, Isabelle; Mathias, Derrick K; Jardim, Juliette G; Joy, Jaimy; Fridman, Arthur; Finnefrock, Adam C; Bagchi, Ansu; Plebanski, Magdalena; Scorpio, Diana G; Churcher, Thomas S; Borg, Natalie A; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Dinglasan, Rhoel R

    2014-02-01

    Malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs) represent a promising approach for the elimination and eradication of this disease. AnAPN1 is a lead TBV candidate that targets a surface antigen on the midgut of the obligate vector of the Plasmodium parasite, the Anopheles mosquito. In this study, we demonstrated that antibodies targeting AnAPN1 block transmission of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax across distantly related anopheline species in countries to which malaria is endemic. Using a biochemical and immunological approach, we determined that the mechanism of action for this phenomenon stems from antibody recognition of a single protective epitope on AnAPN1, which we found to be immunogenic in murine and nonhuman primate models and highly conserved among anophelines. These data indicate that AnAPN1 meets the established target product profile for TBVs and suggest a potential key role for an AnAPN1-based panmalaria TBV in the effort to eradicate malaria. PMID:24478095

  5. 30 CFR 815.2 - Permitting information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permitting information. 815.2 Section 815.2... Permitting information. Notwithstanding cross-references in other parts which may be otherwise construed, part 772 establishes the notice and permit information requirements for coal exploration....

  6. 50 CFR 665.203 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... required to obtain an MHI non-commercial bottomfish permit or a State of Hawaii Commercial Marine License...) Except as provided in subpart A of 15 CFR part 904, any applicant for a permit or a permit holder...

  7. 45 CFR 670.13 - Permit administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit administration. 670.13 Section 670.13 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Permits § 670.13 Permit administration. (a) Issuance of...

  8. 45 CFR 670.13 - Permit administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permit administration. 670.13 Section 670.13 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Permits § 670.13 Permit administration. (a) Issuance of...

  9. 40 CFR 124.6 - Draft permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR § 52.21; (iv) 404 permits, permit conditions under §§ 233.7 and 233.8; (v) NPDES permits, effluent limitations, standards, prohibitions, standards for sewage sludge use or disposal, and conditions under §§ 122... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS PROCEDURES...

  10. 40 CFR 124.6 - Draft permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR § 52.21; (iv) 404 permits, permit conditions under §§ 233.7 and 233.8; (v) NPDES permits, effluent limitations, standards, prohibitions, standards for sewage sludge use or disposal, and conditions under §§ 122... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS PROCEDURES...

  11. 40 CFR 124.6 - Draft permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR § 52.21; (iv) 404 permits, permit conditions under §§ 233.7 and 233.8; (v) NPDES permits, effluent limitations, standards, prohibitions, standards for sewage sludge use or disposal, and conditions under §§ 122... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS PROCEDURES...

  12. 40 CFR 124.6 - Draft permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR § 52.21; (iv) 404 permits, permit conditions under §§ 233.7 and 233.8; (v) NPDES permits, effluent limitations, standards, prohibitions, standards for sewage sludge use or disposal, and conditions under §§ 122... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS PROCEDURES...

  13. 40 CFR 55.6 - Permit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF AIR REGULATIONS § 55.6 Permit requirements. (a) General provisions—(1) Permit applications... follow the applicable procedures of 40 CFR part 124 in processing applications under this part. Until 40 CFR part 124 has been modified to specifically reference permits issued under this part,...

  14. 36 CFR 9.3 - Access permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... units of the National Park System in Alaska, regulations at 43 CFR part 36 govern access to claims, and... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access permits. 9.3 Section 9... MANAGEMENT Mining and Mining Claims § 9.3 Access permits. (a) All special use or other permits dealing...

  15. 36 CFR 9.3 - Access permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... units of the National Park System in Alaska, regulations at 43 CFR part 36 govern access to claims, and... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access permits. 9.3 Section 9... MANAGEMENT Mining and Mining Claims § 9.3 Access permits. (a) All special use or other permits dealing...

  16. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the unit and that was issued in compliance with title IV of the Act... operating in compliance with the Acid Rain Program, except as provided in § 72.9(g)(6)....

  17. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the unit and that was issued in compliance with title IV of the Act... operating in compliance with the Acid Rain Program, except as provided in § 72.9(g)(6)....

  18. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the unit and that was issued in compliance with title IV of the Act... operating in compliance with the Acid Rain Program, except as provided in § 72.9(g)(6)....

  19. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the unit and that was issued in compliance with title IV of the Act... operating in compliance with the Acid Rain Program, except as provided in § 72.9(g)(6)....

  20. 40 CFR 70.6 - Permit content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... increases in emissions that are authorized by allowances acquired pursuant to the acid rain program... the general permit. General permits shall not be authorized for affected sources under the acid rain... the time of permit issuance; (iii) The applicable requirements of the acid rain program,...

  1. 32 CFR 855.9 - Permit renewal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.9 Permit renewal. When a landing permit expires, DD Forms 2401 and 2400 must be resubmitted for continued use of Air Force airfields....

  2. 32 CFR 855.9 - Permit renewal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.9 Permit renewal. When a landing permit expires, DD Forms 2401 and 2400 must be resubmitted for continued use of Air Force airfields....

  3. 32 CFR 855.9 - Permit renewal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.9 Permit renewal. When a landing permit expires, DD Forms 2401 and 2400 must be resubmitted for continued use of Air Force airfields....

  4. 32 CFR 855.9 - Permit renewal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.9 Permit renewal. When a landing permit expires, DD Forms 2401 and 2400 must be resubmitted for continued use of Air Force airfields....

  5. 46 CFR 176.113 - Passengers permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Passengers permitted. 176.113 Section 176.113 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificate of Inspection § 176.113 Passengers permitted. (a) The maximum number of passengers permitted must be...

  6. 30 CFR 774.15 - Permit renewals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY PROGRAMS REVISION; RENEWAL; TRANSFER, ASSIGNMENT, OR SALE OF PERMIT RIGHTS; POST-PERMIT ISSUANCE REQUIREMENTS; AND...

  7. 30 CFR 774.13 - Permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY PROGRAMS REVISION; RENEWAL; TRANSFER, ASSIGNMENT, OR SALE OF PERMIT RIGHTS; POST-PERMIT ISSUANCE REQUIREMENTS; AND...

  8. 27 CFR 71.45 - Basic permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Basic permits. 71.45 Section 71.45 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PERMIT PROCEEDINGS Grounds for Citation § 71.45 Basic permits. Whenever...

  9. 50 CFR 648.5 - Operator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., that, if the permit is suspended or revoked pursuant to 15 CFR part 904, the operator cannot be aboard... 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator shall issue an operator's permit within 30 days of...). (h) Duration. A permit is valid until it is revoked, suspended or modified under 15 CFR part 904,...

  10. 36 CFR 1001.6 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permits. 1001.6 Section 1001.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST GENERAL PROVISIONS § 1001.6 Permits. (a) When authorized by regulations set forth in this chapter, the Executive Director may issue a permit to authorize an otherwise prohibited or...

  11. 40 CFR 70.5 - Permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (iv) Applications for initial phase II acid rain permits shall be submitted to the permitting... permit, as set forth in § 70.7(b) of this part, shall be in effect from the date the application is... shall apply and be included in the acid rain portion of a compliance plan for an affected source,...

  12. 40 CFR 55.6 - Permit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permit requirements. 55.6 Section 55.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF AIR REGULATIONS § 55.6 Permit requirements. (a) General provisions—(1) Permit applications. (i) The owner or operator of an...

  13. 50 CFR 665.242 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... requirements of 50 CFR part 404. (b) General requirements. General requirements governing application...) Applicability. (1) The owner of any vessel used to fish for lobster in Permit Area 1 must have a limited access permit issued for such vessel. (2) The owner of any vessel used to fish for lobster in Permit Area 2...

  14. 50 CFR 697.5 - Operator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of this permit, that if the permit is suspended or revoked pursuant to 15 CFR part 904, the operator... provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator shall issue an operator's permit... is revoked, suspended, or modified under subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, or otherwise expires, or...

  15. 50 CFR 697.5 - Operator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of this permit, that if the permit is suspended or revoked pursuant to 15 CFR part 904, the operator... provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator shall issue an operator's permit... is revoked, suspended, or modified under subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, or otherwise expires, or...

  16. 50 CFR 665.242 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... requirements of 50 CFR part 404. (b) General requirements. General requirements governing application...) Applicability. (1) The owner of any vessel used to fish for lobster in Permit Area 1 must have a limited access permit issued for such vessel. (2) The owner of any vessel used to fish for lobster in Permit Area 2...

  17. 50 CFR 697.6 - Dealer permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... enforcement-related permit sanctions and denials, found at subpart D of 15 CFR part 904. (n) Lobster dealer... provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator will issue a permit at any time during... permit is valid until it is revoked, suspended, or modified under 15 CFR part 904, or otherwise...

  18. 50 CFR 697.6 - Dealer permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... enforcement-related permit sanctions and denials, found at subpart D of 15 CFR part 904. (n) Lobster dealer... provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator will issue a permit at any time during... permit is valid until it is revoked, suspended, or modified under 15 CFR part 904, or otherwise...

  19. 50 CFR 665.242 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... requirements of 50 CFR part 404. (b) General requirements. General requirements governing application...) Applicability. (1) The owner of any vessel used to fish for lobster in Permit Area 1 must have a limited access permit issued for such vessel. (2) The owner of any vessel used to fish for lobster in Permit Area 2...

  20. 50 CFR 665.242 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements of 50 CFR part 404. (b) General requirements. General requirements governing application...) Applicability. (1) The owner of any vessel used to fish for lobster in Permit Area 1 must have a limited access permit issued for such vessel. (2) The owner of any vessel used to fish for lobster in Permit Area 2...

  1. 50 CFR 697.5 - Operator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of this permit, that if the permit is suspended or revoked pursuant to 15 CFR part 904, the operator... provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator shall issue an operator's permit... is revoked, suspended, or modified under subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, or otherwise expires, or...

  2. 50 CFR 697.6 - Dealer permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... enforcement-related permit sanctions and denials, found at subpart D of 15 CFR part 904. (n) Lobster dealer... provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator will issue a permit at any time during... permit is valid until it is revoked, suspended, or modified under 15 CFR part 904, or otherwise...

  3. 50 CFR 697.5 - Operator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of this permit, that if the permit is suspended or revoked pursuant to 15 CFR part 904, the operator... provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator shall issue an operator's permit... is revoked, suspended, or modified under subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, or otherwise expires, or...

  4. 50 CFR 697.6 - Dealer permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... enforcement-related permit sanctions and denials, found at subpart D of 15 CFR part 904. (n) Lobster dealer... provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator will issue a permit at any time during... permit is valid until it is revoked, suspended, or modified under 15 CFR part 904, or otherwise...

  5. 50 CFR 697.6 - Dealer permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... enforcement-related permit sanctions and denials, found at subpart D of 15 CFR part 904. (n) Lobster dealer... provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator will issue a permit at any time during... permit is valid until it is revoked, suspended, or modified under 15 CFR part 904, or otherwise...

  6. 50 CFR 697.5 - Operator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of this permit, that if the permit is suspended or revoked pursuant to 15 CFR part 904, the operator... provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator shall issue an operator's permit... is revoked, suspended, or modified under subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, or otherwise expires, or...

  7. 50 CFR 665.242 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... requirements of 50 CFR part 404. (b) General requirements. General requirements governing application...) Applicability. (1) The owner of any vessel used to fish for lobster in Permit Area 1 must have a limited access permit issued for such vessel. (2) The owner of any vessel used to fish for lobster in Permit Area 2...

  8. 50 CFR 665.801 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Permit appeals. Except as provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, any applicant for a permit or any..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries § 665... Hawaii longline limited access permit if that vessel is used: (1) To fish for western Pacific pelagic...

  9. 50 CFR 665.801 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Permit appeals. Except as provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, any applicant for a permit or any..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries § 665... Hawaii longline limited access permit if that vessel is used: (1) To fish for western Pacific pelagic...

  10. 50 CFR 665.801 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Permit appeals. Except as provided in subpart D of 15 CFR part 904, any applicant for a permit or any..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries § 665... Hawaii longline limited access permit if that vessel is used: (1) To fish for western Pacific pelagic...

  11. 40 CFR 49.155 - Permit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... inspection by use of written, electronic, magnetic and photographic media. (b) Can my permit become invalid... Federal Minor New Source Review Program in Indian Country § 49.155 Permit requirements. This section applies to your permit if you are subject to this program under § 49.153(a) for construction of a...

  12. 40 CFR 49.155 - Permit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... inspection by use of written, electronic, magnetic and photographic media. (b) Can my permit become invalid... Federal Minor New Source Review Program in Indian Country § 49.155 Permit requirements. This section applies to your permit if you are subject to this program under § 49.153(a) for construction of a...

  13. 40 CFR 49.155 - Permit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... inspection by use of written, electronic, magnetic and photographic media. (b) Can my permit become invalid... Federal Minor New Source Review Program in Indian Country § 49.155 Permit requirements. This section applies to your permit if you are subject to this program under § 49.153(a) for construction of a...

  14. 32 CFR 855.9 - Permit renewal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.9 Permit renewal. When a landing permit expires, DD Forms 2401 and 2400 must be resubmitted for continued use of Air Force airfields....

  15. 19 CFR 111.19 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permits. 111.19 Section 111.19 Customs Duties U.S... Procedure To Obtain License or Permit § 111.19 Permits. (a) General. Each person granted a broker's license... the license was delivered to the licensee (see § 111.15) is located and without the payment of...

  16. 45 CFR 670.13 - Permit administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permit administration. 670.13 Section 670.13 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Permits § 670.13 Permit administration. (a) Issuance of...

  17. 45 CFR 670.13 - Permit administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permit administration. 670.13 Section 670.13 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Permits § 670.13 Permit administration. (a) Issuance of...

  18. 50 CFR 648.5 - Operator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., that, if the permit is suspended or revoked pursuant to 15 CFR part 904, the operator cannot be aboard... 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator shall issue an operator's permit within 30 days of...). (h) Duration. A permit is valid until it is revoked, suspended or modified under 15 CFR part 904,...

  19. 50 CFR 648.5 - Operator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., that, if the permit is suspended or revoked pursuant to 15 CFR part 904, the operator cannot be aboard... 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator shall issue an operator's permit within 30 days of...). (h) Duration. A permit is valid until it is revoked, suspended or modified under 15 CFR part 904,...

  20. 50 CFR 648.5 - Operator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., that, if the permit is suspended or revoked pursuant to 15 CFR part 904, the operator cannot be aboard... 15 CFR part 904, the Regional Administrator shall issue an operator's permit within 30 days of...). (h) Duration. A permit is valid until it is revoked, suspended or modified under 15 CFR part 904,...

  1. 30 CFR 777.17 - Permit fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permit fees. 777.17 Section 777.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL... CONTENT REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMIT APPLICATIONS § 777.17 Permit fees. An application for a surface...

  2. 30 CFR 777.17 - Permit fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permit fees. 777.17 Section 777.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL... CONTENT REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMIT APPLICATIONS § 777.17 Permit fees. An application for a surface...

  3. 30 CFR 777.17 - Permit fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permit fees. 777.17 Section 777.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL... CONTENT REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMIT APPLICATIONS § 777.17 Permit fees. An application for a surface...

  4. 30 CFR 777.17 - Permit fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit fees. 777.17 Section 777.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL... CONTENT REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMIT APPLICATIONS § 777.17 Permit fees. An application for a surface...

  5. 30 CFR 777.17 - Permit fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permit fees. 777.17 Section 777.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL... CONTENT REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMIT APPLICATIONS § 777.17 Permit fees. An application for a surface...

  6. 43 CFR 8344.1 - Permit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permit requirements. 8344.1 Section 8344.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS OFF-ROAD VEHICLES Permits § 8344.1 Permit...

  7. 43 CFR 8344.1 - Permit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permit requirements. 8344.1 Section 8344.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS OFF-ROAD VEHICLES Permits § 8344.1 Permit...

  8. 43 CFR 5511.2-3 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permits. 5511.2-3 Section 5511.2-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FOREST MANAGEMENT (5000) FREE USE OF TIMBER Free Use Regulations § 5511.2-3 Permits. (a) Application for permit. Before timber...

  9. 50 CFR 600.501 - Vessel permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... additional permit restrictions on the permit under 15 CFR part 904, if the vessel is involved in the... are contained in 50 CFR part 229 of this title. (b) Responsibility of owners and operators. The owners... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vessel permits. 600.501 Section...

  10. Improved In Vitro Culture of Plasmodium falciparum Permits Establishment of Clinical Isolates with Preserved Multiplication, Invasion and Rosetting Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Letusa; Ahmed Ismail, Hodan; Normark, Johan; Flaberg, Emilie; Szekely, Laszlo; Hultenby, Kjell; Persson, Kristina E. M.; Egwang, Thomas G.; Wahlgren, Mats

    2013-01-01

    To be able to robustly propagate P. falciparum at optimal conditions in vitro is of fundamental importance for genotypic and phenotypic studies of both established and fresh clinical isolates. Cryo-preserved P. falciparum isolates from Ugandan children with severe or uncomplicated malaria were investigated for parasite phenotypes under different in vitro growth conditions or studied directly from the peripheral blood. The parasite cultures showed a minimal loss of parasite-mass and preserved percentage of multiple infected pRBCs to that in peripheral blood, maintained adhesive phenotypes and good outgrowth and multiplication rates when grown in suspension and supplemented with gas. In contrast, abnormal and greatly fluctuating levels of multiple infections were observed during static growth conditions and outgrowth and multiplication rates were inferior. Serum, as compared to Albumax, was found necessary for optimal presentation of PfEMP1 at the pRBC surface and/or for binding of serum proteins (immunoglobulins). Optimal in vitro growth conditions of P. falciparum therefore include orbital shaking (50 rev/min), human serum (10%) and a fixed gas composition (5% O2, 5% CO2, 90% N2). We subsequently established 100% of 76 frozen patient isolates and found rosetting with schizont pRBCs in every isolate (>26% schizont rosetting rate). Rosetting during schizogony was often followed by invasion of the bound RBC as seen by regular and time-lapse microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy. The peripheral parasitemia, the level of rosetting and the rate of multiplication correlated positively to one another for individual isolates. Rosetting was also more frequent with trophozoite and schizont pRBCs of children with severe versus uncomplicated malaria (p<0.002; p<0.004). The associations suggest that rosetting enhances the ability of the parasite to multiply within the human host. PMID:23894537

  11. A Plasmodium falciparum copper-binding membrane protein with copper transport motifs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Copper is an essential catalytic co-factor for metabolically important cellular enzymes, such as cytochrome-c oxidase. Eukaryotic cells acquire copper through a copper transport protein and distribute intracellular copper using molecular chaperones. The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper requirement for malaria parasite development. How the malaria parasite acquires or secretes copper still remains to be fully elucidated. Methods PlasmoDB was searched for sequences corresponding to candidate P. falciparum copper-requiring proteins. The amino terminal domain of a putative P. falciparum copper transport protein was cloned and expressed as a maltose binding fusion protein. The copper binding ability of this protein was examined. Copper transport protein-specific anti-peptide antibodies were generated in chickens and used to establish native protein localization in P. falciparum parasites by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Six P. falciparum copper-requiring protein orthologs and a candidate P. falciparum copper transport protein (PF14_0369), containing characteristic copper transport protein features, were identified in PlasmoDB. The recombinant amino terminal domain of the transport protein bound reduced copper in vitro and within Escherichia coli cells during recombinant expression. Immunolocalization studies tracked the copper binding protein translocating from the erythrocyte plasma membrane in early ring stage to a parasite membrane as the parasites developed to schizonts. The protein appears to be a PEXEL-negative membrane protein. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum parasites express a native protein with copper transporter characteristics that binds copper in vitro. Localization of the protein to the erythrocyte and parasite plasma membranes could provide a mechanism for the delivery of novel anti-malarial compounds. PMID:23190769

  12. Structurally conserved erythrocyte-binding domain in Plasmodium provides a versatile scaffold for alternate receptor engagement

    PubMed Central

    Gruszczyk, Jakub; Lim, Nicholas T. Y.; Arnott, Alicia; He, Wen-Qiang; Nguitragool, Wang; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Mok, Yee-Foong; Murphy, James M.; Smith, Katherine R.; Lee, Stuart; Bahlo, Melanie; Mueller, Ivo; Barry, Alyssa E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how malaria parasites gain entry into human red blood cells is essential for developing strategies to stop blood stage infection. Plasmodium vivax preferentially invades reticulocytes, which are immature red blood cells. The organism has two erythrocyte-binding protein families: namely, the Duffy-binding protein (PvDBP) and the reticulocyte-binding protein (PvRBP) families. Several members of the PvRBP family bind reticulocytes, specifically suggesting a role in mediating host cell selectivity of P. vivax. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first high-resolution crystal structure of an erythrocyte-binding domain from PvRBP2a, solved at 2.12 Å resolution. The monomeric molecule consists of 10 α-helices and one short β-hairpin, and, although the structural fold is similar to that of PfRh5—the essential invasion ligand in Plasmodium falciparum—its surface properties are distinct and provide a possible mechanism for recognition of alternate receptors. Sequence alignments of the crystallized fragment of PvRBP2a with other PvRBPs highlight the conserved placement of disulfide bonds. PvRBP2a binds mature red blood cells through recognition of an erythrocyte receptor that is neuraminidase- and chymotrypsin-resistant but trypsin-sensitive. By examining the patterns of sequence diversity within field isolates, we have identified and mapped polymorphic residues to the PvRBP2a structure. Using mutagenesis, we have also defined the critical residues required for erythrocyte binding. Characterization of the structural features that govern functional erythrocyte binding for the PvRBP family provides a framework for generating new tools that block P. vivax blood stage infection. PMID:26715754

  13. Development of a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Barcode to Genotype Plasmodium vivax Infections

    PubMed Central

    Baniecki, Mary Lynn; Faust, Aubrey L.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Park, Daniel J.; Galinsky, Kevin; Daniels, Rachel F.; Hamilton, Elizabeth; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Karunaweera, Nadira D.; Serre, David; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Sá, Juliana M.; Wellems, Thomas E.; Musset, Lise; Legrand, Eric; Melnikov, Alexandre; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Volkman, Sarah K.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax, one of the five species of Plasmodium parasites that cause human malaria, is responsible for 25–40% of malaria cases worldwide. Malaria global elimination efforts will benefit from accurate and effective genotyping tools that will provide insight into the population genetics and diversity of this parasite. The recent sequencing of P. vivax isolates from South America, Africa, and Asia presents a new opportunity by uncovering thousands of novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genotyping a selection of these SNPs provides a robust, low-cost method of identifying parasite infections through their unique genetic signature or barcode. Based on our experience in generating a SNP barcode for P. falciparum using High Resolution Melting (HRM), we have developed a similar tool for P. vivax. We selected globally polymorphic SNPs from available P. vivax genome sequence data that were located in putatively selectively neutral sites (i.e., intergenic, intronic, or 4-fold degenerate coding). From these candidate SNPs we defined a barcode consisting of 42 SNPs. We analyzed the performance of the 42-SNP barcode on 87 P. vivax clinical samples from parasite populations in South America (Brazil, French Guiana), Africa (Ethiopia) and Asia (Sri Lanka). We found that the P. vivax barcode is robust, as it requires only a small quantity of DNA (limit of detection 0.3 ng/μl) to yield reproducible genotype calls, and detects polymorphic genotypes with high sensitivity. The markers are informative across all clinical samples evaluated (average minor allele frequency > 0.1). Population genetic and statistical analyses show the barcode captures high degrees of population diversity and differentiates geographically distinct populations. Our 42-SNP barcode provides a robust, informative, and standardized genetic marker set that accurately identifies a genomic signature for P. vivax infections. PMID:25781890

  14. Development of a single nucleotide polymorphism barcode to genotype Plasmodium vivax infections.

    PubMed

    Baniecki, Mary Lynn; Faust, Aubrey L; Schaffner, Stephen F; Park, Daniel J; Galinsky, Kevin; Daniels, Rachel F; Hamilton, Elizabeth; Ferreira, Marcelo U; Karunaweera, Nadira D; Serre, David; Zimmerman, Peter A; Sá, Juliana M; Wellems, Thomas E; Musset, Lise; Legrand, Eric; Melnikov, Alexandre; Neafsey, Daniel E; Volkman, Sarah K; Wirth, Dyann F; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2015-03-01

    Plasmodium vivax, one of the five species of Plasmodium parasites that cause human malaria, is responsible for 25-40% of malaria cases worldwide. Malaria global elimination efforts will benefit from accurate and effective genotyping tools that will provide insight into the population genetics and diversity of this parasite. The recent sequencing of P. vivax isolates from South America, Africa, and Asia presents a new opportunity by uncovering thousands of novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genotyping a selection of these SNPs provides a robust, low-cost method of identifying parasite infections through their unique genetic signature or barcode. Based on our experience in generating a SNP barcode for P. falciparum using High Resolution Melting (HRM), we have developed a similar tool for P. vivax. We selected globally polymorphic SNPs from available P. vivax genome sequence data that were located in putatively selectively neutral sites (i.e., intergenic, intronic, or 4-fold degenerate coding). From these candidate SNPs we defined a barcode consisting of 42 SNPs. We analyzed the performance of the 42-SNP barcode on 87 P. vivax clinical samples from parasite populations in South America (Brazil, French Guiana), Africa (Ethiopia) and Asia (Sri Lanka). We found that the P. vivax barcode is robust, as it requires only a small quantity of DNA (limit of detection 0.3 ng/μl) to yield reproducible genotype calls, and detects polymorphic genotypes with high sensitivity. The markers are informative across all clinical samples evaluated (average minor allele frequency > 0.1). Population genetic and statistical analyses show the barcode captures high degrees of population diversity and differentiates geographically distinct populations. Our 42-SNP barcode provides a robust, informative, and standardized genetic marker set that accurately identifies a genomic signature for P. vivax infections. PMID:25781890

  15. Prevalence of drug resistance associated mutations in Plasmodium vivax against sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine in southern Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Pakistan, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum co-exist and usage of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) against P. falciparum exposes P. vivax to the drug leading to generation of resistant alleles. The main aim of this study was to investigate frequency distribution of drug resistance associated mutations in pvdhfr, pvdhps genes and provide baseline molecular epidemiological data on SP-associated resistance in P. vivax from southern Pakistan. Methods From January 2008 to May 2009, a total of 150 samples were collected from patients tested slide-positive for P. vivax, at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, or its collection units located in Baluchistan and Sindh Province. Nested PCR using pvdhfr and pvdhps specific primers was performed for all samples.91.3% (137/150) of the samples were tested PCR positive of which 87.3% (131/137) were successfully sequenced. Sample sequencing data was analysed and compared against wild type reference sequences. Results In dhfr, mutations were observed at codons F57L, S58R and S117N/T. Novel non-synonymous mutations were observed at codon positions N50I, G114R and E119K while a synonymous mutation was observed at codon position 69Y. In dhps, mutations were observed at codon position A383G and A553G while novel non-synonymous mutations were observed at codon positions S373T, E380K, P384L, N389T, V392D, T393P, D459A, M601I, A651D and A661V. Conclusion This is the first report from southern Pakistan on SP resistance in clinical isolates of P. vivax. Results from this study confirm that diverse drug resistant alleles are circulating within this region. PMID:23890361

  16. Killer Bee Molecules: Antimicrobial Peptides as Effector Molecules to Target Sporogonic Stages of Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Victoria; Underhill, Ann; Baber, Ibrahima; Sylla, Lakamy; Baby, Mounirou; Larget-Thiery, Isabelle; Zettor, Agnès; Bourgouin, Catherine; Langel, Ülo; Faye, Ingrid; Otvos, Laszlo; Wade, John D.; Coulibaly, Mamadou B.; Traore, Sekou F.; Tripet, Frederic; Eggleston, Paul; Hurd, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    A new generation of strategies is evolving that aim to block malaria transmission by employing genetically modified vectors or mosquito pathogens or symbionts that express anti-parasite molecules. Whilst transgenic technologies have advanced rapidly, there is still a paucity of effector molecules with potent anti-malaria activity whose expression does not cause detrimental effects on mosquito fitness. Our objective was to examine a wide range of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for their toxic effects on Plasmodium and anopheline mosquitoes. Specifically targeting early sporogonic stages, we initially screened AMPs for toxicity against a mosquito cell line and P. berghei ookinetes. Promising candidate AMPs were fed to mosquitoes to monitor adverse fitness effects, and their efficacy in blocking rodent malaria infection in Anopheles stephensi was assessed. This was followed by tests to determine their activity against P. falciparum in An. gambiae, initially using laboratory cultures to infect mosquitoes, then culminating in preliminary assays in the field using gametocytes and mosquitoes collected from the same area in Mali, West Africa. From a range of 33 molecules, six AMPs able to block Plasmodium development were identified: Anoplin, Duramycin, Mastoparan X, Melittin, TP10 and Vida3. With the exception of Anoplin and Mastoparan X, these AMPs were also toxic to an An. gambiae cell line at a concentration of 25 µM. However, when tested in mosquito blood feeds, they did not reduce mosquito longevity or egg production at concentrations of 50 µM. Peptides effective against cultured ookinetes were less effective when tested in vivo and differences in efficacy against P. berghei and P. falciparum were seen. From the range of molecules tested, the majority of effective AMPs were derived from bee/wasp venoms. PMID:24278025

  17. In-silico studies on DegP protein of Plasmodium falciparum in search of anti-malarials.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Drista; Soni, Rani; Patel, Sachin; Joshi, Deepti; Bhatt, Tarun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Despite encouraging progress over the past decade, malaria caused by the Plasmodium parasite continues to pose an enormous disease burden and is one of the major global health problems. The extreme challenge in malaria management is the resistance of parasites to traditional monochemotherapies like chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. No vaccine is yet in sight, and the foregoing effective drugs are also losing ground against the disease due to the resistivity of parasites. New antimalarials with novel mechanisms of action are needed to circumvent existing or emerging drug resistance. DegP protein, secretory in nature has been shown to be involved in regulation of thermo-oxidative stress generated during asexual life cycle of Plasmodium, probably required for survival of parasite in host. Considering the significance of protein, in this study, we have generated a three-dimensional structure of PfDegP followed by validation of the modeled structure using several tools like RAMPAGE, ERRAT, and others. We also performed an in-silico screening of small molecule database against PfDegP using Glide. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation of protein and protein-ligand complex was carried out using GROMACS. This study substantiated potential drug-like molecules and provides the scope for development of novel antimalarial drugs. PMID:27491850

  18. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, B.P.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations; the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

  19. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, B.P.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department and Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-E Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

  20. 76 FR 67181 - Windsor Machinery Co., Inc.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Windsor Machinery Co., Inc.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2011, Windsor Machinery Co., Inc. filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4... an annual generation of 1,600 megawatt-hours. Applicant Contact: Sarah L. Bower, Windsor Machinery...

  1. 76 FR 12728 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2011, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) filed an application for a successive preliminary permit... new single-unit powerhouse with a turbine and generator constructed downstream of the right...

  2. 75 FR 27768 - Current Connection, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Current Connection, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted... March 30, 2010, Current Connection, LLC filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to... annual generation of 155 gigawatt-hours. Applicant Contact: Timothy D. Smith, CEO, Current...

  3. 76 FR 23321 - New Sweden Irrigation District, ID; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission New Sweden Irrigation District, ID; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2011, New Sweden Irrigation District filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section.... The estimated annual generation of the New Sweden Irrigation Project would be 5.6...

  4. Human Plasmodium knowlesi Infection Detected by Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Malaria

    PubMed Central

    van Hellemond, Jaap J.; Rutten, Marijke; Koelewijn, Rob; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Verweij, Jaco J.; Wismans, Pieter J.; Kocken, Clemens H.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a PCR-confirmed case of Plasmodium knowlesi infection with a high parasitemia level and clinical signs of severe malaria in a migrant worker from Malaysian Borneo in the Netherlands. Investigations showed that commercially available rapid antigen tests for detection of human Plasmodium infections can detect P. knowlesi infections in humans. PMID:19788819

  5. An unsettling picture emerges from population genomic studies of Plasmodium vivax.

    PubMed

    Kissinger, Jessica C

    2016-07-27

    Two new studies confirm that Plasmodium vivax populations are more diverse than Plasmodium falciparum and identify signs of recent selection at many loci, including those for drug resistance. P. vivax shows a trend of regional adaptations that poses challenges to global efforts to control and eliminate this major cause of relapsing malaria. PMID:27463397

  6. Whole Pichia pastoris Yeast Expressing Measles Virus Nucleoprotein as a Production and Delivery System to Multimerize Plasmodium Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Daria; Ruffie, Claude; Dubois, Myriam; Combredet, Chantal; Amino, Rogerio; Formaglio, Pauline; Gorgette, Olivier; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Guery, Charline; Puijalon, Odile; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Ménard, Robert; Tangy, Frédéric; Sala, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are largely used as bioreactors for vaccine production. Usually, antigens are produced in yeast then purified and mixed with adjuvants before immunization. However, the purification costs and the safety concerns recently raised by the use of new adjuvants argue for alternative strategies. To this end, the use of whole yeast as both production and delivery system appears attractive. Here, we evaluated Pichia pastoris yeast as an alternative vaccine production and delivery system for the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of Plasmodium, the etiologic agent of malaria. The CS protein from Plasmodium berghei (Pb) was selected given the availability of the stringent C57Bl/6 mouse model of infection by Pb sporozoites, allowing the evaluation of vaccine efficacy in vivo. PbCS was multimerized by fusion to the measles virus (MV) nucleoprotein (N) known to auto-assemble in yeast in large-size ribonucleoprotein rods (RNPs). Expressed in P. pastoris, the N-PbCS protein generated highly multimeric and heterogenic RNPs bearing PbCS on their surface. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence analyses revealed the shape of these RNPs and their localization in peripheral cytoplasmic inclusions. Subcutaneous immunization of C57Bl/6 mice with heat-inactivated whole P. pastoris expressing N-PbCS RNPs provided significant reduction of parasitemia after intradermal challenge with a high dose of parasites. Thus, in the absence of accessory adjuvants, a very low amount of PbCS expressed in whole yeast significantly decreased clinical damages associated with Pb infection in a highly stringent challenge model, providing a proof of concept of the intrinsic adjuvancy of this vaccine strategy. In addition to PbCS multimerization, the N protein contributed by itself to parasitemia delay and long-term mice survival. In the future, mixtures of whole recombinant yeasts expressing relevant Plasmodium antigens would provide a multivalent formulation applicable for antigen combination screening

  7. Copper pathways in Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes indicate an efflux role for the copper P-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Copper, like iron, is a transition metal that can generate oxygen radicals by the Fenton reaction. The Plasmodium parasite invades an erythrocyte host cell containing 20 μM copper, of which 70% is contained in the Cu/Zn SOD (cuprozinc superoxide dismutase). In the present study, we follow the copper pathways in the Plasmodium-infected erythrocyte. Metal-determination analysis shows that the total copper content of Percoll-purified trophozoite-stage-infected erythrocytes is 66% that of uninfected erythrocytes. This decrease parallels the decrease seen in Cu/Zn SOD levels in parasite-infected erythrocytes. Neocuproine, an intracellular copper chelator, arrests parasites at the ring-to-trophozoite stage transition and also specifically decreases intraparasitic levels of Cu/Zn SOD and catalase. Up to 150 μM BCS (2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthrolinedisulphonic acid), an extracellular copper chelator, has no effect on parasite growth. We characterized a single copy PfCuP-ATPase (Plasmodium falciparum copper P-ATPase) transporter, which, like the Crypto-sporidium parvum copper P-ATPase, has a single copper-binding domain: ‘Met-Xaa-Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Cys’. Recombinant expression of the N-terminal metal-binding domain reveals that the protein specifically binds reduced copper. Transcription of the PfCuP-ATPase gene is the highest at late ring stage/early trophozoite, and is down-regulated in the presence of neocuproine. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy indicate the transporter to be both in the parasite and on the erythrocyte membrane. Both the decrease in total copper and the location of the PfCuP-ATPase gene indicate a copper-efflux pathway from the infected erythrocyte. PMID:15125686

  8. New type of SSUrDNA sequence was detected from both Plasmodium ovale curtisi and Plasmodium ovale wallikeri samples

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is relatively unfamiliar to Chinese staff engaged in malaria diagnosis. In 2013, dried blood spots of four unidentified but suspected ovale malaria samples were sent to the National Malaria Reference Laboratory (NMRL) for reconfirmation. Methods Partial and complete, small, subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) sequences of four samples were obtained with PCR-cloning-sequencing method. Obtained sequences were analyzed by aligning with each other and with nine SSU rDNA sequences of six known Plasmodium parasites. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on complete SSU rDNA sequences and 12 same gene sequences derived from six known Plasmodium parasites and three Babesia parasites. Primary structure of conservative and variable regions of variant sequences was determined also by comparing them with those of six known Plasmodium parasites. To confirm their existence in genome, they were redetected with primers matching their variable regions. PCR systems aimed to roughly detect any eukaryotes and prokaryotes respectively were also applied to search for other pathogens in one of four patients. Results Totally, 19 partial and 23 complete SSU rDNA sequences obtained from four samples. Except eight variant sequences, similarities among sequences from same DNA sample were in general high (more than 98%). The phylogenetic analysis revealed that three cases were infected by P. ovale wallikeri and one by P. ovale curtisi. Four of the variant sequences which obtained from four samples relatively showed high similarities with each other (98.5%-100%). Identical variant sequences actually could be re-obtained from each DNA sample. Their primary structure of conservative and variable regions showed quite fit with that of six known Plasmodium parasites. The test for prokaryote pathogens showed negative and the tests for eukaryotes only found DNA sequences of Human and P. ovale parasites. Conclusion Both P. ovale wallikeri and P. ovale curtisi infections are

  9. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Identification of Five Human Plasmodium Species in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Yee-Ling; Lai, Meng-Yee; Fong, Mun-Yik; Jelip, Jenarun; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-01-01

    The lack of rapid, affordable, and accurate diagnostic tests represents the primary hurdle affecting malaria surveillance in resource- and expertise-limited areas. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a sensitive, rapid, and cheap diagnostic method. Five species-specific LAMP assays were developed based on 18S rRNA gene. Sensitivity and specificity of LAMP results were calculated as compared with microscopic examination and nested polymerase chain reaction. LAMP reactions were highly sensitive with the detection limit of one copy for Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium falciparum, and Plasmodium malariae and 10 copies for Plasmodium knowlesi and Plasmodium ovale. LAMP positively detected all human malaria species in all positive samples (N = 134; sensitivity = 100%) within 35 minutes. All negative samples were not amplified by LAMP (N = 67; specificity = 100%). LAMP successfully detected two samples with very low parasitemia. LAMP may offer a rapid, simple, and reliable test for the diagnosis of malaria in areas where malaria is prevalent. PMID:26598573

  10. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Identification of Five Human Plasmodium Species in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yee-Ling; Lai, Meng-Yee; Fong, Mun-Yik; Jelip, Jenarun; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-02-01

    The lack of rapid, affordable, and accurate diagnostic tests represents the primary hurdle affecting malaria surveillance in resource- and expertise-limited areas. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a sensitive, rapid, and cheap diagnostic method. Five species-specific LAMP assays were developed based on 18S rRNA gene. Sensitivity and specificity of LAMP results were calculated as compared with microscopic examination and nested polymerase chain reaction. LAMP reactions were highly sensitive with the detection limit of one copy for Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium falciparum, and Plasmodium malariae and 10 copies for Plasmodium knowlesi and Plasmodium ovale. LAMP positively detected all human malaria species in all positive samples (N = 134; sensitivity = 100%) within 35 minutes. All negative samples were not amplified by LAMP (N = 67; specificity = 100%). LAMP successfully detected two samples with very low parasitemia. LAMP may offer a rapid, simple, and reliable test for the diagnosis of malaria in areas where malaria is prevalent. PMID:26598573

  11. Federal Environmental Permitting Handbook. Environmental Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The handbook consists of eight chapters addressing permitting and licensing requirements under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (CERCLA/SARA), the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Clean Water Act (CWA), the Federal Insectide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Each chapter consists of: (1) an introduction to the statute and permitting requirements; (2) a diagram illustrating the relationship between permitting requirements under the statute being discussed and permitting requirements from other environmental statutes which may have to be addressed when applying for a particular permit (e.g., when applying for a RCRA permit, permits and permit applications under the CWA, CAA, SDWA, etc. would have to be listed in the RCRA permit application); and, (3) a compilation of the permitting requirements for the regulatory program resulting from the statute. In addition, the Handbook contains a permitting keyword index and a listing of hotline telephone numbers for each of the statutes.

  12. 76 FR 81932 - Auction of FM Broadcast Construction Permits; Revised Construction Permit Number in Auction 93

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... listed in Attachment A to the Auction 93 Procedures Public Notice, 76 FR 78645, December 19, 2011, to MM... COMMISSION Auction of FM Broadcast Construction Permits; Revised Construction Permit Number in Auction 93... the construction permit number for one of the FM broadcast construction permits for Auction 93....

  13. 40 CFR 72.32 - Permit application shield and binding effect of permit application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.32... submits a timely and complete Acid Rain permit application, the owners and operators of the affected... requirement to have an Acid Rain permit under § 72.9(a)(2) and § 72.30(a); provided that any delay in...

  14. 40 CFR 72.32 - Permit application shield and binding effect of permit application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.32... submits a timely and complete Acid Rain permit application, the owners and operators of the affected... requirement to have an Acid Rain permit under § 72.9(a)(2) and § 72.30(a); provided that any delay in...

  15. 40 CFR 72.32 - Permit application shield and binding effect of permit application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.32... submits a timely and complete Acid Rain permit application, the owners and operators of the affected... requirement to have an Acid Rain permit under § 72.9(a)(2) and § 72.30(a); provided that any delay in...

  16. 40 CFR 72.32 - Permit application shield and binding effect of permit application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.32... submits a timely and complete Acid Rain permit application, the owners and operators of the affected... requirement to have an Acid Rain permit under § 72.9(a)(2) and § 72.30(a); provided that any delay in...

  17. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 331 - Administrative Appeal Process for Permit Denials and Proffered Permits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Permit Denials and Proffered Permits A Appendix A to Part 331 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE APPEAL PROCESS Pt. 331, App. A Appendix A to Part 331—Administrative Appeal Process for Permit Denials and Proffered Permits ER28MR00.000...

  18. 30 CFR 937.773 - Requirements for permits and permit processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... applicant shall have the locations of the proposed permit boundaries, topsoil storage areas, sediment...-467.990); Air Contaminant Discharge Permits (ORS 468.005-ORS 468.997), Water Pollution Control Facilities Permits, Waste Discharge Permits (ORS 468.900-ORS 468.997), Energy Facility Site Certificates...

  19. Reducing concentrated animal feeding operations permitting requirements.

    PubMed

    Centner, T J; Newton, G L

    2011-12-01

    Many owners and operators of concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) need to secure National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits from the federal or state permitting authority. Because of the expense and inconvenience of permit applications, farm groups have challenged revisions to the federal CAFO Rule as well as state regulations claiming selected provisions exceeded the authority of the permitting agency. In 2011, 2 courts responded with decisions that clarify federal and state permitting regulations. Another goal of agricultural groups is to change the regulatory authority of the state from an environmental agency to a department of agriculture. These developments suggest that by altering the permitting authority, CAFO owners and operators may alleviate some of the burdens of the permitting process. PMID:21821805

  20. Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting status report

    SciTech Connect

    SONNICHSEN, J.C.

    1999-10-18

    The information contained in, and/or referenced in, this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report addresses Permit Condition II.W (Other Permits and/or Approvals) of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA7890008967). Condition II.W specifies that the Permittees are responsible for obtaining all other applicable federal, state, and local permits authorizing the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. Condition II.W further specifies that the Permittees are to use their best efforts to obtain such permits. For the purposes of this Permit Condition, ''best efforts'' mean submittal of documentation and/or approval(s) in accordance with schedules specified in applicable regulations, or as determined through negotiations with the applicable regulatory agencies.

  1. Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    HOMAN, N.A.

    2000-10-01

    The information contained in, and/or referenced in, this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report addresses Permit Condition II.W (Other Permits and/or Approvals) of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA7890008967). Condition II.W specifies that the Permittees are responsible for obtaining all other applicable federal, state, and local permits authorizing the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. This status report also addresses Permit Condition I.E.22, as interpreted in Section 12.1.25 of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28, Rev. 4), that states this report will be prepared annually and a copy of this report will be placed in the Facility Operating Record, General Information file by October 1 of each year.

  2. 40 CFR 96.223 - CAIR permit contents and term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... source covered by the permit. (c) The term of the CAIR permit will be set by the permitting authority, as... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR permit contents and term. 96.223... Permits § 96.223 CAIR permit contents and term. (a) Each CAIR permit will contain, in a format...

  3. 40 CFR 96.123 - CAIR permit contents and term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... source covered by the permit. (c) The term of the CAIR permit will be set by the permitting authority, as... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR permit contents and term. 96.123... Permits § 96.123 CAIR permit contents and term. (a) Each CAIR permit will contain, in a format...

  4. Homology-Based Prediction of Potential Protein–Protein Interactions between Human Erythrocytes and Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Gayatri; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Padmapriya, Ponnan; Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of malaria, is a well-characterized obligate intracellular parasite known for its ability to remodel host cells, particularly erythrocytes, to successfully persist in the host environment. However, the current levels of understanding from the laboratory experiments on the host–parasite interactions and the strategies pursued by the parasite to remodel host erythrocytes are modest. Several computational means developed in the recent past to predict host–parasite/pathogen interactions have generated testable hypotheses on feasible protein–protein interactions. We demonstrate the utility of protein structure-based protocol in the recognition of potential interacting proteins across P. falciparum and host erythrocytes. In concert with the information on the expression and subcellular localization of host and parasite proteins, we have identified 208 biologically feasible interactions potentially brought about by 59 P. falciparum and 30 host erythrocyte proteins. For selected cases, we have evaluated the physicochemical viability of the predicted interactions in terms of surface complementarity, electrostatic complementarity, and interaction energies at protein interface regions. Such careful inspection of molecular and mechanistic details generates high confidence on the predicted host–parasite protein–protein interactions. The predicted host–parasite interactions generate many experimentally testable hypotheses that can contribute to the understanding of possible mechanisms undertaken by the parasite in host erythrocyte remodeling. Thus, the key protein players recognized in P. falciparum can be explored for their usefulness as targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26740742

  5. Microwave generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  6. Regular production of infective sporozoites of Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax in laboratory-bred Anopheles albimanus.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, S; Salas, M L; Romero, J F; Zapata, J C; Ortiz, H; Arevalo-Herrera, M; Herrera, S

    1997-01-01

    One of the major constraints for studies on the sporogonic cycle of the parasites causing human malaria, and on the protective efficacy of pre-erythrocytic vaccines, is the scarcity of laboratory-reared Anopheles mosquitoes as a source of infective sporozoites. The aim of the present study was to reproduce the life-cycles of Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax in the laboratory and so develop the ability to produce infective sporozoites of these two species regularly under laboratory conditions. Colonized Anopheles albimanus, of Buenaventura and Tecojate strains, were infected by feeding either on Plasmodium-infected blood, from human patients or experimentally inoculated Aotus monkeys, or on gametocytes of the P. falciparum NF-54 isolate grown in vitro. The monkeys were infected with the blood stages of a Colombian P. vivax isolate and then, after recovery, with the Santa Lucia strain of P. falciparum from El Salvador. Although both of the mosquito strains used were successfully infected with both parasite species, the Buenaventura strain of mosquito was generally more susceptible to infection than the Tecojate strain, and particularly to infection with the parasites from the patients, who lived where this strain of mosquitoes was originally isolated. Monkeys injected intravenously with the P. vivax sporozoites produced in the mosquitoes developed patent sexual and asexual parasitaemias; the gametocytes that developed could then be used to infect mosquitoes, allowing the development of more sporozoites. However, experimental infections failed to establish after the P. falciparum sporozoites were used to inoculate monkeys. The ability to reproduce the complete life cycle of P. vivax in the laboratory, from human to mosquito and then to monkey, should greatly facilitate many studies on vivax malaria and on the efficacy of candidate malaria vaccines. The availability of the sporogonic cycles of P. falciparum from three different sources should also permit a variety of

  7. A World Malaria Map: Plasmodium falciparum Endemicity in 2007

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Simon I; Guerra, Carlos A; Gething, Peter W; Patil, Anand P; Tatem, Andrew J; Noor, Abdisalan M; Kabaria, Caroline W; Manh, Bui H; Elyazar, Iqbal R. F; Brooker, Simon; Smith, David L; Moyeed, Rana A; Snow, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Background Efficient allocation of resources to intervene against malaria requires a detailed understanding of the contemporary spatial distribution of malaria risk. It is exactly 40 y since the last global map of malaria endemicity was published. This paper describes the generation of a new world map of Plasmodium falciparum malaria endemicity for the year 2007. Methods and Findings A total of 8,938 P. falciparum parasite rate (PfPR) surveys were identified using a variety of exhaustive search strategies. Of these, 7,953 passed strict data fidelity tests for inclusion into a global database of PfPR data, age-standardized to 2–10 y for endemicity mapping. A model-based geostatistical procedure was used to create a continuous surface of malaria endemicity within previously defined stable spatial limits of P. falciparum transmission. These procedures were implemented within a Bayesian statistical framework so that the uncertainty of these predictions could be evaluated robustly. The uncertainty was expressed as the probability of predicting correctly one of three endemicity classes; previously stratified to be an informative guide for malaria control. Population at risk estimates, adjusted for the transmission modifying effects of urbanization in Africa, were then derived with reference to human population surfaces in 2007. Of the 1.38 billion people at risk of stable P. falciparum malaria, 0.69 billion were found in Central and South East Asia (CSE Asia), 0.66 billion in Africa, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia (Africa+), and 0.04 billion in the Americas. All those exposed to stable risk in the Americas were in the lowest endemicity class (PfPR2−10 ≤ 5%). The vast majority (88%) of those living under stable risk in CSE Asia were also in this low endemicity class; a small remainder (11%) were in the intermediate endemicity class (PfPR2−10 > 5 to < 40%); and the remaining fraction (1%) in high endemicity (PfPR2−10 ≥ 40%) areas. High endemicity was widespread in the

  8. Comparison of the Performances of Five Primer Sets for the Detection and Quantification of Plasmodium in Anopheline Vectors by Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Chaumeau, V.; Andolina, C.; Fustec, B.; Tuikue Ndam, N.; Brengues, C.; Herder, S.; Cerqueira, D.; Chareonviriyaphap, T.; Nosten, F.; Corbel, V.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qrtPCR) has made a significant improvement for the detection of Plasmodium in anopheline vectors. A wide variety of primers has been used in different assays, mostly adapted from molecular diagnosis of malaria in human. However, such an adaptation can impact the sensitivity of the PCR. Therefore we compared the sensitivity of five primer sets with different molecular targets on blood stages, sporozoites and oocysts standards of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) and P. vivax (Pv). Dilution series of standard DNA were used to discriminate between methods at low concentrations of parasite and to generate standard curves suitable for the absolute quantification of Plasmodium sporozoites. Our results showed that the best primers to detect blood stages were not necessarily the best ones to detect sporozoites. Absolute detection threshold of our qrtPCR assay varied between 3.6 and 360 Pv sporozoites and between 6 and 600 Pf sporozoites per mosquito according to the primer set used in the reaction mix. In this paper, we discuss the general performance of each primer set and highlight the need to use efficient detection methods for transmission studies. PMID:27441839

  9. Comparison of the Performances of Five Primer Sets for the Detection and Quantification of Plasmodium in Anopheline Vectors by Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Chaumeau, V; Andolina, C; Fustec, B; Tuikue Ndam, N; Brengues, C; Herder, S; Cerqueira, D; Chareonviriyaphap, T; Nosten, F; Corbel, V

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qrtPCR) has made a significant improvement for the detection of Plasmodium in anopheline vectors. A wide variety of primers has been used in different assays, mostly adapted from molecular diagnosis of malaria in human. However, such an adaptation can impact the sensitivity of the PCR. Therefore we compared the sensitivity of five primer sets with different molecular targets on blood stages, sporozoites and oocysts standards of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) and P. vivax (Pv). Dilution series of standard DNA were used to discriminate between methods at low concentrations of parasite and to generate standard curves suitable for the absolute quantification of Plasmodium sporozoites. Our results showed that the best primers to detect blood stages were not necessarily the best ones to detect sporozoites. Absolute detection threshold of our qrtPCR assay varied between 3.6 and 360 Pv sporozoites and between 6 and 600 Pf sporozoites per mosquito according to the primer set used in the reaction mix. In this paper, we discuss the general performance of each primer set and highlight the need to use efficient detection methods for transmission studies. PMID:27441839

  10. Multiplicity of Infection and Disease Severity in Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, M. Andreína; Lopez-Perez, Mary; Vallejo, Andrés F.; Herrera, Sócrates; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Escalante, Ananias A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiplicity of infection (MOI) refers to the average number of distinct parasite genotypes concurrently infecting a patient. Although several studies have reported on MOI and the frequency of multiclonal infections in Plasmodium falciparum, there is limited data on Plasmodium vivax. Here, MOI and the frequency of multiclonal infections were studied in areas from South America where P. vivax and P. falciparum can be compared. Methodology/Principal Findings As part of a passive surveillance study, 1,328 positive malaria patients were recruited between 2011 and 2013 in low transmission areas from Colombia. Of those, there were only 38 P. vivax and 24 P. falciparum clinically complicated cases scattered throughout the time of the study. Samples from uncomplicated cases were matched in time and location with the complicated cases in order to compare the circulating genotypes for these two categories. A total of 92 P. vivax and 57 P. falciparum uncomplicated cases were randomly subsampled. All samples were genotyped by using neutral microsatellites. Plasmodium vivax showed more multiclonal infections (47.7%) than P. falciparum (14.8%). Population genetics and haplotype network analyses did not detect differences in the circulating genotypes between complicated and uncomplicated cases in each parasite. However, a Fisher exact test yielded a significant association between having multiclonal P. vivax infections and complicated malaria. No association was found for P. falciparum infections. Conclusion The association between multiclonal infections and disease severity in P. vivax is consistent with previous observations made in rodent malaria. The contrasting pattern between P. vivax and P. falciparum could be explained, at least in part, by the fact that P. vivax infections have lineages that were more distantly related among them than in the case of the P. falciparum multiclonal infections. Future research should address the possible role that acquired

  11. Evidence for the Contribution of the Hemozoin Synthesis Pathway of the Murine Plasmodium yoelii to the Resistance to Artemisinin-Related Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau-Travers, Marie-Laure; Iriart, Xavier; Njomnang Soh, Patrice; Bousejra-ElGarah, Fatima; Meunier, Bernard; Berry, Antoine; Benoit-Vical, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a major global health problem, causing approximately 780,000 deaths each year. In response to the spreading of P. falciparum drug resistance, WHO recommended in 2001 to use artemisinin derivatives in combination with a partner drug (called ACT) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria, and most malaria-endemic countries have since changed their treatment policies accordingly. Currently, ACT are often the last treatments that can effectively and rapidly cure P. falciparum infections permitting to significantly decrease the mortality and the morbidity due to malaria. However, alarming signs of emerging resistance to artemisinin derivatives along the Thai-Cambodian border are of major concern. Through long-term in vivo pressures, we have been able to select a murine malaria model resistant to artemisinins. We demonstrated that the resistance of Plasmodium to artemisinin-based compounds depends on alterations of heme metabolism and on a loss of hemozoin formation linked to the down-expression of the recently identified Heme Detoxification Protein (HDP). These artemisinins resistant strains could be able to detoxify the free heme by an alternative catabolism pathway involving glutathione (GSH)-mediation. Finally, we confirmed that artemisinins act also like quinolines against Plasmodium via hemozoin production inhibition. The work proposed here described the mechanism of action of this class of molecules and the resistance to artemisinins of this model. These results should help both to reinforce the artemisinins activity and avoid emergence and spread of endoperoxides resistance by focusing in adequate drug partners design. Such considerations appear crucial in the current context of early artemisinin resistance in Asia. PMID:22403683

  12. An Autochthonous Case of Severe Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Nakaviroj, Surat; Kobasa, Teerayot; Teeranaipong, Phairote; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old Thai man was infected with Plasmodium knowlesi in Chantaburi Province, eastern Thailand. In addition to pyrexia, the patient developed hypotension, renal failure, jaundice, and severe thrombocytopenia. The parasitemia at the time of admission was 16.67% or ∼503,400 parasites/μL. With artesunate treatment and supportive care, the patient recovered uneventfully. The occurrence of complicated knowlesi malaria in a low-endemic area underscores the risk of high morbidity from this simian malaria. PMID:25535314

  13. RIFINs are adhesins implicated in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Goel, Suchi; Palmkvist, Mia; Moll, Kirsten; Joannin, Nicolas; Lara, Patricia; Akhouri, Reetesh R; Moradi, Nasim; Öjemalm, Karin; Westman, Mattias; Angeletti, Davide; Kjellin, Hanna; Lehtiö, Janne; Blixt, Ola; Ideström, Lars; Gahmberg, Carl G; Storry, Jill R; Hult, Annika K; Olsson, Martin L; von Heijne, Gunnar; Nilsson, IngMarie; Wahlgren, Mats

    2015-04-01

    Rosetting is a virulent Plasmodium falciparum phenomenon associated with severe malaria. Here we demonstrate that P. falciparum-encoded repetitive interspersed families of polypeptides (RIFINs) are expressed on the surface of infected red blood cells (iRBCs), where they bind to RBCs--preferentially of blood group A--to form large rosettes and mediate microvascular binding of iRBCs. We suggest that RIFINs have a fundamental role in the development of severe malaria and thereby contribute to the varying global distribution of ABO blood groups in the human population. PMID:25751816

  14. Plasmodium knowlesi Sporozoite Antigen: Expression by Infectious Recombinant Vaccinia Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Godson, G. Nigel; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.; Barnwell, John; Moss, Bernard

    1984-04-01

    The gene coding for the circumsporozoite antigen of the malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a defined vaccinia virus promoter. Cells infected with the recombinant virus synthesized polypeptides of 53,000 to 56,000 daltons that reacted with monoclonal antibody against the repeating epitope of the malaria protein. Furthermore, rabbits vaccinated with the recombinant virus produced antibodies that bound specifically to sporozoites. These data provide evidence for expression of a cloned malaria gene in mammalian cells and illustrate the potential of vaccinia virus recombinants as live malaria vaccines.

  15. Three species of Plasmodium from Canada geese, Branta canadensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Barrow, J.H.

    1967-01-01

    Studies on Canada geese at the Seney National Wildlife Refuge in northern Michigan during the past few years have uncovered at least three species of Plasmodium: P circumflexum, P. relictum, and P. vaughani. Although rarely observed in direct blood smears from the wild hosts, isodiagnosis, using primarily domestic geese as recipients, revealed a prevalence of 60 percent in random samplings of the population. P. circumflexum is the most prevalent and mixed infections have been noted. In experimental infections, induced by blood inoculation, the malaria produced by P. circumflexum produces about a 70 percent mortality in Canada geese and about a 10 percent mortality in domestic geese.

  16. [Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum: global status and basic research].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shao-min; Wang, Man-yuan

    2014-10-01

    Artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum has been identified by WHO in the Greater Mekong subregion. While there is no report on artemisinin resistance in Africa and South America by now, related surveillance measures have been taken place. The genes related artemisinin-resistance has been identified and the molecular markers will be used for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance. The emergence and spread of artemisinin resistance worldwide is a present danger and needs more attention. This article reviews the progress of artemisininresistance malaria parasites and artemisinin-based combination therapies. PMID:25726605

  17. Discrete-Event Simulation Models of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, F. Ellis; Wong, Roger C.; Bossert, William H.

    2008-01-01

    We develop discrete-event simulation models using a single “timeline” variable to represent the Plasmodium falciparum lifecycle in individual hosts and vectors within interacting host and vector populations. Where they are comparable our conclusions regarding the relative importance of vector mortality and the durations of host immunity and parasite development are congruent with those of classic differential-equation models of malaria, epidemiology. However, our results also imply that in regions with intense perennial transmission, the influence of mosquito mortality on malaria prevalence in humans may be rivaled by that of the duration of host infectivity. PMID:18668185

  18. Reduced CD36-dependent tissue sequestration of Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes is detrimental to malaria parasite growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fonager, Jannik; Pasini, Erica M.; Braks, Joanna A.M.; Klop, Onny; Ramesar, Jai; Remarque, Edmond J.; Vroegrijk, Irene O.C.M.; van Duinen, Sjoerd G.; Thomas, Alan W.; Khan, Shahid M.; Mann, Matthias; Kocken, Clemens H.M.; Janse, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    Adherence of parasite-infected red blood cells (irbc) to the vascular endothelium of organs plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The prevailing hypothesis of why irbc adhere and sequester in tissues is that this acts as a mechanism of avoiding spleen-mediated clearance. Irbc of the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei ANKA sequester in a fashion analogous to P. falciparum by adhering to the host receptor CD36. To experimentally determine the significance of sequestration for parasite growth, we generated a mutant P. berghei ANKA parasite with a reduced CD36-mediated adherence. Although the cognate parasite ligand binding to CD36 is unknown, we show that nonsequestering parasites have reduced growth and we provide evidence that in addition to avoiding spleen removal, other factors related to CD36-mediated sequestration are beneficial for parasite growth. These results reveal for the first time the importance of sequestration to a malaria infection, with implications for the development of strategies aimed at reducing pathology by inhibiting tissue sequestration. PMID:22184632

  19. Enhancement of neutrophil-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood forms by fatty acids: importance of fatty acid structure.

    PubMed Central

    Kumaratilake, L M; Ferrante, A; Robinson, B S; Jaeger, T; Poulos, A

    1997-01-01

    Effects of fatty acids on human neutrophil-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood forms were investigated by using a quantitative radiometric assay. The results showed that the antiparasitic activity of neutrophils can be greatly increased (>threefold) by short-term treatment with fatty acids with 20 to 24 carbon atoms and at least three double bonds. In particular, the n-3 polyenoic fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, and the n-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid, significantly enhanced neutrophil antiparasitic activity. This effect was >1.5-fold higher than that induced by an optical concentration of the known agonist cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). At suboptimal concentrations, the combination of arachidonic acid and TNF-alpha caused a synergistic increase in neutrophil-mediated parasite killing. The fatty acid-induced effect was independent of the availability of serum opsonins but dependent on the structure of the fatty acids. The length of the carbon chain, degree of unsaturation, and availability of a free carboxyl group were important determinants of fatty acid activity. The fatty acids which increased neutrophil-mediated killing primed the enhanced superoxide radical generation of neutrophils in response to P. falciparum as detected by chemiluminescence. Scavengers of oxygen radicals significantly reduced the fatty acid-enhanced parasite killing, but cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors had no effect. These findings have identified a new class of immunoenhancers that could be exploited to increase resistance against Plasmodium species. PMID:9317021

  20. A Stem Cell Strategy Identifies Glycophorin C as a Major Erythrocyte Receptor for the Rodent Malaria Parasite Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Yiangou, Loukia; Montandon, Ruddy; Modrzynska, Katarzyna; Rosen, Barry; Bushell, Wendy; Hale, Christine; Billker, Oliver; Rayner, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical complications of malaria are caused by the parasite expansion in the blood. Invasion of erythrocytes is a complex process that depends on multiple receptor-ligand interactions. Identification of host receptors is paramount for fighting the disease as it could reveal new intervention targets, but the enucleated nature of erythrocytes makes genetic approaches impossible and many receptors remain unknown. Host-parasite interactions evolve rapidly and are therefore likely to be species-specific. As a results, understanding of invasion receptors outside the major human pathogen Plasmodium falciparum is very limited. Here we use mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) that can be genetically engineered and differentiated into erythrocytes to identify receptors for the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei. Two proteins previously implicated in human malaria infection: glycophorin C (GYPC) and Band-3 (Slc4a1) were deleted in mESCs to generate stable cell lines, which were differentiated towards erythropoiesis. In vitro infection assays revealed that while deletion of Band-3 has no effect, absence of GYPC results in a dramatic decrease in invasion, demonstrating the crucial role of this protein for P. berghei infection. This stem cell approach offers the possibility of targeting genes that may be essential and therefore difficult to disrupt in whole organisms and has the potential to be applied to a variety of parasites in diverse host cell types. PMID:27362409

  1. Annual Hanford Site environmental permitting status report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, S.A.

    1996-10-01

    This Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report (Status Report) was prepared in response to requirements prescribed in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.2A, `Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination`. This Order, canceled in April 1996, required that information on existing and anticipated environmental permitting for DOE facilities be submitted (or updated) annually by October 1 of each calendar year. Although the Order was canceled, the need for this Status Report still remains. For example, the Washington State Department of Ecology`s (Ecology) Dangerous Waste Permit Application Requirements (Publication Number 95-402, June 1996), Checklist Section J, calls for current information on existing and anticipated environmental permitting. As specified in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28), this Status Report serves as the vehicle for meeting this requirement for the Hanford Facility. This Status Report includes information on all existing and anticipated environmental permitting. Environmental permitting required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976, the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of 1984, and non-RCRA permitting (solid waste handling, Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Clean Water Act Amendments of 1987, Washington State waste discharge, and onsite sewage system) are addressed. Information on RCRA and non-RCRA permitting is included and is current as of July 31, 1996.

  2. Nevada told to process Yucca permits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    The U.S. District Court in Nevada ruled this March that the state must begin processing permits that would allow the Department of Energy to conduct scientific studies on Yucca Mountain, the heavily debated proposed location of the nation's nuclear waste repository. The studies will determine the stability of the site, located about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas.Carl Gertz, DOE's director of the Yucca Mountain Project, is careful to say that processing the permits does not mean issuing the permits. Beatrice Reilley, of the same office, adds that it is “debatable” whether or not the state is making progress in processing the permits.

  3. Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein 2 is Unstructured and Forms Amyloid-Like Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Adda, Christopher G.; Murphy, Vince J.; Sunde, Margaret; Waddington, Lynne J.; Jesse, Schloegel; Talbo, Gert H.; Vingas, Kleo; Kienzle, Vivian; Masciantonio, Rosella; Howlett, Geoffrey J.; Hodder, Anthony N.; Foley, Michael; Anders, Robin F.

    2009-01-01

    Several merozoite surface proteins are being assessed as potential components of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, the cause of the most serious form of human malaria. One of these proteins, merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2), is unusually hydrophilic and contains tandem sequence repeats, characteristics of intrinsically unstructured proteins. A range of physicochemical studies have confirmed that recombinant forms of MSP2 are largely unstructured. Both dimorphic types of MSP2 (3D7 and FC27) are equivalently extended in solution and form amyloid-like fibrils although with different kinetics and structural characteristics. These fibrils have a regular underlying β-sheet structure and both fibril types stain with Congo Red, but only the FC27 fibrils stain with Thioflavin T. 3D7 MSP2 fibrils seeded the growth of fibrils from 3D7 or FC27 MSP2 monomer indicating the involvement of a conserved region of MSP2 in fibril formation. Consistent with this, digestion of fibrils with proteinase K generated resistant peptides, which included the N-terminal conserved region of MSP2. A monoclonal antibody that reacted preferentially with monomeric recombinant MSP2 did not react with the antigen in situ on the merozoite surface. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking of infected erythrocytes generated MSP2 oligomers similar to those formed by polymeric recombinant MSP2. We conclude that MSP2 oligomers containing intermolecular β-strand interactions similar to those in amyloid fibrils may be a component of the fibrillar surface coat on P. falciparum merozoites. PMID:19450733

  4. Cell-mediated immune responses to a cloned Plasmodium falciparum antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Rollwagen, F.M.; Pacheco, N.D.; Wistar, R. Jr.

    1986-03-05

    A peptide fragment of the Plasmodium falciparum (P.f.) circumsporozoite protein (CSP) containing 32 repeats of the immunodominant tetrapeptide ASN-ALA-ASN-PRO (R32tet32) is currently being evaluated as a vaccine in man. This R32tet32 peptide, prepared by recombinant DNA technology from a cloned P.f. gene fragment, has been examined for its ability to stimulate T-cell proliferation in experimental animals. Groups of mice were injected with either R32tet32 emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA), or live, or frozen-thawed P.f. sporozoites. Lymphocytes from such mice were cocultured with varying doses of R32tet32 or irrelevant antigen. Proliferation was assessed by /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake; serum antibody was analyzed by ELISA. A proliferative response was found in mice immunized with R32tet32+CFA as early as day 7 post-injection, and was persistent through at least day 23. No proliferation in response to R32tet32 was observed in lymphocytes taken from mice injected with live or frozen-thawed sporozoites. All three immunogens induced both IgM and IgG antibody to R32tet32. They conclude that exposure to live or frozen-thawed P.f. sporozoites alone is sufficient to generate T-cell helper activity for subsequent antibody production, but that antigen+CFA was necessary to generate significant T-cell proliferative activity.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 2 is unstructured and forms amyloid-like fibrils.

    PubMed

    Adda, Christopher G; Murphy, Vince J; Sunde, Margaret; Waddington, Lynne J; Schloegel, Jesse; Talbo, Gert H; Vingas, Kleo; Kienzle, Vivian; Masciantonio, Rosella; Howlett, Geoffrey J; Hodder, Anthony N; Foley, Michael; Anders, Robin F

    2009-08-01

    Several merozoite surface proteins are being assessed as potential components of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, the cause of the most serious form of human malaria. One of these proteins, merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2), is unusually hydrophilic and contains tandem sequence repeats, characteristics of intrinsically unstructured proteins. A range of physicochemical studies has confirmed that recombinant forms of MSP2 are largely unstructured. Both dimorphic types of MSP2 (3D7 and FC27) are equivalently extended in solution and form amyloid-like fibrils although with different kinetics and structural characteristics. These fibrils have a regular underlying beta-sheet structure and both fibril types stain with Congo Red, but only the FC27 fibrils stain with Thioflavin T. 3D7 MSP2 fibrils seeded the growth of fibrils from 3D7 or FC27 MSP2 monomer indicating the involvement of a conserved region of MSP2 in fibril formation. Consistent with this, digestion of fibrils with proteinase K generated resistant peptides, which included the N-terminal conserved region of MSP2. A monoclonal antibody that reacted preferentially with monomeric recombinant MSP2 did not react with the antigen in situ on the merozoite surface. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking of infected erythrocytes generated MSP2 oligomers similar to those formed by polymeric recombinant MSP2. We conclude that MSP2 oligomers containing intermolecular beta-strand interactions similar to those in amyloid fibrils may be a component of the fibrillar surface coat on P. falciparum merozoites. PMID:19450733

  6. 50 CFR 660.335 - Limited entry permits-renewal, combination, stacking, change of permit ownership or permit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the primary sablefish season described at § 660.372. Privileges, responsibilities, and restrictions... permit to a new permit owner or holder (transferee) during the primary sablefish season described at... on the application form the cumulative quantity, in round weight, of primary season sablefish...

  7. Oligohydramnios in a pregnant Pakistani woman with Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the Western world, the diagnosis and management of Plasmodium vivax malaria in pregnant women can be challenging, and the pathogenesis of adverse outcomes for both the mother and the foetus is still poorly known. The authors describe the case of a 29-year-old Pakistani woman at the 29th week of her second pregnancy, who was admitted to the Hospital following the abrupt onset of fever. At the time of admission, she had been living in Italy without travelling to any malaria-endemic areas for eight months. She was diagnosed with vivax malaria after a thin blood smear revealed the presence of plasmodial trophozoites and gametocytes and treated accordingly. Due to the onset of oligohydramnios, she underwent caesarian section at the 31st week of pregnancy with no further complications. Histological examination of the placenta showed no evidence of plasmodial infection, but was inconclusive. It is unclear whether oligohydramnios is a complication of pregnancy-related Plasmodium vivax malaria. Given the long latency of hypnozoites, every febrile pregnant patient with a previous stay in an endemic area should be screened for malaria with a thick and a thin blood smear. PMID:24758193

  8. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Azerbaijan

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Marie Claude; Menegon, Michela; Cligny, Alexandra; Noyer, Jean Louis; Mammadov, Suleyman; Aliyev, Namig; Gasimov, Elkhan; Majori, Giancarlo; Severini, Carlo

    2004-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax, although causing a less serious disease than Plasmodium falciparum, is the most widespread of the four human malarial species. Further to the recent recrudescence of P. vivax cases in the Newly Independent States (NIS) of central Asia, a survey on the genetic diversity and dissemination in Azerbaijan was undertaken. Azerbaijan is at the crossroads of Asia and, as such, could see a rise in the number of cases, although an effective malaria control programme has been established in the country. Methods Thirty-six P. vivax isolates from Central Azerbaijan were characterized by analysing the genetic polymorphism of the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and the merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) genes, using PCR amplifications and amplicons sequencing. Results Analysis of CSP sequences showed that all the processed isolates belong to the VK 210 type, with variations in the alternation of alanine residue (A) or aspartic acid residue (D) in the repeat motif GDRA(A/D)GQPA along the sequence. As far as MSP-1 genotyping is concerned, it was found that the majority of isolates analysed belong to Belem and Sal I types. Five recombinant isolates were also identified. Combined analysis with the two genetic markers allowed the identification of 19 plasmodial sub-types. Conclusion The results obtained in the present study indicate that there are several P. vivax clones circulating in Azerbaijan and, consequently, a careful malaria surveillance could be of paramount importance to identify, at early stage, the occurrence of possible P. vivax malaria outbreaks. PMID:15535878

  9. A Comprehensive Analysis of Plasmodium Circumsporozoite Protein Binding to Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinghua; Bhanot, Purnima; Hu, Junjie; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is the dominant protein on the surface of Plasmodium sporozoites and plays a critical role in the invasion by sporozoites of hepatocytes. Contacts between CSP and heparin sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) lead to the attachment of sporozoites to hepatocytes and trigger signaling events in the parasite that promote invasion of hepatocytes. The precise sequence elements in CSP that bind HSPGs have not been identified. We performed a systematic in vitro analysis to dissect the association between Plasmodium falciparum CSP (PfCSP) and hepatocytes. We demonstrate that interactions between PfCSP and heparin or a cultured hepatoma cell line, HepG2, are mediated primarily by a lysine-rich site in the amino terminus of PfCSP. Importantly, the carboxyl terminus of PfCSP facilitates heparin-binding by the amino-terminus but does not interact directly with heparin. These findings provide insights into how CSP recognizes hepatocytes and useful information for further functional studies of CSP. PMID:27560376

  10. Pfcrt Gene in Plasmodium falciparum Field Isolates from Muzaffargarh, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Sahar, Sumrin; Tanveer, Akhtar; Ali, Akbar; Bilal, Hazrat; Muhammad Saleem, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to identify the prevalence of different species of Plasmodium and haplotypes of pfcrt in Plasmodium falciparum from the selected area. Methods: Overall, 10,372 blood films of suspected malarial patients were examined microscopically from rural health center Sinawan, district Muzaffargarh, Pakistan from November 2008 to November 2010. P. falciparum positive samples (both whole blood and FTA blood spotted cards) were used for DNA extraction. Nested PCR was used to amplify the pfcrt (codon 72–76) gene fragment. Sequencing was carried out to find the haplotypes in the amplified fragment of pfcrt gene. Result: Over all slide positivity rate (SPR), P. vivax and P. falciparum positivity rate was 21.40 %, 19.37 % and 2.03% respectively. FTA blood spotted cards were equally efficient in the blood storage for PCR and sequencing. Analysis of sequencing results of pfcrt showed only one type of haplotype SagtVMNT (AGTGTAATGAATACA) from codon 72–76 in all samples. Conclusion: The results show high prevalence of CQ resistance and AQ resistant genes. AQ is not recommended to be used as a partner drug in ACT in this locality, so as to ward off future catastrophes. PMID:26623432

  11. Targeting molecular interactions essential for Plasmodium sexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Rodriguez, Joel; Perez-Barreto, Davinia; Ruiz-Reyes, Antonio; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Malaria remains one of the most devastating infectious diseases, killing up to a million people every year. Whereas much progress has been made in understanding the life cycle of the parasite in the human host and in the mosquito vector, significant gaps of knowledge remain. Fertilization of malaria parasites, a process that takes place in the lumen of the mosquito midgut, is poorly understood and the molecular interactions (receptor–ligand) required for Plasmodium fertilization remain elusive. By use of a phage display library, we identified FG1 (Female Gamete peptide 1), a peptide that binds specifically to the surface of female Plasmodium berghei gametes. Importantly, FG1 but not a scrambled version of the peptide, strongly reduces P. berghei oocyst formation by interfering with fertilization. In addition, FG1 also inhibits P. falciparum oocyst formation suggesting that the peptide binds to a molecule on the surface of the female gamete whose structure is conserved. Identification of the molecular interactions disrupted by the FG1 peptide may lead to the development of novel malaria transmission-blocking strategies. PMID:25944054

  12. Plasmodium knowlesi in a traveller returning to New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hoosen, Anwar; Shaw, Marc T M

    2011-05-01

    The recent discovery that Plasmodium knowlesi causes malaria in human populations, established it as the fifth species of plasmodium that may do so. A case of P. knowlesi malaria is described in a helicopter pilot from New Zealand, who became ill after returning from recurring visits to Malaysian Borneo in June 2010. His P. knowlesi infection was not detected using microscopic examination and a rapid diagnostic test for malaria, but was confirmed by both PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and sequence analysis showing homology with the ribosomal RNA gene for P. knowlesi. He responded rapidly to treatment with artemether & lumefantrine combination. The evolution of a rapid diagnostic kit to diagnose P. knowlesi is needed, for early identification and appropriate anti-malarial therapy of suspect cases are both critical in the prevention of the potentially life-threatening disease through P. knowlesi. Clinicians need to consider knowlesi infection in the differential diagnosis in recent-onset febrile travellers to areas of forestation in Southeast Asia. PMID:21481643

  13. Swedish traveller with Plasmodium knowlesi malaria after visiting Malaysian Borneo.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Ulf; Divis, Paul C S; Färnert, Anna; Singh, Balbir

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is typically found in nature in macaques and has recently been recognized as the fifth species of Plasmodium causing malaria in human populations in south-east Asia. A case of knowlesi malaria is described in a Swedish man, who became ill after returning from a short visit to Malaysian Borneo in October 2006. His P. knowlesi infection was not detected using a rapid diagnostic test for malaria, but was confirmed by PCR and molecular characterization. He responded rapidly to treatment with mefloquine. Evaluation of rapid diagnostic kits with further samples from knowlesi malaria patients are necessary, since early identification and appropriate anti-malarial treatment of suspected cases are essential due to the rapid growth and potentially life-threatening nature of P. knowlesi. Physicians should be aware that knowlesi infection is an important differential diagnosis in febrile travellers, with a recent travel history to forested areas in south-east Asia, including short-term travellers who tested negative with rapid diagnostic tests. PMID:19146706

  14. Plasmodium liver load following parenteral sporozoite administration in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ploemen, Ivo H; Chakravarty, Sumana; van Gemert, Geert-Jan J; Annoura, Takeshi; Khan, Shahid M; Janse, Chris J; Hermsen, Cornelus C; Hoffman, Stephen L; Sauerwein, Robert W

    2013-07-25

    One of the bottlenecks in the development of a whole sporozoite malaria vaccine is the route and method of sporozoite administration. Immunization and challenge of human volunteers by mosquito bites is effective, but cannot be used as a vaccine. Intravenous immunization with sporozoites is effective in rodents and non-human primates, and being studied in humans, but is not yet used for licensed vaccines for infectious diseases. Intradermal and subcutaneous immunization regimens show a strong decrease in protective efficacy, which in rodents, is associated with a decreased degree of parasite liver infection during immunization. The objective of this study was to explore alternative routes of sporozoite administration to increase efficiency of liver infection. Using in vivo imaging, we found that IM injection of sporozoites resulted in a greater parasite liver load compared to ID and SC injection. The use of small inoculation volumes and multiple injections further increased the subsequent liver load. These observations were corroborated in a Plasmodium yoelii model using cryopreserved sporozoites administered ID. Our findings provide a rationale for the design of clinical trials to optimize needle and syringe administration of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites. PMID:23063834

  15. Late relapse of imported Plasmodium ovale malaria: a case report.

    PubMed

    Siala, Emna; Gastli, Mondher; Essid, Rym; Jemal, Sana; Ben Abdallah, Rym; Ben Abda, Imène; Aoun, Karim; Bouratbine, Aida

    2015-06-01

    We report the first case of an imported Plasmodium ovale relapse in a Tunisian man who developed malaria three years after leaving sub- Saharan Africa. A 29-year-old Tunisian man consulted in September 2011 because of a fever, myalgia, and headache that had begun eight days earlier and persisted despite treatment with oral antibiotics. On questioning, the patient stated that he had resided three years ago for six months in Ivory Coast, where he acquired malaria. He was treated with artemether-lumefantrine. The patient said he had no recent travel to any other malaria-endemic area and had not received a blood transfusion. A first microscopy of peripheral blood smears was negative for malaria parasites. The diagnosis was established 17 days after onset of symptoms. A repeat microscopic examination of blood smears confirmed the presence of Plasmodium ovale with a parasitemia lower than 0.1%. The patient was treated with artemether lumefantrine, followed by primaquine. This case emphasizes the possibility of relapse of some plasmodial species. It highlights the importance of repeating microscopic examination of blood when the diagnosis of malaria is suspected. PMID:26644094

  16. Proteome mapping of Plasmodium: identification of the P. yoelii remodellome

    PubMed Central

    Siau, Anthony; Huang, Ximei; Weng, Mei; Sze, Siu Kwan; Preiser, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium associated virulence in the host is linked to extensive remodelling of the host erythrocyte by parasite proteins that form the “remodellome”. However, without a common motif or structure available to identify these proteins, little is known about the proteins that are destined to reside in the parasite periphery, the host-cell cytoplasm and/or the erythrocyte membrane. Here, the subcellular fractionation of erythrocytic P. yoelii at trophozoite and schizont stage along with label-free quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of the whole proteome, revealed a proteome of 1335 proteins. Differential analysis of the relative abundance of these proteins across the subcellular compartments allowed us to map their locations, independently of their predicted features. These results, along with literature data and in vivo validation of 61 proteins enabled the identification of a remodellome of 184 proteins. This approach identified a significant number of conserved remodelling proteins across plasmodium that likely represent key conserved functions in the parasite and provides new insights into parasite evolution and biology. PMID:27503796

  17. Human cytotoxic T lymphocytes against the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

    PubMed Central

    Malik, A; Egan, J E; Houghten, R A; Sadoff, J C; Hoffman, S L

    1991-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of malaria sporozoites protect against malaria in rodents. Although there is interest in developing human vaccines that induce CTL against the Plasmodium falciparum CS protein, humans have never been shown to produce CTL against any Plasmodium species protein or other parasite protein. We report that when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from three of four volunteers immunized with irradiated P. falciparum sporozoites were stimulated in vitro with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the P. falciparum CS protein or a peptide including only amino acids 368-390 of the P. falciparum CS protein [CS-(368-390)], the PBMC lysed autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells transfected with the P. falciparum CS protein gene or incubated with CS-(368-390) tricosapeptide. Activity was antigen specific, genetically restricted, and dependent on CD8+ T cells. In one volunteer, seven peptides reflecting amino acids 311-400 were tested, and, as in B10.BR mice, CTL activity was only associated with the CS-(368-390) peptide. Development of an assay for studying human CTL against the CS and other malaria proteins and a method for constructing target cells by direct gene transfection provide a foundation for studying the role of CTL in protection against malaria. PMID:1707538

  18. Proteome mapping of Plasmodium: identification of the P. yoelii remodellome.

    PubMed

    Siau, Anthony; Huang, Ximei; Weng, Mei; Sze, Siu Kwan; Preiser, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium associated virulence in the host is linked to extensive remodelling of the host erythrocyte by parasite proteins that form the "remodellome". However, without a common motif or structure available to identify these proteins, little is known about the proteins that are destined to reside in the parasite periphery, the host-cell cytoplasm and/or the erythrocyte membrane. Here, the subcellular fractionation of erythrocytic P. yoelii at trophozoite and schizont stage along with label-free quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of the whole proteome, revealed a proteome of 1335 proteins. Differential analysis of the relative abundance of these proteins across the subcellular compartments allowed us to map their locations, independently of their predicted features. These results, along with literature data and in vivo validation of 61 proteins enabled the identification of a remodellome of 184 proteins. This approach identified a significant number of conserved remodelling proteins across plasmodium that likely represent key conserved functions in the parasite and provides new insights into parasite evolution and biology. PMID:27503796

  19. Malaria vaccines: identifying Plasmodium falciparum liver-stage targets

    PubMed Central

    Longley, Rhea J.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Spencer, Alexandra J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of a highly efficacious and durable vaccine for malaria remains a top priority for global health researchers. Despite the huge rise in recognition of malaria as a global health problem and the concurrent rise in funding over the past 10–15 years, malaria continues to remain a widespread burden. The evidence of increasing resistance to anti-malarial drugs and insecticides is a growing concern. Hence, an efficacious and durable preventative vaccine for malaria is urgently needed. Vaccines are one of the most cost-effective tools and have successfully been used in the prevention and control of many diseases, however, the development of a vaccine for the Plasmodium parasite has proved difficult. Given the early success of whole sporozoite mosquito-bite delivered vaccination strategies, we know that a vaccine for malaria is an achievable goal, with sub-unit vaccines holding great promise as they are simple and cheap to both manufacture and deploy. However a major difficulty in development of sub-unit vaccines lies within choosing the appropriate antigenic target from the 5000 or so genes expressed by the parasite. Given the liver-stage of malaria represents a bottle-neck in the parasite’s life cycle, there is widespread agreement that a multi-component sub-unit malaria vaccine should preferably contain a liver-stage target. In this article we review progress in identifying and screening Plasmodium falciparum liver-stage targets for use in a malaria vaccine. PMID:26441899

  20. Purification and characterization of Plasmodium yoelii adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sarika; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar; Dwivedi, U N

    2011-12-01

    Plasmodium lacks the de novo pathway for purine biosynthesis and relies exclusively on the salvage pathway. Adenosine deaminase (ADA), first enzyme of the pathway, was purified and characterized from Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malarial species, using ion exchange and gel exclusion chromatography. The purified enzyme is a 41 kDa monomer. The enzyme showed K(m) values of 41 μM and 34 μM for adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine, respectively. Erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine competitively inhibited P. yoelii ADA with K(i) value of 0.5 μM. The enzyme was inhibited by DEPC and protein denaturing agents, urea and GdmCl. Purine analogues significantly inhibited ADA activity. Inhibition by p-chloromercuribenzoate (pCMB) and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) indicated the presence of functional -SH groups. Tryptophan fluorescence maxima of ADA shifted from 339 nm to 357 nm in presence of GdmCl. Refolding studies showed that higher GdmCl concentration irreversibly denatured the purified ADA. Fluorescence quenchers (KI and acrylamide) quenched the ADA fluorescence intensity to the varied degree. The observed differences in kinetic properties of P. yoelii ADA as compared to the erythrocyte enzyme may facilitate in designing specific inhibitors against ADA. PMID:21945268

  1. DNA Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Gene: Amino Acid Sequence of Repetitive Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea, Vincenzo; Ellis, Joan; Zavala, Fidel; Arnot, David E.; Asavanich, Achara; Masuda, Aoi; Quakyi, Isabella; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1984-08-01

    A clone of complementary DNA encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been isolated by screening an Escherichia coli complementary DNA library with a monoclonal antibody to the CS protein. The DNA sequence of the complementary DNA insert encodes a four-amino acid sequence: proline-asparagine-alanine-asparagine, tandemly repeated 23 times. The CS β -lactamase fusion protein specifically binds monoclonal antibodies to the CS protein and inhibits the binding of these antibodies to native Plasmodium falciparum CS protein. These findings provide a basis for the development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  2. 40 CFR 96.323 - CAIR permit contents and term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the CAIR NOX Ozone Season source covered by the permit. (c) The term of the CAIR permit will be set by... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR permit contents and term. 96.323... Permits § 96.323 CAIR permit contents and term. (a) Each CAIR permit will contain, in a format...

  3. 40 CFR 97.323 - CAIR permit contents and term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ozone Season source covered by the permit. (c) The term of the CAIR permit will be set by the permitting... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR permit contents and term. 97.323... permit contents and term. (a) Each CAIR permit will contain, in a format prescribed by the...

  4. Case history review--demilitarization combustion permits.

    PubMed

    Gaborek, B J

    2000-02-01

    In May 1993, Administrative Browner of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) announced that an indirect exposure health risk assessment was required for all hazardous waste combustion facilities seeking a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permit. These types of risk assessments evaluate the health and environmental effects from inhalation of emissions (direct exposure) and from contact with environmental media and consumption of food products impacted by the emissions (indirect exposure). Completion of an indirect exposure risk assessment is often complicated by the various methodologies available for generating results and by the requirements of the regulating community. To minimize this complexity and to maximize consistency between risk assessments, the USEPA developed a number of detailed guidance documents. Site-specific conditions and toxicological data gaps, however, continue to present challenges not addressed by these guidance documents. This paper presents some of the specific challenges encountered by the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine when performing indirect exposure health risk assessments for several demilitarization combustion facilities. PMID:10711390

  5. 40 CFR 144.31 - Application for a permit; authorization by permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... is located on Indian lands. (6) A listing of all permits or construction approvals received or.... (vii) Ocean dumping permits under the Marine Protection Research and Sanctuaries Act. (viii) Dredge...

  6. 40 CFR 144.31 - Application for a permit; authorization by permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... is located on Indian lands. (6) A listing of all permits or construction approvals received or.... (vii) Ocean dumping permits under the Marine Protection Research and Sanctuaries Act. (viii) Dredge...

  7. 40 CFR 144.31 - Application for a permit; authorization by permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... is located on Indian lands. (6) A listing of all permits or construction approvals received or.... (vii) Ocean dumping permits under the Marine Protection Research and Sanctuaries Act. (viii) Dredge...

  8. 30 CFR 921.773 - Requirements for permits and permit processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... issued by the Secretary pursuant to 30 CFR part 773 and applicable permits issued pursuant to the laws of... shall have the locations of the proposed permit boundaries, topsoil storage areas, sediment...

  9. 30 CFR 921.773 - Requirements for permits and permit processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... issued by the Secretary pursuant to 30 CFR part 773 and applicable permits issued pursuant to the laws of... shall have the locations of the proposed permit boundaries, topsoil storage areas, sediment...

  10. 30 CFR 947.773 - Requirements for permits and permit processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... regulations: (1) Department of Ecology: Surface Water Rights Permit, RCW 90.03.250 Dam Safety Approval, RCW 90... deny a permit application to the Washington Department of Natural Resources, the Department of...

  11. 30 CFR 947.773 - Requirements for permits and permit processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regulations: (1) Department of Ecology: Surface Water Rights Permit, RCW 90.03.250 Dam Safety Approval, RCW 90... deny a permit application to the Washington Department of Natural Resources, the Department of...

  12. 30 CFR 947.773 - Requirements for permits and permit processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regulations: (1) Department of Ecology: Surface Water Rights Permit, RCW 90.03.250 Dam Safety Approval, RCW 90... deny a permit application to the Washington Department of Natural Resources, the Department of...

  13. 30 CFR 947.773 - Requirements for permits and permit processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regulations: (1) Department of Ecology: Surface Water Rights Permit, RCW 90.03.250 Dam Safety Approval, RCW 90... deny a permit application to the Washington Department of Natural Resources, the Department of...

  14. 30 CFR 947.773 - Requirements for permits and permit processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regulations: (1) Department of Ecology: Surface Water Rights Permit, RCW 90.03.250 Dam Safety Approval, RCW 90... deny a permit application to the Washington Department of Natural Resources, the Department of...

  15. 40 CFR 52.681 - Permits to construct and tier II operating permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of the SIP. (b) Operating Permits authorizing the use of alternative emission limits (bubbles) under... credits in a bubble pursuant to IDAPA 58.01.01.461), and Tier II Operating Permits authorizing...

  16. 40 CFR 52.681 - Permits to construct and tier II operating permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of the SIP. (b) Operating Permits authorizing the use of alternative emission limits (bubbles) under... credits in a bubble pursuant to IDAPA 58.01.01.461), and Tier II Operating Permits authorizing...

  17. 40 CFR 52.681 - Permits to construct and tier II operating permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of the SIP. (b) Operating Permits authorizing the use of alternative emission limits (bubbles) under... credits in a bubble pursuant to IDAPA 58.01.01.461), and Tier II Operating Permits authorizing...

  18. 40 CFR 52.681 - Permits to construct and tier II operating permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of the SIP. (b) Operating Permits authorizing the use of alternative emission limits (bubbles) under... credits in a bubble pursuant to IDAPA 58.01.01.461), and Tier II Operating Permits authorizing...

  19. 40 CFR 52.681 - Permits to construct and tier II operating permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of the SIP. (b) Operating Permits authorizing the use of alternative emission limits (bubbles) under... credits in a bubble pursuant to IDAPA 58.01.01.461), and Tier II Operating Permits authorizing...

  20. 50 CFR 622.270 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CFR part 904 is not aboard that vessel. (d) Dealer permits and conditions—(1) Permits. For a dealer to..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo... a vessel to be eligible for exemption from the bag and possession limits for dolphin or wahoo in...

  1. 40 CFR 25.9 - Permit enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit enforcement. 25.9 Section 25.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN PROGRAMS UNDER THE RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.9 Permit enforcement. Each...

  2. 9 CFR 104.2 - Permit authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permit authorized. 104.2 Section 104.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES... Permit authorized. (a) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is authorized to issue three types...

  3. 78 FR 36822 - Special Permit Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Special Permit Applications AGENCY: Pipeline And... Applications. SUMMARY: In accordance with the procedures governing the application for, and the processing of..., Subpart B), notice is hereby given of the actions on special permits applications in (May to May...

  4. 40 CFR 124.6 - Draft permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Draft permits. 124.6 Section 124.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING General Program Requirements § 124.6 Draft permits. (a) (Applicable to State programs, see §§ 123.25 (NPDES), 145.11 (UIC), 233.26...

  5. 46 CFR 176.110 - Routes permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Routes permitted. 176.110 Section 176.110 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General Provisions; Certificate of Inspection § 176.110 Routes permitted....

  6. 46 CFR 176.110 - Routes permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Routes permitted. 176.110 Section 176.110 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificate of Inspection § 176.110 Routes permitted. (a) The area of...

  7. 46 CFR 176.110 - Routes permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Routes permitted. 176.110 Section 176.110 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General Provisions; Certificate of Inspection § 176.110 Routes permitted....

  8. 46 CFR 176.110 - Routes permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Routes permitted. 176.110 Section 176.110 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General Provisions; Certificate of Inspection § 176.110 Routes permitted....

  9. 46 CFR 176.110 - Routes permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Routes permitted. 176.110 Section 176.110 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificate of Inspection § 176.110 Routes permitted. (a) The area of...

  10. 36 CFR 327.19 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... permit is required under section 404 of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1344). (See 33 CFR parts 320... (33 U.S.C. 1344) (See 33 CFR parts 320 through 330). Water quality certification may be required... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Permits. 327.19 Section...

  11. 30 CFR 750.25 - Permit fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS ON INDIAN LANDS § 750.25 Permit fees. (a) Applicability. An applicant for a new permit to conduct surface coal mining operations...

  12. 30 CFR 750.25 - Permit fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS ON INDIAN LANDS § 750.25 Permit fees. (a) Applicability. An applicant for a new permit to conduct surface coal mining operations...

  13. 40 CFR 35.925-6 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permits. 35.925-6 Section 35.925-6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.925-6 Permits. That the...

  14. 40 CFR 35.925-6 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permits. 35.925-6 Section 35.925-6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.925-6 Permits. That the...

  15. 40 CFR 35.925-6 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permits. 35.925-6 Section 35.925-6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.925-6 Permits. That the...

  16. 40 CFR 35.925-6 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permits. 35.925-6 Section 35.925-6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.925-6 Permits. That the...

  17. 50 CFR 600.501 - Vessel permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... are contained in 50 CFR part 229 of this title. (b) Responsibility of owners and operators. The owners... additional permit restrictions on the permit under 15 CFR part 904, if the vessel is involved in the... authorize FFV's or persons to harass, capture, or kill marine mammals. No marine mammals may be taken in...

  18. 50 CFR 680.4 - Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permits. 680.4 Section 680.4 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA General § 680.4 Permits. (a) General...

  19. Major developments in section 404-permitting

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, M.; Orr, S.

    2009-06-15

    Mountain coal mining in the Central Appalachians faces increased challenge under the Clean Water Act (CWA). These challenges have included the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) increased involvement in permitting under Section 404 of the CWA; active opposition by environmental groups to Section 404 permits; and proposed federal legislation to reduce the availability of these permits. These recent challenges culminated in a June 11, 2009, Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the PEA, the Department of Interior (DoI) and the Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) that will limit the use of general permits for mountaintop coal mining and increase the scrutiny applied to individual permits, while also providing a coordinated approach for reviewing the backlog of pending permit application. By entering into the MoU, the federal agencies aim to reduce the environmental impacts of mountaintop coal mining while increasing certainty and transparency for permit applications. Challenges to Section 404 permitting for mountaintop coal mining are dynamic and new developments occur almost daily. This article provides a snapshot of the current climate.

  20. 32 CFR 552.90 - Permit office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Permit office. 552.90 Section 552.90 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.90 Permit...