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Sample records for plastic limit load

  1. Plastic Limit Load Analysis of Cylindrical Pressure Vessels with Different Nozzle Inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Anupam; Raval, Harit Kishorchandra; Gandhi, Anish; Pawar, Dipak Bapu

    2016-04-01

    Sudden change in geometry of pressure vessel due to nozzle cutout, leads to local stress concentration and deformation, decreasing its strength. Elastic plastic analysis of cylindrical pressure vessels with different inclination angles of nozzle is important to estimate plastic limit load. In the present study, cylindrical pressure vessels with combined inclination of nozzles (i.e. in longitudinal and radial plane) are considered for elastic plastic limit load analysis. Three dimensional static nonlinear finite element analyses of cylindrical pressure vessels with nozzle are performed for incremental pressure loading. The von Mises stress distribution on pressure vessel shows higher stress zones at shell-nozzle junction. Approximate plastic limit load is obtained by twice elastic slope method. Variation in limit pressure with different combined inclination angle of nozzle is analyzed and found to be distinct in nature. Reported results can be helpful in optimizing pressure vessel design.

  2. Estimating turbine limit load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for estimating turbine limit-load pressure ratio from turbine map information is presented and demonstrated. It is based on a mean line analysis at the last-rotor exit. The required map information includes choke flow rate at all speeds as well as pressure ratio and efficiency at the onset of choke at design speed. One- and two-stage turbines are analyzed to compare the results with those from a more rigorous off-design flow analysis and to show the sensitivities of the computed limit-load pressure ratios to changes in the key assumptions.

  3. Plastic instabilities in statically and dynamically loaded spherical vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, Thomas A; Rodriguez, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Significant changes were made in design limits for pressurized vessels in the 2007 version of the ASME Code (Section VIII, Div. 3) and 2008 and 2009 Addenda. There is now a local damage-mechanics based strain-exhaustion limit as well as the well-known global plastic collapse limit. Moreover, Code Case 2564 (Section VIII, Div. 3) has recently been approved to address impulsively loaded vessels. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate the plastic collapse limit as it applies to dynamically loaded spherical vessels. Plastic instabilities that could potentially develop in spherical shells under symmetric loading conditions are examined for a variety of plastic constitutive relations. First, a literature survey of both static and dynamic instabilities associated with spherical shells is presented. Then, a general plastic instability condition for spherical shells subjected to displacement controlled and impulsive loading is given. This instability condition is evaluated for six plastic and visco-plastic constitutive relations. The role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability point is investigated. Calculations for statically and dynamically loaded spherical shells are presented, illustrating the formation of instabilities as well as the role of imperfections. Conclusions of this work are that there are two fundamental types of instabilities associated with failure of spherical shells. In the case of impulsively loaded vessels, where the pulse duration is short compared to the fundamental period of the structure, one instability type is found not to occur in the absence of static internal pressure. Moreover, it is found that the specific role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability strain depends on the form of the constitutive relation assumed.

  4. Limit loads for pipelines with axial surface flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Tyson, W.R.

    1996-12-31

    The limit loads for pipelines with axial surface flaws have been evaluated by using a strip yield model at levels of ligament yield and ligament collapse. The former was defined as that at which the plastic zone first reaches the back surface, and the later is that at which the plastic zone spreads over the entire ligament. The evaluated collapse load has been used to estimate the failure stress of pipelines containing axial surface flaws. Predictions have been compared with existing experimental data.

  5. Testing for Random Limit Load Versus Static Limit Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. M.

    1997-01-01

    This document is an effort to report the basic test findings in an ongoing quest for understanding how random load factors should be applied to structural components in order to verify the strength of space flight hardware. A Spacelab experiment known as the Atmospheric Emission Photometric Imager (AEPI) was subjected to both an expected flight random environment and the associated Miles' equation equivalent static load. During each of these tests, the fiberglass pedestal was instrumented with 16 triaxial strain gauges around its base. Component strains and invariant stresses were compared. As seen previously in other hardware tests, the stress distribution from the random environment was an order of magnitude below the comparable static stresses. With a proposed data acquisition system, a strain database will be developed that will quantify an empirical relationship between dynamic and static limit stresses. This event will allow a more accurate estimate of launch environment effects on new technology structural components.

  6. Load limiting parachute inflation control

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Hinnerichs, T.; Parker, G.

    1994-01-01

    Excessive deceleration forces experienced during high speed deployment of parachute systems can cause damage to the payload and the canopy fabric. Conventional reefing lines offer limited relief by temporarily restricting canopy inflation and limiting the peak deceleration load. However, the open-loop control provided by existing reefing devices restrict their use to a specific set of deployment conditions. In this paper, the sensing, processing, and actuation that are characteristic of adaptive structures form the basis of three concepts for active control of parachute inflation. These active control concepts are incorporated into a computer simulation of parachute inflation. Initial investigations indicate that these concepts promise enhanced performance as compared to conventional techniques for a nominal release. Furthermore, the ability of each controller to adapt to off-nominal release conditions is examined.

  7. Cyclic loading of an elastic-plastic adhesive spherical microcontact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadin, Y.; Kligerman, Y.; Etsion, I.

    2008-10-01

    A previous study of a single load-unload cycle of an adhesive contact between an elastic-plastic microscopic sphere and a rigid flat is extended here for several load-unload cycles. The interacting forces between the sphere and the flat obey the Lennard-Jones potential. Kinematic hardening is assumed for the sphere material to account for possible plastic shakedown, and the difference between kinematic and isotropic hardenings is discussed. The main goal of the current work is to investigate the evolution of the load-approach curves for the elastic-plastic spherical contact during its cyclic loading-unloading. These curves are presented for different physical conditions, represented by three main dimensionless parameters, which affect the behavior of the elastic-plastic adhesive contact. A transition value of the Tabor parameter is found, below which the load-approach curves are always continuous and jump-in and jump-out instabilities are not expected.

  8. Model of plastic deformation for extreme loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Dean L.; Tonks, Davis L.; Wallace, Duane C.

    2003-01-01

    We present a model of metallic plastic flow suitable for numerical simulations of explosive loading and high velocity impacts. The dependence of the plastic strain rate on applied stress at low strain rates is of the Arrhenius form but with an activation energy that is singular at zero stress so that the deformation rate vanishes in that limit. Work hardening is modeled as a generalized Voce law. At strain rates exceeding 109s-1, work hardening is neglected, and the rate dependence of the flow stress is calculated using Wallace's theory of overdriven shocks in metals [D.C. Wallace, Phys. Rev. B 24, 5597 (1981); 24, 5607 (1981)]. The thermal-activation regime is continuously merged into the strong shock limit, yielding a model applicable over the 15 decades in strain rate from 10-3 to 1012 s-1. The model represents all aspects of constitutive behavior seen in Hopkinson bar and low-rate data, including a rapid increase in the constant-strain rate sensitivity, with 10% accuracy. High-pressure behavior is controlled by the shear modulus, G(ρ,T), and the melting temperature, Tm(ρ). There are eleven material parameters in addition to G(ρ,T) and Tm(ρ). Parameters for Cu, U, Ta, Mo, V, Be, 304 SS, and 21-6-9 SS are provided.

  9. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  10. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  11. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  12. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  13. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  14. The Rhetorical Limits of the "Plastic Body"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, John W.

    2004-01-01

    This essay analyzes the "plastic body" as it is produced in the discourse of plastic surgery. The contemporary industry has constructed a popular image of plastic surgery as a readily available and personally empowering means to resolve body image issues, on the presumption that any body can become a "better" body. The ideology underlying the…

  15. Properties of fiber reinforced plastics about static and dynamic loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Vladimir V.; Korneeva, Natalia V.

    2016-05-01

    A method for investigation of impact toughness of anisotropic polymer composite materials (reinforced plastics) with the help of CM model sample in the configuration of microplastic (micro plastic) and impact pendulum-type testing machine under static and dynamic loadings has been developed. The method is called "Break by Impact" (Impact Break IB). The estimation of impact resistance CFRP by this method showed that an increase in loading velocity ~104 times the largest changes occurs in impact toughness and deformation ability of a material.

  16. Dynamic Load Balancing for Computational Plasticity on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pramono, Eddy; Simon, Horst

    1994-01-01

    The simulation of the computational plasticity on a complex structure remains a formidable computational task, especially when a highly nonlinear, complex material model was used. It appears that the computational requirements for a such problem can only be satisfied by massively parallel architectures. In order to effectively harness the tremendous computational power provided by such architectures, it is imperative to investigate and to study the algorithmic and implementation issues pertaining to dynamic load balancing for computational plasticity on a highly parallel, distributed-memory, multiple-instruction, multiple-data computers. This paper will measure the effectiveness of the algorithms developed in handling the dynamic load balancing.

  17. Plasticity Effects in Dynamically Loaded Nickel Aluminide Bicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, E; Swift, D; McNaney, J; Lorenzana, H; Peralta, P

    2008-12-02

    Elastic and plastic anisotropy are believed to play large roles in the dynamic deformation of many materials at the grain-level. More importantly to polycrystalline materials is how velocity and stress perturbations are transmitted across interfaces in anisotropic materials. Very little work has been done in this area even though it is important for understanding shock/grain boundary interactions. Therefore, experiments have been performed using nanosecond laser shocks of grown Nickel Aluminide bicrystals at tens of GPa. Velocity histories were measured along a line on the back (free) surface of the bicrystals and used to characterize the material behavior. Unstable plastic flow in <100> grains was seen to occur when loaded above 700 m/s free surface velocity. Flow stresses in <111> and <100> grains were measured to be 2.9 and 3.3 GPa, respectively. Calculations were performed based on anisotropic elasticity and dislocation motion on primary slip systems to measure plastic flow properties where plastic strain-rates on the order of 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} were calculated using the experimental velocity histories. Definitive evidence of plastic wave scattering at the grain boundary was not observed experimentally; however, behavior across the grain boundary has been measured. The observations show that a smooth transition occurs between the elastic precursors in both grains as well as the plastic waves (when plastic flow is evident). An anisotropic elastic-plastic wave scattering model has been developed to explain the mechanisms affecting shock/grain boundary interactions.

  18. Mesoscale numerical modeling of plastic bonded explosives under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Hailin; Zhao, Feng; Ji, Guangfu; Fu, Hua

    2015-09-01

    Mesoscale responses of plastic bonded explosives under shock loading are investigated using material point method as implemented in the Uintah Computational Framework. The two-dimensional geometrical model which can approximately reflect the mesoscopic structure of plastic bonded explosives was created based on the Voronoi tessellation. Shock loading for the explosive was performed by a piston moving at a constant velocity. For the purpose of investigating the influence of shock strength on the responses of explosives, two different velocities for the piston were used, 200 m/s and 400 m/s, respectively. The simulation results indicate that under shock loading there forms some stress localizations on the grain boundary of explosive. These stress localizations lead to large plastic deformations, and the plastic strain energy transforms to thermal energy immediately, causing temperature to rise rapidly and form some hot spots on grain boundary areas. The comparison between two different piston velocities shows that with increasing shock strength, the distribution of plastic strain and temperature does not have significant change, but their values increase obviously. Namely, the higher the shock strength is, the higher the hot spot temperature will be.

  19. A Dynamic Discrete Dislocation Plasticity Method for the Dimulation of Plastic Relaxation under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrutxaga-Lerma, Benat; Sutton, Adrian; Eakins, Daniel; Balint, Daniel; Dini, Daniele

    2013-06-01

    This talk intends to offer some insight as to how Discrete Dislocation Plasticity (DDP) can be adapted to simulate plastic relaxation processes under weak shock loading and high strain rates. In those circumstances, dislocations are believed to be the main cause of plastic relaxation in crystalline solids. Direct simulation of dislocations as the dynamic agents of plastic relaxation in those cases remains a challenge. DDP, where dislocations are modelled as discrete discontinuities in elastic continuum media, is often unable to adequately simulate plastic relaxation because it treats dislocation motion quasi-statically, thus neglecting the time-dependent nature of the elastic fields and assuming that they instantaneously acquire the shape and magnitude predicted by elastostatics. Under shock loading, this assumption leads to several artefacts that can only be overcome with a fully time-dependent formulation of the elastic fields. In this talk one of such formulations for the creation, annihilation and arbitrary motion of straight edge dislocations will be presented. These solutions are applied in a two-dimensional model of time-dependent plastic relaxation under shock loading, and some relevant results will be presented. EPSRC CDT in Theory and Simulation of Materials

  20. Cyclic Plasticity under Shock Loading in an HCP Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B.; Hunter, Abigail; Canfield, Thomas R.; Adams, Chris D.

    2012-06-08

    Plate impact experiments with pressures from 2 to 20 GPa, including one shock-partial release-reshock experiment, were performed on vacuum hot-pressed S-200F Beryllium. This hexagonal close-packed (HCP) metal shows significant plasticity effects in such conditions. The experiments were modeled in a Lagrangian hydrocode using an experimentally calibrated Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) constitutive model. By using the shock data to constrain a high rate portion of PTW, the model was able to generally match plasticity effects on the measured wave profile (surface velocity) during the shock loading, but not unloading. A backstress-based cyclic plasticity model to capture the quasi-elastic release (Bauschinger-type effect) was explored in order to match the unloading and reloading portions of the measured wave profiles. A comparison is made with other approaches in the literature to capture the cyclic plasticity in shock conditions.

  1. Elastic-plastic strain acceptance criterion for structures subject to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Solonick, W.

    1996-11-01

    Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local, or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

  2. Elastic-Plastic Strain Acceptance Criteria for Structures Subject to Rapidly Applied Transient Dynamic Loading

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Solonick

    2003-04-01

    Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on material ductility considerations only and are set as a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local , or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

  3. Investigating and Analyzing Applied Loads Higher Than Limit Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karkehabadi, R.; Rhew, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    The results of the analysis for Balance 1621 indicate that the stresses are high near sharp corners. It is important to increase the size of the fillets to relieve some of the high stresses for the balances that will be designed. For the existing balances, the stresses are high and do not satisfy the established criteria. Two options are considered here. One is a possible modification of the existing balances, and two is to consider other load options. Redesigning a balance can be done in order to enhance the structural integrity of the balance. Because an existing balance needs to be modified, it is not possible to increase the fillet sizes without some further modifications to the balance. It is required that some materials be extracted from the balance in order to have larger fillet sizes. Researchers are interested in being able to apply some components of the load on the balance above the limit loads assigned. Is it possible to enhance the load on the same balance and maintain the factor of safety required? Some loads were increased above their limit loads and analyzed here.

  4. 14 CFR 29.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 29.337... Limit maneuvering load factor. The rotorcraft must be designed for— (a) A limit maneuvering load factor... load factor not less than 2.0 and any negative limit maneuvering load factor of not less than −0.5...

  5. Efficiency enhanced, load-limited MILO

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, R.W.; Clark, M.C.; Calico, S.E.

    1997-12-31

    The self-insulating property of a magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO) obviates the need for an external circuit to supply the magnetic field, but restricts the efficiency of power production to values far below (factor of 4) what is achievable with a conventional magnetron (80%). Nevertheless, this corresponds to gigawatts of power output at modest voltage (500 kV) and impedance (5 ohms). Experience has shown that, while it is straightforward to guild a MILO that oscillates at a specific frequency, maximum efficiency (power) cannot be achieved without careful consideration of the design. They have accomplished this using a load-limited MILO which uses an rf choke (Bragg reflector) at the upstream end to provide maximum feedback and, thereby, maximum power. They discuss various aspects of the design of this efficiency enhanced, multi-gigawatt, load-limited MILO, and present results of simulations and experiments. An upper limit on power efficiency is also discussed.

  6. EXPLORING THE LIMITS TO LIGNINS' METABOLIC PLASTICITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Just how far can lignification be pushed with the aim of improving wood processing (and possibly solid wood properties)? We will explore the limits to which the 3 traditional monolignols can be manipulated, but also broaden our scope to begin thinking about how the entire monomer pool for lignificat...

  7. X-ray detection capability of bismuth-loaded plastic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshimizu, Masanori; Bertrand, Guillaume H. V.; Hamel, Matthieu; Kishimoto, Shunji; Haruki, Rie; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Asai, Keisuke

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the high-energy X-ray detection capabilities of Bi-loaded plastic scintillators. The detection efficiency for 67.4 keV X-rays was successfully increased by increasing the Bi concentration. The detection efficiency of a plastic scintillator loaded with 10 wt % Bi was comparable to that of a commercially available plastic scintillator loaded with 5 wt % Pb, NE-142. A subnanosecond time resolution was achieved, and no long scintillation component appeared with Bi loading. These results indicate that Bi loading is an effective method of enhancing the detection efficiency for high-energy X-rays while preserving the timing properties of plastic scintillators.

  8. 36 CFR 1004.11 - Load, weight and size limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Load, weight and size limits... § 1004.11 Load, weight and size limits. (a) Vehicle load, weight and size limits established by State law... following are prohibited: (1) Operating a vehicle that exceeds a load, weight or size limit designated...

  9. 36 CFR 1004.11 - Load, weight and size limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Load, weight and size limits... § 1004.11 Load, weight and size limits. (a) Vehicle load, weight and size limits established by State law... following are prohibited: (1) Operating a vehicle that exceeds a load, weight or size limit designated...

  10. Load limiting energy absorbing lightweight debris catcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor); Schneider, William C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    In the representative embodiment of the invention disclosed, a load limiting, energy absorbing net is arranged to overlay a normally-covered vent opening in the rear bulkhead of the space orbiter vehicle. Spatially-disposed flexible retainer straps are extended from the net and respectively secured to bulkhead brackets spaced around the vent opening. The intermediate portions of the straps are doubled over and stitched together in a pattern enabling the doubled-over portions to progressively separate at a predicable load designed to be well below the tensile capability of the straps as the stitches are successively torn apart by the forces imposed on the retainer members whenever the cover plate is explosively separated from the bulkhead and propelled into the net. By arranging these stitches to be successively torn away at a load below the strap strength in response to forces acting on the retainers that are less than the combined strength of the retainers, this tearing action serves as a predictable compact energy absorber for safely halting the cover plate as the retainers are extended as the net is deployed. The invention further includes a block of an energy-absorbing material positioned in the net for receiving loose debris produced by the explosive release of the cover plate.

  11. Limit Load and Buckling Analysis for Assessing Hanford Single-Shell Tank Dome Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Kenneth I.; Deibler, John E.; Julyk, Larry J.; Karri, Naveen K.; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2012-12-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection has commissioned a structural analysis of record (AOR) for the Hanford single shell tanks (SSTs) to assess their structural integrity. The analysis used finite element techniques to predict the tank response to the historical thermal and operating loads. The analysis also addressed the potential tank response to a postulated design basis earthquake. The combined response to static and seismic loads was then evaluated against the design requirements of American Concrete Institute (ACI) standard, ACI-349-06, for nuclear safety-related concrete structures. Further analysis was conducted to estimate the plastic limit load and the elastic-plastic buckling capacity of the tanks. The limit load and buckling analyses estimate the margin between the applied loads and the limiting load capacities of the tank structure. The potential for additional dome loads from waste retrieval equipment and the addition of large dome penetrations to accommodate retrieval equipment has generated additional interest in the limit load and buckling analyses. This paper summarizes the structural analysis methods that were used to evaluate the limit load and buckling of the single shell tanks.

  12. 36 CFR 4.11 - Load, weight and size limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Load, weight and size limits... INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.11 Load, weight and size limits. (a) Vehicle load, weight and size..., weight or size limit designated by the superintendent. (2) Failing to obtain a permit when required....

  13. 36 CFR 4.11 - Load, weight and size limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Load, weight and size limits... INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.11 Load, weight and size limits. (a) Vehicle load, weight and size..., weight or size limit designated by the superintendent. (2) Failing to obtain a permit when required....

  14. 14 CFR 23.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 23.681 Section 23.681 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Control Systems § 23.681 Limit load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of...

  15. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Maneuver and Gust Conditions § 25.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) Except where limited by maximum (static)...

  16. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Maneuver and Gust Conditions § 25.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) Except where limited by maximum (static)...

  17. Elevated Temperature Primary Load Design Method Using Pseudo Elastic-Perfectly Plastic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Peter; Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I

    2012-01-01

    A new primary load design method for elevated temperature service has been developed. Codification of the procedure in an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III Code Case is being pursued. The proposed primary load design method is intended to provide the same margins on creep rupture, yielding and creep deformation for a component or structure that are implicit in the allowable stress data. It provides a methodology that does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Use of elastic-perfectly plastic analysis based on allowable stress with corrections for constraint, steady state stress and creep ductility is described. This approach is intended to ensure that traditional primary stresses are the basis for design, taking into account ductility limits to stress re-distribution and multiaxial rupture criteria.

  18. 14 CFR 25.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 25.681 Section 25.681 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this Part must be shown by...

  19. 14 CFR 29.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 29.681 Section 29.681 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this part must be shown by...

  20. Discrimination methods between neutron and gamma rays for boron loaded plastic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, Stéphane; Mouanda, Brigitte; Haan, Serge; Louvel, Michel

    2002-05-01

    Boron loaded plastic scintillators exhibit interesting properties for neutron detection in nuclear waste management and especially in investigating the amount of fissile materials when enclosed in waste containers. Combining a high thermal neutron efficiency and a low mean neutron lifetime, they are suitable in neutron multiplicity counting. However, due to their high sensitivity to gamma rays, pulse shape discrimination methods need to be developed in order to optimize the passive neutron assay measurement. From the knowledge of their physical properties, it is possible to separate the three kinds of particles that have interacted in the boron loaded plastic scintillator (gamma, fast neutron and thermal neutron). For this purpose, we have developed and compared the two well known discrimination methods (zero crossing and charge comparison) applied for the first time to boron loaded plastic scintillator. The setup for the zero crossing discrimination method and the charge comparison methods is thoroughly explained, and the results on those boron loaded plastic scintillators are discussed.

  1. A unified creep-plasticity model suitable for thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavik, D.; Sehitoglu, H.

    1988-01-01

    An experimentally based unified creep-plasticity constitutive model was implemented for 1070 steel. Accurate rate and temperature effects were obtained for isothermal and thermo-mechanical loading by incorporating deformation mechanisms into the constitutive equations in a simple way.

  2. Comparision of Limit Load Solutions with Results of a Collapse Tests of Perforated Plates with a Triangular Penetration Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Jones; J.L. Gordon

    2001-12-13

    Limit load solutions obtained by elastic-perfectly plastic finite element analysis (EPP-FEA) are compared to results of tests of low-alloy steel perforated plate geometries loaded to full plastic collapse. Results are given for two plastic-collapse tests of flat circular disks with circular penetrations arranged in a triangular pattern and drilled normal to the surface of the plate. The ligament efficiency (minimum distance between holes divided by the distance between the centers of the holes) of the pattern is 0.32 and the plate thickness is 2.39 inches (60.7 mm). The tests were designed so that a transverse load generated plastic collapse in the outer row of penetrations due to a combination of transverse shear and in-plane bending. Limit-load solutions were obtained using EPP-FEA with small-strain, small-defection linear geometry assumptions. Two FEA models are used: one where the perforated region is modeled using an equivent solid plate (EQS) representation and another where each hole is explicitly modeled by FEA. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the deformation patterns produced by the EPP-FEA solutions match exactly with the deformation patterns produced by the test. The EQS-EPP FEA solution is about 15% lower than the explicit-hole EPP-FEA solution. Using one-third the actual ultimate strength of the material as the strength parameter in the limit load calculation produces a calculated limit load that is greater than a factor of three less than the mean measured plastic-collapse load obtained in the tests. This paper adds to the qualification of the use of limit-load solutions obtained using small-strain, small deflection EPP-FEA programs for the calculation of the limit load for perforated plates.

  3. 14 CFR 27.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 27.681 Section 27.681 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this part must be shown by tests...

  4. 14 CFR 29.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 29.681 Section 29.681 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.681 Limit load static tests. (a) Compliance with...

  5. 14 CFR 27.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 27.681 Section 27.681 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.681 Limit load static tests. (a) Compliance with...

  6. 14 CFR 23.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 23.681 Section 23.681 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.681 Limit load...

  7. 14 CFR 25.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 25.681 Section 25.681 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.681 Limit load static tests. (a) Compliance with...

  8. 14 CFR 29.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 29.681 Section 29.681 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.681 Limit load static tests. (a) Compliance with...

  9. The theory of plasticity in the case of simple loading accompanied by strain-hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilyushin, A A

    1949-01-01

    The author has previously shown that a deformation theory of plasticity is entirely adequate when the loading is simple; that is, when all the applied forces grow in proportion to a single parameter. The author now shows how a general plasticitytheory for any complex loading may be constructed by successively adding quantities of the nature of correction terms to the deformation theory. All of the theories of plasticity so far suggested for the complex loading condition are shown to be special cases of this general theory.

  10. Limitations to leading-order asymptotic solutions for ELASTIC PLASTIC crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drugan, W. J.

    1998-12-01

    Previous work has shown that there are significant discrepancies between leading-order asymptotic analytical solutions for the elastic-plastic fields near growing crack tips and detailed numerical finite element solutions of the same problems. The evidence is clearest in the simplest physically realistic case : quasi-static anti-plane shear crack growth in homogeneous, isotropic elastic-ideally plastic material. There, the sole extant asymptotic analytical solution involves a plastic loading sector of radial stress characteristics extending about 20° from ahead of the crack, followed by elastic unloading, whereas detailed numerical finite element solutions show the presence of an additional sector of plastic loading, extending from about 20 to about 50°, that is comprised of non-radial characteristics. To explore how the asymptotic analysis can completely miss this important solution feature, we derive an exact representation for the stress and deformation fields in such a propagating region of non-radial characteristics, as well as in the other allowable solution regions. These exact solutions contain arbitrary functions, which are determined by applying asymptotic analysis to the solutions and assembling a complete near-tip solution, valid through second order, that is in agreement with the numerical finite element results. In so doing, we prove that the angular extent of the sector of non-radial characteristics, while substantial until extremely close to the crack tip, vanishes in the limit as the tip is approached, and that the solution in this sector is not of variable-separable form. Beyond resolving the analytical-numerical discrepancies in this specific anti-plane shear problem, the analysis serves to caution, by explicit example, that purely leading-order asymptotic solutions to nonlinear crack growth problems cannot in general capture all essential physical features of the near-tip fields, and that the often-invoked assumption of variable

  11. High strain rate loading of polymeric foams and solid plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Richard D.; Chang, Peter C.; Fourney, William L.

    2000-04-01

    The split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) provided a technique to determine the high strain rate response for low density foams and solid ABS and polypropylene plastics. These materials are used in the interior safety panels of automobiles and crash test dummies. Because the foams have a very low impedance, polycarbonate bars were used to acquire the strain rate data in the 100 to 1600 l/s range. An aluminum SPHB setup was used to obtain the solid plastics data which covered strain rates of 1000 to 4000 l/s. The curves for peak strain rate versus peak stress for the foams over the test range studied indicates only a slight strain rate dependence. Peak strain rate versus peak stress curves for polypropylene shows a strain rate dependence up to about 1500 l/s. At that rate the solid poly propylene indicates no strain rate dependence. The ABS plastics are strain rate dependent up to 3500 l/s and then are independent at larger strain rates.

  12. Thermal activation of crack-tip plasticity: The brittle or ductile response of a stationary crack loaded to failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmaier, Alexander; Gumbsch, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Metals with a body centered cubic crystal structure, like tungsten, exhibit a pronounced semibrittle regime at intermediate temperatures. In this regime their fracture toughness strongly depends on loading rate and temperature. Crack-tip plasticity has been studied with two-dimensional numerical simulations on different length scales. The method of discrete dislocation dynamics has been employed to test various assumptions made on the deformation mechanisms and the origin of the strong loading rate and temperature dependence of fracture toughness in this regime. A continuum elasticity-viscoplasticity model capable of describing larger plastic deformations yields complementary information with respect to the discrete dislocation method. Despite of their fundamental differences, both simulations consistently show that crack-tip plasticity can be described as a time-dependent microplastic deformation with well-defined activation energy and that the blunting of the crack tip plays an important role for the transition from semibrittle to ductile behavior. Based on general findings of the numerical simulations an Arrheniuslike relation between loading rate and temperature at points of constant fracture toughness is derived. This scaling relation shows the dominance of dislocation mobility as the rate limiting factor for fracture toughness and for the brittle-to-ductile transition itself. The results of our simulations are also consistent with experimental data gathered on tungsten single crystals. Thus, the proposed scaling relation can be used to predict fracture toughnesses in a wide range of temperatures and loading rates, based on only a small number of experiments.

  13. 29 CFR 1919.29 - Limitations on safe working loads and proof loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Limitations on safe working loads and proof loads. 1919.29 Section 1919.29 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons...

  14. Loading-unloading of an elastic-plastic adhesive spherical microcontact.

    PubMed

    Kadin, Y; Kligerman, Y; Etsion, I

    2008-05-01

    A numerical solution is presented for a single load-unload cycle of an adhesive contact between an elastic-plastic sphere and a rigid flat. The interacting forces between the sphere and the flat are obtained through connecting nonlinear spring elements having force-displacement behavior that obeys the Lennard-Jones potential. Kinematic, rather than isotropic, hardening is assumed for the sphere material to account for possible secondary plastification during the unloading. The well-known Tabor parameter and a plasticity parameter are shown to be the two main dimensionless parameters governing the problem. The effects of these two parameters on the load-approach curves, on the plastically deformed sphere profiles, and on the plastic strain fields inside the sphere are presented, showing different modes of separation during the unloading. PMID:18275967

  15. 14 CFR 25.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within certain load distribution... and center of gravity combinations must be established. (b) The load distribution limits may...

  16. 14 CFR 25.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within certain load distribution... and center of gravity combinations must be established. (b) The load distribution limits may...

  17. 14 CFR 25.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within certain load distribution... and center of gravity combinations must be established. (b) The load distribution limits may...

  18. 14 CFR 25.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within certain load distribution... and center of gravity combinations must be established. (b) The load distribution limits may...

  19. 29 CFR 1917.111 - Maintenance and load limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance and load limits. 1917.111 Section 1917.111 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.111 Maintenance and load...

  20. 14 CFR 27.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 27.337 Section 27.337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads §...

  1. 14 CFR 27.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 27.337 Section 27.337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads §...

  2. 29 CFR 1917.111 - Maintenance and load limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maintenance and load limits. 1917.111 Section 1917.111 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.111 Maintenance and load...

  3. 14 CFR 25.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within certain load distribution... and center of gravity combinations must be established. (b) The load distribution limits may...

  4. 29 CFR 1917.111 - Maintenance and load limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maintenance and load limits. 1917.111 Section 1917.111 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.111 Maintenance and load...

  5. A coupled damage-plasticity model for the cyclic behavior of shear-loaded interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, P.; De Lorenzis, L.

    2015-12-01

    The present work proposes a novel thermodynamically consistent model for the behavior of interfaces under shear (i.e. mode-II) cyclic loading conditions. The interface behavior is defined coupling damage and plasticity. The admissible states' domain is formulated restricting the tangential interface stress to non-negative values, which makes the model suitable e.g. for interfaces with thin adherends. Linear softening is assumed so as to reproduce, under monotonic conditions, a bilinear mode-II interface law. Two damage variables govern respectively the loss of strength and of stiffness of the interface. The proposed model needs the evaluation of only four independent parameters, i.e. three defining the monotonic mode-II interface law, and one ruling the fatigue behavior. This limited number of parameters and their clear physical meaning facilitate experimental calibration. Model predictions are compared with experimental results on fiber reinforced polymer sheets externally bonded to concrete involving different load histories, and an excellent agreement is obtained.

  6. The feasibility of using boron-loaded plastic fibers for neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Grazioso, R.F.; Heger, A.S.; Ensslin, N.; Mayo, D.R.; Mercer, D.J.; Miller, M.C.; Russo, P.A.

    1998-12-01

    The results from simulations and laboratory experiments with boron-loaded plastic scintillating fibers as a nondestructive assay tool are presented. Single and multiclad fibers in three diameters of 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mm were examined for their application in neutron coincident counting. For this application, the simulation results show that various configurations of boro-loaded plastic scintillating fibers have a die-away time ({tau}) of 12 {micro}s with an efficiency ({var_epsilon}) of 50%. For a comparable efficiency, {sup 3}He proportional tubes have a typical die-away time of 50 {micro}s. The shortened die-away time can reduce the relative error for measurement of similar samples by up to 50%. Plastic scintillating fibers also offer flexible configurations with the potential to discriminate between signals from gamma-ray and neutron events. To date, the emphasis of the investigation has been the detection capability of plastic scintillating fibers for neutrons and gamma rays and evaluation of their ability to discriminate between the two events. Quantitative calculations and experiments have also been conducted to determine the light output, evaluate the noise,quantify light attenuation, and determine neutron detection efficiency. Current experimental data support the analytical results that boron-loaded plastic fibers can detect thermal neutrons with performance metrics that are comparable or better than those of {sup 3}He proportional tubes.

  7. Bismuth- and lithium-loaded plastic scintillators for gamma and neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Sanner, Robert D.; Beck, Patrick R.; Swanberg, Erik L.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Payne, Stephen A.; Hurlbut, Charles R.

    2015-04-01

    Transparent plastic scintillators based on polyvinyltoluene (PVT) have been fabricated with high loading of bismuth carboxylates for gamma spectroscopy, and with lithium carboxylates for neutron detection. When activated with a combination of standard fluors, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and tetraphenylbutadiene (TPB), gamma light yields with 15 wt% bismuth tripivalate of 5000 Ph/MeV are measured. A PVT plastic formulation including 30 wt% lithium pivalate and 30 wt% PPO offers both pulse shape discrimination, and a neutron capture peak at ~400 keVee. In another configuration, a bismuth-loaded PVT plastic is coated with ZnS(6Li) paint, permitting simultaneous gamma and neutron detection via pulse shape discrimination with a figure-of-merit of 3.8, while offering gamma spectroscopy with energy resolution of R(662 keV)=15%.

  8. Limit load analysis of perforated disks with square penetration pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Rogalska, E.; Kakol, W.; Guerlement, G.; Lamblin, D.

    1997-02-01

    The problem of limit analysis of perforated disks is important in design of many modern engineering structures, especially for tubesheet heat exchangers. Here, limit load analysis of perforated disks with a square penetration pattern is presented. The results of limit analysis are used to obtain yield surfaces for solid material equivalent to perforated disk based on homogenization approach. Theoretical and experimental results are compared. Approximations of the yield surfaces are proposed.

  9. 29 CFR 1919.29 - Limitations on safe working loads and proof loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limitations on safe working loads and proof loads. 1919.29 Section 1919.29 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and...

  10. Toward a population genetic framework of developmental evolution: the costs, limits, and consequences of phenotypic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Snell-Rood, Emilie C.; Van Dyken, James David; Cruickshank, Tami; Wade, Michael J.; Moczek, Armin P.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive phenotypic plasticity allows organisms to cope with environmental variability, and yet, despite its adaptive significance, phenotypic plasticity is neither ubiquitous nor infinite. In this review, we merge developmental and population genetic perspectives to explore costs and limits on the evolution of plasticity. Specifically, we focus on the role of modularity in developmental genetic networks as a mechanism underlying phenotypic plasticity, and apply to it lessons learned from population genetic theory on the interplay between relaxed selection and mutation accumulation. We argue that the environmental specificity of gene expression and the associated reduction in pleiotropic constraints drive a fundamental tradeoff between the range of plasticity that can be accommodated and mutation accumulation in alternative developmental networks. This tradeoff has broad implications for understanding the origin and maintenance of plasticity and may contribute to a better understanding of the role of plasticity in the origin, diversification, and loss of phenotypic diversity. PMID:20020499

  11. Pushing high-heat-load optics to the limit

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, P. B.

    1999-11-08

    A cryogenically cooled silicon monochromator and a water-cooled diamond monochromator have been tested under twice the standard power load conditions at the Advanced Photon Source. Both monochromators performed satisfactorily under these extreme power loads (several hundred watts of incident power and up to 300 W/mm{sup 2} of incident normal peak power density). The experimental data and the parameters derived to predict the performance limits of the cryogenic silicon monochromator are presented.

  12. Fatigue life prediction under service load considering strengthening effect of loads below fatigue limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lihui; Zheng, Songlin; Feng, Jinzhi

    2014-11-01

    Lightweight design requires an accurate life prediction for structures and components under service loading histories. However, predicted life with the existing methods seems too conservative in some cases, leading to a heavy structure. Because these methods are established on the basis that load cycles would only cause fatigue damage, ignore the strengthening effect of loads. Based on Palmgren-Miner Rule (PMR), this paper introduces a new method for fatigue life prediction under service loadings by taking into account the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit. In this method, the service loadings are classified into three categories: damaging load, strengthening load and none-effect load, and the process for fatigue life prediction is divided into two stages: stage I and stage II, according to the best strengthening number of cycles. During stage I, fatigue damage is calculated considering both the strengthening and damaging effect of load cycles. While during stage II, only the damaging effect is considered. To validate this method, fatigue lives of automobile half shaft and torsion beam rear axle are calculated based on the new method and traditional methods, such as PMR and Modified Miner Rule (MMR), and fatigue tests of the two components are conducted under service loading histories. The tests results show that the percentage errors of the predicted life with the new method to mean life of tests for the two components are -3.78% and -1.76% separately, much lesser than that with PMR and MMR. By considering the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit, the new method can significantly improve the accuracy for fatigue life prediction. Thus lightweight design can be fully realized in the design stage.

  13. Fatigue life prediction under service load considering strengthening effect of loads below fatigue limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lihui; Zheng, Songlin; Feng, Jinzhi

    2014-09-01

    Lightweight design requires an accurate life prediction for structures and components under service loading histories. However, predicted life with the existing methods seems too conservative in some cases, leading to a heavy structure. Because these methods are established on the basis that load cycles would only cause fatigue damage, ignore the strengthening effect of loads. Based on Palmgren-Miner Rule (PMR), this paper introduces a new method for fatigue life prediction under service loadings by taking into account the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit. In this method, the service loadings are classified into three categories: damaging load, strengthening load and none-effect load, and the process for fatigue life prediction is divided into two stages: stage I and stage II, according to the best strengthening number of cycles. During stage I, fatigue damage is calculated considering both the strengthening and damaging effect of load cycles. While during stage II, only the damaging effect is considered. To validate this method, fatigue lives of automobile half shaft and torsion beam rear axle are calculated based on the new method and traditional methods, such as PMR and Modified Miner Rule (MMR), and fatigue tests of the two components are conducted under service loading histories. The tests results show that the percentage errors of the predicted life with the new method to mean life of tests for the two components are -3.78% and -1.76% separately, much lesser than that with PMR and MMR. By considering the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit, the new method can significantly improve the accuracy for fatigue life prediction. Thus lightweight design can be fully realized in the design stage.

  14. Loading Path Dependence of Forming Limit Diagram of a TRIP800 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Soulami, Ayoub; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-04-12

    In this paper, the microstructure-based finite element modeling method is used in investigating the loading path dependence of formability of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. For this purpose, the effects of different loading path on the forming limit diagrams (FLD) of TRIP steels are qualitatively examined using the representative volume element (RVE) of a commercial TRIP800 steel. First, the modeling method was introduced, where a combined isotropic/kinematic hardening rule is adopted for the constituent phases in order to rightly describe the cyclic deformation behaviors of TRIP steels during the forming process with combined loading paths which may include the unloading between the two consecutive loadings. Material parameters for the constituent phases remained the same as those in the authors’ previous study [1] except for some adjustments for the martensite phase due to the introduction of the new combined hardening rule. Based on the new material parameters and new hardening rule, the predicted deformation behaviors of the TRIP800 steel show quite similar qualitative trends to those reported in other experimental works. Pseudo-forming limit strain diagrams (Pseudo-FLD) for the TRIP800 steel were, then, obtained for various loading paths. The computational results show that, similar to other single phase materials, the TRIP800 steel shows very sensitive loading path dependence in the strain-based forming limit diagrams (strain-FLD), but does not in the stress-based forming limit diagrams (stress-FLD), and that the phase transformation does not have significant effects on the FLD for the TRIP800 steel. From the observations in this study, the current modeling methods can be used in examining the qualitative trends of FLD of TRIP steels under different loading paths/prestrains.

  15. Load models for fatigue reliability from limited data

    SciTech Connect

    Winterstein, S.R.; Lange, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    Probability distributions of wind turbine loads are estimated from limited data. The impact of different models on fatigue damage is shown. Common one-parameter probability models, such as the Rayleigh and exponential, are found to give significantly different estimates of load distributions and damage. Greatest differences occur in materials with relatively high values of the S-N exponent b, such as composites. In such cases more accurate damage estimates are found by matching at least two moments of the load data (Weibull model), or still higher moments as well. For this purpose, a new, four-moment ``generalized Weibull`` model is introduced. For edge-wise loads it appears a notable improvement over the basic Weibull model, while it supports the Weibull model in the flapwise case. Uncertainty in damage estimates is also quantified, along with the implied data needs.

  16. Heat loading limits for solid transuranic wastes storage

    SciTech Connect

    Spatz, T.L.

    1993-07-01

    Heat loading limits have been established for four storage configurations of TRU wastes. The calculations were performed assuming the worst case scenario whereby all the heat generated within a drum was generated within one ``cut`` and that this cut was located in the very center of the drum. Poly-boxes containing one HEPA filter were assumed to have a uniform heat generation throughout the filter. The maximum allowable temperatures were based on the materials in the containers. A comparison between the drum center temperature for a uniform heat load distribution and for the center temperature when the heat load is confined to one cut in the center of the drum is also illustrated. This comparison showed that the heat load of a particular drum can be more than doubled by distributing the sources of heat uniformly throughout the container.

  17. Centaur Standard Shroud (CSS) static limit load structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastwood, C.

    1975-01-01

    The structural capabilities of the jettisonable metal shroud were tested and the interaction of the shroud with the Centaur stage was evaluated. A flight-configured shroud and the assemblies of the associated Centaur stage were tested for applied axial and shear loads to flight limit values. The tests included various thermal, pressure, and load conditions to verify localized strength capabilities, to evaluate subsystem performance, and to determine the aging effect on insulation system properties. The tests series verified the strength capabilities of the shroud and of all associated flight assembles. Shroud deflections were shown to remain within allowable limits so long as load sharing members were connected between the shroud and the Centaur stage.

  18. 14 CFR 23.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 23.337 Section 23.337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES...

  19. 14 CFR 23.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... distribution limits. (a) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within... established for the corresponding weight and center of gravity combinations. (b) The load distribution...

  20. 14 CFR 23.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distribution limits. (a) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within... established for the corresponding weight and center of gravity combinations. (b) The load distribution...

  1. 14 CFR 23.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... distribution limits. (a) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within... established for the corresponding weight and center of gravity combinations. (b) The load distribution...

  2. 14 CFR 23.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... distribution limits. (a) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within... established for the corresponding weight and center of gravity combinations. (b) The load distribution...

  3. 14 CFR 23.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distribution limits. (a) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within... established for the corresponding weight and center of gravity combinations. (b) The load distribution...

  4. Plasticity in thermal tolerance has limited potential to buffer ectotherms from global warming

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Alex R.; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2015-01-01

    Global warming is increasing the overheating risk for many organisms, though the potential for plasticity in thermal tolerance to mitigate this risk is largely unknown. In part, this shortcoming stems from a lack of knowledge about global and taxonomic patterns of variation in tolerance plasticity. To address this critical issue, we test leading hypotheses for broad-scale variation in ectotherm tolerance plasticity using a dataset that includes vertebrate and invertebrate taxa from terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats. Contrary to expectation, plasticity in heat tolerance was unrelated to latitude or thermal seasonality. However, plasticity in cold tolerance is associated with thermal seasonality in some habitat types. In addition, aquatic taxa have approximately twice the plasticity of terrestrial taxa. Based on the observed patterns of variation in tolerance plasticity, we propose that limited potential for behavioural plasticity (i.e. behavioural thermoregulation) favours the evolution of greater plasticity in physiological traits, consistent with the ‘Bogert effect’. Finally, we find that all ectotherms have relatively low acclimation in thermal tolerance and demonstrate that overheating risk will be minimally reduced by acclimation in even the most plastic groups. Our analysis indicates that behavioural and evolutionary mechanisms will be critical in allowing ectotherms to buffer themselves from extreme temperatures. PMID:25994676

  5. Plasticity in thermal tolerance has limited potential to buffer ectotherms from global warming.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Alex R; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2015-06-01

    Global warming is increasing the overheating risk for many organisms, though the potential for plasticity in thermal tolerance to mitigate this risk is largely unknown. In part, this shortcoming stems from a lack of knowledge about global and taxonomic patterns of variation in tolerance plasticity. To address this critical issue, we test leading hypotheses for broad-scale variation in ectotherm tolerance plasticity using a dataset that includes vertebrate and invertebrate taxa from terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats. Contrary to expectation, plasticity in heat tolerance was unrelated to latitude or thermal seasonality. However, plasticity in cold tolerance is associated with thermal seasonality in some habitat types. In addition, aquatic taxa have approximately twice the plasticity of terrestrial taxa. Based on the observed patterns of variation in tolerance plasticity, we propose that limited potential for behavioural plasticity (i.e. behavioural thermoregulation) favours the evolution of greater plasticity in physiological traits, consistent with the 'Bogert effect'. Finally, we find that all ectotherms have relatively low acclimation in thermal tolerance and demonstrate that overheating risk will be minimally reduced by acclimation in even the most plastic groups. Our analysis indicates that behavioural and evolutionary mechanisms will be critical in allowing ectotherms to buffer themselves from extreme temperatures. PMID:25994676

  6. Plasticity of Cu nanoparticles: Dislocation-dendrite-induced strain hardening and a limit for displacive plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Albe, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Summary The plastic behaviour of individual Cu crystallites under nanoextrusion is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Single-crystal Cu fcc nanoparticles are embedded in a spherical force field mimicking the effect of a contracting carbon shell, inducing pressure on the system in the range of gigapascals. The material is extruded from a hole of 1.1–1.6 nm radius under athermal conditions. Simultaneous nucleation of partial dislocations at the extrusion orifice leads to the formation of dislocation dendrites in the particle causing strain hardening and high flow stress of the material. As the extrusion orifice radius is reduced below 1.3 Å we observe a transition from displacive plasticity to solid-state amorphisation. PMID:23616936

  7. Elastic-Plastic Behavior of U6Nb under Ramp Wave Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D. B.; Gray, G. T. III; Hixson, R. S.; Hall, C. A.

    2006-07-28

    When uranium-niobium (6 wt.%) alloy is shock loaded, the expected elastic precursor is absent. A prior model attributed this absence to shear-induced twinning and the concomitant shear stress reduction that prevented the shocked material from reaching the plastic yield point. In the present study, carefully prepared U6Nb was subjected to shock loading to verify the adequacy of the prior model. Other samples were loaded with a ramp pressure pulse with strain rate large enough so that significant twinning would not occur during the experiment. Backward integration analyses of these latter experiments' back surface motion give stress-strain loading paths in U6Nb that suggest ordinary elastic-plastic flow. Some of the U6Nb was pre-strained by cold rolling in an effort to further ensure that twinning did not affect wave propagation. Shock and ramp loadings yielded similar results to the baseline material except, as expected, they are consistent with a higher yield stress and twinning shear stress threshold.

  8. Quasi-Plastic Deformation of WC-Co Composites Loaded with a Spherical Indenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibo; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Belnap, J. Daniel

    2007-03-01

    The quasi-plastic deformation behavior of cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) materials was studied using Hertzian indentation techniques. The indentation stress-strain curves of three WC-10 wt pct Co alloys with different hardness values demonstrate that WC-Co alloys exhibit “quasi-plasticity” behavior under indentation load and the increase of indentation stress vs indentation strain bears similarity to “strain hardening” in ductile metals. The analysis of the subsurface indentation damage shows that the mechanisms of the quasi-plastic deformation of WC-Co material are the formation of microcracks. Microcracks were found at heavily damaged areas in all three alloys, and the number of microcracks was higher for the sample with the higher apparent quasi-plasticity. The threshold stress values for the onset of quasi-plastic deformation and formation of ring cracks were determined and used to evaluate the brittleness index of these materials. The correlation of the brittleness index with hardness values gives insight with regard to the brittle or quasi-plastic responses of WC-Co materials.

  9. Load-limiting landing gear footpad energy absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Chris; Tsai, Ted

    1994-01-01

    As a precursor to future manned missions to the moon, an inexpensive, unmanned vehicle that could carry small, scientific payloads to the lunar surface was studied by NASA. The vehicle, called the Common Lunar Lander, required extremely optimized structural systems to increase the potential payload mass. A lightweight energy-absorbing system (LAGFEAS), which also acts as a landing load-limiter was designed to help achieve this optimized structure. Since the versatile and easily tailored system is a load-limiter, it allowed for the structure to be designed independently of the ever-changing landing energy predictions. This paper describes the LAGFEAS system and preliminary verification testing performed at NASA's Johnson Space Center for the Common Lunar Lander program.

  10. Elastic-plastic analysis of the PVRC burst disk tests with comparison to the ASME code -- Primary stress limits

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.P.; Holliday, J.E.

    1999-02-01

    This paper provides a comparison between finite element analysis results and test data from the Pressure Vessel Research Council (PVRC) burst disk program. Testing sponsored by the PVRC over 20 years ago was done by pressurizing circular flat disks made from three different materials until failure by bursting. The purpose of this re-analysis is to investigate the use of finite element analysis (FEA) to assess the primary stress limits of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (1998) and to qualify the use of elastic-plastic (EP-FEA) for limit load calculations. The three materials tested represent the range of strength and ductility found in modern pressure vessel construction and include a low strength high ductility material, a medium strength medium ductility material, and a high strength low ductility low alloy material. Results of elastic and EP-FEA are compared to test data. Stresses from the elastic analyses are linearized for comparison of Code primary stress limits to test results. Elastic-plastic analyses are done using both best-estimate and elastic-perfectly plastic (EPP) stress-strain curves. Both large strain-large displacement (LSLD) and small strain-small displacement (SSSD) assumptions are used with the EP-FEA. Analysis results are compared to test results to evaluate the various analysis methods, models, and assumptions as applied to the bursting of thin disks.

  11. Axisymmetric micromechanics of elastic-perfectly plastic fibrous composites under uniaxial tension loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Allen, David H.

    1993-01-01

    The uniaxial response of a continuous fiber elastic-perfectly plastic composite is modeled herein as a two-element composite cylinder. An axisymmetric analytical micromechanics solution is obtained for the rate-independent elastic-plastic response of the two-element composite cylinder subjected to tensile loading in the fiber direction for the case wherein the core fiber is assumed to be a transversely isotropic elastic-plastic material obeying the Tsai-Hill yield criterion, with yielding simulating fiber failure. The matrix is assumed to be an isotropic elastic-plastic material obeying the Tresca yield criterion. It is found that there are three different circumstances that depend on the fiber and matrix properties: fiber yield, followed by matrix yielding; complete matrix yield, followed by fiber yielding; and partial matrix yield, followed by fiber yielding, followed by complete matrix yield. The order in which these phenomena occur is shown to have a pronounced effect on the predicted uniaxial effective composite response.

  12. Experimental and numerical study of plastic shear instability under high-speed loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sokovikov, Mikhail E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Chudinov, Vasiliy E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Bilalov, Dmitry E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Oborin, Vladimir E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Uvarov, Sergey E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Plekhov, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Terekhina, Alena E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Naimark, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru

    2014-11-14

    The behavior of specimens dynamically loaded during the split Hopkinson (Kolsky) bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions was studied. The lateral surface of the specimens was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was examined using a high-speed infra-red camera and a VISAR velocity measurement system. The microstructure of tested specimens was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The development of plastic shear instability regions has been simulated numerically.

  13. The mechanisms of plastic strain accommodation and post critical behavior of heterogeneous reactive composites subject to dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olney, Karl L.

    The dynamic behavior of granular/porous and laminate reactive materials is of interest due to their practical applications; reactive structural components, reactive fragments, etc. The mesostructural properties control meso- and macro-scale dynamic behavior of these heterogeneous composites including the behavior during the post-critical stage of deformation. They heavily influence mechanisms of fragment generation and the in situ development of local hot spots, which act as sites of ignition in these materials. This dissertation concentrates on understanding the mechanisms of plastic strain accommodation in two representative reactive material systems with different heterogeneous mesostructrues: Aluminum-Tungsten granular/porous and Nickel-Aluminum laminate composites. The main focus is on the interpretation of results of the following dynamic experiments conducted at different strain and strain rates: drop weight tests, explosively expanded ring experiments, and explosively collapsed thick walled cylinder experiments. Due to the natural limitations in the evaluation of the mesoscale behavior of these materials experimentally and the large variation in the size scales between the mesostructural level and the sample, it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to examine the mesoscale behavior in situ. Therefore, numerical simulations of the corresponding experiments are used as the main tool to explore material behavior at the mesoscale. Numerical models were developed to elucidate the mechanisms of plastic strain accommodation and post critical behavior in these heterogeneous composites subjected to dynamic loading. These simulations were able to reproduce the qualitative and quantitative features that were observable in the experiments and provided insight into the evolution of the mechanisms of plastic strain accommodation and post critical behavior in these materials with complex mesotructure. Additionally, these simulations provided a framework to examine

  14. Plastic deformation and ductile fracture of 2024-T351 aluminum under various loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidt, Jeremy Daniel

    The plastic deformation and ductile fracture behavior of 12.7 mm thick 2024-T351 aluminum plate is investigated. Tension, compression and shear experiments are conducted at strain rates ranging from 10 -4 s-1 to 5000 s-1 and temperatures ranging from -50 °C to 450 °C. Anisotropy in the plate is studied by conducting tension and compression tests on specimens oriented in multiple directions within the plate. An anisotropic plasticity model is used in numerical simulations of select experiments. Comparison of the simulation results to the actual test data shows that the material behavior can be adequately captured in tension, compression and shear. Anisotropic plastic deformation behavior in an impacted target panel is also investigated. Numerical simulations using both a von Mises and anisotropic yield functions are compared to previously published experimental data. The choice of yield function has a dramatic effect on the predicted projectile residual velocities. Experimental impact data shows evidence of anisotropic behavior, the trends of which can be captured in simulations using the anisotropic yield function. The dependence of equivalent plastic fracture strain on the state of stress is studied through mechanical experiments on specimens with various geometries, subjected to multiple load conditions. Tension tests of plane stress (thin) specimens, axisymmetric specimens and plane strain (thick) specimens are conducted for this purpose. Combined tension -- torsion, pure shear and compression -- torsion tests as well as dynamic punch experiments are also used. The three dimensional digital image correlation (DIC) technique is used to determine the specimen surface strains in many of the experiments. A coupled experimental -- numerical approach is used to generate fracture locus data points for the tension and punch experiments. The equivalent fracture strain dependence on three stress state parameters: stress triaxiality, Lode parameter and product

  15. Plastic set of smooth large radii of curvature thermal conductance specimens at light loads.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Thermal contact conductance test data at high vacuum were obtained from two Armco iron specimens having smooth, large radii of curvature, convex, one-half wave length surfaces. The data are compared with calculations based on two macroscopic elastic deformation theories and an empirical expression. Major disagreement with the theories and fair agreement with the empirical expression resulted. Plastic deformation of all the contacting surfaces was verified from surface analyzer statistics. These results indicate that the theoretical assumption of macroscopic elastic deformation is inadequate for accurate prediction of heat transfer with light loads for Armco iron specimens similar to those used in this investigation.

  16. Comparative analysis of pulse shape discrimination methods in a 6Li loaded plastic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, Matthew J. I.; Gamage, Kelum A. A.; Taylor, Graeme C.

    2015-07-01

    Three algorithms for discriminating between fast neutrons, thermal neutrons and gamma rays in a 6Li loaded plastic scintillator have been compared. Following a literature review of existing pulse shape discrimination techniques, the performance of the charge comparison method, triangular filtering and frequency gradient analysis were investigated in this work. The scintillator was exposed to three different mixed gamma/neutron radiation fields. The figure of merit of neutron/gamma separation was investigated over a broad energy range, as well as for the neutron capture energy region. After optimisation, all three methods were found to perform similarly in terms of neutron/gamma separation.

  17. Plastic set of smooth large radii of curvature thermal conductance specimens at light loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Thermal contact conductance test data at high vacuum were obtained from two Armco iron specimens having smooth, large radii of curvature, convex, one-half wave length surfaces. The data are compared with calculations based on two macroscopic elastic deformation theories and an empirical expression. Major disagreement with the theories and fair agreement with the empirical expression resulted. Plastic deformation of all the contacting surfaces was verified from surface analyzer statistics. These results indicate that the theoretical assumption of macroscopic elastic deformation is inadequate for accurate prediction of heat transfer with light loads for Armco iron specimens similar to those used in this investigation.

  18. Monte Carlo homogenized limit analysis model for randomly assembled blocks in-plane loaded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Gabriele; Lourenço, Paulo B.

    2010-11-01

    A simple rigid-plastic homogenization model for the limit analysis of masonry walls in-plane loaded and constituted by the random assemblage of blocks with variable dimensions is proposed. In the model, blocks constituting a masonry wall are supposed infinitely resistant with a Gaussian distribution of height and length, whereas joints are reduced to interfaces with frictional behavior and limited tensile and compressive strength. Block by block, a representative element of volume (REV) is considered, constituted by a central block interconnected with its neighbors by means of rigid-plastic interfaces. The model is characterized by a few material parameters, is numerically inexpensive and very stable. A sub-class of elementary deformation modes is a-priori chosen in the REV, mimicking typical failures due to joints cracking and crushing. Masonry strength domains are obtained equating the power dissipated in the heterogeneous model with the power dissipated by a fictitious homogeneous macroscopic plate. Due to the inexpensiveness of the approach proposed, Monte Carlo simulations can be repeated on the REV in order to have a stochastic estimation of in-plane masonry strength at different orientations of the bed joints with respect to external loads accounting for the geometrical statistical variability of blocks dimensions. Two cases are discussed, the former consisting on full stochastic REV assemblages (obtained considering a random variability of both blocks height an length) and the latter assuming the presence of a horizontal alignment along bed joints, i.e. allowing blocks height variability only row by row. The case of deterministic blocks height (quasi-periodic texture) can be obtained as a subclass of this latter case. Masonry homogenized failure surfaces are finally implemented in an upper bound FE limit analysis code for the analysis at collapse of entire walls in-plane loaded. Two cases of engineering practice, consisting on the prediction of the failure

  19. Crystal Plasticity Finite Element Analysis of Loading-Unloading Behaviour in Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hama, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Takuda, Hirohiko

    2010-06-15

    Magnesium alloy sheets exhibit strong inelastic response during unloading. In this study crystal plasticity finite element analysis of loading-unloading behaviour during uniaxial tension in a rolled magnesium alloy sheet was carried out, and the mechanism of this inelastic response was examined in detail in terms of macroscopic and mesoscopic deformations. The unloading behaviour obtained by the simulation was in good agreement with the experiment in terms of variation with stress of instantaneous tangent modulus during unloading. Variations of activities of each family of slip systems during the deformation showed that the activation of basal slip systems is the largest during unloading, and the slip direction during unloading is opposite from during loading. These results indicated that one of the factors of the inelastic behaviour during unloading is the fact that the basal slip systems are easily activated during unloading because of their low strengths.

  20. Elastic-plastic finite element analysis-to-test correlation for structures subjected to dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.C.; Minicucci, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    A test program was undertaken to demonstrate the ability of elastic-plastic finite element methods to predict dynamic inelastic response for simple structural members. Cantilever and fixed-beam specimens were tested to levels that produced plastic straining in the range of 2.0% and to 3.0% and permanent sets. Acceleration, strain, and displacement data were recorded for use in analytical correlation. Correlation analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. Results of the correlation show that current elastic-plastic analysis techniques accurately capture dynamic inelastic response (displacement, acceleration) due to rapidly applied dynamic loading. Peak elastic and inelastic surface strains are accurately predicted. To accurately capture inelastic straining near connections, a solid model, including fillet welds, is necessary. The hardening models currently available in the ABAQUS code (isotropic, kinematic) do not accurately capture inelastic strain reversals caused by specimen rebound. Analyses performed consistently underpredicted the peak strain level of the first inelastic reversal and the rebound deflection and overpredicted the permanent set of structures experiencing inelastic rebound. Based on these findings, an improved hardening model is being implemented in the ABAQUS code by the developers. The intent of this model upgrade is to improve the ability of the program to capture inelastic strain reversals and to predict permanent sets.

  1. Effect of optimum plastic depth on stresses and load-bearing capacity of autofrettaged cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruilin; Zhu, Guolin

    2013-03-01

    Autofrettage is an effective measure to even distribution of stresses and raise load-bearing capacity for (ultra-)high pressure apparatus. Currently, the research on autofrettage has focused mostly on specific engineering problems, while general theoretical study is rarely done. To discover the general law contained in autofrettage theory, by the aid of the authors' previous work and according to the third strength theory, theoretical problems about autofrettage are studied including residual stresses and their equivalent stress, total stresses and their equivalent stress, etc. Because of the equation of optimum depth of plastic zone which is presented in the authors' previous work, the equations for the residual stresses and their equivalent stress as well as the total stress and their equivalent stress are simplified greatly. Thus the law of distribution of the residual stresses and their equivalent stress as well as the total stress and their equivalent stress and the varying tendency of these stresses are discovered. The relation among various parameters are revealed. The safe and optimum load-bearing conditions for cylinders are obtained. According to the results obtained by theoretical analysis, it is shown that if the two parameters, namely ratio of outside to inside radius, k, and depth of plastic zone, k j, meet the equation of optimum depth of plastic zone, when the pressure contained in an autofrettaged cylinder is lower than two times the initial yield pressure of the unautofrettaged cylinder, the equivalent residual stress and the equivalent total stress at the inside surface as well as the elastic-plastic juncture of a cylinder are lower than yield strength. When an autofrettaged cylinder is subjected to just two times the initial yield pressure of the unautofrettaged cylinder, the equivalent total stress within the whole plastic zone is just identically equal to the yield strength, or it is a constant. The proposed research theoretically depicts the

  2. Computer simulation of model cohesive powders: Plastic consolidation, structural changes, and elasticity under isotropic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilabert, F. A.; Roux, J.-N.; Castellanos, A.

    2008-09-01

    The quasistatic behavior of a simple two-dimensional model of a cohesive powder under isotropic loads is investigated by discrete element simulations. We ignore contact plasticity and focus on the effect of geometry and collective rearrangements on the material behavior. The loose packing states, as assembled and characterized in a previous numerical study [Gilabert, Roux, and Castellanos, Phys. Rev. E 75, 011303 (2007)], are observed, under growing confining pressure P , to undergo important structural changes, while solid fraction Φ irreversibly increases (typically, from 0.4-0.5 to 0.75-0.8). The system state goes through three stages, with different forms of the plastic consolidation curve, i.e., Φ as a function of the growing reduced pressure P*=Pa/F0 , defined with adhesion force F0 and grain diameter a . In the low-confinement regime (I), the system undergoes negligible plastic compaction, and its structure is influenced by the assembling process. In regime II the material state is independent of initial conditions, and the void ratio varies linearly with lnP [i.e., Δ(1/Φ)=λΔ(lnP*) ], as described in the engineering literature. Plasticity index λ is reduced in the presence of a small rolling resistance (RR). In the last stage of compaction (III), Φ approaches an asymptotic, maximum solid fraction Φmax , as a power law Φmax-Φ∝(P*)-α , with α≃1 , and properties of cohesionless granular packs are gradually retrieved. Under consolidation, while the range ξ of fractal density correlations decreases, force patterns reorganize from self-balanced clusters to force chains, with correlative evolutions of force distributions, and elastic moduli increase by a large amount. Plastic deformation events correspond to very small changes in the network topology, while the denser regions tend to move like rigid bodies. Elastic properties are dominated by the bending of thin junctions in loose systems. For growing RR those tend to form particle chains, the

  3. Neutron detection and multiplicity counting using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.C.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron detection and multiplicity counting has been investigated using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array. Boron-loaded plastic combines neutron moderation (H) and detection ({sup 10}B) at the molecular level, thereby physically coupling increasing detection efficiency and decreasing die-away time with detector volume. Both of these characteristics address a fundamental limitation of thermal-neutron multiplicity counters, where {sup 3}He proportional counters are embedded in a polyethylene matrix. Separation of the phoswich response into its plastic scintillator and bismuth germanate components was accomplished on a pulse-by-pulse basis using custom integrator and timing circuits. In addition, a custom time-tag module was used to provide a time for each detector event. Analysis of the combined energy and time event stream was performed by calibrating each detector`s response and filtering based on the presence of a simultaneous energy deposition corresponding to the {sup 10}B(n,alpha) reaction products in the plastic scintillator (93 keV{sub ee}) and the accompanying neutron-capture gamma ray in the bismuth germanate (478 keV). Time-correlation analysis was subsequently performed on the filtered event stream to obtain shift-register-type singles and doubles count rates. Proof-of-principle measurements were conducted with a variety of gamma-ray and neutron sources including {sup 137}Cs, {sup 54}Mn, AmLi, and {sup 252}Cf. Results of this study indicate that a neutron-capture probability of {approximately}10% and a die-away time of {approximately}10 {micro}s are possible with a 4-detector array with a detector volume of 1600 cm{sup 3}. Simulations were performed that indicate neutron-capture probabilities on the order of 50% and die-away times of less than 4 {micro}s are realistically achievable. While further study will be required for practical application of such a detection system, the results obtained in this

  4. Strain-induced Defects in Carbon Nanotubes: Electronic Tuning and Plastic Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peihong; Lammert, Paul; Crespi, Vincent

    1998-03-01

    Bond rotation defects can tune the electronic structures of carbon nanotubes (PRL 79, 2093; link). These defects can be created by simple elastic deformations. Continuum elasticity theory augments atomistic calculations of plastic limits and bandgaps as a function of tension.

  5. Effect of normal load and roughness on the nanoscale friction coefficient in the elastic and plastic contact regime.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aditya; Staedler, Thorsten; Jiang, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The influence of applied normal load and roughness on the tribological behavior between the indenter and sample surface during nanoindentation-based scratching has been experimentally investigated by using different surfaces (fused silica and diamond-like carbon) featuring various degrees of roughness. At a sufficiently low applied normal load, wherein the contact is elastic, the friction coefficient is constant. However, at increased normal loads the contact involves plastic deformation and the friction coefficient increases with increasing normal load. The critical load range for a transition from predominantly elastic to plastic contact, between the indenter and sample surface, increases with increasing size of indenter and decreases with roughness. Distinct differences between the present experimental results and the existing theoretical models/predictions are discussed. PMID:23400754

  6. [Treatment of the human body : the possibilities and limits of plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Bermes, C

    2015-01-01

    The desire for authenticity is often cited as a motive for making use of plastic surgery. This article aims to elaborate on the meaning of this particular authenticity. At the same time, it discusses reasons that justify or forbid a plastic surgery intervention in the light of ethics. For this purpose, a distinction is made between "objective body" (Körper) and "subjective body" (Leib), and the objectives of medical actions are questioned. Through the terminological differentiation between integrity (Integrität), prosperity (Wohlergehen), and well-being (Wohlbefinden), these objectives are qualified and the limits of medical actions are determined. PMID:25604537

  7. Limit analysis of pipe clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Service Level D (faulted) load capacity of a conventional three-bolt pipe-clamp based upon the limit analysis method is presented. The load distribution, plastic hinge locations, and collapse load are developed for the lower bound limit load method. The results of the limit analysis are compared with the manufacturer's rated loads. 3 refs.

  8. 14 CFR 25.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... in which— (1) The direction of the test loads produces the most severe loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to the main structure...

  9. 14 CFR 23.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... part must be shown by tests in which— (1) The direction of the test loads produces the most severe... the main structure is included. (b) Compliance must be shown (by analyses or individual load...

  10. 14 CFR 29.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... in which— (1) The direction of the test loads produces the most severe loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to the main structure...

  11. 14 CFR 27.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... which— (1) The direction of the test loads produces the most severe loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to the main structure is...

  12. 14 CFR 25.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... in which— (1) The direction of the test loads produces the most severe loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to the main structure...

  13. 14 CFR 27.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... which— (1) The direction of the test loads produces the most severe loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to the main structure is...

  14. 14 CFR 25.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... in which— (1) The direction of the test loads produces the most severe loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to the main structure...

  15. 14 CFR 23.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... part must be shown by tests in which— (1) The direction of the test loads produces the most severe... the main structure is included. (b) Compliance must be shown (by analyses or individual load...

  16. 14 CFR 27.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... which— (1) The direction of the test loads produces the most severe loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to the main structure is...

  17. 14 CFR 29.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... in which— (1) The direction of the test loads produces the most severe loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to the main structure...

  18. 14 CFR 23.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... part must be shown by tests in which— (1) The direction of the test loads produces the most severe... the main structure is included. (b) Compliance must be shown (by analyses or individual load...

  19. Compensated bismuth-loaded plastic scintillators for neutron detection using low-energy pseudo-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Bertrand, Guillaume H. V.; Normand, Stéphane; Méchin, Laurence; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-covered modified plastic scintillators show a high potential for the deployment of cost-effective neutron detectors. Taking advantage of the low-energy photon and electron signature of thermal neutron captures in gadolinium-155 and gadolinium-157 however requires a background correction. In order to display a trustable rate, dual compensation schemes appear as an alternative to Pulse Shape Discrimination. This paper presents the application of such a compensation scheme to a two-bismuth loaded plastic scintillator system. A detection scintillator interacts with incident photon and fast neutron radiations and is covered with a gadolinium converter to become thermal neutron-sensitive as well. In the meantime, an identical compensation scintillator, covered with terbium, solely interacts with the photon and fast neutron part of incident radiations. After the acquisition and the treatment of the counting signals from both sensors, a hypothesis test determines whether the resulting count rate after subtraction falls into statistical fluctuations or provides a robust image of neutron activity. A laboratory prototype is tested under both photon and neutron radiations, allowing us to investigate the performance of the overall compensation system. The study reveals satisfactory results in terms of robustness to a cesium-137 background and in terms of sensitivity in presence of a californium-252 source.

  20. Effect of cyclical loading on the macroscopic failure behaviour of fibre reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Marder, J.; Kuesters, K.; Fischer, K.

    2014-05-01

    Fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) have become the preferred material choice for a wide range of lightweight applications. However, not only the static strength but also the strength and stiffness degradation under cyclical loading conditions have to be predicted for the efficient and reliable design of structures. The phenomenology of the macroscopic damage process of a laminate subjected to cyclical loads is commonly characterized by a first inter-fibre fracture (IFF) and a subsequent accumulation of these IFFs. Finally the laminate fails by one of the macroscopic failure modes named fibre failure (FF), inter-fibre fracture or delamination. Beside these macroscopic failure mechanisms, laminates are inherently characterized by microscopic flaws and cracks in the matrix and at the fibre matrix interface which accumulate especially in transversely loaded plies before the first macroscopic fracture occurs. In well-designed laminates the majority of the fibres are aligned with the loading direction. The fibre longitudinal compressive strength is therefore a critical value, since its inherently lower than the fibre longitudinal tensile strength. The fibre longitudinal compressive strength is influenced by a multitude of factors, such as fibre volume content, fibre and matrix material and also by the micro damage state of a ply. In this paper, the influence of the micro damage state on the fibre longitudinal compressive strength will be discussed. Experimental investigations have been performed to introduce a characteristic micro damage state into a ply by cyclical transverse preloading and quantify the effect of the preloading and the damage state on the fibre longitudinal compressive strength.

  1. Nogo Receptor Signaling Restricts Adult Neural Plasticity by Limiting Synaptic AMPA Receptor Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jitsuki, Susumu; Nakajima, Waki; Takemoto, Kiwamu; Sano, Akane; Tada, Hirobumi; Takahashi-Jitsuki, Aoi; Takahashi, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Experience-dependent plasticity is limited in the adult brain, and its molecular and cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. Removal of the myelin-inhibiting signaling protein, Nogo receptor (NgR1), restores adult neural plasticity. Here we found that, in NgR1-deficient mice, whisker experience-driven synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) insertion in the barrel cortex, which is normally complete by 2 weeks after birth, lasts into adulthood. In vivo live imaging by two-photon microscopy revealed more AMPAR on the surface of spines in the adult barrel cortex of NgR1-deficient than on those of wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, we observed that whisker stimulation produced new spines in the adult barrel cortex of mutant but not WT mice, and that the newly synthesized spines contained surface AMPAR. These results suggest that Nogo signaling limits plasticity by restricting synaptic AMPAR delivery in coordination with anatomical plasticity. PMID:26472557

  2. Crassulacean acid metabolism under severe light limitation: a matter of plasticity in the shadows?

    PubMed

    Ceusters, Johan; Borland, Anne M; Godts, Christof; Londers, Elsje; Croonenborghs, Sarah; Van Goethem, Davina; De Proft, Maurice P

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increased energetic costs of CAM compared with C(3) photosynthesis, it is hypothesized that the inherent photosynthetic plasticity of CAM allows successful acclimation to light-limiting conditions. The present work sought to determine if CAM presented any constraints to short and longer term acclimation to light limitation and to establish if and how metabolic and photosynthetic plasticity in the deployment of the four phases of CAM might facilitate acclimation to conditions of deep shade. Measurements of leaf gas exchange, organic acids, starch and soluble sugar (glucose, fructose, and sucrose) contents were made in the leaves of the constitutive CAM bromeliad Aechmea 'Maya' over a three month period under severe light limitation. A. 'Maya' was not particularly tolerant of severe light limitation in the short term. A complete absence of net CO(2) uptake and fluctuations in key metabolites (i.e. malate, starch or soluble sugars) indicated a dampened metabolism whilst cell death in the most photosynthetically active leaves was attributed to an over-acidification of the cytoplasm. However, in the longer term, plasticity in the use of the different phases of gas exchange and different storage carbohydrate pools, i.e. a switch from starch to sucrose as the major carbohydrate source, ensured a positive carbon balance for this CAM species under extremely low levels of irradiance. As such, co-ordinated plasticity in the use of C(3) and C(4) carboxylases and different carbohydrate pools together with an increase in the abundance of light-harvesting complexes, appear to underpin the adaptive radiation of the energetically costly CAM pathway within light-limiting environments such as wet cloud forests and shaded understoreys of tropical forests. PMID:20861137

  3. Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Response of a Space Shuttle External Tank Stringer. Part 2; Thermal and Mechanical Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Warren, Jerry E.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Song, Kyongchan; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic-plastic, large-deflection nonlinear thermo-mechanical stress analyses are performed for the Space Shuttle external tank s intertank stringers. Detailed threedimensional finite element models are developed and used to investigate the stringer s elastic-plastic response for different thermal and mechanical loading events from assembly through flight. Assembly strains caused by initial installation on an intertank panel are accounted for in the analyses. Thermal loading due to tanking was determined to be the bounding loading event. The cryogenic shrinkage caused by tanking resulted in a rotation of the intertank chord flange towards the center of the intertank, which in turn loaded the intertank stringer feet. The analyses suggest that the strain levels near the first three fasteners remain sufficiently high that a failure may occur. The analyses also confirmed that the installation of radius blocks on the stringer feet ends results in an increase in the stringer capability.

  4. Mechanical formula for the plastic limit pressure of stent during expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Huang, Nan

    2009-12-01

    The mechanics of cardiovascular stents during the process of expansion are very important for stent function and safety. In general, finite element method (FEM) or experiments are major methods used to ascertain mechanical properties of the stent. In this paper, we develop a theoretical model of the tubular stent, derive formulas for the axial forces and moments on the stent end, and propose formulas for the plastic limit pressure vs. the stent’s radius during expansion. Examples covering different geometrical parameters and material parameters are provided, and the plastic limit pressures calculated by FEM and the present method are compared, proving that the present formulas are acceptable and meaningful for the design and innovation of the stent.

  5. Plastic Behavior of a Nickel-Based Alloy under Monotonic-Tension and Low-Cycle-Fatigue Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E-Wen; Barabash, Rozaliya; Wang, Yandong; Clausen, Bjorn; Li, Li; Liaw, Peter K; Ice, Gene E; Yang, Dr Ren; Choo, Hahn; Pike, Lee M; Klarstrom, Dwaine L

    2008-01-01

    The plasticity behavior of the annealed HASTELLOY C-22HSTM alloy, a face-centered cubic (FCC), nickel-based superalloy, was examined by the in-situ neutron-diffraction experiments at room temperature. Monotonic-tension and low-cycle-fatigue experiments were conducted to observe the plastic behavior of the alloy. The tension straining and cyclic-loading deformation were studied as a function of the stress. The plastic behaviors during the deformation are discussed in the light of the relationship between the stress and dislocation-density evolutions. The calculated dislocation-density evolutions within the alloys reflect the strain hardening and cyclic hardening/softening. Experimental lattice strains are compared to verify the hardening mechanism at the selected stress levels for tension and cyclic loadings. Combining with the calculations of the dislocation densities, the neutron-diffraction experiments give an evidence of the strain and cyclic hardening of the alloy.

  6. The role of the mobility law of dislocations in the plastic response of shock loaded pure metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrutxaga-Lerma, Beñat

    2016-08-01

    This article examines the role that the choice of a dislocation mobility law has in the study of plastic relaxation at shock fronts. Five different mobility laws, two of them phenomenological fits to data, and three more based on physical models of dislocation inertia, are tested by employing dynamic discrete dislocation plasticity (D3P) simulations of a shock loaded aluminium thin foil. It is found that inertial laws invariably entail very short acceleration times for dislocations changing their kinematic state. As long as the mobility laws describe the same regime of terminal speeds, all mobility laws predict the same degree of plastic relaxation at the shock front. This is used to show that the main factor affecting plastic relaxation at the shock front is in fact the speed of dislocations.

  7. 76 FR 25648 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    .... These proposed special conditions pertain to their effects on the structural performance of the airplane... load imposed by sudden engine stoppage due to malfunction or structural failure.'' Limit loads are... structures be able to support limit loads without detrimental permanent deformation, meaning that...

  8. Pushing the Limits: RF Field Control at High Loaded Q

    SciTech Connect

    M. Liepe; S.A. Belomestnykh; J. Dobbins; R.P.K. Kaplan; C.R. Strohman; B.K. Stuhl; C. Hovater; T. Plawski

    2005-05-16

    The superconducting cavities in an Energy-Recovery-Linac will be operated with a high loaded Q of several 10{sup 7}, possible up to 10{sup 8}. Not only has no prior control system ever stabilized the RF field in a linac cavity with such high loaded Q, but also highest field stability in amplitude and phase is required at this high loaded Q. Because of a resulting bandwidth of the cavity of only a few Hz, this presents a significant challenge: the field in the cavity extremely sensitive to any perturbation of the cavity resonance frequency due to microphonics and Lorentz force detuning. To prove that the RF field in a high loaded Q cavity can be stabilized, and that Cornell's newly developed digital control system is able to achieve this, the system was connected to a high loaded Q cavity at the JLab IR-FEL. Excellent cw field stability--about 10{sup -4} rms in relative amplitude and 0.02 deg rms in phase--was achieved at a loaded Q of 2.1 x 10{sup 7} and 1.2 x 10{sup 8}, setting a new record in high loaded Q operation of a linac cavity. Piezo tuner based cavity frequency control proved to be very effective in keeping the cavity on resonance and allowed reliable to ramp up to high gradients in less than 1 second.

  9. 78 FR 28896 - Design Limits and Loading Combinations for Metal Primary Reactor Containment System Components

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... COMMISSION Design Limits and Loading Combinations for Metal Primary Reactor Containment System Components... Combinations for Metal Primary Reactor Containment System Components,'' in which there are no substantive... loading combinations for metal primary reactor containment system components. ADDRESSES: Please refer...

  10. Nogo Receptor 1 Limits Tactile Task Performance Independent of Basal Anatomical Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kast, Ryan J.; Chapman, Katherine S.; Dorton, Hilary M.; Stephany, Céleste-Élise; Arnett, Megan T.; Herman, David H.; McGee, Aaron W.

    2014-01-01

    The genes that govern how experience refines neural circuitry and alters synaptic structural plasticity are poorly understood. The nogo-66 receptor 1 gene (ngr1) is one candidate that may restrict the rate of learning as well as basal anatomical plasticity in adult cerebral cortex. To investigate if ngr1 limits the rate of learning we tested adult ngr1 null mice on a tactile learning task. Ngr1 mutants display greater overall performance despite a normal rate of improvement on the gap-cross assay, a whisker-dependent learning paradigm. To determine if ngr1 restricts basal anatomical plasticity in the associated sensory cortex, we repeatedly imaged dendritic spines and axonal varicosities of both constitutive and conditional adult ngr1 mutant mice in somatosensory barrel cortex for two weeks through cranial windows with two-photon chronic in vivo imaging. Neither constant nor acute deletion of ngr1 affected turnover or stability of dendritic spines or axonal boutons. The improved performance on the gap-cross task is not attributable to greater motor coordination, as ngr1 mutant mice possess a mild deficit in overall performance and a normal learning rate on the rotarod, a motor task. Mice lacking ngr1 also exhibit normal induction of tone-associated fear conditioning yet accelerated fear extinction and impaired consolidation. Thus, ngr1 alters tactile and motor task performance but does not appear to limit the rate of tactile or motor learning, nor determine the low set point for synaptic turnover in sensory cortex. PMID:25386856

  11. Narrative skill in children with early unilateral brain injury: a possible limit to functional plasticity.

    PubMed

    Demir, Ozlem Ece; Levine, Susan C; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2010-07-01

    Children with pre- or perinatal brain injury (PL) exhibit marked plasticity for language learning. Previous work has focused mostly on the emergence of earlier-developing skills, such as vocabulary and syntax. Here we ask whether this plasticity for earlier-developing aspects of language extends to more complex, later-developing language functions by examining the narrative production of children with PL. Using an elicitation technique that involves asking children to create stories de novo in response to a story stem, we collected narratives from 11 children with PL and 20 typically developing (TD) children. Narratives were analysed for length, diversity of the vocabulary used, use of complex syntax, complexity of the macro-level narrative structure and use of narrative evaluation. Children's language performance on vocabulary and syntax tasks outside the narrative context was also measured. Findings show that children with PL produced shorter stories, used less diverse vocabulary, produced structurally less complex stories at the macro-level, and made fewer inferences regarding the cognitive states of the story characters. These differences in the narrative task emerged even though children with PL did not differ from TD children on vocabulary and syntax tasks outside the narrative context. Thus, findings suggest that there may be limitations to the plasticity for language functions displayed by children with PL, and that these limitations may be most apparent in complex, decontextualized language tasks such as narrative production. PMID:20590727

  12. The load separation technique in the elastic-plastic fracture analysis of two- and three-dimensional geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharobeam, Monir H.

    1994-01-01

    Load separation is the representation of the load in the test records of geometries containing cracks as a multiplication of two separate functions: a crack geometry function and a material deformation function. Load separation is demonstrated in the test records of several two-dimensional geometries such as compact tension geometry, single edge notched bend geometry, and center cracked tension geometry and three-dimensional geometries such as semi-elliptical surface crack. The role of load separation in the evaluation of the fracture parameter J-integral and the associated factor eta for two-dimensional geometries is discussed. The paper also discusses the theoretical basis and the procedure for using load separation as a simplified yet accurate approach for plastic J evaluation in semi-elliptical surface crack which is a three-dimensional geometry. The experimental evaluation of J, and particularly J(sub pl), for three-dimensional geometries is very challenging. A few approaches have been developed in this regard and they are either complex or very approximate. The paper also presents the load separation as a mean to identify the blunting and crack growth regions in the experimental test records of precracked specimens. Finally, load separation as a methodology in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics is presented.

  13. An objective function for Hebbian self-limiting synaptic plasticity rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, Claudius; Eckmann, Samuel; Echeveste, Rodrigo

    Objective functions, formulated in terms of information theoretical measures with respect to the input and output probability distributions, provide a useful framework for the formulation of guiding principles for information processing systems, such as neural networks. In the present work, a guiding principle for neural plasticity is formulated in terms of an objective function expressed as the Fisher information with respect to an operator that we denote as the synaptic flux. By minimization of this objective function, we obtain Hebbian self-limiting synaptic plasticity rules, avoiding unbounded weight growth. Furthermore, we show how the rules are selective to directions of maximal negative excess kurtosis, making them suitable for independent component analysis. As an application, the non-linear bars problem is studied, in which each neuron is presented with a non-linear superposition of horizontal and vertical bars. We show that, under the here presented rules, the neurons are able to find the independent components of the input.

  14. 75 FR 70595 - Limited Service Domestic Voyage Load Lines for River Barges on Lake Michigan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a special load line regime for certain unmanned dry-cargo river barges to be exempted from the normal Great Lakes load line assignment while operating on Lake Michigan. Depending on the route, eligible barges may obtain a limited domestic service load line assignment or be conditionally exempted from any load line assignment at all. This special load line regime......

  15. Dynamic response of Cu4Zr54 metallic glass to high strain rate shock loading: plasticity, spall and atomic-level structures

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shengnian; Arman, Bedri; Germann, Timothy C; Cagin, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    We investigate dynamic response of Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} metallic glass under adiabatic planar shock wave loading (one-dimensional strain) wjth molecular dynamics simulations, including Hugoniot (shock) states, shock-induced plasticity and spallation. The Hugoniot states are obtained up to 60 CPa along with the von Mises shear flow strengths, and the dynamic spall strength, at different strain rates and temperatures. The spall strengths likely represent the limiting values achievable in experiments such as laser ablation. For the steady shock states, a clear elastic-plastic transition is identified (e.g., in the shock velocity-particle velocity curve), and the shear strength shows strain-softening. However, the elastic-plastic transition across the shock front displays transient stress overshoot (hardening) above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a relatively sluggish relaxation to the steady shock state, and the plastic shock front steepens with increasing shock strength. The local von Mises shear strain analysis is used to characterize local deformation, and the Voronoi tessellation analysis, the corresponding short-range structures at various stages of shock, release, tension and spallation. The plasticity in this glass is manifested as localized shear transformation zones and of local structure rather than thermal origin, and void nucleation occurs preferentially at the highly shear-deformed regions. The Voronoi and shear strain analyses show that the atoms with different local structures are of different shear resistances that lead to shear localization (e.g., the atoms indexed with (0,0,12,0) are most shear-resistant, and those with (0,2,8,1) are highly prone to shear flow). The dynamic changes in local structures are consistent with the observed deformation dynamics.

  16. Static test induced loads verification beyond elastic limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Harrington, F.

    1996-01-01

    Increasing demands for reliable and least-cost high-performance aerostructures are pressing design analyses, materials, and manufacturing processes to new and narrowly experienced performance and verification technologies. This study assessed the adequacy of current experimental verification of the traditional binding ultimate safety factor which covers rare events in which no statistical design data exist. Because large high-performance structures are inherently very flexible, boundary rotations and deflections under externally applied loads approaching fracture may distort their transmission and unknowingly accept submarginal structures or prematurely fracturing reliable ones. A technique was developed, using measured strains from back-to-back surface mounted gauges, to analyze, define, and monitor induced moments and plane forces through progressive material changes from total-elastic to total-inelastic zones within the structural element cross section. Deviations from specified test loads are identified by the consecutively changing ratios of moment-to-axial load.

  17. Static test induced loads verification beyond elastic limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Harrington, F.

    1996-01-01

    Increasing demands for reliable and least-cost high performance aerostructures are pressing design analyses, materials, and manufacturing processes to new and narrowly experienced performance and verification technologies. This study assessed the adequacy of current experimental verification of the traditional binding ultimate safety factor which covers rare events in which no statistical design data exist. Because large, high-performance structures are inherently very flexible, boundary rotations and deflections under externally applied loads approaching fracture may distort their transmission and unknowingly accept submarginal structures or prematurely fracturing reliable ones. A technique was developed, using measured strains from back-to-back surface mounted gauges, to analyze, define, and monitor induced moments and plane forces through progressive material changes from total-elastic to total inelastic zones within the structural element cross section. Deviations from specified test loads are identified by the consecutively changing ratios of moment-to-axial load.

  18. Nutrient limitation and morphological plasticity of the carnivorous pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea in contrasting wetland environments.

    PubMed

    Bott, Terry; Meyer, Gretchen A; Young, Erica B

    2008-01-01

    * Plasticity of leaf nutrient content and morphology, and macronutrient limitation were examined in the northern pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea subsp. purpurea, in relation to soil nutrient availability in an open, neutral pH fen and a shady, acidic ombrotrophic bog, over 2 yr following reciprocal transplantation of S. purpurea between the wetlands. * In both wetlands, plants were limited by nitrogen (N) but not phosphorus (P) (N content < 2% DW(-1), N : P < 14) but photosynthetic quantum yields were high (F(V)/F(M) > 0.79). Despite carnivory, leaf N content correlated with dissolved N availability to plant roots (leaf N vs , r(2) = 0.344, P < 0.0001); carnivorous N acquisition did not apparently overcome N limitation. * Following transplantation, N content and leaf morphological traits changed in new leaves to become more similar to plants in the new environment, reflecting wetland nutrient availability. Changes in leaf morphology were faster when plants were transplanted from fen to bog than from bog to fen, possibly reflecting a more stressful environment in the bog. * Morphological plasticity observed in response to changes in nutrient supply to the roots in natural habitats complements previous observations of morphological changes with experimental nutrient addition to pitchers. PMID:18643897

  19. Polycrystal plasticity modeling of nickel-based superalloy IN 617 subjected to cyclic loading at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Oskay, Caglar

    2016-06-01

    A crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model considering isothermal, large deformation and cyclic loading conditions has been formulated and employed to investigate the mechanical response of a nickel-based alloy at high temperature. The investigations focus on fatigue and creep-fatigue hysteresis response of IN 617 subjected to fatigue and creep-fatigue cycles. A new slip resistance evolution equation is proposed to account for cyclic transient features induced by solute drag creep that occur in IN 617 at 950 °C. The crystal plasticity model parameters are calibrated against the experimental fatigue and creep-fatigue data based on an optimization procedure that relies on a surrogate modeling (i.e. Gaussian process) technique to accelerate multi-parameter optimizations. The model predictions are validated against experimental data, which demonstrates the capability of the proposed model in capturing the hysteresis behavior for various hold times and strain ranges in the context of fatigue and creep-fatigue loading.

  20. Limit analysis of pipe clamps. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1990-12-31

    The Service Level D (faulted) load capacity of a conventional three-bolt pipe-clamp based upon the limit analysis method is presented. The load distribution, plastic hinge locations, and collapse load are developed for the lower bound limit load method. The results of the limit analysis are compared with the manufacturer`s rated loads. 3 refs.

  1. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... factor n for any speed up to Vn may not be less than 2.1+24,000/ (W +10,000) except that n may not be less than 2.5 and need not be greater than 3.8—where W is the design maximum takeoff weight. (c) The... vary linearly with speed from the value at V C to zero at V D. (d) Maneuvering load factors lower...

  2. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... factor n for any speed up to Vn may not be less than 2.1+24,000/ (W +10,000) except that n may not be less than 2.5 and need not be greater than 3.8—where W is the design maximum takeoff weight. (c) The... vary linearly with speed from the value at V C to zero at V D. (d) Maneuvering load factors lower...

  3. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... factor n for any speed up to Vn may not be less than 2.1+24,000/ (W +10,000) except that n may not be less than 2.5 and need not be greater than 3.8—where W is the design maximum takeoff weight. (c) The... vary linearly with speed from the value at V C to zero at V D. (d) Maneuvering load factors lower...

  4. Limits to physiological plasticity of the coral Pocillopora verrucosa from the central Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Maren; Roder, Cornelia M.; Büchel, Claudia; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2014-12-01

    Many coral species display changing distribution patterns across coral reef depths. While changes in the underwater light field and the ability to associate with different photosynthetic symbionts of the genus Symbiodinium explain some of the variation, the limits to physiological plasticity are unknown for most corals. In the central Red Sea, colonies of the branching coral Pocillopora verrucosa are most abundant in shallow high light environments and become less abundant in water depths below 10 m. To further understand what determines this narrow distribution, we conducted a cross-depths transplant experiment looking at physiological plasticity and acclimation in regard to depth. Colonies from 5, 10, and 20 m were collected, transplanted to all depths, and re-investigated after 30 and 210 d. All coral colonies transplanted downward from shallow to deep water displayed an increase in photosynthetic light-harvesting pigments, which resulted in higher photosynthetic efficiency. Shallow-water specimens transplanted to deeper water showed a significant decrease in total protein content after 30 and 210 d under low light conditions compared to specimens transplanted to shallow and medium depths. Stable isotope data suggest that heterotrophic input of carbon was not increased under low light, and consequently, decreasing protein levels were symptomatic of decreasing photosynthetic rates that could not be compensated for through higher light-harvesting efficiency. Our results provide insights into the physiological plasticity of P. verrucosa in changing light regimes and explain the observed depth distribution pattern. Despite its high abundance in shallow reef waters, P. verrucosa possesses limited heterotrophic acclimation potential, i.e., the ability to support its mainly photoautotrophic diet through heterotrophic feeding. We conclude that P. verrucosa might be a species vulnerable to sudden changes in underwater light fields resulting from processes such as

  5. Influence of normal loads and sliding velocities on friction properties of engineering plastics sliding against rough counterfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruzzaman, D. M.; Chowdhury, M. A.; Rahaman, M. L.; Oumer, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    Friction properties of plastic materials are very important under dry sliding contact conditions for bearing applications. In the present research, friction properties of engineering plastics such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and nylon are investigated under dry sliding contact conditions. In the experiments, PTFE and nylon slide against different rough counterfaces such as mild steel and stainless steel 316 (SS 316). Frictional tests are carried out at low loads 5, 7.5 and 10 N, low sliding velocities 0.5, 0.75 and 1 m/s and relative humidity 70%. The obtained results reveal that friction coefficient of PTFE increases with the increase in normal loads and sliding velocities within the observed range. On the other hand, frictional values of nylon decrease with the increase in normal loads and sliding velocities. It is observed that in general, these polymers show higher frictional values when sliding against SS 316 rather than mild steel. During running-in process, friction coefficient of PTFE and nylon steadily increases with the increase in rubbing time and after certain duration of rubbing, it remains at steady level. At identical operating conditions, the frictional values are significantly different depending on normal load, sliding velocity and material pair. It is also observed that in general, the influence of normal load on the friction properties of PTFE and nylon is greater than that of sliding velocity.

  6. Calculation of Centrally Loaded Thin-Walled Columns Above the Buckling Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinitzhuber, F.

    1945-01-01

    When thin-walled columns formed from flanged sheet, such as used in airplane construction, are subjected to axial load, their behavior at failure varies according to the slenderness ratio. On long columns the axis deflects laterally while the cross section form is maintained; buckling results. The respective breaking load in the elastic range is computed by Euler's formula and for the plastic range by the Engesser- Karman formula. Its magnitude is essentially dependent upon the length. On intermediate length columns, especially where open sections are concerned, the cross section is distorted while the cross section form is preserved; twisting failure results. The buckling load in twisting is calculated according to Wagner and Kappus. On short columns the straight walls of low-bending resistance that form the column are deflected at the same time that the cross section form changes - buckling occurs without immediate failure. Then the buckling load of the total section computable from the buckling loads of the section walls is not the ultimate load; quite often, especially on thin-walled sections, it lies considerably higher and is secured by tests. Both loads, the buckling and the ultimate load are only in a small measure dependent upon length. The present report is an attempt to theoretically investigate the behavior of such short, thin-walled columns above the buckling load with the conventional calculating methods.

  7. Limiting performance of ground transportation vehicles subject to transient loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, W. D.; Wang, B. P.

    1974-01-01

    A computational approach to determining the limiting performance of vehicles subject to transient disturbances based on response variable criteria is set forth. For the purposes of a limiting performance study, the transportation system dynamics are described using second- or first-order equations in which the sought for quantity is a vector of time-varying functions called control or isolator forces that have replaced portions of the physical system. Computations are performed as a linear programming problem. As an example of the limiting performance of vehicles in protecting passengers or cargo under crash conditions, the problem of lading damage of a rail vehicle that is struck by another vehicle is considered.

  8. Calculation Method for Flight Limit Load of V-band Clamp Separation Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Takashi; Shi, Qinzhong

    A simplified calculation method for estimating a flight limit load of the V-band clamp separation shock was established. With this method, the flight limit load is estimated through addition of an appropriate envelope margin to the results acquired with the simplified analysis method proposed in our previous paper. The envelope margin used in the method was calculated based on the reviews on the differences observed between the results of a pyroshock test and the analysis. Using the derived envelope margin, a calculating formula of the flight limit load, which envelopes the actual pyroshock responses with a certain probability, was developed. Based on the formula, flight limit loads for several actual satellites were estimated and compared to the test results. The comparative results showed that the estimated flight limit loads appropriately envelope the test results, which confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. A Bending Test for Determining the Atterberg Plastic Limit in Soils.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Maroto, José Manuel; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto

    2016-01-01

    The thread rolling test is the most commonly used method to determine the plastic limit (PL) in soils. It has been widely criticized, because a considerable subjective judgment from the operator that carries out the test is involved during its performance, which may affect the final result significantly. Different alternative methods have been put forward, but they cannot compete with the standard rolling test in speed, simplicity and cost. In an earlier study by the authors, a simple method with a simple device to determine the PL was presented (the "thread bending test" or simply "bending test"); this method allowed the PL to be obtained with minimal operator interference. In the present paper a version of the original bending test is shown. The experimental basis is the same as the original bending test: soil threads which are 3 mm in diameter and 52 mm long are bent until they start to crack, so that both the bending produced and its related moisture content are determined. However, this new version enables the calculation of PL from an equation, so it is not necessary to plot any curve or straight line to obtain this parameter and, in fact, the PL can be achieved with only one experimental point (but two experimental points are recommended). The PL results obtained with this new version are very similar to those obtained through the original bending test and the standard rolling test by a highly experienced operator. Only in particular cases of high plasticity cohesive soils, there is a greater difference in the result. Despite this, the bending test works very well for all types of soil, both cohesive and very low plasticity soils, where the latter are the most difficult to test via the standard thread rolling method. PMID:27404389

  10. Rankine cycle load limiting through use of a recuperator bypass

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.

    2011-08-16

    A system for converting heat from an engine into work includes a boiler coupled to a heat source for transferring heat to a working fluid, a turbine that transforms the heat into work, a condenser that transforms the working fluid into liquid, a recuperator with one flow path that routes working fluid from the turbine to the condenser, and another flow path that routes liquid working fluid from the condenser to the boiler, the recuperator being configured to transfer heat to the liquid working fluid, and a bypass valve in parallel with the second flow path. The bypass valve is movable between a closed position, permitting flow through the second flow path and an opened position, under high engine load conditions, bypassing the second flow path.

  11. Pushing the Limits: Cognitive, Affective, and Neural Plasticity Revealed by an Intensive Multifaceted Intervention.

    PubMed

    Mrazek, Michael D; Mooneyham, Benjamin W; Mrazek, Kaita L; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2016-01-01

    Scientific understanding of how much the adult brain can be shaped by experience requires examination of how multiple influences combine to elicit cognitive, affective, and neural plasticity. Using an intensive multifaceted intervention, we discovered that substantial and enduring improvements can occur in parallel across multiple cognitive and neuroimaging measures in healthy young adults. The intervention elicited substantial improvements in physical health, working memory, standardized test performance, mood, self-esteem, self-efficacy, mindfulness, and life satisfaction. Improvements in mindfulness were associated with increased degree centrality of the insula, greater functional connectivity between insula and somatosensory cortex, and reduced functional connectivity between posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and somatosensory cortex. Improvements in working memory and reading comprehension were associated with increased degree centrality of a region within the middle temporal gyrus (MTG) that was extensively and predominately integrated with the executive control network. The scope and magnitude of the observed improvements represent the most extensive demonstration to date of the considerable human capacity for change. These findings point to higher limits for rapid and concurrent cognitive, affective, and neural plasticity than is widely assumed. PMID:27047361

  12. Pushing the Limits: Cognitive, Affective, and Neural Plasticity Revealed by an Intensive Multifaceted Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Mrazek, Michael D.; Mooneyham, Benjamin W.; Mrazek, Kaita L.; Schooler, Jonathan W.

    2016-01-01

    Scientific understanding of how much the adult brain can be shaped by experience requires examination of how multiple influences combine to elicit cognitive, affective, and neural plasticity. Using an intensive multifaceted intervention, we discovered that substantial and enduring improvements can occur in parallel across multiple cognitive and neuroimaging measures in healthy young adults. The intervention elicited substantial improvements in physical health, working memory, standardized test performance, mood, self-esteem, self-efficacy, mindfulness, and life satisfaction. Improvements in mindfulness were associated with increased degree centrality of the insula, greater functional connectivity between insula and somatosensory cortex, and reduced functional connectivity between posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and somatosensory cortex. Improvements in working memory and reading comprehension were associated with increased degree centrality of a region within the middle temporal gyrus (MTG) that was extensively and predominately integrated with the executive control network. The scope and magnitude of the observed improvements represent the most extensive demonstration to date of the considerable human capacity for change. These findings point to higher limits for rapid and concurrent cognitive, affective, and neural plasticity than is widely assumed. PMID:27047361

  13. Growth potential limits drought morphological plasticity in seedlings from six Eucalyptus provenances.

    PubMed

    Maseda, Pablo H; Fernández, Roberto J

    2016-02-01

    roots it was clearest in morphology/anatomy (i.e., SRL). Thus, a low RGRmax would limit plastic response to drought not only at the whole plant level but also at the organ and even the tissue level. PMID:26786540

  14. MeCP2 phosphorylation limits psychostimulant-induced behavioral and neuronal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jie V; Wan, Yehong; Wang, Xiaoting; Cohen, Sonia; Wetsel, William C; Greenberg, Michael E; Kenny, Paul J; Calakos, Nicole; West, Anne E

    2014-03-26

    The methyl-DNA binding protein MeCP2 is emerging as an important regulator of drug reinforcement processes. Psychostimulants induce phosphorylation of MeCP2 at Ser421; however, the functional significance of this posttranslational modification for addictive-like behaviors was unknown. Here we show that MeCP2 Ser421Ala knock-in mice display both a reduced threshold for the induction of locomotor sensitization by investigator-administered amphetamine and enhanced behavioral sensitivity to the reinforcing properties of self-administered cocaine. These behavioral differences were accompanied in the knock-in mice by changes in medium spiny neuron intrinsic excitability and nucleus accumbens gene expression typically observed in association with repeated exposure to these drugs. These data show that phosphorylation of MeCP2 at Ser421 functions to limit the circuit plasticities in the nucleus accumbens that underlie addictive-like behaviors. PMID:24671997

  15. Economic impact analysis of effluent limitations and standards for plastics molding and forming industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued effluent limitations and standards in December, 1984, for the Plastics Molding and Forming Industry. The report estimates the economic impacts associated with pollution control costs. Plant-specific treatment costs for 20 percent of the impacted plants are compared to estimated pre-tax plant income to assess the impact of treatment costs on plant liquidity. Then a closure analysis is performed, comparing the current salvage value of the plant's assets with the present value of the plant's cash flow plus the terminal value of its assets. The results are extrapolated to the 558 plants which, as direct dischargers, would be impacted. The results of this plant-level analysis are used to assess the indirect impacts of the regulation, e.g., price changes, unemployment and shifts, in the balance of foreign trade.

  16. MeCP2 Phosphorylation Limits Psychostimulant-Induced Behavioral and Neuronal Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jie V.; Wan, Yehong; Wang, Xiaoting; Cohen, Sonia; Wetsel, William C.; Greenberg, Michael E.; Kenny, Paul J.; Calakos, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The methyl-DNA binding protein MeCP2 is emerging as an important regulator of drug reinforcement processes. Psychostimulants induce phosphorylation of MeCP2 at Ser421; however, the functional significance of this posttranslational modification for addictive-like behaviors was unknown. Here we show that MeCP2 Ser421Ala knock-in mice display both a reduced threshold for the induction of locomotor sensitization by investigator-administered amphetamine and enhanced behavioral sensitivity to the reinforcing properties of self-administered cocaine. These behavioral differences were accompanied in the knock-in mice by changes in medium spiny neuron intrinsic excitability and nucleus accumbens gene expression typically observed in association with repeated exposure to these drugs. These data show that phosphorylation of MeCP2 at Ser421 functions to limit the circuit plasticities in the nucleus accumbens that underlie addictive-like behaviors. PMID:24671997

  17. Epigenetics of drought-induced trans-generational plasticity: consequences for range limit development.

    PubMed

    Alsdurf, Jacob; Anderson, Cynthia; Siemens, David H

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation gives plants the potential to adapt to stressful environments that often exist beyond their geographic range limits. However, various genetic, physiological or developmental constraints might prevent the process of adaptation. Alternatively, environmentally induced epigenetic changes might sustain populations for several generations in stressful areas across range boundaries, but previous work on Boechera stricta, an upland mustard closely related to Arabidopsis, documented a drought-induced trans-generational plastic trade-off that could contribute to range limit development. Offspring of parents who were drought treated had higher drought tolerance, but lower levels of glucosinolate toxins. Both drought tolerance and defence are thought to be needed to expand the range to lower elevations. Here, we used methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphisms to determine whether environmentally induced DNA methylation and thus epigenetics could be a mechanism involved in the observed trans-generational plastic trade-off. We compared 110 offspring from the same self-fertilizing lineages whose parents were exposed to experimental drought stress treatments in the laboratory. Using three primer combinations, 643 polymorphic epi-loci were detected. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) on the amount of methylation detected resulted in significant combinations of epi-loci that distinguished the parent drought treatments in the offspring. Principal component (PC) and univariate association analyses also detected the significant differences, even after controlling for lineage, planting flat, developmental differences and multiple testing. Univariate tests also indicated significant associations between the amount of methylation and drought tolerance or glucosinolate toxin concentration. One epi-locus that was implicated in DFA, PC and univariate association analysis may be directly involved in the trade-off because increased methylation at this

  18. Epigenetics of drought-induced trans-generational plasticity: consequences for range limit development

    PubMed Central

    Alsdurf, Jacob; Anderson, Cynthia; Siemens, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation gives plants the potential to adapt to stressful environments that often exist beyond their geographic range limits. However, various genetic, physiological or developmental constraints might prevent the process of adaptation. Alternatively, environmentally induced epigenetic changes might sustain populations for several generations in stressful areas across range boundaries, but previous work on Boechera stricta, an upland mustard closely related to Arabidopsis, documented a drought-induced trans-generational plastic trade-off that could contribute to range limit development. Offspring of parents who were drought treated had higher drought tolerance, but lower levels of glucosinolate toxins. Both drought tolerance and defence are thought to be needed to expand the range to lower elevations. Here, we used methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphisms to determine whether environmentally induced DNA methylation and thus epigenetics could be a mechanism involved in the observed trans-generational plastic trade-off. We compared 110 offspring from the same self-fertilizing lineages whose parents were exposed to experimental drought stress treatments in the laboratory. Using three primer combinations, 643 polymorphic epi-loci were detected. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) on the amount of methylation detected resulted in significant combinations of epi-loci that distinguished the parent drought treatments in the offspring. Principal component (PC) and univariate association analyses also detected the significant differences, even after controlling for lineage, planting flat, developmental differences and multiple testing. Univariate tests also indicated significant associations between the amount of methylation and drought tolerance or glucosinolate toxin concentration. One epi-locus that was implicated in DFA, PC and univariate association analysis may be directly involved in the trade-off because increased methylation at this

  19. Study of plastic strain localization mechanisms caused by nonequilibrium transitions in mesodefect ensembles under high-speed loading

    SciTech Connect

    Sokovikov, Mikhail Chudinov, Vasiliy; Bilalov, Dmitry; Oborin, Vladimir; Uvarov, Sergey; Plekhov, Oleg; Naimark, Oleg

    2015-10-27

    The behavior of specimens dynamically loaded during split Hopkinson (Kolsky) bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions was studied. The lateral surface of the specimens was investigated in-situ using a high-speed infrared camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time allowed one to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was examined using a high-speed infrared camera and a VISAR velocity measurement system. The microstructure of tested specimens was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profiler and a scanning electron microscope. The development of plastic shear instability regions has been simulated numerically.

  20. Methods for combining payload parameter variations with input environment. [calculating design limit loads compatible with probabilistic structural design criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are presented for calculating design limit loads compatible with probabilistic structural design criteria. The approach is based on the concept that the desired limit load, defined as the largest load occurring in a mission, is a random variable having a specific probability distribution which may be determined from extreme-value theory. The design limit load, defined as a particular of this random limit load, is the value conventionally used in structural design. Methods are presented for determining the limit load probability distributions from both time-domain and frequency-domain dynamic load simulations. Numerical demonstrations of the method are also presented.

  1. Printed Flexible Plastic Microchip for Viral Load Measurement through Quantitative Detection of Viruses in Plasma and Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee, Hadi; Kanakasabapathy, Manoj Kumar; Juillard, Franceline; Keser, Mert; Sadasivam, Magesh; Yuksekkaya, Mehmet; Hanhauser, Emily; Henrich, Timothy J.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Kaye, Kenneth M.; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    We report a biosensing platform for viral load measurement through electrical sensing of viruses on a flexible plastic microchip with printed electrodes. Point-of-care (POC) viral load measurement is of paramount importance with significant impact on a broad range of applications, including infectious disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring specifically in resource-constrained settings. Here, we present a broadly applicable and inexpensive biosensing technology for accurate quantification of bioagents, including viruses in biological samples, such as plasma and artificial saliva, at clinically relevant concentrations. Our microchip fabrication is simple and mass-producible as we print microelectrodes on flexible plastic substrates using conductive inks. We evaluated the microchip technology by detecting and quantifying multiple Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) subtypes (A, B, C, D, E, G, and panel), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), and Kaposi’s Sarcoma-associated Herpes Virus (KSHV) in a fingerprick volume (50 µL) of PBS, plasma, and artificial saliva samples for a broad range of virus concentrations between 102 copies/mL and 107 copies/mL. We have also evaluated the microchip platform with discarded, de-identified HIV-infected patient samples by comparing our microchip viral load measurement results with reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) as the gold standard method using Bland-Altman Analysis. PMID:26046668

  2. Printed Flexible Plastic Microchip for Viral Load Measurement through Quantitative Detection of Viruses in Plasma and Saliva.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Hadi; Kanakasabapathy, Manoj Kumar; Juillard, Franceline; Keser, Mert; Sadasivam, Magesh; Yuksekkaya, Mehmet; Hanhauser, Emily; Henrich, Timothy J; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Kaye, Kenneth M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    We report a biosensing platform for viral load measurement through electrical sensing of viruses on a flexible plastic microchip with printed electrodes. Point-of-care (POC) viral load measurement is of paramount importance with significant impact on a broad range of applications, including infectious disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring specifically in resource-constrained settings. Here, we present a broadly applicable and inexpensive biosensing technology for accurate quantification of bioagents, including viruses in biological samples, such as plasma and artificial saliva, at clinically relevant concentrations. Our microchip fabrication is simple and mass-producible as we print microelectrodes on flexible plastic substrates using conductive inks. We evaluated the microchip technology by detecting and quantifying multiple Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) subtypes (A, B, C, D, E, G, and panel), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), and Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpes Virus (KSHV) in a fingerprick volume (50 µL) of PBS, plasma, and artificial saliva samples for a broad range of virus concentrations between 10(2) copies/mL and 10(7) copies/mL. We have also evaluated the microchip platform with discarded, de-identified HIV-infected patient samples by comparing our microchip viral load measurement results with reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) as the gold standard method using Bland-Altman Analysis. PMID:26046668

  3. Gloeobacter Rhodopsin, Limitation of Proton Pumping at High Electrochemical Load

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Arend; Wietek, Jonas; Hegemann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We studied the photocurrents of a cyanobacterial rhodopsin Gloeobacter violaceus (GR) in Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells. This protein is a light-driven proton pump with striking similarities to marine proteorhodopsins, including the D121-H87 cluster of the retinal Schiff base counterion and a glutamate at position 132 that acts as a proton donor for chromophore reprotonation during the photocycle. Interestingly, at low extracellular pHo and negative voltage, the proton flux inverted and directed inward. Using electrophysiological measurements of wild-type and mutant GR, we demonstrate that the electrochemical gradient limits outward-directed proton pumping and converts it into a purely passive proton influx. This conclusion contradicts the contemporary paradigm that at low pH, proteorhodopsins actively transport H+ into cells. We identified E132 and S77 as key residues that allow inward directed diffusion. Substitution of E132 with aspartate or S77 with either alanine or cysteine abolished the inward-directed current almost completely. The proton influx is likely caused by the pKa of E132 in GR, which is lower than that of other microbial ion pumping rhodopsins. The advantage of such a low pKa is an acceleration of the photocycle and high pump turnover at high light intensities. PMID:24209850

  4. Narrative Skill in Children with Early Unilateral Brain Injury: A Possible Limit to Functional Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Ozlem Ece; Levine, Susan C.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Children with pre- or perinatal brain injury (PL) exhibit marked plasticity for language learning. Previous work has focused mostly on the emergence of earlier-developing skills, such as vocabulary and syntax. Here we ask whether this plasticity for earlier-developing aspects of language extends to more complex, later-developing language functions…

  5. Forming Limits in Sheet Metal Forming for Non-Proportional Loading Conditions - Experimental and Theoretical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ofenheimer, Aldo; Buchmayr, Bruno; Kolleck, Ralf

    2005-08-05

    The influence of strain paths (loading history) on material formability is well known in sheet forming processes. Sophisticated experimental methods are used to determine the entire shape of strain paths of forming limits for aluminum AA6016-T4 alloy. Forming limits for sheet metal in as-received condition as well as for different pre-deformation are presented. A theoretical approach based on Arrieux's intrinsic Forming Limit Stress Curve (FLSC) concept is employed to numerically predict the influence of loading history on forming severity. The detailed experimental strain paths are used in the theoretical study instead of any linear or bilinear simplified loading histories to demonstrate the predictive quality of forming limits in the state of stress.

  6. A platform for actively loading cargo RNA to elucidate limiting steps in EV-mediated delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Michelle E.; Leonard, Joshua N.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate intercellular communication through transfer of RNA and protein between cells. Thus, understanding how cargo molecules are loaded and delivered by EVs is of central importance for elucidating the biological roles of EVs and developing EV-based therapeutics. While some motifs modulating the loading of biomolecular cargo into EVs have been elucidated, the general rules governing cargo loading and delivery remain poorly understood. To investigate how general biophysical properties impact loading and delivery of RNA by EVs, we developed a platform for actively loading engineered cargo RNAs into EVs. In our system, the MS2 bacteriophage coat protein was fused to EV-associated proteins, and the cognate MS2 stem loop was engineered into cargo RNAs. Using this Targeted and Modular EV Loading (TAMEL) approach, we identified a configuration that substantially enhanced cargo RNA loading (up to 6-fold) into EVs. When applied to vesicles expressing the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) – gesicles – we observed a 40-fold enrichment in cargo RNA loading. While active loading of mRNA-length (>1.5 kb) cargo molecules was possible, active loading was much more efficient for smaller (~0.5 kb) RNA molecules. We next leveraged the TAMEL platform to elucidate the limiting steps in EV-mediated delivery of mRNA and protein to prostate cancer cells, as a model system. Overall, most cargo was rapidly degraded in recipient cells, despite high EV-loading efficiencies and substantial EV uptake by recipient cells. While gesicles were efficiently internalized via a VSVG-mediated mechanism, most cargo molecules were rapidly degraded. Thus, in this model system, inefficient endosomal fusion or escape likely represents a limiting barrier to EV-mediated transfer. Altogether, the TAMEL platform enabled a comparative analysis elucidating a key opportunity for enhancing EV-mediated delivery to prostate cancer cells, and this technology should be of

  7. Backpack load limit recommendation for middle school students based on physiological and psychophysical measurements.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Denise H; Freivalds, Andris

    2009-01-01

    The load of student's backpacks has raised questions over the safety and health of schoolchildren everywhere. The purpose of this study is to use electromyography (EMG), posture evaluation, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion and perceptions of pain to find an acceptable backpack load limit for middle school students. Twenty middle school students aged 11 to 14 (10 female and 10 male) volunteered for the study. The subjects completed two tests, standing stationary and walking on a treadmill, where they carried 5% incremental loads from 0% body mass (BM) to 20% BM. The study indicated that the Borg-CR10 ratings and trunk flexion angle for the walking trial indicated a possible load limit of 10% BM due to the non-significant difference between 0 and 10% BM and the significant difference between 10 and 15% BM. PMID:19369726

  8. Numerical and Theoretical Analysis of Plastic Response of 5A06 Aluminum Circular Plates Subjected to Underwater Explosion Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Zhang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    Dynamic response analysis of structures subjected to underwater explosion loading has been always an interesting field for researchers. Understanding the deformation and failure mechanism of simple structures plays an important role in an actual project under this kind of loading. In this paper, the deformation and failure characteristics of 5A06 aluminum circular plates were investigated computationally and theoretically. The computational study was based on a Johnson-cook material parameter mode which was obtained from several previous studies provides a good description of deformation and failure of 5A06 aluminum circular plates under underwater explosion loading. The deformation history of the clamped circular plate is recorded; the maximum deflection and the thickness reduction measurements of target plates at different radii were conducted. The computational approach provided insight into the relationship between the failure mechanism and the strength of impact wave, and a computing formulae for strain field of the specimen was derived based on the same volume principle and rigid-plastic assumption. The simulation and theoretical calculation results are in good agreement with the experiments results. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO:11272057).

  9. Highly lead-loaded red plastic scintillators as an X-ray imaging system for the Laser Mega Joule

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, M.; Normand, S.; Turk, G.; Darbon, S.

    2011-07-01

    The scope of this project intends to record spatially resolved images of core shape and size of a DT micro-balloon during Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments at Laser Mega Joule facility (LMJ). We need to develop an X-ray imaging system which can operate in the radiative background generated by an ignition shot of ICF. The scintillator is a part of the imaging system and has to gather a compromise of scintillating properties (scintillating efficiency, decay time, emission wavelength) so as to both operate in the hard radiative environment and to allow the acquisition of spatially resolved images. Inorganic scintillators cannot be used because no compromise can be found regarding the expected scintillating properties, most of them are not fast enough and emit blue light. Organic scintillators are generally fast, but present low X-ray absorption in the 10 to 40 keV range, that does not permit the acquisition of spatially resolved images. To this aim, we have developed highly lead-loaded and red-fluorescent fast plastic scintillators. Such a combination is not currently available via scintillator suppliers, since they propose only blue-fluorescent plastic scintillators doped with up to 12%w Pb. Thus, incorporation ratio up to 27%w Pb has been reached in our laboratory, which can afford a plastic scintillator with an outstanding Z{sub eff} close to 50. X-rays in the 10 to 40 keV range can thus be detected with a higher probability of photoelectric effect than for classic organic scintillators, such as NE102. The strong orange-red fluorescence can be filtered, so that we can eliminate residual Cerenkov light, generated by {gamma}-ray absorption in glass parts of the imaging system. Decay times of our scintillators evaluated under UV excitation were estimated to be in the range 10 to 13 ns. (authors)

  10. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Bbbbbb... - Applicability Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks 2 Table 2 to Subpart BBBBBB of Part 63 Protection of... Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks If you own or operate . . . Then you must . . . 1. A bulk gasoline terminal loading rack(s) with a gasoline throughput (total of all...

  11. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Bbbbbb... - Applicability Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks 2 Table 2 to Subpart BBBBBB of Part 63 Protection of... Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks If you own or operate . . . Then you must . . . 1. A bulk gasoline terminal loading rack(s) with a gasoline throughput (total of all...

  12. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Bbbbbb... - Applicability Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks 2 Table 2 to Subpart BBBBBB of Part 63 Protection of... Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks If you own or operate . . . Then you must . . . 1. A bulk gasoline terminal loading rack(s) with a gasoline throughput (total of all...

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Bbbbbb... - Applicability Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks 2 Table 2 to Subpart BBBBBB of Part 63 Protection of... Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks If you own or operate . . . Then you must . . . 1. A bulk gasoline terminal loading rack(s) with a gasoline throughput (total of all...

  14. Effects of altered loading states on muscle plasticity: what have we learned from rodents?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the key findings concerning the adaptive properties of rodent muscle in response to altered loading states. When the mechanical stress on the muscle is chronically increased, the muscle adapts by hypertrophying its fibers. This response is regulated by processes resulting in contractile protein expression reflecting slower phenotypes, thereby enabling the muscle to better support load-hearing activity. In contrast, reducing the load-bearing activity induces an opposite response whereby muscles used for both antigravity function and locomotion atrophy while transforming some of the slow fibers into faster contractile phenotypes. Accompanying the atrophy is both a reduced power generating and activity sustaining capability. These adaptive processes are regulated by both transcriptional and translational processes. Available evidence further suggests that the interaction of heavy resistance activity and hormonal/growth factors (insulin-like growth factor, growth hormone, glucocorticoids, etc.) are critical in the maintenance of muscle mass and function. Also resistance training, in contrast to other activities such as endurance running, provides a more economical form of stress because less mechanical activity is required to maintain muscle homeostasis in the context of chronic states of weightlessness.

  15. Effect of crash pulse shape on seat stroke requirements for limiting loads on occupants of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical study was made to provide comparative information on various crash pulse shapes that potentially could be used to test seats under conditions included in Federal Regulations Part 23 Paragraph 23.562(b)(1) for dynamic testing of general aviation seats, show the effects that crash pulse shape can have on the seat stroke requirements necessary to maintain a specified limit loading on the seat/occupant during crash pulse loadings, compare results from certain analytical model pulses with approximations of actual crash pulses, and compare analytical seat results with experimental airplace crash data. Structural and seat/occupant displacement equations in terms of the maximum deceleration, velocity change, limit seat pan load, and pulse time for five potentially useful pulse shapes were derived; from these, analytical seat stroke data were obtained for conditions as specified in Federal Regulations Part 23 Paragraph 23.562(b)(1) for dynamic testing of general aviation seats.

  16. The Legal Doctrine on 'Limitation of Liability' in the Precedent Analysis on Plastic Surgery Medical Malpractice Lawsuits.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo Young; Pak, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Seung-Eun; Kang, So Ra

    2015-12-01

    This study intended to review the precedents on plastic surgery medical malpractice lawsuits in lower-court trials, classify the reasons of 'limitation of liability' by type, and suggest a standard in the acknowledgement of limitation of liability ratio. The 30 lower-court's rulings on the cases bearing the medical negligence of the defendants acknowledged the liability ratio of the defendants between 30% and 100%. Ten cases ruled that the defendants were wholly responsible for the negligence or malpractice, while 20 cases acknowledged the limitation of liability principle. In the determination of damage compensation amount, the court considered the cause of the victim side, which contributed in the occurrence of the damage. The court also believed that it is against the idea of fairness to have the assailant pay the whole compensation, even there is no victim-side cause such as previous illness or physical constitution of the patient, and applies the legal doctrine on limitation of liability, which is an independent damage compensation adjustment system. Most of the rulings also limited the ratio of responsibility to certain extent. When considering that the legal doctrine on limitation of liability which supports concrete validity for the fair sharing of damage, the tangible classification of causes of limitation of liability suggested in this study would be a useful tool in forecasting the ruling of a plastic surgery medical malpractice lawsuit. PMID:26713045

  17. The Legal Doctrine on 'Limitation of Liability' in the Precedent Analysis on Plastic Surgery Medical Malpractice Lawsuits

    PubMed Central

    Kang, So Ra

    2015-01-01

    This study intended to review the precedents on plastic surgery medical malpractice lawsuits in lower-court trials, classify the reasons of 'limitation of liability' by type, and suggest a standard in the acknowledgement of limitation of liability ratio. The 30 lower-court's rulings on the cases bearing the medical negligence of the defendants acknowledged the liability ratio of the defendants between 30% and 100%. Ten cases ruled that the defendants were wholly responsible for the negligence or malpractice, while 20 cases acknowledged the limitation of liability principle. In the determination of damage compensation amount, the court considered the cause of the victim side, which contributed in the occurrence of the damage. The court also believed that it is against the idea of fairness to have the assailant pay the whole compensation, even there is no victim-side cause such as previous illness or physical constitution of the patient, and applies the legal doctrine on limitation of liability, which is an independent damage compensation adjustment system. Most of the rulings also limited the ratio of responsibility to certain extent. When considering that the legal doctrine on limitation of liability which supports concrete validity for the fair sharing of damage, the tangible classification of causes of limitation of liability suggested in this study would be a useful tool in forecasting the ruling of a plastic surgery medical malpractice lawsuit. PMID:26713045

  18. A simple method of calculating lower-bound limit loads for axisymmetric thin shells

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.T.; Hamilton, R.; Shi, J.; Mackenzie, D.

    1997-05-01

    In this paper, a simple method for calculating lower-bound limit loads for shells is presented, based on Ilyushin`s and Ivanov`s generalized yield criterion, respectively, and using the elastic compensation procedure. Several examples, including torispherical and conical ends, radial nozzles, and a skirted vessel, are examined using this method. The results are compared with previously published results.

  19. 76 FR 44245 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... FR 25648). One supportive comment was received and the special conditions are adopted as proposed... structural performance of the airplane. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or... imposed by sudden engine stoppage due to malfunction or structural failure.'' Limit loads are expected...

  20. 76 FR 8778 - Construction Standards on Posting Emergency Telephone Numbers and Floor Load Limits; Extension of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    .... 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 4-2010 (75 FR 55355). Signed at Washington, DC, on... Floor Load Limits; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of Information... extend OMB approval of the information collection requirements specified by the Construction Standards...

  1. A bounding technique for plastic deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giambanco, F.; Palizzolo, L.; Panzeca, T.

    1992-05-01

    On the grounds of the known proportionality between the kinematical part of the solution of the Euler-Lagrange equations relative to the shakedown load factor problem for an elastic perfectly plastic solid subjected to cyclic loads and the gradient of the kinematical part of the elastic-plastic steady-state response of the solid to cyclic loads at the shakedown limit, a special bounding technique is developed. Such technique consists of computing a bound on the proportionality factor between the two kinematical solutions and, consequently, bounds on any measure of real plastic deformation produced by cyclic loads slightly above the shakedown limit. The technique is then generalized to the case of loads arbitraily varying within a given load domain. Some computational aspects are also discussed. Two examples solved in analytic form and one numerical application conclude the paper.

  2. Elasto/visco-plastic deformation of multi-layered shells of revolution under thermal loading due to fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Takezono, S.; Tao, K.; Inamura, E.

    1995-11-01

    An analytical method for the elasto/visco-plastic deformation of the multi-layered shells subjected to thermal loads due to fluid is developed. First, the temperature distribution through the thickness in each layer is assumed to be linear, and the temperature field in the shell is determined using the equations of heat conduction and heat transfer. Secondly, the stresses and deformations are analyzed by the thermal stress equations. The equations of equilibrium and the relationships between the strains and displacements are derived from the Sanders shell theory. For the constitutive relations, Perzyna`s equations are employed. As a numerical example, a two-layered cylindrical shell composed of mild steel and titanium subjected to locally distributed thermal loads due to fluid is analyzed. Numerical computations are carried out for three cases of the ratio of the thickness of the titanium layer to the shell thickness. It is fund from the computations that the temperature and stress distributions and the deformation vary significantly depending on the thickness ratio.

  3. Investigation of the features of polycrystals complex loading using a two-level crystal plasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volegov, P. S.; Trusov, P. V.; Gribov, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    The article considers a two-level mathematical model of inelastic deformation of metal polycrystals taking into account evolution of the structure. The structure of the model was considered, some special features of its application to describe the intensity of inelastic deformations were marked. The need for a careful physical analysis of the hardening laws construction was highlighted. To evaluate the applicability of multi-level models to describe the known experimental effects of cyclic deformation a number of results of field experiments on the complex proportional and disproportional cyclic deformation was considered, some specific effects that appear in these processes were identified: stresses amplitude output at the stationary value; additional cyclic hardening at a disproportionate loading, which magnitude depends on the so-called degree of disproportionality. Numerical experiments on the disproportionate cyclic loading were carried out, the possibility of modified hardening laws to describe access to the stationary values of the stress intensity was noted, and also the possibility of a qualitative description of the effect of additional cyclic hardening was demonstrated. The A.A. Ilyushin hypothesis by isotropy and the principle of vector properties delay at the turn of the deformation path were validated.

  4. Activation of sucrose transport in defoliated Lolium perenne L.: an example of apoplastic phloem loading plasticity.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Alexandre; Desclos, Marie; Amiard, Véronique; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Adams, William W; Turgeon, Robert; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Noiraud-Romy, Nathalie

    2009-07-01

    The pathway of carbon phloem loading was examined in leaf tissues of the forage grass Lolium perenne. The effect of defoliation (leaf blade removal) on sucrose transport capacity was assessed in leaf sheaths as the major carbon source for regrowth. The pathway of carbon transport was assessed via a combination of electron microscopy, plasmolysis experiments and plasma membrane vesicles (PMVs) purified by aqueous two-phase partitioning from the microsomal fraction. Results support an apoplastic phloem loading mechanism. Imposition of an artificial proton-motive force to PMVs from leaf sheaths energized an active, transient and saturable uptake of sucrose (Suc). The affinity of Suc carriers for Suc was 580 microM in leaf sheaths of undefoliated plants. Defoliation induced a decrease of K(m) followed by an increase of V(max). A transporter was isolated from stubble (including leaf sheaths) cDNA libraries and functionally expressed in yeast. The level of L.perenne SUcrose Transporter 1 (LpSUT1) expression increased in leaf sheaths in response to defoliation. Taken together, the results indicate that Suc transport capacity increased in leaf sheaths of L. perenne in response to leaf blade removal. This increase might imply de novo synthesis of Suc transporters, including LpSUT1, and may represent one of the mechanisms contributing to rapid refoliation. PMID:19520670

  5. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

    PubMed Central

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L. Scott; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour. PMID:24619446

  6. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L. Scott; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour.

  7. Comparative Gamma Spectroscopy with SrI2(Eu), GYGAG(Ce) and Bi-loaded Plastic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J

    2010-11-19

    We are developing new scintillator materials that offer potential for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy at low cost. Single crystal SrI{sub 2}(Eu) offers {approx}3% resolution at 662 keV, in sizes of {approx}1 in{sup 3}. We have developed ceramics processing technology allowing us to achieve cubic inch scale transparent ceramic scintillators offering gamma spectroscopy performance superior to NaI(Tl). We fabricated a bismuth-loaded plastic scintillator that demonstrates energy resolution of {approx}8% at 662 keV in small sizes. Gamma ray spectroscopy can be used to identify the presence of weak radioactive sources within natural background. The ability to discriminate close-lying spectral lines is strongly dependent upon the energy resolution of the detector. In addition to excellent energy resolution, large volume detectors are needed to acquire sufficient events, for example, to identify a radioactive anomaly moving past a detector. We have employed a 'directed search' methodology for identifying potential scintillator materials candidates, resulting in the discovery of Europium-doped Strontium Iodide, SrI{sub 2}(Eu), Cerium-doped Gadolinium Garnet, GYGAG(Ce), and Bismuth-loaded Polymers. These scintillators possess very low self-radioactivity, offer energy resolution of 3-8% at 662 keV, and have potential to be grown cost-effectively to sizes similar to the most widely deployed gamma spectroscopy scintillator, Thallium-doped Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). In this study, gamma ray spectra of a variety of sources, were obtained employing SrI{sub 2}(Eu), GYGAG(Ce), Bi-loaded polymers, LaBr{sub 3}(Ce), and NaI(Tl). The effects of detector size, energy resolution, and background radioactivity (including self-radioactivity) on the ability to distinguish weak sources is quantified, based on a simple model, and qualitatively compared to laboratory data.

  8. Role of afferent input in load-dependent plasticity of rat muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, F.; Umemoto, S.; Higo, Y.; Kawabe, N.; Wang, X. D.; Lan, Y. B.; Ohira, Y.

    We have been studying the role of afferent input in the plasticity of skeletal muscles. The present study was performed to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the deafferentation-related inhibition of the compensatory hypertrophy in rat soleus muscle. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly separated into the control, functionally overloaded (FO), and functionally overloaded + deafferentation (FO+DA) group. The tendons of plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles were transected in the FO rats. The dorsal roots of the spinal cord at the L4-5 segmental levels were additionally transected in the FO+DA rats. The sampling of the soleus was performed 2 weeks after the surgery and ambulation recovery. The single muscle fibers were isolated in low-calcium relaxing solution. Further, the myonuclei or argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) were stained. Significant increase of the fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) was seen in the FO, but not in the FO+DA, rats. The myonuclear number in fiber was significantly decreased by FO. Addition of DA to FO further promoted the reduction of myonuclear number. The mean nucleus size and DNA content in single nucleus in all groups were identical. Although a single or double AgNORs were seen in ~90% of myonuclei in the control rats, their distributions were 72 and 76% in the FO and FO+DA rats, respectively (p<0.05). More myonuclei containing 3-5 AgNORs were noted in the FO and FO+DA rats. The mean number of the AgNORs per myonucleus was 1.7 in the control, 2.1 in both FO and FO+DA rats (p<0.05). It was suggested that the FO-related increase of the number of AgNORs may be responsible for the induction of compensatory hypertrophy. It was also indicated that intact afferent input plays an essential role in these phenomena.

  9. Application of a Sixth Order Generalized Stress Function To Determine Limit Loads for Plates with Triangular Penetration Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Gordon; D.P. Jones

    2001-12-20

    The capabilities to obtain limit load solutions of plates with triangular penetration patterns using fourth order functions to represent the collapse surface has been presented in previous papers. These papers describe how equivalent solid plate elastic-perfectly plastic finite element capabilities are generated and demonstrated how such capabilities can be used to great advantage in the analysis of tubesheets in large heat exchanger applications. However, these papers have pointed out that although the fourth order functions can produce sufficient accuracy for many practical applications, there are situations where improvements in the accuracy of inplane and transverse shear are desirable. This paper investigates the use of a sixth order function to represent the collapse surface for improved accuracy of the inplane response. Explicit elastic-perfectly plastic finite element solutions are obtained for unit cells representing an infinite array of circular penetrations arranged in an equilateral triangular array. These cells are used to create a numerical representation of the complete collapse surfaces for a number of ligament efficiencies (h/P where h is the minimum ligament width and P is the distance between hole centers). Each collapse surface is then fit to a sixth order function that satisfies the periodicity of the hole pattern. Sixth-order collapse functions were developed for h/P values between .05 and .50. Accuracy of the sixth order and the fourth order functions are compared. It was found that the sixth order function is indeed more accurate, reducing the error from 12.2% for the fourth order function to less than 3% for the sixth order function.

  10. Limitations of power conversion systems under transient loads and impact on the pulsed tokamak power reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, G. T.; Wong, C. P. C.; Kapich, D. D.; McDonald, C. F.; Schleicher, R. W.

    1993-11-01

    The impact of cyclic loading of the power conversion system of a helium-cooled, pulsed tokamak power plant is assessed. Design limits of key components of heat transport systems employing Rankine and Brayton thermodynamic cycles are quantified based on experience in gas-cooled fission reactor design and operation. Cyclic loads due to pulsed tokamak operation are estimated. Expected performance of the steam generator is shown to be incompatible with pulsed tokamak operation without load leveling thermal energy storage. The close cycle gas turbine is evaluated qualitatively based on performance of existing industrial and aeroderivative gas turbines. Advances in key technologies which significantly improve prospects for operation with tokamak fusion plants are reviewed.

  11. Cell Death, Neuronal Plasticity and Functional Loading in the Development of the Central Nervous System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Research on the precise timing and regulation of neuron production and maturation in the vestibular and visual systems of Wistar rats and several inbred strains of mice (C57B16 and Pallid mutant) concentrated upon establishing a timing baseline for mitotic development of the neurons of the vestibular nuclei and the peripheral vestibular sensory structures (maculae, cristae). This involved studies of the timing and site of neuronal cell birth and preliminary studies of neuronal cell death in both central and peripheral elements of the mammalian vestibular system. Studies on neuronal generation and maturation in the retina were recently added to provide a mechanism for more properly defining the in utero' developmental age of the individual fetal subject and to closely monitor potential transplacental effects of environmentally stressed maternal systems. Information is given on current efforts concentrating upon the (1) perinatal period of development (E18 thru P14) and (2) the role of cell death in response to variation in the functional loading of the vestibular and proprioreceptive systems in developing mammalian organisms.

  12. Structural Analysis of Shipping Casks, Vol. 9. Energy Absorption Capabilities of Plastically Deformed Struts Under Specified Impact Loading Conditions (Thesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, F.C.

    2001-02-19

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the energy absorption characteristics of plastically deformed inclined struts under impact loading. This information is needed to provide a usable method by which designers and analysts of shipping casks for radioactive or fissile materials can determine the energy absorption capabilities of external longitudinal fins on cylindrical casks under specified impact conditions. A survey of technical literature related to experimental determination of the dynamic plastic behavior of struts revealed no information directly applicable to the immediate problem, especially in the impact velocity ranges desired, and an experimental program was conducted to obtain the needed data. Mild-steel struts with rectangular cross sections were impacted by free-falling weights dropped from known heights. These struts or fin specimens were inclined at five different angles to simulate different angles of impact that fins on a shipping cask could experience under certain accident conditions. The resisting force of the deforming strut was measured and recorded as a function of time by using load cells instrumented with resistance strain gage bridges, signal conditioning equipment, an oscilloscope, and a Polaroid camera. The acceleration of the impacting weight was measured and recorded as a function of time during the latter portion of the testing program by using an accelerometer attached to the drop hammer, appropriate signal conditioning equipment, the oscilloscope, and the camera. A digital computer program was prepared to numerically integrate the force-time and acceleration-time data recorded during the tests to obtain deformation-time data. The force-displacement relationships were then integrated to obtain values of absorbed energy with respect to deformation or time. The results for various fin specimen geometries and impact angles are presented graphically, and these curves may be used to compute the energy absorption capacity of

  13. Effects of specimen size on limiting compressive loading for silicate, ceramic, and other materials

    SciTech Connect

    Okhrimenko, G.M.

    1995-06-01

    Published data are examined on the ultimate strength in uniaxial compression for glass, glass ceramics, porcelain, crystalline silicon, periclase - spinel - chromite material PSCM, and ferrite in relation to the specimen dimensions. Two methods are proposed for combined experimental and computational estimation of the effects from the volume on the limiting load, which are based only on the data obtained from testing specimens with one or two standard dimensions.

  14. Invasive Acer negundo outperforms native species in non-limiting resource environments due to its higher phenotypic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To identify the determinants of invasiveness, comparisons of traits of invasive and native species are commonly performed. Invasiveness is generally linked to higher values of reproductive, physiological and growth-related traits of the invasives relative to the natives in the introduced range. Phenotypic plasticity of these traits has also been cited to increase the success of invasive species but has been little studied in invasive tree species. In a greenhouse experiment, we compared ecophysiological traits between an invasive species to Europe, Acer negundo, and early- and late-successional co-occurring native species, under different light, nutrient availability and disturbance regimes. We also compared species of the same species groups in situ, in riparian forests. Results Under non-limiting resources, A. negundo seedlings showed higher growth rates than the native species. However, A. negundo displayed equivalent or lower photosynthetic capacities and nitrogen content per unit leaf area compared to the native species; these findings were observed both on the seedlings in the greenhouse experiment and on adult trees in situ. These physiological traits were mostly conservative along the different light, nutrient and disturbance environments. Overall, under non-limiting light and nutrient conditions, specific leaf area and total leaf area of A. negundo were substantially larger. The invasive species presented a higher plasticity in allocation to foliage and therefore in growth with increasing nutrient and light availability relative to the native species. Conclusions The higher level of plasticity of the invasive species in foliage allocation in response to light and nutrient availability induced a better growth in non-limiting resource environments. These results give us more elements on the invasiveness of A. negundo and suggest that such behaviour could explain the ability of A. negundo to outperform native tree species, contributes to its spread

  15. Plasticity induced by pre-existing defects during high strain-rate loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringa, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    High strain-rate deformation of metals has been typically studied for perfect monocrystals. Computational advances now allow more realistic simulations of materials including defects, which lower the Hugoniot Elastic Limit, and lead to microstructures differing from the ones from perfect monocrystals. As pre-existing defects one can consider vacancy clusters, dislocation loops, grain boundaries, etc. New analysis tools allow analysis of dislocation densities and twin fractions, for both f.c.c. and b.c.c. metals. Recent results for defective single crystal Ta [Tramontina et al.., High Energy Den. Phys. 10, 9 (2014), and Ruestes et al., Scripta Mat. 68, 818 (2013)], and for polycrystalline b.c.c metals [Tang et al., Mat. Sci. Eng. A 580, 414 (2013), and Gunkelmann et al., Phys. Rev. B 86, 144111 (2012)] will be highlighted, alongside new results for nanocrystalline Cu, Ta, Fe, and Zr [Ruestes et al., Scripta Mat. 71, 9 (2014)]. This work has been carried out in collaboration with D. Tramontina, C. Ruestes, E. Millan, J. Rodriguez-Nieva, M.A. Meyers, Y. Tang, H. Urbassek, N. Gunkelmann, A. Stukowski, M. Ruda, G. Bertolino, D. Farkas, A. Caro, J. Hawreliak, B. Remington, R. Rudd, P. Erhart, R. Ravelo, T. Germann, N. Park, M. Suggit, S. Michalik, A. Higginbotham and J. Wark. Funding by PICT2008-1325 and SeCTyP U.N. Cuyo.

  16. Sensory cortex limits cortical maps and drives top-down plasticity in thalamocortical circuits

    PubMed Central

    Zembrzycki, Andreas; Chou, Shen-Ju; Ashery-Padan, Ruth; Stoykova, Anastassia; O’Leary, Dennis D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Primary somatosensory cortex (S1) contains a complete body map that mirrors subcortical maps developed by peripheral sensory input projecting to sensory hindbrain, thalamus, then S1. Peripheral changes during development alter these maps through ‘bottom-up’ plasticity. Unknown is how S1 size influences map organization and if an altered S1 map feedbacks to affect subcortical maps. We show in mice that S1 is significantly reduced by cortex-specific deletion of Pax6, resulting in a reduced body map and loss of body representations by exclusion of later-differentiating sensory thalamocortical input. An initially normal sensory thalamus was re-patterned to match the aberrant S1 map by apoptotic deletion of thalamic neurons representing body parts with axons excluded from S1. Deleted representations were rescued by altering competition between thalamocortical axons by sensory deprivation or increasing S1. Thus, S1 size determined resolution and completeness of body maps and engaged ‘top-down’ plasticity that re-patterned sensory thalamus to match S1. PMID:23831966

  17. Classical MHCI molecules regulate retinogeniculate refinement and limit ocular dominance plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Datwani, Akash; McConnell, Michael J.; Kanold, Patrick O.; Micheva, Kristina D.; Busse, Brad; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Smith, Stephen J.; Shatz, Carla J.

    2009-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex Class I (MHCI) genes were discovered unexpectedly in healthy CNS neurons in a screen for genes regulated by neural activity. In mice lacking just 2 of the 50+ MHCI genes H2-Kb and H2-Db, ocular dominance (OD) plasticity is enhanced. Mice lacking PirB, an MHCI receptor, have a similar phenotype. H2-Kb and H2-Db are expressed not only in visual cortex, but also in lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) where protein localization correlates strongly with synaptic markers and complement protein C1q. In KbDb-/- mice developmental refinement of retinogeniculate projections is impaired, similar to C1q-/- mice. These phenotypes in KbDb-/- mice are strikingly similar to those in β2m-/-TAP1-/- mice, which lack cell surface expression of all MHCIs, implying that H2-Kb and H2-Db can account for observed changes in synapse plasticity. H2-Kb and H2-Db ligands, signaling via neuronal MHCI receptors, may enable activity-dependent remodeling of brain circuits during developmental critical periods. PMID:19945389

  18. Critical material attributes (CMAs) of strip films loaded with poorly water-soluble drug nanoparticles: I. Impact of plasticizer on film properties and dissolution.

    PubMed

    Krull, Scott M; Patel, Hardik V; Li, Meng; Bilgili, Ecevit; Davé, Rajesh N

    2016-09-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated polymer films to be a promising platform for delivery of poorly water-soluble drug particles. However, the impact of critical material attributes, for example plasticizer, on the properties of and drug release from such films has yet to be investigated. In response, this study focuses on the impact of plasticizer and plasticizer concentration on properties and dissolution rate of polymer films loaded with poorly water-soluble drug nanoparticles. Glycerin, triacetin, and polyethylene glycol were selected as film plasticizers. Griseofulvin was used as a model Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II drug and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose was used as a film-forming polymer. Griseofulvin nanoparticles were prepared via wet stirred media milling in aqueous suspension. A depression in film glass transition temperature was observed with increasing plasticizer concentration, along with a decrease in film tensile strength and an increase in film elongation, as is typical of plasticizers. However, the type and amount of plasticizer necessary to produce strong yet flexible films had no significant impact on the dissolution rate of the films, suggesting that film mechanical properties can be effectively manipulated with minimal impact on drug release. Griseofulvin nanoparticles were successfully recovered upon redispersion in water regardless of plasticizer or content, even after up to 6months' storage at 40°C and 75% relative humidity, which contributed to similar consistency in dissolution rate after 6months' storage for all films. Good content uniformity (<4% R.S.D. for very small film sample size) was also maintained across all film formulations. PMID:27402100

  19. Advances in Developing HIV-1 Viral Load Assays for Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Wang, ShuQi; Xu, Feng; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Commercial HIV-1 RNA viral load assays have been routinely used in developed countries to monitor antiretroviral treatment (ART). However, these assays require expensive equipment and reagents, well-trained operators, and established laboratory infrastructure. These requirements restrict their use in resource-limited settings where people are most afflicted with the HIV-1 epidemic. Inexpensive alternatives such as the Ultrasensitive p24 assay, the Reverse Transcriptase (RT) assay and in-house reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) have been developed. However, they are still time-consuming, technologically complex and inappropriate for decentralized laboratories as point-of-care (POC) tests. Recent advances in microfluidics and nanotechnology offer new strategies to develop low-cost, rapid, robust and simple HIV-1 viral load monitoring systems. We review state-of-the-art technologies used for HIV-1 viral load monitoring in both developed and developing settings. Emerging approaches based on microfluidics and nanotechnology, which have potential to be integrated into POC HIV-1 viral load assays, are also discussed. PMID:20600784

  20. Forming limit prediction using a self-consistent crystal plasticity framework: a case study for body-centered cubic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Youngung; Pham, Minh-Son; Iadicola, Mark; Creuziger, Adam; Foecke, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    A rate-dependent self-consistent crystal plasticity model was incorporated with the Marciniak–Kuczyński model in order to study the effects of anisotropy on the forming limits of BCC materials. The computational speed of the model was improved by a factor of 24 when running the simulations for several strain paths in parallel. This speed-up enabled a comprehensive investigation of the forming limits of various BCC textures, such as γ , σ , α , η and ε fibers and a uniform (random) texture. These simulations demonstrate that the crystallographic texture has significant (both positive and negative) effects on the resulting forming limit diagrams. For example, the γ fiber texture, which is often sought through thermo-mechanical processing due to a high r-value, had the highest forming limit in the balanced biaxial strain path but the lowest forming limit under the plane strain path among the textures under consideration. A systematic investigation based on the results produced by the current model, referred to as ‘VPSC-FLD’, suggests that the r-value does not serve as a good measure of forming limit strain. However, model predictions show a degree of correlation between the r-value and the forming limit stress.

  1. Interplay of model ingredients affecting aggregate shape plasticity in diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Neto, P.; Stošić, T.; Stošić, B.; Lessa, R.; Milošević, M. V.

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the combined effect of three ingredients of an aggregation model—surface tension, particle flow and particle source—representing typical characteristics of many aggregation growth processes in nature. Through extensive numerical experiments and for different underlying lattice structures we demonstrate that the location of incoming particles and their preferential direction of flow can significantly affect the resulting general shape of the aggregate, while the surface tension controls the surface roughness. Combining all three ingredients increases the aggregate shape plasticity, yielding a wider spectrum of shapes as compared to earlier works that analyzed these ingredients separately. Our results indicate that the considered combination of effects is fundamental for modeling the polymorphic growth of a wide variety of structures in confined geometries and/or in the presence of external fields, such as rocks, crystals, corals, and biominerals.

  2. Interplay of model ingredients affecting aggregate shape plasticity in diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Neto, P; Stošić, T; Stošić, B; Lessa, R; Milošević, M V

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the combined effect of three ingredients of an aggregation model--surface tension, particle flow and particle source--representing typical characteristics of many aggregation growth processes in nature. Through extensive numerical experiments and for different underlying lattice structures we demonstrate that the location of incoming particles and their preferential direction of flow can significantly affect the resulting general shape of the aggregate, while the surface tension controls the surface roughness. Combining all three ingredients increases the aggregate shape plasticity, yielding a wider spectrum of shapes as compared to earlier works that analyzed these ingredients separately. Our results indicate that the considered combination of effects is fundamental for modeling the polymorphic growth of a wide variety of structures in confined geometries and/or in the presence of external fields, such as rocks, crystals, corals, and biominerals. PMID:25122308

  3. Developing a New Appliance to Dissipate Mechanical Load on Teeth and Improve Limitation of Vertical Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Satomi, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takehito; Iino, Mituyoshi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The principle of leverage to superpose the convex surfaces of two shells was applied to develop a device for treating limitation of mouth opening and called it the "shell-shaped mouth opener" and analyzed pressure on the teeth with the TheraBite® appliance and the shell-shaped mouth opening appliance. Material and Methods To compare the TheraBite® appliance and the shell-shaped mouth opening appliance, pressure on the teeth in the dentition model with both devices was analyzed using the Inastomer® flexible conductive sensor. Results The load was better dispersed to each tooth in the shell-shaped mouth opening appliance in the all quadrants compared to the TheraBite® appliance. Conclusions The present study revealed that the shell-shaped mouth opening appliance which was originally invented in our lab, dissipated the mechanical load on teeth more evenly than the TheraBite® appliance. PMID:24422037

  4. Thermal elasto/visco-plastic analysis of multi-layered moderately thick shells of revolution under thermal loading due to fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Inamura, E.; Takezono, S.; Tao, K.

    1996-12-01

    An analytical formulation and a numerical solution of the thermal elasto/visco-plastic deformation of multi-layered moderately thick shells of revolution subjected to thermal loads due to fluid are developed. The temperature distribution through each layer thickness is assumed to be a quadratic curve and is determined using the equations of heat conduction and heat transfer. The equations of equilibrium and the relations between the strains and displacements are derived from the Reissner-Naghdi theory. For the constitutive relations, the Perzyna equations are employed. As numerical examples, two-layered cylindrical shells composed of mild steel and titanium subjected to thermal loads due to fluid are analyzed.

  5. Sparking limits, cavity loading, and beam breakup instability associated with high-current rf linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Faehl, R.J.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The limitations on high-current rf linacs due to gap sparking, cavity loading, and the beam breakup instability are studied. It appears possible to achieve cavity accelerating gradients as high as 35 MV/m without sparking. Furthermore, a linear analysis, as well as self-consistent particle simulations of a multipulsed 10 kA beam, indicated that only a negligible small fraction of energy is radiated into nonfundamental cavity modes. Finally, the beam breakup instability is analyzed and found to be able to magnify initial radial perturbations by a factor of no more than about 20 during the beam transit time through a 1 GeV accelerator.

  6. Limitation of Finite Element Analysis of Poroelastic Behavior of Biological Tissues Undergoing Rapid Loading

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Ian A.; Chegini, Salman; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Gardner-Morse, Mack G.; Iatridis, James C.; Laible, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    The finite element method is used in biomechanics to provide numerical solutions to simulations of structures having complex geometry and spatially differing material properties. Time-varying load deformation behaviors can result from solid viscoelasticity as well as viscous fluid flow through porous materials. Finite element poroelastic analysis of rapidly loaded slow-draining materials may be ill-conditioned, but this problem is not widely known in the biomechanics field. It appears as instabilities in the calculation of interstitial fluid pressures, especially near boundaries and between different materials. Accurate solutions can require impractical compromises between mesh size and time steps. This article investigates the constraints imposed by this problem on tissues representative of the intervertebral disc, subjected to moderate physiological rates of deformation. Two test cylindrical structures were found to require over 104 linear displacement-constant pressure elements to avoid serious oscillations in calculated fluid pressure. Fewer Taylor–Hood (quadratic displacement–linear pressure elements) were required, but with complementary increases in computational costs. The Vermeer–Verruijt criterion for 1D mesh size provided guidelines for 3D mesh sizes for given time steps. Pressure instabilities may impose limitations on the use of the finite element method for simulating fluid transport behaviors of biological soft tissues at moderately rapid physiological loading rates. PMID:20306136

  7. Behaviour of Silicon-Doped CFC Limiter under High Heat Load in TEXTOR-94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, A.; Philipps, V.; Hirai, T.; Kirschner, A.; Lehnen, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.

    In order to study the impurity production, recycling and power deposition a Si doped CFC test limiter (NS31) was used in TEXTOR-94. The release of impurities (C, Si, O, Cr, CD radicals) was measured spectroscopically. A reduced methane production was found in the Si doped graphite when compared to a pure graphite limiter. A smaller decrease of the carbon fluxes could also be observed. The limiter contained about 1%-1.5% of Si, but a relative Si flux (Si/D) from the Si doped CFC surface between 0.12% and 0.4% has been measured. A chemical erosion of Si due to formation of SiDx has not been observed. Silicon evaporated from the surface at temperatures above 1500°C. This led to an increase of Si concentration and total radiation losses from the plasma. Surface analysis shows the formation of microcracks and holes on the plasma exposed limiter surface. The released Si was deposited in the vicinity of the tangency point of the limiter. Whereas a Si depletion was observed in the area of highest power loading with values reaching in and in-between fibres values of 0.03% and 0.02% respectively.

  8. Modeling of limiter heat loads and impurity transport in Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effenberg, Florian; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Hoelbe, H.; Koenig, R.; Krychowiak, M.; Pedersen, T. S.; Bozhenkov, S.; Reiter, D.

    2015-11-01

    The quasi-isodynamic stellarator Wendelstein 7-X starts plasma operation in a limiter configuration. The field consists of closed magnetic flux surfaces avoiding magnetic islands in the plasma boundary. Because of the small size of the limiters and the absence of wall-protecting elements in this phase, limiter heat loads and impurity generation due to plasma surface interaction become a concern. These issues are studied with the 3D fluid plasma edge and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-Eirene. It is shown that the 3D SOL consists of three separate helical magnetic flux bundles of different field line connection lengths. A density scan at input power of 4MW reveals a strong modulation of the plasma paramters with the connection length. The limiter peak heat fluxes drop from 14 MWm-2 down to 10 MWm-2 with raising the density from 1 ×1018m-3 to 1.9 ×1019m-3, accompanied by an increase of the heat flux channel widths λq. Radiative power losses can help to avoid thermal overloads of the limiters at the upper margin of the heating power. The power removal feasibility of the intrinsic carbon and other extrinsic light impurities via active gas injection is discussed as a preparation of this method for island divertor operation. Work supported in part by start up funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA and by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-SC0013911.

  9. Exploring the influence of loading geometry on the plastic flow properties of geological materials: Results from combined torsion + axial compression tests on calcite rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey-Crump, S. J.; Xiao, W. F.; Mecklenburgh, J.; Rutter, E. H.; May, S. E.

    2016-07-01

    For technical reasons, virtually all plastic deformation experiments on geological materials have been performed in either pure shear or simple shear. These special case loading geometries are rather restrictive for those seeking insight into how microstructure evolves under the more general loading geometries that occur during natural deformation. Moreover, they are insufficient to establish how plastic flow properties might vary with the 3rd invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor (J3) which describes the stress configuration, and so applications that use those flow properties (e.g. glaciological and geodynamical modelling) may be correspondingly compromised. We describe an inexpensive and relatively straightforward modification to the widely used Paterson rock deformation apparatus that allows torsion experiments to be performed under simultaneously applied axial loads. We illustrate the performance of this modification with the results of combined stress experiments performed on Carrara marble and Solnhofen limestone at 500°-600 °C and confining pressures of 300 MPa. The flow stresses are best described by the Drucker yield function which includes J3-dependence. However, that J3-dependence is small. Hence for these initially approximately isotropic calcite rocks, flow stresses are adequately described by the J3-independent von Mises yield criterion that is widely used in deformation modelling. Loading geometry does, however, have a profound influence on the type and rate of development of crystallographic preferred orientation, and hence of mechanical anisotropy. The apparatus modification extends the range of loading geometries that can be used to investigate microstructural evolution, as well as providing greater scope for determining the shape of the yield surface in plastically anisotropic materials.

  10. Axial loads on implant-supported partial fixed prostheses for external and internal hex connections and machined and plastic copings: strain gauge analysis.

    PubMed

    de Vasconcellos, Luis Gustavo Oliveira; Kojima, Alberto Noriyuki; Nishioka, Renato Sussumu; de Vasconcellos, Luana Marotta Reis; Balducci, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to use strain gauge (SG) analysis to compare the effects of the implant-abutment joint, the coping, and the location of load on strain distribution in the bone around implants supporting 3-unit fixed partial prostheses. Three external hexagon (EH) implants and 3 internal hexagon (IH) implants were inserted into 2 polyurethane blocks. Microunit abutments were screwed onto their respective implant groups. Machined cobalt-chromium copings and plastic copings were screwed onto the abutments, which received standard wax patterns. The wax patterns were cast in a cobalt-chromium alloy (n = 5): group 1 = EH/machined. group 2 = EH/plastic, group 3 = IH/machined, and group 4 = IH/plastic. Four SGs were bonded onto the surface of the block tangentially to the implants. Each metallic structure was screwed onto the abutments and an axial load of 30 kg was applied at 5 predetermined points. The magnitude of microstrain on each SG was recorded in units of microstrain (με). The data were analyzed using 3-factor repeated measures analysis of variance and a Tukey test (α = 0.05). The results showed statistically significant differences for the type of implant-abutment joint, loading point, and interaction at the implant-abutment joint/loading point. The IH connection showed higher microstrain values than the EH connection. It was concluded that the type of coping did not interfere in the magnitude of microstrain, but the implant/abutment joint and axial loading location influenced this magnitude. PMID:23574373

  11. Etching-limiting process and origin of loading effects in silicon etching with hydrogen chloride gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, Naoya; Suda, Jun; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2014-01-01

    The etching-limiting step in slow Si etching with HCl/H2 at atmospheric pressure was investigated. The etching was performed at a low etching rate below 10 nm/min in the temperature range of 1000-1100 °C. In the case of bare Si etching, it was confirmed that the etching rate showed little temperature dependence and was proportional to the equilibrium pressure of the etching by-product SiCl2 calculated by thermochemical analysis. In addition, the etching rates of Si(100) and (110) faces were almost the same. These results indicate that SiCl2 diffusion in the gas phase is the rate-limiting step. In the etching of the Si surface with SiO2 mask patterns, a strong loading effect (mask/opening pattern dependence of the etching rate) was observed. The simulation of the diffusion of gas species immediately above the Si surface revealed that the loading effect was attributed to the pattern-dependent diffusion of SiCl2.

  12. On a phase field approach for martensitic transformations in a crystal plastic material at a loaded surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Regina; Kuhn, Charlotte; Müller, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    A continuum phase field model for martensitic transformations is introduced, including crystal plasticity with different slip systems for the different phases. In a 2D setting, the transformation-induced eigenstrain is taken into account for two martensitic orientation variants. With aid of the model, the phase transition and its dependence on the volume change, crystal plastic material behavior, and the inheritance of plastic deformations from austenite to martensite are studied in detail. The numerical setup is motivated by the process of cryogenic turning. The resulting microstructure qualitatively coincides with an experimentally obtained martensite structure. For the numerical calculations, finite elements together with global and local implicit time integration scheme are employed.

  13. Wind, waves, and wing loading: Morphological specialization may limit range expansion of endangered albatrosses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suryan, R.M.; Anderson, D.J.; Shaffer, S.A.; Roby, D.D.; Tremblay, Y.; Costa, D.P.; Sievert, P.R.; Sato, F.; Ozaki, K.; Balogh, G.R.; Nakamura, N.

    2008-01-01

    Among the varied adaptations for avian flight, the morphological traits allowing large-bodied albatrosses to capitalize on wind and wave energy for efficient long-distance flight are unparalleled. Consequently, the biogeographic distribution of most albatrosses is limited to the windiest oceanic regions on earth; however, exceptions exist. Species breeding in the North and Central Pacific Ocean (Phoebastria spp.) inhabit regions of lower wind speed and wave height than southern hemisphere genera, and have large intrageneric variation in body size and aerodynamic performance. Here, we test the hypothesis that regional wind and wave regimes explain observed differences in Phoebastria albatross morphology and we compare their aerodynamic performance to representatives from the other three genera of this globally distributed avian family. In the North and Central Pacific, two species (short-tailed P. albatrus and waved P. irrorata) are markedly larger, yet have the smallest breeding ranges near highly productive coastal upwelling systems. Short-tailed albatrosses, however, have 60% higher wing loading (weight per area of lift) compared to waved albatrosses. Indeed, calculated aerodynamic performance of waved albatrosses, the only tropical albatross species, is more similar to those of their smaller congeners (black-footed P. nigripes and Laysan P. immutabilis), which have relatively low wing loading and much larger foraging ranges that include central oceanic gyres of relatively low productivity. Globally, the aerodynamic performance of short-tailed and waved albatrosses are most anomalous for their body sizes, yet consistent with wind regimes within their breeding season foraging ranges. Our results are the first to integrate global wind and wave patterns with albatross aerodynamics, thereby identifying morphological specialization that may explain limited breeding ranges of two endangered albatross species. These results are further relevant to understanding past and

  14. Wind, Waves, and Wing Loading: Morphological Specialization May Limit Range Expansion of Endangered Albatrosses

    PubMed Central

    Suryan, Robert M.; Anderson, David J.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Roby, Daniel D.; Tremblay, Yann; Costa, Daniel P.; Sievert, Paul R.; Sato, Fumio; Ozaki, Kiyoaki; Balogh, Gregory R.; Nakamura, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    Among the varied adaptations for avian flight, the morphological traits allowing large-bodied albatrosses to capitalize on wind and wave energy for efficient long-distance flight are unparalleled. Consequently, the biogeographic distribution of most albatrosses is limited to the windiest oceanic regions on earth; however, exceptions exist. Species breeding in the North and Central Pacific Ocean (Phoebastria spp.) inhabit regions of lower wind speed and wave height than southern hemisphere genera, and have large intrageneric variation in body size and aerodynamic performance. Here, we test the hypothesis that regional wind and wave regimes explain observed differences in Phoebastria albatross morphology and we compare their aerodynamic performance to representatives from the other three genera of this globally distributed avian family. In the North and Central Pacific, two species (short-tailed P. albatrus and waved P. irrorata) are markedly larger, yet have the smallest breeding ranges near highly productive coastal upwelling systems. Short-tailed albatrosses, however, have 60% higher wing loading (weight per area of lift) compared to waved albatrosses. Indeed, calculated aerodynamic performance of waved albatrosses, the only tropical albatross species, is more similar to those of their smaller congeners (black-footed P. nigripes and Laysan P. immutabilis), which have relatively low wing loading and much larger foraging ranges that include central oceanic gyres of relatively low productivity. Globally, the aerodynamic performance of short-tailed and waved albatrosses are most anomalous for their body sizes, yet consistent with wind regimes within their breeding season foraging ranges. Our results are the first to integrate global wind and wave patterns with albatross aerodynamics, thereby identifying morphological specialization that may explain limited breeding ranges of two endangered albatross species. These results are further relevant to understanding past and

  15. Wind, waves, and wing loading: morphological specialization may limit range expansion of endangered albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Suryan, Robert M; Anderson, David J; Shaffer, Scott A; Roby, Daniel D; Tremblay, Yann; Costa, Daniel P; Sievert, Paul R; Sato, Fumio; Ozaki, Kiyoaki; Balogh, Gregory R; Nakamura, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    Among the varied adaptations for avian flight, the morphological traits allowing large-bodied albatrosses to capitalize on wind and wave energy for efficient long-distance flight are unparalleled. Consequently, the biogeographic distribution of most albatrosses is limited to the windiest oceanic regions on earth; however, exceptions exist. Species breeding in the North and Central Pacific Ocean (Phoebastria spp.) inhabit regions of lower wind speed and wave height than southern hemisphere genera, and have large intrageneric variation in body size and aerodynamic performance. Here, we test the hypothesis that regional wind and wave regimes explain observed differences in Phoebastria albatross morphology and we compare their aerodynamic performance to representatives from the other three genera of this globally distributed avian family. In the North and Central Pacific, two species (short-tailed P. albatrus and waved P. irrorata) are markedly larger, yet have the smallest breeding ranges near highly productive coastal upwelling systems. Short-tailed albatrosses, however, have 60% higher wing loading (weight per area of lift) compared to waved albatrosses. Indeed, calculated aerodynamic performance of waved albatrosses, the only tropical albatross species, is more similar to those of their smaller congeners (black-footed P. nigripes and Laysan P. immutabilis), which have relatively low wing loading and much larger foraging ranges that include central oceanic gyres of relatively low productivity. Globally, the aerodynamic performance of short-tailed and waved albatrosses are most anomalous for their body sizes, yet consistent with wind regimes within their breeding season foraging ranges. Our results are the first to integrate global wind and wave patterns with albatross aerodynamics, thereby identifying morphological specialization that may explain limited breeding ranges of two endangered albatross species. These results are further relevant to understanding past and

  16. Characterization of Engine Control Authority on HCCI Combustion as the High Load Limit is Approached

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Foster, Matthew; Confer, Keith; Moore, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    While the potential emissions and efficiency benefits of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion are well known, realizing the potentials on a production intent engine presents numerous challenges. In this study we focus on characterizing the authority of the available engine controls as the high load limit of HCCI combustion is approached. The experimental work is performed on a boosted single-cylinder research engine equipped with direct injection (DI) fueling, cooled external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), and a hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) valve train to enable the negative valve overlap (NVO) breathing strategy. Valve lift and duration are held constant while phasing is varied in an effort to make the results as relevant as possible to production intent cam-based variable valve actuation (VVA) systems on multi-cylinder engines. Results presented include engine loads from 350 to 650 kPa IMEPnet and manifold pressure from 98 to 190 kPaa at 2000 rpm. It is found that in order to increase engine load to 650 kPa IMEPnet, it is necessary to increase manifold pressure and external EGR while reducing the NVO duration. Both NVO duration and fuel injection timing are effective means of controlling combustion phasing, with NVO duration being a coarse control and fuel injection timing being a fine control. NOX emissions are low throughout the study, with emissions below 0.1 g/kW-h at all boosted HCCI conditions, while good combustion efficiency is maintained (>96.5%). Net indicated thermal efficiency increases with load up to 600 kPa IMEPnet, where a peak efficiency of 41% is achieved. Results of independent parametric investigations are presented on the effect of external EGR, intake effect of manifold pressure, and the effect of NVO duration. It is found that increasing EGR at a constant manifold pressure and increasing manifold pressure at a constant EGR rate both have the effect of retarding combustion phasing. It is also found that combustion

  17. Full-scale crash-test evaluation of two load-limiting subfloors for general aviation airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1984-01-01

    Three six place, low wing, twin engine general aviation airplane test specimens were crash tested at the Langley Impact Dynamics Research Facility under controlled free flight conditions. One structurally unmodified airplane was the base line specimen for the test series. The other two airplanes were structurally modified to incorporate load limiting (energy absorbing) subfloor concepts into the structure for full scale crash test evaluation and for comparison with the unmodified airplane test results. Typically, the lowest floor accelerations, the lowest anthropomorphic dummy responses, and the least seat crushing of standard and load limiting seats occurred in the airplanes modified with load limiting subfloors, wherein the greatest structural crushing of the subfloor took place. The better performing of the two load limiting subfloor concepts reduced the peak airplane floor accelerations to -25g to -30g as compared with approximately -40g to -55g for the unmodified airplane structure.

  18. HCCI Load Expansion Opportunities using a Fully Variable HVA Research Engine to Guide Development of a Production Intent Cam-based VVA Engine: The Low Load Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Weall, Adam J; Szybist, James P; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Foster, Matthew; Confer, Keith; Moore, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    While the potential emissions and efficiency benefits of HCCI combustion are well known, realizing the potentials on a production intent engine presents numerous challenges. In this study we focus on identifying challenges and opportunities associated with a production intent cam-based variable valve actuation (VVA) system on a multi-cylinder engine in comparison to a fully flexible, naturally aspirated, hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) system on a single-cylinder engine, with both platforms sharing the same GDI fueling system and engine geometry. The multi-cylinder production intent VVA system uses a 2-step cam technology with wide authority cam phasing, allowing adjustments to be made to the negative valve overlap (NVO) duration but not the valve opening durations. On the single cylinder HVA engine, the valve opening duration and lift are variable in addition to the NVO duration. The content of this paper is limited to the low-medium operating load region at 2000rpm. Using different injection strategies, including the NVO pilot injection approach, the single-cylinder engine is operated over a load range from 160-390 kPa net IMEP at 2000 rpm. Changes to valve opening duration on the single-cylinder HVA engine illustrate opportunities for load expansion and efficiency improvement at certain conditions. For instance, the low load limit can be extended on the HVA engine by reducing breathing and operating closer to a stoichiometric air fuel ratio (AFR) by using valve deactivation. The naturally aspirated engine used here without external EGR confirmed that as operating load increases the emissions of NOx increases due to combustion temperature. NOx emissions are found to be one limitation to the maximum load limitation, the other being high pressure rise rate. It is found that the configuration of the production intent cam-based system represents a good compromise between valve lift and duration in the low to medium load region. Changing the extent of charge motion

  19. HCCI Load Expansion Opportunities Using a Fully Variable HVA Research Engine to Guide Developments of a Production Intent Cam-Based VVA Engine: The Low Load Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Weall, Adam J; Szybist, James P; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Foster, Matthew; Confer, Keith; Moore, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    While the potential emissions and efficiency benefits of HCCI combustion are well known, realizing the potentials on a production intent engine presents numerous challenges. In this study we focus on identifying challenges and opportunities associated with a production intent cam-based variable valve actuation (VVA) system on a multi-cylinder engine in comparison to a fully flexible, naturally aspirated, hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) system on a single-cylinder engine, with both platforms sharing the same GDI fueling system and engine geometry. The multi-cylinder production intent VVA system uses a 2-step cam technology with wide authority cam phasing, allowing adjustments to be made to the negative valve overlap (NVO) duration but not the valve opening durations. On the single cylinder HVA engine, the valve opening duration and lift are variable in addition to the NVO duration. The content of this paper is limited to the low-medium operating load region at 2000rpm. Using different injection strategies, including the NVO pilot injection approach, the single-cylinder engine is operated over a load range from 160-390 kPa net IMEP at 2000 rpm. Changes to valve opening duration on the single-cylinder HVA engine illustrate opportunities for load expansion and efficiency improvement at certain conditions. For instance, the low load limit can be extended on the HVA engine by reducing breathing and operating closer to a stoichiometric air fuel ratio (AFR) by using valve deactivation. The naturally aspirated engine used here without external EGR confirmed that as operating load increases the emissions of NOx increases due to combustion temperature. NOx emissions are found to be one limitation to the maximum load limitation, the other being high pressure rise rate. It is found that the configuration of the production intent cam-based system represents a good compromise between valve lift and duration in the low to medium load region. Changing the extent of charge motion

  20. Strength Estimation of Self-Piercing Rivets using Lower Bound Limit Load Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2005-08-01

    This paper summarizes the authors' work on strength and failure mode estimation of self-piercing rivets (SPR) for automotive applications. First, the static cross tension strength of an SPR joint is estimated using a lower bound limit load based strength estimator. Failure mode associated with the predicted failure strength can also be identified. It is shown that the cross tension strength of an SPR joint depends on the material and gage combinations, rivet design, die design and riveting direction. The analytical rivet strength estimator is then validated by experimental rivet strength measurements and failure mode observations from nine SPR joint populations with various material and gage combinations. Next, the estimator is used to optimize rivet strength. Two illustrative examples are presented in which rivet strength is improved by changing rivet length and riveting direction from the original manufacturing parameters.

  1. Load limit of a UASB fed septic tank-treated domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lohani, Sunil Prasad; Bakke, Rune; Khanal, Sanjay N

    2015-01-01

    Performance of a 250 L pilot-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, operated at ambient temperatures, fed septic tank effluents intermittently, was monitored for hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 18 h to 4 h. The total suspended solids (TSS), total chemical oxygen demand (CODT), dissolved chemical oxygen demand (CODdis) and suspended chemical oxygen demand (CODss) removal efficiencies ranged from 20 to 63%, 15 to 56%, 8 to 35% and 22 to 72%, respectively, for the HRT range tested. Above 60% TSS and 47% CODT removal were obtained in the combined septic tank and UASB process. The process established stable UASB treatment at HRT≥6 h, indicating a hydraulic load design limit. The tested septic tank-UASB combined system can be a low-cost and effective on-site sanitation solution. PMID:26465318

  2. Numerical limit analysis and plasticity criterion of a porous Coulomb material with elliptic cylindrical voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Franck; Pastor, Joseph; Kondo, Djimedo

    2015-03-01

    The paper is devoted to a numerical Limit Analysis of a hollow cylindrical model with a Coulomb solid matrix (of confocal boundaries) considered in the case of a generalized plane strain. To this end, the static approach of Pastor et al. (2008) [18] for Drucker-Prager materials is first extended to Coulomb problems. A new mixed-but rigorously kinematic-code is elaborated for Coulomb problems in the present case of symmetry, resulting also in a conic programming approach. Owing to the good conditioning of the resulting optimization problems, both methods give very close bounds by allowing highly refined meshes, as verified by comparing to existing exact solutions. In a second part, using the identity of Tresca (as special case of Coulomb) and von Mises materials in plane strain, the codes are used to assess the corresponding results of Mariani and Corigliano (2001) [13] and of Madou and Leblond (2012) [11] for circular and elliptic cylindrical voids in a von Mises matrix. Finally, the Coulomb problem is investigated, also in terms of projections on the coordinate planes of the principal macroscopic stresses.

  3. 40 CFR 130.7 - Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... individual water quality-based effluent limitations. 130.7 Section 130.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.7 Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations. (a) General....

  4. 40 CFR 130.7 - Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... individual water quality-based effluent limitations. 130.7 Section 130.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.7 Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations. (a) General....

  5. 40 CFR 130.7 - Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... individual water quality-based effluent limitations. 130.7 Section 130.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.7 Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations. (a) General....

  6. Limitations of liquid nitrogen cooling of high heat load x-ray monochromators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khounsary, Ali; Strons, Philip; Kujala, Naresh; Macrander, Albert

    2012-10-01

    X-ray monochromators, made of single crystals or multilayer coatings, are the most common optical components on many synchrotron beamlines. They intercept the broad-spectrum x-ray (white or pink) beams generated by the radiation source and absorb all but select narrow spectral bands of x-rays, which are diffracted according to Bragg's Law. With some incident beam power in the kW range, minimizing thermally induced deformation detrimental to the performance of the device necessitates the design of optimally cooled monochromators. Monochromator substrate designs have evolved, in parallel with thermal loads of the incident beams, from simple blocks with no cooling, to water cooled (both contact -cooled and internally cooled), and to cryogenically cooled designs where the undesirable thermal distortions are kept in check by operating in a temperature range where the thermomechanical properties of the substrate materials are favorable. Fortuitously, single-crystal silicon at cryogenic temperatures has an exceptionally favorable combination of high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient. With further increases in x-ray beam power, partly as a result of the upgrades to the existing synchrotron facilities, the question arises as to the ultimate limits of liquid-nitrogen-cooled silicon monochromators' ability to handle the increased thermal load. In this paper, we describe the difficulties and begin the investigation by using a simple geometric model for a monochromator and obtain analytical solutions for the temperature field. The temperature can be used as a proxy for thermally induced deformation. The significant role of the nonlinear material properties of silicon is examined.

  7. Plasticity of protective mechanisms only partially explains interactive effects of temperature and UVR on upper thermal limits.

    PubMed

    Kern, Pippa; Cramp, Rebecca L; Seebacher, Frank; Ghanizadeh Kazerouni, Ensiyeh; Franklin, Craig E

    2015-12-01

    Temperature and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) are key environmental drivers that are linked in their effects on cellular damage. Exposure to both high temperatures and UVR can cause cellular damage that result in the up-regulation of common protective mechanisms, such as the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) and antioxidants. As such, the interactive effects of these stressors at the cellular level may determine physiological limits, such as thermal tolerance. Furthermore, antioxidant activity is often thermally sensitive, which may lead to temperature dependent effects of UVR exposure. Here we examined the interactive effects of temperature and UVR on upper thermal limits, Hsp70 abundance, oxidative damage and antioxidant (catalase) activity. We exposed Limnodynastes peronii tadpoles to one of three temperature treatments (constant 18°C, constant 28°C and daily fluctuations between 18 and 28°C) in the presence or absence of UVR. Tadpoles were tested for upper thermal limits (CTmax), induction of Hsp70, oxidative damage and catalase activity. Our results show that CTmax was influenced by an interactive effect between temperature and UVR treatment. For tadpoles kept in cold temperatures, exposure to UVR led to cross-tolerance to high temperatures, increasing CTmax. Plasticity in this trait was not fully explained by changes in the lower level mechanistic traits examined. These results highlight the difficulty in predicting the mechanistic basis for the interactive effects of multiple stressors on whole animal traits. Multifactorial studies may therefore be required to understand how complex mechanistic processes shape physiological tolerances, and determine responses to environmental variation. PMID:26408107

  8. Adhesion-induced instabilities in elastic and elastic-plastic contacts during single and repetitive normal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Z.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2011-04-01

    Adhesive interaction in spherical contacts was modeled with the Lennard-Jones (L-J) potential. Elastic adhesive contact was analyzed by the equivalent system of a rigid sphere with reduced radius of curvature and a half-space of effective elastic modulus. The critical gap at the instant of abrupt surface contact (jump-in) and separation (jump-out) was determined from the deformed surface profile of the elastic half-space and geometrical relationships. A finite element model of a rigid sphere and an elastic-plastic half-space was used to examine elastic-plastic adhesive contact. Surface adhesion was modeled by nonlinear springs with a force-displacement relationship governed by the L-J potential. The evolution of the interfacial force and the central gap distance as well as the occurrence of jump-in and jump-out instabilities were investigated in terms of the Tabor parameter, plasticity parameter, and dimensionless maximum normal displacement. The force-displacement response due to several approach-retraction cycles was interpreted in the context of elastic and plastic shakedown behaviors using dimensionless parameters.

  9. An in-situ neutron diffraction study of a multi-phase transformation and twinning-induced plasticity steel during cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Brown, Donald W.; Clausen, Bjørn; Tomé, Carlos N.; Pereloma, Elena V.; Davies, Christopher H. J.; Gazder, Azdiar A.

    2015-04-27

    In-situ neutron diffraction during cyclic tension-compression loading (∼+3.5% to −2.8%) of a 17Mn-3Al-2Si-1Ni-0.06C steel that exhibits concurrent transformation and twinning -induced plasticity effects indicated a significant contribution of intragranular back stresses to the observed Bauschinger effect. Rietveld analysis revealed a higher rate of martensitic transformation during tension compared to compression. Throughout cycling, α′-martensite exhibited the highest phase strains such that it bears an increasing portion of the macroscopic load as its weight fraction evolves. On the other hand, the ε-martensite strain remained compressive as it accommodated most of the internal strains caused by the shape misfit associated with the γ→ε and/or ε→α′ transformations.

  10. An in-situ neutron diffraction study of a multi-phase transformation and twinning-induced plasticity steel during cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Brown, Donald W.; Pereloma, Elena V.; Clausen, Bjørn; Davies, Christopher H. J.; Tomé, Carlos N.; Gazder, Azdiar A.

    2015-04-01

    In-situ neutron diffraction during cyclic tension-compression loading (˜+3.5% to -2.8%) of a 17Mn-3Al-2Si-1Ni-0.06C steel that exhibits concurrent transformation and twinning -induced plasticity effects indicated a significant contribution of intragranular back stresses to the observed Bauschinger effect. Rietveld analysis revealed a higher rate of martensitic transformation during tension compared to compression. Throughout cycling, α'-martensite exhibited the highest phase strains such that it bears an increasing portion of the macroscopic load as its weight fraction evolves. On the other hand, the ɛ-martensite strain remained compressive as it accommodated most of the internal strains caused by the shape misfit associated with the γ→ɛ and/or ɛ→α' transformations.

  11. Dynamic response of concrete beams externally reinforced with carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) subjected to impulsive loads

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, D.M.; Ross, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    A series of 54 laboratory scale concrete beams 3 x 3 x 30 in. in size were impulsively loaded to failure in a drop weight impact machine. The beams had no internal reinforcement, but instead were externally reinforced on the bottom or tension side of the beams with 1, 2, and 3 ply AS4C/1919 graphite epoxy panels. In addition, several of the beams were also reinforced on the sides with 3 ply CFRP. The beams were simply supported in a drop weight machine and subjected to impact loads with amplitudes up to 10 kips, and durations less than 1 ms, at beam midspan. Measurements made during the loading event included beam total load, midspan displacement, as well as midspan strain at 3 locations in the beam`s cross-section. A high speed framing camera was also used to record the beam`s displacement-time behavior as well as to gain insight into the failure mechanisms. Beam midspan accelerations were determined by double differentiation of the displacement versus time data, and in turn, the beam`s inertial loads were calculated using the beam`s equivalent mass. Beam dynamic bending loads versus time were determined from the difference between the total load versus time and the inertial load versus time data. Bending loads versus displacements were also determined along with fracture energies. Failure to correct the loads for inertia will result in incorrect conclusions being drawn from the data, especially for bending resistance of brittle concrete test specimens. A comparison with quasistatic bending (fracture) energy data showed that the dynamic failure energy absorbed by the beams was always less than the static fracture energy, due to the brittle nature of concrete when impulsively loaded.

  12. Extensive phenotypic plasticity of a Red Sea coral over a strong latitudinal temperature gradient suggests limited acclimatization potential to warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawall, Yvonne; Al-Sofyani, Abdulmoshin; Hohn, Sönke; Banguera-Hinestroza, Eulalia; Voolstra, Christian R.; Wahl, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Global warming was reported to cause growth reductions in tropical shallow water corals in both, cooler and warmer, regions of the coral species range. This suggests regional adaptation with less heat-tolerant populations in cooler and more thermo-tolerant populations in warmer regions. Here, we investigated seasonal changes in the in situ metabolic performance of the widely distributed hermatypic coral Pocillopora verrucosa along 12° latitudes featuring a steep temperature gradient between the northern (28.5°N, 21-27°C) and southern (16.5°N, 28-33°C) reaches of the Red Sea. Surprisingly, we found little indication for regional adaptation, but strong indications for high phenotypic plasticity: Calcification rates in two seasons (winter, summer) were found to be highest at 28-29°C throughout all populations independent of their geographic location. Mucus release increased with temperature and nutrient supply, both being highest in the south. Genetic characterization of the coral host revealed low inter-regional variation and differences in the Symbiodinium clade composition only at the most northern and most southern region. This suggests variable acclimatization potential to ocean warming of coral populations across the Red Sea: high acclimatization potential in northern populations, but limited ability to cope with ocean warming in southern populations already existing at the upper thermal margin for corals.

  13. Extensive phenotypic plasticity of a Red Sea coral over a strong latitudinal temperature gradient suggests limited acclimatization potential to warming.

    PubMed

    Sawall, Yvonne; Al-Sofyani, Abdulmoshin; Hohn, Sönke; Banguera-Hinestroza, Eulalia; Voolstra, Christian R; Wahl, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Global warming was reported to cause growth reductions in tropical shallow water corals in both, cooler and warmer, regions of the coral species range. This suggests regional adaptation with less heat-tolerant populations in cooler and more thermo-tolerant populations in warmer regions. Here, we investigated seasonal changes in the in situ metabolic performance of the widely distributed hermatypic coral Pocillopora verrucosa along 12° latitudes featuring a steep temperature gradient between the northern (28.5°N, 21-27°C) and southern (16.5°N, 28-33°C) reaches of the Red Sea. Surprisingly, we found little indication for regional adaptation, but strong indications for high phenotypic plasticity: Calcification rates in two seasons (winter, summer) were found to be highest at 28-29°C throughout all populations independent of their geographic location. Mucus release increased with temperature and nutrient supply, both being highest in the south. Genetic characterization of the coral host revealed low inter-regional variation and differences in the Symbiodinium clade composition only at the most northern and most southern region. This suggests variable acclimatization potential to ocean warming of coral populations across the Red Sea: high acclimatization potential in northern populations, but limited ability to cope with ocean warming in southern populations already existing at the upper thermal margin for corals. PMID:25754672

  14. Plastic Response of Tracheids in Pinus pinaster in a Water-Limited Environment: Adjusting Lumen Size instead of Wall Thickness.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana; Nabais, Cristina; Vieira, Joana; Rossi, Sergio; Campelo, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    The formation of wood results from cambial activity and its anatomical properties reflect the variability of environmental conditions during the growing season. Recently, it was found that wood density variations in conifers growing under cold-limited environment result from the adjustment of cell wall thickness (CWT) to temperature. Additionally, it is known that intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs) are formed in response to precipitation after the summer drought. Although IADFs are frequent in Mediterranean conifers no study has yet been conducted to determine if these structures result from the adjustment of lumen diameter (LD) or CWT to soil water availability. Our main objective is to investigate the intra-ring variation of wood anatomical features (LD and CWT) in Pinus pinaster Ait. growing under a water-limited environment. We compared the tracheidograms of LD and CWT for the years 2010-2013 in P. pinaster growing in the west coast of Portugal. Our results suggest a close association between LD and soil moisture content along the growing season, reinforcing the role of water availability in determining tracheid size. Compared with CWT, LD showed a higher intra- and inter-annual variability suggesting its strong adjustment value to variations in water availability. The formation of a latewood IADF appears to be predisposed by higher rates of cell production in spring and triggered by early autumn precipitation. Our findings reinforce the crucial role of water availability on cambial activity and wood formation in Mediterranean conifers, and emphasize the high plasticity of wood anatomical features under Mediterranean climate. PMID:26305893

  15. Maternal dietary loads of α-tocopherol depress protein kinase C signaling and synaptic plasticity in rat postnatal developing hippocampus and promote permanent deficits in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Betti, Michele; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Minelli, Andrea; Floridi, Alessandro; Lattanzi, Davide; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Bucherelli, Corrado; Prospero, Emilia; Frontini, Andrea; Santarelli, Lory; Baldi, Elisabetta; Benetti, Fernando; Galli, Francesco; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin E (α-tocopherol) supplementation has been tested as prophylaxis against gestational disorders associated with oxidative damage. However, recent evidence showing that high maternal α-tocopherol intake can adversely affect offspring development raises concerns on the safety of vitamin E extradosages during pregnancy. Besides acting as an antioxidant, α-tocopherol depresses cell proliferation and modulates cell signaling through inhibiting protein kinase C (PKC), a kinase that is deeply involved in neural maturation and plasticity. Possible effects of α-tocopherol loads in the maturing brain, where PKC dysregulation is associated to developmental dysfunctions, are poorly known. Here, supranutritional doses of α-tocopherol were fed to pregnant and lactating dams to evaluate the effects on PKC signaling and morphofunctional maturation in offspring hippocampus. Results showed that maternal supplementation potentiates hippocampal α-tocopherol incorporation in offspring and leads to marked decrease of PKC phosphorylation throughout postnatal maturation, accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of growth-associated protein-43 and myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate, two PKC substrates involved in neural development and plasticity. Although processes of neuronal maturation, synapse formation and targeting appeared unaffected, offspring of supplemented mothers displayed a marked reduction of long-term synaptic plasticity in juvenile hippocampus. Interestingly, this impairment persisted in adulthood, when a deficit in hippocampus-dependent, long-lasting spatial memory was also revealed. In conclusion, maternal supplementation with elevated doses of α-tocopherol can influence cell signaling and synaptic plasticity in developing hippocampus and promotes permanent adverse effects in adult offspring. The present results emphasize the need to evaluate the safety of supranutritional maternal intake of α-tocopherol in humans. PMID:20382010

  16. Comparison of Thoracic Injury Risk in Frontal Car Crashes for Occupant Restrained without Belt Load Limiters and Those Restrained with 6 kN and 4 kN Belt Load Limiters.

    PubMed

    Foret-Bruno, J Y; Trosseille, X; Page, Y; Huère, J F; Le Coz, J Y; Bendjellal, F; Diboine, A; Phalempin, T; Villeforceix, D; Baudrit, P; Guillemot, H; Coltat, J C

    2001-11-01

    In France, as in other countries, accident research studies show that a large proportion of restrained occupants who sustain severe or fatal injuries are involved in frontal impacts (65% and 50%, respectively). In severe frontal impacts with restrained occupants and where intrusion is not preponderant, the oldest occupants very often sustain severe thoracic injuries due to the conventional seat belt. As we have been observing over the last years, we will expect in the coming years developments which include more solidly-built cars, as offset crash test procedures are widely used to evaluate the passive safety of production vehicles. The reduction of intrusion for the most severe frontal impacts, through optimization of car deformation, usually translates into an increase in restraint forces and hence thoracic injury risk with a conventional retractor seat belt for a given impact severity. It is, therefore essential to limit the restraint forces exerted by the seat belt on the thorax in order to reduce the number of road casualties. In order to address thoracic injury risk in frontal impact, Renault cars have been equipped with the Programmed Restraint System (PRS) since 1995. The PRS is a restraint system that combines belt load limitation and pyrotechnic belt pretension. In an initial design of the Programmed Restraint System (PRS1), the belt load limiter was a steel component designed to shear at a given shoulder force, namely 6 kN. It was mounted between the retractor and the lower anchorage point of the belt. The design of the PRS was modified in 1998 (PRS2), but the principle of load limitation was maintained. The threshold was decreased to 4 kN and this lower belt belt-force limiter has been combined with a specially designed airbag. This paper reports on 347 real-world frontal accidents where the EES (Equivalent Energy Speed) ranged from 35 to 75 km/h. One hundred and ninety-eight (198) of these accidents involved cars equipped with the 6 kN load limiter

  17. A criterion for high-cycle fatigue life and fatigue limit prediction in biaxial loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejkowski, Łukasz; Skibicki, Dariusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a criterion for high-cycle fatigue life and fatigue strength estimation under periodic proportional and non-proportional cyclic loading. The criterion is based on the mean and maximum values of the second invariant of the stress deviator. Important elements of the criterion are: function of the non-proportionality of fatigue loading and the materials parameter that expresses the materials sensitivity to non-proportional loading. The methods for the materials parameters determination uses three S-N curves: tension-compression, torsion, and any non-proportional loading proposed. The criterion has been verified using experimental data, and the results are included in the paper. These results should be considered as promising. The paper also includes a proposal for multiaxial fatigue models classification due to the approach for the non-proportionality of loading.

  18. On the limits of quasi-static analysis for a simple Coulomb frictional oscillator in response to harmonic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papangelo, A.; Ciavarella, M.

    2015-03-01

    Due to the nonlinearity of the Coulomb friction law, even the simplest models of interfaces in contact show a very rich dynamic solution. It is often desirable, especially if the frequency of loading is only a fraction of the first natural frequency of the system, to replace a full dynamic analysis with a quasi-static one, which obviously is much simpler to obtain. In this work, we study a simple Coulomb frictional oscillator with harmonic tangential load, but with constant normal load. It is found that the quasi-static solution (which has only 2 stops) captures approximately the displacement peak as long as the forcing frequency is low enough for the dynamic solution to have 2 or, even better, more than 2 stops. Instead, the velocity peak is not correctly estimated, since the velocity becomes highly irregular due to the stick-slip stops, whose number increases without limit for zero frequency. In this sense, the classical quasi-static solution, obtaining by cancelling inertia terms in the equilibrium equations, does not coincide with the limit of the full dynamic solution at low frequencies. The difference is not eliminated by adding a small amount of viscous damping, as only with critical damping, the dynamic solution is very close to the quasi-static one. Additional discrepancies arise above a limit frequency whose value depends on the ratio of the tangential load to the limit one for sliding, and correspond to when the dynamic solution turns from 2 to 0 stop per cycle.

  19. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Bbbbbb... - Applicability Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks 2 Table 2 to Subpart BBBBBB of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR...

  20. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  1. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  2. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  3. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  4. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  5. Experimentally reduced root–microbe interactions reveal limited plasticity in functional root traits in Acer and Quercus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Ho; Comas, Louise H.; Callahan, Hilary S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Interactions between roots and soil microbes are critical components of below-ground ecology. It is essential to quantify the magnitude of root trait variation both among and within species, including variation due to plasticity. In addition to contextualizing the magnitude of plasticity relative to differences between species, studies of plasticity can ascertain if plasticity is predictable and whether an environmental factor elicits changes in traits that are functionally advantageous. Methods To compare functional traits and trait plasticities in fine root tissues with natural and reduced levels of colonization by microbial symbionts, trimmed and surface-sterilized root segments of 2-year-old Acer rubrum and Quercus rubra seedlings were manipulated. Segments were then replanted into satellite pots filled with control or heat-treated soil, both originally derived from a natural forest. Mycorrhizal colonization was near zero in roots grown in heat-treated soil; roots grown in control soil matched the higher colonization levels observed in unmanipulated root samples collected from field locations. Key Results Between-treatment comparisons revealed negligible plasticity for root diameter, branching intensity and nitrogen concentration across both species. Roots from treated soils had decreased tissue density (approx. 10–20 %) and increased specific root length (approx. 10–30 %). In contrast, species differences were significant and greater than treatment effects in traits other than tissue density. Interspecific trait differences were also significant in field samples, which generally resembled greenhouse samples. Conclusions The combination of experimental and field approaches was useful for contextualizing trait plasticity in comparison with inter- and intra-specific trait variation. Findings that root traits are largely species dependent, with the exception of root tissue density, are discussed in the context of current literature on root

  6. Estimation of fatigue and extreme load distributions from limited data with application to wind energy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzwater, LeRoy M.

    2004-01-01

    An estimate of the distribution of fatigue ranges or extreme loads for wind turbines may be obtained by separating the problem into two uncoupled parts, (1) a turbine specific portion, independent of the site and (2) a site-specific description of environmental variables. We consider contextually appropriate probability models to describe the turbine specific response for extreme loads or fatigue. The site-specific portion is described by a joint probability distribution of a vector of environmental variables, which characterize the wind process at the hub-height of the wind turbine. Several approaches are considered for combining the two portions to obtain an estimate of the extreme load, e.g., 50-year loads or fatigue damage. We assess the efficacy of these models to obtain accurate estimates, including various levels of epistemic uncertainty, of the turbine response.

  7. Egg load dynamics and the risk of egg and time limitation experienced by an aphid parasitoid in the field

    PubMed Central

    Dieckhoff, Christine; Theobald, Julian C; Wäckers, Felix L; Heimpel, George E

    2014-01-01

    Insect parasitoids and herbivores must balance the risk of egg limitation and time limitation in order to maximize reproductive success. Egg and time limitation are mediated by oviposition and egg maturation rates as well as by starvation risk and other determinants of adult lifespan. Here, we assessed egg load and nutritional state in the soybean aphid parasitoid Binodoxys communis under field conditions to estimate its risk of becoming either egg- or time-limited. The majority of female B. communis showed no signs of egg limitation. Experimental field manipulations of B. communis females suggested that an average of 4–8 eggs were matured per hour over the course of a day. Regardless, egg loads remained constant over the course of the day at approximately 80 eggs, suggesting that egg maturation compensates for oviposition. This is the first case of such “egg load buffering” documented for a parasitoid in the field. Despite this buffering, egg loads dropped slightly with increasing host (aphid) density. This suggests that egg limitation could occur at very high host densities as experienced in outbreak years in some locations in the Midwestern USA. Biochemical analyses of sugar profiles showed that parasitoids fed upon sugar in the field at a remarkably high rate. Time limitation through starvation thus seems to be very low and aphid honeydew is most likely a source of dietary sugar for these parasitoids. This latter supposition is supported by the fact that body sugar levels increase with host (aphid) density. Together, these results suggest that fecundity of B. communis benefits from both dynamic egg maturation strategies and sugar-feeding. PMID:24963373

  8. Cellulose accessibility limits the effectiveness of minimum cellulase loading on the efficient hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Valdeir; Saddler, Jack N

    2011-01-01

    A range of lignocellulosic feedstocks (including agricultural, softwood and hardwood substrates) were pretreated with either sulfur dioxide-catalyzed steam or an ethanol organosolv procedure to try to establish a reliable assessment of the factors governing the minimum protein loading that could be used to achieve efficient hydrolysis. A statistical design approach was first used to define what might constitute the minimum protein loading (cellulases and β-glucosidase) that could be used to achieve efficient saccharification (defined as at least 70% glucan conversion) of the pretreated substrates after 72 hours of hydrolysis. The likely substrate factors that limit cellulose availability/accessibility were assessed, and then compared with the optimized minimum amounts of protein used to obtain effective hydrolysis. The optimized minimum protein loadings to achieve efficient hydrolysis of seven pretreated substrates ranged between 18 and 63 mg protein per gram of glucan. Within the similarly pretreated group of lignocellulosic feedstocks, the agricultural residues (corn stover and corn fiber) required significantly lower protein loadings to achieve efficient hydrolysis than did the pretreated woody biomass (poplar, douglas fir and lodgepole pine). Regardless of the substantial differences in the source, structure and chemical composition of the feedstocks, and the difference in the pretreatment technology used, the protein loading required to achieve efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulosic substrates was strongly dependent on the accessibility of the cellulosic component of each of the substrates. We found that cellulose-rich substrates with highly accessible cellulose, as assessed by the Simons' stain method, required a lower protein loading per gram of glucan to obtain efficient hydrolysis compared with substrates containing less accessible cellulose. These results suggest that the rate-limiting step during hydrolysis is not the catalytic cleavage of the

  9. Strain limit criteria to predict failure

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, H.E.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years extensive effort has been expended to qualify existing structures for conditions that are beyond the original design basis. Determination of the component failure load is useful for this type of evaluation. This paper presents criteria based upon strain limits to predict the load at failure. The failure modes addressed are excessive plastic deformations, localized plastic strains, and structural instability. The effects of analytical method sophistication, as built configurations, material properties degradation, and stress state are addressed by the criteria.

  10. Effect of Large Scale Transmission Limitations on Renewable Energy Load Matching for Western U.S.: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, V.; Short, W.; Gilchrist, B.

    2012-06-01

    Based on the available geographically dispersed data for the Western U.S. (excluding Alaska), we analyze to what extent the geographic diversity of these resources can offset their variability. Without energy storage and assuming unlimited energy flows between regions, wind and PV can meet up to 80% of loads in Western U.S. while less than 10% of the generated power is curtailed. Limiting hourly energy flows by the aggregated transmission line carrying capacities decreases the fraction of the load that can be met with wind and PV generation to approximately 70%.

  11. Experimentally reduced root–microbe interactions reveal limited plasticity in functional root traits in Acer and Quercus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract. Background and Aims Interactions between roots and soil microbes are critical components of below-ground ecology. It is essential to quantify the magnitude of root trait variation both among and within species, including variation due to plasticity. In addition to contextualizing the mag...

  12. 78 FR 79074 - Technical Report Evaluating Seat Belt Pretensioners and Load Limiters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you may visit http://www.regulations.gov . How can I be sure... seats of passenger cars and LTVs. The report's title is: Effectiveness of Pretensioners and Load... vehicles. By model year 2008, all new cars and LTVs sold in the United States were equipped...

  13. Inspiratory muscle training in chronic airflow limitation: comparison of two different training loads with a threshold device.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, C; Muñoz, V; Beroiza, T; Leiva, A; Cruz, E

    1994-07-01

    The usefulness of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in chronic airflow limitation (CAL) patients is a controversial issue, mainly due to differences in the training load. To further evaluate this aspect, we studied the effect of the magnitude of the load using a threshold pressure trainer. Ten CAL patients (5 males, 5 females) 67 +/- 2 yrs (mean +/- SEM) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 36 +/- 2% pred, were trained for 30 min a day using a load of 30% of their maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax) (Group 1). Another 10 CAL patients (5 males, 5 females), 73 +/- 2 yrs and FEV1 37 +/- 2% pred), were trained using only 12% of their PImax (Group 2). Training was assessed by PImax, inspiratory muscle power output (IMPO), sustainable inspiratory pressure (SIP), maximal inspiratory flow rate (VImax), pattern of breathing during loaded breathing, Mahler's dyspnoea score, and the 6 min walking distance (6MWD). After 5 weeks of training, Group 1 exhibited significant increments in: PImax (34 +/- 11%); IMPO (92 +/- 16%); SIP (36 +/- 9%); and VImax (34 +/- 13%). Dyspnoea was also reduced, and the 6MWD increased by 48 +/- 22 m. We observed no significant changes in Group 2. During loaded breathing, Group 1 showed a significant increment in tidal volume (VT) and mean inspiratory flow (VT/TI), and a reduction in inspiratory time (TI). In Group 2, VT and VT/TI also increased significantly, but the breathing frequency increased with a reduction of expiratory time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7925905

  14. [Effects of plastic mulch on soil moisture and temperature and limiting factors to yield increase for dryland spring maize in the North China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng-Yao; Zhang, Li-Feng; Li, Zhi-Hong; Jia, Jian-Ming; Fan, Feng-Cui; Shi, Yu-Fang

    2014-11-01

    Four treatments, including ridge tillage with plastic mulch (RP), ridge tillage without mulch (RB), flat tillage with plastic mulch (FP) and flat tillage without mulch (FB), were carried out to examine the tillage type and mulch on the effects of soil moisture and temperature, yield and water use efficiency (WUE) of dry land spring maize in the North China. Results showed that the average soil temperature was increased by 1-3 °C and the accumulated soil temperature was increased by 155.2-280.9 °C from sowing to tasseling by plastic mulch, and the growing duration was extended by 5.9-10.7 d. The water conservation effect of plastic mulch was significant from sowing to the seedling establishment, with WUE being increased by 81.6%-136.4% under mulch as compared with that without mulch. From the seedling to jointing stage, which coincided with the dry period in the region, soil water utilization by the maize under mulch could reach the depth of 80-100 cm, and its WUE was about 17.0%-21.6% lower than the maize without mulch, since the latter was affected by dry stress. With the coming of rainy season around the trumpeting stage, soil water in each treatment was replenished and maintained at relative high level up to harvest. Yield of maize was increased by 9.5% under RP as compared with RB. However, yield was reduced by 5.0% under FP, due to the plastic film under flat tillage prevented the infiltration of rainfall and waterlogging occurred. No significant difference in yield was found between RB and FB. Higher yield of spring maize was limited because of the mismatching in water supply and demand characterized by soil water shortage before the rainy season and abundant soil water storage after the rainy season. PMID:25898617

  15. Study of atmospheric pressure weakly ionized plasma as surface compatibilization technique for improved plastic composites loaded with cellulose based fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekobou, William Pimakouon

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have gained considerable interest from researchers recently for their unique prospective of engineering surfaces with plasma without the need of vacuum systems. They offer the advantage of low energy consumption, minimal capital cost and their simplicity as compared to conventional low pressure plasmas make them easy to upscale from laboratory to industry size. The present dissertation summarizes results of our attempt at applying atmospheric pressure weakly ionized plasma (APWIP) to the engineering of plastic composites filled with cellulose based substrates. An APWIP reactor was designed and built based on a multipoint-to-grounded ring and screen configurations. The carrier gas was argon and acetylene serves as the precursor molecule. The APWIP reactors showed capability of depositing plasma polymerized coating rich in carbon on substrates positioned within the electrode gap as well as downstream of the plasma discharge into the afterglow region. Our findings show that films grow by forming islands which for prolonged deposition time grow into thin films showing nodules, aggregates of nodules and microspheres. They also show chemical structure similar to films deposited from hydrocarbons with other conventional plasma techniques. The plasma polymerized deposits were used on substrates to modify their surface properties. Results show the surface of wood veneer and wood flour can be finely tuned from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. It was achieved by altering the topography of the surfaces along with their chemical composition. The wettability of wood veneer was investigated with contact angle measurements on capacitive drops and the capillary effect was utilized to assess surface properties of wood flour exposed to the discharges.

  16. Nogo Receptor 1 Limits Ocular Dominance Plasticity but not Turnover of Axonal Boutons in a Model of Amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Michael G; Kast, Ryan J; Dorton, Hilary M; Chapman, Katherine S; McGee, Aaron W

    2016-05-01

    The formation and stability of dendritic spines on excitatory cortical neurons are correlated with adult visual plasticity, yet how the formation, loss, and stability of postsynaptic spines register with that of presynaptic axonal varicosities is unknown. Monocular deprivation has been demonstrated to increase the rate of formation of dendritic spines in visual cortex. However, we find that monocular deprivation does not alter the dynamics of intracortical axonal boutons in visual cortex of either adult wild-type (WT) mice or adult NgR1 mutant (ngr1-/-) mice that retain critical period visual plasticity. Restoring normal vision for a week following long-term monocular deprivation (LTMD), a model of amblyopia, partially restores ocular dominance (OD) in WT andngr1-/- mice but does not alter the formation or stability of axonal boutons. Both WT andngr1-/- mice displayed a rapid return of normal OD within 8 days after LTMD as measured with optical imaging of intrinsic signals. In contrast, single-unit recordings revealed thatngr1-/- exhibited greater recovery of OD by 8 days post-LTMD. Our findings support a model of structural plasticity in which changes in synaptic connectivity are largely postsynaptic. In contrast, axonal boutons appear to be stable during changes in cortical circuit function. PMID:25662716

  17. Plastic failure of nonlocal beams.

    PubMed

    Challamel, Noël; Lanos, Christophe; Casandjian, Charles

    2008-08-01

    This paper questions the mode of collapse of some simple softening nonlocal structural systems comprising the classical cantilever beam. Nanobeams can be concerned by such an elementary model. The homogeneous cantilever beam loaded by a concentrated force at its extremity is first considered as a structural paradigm. A nonlocal plasticity model is developed in order to control the localization process induced by microcracking phenomena. An implicit gradient plasticity model equivalent to a nonlocal integral plasticity model is used in this paper. It is shown that the regularized problem is well posed. Closed-form solutions of the elastoplastic deflection are finally derived. The length of the plastic zone grows during the softening process until an asymptotic limited value, which depends on the characteristic length of the material. Scale effects are clearly obtained for these static bending tests. Other structural cases are also presented, including the simply supported beam under uniform transverse loading. It is concluded that the mode of collapse is firmly a nonlocal phenomenon. PMID:18850959

  18. Plasticized phenolphthalein polycarbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E. S.

    1976-01-01

    Phenolphthalein polycarbonate was successfully plasticized with polychlorinated biphenyls (e.g., Aroclor 1231) or tricresyl phosphate and cast from tetrahydrofuran to give clear films without loss of fire resistance. At loadings of 20 to 30 percent plasticizer the Tg was lowered to approximately 100 C which would render phenolphthalein polycarbonate easily moldable. Although these materials had some mechanical integrity as shown by their film forming ability, the room temperature toughness of the plasticized polymer was not significantly improved over unmodified polymer.

  19. Elastic-plastic models for multi-site damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Actis, Ricardo L.; Szabo, Barna A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments in advanced analysis methods for the computation of stress site damage. The method of solution is based on the p-version of the finite element method. Its implementation was designed to permit extraction of linear stress intensity factors using a superconvergent extraction method (known as the contour integral method) and evaluation of the J-integral following an elastic-plastic analysis. Coarse meshes are adequate for obtaining accurate results supported by p-convergence data. The elastic-plastic analysis is based on the deformation theory of plasticity and the von Mises yield criterion. The model problem consists of an aluminum plate with six equally spaced holes and a crack emanating from each hole. The cracks are of different sizes. The panel is subjected to a remote tensile load. Experimental results are available for the panel. The plasticity analysis provided the same limit load as the experimentally determined load. The results of elastic-plastic analysis were compared with the results of linear elastic analysis in an effort to evaluate how plastic zone sizes influence the crack growth rates. The onset of net-section yielding was determined also. The results show that crack growth rate is accelerated by the presence of adjacent damage, and the critical crack size is shorter when the effects of plasticity are taken into consideration. This work also addresses the effects of alternative stress-strain laws: The elastic-ideally-plastic material model is compared against the Ramberg-Osgood model.

  20. A strain measurement model using a limited number of sensors for steel beam structures subjected to uncertain loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Byung Kwan; Hwang, Jin Woo; Lee, Ji Hoon; Kim, Yousok; Park, Hyo Seon

    2015-11-01

    The maximum stress of a structural member has been extensively adopted as a safety assessment indicator in structural health monitoring. Due to construction errors in the field and changes in the loading conditions during or after construction, it is impractical to accurately predict the location and magnitude of the maximum strain of a member a priori. To avoid the dependency of strain sensing methods on information of the structural and loading conditions, this paper proposes a strain distribution measurement model for steel beam structures subjected to uncertain loadings with uncertainties in magnitudes and shapes. With strains measured from a limited number of sensors, a general form equation of the strain distribution is determined for the estimation of the strain distribution. The performance of the strain distribution measurement model is verified by comparing estimated strain values from the proposed method and measured strains directly from fiber Bragg grating sensors or electrical strain gauges during static loading tests on single- and multi-span beam structures.

  1. Experience with bulk tungsten test-limiters under high heat loads: melting and melt layer propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, G.; Bazylev, B.; Hirai, T.; Huber, A.; Kreter, A.; Mertens, Ph; Nedospasov, A.; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Rubel, M.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.; Sundelin, P.; Tokar, M.; Wessel, E.

    2007-03-01

    The paper provides an overview of processes and underlying physics governing tungsten melt erosion in the fusion plasma environment. Experiments with three different bulk tungsten test-limiters were performed in TEXTOR: (i) thermally insulated solid plate fixed on a graphite roof-like limiter heated up by the plasma to the melting point, (ii) macro-brush of the ITER-relevant castellated structure and (iii) lamellae structure developed for the JET divertor. The main objectives were to determine the metal surface damage, the formation of the melt layer and its motion in the magnetic field. PHEMOBRID-3D and MEMOS-1.5D numerical codes were used to simulate the experiment with the roof-like test-limiter. Both experiments and simulation showed that the melting of tungsten can lead to a large material redistribution due to thermo-electron emission currents without ejection of molten material to the plasma.

  2. Hydraulic mechanism to limit torsional loads between the IUS and space transportation system orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, James R.

    1986-01-01

    The Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) is a two-stage booster used by NASA and the Defense Department to insert payloads into geosynchronous orbit from low-Earth orbit. The hydraulic mechanism discussed here was designed to perform a specific dynamic and static interface function within the Space Transportation System's Orbiter. Requirements, configuration, and application of the hydraulic mechanism with emphasis on performance and methods of achieving zero external hydraulic leakage are discussed. The hydraulic load-leveler mechanism meets the established design requirements for operation in a low-Earth orbit. Considerable testing was conducted to demonstrate system performance and verification that external leakage had been reduced to zero. Following each flight use of an ASE, all hydraulic mechanism components are carefully inspected for leakage. The ASE, including the hydraulic mechanism, has performed without any anomalies during all IUS flights.

  3. Limited plasticity in the phenotypic variance-covariance matrix for male advertisement calls in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus.

    PubMed

    Pitchers, W R; Brooks, R; Jennions, M D; Tregenza, T; Dworkin, I; Hunt, J

    2013-05-01

    Phenotypic integration and plasticity are central to our understanding of how complex phenotypic traits evolve. Evolutionary change in complex quantitative traits can be predicted using the multivariate breeders' equation, but such predictions are only accurate if the matrices involved are stable over evolutionary time. Recent study, however, suggests that these matrices are temporally plastic, spatially variable and themselves evolvable. The data available on phenotypic variance-covariance matrix (P) stability are sparse, and largely focused on morphological traits. Here, we compared P for the structure of the complex sexual advertisement call of six divergent allopatric populations of the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. We measured a subset of calls from wild-caught crickets from each of the populations and then a second subset after rearing crickets under common-garden conditions for three generations. In a second experiment, crickets from each population were reared in the laboratory on high- and low-nutrient diets and their calls recorded. In both experiments, we estimated P for call traits and used multiple methods to compare them statistically (Flury hierarchy, geometric subspace comparisons and random skewers). Despite considerable variation in means and variances of individual call traits, the structure of P was largely conserved among populations, across generations and between our rearing diets. Our finding that P remains largely stable, among populations and between environmental conditions, suggests that selection has preserved the structure of call traits in order that they can function as an integrated unit. PMID:23530814

  4. Limited plasticity in the phenotypic variance-covariance matrix for male advertisement calls in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus

    PubMed Central

    Pitchers, W. R.; Brooks, R.; Jennions, M. D.; Tregenza, T.; Dworkin, I.; Hunt, J.

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic integration and plasticity are central to our understanding of how complex phenotypic traits evolve. Evolutionary change in complex quantitative traits can be predicted using the multivariate breeders’ equation, but such predictions are only accurate if the matrices involved are stable over evolutionary time. Recent work, however, suggests that these matrices are temporally plastic, spatially variable and themselves evolvable. The data available on phenotypic variance-covariance matrix (P) stability is sparse, and largely focused on morphological traits. Here we compared P for the structure of the complex sexual advertisement call of six divergent allopatric populations of the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. We measured a subset of calls from wild-caught crickets from each of the populations and then a second subset after rearing crickets under common-garden conditions for three generations. In a second experiment, crickets from each population were reared in the laboratory on high- and low-nutrient diets and their calls recorded. In both experiments, we estimated P for call traits and used multiple methods to compare them statistically (Flury hierarchy, geometric subspace comparisons and random skewers). Despite considerable variation in means and variances of individual call traits, the structure of P was largely conserved among populations, across generations and between our rearing diets. Our finding that P remains largely stable, among populations and between environmental conditions, suggests that selection has preserved the structure of call traits in order that they can function as an integrated unit. PMID:23530814

  5. Delayed plastic relaxation limit in SiGe islands grown by Ge diffusion from a local source

    SciTech Connect

    Vanacore, G. M.; Zani, M.; Tagliaferri, A.; Nicotra, G.; Bollani, M.; Bonera, E.; Montalenti, F.; Picco, A.; Boioli, F.; Capellini, G.; Isella, G.; Osmond, J.

    2015-03-14

    The hetero-epitaxial strain relaxation in nano-scale systems plays a fundamental role in shaping their properties. Here, the elastic and plastic relaxation of self-assembled SiGe islands grown by surface-thermal-diffusion from a local Ge solid source on Si(100) are studied by atomic force and transmission electron microscopies, enabling the simultaneous investigation of the strain relaxation in different dynamical regimes. Islands grown by this technique remain dislocation-free and preserve a structural coherence with the substrate for a base width as large as 350 nm. The results indicate that a delay of the plastic relaxation is promoted by an enhanced Si-Ge intermixing, induced by the surface-thermal-diffusion, which takes place already in the SiGe overlayer before the formation of a critical nucleus. The local entropy of mixing dominates, leading the system toward a thermodynamic equilibrium, where non-dislocated, shallow islands with a low residual stress are energetically stable. These findings elucidate the role of the interface dynamics in modulating the lattice distortion at the nano-scale, and highlight the potential use of our growth strategy to create composition and strain-controlled nano-structures for new-generation devices.

  6. Delayed plastic relaxation limit in SiGe islands grown by Ge diffusion from a local source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacore, G. M.; Nicotra, G.; Zani, M.; Bollani, M.; Bonera, E.; Montalenti, F.; Capellini, G.; Isella, G.; Osmond, J.; Picco, A.; Boioli, F.; Tagliaferri, A.

    2015-03-01

    The hetero-epitaxial strain relaxation in nano-scale systems plays a fundamental role in shaping their properties. Here, the elastic and plastic relaxation of self-assembled SiGe islands grown by surface-thermal-diffusion from a local Ge solid source on Si(100) are studied by atomic force and transmission electron microscopies, enabling the simultaneous investigation of the strain relaxation in different dynamical regimes. Islands grown by this technique remain dislocation-free and preserve a structural coherence with the substrate for a base width as large as 350 nm. The results indicate that a delay of the plastic relaxation is promoted by an enhanced Si-Ge intermixing, induced by the surface-thermal-diffusion, which takes place already in the SiGe overlayer before the formation of a critical nucleus. The local entropy of mixing dominates, leading the system toward a thermodynamic equilibrium, where non-dislocated, shallow islands with a low residual stress are energetically stable. These findings elucidate the role of the interface dynamics in modulating the lattice distortion at the nano-scale, and highlight the potential use of our growth strategy to create composition and strain-controlled nano-structures for new-generation devices.

  7. Economic-impact analysis of effluent-limitations guidelines and standards for the organic chemicals, plastics, and synthetic-fibers industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    This report identifies and analyzes economic impacts that are likely to result from water-pollution-control regulations on the organic chemicals, plastics, and synthetic fibers (OCPSF) industry. The regulations included EPA effluent limitations and standards. The report supplements technical studies supporting the issuance of the OCPSF regulations by estimating the broader economic effects that might result from the application of various control methods and technologies. The primary economic-impact variables assessed include the costs of the contemplated regulations, and the potential for these regulations to cause plant closure, unemployment, reductions in profitability, shifts in the balance of trade, and anticompetitive effects on small business and new facilities.

  8. Thermal load distribution near the tips of the ALT-II limiter roof on TEXTOR-94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, T.; Finken, K. H.; Mank, G.; Noda, N.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of these investigations is the description of the power flux on roof-like limiters near the LCFS. Here, the specific subject is the toroidal pump limiter ALT-II of TEXTOR-94. Similar to other plasma facing objects, the surface of ALT-II is shaped to enhance the plasma wetted area; this is achieved by reducing the angle of incidence of the magnetic field to less than 1° for the first 10 mm of the SOL. This small angle of incidence enhances all effects of toroidal non-uniformity as given, for example, by magnetic field ripple. Extensive modelling explains well the observed heating pattern on the limiter surface due to the ripple effect. In contrast to the expectations from density and temperature distributions in the SOL and at the edge of the confined region, an excessive power density is deposited on the first few millimetres near the tip of the limiter roof. Physical effects which could cause this phenomenon are discussed.

  9. Aggravated phosphorus limitation on biomass production under increasing nitrogen loading: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Niu, Shuli; Yu, Guirui

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), either individually or in combination, have been demonstrated to limit biomass production in terrestrial ecosystems. Field studies have been extensively synthesized to assess global patterns of N impacts on terrestrial ecosystem processes. However, to our knowledge, no synthesis has been done so far to reveal global patterns of P impacts on terrestrial ecosystems, especially under different nitrogen (N) levels. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of impacts of P addition, either alone or with N addition, on aboveground (AGB) and belowground biomass production (BGB), plant and soil P concentrations, and N : P ratio in terrestrial ecosystems. Overall, our meta-analysis quantitatively confirmed existing notions: (i) colimitation of N and P on biomass production and (ii) more P limitation in tropical forest than other ecosystems. More importantly, our analysis revealed new findings: (i) P limitation on biomass production was aggravated by N enrichment and (ii) plant P concentration was a better indicator of P limitation than soil P availability. Specifically, P addition increased AGB and BGB by 34% and 13%, respectively. The effect size of P addition on biomass production was larger in tropical forest than grassland, wetland, and tundra and varied with P fertilizer forms, P addition rates, or experimental durations. The P-induced increase in biomass production and plant P concentration was larger under elevated than ambient N. Our findings suggest that the global limitation of P on biomass production will become severer under increasing N fertilizer and deposition in the future. PMID:26463578

  10. Application of a model of plastic porous materials including void shape effects to the prediction of ductile failure under shear-dominated loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Léo; Leblond, Jean-Baptiste; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-09-01

    An extension of Gurson's famous model (Gurson, 1977) of porous plastic solids, incorporating void shape effects, has recently been proposed by Madou and Leblond (Madou and Leblond, 2012a, 2012b, 2013; Madou et al., 2013). In this extension the voids are no longer modelled as spherical but ellipsoidal with three different axes, and changes of the magnitude and orientation of these axes are accounted for. The aim of this paper is to show that the new model is able to predict softening due essentially to such changes, in the absence of significant void growth. This is done in two steps. First, a numerical implementation of the model is proposed and incorporated into the SYSTUS® and ABAQUS® finite element programmes (through some freely available UMAT (Leblond, 2015) in the second case). Second, the implementation in SYSTUS® is used to simulate previous "numerical experiments" of Tvergaard and coworkers (Tvergaard, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2015a; Dahl et al., 2012; Nielsen et al., 2012) involving the shear loading of elementary porous cells, where softening due to changes of the void shape and orientation was very apparent. It is found that with a simple, heuristic modelling of the phenomenon of mesoscopic strain localization, the model is indeed able to reproduce the results of these numerical experiments, in contrast to Gurson's model disregarding void shape effects.

  11. Small amplitude, free longitudinal vibrations of a load on a finitely deformed stress-softening spring with limiting extensibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, M. F.; Bhattacharyya, R.; Sarangi, S.

    2009-09-01

    A constitutive theory for a general class of incompressible, isotropic stress-softening, limited elastic rubberlike materials is introduced. The model is applied to study the small amplitude, free longitudinal vibrational frequency of a load about a suspended static equilibrium stretch of a finitely deformed, stress-softening spring with limiting extensibility. A number of physical results, including bounds on the frequency, are reported. It is proved, for example, that the normalized vibrational frequency for the ideally elastic neo-Hookean oscillator is a lower bound for the normalized frequency of every incompressible, isotropic stress-softening, limited elastic oscillator within the general class. All results are illustrated for the special limited elastic Gent and the purely elastic Demiray biomaterial models, both with stress-softening characterized by a Zúñiga-Beatty front factor damage function. The results for both stress-softening models are compared with experimental data for several gum rubbers and thoracic aortic tissue provided by others; and, overall, it is found that the stress-softening, limited elastic Gent model best characterizes the data.

  12. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  13. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  14. Flow Curve Determination at Large Plastic Strain Levels: Limitations of the Membrane Theory in the Analysis of the Hydraulic Bulge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, X.; Iancu, A.; Ferron, G.

    2011-05-01

    Nowadays, an accurate determination of the true stress-strain curve is a key-element for all finite element (FE) forming predictions. Since the introduction of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) for the automotive market, the standard uniaxial tension test suffers the drawback of relatively low uniform elongations. The extrapolation of the uniaxial stress-strain curve up to large strains is not without consequence in forming predictions—especially formability and springback. One of the means to solve this problem is to use experimental tests where large plastic strain levels can be reached. The hydraulic bulge test is one of these tests. The effective plastic strain levels reached in the bulge test are of about 0.7. From an experimental standpoint, the biaxial flow stress is estimated using measurement of fluid pressure, and calculation of thickness and curvature at the pole, via appropriate measurements and assumptions. The biaxial stress at the pole is determined using the membrane equilibrium equation. The analysis proposed in this paper consists of performing "virtual experiments" where the results obtained by means of FE calculations are used as input data for determining the biaxial stress-strain law in agreement with the experimental procedure. In this way, a critical discussion of the experimental procedure can be made, by comparing the "experimental" stress-strain curve (Membrane theory curve) with the "reference" one introduced in the simulations. In particular, the influences of the "(die diameter)/thickness" ratio and of the plastic anisotropy are studied, and limitations of the hydraulic bulge test analysis are discussed.

  15. Thickness effects on the plastic collapse of perforated plates with triangular penetration patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J.L.; Jones, D.P.; Holliday, J.E.

    2000-03-01

    This paper investigates the effects of plate thickness on the accuracy of limit load solutions obtained using an elastic-perfectly plastic [EPP] equivalent solid [EQS] procedure for flat perforated plates with a triangular array of penetrations. The EQS approach for limit loads is based on an EQS collapse surface that is valid for generalized plane strain. This assumption is applicable for very thick plates but is known to be less reasonable for very thin plates where plane stress may be a better assumption. The limits of applicability of the generalized plane strain assumption are investigated by obtaining limit load solutions for perforated plates of various thicknesses that are subjected to in-plane and bending loads. Plastic limit load solutions obtained using three-dimensional EPP finite element analysis [FEA] of models which include each penetration explicitly are compared with solutions obtained using the EQS approximation. The penetration pattern chosen for this study has a ligament efficiency (ligament width-to-pitch ratio, h/P) of 0.32. For plates thicker than the pitch, the limit load calculated using the EQS method for both in-plane and bending loads is shown to be very accurate (within 4%) of the limit load calculated for the explicit model. On the other hand, for thin plates (t/P< 2), the EQS limit load is 5% greater than the explicit limit load for bending and 8% greater than the explicit limit load for in-plane loads. For thinner plates, the collapse surface is tied to the local geometry deformation and, hence, an equivalent solid plate representation of plastic collapse is a function of deformation mode and thickness.

  16. Evidence for potentials and limitations of brain plasticity using an atlas of functional resectability of WHO grade II gliomas: towards a "minimal common brain".

    PubMed

    Ius, Tamara; Angelini, Elsa; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Duffau, Hugues

    2011-06-01

    Despite recent advances in non-invasive brain mapping imaging, the resectability of a given area in a patient harboring a WHO grade II glioma cannot be predicted preoperatively with high reliability, due to mechanisms of functional reorganization. Therefore, intraoperative mapping by direct electrical stimulation remains the gold standard for detection and preservation of eloquent areas during glioma surgery, because it enables to perform on-line anatomo-functional correlations. To study potentials and limitations of brain plasticity, we gathered 58 postoperative MRI of patients operated on for a WHO grade II glioma under direct electrical cortico-subcortical stimulation. Postoperative images were registered on the MNI template to construct an atlas of functional resectability for which each voxel represents the probability to observe residual non-resectable tumor, that is, non-compensable area. The resulting atlas offers a rigorous framework to identify areas with high plastic potential (i.e. with probabilities of residual tumor close to 0), with low compensatory capabilities (i.e. probabilities of residual tumor close to 1) and with intermediate level of resectability (probability around 0.5). The resulting atlas highlights the utmost importance of preserving a core of connectivity through the main associative pathways, namely, it supports the existence of a "minimal common brain" among patients. PMID:21414413

  17. Cross-Modal Plasticity in Higher-Order Auditory Cortex of Congenitally Deaf Cats Does Not Limit Auditory Responsiveness to Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Baumhoff, Peter; Tillein, Jochen; Lomber, Stephen G.; Hubka, Peter; Kral, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Congenital sensory deprivation can lead to reorganization of the deprived cortical regions by another sensory system. Such cross-modal reorganization may either compete with or complement the “original“ inputs to the deprived area after sensory restoration and can thus be either adverse or beneficial for sensory restoration. In congenital deafness, a previous inactivation study documented that supranormal visual behavior was mediated by higher-order auditory fields in congenitally deaf cats (CDCs). However, both the auditory responsiveness of “deaf” higher-order fields and interactions between the reorganized and the original sensory input remain unknown. Here, we studied a higher-order auditory field responsible for the supranormal visual function in CDCs, the auditory dorsal zone (DZ). Hearing cats and visual cortical areas served as a control. Using mapping with microelectrode arrays, we demonstrate spatially scattered visual (cross-modal) responsiveness in the DZ, but show that this did not interfere substantially with robust auditory responsiveness elicited through cochlear implants. Visually responsive and auditory-responsive neurons in the deaf auditory cortex formed two distinct populations that did not show bimodal interactions. Therefore, cross-modal plasticity in the deaf higher-order auditory cortex had limited effects on auditory inputs. The moderate number of scattered cross-modally responsive neurons could be the consequence of exuberant connections formed during development that were not pruned postnatally in deaf cats. Although juvenile brain circuits are modified extensively by experience, the main driving input to the cross-modally (visually) reorganized higher-order auditory cortex remained auditory in congenital deafness. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In a common view, the “unused” auditory cortex of deaf individuals is reorganized to a compensatory sensory function during development. According to this view, cross-modal plasticity takes

  18. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  19. SAMBA HIV semiquantitative test, a new point-of-care viral-load-monitoring assay for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Allyson V; Ushiro-Lumb, Ines; Edemaga, Daniel; Joshi, Hrishikesh A; De Ruiter, Annemiek; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Jendrulek, Isabelle; McGuire, Megan; Goel, Neha; Sharma, Pia I; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Lee, Helen H

    2014-09-01

    Routine viral-load (VL) testing of HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is used to monitor treatment efficacy. However, due to logistical challenges, implementation of VL has been difficult in resource-limited settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the SAMBA semi-Q (simple amplification-based assay semiquantitative test for HIV-1) in London, Malawi, and Uganda. The SAMBA semi-Q can distinguish between patients with VLs above and below 1,000 copies/ml. The SAMBA semi-Q was validated with diluted clinical samples and blinded plasma samples collected from HIV-1-positive individuals. SAMBA semi-Q results were compared with results from the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, v2.0. Testing of 96 2- to 10-fold dilutions of four samples containing HIV-1 subtype C as well as 488 samples from patients in the United Kingdom, Malawi, and Uganda yielded an overall accuracy for the SAMBA semi-Q of 99% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93.8 to 99.9%) and 96.9% (95% CI 94.9 to 98.3%), respectively, compared to to the Roche test. Analysis of VL data from patients in Malawi and Uganda showed that the SAMBA cutoff of 1,000 copies/ml appropriately distinguished treated from untreated individuals. Furthermore, analysis of the viral loads of 232 patients on ART in Malawi and Uganda revealed similar patterns for virological control, defined as either <1,000 copies/ml (SAMBA cutoff) or <5,000 copies/ml (WHO 2010 criterion; WHO, Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection in Adults and Adolescents: Recommendations for a Public Health Approach, 2010). This study suggests that the SAMBA semi-Q has adequate concurrency with the gold standard measurements for viral load. This test can allow VL monitoring of patients on ART at the point of care in resource-limited settings. PMID:25031444

  20. Plastic flow in shock-loaded silver at strain rates from 104 s-1 to 107 s-1 and temperatures from 296 K to 1233 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaretsky, E. B.; Kanel, G. I.

    2011-10-01

    The evolution of elastic-plastic shock waves in 99.9% purity silver samples of 0.127 to 2.0 mm thickness has been studied in a series of VISAR-instrumented planar impact experiments with initial sample temperature varied from 296 to 1233 K. The decay of elastic precursor wave at 933, 1173, and 1233 K temperatures is approximately inversely proportional to the square root of the propagation distance. The latter corresponds to the cubic dependence of initial plastic strain rate, ranged from 104 s-1 to 106 s-1, on the shear stress. At fixed strain rates, the flow stress grows linearly with the temperature but the dependence becomes stronger near the silver melting point, 1234 K. An analysis of the rise times of the plastic shock waves shows that for the same level of shear stress the plastic strain rate at the shock front is significantly higher than that at the top of the elastic precursor wave.

  1. Limitation of sludge biotic index application for control of a wastewater treatment plant working with shock organic and ammonium loadings.

    PubMed

    Drzewicki, Adam; Kulikowska, Dorota

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between activated sludge microfauna, the sludge biotic index (SBI) and the effluent quality of a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) working with shock organic and ammonium loadings caused by periodic wastewater delivery from septic tanks. Irrespective of high/low effluent quality in terms of COD, BOD5, ammonium and suspended solids, high SBI values (8-10), which correspond to the first quality class of sludge, were observed. High SBI values were connected with abundant taxonomic composition and the domination of crawling ciliates with shelled amoebae and attached ciliates. High SBI values, even at a low effluent quality, limit the usefulness of the index for monitoring the status of an activated sludge system and the effluent quality in municipal WWTP-treated wastewater from septic tanks. It was shown that a more sensitive indicator of effluent quality was a change in the abundance of attached ciliates with a narrow peristome (Vorticella infusionum and Opercularia coarctata), small flagellates and crawling ciliates (Acineria uncinata) feeding on flagellates. PMID:21802913

  2. How the Impacts of N Loading on Resource Limitation, Functional Composition of Plankton, and Net Primary Production Influence Nitrate Uptake and Trophic Transfer in Lake Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, F.; Mellard, J.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) loading in aquatic ecosystems can have a multitude of effects. Increased N availability often elevates primary production, but typically also alters community composition and trophic structure. How all the myriad impacts of N loading conspire to produce whole ecosystem responses to perturbation is not well understood. To characterize how whole ecosystems response to perturbation along a gradient of N loading, we added nitrate (and phosphate) to large in situ aquatic mesocosms at different rates over the course of three months and quantified biomass distributions across multiple size classes, plankton community composition (including functional traits), and N flow among size classes in both the epilimnion and the hypolimnion prior and subsequent to a one week shading perturbation. Increased N loading resulted in greater rates of light attenuation with depth, which in turn selected for species with higher tolerance to light limitation and low inorganic C availability, but also resulted in increased rates of primary production and top-down grazing pressure. Different degrees of N loading resulted in different rates of nitrate uptake and trophic transfer, as calculated from 15N pulse-chase additions, both prior and subsequent to the shading pertubation, with the loading effect diminished after the perturbation. N loading was positively associated with the rate of N transfer between the epilimnion, where the N was added, and the hypolimnion. A complex picture of whole ecosystem response to perturbation along a gradient of N loading emerges. N loading appears to simplify resource competition among phytoplankton by alleviating N limitation to an extent, and at the same time supports elevated production across trophic levels. Nitrate uptake rate is contingent on standing stock phytoplankton biomass and resource limitation status. Rates of nitrate removal from the water column depend on how N loading alters the abiotic environment (primarily light availability

  3. Modelling the impact of temperature-induced life history plasticity and mate limitation on the epidemic potential of a marine ectoparasite.

    PubMed

    Groner, Maya L; Gettinby, George; Stormoen, Marit; Revie, Crawford W; Cox, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Temperature is hypothesized to contribute to increased pathogenicity and virulence of many marine diseases. The sea louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) is an ectoparasite of salmonids that exhibits strong life-history plasticity in response to temperature; however, the effect of temperature on the epidemiology of this parasite has not been rigorously examined. We used matrix population modelling to examine the influence of temperature on demographic parameters of sea lice parasitizing farmed salmon. Demographically-stochastic population projection matrices were created using parameters from the existing literature on vital rates of sea lice at different fixed temperatures and yearly temperature profiles. In addition, we quantified the effectiveness of a single stage-specific control applied at different times during a year with seasonal temperature changes. We found that the epidemic potential of sea lice increased with temperature due to a decrease in generation time and an increase in the net reproductive rate. In addition, mate limitation constrained population growth more at low temperatures than at high temperatures. Our model predicts that control measures targeting preadults and chalimus are most effective regardless of the temperature. The predictions from this model suggest that temperature can dramatically change vital rates of sea lice and can increase population growth. The results of this study suggest that sea surface temperatures should be considered when choosing salmon farm sites and designing management plans to control sea louse infestations. More broadly, this study demonstrates the utility of matrix population modelling for epidemiological studies. PMID:24505493

  4. Modelling the Impact of Temperature-Induced Life History Plasticity and Mate Limitation on the Epidemic Potential of a Marine Ectoparasite

    PubMed Central

    Groner, Maya L.; Gettinby, George; Stormoen, Marit; Revie, Crawford W.; Cox, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Temperature is hypothesized to contribute to increased pathogenicity and virulence of many marine diseases. The sea louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) is an ectoparasite of salmonids that exhibits strong life-history plasticity in response to temperature; however, the effect of temperature on the epidemiology of this parasite has not been rigorously examined. We used matrix population modelling to examine the influence of temperature on demographic parameters of sea lice parasitizing farmed salmon. Demographically-stochastic population projection matrices were created using parameters from the existing literature on vital rates of sea lice at different fixed temperatures and yearly temperature profiles. In addition, we quantified the effectiveness of a single stage-specific control applied at different times during a year with seasonal temperature changes. We found that the epidemic potential of sea lice increased with temperature due to a decrease in generation time and an increase in the net reproductive rate. In addition, mate limitation constrained population growth more at low temperatures than at high temperatures. Our model predicts that control measures targeting preadults and chalimus are most effective regardless of the temperature. The predictions from this model suggest that temperature can dramatically change vital rates of sea lice and can increase population growth. The results of this study suggest that sea surface temperatures should be considered when choosing salmon farm sites and designing management plans to control sea louse infestations. More broadly, this study demonstrates the utility of matrix population modelling for epidemiological studies. PMID:24505493

  5. Plastic Jellyfish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Presents an environmental science activity designed to enhance students' awareness of the hazards of plastic waste for wildlife in aquatic environments. Discusses how students can take steps to reduce the effects of plastic waste. (WRM)

  6. Geometry changes in the elastic-plastic analysis of steel spatial skeletal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondok, Hosain Mohamed H.

    The principal objective is to furnish a tool for aunified formulation and numerical analysis of all the history-independent classes of response of elastic perfectly plastic space skeletal structures. We aim at determination of load domains corresponding to elastic, shakedown and collapse behavior for structures in initial and deformed configurations. Numerical program SDLAS for post-yield and inadaptation (non-shakedown) analysis of elastic-plastic space skeletal structures was prepared. It accounts for biaxial bending, torsion and axial forces contributing to yielding of beam elements. The program permits to determine a safe domain for either proportional or variable repeated loads. The proposed method accounts for nonlinear geometrical effects. In the post-yield analysis the conditions for plastic now are considered at subsequent deformed configurations. For the inadaptation analysis the similar procedure is applied. Automatic generation of all possible plastic deformation modes allows to select the most dangerous mechanisms and to determine a critical plastic deformation path. Finally, the post-yield or inadaptation curve is obtained showing the dependence of load (load domain) multiplier on the plastic deformation. These problems are formulated as a sequence of linear programming tasks and are solved by a step by step procedure. The proposed method allows to determine the limit multiplier and the shakedown (adaptation) multiplier accounting for geometric effects.

  7. Can HIV reverse transcriptase activity assay be a low-cost alternative for viral load monitoring in resource-limited settings?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Soham; Palchaudhuri, Riya; Neogi, Ujjwal; Srinivasa, Hiresave; Ashorn, Per; De Costa, Ayesha; Källander, Clas; Shet, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance and cost of an HIV reverse transcriptase-enzyme activity (HIV-RT) assay in comparison to an HIV-1 RNA assay for routine viral load monitoring in resource limited settings. Design A cohort-based longitudinal study. Setting Two antiretroviral therapy (ART) centres in Karnataka state, South India, providing treatment under the Indian AIDS control programme. Participants A cohort of 327 HIV-1-infected Indian adult patients initiating first-line ART. Outcome measures Performance and cost of an HIV-RT assay (ExaVir Load V3) in comparison to a gold standard HIV-1 RNA assay (Abbott m2000rt) in a cohort of 327 Indian patients before (WK00) and 4 weeks (WK04) after initiation of first-line therapy. Results Plasma viral load was determined by an HIV-1 RNA assay and an HIV-RT assay in 629 samples (302 paired samples and 25 single time point samples at WK00) obtained from 327 patients. Overall, a strong correlation of r=0.96 was observed, with good correlation at WK00 (r=0.84) and at WK04 (r=0.77). Bland-Altman analysis of all samples showed a good level of agreement with a mean difference (bias) of 0.22 log10copies/mL. The performance of ExaVir Load V3 was not negatively affected by a nevirapine/efavirenz based antiretroviral regimen. The per test cost of measuring plasma viral load by the Abbott m2000rt and ExaVir Load V3 assays in a basic lab setting was $36.4 and $16.8, respectively. Conclusions The strong correlation between the HIV-RT and HIV-1 RNA assays suggests that the HIV-RT assay can be an affordable alternative option for monitoring patients on antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings. Trial registration number ISRCTN79261738. PMID:26817634

  8. Research regarding to behavior on advanced plastic from rolling mills equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardelean, M.; Ardelean, E.; Popa, E.; Josan, A.; Socalici, A.

    2016-02-01

    New advanced plastic can be used in construction of different equipment's from some industries; due to mechanical properties closer to nonferrous materials. In steel industries uses of this materials are limited because working temperature is too low, related to nonferrous or ferrous material. In this paper is presented some researches related to replacement of bronze material with advanced plastic in construction of antifriction bearings. For replaces of this material with engineering plastic product, it was calculated analytical and using simulation, forces in node of braking mechanism. Using these loads, it was make simulation regarding behavior of static loads with finite element software. Based on these researches, this bearing can be made from engineering plastic product, in same qualitative and technical condition, and this is a way to reduce maintenance and exploitation cost.

  9. 76 FR 10213 - Special Conditions: Embraer Model EMB-135BJ (Legacy 650) Airplanes, Limit Engine Torque Loads for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... stoppage, due to malfunction or structural failure (such as compressor jamming), has been a specific...-common seizure events resulting from structural failures. For those less-common but severe seizure events, these criteria could allow some deformation in the engine- supporting structure (ultimate load...

  10. THE DEVELOPMENT OF EMPIRICAL LOAD-ECOLOGICAL RESPONSE MODELS TO DETERMINE NITROGEN LIMITS IN THE COASTAL ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Atlantic Ecology Division (AED) has initiated a multi-year research program to develop empirical nitrogen load-response models. Our research on embayments in southern New England is part of a multi-regional effort to develop cause-effect models for the Gulf of Mexic...

  11. Development of a Practical Methodology for Elastic-Plastic and Fully Plastic Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClung, R. C.; Chell, G. G.; Lee, Y.-D.; Russell, D. A.; Orient, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    A practical engineering methodology has been developed to analyze and predict fatigue crack growth rates under elastic-plastic and fully plastic conditions. The methodology employs the closure-corrected effective range of the J-integral, (Delta)J(sub eff), as the governing parameter. The methodology contains original and literature J and (Delta)J solutions for specific geometries, along with general methods for estimating J for other geometries and other loading conditions, including combined mechanical loading and combined primary and secondary loading. The methodology also contains specific practical algorithms that translate a J solution into a prediction of fatigue crack growth rate or life, including methods for determining crack opening levels, crack instability conditions, and material properties. A critical core subset of the J solutions and the practical algorithms has been implemented into independent elastic-plastic NASGRO modules. All components of the entire methodology, including the NASGRO modules, have been verified through analysis and experiment, and limits of applicability have been identified.

  12. Development of a Practical Methodology for Elastic-Plastic and Fully Plastic Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClung, R. C.; Chell, G. G.; Lee, Y. -D.; Russell, D. A.; Orient, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    A practical engineering methodology has been developed to analyze and predict fatigue crack growth rates under elastic-plastic and fully plastic conditions. The methodology employs the closure-corrected effective range of the J-integral, delta J(sub eff) as the governing parameter. The methodology contains original and literature J and delta J solutions for specific geometries, along with general methods for estimating J for other geometries and other loading conditions, including combined mechanical loading and combined primary and secondary loading. The methodology also contains specific practical algorithms that translate a J solution into a prediction of fatigue crack growth rate or life, including methods for determining crack opening levels, crack instability conditions, and material properties. A critical core subset of the J solutions and the practical algorithms has been implemented into independent elastic-plastic NASGRO modules. All components of the entire methodology, including the NASGRO modules, have been verified through analysis and experiment, and limits of applicability have been identified.

  13. Application Of A New Semi-Empirical Model For Forming Limit Prediction Of Sheet Material Including Superposed Loads Of Bending And Shearing

    SciTech Connect

    Held, Christian; Liewald, Mathias; Schleich, Ralf; Sindel, Manfred

    2010-06-15

    The use of lightweight materials offers substantial strength and weight advantages in car body design. Unfortunately such kinds of sheet material are more susceptible to wrinkling, spring back and fracture during press shop operations. For characterization of capability of sheet material dedicated to deep drawing processes in the automotive industry, mainly Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) are used. However, new investigations at the Institute for Metal Forming Technology have shown that High Strength Steel Sheet Material and Aluminum Alloys show increased formability in case of bending loads are superposed to stretching loads. Likewise, by superposing shearing on in plane uniaxial or biaxial tension formability changes because of materials crystallographic texture. Such mixed stress and strain conditions including bending and shearing effects can occur in deep-drawing processes of complex car body parts as well as subsequent forming operations like flanging. But changes in formability cannot be described by using the conventional FLC. Hence, for purpose of improvement of failure prediction in numerical simulation codes significant failure criteria for these strain conditions are missing. Considering such aspects in defining suitable failure criteria which is easy to implement into FEA a new semi-empirical model has been developed considering the effect of bending and shearing in sheet metals formability. This failure criterion consists of the combination of the so called cFLC (combined Forming Limit Curve), which considers superposed bending load conditions and the SFLC (Shear Forming Limit Curve), which again includes the effect of shearing on sheet metal's formability.

  14. Application Of A New Semi-Empirical Model For Forming Limit Prediction Of Sheet Material Including Superposed Loads Of Bending And Shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Christian; Liewald, Mathias; Schleich, Ralf; Sindel, Manfred

    2010-06-01

    The use of lightweight materials offers substantial strength and weight advantages in car body design. Unfortunately such kinds of sheet material are more susceptible to wrinkling, spring back and fracture during press shop operations. For characterization of capability of sheet material dedicated to deep drawing processes in the automotive industry, mainly Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) are used. However, new investigations at the Institute for Metal Forming Technology have shown that High Strength Steel Sheet Material and Aluminum Alloys show increased formability in case of bending loads are superposed to stretching loads. Likewise, by superposing shearing on in plane uniaxial or biaxial tension formability changes because of materials crystallographic texture. Such mixed stress and strain conditions including bending and shearing effects can occur in deep-drawing processes of complex car body parts as well as subsequent forming operations like flanging. But changes in formability cannot be described by using the conventional FLC. Hence, for purpose of improvement of failure prediction in numerical simulation codes significant failure criteria for these strain conditions are missing. Considering such aspects in defining suitable failure criteria which is easy to implement into FEA a new semi-empirical model has been developed considering the effect of bending and shearing in sheet metals formability. This failure criterion consists of the combination of the so called cFLC (combined Forming Limit Curve), which considers superposed bending load conditions and the SFLC (Shear Forming Limit Curve), which again includes the effect of shearing on sheet metal's formability.

  15. Limits on the prediction of helicopter rotor noise using thickness and loading sources: Validation of helicopter noise prediction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succi, G. P.

    1983-01-01

    The techniques of helicopter rotor noise prediction attempt to describe precisely the details of the noise field and remove the empiricisms and restrictions inherent in previous methods. These techniques require detailed inputs of the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and blade surface pressure distribution. The Farassat noise prediction techniques was studied, and high speed helicopter noise prediction using more detailed representations of the thickness and loading noise sources was investigated. These predictions were based on the measured blade surface pressures on an AH-1G rotor and compared to the measured sound field. Although refinements in the representation of the thickness and loading noise sources improve the calculation, there are still discrepancies between the measured and predicted sound field. Analysis of the blade surface pressure data indicates shocks on the blades, which are probably responsible for these discrepancies.

  16. Elasto-plastic contact between rollers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Kunliang; Li, Penghui

    1991-12-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional contact stress between roller and rolling road for a strain- hardening material in an elasto-plastic state is limited, to say the least. Mathematical analyses of stress for this problem meet with extreme difficulties. Therefore, experimental approaches are desirable. The experimental elasto-plastic stress analysis method proposed by A. R. Hunter is extended in this investigation. The model material is epoxy resin, which exhibits a frozen nonlinear effective stress-strain behavior similar to that of bearing steel when subjected to a thermal cycle whose maximum temperature is significantly less than the critical temperature of the material. This effective stress-strain curve and an effective birefringence- stress curve were obtained by subjecting uniaxial tensile specimens to constant stress and the appropriate thermal cycle. Then the model was subjected to the same thermal cycle and a uniform distributed load that would develop a plastic zone. The stress distributions on the contact surface and the plastic-zone expansion law were obtained from photomechanical analysis of the slices removed from the model. Several important conclusions were summed up that would greatly improve the roller bearing design.

  17. Plastics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Tommy G.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high schools industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in plastics technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to production technology; history and development of plastics; safety; youth leadership,…

  18. Use of recycled plastics in wood plastic composites - a review.

    PubMed

    Kazemi Najafi, Saeed

    2013-09-01

    The use of recycled and waste thermoplastics has been recently considered for producing wood plastic composites (WPCs). They have great potential for WPCs manufacturing according to results of some limited researches. This paper presents a detailed review about some essential properties of waste and recycled plastics, important for WPCs production, and of research published on the effect of recycled plastics on the physical and mechanical properties of WPCs. PMID:23777666

  19. Development of lithium and tungsten limiters for test on T-10 tokamak at high heat load condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyublinski, I. E.; Vertkov, A. V.; Zharkov, M. Yu; Vershkov, V. A.; Mirnov, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    Application of a complex of powerful (up to 3 MW) ECR plasma heating in T-10 tokamak is pulled down with a problem of the strong plasma pollution at power input more than 2 MW. For the solution of these problems the new W and Li limiters is developed and prepared to implementation. As it is supposed, application of W as a plasma facing material will allow excluding carbon influx into vacuum chamber. An additional Li limiter arranged in a shadow of W one will be used as a Li source for plasma periphery cooling due to a reradiation on Li that will lead to decrease in power deposition on W limiters. Parameters and design of limiters are presented. Plasma facing surface of a limiter is made of capillary-porous system (CPS) with Li. Porous matrix of CPS (W felt) provides stability of liquid Li surface under MHD force effect and an opportunity of its constant renewal due to capillary forces. The necessary Li flux from a Li limiter surface is estimated for maintenance of normal operation mode of W limiters at ECRH power of 3 MW during 400 ms. It is shown, that upgrade of limiters in tokamak T-10 will allow providing of ECR plasma heating with power up to 3 MW at reasonable Li flux.

  20. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  1. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  2. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  3. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  4. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  5. Measurement of Low Energy Detection Efficiency of a Plastic Scintillator: Implications on the Lower Energy Limit and Sensitivity of a Hard X-Ray Focal Plane Compton Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, T.; Vadawale, S. V.; Shanmugam, M.; Goyal, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    The polarization measurements in X-rays offer a unique opportunity for the study of physical processes under the extreme conditions prevalent at compact X-ray sources, including gravitation, magnetic field, and temperature. Unfortunately, there has been no real progress in observational X-ray polarimetry thus far. Although photoelectron tracking-based X-ray polarimeters provide realistic prospects of polarimetric observations, they are effective in the soft X-rays only. With the advent of hard X-ray optics, it has become possible to design sensitive X-ray polarimeters in hard X-rays based on Compton scattering. An important point that should be carefully considered for the Compton polarimeters is the lower energy threshold of the active scatterer, which typically consists of a plastic scintillator due to its lowest effective atomic number. Therefore, an accurate understanding of the plastic scintillators energy threshold is essential to make a realistic estimate of the energy range and sensitivity of any Compton polarimeter. In this context, we set up an experiment to investigate the plastic scintillators behavior for very low energy deposition events. The experiment involves the detection of Compton scattered photons from a long, thin, plastic scintillator (a similar configuration as the eventual Compton polarimeter) by a high resolution CdTe detector at different scattering angles. We find that it is possible to detect energy deposition well below 1 keV, though with decreasing efficiency. We present detailed semianalytical modeling of our experimental setup and discuss the results in the context of the energy range and sensitivity of the Compton polarimeter involving plastic scintillators.

  6. 40 CFR 130.7 - Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Continuing Planning Process (CPP). (b) Identification and priority setting for water quality-limited segments... TMDLs shall be subject to public review as defined in the State CPP. (2) Each State shall estimate...

  7. Load-bearing capacity and biological allowable limit of biodegradable metal based on degradation rate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Youn; Chae, Soo-Won; Choi, Kui Won; Seok, Hyun Kwang; Han, Hyung Seop; Yang, Seok Jo; Kim, Young Yul; Kim, Jong Tac; Jung, Jae Young; Assad, Michel

    2012-08-01

    In this study, a newly developed Mg-Ca-Zn alloy for low degradation rate and surface erosion properties was evaluated. The compressive, tensile, and fatigue strength were measured before implantation. The degradation behavior was evaluated by analyzing the microstructure and local hardness of the explanted specimen. Mean and maximum degradation rates were measured using micro CT equipment from 4-, 8-, and 16- week explants, and the alloy was shown to display surface erosion properties. Based on these characteristics, the average and minimum load bearing capacities in tension, compression, and bending modes were calculated. According to the degradation rate and references of recommended dietary intakes (RDI), the Mg-Ca-Zn alloy appears to be safe for human use. PMID:22689439

  8. Identification of unknown spatial load distributions in a vibrating Euler–Bernoulli beam from limited measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanov, Alemdar; Kawano, Alexandre

    2016-05-01

    Two types of inverse source problems of identifying asynchronously distributed spatial loads governed by the Euler–Bernoulli beam equation ρ (x){w}{tt}+μ (x){w}t+{({EI}(x){w}{xx})}{xx}-{T}r{u}{xx}={\\sum }m=1M{g}m(t){f}m(x), (x,t)\\in {{{Ω }}}T := (0,l)× (0,T), with hinged–clamped ends (w(0,t)={w}{xx}(0,t)=0,w(l,t) = {w}x(l,t)=0,t\\in (0,T)), are studied. Here {g}m(t) are linearly independent functions, describing an asynchronous temporal loading, and {f}m(x) are the spatial load distributions. In the first identification problem the values {ν }k(t),k=\\bar{1,K}, of the deflection w(x,t), are assumed to be known, as measured output data, in a neighbourhood of the finite set of points P:= \\{{x}k\\in (0,l),k=\\bar{1,K}\\}\\subset (0,l), corresponding to the internal points of a continuous beam, for all t\\in ]0,T[. In the second identification problem the values {θ }k(t),k=\\bar{1,K}, of the slope {w}x(x,t), are assumed to be known, as measured output data in a neighbourhood of the same set of points P for all t\\in ]0,T[. These inverse source problems will be defined subsequently as the problems ISP1 and ISP2. The general purpose of this study is to develop mathematical concepts and tools that are capable of providing effective numerical algorithms for the numerical solution of the considered class of inverse problems. Note that both measured output data {ν }k(t) and {θ }k(t) contain random noise. In the first part of the study we prove that each measured output data {ν }k(t) and {θ }k(t),k=\\bar{1,K} can uniquely determine the unknown functions {f}m\\in {H}-1(]0,l[),m=\\bar{1,M}. In the second part of the study we will introduce the input–output operators {{ K }}d :{L}2(0,T)\\mapsto {L}2(0,T),({{ K }}df)(t):= w(x,t;f),x\\in P, f(x) := ({f}1(x),\\ldots ,{f}M(x)), and {{ K }}s :{L}2(0,T)\\mapsto {L}2(0,T), ({{ K }}sf)(t):= {w}x(x,t;f), x\\in P , corresponding to the problems ISP1 and ISP2, and then reformulate these problems as the operator equations

  9. Secondary Engineering Design Graphics Educator Service Load of Students with Identified Categorical Disabilities and Limited English Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Li, Songze; Williams, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    The ever-changing student population of engineering design graphics students necessitates broader sets of instructor adeptness. Specifically, preparedness to educate and provide adequate educational access to content for students with identified categorical disabilities and Limited English Proficiency (LEP) is now an essential readiness skill for…

  10. The influence of N load and harvest intensity on the risk of P limitation in Swedish forest soils.

    PubMed

    Akselsson, Cecilia; Westling, Olle; Alveteg, Mattias; Thelin, Gunnar; Fransson, Ann-Mari; Hellsten, Sofie

    2008-10-15

    Nitrogen (N) is often considered to be the major factor limiting tree growth in northern forest ecosystems. An increased N availability, however, increases the demand for other nutrients such as base cations and phosphorous (P) which in turn may change which nutrient is the limiting factor. If P or base cations become limiting, N will start to leach which means a risk of increased eutrophication of surface waters. As many studies focus on base cations, this study instead aims at estimating P budgets on a regional scale for different harvesting scenarios relevant for Swedish conditions. P budget calculations were carried out for 14,550 coniferous sites from the Swedish National Forest Inventory, as weathering+deposition-harvesting-leaching. Three scenarios with different harvest intensities were used: 1) no harvesting, 2) stem harvesting and 3) whole-tree harvesting. The input data were derived from measurements and model results. The P budget estimates indicate that harvesting, especially whole-tree harvesting, result in net losses of P in large parts of Sweden. The highest losses were found in southern Sweden due to high growth rate in this area. In the whole-tree harvesting scenario the losses exceeded 1 kg ha(-1) y(-1) on many sites. N budget calculations on the same sites indicate that N generally accumulates in the whole country and especially in the southern parts. Consequently, the N and P budget calculations indicate that the forests in southern Sweden are in a transition phase from N-to P-limitation to growth. This transition will proceed as long as the accumulation of N continues. These results are important in a sustainable forestry context, as a basis for assessing the risk of future N leaching, and in designing recommendations for abatement strategies of N deposition and for application of wood ash recycling and N fertilization. PMID:18155750

  11. Presynaptic long-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Calakos, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a major cellular substrate for learning, memory, and behavioral adaptation. Although early examples of long-term synaptic plasticity described a mechanism by which postsynaptic signal transduction was potentiated, it is now apparent that there is a vast array of mechanisms for long-term synaptic plasticity that involve modifications to either or both the presynaptic terminal and postsynaptic site. In this article, we discuss current and evolving approaches to identify presynaptic mechanisms as well as discuss their limitations. We next provide examples of the diverse circuits in which presynaptic forms of long-term synaptic plasticity have been described and discuss the potential contribution this form of plasticity might add to circuit function. Finally, we examine the present evidence for the molecular pathways and cellular events underlying presynaptic long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24146648

  12. Limit case analysis of the "stable indenter velocity" method for obtaining creep stress exponents from constant load indentation creep tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; Dean, J.; Clyne, T. W.

    2016-06-01

    This study concerns a commonly-used procedure for evaluating the steady state creep stress exponent, n, from indentation data. The procedure involves monitoring the indenter displacement history under constant load and making the assumption that, once its velocity has stabilised, the system is in a quasi-steady state, with stage II creep dominating the behaviour. The stress and strain fields under the indenter are represented by "equivalent stress" and "equivalent strain rate" values. The estimate of n is then obtained as the gradient of a plot of the logarithm of the equivalent strain rate against the logarithm of the equivalent stress. Concerns have, however, been expressed about the reliability of this procedure, and indeed it has already been shown to be fundamentally flawed. In the present paper, it is demonstrated, using a very simple analysis, that, for a genuinely stable velocity, the procedure always leads to the same, constant value for n (either 1.0 or 0.5, depending on whether the tip shape is spherical or self-similar). This occurs irrespective of the value of the measured velocity, or indeed of any creep characteristic of the material. It is now clear that previously-measured values of n, obtained using this procedure, have varied in a more or less random fashion, depending on the functional form chosen to represent the displacement-time history and the experimental variables (tip shape and size, penetration depth, etc.), with little or no sensitivity to the true value of n.

  13. A thermomechanical anisotropic model for shock loading of elastic-plastic and elastic-viscoplastic materials with application to jointed rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M. B.; Vorobiev, O.; Vitali, E.

    2016-07-01

    A large deformation thermomechanical model is developed for shock loading of a material that can exhibit elastic and inelastic anisotropy. Use is made of evolution equations for a triad of microstructural vectors mathbf{m}i (hbox {i}=1,2,3) which model elastic deformations and directions of anisotropy. Specific constitutive equations are presented for a material with orthotropic elastic response. The rate of inelasticity depends on an orthotropic yield function that can be used to model weak fault planes with failure in shear and which exhibits a smooth transition to isotropic response at high compression. Moreover, a robust, strongly objective numerical algorithm is proposed for both rate-independent and rate-dependent response. The predictions of the continuum model are examined by comparison with exact steady-state solutions. Also, the constitutive equations are used to obtain a simplified continuum model of jointed rock which is compared with high fidelity numerical solutions that model a persistent system of joints explicitly in the rock medium.

  14. Plastic flow and failure in HY100, HY130 and AF1410 alloy steels under high strain rate and impact loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, A. M.; Last, H. R.; Garrett, R. K., Jr.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results from impact experiments, constitutive/failure modeling, and metallurgical failure analyses for three steels: HY100, HY130, and AF1410. The main objectives of this effort are: (1) to obtain fundamental engineering data in terms of stress-strain curves up to failure at different temperatures and strain rates, (2) to evaluate the observed differences in the macroscopic behaviors through microscopic metallurgical studies, and (3) to describe the flow and failure behaviors using already available material strength and spall models. The high strain rate and impact experiments considered are the split Hopkinson bar (SHB) and the planar plate impact tests, respectively. In addition, the baseline data include quasi-static (QS) tests at low strain rates. The QS and SHB data provide stress-strain curves at different strain rates and temperatures. The experimental data illustrate the effects of two important loading parameters (strain rate and temperature) on the flow and failure behaviors of HY100, HY130, and AF1410 steels.

  15. Thermal load distribution on the ALT-II limiter of TEXTOR-94 during RI mode operation and during disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finken, K. H.; Denner, T.; Mank, G.

    2000-03-01

    Thermographic measurements using an IR scanner have been performed at the pump limiter ALT-II of TEXTOR-94 during RI mode discharges and during disruptions. The measurements on the RI mode discharges were done to complete the TEXTOR database which had shown a structured decay pattern of the deposited power. It was found that the underlying radial heat flux can be described by two exponential decay functions. This structure, which generates an unexpected heat component close to the tangent line, has been observed in all discharge conditions including the RI mode. During disruptions, the heat is released in short pulses with a typical duration of 0.01-0.1 ms. The radial decay length of these pulses has a similar shape to the heat flux during normal discharges: it consists again of a strong component close to the tangent line with a radial decay length of 2-5 mm and probably one with a decay length of the order of 1 cm. The heat is released at the time when the edge electron temperature of the plasma drops, when intense hydrogen and carbon fluxes occur near the walls, and when electrical currents in the limiter blades are excited. In a tentative interpretation, the temporal and spatial structure of the heat pulse is attributed to the presence and growth of a laminar zone at the plasma edge, which is connected with the ergodization of the plasma edge during a disruption.

  16. A numerical basis for strain-gradient plasticity theory: Rate-independent and rate-dependent formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K. L.; Niordson, C. F.

    2014-02-01

    A numerical model formulation of the higher order flow theory (rate-independent) by Fleck and Willis [2009. A mathematical basis for strain-gradient plasticity theory - part II: tensorial plastic multiplier. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 57, 1045-1057.], that allows for elastic-plastic loading/unloading and the interaction of multiple plastic zones, is proposed. The predicted model response is compared to the corresponding rate-dependent version of visco-plastic origin, and coinciding results are obtained in the limit of small strain-rate sensitivity. First, (i) the evolution of a single plastic zone is analyzed to illustrate the agreement with earlier published results, whereafter examples of (ii) multiple plastic zone interaction, and (iii) elastic-plastic loading/unloading are presented. Here, the simple shear problem of an infinite slab constrained between rigid plates is considered, and the effect of strain gradients, strain hardening and rate sensitivity is brought out. For clarity of results, a 1D model is constructed following a procedure suitable for generalization to 2D and 3D.

  17. Using a gel/plastic surrogate to study the biomechanical response of the head under air shock loading: a combined experimental and numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Wagner, Christina; Dal Cengio Leonardi, Alessandra; Jin, Xin; Vandevord, Pamela; Chou, Clifford; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2012-03-01

    A combined experimental and numerical study was conducted to determine a method to elucidate the biomechanical response of a head surrogate physical model under air shock loading. In the physical experiments, a gel-filled egg-shaped skull/brain surrogate was exposed to blast overpressure in a shock tube environment, and static pressures within the shock tube and the surrogate were recorded throughout the event. A numerical model of the shock tube was developed using the Eulerian approach and validated against experimental data. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) fluid-structure coupling algorithm was then utilized to simulate the interaction of the shock wave and the head surrogate. After model validation, a comprehensive series of parametric studies was carried out on the egg-shaped surrogate FE model to assess the effect of several key factors, such as the elastic modulus of the shell, bulk modulus of the core, head orientation, and internal sensor location, on pressure and strain responses. Results indicate that increasing the elastic modulus of the shell within the range simulated in this study led to considerable rise of the overpressures. Varying the bulk modulus of the core from 0.5 to 2.0 GPa, the overpressure had an increase of 7.2%. The curvature of the surface facing the shock wave significantly affected both the peak positive and negative pressures. Simulations of the head surrogate with the blunt end facing the advancing shock front had a higher pressure compared to the simulations with the pointed end facing the shock front. The influence of an opening (possibly mimicking anatomical apertures) on the peak pressures was evaluated using a surrogate head with a hole on the shell of the blunt end. It was revealed that the presence of the opening had little influence on the positive pressures but could affect the negative pressure evidently. PMID:21590345

  18. Molecular dynamics study on atomic elastic stiffness in Si under tension: homogenization by external loading and its limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, K.; Fujihara, M.

    2012-06-01

    As a series of studies that discuss the onset of inelastic deformation based on atomic elastic stiffness (AES), we investigated the AES in silicon by the Tersoff interatomic potential. For a comprehensive discussion including the effect of structural inhomogeneity by surface and grain boundaries, we performed tensile simulations on bulk/nanowire of Si single crystal, laminate bulk/bamboo nanowire with Σ5 twist grain boundary under a very low temperature (T = 1 K). Not only the stress-strain response, but also the AESs at each atom point, B_{ij}^\\alpha , were evaluated numerically by \\Delta\\sigma_i^\\alpha/\\Delta\\varepsilon_j (Voigt notation) against local strain perturbation. The deviation of \\det B_{ij}^\\alpha vanishes/diminishes by tension both in the homogeneous case of bulk perfect lattice and inhomogeneous ones with surface and grain boundaries; however, there is a certain limit for the homogenization. That is, the subtle deviation of AES in the perfect bulk vanishes by tension but it increases again like an onset of resonance, showing precursor stress decrease just before the unstable stress drop. In the inhomogeneous cases, we demonstrated that the near-zero AESs at the initial structural defects, e.g. surface or grain boundary, do not change but the positive AESs of other stable atoms approach zero by tension. When these distributions overlap each other, the standard deviation of AES increases again as if it were the first homogenization limit. However, the real homogenization starts at that point; that is, the AES distribution changes its shape to have a single peak at the \\det B_{ij}^\\alpha=0 border, suggesting that the difference of initial defects and other stable part vanishes before the system instability.

  19. Plastic Bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bruce K

    2016-09-01

    Plastic bronchitis is an uncommon and probably underrecognized disorder, diagnosed by the expectoration or bronchoscopic removal of firm, cohesive, branching casts. It should not be confused with purulent mucous plugging of the airway as seen in patients with cystic fibrosis or bronchiectasis. Few medications have been shown to be effective and some are now recognized as potentially harmful. Current research directions in plastic bronchitis research include understanding the genetics of lymphatic development and maldevelopment, determining how abnormal lymphatic malformations contribute to cast formation, and developing new treatments. PMID:27514587

  20. Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    2014 Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics Cosmetic Procedure Trends 2014 Plastic Surgery Statistics Report Please credit the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PLASTIC SURGEONS when citing statistical data or using ...

  1. Plastics Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 16 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of plastics technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific occupation and would…

  2. Novel Ti-base nanostructure-dendrite composite with enhanced plasticity.

    PubMed

    He, Guo; Eckert, Jürgen; Löser, Wolfgang; Schultz, Ludwig

    2003-01-01

    Single-phase nanocrystalline materials undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation under loading at room temperature, which results in a very limited plastic strain (smaller than 0-3%). The materials therefore display low ductility, leading to catastrophic failure, which severely restricts their application. Here, we present a new in situ-formed nanostructured matrix/ductile dendritic phase composite microstructure for Ti-base alloys, which exhibits up to 14.5% compressive plastic strain at room temperature. The new composite microstructure was synthesized on the basis of the appropriate choice of composition, and by using well-controlled solidification conditions. Deformation occurs partially through dislocation movement in dendrites, and partially through a shear-banding mechanism in the nanostructured matrix. The dendrites act as obstacles restricting the excessive deformation by isolating the highly localized shear bands in small, discrete interdendritic regions, and contribute to the plasticity. We suggest that microscale ductile crystalline phases might therefore be used to toughen nanostructured materials. PMID:12652670

  3. Multiaxial cyclic plasticity of ultrafine grain nickel produced by pulsed electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batane, Ntirelang Robert

    The desirable properties of ultrafine grain (UFG) materials have prompted significant research efforts over the past decade. These materials have proven to be suitable for many industrial applications where conventional grain sized materials have limitations. Some properties of UFG materials which make them preferred over their conventional grain sized counterparts include high strength, corrosion resistance, and high shock resistance. The understanding of mechanical behavior of UFG materials under cyclic loading still remains a challenge. Available data in the literature about UFG material subjected to cyclic loading is limited. As most engineering components experience complex stress-strain states, an understanding of multiaxial fatigue is critical in applications where reliability and optimum performance are required. The objective of this research, therefore, was to study the mechanical behavior of UFG nickel under multiaxial loading conditions. In the first part of this research, the uniaxial fatigue behavior of UFG nickel synthesized by pulsed electrodeposition in a nickel sulfamate bath was studied. Bulk nickel cylinders, 10mm in diameter and 60mm long, were electroformed. The cylinders were machined into test specimens and cycled in fully reversed tension-compression at room temperature at different plastic strain amplitudes. The second part involved multiaxial deformation of thin-walled nickel tubes. The thin-walled UFG nickel tubes were produced by the same technique as that used in electroforming the UFG nickel solid cylinders. Thin-walled tubes were subjected to axial-torsional cyclic loading. For comparison purposes, conventional grain size (CG) nickel specimens were also tested under the same loading conditions as the UFG nickel specimens. The UFG nickel shows high cyclic strength as compared to CG nickel under both uniaxial and multiaxial loading conditions. CG nickel shows higher effective saturation stress under nonproportional loading than

  4. Plastic tension of thin strip with symmetrical cut-outs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepershin, Rostislav I.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical solution of thin strip plane-stress tension with symmetrical cut-outs for Mises rigid-plastic solid is given. Limit plastic state of neck forming along the rigid-plastic boundaries induced by velocity discontinuity is considered. The problem solution can be useful for the material limit plastic formability estimation in the case of biaxial stress tension in complex thin sheet plastic forming technology.

  5. PLAN2D - A PROGRAM FOR ELASTO-PLASTIC ANALYSIS OF PLANAR FRAMES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C.

    1994-01-01

    PLAN2D is a FORTRAN computer program for the plastic analysis of planar rigid frame structures. Given a structure and loading pattern as input, PLAN2D calculates the ultimate load that the structure can sustain before collapse. Element moments and plastic hinge rotations are calculated for the ultimate load. The location of hinges required for a collapse mechanism to form are also determined. The program proceeds in an iterative series of linear elastic analyses. After each iteration the resulting elastic moments in each member are compared to the reserve plastic moment capacity of that member. The member or members that have moments closest to their reserve capacity will determine the minimum load factor and the site where the next hinge is to be inserted. Next, hinges are inserted and the structural stiffness matrix is reformulated. This cycle is repeated until the structure becomes unstable. At this point the ultimate collapse load is calculated by accumulating the minimum load factor from each previous iteration and multiplying them by the original input loads. PLAN2D is based on the program STAN, originally written by Dr. E.L. Wilson at U.C. Berkeley. PLAN2D has several limitations: 1) Although PLAN2D will detect unloading of hinges it does not contain the capability to remove hinges; 2) PLAN2D does not allow the user to input different positive and negative moment capacities and 3) PLAN2D does not consider the interaction between axial and plastic moment capacity. Axial yielding and buckling is ignored as is the reduction in moment capacity due to axial load. PLAN2D is written in FORTRAN and is machine independent. It has been tested on an IBM PC and a DEC MicroVAX. The program was developed in 1988.

  6. Photochromic plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, N.Y.C.

    1990-12-31

    The benefits of photochromic glazing materials as well as other switchable devices for solar control and/or use have been analyzed. The analysis indicates that the saving in cooling costs may be significant for a commercial building. This saving can be further increased if other solar control technologies which operate in the solar spectra region outside the visible range are integrated with photochromic property. Photochromic plastics have the advantage of readiness to integrate with other solar control technologies as in the case of retrofit polyester film. The glazing applications of spirooxazines have only been considered recently. The few examples described in the preceding section are just exploratory. Improvements in photochromic performance and durability are definitely probable as more spirooxazine compounds and formulations are tested and stabilization methods are discovered. Recently, an all plastic model house was constructed by General Electric in which both photochromic and electrochromic switchable windows were employed. Thus, commercialization of photochromic plastics for glazing applications may not be as remote as it was not too long ago. 66 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Respiratory Muscle Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gransee, Heather M.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle’s plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles. PMID:23798306

  8. Plasticity and thermal recovery of thin copper wires in torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Dong; Dunstan, David J.; Bushby, Andrew J.

    2015-06-01

    Experiments in small-scale plasticity usually focus on small-sized samples. However, studying thin wires with lengths up to metres in torsion has the advantage of giving extremely high strain resolution and reversal of the loading direction. In this way, we explore the early stage of plasticity. Microstrain plastic deformation, dislocation creep and the Bauschinger effects are easily observed. The onset of irreversible deformation was observed and associated with a few dislocations in the largest grains throughout the wire. Easy plastic deformation on reversal of the loading direction was observed following this initial plastic deformation but not before.

  9. HEAVY METAL LOADED PLASTIC SCINTILLATING COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, M. Jr.

    1962-06-26

    Thls lnventlon relates to a plastlc sclntlllatlon composltlon havlng lncorporated ln the base plastlc a lead compound. Thls compound forms a haze- free sclntillator. The lead compound has the general formula (R/sub 4/) x from the group consisting of hydrogen, alky, and phenyl, R4 ls selected from the group conslstlng of acrylyl and methacryiyl radlcals, and x ls a number from 0,5 to 1; however, when R/sub 1/, R/sub 2/, and R/sub 3/ are all hydrogen the x ls equal to 1. The phosphor ln the sclntlllatlng compositlon and the lead compound can be dlssolved ln a polymerlc resln selected from the group conslsting of polyvinyl toluene and copolymers of vlnyl toluene and cyclohexyl methacrylate. (AEC)

  10. Limit of detection of genomic DNA by conventional PCR for estimating the load of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli associated with bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekhar, K M; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Veeresh, B H; Hegde, Raveendra; Rathnamma, D; Murag, Shivaraj; Veeregowda, B M; Upendra, H A; Hegde, Nagendra R

    2015-11-01

    Detection of mastitis-associated bacteria can be accomplished by culturing or by molecular techniques. On the other hand, rapid and inexpensive methods to enumerate bacterial load without culturing can be better achieved by molecular methods. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli are the predominant bacterial pathogens associated with bovine mastitis. Here, we describe the application of conventional PCR for the limit of detection (LOD) of genomic DNA of S. aureus and E. coli based on single-copy genes. The selected genes were thermonuclease (nuc), aureolysin (aur), and staphopain A (scpA) for S. aureus and β-D-glucuronidase A (uidA), cytochrome d oxidase (cyd), and rodA (a gene affecting cell shape and methicillin sensitivity) for E. coli. The LOD was 5.3, 15.9, and 143 pg for aur, nuc, and scpA genes, corresponding to S. aureus genomic copies of 1.75 × 10(3), 5.16 × 10(3), and 4.71 × 10(4), respectively. The LOD was 0.45, 12.3 and 109 pg for uidA, rodA and cyd genes, corresponding to E. coli genome copies of 8.91 × 10(1), 2.43 × 10(3), and 2.16 × 10(4), respectively. Application of uidA and aur PCRs to field strains revealed that as low as approximately 100 genome copies of E. coli and 1000-10,000 copies of S. aureus could be detected. This study is the first to report LOD of genomic DNA using conventional PCR for aur and scpA genes of S. aureus, and rodA and cyd genes of E. coli. The results should be useful for developing assays to assess bacterial load in milk and to determine the load that contributes to subclinical or clinical mastitis. PMID:25773783

  11. Fracture mechanics validity limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Dennis M.; Ernst, Hugo A.

    1994-01-01

    Fracture behavior is characteristics of a dramatic loss of strength compared to elastic deformation behavior. Fracture parameters have been developed and exhibit a range within which each is valid for predicting growth. Each is limited by the assumptions made in its development: all are defined within a specific context. For example, the stress intensity parameters, K, and the crack driving force, G, are derived using an assumption of linear elasticity. To use K or G, the zone of plasticity must be small as compared to the physical dimensions of the object being loaded. This insures an elastic response, and in this context, K and G will work well. Rice's J-integral has been used beyond the limits imposed on K and G. J requires an assumption of nonlinear elasticity, which is not characteristic of real material behavior, but is thought to be a reasonable approximation if unloading is kept to a minimum. As well, the constraint cannot change dramatically (typically, the crack extension is limited to ten-percent of the initial remaining ligament length). Rice, et al investigated the properties required of J-type parameters, J(sub x), and showed that the time rate, dJ(sub x)/dt, must not be a function of the crack extension rate, da/dt. Ernst devised the modified-J parameter, J(sub M), that meets this criterion. J(sub M) correlates fracture data to much higher crack growth than does J. Ultimately, a limit of the validity of J(sub M) is anticipated, and this has been estimated to be at a crack extension of about 40-percent of the initial remaining ligament length. None of the various parameters can be expected to describe fracture in an environment of gross plasticity, in which case the process is better described by deformation parameters, e.g., stress and strain. In the current study, various schemes to identify the onset of the plasticity-dominated behavior, i.e., the end of fracture mechanics validity, are presented. Each validity limit parameter is developed in

  12. Direct observation of plasticity and quantitative hardness measurements in single crystal cyclotrimethylene trinitramine by nanoindention

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Kyle J; Hooks, David E; Bahr, David F

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of deformation beginning with elasticity and continuing through the elastic-plastic transition to incipient cracking has been conducted for (210), (021), and (001) oriented single crystals of the explosive cyclotrimethylene trinitramine, commonly known as 'RDX' Instrumented indentation was performed with a conical tip over a range of loads. The resulting load-depth data exhibited distinct, reproducible, orientation dependent load excursions demonstrating elastic-plastic transitions. Indent impressions were imaged by scanning probe microscopy. Impressions on the (210) and (001) planes showed deformation pileup features associated with zone axes of slip planes. Clearly discernable slip traces were evident on the (210) plane. The (021) indentations produced significant material pile-up surrounding the impression, but did not contain discrete features associable with specific zone axes. All of the orientations exhibited cracking thresholds at very low loads. The reduced moduli were anisotropic and the hardness's were isotropic indicating limited plasticity. Maximum shear stresses estimated from a Hertzian model, at load excursions, were within a factor of 10 of published shear moduli indicating deformation initiated near the theoretical yield strength presumably by homogeneous nucleation of dislocations. The material strength parameters and apparent deformation pathways inferred from this work are compared to historical microhardness testing and interpretation of anisotropic hardness in which ambiguity of results can be attributed to the effects of cracking and simultaneous slip on multiple systems.

  13. Experimental assessment of unvalidated assumptions in classical plasticity theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, Rebecca Moss; Burghardt, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Bronowski, David R.

    2009-01-01

    This report investigates the validity of several key assumptions in classical plasticity theory regarding material response to changes in the loading direction. Three metals, two rock types, and one ceramic were subjected to non-standard loading directions, and the resulting strain response increments were displayed in Gudehus diagrams to illustrate the approximation error of classical plasticity theories. A rigorous mathematical framework for fitting classical theories to the data, thus quantifying the error, is provided. Further data analysis techniques are presented that allow testing for the effect of changes in loading direction without having to use a new sample and for inferring the yield normal and flow directions without having to measure the yield surface. Though the data are inconclusive, there is indication that classical, incrementally linear, plasticity theory may be inadequate over a certain range of loading directions. This range of loading directions also coincides with loading directions that are known to produce a physically inadmissible instability for any nonassociative plasticity model.

  14. Protein expression and genetic structure of the coral Porites lobata in an environmentally extreme Samoan back reef: Does host genotype limit phenotypic plasticity?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barshis, D.J.; Stillman, J.H.; Gates, R.D.; Toonen, R.J.; Smith, L.W.; Birkeland, C.

    2010-01-01

    The degree to which coral reef ecosystems will be impacted by global climate change depends on regional and local differences in corals' susceptibility and resilience to environmental stressors. Here, we present data from a reciprocal transplant experiment using the common reef building coral Porites lobata between a highly fluctuating back reef environment that reaches stressful daily extremes, and a more stable, neighbouring forereef. Protein biomarker analyses assessing physiological contributions to stress resistance showed evidence for both fixed and environmental influence on biomarker response. Fixed influences were strongest for ubiquitin-conjugated proteins with consistently higher levels found in back reef source colonies both pre and post-transplant when compared with their forereef conspecifics. Additionally, genetic comparisons of back reef and forereef populations revealed significant population structure of both the nuclear ribosomal and mitochondrial genomes of the coral host (FST = 0.146 P < 0.0001, FST = 0.335 P < 0.0001 for rDNA and mtDNA, respectively), whereas algal endosymbiont populations were genetically indistinguishable between the two sites. We propose that the genotype of the coral host may drive limitations to the physiological responses of these corals when faced with new environmental conditions. This result is important in understanding genotypic and environmental interactions in the coral algal symbiosis and how corals may respond to future environmental changes. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Transparent plastic scintillators for neutron detection based on lithium salicylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabe, Andrew N.; Glenn, Andrew M.; Carman, M. Leslie; Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent plastic scintillators with pulse shape discrimination containing 6Li salicylate have been synthesized by bulk polymerization with a maximum 6Li loading of 0.40 wt%. Photoluminescence and scintillation responses to gamma-rays and neutrons are reported herein. Plastics containing 6Li salicylate exhibit higher light yields and permit a higher loading of 6Li as compared to previously reported plastics based on lithium 3-phenylsalicylate. However, pulse shape discrimination performance is reduced in lithium salicylate plastics due to the requirement of adding more nonaromatic monomers to the polymer matrix as compared to those based on lithium 3-phenylsalicylate. Reduction in light yield and pulse shape discrimination performance in lithium-loaded plastics as compared to pulse shape discrimination plastics without lithium is interpreted in terms of energy transfer interference by the aromatic lithium salts.

  16. Fabrication of plastic biochips

    SciTech Connect

    Saaem, Ishtiaq; Ma, Kuo-Sheng; Alam, S. Munir; Tian Jingdong

    2010-07-15

    A versatile surface functionalization procedure based on rf magnetron sputtering of silica was performed on poly(methylmethacrylate), polycarbonate, polypropylene, and cyclic olefin copolymers (Topas 6015). The hybrid thermoplastic surfaces were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectrometer analysis and contact angle measurements. The authors then used these hybrid materials to perform a sandwich assay targeting an HIV-1 antibody using fluorescent detection and biotinylated peptides immobilized using the bioaffinity of biotin-neutravidin. They found a limit of detection similar to arrays on glass surfaces and believed that this plastic biochip platform may be used for the development of disposable immunosensing and diagnostic applications.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Spark-Ignited Combustion with High-Octane Biofuels and EGR. 2. Fuel and EGR Effects on Knock-Limited Load and Speed

    SciTech Connect

    Splitter, Derek A; Szybist, James P

    2013-01-01

    The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in midlevel alcohol gasoline blends with 24% vol/vol isobutanol gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol/vol ethanol gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine is used with an 11.85:1 compression ratio, hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and was capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Experiments were conducted with all fuels to full-load conditions with = 1, using both 0% and 15% external-cooled EGR. Higher octane number biofuel blends exhibited increased stoichiometric torque capability at this compression ratio, where the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with E30 as compared to that of 87AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg (indicating mean effective pressure gross) at = 1. The results demonstrate that for all fuels, EGR is a key enabler for increasing engine efficiency but is less useful for knock mitigation with E30 than for 87AKI gasoline or IB24. Under knocking conditions, 15% EGR is found to offer 1 CA of CA50 timing advance with E30, whereas up to 5 CA of CA50 advance is possible with knock-limited 87AKI gasoline. Compared to 87AKI, both E30 and IB24 are found to have reduced adiabatic flame temperature and shorter combustion durations, which reduce knocking propensity beyond that indicated by the octane number. However, E30+0% EGR is found to exhibit the better antiknock properties than either 87AKI+15% EGR or IB24+15% EGR, expanding the knock limited operating range and engine stoichiometric torque capability at high compression ratio. Furthermore, the fuel sensitivity (S) of E30 was attributed to reduced speed sensitivity of E30, expanding the low-speed stoichiometric torque capability at high compression ratio. The results illustrate that intermediate alcohol gasoline blends exhibit exceptional antiknock properties and performance beyond that indicated by the octane

  18. Plastic matrix composites with continuous fiber reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-19

    Most plastic resins are not suitable for structural applications. Although many resins are extremely tough, most lack strength, stiffness, and deform under load with time. By mixing strong, stiff, fibrous materials into the plastic matrix, a variety of structural composite materials can be formed. The properties of these composites can be tailored by fiber selection, orientation, and other factors to suit specific applications. The advantages and disadvantages of fiberglass, carbon-graphite, aramid (Kevlar 49), and boron fibers are summarized.

  19. Degradation of plastic carrier bags in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    O'Brine, Tim; Thompson, Richard C

    2010-12-01

    There is considerable concern about the hazards that plastic debris presents to wildlife. Use of polymers that degrade more quickly than conventional plastics presents a possible solution to this problem. Here we investigate breakdown of two oxo-biodegradable plastics, compostable plastic and standard polyethylene in the marine environment. Tensile strength of all materials decreased during exposure, but at different rates. Compostable plastic disappeared from our test rig between 16 and 24 weeks whereas approximately 98% of the other plastics remained after 40 weeks. Some plastics require UV light to degrade. Transmittance of UV through oxo-biodegradable and standard polyethylene decreased as a consequence of fouling such that these materials received ∼ 90% less UV light after 40 weeks. Our data indicate that compostable plastics may degrade relatively quickly compared to oxo-biodegradable and conventional plastics. While degradable polymers offer waste management solutions, there are limitations to their effectiveness in reducing hazards associated with plastic debris. PMID:20961585

  20. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for a highly plastic 3-D stress field condition. The flight hardware investigated in this paper is a large separation bolt that fractures using pyrotechnics at the appointed time during the flight sequence. The separation bolt has a deep notch that produces a severe stress concentration and a large plastic zone when highly loaded. For this geometry, linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) techniques are not valid due to the large nonlinear stress field. Unfortunately, industry codes that are generally available for fracture mechanics analysis and fatigue crack growth (e.g. NASGRO (11) are limited to LEFM and are available for only a limited number of geometries. The results of LEFM based codes are questionable when used on geometries with significant plasticity. Therefore elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) techniques using the finite element method (FEM) were used to analyze the bolt and test coupons. scale flight hardware is very costly in t e r n of assets, laboratory resources, and schedule. Therefore to alleviate some of these problems, a series of novel test coupons were developed to simulate the elastic-plastic stress field present in the bolt.

  1. [Humanitarian plastic surgery in question].

    PubMed

    Montandon, D; Quinodoz, P; Pittet, B

    2004-06-01

    Humanitarian plastic surgery has become very fashionable and more and more surgeons are attracted by this type of commitment. The authors remind here of the necessary conditions and limitations of these actions. The communicative action according to J. Habermas, which means a true partnership with the local health care specialists should be the only valid engagement. PMID:15276263

  2. A plastic scintillation counter prototype.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Etsuko; Kawano, Takao

    2015-10-01

    A new prototype device for beta-ray measurement, a plastic scintillation counter, was assembled as an alternative device to liquid scintillation counters. This device uses plastic scintillation sheets (PS sheets) as a sample applicator without the use of a liquid scintillator. The performance was evaluated using tritium labeled compounds, and good linearity was observed between the activity and net count rate. The calculated detection limit of the device was 0.01 Bq mL(-1) after 10 h measurement for 2 mL sample. PMID:26164628

  3. Method of determining elastic and plastic mechanical properties of ceramic materials using spherical indenters

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    The invention pertains a method of determining elastic and plastic mechanical properties of ceramics, intermetallics, metals, plastics and other hard, brittle materials which fracture prior to plastically deforming when loads are applied. Elastic and plastic mechanical properties of ceramic materials are determined using spherical indenters. The method is most useful for measuring and calculating the plastic and elastic deformation of hard, brittle materials with low values of elastic modulus to hardness.

  4. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of an unidirectional, 9 vol percent tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling via elastic-plastic finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects that the residual stresses and the degree of matrix work hardening (i.e., cold-worked, annealed) have upon the behavior of a 9 vol percent, unidirectional W/Cu composite, undergoing tensile loading. The inclusion of the residual stress-containing state as well as the simulated matrix material conditions proved to be significant since the Cu matrix material exhibited plastic deformation, which affected the subsequent tensile response of the composite system. The stresses generated during cooldown to room temperature from the manufacturing temperature were more of a factor on the annealed-matrix composite, since they induced the softened matrix to plastically flow. This event limited the total load-carrying capacity of this matrix-dominated, ductile-ductile type material system. Plastic deformation of the hardened-matrix composite during the thermal cooldown stage was not considerable, therefore, the composite was able to sustain a higher stress before showing any appreciable matrix plasticity. The predicted room temperature, stress-strain response, and deformation stages under both material conditions represented upper and lower bounds characteristic of the composite's tensile behavior. The initial deformation stage for the hardened material condition showed negligible matrix plastic deformation while for the annealed state, its initial deformation stage showed extensive matrix plasticity. Both material conditions exhibited a final deformation stage where the fiber and matrix were straining plastically. The predicted stress-strain results were compared to the experimental, room temperature, tensile stress-strain curve generated from this particular composite system. The analyses indicated that the actual thermal-mechanical state of the composite's Cu matrix, represented by the experimental data, followed the annealed material condition.

  5. Elastic And Plastic Deformations In Butt Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents study of mathematical modeling of stresses and strains, reaching beyond limits of elasticity, in bars and plates. Study oriented toward development of capability to predict stresses and resulting elastic and plastic strains in butt welds.

  6. Particulate contamination in plastic ampoules.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, R C; Gillies, I R

    1986-05-01

    Plastic ampoules of Water for Injections, JP, and Injection Sodium Chloride, JP, were investigated to determine their particle load. Four batches were studied. The ampoules were twist-opened as they would be in the clinical setting and the total particle load, both inherent and that created in opening, was determined by reading the contents with a HIAC 420 particle counter with a CMB 60 sensor. The total particle content was found to be minimal, easily complying with world L.V.P. standards and the S.V.P. standard of the USP XXI. The number of particles found in these opened plastic ampoules was significantly lower than that found in clinically snap-opened glass ampoules and also slightly lower than that found in laboratory heat-opened glass ampoules. Whilst the plastic ampoule has a restricted application because it is not suitable for all drugs, it is concluded that when they are used as the immediate container for Water for Injections and Injection Sodium Chloride they are highly effective in reducing the particulate contamination generated in opening. PMID:2872309

  7. Defining structural limit zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Method for defining limit loads uses probability distribution of largest load occurring during given time intervals. Method is compatible with both deterministic and probabilistic structural design criteria. It also rationally accounts for fact that longer structure is exposed to random loading environment, greater is possibility that it will experience extreme load.

  8. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  9. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  10. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  11. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  12. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  13. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  14. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A

    2016-03-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  15. Pattern formation in plastic liquid films on elastomers by ratcheting.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiangshui; Yang, Jiawei; Jin, Lihua; Clarke, David R; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-04-20

    Plastic liquids, also known as Bingham liquids, retain their shape when loads are small, but flow when loads exceed a threshold. We discovered that plastic liquid films coated on elastomers develop wavy patterns under cyclic loads. As the number of cycles increases, the wavelength of the patterns remains unchanged, but the amplitude of the patterns increases and then saturates. Because the patterns develop progressively under cyclic loads, we call this phenomenon as "patterning by ratcheting". We observe the phenomenon in plastic liquids of several kinds, and studied the effects of thickness, the cyclic frequency of the stretch, and the range of the stretch. Finite element simulations show that the ratcheting phenomenon can occur in materials described by a commonly used model of elastic-plastic deformation. PMID:27008927

  16. Rate and temperature dependences of the yield stress of commercial titanium under conditions of shock-wave loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of elastic-plastic shock waves with the propagation distance has been studied in annealed titanium of commercial purity at temperatures 20 °C and 600 °C. The free surface velocity histories of the shock-loaded samples 0.25-4.0 mm in thickness have been recorded using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector. The measured decays of the elastic precursor waves have been converted into relationships between the shear stress and the initial plastic strain rate at the Hugoniot elastic limit. It has been found that the temperature practically does not influence on the resistance to high-rate plastic deformation: the plastic strain rate varies with the shear stress as γ ˙ = 2.5 × 10 6 ( τ / τ 0 ) 4.8 s-1 at 20 °C and γ ˙ = 2.9 × 10 6 ( τ / τ 0 ) 4.9 s-1 at 600 °C. An analysis of the rise times of the plastic shock waves has shown that for the same level of shear stress, the plastic strain rate after small compressive strain is more than by order of magnitude higher than the initial plastic strain rate at the wave's foot. Such acceleration of the plastic deformation seems to be a result of an intense multiplication of the mobile dislocations or twins.

  17. Ear Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  18. Plastic Surgery for Teenagers

    MedlinePlus

    ... or severe acne and scarring. Teens frequently gain self-esteem and confidence when their physical problems are corrected. ... art as a helpful index of anxiety and self-esteem with plastic surgery. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 2002. ...

  19. Plastic encapsulated parts

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, T.

    1994-10-01

    Plastic semiconductor packages were characterized as possible alternatives for canned devices, which are susceptible to internal shorts caused by conductive particles. Highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) as well as electrical and mechanical testing were conducted on plastic technology devices.

  20. Periodontal Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ...

  1. Plasticity and Geotechnics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hai-Sui

    Plasticity and Geotechnics is the first attempt to summarize and present, in one volume, the major developments achieved to date in the field of plasticity theory for geotechnical materials and its applications to geotechnical analysis and design.

  2. Processing of plastics

    PubMed Central

    Spaak, Albert

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of the processing of plastic materials from the handling of polymers in the pellet and powder form to manufacturing of a plastic fabricated product. Various types of equipment used and melt processing ranges of various polymer formulations to make the myriad of plastic products that are commercially available are discussed. PMID:1175556

  3. Plastics in Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeist, Irving, Ed.

    The evaluation and use of plastics in the construction industry are explained. The contributors offer extensive, timely, and thoroughly researched data on the chemistry, properties, functions, engineering behavior, and specific applications of plastics to building requirements. The major subjects discussed in depth are--(1) the role of plastics in…

  4. Tomorrow's Plastic World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Averil

    2005-01-01

    Far from being just cheap packaging materials, plastics may be the materials of tomorrow. Plastic can conduct electricity, and this opens up a host of high-tech possibilities in the home and in energy generation. These possibilities are discussed here along with how plastic can be recycled and perhaps even grown.

  5. Plastic debris in the open ocean

    PubMed Central

    Cózar, Andrés; Echevarría, Fidel; González-Gordillo, J. Ignacio; Irigoien, Xabier; Úbeda, Bárbara; Hernández-León, Santiago; Palma, Álvaro T.; Navarro, Sandra; García-de-Lomas, Juan; Ruiz, Andrea; Fernández-de-Puelles, María L.; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a rising concern regarding the accumulation of floating plastic debris in the open ocean. However, the magnitude and the fate of this pollution are still open questions. Using data from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation, regional surveys, and previously published reports, we show a worldwide distribution of plastic on the surface of the open ocean, mostly accumulating in the convergence zones of each of the five subtropical gyres with comparable density. However, the global load of plastic on the open ocean surface was estimated to be on the order of tens of thousands of tons, far less than expected. Our observations of the size distribution of floating plastic debris point at important size-selective sinks removing millimeter-sized fragments of floating plastic on a large scale. This sink may involve a combination of fast nano-fragmentation of the microplastic into particles of microns or smaller, their transference to the ocean interior by food webs and ballasting processes, and processes yet to be discovered. Resolving the fate of the missing plastic debris is of fundamental importance to determine the nature and significance of the impacts of plastic pollution in the ocean. PMID:24982135

  6. Plastic debris in the open ocean.

    PubMed

    Cózar, Andrés; Echevarría, Fidel; González-Gordillo, J Ignacio; Irigoien, Xabier; Ubeda, Bárbara; Hernández-León, Santiago; Palma, Alvaro T; Navarro, Sandra; García-de-Lomas, Juan; Ruiz, Andrea; Fernández-de-Puelles, María L; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-07-15

    There is a rising concern regarding the accumulation of floating plastic debris in the open ocean. However, the magnitude and the fate of this pollution are still open questions. Using data from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation, regional surveys, and previously published reports, we show a worldwide distribution of plastic on the surface of the open ocean, mostly accumulating in the convergence zones of each of the five subtropical gyres with comparable density. However, the global load of plastic on the open ocean surface was estimated to be on the order of tens of thousands of tons, far less than expected. Our observations of the size distribution of floating plastic debris point at important size-selective sinks removing millimeter-sized fragments of floating plastic on a large scale. This sink may involve a combination of fast nano-fragmentation of the microplastic into particles of microns or smaller, their transference to the ocean interior by food webs and ballasting processes, and processes yet to be discovered. Resolving the fate of the missing plastic debris is of fundamental importance to determine the nature and significance of the impacts of plastic pollution in the ocean. PMID:24982135

  7. Glassy features of crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, Arttu; Costantini, Giulio; Alava, Mikko J.; Zapperi, Stefano; Laurson, Lasse

    2016-08-01

    Crystal plasticity occurs by deformation bursts due to the avalanchelike motion of dislocations. Here we perform extensive numerical simulations of a three-dimensional dislocation dynamics model under quasistatic stress-controlled loading. Our results show that avalanches are power-law distributed and display peculiar stress and sample size dependence: The average avalanche size grows exponentially with the applied stress, and the amount of slip increases with the system size. These results suggest that intermittent deformation processes in crystalline materials exhibit an extended critical-like phase in analogy to glassy systems instead of originating from a nonequilibrium phase transition critical point.

  8. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs which can be combined to determine any one of the six general load components.

  9. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, B.L.

    1998-12-15

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components. 16 figs.

  10. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components.

  11. Biodegradability of Plastics

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P.; Ugwu, Charles U.; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed. PMID:19865515

  12. Limit pressure of a circumferentially reinforced SiC/Ti ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Pastor, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    Limit loads under plane stress and plane strain are found for a circumferentially reinforced elastoplastic ring subjected to interior pressure. These are used as bounds on an estimate of the failure pressure of a SiC/Ti test rig that is being fabricated and tested. The ring is to serve as a benchmark against which deformation and failure analysis methods can be assessed. An anisotropic perfect plasticity idealization of the SiC/Ti ring material is made and used in the limit load calculations. An estimate of the failure pressure of the NASA/PW benchmark test ring is given.

  13. Plasmid load adversely affects growth and gluconic acid secretion ability of mineral phosphate-solubilizing rhizospheric bacterium Enterobacter asburiae PSI3 under P limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Archana, G; Naresh Kumar, G

    2011-01-20

    Effect of the metabolic load caused by the presence of plasmids on mineral phosphate-solubilizing (MPS) Enterobacter asburiae PSI3, was monitored with four plasmid cloning vectors and one native plasmid, varying in size, nature of the replicon, copy number and antibiotic resistance genes. Except for one plasmid, the presence of all other plasmids in E. asburiae PSI3 resulted in the loss of the MPS phenotype as reflected by the failure to bring about a drop in pH and release soluble P when grown in media containing rock phosphate (RP) as the sole P source. When 100 μM soluble P was supplemented along with RP, the adverse effects of plasmids on MPS phenotype and on growth parameters was reduced for some plasmid bearing derivatives, as monitored in terms of specific growth rates, glucose consumed, gluconic acids yields and P released. When 10 mM of soluble P as the only P source, was added to the medium all transformants showed growth and pH drop comparable with native strain. It may be concluded that different plasmids impose, to varying extents, a metabolic load in the phosphate-solubilizing bacterium E. asburiae PSI3 and results in diminishing its growth and P-solubilizing ability in P deficient conditions. PMID:20171856

  14. Cumulative plastic deformation for fine-grained subgrade soils

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.Q.; Selig, E.T.

    1996-12-01

    Improvements to existing methods in the literature have been made for predicting cumulative plastic deformation for fine-grained subgrade soils. The soil deviator stress, number of stress applications, soil physical state, and soil type are considered. The improved method incorporates multilevels of deviator stresses and multisoil physical states that result from load-level variations, as well as seasonal and weather changes throughout traffic. Measurements of plastic deformation for a railroad-track subgrade are presented and show a significant influence of soil physical state, soil type, traffic tonnage, and wheel loads on the accumulation of plastic deformation. Comparisons between predicted and experimental results show good applicability of the improved method.

  15. Reduction of the hydraulic retention time at constant high organic loading rate to reach the microbial limits of anaerobic digestion in various reactor systems.

    PubMed

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M; Schmidt, Thomas; Lv, Zuopeng; Liebetrau, Jan; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2016-10-01

    The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) reduction at constant high organic loading rate on the activity of hydrogen-producing bacteria and methanogens were investigated in reactors digesting thin stillage. Stable isotope fingerprinting was additionally applied to assess methanogenic pathways. Based on hydA gene transcripts, Clostridiales was the most active hydrogen-producing order in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), fixed-bed reactor (FBR) and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), but shorter HRT stimulated the activity of Spirochaetales. Further decreasing HRT diminished Spirochaetales activity in systems with biomass retention. Based on mcrA gene transcripts, Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina were the predominantly active in CSTR and ASBR, whereas Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum activity was more significant in stably performing FBR. Isotope values indicated the predominance of aceticlastic pathway in FBR. Interestingly, an increased activity of Methanosaeta was observed during shortening HRT in CSTR and ASBR despite high organic acids concentrations, what was supported by stable isotope data. PMID:26853042

  16. How Plastics Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Louis

    2013-03-01

    We encounter plastics every day, but despite their widespread use, amazing range of properties, and basic scientific underpinnings, most physicists--like most people--know relatively little about plastics. In contrast to hard crystalline and amorphous solids (e.g., metals, salts, ceramics, and glasses), we take plastics for granted, select them carelessly, and examine them more closely only on a need-to-know basis. By ignoring plastics until we need them, however, we risk not knowing what we don't know and using the wrong ones. To repurpose a familiar advertisement, ``there's a plastic for that.'' This talk will review some of the basic physics and science of plastics. It will examine the roles of temperature, order, intermolecular forces, entanglements, and linkages in plastics, and how those issues affect the properties of a given plastic. We'll stop along the way to recognize a few of the more familiar plastics, natural and synthetic, and explain some of their mechanical, chemical, and optical properties. The talk will conclude by explaining the remarkable properties of a plastic that has been largely misunderstood since its discovery 70 years ago: Silly Putty.

  17. How quickly do albatrosses and petrels digest plastic particles?

    PubMed

    Ryan, Peter G

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how rapidly seabirds excrete or regurgitate ingested plastic items is important for their use as monitors of marine debris. van Franeker and Law (2015) inferred that fulmarine petrels excrete ∼75% of plastic particles within a month of ingestion based on decreases in the amounts of plastic in the stomachs of adult petrels moving to relatively clean environments to breed. However, similar decreases occur among resident species due to adults passing plastic loads to their chicks. The few direct measures of wear rates and retention times of persistent stomach contents suggest longer plastic residence times in most albatrosses and petrels. Residence time presumably varies with item size, type of plastic, the amount and composition of other persistent stomach contents, and the size at which items are excreted, which may vary among taxa. Accurate measures of ingested plastic retention times are needed to better understand temporal and spatial patterns in ingested plastic loads within marine organisms, especially if they are to be used as indicators of plastic pollution trends. PMID:26286902

  18. Our plastic age.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard C; Swan, Shanna H; Moore, Charles J; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2009-07-27

    Within the last few decades, plastics have revolutionized our daily lives. Globally we use in excess of 260 million tonnes of plastic per annum, accounting for approximately 8 per cent of world oil production. In this Theme Issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, we describe current and future trends in usage, together with the many benefits that plastics bring to society. At the same time, we examine the environmental consequences resulting from the accumulation of waste plastic, the effects of plastic debris on wildlife and concerns for human health that arise from the production, usage and disposal of plastics. Finally, we consider some possible solutions to these problems together with the research and policy priorities necessary for their implementation. PMID:19528049

  19. Our plastic age

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Richard C.; Swan, Shanna H.; Moore, Charles J.; vom Saal, Frederick S.

    2009-01-01

    Within the last few decades, plastics have revolutionized our daily lives. Globally we use in excess of 260 million tonnes of plastic per annum, accounting for approximately 8 per cent of world oil production. In this Theme Issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, we describe current and future trends in usage, together with the many benefits that plastics bring to society. At the same time, we examine the environmental consequences resulting from the accumulation of waste plastic, the effects of plastic debris on wildlife and concerns for human health that arise from the production, usage and disposal of plastics. Finally, we consider some possible solutions to these problems together with the research and policy priorities necessary for their implementation. PMID:19528049

  20. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  1. Plastics and health risks.

    PubMed

    Halden, Rolf U

    2010-01-01

    By 2010, the worldwide annual production of plastics will surpass 300 million tons. Plastics are indispensable materials in modern society, and many products manufactured from plastics are a boon to public health (e.g., disposable syringes, intravenous bags). However, plastics also pose health risks. Of principal concern are endocrine-disrupting properties, as triggered for example by bisphenol A and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Opinions on the safety of plastics vary widely, and despite more than five decades of research, scientific consensus on product safety is still elusive. This literature review summarizes information from more than 120 peer-reviewed publications on health effects of plastics and plasticizers in lab animals and humans. It examines problematic exposures of susceptible populations and also briefly summarizes adverse environmental impacts from plastic pollution. Ongoing efforts to steer human society toward resource conservation and sustainable consumption are discussed, including the concept of the 5 Rs--i.e., reduce, reuse, recycle, rethink, restrain--for minimizing pre- and postnatal exposures to potentially harmful components of plastics. PMID:20070188

  2. Astrocytes: Orchestrating synaptic plasticity?

    PubMed

    De Pittà, M; Brunel, N; Volterra, A

    2016-05-26

    Synaptic plasticity is the capacity of a preexisting connection between two neurons to change in strength as a function of neural activity. Because synaptic plasticity is the major candidate mechanism for learning and memory, the elucidation of its constituting mechanisms is of crucial importance in many aspects of normal and pathological brain function. In particular, a prominent aspect that remains debated is how the plasticity mechanisms, that encompass a broad spectrum of temporal and spatial scales, come to play together in a concerted fashion. Here we review and discuss evidence that pinpoints to a possible non-neuronal, glial candidate for such orchestration: the regulation of synaptic plasticity by astrocytes. PMID:25862587

  3. Efficient elastic-plastic design of small foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, G. J.; Cunniff, P. F.

    1982-09-01

    An elastic plastic design analysis method is presented for small foundations which utilizes an energy criterion to insure against large deflections or unwanted collapse. The interaction effects from direct loads and shears are included, which has the effect of predicting a carrying capacity somewhat less than that of ordinary limit analysis. The energy storage capacity is calculated in a fashion which is conservative since the reduction of the planar moments of inertia is ignored. Several examples are worked out which use various beam like structures to illustrate the enhancement of carrying capacity from the sections contribution and of the indeterminate structural reactions. The results are worked up in detail, both theoretically and by numerical examples to show the ease of application and efficiency of this method.

  4. Tests and analyses for fully plastic fracture mechanics of plane strain mode I crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, F.A.; Parks, D.M.; Kim, Y.J.

    1995-12-31

    Under monotonic loading, structures should ideally be ductile enough to provide continued resistance during crack growth. For fully plastic crack growth in low strength alloys, existing asymptotic solutions for elastic-plastic growing cracks are not applicable because they reach the fracture strain only in regions small compared to the inhomogeneities of the actual fracture process. For the limiting case of non-hardening fully-plastic plane strain crack growth, in a number of geometries and loadings the near-tip fields are characterized in terms of three parameters: an effective angle 2{theta}{sub s} between a pair of slip planes, and the normal stress {sigma}{sub s} and the increment of displacement {delta}u{sub s} across the planes. This three-parameter characterization is in contrast to the one- or two-parameter (K or J and T or Q) characterization in linear or non-linear elastic fracture mechanics. These {theta}{sub s}, {sigma}{sub s}, and {delta}u{sub s} parameters are found form the far-field geometries and loadings through slip line fields or least upper bound analyses based on circular arcs. The resulting crack growth, in terms of the crack tip opening angle (CTOA), is a function of {theta}{sub s}, {sigma}{sub s}, and the material. The geometry of the crack growing between two moving slip planes emanating from its tip reduces this function to the critical fracture shear strain left behind the slip planes, {gamma}f, as a function of {sigma}{sub s}. {gamma}f({sigma}{sub s}) is found theoretically from a hole initiation and growth model. It is also found from preliminary fully plastic crack growth experiments on unequally grooved specimens with fixed-grip extension or 4-point bending of a 1018 CF steel.

  5. Loading Drosophila nerve terminals with calcium indicators.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Adam J; Macleod, Gregory T

    2007-01-01

    Calcium plays many roles in the nervous system but none more impressive than as the trigger for neurotransmitter release, and none more profound than as the messenger essential for the synaptic plasticity that supports learning and memory. To further elucidate the molecular underpinnings of Ca(2+)-dependent synaptic mechanisms, a model system is required that is both genetically malleable and physiologically accessible. Drosophila melanogaster provides such a model. In this system, genetically-encoded fluorescent indicators are available to detect Ca(2+) changes in nerve terminals. However, these indicators have limited sensitivity to Ca(2+) and often show a non-linear response. Synthetic fluorescent indicators are better suited for measuring the rapid Ca(2+) changes associated with nerve activity. Here we demonstrate a technique for loading dextran-conjugated synthetic Ca(2+) indicators into live nerve terminals in Drosophila larvae. Particular emphasis is placed on those aspects of the protocol most critical to the technique's success, such as how to avoid static electricity discharges along the isolated nerves, maintaining the health of the preparation during extended loading periods, and ensuring axon survival by providing Ca(2+) to promote sealing of severed axon endings. Low affinity dextran-conjugated Ca(2+)-indicators, such as fluo-4 and rhod, are available which show a high signal-to-noise ratio while minimally disrupting presynaptic Ca(2+) dynamics. Dextran-conjugation helps prevent Ca(2+) indicators being sequestered into organelles such as mitochondria. The loading technique can be applied equally to larvae, embryos and adults. PMID:18997898

  6. A model for creep life prediction of thin tube using strain energy density as a function of stress triaxiality under quasistatic loading employing elastic-creep & elastic-plastic-creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Tahir; Kanapathipillai, Sangarapillai; Chowdhury, Mahiuddin

    2013-06-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of a new multiaxial creep damage model developed by authors using stress traixiality to predict the failure time of a component made of 0.5%Cr-0.5%Mo-0.25%V low alloy steel. The model employs strain energy density and assumes that the uniaxial strain energy density of a component can be easily calculated and can be converted to multi-axial strain energy density by multiplying it to a function of stress trixiality which is a ratio of mean stress to equivalent stress. For comparison, an elastic-creep and elastic-plastic-creep finite element analysis (FEA) is performed to get multi-axial strain energy density of the component which is compared with the calculated strain energy density for both cases. The verification and application of the model are demonstrated by applying it to thin tube for which the experimental data are available. The predicted failure times by the model are compared with the experimental results. The results show that the proposed model is capable of predicting failure times of the component made of the above-mentioned material with an accuracy of 4.0%.

  7. Detecting plastics in seedcotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To increase global market share and value the US cotton industry needs to supply cotton lint that is free of contamination. Removing plastic contamination first requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to validate a custom Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IM...

  8. Reinforced plastics durability

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, G.

    1999-01-01

    Written especially for first-time users of reinforced plastics. The book offers substantial introductory information with key concepts. Chapters examine the long-term threats to the integrity of reinforced plastics: outdoor weathering, solvent/water attack, high temperatures, and repetitive stress.

  9. Laser processing of plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Peter A.

    1995-03-01

    CO2-laser processing of plastics has been studied experimentally and theoretically. Welding of cylindrical parts made from polycarbonate and polypropylene, cutting of polymethyl-methacrylate plates, and drilling holes in polypropylene are presented as examples. A good coincidence between theoretical and experimental results in case of laser welding has been found. Some practical aspects of laser processing of plastics has been given.

  10. Detecting plastics in seedcotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US cotton industry wants to increase market share and value by supplying pure cotton. Removing contamination requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to determine if Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) could be used to find small amounts of plastic in ...

  11. Prospects for microbiological solutions to environmental pollution with plastics.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Martin C; Harms, Hauke; Schlosser, Dietmar

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic polymers, commonly named plastics, are among the most widespread anthropogenic pollutants of marine, limnic and terrestrial ecosystems. Disruptive effects of plastics are known to threaten wildlife and exert effects on natural food webs, but signs for and knowledge on plastic biodegradation are limited. Microorganisms are the most promising candidates for an eventual bioremediation of environmental plastics. Laboratory studies have reported various effects of microorganisms on many types of polymers, usually by enzymatic hydrolysis or oxidation. However, most common plastics have proved to be highly recalcitrant even under conditions known to favour microbial degradation. Knowledge on environmental degradation is yet scarcer. With this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on microbiological degradation of several of the most common plastic types. Furthermore, we illustrate the analytical challenges concerning the evaluation of plastic biodegradation as well as constraints likely standing against the evolution of effective biodegradation pathways. PMID:26318446

  12. 14 CFR 23.421 - Balancing loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Balancing loads. 23.421 Section 23.421... Balancing Surfaces § 23.421 Balancing loads. (a) A horizontal surface balancing load is a load necessary to... balancing surfaces must be designed for the balancing loads occurring at any point on the limit...

  13. 14 CFR 23.421 - Balancing loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Balancing loads. 23.421 Section 23.421... Balancing Surfaces § 23.421 Balancing loads. (a) A horizontal surface balancing load is a load necessary to... balancing surfaces must be designed for the balancing loads occurring at any point on the limit...

  14. Suspended Load

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The suspended load of rivers and streams consists of the sediments that are kept in the water column by the upward components of the flow velocity. Suspended load may be divided into cohesive and non-cohesive loads which are primarily discriminated by sediment particle size. Non-cohesive sediment ...

  15. Track recording plastic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarle, Gregory (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Improved nuclear track recording plastic compositions are provided which exhibit greatly decreased surface roughness when etched to produce visible tracks of energetic nuclear particles which have passed into and/or through said plastic. The improved compositions incorporate a small quantity of a phthalic acid ester into the major plastic component which is derived from the polymerization of monomeric di-ethylene glycol bis allyl carbonate. Di-substituted phthalic acid esters are preferred as the added component, with the further perference that the ester substituent has a chain length of 2 or more carbon atoms. The inclusion of the phthalic acid ester to an extent of from about 1-2% by weight of the plastic compositions is sufficient to drastically reduce the surface roughness ordinarily produced when the track recording plastic is contacted by etchants.

  16. Stress- and Allostasis-Induced Brain Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Bruce S.; Gianaros, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The brain is the key organ of stress processes. It determines what individuals will experience as stressful, it orchestrates how individuals will cope with stressful experiences, and it changes both functionally and structurally as a result of stressful experiences. Within the brain, a distributed, dynamic, and plastic neural circuitry coordinates, monitors, and calibrates behavioral and physiological stress response systems to meet the demands imposed by particular stressors. These allodynamic processes can be adaptive in the short term (allostasis) and maladaptive in the long term (allostatic load). Critically, these processes involve bidirectional signaling between the brain and body. Consequently, allostasis and allostatic load can jointly affect vulnerability to brain-dependent and stress-related mental and physical health conditions. This review focuses on the role of brain plasticity in adaptation to, and pathophysiology resulting from, stressful experiences. It also considers interventions to prevent and treat chronic and prevalent health conditions via allodynamic brain mechanisms. PMID:20707675

  17. Plastic Surgery for Ethnic Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Briefing Papers > Plastic Surgery for Ethnic Patients Briefing Paper: Plastic Surgery for Ethnic Patients More than 3. ... 2067-2071. Share Related Links Plastic Surgery Briefing Papers Menu Cosmetic Reconstructive Patient Safety Before & After Find ...

  18. American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor who is a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS®), you can rest assured ... ASPS The Plastic Surgery Foundation Copyright © 2016 American Society of Plastic Surgeons | Privacy Policy | Sitemap | Terms and ...

  19. Lightweight porous plastic plaque. [nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, M.

    1978-01-01

    The porosity and platability of various materials were investigated to determine a suitable substrate for nickel-plated electrodes. Immersion, ultrasonics, and flow-through plating techniques were tried using nonproprietary formulations, and proprietary phosphide and boride baths. Modifications to the selected material include variations in formulation and treatment, carbon loading to increase conductivity, and the incorporation of a grid. Problems to be solved relate to determining conductivities and porosities as a function of amount of nickel plated on the plastics; loading; charge and discharge curves of electrodes at different current densities; cell performance; and long-term degradation of electrodes.

  20. Plastics as structural materials for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, G M

    1937-01-01

    The purpose here is to consider the mechanical characteristics of reinforced phenol-formaldehyde resin as related to its use as structural material for aircraft. Data and graphs that have appeared in the literature are reproduced to illustrate the comparative behavior of plastics and materials commonly used in aircraft construction. Materials are characterized as to density, static strength, modulus of elasticity, resistance to long-time loading, strength under repeated impact, energy absorption, corrosion resistance, and ease of fabrication.

  1. Plasticity-Mediated Persistence in New and Changing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Baldwin's synthesis of the Organicist position, first published in 1896 and elaborated in 1902, sought to rescue environmentally induced phenotypes from disrepute by showing their Darwinian significance. Of particular interest to Baldwin was plasticity's mediating role during environmental change or colonization—plastic individuals were more likely to successfully survive and reproduce in new environments than were nonplastic individuals. Once a population of plastic individuals had become established, plasticity could further mediate the future course of evolution. The evidence for plasticity-mediated persistence (PMP) is reviewed here with a particular focus on evolutionary rescue experiments, studies on invasive success, and the role of learning in survival. Many PMP studies are methodologically limited, showing that preexistent plasticity has utility in new environments (soft PMP) rather than directly demonstrating that plasticity is responsible for persistence (hard PMP). An ideal PMP study would be able to demonstrate that (1) plasticity preexisted environmental change, (2) plasticity was fortuitously beneficial in the new environment, (3) plasticity was responsible for individual persistence in the new environment, and (4) plasticity was responsible for population persistence in succeeding generations. Although PMP is not ubiquitous, Baldwin's hypotheses have been largely vindicated in theoretical and empirical studies, but much work remains. PMID:25386380

  2. Plasticity characteristics obtained through hardness measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Milman, Y.V.; Galanov, B.A.; Chugunova, S.I. )

    1993-09-01

    A characteristic of material plasticity [delta][sub H] is proposed. [delta][sub H] is determined as a part of plastic deformation in the total deformation during indentation. The following analytic expressions for the elastic deformation [epsilon][sub e] and for the total deformation [epsilon] on the contact area indenter-specimen in the direction of loading force are obtained, [epsilon][sub e] = 1.08(1 [minus] v [minus] 2v[sup 2])H[sub V/E], [epsilon] [approx] 0.076, where H[sub V] is the Vickers hardness, E is Young's modulus, v is the Poisson ratio, and [delta][sub H] = 1 [minus] ([epsilon][sub e]/[epsilon]). The [delta][sub H] value is calculated for various crystalline materials at different temperatures and in different structural states. [delta][sub H] is consistent with the concept of plasticity established before, and to characterize the influence of temperature, alloying and strain hardening on plasticity. The necessary condition for revealing ductility at tension and bending is [delta][sub H] [>=] 0.9. [delta][sub H] can be used as a plasticity characteristic of brittle materials.

  3. Laser welding of micro plastic parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberstroh, E.; Hoffmann, W.-M.

    2007-02-01

    Most welding processes for plastics do not meet the demands of micro technology and thus cannot be applied in this innovative industrial sector. One of the few techniques which are applicable in this sector is the laser transmission welding, which has distinctive advantages like low mechanical and thermal load of the joining parts. This makes the laser particularly suitable for the welding of micro plastics parts. Thereby, contour welding is a process variant of laser transmission welding enabling the welding of complex and even three-dimensional weld contours. But so far it has not yet been applied for welding plastics parts of micro scale in the industrial practice. Recent research at the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) at the RWTH Aachen University shows the feasibility of this process to weld small and complex micro parts. Good mechanical properties can be achieved. However, it is necessary to apply measures to reduce the formation of flash. Moreover, it can be shown that there is a strong influence of some material parameters on the laser welding process so that some plastics are more suitable than others for the contour welding in micro technology.

  4. Modeling, simulation, and analysis of birefringent effects in plastic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Achyut; Asundi, Anand

    2015-09-01

    Plastic optics has been widely used in different application. They have been facing birefringent effects during manufacturing or during certain application. Finite element modeling of plastic optics in CAD interface is done along with experimental and theoretical comparison of the specimen with the help of solid mechanics and image processing. Low birefringence plastic optics is chosen for the experiment and varying load is applied to observe the characteristics both in experiment and simulation. Low birefringence polariscope was used to measure the birefringence in the plastic specimen. Birefringence is caused due to many effects like stress induced birefringence temperature induced due to thermal gradient and pressure during manufacturing. Here stress is induced on low birefringence specimen by two point compression loading and is compared on the base of solid mechanics, finite element modeling and image processing. The results were found to be similar and convincing.

  5. Localized plasticity of graphite/magnesium metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.S.; Rawal, S.; Misra, M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses localized matrix plasticity in a pitch 55 graphite/magnesium (Gr/Mg) metal matrix composite (MMC) due to damping/hysteresis effects in bending. It was found that for this material system, chosen mainly for its damping ability, plasticity or permanent deformation occurs in the matrix material of the composite from relatively small structural deformations. The behavior of the plasticity is unique to these MMC systems as it is constrained to follow its original loading path back to its zero deformation state upon unloading. This retracement of loading path is attributed to the Gr fibers acting as elastic constraint layers. For optical rail platforms, the ability to recover the original platform shape, even with localized matrix plasticity, implies a high level of survivability. Moire interferometry was combined with research on the microstructure of this particular material system to yield these subtle results.

  6. Anxiety disorders in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rankin, M; Borah, G L

    1997-08-01

    Surgery is a stressful event, with the potential for profound disturbance to the patient's psychological and physiologic homeostasis. Cosmetic surgery is a particularly intense psychological experience because, in addition to the usual concerns about surgical side effects, cosmetic patients bring their hopes and expectations for improved self-image, putting them at risk for the added anxiety of disappointment. High levels of anxiety coupled with the perception of vulnerability or threat to self can cause significant psychological reactions complicating care for the plastic surgical patient. This paper outlines the diagnostic features of the common types of anxiety disorders seen in plastic surgical patients, and it offers treatment strategies for the practitioner, delineating when referral to a mental health expert is advised. Specific clinical case studies of panic attack, posttraumatic stress disorder, and acute stress disorder are presented to illustrate the variety of abnormal anxiety responses that may be encountered in the perioperative setting. Interventions for the anxious patient are part science and part art. Careful questioning and psychosocial assessment can identify those patients who are at greater risk for psychological problems after surgery. However, some patients may mask or keep secret their concerns, which can be manifested with resulting anger and hostility. Plastic surgeons must use appropriate indicators of psychological anxiety and measure a specific patient's reactions to surgery to make the diagnosis of abnormal anxiety. Close follow-up by the plastic surgical team is an essential part of the anxiety disorder patient's psychological treatment, but it is imperative that these problematic patients be referred promptly to a qualified mental health professional to limit their adverse experience and promote their well-being. Patients who are less anxious during the perioperative period report less emotional distress and fewer defensive

  7. Synaptic plasticity and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2009-01-01

    A number of neuronal functions, including synaptic plasticity, depend on proper regulation of synaptic proteins, many of which can be rapidly regulated by phosphorylation. Neuronal activity controls the function of these synaptic proteins by exquisitely regulating the balance of various protein kinase and protein phosphatase activity. Recent understanding of synaptic plasticity mechanisms underscores important roles that these synaptic phosphoproteins play in regulating both pre- and post-synaptic functions. This review will focus on key postsynaptic phosphoproteins that have been implicated to play a role in synaptic plasticity. PMID:16904750

  8. Bringing Home the Trash: Do Colony-Based Differences in Foraging Distribution Lead to Increased Plastic Ingestion in Laysan Albatrosses?

    PubMed Central

    Young, Lindsay C.; Vanderlip, Cynthia; Duffy, David C.; Afanasyev, Vsevolod; Shaffer, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    When searching for prey, animals should maximize energetic gain, while minimizing energy expenditure by altering their movements relative to prey availability. However, with increasing amounts of marine debris, what once may have been ‘optimal’ foraging strategies for top marine predators, are leading to sub-optimal diets comprised in large part of plastic. Indeed, the highly vagile Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) which forages throughout the North Pacific, are well known for their tendency to ingest plastic. Here we examine whether Laysan albatrosses nesting on Kure Atoll and Oahu Island, 2,150 km apart, experience different levels of plastic ingestion. Twenty two geolocators were deployed on breeding adults for up to two years. Regurgitated boluses of undigestable material were also collected from chicks at each site to compare the amount of plastic vs. natural foods. Chicks from Kure Atoll were fed almost ten times the amount of plastic compared to chicks from Oahu despite boluses from both colonies having similar amounts of natural food. Tracking data indicated that adults from either colony did not have core overlapping distributions during the early half of the breeding period and that adults from Kure had a greater overlap with the putative range of the Western Garbage Patch corroborating our observation of higher plastic loads at this colony. At-sea distributions also varied throughout the year suggesting that Laysan albatrosses either adjusted their foraging behavior according to constraints on time away from the nest or to variation in resources. However, in the non-breeding season, distributional overlap was greater indicating that the energy required to reach the foraging grounds was less important than the total energy available. These results demonstrate how a marine predator that is not dispersal limited alters its foraging strategy throughout the reproductive cycle to maximize energetic gain and how this has led to differences in

  9. Bringing home the trash: do colony-based differences in foraging distribution lead to increased plastic ingestion in Laysan albatrosses?

    PubMed

    Young, Lindsay C; Vanderlip, Cynthia; Duffy, David C; Afanasyev, Vsevolod; Shaffer, Scott A

    2009-01-01

    When searching for prey, animals should maximize energetic gain, while minimizing energy expenditure by altering their movements relative to prey availability. However, with increasing amounts of marine debris, what once may have been 'optimal' foraging strategies for top marine predators, are leading to sub-optimal diets comprised in large part of plastic. Indeed, the highly vagile Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) which forages throughout the North Pacific, are well known for their tendency to ingest plastic. Here we examine whether Laysan albatrosses nesting on Kure Atoll and Oahu Island, 2,150 km apart, experience different levels of plastic ingestion. Twenty two geolocators were deployed on breeding adults for up to two years. Regurgitated boluses of undigestable material were also collected from chicks at each site to compare the amount of plastic vs. natural foods. Chicks from Kure Atoll were fed almost ten times the amount of plastic compared to chicks from Oahu despite boluses from both colonies having similar amounts of natural food. Tracking data indicated that adults from either colony did not have core overlapping distributions during the early half of the breeding period and that adults from Kure had a greater overlap with the putative range of the Western Garbage Patch corroborating our observation of higher plastic loads at this colony. At-sea distributions also varied throughout the year suggesting that Laysan albatrosses either adjusted their foraging behavior according to constraints on time away from the nest or to variation in resources. However, in the non-breeding season, distributional overlap was greater indicating that the energy required to reach the foraging grounds was less important than the total energy available. These results demonstrate how a marine predator that is not dispersal limited alters its foraging strategy throughout the reproductive cycle to maximize energetic gain and how this has led to differences in plastic

  10. Atomic simulation of cracks under mixed mode loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1984-01-01

    A discrete atomic model of a crack tip in iron under mixed mode loads is examined. The results indicate that the behavior of the crack at the atomic scale as a function of the ratio of mode I to mode II component of load is quite complex. In general, crack tip plasticity appears to increase as the mode II component of load increases.

  11. [The role of plastic shock absorbers in dental implantation].

    PubMed

    Szücs, A; Divinyi, T; Belina, K; Vörös, G

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of different plastics (PE, PP, PI, PA, ABS, POM) was examined by static and dynamic loading. Detection of microdeformations and photoelastic stress analysis served as the examination method. According to the results, polyethylene is unsuitable, however the other plastics, with clauses, are suitable as shock absorbers. Apart from the mechanical investigation photoelastic stress analysis also revealed the benefit of osseointegration in force transmission to the bone. PMID:10028763

  12. Anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure in a single continuously stirred tank reactor process: Limits in co-substrate ratios and organic loading rate.

    PubMed

    Rico, Carlos; Muñoz, Noelia; Rico, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure was investigated with the aim of determining the treatment limits in terms of the cheese whey fraction in feed and the organic loading rate. The results of a continuous stirred tank reactor that was operated with a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 days showed that the co-digestion process was possible with a cheese whey fraction as high as 85% in the feed. The efficiency of the process was similar within the range of the 15-85% cheese whey fraction. To study the effect of the increasing loading rate, the HRT was progressively shortened with the 65% cheese whey fraction in the feed. The reactor efficiency dropped as the HRT decreased but enabled a stable operation over 8.7 days of HRT. At these operating conditions, a volumetric methane production rate of 1.37 m(3) CH4 m(-3) d(-1) was achieved. PMID:25911592

  13. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  14. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  15. Pathogen evolution under host avoidance plasticity.

    PubMed

    McLeod, David V; Day, Troy

    2015-09-01

    Host resistance consists of defences that limit pathogen burden, and can be classified as either adaptations targeting recovery from infection or those focused upon infection avoidance. Conventional theory treats avoidance as a fixed strategy which does not vary from one interaction to the next. However, there is increasing empirical evidence that many avoidance strategies are triggered by external stimuli, and thus should be treated as phenotypically plastic responses. Here, we consider the implications of avoidance plasticity for host-pathogen coevolution. We uncover a number of predictions challenging current theory. First, in the absence of pathogen trade-offs, plasticity can restrain pathogen evolution; moreover, the pathogen exploits conditions in which the host would otherwise invest less in resistance, causing resistance escalation. Second, when transmission trades off with pathogen-induced mortality, plasticity encourages avirulence, resulting in a superior fitness outcome for both host and pathogen. Third, plasticity ensures the sterilizing effect of pathogens has consequences for pathogen evolution. When pathogens castrate hosts, selection forces them to minimize mortality virulence; moreover, when transmission trades off with sterility alone, resistance plasticity is sufficient to prevent pathogens from evolving to fully castrate. PMID:26336170

  16. Dreaming in plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzhov, Marianna; Andelman, David; Shikler, Rafi

    2008-07-01

    Plastic is one of the most versatile materials available. It is cheap, flexible and easy to process, and as a result it is all around us - from our computer keyboards to the soles of our shoes. One of its most common applications is as an insulating coating for electric wires; indeed, plastic is well known for its insulating characteristics. It came as something of a surprise, therefore, when in the late 1970s a new generation of plastics was discovered that displayed exactly the opposite behaviour - the ability to conduct electricity. In fact, plastics can be made with a whole range of conductivities - there are polymer materials that behave like semiconductors and there are those that can conduct as well as metals. This discovery sparked a revolution in the electronics community, and three decades of research effort is now yielding a range of stunning new applications for this ubiquitous material.

  17. A Plastic Menagerie

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Mary Jane

    2010-01-01

    Bobble heads had become quite popular, depicting all sorts of sports figures, animals, and even presidents. In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made bobble head sculptures out of empty plastic drink bottles. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  18. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  19. Recycle plastics into feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, H.; Kaminsky, W.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal cracking of mixed-plastics wastes with a fluidized-bed reactor can be a viable and cost-effective means to meet mandatory recycling laws. Strict worldwide environmental statutes require the hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) to develop and implement product applications and technologies that reuse post-consumer mixed-plastics waste. Recycling or reuse of plastics waste has a broad definition. Recycling entails more than mechanical regranulation and remelting of polymers for film and molding applications. A European consortium of academia and refiners have investigated if it is possible and profitable to thermally crack plastics into feedstocks for refining and petrochemical applications. Development and demonstration of pyrolysis methods show promising possibilities of converting landfill garbage into valuable feedstocks such as ethylene, propylene, BTX, etc. Fluidized-bed reactor technologies offer HPI operators a possible avenue to meet recycling laws, conserve raw materials and yield a profit. The paper describes thermal cracking for feedstocks and pyrolysis of polyolefins.

  20. Extruded plastic scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau, Alan D. Bross and Kerry L. Mellott

    1999-04-16

    As a way to lower the cost of plastic scintillation detectors, commercially available polystyrene pellets have been used in the production of scintillating materials that can be extruded into different profiles. The selection of the raw materials is discussed. Two techniques to add wavelength shifting dopants to polystyrene pellets and to extrude plastic scintillating strips are described. Data on light yield and transmittance measurements are presented.

  1. Laser cutting plastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000-watt CO/sub 2/ laser has been demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics have been laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass-reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass-reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposable tooling made from acrylic.

  2. Elective plastic surgical procedures in adolescence.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Mary H; Schooler, Wesley G

    2004-10-01

    Adolescent patients are seeking plastic surgery to correct deformities or perceived deformities in increasing numbers. It is essential for the physician to understand the influence of perceived body image irregularity that motivates patients of all ages to request plastic surgery. The increased demand for plastic surgical procedures among young patients is caused partially to increased media exposure to the available procedures offered by plastic surgeons. A successful aesthetic procedure can have a positive influence on a mature, well-motivated teenager, while surgery on a psychologically unstable adolescent can be damaging to the patient. The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery has developed guidelines for the appropriate selection of teenagers for aesthetic plastic surgery [26]. First, the physician must "assess physical maturity, because operating on a feature that has not yet fully developed could interfere with growth or negate the benefits of surgery in later years." Second, the physician should explore emotional maturity and expectations of the teenager. The teenager should understand the goals and limitations of the proposed surgery and have realistic expectations. Third, only board certified plastic surgeons who operate in accredited facilities should perform these procedures, to ensure the safety of the teenager and the quality of the procedure. Finally, teenagers and their parents should understand the risks of surgery, postoperative restrictions on activity, and typical recovery times. The referring physician and surgeon must be aware of the positive or negative effects that plastic surgery can have on the life of a teenager and be able to select patients who have the motivation, maturity, psychosocial, and emotional attributes that will lead to patient satisfaction. PMID:15625989

  3. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with engineering plastics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cavestri, R.C.

    1993-12-01

    23 plastics have been subjected to immersion studies using 7 different lubricants at 60 C and 100 C, and 10 different refrigerants at ambient and 60 C. In the first part of the study, 22 hermetic stress crack-creep rupture test chambers were used to determine dynamic effects of a constant dead weight load on plastic test bars immersed at 20 C in a 40% refrigerant 32 ISOVG branched acid polyolester lubricant. The creep modulus data of the 10 refrigerants, using a dead weight load of 25% of ultimate tensile, are compared to values for air and HCFC-22. In the second part, the plastic test bars were aged for 14 d at constant refrigerant pressure 300 psia with 17 refrigerant lubricant combinations at 150 C. Additional evaluations were conducted to elucidate the effects of temperature, refrigerant, and lubricant on the plastics. At 150 C, high acid formation (high TAN) was further examined with dehydrated plastics. These evaluations indicate that dehydrating the plastics reduced, but did not eliminate, high TAN values and that heat alone caused the lost physicals. Alternative HFC refrigerants had little impact on plastics; some polyolester lubricants caused identifiable changes.

  4. Upper-bound limit analysis based on the natural element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shu-Tao; Liu, Ying-Hua

    2012-10-01

    The natural element method (NEM) is a newly-developed numerical method based on Voronoi diagram and Delaunay triangulation of scattered points, which adopts natural neighbour interpolation to construct trial functions in the framework of Galerkin method. Owing to its distinctive advantages, the NEM is used widely in many problems of computational mechanics. Utilizing the NEM, this paper deals with numerical limit analysis of structures made up of perfectly rigid-plastic material. According to kinematic theorem of plastic limit analysis, a mathematical programming natural element formulation is established for determining the upper bound multiplier of plane problems, and a direct iteration algorithm is proposed accordingly to solve it. In this algorithm, the plastic incompressibility condition is handled by two different treatments, and the nonlinearity and nonsmoothness of the goal function are overcome by distinguishing the rigid zones from the plastic zones at each iteration. The procedure implementation of iterative process is quite simple and effective because each iteration is equivalent to solving an associated elastic problem. The obtained limit load multiplier is proved to monotonically converge to the upper bound of true solution. Several benchmark examples are investigated to validate the significant performance of the NEM in the application field of limit analysis.

  5. The Need for Plastics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society of Plastics Engineers, Inc., Stamford, CT.

    In view of a lack of trained personnel in the industry, the Plastics Education Foundation proposes that educators (1) add more plastics programs, (2) establish plastics engineering degrees at appropriate 4-year institutions, (3) add plastics processing technology to current engineering curricula, and (4) interest younger students in courses and/or…

  6. Tensile instabilities for porous plasticity models

    SciTech Connect

    BRANNON,REBECCA M.

    2000-02-29

    Several concepts (and assumptions) from the literature for porous metals and ceramics have been synthesized into a consistent model that predicts an admissibility limit on a material's porous yield surface. To ensure positive plastic work, the rate at which a yield surface can collapse as pores grow in tension must be constrained.

  7. Effects of dispersal plasticity on population divergence and speciation.

    PubMed

    Arendt, J D

    2015-10-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is thought to have a role in driving population establishment, local adaptation and speciation. However, dispersal plasticity has been underappreciated in this literature. Plasticity in the decision to disperse is taxonomically widespread and I provide examples for insects, molluscs, polychaetes, vertebrates and flowering plants. Theoretical work is limited but indicates an interaction between dispersal distance and plasticity in the decision to disperse. When dispersal is confined to adjacent patches, dispersal plasticity may enhance local adaptation over unconditional (non-plastic) dispersal. However, when dispersal distances are greater, plasticity in dispersal decisions strongly reduces the potential for local adaptation and population divergence. Upon dispersal, settlement may be random, biased but genetically determined, or biased but plastically determined. Theory shows that biased settlement of either type increases population divergence over random settlement. One model suggests that plasticity further enhances chances of speciation. However, there are many strategies for deciding on where to settle such as a best-of-N strategy, sequential sampling with a threshold for acceptance or matching with natal habitat. To date, these strategies do not seem to have been compared within a single model. Although we are just beginning to explore evolutionary effects of dispersal plasticity, it clearly has the potential to enhance as well as inhibit population divergence. Additional work should pay particular attention to dispersal distance and the strategy used to decide on where to settle. PMID:25806544

  8. Phenotypic plasticity in two marine snails: constraints superseding life history.

    PubMed

    Hollander, J; Collyer, M L; Adams, D C; Johannesson, K

    2006-11-01

    In organisms encountering predictable environments, fixed development is expected, whereas in organisms that cannot predict their future environment, phenotypic plasticity would be optimal to increase local adaptation. To test this prediction we experimentally compared phenotypic plasticity in two rocky-shore snail species; Littorina saxatilis releasing miniature snails on the shore, and Littorina littorea releasing drifting larvae settling on various shores, expecting L. littorea to show more phenotypic plasticity than L. saxatilis. We compared magnitude and direction of vectors of phenotypic difference in juvenile shell traits after 3 months exposure to different stimuli simulating sheltered and crab-rich shores, or wave-exposed and crab-free shores. Both species showed similar direction and magnitude of vectors of phenotypic difference with minor differences only between ecotypes of the nondispersing species, indicating that plasticity is an evolving trait in L. saxatilis. The lack of a strong plastic response in L. littorea might be explained by limits rather than costs to plasticity. PMID:17040383

  9. Assessment of Cracks in Stress Concentration Regions with Localized Plastic Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, E.

    1998-11-25

    Marty brittle fracture evaluation procedures include plasticity corrections to elastically computed stress intensity factors. These corrections, which are based on the existence of a plastic zone in the vicinity of the crack tip, can overestimate the plasticity effect for a crack embedded in a stress concentration region in which the elastically computed stress exceeds the yield strength of the material in a localized zone. The interactions between the crack, which acts to relieve the high stresses driving the crack, plasticity effects in the stress concentration region, and the nature and source of the loading are examined by formulating explicit flaw finite element models for a crack emanating from the root of a notch located in a panel subject to an applied tensile stress. The results of these calculations provide conditions under which a crack-tip plasticity correction based on the Irwin plastic zone size overestimates the plasticity effect. A failure assessment diagram (FAD) curve is used to characterize the effect of plasticity on the crack driving force and to define a less restrictive plasticity correction for cracks at notch roots when load-controlled boundary conditions are imposed. The explicit flaw finite element results also demonstrate that stress intensity factors associated with load-controlled boundary conditions, such as those inherent in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code as well as in most handbooks of stress intensity factors, can be much higher than those associated with displacement-controlled conditions, such as those that produce residual or thermal stresses. Under certain conditions, the inclusion of plasticity effects for cracks loaded by displacement-controlled boundary conditions reduces the crack driving force thus justifying the elimination of a plasticity correction for such loadings. The results of this study form the basis for removing unnecessary conservatism from flaw evaluation procedures that utilize plasticity

  10. Considerations of crack growth and plasticity in finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. D.; Liebowitz, H.

    1978-01-01

    A finite-element analysis was made of crack growth in a center-cracked specimen subjected to monotonically increasing load until the point of fast fracture. Since part of the specimen experienced unloading, the boundary value problem which was formulated was based upon incremental theory of plasticity. Experimental load and crack size records were utilized. Linear relations between plastic energy and crack growth were observed. Fracture toughness parameters, which were evaluated at the onset of unstable crack propagation from finite-element analysis, were in good agreement with those determined experimentally.

  11. Hydrogen-Induced Plastic Deformation in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukáč, F.; Čížek, J.; Vlček, M.; Procházka, I.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.; Traeger, F.; Rogalla, D.; Becker, H.-W.

    In the present work hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals covered with Pd over-layer were electrochemically loaded with hydrogen and the influence of hydrogen on ZnO micro structure was investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) was employed for determination of depth profile of hydrogen concentration in the sample. NRA measurements confirmed that a substantial amount of hydrogen was introduced into ZnO by electrochemical charging. The bulk hydrogen concentration in ZnO determined by NRA agrees well with the concentration estimated from the transported charge using the Faraday's law. Moreover, a subsurface region with enhanced hydrogen concentration was found in the loaded crystals. Slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) investigations of hydrogen-loaded crystal revealed enhanced concentration of defects in the subsurface region. This testifies hydrogen-induced plastic deformation of the loaded crystal. Absorbed hydrogen causes a significant lattice expansion. At low hydrogen concentrations this expansion is accommodated by elastic straining, but at higher concentrations hydrogen-induced stress exceeds the yield stress in ZnO and plastic deformation of the loaded crystal takes place. Enhanced hydrogen concentration detected in the subsurface region by NRA is, therefore, due to excess hydrogen trapped at open volume defects introduced by plastic deformation. Moreover, it was found that hydrogen-induced plastic deformation in the subsurface layer leads to typical surface modification: formation of hexagonal shape pyramids on the surface due to hydrogen-induced slip in the [0001] direction.

  12. The plasticity of clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Group, F.F.

    1905-01-01

    (1) Sand injures plasticity little at first because the grains are suspended in a plastic mass. It is only when grains are abundant enough to come in contact with their neighbors, that the effect becomes serious, and then both strength and amount of possible flow are injured. (2) Certain rare organic colloids increase the plasticity by rendering the water viscous. (3) Fineness also tends to increase plasticity. (4) Plane surfaces (plates) increase the amount of possible flow. They also give a chance for lubrication by thinner films, thus increasing the friction of film, and the strength of the whole mass. The action of plates is thus twofold ; but fineness may be carried to such an extent as to break up plate-like grains into angular fragments. The beneficial effects of plates are also decreased by the fact that each is so closely surrounded by others in the mass. (5) Molecular attraction is twofold in increasing plasticity. As the attraction increases, the coherence and strength of the mass increase, and the amount of possible deformation before crumbling also increases. Fineness increases this action by requiring more water. Colloids and crystalloids in solution may also increase the attraction. It is thus seen to be more active than any other single factor.

  13. A critical review of the state of finite plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghdi, P. M.

    1990-05-01

    The object of this paper is to provide a critical review of the current state of plasticity in the presence of finite deformation. In view of the controversy regarding a number of fundamental issues between several existing schools of plasticity, the areas of agreement are described separately from those of disagreement. Attention is mainly focussed on the purely mechanical, rate-independent, theory of elastic-plastic materials, although closely related topics such as rate-dependent behavior, thermal effects, experimental and computational aspects, microstructural effects and crystal plasticity are also discussed and potentially fruitful directions are identified. A substantial portion of this review is devoted to the area of disagreement that covers a detailed presentation of argument(s), both pro and con, for all of the basic constitutive ingredients of the rate-independent theory such as the primitive notion or definition of plastic strain, the structure of the constitutive equation for the stress response, the yield function, the loading criteria and the flow and the hardening rules. The majority of current research in finite plasticity theory, as with its infinitesimal counterpart, still utilizes a (classical) stress-based approach which inherently possesses some shortcomings for the characterization of elastic-plastic materials. These and other anomalous behavior of a stress-based formulation are contrasted with the more recent strain-based formulation of finite plasticity. A number of important features and theoretical advantages of the latter formulation, along with its computational potential and experimental interpretation, are discussed separately.

  14. Unified creep-plasticity model for halite

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, R. D.

    1980-11-01

    There are two national energy programs which are considering caverns in geological salt (NaCl) as a storage repository. One is the disposal of nuclear wastes and the other is the storage of oil. Both short-time and long-time structural deformations and stresses must be predictable for these applications. At 300K, the nominal initial temperature for both applications, the salt is at 0.28 of the melting temperature and exhibits a significant time dependent behavior. A constitutive model has been developed which describes the behavior observed in an extensive set of triaxial creep tests. Analysis of these tests showed that a single deformation mechanism seems to be operative over the stress and temperature range of interest so that the secondary creep data can be represented by a power of the stress over the entire test range. This simple behavior allowed a new unified creep-plasticity model to be applied with some confidence. The resulting model recognizes no inherent difference between plastic and creep strains yet models the total inelastic strain reasonably well including primary and secondary creep and reverse loadings. A multiaxial formulation is applied with a back stress. A Bauschinger effect is exhibited as a consequence and is present regardless of the time scale over which the loading is applied. The model would be interpreted as kinematic hardening in the sense of classical plasticity. Comparisons are made between test data and model behavior.

  15. Consumer hazards of plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Wiberg, G S

    1976-01-01

    The modern consumer is exposed to a wide variety of plastic and rubber products in his day to day life: at home, work, school, shopping, recreation and play, and transport. A large variety of toxic sequellae have resulted from untoward exposures by many different routes: oral, dermal, inhalation, and parenteral. Toxic change may result from the plastic itself, migration of unbound components and additives, chemical decomposition or toxic pyrolysis products. The type of damage may involve acute poisoning, chronic organ damage, reproductive disorders, and carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic episodes. Typical examples for all routes are cited along with the activites of Canadian regulatory agencies to reduce both the incidence and severity of plastic-induced disease. PMID:1026409

  16. Simulation study on the avalanche process of the mixed brittle-plastic fiber bundle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Xia, Hui; Han, Kui

    2016-01-01

    The mixed brittle-plastic fiber bundle model is an extension model based on the classical fiber bundle model to describe the nonbrittle failure process of some hierarchical structure materials such as spider silk. In order to explore the breaking dynamic properties of the hierarchical structure materials in short-range correlation, the mixed brittle-plastic fiber bundle model in local load sharing condition is detailed and numerically studied. The impacts of the proportion of plastic fibers and the plastic strength of a single plastic fiber on the macroscopic constitutive behavior, the avalanche size distribution and the step number of the external load increasing are investigated, respectively. The numerical results show that the insert of plastic fibers will hinder the brittle fracture process; as a result, both the macroscopic mechanical natures and the statistical properties of fracture are significantly influenced.

  17. Model of plasticity of amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, V. I.; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2011-08-01

    Starting from a classical Kröener-Rieder kinematic picture for plasticity, we derive a set of dynamical equations describing plastic flow in a Lagrangian formulation. Our derivation is a natural and straightforward extension of simple fluids, elastic, and viscous solids theories. These equations contain the Maxwell model as a special limit. This paper is inspired by the particularly important work of Langer and coworkers. We shall show that our equations bear some resemblance with the shear-transformation zones model developed by Langer and coworkers. We shall point out some important differences. We discuss some results of plasticity, which can be described by the present model. We exploit the model equations for the simple examples: straining of a slab and a rod. We find that necking manifests always itself (not as a result of instability), except if the very special constant-velocity stretching process is imposed.

  18. Plastic heliostat enclosure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. J.

    1984-12-01

    The conceptual design and cost analysis of an enclosed plastic heliostat for a 50-MW/sub e/ central receiver solar thermal electric power plant are presented. The purpose of the study was to analyze the most recent design of the Boeing enclosed plastic heliostat for cost and compare results with a reference second generation glass heliostat case provided by Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. In addition, sensitivities of busbar energy costs to variations in capital cost (installed cost), operation and maintenance most and overall reflectivity were evaluated.

  19. Mesoscale Studies of Mixing in Reactive Materials During Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya; Herbold, Eric

    2011-06-01

    One of the requisite processes for reactions between solid powder particles resulting from shock loading is that they undergo large deformations, exposing new surfaces while mixing with surrounding material. The deformability of Al particles on the scale of hundreds of nanometers to several microns with an oxide layer or Ni coating during shock loading is investigated. Mesoscale simulations with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN show enhanced fracture of the outside layer of the Al particles when even small volume fractions of a larger or dense material is added to the mixture. Rate of reactions in solid-solid mixtures is not a unique function of pressure, temperature and the plastic strain. Reactions under shock loading happen in reaction zone, which extent is defined by the surface of interfacial area and the depth of the diffusion layer. The former depends on the level of hydrodynamic mixing of heterogeneous material under shock, while the latter depends on the temperature-dependent species diffusion. These processes introduce time and length scales onto the problem. To study diffusion-limited reactions on the grain scale level, material diffusion and a simple reaction kinetic which depends on the interfacial surface area is implemented in GEODYN. Several scenarios of diffusion-reaction processes initiated by shock loading in loose or consolidated powders with initially well- defined material interfaces are considered.

  20. Biaxial load effects in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Lee, J. D.; Eftis, J.

    1977-01-01

    It is found that the standard expressions for elastic stress and displacement in the crack-tip region (i.e., the so-called singular solution) cannot be considered to be approximations that are acceptable in a completely general sense. This conclusion is best illustrated by the instance of a biaxially loaded infinite sheet with a flat horizontal central crack, where the effect of load applied parallel to the plane of the crack appears entirely in the second terms of the series representations for local stresses and displacements. An elastoplastic finite-element analysis of the same biaxially loaded finite specimen geometry shows that the global energy release rate, the J-integral, the plastic stress and strain intensity factors (in the sense of Hilton and Hutchinson), and the size of the crack border region plastic yield, all have pronounced biaxial load dependence.

  1. Maximum-load predictions in the Dugdale model using critical CTOA criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Inhoy Gu . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    An engineering method of elastic-plastic fracture analysis is suggested for plane-strain specimens under tension. The condition for an increment of crack extension is set by a critical increment of crack tip opening displacement (CTOD). The CTOD increment divided by the incremental crack extension is a critical crack tip opening angle (CTOA), assumed to be constant for a material of a given thickness, characterizing the tearing resistance of material. Based on a finite-element analysis of crack tip deformation, a load term in the CTOD equation of the Dugdale strip yield model is modified to accommodate large and small scale yielding, for which cohesive stress in the strip is assumed greater than that for the plane-stress model. Approximate generalization of the Dugdale model is suggested for finite-size specimens. A definition of CTOD is reviewed with a round and sharp crack tip. In a successive application of the CTOA is reviewed with a round and sharp crack tip. In a successive application of the CTOA criterion at a current extending crack tip, the integration of the incremental crack extensions and load increments after fracture initiation gives a relationship in which a maximum load is either a peak load or a limit load on an unbroken ligament. Material constants are evaluated so that the calculated loads agree with test loads at each crack extension. The proposed method is applied to various specimens of 304 stainless steel for which test data are available.

  2. Laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation for shock wave loading: validation and applications.

    PubMed

    Paisley, Dennis L; Luo, Sheng-Nian; Greenfield, Scott R; Koskelo, Aaron C

    2008-02-01

    We present validation and some applications of two laser-driven shock wave loading techniques: laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation. We characterize the flyer plate during flight and the dynamically loaded target with temporally and spatially resolved diagnostics. With transient imaging displacement interferometry, we demonstrate that the planarity (bow and tilt) of the loading induced by a spatially shaped laser pulse is within 2-7 mrad (with an average of 4+/-1 mrad), similar to that in conventional techniques including gas gun loading. Plasma heating of target is negligible, in particular, when a plasma shield is adopted. For flyer plate loading, supported shock waves can be achieved. Temporal shaping of the drive pulse in confined laser ablation allows for flexible loading, e.g., quasi-isentropic, Taylor-wave, and off-Hugoniot loading. These techniques can be utilized to investigate such dynamic responses of materials as Hugoniot elastic limit, plasticity, spall, shock roughness, equation of state, phase transition, and metallurgical characteristics of shock-recovered samples. PMID:18315311

  3. An analysis of fully plastic Brinell indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biwa, Shiro; Storåkers, Bertil

    1995-08-01

    strain measures. Attention is also given to the elastic-plastic transition region of Brinell indentation in search for loading levels sufficiently high that the results tend to an asymptotic fully plastic state. A standard finite element technique employing contact elements for a moving boundary is used to analyse with tolerable accuracy the influence of elasticity and more elaborate hardening behaviour. Some relevant features are shown for a sequence of solutions from elastic Hertzian to fully plastic behaviour.

  4. Effect of tip radius on the incipient plasticity of chromium studied by nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong; Morris, James R; Nieh, T. G.

    2015-01-01

    The onset of plasticity in Cr was investigated by nanoindentation using indenters with tip radii ranging from 60 to 759 nm. The stress for incipient plasticity was found to increase with decreasing tip radius. The cumulative pop-in probability on load could be described successfully by a combined model over the full range of tip radius, indicating that the incipient plasticity might be triggered either by the homogeneous nucleation of dislocation or by the activation of existing dislocations underneath the indenter.

  5. Migration of nanoparticles from plastic packaging materials containing carbon black into foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Bott, Johannes; Störmer, Angela; Franz, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Carbon black was investigated to assess and quantify the possibility that nanoparticles might migrate out of plastic materials used in the food packaging industry. Two types of carbon black were incorporated in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polystyrene (PS) at 2.5% and 5.0% loading (w/w), and then subjected to migration studies. The samples were exposed to different food simulants according to European Union Plastics Regulation 10/2011, simulating long-term storage with aqueous and fatty foodstuffs. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a multi-angle laser light-scattering (MALLS) detector was used to separate, characterise and quantify the potential release of nanoparticles. The AF4 method was successful in differentiating carbon black from other matrix components, such as extracted polymer chains, in the migration solution. At a detection limit of 12 µg kg⁻¹, carbon black did not migrate from the packaging material into food simulants. The experimental findings are in agreement with theoretical considerations based on migration modelling. From both the experimental findings and theoretical considerations, it can be concluded that carbon black does not migrate into food once it is incorporated into a plastics food contact material. PMID:25105506

  6. MWCNTs-reinforced epoxidized linseed oil plasticized polylactic acid nanocomposite and its electroactive shape memory behaviour.

    PubMed

    Alam, Javed; Alam, Manawwer; Raja, Mohan; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy

    2014-01-01

    A novel electroactive shape memory polymer nanocomposite of epoxidized linseed oil plasticized polylactic acid and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was prepared by a combination of solution blending, solvent cast technique, and hydraulic hot press moulding. In this study, polylactic acid (PLA) was first plasticized by epoxidized linseed oil (ELO) in order to overcome the major limitations of PLA, such as high brittleness, low toughness, and low tensile elongation. Then, MWCNTs were incorporated into the ELO plasticized PLA matrix at three different loadings (2, 3 and 5 wt. %), with the aim of making the resulting nanocomposites electrically conductive. The addition of ELO decreased glass transition temperature, and increased the elongation and thermal degradability of PLA, as shown in the results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile test, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to observe surface morphology, topography, and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the nanocomposite. Finally, the electroactive-shape memory effect (electroactive-SME) in the resulting nanocomposite was investigated by a fold-deploy "U"-shape bending test. As per the results, the addition of both ELO and MWCNTs to PLA matrix seemed to enhance its overall properties with a great deal of potential in improved shape memory. The 3 wt. % MWCNTs-reinforced nanocomposite system, which showed 95% shape recovery within 45 s at 40 DC voltage, is expected to be used as a preferential polymeric nanocomposite material in various actuators, sensors and deployable devices. PMID:25365179

  7. Linear, non-linear and plastic bending deformation of cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pan; Ogawa, Yu; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Ismail, Ahmed E; Mazeau, Karim

    2016-07-20

    The deformation behaviour of cellulose nanocrystals under bending loads was investigated by using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and finite element analysis (FEA), and compared with electron micrographs of ultrasonicated microfibrils. The linear elastic, non-linear elastic, and plastic deformation regions were observed with increasing bending displacements. In the linear elastic region, the deformation behaviour was highly anisotropic with respect to the bending direction. This was due to the difference in shear modulus, and the deformation could be approximated by standard continuum mechanics using the corresponding elastic tensors. Above the linear elastic region, the shear deformation became a dominant factor as the amplitude of shear strain drastically increased. Plastic deformation limit was observed at the bending angle above about 60°, independent of the bending direction. The morphology of the atomistic model of plastically deformed cellulose crystals showed a considerable similarity to the kinked cellulose microfibrils observed by transmission electron microscopy. Our observations highlight the importance of shear during deformation of cellulose crystals and provide an understanding of basic deformations occurring during the processing of cellulose materials. PMID:27388579

  8. Migration of nanoparticles from plastic packaging materials containing carbon black into foodstuffs

    PubMed Central

    Bott, Johannes; Störmer, Angela; Franz, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Carbon black was investigated to assess and quantify the possibility that nanoparticles might migrate out of plastic materials used in the food packaging industry. Two types of carbon black were incorporated in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polystyrene (PS) at 2.5% and 5.0% loading (w/w), and then subjected to migration studies. The samples were exposed to different food simulants according to European Union Plastics Regulation 10/2011, simulating long-term storage with aqueous and fatty foodstuffs. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a multi-angle laser light-scattering (MALLS) detector was used to separate, characterise and quantify the potential release of nanoparticles. The AF4 method was successful in differentiating carbon black from other matrix components, such as extracted polymer chains, in the migration solution. At a detection limit of 12 µg kg−1, carbon black did not migrate from the packaging material into food simulants. The experimental findings are in agreement with theoretical considerations based on migration modelling. From both the experimental findings and theoretical considerations, it can be concluded that carbon black does not migrate into food once it is incorporated into a plastics food contact material. PMID:25105506

  9. Microscopic anthropogenic litter in terrestrial birds from Shanghai, China: Not only plastics but also natural fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shiye; Zhu, Lixin; Li, Daoji

    2016-04-15

    The level of contamination by microscopic anthropogenic litter (0.5-5mm) in terrestrial ecosystems is not well understood. After chemical digestion in 10% KOH, microscopic anthropogenic litter from the gastrointestinal tracts of 17 terrestrial birds was identified and categorized under a stereomicroscope based on its physical properties and melting tests. In total, 364 items from 16 birds were identified as microscopic anthropogenic litter, ranging in size from 0.5 to 8.5mm. No relationship between plastic load and body condition was found. Natural fibers, plastic fibers and fragmented plastics represented, respectively, 37.4% (136 items), 54.9% (200 items) and 7.7% (28 items) of total litter items. Small sample sizes limited our ability to draw strong conclusions about the metabolism of natural fibers, but the decline in the proportion of natural fibers from the esophagus to stomach to intestine suggested that they may be digestible. Particles smaller than 5mm represented more than 90% of the total number of pollutant items. Particles with colors in the mid-tones and fibrous shapes were overwhelmingly common particles. The results reflect pollution by microscopic anthropogenic litter in the terrestrial ecosystem of the study area. Microscopic natural fibers, which may disperse and adsorb chemical pollutants differently from microplastic and may pose an even greater risk, are in urgent need of further research. PMID:26874248

  10. MWCNTs-Reinforced Epoxidized Linseed Oil Plasticized Polylactic Acid Nanocomposite and Its Electroactive Shape Memory Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Javed; Alam, Manawwer; Raja, Mohan; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy

    2014-01-01

    A novel electroactive shape memory polymer nanocomposite of epoxidized linseed oil plasticized polylactic acid and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was prepared by a combination of solution blending, solvent cast technique, and hydraulic hot press moulding. In this study, polylactic acid (PLA) was first plasticized by epoxidized linseed oil (ELO) in order to overcome the major limitations of PLA, such as high brittleness, low toughness, and low tensile elongation. Then, MWCNTs were incorporated into the ELO plasticized PLA matrix at three different loadings (2, 3 and 5 wt. %), with the aim of making the resulting nanocomposites electrically conductive. The addition of ELO decreased glass transition temperature, and increased the elongation and thermal degradability of PLA, as shown in the results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile test, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to observe surface morphology, topography, and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the nanocomposite. Finally, the electroactive-shape memory effect (electroactive-SME) in the resulting nanocomposite was investigated by a fold-deploy “U”-shape bending test. As per the results, the addition of both ELO and MWCNTs to PLA matrix seemed to enhance its overall properties with a great deal of potential in improved shape memory. The 3 wt. % MWCNTs-reinforced nanocomposite system, which showed 95% shape recovery within 45 s at 40 DC voltage, is expected to be used as a preferential polymeric nanocomposite material in various actuators, sensors and deployable devices. PMID:25365179

  11. High strain-rate plastic flow in Fe and Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Raymond; Eggert, Jon; Rudd, Robert; Bolme, Cynthia; Collins, Gilbert

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the nature and time-dependence of material deformation at high strain rates is an important goal in condensed matter physics. Under dynamic loading, the rate of plastic strain is determined by the flow of dislocations through the crystal lattice and is a complex function of time, distance, sample purity, temperature, internal stresses, microstructure and strain rate. Under shock compression time-dependent plasticity is typically inferred by fitting elastic precursor stresses as a function of propagation distance with a phenomenologically based dislocation kinetics model. We employ a laser-driven ramp wave loading technique to compress 6-70 micron thick samples of bcc-Fe and fcc-Al over a strain rate range of 1e6-1e8 1/s. Our data show that for fixed sample thickness, stresses associated the onset of plasticity are highly dependent on the strain rate of compression and do not readily fit into the elastic stress - distance evolution descriptive of instantaneous shock loading. We find that the elastic stress at the onset of plasticity is well correlated with the strain rate at the onset of plastic flow for both shock- and ramp-wave experiments. Our data, combined with data from other dynamic compression platforms, reveal a sharp increase in the peak elastic stress at high strain rates, consistent with a transition in dislocation flow dominated by phonon drag. smith248@llnl.gov

  12. Deformation fields near a steady fatigue crack with anisotropic plasticity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gao, Yanfei

    2015-11-30

    In this work, from finite element simulations based on an irreversible, hysteretic cohesive interface model, a steady fatigue crack can be realized if the crack extension exceeds about twice the plastic zone size, and both the crack increment per loading cycle and the crack bridging zone size are smaller than the plastic zone size. The corresponding deformation fields develop a plastic wake behind the crack tip and a compressive residual stress field ahead of the crack tip. In addition, the Hill’s plasticity model is used to study the role of plastic anisotropy on the retardation of fatigue crack growth andmore » the elastic strain fields. It is found that for Mode-I cyclic loading, an enhanced yield stress in directions that are inclined from the crack plane will lead to slower crack growth rate, but this retardation is insignificant for typical degrees of plastic anisotropy. Furthermore, these results provide key inputs for future comparisons to neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements that provide full-field lattice strain mapping near fracture and fatigue crack tips, especially in textured materials such as wrought or rolled Mg alloys.« less

  13. Deformation fields near a steady fatigue crack with anisotropic plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yanfei

    2015-11-30

    In this work, from finite element simulations based on an irreversible, hysteretic cohesive interface model, a steady fatigue crack can be realized if the crack extension exceeds about twice the plastic zone size, and both the crack increment per loading cycle and the crack bridging zone size are smaller than the plastic zone size. The corresponding deformation fields develop a plastic wake behind the crack tip and a compressive residual stress field ahead of the crack tip. In addition, the Hill’s plasticity model is used to study the role of plastic anisotropy on the retardation of fatigue crack growth and the elastic strain fields. It is found that for Mode-I cyclic loading, an enhanced yield stress in directions that are inclined from the crack plane will lead to slower crack growth rate, but this retardation is insignificant for typical degrees of plastic anisotropy. Furthermore, these results provide key inputs for future comparisons to neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements that provide full-field lattice strain mapping near fracture and fatigue crack tips, especially in textured materials such as wrought or rolled Mg alloys.

  14. Molecular Signaling in Muscle Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Henry F.

    1999-01-01

    Extended spaceflight under microgravity conditions leads to significant atrophy of weight-bearing muscles. Atrophy and hypertrophy are the extreme outcomes of the high degree of plasticity exhibited by skeletal muscle. Stimuli which control muscle plasticity include neuronal, hormonal, nutritional, and mechanical inputs. The mechanical stimulus for muscle is directly related to the work or exercise against a load performed. Little or no work is performed by weight-bearing muscles under microgravity conditions. A major hypothesis is that focal adhesion kinase (FAK) which is associated with integrin at the adherens junctions and costa meres of all skeletal muscles is an integral part of the major mechanism for molecular signaling upon mechanical stimulation in all muscle fibers. Additionally, we propose that myotonic protein kinase (DMPK) and dystrophin (DYSTR) also participate in distinct mechanically stimulated molecular signaling pathways that are most critical in type I and type II muscle fibers, respectively. To test these hypotheses, we will use the paradigms of hindlimb unloading and overloading in mice as models for microgravity conditions and a potential exercise countermeasure, respectively, in mice. We expect that FAK loss-of-function will impair hypertrophy and enhance atrophy in all skeletal muscle fibers whereas DYSTR and DMPK loss-of-function will have similar but more selective effects on Type IT and Type I fibers, respectively. Gene expression will be monitored by muscle-specific creatine kinase M promoter-reporter construct activity and specific MRNA and protein accumulation in the soleus (type I primarily) and plantaris (type 11 primarily) muscles. With these paradigms and assays, the following Specific Project Aims will be tested in genetically altered mice: 1) identify the roles of DYSTR and its pathway; 2) evaluate the roles of the DMPK and its pathway; 3) characterize the roles of FAK and its pathway and 4) genetically analyze the mechanisms

  15. Individual differences in behavioural plasticities.

    PubMed

    Stamps, Judy A

    2016-05-01

    Interest in individual differences in animal behavioural plasticities has surged in recent years, but research in this area has been hampered by semantic confusion as different investigators use the same terms (e.g. plasticity, flexibility, responsiveness) to refer to different phenomena. The first goal of this review is to suggest a framework for categorizing the many different types of behavioural plasticities, describe examples of each, and indicate why using reversibility as a criterion for categorizing behavioural plasticities is problematic. This framework is then used to address a number of timely questions about individual differences in behavioural plasticities. One set of questions concerns the experimental designs that can be used to study individual differences in various types of behavioural plasticities. Although within-individual designs are the default option for empirical studies of many types of behavioural plasticities, in some situations (e.g. when experience at an early age affects the behaviour expressed at subsequent ages), 'replicate individual' designs can provide useful insights into individual differences in behavioural plasticities. To date, researchers using within-individual and replicate individual designs have documented individual differences in all of the major categories of behavioural plasticities described herein. Another important question is whether and how different types of behavioural plasticities are related to one another. Currently there is empirical evidence that many behavioural plasticities [e.g. contextual plasticity, learning rates, IIV (intra-individual variability), endogenous plasticities, ontogenetic plasticities) can themselves vary as a function of experiences earlier in life, that is, many types of behavioural plasticity are themselves developmentally plastic. These findings support the assumption that differences among individuals in prior experiences may contribute to individual differences in behavioural

  16. Preserving in Plastic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahla, James

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps for casting insects in permanent molds prepared from commercially available liquid plastic. Also describes dry mountings in glass, acrylic, and petri dishes. The rationale for specimen use, hints for producing quality results, purchasing information, and safety precautions are considered. (DH)

  17. Plastics in Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergandine, David R.; Holm, D. Andrew

    The materials in this curriculum supplement, developed for middle school or high school science classes, present solid waste problems related to plastics. The set of curriculum materials is divided into two units to be used together or independently. Unit I begins by comparing patterns in solid waste from 1960 to 1990 and introducing methods for…

  18. Plastics in medical applications.

    PubMed

    Lantos, P R

    1988-01-01

    Plastics are fulfilling a number of critical roles in a variety of medical applications. While some of these are low-technology, throw-away products, many of the applications impose critical requirements as to mechanical performance, chemical resistance, biocompatibility, ability to be sterilized and to remain sterile. By performing capably and reliably in these applications, plastics have found a major outlet, one that offers good opportunities for the present materials as well as for future developments. Numerous challenges remain. The present materials perform, though barely adequately, and superior performance over longer periods of time is an important goal. While off-the-shelf plastics have been used in most medical applications, it is likely that development work will focus on the needs of specific important medical applications. In addition to the usual need for ever decreasing costs and prices, there is the opportunity for materials that possess improved blood compatibility, radiation resistance, and/or in vivo compatibility for improved degradable sutures, coatings for pacemakers, phthalate-free plastics, bags with improved gas impermeability and disposables with controlled degradability. PMID:3230510

  19. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  20. Music drives brain plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Music is becoming more and more of an issue in the cognitive neurosciences. A major finding in this research area is that musical practice is associated with structural and functional plasticity of the brain. In this brief review, I will give an overview of the most recent findings of this research area. PMID:20948610

  1. Method for compression molding of thermosetting plastics utilizing a temperature gradient across the plastic to cure the article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for compression molding of thermosetting plastics composition. Heat is applied to the compressed load in a mold cavity and adjusted to hold molding temperature at the interface of the cavity surface and the compressed compound to produce a thermal front. This thermal front advances into the evacuated compound at mean right angles to the compression load and toward a thermal fence formed at the opposite surface of the compressed compound.

  2. LOADING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-10-01

    A device is presented for loading or charging bodies of fissionable material into a reactor. This device consists of a car, mounted on tracks, into which the fissionable materials may be placed at a remote area, transported to the reactor, and inserted without danger to the operating personnel. The car has mounted on it a heavily shielded magazine for holding a number of the radioactive bodies. The magazine is of a U-shaped configuration and is inclined to the horizontal plane, with a cap covering the elevated open end, and a remotely operated plunger at the lower, closed end. After the fissionable bodies are loaded in the magazine and transported to the reactor, the plunger inserts the body at the lower end of the magazine into the reactor, then is withdrawn, thereby allowing gravity to roll the remaining bodies into position for successive loading in a similar manner.

  3. The experimental verification of the evolution of kinematic and isotropic hardening in cyclic plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trampczynski, Wieslaw

    S IMPLE PLASTIC shear, plastic torsion, cyclic plastic shear, cyclic plastic tension-compression and out of phase tests of 18G2A and 21CrMoV57 steel were performed. The specimens were loaded monotonically and cyclically with constant effective strain rate under controlled amplitude of plastic strains at room temperature. Using the technique of successive unloadings, the standard physical quantities and the stress jumps corresponding to opposite directions of plastic straining were measured. For the Huber-Mises yield surface such results enable the evolution of kinematic and isotropic hardening for such programs to be followed. The results obtained show new effects concerning the influence of strain history on cyclic plasticity and can be useful for verification of existing theoretical approaches and stimulation of new theoretical ideas.

  4. MiRNAs in Astrocyte-Derived Exosomes as Possible Mediators of Neuronal Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lafourcade, Carlos; Ramírez, Juan Pablo; Luarte, Alejandro; Fernández, Anllely; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes use gliotransmitters to modulate neuronal function and plasticity. However, the role of small extracellular vesicles, called exosomes, in astrocyte-to-neuron signaling is mostly unknown. Exosomes originate in multivesicular bodies of parent cells and are secreted by fusion of the multivesicular body limiting membrane with the plasma membrane. Their molecular cargo, consisting of RNA species, proteins, and lipids, is in part cell type and cell state specific. Among the RNA species transported by exosomes, microRNAs (miRNAs) are able to modify gene expression in recipient cells. Several miRNAs present in astrocytes are regulated under pathological conditions, and this may have far-reaching consequences if they are loaded in exosomes. We propose that astrocyte-derived miRNA-loaded exosomes, such as miR-26a, are dysregulated in several central nervous system diseases; thus potentially controlling neuronal morphology and synaptic transmission through validated and predicted targets. Unraveling the contribution of this new signaling mechanism to the maintenance and plasticity of neuronal networks will impact our understanding on the physiology and pathophysiology of the central nervous system. PMID:27547038

  5. Finite element investigation of thermo-elastic and thermo-plastic consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Aboustit, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    The transient response of saturated continua due to thermal as well as mechanical loads is investigated in both elastic and plastic ranges. When the two phase saturated media are subjected to thermomechanical loading, the energy equation is coupled with the mass flow and solid deformation equations resulting in the initial boundary value problem of thermal consolidation. The solid behavior may be assumed to be either elastic or elastoplastic leading to the associated theories of thermoelastic and thermoelastoplastic consolidation. The governing equations for the quasi-static infinitesimal theory of thermoelastic consolidation are developed by using the theory of mixtures. An equivalent variational principle is developed along with associated finite element formulations. Two isoparametric elements of the composite type are employed for the spatial discretization. The formulation is extended to the plastic ranges by modeling the solid phase as an elastic work hardening material with an associated flow rule. An incremental iterative scheme is developed to solve this nonlinear transient problem. Several special purpose computer codes are developed for evaluating the isothermal, thermal, elastic and elastoplastic plane strain consolidation responses. These codes have been evaluated against limiting cases available in the literature. The effects of temporal and spatial interpolation schemes are investigated for one-dimensional thermoelastic consolidation problems. An application dealing with a plane strain underground coal gasification problem is also presented.

  6. Micropillar compression technique applied to micron-scale mudstone elasto-plastic deformation.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Chidsey, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Boyce, Brad Lee; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

    2010-12-01

    Mudstone mechanical testing is often limited by poor core recovery and sample size, preservation and preparation issues, which can lead to sampling bias, damage, and time-dependent effects. A micropillar compression technique, originally developed by Uchic et al. 2004, here is applied to elasto-plastic deformation of small volumes of mudstone, in the range of cubic microns. This study examines behavior of the Gothic shale, the basal unit of the Ismay zone of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation and potential shale gas play in southeastern Utah, USA. Precision manufacture of micropillars 5 microns in diameter and 10 microns in length are prepared using an ion-milling method. Characterization of samples is carried out using: dual focused ion - scanning electron beam imaging of nano-scaled pores and distribution of matrix clay and quartz, as well as pore-filling organics; laser scanning confocal (LSCM) 3D imaging of natural fractures; and gas permeability, among other techniques. Compression testing of micropillars under load control is performed using two different nanoindenter techniques. Deformation of 0.5 cm in diameter by 1 cm in length cores is carried out and visualized by a microscope loading stage and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Axisymmetric multistage compression testing and multi-stress path testing is carried out using 2.54 cm plugs. Discussion of results addresses size of representative elementary volumes applicable to continuum-scale mudstone deformation, anisotropy, and size-scale plasticity effects. Other issues include fabrication-induced damage, alignment, and influence of substrate.

  7. Numerical implementation of a crystal plasticity model with dislocation transport for high strain rate applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayeur, Jason R.; Mourad, Hashem M.; Luscher, Darby J.; Hunter, Abigail; Kenamond, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    This paper details a numerical implementation of a single crystal plasticity model with dislocation transport for high strain rate applications. Our primary motivation for developing the model is to study the influence of dislocation transport and conservation on the mesoscale response of metallic crystals under extreme thermo-mechanical loading conditions (e.g. shocks). To this end we have developed a single crystal plasticity theory (Luscher et al (2015)) that incorporates finite deformation kinematics, internal stress fields caused by the presence of geometrically necessary dislocation gradients, advection equations to model dislocation density transport and conservation, and constitutive equations appropriate for shock loading (equation of state, drag-limited dislocation velocity, etc). In the following, we outline a coupled finite element–finite volume framework for implementing the model physics, and demonstrate its capabilities in simulating the response of a [1 0 0] copper single crystal during a plate impact test. Additionally, we explore the effect of varying certain model parameters (e.g. mesh density, finite volume update scheme) on the simulation results. Our results demonstrate that the model performs as intended and establishes a baseline of understanding that can be leveraged as we extend the model to incorporate additional and/or refined physics and move toward a multi-dimensional implementation.

  8. MiRNAs in Astrocyte-Derived Exosomes as Possible Mediators of Neuronal Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lafourcade, Carlos; Ramírez, Juan Pablo; Luarte, Alejandro; Fernández, Anllely; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes use gliotransmitters to modulate neuronal function and plasticity. However, the role of small extracellular vesicles, called exosomes, in astrocyte-to-neuron signaling is mostly unknown. Exosomes originate in multivesicular bodies of parent cells and are secreted by fusion of the multivesicular body limiting membrane with the plasma membrane. Their molecular cargo, consisting of RNA species, proteins, and lipids, is in part cell type and cell state specific. Among the RNA species transported by exosomes, microRNAs (miRNAs) are able to modify gene expression in recipient cells. Several miRNAs present in astrocytes are regulated under pathological conditions, and this may have far-reaching consequences if they are loaded in exosomes. We propose that astrocyte-derived miRNA-loaded exosomes, such as miR-26a, are dysregulated in several central nervous system diseases; thus potentially controlling neuronal morphology and synaptic transmission through validated and predicted targets. Unraveling the contribution of this new signaling mechanism to the maintenance and plasticity of neuronal networks will impact our understanding on the physiology and pathophysiology of the central nervous system. PMID:27547038

  9. Connecting Local Yield Stresses with Plastic Activity in Amorphous Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patinet, Sylvain; Vandembroucq, Damien; Falk, Michael L.

    2016-07-01

    In model amorphous solids produced via differing quench protocols, a strong correlation is established between local yield stress measured by direct local probing of shear stress thresholds and the plastic rearrangements observed during remote loading in shear. This purely local measure shows a higher predictive power for identifying sites of plastic activity when compared with more conventional structural properties. Most importantly, the sites of low local yield stress, thus defined, are shown to be persistent, remaining predictive of deformation events even after fifty or more such plastic rearrangements. This direct and nonperturbative approach gives access to relevant transition pathways that control the stability of amorphous solids. Our results reinforce the relevance of modeling plasticity in amorphous solids based on a gradually evolving population of discrete and local zones preexisting in the structure.

  10. Use of Flexible Body Coupled Loads in Assessment of Day of Launch Flight Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Brett R.; Yunis, Isam; Olds, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    A Day of Launch flight loads assessment technique that determines running loads calculated from flexible body coupled loads was developed for the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle. The technique was developed to quantify DOL flight loads in terms of structural load components rather than the typically used q-alpha metric to provide more insight into the DOL loads. In this technique, running loads in the primary structure are determined from the combination of quasi-static aerodynamic loads and dynamic loads. The aerodynamic loads are calculated as a function of time using trajectory parameters passed from the DOL trajectory simulation and are combined with precalculated dynamic loads using a load combination equation. The potential change in aerodynamic load due to wind variability during the countdown is included in the load combination. In the event of a load limit exceedance, the technique allows the identification of what load component is exceeded, a quantification of how much the load limit is exceeded, and where on the vehicle the exceedance occurs. This technique was used to clear the Ares I-X FTV for launch on October 28, 2009. This paper describes the use of coupled loads in the Ares I-X flight loads assessment and summarizes the Ares I-X load assessment results.

  11. Force Limit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  12. Spring back of infinite honeycomb sheets beyond plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfanti, A.; Bhaskar, A.

    2015-02-01

    Cellular structures are promising for applications where high stiffness and strength are required with the minimal use of material. They are often used in applications where the plastic deformation plays an important role, such as those involving crashworthiness, energy absorption, and stents. The elastic analysis of a honeycomb sheet has been carried out in the past [1]. The present analysis extends this classical work in the elasto-plastic regime. Recoil analysis due to elastic recovery is absent from the published literature. This work aims to develop an analytical model to calculate the spring back for a simplified case, that of an infinite honeycomb sheet. An elastic-perfectly plastic material model is assumed. The recoil for a clamped beam with a load and moment applied at the free edge is analytically calculated first. This is carried out by relating the stress distribution of the cross section to the final deformed shape. The part corresponding to the elastic contribution is subsequently subtracted in order to obtain the final configuration after the external load is removed. This simple elasto-plastic analysis is then incorporated into the analysis of an infinite sheet made of uniform hexagonal cells. The translational symmetry of the lattice is exploited along with the analysis of a beam under tip loading through to plastic stage and recoil. The final shape of the struts upon the removal of the remote stress is completely determined by the plastic deformation which cannot be recovered. The expression for the beam thus obtained is then used to build an analytical model for an infinite honeycomb sheet loaded in both directions.

  13. Plastics for Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Jack

    1977-01-01

    Describes three plastics projects (which involve making a styrene fishing bobber, an acrylic salad fork and spoon set, and acetate shrink art) designed to provide elementary level students an opportunity to work with plastics and to learn about careers in plastics production and distribution. (TA)

  14. Use of Plastic Capillaries for Macromolecular Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Rachel R.; Hong, Young-Soo; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of crystallization of biomolecules in plastic capillaries (Nalgene 870 PFA tubing) are presented. These crystallization methods used batch, free-interface liquid- liquid diffusion alone, or a combination with vapor diffusion. Results demonstrated growth of crystals of test proteins such as thaumatin and glucose isomerase, as well as protein studied in our laboratory such dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Once the solutions were loaded in capillaries, they were stored in the tubes in frozen state at cryogenic temperatures until the desired time of activation of crystallization experiments.

  15. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  16. Recycling of plastic waste by density separation: prospects for optimization.

    PubMed

    Gent, Malcolm Richard; Menendez, Mario; Toraño, Javier; Diego, Isidro

    2009-03-01

    A review of existing industrial processing and results of alternative processing investigations for separating solid mixtures and specifically recycling plastic waste by density separation is presented. Media density separation is shown to be fundamental for separation and/or pre-concentration in the recycling of plastics. The current use of static media processes limits the capacity and size of material that can be treated commercially. Investigations have shown that the hydroscopic properties of plastics can be reduced to improve such separations. This indicates that an alternative processing method is required to increase the commercial recovery of recyclable plastics. Cylindroconical and cylindrical cyclone-type media separators, such as those used for processing coal, are reviewed and suggested as a potential substitute. Both have superior production capacities and are able to process a larger range in particle sizes treated. A summary of results of investigations with cyclone media devices for recycling plastics is presented. PMID:19244417

  17. A Strip-Yield Model for Predicting the Growth of Part-Through Cracks Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniewicz, S. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Flaws exist in aircraft structures due to manufacturing operations and material defects. Under variable amplitude cyclic loading, these flaws grow as part-through cracks reducing the residual strength of structural components. To meet damage tolerant design requirements, accurate flaw growth predictions are needed which account for continual changes in crack shape as well as crack growth retardation and acceleration. Predicting the growth of part-through cracks under cyclic loading using an innovative and computationally efficient model is the focus of the research summarized in this report. In this research effort, a slice synthesis methodology was developed and used to construct a modified strip-yield model for the part-through semi-elliptical surface flaw, enabling prediction of plasticity-induced closure along the crack front and subsequent fatigue crack growth under constant amplitude and variable amplitude loading. While modeling the plasticity-induced closure in a part-through flaw may be performed using three dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis, this type of effort is impractical from an engineering perspective. A modified strip-yield model similar to that used in FASTRAN for part-through flaws is a much needed engineering design tool, particularly when computational resources are limited.

  18. Breathing: Rhythmicity, Plasticity, Chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jack L.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Nattie, Eugene E.

    2010-01-01

    Breathing is a vital behavior that is particularly amenable to experimental investigation. We review recent progress on three problems of broad interest. (i) Where and how is respiratory rhythm generated? The preBötzinger Complex is a critical site, whereas pacemaker neurons may not be essential. The possibility that coupled oscillators are involved is considered. (ii) What are the mechanisms that underlie the plasticity necessary for adaptive changes in breathing? Serotonin-dependent long-term facilitation following intermittent hypoxia is an important example of such plasticity, and a model that can account for this adaptive behavior is discussed. (iii) Where and how are the regulated variables CO2 and pH sensed? These sensors are essential if breathing is to be appropriate for metabolism. Neurons with appropriate chemosensitivity are spread throughout the brainstem; their individual properties and collective role are just beginning to be understood. PMID:12598679

  19. 77 FR 54930 - Carlyle Plastics and Resins, Formerly Known as Fortis Plastics, A Subsidiary of Plastics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... determination was published in the Federal Register on Monday, July 23, 2012 (77 FR 43123). ] At the request of... Employment and Training Administration Carlyle Plastics and Resins, Formerly Known as Fortis Plastics, A Subsidiary of Plastics Acquisitions Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly Services and...

  20. Frozen cultural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Houdek, Petr; Novakova, Julie

    2016-01-01

    We discuss cultural group selection under the view of the frozen plasticity theory and the different explanatory power and predictions of this framework. We present evidence that cultural adaptations and their influence on the degree of cooperation may be more complex than presented by Richerson et al., and conclude with the gene-environment-culture relationship and its impacts on cultural group selection. PMID:27561647

  1. Compensatory plasticity: time matters

    PubMed Central

    Lazzouni, Latifa; Lepore, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Plasticity in the human and animal brain is the rule, the base for development, and the way to deal effectively with the environment for making the most efficient use of all the senses. When the brain is deprived of one sensory modality, plasticity becomes compensatory: the exception that invalidates the general loss hypothesis giving the opportunity of effective change. Sensory deprivation comes with massive alterations in brain structure and function, behavioral outcomes, and neural interactions. Blind individuals do as good as the sighted and even more, show superior abilities in auditory, tactile and olfactory processing. This behavioral enhancement is accompanied with changes in occipital cortex function, where visual areas at different levels become responsive to non-visual information. The intact senses are in general used more efficiently in the blind but are also used more exclusively. New findings are disentangling these two aspects of compensatory plasticity. What is due to visual deprivation and what is dependent on the extended use of spared modalities? The latter seems to contribute highly to compensatory changes in the congenitally blind. Short-term deprivation through the use of blindfolds shows that cortical excitability of the visual cortex is likely to show rapid modulatory changes after few minutes of light deprivation and therefore changes are possible in adulthood. However, reorganization remains more pronounced in the congenitally blind. Cortico-cortical pathways between visual areas and the areas of preserved sensory modalities are inhibited in the presence of vision, but are unmasked after loss of vision or blindfolding as a mechanism likely to drive cross-modal information to the deafferented visual cortex. The development of specialized higher order visual pathways independently from early sensory experience is likely to preserve their function and switch to the intact modalities. Plasticity in the blind is also accompanied with

  2. Shuttle car loading system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A system is described for loading newly mined material such as coal, into a shuttle car, at a location near the mine face where there is only a limited height available for a loading system. The system includes a storage bin having several telescoping bin sections and a shuttle car having a bottom wall that can move under the bin. With the bin in an extended position and filled with coal the bin sections can be telescoped to allow the coal to drop out of the bin sections and into the shuttle car, to quickly load the car. The bin sections can then be extended, so they can be slowly filled with more while waiting another shuttle car.

  3. Plastic footwear for leprosy.

    PubMed

    Antia, N H

    1990-03-01

    The anaesthetic foot in leprosy poses the most major problem in the rehabilitation of its patients. Various attempts have been made to produce protective footwear such as the microcellular rubber-car-tyre sandals. Unfortunately these attempts have had little success on a large scale because of the inability to produce them in large numbers and the stigma attached to such unusual footwear. While such footwear may be superior to the 'tennis' shoe in protecting the foot from injury by the penetration of sharp objects, it fails to distribute the weight-bearing forces which is the major cause of plantar damage and ulceration in the anaesthetic foot. This can be achieved by providing rigidity to the sole, as demonstrated by the healing of ulcers in plaster of paris casts or the rigid wooden clog. A new type of moulded plastic footwear has been evolved in conjunction with the plastic footwear industry which provides footwear that can be mass produced at a low price and which overcomes the stigma of leprosy. Controlled rigidity is provided by the incorporation of a spring steel shank between the sponge insole and the hard wearing plastic sole. Trials have demonstrated both the acceptability of the footwear and its protective effects as well as its hard wearing properties. PMID:2319903

  4. Plasticity of amyloid fibrils†

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Ronald; Shivaprasad, Shankaramma; Williams, Angela D.

    2008-01-01

    In experiments designed to characterize the basis of amyloid fibril stability through mutational analysis of the Aβ(1-40) molecule, fibrils exhibit consistent, significant structural malleability. In these results, and in other properties, amyloid fibrils appear to more resemble plastic materials generated from synthetic polymers than they do globular proteins. Thus, like synthetic polymers and plastics, amyloid fibrils exhibit both polymorphism, the ability of one polypeptide to form aggregates of different morphologies, and isomorphism, the ability of different polypeptides to grow into a fibrillar amyloid morphology. This view links amyloid with the prehistorical and 20th Century use of proteins as starting materials to make films, fibers, and plastics, and with the classic protein fiber stretching experiments of the Astbury group. Viewing amyloid from the point of view of the polymer chemist may shed new light on issues such as the role of protofibrils in the mechanism of amyloid formation, the biological potency of fibrils, and the prospects for discovering inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:17198370

  5. Microelectronics plastic molded packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Palmer, D.W.; Peterson, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    The use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectronics for nuclear weapon applications will soon be reality rather than hearsay. The use of COTS for new technologies for uniquely military applications is being driven by the so-called Perry Initiative that requires the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to accept and utilize commercial standards for procurement of military systems. Based on this philosophy, coupled with several practical considerations, new weapons systems as well as future upgrades will contain plastic encapsulated microelectronics. However, a conservative Department of Energy (DOE) approach requires lifetime predictive models. Thus, the focus of the current project is on accelerated testing to advance current aging models as well as on the development of the methodology to be used during WR qualification of plastic encapsulated microelectronics. An additional focal point involves achieving awareness of commercial capabilities, materials, and processes. One of the major outcomes of the project has been the definition of proper techniques for handling and evaluation of modern surface mount parts which might be used in future systems. This program is also raising the familiarity level of plastic within the weapons complex, allowing subsystem design rules accommodating COTS to evolve. A two year program plan is presented along with test results and commercial interactions during this first year.

  6. New perspectives in plastic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Alex

    2011-06-01

    During the past 50 years new plastic materials, in various applications, have gradually replaced the traditional metal, wood, leather materials. Ironically, the most preferred property of plastics--durability--exerts also the major environmental threat. Recycling has practically failed to provide a safe solution for disposal of plastic waste (only 5% out of 1 trillion plastic bags, annually produced in the US alone, are being recycled). Since the most utilized plastic is polyethylene (PE; ca. 140 million tons/year), any reduction in the accumulation of PE waste alone would have a major impact on the overall reduction of the plastic waste in the environment. Since PE is considered to be practically inert, efforts were made to isolate unique microorganisms capable of utilizing synthetic polymers. Recent data showed that biodegradation of plastic waste with selected microbial strains became a viable solution. PMID:21356588

  7. Benchmark cyclic plastic notch strain measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, W. N., Jr.; Ward, M.

    1983-01-01

    Plastic strains at the roots of notched specimens of Inconel 718 subjected to tension-compression cycling at 650 C are reported. These strains were measured with a laser-based technique over a gage length of 0.1 mm and are intended to serve as 'benchmark' data for further development of experimental, analytical, and computational approaches. The specimens were 250 mm by 2.5 mm in the test section with double notches of 4.9 mm radius subjected to axial loading sufficient to cause yielding at the notch root on the tensile portion of the first cycle. The tests were run for 1000 cycles at 10 cpm or until cracks initiated at the notch root. The experimental techniques are described, and then representative data for the various load spectra are presented. All the data for each cycle of every test are available on floppy disks from NASA.

  8. A Nonlocal Peridynamic Plasticity Model for the Dynamic Flow and Fracture of Concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, Tracy; Lammi, Christopher James

    2014-10-01

    A nonlocal, ordinary peridynamic constitutive model is formulated to numerically simulate the pressure-dependent flow and fracture of heterogeneous, quasi-brittle ma- terials, such as concrete. Classical mechanics and traditional computational modeling methods do not accurately model the distributed fracture observed within this family of materials. The peridynamic horizon, or range of influence, provides a characteristic length to the continuum and limits localization of fracture. Scaling laws are derived to relate the parameters of peridynamic constitutive model to the parameters of the classical Drucker-Prager plasticity model. Thermodynamic analysis of associated and non-associated plastic flow is performed. An implicit integration algorithm is formu- lated to calculate the accumulated plastic bond extension and force state. The gov- erning equations are linearized and the simulation of the quasi-static compression of a cylinder is compared to the classical theory. A dissipation-based peridynamic bond failure criteria is implemented to model fracture and the splitting of a concrete cylinder is numerically simulated. Finally, calculation of the impact and spallation of a con- crete structure is performed to assess the suitability of the material and failure models for simulating concrete during dynamic loadings. The peridynamic model is found to accurately simulate the inelastic deformation and fracture behavior of concrete during compression, splitting, and dynamically induced spall. The work expands the types of materials that can be modeled using peridynamics. A multi-scale methodology for simulating concrete to be used in conjunction with the plasticity model is presented. The work was funded by LDRD 158806.

  9. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation. PMID:26337962

  10. LOADED WAVEGUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Mullett, L.B.; Loach, B.G.; Adams, G.L.

    1958-06-24

    >Loaded waveguides are described for the propagation of electromagnetic waves with reduced phase velocities. A rectangular waveguide is dimensioned so as to cut-off the simple H/sub 01/ mode at the operating frequency. The waveguide is capacitance loaded, so as to reduce the phase velocity of the transmitted wave, by connecting an electrical conductor between directly opposite points in the major median plane on the narrower pair of waveguide walls. This conductor may take a corrugated shape or be an aperature member, the important factor being that the electrical length of the conductor is greater than one-half wavelength at the operating frequency. Prepared for the Second U.N. International ConferThe importance of nuclear standards is duscussed. A brief review of the international callaboration in this field is given. The proposal is made to let the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) coordinate the efforts from other groups. (W.D.M.)

  11. Phenotypic and genomic plasticity of alternative male reproductive tactics in sailfin mollies

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Bonnie A.; Janowitz, Ilana; Thairu, Margaret; Travis, Joseph; Hughes, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    A major goal of modern evolutionary biology is to understand the causes and consequences of phenotypic plasticity, the ability of a single genotype to produce multiple phenotypes in response to variable environments. While ecological and quantitative genetic studies have evaluated models of the evolution of adaptive plasticity, some long-standing questions about plasticity require more mechanistic approaches. Here, we address two of those questions: does plasticity facilitate adaptive evolution? And do physiological costs place limits on plasticity? We examine these questions by comparing genetically and plastically regulated behavioural variation in sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna), which exhibit striking variation in plasticity for male mating behaviour. In this species, some genotypes respond plastically to a change in the social environment by switching between primarily courting and primarily sneaking behaviour. In contrast, other genotypes have fixed mating strategies (either courting or sneaking) and do not display plasticity. We found that genetic and plastic variation in behaviour were accompanied by partially, but not completely overlapping changes in brain gene expression, in partial support of models that predict that plasticity can facilitate adaptive evolution. We also found that behavioural plasticity was accompanied by broader and more robust changes in brain gene expression, suggesting a substantial physiological cost to plasticity. We also observed that sneaking behaviour, but not courting, was associated with upregulation of genes involved in learning and memory, suggesting that sneaking is more cognitively demanding than courtship. PMID:24573842

  12. Bacterial production of the biodegradable plastics polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Urtuvia, Viviana; Villegas, Pamela; González, Myriam; Seeger, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Petroleum-based plastics constitute a major environmental problem due to their low biodegradability and accumulation in various environments. Therefore, searching for novel biodegradable plastics is of increasing interest. Microbial polyesters known as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable plastics. Life cycle assessment indicates that PHB is more beneficial than petroleum-based plastics. In this report, bacterial production of PHAs and their industrial applications are reviewed and the synthesis of PHAs in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 is described. PHAs are synthesized by a large number of microorganisms during unbalanced nutritional conditions. These polymers are accumulated as carbon and energy reserve in discrete granules in the bacterial cytoplasm. 3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxyvalerate are two main PHA units among 150 monomers that have been reported. B. xenovorans LB400 is a model bacterium for the degradation of polychlorobiphenyls and a wide range of aromatic compounds. A bioinformatic analysis of LB400 genome indicated the presence of pha genes encoding enzymes of pathways for PHA synthesis. This study showed that B. xenovorans LB400 synthesize PHAs under nutrient limitation. Staining with Sudan Black B indicated the production of PHAs by B. xenovorans LB400 colonies. The PHAs produced were characterized by GC-MS. Diverse substrates for the production of PHAs in strain LB400 were analyzed. PMID:24974981

  13. A nonlocal, ordinary, state-based plasticity model for peridynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, John Anthony

    2011-05-01

    An implicit time integration algorithm for a non-local, state-based, peridynamics plasticity model is developed. The flow rule was proposed in [3] without an integration strategy or yield criterion. This report addresses both of these issues and thus establishes the first ordinary, state-based peridynamics plasticity model. Integration of the flow rule follows along the lines of the classical theories of rate independent J{sub 2} plasticity. It uses elastic force state relations, an additive decomposition of the deformation state, an elastic force state domain, a flow rule, loading/un-loading conditions, and a consistency condition. Just as in local theories of plasticity (LTP), state variables are required. It is shown that the resulting constitutive model does not violate the 2nd law of thermodynamics. The report also develops a useful non-local yield criterion that depends upon the yield stress and horizon for the material. The modulus state for both the ordinary elastic material and aforementioned plasticity model is also developed and presented.

  14. A review of path-independent integrals in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, task 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    The path independent (P-I) integrals in elastic plastic fracture mechanics which have been proposed in recent years to overcome the limitations imposed on the J integral are reviewed. The P-I integrals considered herein are the J integral by Rice, the thermoelastic P-I integrals by Wilson and Yu and by Gurtin, the J* integral by Blackburn, the J sub theta integral by Ainsworth et al., the J integral by Kishimoto et al., and the delta T sub p and delta T* sub p integrals by Atluri et al. The theoretical foundation of these P-I integrals is examined with emphasis on whether or not path independence is maintained in the presence of nonproportional loading and unloading in the plastic regime, thermal gradients, and material inhomogeneities. The similarities, differences, salient features, and limitations of these P-I integrals are discussed. Comments are also made with regard to the physical meaning, the possibility of experimental measurement, and computational aspects.

  15. Equivalency of Berkovich and conical load-indentation curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaddiwudhipong, S.; Hua, J.; Tho, K. K.; Liu, Z. S.

    2006-01-01

    The Berkovich indenter, which is one of the most commonly used indenter tips in instrumented indentation experiments, requires a tedious 3D finite element simulation. The indenter is widely idealized as a conical indenter of 70.3° half-angle to enable a substantially less demanding 2D axisymmetric modelling. Although the approach has been commonly adopted, limited studies have been performed to investigate possible deviations due to this simplification. The present study attempts to address the equivalency of the two indenters by performing extensively both 3D and 2D finite element analyses to simulate the load-displacement response of a wide range of elasto-plastic materials obeying power law strain-hardening during indentation for both Berkovich and conical indenters, respectively. It is demonstrated that the equivalency between these two indenters in terms of curvature of the loading curve is not valid across the range of material properties under study. However, it is established that if only the ratio of the remaining work done (WR) and the total work done (WT) of the load-indentation curve is of interest, this simplification can be adopted with satisfactory results.

  16. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    The analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for highly plastic stress field condition is presented in this paper. The flight hardware investigated is a large separation bolt that has a deep notch, which produces a large plastic zone at the notch root when highly loaded. Four test specimen configurations are analyzed in an attempt to match the elastic-plastic stress field and crack constraint conditions present in the separation bolt. Elastic-plastic finite element analysis is used to compare the stress fields and critical fracture parameters. Of the four test specimens analyzed, the modified double-edge notch tension - 3 (MDENT-3) most closely approximates the stress field, J values, and crack constraint conditions found in the flight hardware. The MDENT-3 is also most insensitive to load misalignment and/or load redistribution during crack growth.

  17. Plasticity and Recovery After Dorsal Column Spinal Cord Injury in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Reed, Jamie L; Liao, Chia-Chi; Qi, Hui-Xin; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-01-01

    Here, we review recent work on plasticity and recovery after dorsal column spinal cord injury in nonhuman primates. Plasticity in the adult central nervous system has been established and studied for the past several decades; however, capacities and limits of plasticity are still under investigation. Studies of plasticity include assessing multiple measures before and after injury in animal models. Such studies are particularly important for improving recovery after injury in patients. In summarizing work by our research team and others, we suggest how the findings from plasticity studies in nonhuman primate models may affect therapeutic interventions for conditions involving sensory loss due to spinal cord injury. PMID:27578996

  18. Plasticity and Recovery After Dorsal Column Spinal Cord Injury in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Jamie L.; Liao, Chia-Chi; Qi, Hui-Xin; Kaas, Jon H.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we review recent work on plasticity and recovery after dorsal column spinal cord injury in nonhuman primates. Plasticity in the adult central nervous system has been established and studied for the past several decades; however, capacities and limits of plasticity are still under investigation. Studies of plasticity include assessing multiple measures before and after injury in animal models. Such studies are particularly important for improving recovery after injury in patients. In summarizing work by our research team and others, we suggest how the findings from plasticity studies in nonhuman primate models may affect therapeutic interventions for conditions involving sensory loss due to spinal cord injury. PMID:27578996

  19. Direct liquefaction of plastics and coprocessing of coal with plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Feng, Z.; Mahajan, V.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this work were to optimize reaction conditions for the direct liquefaction of waste plastics and the coprocessing of coal with waste plastics. In previous work, the direct liquefaction of medium and high density polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PPE), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and a mixed plastic waste, and the coliquefaction of these plastics with coals of three different ranks was studied. The results established that a solid acid catalyst (HZSM-5 zeolite) was highly active for the liquefaction of the plastics alone, typically giving oil yields of 80-95% and total conversions of 90-100% at temperatures of 430-450 {degrees}C. In the coliquefaction experiments, 50:50 mixtures of plastic and coal were used with a tetralin solvent (tetralin:solid = 3:2). Using approximately 1% of the HZSM-5 catalyst and a nanoscale iron catalyst, oil yields of 50-70% and total conversion of 80-90% were typical. In the current year, further investigations were conducted of the liquefaction of PE, PPE, and a commingled waste plastic obtained from the American Plastics Council (APC), and the coprocessing of PE, PPE and the APC plastic with Black Thunder subbituminous coal. Several different catalysts were used in these studies.

  20. Plastic Surgery and Suicide: A Clinical Guide for Plastic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vikram; Coffey, M Justin

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have identified an increased risk of suicide among patient populations which a plastic surgeon may have a high risk of encountering: women undergoing breast augmentation, cosmetic surgery patients, and breast cancer patients. No formal guidelines exist to assist a plastic surgeon when faced with such a patient, and not every plastic surgery team has mental health clinicians that are readily accessible for consultation or referral. The goal of this clinical guide is to offer plastic surgeons a set of practical approaches to manage potentially suicidal patients. In addition, the authors review a screening tool, which can assist surgeons when encountering high-risk patients. PMID:27622096