Science.gov

Sample records for plastic encapsulated parts

  1. Plastic encapsulated parts

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, T.

    1994-10-01

    Plastic semiconductor packages were characterized as possible alternatives for canned devices, which are susceptible to internal shorts caused by conductive particles. Highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) as well as electrical and mechanical testing were conducted on plastic technology devices.

  2. Screening Plastic-Encapsulated Solid-State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buldhaupt, L.

    1984-01-01

    Suitability of plastic-encapsulated solid-state electronic devices for use in spacecraft discussed. Conclusion of preliminary study was plasticencapsulated parts sufficiently reliable to be considered for use in lowcost equipment used at moderate temperature and low humidity. Useful to engineers as guides to testing or use of plastic encapsulated semiconductors in severe terrestrial environments.

  3. Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs) Reliability Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, M.

    2000-01-01

    It is reported by some users and has been demonstrated by others via testing and qualification that the quality and reliability of plastic-encapsulated microcircuits (PEMs) manufactured today are excellent in commercial applications and closely equivalent, and in some cases superior to their hemetic counterparts.

  4. Plastic molds reduce cost of encapsulating electric cable connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, D.

    1964-01-01

    Resin casting of the aluminum master pattern forms a plastic mold for encapsulating a cable connector. An elastomer is injected into the mold and cured. The mold is disassembled leaving an elastomeric encapsulation around the connector.

  5. Feasibility study of silicon nitride protection of plastic encapsulated semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, J. W.; Hall, T. C.; Erickson, J. J.; Gebhart, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    The application of low temperature silicon nitride protective layers on wire bonded integrated circuits mounted on lead frame assemblies is reported. An evaluation of the mechanical and electrical compatibility of both plasma nitride and photochemical silicon nitride (photonitride) passivations (parallel evaluations) of integrated circuits which were then encapsulated in plastic is described. Photonitride passivation is compatible with all wire bonded lead frame assemblies, with or without initial chip passivation. Plasma nitride passivation of lead frame assemblies is possible only if the chip is passivated before lead frame assembly. The survival rate after the environmental test sequence of devices with a coating of plasma nitride on the chip and a coating of either plasma nitride or photonitride over the assembled device is significantly greater than that of devices assembled with no nitride protective coating over either chip or lead frame.

  6. Critical concerns, solutions and guidelines for use of plastic encapsulated microcircuits for space flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virmani, Nick; Shaw, Jack

    1997-01-01

    Some of the concerns and risk mitigation procedures for using plastic encapsulated microcircuits (PEMs) for space applications are discussed. Despite their advantages, PEMs cannot be implemented in all space applications by replacing military parts numbers with their commercial counterparts in product designs and part lists. The technical and procurement concerns are summarized, and suggestions for high reliability procurements are given. The ability to withstand deleterious environmental effects and to meet mission critical reliability is the key to the successful use of PEMs for space applications.

  7. Detecting corrosion in plastic encapsulated micro-electronics packages

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Peterson, D.W.; Sweet, J.N.

    1998-08-01

    In the past, most defense microelectronics components were packaged in ceramic, hermetic enclosures. PEMs are not hermetic because the plastic molding compounds are permeable to moisture. This lack of hermeticity creates an unknown liability, especially with respect to corrosion of the metallization features. This potential liability must be addressed to ensure long-term reliability of these systems is maintained under conditions of long-term dormant storage. However, the corrosion process is difficult to monitor because it occurs under the encapsulating plastic and is therefore not visible. The authors have developed techniques that allow them to study corrosion of Al bondpads and traces under relevant atmospheric corrosion conditions. The cornerstone of this capability is the ATC 2.6, a microelectronic test device designed at Sandia National Laboratories. Corrosion tests were performed by exposing test chips to aggressive environments. The electrical response of the ATC indicated an increase in bondpad resistance with exposure time. Note that the change in resistance is not uniform from one bondpad to another. This illustrates the stochastic nature of the corrosion process. The change in resistance correlated with visual observation of corrosion of the bondpads on the unencapsulated test chips.

  8. Different Approaches for Ensuring Performance/Reliability of Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs) in Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerke, R. David; Sandor, Mike; Agarwal, Shri; Moor, Andrew F.; Cooper, Kim A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs). Different approaches are addressed to ensure good performance and reliability of PEMs. The topics include: 1) Mitigating Risk; and 2) Program results.

  9. Development of design, qualification, screening, and application requirements for plastic encapsulated solid-state devices for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Test data were collected on 1035 plastic encapsulated devices and 75 hermetically scaled control group devices that were purchased from each of five different manufacturers in the categories of (1) low power Schottsky TTL (bipolar) digital circuits; (2) CMOS digital circuits; (3) operational amplifier linear circuits; and (4) NPN transistors. These parts were subjected to three different initial screening conditions, then to extended life testing, to determine any possible advantages or trends for any particular screen. Several tests were carried out in the areas of flammability testing, humidity testing, high pressure steam (auroclave) testing, and high temperature storage testing. Test results are presented. Procurement and application considerations for use of plastic encapsulated semiconductors are presented and a statistical analysis program written to study the log normal distributions resulting from life testing is concluded.

  10. Different Approaches for Ensuring Performance/Reliability of Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs) in Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerke, R. David; Sandor, Mike; Agarwal, Shri; Moor, Andrew F.; Cooper, Kim A.

    2000-01-01

    Engineers within the commercial and aerospace industries are using trade-off and risk analysis to aid in reducing spacecraft system cost while increasing performance and maintaining high reliability. In many cases, Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components, which include Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs), are candidate packaging technologies for spacecrafts due to their lower cost, lower weight and enhanced functionality. Establishing and implementing a parts program that effectively and reliably makes use of these potentially less reliable, but state-of-the-art devices, has become a significant portion of the job for the parts engineer. Assembling a reliable high performance electronic system, which includes COTS components, requires that the end user assume a risk. To minimize the risk involved, companies have developed methodologies by which they use accelerated stress testing to assess the product and reduce the risk involved to the total system. Currently, there are no industry standard procedures for accomplishing this risk mitigation. This paper will present the approaches for reducing the risk of using PEMs devices in space flight systems as developed by two independent Laboratories. The JPL procedure involves primarily a tailored screening with accelerated stress philosophy while the APL procedure is primarily, a lot qualification procedure. Both Laboratories successfully have reduced the risk of using the particular devices for their respective systems and mission requirements.

  11. Laser welding of micro plastic parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberstroh, E.; Hoffmann, W.-M.

    2007-02-01

    Most welding processes for plastics do not meet the demands of micro technology and thus cannot be applied in this innovative industrial sector. One of the few techniques which are applicable in this sector is the laser transmission welding, which has distinctive advantages like low mechanical and thermal load of the joining parts. This makes the laser particularly suitable for the welding of micro plastics parts. Thereby, contour welding is a process variant of laser transmission welding enabling the welding of complex and even three-dimensional weld contours. But so far it has not yet been applied for welding plastics parts of micro scale in the industrial practice. Recent research at the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) at the RWTH Aachen University shows the feasibility of this process to weld small and complex micro parts. Good mechanical properties can be achieved. However, it is necessary to apply measures to reduce the formation of flash. Moreover, it can be shown that there is a strong influence of some material parameters on the laser welding process so that some plastics are more suitable than others for the contour welding in micro technology.

  12. Analysis of field usage failure rate data for plastic encapsulated solid state devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Survey and questionnaire techniques were used to gather data from users and manufacturers on the failure rates in the field of plastic encapsulated semiconductors. It was found that such solid state devices are being successfully used by commercial companies which impose certain screening and qualification procedures. The reliability of these semiconductors is now adequate to support their consideration in NASA systems, particularly in low cost systems. The cost of performing necessary screening for NASA applications was assessed.

  13. Instructions for Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuit(PEM) Selection, Screening and Qualification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Terry; Teverovsky, Alexander; Leidecker, Henning

    2002-01-01

    The use of Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs) is permitted on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) spaceflight applications, provided each use is thoroughly evaluated for thermal, mechanical, and radiation implications of the specific application and found to meet mission requirements. PEMs shall be selected for their functional advantage and availability, not for cost saving; the steps necessary to ensure reliability usually negate any initial apparent cost advantage. A PEM shall not be substituted for a form, fit and functional equivalent, high reliability, hermetic device in spaceflight applications. Due to the rapid change in wafer-level designs typical of commercial parts and the unknown traceability between packaging lots and wafer lots, lot specific testing is required for PEMs, unless specifically excepted by the Mission Assurance Requirements (MAR) for the project. Lot specific qualification, screening, radiation hardness assurance analysis and/or testing, shall be consistent with the required reliability level as defined in the MAR. Developers proposing to use PEMs shall address the following items in their Performance Assurance Implementation Plan: source selection (manufacturers and distributors), storage conditions for all stages of use, packing, shipping and handling, electrostatic discharge (ESD), screening and qualification testing, derating, radiation hardness assurance, test house selection and control, data collection and retention.

  14. Structural and thermodynamic aspects of plasticization and antiplasticization in glassy encapsulation and biostabilization matrices.

    PubMed

    Ubbink, Job

    2016-05-01

    The structural and thermodynamic properties of glassy carbohydrate matrices for the encapsulation and biostabilization of sensitive bioactive compounds, such as pharmaceutically active proteins and oxidation-sensitive compounds, are reviewed in the context of the plasticization and antiplasticization of glassy carbohydrates of intermediate and high molecular weight by low molecular weight diluents. Plasticization and antiplasticization may be monitored either by dynamic measures or by structural and thermodynamic features of the glassy matrices. Specifically, it is demonstrated that the decrease in size of the molecular free volume holes with increasing diluent content, as determined by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), is related to the antiplasticization of glassy carbohydrate matrices, resulting in increased barrier properties of the glassy matrix. As far as could be ascertained from the available data, the regimes as identified by PALS map on those detected by neutron scattering and dielectric spectroscopy for glassy matrices consisting of trehalose and the diluent glycerol. The review is concluded by a survey of the published results on the stability of bioactive compounds encapsulated in carbohydrate glasses and an overview of outstanding questions. PMID:26748258

  15. Roll-to-Roll Encapsulation of Metal Nanowires between Graphene and Plastic Substrate for High-Performance Flexible Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bing; Hsu, Po-Chun; Chen, Guanchu; Chandrashekar, B N; Liao, Lei; Ayitimuda, Zhawulie; Wu, Jinxiong; Guo, Yunfan; Lin, Li; Zhou, Yu; Aisijiang, Mahaya; Xie, Qin; Cui, Yi; Liu, Zhongfan; Peng, Hailin

    2015-06-10

    Transparent conductive film on plastic substrate is a critical component in low-cost, flexible, and lightweight optoelectronics. Industrial-scale manufacturing of high-performance transparent conductive flexible plastic is needed to enable wide-ranging applications. Here, we demonstrate a continuous roll-to-roll (R2R) production of transparent conductive flexible plastic based on a metal nanowire network fully encapsulated between graphene monolayer and plastic substrate. Large-area graphene film grown on Cu foil via a R2R chemical vapor deposition process was hot-laminated onto nanowires precoated EVA/PET film, followed by a R2R electrochemical delamination that preserves the Cu foil for reuse. The encapsulated structure minimized the resistance of both wire-to-wire junctions and graphene grain boundaries and strengthened adhesion of nanowires and graphene to plastic substrate, resulting in superior optoelectronic properties (sheet resistance of ∼8 Ω sq(-1) at 94% transmittance), remarkable corrosion resistance, and excellent mechanical flexibility. With these advantages, long-cycle life flexible electrochromic devices are demonstrated, showing up to 10000 cycles. PMID:26020567

  16. Experiences issues with plastic parts at cold temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Mike; Agarwal, Shri

    2005-01-01

    Missions to MARS/planets/asteroids require electronic parts to operate and survive at extreme cold conditions. At extreme cold temperatures many types of cold related failures can occur. Office 514 is currently evaluating plastic parts under various cold temperature conditions and applications. Evaluations, screens, and qualifications are conducted on flight parts.

  17. Mold-filling experiments for validation of modeling encapsulation. Part 1, "wine glass" mold.

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Altobelli, Stephen A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2005-06-01

    The C6 project 'Encapsulation Processes' has been designed to obtain experimental measurements for discovery of phenomena critical to improving these processes, as well as data required in the verification and validation plan (Rao et al. 2001) for model validation of flow in progressively complex geometries. We have observed and recorded the flow of clear, Newtonian liquids and opaque, rheologically complex suspensions in two mold geometries. The first geometry is a simple wineglass geometry in a cylinder and is reported here in Part 1. The results in a more realistic encapsulation geometry are reported in Part 2.

  18. PEM-INST-001: Instructions for Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuit (PEM) Selection, Screening, and Qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander; Sahu, Kusum

    2003-01-01

    Potential users of plastic encapsulated microcircuits (PEMs) need to be reminded that unlike the military system of producing robust high-reliability microcircuits that are designed to perform acceptably in a variety of harsh environments, PEMs are primarily designed for use in benign environments where equipment is easily accessed for repair or replacement. The methods of analysis applied to military products to demonstrate high reliability cannot always be applied to PEMs. This makes it difficult for users to characterize PEMs for two reasons: 1. Due to the major differences in design and construction, the standard test practices used to ensure that military devices are robust and have high reliability often cannot be applied to PEMs that have a smaller operating temperature range and are typically more frail and susceptible to moisture absorption. In contrast, high-reliability military microcircuits usually utilize large, robust, high-temperature packages that are hermetically sealed. 2. Unlike the military high-reliability system, users of PEMs have little visibility into commercial manufacturers proprietary design, materials, die traceability, and production processes and procedures. There is no central authority that monitors PEM commercial product for quality, and there are no controls in place that can be imposed across all commercial manufacturers to provide confidence to high-reliability users that a common acceptable level of quality exists for all PEMs manufacturers. Consequently, there is no guaranteed control over the type of reliability that is built into commercial product, and there is no guarantee that different lots from the same manufacturer are equally acceptable. And regarding application, there is no guarantee that commercial products intended for use in benign environments will provide acceptable performance and reliability in harsh space environments. The qualification and screening processes contained in this document are intended to

  19. Improved molding process ensures plastic parts of higher tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.

    1968-01-01

    Single molding process ensures that plastic parts /of a given mechanical design/ produced from a conventional thermosetting molding compound will have a maximum tensile strength. The process can also be used for other thermosetting compounds to produce parts with improved physical properties.

  20. Long Term Stability of Laser Joined Plastic Metal Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesner, A.; Olowinsky, A.; Gillner, A.

    To join plastic to metal a laser based two-step laser process is described. The first process step is the laser micro structuring of the metal surface to create microstructures with undercut grooves. The subsequent transmission joining process allows a selective heating of arbitrary component geometries and the local control of the joining temperature. Both parts are brought into direct contact prior to welding. The plastic part is melted and expands into the microstructures through the external clamping pressure. The joining results due to micro cramping after setting. The long term stability of the joining is described.

  1. Design consideration for design a flat and ring plastics part using Solidworks software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amran, M. A. M.; Faizal, K. M.; Salleh, M. S.; Sulaiman, M. A.; Mohamad, E.

    2015-12-01

    Various considerations on design of plastic injection moulded parts were applied in initial stage to prevent any defects of end products. Therefore, the objective of this project is to design the plastic injection moulded part by taking consideration on several factors such as draft angle, corner radius and location of gate. In this project, flat plastic part, ring plastic part, core inserts for flat and ring plastic part were designed using SolidWorks software. The plastic part was drawn in sketching mode then the 3D modeling of solid part was generated using various commands. Considerations of plastic part such as draft angle and corner radius with location of gate was considered in the design stage. Finally, it was successfully designed the two plastic parts with their respectively insert by using SolidWorks software. The flat plastic part and ring plastic part were designed for the purpose for future researches for study the weld lines, meld lines, air trapped and geometrical size of the product. Thus, by designing the flat plastic part and ring plastic part having core insert on each part, the completed mould design of two plate mould can be considered. This is because, plastic injection parts are needed to be designed properly in order to neglect any defect when the mould was made.

  2. Sulfur polymer cement as a low-level waste glass matrix encapsulant. Part 1: Thermal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sliva, P.; Peng, Y.B.; Bunnell, L.R.; Peeler, D.K.; Feng, X.; Martin, P.; Turner, P.J.

    1996-08-01

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a candidate material to encapsulate low-level waste (LLW) glass. Molten SPC will be poured into a LLW glass cullet-filled canister, surrounding the glass to act as an additional barrier to groundwater intrusion. This paper covers the first part of a study performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory concerned with the fundamental aspects of embedding LLW glass in SPC. Part one is a study of the SPC itself. Variations in SPC properties are discussed, especially in relation to long-term stability and controlling crystallization in a cooling canister.

  3. Embedded Heaters for Joining or Separating Plastic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Melvin A., III

    2004-01-01

    A proposed thermal-bonding technique would make it possible to join or separate thermoplastic parts quickly and efficiently. The technique would eliminate the need for conventional welding or for such conventional fastening components as bolted flanges or interlocking hooks. The technique could be particularly useful in the sign industry (in which large quantities of thermoplastics are used) or could be used to join plastic pipes. A thin sheet of a suitable electrically conductive material would be formed to fit between two thermoplastic parts to be joined (see figure). The electrically conductive sheet and the two parts would be put together tightly, then an electrical current would be sent through the conductor to heat the thermoplastic locally. The magnitude of the current and the heating time would be chosen to generate just enough heat to cause the thermoplastic to adhere to both sides of the electrically conductive sheet. Optionally, the electrically conductive sheet could contain many small holes to provide purchase or to increase electrical resistance to facilitate the generation of heat. After thermal bonding, the electrically conductive sheet remains as an integral part of the structure. If necessary, the electrically conductive sheet can be reheated later to separate the joined thermoplastic parts.

  4. Using magnetic levitation for non-destructive quality control of plastic parts.

    PubMed

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Nemiroski, Alex; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Bwambok, David K; Yang, Dian; Harburg, Daniel V; Tricard, Simon; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) enables rapid and non-destructive quality control of plastic parts. The feasibility of MagLev as a method to: i) rapidly assess injection-molded plastic parts for defects during process optimization, ii) monitor the degradation of plastics after exposure to harsh environmental conditions, and iii) detect counterfeit polymers by density is demonstrated. PMID:25589230

  5. National Plastics Corporation: Energy Assessment Helps Automotive Plastic Parts Maker Save $34,000 Per Year

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-09-01

    Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices case study based on a comprehensive plant assessment conducted at National Plastics Corporation by ITP's Industrial Assessment Center in conjunction with The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc.

  6. On boredom: a close encounter with encapsulated parts of the psyche.

    PubMed

    Bergstein, Avner

    2009-06-01

    The psychoanalytical literature has numerous scattered references to the analyst's experience of boredom, especially amongst writers working with primitive mental states. In the present paper, the author tries to gather some of these references in an attempt to integrate the various facets of this widespread phenomenon, and reflect on some clinical issues and dilemmas it raises. It is suggested that the experience of boredom in analysis may be a reaction to an encounter with a hidden, encapsulated part of the psyche, a bidimensional area of experience in which mental activity has been suspended, and experience remains meaningless. This is a barren area of lack, an encounter with the autistic core of the psyche. However, boredom may also be an experiential expression of despair, a re-living of primitive object relations with an emotionally non-existent primary object. Through bringing the emptiness and desolation into analysis, the individual makes room for the empty, blunt, dead inner object which resides within him, and that needs to be integrated into the psyche. This inner object is a vital part of the patient's inner world, part of his history, and can neither be erased nor filled in order to eradicate the emptiness. This is illustrated by clinical material from patients along the spectrum of autism, autistic reaction following trauma and autistic barriers in neurotic patients. PMID:19580600

  7. Bacterial Community Profiling of Plastic Litter in the Belgian Part of the North Sea.

    PubMed

    De Tender, Caroline A; Devriese, Lisa I; Haegeman, Annelies; Maes, Sara; Ruttink, Tom; Dawyndt, Peter

    2015-08-18

    Bacterial colonization of marine plastic litter (MPL) is known for over four decades. Still, only a few studies on the plastic colonization process and its influencing factors are reported. In this study, seafloor MPL was sampled at different locations across the Belgian part of the North Sea to study bacterial community structure using 16S metabarcoding. These marine plastic bacterial communities were compared with those of sediment and seawater, and resin pellets sampled on the beach, to investigate the origin and uniqueness of plastic bacterial communities. Plastics display great variation of bacterial community composition, while each showed significant differences from those of sediment and seawater, indicating that plastics represent a distinct environmental niche. Various environmental factors correlate with the diversity of MPL bacterial composition across plastics. In addition, intrinsic plastic-related factors such as pigment content may contribute to the differences in bacterial colonization. Furthermore, the differential abundance of known primary and secondary colonizers across the various plastics may indicate different stages of bacterial colonization, and may confound comparisons of free-floating plastics. Our studies provide insights in the factors that shape plastic bacterial colonization and shed light on the possible role of plastic as transport vehicle for bacteria through the aquatic environment. PMID:26204244

  8. Process combinations for the manufacturing of metal-plastic hybrid parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drossel, W.-G.; Lies, C.; Albert, A.; Haase, R.; Müller, R.; Scholz, P.

    2016-03-01

    The usage of innovative lightweight materials and processing technologies gains importance in manifold industrial scopes. Especially for moving parts and mobility products the weight is decisively. The aerospace and automotive industries use light and high-strength materials to reduce weight and energy consumption and thereby improve the performance of their products. Composites with reinforced plastics are of particular importance. They offer a low density in combination with high specific stiffness and strength. A pure material substitution through reinforced plastics is still not economical. The approach of using hybrid metal-plastic structures with the principle of “using the right material at the right place” is a promising solution for the economical realization of lightweight structures with a high achievement potential. The article shows four innovative manufacturing possibilities for the realization of metal-plastic-hybrid parts.

  9. Encapsulation of CO2 into amorphous alpha-cyclodextrin powder at different moisture contents - Part 1: Encapsulation capacity and stability of inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thao M; Howes, Tony; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2016-07-15

    This study investigated the effects of water-induced crystallization of amorphous alpha-cyclodextrin (α-CD) powder on CO2 encapsulation at 0.4-1.6 MPa pressure for 1-72 h through the addition of water (to reach to 13, 15 and 17% wet basis, w.b.) into amorphous α-CD powder prior to the encapsulation. The results showed that the α-CD encapsulation capacity was over 1 mol CO2/mol α-CD after pressurizing for longer than 48 h. The encapsulated CO2 concentration by the addition of water was considerably higher (p<0.05) than that of amorphous α-CD powder (5.51% MC, w.b.) without an addition of water and that of crystalline α-CD powders under the same MC and encapsulation conditions. A comparison of CO2 release properties (75% relative humidity, 25 °C) from complexed powders prepared from amorphous and crystalline α-CD powders under the same conditions is also presented. PMID:26948624

  10. Applying simulation to optimize plastic molded optical parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, Matthew; Bakharev, Alexander; Costa, Franco; Friedl, Chris

    2012-10-01

    Optical injection molded parts are used in many different industries including electronics, consumer, medical and automotive due to their cost and performance advantages compared to alternative materials such as glass. The injection molding process, however, induces elastic (residual stress) and viscoelastic (flow orientation stress) deformation into the molded article which alters the material's refractive index to be anisotropic in different directions. Being able to predict and correct optical performance issues associated with birefringence early in the design phase is a huge competitive advantage. This paper reviews how to apply simulation analysis of the entire molding process to optimize manufacturability and part performance.

  11. Effectiveness of hardening threaded parts by plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Pyshkin, V.A.; Belai, S.V.; Dyad'kova, I.G.

    1983-03-01

    The rules of hardening threaded parts by roller burning the root of the inner diameter of a thread are studied. The effectiveness of hardening increases where the allowance for the inner diameter increases. By equations, a change in the inner diameter can be used to determine the depth of work hardening residual compressive stress, fatigue limit, and the mechanical properties of the threaded part. The effective stress concentration factor, increase in transmission load, and average tensile stress in cyclic loading, are also calculated. Equations help to determine the depth of hardening necessary; the optimum conditions of burnishing; and the maximum increase in fatigue strength, with optimum hardening conditions.

  12. Multilayer injection moulding of thick-walled optical plastics parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Neuss, A.; Weber, M.; Walach, P.

    2014-05-01

    Optical components are often thick-walled. The cycle time of precise polymer optics with a wall thickness of more than 20 mm exceeds several minutes. The multilayer injection moulding or compression moulding lowers the cycle time and increases the quality of the moulded parts. For the production of multilayer moulded lenses the mould design plays an important role. An innovative mould concept is presented with the possiblity to produce double or triple layer lenses. To ensure the quality and the endurance of multilayer moulded optical components in their applications, the cohesion in the interface is important. Tensile shear tests show the ability of multilayer moulded parts with high cohesion values for optical applications.

  13. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  14. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  15. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  18. The radiation crosslinking of moulded plastic parts of different shape and size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, L.

    The crosslinking of moulded plastic parts extends the range of application of thermoplastic polymers by the improvement of their thermal and chemical stability. Radiation processing is unique for many of these products because the application of other crosslinking methods is not possible or has at least large drawbacks. Some technical aspects of the radiation treatment of moulded plastic parts on a production scale are discussed. Accelerators, supplying electron beams with energies above 2 MeV, are generally the preferred radiation source in this field. The temperature rise within the irradiated product has to be taken into account when higher doses must be applied. Examples of areas of application are given in which the improvement of the thermal stability and the resistance against stress corrosion of moulded plastic parts by radiation crosslinking are of importance. The reduction of the premeation rate through polymers resulting from crosslinking, is of interest for the gas tanks of passenger cars. The production of plastic parts with different properties in fractions of one single item by using shielding masks opens the designer new possibilities. In the case of elastomers a radiation treatment can supplement the heat vulcanization process and improve the uniformity of the product quality.

  19. Environmental impact of pyrolysis of mixed WEEE plastics part 1: Experimental pyrolysis data.

    PubMed

    Alston, Sue M; Clark, Allan D; Arnold, J Cris; Stein, Bridget K

    2011-11-01

    Growth in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is posing increasing problems of waste management, partly resulting from its plastic content. WEEE plastics include a range of polymers, some of which can be sorted and extracted for recycling. However a nonrecyclable fraction remains containing a mixture of polymers contaminated with other materials, and pyrolysis is a potential means of recovering the energy content of this. In preparation for a life cycle assessment of this option, described in part 2 of this paper set, data were collected from trials using experimental pyrolysis equipment representative of a continuous commercial process operated at 800 °C. The feedstock contained acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high impact polystyrene with high levels of additives, and dense polymers including polyvinylchloride, polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, and polymethyl methacrylate. On average 39% was converted to gases, 36% to oils, and 25% remained as residue. About 35% of the gas was methane and 42% carbon monoxide, plus other hydrocarbons, oxygen and carbon dioxide. The oils were almost all aromatic, forming a similar mixture to fuel oil. The residue was mainly carbon with inorganic compounds from the plastic additives and most of the chlorine from the feedstock. The results showed that the process produced around 70% of the original plastic weight as potential fuel. PMID:21939226

  20. Environmental impact of pyrolysis of mixed WEEE plastics part 2: Life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Alston, Sue M; Arnold, J Cris

    2011-11-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) contains up to 25% plastics. Extraction of higher quality fractions for recycling leaves a mix of plastic types contaminated with other materials, requiring the least environmentally harmful disposal route. Data from trials of pyrolysis, described in part 1 of this paper set, were used in a life cycle assessment of the treatment of WEEE plastics. Various levels of recycling of the sorted fraction were considered, and pyrolysis was compared with incineration (with energy recovery) and landfill for disposal of the remainder. Increased recycling gave reduced environmental impact in almost all categories considered, although inefficient recycling decreased that benefit. Significant differences between pyrolysis, incineration and landfill were seen in climate change impacts, carbon sent to landfill, resources saved, and radiation. There was no overall "best" option. Landfill had the least short-term impact on climate change so could be a temporary means of sequestering carbon. Incineration left almost no carbon to landfill, but produced the most greenhouse gases. Pyrolysis or incineration saved most resources, with the balance depending on the source of electricity replaced by incineration. Pyrolysis emerged as a strong compromise candidate since the gases and oils produced could be used as fuels and so provided significant resource saving without high impact on climate change or landfill space. PMID:21939231

  1. The Suitability of 3D Printed Plastic Parts for Laboratory Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, Andrew; Bloom, Josh; Albertson, Robert; Gershman, Sophia

    2014-10-01

    3D printing has become popular for a variety of users including scientists and engineers interested in producing their own laboratory equipment. Pearce and his group have tested a variety of different objects, developed a library of open-source files for printing optics equipment and found a cost savings of up to 97% compared to the equivalent objects purchased commercially. In order to determine the suitability of 3D printed parts for our plasma physics laboratory, we measured the accuracy, strength, vacuum compatibility, and electrical properties of test pieces printed in PLA plastic. For example, samples could be printed with a dimensional accuracy on the order of 50 μm and had an average tensile strength of 60 MPa, similar to bulk plastic. For pressures greater than 10-6 torr a residual gas analyzer showed no increase above background until samples were heated to greater than 75°C. While clearly not for all applications, the flexibility of rapidly creating custom parts has led to the 3D printer becoming an invaluable resource in our laboratory.

  2. Aging behavior of polymeric solar absorber materials - Part 1: Engineering plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.

    2010-09-15

    In this series of two papers, various polymeric materials are investigated as to their potential applicability as absorber materials for solar thermal collectors. The focus of the investigation is to study the aging behavior of these materials under maximum operating conditions (80 C in water up to 16,000 h) and stagnation conditions (140 C in air up to 500 h) typical for northern climate. The materials supplied or produced as polymer films were first characterized in the unaged state and then for different states of aging by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and by mechanical tensile tests. Physical aging phenomena were studied by DSC, SEC analysis provided information on chemical degradation of the materials. In addition, physical and chemical aging were both analyzed via the small and large strain mechanical behavior. While the present Part 1 of this paper series deals with the aging behavior of engineering plastics, including two amorphous polymers (a polyphenylene ether polystyrene blend (PPE + PS) and polycarbonate (PC)) and two semi-crystalline polymers (two types of polyamide 12 (PA12)), the aging behavior of so-called ''commodity'' plastics (PE and PP) is the subject of Part 2. Comparing the two aging conditions, the amorphous materials (PPE + PS and PC) turned out to be more prone to physical and chemical aging at 140 C in air. In contrast, the semi-crystalline PA12 materials were more strongly affected by exposure to water at 80 C, although to different degrees, depending on the modification. (author)

  3. Encapsulation Processing and Manufacturing Yield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of the ethyl vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulation system is presented. This work is part of the materials baseline needed to demonstrate a 30 year module lifetime capability. Process and compound variables are both being studied along with various module materials. Results have shown that EVA should be stored rolled up, and enclosed in a plastic bag to retard loss of peroxide curing agents. The TBEC curing agent has superior shelf life and processing than the earlier Lupersol-101 curing agent. Analytical methods were developed to test for peroxide content, and experimental methodologies were formalized.

  4. Aging behavior of polymeric solar absorber materials - Part 2: Commodity plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.

    2010-09-15

    In this series of two papers, various polymeric materials are investigated as to their potential applicability as absorber materials for solar thermal collectors. While Part 1 of this paper series deals with the aging behavior of engineering plastics, including two amorphous polymers (PPE + PS) and (PC) and two semi-crystalline polymers (two types of PA12), the present Part 2 treats the aging behavior of semi-crystalline so-called ''commodity'' plastics (two types of crosslinked polyethylene (PE-X) and two types of polypropylene (PP)). As in Part 1, the focus of the investigation is to study the aging behavior of these materials under maximum operating conditions (80 C in water up to 16,000 h) and stagnation conditions (140 C in air up to 500 h) typical for northern climate. The materials supplied or produced as polymer films were first characterized in the unaged state and then for different states of aging by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and by mechanical tensile tests. DSC was applied primarily to obtain information on physical aging phenomena, whereas SEC analysis was used to characterize chemical degradation of the materials. In addition, physical and chemical aging were both analyzed via the small and large strain mechanical behavior. Comparing the two aging conditions in hot air and hot water, a rather stable mechanical performance profile was found for both PP types over the investigated aging time, which was interpreted in terms of competing physical and chemical aging mechanisms. Analogously such competing mechanisms were also inferred for one of the PE-X materials, while the other exhibited substantial degradation in terms of strain-to-break values for both aging conditions. In principle, both PP and PE-X are promising candidates for black absorber applications in northern climates if proper measures against overheating are taken and when adequately modified. (author)

  5. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1988-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  6. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1990-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  7. Microelectronics plastic molded packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Palmer, D.W.; Peterson, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    The use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectronics for nuclear weapon applications will soon be reality rather than hearsay. The use of COTS for new technologies for uniquely military applications is being driven by the so-called Perry Initiative that requires the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to accept and utilize commercial standards for procurement of military systems. Based on this philosophy, coupled with several practical considerations, new weapons systems as well as future upgrades will contain plastic encapsulated microelectronics. However, a conservative Department of Energy (DOE) approach requires lifetime predictive models. Thus, the focus of the current project is on accelerated testing to advance current aging models as well as on the development of the methodology to be used during WR qualification of plastic encapsulated microelectronics. An additional focal point involves achieving awareness of commercial capabilities, materials, and processes. One of the major outcomes of the project has been the definition of proper techniques for handling and evaluation of modern surface mount parts which might be used in future systems. This program is also raising the familiarity level of plastic within the weapons complex, allowing subsystem design rules accommodating COTS to evolve. A two year program plan is presented along with test results and commercial interactions during this first year.

  8. POLYETHYLENE ENCAPSULATES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE DRUMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This capsule report summarizes studies of the use of polyethylene (P.E.) for encapsulating drums of hazardous wastes. Flat PE sheet is welded to roto moded PE containers which forms the encapsulates. Plastic pipe welding art was used, but the prototype welding apparatus required ...

  9. Biodegradation and Mineralization of Polystyrene by Plastic-Eating Mealworms: Part 1. Chemical and Physical Characterization and Isotopic Tests.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Yang, Jun; Wu, Wei-Min; Zhao, Jiao; Song, Yiling; Gao, Longcheng; Yang, Ruifu; Jiang, Lei

    2015-10-20

    Polystyrene (PS) is generally considered to be durable and resistant to biodegradation. Mealworms (the larvae of Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus) from different sources chew and eat Styrofoam, a common PS product. The Styrofoam was efficiently degraded in the larval gut within a retention time of less than 24 h. Fed with Styrofoam as the sole diet, the larvae lived as well as those fed with a normal diet (bran) over a period of 1 month. The analysis of fecula egested from Styrofoam-feeding larvae, using gel permeation chromatography (GPC), solid-state (13)C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS NMR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric Fourier transform infrared (TG-FTIR) spectroscopy, substantiated that cleavage/depolymerization of long-chain PS molecules and the formation of depolymerized metabolites occurred in the larval gut. Within a 16 day test period, 47.7% of the ingested Styrofoam carbon was converted into CO2 and the residue (ca. 49.2%) was egested as fecula with a limited fraction incorporated into biomass (ca. 0.5%). Tests with α (13)C- or β (13)C-labeled PS confirmed that the (13)C-labeled PS was mineralized to (13)CO2 and incorporated into lipids. The discovery of the rapid biodegradation of PS in the larval gut reveals a new fate for plastic waste in the environment. PMID:26390034

  10. Catalytic thermal cracking of post-consumer waste plastics to fuels: Part 1 - Kinetics and optimization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to investigate thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of waste plastics such as prescription bottles (polypropylene/PP), high density polyethylene, landfill liners (polyethylene/PE), packing materials (polystyrene/PS), and foams (polyurethane/PU) into crude plastic...

  11. Are plastic heat exchangers feasible for solar water heaters? Part 2: Material choices

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R.; Mantell, S.; Davidson, J.

    1999-07-01

    Development of low cost plastic heat exchangers for solar water heating depends, at least in part, on the suitability of polymers for this demanding environment. Since the heat exchanger is in contact with pressurized potable water, some technical issues must be addressed that are not necessarily relevant to the development of polymer-based collectors. These include long-term pressure and temperature capabilities; compatibility with municipal drinking water and propylene glycol, and compliance with applicable plumbing codes. In this paper, polymers that are most appropriate for this application are identified. Because polymer strength, stiffness, and thermal conductivity requirements depend on the heat exchanger design, no single polymer emerged as ideal for every heat exchanger component. Fiber reinforced PolyPhthalAmide (PPA) and PolyPhenylene Sulphide (PPS) are recommended for fittings and manifolds. Unreinforced high temperature nylon (HTN) is recommended for thin walled tubes (either straight or coiled). Cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) is also recommended for coiled tubes. The selection process was based on three criteria levels: (1) polymer compatibility with potable water, (2) polymer behavior in hot water or propylene glycol, and (3) polymer attributes such as strength, stiffness, thermal conductivity and cost.

  12. Plastic Surgery Training Worldwide: Part 1. The United States and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Parisa; van Paridon, Maaike W.; Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Paul, Marek A.; Winters, Henri A.; Martinot-Duquennoy, Veronique; Noah, Ernst Magnus; Pallua, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Major differences exist in residency training, and the structure and quality of residency programs differ between different countries and teaching centers. It is of vital importance that a better understanding of the similarities and differences in plastic surgery training be ascertained as a means of initiating constructive discussion and commentary among training programs worldwide. In this study, the authors provide an overview of plastic surgery training in the United States and Europe. Methods: A survey was sent to select surgeons in 10 European countries that were deemed to be regular contributors to the plastic surgery literature. The questions focused on pathway to plastic surgery residency, length of training, required pretraining experience, training scheme, research opportunities, and examinations during and after plastic surgery residency. Results: Plastic surgery residency training programs in the United States differ from the various (selected) countries in Europe and are described in detail. Conclusions: Plastic surgery education is vastly different between the United States and Europe, and even within Europe, training programs remain heterogeneous. Standardization of curricula across the different countries would improve the interaction of different centers and facilitate the exchange of vital information for quality control and future improvements. The unique characteristics of the various training programs potentially provide a basis from which to learn and to gain from one another. PMID:27257571

  13. Are the Mesothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition, Sclerotic Peritonitis Syndromes, and Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis Part of the Same Process?

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Jesús; Gónzalez-Mateo, Guadalupe; Jimenez-Heffernan, José; Selgas, Rafael; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Aguilera Peralta, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    Mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) is an autoregulated physiological process of tissue repair that in uncontrolled conditions, such as peritoneal dialysis (PD), can lead to peritoneal fibrosis. The maximum expression of sclerotic peritoneal syndromes (SPS) is the encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) for which no specific treatment exists. The SPS includes a wide range of peritoneal fibrosis that appears progressively and is considered as a reversible process, while EPS does not. EPS is a serious complication of PD characterized by a progressive intra-abdominal inflammatory process that results in bridles and severe fibrous tissue formation which cover and constrict the viscera. Recent studies show that transdifferentiated mesothelial cells isolated from the PD effluent correlate very well with the clinical events such as the number of hemoperitoneum and peritonitis, as well as with PD function (lower ultrafiltration and high Cr-MTC). In addition, in peritoneal biopsies from PD patients, the MMT correlates very well with anatomical changes (fibrosis and angiogenesis). However, the pathway to reach EPS from SPS has not been fully and completely established. Herein, we present important evidence pointing to the MMT that is present in the initial peritoneal fibrosis stages and it is perpetual over time, with at least theoretical possibility that MMT initiated the fibrosing process to reach EPS. PMID:23476771

  14. On the buckling of bars and plates in the plastic range. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benthem, J P

    1956-01-01

    A review is made of existing literature concerning comparison with experiment of various theoretical formulas for buckling of plates in the plastic region. The significance and relative merits of various theories are discussed.

  15. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites: Plasticity and damage mechanisms, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The inelastic deformation mechanisms for the SiC (SCS-6)/Ti-15-3 system were studied at 538 C (1000 F) using a combination of mechanical measurements and detailed microstructural examinations. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall MMC response, and to compare the room temperature and elevated temperature deformation behaviors. Four different laminates were studied: (0)8, (90)8,(+ or -45)2s, and (0/90)2s, with the primary emphasis on the unidirectional (0)8, and (90)8 systems. The elevated temperature responses were similar to those at room temperature, involving a two-stage elastic-plastic type of response for the (0)8 system, and a characteristic three-stage deformation response for the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s systems. The primary effects of elevated temperatures included: (1) reduction in the 'yield' and failure strengths; (2) plasticity through diffused slip rather than concentrated planar slip (which occurred at room temperature); and (3) time-dependent deformation. The inelastic deformation mechanism for the (0)8 MMC was dominated by plasticity at both temperatures. For the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s MMCs, a combination of damage and plasticity contributed to the deformation at both temperatures.

  16. Interaction of multiple through-thickness defects under plastic collapse conditions: Part 1 (1996--1997). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Denys, R.M.; Lefevre, T.

    1998-06-06

    The traditional approach to assess the quality of welds is based on workmanship quality control considerations. Workmanship standards warrant a high but conservative quality level for the elastic design conditions. The application of an Engineering Critical Assessment (ECA) based defect limit reduces the deficiencies associated with workmanship standards. ECA methodologies assume single defects. However welds may contain one or more (multiple) defects. In addition, the use of high resolution radiographs and ultrasonic inspection increases the sensitivity of detecting (multiple) imperfections as compared with conventional radiographic inspection. Realizing that girth welds in thin-walled pipelines fail primarily by plastic collapse, the applicability of linear elastic fracture mechanics based interaction rules for thin-walled structures is brought into question. This conclusion, in conjunction with the improved resolution of non-destructive techniques, gave the impetus to conduct research into the interaction of defects in thin-walled structures subject to plastic collapse. The purpose of this work was to quantify the conservatism of present interaction rules and to develop more representative defect interaction rules for thin-wall pipelines under plastic collapse. The work is organized into two parts. The first part reviews the interaction rules found in the codes with the purpose of quantifying their differences. Part 2 outlines the experimental work used to accomplish the aims of the research program and compares the results to current interaction rules and the Gross Section Yielding performance criterion.

  17. PRESAGETM - Development and optimization studies of a 3D radiochromic plastic dosimeter - Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovics, J.; Jordan, K.; Dietrich, J.

    2006-12-01

    This paper studies the polymerization of six different transparent plastics as potential 3D dosimeter matrices. In addition, six different leuco dyes and sixteen different free radical initiators were evaluated. Finally, the photoreactivity of the dosimeter was studied so that the effect of exposure to UV could be minimized.

  18. Mitigating cutting-induced plasticity in the contour method, Part 2: Numerical analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Muránsky, O.; Hamelin, C. J.; Hosseinzadeh, F.; Prime, M. B.

    2016-09-01

    Cutting-induced plasticity can have a significant effect on the measurement accuracy of the contour method. The present study examines the benefit of a double-embedded cutting configuration that relies on self-restraint of the specimen, relative to conventional edge-crack cutting configurations. A series of finite element analyses are used to simulate the planar sectioning performed during double-embedded and conventional edge-crack contour cutting configurations. The results of numerical analyses are first compared to measured results to validate the cutting simulations. The simulations are then used to compare the efficacy of different cutting configurations by predicting the deviation of the residual stress profile frommore » an original (pre-cutting) reference stress field, and the extent of cutting-induced plasticity. Comparisons reveal that while the double-embedded cutting configuration produces the most accurate residual stress measurements, the highest levels of plastic flow are generated in this process. As a result, this cutting-induced plastic deformation is, however, largely confined to small ligaments formed as a consequence of the sample sectioning process, and as such it does not significantly affect the back-calculated residual stress field.« less

  19. Inelastic Deformation of Metal Matrix Composites. Part 1; Plasticity and Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a Ti 15-3/SCS6 (SiC fiber) metal matrix composite (MMC) were investigated using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall inelastic response, and to confirm the mechanisms by rigorous microstructural evaluations. The results of room temperature experiments performed on 0 degree and 90 degree systems primarily are reported in this report. Results of experiments performed on other laminate systems and at high temperatures will be provided in a forthcoming report. Inelastic deformation of the 0 degree MMC (fibers parallel to load direction) was dominated by the plasticity of the matrix. In contrast, inelastic deformations of the 90 degree composite (fibers perpendicular to loading direction) occurred by both damage and plasticity. The predictions of a continuum elastic plastic model were compared with experimental data. The model was adequate for predicting the 0 degree response; however, it was inadequate for predicting the 90 degree response largely because it neglected damage. The importance of validating constitutive models using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis is pointed out. The deformation mechanisms, and the likely sequence of events associated with the inelastic deformation of MMCs, are indicated in this paper.

  20. Encapsulation materials for photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C.

    1979-01-01

    As a part of the Low Cost Solar Array Project an encapsulation task has been established to identify, develop, and evaluate new low-cost, long-life encapsulation systems capable of meeting the project cost and performance goals. Low-cost material system candidates have been identified and are being characterized in laboratory and field tests with detailed evaluation of their environmental stability when subjected to temperature cycling, humidity, ultraviolet radiation, dirt, and various other environmental hazards.

  1. The exponentiated Hencky-logarithmic strain energy: part III—coupling with idealized multiplicative isotropic finite strain plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Patrizio; Ghiba, Ionel-Dumitrel

    2016-03-01

    We investigate an immediate application in finite strain multiplicative plasticity of the family of isotropic volumetric-isochoric decoupled strain energies F mapsto W_eH(F):= widehat{W}_eH(U) := μ/k e^{k | dev_n log {U}|^2}+κ/2 {widehat{k}} e^{widehat{k} [ tr(log U)]^2}&quad if& det F > 0, + ∞ & quad if & det F ≤ 0, based on the Hencky-logarithmic (true, natural) strain tensor {log U} . Here, {μ > 0} is the infinitesimal shear modulus, {κ=2 μ+3λ/3 > 0} is the infinitesimal bulk modulus with λ the first Lamé constant, {k,widehat{k}} are additional dimensionless material parameters, {F=nabla \\varphi} is the gradient of deformation, {U=√{F^T F}} is the right stretch tensor, and dev n {log {U} =log {U}-1/n tr(log {U})\\cdot{1}} is the deviatoric part of the strain tensor {log U} . Based on the multiplicative decomposition {F=F_e F_p} , we couple these energies with some isotropic elasto-plastic flow rules {F_p {dt}/[F_p^{-1}]in-partial χ(dev_3 Σe)} defined in the plastic distortion F p , where {partial χ} is the subdifferential of the indicator function {χ} of the convex elastic domain {E_e({Σe},1/3{σ}_{y}^2)} in the mixed-variant {Σe} -stress space, {Σe=F_e^T D_{F_e}W_iso(F_e)} , and {W_iso(F_e)} represents the isochoric part of the energy. While {W_eH} may loose ellipticity, we show that loss of ellipticity is effectively prevented by the coupling with plasticity, since the ellipticity domain of {W_eH} on the one hand and the elastic domain in {Σe} -stress space on the other hand are closely related. Thus, the new formulation remains elliptic in elastic unloading at any given plastic predeformation. In addition, in this domain, the true stress-true strain relation remains monotone, as observed in experiments.

  2. Method for encapsulating hazardous wastes using a staged mold

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1989-01-01

    A staged mold and method for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  3. Parametric and non-parametric modeling of short-term synaptic plasticity. Part I: computational study

    PubMed Central

    Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Berger, Theodore W.

    2009-01-01

    Parametric and non-parametric modeling methods are combined to study the short-term plasticity (STP) of synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). The nonlinear dynamics of STP are modeled by means: (1) previously proposed parametric models based on mechanistic hypotheses and/or specific dynamical processes, and (2) non-parametric models (in the form of Volterra kernels) that transforms the presynaptic signals into postsynaptic signals. In order to synergistically use the two approaches, we estimate the Volterra kernels of the parametric models of STP for four types of synapses using synthetic broadband input–output data. Results show that the non-parametric models accurately and efficiently replicate the input–output transformations of the parametric models. Volterra kernels provide a general and quantitative representation of the STP. PMID:18506609

  4. [Determination of bisphenol A in plastic parts of small household appliances by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Xiaofei; Lü, Pin; Li, Hui; Lu, Xiaoyu

    2012-01-01

    A method for the determination of bisphenol A in the plastic parts of small household appliances by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed. The sample was extracted with accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and purified by Sep-Pak C18 solid phase extraction. Bisphenol A was separated and detected using LC-MS/MS in negative ion mode with the mobile phases of methanol and water (containing 0.05% ammonia water). The linearity of the method was good in the range of 5 μg/L to 100 μg/L. The recoveries for the spiked sample were from 95.2% to 109.7% at the three levels, 10, 25 and 75 μg/kg. The relative standard deviations were less than 3.8%. The limit of detection was 10 μg/kg. The method is easy-handling, time-saving, sensitive and suitable for the determination of the residual bisphenol A in the plastic parts of household appliances. PMID:22667100

  5. Mass Spectrometry of 3D-printed plastic parts under plasma and radiative heat environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, W. F.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Bates, E. M.; Birmingham, W.; Takeno, J.; Knop, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present the design and preliminary results of a mass spectrometry system used to assess vacuum compatibility of 3D-printed parts, developed at the Dusty Plasma Laboratory of the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). A decrease in outgassing was observed when electroplated parts were inserted in the test chamber vs. non electroplated ones. Outgassing will also be tested under different environments such as plasma and radiative heat. Heat will be generated by a titanium getter pump placed inside a 90 degree elbow, such that titanium does not coat the part. A mirror inside the elbow will be used to throttle the heat arriving at the part. Plasma exposure of 3D printed parts will be achieved by placing the parts in a separate chamber connected to the spectrometer by a vacuum line that is differentially pumped. The signals from the mass spectrometer will be analyzed to see how the vacuum conditions fluctuate under different plasma discharges.

  6. Encapsulated environment.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Tom M; Daanen, Hein A M; Cheung, Stephen S

    2013-07-01

    In many occupational settings, clothing must be worn to protect individuals from hazards in their work environment. However, personal protective clothing (PPC) restricts heat exchange with the environment due to high thermal resistance and low water vapor permeability. As a consequence, individuals who wear PPC often work in uncompensable heat stress conditions where body heat storage continues to rise and the risk of heat injury is greatly enhanced. Tolerance time while wearing PPC is influenced by three factors: (i) initial core temperature (Tc), affected by heat acclimation, precooling, hydration, aerobic fitness, circadian rhythm, and menstrual cycle (ii) Tc tolerated at exhaustion, influenced by state of encapsulation, hydration, and aerobic fitness; and (iii) the rate of increase in Tc from beginning to end of the heat-stress exposure, which is dependent on the clothing characteristics, thermal environment, work rate, and individual factors like body composition and economy of movement. Methods to reduce heat strain in PPC include increasing clothing permeability for air, adjusting pacing strategy, including work/rest schedules, physical training, and cooling interventions, although the additional weight and bulk of some personal cooling systems offset their intended advantage. Individuals with low body fatness who perform regular aerobic exercise have tolerance times in PPC that exceed those of their sedentary counterparts by as much as 100% due to lower resting Tc, the higher Tc tolerated at exhaustion and a slower increase in Tc during exercise. However, questions remain about the importance of activity levels, exercise intensity, cold water ingestion, and plasma volume expansion for thermotolerance. PMID:23897690

  7. Characterization of fiberglass-filled diallyl phthalate plastic molding resins and molded parts

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, R.B.; Glaub, J.E.; Bonekowski, N.R.; Gillham, P.D.

    1980-12-01

    Characterization of diallyl phthalate (DAP) molding resins was undertaken by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and by combined size exclusion chromatography (SEC)/low angle laser light scattering (LALLS) in order to better predict moldability and storage life limits. Completeness of cure of molded parts, before and after any post-curing, was also determined by thermal analysis. Molecular weights and molecular weight distributions of the DAP molding resins by SEC/LALLS indicated that the better molding resins have lower M/sub w//M/sub n/ ratios. Association effects were observed, which could not be overcome by solvent modification alone. Determination of DAP molding resin heats of reaction by DSC indicated a linear relation between ..delta..H/sub R/ and weight percent filler for the good molding resins. DSC analyses of molded DAP parts showed that 95% cure was achieved in some as-molded parts, with a post-cure temperature of 165/sup 0/C being required to complete the cure to 100%. Thickness of the parts was a factor, with the thicker parts being 100% cured as molded. The glass transition temperature (T/sub g/) of the molded parts increased as cure was completed, to approx. 160 to 165/sup 0/C maximum. These results are consistent with a model of thermoset resin curing behavior which states that 100% cure can be achieved only if a post-curing operation is conducted above the T/sub g infinity/ (T/sub g/ at complete cure) of the polymer.

  8. Elastic-plastic fracture of cylindrical shells containing a part-through circumferential crack

    SciTech Connect

    Ezzat, H.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-11-01

    The problem of fatigue crack propagation and ductile fracture of a cylindrical shell containing a macroscopic circumferential flaw is considered. The main interest in the study is in applications to line pipes and other cylindrical containers under secondary axial stresses in addition to the primary stresses coming from the internal pressure. The stress intensity factor for the part-through crack used in analyzing and correlating the fatigue crack propagation rate is obtained by using a line spring model in conjunction with Reissner's shell theory. To analyze the ductile fracture instability and to correlate the experimental and theoretical results, the crack mouth opening displacement is used as the parameter. The limited data on fatigue crack propagation give the expected result, namely that the crack propagation rate in pipes may be predicted from the fatigue results performed on simpler geometries provided the stress intensity factors in pipes are calculated with sufficient accuracy. 14 references.

  9. Module encapsulation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1986-01-01

    The identification and development techniques for low-cost module encapsulation materials were reviewed. Test results were displayed for a variety of materials. The improved prospects for modeling encapsulation systems for life prediction were reported.

  10. Photopolymerizable liquid encapsulants for microelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikerikar, Kiran K.

    2000-10-01

    Plastic encapsulated microelectronic devices consist of a silicon chip that is physically attached to a leadframe, electrically interconnected to input-output leads, and molded in a plastic that is in direct contact with the chip, leadframe, and interconnects. The plastic is often referred to as the molding compound, and is used to protect the chip from adverse mechanical, thermal, chemical, and electrical environments. Encapsulation of microelectronic devices is typically accomplished using a transfer molding process in which the molding compound is cured by heat. Most transfer molding processes suffer from significant problems arising from the high operating temperatures and pressures required to fill the mold. These aspects of the current process can lead to thermal stresses, incomplete mold filling, and wire sweep. In this research, a new strategy for encapsulating microelectronic devices using photopolymerizable liquid encapsulants (PLEs) has been investigated. The PLEs consist of an epoxy novolac-based vinyl ester resin (˜25 wt.%), fused silica filler (70--74 wt.%), and a photoinitiator, thermal initiator, and silane coupling agent. For these encapsulants, the use of light, rather than heat, to initiate the polymerization allows precise control over when the reaction starts, and therefore completely decouples the mold filling and the cure. The low viscosity of the PLEs allows for low operating pressures and minimizes problems associated with wire sweep. In addition, the in-mold cure time for the PLEs is equivalent to the in-mold cure times of current transfer molding compounds. In this thesis, the thermal and mechanical properties, as well as the viscosity and adhesion of photopolymerizable liquid encapsulants, are reported in order to demonstrate that a UV-curable formulation can have the material properties necessary for microelectronic encapsulation. In addition, the effects of the illumination time, postcure time, fused silica loading, and the inclusion

  11. Encapsulation of CO2 into amorphous alpha-cyclodextrin powder at different moisture contents - Part 2: Characterization of complexed powders and determination of crystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thao M; Howes, Tony; Jack, Kevin S; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to characterize CO2-α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) inclusion complexes produced from amorphous α-CD powder at moisture contents (MC) close to or higher than the critical level of crystallization (e.g. 13, 15 and 17% MC on wet basis, w.b.) at 0.4 and 1.6MPa pressure for 72h. The results of (13)C NMR, SEM, DSC and X-ray analyses showed that these MC levels were high enough to induce crystallization of CO2-α-CD complexed powders during encapsulation, by which amount of CO2 encapsulated by amorphous α-CD powder was significantly increased. The formation of inclusion complexes were well confirmed by results of FTIR and (13)C NMR analyses through an appearance of a peak associated with CO2 on the FTIR (2334cm(-1)) and NMR (125.3ppm) spectra. Determination of crystal packing patterns of CO2-α-CD complexed powders showed that during crystallization, α-CD molecules were arranged in cage-type structure in which CO2 molecules were entrapped in isolated cavities. PMID:27041303

  12. Solar cell encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Amitava (Inventor); Ingham, John D. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A polymer syrup for encapsulating solar cell assemblies. The syrup includes uncrosslinked poly(n-butyl)acrylate dissolved in n-butyl acrylate monomer. Preparation of the poly(n-butyl)acrylate and preparation of the polymer syrup is disclosed. Methods for applying the polymer syrup to solar cell assemblies as an encapsulating pottant are described. Also included is a method for solar cell construction utilizing the polymer syrup as a dual purpose adhesive and encapsulating material.

  13. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  14. Characterization Methods of Encapsulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhibing; Law, Daniel; Lian, Guoping

    Food active ingredients can be encapsulated by different processes, including spray drying, spray cooling, spray chilling, spinning disc and centrifugal co-extrusion, extrusion, fluidized bed coating and coacervation (see Chap. 2 of this book). The purpose of encapsulation is often to stabilize an active ingredient, control its release rate and/or convert a liquid formulation into a solid which is easier to handle. A range of edible materials can be used as shell materials of encapsulates, including polysaccharides, fats, waxes and proteins (see Chap. 3 of this book). Encapsulates for typical industrial applications can vary from several microns to several millimetres in diameter although there is an increasing interest in preparing nano-encapsulates. Encapsulates are basically particles with a core-shell structure, but some of them can have a more complex structure, e.g. in a form of multiple cores embedded in a matrix. Particles have physical, mechanical and structural properties, including particle size, size distribution, morphology, surface charge, wall thickness, mechanical strength, glass transition temperature, degree of crystallinity, flowability and permeability. Information about the properties of encapsulates is very important to understanding their behaviours in different environments, including their manufacturing processes and end-user applications. E.g. encapsulates for most industrial applications should have desirable mechanical strength, which should be strong enough to withstand various mechanical forces generated in manufacturing processes, such as mixing, pumping, extrusion, etc., and may be required to be weak enough in order to release the encapsulated active ingredients by mechanical forces at their end-user applications, such as release rate of flavour by chewing. The mechanical strength of encapsulates and release rate of their food actives are related to their size, morphology, wall thickness, chemical composition, structure etc. Hence

  15. The role of dissipation and defect energy in variational formulations of problems in strain-gradient plasticity. Part 2: single-crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, B. D.

    2011-11-01

    Variational formulations are constructed for rate-independent problems in small-deformation single-crystal strain-gradient plasticity. The framework, based on that of Gurtin (J Mech Phys Solids 50: 5-32, 2002), makes use of the flow rule expressed in terms of the dissipation function. Provision is made for energetic and dissipative microstresses. Both recoverable and non-recoverable defect energies are incorporated into the variational framework. The recoverable energies include those that depend smoothly on the slip gradients, the Burgers tensor, or on the dislocation densities (Gurtin et al. J Mech Phys Solids 55:1853-1878, 2007), as well as an energy proposed by Ohno and Okumura (J Mech Phys Solids 55:1879-1898, 2007), which leads to excellent agreement with experimental results, and which is positively homogeneous and therefore not differentiable at zero slip gradient. Furthermore, the variational formulation accommodates a non-recoverable energy due to Ohno et al. (Int J Mod Phys B 22:5937-5942, 2008), which is also positively homogeneous, and a function of the accumulated dislocation density. Conditions for the existence and uniqueness of solutions are established for the various examples of defect energy, with or without the presence of hardening or slip resistance.

  16. Biodegradable films of partly branched poly(l-lactide)-co-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) copolymer: modulation of phase morphology, plasticization properties and thermal depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Broström, Jenny; Boss, Annika; Chronakis, Ioannis S

    2004-01-01

    We report on the modulation of phase morphology, plasticization properties, and thermal stability of films of partly branched poly(l-lactide)-co-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) copolymer (PLLA-co-PCL) with additions of low molecular weight compounds, namely, triethyl citrate ester, diethyl phthalate, diepoxy polyether (poly(propylene glycol) diglycidyl ether), and with epoxidized soybean oil (ESO). The PLLA-co-PCL/polyether films showed significant stability against thermal depolymerization, high film flexibility, and good plasticizing properties, probably due to cross-linking and chain branching formation between diepoxy groups with both the end carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of the PLLA copolymer (initially present or generated during the degradation process) to produce primary ester and ether bonds, respectively. Diethyl phthalate and triethyl citrate ester were found to be efficient plasticizers for PLLA copolymer in terms of glass transition and mechanical properties, but the more water-soluble plasticizer triethyl citrate induced a dramatic loss in the molecular weight of the copolymer. Although ESO cannot play the role of a plasticizer, it substantially stabilizes and retards thermal depolymerization of the PLLA copolymer matrix, possibly because of a reaction between epoxy groups with the end carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of the PLLA copolymer. The presence of ESO in PLLA-co-PCL/ESO/triethyl citrate blends enhanced the compatibility and miscibility of the plasticizer with the PLLA copolymer matrix, considerably improved the mechanical properties (elongation at break), and substantially stabilized the copolymer against thermal depolymerization. It seems likely that the epoxy groups interact not only with the end hydroxyl and carboxyl group of the copolymer but as well with the hydroxyl group of triethyl citrate plasticizer to produce a new ether bond (C-O-C) as the cross-linking unit. On the other hand, for PLLA-co-PCL/ESO/polyether blends, (80/10/10) epoxidized oil

  17. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into an adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  18. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into and adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  19. Y-12 Development Organization technical progress report period ending March 1, 1995. Part 5, Ceramics/plastics/carbon materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    The preparation of small-scale-Production crucibles by plasma-spraying of TRIBOCOR onto niobium is continuing. Microwave heat-treatment of this size crucible has been demonstrated successfully. Conventional plasma-spray coating appears to offer advantages over ``vacuum`` plasma-spraying for preparing the coatings. Encapsulant/stucco ``shells`` for ``casketing`` boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) or silicon carbide (SiC) results in consistent attainment of the necessary {ge}2100C processing temperatures for these nonoxide materials. Gelcasting is an excellent technique for making shapes with both B{sub 4}C and SiC. Tiles of B{sub 4}C were prepared and will be microwave sintered soon.

  20. Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Response of a Space Shuttle External Tank Stringer. Part 2; Thermal and Mechanical Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Warren, Jerry E.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Song, Kyongchan; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic-plastic, large-deflection nonlinear thermo-mechanical stress analyses are performed for the Space Shuttle external tank s intertank stringers. Detailed threedimensional finite element models are developed and used to investigate the stringer s elastic-plastic response for different thermal and mechanical loading events from assembly through flight. Assembly strains caused by initial installation on an intertank panel are accounted for in the analyses. Thermal loading due to tanking was determined to be the bounding loading event. The cryogenic shrinkage caused by tanking resulted in a rotation of the intertank chord flange towards the center of the intertank, which in turn loaded the intertank stringer feet. The analyses suggest that the strain levels near the first three fasteners remain sufficiently high that a failure may occur. The analyses also confirmed that the installation of radius blocks on the stringer feet ends results in an increase in the stringer capability.

  1. Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Response of a Space Shuttle External Tank Stringer. Part 1; Stringer-Feet Imperfections and Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Elliott, Kenny B.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Warren, Jerry E.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic-plastic, large-deflection nonlinear stress analyses are performed for the external hat-shaped stringers (or stiffeners) on the intertank portion of the Space Shuttle s external tank. These stringers are subjected to assembly strains when the stringers are initially installed on an intertank panel. Four different stringer-feet configurations including the baseline flat-feet, the heels-up, the diving-board, and the toes-up configurations are considered. The assembly procedure is analytically simulated for each of these stringer configurations. The location, size, and amplitude of the strain field associated with the stringer assembly are sensitive to the assumed geometry and assembly procedure. The von Mises stress distributions from these simulations indicate that localized plasticity will develop around the first eight fasteners for each stringer-feet configuration examined. However, only the toes-up configuration resulted in high assembly hoop strains.

  2. Encapsulation with structured triglycerides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids provide excellent materials to encapsulate bioactive compounds for food and pharmaceutical applications. Lipids are renewable, biodegradable, and easily modified to provide additional chemical functionality. The use of structured lipids that have been modified with photoactive properties are ...

  3. Process for remediation of plastic waste

    DOEpatents

    Pol, Vilas G; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan

    2013-11-12

    A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of about 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically carbon nanotubes having a partially filled core (encapsulated) adjacent to one end of the nanotube. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  4. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  5. Review of encapsulation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaulis, L.

    1996-09-01

    The use of encapsulation technology to produce a compliant waste form is an outgrowth from existing polymer industry technology and applications. During the past 12 years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been researching the use of this technology to treat mixed wastes (i.e., containing hazardous and radioactive wastes). The two primary encapsulation techniques are microencapsulation and macroencapsulation. Microencapsulation is the thorough mixing of a binding agent with a powdered waste, such as incinerator ash. Macroencapsulation coats the surface of bulk wastes, such as lead debris. Cement, modified cement, and polyethylene are the binding agents which have been researched the most. Cement and modified cement have been the most commonly used binding agents to date. However, recent research conducted by DOE laboratories have shown that polyethylene is more durable and cost effective than cements. The compressive strength, leachability, resistance to chemical degradation, etc., of polyethylene is significantly greater than that of cement and modified cement. Because higher waste loads can be used with polyethylene encapsulant, the total cost of polyethylene encapsulation is significantly less costly than cement treatment. The only research lacking in the assessment of polyethylene encapsulation treatment for mixed wastes is pilot and full-scale testing with actual waste materials. To date, only simulated wastes have been tested. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site had planned to conduct pilot studies using actual wastes during 1996. This experiment should provide similar results to the previous tests that used simulated wastes. If this hypothesis is validated as anticipated, it will be clear that polyethylene encapsulation should be pursued by DOE to produce compliant waste forms.

  6. Encapsulation materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    Encapsulation materials for solar cells were investigated. The different phases consisted of: (1) identification and development of low cost module encapsulation materials; (2) materials reliability examination; and (3) process sensitivity and process development. It is found that outdoor photothermal aging devices (OPT) are the best accelerated aging methods, simulate worst case field conditions, evaluate formulation and module performance and have a possibility for life assessment. Outdoor metallic copper exposure should be avoided, self priming formulations have good storage stability, stabilizers enhance performance, and soil resistance treatment is still effective.

  7. Laser processing of plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Peter A.

    1995-03-01

    CO2-laser processing of plastics has been studied experimentally and theoretically. Welding of cylindrical parts made from polycarbonate and polypropylene, cutting of polymethyl-methacrylate plates, and drilling holes in polypropylene are presented as examples. A good coincidence between theoretical and experimental results in case of laser welding has been found. Some practical aspects of laser processing of plastics has been given.

  8. The Nuclear Hormone Receptor NHR-40 Acts Downstream of the Sulfatase EUD-1 as Part of a Developmental Plasticity Switch in Pristionchus.

    PubMed

    Kieninger, Manuela R; Ivers, Nicholas A; Rödelsperger, Christian; Markov, Gabriel V; Sommer, Ralf J; Ragsdale, Erik J

    2016-08-22

    Developmental plasticity, the ability of one genotype to produce distinct phenotypes in different environments, has been suggested to facilitate phenotypic diversification, and several examples in plants and animals support its macroevolutionary potential [1-8]. However, little is known about associated molecular mechanisms, because environmental effects on development are difficult to study by laboratory approaches. One promising system is the mouth dimorphism of the nematode Pristionchus pacificus [9-12]. Following an irreversible decision in larval development, these nematodes form moveable teeth that occur in either of two discrete morphs. The "eurystomatous" (Eu) form has a wide mouth and two teeth, allowing predatory feeding on other nematodes. In contrast, the alternative ("stenostomatous"; St) form has diminutive mouthparts that largely constrain its diet to microbes. The sulfatase EUD-1 was previously discovered to execute a polyphenism switch based on dosage of functional alleles [13] and confirmed a prediction of evolutionary theory about how developmental switches control plasticity [1, 3]. However, the genetic context of this single gene, and hence the molecular complexity of switch mechanisms, was previously unknown. Here we use a suppressor screen to identify factors downstream of eud-1 in mouth-form regulation. We isolated three dominant, X-linked mutants in the nuclear hormone receptor gene nhr-40 that are haploinsufficient. Both eud-1 nhr-40 double and nhr-40 single mutants are all Eu, whereas transgenic overexpression of nhr-40 does not restore the wild-type phenotype but instead results in nearly all-St lines. Thus, NHR-40 is part of a developmental switch, suggesting that switch mechanisms controlling plasticity consist of multi-component hormonal signaling systems. PMID:27451902

  9. Encapsulation materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1985-01-01

    The successful use of outdoor mounting racks as an accelerated aging technique (these devices are called optal reactors); a beginning list of candidate pottant materials for thin-film encapsulation, which process at temperatures well below 100 C; and description of a preliminary flame retardant formulation for ethylene vinyl acetate which could function to increase module flammability ratings are presented.

  10. Subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Dogu; Berg, Jais O

    2016-04-01

    We have described subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis, which is benign, usually asymptomatic and underreported. Images have only been published on two earlier occasions, in which the necrotic nodules appear "pearly" than the cloudy yellow surface in present case. The presented image may help future surgeons to establish the diagnosis peroperatively. PMID:27099753

  11. Wet Winding Improves Coil Encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    Wet-winding process encapsulates electrical coils more uniformily than conventional processes. Process requires no vacuum pump and adapts easily to existing winding machines. Encapsulant applied to each layer of wire as soon as added to coil. Wet-winding process eliminates voids, giving more uniformly encapsulated coil.

  12. Comparison between Palm Oil Derivative and Commercial Thermo-Plastic Binder System on the Properties of the Stainless Steel 316L Sintered Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, R.; Azmirruddin, M.; Wei, G. C.; Fong, L. K.; Abdullah, N. I.; Omar, K.; Muhamad, M.; Muhamad, S.

    2010-03-01

    Binder system is one of the most important criteria for the powder injection molding (PIM) process. Failure in the selection of the binder system will affect on the final properties of the sintered parts. The objectives of this studied is to develop a novel binder system based on the local natural resources and environmental friendly binder system from palm oil derivative which is easily available and cheap in our country of Malaysia. The novel binder that has been developed will be replaced the commercial thermo-plastic binder system or as an alternative binder system. The results show that the physical and mechanical properties of the final sintered parts fulfill the Metal Powder Industries Federation (MPIF) standard 35 for PIM parts. The biocompatibility test using cell osteosarcoma (MG63) and vero fibroblastic also shows that the cell was successfully growth on the sintered stainless steel 316L parts indicate that the novel binder was not toxic. Therefore, the novel binder system based on palm oil derivative that has been developed as a binder system fulfills the important criteria for the binder system in PIM process.

  13. Photovoltaic encapsulation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B.; Willis, P. W.; Cuddihy, E. C.

    1981-01-01

    Candidate materials for the construction of cost-effective solar cell flat array modules are reviewed. Fabrication goals include electricity production at $.70/W with a lifetime of 20 yr. Research is currently directed toward low cost encapsulants and substrates for the cells, and outer covers which resist weathering. Ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) at $.09/sq ft has displayed the most promising results as the encapsulant laminate when subjected to peroxide cross-linking to prevent melting. EVA accepts the addition of antioxidants, quenchers, absorbers, and stabilizers. Wood is favored as the rigid substrate due to cost, while top covers in substrate modules comprise candidate acrylic and polyvinyl fluoride films and a copolymer. Finally, fiberglass mat is placed between the substrate and the EVA pottant as a mechanical support and for electrical insulation.

  14. Materials for Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandrey, Christine; Bartkowiak, Artur; Harding, Stephen E.

    A multitude of substances are known which can be used to entrap, coat, or encapsulate solids, liquids, or gases of different types, origins, and properties. However, only a limited number thereof have been certified for food applications as “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) materials. It is worth mentioning that the regulations for food additives are much stricter than for pharmaceuticals or cosmetics. Consequently, some compounds, which are widely accepted for drug encapsulation, have not been approved for use in the food industry. Moreover, different regulations can exist for different continents, economies, or countries, a problem which has to be addressed by food producers who wish to export their products or who intend expanding their markets.

  15. Air encapsulation during infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Herkelrath, W.N.; Murphy, F.

    1988-01-01

    A series of field and laboratory experiments were performed to measure the effects of air encapsulation within the soil's transmission zone upon several infiltration properties. In the field, infiltration rates were measured using a double-cap infiltrometer and soil-water contents were measured using time-domain reflectometry (TDR). In the laboratory, infiltration experiments were peformed using repacked soil columns using TDR and CO 2 flooding. Results suggest that a significant portion of the total encapsulated air resided in interconnected pores within the soil's transmission zone. For the time scale considered, this residual air caused the effective hydraulic conductivity of the transmission zone to remain at a level no greater than 20% of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil. -from Authors

  16. New frontiers for encapsulation in the chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Brenda; Song, Ziyuan; Li, Jun; Zimmerman, Steven C; Cheng, Jianjun; Moore, Jeffrey S; Harris, Keith; Katz, Joshua S

    2015-04-01

    Encapsulation of actives comprises an area of exploration undergoing rapid growth in both academic and industrial research settings. Encapsulation processes are employed as a part of product synthesis processes for improved efficiency, enhanced stability, active ingredient compatibility, increased safety, targeted delivery, and novel performance of the end product. Such technical benefits enable producers to offer products with increased formulation complexity, access new markets, differentiate products, and improve compatibility and stability, while meeting consumer demands with improved performance, reduced costs, and new actives. In this review, we highlight several emerging academic areas of encapsulation that we believe have specific relevance to industrial formulation, with a focus on three primary areas: supramolecular encapsulation, aqueous self-assembled systems, and emulsion-based capsules. The goal of this review is to help identify the major challenges facing encapsulation technology adoption in the chemical industry, bringing focus and maximizing the potential value of ongoing research efforts. PMID:25764282

  17. High-Performance CCSDS Encapsulation Service Implementation in FPGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clare, Loren P.; Torgerson, Jordan L.; Pang, Jackson

    2010-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Encapsulation Service is a convergence layer between lower-layer space data link framing protocols, such as CCSDS Advanced Orbiting System (AOS), and higher-layer networking protocols, such as CFDP (CCSDS File Delivery Protocol) and Internet Protocol Extension (IPE). CCSDS Encapsulation Service is considered part of the data link layer. The CCSDS AOS implementation is described in the preceding article. Recent advancement in RF modem technology has allowed multi-megabit transmission over space links. With this increase in data rate, the CCSDS Encapsulation Service needs to be optimized to both reduce energy consumption and operate at a high rate. CCSDS Encapsulation Service has been implemented as an intellectual property core so that the aforementioned problems are solved by way of operating the CCSDS Encapsulation Service inside an FPGA. The CCSDS En capsula tion Service in FPGA implementation consists of both packetizing and de-packetizing features

  18. Plastic Jellyfish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Presents an environmental science activity designed to enhance students' awareness of the hazards of plastic waste for wildlife in aquatic environments. Discusses how students can take steps to reduce the effects of plastic waste. (WRM)

  19. All-plastic, miniature, digital fluorescence microscope for three part white blood cell differential measurements at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Forcucci, Alessandra; Pawlowski, Michal E; Majors, Catherine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

    2015-11-01

    Three-part differential white blood cell counts are used for disease diagnosis and monitoring at the point-of-care. A low-cost, miniature achromatic microscope was fabricated for identification of lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes in samples of whole blood stained with acridine orange. The microscope was manufactured using rapid prototyping techniques of diamond turning and 3D printing and is intended for use at the point-of-care in low-resource settings. The custom-designed microscope requires no manual adjustment between samples and was successfully able to classify three white blood cell types (lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes) using samples of peripheral whole blood stained with acridine orange. PMID:26601006

  20. All-plastic, miniature, digital fluorescence microscope for three part white blood cell differential measurements at the point of care

    PubMed Central

    Forcucci, Alessandra; Pawlowski, Michal E.; Majors, Catherine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2015-01-01

    Three-part differential white blood cell counts are used for disease diagnosis and monitoring at the point-of-care. A low-cost, miniature achromatic microscope was fabricated for identification of lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes in samples of whole blood stained with acridine orange. The microscope was manufactured using rapid prototyping techniques of diamond turning and 3D printing and is intended for use at the point-of-care in low-resource settings. The custom-designed microscope requires no manual adjustment between samples and was successfully able to classify three white blood cell types (lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes) using samples of peripheral whole blood stained with acridine orange. PMID:26601006

  1. Non-Dimensional Characterization of the Friction Stir/Spot Welding Process Using a Simple Couette Flow Model Part I: Constant Property Bingham Plastic Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Gregory A.; Langerman, Michael

    2004-06-01

    A simplified model for the material flow created during a friction stir/spot welding process has been developed using a boundary driven cylindrical Couette flow model with a specified heat flux at the inner cylinder for a Bingham plastic material. Non-dimensionalization of the constant property governing equations identified three parameters that influence the velocity and temperature fields. Analytic solutions to these equations are presented and some representative results from a parametric study (parameters chosen and varied over ranges expected for the welding of a wide variety of metals) are discussed. The results also provide an expression for the critical radius (location of vanishing material velocity) as functions of the relevant non-dimensional parameters. A final study was conducted in which values for the non-dimensional heat flux parameter were chosen to produce peak dimensional temperatures on the order of 80% of the melting temperature for a typical 2000 series aluminum. Under these conditions it was discovered that the ratio of the maximum rate of shear work within the material (viscous dissipation) to the rate of energy input at the boundary due to frictional heating, ranged from about 0.0005 % for the lowest pin tool rotation rate, to about 1.3 % for the highest tool rotation rate studied. Curve fits to previous Gleeble data taken for a number of aluminum alloys provide reasonable justification for the Bingham plastic constitutive model, and although these fits indicate a strong temperature dependence for critical flow stress and viscosity, this work provides a simple tool for more sophisticated model validation. Part II of this study will present numerical solutions for velocity and temperature fields resulting from the non-linear coupling of the momentum and energy equations created by temperature dependent transport properties.

  2. Module Encapsulant Diagnostic and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2005-01-01

    Encapsulant materials are used in photovoltaic devices for mechanical support, electrical isolation, and protection against corrosion. The ability of an encapsulant to protect against surface corrosion is related to its adhesional strength. The adhesion of candidate encapsulants under accelerated environmental stress was examined to determine what materials have the best hydrolytic stability and are more likely to reduce corrosion rates. Under environmental exposure, the ingress of water has been correlated with increased corrosion rates. The diffusivity of different encapsulants has been measured to determine how long it takes for water to enter a module. The high diffusivity of ethylene vinyl acetate indicates that, even with the use of an impermeable back-sheet, moisture from the sides will diffuse throughout the entire module. To significantly reduce moisture ingress requires a true hermetic seal, the use of an encapsulant loaded with desiccant, or the use of a very low diffusivity encapsulant.

  3. Selective encapsulation by Janus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Ruth, Donovan; Gunton, James D.; Rickman, Jeffrey M.

    2015-06-28

    We employ Monte Carlo simulation to examine encapsulation in a system comprising Janus oblate spheroids and isotropic spheres. More specifically, the impact of variations in temperature, particle size, inter-particle interaction range, and strength is examined for a system in which the spheroids act as the encapsulating agents and the spheres as the encapsulated guests. In this picture, particle interactions are described by a quasi-square-well patch model. This study highlights the environmental adaptation and selectivity of the encapsulation system to changes in temperature and guest particle size, respectively. Moreover, we identify an important range in parameter space where encapsulation is favored, as summarized by an encapsulation map. Finally, we discuss the generalization of our results to systems having a wide range of particle geometries.

  4. JPL encapsulation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed summary of the diverse encapsulation materials and techniques that evolved to meet the cost goals of the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project is presented. A typical solar cell now consists of low iron glass, two layers of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) polymers, a porous space, primers/adhesives, a back cover of Tedlar, and a gasket/seal for a volume cost of $1.30/sq ft. This compares well with the project goal of $1.40/sq ft.

  5. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOEpatents

    Nuckolls, John H.; Thiessen, Albert R.; Dahlbacka, Glen H.

    1983-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  6. Plastic surgery's plastics.

    PubMed

    Ousterhout, D K; Stelnicki, E J

    1996-01-01

    Alloplastic materials have become an essential part of reconstructing the craniofacial skeleton. This article reviews several of the more commonly used implant materials and summarizes their mechanical properties and use in reconstructive surgery. PMID:8617027

  7. Micro-Encapsulation of Probiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiners, Jean-Antoine

    Micro-encapsulation is defined as the technology for packaging with the help of protective membranes particles of finely ground solids, droplets of liquids or gaseous materials in small capsules that release their contents at controlled rates over prolonged periods of time under the influences of specific conditions (Boh, 2007). The material encapsulating the core is referred to as coating or shell.

  8. Encapsulation of Aroma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuidam, Nicolaas Jan; Heinrich, Emmanuel

    Flavor is one of the most important characteristics of a food product, since people prefer to eat only food products with an attractive flavor (Voilley and Etiévant 2006). Flavor can be defined as a combination of taste, smell and/or trigeminal stimuli. Taste is divided into five basic ones, i.e. sour, salty, sweet, bitter and umami. Components that trigger the so-called gustatory receptors for these tastes are in general not volatile, in contrast to aroma. Aroma molecules are those that interact with the olfactory receptors in the nose cavity (Firestein 2001). Confusingly, aroma is often referred to as flavor. Trigeminal stimuli cause sensations like cold, touch, and prickling. The current chapter only focuses on the encapsulation of the aroma molecules.

  9. Plastics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Tommy G.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high schools industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in plastics technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to production technology; history and development of plastics; safety; youth leadership,…

  10. Sclerosing Encapsulating Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman O.

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) is a rare chronic inflammatory condition of the peritoneum with an unknown aetiology. Also known as abdominal cocoon, the condition occurs when loops of the bowel are encased within the peritoneal cavity by a membrane, leading to intestinal obstruction. Due to its rarity and non-specific clinical features, it is often misdiagnosed. The condition presents with recurrent episodes of small bowel obstruction and can be idiopathic or secondary; the latter is associated with predisposing factors such as peritoneal dialysis or abdominal tuberculosis. In the early stages, patients can be managed conservatively; however, surgical intervention is necessary for those with advanced stage intestinal obstruction. A literature review revealed 118 cases of SEP; the mean age of these patients was 39 years and 68.0% were male. The predominant presentation was abdominal pain (72.0%), distension (44.9%) or a mass (30.5%). Almost all of the patients underwent surgical excision (99.2%) without postoperative complications (88.1%). PMID:27226904

  11. Gravity Probe B Encapsulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being encapsulated atop the Delta II launch vehicle. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  12. Application of Thermo-Mechanical Measurements of Plastic Packages for Reliability Evaluation of PEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Teverovsky, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Thermo-mechanical analysis (TMA) is typically employed for measurements of the glass transition temperature (Tg) and coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) in molding compounds used in plastic encapsulated microcircuits (PEMs). Application of TMA measurements directly to PEMs allows anomalies to be revealed in deformation of packages with temperature, and thus indicates possible reliability concerns related to thermo-mechanical integrity and stability of the devices. In this work, temperature dependencies of package deformation were measured in several types of PEMs that failed environmental stress testing including temperature cycling, highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) in humid environments, and bum-in (BI) testing. Comparison of thermo-mechanical characteristics of packages and molding compounds in the failed parts allowed for explanation of the observed failures. The results indicate that TMA of plastic packages might be used for quality evaluation of PEMs intended for high-reliability applications.

  13. Encapsulated microsensors for reservoir interrogation

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Eddie Elmer; Aines, Roger D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2016-03-08

    In one general embodiment, a system includes at least one microsensor configured to detect one or more conditions of a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and a receptacle, wherein the receptacle encapsulates the at least one microsensor. In another general embodiment, a method include injecting the encapsulated at least one microsensor as recited above into a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and detecting one or more conditions of the fluidic medium of the reservoir.

  14. A composite-appropriate integration method of thick functional components in fibre-reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippatos, A.; Höhne, R.; Kliem, M.; Gude, M.

    2016-03-01

    The use of integrated structural health monitoring systems for critical composite parts, such as wind turbine blades, fuselage and wing parts, is an promising approach to guarantee a safe and efficient operational lifetime of such components. Therefore, the integration of thick functional components like sensors, actuators and electronic components is often necessary. An optimal integration of such components should be ensured without material imperfections in the composite structure, i.e. voids and resin rich areas, and failure of the functional components. In this paper, first investigations were undertaken for a basic understanding of the mechanical performance of a fibre reinforced plastic component with integrated functional elements. The influence of different materials and treatment methods for the encapsulation of electronic components was experimentally investigated under static and dynamic loading tests. By means of a parametric finite element model, the effects of an encapsulation and various parameters such as the shape and orientation of the electronic components were examined. Several encapsulation variants were investigated in order to minimise the chance of failure initiations. Based both on experimental and numerical results, a preferred composite integration concept was selected for an electronic board and some first recommendations for an optimal integration were derived.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A POLYMERIC CEMENTING AND ENCAPSULATING PROCESS FOR MANAGING HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A process using polymeric materials to cement and encapsulate dry hazardous waste was researched, developed, and evaluated. The process involves cementing particulates of waste into 500 to 1000 pound agglomerates, and then fusing a plastic jacket onto the agglomerate surfaces, th...

  16. Encapsulated scintillators monitor /sup 3/H-solute concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, G.; Gruner, S.

    1982-02-01

    The short range of the /sup 3/H beta allows shielding of microbeds of scintillator by a several um thick coating of a water based gel. Gels may be used which are permeable to a wide variety of tritiated molecules. Thus, the light output of a mixture of the coated beads and a solution of the tritiated compound is proportional to the solution concentration of the tritiated substance. The mixture may also contain particles to which the gel is impermeable, such as cells, vesicles, large proteins, etc., but which can alter the concentration of the tritiated compound by uptake or release. In this case, the light output monitors the fractional uptake of the tritiated material. The design criteria for encapsulating the scintillators and dynamically monitoring the scintillation output are discussed. A simple method for encapsulating plastic scintillator microbeads, suitable for monitoring slow concentration changes, is described and tested.

  17. Enhanced Mechanical Stability of Gold Nanotips through Carbon Nanocone Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano-Marquez, Abraham G.; Schmidt, Wesller G.; Ribeiro-Soares, Jenaina; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Rodrigues, Wagner N.; Santos, Adelina P.; Furtado, Clascidia A.; Autreto, Pedro A. S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; Jorio, Ado

    2015-06-01

    Gold is a noble metal that, in comparison with silver and copper, has the advantage of corrosion resistance. Despite its high conductivity, chemical stability and biocompatibility, gold exhibits high plasticity, which limits its applications in some nanodevices. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study on how to attain enhanced mechanical stability of gold nanotips. The gold tips were fabricated by chemical etching and further encapsulated with carbon nanocones via nanomanipulation. Atomic force microscopy experiments were carried out to test their mechanical stability. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the encapsulated nanocone changes the strain release mechanisms at the nanoscale by blocking gold atomic sliding, redistributing the strain along the whole nanostructure. The carbon nanocones are conducting and can induce magnetism, thus opening new avenues on the exploitation of transport, mechanical and magnetic properties of gold covered by sp2 carbon at the nanoscale.

  18. Enhanced Mechanical Stability of Gold Nanotips through Carbon Nanocone Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Marquez, Abraham G.; Schmidt, Wesller G.; Ribeiro-Soares, Jenaina; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Rodrigues, Wagner N.; Santos, Adelina P.; Furtado, Clascidia A.; Autreto, Pedro A.S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; Jorio, Ado

    2015-01-01

    Gold is a noble metal that, in comparison with silver and copper, has the advantage of corrosion resistance. Despite its high conductivity, chemical stability and biocompatibility, gold exhibits high plasticity, which limits its applications in some nanodevices. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study on how to attain enhanced mechanical stability of gold nanotips. The gold tips were fabricated by chemical etching and further encapsulated with carbon nanocones via nanomanipulation. Atomic force microscopy experiments were carried out to test their mechanical stability. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the encapsulated nanocone changes the strain release mechanisms at the nanoscale by blocking gold atomic sliding, redistributing the strain along the whole nanostructure. The carbon nanocones are conducting and can induce magnetism, thus opening new avenues on the exploitation of transport, mechanical and magnetic properties of gold covered by sp2 carbon at the nanoscale. PMID:26083864

  19. Plastic Bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bruce K

    2016-09-01

    Plastic bronchitis is an uncommon and probably underrecognized disorder, diagnosed by the expectoration or bronchoscopic removal of firm, cohesive, branching casts. It should not be confused with purulent mucous plugging of the airway as seen in patients with cystic fibrosis or bronchiectasis. Few medications have been shown to be effective and some are now recognized as potentially harmful. Current research directions in plastic bronchitis research include understanding the genetics of lymphatic development and maldevelopment, determining how abnormal lymphatic malformations contribute to cast formation, and developing new treatments. PMID:27514587

  20. High reliability plastic packaging for microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, J.N.; Peterson, D.W.; Hsia, A.H.; Tuck, M.

    1997-07-01

    Goal was Assembly Test Chips (ATCs) which could be used for evaluating plastic encapsulation technologies. Circuits were demonstrated for measuring Au-Al wirebond and Al metal corrosion failure rates during accelerated temperature and humidity testing. The test circuits on the ATC02.5 chip were very sensitive to extrinsic or processing induced failure rates. Accelerated aging experiments were conducted with unpassivated triple track Al structures on the ATC02.6 chip; the unpassivated tracks were found to be very sensitive to particulate contamination. Some modifications to existing circuitry were suggested. The piezoresistive stress sensing circuitry designed for the ATC04 test chip was found suitable for determining the change in the state of mechanical stress at the die when both initial and final measurements were made near room temperature (RT). Attempt to measure thermal stress between RT and a typical polymer glass transition temperature failed because of excessive die resistor- substrate leakage currents at the high temperature end; suitable circuitry changes were developed to overcome this problem. One temperature and humidity experiment was conducted with Sandia developed static radom access memory parts to examine non-corrosion CMOS failures; this objective was not achieved, but corrosion failure at the metal to Si contacts on the die surface could be detected. This 2-year effort resulted in new designs for test circuits which could be used on an advanced ATC for reliability assessment in Defense Programs electronics development projects.

  1. Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    2014 Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics Cosmetic Procedure Trends 2014 Plastic Surgery Statistics Report Please credit the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PLASTIC SURGEONS when citing statistical data or using ...

  2. Plastics Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 16 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of plastics technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific occupation and would…

  3. Evaluation testing of solid encapsulated microcircuits for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. D.

    1977-01-01

    Epoxy encapsulated microcircuits were subjected to various thermal, vibration, thermal cycling, and reduced barometric pressure stress tests to obtain electrical, environmental, and failure data. Analyses of the data were employed to derive information on environmental and operating design limits to determine the capability of encapsulated microcircuits to perform in space applications and environments. Seven different part types (four TTL, two CMOS, one linear) from five different manufacturers were subjected to single, multiple, and combinational environmental stress levels to determine: (1) what failure mechanisms are unique to encapsulated microcircuits; (2) how believable are suppliers claims of improved reliability, (3) what stress tests and screens can be used to identify potential early failure, and (4) what stress tests and screens should be avoided to prevent unwanted life degradation.

  4. Microbes encapsulated within crosslinkable polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Chidambaram, Devicharan; Liu, Ying; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2013-02-05

    The invention relates to porous films comprising crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers. Viable microbes are encapsulated within the crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers. The crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers are water insoluble and permeable. The invention also relates to methods of making and using such porous films.

  5. Asbestos: The Case for Encapsulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russek, William F.

    1980-01-01

    Encapsulation has proven to be the safest, surest, and most permanent method of treating sprayed asbestos on ceilings and walls. Federal aid is available to help pay for inspection of school buildings for asbestos and for asbestos removal. (Author/MLF)

  6. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, Michael S.

    1995-01-01

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  7. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, M.S.

    1995-08-22

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired. 5 figs.

  8. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  9. Efficiencies in alginate encapsulation of vegetative explants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study was to improve a non-mechanized bulk encapsulation technique to standardize encapsulation procedures and reduce the labor time compared to encapsulating individual nodes. Four mm-long nodal segments from Stage II cultures of Hibiscus moscheutos L. ‘Lord Baltimore’ were encapsu...

  10. Recommended practices for encapsulating high voltage assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankisley, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    Preparation and encapsulation of high voltage assemblies are considered. Related problems in encapsulating are brought out in these instructions. A test sampling of four frequently used encapsulating compounds is shown in table form. The purpose of this table is to give a general idea of the working time available and the size of the container required for mixing and de-aerating.

  11. Photochromic plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, N.Y.C.

    1990-12-31

    The benefits of photochromic glazing materials as well as other switchable devices for solar control and/or use have been analyzed. The analysis indicates that the saving in cooling costs may be significant for a commercial building. This saving can be further increased if other solar control technologies which operate in the solar spectra region outside the visible range are integrated with photochromic property. Photochromic plastics have the advantage of readiness to integrate with other solar control technologies as in the case of retrofit polyester film. The glazing applications of spirooxazines have only been considered recently. The few examples described in the preceding section are just exploratory. Improvements in photochromic performance and durability are definitely probable as more spirooxazine compounds and formulations are tested and stabilization methods are discovered. Recently, an all plastic model house was constructed by General Electric in which both photochromic and electrochromic switchable windows were employed. Thus, commercialization of photochromic plastics for glazing applications may not be as remote as it was not too long ago. 66 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A wireless system for monitoring polymer encapsulations.

    PubMed

    von Metzen, Rene P; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We present a principle for monitoring of the electrical properties of polymers used as insulators for electrically active implants. This method can be used for measurements in vitro and in vivo with incomplex instrumentation. The system is based on the detuning of an oscillating circuit with an interdigital electrode (IDE) structure serving as a capacitive and resistive sensor within the oscillator. This circuit is powered via an inductive link from an external coil. The phase of the external coil's impedance is used to determine the resonance frequency and quality factor of the sensing part wirelessly. The research objective is to obtain detailed information about processes at the metal/polymer interface such as a change of the capacity due to altering of the dielectric constant (i.e. uptake of water vapor or condensation of water) and lowering of the quality factor because of leakage currents. With this information it is possible to detect if the encapsulation is stable, if degradation and loss of adhesion occurs, and if the metal corrodes. The method can be used to evaluate the long term stability of materials and technologies in vitro. The future application is to monitor the stability of implant encapsulations in situ to predict failures before they occur. PMID:18003538

  13. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  14. Photovoltaic module bypass diode encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented. The Semicon PN junction diode cells were selected. Diode junction to heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1 deg C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150 deg C. Three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed. Thermal testing of these modules enabled the formulation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally mounted packaged diodes. It is concluded that, when proper designed and installed, these bypass diode devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

  15. Liposome encapsulation of chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Rahman, Yueh Erh

    1976-01-13

    A method for transferring a chelating agent across a cellular membrane by encapsulating the charged chelating agent within liposomes and carrying the liposome-encapsulated chelating agent to the cellular membrane where the liposomes containing the chelating agent will be taken up by the cells, thereby transferring the chelating agent across the cellular membrane. A chelating agent can be introduced into the interior of a cell of a living organism wherein the liposomes will be decomposed, releasing the chelating agent to the interior of the cell. The released chelating agent will complex intracellularly deposited toxic heavy metals, permitting the more soluble metal complex to transfer across the cellular membrane from the cell and subsequently be removed from the living organism.

  16. Recent progress on thin-film encapsulation technologies for organic electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Duan; Yang, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Zheng; Tao, Ye; Liu, Yun-Fei

    2016-03-01

    Among the advanced electronic devices, flexible organic electronic devices with rapid development are the most promising technologies to customers and industries. Organic thin films accommodate low-cost fabrication and can exploit diverse molecules in inexpensive plastic light emitting diodes, plastic solar cells, and even plastic lasers. These properties may ultimately enable organic materials for practical applications in industry. However, the stability of organic electronic devices still remains a big challenge, because of the difficulty in fabricating commercial products with flexibility. These organic materials can be protected using substrates and barriers such as glass and metal; however, this results in a rigid device and does not satisfy the applications demanding flexible devices. Plastic substrates and transparent flexible encapsulation barriers are other possible alternatives; however, these offer little protection to oxygen and water, thus rapidly degrading the devices. Thin-film encapsulation (TFE) technology is most effective in preventing water vapor and oxygen permeation into the flexible devices. Because of these (and other) reasons, there has been an intense interest in developing transparent barrier materials with much lower permeabilities, and their market is expected to reach over 550 million by 2025. In this study, the degradation mechanism of organic electronic devices is reviewed. To increase the stability of devices in air, several TFE technologies were applied to provide efficient barrier performance. In this review, the degradation mechanism of organic electronic devices, permeation rate measurement, traditional encapsulation technologies, and TFE technologies are presented.

  17. Factors Influencing the Quality of Encapsulation in Rock Bolting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Naj; Craig, Peter; Mirzaghorbanali, Ali; Nemcik, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Bolt installation quality is influenced by various factors, some are well known and others are less recognised. A programme of field and laboratory studies was undertaken to examine various factors of relevance to the load transfer mechanism between the bolt, resin and rock to ensure test methods truly represent field performance. Short encapsulation tests were undertaken as part of the Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP) funded project (C21011) with the ultimate aim of developing standard test methods for assessing bolt encapsulation with chemical resin anchor installations. The field study consisted of a series of Short Encapsulation Pull Tests (SEPT) carried out in three mines with different geological conditions to determine the most representative and practical method of SEPT. Additional field work included installation of bolts into threaded steel tubes for subsequent removal and laboratory evaluation. A series of pull tests was carried out by installing bolts in overhead rig mounted sandstone block, cast in concrete with controlled encapsulation length. Factors of importance considered included; borehole diameter, resin annulus thickness, installation time (including bolt spin to the back and "spin at back"), the effect of gloving and hole over drill. It was found that the borehole diameter had a detrimental effect on the encapsulation bonding strength. Bolt installation time of approximately 10 s constituted an acceptable time for effective bolt installation and within the resin manufacturers recommended time of 14 s. Maintaining constant length of encapsulation was paramount for obtaining consistency and repeatability of the test results. Finally, a numerical simulation study was carried out to assess the capabilities of FLAC 2D software in simulating the pull testing of rock bolts.

  18. Encapsulant materials and associated devices

    DOEpatents

    Kempe, Michael D; Thapa, Prem

    2012-05-22

    Compositions suitable for use as encapsulants are described. The inventive compositions include a high molecular weight polymeric material, a curing agent, an inorganic compound, and a coupling agent. Optional elements include adhesion promoting agents, colorants, antioxidants, and UV absorbers. The compositions have desirable diffusivity properties, making them suitable for use in devices in which a substantial blocking of moisture ingress is desired, such as photovoltaic (PV) modules.

  19. Encapsulant materials and associated devices

    DOEpatents

    Kempe, Michael D; Thapa, Prem

    2011-03-08

    Compositions suitable for use as encapsulants are described. The inventive compositions include a high molecular weight polymeric material, a curing agent, an inorganic compound, and a coupling agent. Optional elements include adhesion promoting agents, colorants, antioxidants, and UV absorbers. The compositions have desirable diffusivity properties, making them suitable for use in devices in which a substantial blocking of moisture ingress is desired, such as photovoltaic (PV) modules.

  20. Novel nanotubes and encapsulated nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, M.; Hsu, W. K.; Schilder, A.; Terrones, H.; Grobert, N.; Hare, J. P.; Zhu, Y. Q.; Schwoerer, M.; Prassides, K.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    Carbon nanotubes, with or without encapsulated material, generated by arc discharge and electrolytic techniques have been studied. Microcrystals of refractory carbides (i.e. NbC, TaC, MoC), contained in nanotubes and polyhedral particles, produced by arcing electrodes of graphite/metal mixtures, were analysed by high hesolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray powder diffraction. Encapsulation of MoC was found to give rise to an unusual stable form, namely face-centered-cubic MoC. SQUID measurements indicate that the encapsulated carbides exhibit superconducting transitions at about 10-12 K, thus they differ from carbon nanotubes/nanoparticles which do not superconduct. Four-probe and microwave (contactless) conductivity measurements indicate that most of the analysed samples behave as semiconductors. However, metallic transport was observed in specimens containing single conglomerated carbon nanotube bundles and boron-doped carbon nanotubes. Novel metallic βSn nanowires were produced by electrolysis of graphite electrodes immersed in molten LiCl/SnCl2 mixtures. Prolonged electron irradiation of these nanowires leads to axial growth and to dynamic transformations. These observations suggest ways in which materials may be modified by microencapsulation and irradiation.

  1. Process for Encapsulating Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Mosier, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    A process for growing protein crystals encapsulated within membranes has been invented. This process begins with the encapsulation of a nearly saturated aqueous protein solution inside semipermeable membranes to form microcapsules. The encapsulation is effected by use of special formulations of a dissolved protein and a surfactant in an aqueous first liquid phase, which is placed into contact with a second, immiscible liquid phase that contains one or more polymers that are insoluble in the first phase. The second phase becomes formed into the semipermeable membranes that surround microglobules of the first phase, thereby forming the microcapsules. Once formed, the microcapsules are then dehydrated osmotically by exposure to a concentrated salt or polymer solution. The dehydration forms supersaturated solutions inside the microcapsules, thereby enabling nucleation and growth of protein crystals inside the microcapsules. By suitable formulation of the polymer or salt solution and of other physical and chemical parameters, one can control the rate of transport of water out of the microcapsules through the membranes and thereby create physicochemical conditions that favor the growth, within each microcapsule, of one or a few large crystals suitable for analysis by x-ray diffraction. The membrane polymer can be formulated to consist of low-molecular-weight molecules that do not interfere with the x-ray diffraction analysis of the encapsulated crystals. During dehydration, an electrostatic field can be applied to exert additional control over the rate of dehydration. This protein-crystal-encapsulation process is expected to constitute the basis of protein-growth experiments to be performed on the space shuttle and the International Space Station. As envisioned, the experiments would involve the exposure of immiscible liquids to each other in sequences of steps under microgravitational conditions. The experiments are expected to contribute to knowledge of the precise

  2. Thermal modeling of an epoxy encapsulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, R.G.; Schutt, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The encapsulation of components is a widely used process at Sandia National Laboratories for packaging components to withstand structural loads. Epoxy encapsulants are also used for their outstanding dielectric strength characteristics. The production of high voltage assemblies requires the encapsulation of ceramic and electrical components (such as transformers). Separation of the encapsulant from internal contact surfaces or voids within the encapsulant itself in regions near the mold base have caused high voltage breakdown failures during production testing. In order to understand the failure mechanisms, a methodology was developed to predict both the thermal response and gel front progression of the epoxy the encapsulation process. A thermal model constructed with PATRAN Plus (1) and solved with the P/THERMAL (2) analysis system was used to predict the thermal response of the encapsulant. This paper discusses the incorporation of an Arrhenius kinetics model into Q/TRAN (2) to model the complex volumetric heat generation of the epoxy during the encapsulation process. As the epoxy begins to cure, it generates heat and shrinks. The total cure time of the encapsulant (transformation from a viscous liquid to solid) is dependent on both the initial temperature and the entire temperature history. Because the rate of cure is temperature dependent, the cure rate accelerates with a temperature increase and, likewise, the cure rate is quenched if the temperature is reduced. The temperature and conversion predictions compared well against experimental data. The thermal simulation results were used to modify the temperature cure process of the encapsulant and improve production yields.

  3. Encapsulation methods for organic electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Blum, Yigal D.; Chu, William Siu-Keung; MacQueen, David Brent; Shi, Yijian

    2013-06-18

    The disclosure provides methods and materials suitable for use as encapsulation barriers in electronic devices. In one embodiment, for example, there is provided an electroluminescent device or other electronic device encapsulated by alternating layers of a silicon-containing bonding material and a ceramic material. The encapsulation methods provide, for example, electronic devices with increased stability and shelf-life. The invention is useful, for example, in the field of microelectronic devices.

  4. Applications of ethylene vinyl acetate as an encapsulation material for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Coulbert, C. D.; Liang, R. H.; Gupta, A.; Willis, P.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    Terrestrial photovoltaic modules must undergo substantial reductions in cost in order to become economically attractive as practical devices for large scale production of electricity. Part of the cost reductions must be realized by the encapsulation materials that are used to package, protect, and support the solar cells, electrical interconnects, and other ancillary components. As many of the encapsulation materials are polymeric, cost reductions necessitate the use of low cost polymers. The performance and status of ethylene vinyl acetate, a low cost polymer that is being investigated as an encapsulation material for terrestrial photovoltaic modules, are described.

  5. Application for Approval of Modification for the 105-KE Basin Encapsulation Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This application is being submitted to US EPA pursuant to Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61.07, amended. The encapsulation activity will consist of the activities necessary to complete encapsulation of the fuel elements and sludge in 105-KE basin, a storage basin for irradiated N Reactor fuel in Hanford 100-K Area; it currently stores 1,150 MTU of N Reactor irradiated fuel elements transferred to the basin from 1975 through 1989. The application presents the chemical and physical processes relating to the encapsulation activity, source term, expected annual emissions, radionuclide control and monitoring equipment, and projected dose to the maximally exposed individual.

  6. Liposome-encapsulated actinomycin for cancer chemotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Rahman, Yueh-Erh; Cerny, Elizabeth A.

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for chemotherapy of malignant tumors by injection of antitumor drugs. The antitumor drug is encapsulated within liposomes and the liposomes containing the encapsulated drug are injected into the body. The encapsulated drug penetrates into the tumor cells where the drug is slowly released and induces degeneration and death of the tumor cells, while any toxicity to the host body is reduced. Liposome encapsulation of actinomycin D has been found to be particularly effective in treating cancerous abdominal tumors, while drastically reducing the toxicity of actinomycin D to the host.

  7. Effects of epoxy/hardener stoichiometry on structures and properties of a diethanolamine-cured epoxy encapsulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. F.; Xiao, M. Z.; Wu, Z.; Peng, K.; Han, C. M.; Xiang, W.; Dai, J. Y.

    2016-07-01

    For the epoxy encapsulant cured by diethanolamine, optimal epoxy/hardener stoichiometry could hardly be predicted due to the complex curing mechanisms. In this paper, the influences of stoichiometry were investigated by FTIR, DMA and tensile testing. The results showed that stoichiometry has a dominating effect on both Tg and tensile properties of the cured epoxy. The largest Tg , highest crosslink density as well as excellent ductility appeared in epoxy encapsulant cured with 14 wt% diethanolmine. When the content of diethanolamine was lower than 14 wt%, epoxy encapsulants showed smaller glycidyl conversion even with long-duration post-cure. Larger tensile strength and modulus were also observed in the glycidyl-rich epoxies, which could be explained by anti-plasticization effect. The amine-rich epoxy, however, had extremely high glycidyl conversion and presented brittle tensile behavior. A diethanolamine content of 12-14 wt% for the epoxy encapsulant is suggested to obtain optimal thermal and tensile properties.

  8. The John D. Constable International Traveling Fellowship: A Reciprocal Education in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eberlin, Kyle R; Del Frari, Barbara; Dai, Xinyi; Austen, William G

    2015-06-01

    The John D. Constable International Traveling Fellowship has been an integral part of the American Association of Plastic Surgeons since 2006 and has provided an opportunity for international plastic surgeons to work with leaders in American plastic surgery. PMID:26080120

  9. Alginate-Encapsulation for the Improved Hypothermic Preservation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Swioklo, Stephen; Constantinescu, Andrei; Connon, Che J

    2016-03-01

    Despite considerable progress within the cell therapy industry, unmet bioprocessing and logistical challenges associated with the storage and distribution of cells between sites of manufacture and the clinic exist. We examined whether hypothermic (4°C-23°C) preservation of human adipose-derived stem cells could be improved through their encapsulation in 1.2% calcium alginate. Alginate encapsulation improved the recovery of viable cells after 72 hours of storage. Viable cell recovery was highly temperature-dependent, with an optimum temperature of 15°C. At this temperature, alginate encapsulation preserved the ability for recovered cells to attach to tissue culture plastic on rewarming, further increasing its effect on total cell recovery. On attachment, the cells were phenotypically normal, displayed normal growth kinetics, and maintained their capacity for trilineage differentiation. The number of cells encapsulated (up to 2 × 10(6) cells per milliliter) did not affect viable cell recovery nor did storage of encapsulated cells in a xeno-free, serum-free,current Good Manufacturing Practice-grade medium. We present a simple, low-cost system capable of enhancing the preservation of human adipose-derived stem cells stored at hypothermic temperatures, while maintaining their normal function. The storage of cells in this manner has great potential for extending the time windows for quality assurance and efficacy testing, distribution between the sites of manufacture and the clinic, and reducing the wastage associated with the limited shelf life of cells stored in their liquid state. PMID:26826163

  10. Treatment studies of paint stripping waste from plastic media blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    Blasting with plastic media is used to strip paint and decontaminate surfaces. For disposal the plastic media is pulverized into a plastic dust. About 10 wt % of the waste from plastic media blasting is pulverized paint, which makes the waste a characteristically hazardous waste because of the presence of barium, cadmium, chromium and lead in the paint pigments. Four separate treatments of this hazardous waste were studied: (1) density separation to remove the paint, (2) self-encapsulation of the mix of plastic and paint dust into plastic pellets, (3) solidification/stabilization (S/S) into cementitious waste forms, and (4) low-temperature ashing to destroy the large mass of nonhazardous polymer. Two types of plast blasting wastes were studied: a urea formaldehyde thermoset polymer and an acrylic thermoplastic polymer (polymethylmethacrylate). Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP) extraction concentrations for the treated and untreated wastes are listed. Density separation failed to adequately separate the paint with an aqueous carbonate solution. Self-encapsulation reduced the waste volume by about 50%, but did not meet TCLP criteria. Cementitious solidification gave the lowest TCLP concentrations, but increased the waste volume by about 50%. Low-temperature ashing at 600 C resulted in a mass decrease of 93 to 98% for the wastes; the metals remaining in the ash could be stabilized with cementitious solidification and still result in a volume decrease of 75 to 95 volume percent.

  11. Review of potential processing techniques for the encapsulation of wastes in thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, B.R.; Lageraaen, P.R.; Kalb, P.D.

    1995-08-01

    Thermoplastic encapsulation has been extensively studied at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) Environmental and Waste Technology Center (EWTC) as a waste encapsulation technology applicable to a wide range of waste types including radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. Encapsulation involves processing thermoplastic and waste materials into a waste form product by heating and mixing both materials into a homogeneous molten mixture. Cooling of the melt results in a solid monolithic waste form in which contaminants have been completely surrounded by a polymer matrix. Heating and mixing requirements for successful waste encapsulation can be met using proven technologies available in various types of commercial equipment. Processing techniques for thermoplastic materials, such as low density polyethylene (LDPE), are well established within the plastics industry. The majority of commercial polymer processing is accomplished using extruders, mixers or a combination of these technologies. Extruders and mixers are available in a broad range of designs and are used during the manufacture of consumer and commercial products as well as for compounding applications. Compounding which refers to mixing additives such as stabilizers and/or colorants with polymers, is analogous to thermoplastic encapsulation. Several processing technologies were investigated for their potential application in encapsulating residual sorbent waste in selected thermoplastic polymers, including single-screw extruders, twin-screw extruders, continuous mixers, batch mixers as well as other less conventional devices. Each was evaluated based on operational ease, quality control, waste handling capabilities as well as degree of waste pretreatment required. Based on literature review, this report provides a description of polymer processing technologies, a discussion of the merits and limitations of each and an evaluation of their applicability to the encapsulation of sorbent wastes.

  12. Transmission laser welding of plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Paul A.; Jones, I. A.; Kennish, Y.

    2003-03-01

    The use of lasers for welding plastics was demonstrated in the early 1970s. However, it was not until late in the 1990s that production applications started to be considered widely. This followed the broad realization that by selection of a suitable combination of radiation wavelength and plastics additives, to control light transmission and absorption, heat could be generated at the joint of a pre-assembled part without melting its outer surfaces. It is of added benefit that the window of transmission for an unpigmented and unfilled plastic typically covers the wavelengths delivered by small and cost effective diode lasers. Recent developments in the transmission laser welding process for plastics are discussed, including methods for the generation of welds between two clear plastics, application of similar techniques to the joining of thermoplastic textiles and new equipment, able to heat a complete joint and assist in the sealing of assemblies where the joint surfaces are not particuarly smooth. An analytical heat flow model for the welding of clear plastics is shown in use for selecting process parameters.

  13. Lipid encapsulated docosahexaenoic acid methyl ester

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Encapsulation of structurally sensitive compounds within a solid lipid matrix provides a barrier to prooxidant compounds and effectively limits the extent of oxidative degradation. Encapsulated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) methyl ester was examined as a model compound for functional foods and feeds. S...

  14. Attaching strain gages by ultrasonic plastic welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, A. T.; Silbert, L.

    1977-01-01

    Technique employs application of pressure and ultrasound to effect welding of encapsulated strain gates to metallic surfaces. Process requires no heat or adhesives. Technique might also be used to simplify curing of epoxy adhesives and for attachment problems like bonding cryogenic temperature sensors to structural parts.

  15. Laser welding of plastics: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Peter A.

    1995-10-01

    The process of laser welding of plastics is studied theoretically and experimentally. Welding of cylindrical parts made from polycarbonate and polypropylene is presented as examples. A good correspondence between theoretical and experimental results is found. Some practical aspects of laser welding of plastics are given.

  16. Point contacts in encapsulated graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Handschin, Clevin; Fülöp, Bálint; Csonka, Szabolcs; Makk, Péter; Blanter, Sofya; Weiss, Markus; Schönenberger, Christian; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2015-11-02

    We present a method to establish inner point contacts with dimensions as small as 100 nm on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) encapsulated graphene heterostructures by pre-patterning the top-hBN in a separate step prior to dry-stacking. 2- and 4-terminal field effect measurements between different lead combinations are in qualitative agreement with an electrostatic model assuming point-like contacts. The measured contact resistances are 0.5–1.5 kΩ per contact, which is quite low for such small contacts. By applying a perpendicular magnetic field, an insulating behaviour in the quantum Hall regime was observed, as expected for inner contacts. The fabricated contacts are compatible with high mobility graphene structures and open up the field for the realization of several electron optical proposals.

  17. Plasmon excitations for encapsulated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbs, Godfrey; Horing, N. J. M.; Iurov, Andrii; Dahal, Dipendra

    2016-06-01

    We have developed an analytical formulation to calculate the plasmon dispersion relation for a two-dimensional layer which is encapsulated within a narrow spatial gap between two bulk half-space plasmas. This is based on a solution of the inverse dielectric function integral equation within the random-phase approximation (RPA). We take into account the nonlocality of the plasmon dispersion relation for both gapped and gapless graphene as the sandwiched two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor plasma. The associated nonlocal graphene plasmon spectrum coupled to the ‘sandwich’ system is exhibited in density plots, which show a linear mode and a pair of depolarization modes shifted from the bulk plasma frequency.

  18. Nonlinear Echoes from Encapsulated Antibubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Kristoffer; Kotopoulis, Spiros; Poortinga, Albert T.; Postema, Michiel

    An antibubble consists of a liquid droplet, surrounded by a gas, often with an encapsulating shell. Antibubbles of microscopic sizes suspended in fluids are acoustically active in the ultrasonic range. Antibubbles have applications in food processing and guided drug delivery. We study the sound generated from antibubbles, with droplet core sizes in the range of 0-90% of the equilibrium antibubble inner radius. The antibubble resonance frequency, the phase difference of the echo with respect to the incident acoustic pulse, and the presence of higher harmonics are strongly dependent of the core droplet size. Antibubbles oscillate highly nonlinearly around resonance size. This may allow for using antibubbles in clinical diagnostic imaging and targeted drug delivery.

  19. Feasibility Study of Solar Dome Encapsulation of Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The technical and economic advantages of using air-supported plastic enclosures to protect flat plate photovoltaic arrays are described. Conceptual designs for a fixed, latitude-tilt array and a fully tracking array were defined. Detailed wind loads and strength analyses were performed for the fixed array. Detailed thermal and power output analyses provided array performance for typical seasonal and extreme temperature conditions. Costs of each design as used in a 200 MWe central power station were defined from manufacturing and material cost estimates. The capital cost and cost of energy for the enclosed fixed-tilt array were lower than for the enclosed tracking array. The enclosed fixed-tilt array capital investment was 38% less, and the levelized bus bar energy cost was 26% less than costs for a conventional, glass-encapsulated array design. The predicted energy cost for the enclosed fixed array was 79 mills/kW-h for direct current delivered to the power conditioning units.

  20. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III; Kallis, J. M.; Trucker, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical models were developed to perform optical, thermal, electrical and structural analyses on candidate encapsulation systems. From these analyses several candidate encapsulation systems were selected for qualification testing.

  1. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials section, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tests for chemical structure, material properties, water absorption, aging and curing agent of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) and UV absorption studies are carried out. A computer model was developed for thermal optical modeling, to investigate dependence between module operating temperature and solar insolation, and heat dissapation behavior. Structural analyses were performed in order to determine the stress distribution under wind and heat conditions. Curves are shown for thermal loading conditions. An electrical isolation was carried out to investigate electrical stress aging of non-metallic encapsulation materials and limiting material flaws, and to develop a computer model of electrical fields and stresses in encapsulation materials. In addition, a mathematical model was developed and tests were conducted to predict hygroscopic and thermal expansion and contraction on a plastic coated wooden substrate. Thermal cycle and humidity freezing cycle tests, partial discharge tests, and hail impact tests were also carried out. Finally, the effects of soiling on the surface of photovoltaic modules were investigated. Two antisoiling coatings, a fluorinated silane and perflourodecanoic acid were considered.

  2. Wire Bond Encapsulation for the CMS Forward Pixel Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbotham, Sam; CMS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Phase 1 upgrade of the pixel tracker for the CMS experiment will require the assembly of approximately 1000 modules consisting of pixel sensors bump bonded to readout chips. Electrical connections between the custom readout chips and support ASIC's that constitute the front-end of the pixel data acquisition system are made via wire bonds to a thin printed circuit board. Part of the assembly process carried out at Purdue University includes the partial encapsulation of the wire bonds for mechanical protection, prevention of electrolytic corrosion, and to damp oscillations due to Lorentz forces from transient current pulses in large magnetic fields. We present the details of the robotic assembly process which allows the deposition of the viscous encapsulant compound with 100 micron precision.

  3. Polyethylene encapsulation full-scale technology demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Lageraaen, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    A full-scale integrated technology demonstration of a polyethylene encapsulation process, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD), was conducted at the Environmental & Waste Technology Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL.) in September 1994. As part of the Polymer Solidification National Effort, polyethylene encapsulation has been developed and tested at BNL as an alternative solidification technology for improved, cost-effective treatment of low-level radioactive (LLW), hazardous and mixed wastes. A fully equipped production-scale system, capable of processing 900 kg/hr (2000 lb/hr), has been installed at BNL. The demonstration covered all facets of the integrated processing system including pre-treatment of aqueous wastes, precise feed metering, extrusion processing, on-line quality control monitoring, and process control.

  4. Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman; Noble, David F. ); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James; Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-06-01

    As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

  5. Encapsulation of orange terpenes investigating a plasticisation extrusion process.

    PubMed

    Tackenberg, Markus W; Krauss, Ralph; Schuchmann, Heike P; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Extrusion is widely used for flavour encapsulation. However, there is a lack of process understanding. This study is aimed at improving the understanding of a counter rotating twin screw extrusion process. Orange terpenes as model flavour, maltodextrin and sucrose as matrix materials, and a water feed rate between 4.0% and 5.7% were applied. Product temperatures < 80 °C and specific mechanical energy inputs <260 Wh/kg resulted. Amorphous and partly crystalline samples were obtained. The loss of crystalline sucrose was linked to a dissolution process of the sugar in the available water amount. Melting of the excipients did not arise, resulting in a plasticisation extrusion process. Maximally 67% of the flavour was retained (corresponding to a 4.1% product flavour load). The flavour loss correlated with insufficient mixing during the process and flavour evaporation after extrusion. Based on these results, recommendations for an improved encapsulation process are given. PMID:26052721

  6. Encapsulation effects on carbonaceous aerosol light absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Onasch, T.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-03-15

    The contribution of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering and, in part, because the primary absorbing aerosol of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan and Carmichael (2008) who suggest that incorporating the atmospheric heating due to brown clouds (plumes containing soot byproducts from automobiles, biomass burning, wood-burning kitchen stoves, and coal-fired power plants) will increase black carbon (BC) radiative forcing from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change best estimate of 0.34 Wm-2 (±0.25 Wm-2) (IPCC 2007) to 0.9 Wm-2. This noteworthy degree of uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes as the particle ages in the atmosphere and becomes encapsulated within a coating of inorganic and/or organic substances. In July 2008, a laboratory-based measurement campaign, led by Boston College and Aerodyne, was initiated to begin addressing this interdependence. To achieve insights into the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, measurements of both the optical and physical properties of flame-generated soot under nascent, coated, and denuded conditions were conducted. This poster presents data on black carbon (BC) light absorption measured by Photothermal Interferometry (Sedlacek and Lee 2007). In addition to examining nascent BC—to provide a baseline measurement—encapsulation with varying thicknesses of either dioctyl sebacate (DOS) or sulfuric acid was conducted to glean insights into the interplay between particle mixing state and optical properties. Additionally, some experiments were carried out where BC was coated and then denuded. In the case of DOS-coated soot, a

  7. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, R. S.; Lagasse, R. R.; Guess, T. R.; Plazek, D. J.; Bero, C.

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e.g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component's protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies.

  8. Integral Glass Encapsulation for Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, P. R.; Tobin, R. G.; Kreisman, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Work reported was performed during the period from August 1977 to December 1978. The program objective was to continue the development of electrostatic bonding (ESB) as an encapsulation technique for terrestrial cells. Economic analyses shows that this process can be a cost-effective method of producing reliable, long lifetime solar modules. When considered in sufficient volume, both material and equipment costs are competitive with conventional encapsulation systems. In addition, the possibility of integrating cell fabrication into the encapsulation process, as in the case of the preformed cell contacts discussed in this report, offers the potential of significant overall systems cost reduction.

  9. Essential oils: from extraction to encapsulation.

    PubMed

    El Asbahani, A; Miladi, K; Badri, W; Sala, M; Aït Addi, E H; Casabianca, H; El Mousadik, A; Hartmann, D; Jilale, A; Renaud, F N R; Elaissari, A

    2015-04-10

    Essential oils are natural products which have many interesting applications. Extraction of essential oils from plants is performed by classical and innovative methods. Numerous encapsulation processes have been developed and reported in the literature in order to encapsulate biomolecules, active molecules, nanocrystals, oils and also essential oils for various applications such as in vitro diagnosis, therapy, cosmetic, textile, food etc. Essential oils encapsulation led to numerous new formulations with new applications. This insures the protection of the fragile oil and controlled release. The most commonly prepared carriers are polymer particles, liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles. PMID:25683145

  10. Hermetic encapsulation technique for solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deminet, C.; Horne, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    A concept is presented for encapsulating solar cells between two layers of glass either individually, in panels, or in a continuous process. The concept yields an integral unit that is hermetically sealed and that is tolerant to high temperature thermal cycling and to particulate radiation. Data are presented on both high temperature solar cells and special glasses that soften at low temperatures for use with the concept. The results of encapsulating experiments are presented which show the successful application of the concept to the special high temperature cells. The mechanical feasibility of encapsulating 2 mil cells between two layers of 2 mil glass is also demonstrated.

  11. 49 CFR 192.375 - Service lines: Plastic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Plastic. 192.375 Section 192.375... § 192.375 Service lines: Plastic. (a) Each plastic service line outside a building must be installed... terminate above ground level and outside the building, if— (i) The above ground level part of the...

  12. 49 CFR 192.375 - Service lines: Plastic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Plastic. 192.375 Section 192.375... § 192.375 Service lines: Plastic. (a) Each plastic service line outside a building must be installed... terminate above ground level and outside the building, if— (i) The above ground level part of the...

  13. 49 CFR 192.375 - Service lines: Plastic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Plastic. 192.375 Section 192.375... § 192.375 Service lines: Plastic. (a) Each plastic service line outside a building must be installed... terminate above ground level and outside the building, if— (i) The above ground level part of the...

  14. 49 CFR 192.375 - Service lines: Plastic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Plastic. 192.375 Section 192.375... § 192.375 Service lines: Plastic. (a) Each plastic service line outside a building must be installed... terminate above ground level and outside the building, if— (i) The above ground level part of the...

  15. 49 CFR 192.375 - Service lines: Plastic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Plastic. 192.375 Section 192.375... § 192.375 Service lines: Plastic. (a) Each plastic service line outside a building must be installed... terminate above ground level and outside the building, if— (i) The above ground level part of the...

  16. MIPP Plastic Ball electronics upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Baldin, Boris; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    An upgrade electronics design for Plastic Ball detector is described. The Plastic Ball detector was a part of several experiments in the past and its back portion (proposed to be used in MIPP) consists of 340 photomultipliers equipped with a sandwich scintillator. The scintillator sandwich has fast and slow signal component with decay times 10 ns and 1 {micro}s respectively. The upgraded MIPP experiment will collect up to 12,000 events during each 4 second spill and read them out in {approx}50 seconds between spills. The MIPP data acquisition system will employ deadtime-less concept successfully implemented in Muon Electronics of Dzero experiment at Fermilab. An 8-channel prototype design of the Plastic Ball Front End (PBFE) implementing these requirements is discussed. Details of the schematic design, simulation and prototype test results are discussed.

  17. Safe epoxy encapsulant for high voltage magnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Archer, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Formula 456, an aliphatic amine cured epoxy for impregnating coils and high voltage transformers. Sandia has evaluated a number of MDA-free epoxy encapsulants which relied on either anhydride or other aromatic amine curing agents. The use of aliphatic amine curing agents was more recently evaluated and has resulted in the definition of Formula 456 resin. Methylene dianiline (MDA) has been used for more than 20 years as the curing agent for various epoxy formulations throughout the Department of Energy and much of industry. Sandia National Laboratories began the process of replacing MDA with other formulations because of regulations imposed by OSHA on the use of MDA. OSHA has regulated MDA because it is a suspect carcinogen. Typically the elimination of OSHA-regulated materials provides a rare opportunity to qualify new formulations in a range of demanding applications. It was important to take full advantage of that opportunity, although the associated materials qualification effort was costly. Small high voltage transformers are one of those demanding applications. The successful implementation of the new formulation for high reliability transformers will be described. The test results that demonstrate the parts are qualified for use in DOE weapon systems will be presented.

  18. Growth of FePt encapsulated carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Yuji Kaneko, Tetsuya; Hori, Kenta; Takase, Sho; Sato, Hideki; Maeda, Kohji; Kobayashi, Tadashi; Kato, Takeshi; Iwata, Satoshi; Jimbo, Mutsuko

    2014-03-15

    FePt encapsulated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition using an Fe/Pt bilayer catalyst. The CNTs were grown according to the base growth model. Selected area electron diffraction results revealed that the encapsulated particles were A1-FePt, L1{sub 0}-FePt, and Fe{sub 3}PtC. The crystal structures of particles found at the root parts of CNTs were not able to be identified, however. The layered structure of catalytic films seemed to be responsible for the difference in Pt content between particles found at tip and root parts of CNTs. Approximately 60% of CNTs grown at 800 °C had particles at their tip parts, compared to only 30% when the growth temperature was 700 °C, indicating that higher process temperatures promote particle encapsulation in CNTs.

  19. Encapsulation process sterilizes and preserves surgical instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. C.; Morelli, F. A.

    1964-01-01

    Ethylene oxide is blended with an organic polymer to form a sterile material for encapsulating surgical instruments. The material does not bond to metal and can be easily removed when the instruments are needed.

  20. A hybrid encapsulation method for organic electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, N.; Graham, S.; Potscavage, W. J. Jr.; Domercq, B.; Kippelen, B.

    2009-04-20

    We report a thin-film encapsulation method for organic electronics that combines the deposition of a layer of SiO{sub x} or SiN{sub x} (100 nm) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by a layer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (10-50 nm) by atomic layer deposition and a 1-{mu}m-thick layer of parylene by chemical vapor deposition. The effective water vapor transmission rates of the encapsulation was (2{+-}1)x10{sup -5} g/m{sup 2} day at 20 deg. C and 50% relative humidity (RH). The encapsulation was integrated with pentacene/C{sub 60} solar cells, which showed no decrease in conversion efficiency after 5800 h of exposure to air demonstrating the effectiveness of the encapsulation methodology.

  1. Statistical Modeling of Single Target Cell Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Moon, SangJun; Ceyhan, Elvan; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    High throughput drop-on-demand systems for separation and encapsulation of individual target cells from heterogeneous mixtures of multiple cell types is an emerging method in biotechnology that has broad applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, genomics, and cryobiology. However, cell encapsulation in droplets is a random process that is hard to control. Statistical models can provide an understanding of the underlying processes and estimation of the relevant parameters, and enable reliable and repeatable control over the encapsulation of cells in droplets during the isolation process with high confidence level. We have modeled and experimentally verified a microdroplet-based cell encapsulation process for various combinations of cell loading and target cell concentrations. Here, we explain theoretically and validate experimentally a model to isolate and pattern single target cells from heterogeneous mixtures without using complex peripheral systems. PMID:21814548

  2. Palisaded Encapsulated Neuroma of the Trunk: A Case Report and Review of Palisaded Encapsulated Neuroma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    Palisaded encapsulated neuroma is a rare, benign cutaneous tumor. It most commonly presents as a solitary, flesh-colored, dome-shaped nodule affecting the face. However, albeit rarely, palisaded encapsulated neuroma may also appear on the trunk, genitals, or extremities. We describe the clinical and pathologic findings of a male patient who presented with a palisaded encapsulated neuroma on his left flank. In addition, we review the characteristics of patients with truncal palisaded encapsulated neuromas and summarize the clinical and histologic differential diagnosis of this tumor.

  3. Sol-gel encapsulation for controlled drug release and biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jonathan

    The main focus of this dissertation is to investigate the use of sol-gel encapsulation of biomolecules for controlled drug release and biosensing. Controlled drug release has advantages over conventional therapies in that it maintains a constant, therapeutic drug level in the body for prolonged periods of time. The anti-hypertensive drug Captopril was encapsulated in sol-gel materials of various forms, such as silica xerogels and nanoparticles. The primary objective was to show that sol-gel silica materials are promising drug carriers for controlled release by releasing Captopril at a release rate that is within a therapeutic range. We were able to demonstrate desired release for over a week from Captopril-doped silica xerogels and overall release from Captopril-doped silica nanoparticles. As an aside, the antibiotic Vancomycin was also encapsulated in these porous silica nanoparticles and desired release was obtained for several days in-vitro. The second part of the dissertation focuses on immobilizing antibodies and proteins in sol-gel to detect various analytes, such as hormones and amino acids. Sol-gel competitive immunoassays on antibody-doped silica xerogels were used for hormone detection. Calibration for insulin and C-peptide in standard solutions was obtained in the nM range. In addition, NASA-Ames is also interested in developing a reagentless biosensor using bacterial periplasmic binding proteins (bPBPs) to detect specific biomarkers, such as amino acids and phosphate. These bPBPs were doubly labeled with two different fluorophores and encapsulated in silica xerogels. Ligand-binding experiments were performed on the bPBPs in solution and in sol-gel. Ligand-binding was monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the two fluorophores on the bPBP. Titration data show that one bPBP has retained its ligand-binding properties in sol-gel.

  4. Encapsulated Thermoelectric Modules for Advanced Thermoelectric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Jinushi, Takahiro; Ishijima, Zenzo

    2014-06-01

    An encapsulated thermoelectric (TE) module consists of a vacuum-tight stainless-steel container in which an SiGe or BiTe TE module is encapsulated. This construction enables maximum performance and durability because: the thermal expansion mismatch between the hot and cold sides of the container can be accommodated by a sliding sheet in the container; the TE module inside is always kept in a vacuum environment, therefore no oxidation can occur; and the pressure difference between the inside and outside of the container reduces thermal contact resistance inside the container. Our encapsulated SiGe module features higher operating temperature—up to 650°C for both hot and cold sides. Other high-temperature modules and conventional BiTe modules, including both-sides and one-side skeleton types, have been encapsulated. Several variants of the encapsulated module are available. Encapsulated thermoelectric modules with integrated coolers contain cooling panels through which water can pass. If the module hot side is heated by a radiating heat source (radiation coupling) or convection of a hot gas or fluid (convection coupling), no pressing force on the module is necessary. It therefore features minimum contact resistance with the cooling duct, because no pressure is applied, maximum TE power, and minimum installation cost. Another, larger, variant is a quadruple flexible container in which four modules (each of maximum size 40 mm × 40 mm) are encapsulated. These encapsulated modules were used in a powder metallurgy furnace and were in use for more than 3000 h. Application to cryogenic temperatures simulating the liquid nitrogen gas vaporizer has been also attempted.

  5. Periodontal Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ...

  6. Plasticity and Geotechnics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hai-Sui

    Plasticity and Geotechnics is the first attempt to summarize and present, in one volume, the major developments achieved to date in the field of plasticity theory for geotechnical materials and its applications to geotechnical analysis and design.

  7. Ear Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  8. Plastic Surgery for Teenagers

    MedlinePlus

    ... or severe acne and scarring. Teens frequently gain self-esteem and confidence when their physical problems are corrected. ... art as a helpful index of anxiety and self-esteem with plastic surgery. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 2002. ...

  9. Spectral perturbations from silicon diode detector encapsulation and shielding in photon fields

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjoe, Anders

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Silicon diodes are widely used as detectors for relative dose measurements in radiotherapy. The common manufacturing practice is to encapsulate the diodes in plastic for protection and to facilitate mounting in scanning devices. Diodes intended for use in photon fields commonly also have a shield of a high atomic number material (usually tungsten) integrated into the encapsulation to selectively absorb low-energy photons to which silicon diodes would otherwise over-response. However, new response models based on cavity theories and spectra calculations have been proposed for direct correction of the readout from unshielded (e.g., ''electron'') diodes used in photon fields. This raises the question whether it is correct to assume that the spectrum in a water phantom at the location of the detector cavity is not perturbed by the detector encapsulation materials. The aim of this work is to investigate the spectral effects of typical encapsulations, including shielding, used for clinical diodes. Methods: The effects of detector encapsulation of an unshielded and a shielded commercial diode on the spectra at the detector cavity location are studied through Monte Carlo simulations with PENELOPE-2005. Variance reduction based on correlated sampling is applied to reduce the CPU time needed for the simulations. Results: The use of correlated sampling is found to be efficient and to not introduce any significant bias to the results. Compared to reference spectra calculated in water, the encapsulation for an unshielded diode is demonstrated to not perturb the spectrum, while a tungsten shielded diode caused not only the desired decrease in low-energy scattered photons but also a large increase of the primary electron fluence. Measurements with a shielded diode in a 6 MV photon beam proved that the shielding does not completely remove the field-size dependence of the detector response caused by the over-response from low-energy photons. Response factors of a properly

  10. Glass fiber reinforced plastics within the fringe and flexure tracker of LINC-NIRVANA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smajic, Semir; Eckart, A.; Horrobin, M.; Lindhorst, B.; Pott, J.-U.; Rauch, C.; Rost, S.; Straubmeier, C.; Tremou, E.; Wank, I.; Zuther, J.

    2012-07-01

    The Fringe and Flexure Tracking System (FFTS) is meant to monitor and correct atmospheric piston varia­ tion and instrumental vibrations and flexure during near-infrared interferometric image acquisition of LING­ NIRVANA. In close work with the adaptive optics system the FFTS enables homothetic imaging for the Large Binocular Telescope. One of the main problems we had to face is the connection between the cryogenic upper part of the instrument, e.g. detector head, and the lower ambient temperature part. In this ambient temperature part the moving stages are situated that move the detector head in the given field of view (FOV). We show how we solved this problem using the versatile material glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP's) and report in what way this material can be worked. We discuss in detail the exquisite characteristics of this material which we use to combine the cryogenic and ambient environments to a fully working system. The main characteristics that we focus on are the low temperature conduction and the tensile strength of the GFRP's. The low temperature conduction is needed to allow for a low heat-exchange between the cryogenic and ambient part whereas the tensile strength is needed to support heavy structures like the baffle motor and to allow for a minimum of flexure for the detector head. Additionally, we discuss the way we attached the GFRP to the remaining parts of the FFTS using a two component encapsulant.

  11. Use of recycled plastics in concrete: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Gu, Lei; Ozbakkaloglu, Togay

    2016-05-01

    Plastics have become an essential part of our modern lifestyle, and the global plastic production has increased immensely during the past 50years. This has contributed greatly to the production of plastic-related waste. Reuse of waste and recycled plastic materials in concrete mix as an environmental friendly construction material has drawn attention of researchers in recent times, and a large number of studies reporting the behavior of concrete containing waste and recycled plastic materials have been published. This paper summarizes the current published literature until 2015, discussing the material properties and recycling methods of plastic and the influence of plastic materials on the properties of concrete. To provide a comprehensive review, a total of 84 studies were considered, and they were classified into sub categories based on whether they dealt with concrete containing plastic aggregates or plastic fibers. Furthermore, the morphology of concrete containing plastic materials is described in this paper to explain the influence of plastic aggregates and plastic fibers on the properties of concrete. The properties of concretes containing virgin plastic materials were also reviewed to establish their similarities and differences with concrete containing recycled plastics. PMID:26970843

  12. Asymmetrical Polyhedral Configuration of Giant Vesicles Induced by Orderly Array of Encapsulated Colloidal Particles

    PubMed Central

    Natsume, Yuno; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Giant vesicles (GVs) encapsulating colloidal particles by a specific volume fraction show a characteristic configuration under a hypertonic condition. Several flat faces were formed in GV membrane with orderly array of inner particles. GV shape changed from the spherical to the asymmetrical polyhedral configuration. This shape deformation was derived by entropic interaction between inner particles and GV membrane. Because a part of inner particles became to form an ordered phase in the region neighboring the GV membrane, free volume for the other part of particles increased. Giant vesicles encapsulating colloidal particles were useful for the model of “crowding effect” which is the entropic interaction in the cell. PMID:26752650

  13. Tomorrow's Plastic World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Averil

    2005-01-01

    Far from being just cheap packaging materials, plastics may be the materials of tomorrow. Plastic can conduct electricity, and this opens up a host of high-tech possibilities in the home and in energy generation. These possibilities are discussed here along with how plastic can be recycled and perhaps even grown.

  14. Processing of plastics

    PubMed Central

    Spaak, Albert

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of the processing of plastic materials from the handling of polymers in the pellet and powder form to manufacturing of a plastic fabricated product. Various types of equipment used and melt processing ranges of various polymer formulations to make the myriad of plastic products that are commercially available are discussed. PMID:1175556

  15. Plastics in Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeist, Irving, Ed.

    The evaluation and use of plastics in the construction industry are explained. The contributors offer extensive, timely, and thoroughly researched data on the chemistry, properties, functions, engineering behavior, and specific applications of plastics to building requirements. The major subjects discussed in depth are--(1) the role of plastics in…

  16. Commercial Parts Technology Qualification Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Many high-reliability systems, including space systems, use selected commercial parts (including Plastic Encapsulated Microelectronics or PEMs) for unique functionality, small size, low weight, high mechanical shock resistance, and other factors. Predominantly this usage is subjected to certain 100% tests (typically called screens) and certain destructive tests usually (but not always) performed on the flight lot (typically called qualification tests). Frequently used approaches include those documented in EEE-INST-002 and JPL DocID62212 (which are sometimes modified by the particular aerospace space systems manufacturer). In this study, approaches from these documents and several space systems manufacturers are compared to approaches from a launch systems manufacturer (SpaceX), an implantable medical electronics manufacturer (Medtronics), and a high-reliability transport system process (automotive systems). In the conclusions section, these processes are outlined for all of these cases and presented in tabular form. Then some simple comparisons are made. In this introduction section, the PEM technology qualification process is described, as documented in EEE-INST-002 (written by the Goddard Space Flight Center, GSFC), as well as the somewhat modified approach employed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Approaches used at several major NASA contractors are also described

  17. Biodegradability of Plastics

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P.; Ugwu, Charles U.; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed. PMID:19865515

  18. Photothermal degradation studies of encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The reliability physics program at JPL is outlined. The overall objectives and approaches are given in the program. The objectives, approaches and conclusions are given for two specific parts of the programs. These two parts are mechanistic studies of photothermal degradation and performance characteristics of materials with respect to photothermal stresses.

  19. USE OF RECYCLED POLYMERS FOR ENCAPSULATION OF RADIOACTIVE, HAZARDOUS AND MIXED WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    LAGERRAAEN,P.R.; KALB,P.D.

    1997-11-01

    Polyethylene encapsulation is a waste treatment technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory using thermoplastic polymers to safely and effectively solidify hazardous, radioactive and mixed wastes for disposal. Over 13 years of development and demonstration with surrogate wastes as well as actual waste streams on both bench and full scale have shown this to be a viable and robust technology with wide application. Process development efforts have previously focused on the use of virgin polymer feedstocks. In order to potentially improve process economics and serve to lessen the municipal waste burden, recycled polymers were investigated for use as encapsulating agents. Recycled plastics included low-density polyethylene, linear low-density polyethylene, high-density polyethylene and polypropylene, and were used as a direct substitute for or blended together with virgin resin. Impacts on processing and final waste form performance were examined.

  20. Plastics in Our Lives. What We Make. Science and Technology Education in Philippine Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philippines Univ., Quezon City. Inst. for Science and Mathematics Education Development.

    This module, recommended for third or fourth year high school students, consists of three parts. The first part (entitled "Knowing Plastics") gives some background information regarding the origin of plastics, their chemical and physical properties, and the different available types. The second part (entitled "Shaping Plastics") describes how…

  1. Ethical issues in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Sterodimas, Aris; Radwanski, Henrique N; Pitanguy, Ivo

    2011-04-01

    Plastic, reconstructive, and cosmetic surgery refers to a variety of operations performed in order to repair or restore body parts to look normal or to enhance a certain structure or anatomy that is already normal. Several ethical considerations such as a patient's right for autonomy, informed consent, beneficence, and nonmalfeasance need to be given careful consideration. The principal objective of the medical profession is to render services to humanity with full respect for human dignity. Plastic surgeons should merit the confidence of patients entrusted to their care, rendering to each a full measure of service and devotion. They require an extensive amount of education and training. The increases in demand for aesthetic plastic surgery and the advocacy of practice in the media have raised concerns about the circumstances under which cosmetic surgery is ethical and permissible. Innovative research, and new technologies derived from such research, almost always raises ethical and policy concerns. Medical ethics regulate what is, and what is not, correct in promoting plastic surgery to the public. It is essential to create an educated and informed public about the ethical issues in the plastic and reconstructive surgery field. Plastic surgeons need to carefully evaluate the degree of deformity, physical and emotional maturity, and desired outcome of patients who request plastic surgery procedures. Science is a powerful force for change in modern society and plastic surgeons have a responsibility to shepherd that change with thoughtful advocacy and careful ethical scrutiny of their own behavior. PMID:21336881

  2. Plastic crystal phases of simple water models.

    PubMed

    Aragones, J L; Vega, C

    2009-06-28

    We report the appearance of two plastic crystal phases of water at high pressure and temperature using computer simulations. In one of them the oxygen atoms form a body centered cubic structure (bcc) and in the other they form a face centered cubic structure (fcc). In both cases the water molecules were able to rotate almost freely. We have found that the bcc plastic crystal transformed into a fcc plastic crystal via a Martensitic phase transition when heated at constant pressure. We have performed the characterization and localization in the phase diagram of these plastic crystal phases for the SPC/E, TIP4P, and TIP4P/2005 water potential models. For TIP4P/2005 model free energy calculations were carried out for the bcc plastic crystal and fcc plastic crystal using a new method (which is a slight variation of the Einstein crystal method) proposed for these types of solid. The initial coexistence points for the SPC/E and TIP4P models were obtained using Hamiltonian Gibbs-Duhem integration. For all of these models these two plastic crystal phases appear in the high pressure and temperature region of the phase diagram. It would be of interest to study if such plastic crystal phases do indeed exist for real water. This would shed some light on the question of whether these models can describe satisfactorily the high pressure part of the phase diagram of water, and if not, where and why they fail. PMID:19566163

  3. Encapsulation layer design and scalability in encapsulated vertical 3D RRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Muxi; Fang, Yichen; Wang, Zongwei; Chen, Gong; Pan, Yue; Yang, Xue; Yin, Minghui; Yang, Yuchao; Li, Ming; Cai, Yimao; Huang, Ru

    2016-05-01

    Here we propose a novel encapsulated vertical 3D RRAM structure with each resistive switching cell encapsulated by dielectric layers, contributing to both the reliability improvement of individual cells and thermal disturbance reduction of adjacent cells due to the effective suppression of unwanted oxygen vacancy diffusion. In contrast to the traditional vertical 3D RRAM, encapsulated bar-electrodes are adopted in the proposed structure substituting the previous plane-electrodes, thus encapsulated resistive switching cells can be naturally formed by simply oxidizing the tip of the metal bar-electrodes. In this work, TaO x -based 3D RRAM devices with SiO2 and Si3N4 as encapsulation layers are demonstrated, both showing significant advantages over traditional unencapsulated vertical 3D RRAM. Furthermore, it was found thermal conductivity and oxygen blocking ability are two key parameters of the encapsulation layer design influencing the scalability of vertical 3D RRAM. Experimental and simulation data show that oxygen blocking ability is more critical for encapsulation layers in the relatively large scale, while thermal conductivity becomes dominant as the stacking layers scale to the sub-10 nm regime. Finally, based on the notable impacts of the encapsulation layer on 3D RRAM scaling, an encapsulation material with both excellent oxygen blocking ability and high thermal conductivity such as AlN is suggested to be highly desirable to maximize the advantages of the proposed encapsulated structure. The findings in this work could pave the way for reliable ultrahigh-density storage applications in the big data era.

  4. Encapsulation layer design and scalability in encapsulated vertical 3D RRAM.

    PubMed

    Yu, Muxi; Fang, Yichen; Wang, Zongwei; Chen, Gong; Pan, Yue; Yang, Xue; Yin, Minghui; Yang, Yuchao; Li, Ming; Cai, Yimao; Huang, Ru

    2016-05-20

    Here we propose a novel encapsulated vertical 3D RRAM structure with each resistive switching cell encapsulated by dielectric layers, contributing to both the reliability improvement of individual cells and thermal disturbance reduction of adjacent cells due to the effective suppression of unwanted oxygen vacancy diffusion. In contrast to the traditional vertical 3D RRAM, encapsulated bar-electrodes are adopted in the proposed structure substituting the previous plane-electrodes, thus encapsulated resistive switching cells can be naturally formed by simply oxidizing the tip of the metal bar-electrodes. In this work, TaO x -based 3D RRAM devices with SiO2 and Si3N4 as encapsulation layers are demonstrated, both showing significant advantages over traditional unencapsulated vertical 3D RRAM. Furthermore, it was found thermal conductivity and oxygen blocking ability are two key parameters of the encapsulation layer design influencing the scalability of vertical 3D RRAM. Experimental and simulation data show that oxygen blocking ability is more critical for encapsulation layers in the relatively large scale, while thermal conductivity becomes dominant as the stacking layers scale to the sub-10 nm regime. Finally, based on the notable impacts of the encapsulation layer on 3D RRAM scaling, an encapsulation material with both excellent oxygen blocking ability and high thermal conductivity such as AlN is suggested to be highly desirable to maximize the advantages of the proposed encapsulated structure. The findings in this work could pave the way for reliable ultrahigh-density storage applications in the big data era. PMID:27044065

  5. Sol-gel method for encapsulating molecules

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ashley, Carol S.; Bhatia, Rimple; Singh, Anup K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for encapsulating organic molecules, and in particular, biomolecules using sol-gel chemistry. A silica sol is prepared from an aqueous alkali metal silicate solution, such as a mixture of silicon dioxide and sodium or potassium oxide in water. The pH is adjusted to a suitably low value to stabilize the sol by minimizing the rate of siloxane condensation, thereby allowing storage stability of the sol prior to gelation. The organic molecules, generally in solution, is then added with the organic molecules being encapsulated in the sol matrix. After aging, either a thin film can be prepared or a gel can be formed with the encapsulated molecules. Depending upon the acid used, pH, and other processing conditions, the gelation time can be from one minute up to several days. In the method of the present invention, no alcohols are generated as by-products during the sol-gel and encapsulation steps. The organic molecules can be added at any desired pH value, where the pH value is generally chosen to achieve the desired reactivity of the organic molecules. The method of the present invention thereby presents a sufficiently mild encapsulation method to retain a significant portion of the activity of the biomolecules, compared with the activity of the biomolecules in free solution.

  6. Encapsulation of Natural Polyphenolic Compounds; a Review

    PubMed Central

    Munin, Aude; Edwards-Lévy, Florence

    2011-01-01

    Natural polyphenols are valuable compounds possessing scavenging properties towards radical oxygen species, and complexing properties towards proteins. These abilities make polyphenols interesting for the treatment of various diseases like inflammation or cancer, but also for anti-ageing purposes in cosmetic formulations, or for nutraceutical applications. Unfortunately, these properties are also responsible for a lack in long-term stability, making these natural compounds very sensitive to light and heat. Moreover, polyphenols often present a poor biodisponibility mainly due to low water solubility. Lastly, many of these molecules possess a very astringent and bitter taste, which limits their use in food or in oral medications. To circumvent these drawbacks, delivery systems have been developed, and among them, encapsulation would appear to be a promising approach. Many encapsulation methods are described in the literature, among which some have been successfully applied to plant polyphenols. In this review, after a general presentation of the large chemical family of plant polyphenols and of their main chemical and biological properties, encapsulation processes applied to polyphenols are classified into physical, physico-chemical, chemical methods, and other connected stabilization methods. After a brief description of each encapsulation process, their applications to polyphenol encapsulation for pharmaceutical, food or cosmetological purposes are presented. PMID:24309309

  7. How Plastics Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Louis

    2013-03-01

    We encounter plastics every day, but despite their widespread use, amazing range of properties, and basic scientific underpinnings, most physicists--like most people--know relatively little about plastics. In contrast to hard crystalline and amorphous solids (e.g., metals, salts, ceramics, and glasses), we take plastics for granted, select them carelessly, and examine them more closely only on a need-to-know basis. By ignoring plastics until we need them, however, we risk not knowing what we don't know and using the wrong ones. To repurpose a familiar advertisement, ``there's a plastic for that.'' This talk will review some of the basic physics and science of plastics. It will examine the roles of temperature, order, intermolecular forces, entanglements, and linkages in plastics, and how those issues affect the properties of a given plastic. We'll stop along the way to recognize a few of the more familiar plastics, natural and synthetic, and explain some of their mechanical, chemical, and optical properties. The talk will conclude by explaining the remarkable properties of a plastic that has been largely misunderstood since its discovery 70 years ago: Silly Putty.

  8. Encapsulant selection and durability testing experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1985-10-01

    The Flat Plate Solar Array Project (FSA) has established technically challenging cost and service life goals for photovoltaic modules. These goals are a cost of $70 sq m and an expected 30 years of service life in an outdoor weathering environment. out of the cost goal, $14 sq m is allocated for encapsulation materials, which includes the cost of a structural panel. At FSA's inception in 1975, the cumulative cost of encapsulation materials in popular use, such as room temperature vulcanized (RTV) silicones, aluminum panels, etc., greatly exceeded $14/sq m. Accordingly, it became necessary to identify and/or develop new materials and new material technologies to achieve the goals. Many of these new materials are low cost polymers that satisfy module engineering and encapsulation processing requirements but unfortunately are not intrinsically weather stable. This necessitates identifying lifetime and/or weathering deficiencies inherent in these low cost materials and developing specific approaches to enhancing weather stability.

  9. Nanocellulose-alginate hydrogel for cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Minsung; Lee, Dajung; Hyun, Jinho

    2015-02-13

    TEMPO-oxidized bacterial cellulose (TOBC)-sodium alginate (SA) composites were prepared to improve the properties of hydrogel for cell encapsulation. TOBC fibers were obtained using a TEMPO/NaBr/NaClO system at pH 10 and room temperature. The fibrillated TOBCs mixed with SA were cross-linked in the presence of Ca(2+) solution to form hydrogel composites. The compression strength and chemical stability of the TOBC/SA composites were increased compared with the SA hydrogel, which indicated that TOBC performed an important function in enhancing the structural, mechanical and chemical stability of the composites. Cells were successfully encapsulated in the TOBC/SA composites, and the viability of cells was investigated. TOBC/SA composites can be a potential candidate for cell encapsulation engineering. PMID:25458293

  10. Encapsulant selection and durability testing experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Flat Plate Solar Array Project (FSA) has established technically challenging cost and service life goals for photovoltaic modules. These goals are a cost of $70 sq m and an expected 30 years of service life in an outdoor weathering environment. out of the cost goal, $14 sq m is allocated for encapsulation materials, which includes the cost of a structural panel. At FSA's inception in 1975, the cumulative cost of encapsulation materials in popular use, such as room temperature vulcanized (RTV) silicones, aluminum panels, etc., greatly exceeded $14/sq m. Accordingly, it became necessary to identify and/or develop new materials and new material technologies to achieve the goals. Many of these new materials are low cost polymers that satisfy module engineering and encapsulation processing requirements but unfortunately are not intrinsically weather stable. This necessitates identifying lifetime and/or weathering deficiencies inherent in these low cost materials and developing specific approaches to enhancing weather stability.

  11. Nondestructive Assay Options for Spent Fuel Encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Stephen J.; Jansson, Peter

    2014-10-02

    This report describes the role that nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques and systems of NDA techniques may have in the context of an encapsulation and deep geological repository. The potential NDA needs of an encapsulation and repository facility include safeguards, heat content, and criticality. Some discussion of the facility needs is given, with the majority of the report concentrating on the capability and characteristics of individual NDA instruments and techniques currently available or under development. Particular emphasis is given to how the NDA techniques can be used to determine the heat production of an assembly, as well as meet the dual safeguards needs of 1) determining the declared parameters of initial enrichment, burn-up, and cooling time and 2) detecting defects (total, partial, and bias). The report concludes with the recommendation of three integrated systems that might meet the combined NDA needs of the encapsulation/repository facility.

  12. Composition and method for encapsulating photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Pern, Fu-Jann

    2000-01-01

    A composition and method for encapsulating a photovoltaic device which minimizes discoloration of the encapsulant. The composition includes an ethylene-vinyl acetate encapsulant, a curing agent, an optional ultraviolet light stabilizer, and/or an optional antioxidant. The curing agent is preferably 1,1-di-(t-butylperoxy)-3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane; the ultraviolet light stabilizer is bis-(N-octyloxy-tetramethyl) piperidinyl sebacate and the antioxidant is selected from the group consisting of tris (2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl) phosphite, tetrakis methylene (3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyhydrocinnamate) methane, octadecyl 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyhydrocinnamate, and 2,2'-ethylidene bis(4,6-di-t-butylphenyl) fluorophosponite. The composition is applied to a solar cell then cured. The cured product contains a minimal concentration of curing-generated chromophores and resists UV-induced degradation.

  13. Swelling of particle-encapsulating random manifolds.

    PubMed

    Haleva, Emir; Diamant, Haim

    2008-08-01

    We study the statistical mechanics of a closed random manifold of fixed area and fluctuating volume, encapsulating a fixed number of noninteracting particles. Scaling analysis yields a unified description of such swollen manifolds, according to which the mean volume gradually increases with particle number, following a single scaling law. This is markedly different from the swelling under fixed pressure difference, where certain models exhibit criticality. We thereby indicate when the swelling due to encapsulated particles is thermodynamically inequivalent to that caused by fixed pressure. The general predictions are supported by Monte Carlo simulations of two particle-encapsulating model systems: a two-dimensional self-avoiding ring and a three-dimensional self-avoiding fluid vesicle. In the former the particle-induced swelling is thermodynamically equivalent to the pressure-induced one, whereas in the latter it is not. PMID:18850811

  14. Assessment of bioburden encapsulated in bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Newlin, Laura; Chung, Shirley Y.; Ellyin, Raymond

    2016-05-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) imposes bioburden limitations on all spacecraft destined for solar system bodies that might harbor evidence of extant or extinct life. The subset of microorganisms trapped within solid materials during manufacture and assembly is referred to as encapsulated bioburden. In the absence of spacecraft-specific data, NASA relies on specification values to estimate total spacecraft encapsulated bioburden, typically 30 endospores/cm3 or 300 viable cells/cm3 in non-electronic materials. Specification values for endospores have been established conservatively, and represent no less than an order of magnitude greater abundance than that derived from empirical assessments of actual spacecraft materials. The goal of this study was to generate data germane to determining whether revised bulk encapsulated material values (lower than those estimated by historical specifications) tailored specifically to the materials designated in modern-day spacecraft design could be used, on a case-by-case basis, to comply with planetary protection requirements. Organic materials having distinctly different chemical properties and configurations were selected. This required more than one experimental and analytical approach. Filtration was employed for liquid electrolytes, lubricants were suspended in an aqueous solution and solids (wire and epoxy sealant) were cryogenically milled. The final data characteristic for all bioburden estimates was microbial colony formation in rich agar growth medium. To assess survival potential, three non-spore-forming bacterial cell lines were systematically encapsulated in an epoxy matrix, liberated via cryogenic grinding, and cultured. Results suggest that bulk solid materials harbor significantly fewer encapsulated microorganisms than are estimated by specification values. Lithium-ion battery electrolyte reagents housed fewer than 1 CFU/cm3. Results also demonstrated that non-spore-forming microorganisms

  15. Approaches to Encapsulation of Flexible CIGS Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Larry C.; Gross, Mark E.; Graff, Gordon L.; Kundu, Sambhu N.; Chu, Xi; Lin, Steve

    2008-07-16

    Thin-film solar cells based on CIGS are being considered for large scale power plants as well as building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) applications. Past studies indicate that CIGS cells degrade rapidly when exposed to moisture. As a result, an effective approach to encapsulation is required for CIGS cells to satisfy the international standard IEC 61646. CIGS modules fabricated for use in large power plants can be encapsulated with glass sheets on the top and bottom surfaces and can be effectively sealed around the edges. In the case of BIPV applications, however, it is desirable to utilize CIGS cells grown on flexible substrates, both for purposes of achieving reduced weight and for cases involving non-flat surfaces. For these cases, approaches to encapsulation must be compatible with the flexible substrate requirement. Even in the case of large power plants, the glass-to-glass approach to encapsulation may eventually be considered too costly. We are investigating encapsulation of flexible CIGS cells by lamination. Sheets of PET or PEN coated with multilayer barrier coatings are used to laminate the flexible cells. Results are discussed for laminated cells from two CIGS manufacturers. In both cases, the cell efficiency decreases less than 10% after 1000 hours of exposure to an environment of 85C/85%RH. This paper discusses these two approaches, reviews results achieved with cells and mini-modules fabricated by the former Shell Solar, Industries (SSI) stressed at 60C/90%RH (60/90), and recent studies of encapsulated IEC cells subjected to an environment of 85ºC/85%RH (85/85).

  16. Anxiety disorders in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rankin, M; Borah, G L

    1997-08-01

    Surgery is a stressful event, with the potential for profound disturbance to the patient's psychological and physiologic homeostasis. Cosmetic surgery is a particularly intense psychological experience because, in addition to the usual concerns about surgical side effects, cosmetic patients bring their hopes and expectations for improved self-image, putting them at risk for the added anxiety of disappointment. High levels of anxiety coupled with the perception of vulnerability or threat to self can cause significant psychological reactions complicating care for the plastic surgical patient. This paper outlines the diagnostic features of the common types of anxiety disorders seen in plastic surgical patients, and it offers treatment strategies for the practitioner, delineating when referral to a mental health expert is advised. Specific clinical case studies of panic attack, posttraumatic stress disorder, and acute stress disorder are presented to illustrate the variety of abnormal anxiety responses that may be encountered in the perioperative setting. Interventions for the anxious patient are part science and part art. Careful questioning and psychosocial assessment can identify those patients who are at greater risk for psychological problems after surgery. However, some patients may mask or keep secret their concerns, which can be manifested with resulting anger and hostility. Plastic surgeons must use appropriate indicators of psychological anxiety and measure a specific patient's reactions to surgery to make the diagnosis of abnormal anxiety. Close follow-up by the plastic surgical team is an essential part of the anxiety disorder patient's psychological treatment, but it is imperative that these problematic patients be referred promptly to a qualified mental health professional to limit their adverse experience and promote their well-being. Patients who are less anxious during the perioperative period report less emotional distress and fewer defensive

  17. Temperature responsive hydroxypropyl cellulose for encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Heitfeld, Kevin A.; Guo, Tingtai; Yang, George; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2009-08-26

    This work focuses on the use of temperature responsive gels (TRGs) (polymeric hydrogels with a large temperature-dependent change in volume) for flavor retention at cooking temperatures. Specifically, we have studied a gel with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) that swells at low temperatures and collapses at high temperatures. In the collapsed state, the polymer acts as a transport barrier, keeping the volatile flavors inside. We have successfully synthesized a cellulose gel that exhibits this volume change and have encapsulated an oil phase inside the gel. The flavor-loaded encapsulated oil exhibited an increased release time when compared to similar gelatin capsules.

  18. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  19. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOEpatents

    Dahlgran, J.R.

    1999-08-17

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation uses encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration. 1 fig.

  20. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOEpatents

    Dahlgran, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

  1. Our plastic age

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Richard C.; Swan, Shanna H.; Moore, Charles J.; vom Saal, Frederick S.

    2009-01-01

    Within the last few decades, plastics have revolutionized our daily lives. Globally we use in excess of 260 million tonnes of plastic per annum, accounting for approximately 8 per cent of world oil production. In this Theme Issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, we describe current and future trends in usage, together with the many benefits that plastics bring to society. At the same time, we examine the environmental consequences resulting from the accumulation of waste plastic, the effects of plastic debris on wildlife and concerns for human health that arise from the production, usage and disposal of plastics. Finally, we consider some possible solutions to these problems together with the research and policy priorities necessary for their implementation. PMID:19528049

  2. Our plastic age.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard C; Swan, Shanna H; Moore, Charles J; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2009-07-27

    Within the last few decades, plastics have revolutionized our daily lives. Globally we use in excess of 260 million tonnes of plastic per annum, accounting for approximately 8 per cent of world oil production. In this Theme Issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, we describe current and future trends in usage, together with the many benefits that plastics bring to society. At the same time, we examine the environmental consequences resulting from the accumulation of waste plastic, the effects of plastic debris on wildlife and concerns for human health that arise from the production, usage and disposal of plastics. Finally, we consider some possible solutions to these problems together with the research and policy priorities necessary for their implementation. PMID:19528049

  3. Plasticized phenolphthalein polycarbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E. S.

    1976-01-01

    Phenolphthalein polycarbonate was successfully plasticized with polychlorinated biphenyls (e.g., Aroclor 1231) or tricresyl phosphate and cast from tetrahydrofuran to give clear films without loss of fire resistance. At loadings of 20 to 30 percent plasticizer the Tg was lowered to approximately 100 C which would render phenolphthalein polycarbonate easily moldable. Although these materials had some mechanical integrity as shown by their film forming ability, the room temperature toughness of the plasticized polymer was not significantly improved over unmodified polymer.

  4. Plastics and health risks.

    PubMed

    Halden, Rolf U

    2010-01-01

    By 2010, the worldwide annual production of plastics will surpass 300 million tons. Plastics are indispensable materials in modern society, and many products manufactured from plastics are a boon to public health (e.g., disposable syringes, intravenous bags). However, plastics also pose health risks. Of principal concern are endocrine-disrupting properties, as triggered for example by bisphenol A and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Opinions on the safety of plastics vary widely, and despite more than five decades of research, scientific consensus on product safety is still elusive. This literature review summarizes information from more than 120 peer-reviewed publications on health effects of plastics and plasticizers in lab animals and humans. It examines problematic exposures of susceptible populations and also briefly summarizes adverse environmental impacts from plastic pollution. Ongoing efforts to steer human society toward resource conservation and sustainable consumption are discussed, including the concept of the 5 Rs--i.e., reduce, reuse, recycle, rethink, restrain--for minimizing pre- and postnatal exposures to potentially harmful components of plastics. PMID:20070188

  5. Astrocytes: Orchestrating synaptic plasticity?

    PubMed

    De Pittà, M; Brunel, N; Volterra, A

    2016-05-26

    Synaptic plasticity is the capacity of a preexisting connection between two neurons to change in strength as a function of neural activity. Because synaptic plasticity is the major candidate mechanism for learning and memory, the elucidation of its constituting mechanisms is of crucial importance in many aspects of normal and pathological brain function. In particular, a prominent aspect that remains debated is how the plasticity mechanisms, that encompass a broad spectrum of temporal and spatial scales, come to play together in a concerted fashion. Here we review and discuss evidence that pinpoints to a possible non-neuronal, glial candidate for such orchestration: the regulation of synaptic plasticity by astrocytes. PMID:25862587

  6. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  7. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Interim Status Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2000-12-01

    This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). WESF is located within the 225B Facility in the 200 East Area on the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based on Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the storage unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the intention is to clean close WESF, postclosure activities are not applicable to this interim status closure plan. To clean close the storage unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or environmentally is impracticable, the interim status closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. WESF stores cesium and strontium encapsulated salts. The encapsulated salts are stored in the pool cells or process cells located within 225B Facility. The dangerous waste is contained within a double containment system to preclude spills to the environment. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the capsules, operating methods and administrative controls require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  8. Silicone encapsulant development for fireset applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, J.A.; Curro, J.G.; Paulsen, L.L.

    1983-05-01

    Purpose of this program is to formulate an encapsulant which is acceptable from a nuclear-safety standpoint, and can be used for encapsulation of firesets. Systems based on silicone resins have the lowest conductivity at elevated temperatures of any encapsulant studied. Unfortunately, silicone resins also have relatively low tear strengths and high-thermal-expansion coefficients. Despite these limitations, we previously formulated a Sylgard 184/glass microballoon encapsulant with acceptable mechanical and thermal properties. The Sylgard 184 resin system, which is a vinyl-addition silicone manufactured by Dow Corning has the undesirable property (for fireset applications) of outgassing substantial amounts of hydrogen. In order to eliminate this undersirable feature, we have recently formulated a new material based on a vinyl-addition silicone system which is cured with a peroxide and does not outgas hydrogen. Preliminary measurements on this new system look encouraging. An acceptable cure can be achieved at 40/sup 0/C; the viscosity, modulus and thermal expansion coefficient are virtually identical to the commercial Sylgard system. The tear strength, however, is about half the value of the Sylgard formulation (3.4 versus 6.4 Kj/m/sup 2/).

  9. Elastomer Encapsulant for Solar-Cell Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B.; Willis, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    Butyl acrylate syrups useful potting compounds for encapsulating photovoltaic cells in modular arrays. Material pourable liquid pumped into module, then cured to rubbery consistency. Cured material is thermoset elastomer highly transparent, low cost, flexible and with good low-temperature properties.

  10. Prepolymer Syrup for Encapsulating Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Ingham, J. D.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Clear polymer syrup, made by disolving n-butyl acrylate prepolymer in monomer, used to encapsulate solar cells by any of three standard processes (dipping, multiple coating, or automated machine coating). Use of cyclohexane instead of methanol/water solvent during initial polymerization stage maintains high molecular weight and raises yield of linear polymer to essentially 100 percent.

  11. Capsoplexes: encapsulating complexes via guest recognition.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Philipp J; Pöthig, Alexander

    2016-07-12

    A new dinuclear Ni-NHC complex is able to selectively recognise and self-assemble with guests via tennis-ball like encapsulation, exemplarily demonstrated employing halides. Addition of chloride or bromide leads to the formation of capsules with small cavities which are stabilised through non-classical hydrogen bonds and Coulomb interactions between the anion and the metal centres. PMID:26923883

  12. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2002-01-01

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  13. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2006-04-11

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  14. Method for foam encapsulating laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1977-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser fusion targets are made by positioning a fusion fuel-filled sphere within a mold cavity of suitable configuration and dimensions, and then filling the cavity with a material capable of producing a low density, microcellular foam, such as cellulose acetate dissolved in an acetone-based solvent. The mold assembly is dipped into an ice water bath to gel the material and thereafter soaked in the water bath to leach out undesired components, after which the gel is frozen, then freeze-dried wherein water and solvents sublime and the gel structure solidifies into a low-density microcellular foam, thereafter the resulting foam encapsulated target is removed from the mold cavity. The fuel-filled sphere is surrounded by foam having a thickness of about 10 to 100 .mu.m, a cell size of less than 2 .mu.m, and density of 0.065 to 0.6 .times. 10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3. Various configured foam-encapsulated targets capable of being made by this encapsulation method are illustrated.

  15. Encapsulated breaker for aqueous polymeric fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Gulbis, J.; King, M.T.; Hawkins, G.W.; Brannon, H.D. )

    1992-02-01

    Persulfates are commonly used as breakers for aqueous fluids viscosified with guar or cellulose derivatives. These breakers are necessary to minimize permeability damage to proppant packs at temperatures where there is little thermal degradation of the polymers. Unfortunately, dissolved persulfates are much too reactive, even at moderate temperatures (140 to 200{degrees} F), to be used at concentrations sufficient to degrade concentrated, high-molecular-weight polymers thoroughly. Technology described in this paper was used to produce a delayed breaker. The breaker is prepared by encapsulating ammonium persulfate (APS) with a water-resistant coating. The coating shields the fluid from the breaker so that high breaker concentrations can be added to the fluid without causing the premature loss of fluid properties, such as viscosity or fluid-loss control. Critical factors in the design of encapsulated breakers (such as coating barrier properties, release mechanisms, and reactive chemical properties) are discussed. The effects of encapsulated breaker on fluid rheology were compared for several encapsulated persulfates.

  16. Encapsulation Processing and Manufacturing Yield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of encapsulation processing and a manufacturing productivity analysis for photovoltaic cells are discussed. The goals were: (1) to understand the relationships between both formulation variables and process variables; (2) to define conditions required for optimum performance; (3) to predict manufacturing yield; and (4) to provide documentation to industry.

  17. Stability of lipid encapsulated phenolic acid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds such as ferulic acid and p-coumaric acids are potential bioactive additives for use in animal feeds to replace current antioxidants and antimicrobial compounds. These compounds are ubiquitous in plants and may be obtained from commodity grain crops and waste biomass. Encapsulation...

  18. Encapsulation, the Curriculum, and Third World Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarchow, Elaine M.; Dhawan, Gita

    1982-01-01

    The global desire to educate the whole person is validated by interviews with Third World faculty and students concerning curriculums in India, Cameroon and Kenya to determine whether encapsulation--a partial and distorted image of external reality--is present and affects studies in their countries. (Author/CM)

  19. Cell encapsulation and oxygenation in nanoporous microcontainers

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Joonbum; Liu, Li; Su, Yang; Nemani, Krishnamurthy; Trivedi, Krutarth; Cui, Yonghao; Vachha, Behroze; Mason, Ralph; Hu, Wenchuang; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2010-01-01

    With strides in stem cell biology, cell engineering and molecular therapy, the transplantation of cells to produce therapeutic molecules endogenously is an attractive and achievable alternative to the use of exogenous drugs. The encapsulation of such cell transplants in semi-permeable, nanoporous constructs is often required to protect them from immune attack and to prevent their proliferation in the host. However, effective graft immunoisolation has been mostly elusive owing to the absence of a high-throughput method to create precisely controlled, high-aspect-ratio nanopores. To address the clinical need for effective cell encapsulation and immunoisolation, we devised a biocompatible cell-encapsulating microcontainer and a method to create highly anisotropic nanopores in the micro-container’s surface. To evaluate the efficacy of these nanopores in oxygenating the encapsulated cells, we engineered 9L rat glioma cells to bioluminesce under hypoxic conditions. The methods described above should aid in evaluating the long term survival and efficacy of cellular grafts. PMID:19629700

  20. Testing Protocol for Module Encapsulant Creep (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M. D.; Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.; Moseley, J. M.; Shah, Q.; Tamizhmani, G.; Sakurai, K.; Inoue, M.; Doi, T.; Masuda, A.

    2012-02-01

    Recently there has been an interest in the use of thermoplastic encapsulant materials in photovoltaic modules to replace chemically crosslinked materials, e.g., ethylene-vinyl acetate. The related motivations include the desire to: reduce lamination time or temperature; use less moisture-permeable materials; or use materials with better corrosion characteristics. However, the use of any thermoplastic material in a high-temperature environment raises safety and performance concerns, as the standardized tests currently do not expose the modules to temperatures in excess of 85C, yet modules may experience temperatures above 100C in operation. Here we constructed eight pairs of crystalline-silicon modules and eight pairs of glass/encapsulation/glass mock modules using different encapsulation materials of which only two were designed to chemically crosslink. One module set was exposed outdoors with insulation on the back side in Arizona in the summer, and an identical set was exposed in environmental chambers. High precision creep measurements and performance measurements indicate that despite many of these polymeric materials being in the melt state at some of the highest outdoor temperatures achievable, very little creep was seen because of their high viscosity, temperature heterogeneity across the modules, and in the case of the crystalline-silicon modules, the physical restraint of the backsheet. These findings have very important implications for the development of IEC and UL qualification and safety standards, and in regards to the necessary level of cure during the processing of crosslinking encapsulants.

  1. Stability of lipid encapsulated ferulic acid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Encapsulation of bioactive compounds by a solid lipid matrix provides stability and a mechanism for controlled release in formulated products. Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and have applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a common pheno...

  2. Preparation of Graphene Encapsulated Silicon Nanoball.

    PubMed

    Kim, Huijin; So, Deasup; Park, Sungjin; Huh, Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Concerning application of graphene, a lot of efforts have been made to improve performance of nanomaterials in many fields, such as electric and electronic devices. Some examples are preparation of 3-dimension structured nanomaterials like nanoballs by CVD process and hybridizing with silicon. These graphene-based materials are proven to be available for secondary battery, EMI and ACF in electronics. Especially, some research has shown that they were very effective to enhance safety and volumetric capacity when they were used as anode materials of secondary battery. Although graphite and its compound with metal have been used as an anode material due to their high stability and reversibility, it still has lower charge capacity. On the contrary, silicon is known as a material which increases the charge capacity up to four times, compared with carbon-based materials, but it has lower stability and reversibility. For that reason, a few researchers just started to improve the charge capacity by hybridization of carbon-based material with silicon. In this paper, we prepared nanocarbon based material which has a new structure of graphene encapsulated silicon nanoball as an anode material which is applicable to high-capacity secondary battery. In order to form a graphene encapsulated silicon nanoballs, the polystyrene encapsulated silicon nanoballs were prepared by emulsion polymerization of styrene monomer with silicon nanoparticles. The resulting nanoballs were immersed in iron chloride solution and then dried. Finally they were treated in high temperature through CVD and etched by hydrogen chloride. Morphology of the graphene encapsulated silicon nanoballs was observed by the field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and the field emission transmission electron microscope (FETEM) to search for core-shell structured nanoball. Spherical structure of graphene encapsulated silicon nanoball was investigated by the Raman, the X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy to

  3. Encapsulation of Organic Chemicals within a Starch Matrix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wing, R. E.; Shasha, B. S.

    1983-01-01

    Three experiments demonstrating the feasibility of encapsulating liquids within a starch matrix are described, including encapsulation of linseed oil using the zanthate method and of turpentine and butylate using the calcium adduct procedure. Encapsulated materials, including pesticides, are slowly released from the resulting matrix. Considers…

  4. Reinforced plastics durability

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, G.

    1999-01-01

    Written especially for first-time users of reinforced plastics. The book offers substantial introductory information with key concepts. Chapters examine the long-term threats to the integrity of reinforced plastics: outdoor weathering, solvent/water attack, high temperatures, and repetitive stress.

  5. Detecting plastics in seedcotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US cotton industry wants to increase market share and value by supplying pure cotton. Removing contamination requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to determine if Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) could be used to find small amounts of plastic in ...

  6. Detecting plastics in seedcotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To increase global market share and value the US cotton industry needs to supply cotton lint that is free of contamination. Removing plastic contamination first requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to validate a custom Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IM...

  7. Neural Plasticity: For Good and Bad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Møller, A. R.

    The brain's ability to change its organization and function is necessary for normal development of the nervous system and it makes it possible to adapt to changing demands but it can also cause disorders when going awry. This property, known as neural plasticity, is only evident when induced, very much like genes. Plastic changes may be programmed and providing a ``midcourse correction" during childhood development. If that is not executed in the normal way severe developmental disorders such as autism may results. Normal development of functions and anatomical organization of the brain and the spinal cord depend on appropriate sensory stimulation and motor activations. So-called enriched sensory environments have been shown to be beneficial for cognitive development and enriched acoustic environment may even slow the progression of age-related hearing loss. It is possible that the beneficial effect of physical exercise is achieved through activation of neural plasticity. The beneficial effect of training after trauma to the brain or spinal cord is mainly achieved through shifting functions from damaged brain area to other parts of the central nervous system and adapting these parts to take over the functions that are lost. This is accomplished through activation of neural plasticity. Plastic changes can also be harmful and cause symptoms and signs of disorders such as some forms of chronic pain (central neuropathic pain) and severe tinnitus. We will call such disorders ``plasticity disorders".

  8. Track recording plastic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarle, Gregory (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Improved nuclear track recording plastic compositions are provided which exhibit greatly decreased surface roughness when etched to produce visible tracks of energetic nuclear particles which have passed into and/or through said plastic. The improved compositions incorporate a small quantity of a phthalic acid ester into the major plastic component which is derived from the polymerization of monomeric di-ethylene glycol bis allyl carbonate. Di-substituted phthalic acid esters are preferred as the added component, with the further perference that the ester substituent has a chain length of 2 or more carbon atoms. The inclusion of the phthalic acid ester to an extent of from about 1-2% by weight of the plastic compositions is sufficient to drastically reduce the surface roughness ordinarily produced when the track recording plastic is contacted by etchants.

  9. Encapsulated Energy Transfer Cassettes with Extremely Well Resolved Fluorescent Outputs

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Jose, Jiney; Loudet, Aurore; Pérez-Bolívar, César; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Burgess, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    the acceptor part, ie red. Overall, this paper reports readily accessible, cyanine-based through-bond energy transfer cassettes that are lypophilic but can be encapsulated to form nanoparticles that disperse freely in water. These particles can be used to enter cells and to label organelles. PMID:21105708

  10. Biocompatible Hydrogels for Microarray Cell Printing and Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Datar, Akshata; Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-12-01

    Conventional drug screening processes are a time-consuming and expensive endeavor, but highly rewarding when they are successful. To identify promising lead compounds, millions of compounds are traditionally screened against therapeutic targets on human cells grown on the surface of 96-wells. These two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayers are physiologically irrelevant, thus, often providing false-positive or false-negative results, when compared to cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) structures such as hydrogel droplets. However, 3D cell culture systems are not easily amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS), thus inherently low throughput, and requiring relatively large volume for cell-based assays. In addition, it is difficult to control cellular microenvironments and hard to obtain reliable cell images due to focus position and transparency issues. To overcome these problems, miniaturized 3D cell cultures in hydrogels were developed via cell printing techniques where cell spots in hydrogels can be arrayed on the surface of glass slides or plastic chips by microarray spotters and cultured in growth media to form cells encapsulated 3D droplets for various cell-based assays. These approaches can dramatically reduce assay volume, provide accurate control over cellular microenvironments, and allow us to obtain clear 3D cell images for high-content imaging (HCI). In this review, several hydrogels that are compatible to microarray printing robots are discussed for miniaturized 3D cell cultures. PMID:26516921