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Sample records for plastic pipe

  1. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.281 Section 192.281... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion may not be disturbed until it has properly set. Plastic pipe may not be joined by a threaded joint...

  2. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.281 Section 192.281... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion may not be disturbed until it has properly set. Plastic pipe may not be joined by a threaded joint...

  3. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.281 Section 192.281... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion may not be disturbed until it has properly set. Plastic pipe may not be joined by a threaded joint...

  4. 49 CFR 192.59 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.59 Section 192.59 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.59 Plastic pipe. (a) New plastic pipe... specification; and (2) It is resistant to chemicals with which contact may be anticipated. (b) Used plastic...

  5. 49 CFR 192.59 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.59 Section 192.59 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.59 Plastic pipe. (a) New plastic pipe... specification; and (2) It is resistant to chemicals with which contact may be anticipated. (b) Used plastic...

  6. 49 CFR 192.59 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.59 Section 192.59 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.59 Plastic pipe. (a) New plastic pipe... specification; and (2) It is resistant to chemicals with which contact may be anticipated. (b) Used plastic...

  7. 49 CFR 192.59 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.59 Section 192.59 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.59 Plastic pipe. (a) New plastic pipe... specification; and (2) It is resistant to chemicals with which contact may be anticipated. (b) Used plastic...

  8. 49 CFR 192.59 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.59 Section 192.59 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.59 Plastic pipe. (a) New plastic pipe... specification; and (2) It is resistant to chemicals with which contact may be anticipated. (b) Used plastic...

  9. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion..., see § 192.7). (3) The joint may not be heated to accelerate the setting of the cement. (c) Heat-fusion joints. Each heat-fusion joint on plastic pipe must comply with the following: (1) A butt...

  10. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion..., see § 192.7). (3) The joint may not be heated to accelerate the setting of the cement. (c) Heat-fusion joints. Each heat-fusion joint on plastic pipe must comply with the following: (1) A butt...

  11. 49 CFR 192.321 - Installation of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Installation of plastic pipe. 192.321 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.321 Installation of plastic pipe. (a) Plastic pipe must be installed below ground level except as provided by paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. (b) Plastic pipe that...

  12. 49 CFR 192.321 - Installation of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Installation of plastic pipe. 192.321 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.321 Installation of plastic pipe. (a) Plastic pipe must be installed below ground level except as provided by paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. (b) Plastic pipe that...

  13. 49 CFR 192.321 - Installation of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Installation of plastic pipe. 192.321 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.321 Installation of plastic pipe. (a) Plastic pipe must be installed below ground level except as provided by paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. (b) Plastic pipe that...

  14. 49 CFR 192.321 - Installation of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Installation of plastic pipe. 192.321 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.321 Installation of plastic pipe. (a) Plastic pipe must be installed below ground level except as provided by paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. (b) Plastic pipe that...

  15. 49 CFR 192.321 - Installation of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Installation of plastic pipe. 192.321 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.321 Installation of plastic pipe. (a) Plastic pipe must be installed below ground level except as provided by paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. (b) Plastic pipe that...

  16. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  17. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  18. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  19. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  20. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  1. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  2. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  3. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  4. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  5. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  6. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the...

  7. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the...

  8. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. 192... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the...

  9. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. 192... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the...

  10. 49 CFR 192.311 - Repair of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Repair of plastic pipe. 192.311 Section 192.311... Lines and Mains § 192.311 Repair of plastic pipe. Each imperfection or damage that would impair the serviceability of plastic pipe must be repaired or removed....

  11. 49 CFR 192.311 - Repair of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Repair of plastic pipe. 192.311 Section 192.311... Lines and Mains § 192.311 Repair of plastic pipe. Each imperfection or damage that would impair the serviceability of plastic pipe must be repaired or removed....

  12. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  13. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. 192... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the...

  14. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified...

  15. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  16. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified...

  17. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  18. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified...

  19. 49 CFR 192.311 - Repair of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Repair of plastic pipe. 192.311 Section 192.311... Lines and Mains § 192.311 Repair of plastic pipe. Each imperfection or damage that would impair the serviceability of plastic pipe must be repaired or removed....

  20. 49 CFR 192.311 - Repair of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repair of plastic pipe. 192.311 Section 192.311... Lines and Mains § 192.311 Repair of plastic pipe. Each imperfection or damage that would impair the serviceability of plastic pipe must be repaired or removed....

  1. 49 CFR 192.311 - Repair of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Repair of plastic pipe. 192.311 Section 192.311... Lines and Mains § 192.311 Repair of plastic pipe. Each imperfection or damage that would impair the serviceability of plastic pipe must be repaired or removed....

  2. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  3. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  4. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified...

  5. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified...

  6. Ultrasonic Welding of Plastic Pipes Using Torsional Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Hori, Kiichi; Ide, Masao

    1998-05-01

    In recent years, the application of ultrasonic welding to plastics has become common. In this paper a method for ultrasonic welding of plastic pipes using torsional vibrations is reported. In this method torsional vibrations are applied to the welding pipe from the circumferential direction with horns placed near the welding surface. Static pressure is independently applied from the vibrations to the welding surface. It was observed that acrylic resin pipes could be effectively welded by the proposed method.

  7. INSPECTION OF FUSION JOINTS IN PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Savitski; Connie Reichert; John Coffey

    2005-07-13

    The standard method of joining plastic pipe in the field is the butt fusion process. As in any pipeline application, joint quality greatly affects overall operational safety of the system. Currently no simple, reliable, cost effective method of assessing the quality of fusion joints in the field exists. Visual examination and pressure testing are current non-destructive approaches, which do not provide any assurance about the long-term pipeline performance. This project will develop, demonstrate, and validate an in-situ non-destructive inspection method for butt fusion joints in gas distribution plastic pipelines. The inspection system will include a laser based image-recognition system that will automatically generate and interpret digital images of pipe joints and assign them a pass/fail rating, which eliminates operator bias in evaluating joint quality. A Weld Zone Inspection Method (WZIM) is being developed in which local heat is applied to the joint region to relax the residual stresses formed by the original joining operation and reveal the surface condition of the joint. In cases where the joint is not formed under optimal conditions, and the intermolecular forces between contacting surfaces are not strong enough, the relaxation of macromolecules in the surface layer causes the material to pull back, revealing a fusion line. If the joint is sound, the bond line image does not develop. To establish initial feasibility of the approach, welds were performed under standard and nonstandard conditions. These welds were subjected to the WZIM and tensile testing. There appears to be a direct correlation between the WZIM and tensile testing results. Although WZIM appears to be more sensitive than tensile testing can verify, the approach appears valid.

  8. INSPECTION OF FUSION JOINTS IN PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Savitski; Connie Reichert; John Coffey

    2004-07-13

    The standard method of joining plastic pipe in the field is the butt fusion process. As in any pipeline application, joint quality greatly affects overall operational safety of the system. Currently no simple, reliable, cost effective method of assessing the quality of fusion joints in the field exists. Visual examination and pressure testing are current non-destructive approaches, which do not provide any assurance about the long-term pipeline performance. This project will develop, demonstrate, and validate an in-situ non-destructive inspection method for butt fusion joints in gas distribution plastic pipelines. The inspection system will include a laser based image-recognition system that will automatically generate and interpret digital images of pipe joints and assign them a pass/fail rating, which eliminates operator bias in evaluating joint quality. A Weld Zone Inspection Method (WZIM) is being developed in which local heat is applied to the joint region to relax the residual stresses formed by the original joining operation and reveal the surface condition of the joint. In cases where the joint is not formed under optimal conditions, and the intermolecular forces between contacting surfaces are not strong enough, the relaxation of macromolecules in the surface layer causes the material to pull back, revealing a fusion line. If the joint is sound, the bond line image does not develop. To establish initial feasibility of the approach, welds were performed under standard and non-standard conditions. These welds were subjected to the WZIM and tensile testing. There appears to be a direct correlation between the WZIM and tensile testing results. Although WZIM appears to be more sensitive than tensile testing can verify, the approach appears valid.

  9. INSPECTION OF FUSION JOINTS IN PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Savitski; Connie Reichert; John Coffey

    2004-10-29

    The standard method of joining plastic pipe in the field is the butt fusion process. As in any pipeline application, joint quality greatly affects overall operational safety of the system. Currently no simple, reliable, cost effective method of assessing the quality of fusion joints in the field exists. Visual examination and pressure testing are current non-destructive approaches, which do not provide any assurance about the long-term pipeline performance. This project will develop, demonstrate, and validate an in-situ non-destructive inspection method for butt fusion joints in gas distribution plastic pipelines. The inspection system will include a laser based image-recognition system that will automatically generate and interpret digital images of pipe joints and assign them a pass/fail rating, which eliminates operator bias in evaluating joint quality. A Weld Zone Inspection Method (WZIM) is being developed in which local heat is applied to the joint region to relax the residual stresses formed by the original joining operation and reveal the surface condition of the joint. In cases where the joint is not formed under optimal conditions, and the intermolecular forces between contacting surfaces are not strong enough, the relaxation of macromolecules in the surface layer causes the material to pull back, revealing a fusion line. If the joint is sound, the bond line image does not develop. To establish initial feasibility of the approach, welds were performed under standard and non-standard conditions. These welds were subjected to the WZIM and tensile testing. There appears to be a direct correlation between the WZIM and tensile testing results. Although WZIM appears to be more sensitive than tensile testing can verify, the approach appears valid.

  10. Inspection of Fusion Joints in Plastic Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Connie Reichert

    2005-09-01

    The standard method of joining plastic pipe in the field is the butt fusion process. As in any pipeline application, joint quality greatly affects overall operational safety of the system. Currently no simple, reliable, cost-effective method exists for assessing the quality of fusion joints in the field. Visual examination and pressure testing are current nondestructive approaches, which do not provide any assurance about the long-term pipeline performance. This project developed, demonstrated, and validated an in-situ nondestructive inspection method for butt fusion joints in gas distribution plastic pipelines. The inspection system includes a laser-based image-recognition system that automatically generates and interprets digital images of pipe joints and assigns them a pass/fail rating, which eliminates operator bias in evaluating joint quality. An EWI-patented process, the Weld Zone Inspection Method (WZIM) was developed in which local heat is applied to the joint region to relax the residual stresses formed by the original joining operation, which reveals the surface condition of the joint. In cases where the joint is not formed under optimal conditions, and the intermolecular forces between contacting surfaces are not strong enough, the relaxation of macromolecules in the surface layer causes the material to pull back, revealing a fusion line. If the joint is sound, the bond line image does not develop. To establish initial feasibility of the approach, welds were performed under standard and nonstandard conditions. These welds were subjected to the WZIM and two destructive forms of testing: short-term tensile testing and long-term creep rupture testing. There appears to be a direct correlation between the WZIM and the destructive testing results. Although WZIM appears to be more sensitive than destructive testing can verify, the approach appears valid.

  11. Electrostatic hazards with underground plastic pipes at petrol stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walmsley, H. L.

    2011-06-01

    The paper analyses some ignition incidents that have been reported with insulating, (non-conductive) underground plastic pipes in retail petrol stations. The occurrence of the incidents is compared with voltage measurements, observations of the typical spread of streaming currents recorded in gasoline handling and theoretical estimates of the voltages on the pipes. The comparisons suggest that neither incendive sparks from unbonded conductors nor incendive brush discharges from insulating pipe surfaces can be ruled out although both are expected to be rare. The hazards can be prevented by using pipes with earthed conductive or dissipative inner linings.

  12. CAPACITIVE TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE LOCATION OF PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brian J. Huber

    2003-12-30

    The objective of this program was to develop and test a system that would detect and image buried plastic and ceramic pipe. The system is designed to detect variations in the electric permeability of soil corresponding to the presence of a buried plastic pipe. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) proposed to develop a compact and inexpensive capacitive tomography-imaging sensor that can be placed on the ground to image objects embedded in the soil. The system provides a coarse image, which allows the operator to identify a buried object's location both horizontally and vertically.

  13. Workshop on plastic-pipe location, Westin Chicago Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, May 1-2, 1990. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    Preprints of papers presented to the May 1990 GRI Workshop on Plastic Pipe Location are provided. Topics include an historical overview of plastic pipe location, the location of non-metallic utilities, radar applications, the Terrascan system, plastic pipe location in Japan, subsurface pipe mapping, and non-contact acoustic buried plastic pipe location.

  14. 49 CFR 192.285 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.285 Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints. (a) No person may make a plastic pipe joint unless that person has been qualified under the applicable joining...

  15. 49 CFR 192.285 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.285 Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints. (a) No person may make a plastic pipe joint unless that person has been qualified under the applicable joining...

  16. 49 CFR 192.285 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.285 Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints. (a) No person may make a plastic pipe joint unless that person has been qualified under the applicable joining...

  17. 49 CFR 192.285 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.285 Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints. (a) No person may make a plastic pipe joint unless that person has been qualified under the applicable joining...

  18. 49 CFR 192.285 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.285 Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints. (a) No person may make a plastic pipe joint unless that person has been qualified under the applicable joining...

  19. CAPACITIVE TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE LOCATION OF PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brian J. Huber

    2003-01-31

    Throughout the utility industry, there is high interest in subsurface imaging of plastic, ceramic, and metallic objects because of the cost, reliability, and safety benefits available in avoiding impacts with the existing infrastructure and in reducing inappropriate excavations. Industry interest in locating plastic pipe has resulted in funding available for the development of technologies that enable this imaging. Gas Technology Institute (GTI) proposes to develop a compact and inexpensive capacitive tomography imaging sensor that takes the form of a flat plate or flexible mat that can be placed on the ground to image objects embedded in the soil. A compact, low-cost sensor that can image objects through soil could be applied to multiple operations and will produce a number of cost savings for the gas industry. In a stand-alone mode, it could be used to survey an area prior to excavation. The technology would improve the accuracy and reliability of any operation that involves excavation by locating or avoiding buried objects. An accurate subsurface image of an area will enable less costly keyhole excavations and other cost-saving techniques. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been applied to this area with limited success. Radar requires a high-frequency carrier to be injected into the soil: the higher the frequency, the greater the image resolution. Unfortunately, high-frequency radio waves are more readily absorbed by soil. Also, high-frequency operation raises the cost of the associated electronics. By contrast, the capacitive tomography sensor uses low frequencies with a multiple-element antenna to obtain good resolution. Low-frequency operation lowers the cost of the associated electronics while improving depth of penetration. The objective of this project is to combine several existing techniques in the area of capacitive sensing to quickly produce a demonstrable prototype. The sensor itself will take the form of a flat array of electrodes that can be

  20. CAPACITIVE TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE LOCATION OF PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brian J. Huber

    2003-04-30

    Throughout the utility industry, there is high interest in subsurface imaging of plastic, ceramic, and metallic objects because of the cost, reliability, and safety benefits available in avoiding impacts with the existing infrastructure and in reducing inappropriate excavations. Industry interest in locating plastic pipe has resulted in funding available for the development of technologies that enable this imaging. Gas Technology Institute (GTI) proposes to develop a compact and inexpensive capacitive tomography imaging sensor that takes the form of a flat plate or flexible mat that can be placed on the ground to image objects embedded in the soil. A compact, low-cost sensor that can image objects through soil could be applied to multiple operations and will produce a number of cost savings for the gas industry. In a stand-alone mode, it could be used to survey an area prior to excavation. The technology would improve the accuracy and reliability of any operation that involves excavation by locating or avoiding buried objects. An accurate subsurface image of an area will enable less costly keyhole excavations and other cost-saving techniques. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been applied to this area with limited success. Radar requires a high-frequency carrier to be injected into the soil: the higher the frequency, the greater the image resolution. Unfortunately, high-frequency radio waves are more readily absorbed by soil. Also, high-frequency operation raises the cost of the associated electronics. By contrast, the capacitive tomography sensor uses low frequencies with a multiple-element antenna to obtain good resolution. Low-frequency operation lowers the cost of the associated electronics while improving depth of penetration. The objective of this project is to combine several existing techniques in the area of capacitive sensing to quickly produce a demonstrable prototype. The sensor itself will take the form of a flat array of electrodes that can be

  1. CAPACITIVE TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE LOCATION OF PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brian J. Huber

    2002-10-30

    Throughout the utility industry, there is high interest in subsurface imaging of plastic, ceramic, and metallic objects because of the cost, reliability, and safety benefits available in avoiding impacts with the existing infrastructure and in reducing inappropriate excavations. Industry interest in locating plastic pipe has resulted in funding available for the development of technologies that enable this imaging. Gas Technology Institute (GTI) proposes to develop a compact and inexpensive capacitive tomography imaging sensor that takes the form of a flat plate or flexible mat that can be placed on the ground to image objects embedded in the soil. A compact, low-cost sensor that can image objects through soil could be applied to multiple operations and will produce a number of cost savings for the gas industry. In a stand-alone mode, it could be used to survey an area prior to excavation. The technology would improve the accuracy and reliability of any operation that involves excavation by locating or avoiding buried objects. An accurate subsurface image of an area will enable less costly keyhole excavations and other cost-saving techniques. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been applied to this area with limited success. Radar requires a high-frequency carrier to be injected into the soil: the higher the frequency, the greater the image resolution. Unfortunately, high-frequency radio waves are more readily absorbed by soil. Also, high-frequency operation raises the cost of the associated electronics. By contrast, the capacitive tomography sensor uses low frequencies with a multiple-element antenna to obtain good resolution. Low-frequency operation lowers the cost of the associated electronics while improving depth of penetration. The objective of this project is to combine several existing techniques in the area of capacitive sensing to quickly produce a demonstrable prototype. The sensor itself will take the form of a flat array of electrodes that can be

  2. Terahertz inline wall thickness monitoring system for plastic pipe extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, J.; Stich, D.; Heidemeyer, P.; Bastian, M.; Hochrein, T.

    2014-05-01

    Conventional and commercially available inline wall thickness monitoring systems for pipe extrusion are usually based on ultrasonic or x-ray technology. Disadvantages of ultrasonic systems are the usual need of water as a coupling media and the high damping in thick walled or foamed pipes. For x-ray systems special safety requirements have to be taken into account because of the ionizing radiation. The terahertz (THz) technology offers a novel approach to solve these problems. THz waves have many properties which are suitable for the non-destructive testing of plastics. The absorption of electrical isolators is typically very low and the radiation is non-ionizing in comparison to x-rays. Through the electromagnetic origin of the THz waves they can be used for contact free measurements. Foams show a much lower absorption in contrast to acoustic waves. The developed system uses THz pulses which are generated by stimulating photoconductive switches with femtosecond laser pulses. The time of flight of THz pulses can be determined with a resolution in the magnitude of several ten femtoseconds. Hence the thickness of an object like plastic pipes can be determined with a high accuracy by measuring the time delay between two reflections on materials interfaces e.g. at the pipe's inner and outer surface, similar to the ultrasonic technique. Knowing the refractive index of the sample the absolute layer thickness from the transit time difference can be calculated easily. This method in principle also allows the measurement of multilayer systems and the characterization of foamed pipes.

  3. Terahertz inline wall thickness monitoring system for plastic pipe extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hauck, J. E-mail: d.stich@skz.de E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de Stich, D. E-mail: d.stich@skz.de E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de Heidemeyer, P. E-mail: d.stich@skz.de E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de Bastian, M. E-mail: d.stich@skz.de E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de Hochrein, T. E-mail: d.stich@skz.de E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de

    2014-05-15

    Conventional and commercially available inline wall thickness monitoring systems for pipe extrusion are usually based on ultrasonic or x-ray technology. Disadvantages of ultrasonic systems are the usual need of water as a coupling media and the high damping in thick walled or foamed pipes. For x-ray systems special safety requirements have to be taken into account because of the ionizing radiation. The terahertz (THz) technology offers a novel approach to solve these problems. THz waves have many properties which are suitable for the non-destructive testing of plastics. The absorption of electrical isolators is typically very low and the radiation is non-ionizing in comparison to x-rays. Through the electromagnetic origin of the THz waves they can be used for contact free measurements. Foams show a much lower absorption in contrast to acoustic waves. The developed system uses THz pulses which are generated by stimulating photoconductive switches with femtosecond laser pulses. The time of flight of THz pulses can be determined with a resolution in the magnitude of several ten femtoseconds. Hence the thickness of an object like plastic pipes can be determined with a high accuracy by measuring the time delay between two reflections on materials interfaces e.g. at the pipe's inner and outer surface, similar to the ultrasonic technique. Knowing the refractive index of the sample the absolute layer thickness from the transit time difference can be calculated easily. This method in principle also allows the measurement of multilayer systems and the characterization of foamed pipes.

  4. Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe to a stainless steel flange

    DOEpatents

    Allais, Arnaud; Hoffmann, Ernst

    2008-02-05

    Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) to a stainless steel flange (12, 16), in which the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) is accommodated in a ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) in the flange (12, 16), the groove conforming to the dimensions of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18), where the gap remaining between the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) and the ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) is filled with a sealant (19).

  5. CAPACITIVE TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE LOCATION OF PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brian J. Huber

    2003-07-29

    Throughout the utility industry, there is high interest in subsurface imaging of plastic, ceramic, and metallic objects because of the cost, reliability, and safety benefits available in avoiding impacts with the existing infrastructure and in reducing inappropriate excavations. Industry interest in locating plastic pipe has resulted in funding available for the development of technologies that enable this imaging. Gas Technology Institute (GTI) proposes to develop a compact and inexpensive capacitive tomography imaging sensor that takes the form of a flat plate or flexible mat that can be placed on the ground to image objects embedded in the soil. A compact, low-cost sensor that can image objects through soil could be applied to multiple operations and will produce a number of cost savings for the gas industry. In a stand-alone mode, it could be used to survey an area prior to excavation. The technology would improve the accuracy and reliability of any operation that involves excavation by locating or avoiding buried objects. An accurate subsurface image of an area will enable less costly keyhole excavations and other cost-saving techniques. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been applied to this area with limited success. Radar requires a high-frequency carrier to be injected into the soil: the higher the frequency, the greater the image resolution. Unfortunately, high-frequency radio waves are more readily absorbed by soil. Also, high-frequency operation raises the cost of the associated electronics. By contrast, the capacitive tomography sensor uses low frequencies with a multiple-element antenna to obtain good resolution. Low-frequency operation lowers the cost of the associated electronics while improving depth of penetration. The objective of this project is to combine several existing techniques in the area of capacitive sensing to quickly produce a demonstrable prototype. The sensor itself will take the form of a flat array of electrodes that can be

  6. CAPACITIVE TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE LOCATION OF PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brian J. Huber

    2002-04-29

    Throughout the utility industry, there is high interest in subsurface imaging of plastic, ceramic, and metallic objects because of the cost, reliability, and safety benefits available in avoiding impacts with the existing infrastructure and in reducing inappropriate excavations. Industry interest in locating plastic pipe has resulted in funding available for the development of technologies that enable this imaging. Gas Technology Institute (GTI) proposes to develop a compact and inexpensive capacitive tomography imaging sensor that takes the form of a flat plate or flexible mat that can be placed on the ground to image objects embedded in the soil. A compact, low-cost sensor that can image objects through soil could be applied to multiple operations and will produce a number of cost savings for the gas industry. In a stand-alone mode, it could be used to survey an area prior to excavation. The technology would improve the accuracy and reliability of any operation that involves excavation by locating or avoiding buried objects. An accurate subsurface image of an area will enable less costly keyhole excavations and other cost-saving techniques. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been applied to this area with limited success. Radar requires a high-frequency carrier to be injected into the soil: the higher the frequency, the greater the image resolution. Unfortunately, high-frequency radio waves are more readily absorbed by soil. Also, high-frequency operation raises the cost of the associated electronics. By contrast, the capacitive tomography sensor uses low frequencies with a multiple-element antenna to obtain good resolution. Low-frequency operation lowers the cost of the associated electronics while improving depth of penetration. The objective of this project is to combine several existing techniques in the area of capacitive sensing to quickly produce a demonstrable prototype. The sensor itself will take the form of a flat array of electrodes that can be

  7. CAPACITIVE TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE LOCATION OF PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brian J. Huber

    2002-07-15

    Throughout the utility industry, there is high interest in subsurface imaging of plastic, ceramic, and metallic objects because of the cost, reliability, and safety benefits available in avoiding impacts with the existing infrastructure and in reducing inappropriate excavations. Industry interest in locating plastic pipe has resulted in funding available for the development of technologies that enable this imaging. Gas Technology Institute (GTI) proposes to develop a compact and inexpensive capacitive tomography imaging sensor that takes the form of a flat plate or flexible mat that can be placed on the ground to image objects embedded in the soil. A compact, low-cost sensor that can image objects through soil could be applied to multiple operations and will produce a number of cost savings for the gas industry. In a stand-alone mode, it could be used to survey an area prior to excavation. The technology would improve the accuracy and reliability of any operation that involves excavation by locating or avoiding buried objects. An accurate subsurface image of an area will enable less costly keyhole excavations and other cost-saving techniques. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been applied to this area with limited success. Radar requires a high-frequency carrier to be injected into the soil: the higher the frequency, the greater the image resolution. Unfortunately, high-frequency radio waves are more readily absorbed by soil. Also, high-frequency operation raises the cost of the associated electronics. By contrast, the capacitive tomography sensor uses low frequencies with a multiple-element antenna to obtain good resolution. Low-frequency operation lowers the cost of the associated electronics while improving depth of penetration. The objective of this project is to combine several existing techniques in the area of capacitive sensing to quickly produce a demonstrable prototype. The sensor itself will take the form of a flat array of electrodes that can be

  8. CAPACITIVE TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE LOCATION OF PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brian J. Huber; Christopher J. Ziolkowski

    2002-01-25

    Throughout the utility industry, there is high interest in subsurface imaging of plastic, ceramic, and metallic objects because of the cost, reliability, and safety benefits available in avoiding impacts with the existing infrastructure and in reducing inappropriate excavations. Industry interest in locating plastic pipe has resulted in funding available for the development of technologies that enable this imaging. Gas Technology Institute (GTI) proposes to develop a compact and inexpensive capacitive tomography imaging sensor that takes the form of a flat plate or flexible mat that can be placed on the ground to image objects embedded in the soil. A compact, low-cost sensor that can image objects through soil could be applied to multiple operations and will produce a number of cost savings for the gas industry. In a stand-alone mode, it could be used to survey an area prior to excavation. The technology would improve the accuracy and reliability of any operation that involves excavation by locating or avoiding buried objects. An accurate subsurface image of an area will enable less costly keyhole excavations and other cost-saving techniques. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been applied to this area with limited success. Radar requires a high-frequency carrier to be injected into the soil: the higher the frequency, the greater the image resolution. Unfortunately, high-frequency radio waves are more readily absorbed by soil. Also, high-frequency operation raises the cost of the associated electronics. By contrast, the capacitive tomography sensor uses low frequencies with a multiple-element antenna to obtain better resolution. Low-frequency operation lowers the cost of the associated electronics while improving depth of penetration. The objective of this project is to combine several existing techniques in the area of capacitive sensing to quickly produce a demonstrable prototype. The sensor itself will take the form of a flat array of electrodes that can be

  9. Analysis of Deformation Behavior of Plastic during Lining on Steel Pipe with an FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Toshiro; Mikawa, Toshihide; Kushizaki, Yoshiyuki

    2007-05-01

    There exist serious issues on the poor adhesion and residual stress of plastics on the steel pipe lined with plastics such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP), which cause the interface delamination and crack of plastics. In order to prevent the failure during lining, the optimum lining conditions such as temperature pattern and the length of plastic pipe are not determined by the theoretical analysis but by trial and error because of the following reasons: As a plastic pipe is longitudinally stretched in advance, it has the strong anisotropy that it shrinks in the longitudinal direction and expands in the circumferential direction while sliding and adhesion of plastics at the contact point with steel during lining. Moreover, plastics are usually a viscoelastic material; the dynamic behavior is remarkably dependent on temperature and time. In this work, the authors have tried to analyze the deformation behavior of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) lining a steel pipe during lining. Mechanical and viscoelastic properties of stretched PVC pipe have been measured in the longitudinal and circumferential directions. The deformation behavior of PVC pipe has been numerically predicted by a finite element analysis (FEA) under the assumption of anisotropic and viscoelastic material during lining. It has been confirmed that the calculated results by an FEA can give the good agreement with experimental ones.

  10. 3 users abandon plastic rooftop-sprinkler systems: say sun warps and cracks pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, C.

    1982-05-03

    Cold temperature and exposure to the sun have cracked and warped plastic piping used for rooftop sprinklers and caused some users to remove the systems they hoped would reduce cooling costs. Manufacturers of the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe, however, claim the cracking was due to improper draining. Copper tubing can be used, but at a 20 to 50% increase in cost. Chemical treatment to repel ultraviolet rays must be used on PVC piping to withstand sunlight. Several users report their experiences with rooftop sprinkling systems. (DCK)

  11. Relationship between Horn Pressure and Welding Time in Ultrasonic Welding of Plastic Pipes Using Torsional Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Kenichi; Ohdaira, Etsuzo; Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Ide, Masao

    1999-05-01

    Application of ultrasonic welding to plastics has become common. Recently, an ultrasonic welding method for long plastic pipes using torsional vibrations was developed. Optimal welding conditions for this new method have not yet been clarified. This paper reports the results of an investigation made in order to clarify the conditions, focusing on the welding time and both horn pressure, static force that horns pinch pipe, and static pressure which is added to welding surface. Experiments were performed on the welding of acrylic resin and ABS resin pipes. It was found that welding time decreases exponentially with increasing horn pressure and that increasing the static pressure reduces the welding time. It was also found there is an optimum range ofhorn pressures.

  12. Simplified analyses of a fiber-reinforced plastic joint for filament-wound pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada, H.; Parsons, I.D.

    1999-08-01

    A simplified analysis procedure is described for a fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) stub-flanged joint which addresses some of the problems with current FRP joints. The joint consists of a tapered hub that is filament-wound with the pipe. A separate stub is used to connect the two halves of the joint. This system avoids material discontinuities at the flange-pipe intersection and pull-back of the flange. The joint is modeled following the Taylor Forge approach used in metallic joint analysis. The analytical model is verified using finite element analysis; the results are in excellent agreement.

  13. Capacitance probe for detection of anomalies in non-metallic plastic pipe

    DOEpatents

    Mathur, Mahendra P.; Spenik, James L.; Condon, Christopher M.; Anderson, Rodney; Driscoll, Daniel J.; Fincham, Jr., William L.; Monazam, Esmail R.

    2010-11-23

    The disclosure relates to analysis of materials using a capacitive sensor to detect anomalies through comparison of measured capacitances. The capacitive sensor is used in conjunction with a capacitance measurement device, a location device, and a processor in order to generate a capacitance versus location output which may be inspected for the detection and localization of anomalies within the material under test. The components may be carried as payload on an inspection vehicle which may traverse through a pipe interior, allowing evaluation of nonmetallic or plastic pipes when the piping exterior is not accessible. In an embodiment, supporting components are solid-state devices powered by a low voltage on-board power supply, providing for use in environments where voltage levels may be restricted.

  14. Probabilistic elastic-plastic fracture analysis of cracked pipes with circumferential through-wall flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.

    1995-11-01

    A probabilistic fracture model was developed to analyze circumferential through-walled-cracked pipes subjected to bending loads. It involved elastic-plastic finite element analysis for estimating energy releases rates, J-tearing theory for characterizing ductile fracture, and standard methods of structural reliability theory for conduction probabilistic analysis. The evaluation of J-integral was based on the deformation theory of plasticity and power-law idealizations of the stress-strain and fracture toughness curves. This allows J to be expressed in terms of non-dimensional influence functions (F- and h{sub 1}-functions) that depend on the crack size, pipe geometry, and material hardening constant. New equations were proposed to represent these functions and were applied to conduct stochastic pipe fracture evaluations. Both analytical and simulation methods were formulated to determine the probabilistic characteristics of J. The same methods were used later to predict the failure probability of pipes as a function of the applied load. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the proposed methodology. The validity of J-integral based on the proposed equations for predicting crack driving force in a through-wall-cracked pipe was evaluated by comparing with available results in the current literature. Probability densities of J-integral were predicted as a function of applied loads. Failure probabilities corresponding to three different performance criteria were evaluated for a stainless steel nuclear piping in the Boiling Water Reactor plant. The results suggest that large differences may exist in the failure probability estimates produced by these performance criteria.

  15. Standard specification for coextruded poly (vinyl chloride) (pvc) non-pressure plastic pipe having reprocessed-recycled content. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee F-17 on Plastic Piping Systems and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee F17.25 on Vinyl Based Pipe. Current edition approved Oct. 10, 1997 and published October 1998. Originally published as F 1760-96. Last previous edition was F 1760-96.

  16. Elastic-plastic characterization of a cast stainless steep pipe elbow material

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.A.; Hackett, E.M.; Roe, C.

    1992-01-01

    Tests conducted in Japan as part of the High Level Vibration Test (HLVT) program for reactor piping systems revealed fatigue crack growth in a cast stainless steel pipe elbow. The material tested was equivalent to ASME SA-351CF8M. The David Taylor Research Center (DTRC) was tasked to developed the appropriate material property data to characterize cyclic deformation, cyclic elastic-plastic crack growth and ductile tearing resistance in the pipe elbow material. It was found that the cast stainless steel was very resistant to ductile crack extension. J-R curves essentially followed a blunting behavior to very high J levels. Low cycle fatigue crack growth rate data obtained on this material using a cyclic J integral approach was consistent with the high cycle fatigue crack growth rate and with a standard textbook correlation equation typical for this type of material. Evaluation of crack closure effects was essential to accurately determine the crack driving force for cyclic elastic- plastic crack growth in this material. SEM examination of several of the cyclic J test fracture surfaces indicated that fatigue was the primary mode of fracture with ductile crack extension intervening only during the last few cycles of loading.

  17. Simulation of ratcheting in straight pipes using ANSYS with an improved cyclic plasticity model

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, T.; Zhu, Y.; Matzen, V.C.

    1996-12-01

    Ratcheting has been shown to be a contributing cause of failure in several seismic experiments on piping components and systems. Most commercial finite element codes have been unable to simulate the ratcheting in those tests accurately. The reason for this can be traced to inadequate plasticity constitutive models in the analysis codes. The authors have incorporated an improved cyclic plasticity model, based on an Armstrong-Frederick kinematic hardening rule in conjunction with the Drucker-Palgen plastic modulus equation, into an ANSYS user subroutine. This modified analysis code has been able to simulate quite accurately the ratcheting behavior of a tube subjected to a constant internal pressure and axially strain controlled cycling. This paper describes simulations obtained form this modified ANSYS code for two additional tests: (1) a tube subjected to constant axial stress and prescribed torsional cycling, and (2) a straight pipe subjected to constant internal pressure and quasi-static cyclic bending. The analysis results from the modified ANSYS code are compared to the experimental data, as well as results from ABAQUS and the original ANSYS code. The resulting correlation shows a significant improvement over the original ANSYS and the ABAQUS codes.

  18. Field fabrication and installation of flangeless connections for plastic-lined piping

    SciTech Connect

    Kalnins, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    The chemical process industries have relied on Plastic-Lined Piping (PLP) to solve complex corrosion problems for over forty years. The Fugitive Emissions Regulations of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have created concerns about the large number of flanged connections traditionally associated with PLP. In the past several years, new joint reduction technologies have been introduced to minimize the number of flanged connections in a PLP system. These technologies incorporate new piping and bending technology and flangeless joints to create fabricated PLP assemblies. Until recently, the flangeless joints were limited to factory-fabricated assemblies. New technology permits the flangeless joints to be created in the field using a novel mechanical connection. This novel mechanical connection, field-fabrication and installation aspects of the flangeless connection are discussed.

  19. Comparison of linear-elastic-plastic, elastic-plastic, and fully plastic failure models in the assessment of piping integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    A double-ended guillotine break in the primary coolant loop of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is a postulated loss of coolant accient which can result in extreme dynamic loads (i.e., the asymmetric blowdown load) on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) an vessel intervals. Design and construction of the RPV and support systems to withstand these extreme dynamic loads is very difficult. Similar high loading would also be experienced in a boiling water reactor given a similar accident. Although such a break would be an extremely rare event, its obvious safety and design implications demand that it is carefully evaluated. The work discussed here is part of the Load Combinations Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to estimate the probability of a double-ended guillotine break in the primary reactor coolant loop of a selected PWR. The program employs a fracture mechanics based fatigue model to propagate cracks from an initial flaw distribution. It was found that while most of the large cracks grew into leaks, a complete (or nearly complete) circumferential crack could lead to a double-ended pipe break with prior leaking and thus, without warning. It is important to assess under what loads such a crack will result in complete pipe severance. The loads considered in this evaluation result from pressure, dead weight and seismic stresses. For the PWR hot leg considered in this investigation the internal pressure contributes the most to the load controlled stresses (i.e., stresses which can cause piping failure) and thus, the problem is treated as axisymmetric with uniform axial loading.

  20. Stress and strength analysis of fiber reinforced plastic pipe tees with reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Z.; Widera, G.E.O.; Xue, M.

    1996-12-01

    In this paper, a stress and strength analysis of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) pipe tees with reinforcement by use of 3-D finite element method is presented. Wilson`s incompatible elements and the 16-node 3-D element with relative degrees of freedom have been employed to carry out the analysis. The reliability of the program is also investigated. Two reinforcing methods, pad and compact reinforcement, are investigated. The fact that the properties and principal directions of the materials of the two intersecting pipes and the reinforcement are different has been taken into account in the analysis. The continuity of stress and strain fields at the intersecting surface of two different materials is considered in the post processing of the FEM results. The results show that the stress concentration in a FRP pipe intersection without reinforcement (r/R = 0.4--0.7) is significant. A reasonable design can be obtained by considering both stress fields and the orthotropic strength parameters of the materials. The in-plane shear stress may be the controlling factor because of the relatively low shear strength of most composites. Use of either reinforcing method does not change the location of the maximum tensile stress and the maximum shear stress, and both alleviate the stress concentration at the intersection. It is shown that the compact reinforcing method is more effective than the pad one. The larger the reinforcing area of the compact reinforcing method, the smaller the stress concentration factor, but the lower the rate of reduction.

  1. Evaluating quality of adhesive joints in glass-fiber plastic piping by using active thermal NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosso, M.; Marinho, C. A.; Nesteruk, D. A.; Rebello, J. M.; Soares, S. D.; Vavilov, V. P.

    2013-05-01

    GRP-type composites (Glass-fibre Reinforced Plastics) have been continuously employed in the oil industry in recent years, often on platforms, especially in pipes for water or oil under moderate temperatures. In this case, the pipes are usually connected through adhesive joints and, consequently, the detection of defects in these joints, as areas without adhesive or adhesive failure (disbonding), gains great importance. One-sided inspection on the joint surface (front side) is a challenging task because the material thickness easily exceeds 10 mm that is far beyond the limits of the capacity of thermography applied to GRP inspection, as confirmed by the experience. Detection limits have been evaluated both theoretically and experimentally as a function of outer wall thickness and defect lateral size. The 3D modeling was accomplished by using the ThermoCalc-6L software. The experimental unit consisted of a FLIR SC640 and NEC TH- 9100 IR imagers and some home-made heaters with the power from 1,5 to 30 kW. The results obtained by applying pulsed heating have demonstrated that the inspection efficiency is strongly dependent on the outer wall thickness with a value of about 8 mm being a detection limit.

  2. Probabilistic elastic-plastic fracture analysis of circumferentially cracked pipes with finite-length surface flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.

    1996-12-01

    A new probabilistic model was developed for predicting elastic-plastic fracture response of circumferentially cracked pipes with finite-length, constant-depth, internal surface flaws subject to remote bending loads. It involves engineering estimation of energy release rate, J-tearing theory for characterizing ductile fracture, and standard methods of structural reliability theory. The underlying J-estimation model is based on deformation theory of plasticity, constitutive law characterized by power law model for stress-strain curve, and an equivalence criterion incorporating reduced thickness analogy for simulating system compliance due to the presence of a crack. New equations were developed to predict J-integral and were evaluated by comparing with available finite-element results from the current literature. Both analytical and simulation methods were formulated to determine the probabilistic characteristics of J. The same methods were used later to predict the probability of crack initiation and net-section collapse as a function of the applied load. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the proposed methodology.

  3. For Piping Corrosive Wastes--Glass, Metal Or Plastic? Laboratory Design Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, J. Clyde

    1964-01-01

    Materials (piping and joints) for waste-piping systems are evaluated and a material or materials best qualified for above ground service in health research facilities are recommended. Evaluation is based on cost and performance because the potential value of any material depends on its ability to compete in both areas. In general, the following…

  4. Elasto-plastic stress analysis of thick-walled FGM pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Figueiredo, Fabio; Borges, Lavinia; Rochinha, Fernando

    2008-02-15

    The paper is concerned with quasi-static deformation processes of elastic-plastic FGM structures. It is assumed that the structures undergo small strain and the material properties of the graded layer are modeled by the modified rule of mixtures approximation. The elastic domain for ductile phases is defined through the Von Mises yield criterion. The mathematical problem consists of a variational equation that represents the equilibrium of the body and a variational inequality expressing the plastic strain rate evolution. An iterative method for solving this nonlinear system, combining a finite element approximation and an incremental-iterative scheme, is proposed. The results of some numerical experiments comparing the plastic response of tubes with abrupt transition to different configurations obtained using smooth transitions containing FGM layers between the two dissimilar materials are provided.

  5. Assimilable organic carbon release, chemical migration, and drinking water impacts of multiple brands of plastic pipes available in the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Matthew

    Increased installation of polymer potable water pipes in United States plumbing systems has created a need to thoroughly evaluate their water quality impacts. Eleven brands of new polymer drinking water pipe were evaluated for assimilable organic carbon (AOC) release at room temperature for 28 days. They included polyvinyl chloride (PVC), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene (PP), and cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) pipes. Three of eight PEX pipe brands exceeded a 100 microg/L AOC threshold for microbial regrowth for the first exposure period and no brands exceeded this value on day 28. No detectable increase in AOC was found for PP and PEX-a1 pipes; the remaining pipe brands contributed marginal AOC levels. Water quality impacts were more fully evaluated for two brands of PEX-b and one brand of PP pipe. PEX pipes released more total organic carbon (TOC), volatile organic compounds (VOC), and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOC) and caused greater odor than the PP pipe. All three materials showed reductions in these water quality parameters over 30 days. Three PEX pipe field studies revealed that aged systems did not display more intense odors than distribution systems. However, the organic releases from polymer pipes may still alter water quality and contribute to rapid microbial growth, even though the aesthetic impacts are temporary.

  6. Singing Corrugated Pipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1974-01-01

    Presents theoretical and experimental observations made with a musical toy called Hummer consisting of a corrugated flexible plastic tube about three-feet long and one-inch diam open at both ends. Included are descriptions of three new instruments: the Water Pipe, the Gas-Pipe Corrugahorn Bugle, and the Gas-Pipe Blues Corrugahorn. (CC)

  7. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Heat Pipes were originally developed by NASA and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory during the 1960s to dissipate excessive heat build- up in critical areas of spacecraft and maintain even temperatures of satellites. Heat pipes are tubular devices where a working fluid alternately evaporates and condenses, transferring heat from one region of the tube to another. KONA Corporation refined and applied the same technology to solve complex heating requirements of hot runner systems in injection molds. KONA Hot Runner Systems are used throughout the plastics industry for products ranging in size from tiny medical devices to large single cavity automobile bumpers and instrument panels.

  8. Practical Usage of Effect of Cold Weldability of Metals in Joint of Plastically Deformable Gasket and Flanges of Detachable Joint of Fuel Pipe-Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danchenko, V. G.

    2002-01-01

    The performed investigations of the character of changing the leakage of control gas through flange connections in the process of drawing- up the bolts in to calculation moment and subsequent lowering of bolt loading to zero have shown the following. Gradual reduction of leakage through a gasket occurs in the process of increasing the tightening torque up to its complete absence. But there is no leakage through the unloaded gasket after untwisting all nuts and removal of fastening bolts from flanges. The performed analysis has shown that this effect is caused by cold weldability of the gasket with flanges; this is a result of flowing of its material into microrough holes of contact surfaces of flanges at plastic deformation with formation of strong and dense contact. Some technological methods of formation of undetachable joint have been developed for practical application of this effect. According to one of those methods, drawing- up the gasket is performed with the help of flanges preliminarily. Those bolts are substituted by less strong standard bolts for drawing- up by less moment after achievement of stress needed. Method of pressurization of the joint is more effective when technological detachable flanges and bolts are used for reduction of the gasket up to its plastic state. Those flanges and bolts are removed after drawing- up; after that standard flanges are loaded by the moment used for reception of effort only from pressure of operational medium in the pipe- line (Qoper.m.) because drawing- up of the gasket by effort (Qeff.) that provides its plastic state, is already achieved. Then we exclude the first component (Qeff.) in dependence which is known from technical literature: Qdraw. = Qeff . + Qoper .m. = qFgas. + PFpip. (1), and the final formula for calculation of the effort of drawing- up the joint (in which drawing- up the gasket with provision of cold weldability is carried out preliminarily before drawing- up the standard bolts) is expressed in

  9. Elasto-Plastic FEM Stress Analysis and Mechanical Characteristics of Pipe Flange Connections with Non-Asbestos Gaskets under Internal Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Yoshio; Omiya, Yuya; Kobayashi, Takashi; Sawa, Toshiyuki

    The effects of the nominal diameter of pipe flange connections with non-asbestos spiral wound gaskets(SWG) under internal pressure on the mechanical characteristics such as the contact gasket stress distribution which governs the sealing performance, the load factor and the hub stress of the connections were evaluated. The stresses in the connections with the nominal diameters from 3” to 24” under internal pressure are analyzed using the elasto-plastic(EP) FEM analysis taking account the hysteresis and non-linearity of deformation behavior of the non-asbestos SWG. As a result, it is found that the variations in the contact gasket stress distributions are substantial due to the flange rotation in the connections with the larger nominal diameter. Leakage tests were conducted to measure the axial bolt forces (the load factor) and the hub stress. The results obtained from the EP-FEM analyses are fairly consistent with the experimental results concerning the variation in the axial bolt forces (the load factor) and the hub stress. Using the obtained contact gasket stress distributions and the fundamental relationship between the amount of leakage and the contact gasket stress, the amount of the leakage of the connections is estimated. It is observed that the sealing performance of the connections with larger nominal diameter is worse than that of the connection with smaller nominal diameter because of the flange rotation. The estimated results are in a fairly good agreement with the measured results. The difference in the hub stress between the EP-FEM and ASME code is demonstrated and the differences in the load factor and the sealing performance of the connections are shown between the asbestos and non-asbestos gaskets.

  10. Mechanical properties of a pipe workpiece at the stages of JCOE pipe forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalov, I. P.; Solov'ev, D. M.; Filippov, G. A.; Livanova, O. V.

    2015-04-01

    The mechanical properties (strength, plasticity, strain aging sensitivity, impact toughness, resistance to crack nucleation and propagation) of a ferritic-bainitic steel of strength class K60 are studied at the stages of JCOE pipe forming (sheet, pipe workpiece, finished pipe) and after artificial aging. The dependence of the change of the mechanical properties of the pipe workpiece along the perimeter on the degree of deformation action of a working tool in pipe forming is found.

  11. Boomwhackers and End-Pipe Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2014-02-01

    End-pipe corrections seldom come to mind as a suitable topic for an introductory physics lab. Yet, the end-pipe correction formula can be verified in an engaging and inexpensive lab that requires only two supplies: plastic-tube toys called boomwhackers and a meterstick. This article describes a lab activity in which students model data from plastic tubes to arrive at the end-correction formula for an open pipe. Students also learn the basic mathematics behind the musical scale, and come to appreciate the importance of end-pipe physics in the engineering design of toy musical tubes.

  12. Pipe support

    DOEpatents

    Pollono, Louis P.

    1979-01-01

    A pipe support for high temperature, thin-walled piping runs such as those used in nuclear systems. A section of the pipe to be supported is encircled by a tubular inner member comprised of two walls with an annular space therebetween. Compacted load-bearing thermal insulation is encapsulated within the annular space, and the inner member is clamped to the pipe by a constant clamping force split-ring clamp. The clamp may be connected to pipe hangers which provide desired support for the pipe.

  13. Towards an in-situ measurement of wave velocity in buried plastic water distribution pipes for the purposes of leak location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Fabrício C. L.; Brennan, Michael J.; Joseph, Phillip F.; Dray, Simon; Whitfield, Stuart; Paschoalini, Amarildo T.

    2015-12-01

    Water companies are under constant pressure to ensure that water leakage is kept to a minimum. Leak noise correlators are often used to help find and locate leaks. These devices correlate acoustic or vibration signals from sensors which are placed either side the location of a suspected leak. The peak in the cross-correlation function of the measured signals gives the time difference between the arrival times of the leak noise at the sensors. To convert the time delay into a distance, the speed at which the leak noise propagates along the pipe (wave-speed) needs to be known. Often, this is estimated from historical wave-speed data measured on other pipes obtained at various times and under various conditions, or it is estimated from tables which are calculated using simple formula. Usually, the wave-speed is not measured directly at the time of the correlation measurement and is therefore potentially a source of significant error in the localisation of the leak. In this paper, a new method of measuring the wave-speed in-situ in the presence of a leak, that is robust and simple, is explored. Experiments were conducted on a bespoke large scale buried pipe test-rig, in which a leak was also induced in the pipe between the measurement positions to simulate a condition that is likely to occur in practice. It is shown that even in conditions where the signal to noise ratio is very poor, the wave-speed estimate calculated using the new method is less than 5% different from the best estimate of 387 m s-1.

  14. Pipe Dreams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of attention to plumbing in college facilities, offering examples from various campuses. Addresses preventive maintenance, technology, and piping materials, including the debate between cast iron and PVC for drain pipes. (EV)

  15. Heat Pipe Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The heat pipe, a sealed chamber whose walls are lined with a "wick," a thin capillary network containing a working fluid in liquid form was developed for a heat distribution system for non-rotating satellites. Use of the heat pipe provides a continuous heat transfer mechanism. "Heat tubes" that improve temperature control in plastics manufacturing equipment incorporated the heat pipe technology. James M. Stewart, an independent consultant, patented the heat tubes he developed and granted a license to Kona Corporation. The Kona Nozzle for heaterless injection molding gets heat for its operation from an external source and has no internal heating bands, reducing machine maintenance and also eliminating electrical hazards associated with heater bands. The nozzles are used by Eastman Kodak, Bic Pen Corporation, Polaroid, Tupperware, Ford Motor Company, RCA, and Western Electric in the molding of their products.

  16. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtseva, Olga

    2007-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe. Model experiments with pipes having radii R = 57 mm confirmed results of the calculations and the possibility in principle to weld pipes by explosion with use of water as filler. Reduction of pipe diameter after dynamic loading and explosive welding was ˜2%.

  17. Boomwhackers and End-Pipe Corrections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    End-pipe corrections seldom come to mind as a suitable topic for an introductory physics lab. Yet, the end-pipe correction formula can be verified in an engaging and inexpensive lab that requires only two supplies: plastic-tube toys called boomwhackers and a meter-stick. This article describes a lab activity in which students model data from…

  18. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Phoenix Refrigeration Systems, Inc.'s heat pipe addition to the Phoenix 2000, a supermarket rooftop refrigeration/air conditioning system, resulted from the company's participation in a field test of heat pipes. Originally developed by NASA to control temperatures in space electronic systems, the heat pipe is a simple, effective, heat transfer system. It has been used successfully in candy storage facilities where it has provided significant energy savings. Additional data is expected to fully quantify the impact of the heat pipes on supermarket air conditioning systems.

  19. Limit analysis of pipe clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Service Level D (faulted) load capacity of a conventional three-bolt pipe-clamp based upon the limit analysis method is presented. The load distribution, plastic hinge locations, and collapse load are developed for the lower bound limit load method. The results of the limit analysis are compared with the manufacturer's rated loads. 3 refs.

  20. Pipe connector

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Thomas E.; Pardini, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A safety test facility for testing sodium-cooled nuclear reactor components includes a reactor vessel and a heat exchanger submerged in sodium in the tank. The reactor vessel and heat exchanger are connected by an expansion/deflection pipe coupling comprising a pair of coaxially and slidably engaged tubular elements having radially enlarged opposed end portions of which at least a part is of spherical contour adapted to engage conical sockets in the ends of pipes leading out of the reactor vessel and in to the heat exchanger. A spring surrounding the pipe coupling urges the end portions apart and into engagement with the spherical sockets. Since the pipe coupling is submerged in liquid a limited amount of leakage of sodium from the pipe can be tolerated.

  1. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  2. Explosive welding of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennov, O.; Burtseva, O.; Kitin, A.

    2006-08-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water. Model experiments with pipes having radii R = 57 mm confirmed results of the calculations and the possibility in principle to weld pipes by explosion with use of water as filler.

  3. Piping Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Burns & McDonnell provide architectural and engineering services in planning, design and construction of a wide range of projects all over the world. In design analysis, company regularly uses COSMIC computer programs. In computer testing piping design of a power plant, company uses Pipe Flexibility Analysis Program (MEL-21) to analyze stresses due to weight, temperature, and pressure found in proposed piping systems. Individual flow rates are put into the computer, then computer calculates the pressure drop existing across each component; if needed, design corrections or adjustments can be made and rechecked.

  4. Piping Flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A NASA computer program aids Hudson Engineering Corporation, Houston, Texas, in the design and construction of huge petrochemical processing plants like the one shown, which is located at Ju'aymah, Saudi Arabia. The pipes handling the flow of chemicals are subject to a variety of stresses, such as weight and variations in pressure and temperature. Hudson Engineering uses a COSMIC piping flexibility analysis computer program to analyze stresses and unsure the necessary strength and flexibility of the pipes. This program helps the company realize substantial savings in reduced engineering time.

  5. Consumer Exposure to Bisphenol A from Plastic Bottles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bidabadi, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a plastic monomer and plasticizer and is a chemical that has one of the highest volume production worldwide, with more than six billion pounds each year. Its primary use is the production of polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins used to line metal cans in a host of plastic consumer products such as toys, water pipes, drinking…

  6. Ultimate bending capacity of strain hardening steel pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-fei; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Hong; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jing; Cao, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Based on Hencky's total strain theory of plasticity, ultimate bending capacity of steel pipes can be determined analytically assuming an elastic-linear strain hardening material, the simplified analytical solution is proposed as well. Good agreement is observed when ultimate bending capacities obtained from analytical solutions are compared with experimental results from full-size tests of steel pipes. Parametric study conducted as part of this paper indicates that the strain hardening effect has significant influence on the ultimate bending capacity of steel pipes. It is shown that pipe considering strain hardening yields higher bending capacity than that of pipe assumed as elastic-perfectly plastic material. Thus, the ignorance of strain hardening effect, as commonly assumed in current codes, may underestimate the ultimate bending capacity of steel pipes. The solutions proposed in this paper are applicable in the design of offshore/onshore steel pipes, supports of offshore platforms and other tubular structural steel members.

  7. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Bobs Candies, Inc. produces some 24 million pounds of candy a year, much of it 'Christmas candy.' To meet Christmas demand, it must produce year-round. Thousands of cases of candy must be stored a good part of the year in two huge warehouses. The candy is very sensitive to temperature. The warehouses must be maintained at temperatures of 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit with relative humidities of 38- 42 percent. Such precise climate control of enormous buildings can be very expensive. In 1985, energy costs for the single warehouse ran to more than $57,000 for the year. NASA and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were adapting heat pipe technology to control humidity in building environments. The heat pipes handle the jobs of precooling and reheating without using energy. The company contacted a FSEC systems engineer and from that contact eventually emerged a cooperative test project to install a heat pipe system at Bobs' warehouses, operate it for a period of time to determine accurately the cost benefits, and gather data applicable to development of future heat pipe systems. Installation was completed in mid-1987 and data collection is still in progress. In 1989, total energy cost for two warehouses, with the heat pipes complementing the air conditioning system was $28,706, and that figures out to a cost reduction.

  8. Piping Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A complex of high pressure piping at Stennis Space Center carries rocket propellants and other fluids/gases through the Center's Component Test Facility. Conventional clamped connectors tend to leak when propellant lines are chilled to extremely low temperatures. Reflange, Inc. customized an existing piping connector to include a secondary seal more tolerant of severe thermal gradients for Stennis. The T-Con connector solved the problem, and the company is now marketing a commercial version that permits testing, monitoring or collecting any emissions that may escape the primary seal during severe thermal transition.

  9. Pipe gripper

    DOEpatents

    Moyers, S.M.

    1975-12-16

    A device for gripping the exterior surface of a pipe or rod is described which has a plurality of wedges, each having a concave face which engages the outer surface of the pipe and each having a smooth face opposing the concave face. The wedges are seated on and their grooved concave faces are maintained in circular alignment by tapered axial segments of an opening extending through a wedge-seating member. The wedges are allowed to slide across the tapered axial segments so that such a sliding movement acts to vary the diameter of the circular alignment.

  10. Quality assurance of glass fiber reinforced piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ende, C.A.M. van den; Bruijn, J.C.M. de

    1997-12-01

    Resin based glass fiber reinforced plastic piping systems have been in use for over 30 years in a variety of industrial purposes, e.g. cooling and potable water, crude oil, gas, etc. Glass fiber reinforced piping systems have considerable advantages over alternative materials for piping systems. This is mainly due to their high corrosion resistance. The use of GRP pipes is limited due to the lack of quality assurance. As with other piping systems the joint is the weakest point. The paper describes the effort made towards a better quality control and understanding of the failure through determination of acceptance criteria and development of nondestructive testing methods for adhesively bounded joints.

  11. PVC (polyvinylchloride) pipe reliability and failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.M.

    1984-06-01

    This report is narrowed to one variety of plastic pipe, polyvinylchloride (PVC), because of its common and extensive industrial, commercial and residential applications. There are certain disadvantages which must also be considered. PVC pipe is essentially brittle in nature, and it is relatively easily damaged by mechanical means such as being struck by tools or other materials; being weakened or fractured by gouging, abrasion or rough handling such as commonly occurs when pipe sections are thrown or walked on by workers. Excessive heat, welding slag, sunlight, and certain chemicals adversely affect it. There is also some concern about manufacturing processes which can affect product quality and integrity.

  12. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  13. Static analysis of a piping system with elbows

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.J.

    1994-03-01

    Vibration tests of elbows to failure were performed in Japan in the early 1970s. The piping system included two elbows and an eccentric mass. Tests were run both pressurized and unpressurized. This report documents a static analysis of the piping system in which the elbows are subjected to out of plane bending. The effects of internal pressure and material plasticity are investigated.

  14. 49 CFR 192.191 - Design pressure of plastic fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design pressure of plastic fittings. 192.191... Components § 192.191 Design pressure of plastic fittings. (a) Thermosetting fittings for plastic pipe must conform to ASTM D 2517, (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7). (b) Thermoplastic fittings for...

  15. 49 CFR 192.191 - Design pressure of plastic fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design pressure of plastic fittings. 192.191... Components § 192.191 Design pressure of plastic fittings. (a) Thermosetting fittings for plastic pipe must conform to ASTM D 2517, (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7). (b) Thermoplastic fittings for...

  16. 49 CFR 192.191 - Design pressure of plastic fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design pressure of plastic fittings. 192.191... Components § 192.191 Design pressure of plastic fittings. (a) Thermosetting fittings for plastic pipe must conform to ASTM D 2517, (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7). (b) Thermoplastic fittings for...

  17. 49 CFR 192.191 - Design pressure of plastic fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design pressure of plastic fittings. 192.191... Components § 192.191 Design pressure of plastic fittings. (a) Thermosetting fittings for plastic pipe must conform to ASTM D 2517, (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7). (b) Thermoplastic fittings for...

  18. 49 CFR 192.191 - Design pressure of plastic fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design pressure of plastic fittings. 192.191... Components § 192.191 Design pressure of plastic fittings. (a) Thermosetting fittings for plastic pipe must conform to ASTM D 2517, (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7). (b) Thermoplastic fittings for...

  19. Heat pipe technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A bibliography of heat pipe technology to provide a summary of research projects conducted on heat pipes is presented. The subjects duscussed are: (1) heat pipe applications, (2) heat pipe theory, (3) design and fabrication, (4) testing and operation, (5) subject and author index, and (6) heat pipe related patents.

  20. Limit analysis of pipe clamps. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1990-12-31

    The Service Level D (faulted) load capacity of a conventional three-bolt pipe-clamp based upon the limit analysis method is presented. The load distribution, plastic hinge locations, and collapse load are developed for the lower bound limit load method. The results of the limit analysis are compared with the manufacturer`s rated loads. 3 refs.

  1. Microstructural characterization of pipe bomb fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Otto; Oxley, Jimmie; Smith, James; Platek, Michael; Ghonem, Hamouda; Bernier, Evan; Downey, Markus; Cumminskey, Christopher

    2010-03-15

    Recovered pipe bomb fragments, exploded under controlled conditions, have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and microhardness. Specifically, this paper examines the microstructural changes in plain carbon-steel fragments collected after the controlled explosion of galvanized, schedule 40, continuously welded, steel pipes filled with various smokeless powders. A number of microstructural changes were observed in the recovered pipe fragments: deformation of the soft alpha-ferrite grains, deformation of pearlite colonies, twin formation, bands of distorted pearlite colonies, slip bands, and cross-slip bands. These microstructural changes were correlated with the relative energy of the smokeless powder fillers. The energy of the smokeless powder was reflected in a reduction in thickness of the pipe fragments (due to plastic strain prior to fracture) and an increase in microhardness. Moreover, within fragments from a single pipe, there was a radial variation in microhardness, with the microhardness at the outer wall being greater than that at the inner wall. These findings were consistent with the premise that, with the high energy fillers, extensive plastic deformation and wall thinning occurred prior to pipe fracture. Ultimately, the information collected from this investigation will be used to develop a database, where the fragment microstructure and microhardness will be correlated with type of explosive filler and bomb design. Some analyses, specifically wall thinning and microhardness, may aid in field characterization of explosive devices.

  2. Failure investigation of eddystone main steam piping

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, J.F.; Bynum, J.E.; Daikoku, T.; Ellis, F.V.; Haneda, H.; Rafiee, M.H.; Siddall, W.F.

    1985-10-01

    In March 1983, personnel at Philadelphia Electric's Eddystone No. 1 power plant discovered a through wall leak in the main steam outlet piping. This pipe was designed to carry steam at a pressure of 5300 psi (36,538 kPa) and a temperature of 1210F(654C). The pipe was made of 316 stainless steel and had been operated approximately 130,000 hours at the time that failure was discovered. Subsequent inspection revealed that many OD cracks existed in this piping system. This paper details the investigation into the cause of the failure. The following elements are highlighted: the in-place metallography which successfully used the plastic replica technique; the elasticplastic stress analysis and life prediction techniques carried out to assess probable failure modes and loadings; and the experimental stress analysis which was conducted to confirm analytical hypotheses.

  3. Finite element simulation of pipe dynamic response

    SciTech Connect

    Slagis, G.C.; Litton, R.W.

    1996-12-01

    Nonlinear finite element dynamic analyses of the response of a pipe span to controlled-displacement, sinusoidal vibration have been performed. The objective of this preliminary study is to compare strain and acceleration response data to those generated by Beaney in the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories experiments. Results for an unpressurized, 5 Hz, carbon steel pipe are in good agreement with the experiments. Hence, it appears that analytical simulation will be useful to assess seismic margins. Recommendations for additional studies are provided. The analyses confirm the test results--dynamic response is greatly attenuated by material plasticity. Analytical strains and accelerations are about 30% higher than test data. There are several possible explanations for the differences. To assess the effect of frequency on response, the length of the pipe span was increased. Analysis of the longer, 2 Hz, pipe span shows significantly greater cyclic strains than the 5 Hz span at the same input excitation levels.

  4. Plastic Jellyfish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Presents an environmental science activity designed to enhance students' awareness of the hazards of plastic waste for wildlife in aquatic environments. Discusses how students can take steps to reduce the effects of plastic waste. (WRM)

  5. Ultrasonic pipe assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Graham H.; Morrow, Valerie L.; Levie, Harold; Kane, Ronald J.; Brown, Albert E.

    2003-12-23

    An ultrasonic pipe or other structure assessment system includes an ultrasonic transducer positioned proximate the pipe or other structure. A fluid connection between the ultrasonic transducer and the pipe or other structure is produced. The ultrasonic transducer is moved relative to the pipe or other structure.

  6. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  7. Short cracks in piping and piping welds

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.M.; Brust, F.; Francini, R.; Ghadiali, N.; Kilinski, T.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Landow, M.; Marschall, C.W.; Rahman, S.; Scott, P. )

    1992-04-01

    This is the second semiannual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds research program. The program began in March 1990 and will extend for 4 years. The intent of this program is to verify and improve fracture analyses for circumferentially cracked large-diameter nuclear piping with crack sizes typically used in leak-before-break analyses or in-service flaw evaluations. Only quasi-static loading rates are evaluated since the NRC's International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program is evaluating the effects of seismic loading rates on cracked piping systems. Progress for through-wall-cracked pipe involved (1) conducting a 28-inch diameter stainless steel SAW and 4-inch diameter French TP316 experiments, (2) conducting a matrix of FEM analyses to determine GE/EPRI functions for short TWC pipe, (3) comparison of uncracked pipe maximum moments to various analyses and FEM solutions, (4) development of a J-estimation scheme that includes the strength of both the weld and base metals. Progress for surface-cracked pipe involved (1) conducting two experiments on 6-inch diameter pipe with d/t = 0.5 and {Theta}/{pi} = 0.25 cracks, (2) comparisons of the pipe experiments to Net-Section-Collapse predictions, and (3) modification of the SC.TNP and SC.TKP J-estimation schemes to include external surface cracks.

  8. Common causes of material degradation in buried piping

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C.F.

    1997-01-20

    Buried pipe may fail for innumerable reasons. Causes can be mechanical damage/breakage, chemically initiated corrosion, or a combination. Failures may originate either internally or externally on the pipe. They may be related to flaws in the design, to excessive or unanticipated internal pressure or ground level loading, and/or to poor or uncertain installation practice. Or the pipe may simply ``wear out`` in service. Steel is strong and very forgiving in underground applications, especially with regard to backfill. However, soil support developed through densification or compaction is critical for brittle concrete and vitrified clay tile pipe, and is very important for cast iron and plastic pipe. Chemistry of the soil determines whether or not it will enhance corrosion or other types of degradation. Various causes and mechanisms for deterioration of buried pipe are indicated. Some peculiarities of the different materials of construction are characterized. Repair methods and means to circumvent special problems are described.

  9. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOEpatents

    Person, Abraham

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  10. Reusable pipe flange covers

    DOEpatents

    Holden, James Elliott; Perez, Julieta

    2001-01-01

    A molded, flexible pipe flange cover for temporarily covering a pipe flange and a pipe opening includes a substantially round center portion having a peripheral skirt portion depending from the center portion, the center portion adapted to engage a front side of the pipe flange and to seal the pipe opening. The peripheral skirt portion is formed to include a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs, wherein free ends of the flexible tabs are formed with respective through passages adapted to receive a drawstring for pulling the tabs together on a back side of the pipe flange.

  11. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y.

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  12. Plastics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Tommy G.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high schools industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in plastics technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to production technology; history and development of plastics; safety; youth leadership,…

  13. Heat pipe flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, S.

    1973-01-01

    OAO 3 heat pipe flight experiments to check out weightlessness behavior are reported. Tested were a hollow channel screen system with helical grooves, a heat pipe with a wicking system of horizontal grooves, and a spiral artery pipe with multichannel fluid return to the evaporator. Flight experiment data proved that all heat pipe geometries containing wicking systems provided uninterrupted fluid return to the condensators during weightlessness and sufficient cooling for isothermalizing optical instruments onboard OAO.

  14. Heat pipes. [technology utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The development and use of heat pipes are described, including space requirements and contributions. Controllable heat pipes, and designs for automatically maintaining a selected constant temperature, are discussed which would add to the versatility and usefulness of heat pipes in industrial processing, manufacture of integrated circuits, and in temperature stabilization of electronics.

  15. Evaluation of environmental impacts of two common restoration methodologies for pipes that convey stormwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dianjun E; Smith, James A

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the environmental impact of two commercial stormwater pipe-repair technologies (Ultraliner and Troliner). These technologies use liners believed to contain three plasticizers of potential environmental concern: bisphenol A (BPA), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP). The release of these two products was investigated both experimentally and mathematically. Kinetic batch experiments were conducted to determine if contaminants were leaching from Ultraliner, Troliner, and the grout (used with Troliner) into water. In all cases for all incubation times up to 48 h, none of the three plasticizers were detected in water in contact with any of the pipe-repair materials. A generic GC-FID scan did not detect any unidentified compounds relative to control samples. In addition, a mathematical model of plasticizer leaching from the pipe-liner material was developed. Under various pipe geometries, simulated aqueous concentrations of the plasticizers were less than regulatory limits. PMID:22820681

  16. Dynamic tests of cracked pipe components

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D.A.; Heald, J.D.; Sharma, S.R.

    1984-02-01

    Dynamic tests were conducted involving notched sections of 4-in. (10-cm) stainless steel and Inconel-600 pipe. The specimen was a four-point bending beam with end masses sized to give an elastic first-mode frequency near that of typical field installed piping systems (15 Hz). Specimens were loaded using sinewave excitation at this first mode natural frequency. Specimen response was compared to predictions from an elastic-plastic dynamic analysis previously developed on this program. In addition, specimen loads at failure were compared to those predicted from a net section collapse failure criterion. The results confirmed that the elasticplastic dynamic analysis adequately predicted the dynamic response of flawed pipes under seismic-type excitation. Furthermore, net section collapse does not occur under dynamic loading conditions which simulate natural frequencies of asinstalled light water reactor piping systems. Finally, a net section collapse criterion yields conservative estimates of the load capacity of flawed pipe sections provided crack growth is properly accounted for.

  17. 65. FIRE SUPPRESSION PIPES BEHIND FLAME BUCKET. PIPES TO UMBILICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. FIRE SUPPRESSION PIPES BEHIND FLAME BUCKET. PIPES TO UMBILICAL MAST IN LOWER LEFT CORNER; PIPES TO LAUNCHER IN UPPER LEFT CORNER; PIPES TO FLAME BUCKET IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF PHOTOGRAPH. POTABLE WATER PIPING IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF PHOTO. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  18. Miniature Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Small Business Innovation Research contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center to Thermacore Inc. have fostered the company work on devices tagged "heat pipes" for space application. To control the extreme temperature ranges in space, heat pipes are important to spacecraft. The problem was to maintain an 8-watt central processing unit (CPU) at less than 90 C in a notebook computer using no power, with very little space available and without using forced convection. Thermacore's answer was in the design of a powder metal wick that transfers CPU heat from a tightly confined spot to an area near available air flow. The heat pipe technology permits a notebook computer to be operated in any position without loss of performance. Miniature heat pipe technology has successfully been applied, such as in Pentium Processor notebook computers. The company expects its heat pipes to accommodate desktop computers as well. Cellular phones, camcorders, and other hand-held electronics are forsible applications for heat pipes.

  19. Piping inspection instrument carriage

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1993-09-20

    This invention is comprised of a pipe inspection instrument carriage for use with a pipe crawler or other locomotion means for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has means mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and means for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has means for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure.

  20. Deployable Heat Pipe Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    A 1.2- by 1.8-m variable conductance heat pipe radiator was designed, built, and tested. The radiator has deployment capability and can passively control Freon-21 fluid loop temperatures under varying loads and environments. It consists of six grooved variable conductance heat pipes attached to a 0.032-in. aluminum panel. Heat is supplied to the radiator via a fluid header or a single-fluid flexible heat pipe header. The heat pipe header is an artery design that has a flexible section capable of bending up to 90 degrees. Radiator loads as high as 850 watts were successfully tested. Over a load variation of 200 watts, the outlet temperature of the Freon-21 fluid varied by 7 F. An alternate control system was also investigated which used a variable conductance heat pipe header attached to the heat pipe radiator panel.

  1. Fracture propagation, pipe deformation study

    SciTech Connect

    Aloe, A.; Di Candia, A.; Bramante, M.

    1983-04-15

    Shear fracture propagation has become an important research subject connected with design aspects of gas pipelines. Difficulties involved in predicting safe service conditions from pure theoretical studies require 1:1 scale experiments. Through these tests, semiempirical design criteria was formulated where the minimum level of material quality, indicated by Charpy V energy in the ductile range, is determined as a function of pipe geometry and hoop stress. Disagreements exist among these criteria. Different arrest energy predictions at high hoop stresses and different effects ascribed to the thickness have called for further research in the field. Some interesting indications were obtained about shape and size of the plastic zone ahead of the propagating crack. Burst tests have been conducted and are discussed.

  2. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  3. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  4. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bast, Richard M.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Henning, Carl D.; Lennon, Joseph P.; Pastrnak, John W.; Smith, Joseph A.

    1994-01-01

    An attachment mechanism for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection.

  5. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bast, R.M.; Chesnut, D.A.; Henning, C.D.; Lennon, J.P.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Smith, J.A.

    1994-12-13

    An attachment mechanism is described for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection. 6 figures.

  6. Underground radial pipe network

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.L.

    1984-04-24

    The network, useful in conducting fluids to underground sites, is an assembly of flexible pipes or tubes, suspended from and connected to a drill pipe. The flexible pipes, assembled in a bundle, are spring biased to flare outwardly in an arcuate manner when a releasable cap on the distal end of the bundle is removed. The assembled bundle is inserted into and lowered down a bore hole. When the cap is released, the pipes flare radially and outwardly. Fluid, pumped into and through the assembly, can be directed into the underground formation for various purposes.

  7. Heat Pipe Materials Compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.; Fleischman, G. L.; Luedke, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program to evaluate noncondensable gas generation in ammonia heat pipes was completed. A total of 37 heat pipes made of aluminum, stainless steel and combinations of these materials were processed by various techniques, operated at different temperatures and tested at low temperature to quantitatively determine gas generation rates. In order of increasing stability are aluminum/stainless combination, all aluminum and all stainless heat pipes. One interesting result is the identification of intentionally introduced water in the ammonia during a reflux step as a means of surface passivation to reduce gas generation in stainless-steel/aluminum heat pipes.

  8. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  9. Introduction to Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. NCTS 21070-15. Course Description: This course will present operating principles of the heat pipe with emphases on the underlying physical processes and requirements of pressure and energy balance. Performance characterizations and design considerations of the heat pipe will be highlighted. Guidelines for thermal engineers in the selection of heat pipes as part of the spacecraft thermal control system, testing methodology, and analytical modeling will also be discussed.

  10. Pipe crawler apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Gregory L.; Erickson, Scott A.; Blackmon, Bruce L.

    2002-01-01

    A pipe crawler apparatus particularly useful for 3-inch and 4-inch diameter pipes is provided. The pipe crawler apparatus uses a gripping apparatus in which a free end of a piston rod is modified with a bearing retaining groove. Bearings, placed within the groove, are directed against a camming surface of three respective pivoting support members. The non-pivoting ends of the support members carry a foot-like gripping member that, upon pivoting of the support member, engages the interior wall of the pipe.

  11. Heat Pipe Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, William B.; Simon, Justin I.; Webb, A. Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    When volcanism dominates heat transport, a terrestrial body enters a heat-pipe mode, in which hot magma moves through the lithosphere in narrow channels. Even at high heat flow, a heat-pipe planet develops a thick, cold, downwards-advecting lithosphere dominated by (ultra-)mafic flows and contractional deformation at the surface. Heat-pipes are an important feature of terrestrial planets at high heat flow, as illustrated by Io. Evidence for their operation early in Earth's history suggests that all terrestrial bodies should experience an episode of heat-pipe cooling early in their histories.

  12. Heat pipe investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    The OAO-C spacecraft has three circular heat pipes, each of a different internal design, located in the space between the spacecraft structural tube and the experiment tube, which are designed to isothermalize the structure. Two of the pipes are used to transport high heat loads, and the third is for low heat loads. The test problems deal with the charging of the pipes, modifications, the mobile tilt table, the position indicator, and the heat input mechanisms. The final results showed that the techniques used were adequate for thermal-vacuum testing of heat pipes.

  13. Plastic Bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bruce K

    2016-09-01

    Plastic bronchitis is an uncommon and probably underrecognized disorder, diagnosed by the expectoration or bronchoscopic removal of firm, cohesive, branching casts. It should not be confused with purulent mucous plugging of the airway as seen in patients with cystic fibrosis or bronchiectasis. Few medications have been shown to be effective and some are now recognized as potentially harmful. Current research directions in plastic bronchitis research include understanding the genetics of lymphatic development and maldevelopment, determining how abnormal lymphatic malformations contribute to cast formation, and developing new treatments. PMID:27514587

  14. Fluid-structure interaction in water-filled thin pipes of anisotropic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jeong Ho; Inaba, K.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of elastic anisotropy in piping materials on fluid-structure interaction are studied for water-filled carbon-fiber reinforced thin plastic pipes. When an impact is introduced to water in a pipe, there are two waves traveling at different speeds. A primary wave corresponding to a breathing mode of pipe travels slowly and a precursor wave corresponding to a longitudinal mode of pipe travels fast. An anisotropic stress-strain relationship of piping materials has been taken into account to describe the propagation of primary and precursor waves in the carbon-fiber reinforced thin plastic pipes. The wave speeds and strains in the axial and hoop directions are calculated as a function of carbon-fiber winding angles and compared with the experimental data. As the winding angle increases, the primary wave speed increases due to the increased stiffness in the hoop direction, while the precursor wave speed decreases. The magnitudes of precursor waves are much smaller than those of primary waves so that the effect of precursor waves on the deformation of pipe is not significant. The primary wave generates the hoop strain accompanying the opposite-signed axial strain through the coupling compliance of pipe. The magnitude of hoop strain induced by the primary waves decreases with increasing the winding angle due to the increased hoop stiffness of pipe. The magnitude of axial strain is small at low and high winding angles where the coupling compliance is small.

  15. Cracking resistance in steam pipe fittings having various microdamage levels

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, I.I.; Googe, S.Yu.; Shul`gina, N.G.

    1995-05-01

    Cracking resistance and metal damage are considered in relation to structural state for steam-pipe fittings during use. An approximate scheme is given for estimating the maximum permissible operating time in the plastic state in relation to the depth of an observed crack-type defect.

  16. Analyses and design of underground reinforced plastic mortar pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Magid, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified design procedure for underground Reinforced Plastic Mortar (RPM) pipe is proposed. This procedure is based on finite-element analyses of the pipe-soil system and composite laminate analysis of the pipe. With the proposed method, the designer is able to select the best trench geometry and backfill conditions, to determine the construction effects, and to devise the constituent pipe materials according to the given installation conditions for a reliable and cost-effective design. Existing design methods of underground flexible pipes were evaluated. A thorough investigation of the problems encountered with the RPM pipe is made to study the possible modes and causes of failure. The new design method is based on a composite beam element model to account for the failure modes pertinent to fiberglass-reinforced plastic pipes. The design procedure and the required soil and pipe materials data are described. It is shown that simpler performance limits are needed and that the proposed design procedure can be fully implemented once these data are provided.

  17. J-integral of circumferential crack in large diameter pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Chao, Yuh J.; Sutton, M. A.; Lam, P. S.; Mertz, G. E.

    Large diameter thin-walled pipes are encountered in a low pressure nuclear power piping system. Fracture parameters such as K and J, associated with postulated cracks, are needed to assess the safety of the structure, for example, prediction of the onset of tile crack growth and the stability of the crack. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has completed a comprehensive study of cracks in pipes and handbook-type data is available. However, for some large diameter, thin-walled pipes the needed information is not included in the handbook. This paper reports our study of circumferential cracks in large diameter, thin-walled pipes (R/t=30 to 40) under remote bending or tension loads. Elastic-Plastic analyses using the finite element method were performed to determine the elastic and fully plastic J values for various pipe/crack geometries. A non-linear Ramberg-Osgood material model is used with strain hardening exponents (n) that range from 3 to 10. A number of circumferential, through thickness cracks were studied with half crack angles ranging from 0.063(pi) to 0.5(pi). Results are tabulated for use with the EPRI estimation scheme.

  18. Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    2014 Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics Cosmetic Procedure Trends 2014 Plastic Surgery Statistics Report Please credit the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PLASTIC SURGEONS when citing statistical data or using ...

  19. Plastics Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 16 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of plastics technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific occupation and would…

  20. Heat pipe methanator

    DOEpatents

    Ranken, William A.; Kemme, Joseph E.

    1976-07-27

    A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

  1. These Pipes Are "Happening"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The author is blessed with having the water pipes for the school system in her office. In this article, the author describes how the breaking of the pipes had led to a very worthwhile art experience for her students. They practiced contour and shaded drawing techniques, reviewed patterns and color theory, and used their reasoning skills--all while…

  2. Extendable pipe crawler

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, Mark

    1991-01-01

    A pipe crawler having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radially outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of a pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by "inchworm"-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward.

  3. Extendable pipe crawler

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, M.

    1991-05-28

    A pipe crawler is described having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radially outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of a pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by inchworm'-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward. 5 figures.

  4. A study of primary stress indices for piping elbows

    SciTech Connect

    Macfarlane, D.M.; Boyle, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    The behavior of pipe bends under moment loading is investigated in a parametric study using the elastic compensation technique for finite element analysis. The use of an Ilyushin formulation allows elastic compensation to be applied to shell elements (Boyle et al., 1993). Elastic compensation develops a lower bound limit load, which can be equated to the ASME B{sub 2} stress indices for pipe elbows. Experiments by Touboul et al. (1987) have developed formulae for normalized limit moment and the corresponding B{sub 2} indices for pipe bends in terms of the pipe parameter. This study supports the values for in-plane moment loading and suggests a modification of the formula for out of plane moments. The results for the Ilyushin formulation for elastic compensation are shown to compare well with those of a full elastic-plastic analysis.

  5. Photochromic plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, N.Y.C.

    1990-12-31

    The benefits of photochromic glazing materials as well as other switchable devices for solar control and/or use have been analyzed. The analysis indicates that the saving in cooling costs may be significant for a commercial building. This saving can be further increased if other solar control technologies which operate in the solar spectra region outside the visible range are integrated with photochromic property. Photochromic plastics have the advantage of readiness to integrate with other solar control technologies as in the case of retrofit polyester film. The glazing applications of spirooxazines have only been considered recently. The few examples described in the preceding section are just exploratory. Improvements in photochromic performance and durability are definitely probable as more spirooxazine compounds and formulations are tested and stabilization methods are discovered. Recently, an all plastic model house was constructed by General Electric in which both photochromic and electrochromic switchable windows were employed. Thus, commercialization of photochromic plastics for glazing applications may not be as remote as it was not too long ago. 66 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Piping stress handbook. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Helguero, V.

    1986-01-01

    This abridged volume contains the following: Coefficients of thermal expansion. Allowable stress range for ANSI/ASME Power Piping Code B31.1. Stress intensification and flexibility factors. Pressure and stress ratios. Design criteria for allowable loads, moment, and stresses. Properties of pipe. Weight and dimensions of pipe and components. Pipe support selection and design. Fundamentals of expansion joints. Index.

  7. Experimenting with a "Pipe" Whistle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Olga

    2012-01-01

    A simple pipe whistle can be made using pieces of PVC pipe. The whistle can be used to measure the resonant frequencies of open or closed pipes. A slightly modified version of the device can be used to also investigate the interesting dependence of the sound frequencies produced on the orifice-to-edge distance. The pipe whistle described here…

  8. Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, C.F.; Howard, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Pipe crawlers, pipe inspection {open_quotes}rabbits{close_quotes} and similar vehicles are widely used for inspecting the interior surfaces of piping systems, storage tanks and process vessels for damaged or flawed structural features. This paper describes the design of a flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus.

  9. Gas pipe explorer robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A gas pipe explorer formed of a plurality of connecting elements, and an articulation element between the connected elements. The connected elements include drive capabilities, and the articulation element allows the connected elements to traverse gas pipes of arbitrary shapes and sizes. A sensor may sends the characteristics of the gas pipe, and the communication element may send back those sends characteristics. The communication can be wired, over a tether connecting the device to a remote end. Alternatively, the connection can be wireless, driven by either a generator or a battery.

  10. An electrohydrodynamic heat pipe.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    A heat pipe of new design, using an electrode structure to orient and guide the dielectric liquid phase flow, is proposed. Analysis indicates that the operation of the electrohydrodynamic heat pipe is in direct analogy to capillary devices, with the polarization force acting in place of capillarity. Advantages of these new heat pipes include greatly reduced liquid friction, electrohydrodynamically enhanced evaporation and condensation heat transfer, and a possible voltage-controlled on/off feature. Preliminary calculations indicate that relatively high performance devices are possible.

  11. Electrohydrodynamic heat pipes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1973-01-01

    An electrohydrodynamic heat pipe of radical design is proposed which substitutes polarization electrohydrodynamic force effects for capillarity in collecting, guiding, and pumping a condensate liquid phase. The discussed device is restricted to the use of dielectric liquids as working fluids. Because of the relatively poor thermal transport properties of these liquids, capillary heat pipes using these liquids have not been high performance devices. The employment of the electrohydrodynamic concept should enhance this performance and help fill the performance gap that exists in the temperature range from 250 F to 750 F for 'conventional' capillary heat pipes.

  12. Improved Thin, Flexible Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Gernert, Nelson J.; Sarraf, David B.; Wollen, Peter J.; Surina, Frank C.; Fale, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Flexible heat pipes of an improved type are fabricated as layers of different materials laminated together into vacuum- tight sheets or tapes. In comparison with prior flexible heat pipes, these flexible heat pipes are less susceptible to leakage. Other advantages of these flexible heat pipes, relative to prior flexible heat pipes, include high reliability and greater ease and lower cost of fabrication. Because these heat pipes are very thin, they are highly flexible. When coated on outside surfaces with adhesives, these flexible heat pipes can be applied, like common adhesive tapes, to the surfaces of heat sinks and objects to be cooled, even if those surfaces are curved.

  13. AutoPIPE Extract Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, Barbara E.

    1993-07-02

    The AutoPIPE Extract Program (APEX) provides an interface between CADAM (Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing) Release 21 drafting software and the AutoPIPE, Version 4.4, piping analysis program. APEX produces the AutoPIPE batch input file that corresponds to the piping shown in a CADAM model. The card image file contains header cards, material cards, and pipe cross section cards as well as tee, bend, valve, and flange cards. Node numbers are automatically generated. APEX processes straight pipe, branch lines and ring geometries.

  14. AutoPIPE Extract Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-07-02

    The AutoPIPE Extract Program (APEX) provides an interface between CADAM (Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing) Release 21 drafting software and the AutoPIPE, Version 4.4, piping analysis program. APEX produces the AutoPIPE batch input file that corresponds to the piping shown in a CADAM model. The card image file contains header cards, material cards, and pipe cross section cards as well as tee, bend, valve, and flange cards. Node numbers are automatically generated. APEX processes straightmore » pipe, branch lines and ring geometries.« less

  15. Concentrated and piped sunlight for indoor illumination.

    PubMed

    Fraas, L M; Pyle, W R; Ryason, P R

    1983-02-15

    A concept for indoor illumination of buildings using sunlight is described. For this system, a tracking concentrator on the building roof follows the sun and focuses sunlight into a lightguide. A system of transparent lightguides distributes the sunlight to interior rooms. Recent advances in the transparency of acrylic plastic optical fibers suggest that acrylic lightguides could be successfully used for piping sunlight. The proposed system displaces electricity currently used for indoor lighting. It is argued that using sunlight directly for indoor illumination would be about twenty-five times more cost-effective than using sunlight to generate electricity with solar cells for powering electric lamps for indoor lighting. PMID:18195829

  16. An electrohydrodynamic heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    Dielectric liquid for transfer of heat provides liquid flow from the condenser section to the evaporator section in conventional heat pipes. Working fluid is guided or pumped by an array of wire electrodes connected to a high-voltage source.

  17. Heat pipe manufacturing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1974-01-01

    Heat pipe manufacturing methods are examined with the goal of establishing cost effective procedures that will ultimately result in cheaper more reliable heat pipes. Those methods which are commonly used by all heat pipe manufacturers have been considered, including: (1) envelope and wick cleaning, (2) end closure and welding, (3) mechanical verification, (4) evacuation and charging, (5) working fluid purity, and (6) charge tube pinch off. The study is limited to moderate temperature aluminum and stainless steel heat pipes with ammonia, Freon-21 and methanol working fluids. Review and evaluation of available manufacturers techniques and procedures together with the results of specific manufacturing oriented tests have yielded a set of recommended cost-effective specifications which can be used by all manufacturers.

  18. Miniature pipe crawler tractor

    DOEpatents

    McKay, Mark D.; Anderson, Matthew O.; Ferrante, Todd A.; Willis, W. David

    2000-01-01

    A pipe crawler tractor may comprise a half tractor assembly having a first base drive wheel, a second base drive wheel, and a top drive wheel. The drive wheels are mounted in spaced-apart relation so that the top drive wheel is positioned between the first and second base drive wheels. The mounting arrangement is also such that the first and second base drive wheels contact the inside surface of the pipe at respective first and second positions and so that the top drive wheel contacts the inside surface of the pipe at a third position, the third position being substantially diametrically opposed to the first and second positions. A control system connected to the half tractor assembly controls the rotation of the first base wheel, the second base wheel, and the top drive wheel to move the half tractor assembly within the pipe.

  19. Heat pipe development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienart, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to investigate analytically and experimentally the performance of heat pipes with composite wicks--specifically, those having pedestal arteries and screwthread circumferential grooves. An analytical model was developed to describe the effects of screwthreads and screen secondary wicks on the transport capability of the artery. The model describes the hydrodynamics of the circumferential flow in triangular grooves with azimuthally varying capillary menisci and liquid cross-sections. Normalized results were obtained which give the influence of evaporator heat flux on the axial heat transport capability of the arterial wick. In order to evaluate the priming behavior of composite wicks under actual load conditions, an 'inverted' glass heat pipe was designed and constructed. The results obtained from the analysis and from the tests with the glass heat pipe were applied to the OAO-C Level 5 heat pipe, and an improved correlation between predicted and measured evaporator and transport performance were obtained.

  20. Heat Pipe Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The heat pipe was developed to alternately cool and heat without using energy or any moving parts. It enables non-rotating spacecraft to maintain a constant temperature when the surface exposed to the Sun is excessively hot and the non Sun-facing side is very cold. Several organizations, such as Tropic-Kool Engineering Corporation, joined NASA in a subsequent program to refine and commercialize the technology. Heat pipes have been installed in fast food restaurants in areas where humid conditions cause materials to deteriorate quickly. Moisture removal was increased by 30 percent in a Clearwater, FL Burger King after heat pipes were installed. Relative humidity and power consumption were also reduced significantly. Similar results were recorded by Taco Bell, which now specifies heat pipe systems in new restaurants in the Southeast.

  1. Neurophysiology of pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkley, Dwight

    2014-11-01

    This work explores the connection between the transition to turbulence in pipe flow and the dynamics of excitable media, as exemplified by nerve cells. The primary goal is to leverage years of extensive analysis of neural systems to understand the dynamics of transitional turbulence. To demonstrate the predictive nature of the approach, model simulations will be presented for puffs in pipe flow for cases not previously studied experimentally.

  2. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  3. Freezable heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.; Sanzi, James L.

    1981-02-03

    A heat pipe whose fluid can be repeatedly frozen and thawed without damage to the casing. An additional part is added to a conventional heat pipe. This addition is a simple porous structure, such as a cylinder, self-supporting and free standing, which is dimensioned with its diameter not spanning the inside transverse dimension of the casing, and with its length surpassing the depth of maximum liquid.

  4. Heat pipe dynamic behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issacci, F.; Roche, G. L.; Klein, D. B.; Catton, I.

    1988-01-01

    The vapor flow in a heat pipe was mathematically modeled and the equations governing the transient behavior of the core were solved numerically. The modeled vapor flow is transient, axisymmetric (or two-dimensional) compressible viscous flow in a closed chamber. The two methods of solution are described. The more promising method failed (a mixed Galerkin finite difference method) whereas a more common finite difference method was successful. Preliminary results are presented showing that multi-dimensional flows need to be treated. A model of the liquid phase of a high temperature heat pipe was developed. The model is intended to be coupled to a vapor phase model for the complete solution of the heat pipe problem. The mathematical equations are formulated consistent with physical processes while allowing a computationally efficient solution. The model simulates time dependent characteristics of concern to the liquid phase including input phase change, output heat fluxes, liquid temperatures, container temperatures, liquid velocities, and liquid pressure. Preliminary results were obtained for two heat pipe startup cases. The heat pipe studied used lithium as the working fluid and an annular wick configuration. Recommendations for implementation based on the results obtained are presented. Experimental studies were initiated using a rectangular heat pipe. Both twin beam laser holography and laser Doppler anemometry were investigated. Preliminary experiments were completed and results are reported.

  5. Heat Pipe Integrated Microsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Gass, K.; Robertson, P.J.; Shul, R.; Tigges, C.

    1999-03-30

    The trend in commercial electronics packaging to deliver ever smaller component packaging has enabled the development of new highly integrated modules meeting the demands of the next generation nano satellites. At under ten kilograms, these nano satellites will require both a greater density electronics and a melding of satellite structure and function. Better techniques must be developed to remove the subsequent heat generated by the active components required to-meet future computing requirements. Integration of commercially available electronics must be achieved without the increased costs normally associated with current generation multi chip modules. In this paper we present a method of component integration that uses silicon heat pipe technology and advanced flexible laminate circuit board technology to achieve thermal control and satellite structure. The' electronics/heat pipe stack then becomes an integral component of the spacecraft structure. Thermal management on satellites has always been a problem. The shrinking size of electronics and voltage requirements and the accompanying reduction in power dissipation has helped the situation somewhat. Nevertheless, the demands for increased onboard processing power have resulted in an ever increasing power density within the satellite body. With the introduction of nano satellites, small satellites under ten kilograms and under 1000 cubic inches, the area available on which to place hot components for proper heat dissipation has dwindled dramatically. The resulting satellite has become nearly a solid mass of electronics with nowhere to dissipate heat to space. The silicon heat pipe is attached to an aluminum frame using a thermally conductive epoxy or solder preform. The frame serves three purposes. First, the aluminum frame provides a heat conduction path from the edge of the heat pipe to radiators on the surface of the satellite. Secondly, it serves as an attachment point for extended structures attached to

  6. Investigation of organic matter migrating from polymeric pipes into drinking water under different flow manners.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Liu, Shuming; Liu, Wenjun

    2014-02-01

    Polymeric pipes, such as unplasticized polyvinyl chloride (uPVC) pipes, polypropylene random (PPR) pipes and polyethylene (PE) pipes are increasingly used for drinking water distribution lines. Plastic pipes may include some additives like metallic stabilizers and other antioxidants for the protection of the material during its production and use. Thus, some compounds can be released from those plastic pipes and cast a shadow on drinking water quality. This work develops a new procedure to investigate three types of polymer pipes (uPVC, PE and PPR) with respect to the migration of total organic carbon (TOC) into drinking water. The migration test was carried out in stagnant conditions with two types of migration processes, a continuous migration process and a successive migration process. These two types of migration processes are specially designed to mimic the conditions of different flow manners in drinking water pipelines, i.e., the situation of continuous stagnation with long hydraulic retention times and normal flow status with regular water renewing in drinking water networks. The experimental results showed that TOC release differed significantly with different plastic materials and under different flow manners. The order of materials with respect to the total amount of TOC migrating into drinking water was observed as PE > PPR > uPVC under both successive and continuous migration conditions. A higher amount of organic migration from PE and PPR pipes was likely to occur due to more organic antioxidants being used in pipe production. The results from the successive migration tests indicated the trend of the migration intensity of different pipe materials over time, while the results obtained from the continuous migration tests implied that under long stagnant conditions, the drinking water quality could deteriorate quickly with the consistent migration of organic compounds and the dramatic consumption of chlorine to a very low level. Higher amounts of TOC

  7. Different senescent HDPE pipe-risk: brief field investigation from source water to tap water in China (Changsha City).

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Tang, Lin; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming; Deng, Yaocheng; Dong, Haoran; Wang, Jingjing; Wu, Yanan

    2015-10-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) derived from plastic pipes widely used in water distribution definitely influence our daily drinking water quality. There are still few scientific or integrated studies on the release and degradation of the migrating chemicals in pipelines. This investigation was carried out at field sites along a pipeline in Changsha, China. Two chemicals, 2, 4-tert-buthylphenol and 1, 3-diphenylguanidine, were found to be migrating from high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe material. New pipes released more of these two compounds than older pipes, and microorganisms living in older pipes tended to degrade them faster, indicating that the aged pipes were safer for water transmission. Microorganism degradation in water plays a dominant role in the control of these substances. To minimize the potential harm to human, a more detailed study incorporating assessment of their risk should be carried out, along with seeking safer drinking pipes. PMID:26308926

  8. Analytical simulation of nonlinear response to seismic test excitations of HDR-VKL piping system

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, M.G.; Kot, C.A. ); Mojtahed, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic tests with simulated earthquake excitation (SHAM) were performed during April--May 1988 on the Versuchskreislauf (VKL) piping system at the Heissdampfreaktor (HDR) Test Facility in Kahl/Main, Federal Republic of Germany. The major objectives of these tests were to study the behavior of a full-scale in-plant piping system subjected to a range of seismic excitation levels (from design levels to those that might induce either failure of pipe supports or plasticity in the pipe runs) and to establish seismic margins for piping and pipe supports. Data obtained in the tests are also being used to validate analytical methods for piping response calculation. Detailed reports on the SHAM experiments are given elsewhere by Kot et al. (1990). This paper describes an effort to evaluate the computer code NONPIPE (proprietary to Nutech Engineers) with data from one of the SHAM tests. NONPIPE is a nonlinear finite-element program capable of calculating the elastic-plastic response of piping systems subjected to seismic excitation. The special characteristic of this code is the simplified or approximate approach it uses for modeling the elastic behavior which makes the calculations relatively less resource intensive than those of other nonlinear codes. The evaluation is based on a comparison of computational results of simulation of a SHAM test with corresponding test measurements. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Fracture behavior of short circumferentially surface-cracked pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnaswamy, P.; Scott, P.; Mohan, R.

    1995-11-01

    This topical report summarizes the work performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Comniission`s (NRC) research program entitled ``Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds`` that specifically focuses on pipes with short, circumferential surface cracks. The following details are provided in this report: (i) material property deteminations, (ii) pipe fracture experiments, (iii) development, modification and validation of fracture analysis methods, and (iv) impact of this work on the ASME Section XI Flaw Evaluation Procedures. The material properties developed and used in the analysis of the experiments are included in this report and have been implemented into the NRC`s PIFRAC database. Six full-scale pipe experiments were conducted during this program. The analyses methods reported here fall into three categories (i) limit-load approaches, (ii) design criteria, and (iii) elastic-plastic fracture methods. These methods were evaluated by comparing the analytical predictions with experimental data. The results, using 44 pipe experiments from this and other programs, showed that the SC.TNP1 and DPZP analyses were the most accurate in predicting maximum load. New Z-factors were developed using these methods. These are being considered for updating the ASME Section XI criteria.

  10. Wedgethread pipe connection

    DOEpatents

    Watts, John D.

    2003-06-17

    Several embodiments of a wedgethread pipe connection are disclosed that have improved makeup, sealing, and non-loosening characteristics. In one embodiment, an open wedgethread is disclosed that has an included angle measured in the gap between the stab flank and the load flank to be not less than zero, so as to prevent premature wedging between mating flanks before the position of full makeup is reached, as does occur between trapped wedgethreads wherein the included angle is less than zero. The invention may be used for pipe threads large or small, as a flush joint, with collars, screwed into plates or it may even be used to reversibly connect such as solid posts to base members where a wide makeup torque range is desired. This Open wedgethread, as opposed to trapped wedgethreads, provides a threaded pipe connection that: is more cost-effective; can seal high pressure gas; can provide selectively a connection strength as high as the pipe strength; assures easy makeup to the desired position of full makeup within a wide torque range; may have a torque strength as high as the pipe torque strength; is easier to manufacture; is easier to gage; and is less subject to handling damage.

  11. Remotely operated pipe connector

    DOEpatents

    Josefiak, Leonard J.; Cramer, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely assembling and disassembling a Graylock type coctor between a pipe and a closure for the pipe includes a base and a receptacle on the base for the closure. The pipe is moved into position vertically above the closure by a suitable positioning device such that the flange on the pipe is immediately adjacent and concentric with the flange on the closure. A moving device then moves two semicircular collars from a position free of the closure to a position such that the interior cam groove of each collar contacts the two flanges. Finally, a tensioning device automatically allows remote tightening and loosening of a nut and bolt assembly on each side of the collar to cause a seal ring located between the flanges to be compressed and to seal the closure. Release of the pipe and the connector is accomplished in the reverse order. Preferably, the nut and bolt assembly includes an elongate shaft portion on which a removable sleeve is located.

  12. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, E.

    1997-04-01

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

  13. Short cracks in piping and piping wells. Volume 3, No. 2: Semiannual report, October 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.M.; Brust, F.; Francini, R.

    1994-03-01

    This is the sixth semiannual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s 4-year research program ``Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds`` which began in March 1990. The objective is to verify and improve fracture analyses for circumferentially cracked nuclear piping with cracks sizes typically found during in-service flaw evaluations. Progress is the through-wall-cracked pipe efforts involved (1) verification of deformation plasticity under nonproportional loading, (2) evaluation of the effect of weld metal strength on various J-estimation schemes, and (3) development of new GE/EPRI functions. Surface-cracked pipe evaluations involved (1) material characterization of B&W C-Mn-Mo submerged arc weld metal, and (2) 3D finite-element mesh refinement study. The toughness of the bimetallic weld fusion line was evaluated and showed unusual fracture behavior based on the results of the Charpy tests. The dynamic strain aging J-R tests confirmed the screening criterion developed earlier in the program. The results from this program to date necessitated several additional efforts. These were initiated and have been reported here. Presentation of the results from this program to the ASME Section XI Pipe Flaw Evaluation Working Group is also summarized here.

  14. Permeability of methane, carbon dioxide and water in PA11 and PVDF used for flexible pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, T.R.; Skar, J.I.; Hansteen, C.

    1999-11-01

    Permeability of methane, carbon dioxide and water in plasticized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and plasticized polyarnid 11 (PA11 ) has been measured for a number of temperatures and pressures in a small scale test apparatus and permeability coefficients have been calculated. The results have been used to predict if the annulus of flexible pipes will be water wet. For verification of the small scale test, a large scale test has also been carried out in a 50 mm flexible pipe. Both test methods show that the annulus of flexible pipes will be water wet when carrying gas and water. This implies that the conditions in the annulus will be corrosive when pipes are carrying gas which contains carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide. The corrosive conditions and corrosion fatigue must be taken into account when the fatigue life of flexible risers is calculated.

  15. Apparatus for inspecting piping

    DOEpatents

    Zollingger, W.T.; Appel, D.K.; Park, L.R.

    1995-03-21

    An inspection rabbit is described for inspecting piping systems having severe bends therein. The rabbit consists of a flexible, modular body containing a miniaturized eddy current inspection probe, a self-contained power supply for proper operation of the rabbit, an outer surface that allows ease of movement through piping systems and means for transmitting data generated by the inspection device. The body is preferably made of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing or, alternatively, silicone rubber with a shrink wrapping of polytetrafluoroethylene (TEFLON{trademark}). The body is formed to contain the power supply, preferably a plurality of batteries, and a spool of communication wire that connects to a data processing computer external to the piping system. 6 figures.

  16. Apparatus for inspecting piping

    DOEpatents

    Zollingger, W. Thor; Appel, D. Keith; Park, Larry R.

    1995-01-01

    An inspection rabbit for inspecting piping systems having severe bends therein. The rabbit consists of a flexible, modular body containing a miniaturized eddy current inspection probe, a self-contained power supply for proper operation of the rabbit, an outer surface that allows ease of movement through piping systems and means for transmitting data generated by the inspection device. The body is preferably made of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing or, alternatively, silicone rubber with a shrink wrapping of polytetrafluoroethylene (TEFLON.RTM.). The body is formed to contain the power supply, preferably a plurality of batteries, and a spool of communication wire that connects to a data processing computer external to the piping system.

  17. Heat-pipe Earth.

    PubMed

    Moore, William B; Webb, A Alexander G

    2013-09-26

    The heat transport and lithospheric dynamics of early Earth are currently explained by plate tectonic and vertical tectonic models, but these do not offer a global synthesis consistent with the geologic record. Here we use numerical simulations and comparison with the geologic record to explore a heat-pipe model in which volcanism dominates surface heat transport. These simulations indicate that a cold and thick lithosphere developed as a result of frequent volcanic eruptions that advected surface materials downwards. Declining heat sources over time led to an abrupt transition to plate tectonics. Consistent with model predictions, the geologic record shows rapid volcanic resurfacing, contractional deformation, a low geothermal gradient across the bulk of the lithosphere and a rapid decrease in heat-pipe volcanism after initiation of plate tectonics. The heat-pipe Earth model therefore offers a coherent geodynamic framework in which to explore the evolution of our planet before the onset of plate tectonics. PMID:24067709

  18. Composite drill pipe

    DOEpatents

    Leslie, James C.; Leslie, II, James C.; Heard, James; Truong, Liem , Josephson; Marvin , Neubert; Hans

    2008-12-02

    A composite pipe segment is formed to include tapered in wall thickness ends that are each defined by opposed frustoconical surfaces conformed for self centering receipt and intimate bonding contact within an annular space between corresponding surfaces of a coaxially nested set of metal end pieces. The distal peripheries of the nested end pieces are then welded to each other and the sandwiched and bonded portions are radially pinned. The composite segment may include imbedded conductive leads and the axial end portions of the end pieces are shaped to form a threaded joint with the next pipe assembly that includes a contact ring in one pipe assembly pierced by a pointed contact in the other to connect the corresponding leads across the joint.

  19. Heat pipes and use of heat pipes in furnace exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Polcyn, Adam D.

    2010-12-28

    An array of a plurality of heat pipe are mounted in spaced relationship to one another with the hot end of the heat pipes in a heated environment, e.g. the exhaust flue of a furnace, and the cold end outside the furnace. Heat conversion equipment is connected to the cold end of the heat pipes.

  20. Apparatus for moving a pipe inspection probe through piping

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Appel, D.K.; Lewis, G.W.

    1995-07-18

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for controllably moving devices for cleaning or inspection through piping systems, including piping systems with numerous piping bends therein, by using hydrostatic pressure of a working fluid introduced into the piping system. The apparatus comprises a reservoir or other source for supplying the working fluid to the piping system, a launch tube for admitting the device into the launcher and a reversible, positive displacement pump for controlling the direction and flow rate of the working fluid. The device introduced into the piping system moves with the flow of the working fluid through the piping system. The launcher attaches to the valved ends of a piping system so that fluids in the piping system can recirculate in a closed loop. The method comprises attaching the launcher to the piping system, supplying the launcher with working fluid, admitting the device into the launcher, pumping the working fluid in the direction and at the rate desired so that the device moves through the piping system for pipe cleaning or inspection, removing the device from the launcher, and collecting the working fluid contained in the launcher. 8 figs.

  1. Apparatus for moving a pipe inspection probe through piping

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Appel, D. Keith; Lewis, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controllably moving devices for cleaning or inspection through piping systems, including piping systems with numerous piping bends therein, by using hydrostatic pressure of a working fluid introduced into the piping system. The apparatus comprises a reservoir or other source for supplying the working fluid to the piping system, a launch tube for admitting the device into the launcher and a reversible, positive displacement pump for controlling the direction and flow rate of the working fluid. The device introduced into the piping system moves with the flow of the working fluid through the piping system. The launcher attaches to the valved ends of a piping system so that fluids in the piping system can recirculate in a closed loop. The method comprises attaching the launcher to the piping system, supplying the launcher with working fluid, admitting the device into the launcher, pumping the working fluid in the direction and at the rate desired so that the device moves through the piping system for pipe cleaning or inspection, removing the device from the launcher, and collecting the working fluid contained in the launcher.

  2. Superfluid Helium Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully, P.

    This paper reports on the development and the thermal tests of three superfluid helium heat pipes. Two of them are designed to provide a large transport capacity (4 mW at 1.7 K). They feature a copper braid located inside a 6 mm outer diameter stainless tube fitted with copper ends for mechanical anchoring. The other heat pipe has no copper braid and is designed to get much smaller heat transport capacity (0.5 mW) and to explore lower temperature (0.7 - 1 K). The copper braid and the tube wall is the support of the Rollin superfluid helium film in which the heat is transferred. The low filling pressure makes the technology very simple with the possibility to easily bend the tube. We present the design and discuss the thermal performance of the heat pipes tested in the 0.7 to 2.0 K temperature range. The long heat pipe (1.2 m with copper braid) and the short one (0.25 m with copper braid) have similar thermal performance in the range 0.7 - 2.0 K. At 1.7 K the long heat pipe, 120 g in weight, reaches a heat transfer capacity of 6.2 mW and a thermal conductance of 600 mW/K for 4 mW transferred power. Due to the pressure drop of the vapor flow and Kapitza thermal resistance, the conductance of the third heat pipe dramatically decreases when the temperature decreases. A 3.8 mW/K is obtained at 0.7 K for 0.5 mW transferred power.

  3. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  4. Heat transfer in pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbach, T.

    1985-01-01

    The heat transfer from hot water to a cold copper pipe in laminar and turbulent flow condition is determined. The mean flow through velocity in the pipe, relative test length and initial temperature in the vessel were varied extensively during tests. Measurements confirm Nusselt's theory for large test lengths in laminar range. A new equation is derived for heat transfer for large starting lengths which agrees satisfactorily with measurements for large starting lengths. Test results are compared with the new Prandtl equation for heat transfer and correlated well. Test material for 200- and to 400-diameter test length is represented at four different vessel temperatures.

  5. Heat pipe cooled probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J. (Inventor); Couch, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    The basic heat pipe principle is employed to provide a self-contained passively cooled probe that may be placed into a high temperature environment. The probe consists of an evaporator region of a heat pipe and a sensing instrument. Heat is absorbed as the working fluid evaporates in the probe. The vapor is transported to the vapor space of the condenser region. Heat is dissipated from the condenser region and fins causing condensation of the working fluid, which returns to the probe by gravity and the capillary action of the wick. Working fluid, wick and condenser configurations and structure materials can be selected to maintain the probe within an acceptable temperature range.

  6. Pipe Drafting with CAD. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithson, Buddy

    This teacher's guide contains nine units of instruction for a course on computer-assisted pipe drafting. The course covers the following topics: introduction to pipe drafting with CAD (computer-assisted design); flow diagrams; pipe and pipe components; valves; piping plans and elevations; isometrics; equipment fabrication drawings; piping design…

  7. Piping and equipment resistance to seismic-generated missiles

    SciTech Connect

    LaSalle, F.R.; Golbeg, P.R.; Chenault, D.M.

    1992-02-01

    For reactor and nuclear facilities, both Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 50, and US Department of Energy Order 6430.1A require assessments of the interaction of non-Safety Class 1 piping and equipment with Safety Class 1 piping and equipment during a seismic event to maintain the safety function. The safety class systems of nuclear reactors or nuclear facilities are designed to the applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers standards and Seismic Category 1 criteria that require rigorous analysis, construction, and quality assurance. Because non-safety class systems are generally designed to lesser standards and seismic criteria, they may become missiles during a safe shutdown earthquake. The resistance of piping, tubing, and equipment to seismically generated missiles is addressed in the paper. Gross plastic and local penetration failures are considered with applicable test verification. Missile types and seismic zones of influence are discussed. Field qualification data are also developed for missile evaluation.

  8. Deployable heat-pipe radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1978-01-01

    Loop temperatures are controlled effectively under varying load conditions. Radiator has four separate pieces of hardware: heat-pipe panel, flexible heat-pipe leader, heat exchanger, fluid header. Single-fluid transport capacities of about 850 watts, corresponding to 51,000 watt-inches, have been achieved in 90 degree bend orientation of heat-pipe header.

  9. Reusable high-temperature heat pipes and heat pipe panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A reusable, durable heat pipe which is capable of operating at temperatures up to about 3000 F in an oxidizing environment and at temperatures above 3000 F in an inert or vacuum environment is produced by embedding a refractory metal pipe within a carbon-carbon composite structure. A reusable, durable heat pipe panel is made from an array of refractory-metal pipes spaced from each other. The reusable, durable, heat-pipe is employed to fabricate a hypersonic vehicle leading edge and nose cap.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF PERMANENT MECHANICAL REPAIR SLEEVE FOR PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hitesh Patadia

    2005-04-29

    The report presents a comprehensive summary of the prototype development process utilized towards the development of a permanent mechanical repair fitting intended to be installed on damaged PE mains under blowing gas conditions. Specifically, the step by step construction approach is presented and the experimental data to support the mitigation of ensuing slow crack growth (SCG) of the damage area.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF PERMANENT MECHANICAL REPAIR SLEEVE FOR PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hitesh Patadia

    2004-09-30

    The report presents a comprehensive summary of the project status related to the development of a permanent mechanical repair fitting intended to be installed on damaged PE mains under blowing gas conditions. Specifically, the product definition has been developed taking into account relevant codes and standards and industry input. A conceptual design for the mechanical repair sleeve has been developed which meets the product definition.

  12. Defect characterization in pipe-to-pipe welds in large diameter stainless steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Rawl, D.E. Jr.; West, S.L.; Wheeler, D.A.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Metallurgical evaluation of pipe-to-pipe welds in large-diameter, Type 304 stainless steel piping used to construct the moderator/coolant water systems for Savannah River Site reactors has demonstrated that small weld defects found in this 1950-vintage system do not compromise the integrity of the system. The weld defects were too small for detection by the pre-service standard radiographic inspection, but were found through systematic ultrasonic testing (UT) and penetrant testing (PT) evaluations of piping that had been removed during upgrades to the piping system. The defects include lack of weld penetration, slag inclusions, and other weld metal discontinuities. These discontinuities typically did not propagate during more than 35 years of service. The defects examined were too small and isolated to degrade the mechanical properties of the pipe-to-pipe weldments and therefore did not compromise the integrity of the piping system. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  13. BNL NONLINEAR PRE TEST SEISMIC ANALYSIS FOR THE NUPEC ULTIMATE STRENGTH PIPING TEST PROGRAM.

    SciTech Connect

    DEGRASSI,G.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,C.; SUZUKI,K.; NAMITA,Y.

    2003-08-17

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has been conducting a multi-year research program to investigate the behavior of nuclear power plant piping systems under large seismic loads. The objectives of the program are: to develop a better understanding of the elasto-plastic response and ultimate strength of nuclear piping; to ascertain the seismic safety margin of current piping design codes; and to assess new piping code allowable stress rules. Under this program, NUPEC has performed a large-scale seismic proving test of a representative nuclear power plant piping system. In support of the proving test, a series of materials tests, static and dynamic piping component tests, and seismic tests of simplified piping systems have also been performed. As part of collaborative efforts between the United States and Japan on seismic issues, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and its contractor, the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), are participating in this research program by performing pre-test and post-test analyses, and by evaluating the significance of the program results with regard to safety margins. This paper describes BNL's pre-test analysis to predict the elasto-plastic response for one of NUPEC's simplified piping system seismic tests. The capability to simulate the anticipated ratcheting response of the system was of particular interest. Analyses were performed using classical bilinear and multilinear kinematic hardening models as well as a nonlinear kinematic hardening model. Comparisons of analysis results for each plasticity model against test results for a static cycling elbow component test and for a simplified piping system seismic test are presented in the paper.

  14. 46 CFR 154.503 - Piping and piping system components: Protection from movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piping and piping system components: Protection from..., Construction and Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.503 Piping and piping system components... cause stresses that exceed the design stresses, the piping and piping system components and cargo...

  15. 46 CFR 154.503 - Piping and piping system components: Protection from movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Piping and piping system components: Protection from..., Construction and Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.503 Piping and piping system components... cause stresses that exceed the design stresses, the piping and piping system components and cargo...

  16. 46 CFR 154.503 - Piping and piping system components: Protection from movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piping and piping system components: Protection from..., Construction and Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.503 Piping and piping system components... cause stresses that exceed the design stresses, the piping and piping system components and cargo...

  17. 46 CFR 154.503 - Piping and piping system components: Protection from movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping and piping system components: Protection from..., Construction and Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.503 Piping and piping system components... cause stresses that exceed the design stresses, the piping and piping system components and cargo...

  18. Flexible Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.; Wolf, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Narrow Tube carries 10 watts or more to moving parts. Heat pipe 12 inches long and diameter of 0.312 inch (7.92mm). Bent to minimum radius of 2.5 blocks. Flexible section made of 321 stainless steel tubing (Cajon Flexible Tubing or equivalent). Evaporator and condenser made of oxygen free copper. Working fluid methanol.

  19. Aeronautical tubes and pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauclair, N.

    1984-12-01

    The main and subcomponent French suppliers of aircraft tubes and pipes are discussed, and the state of the industry is analyzed. Quality control is essential for tubes with regard to their i.d. and metallurgical compositions. French regulations do not allow welded seam tubes in hydraulic circuits unless no other form is available, and then rustproofed steel must be installed. The actual low level of orders for any run of tubes dictates that the product is only one of several among the manufacturers' line. Automation, both in NDT and quality control, assures that the tubes meet specifications. A total of 10 French companies participate in the industry, serving both civil and military needs, with some companies specializing only in titanium, steel, or aluminum materials. Concerns wishing to enter the market must upgrade their equipment to meet the higher aeronautical specifications and be prepared to furnish tubes and pipes that serve both functional and structural purposes simultaneously. Additionally, pipe-bending machines must also perform to tight specifications. Pipes can range from 0.2 mm exterior diameter to 40 mm, with wall thicknesses from 0.02 mm to 3 mm. A chart containing a list of manufacturers and their respective specifications and characteristics is presented, and a downtrend in production with reduction of personnel is noted.

  20. Heat pipe investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Techniques associated with thermal-vacuum and bench testing, along with flight testing of the OAO-C spacecraft heat pipes are outlined, to show that the processes used in heat transfer design and testing are adequate for good performance evaluations.

  1. Engineering methods for the assessment of ductile fracture margin in nuclear power plant piping

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganath, S.; Mehta, H.S.

    1981-10-01

    When a crack is discovered during inspection of a piping component in a nuclear power plant, the decision on replacement is dependent on the available design margin of the pipe in the presence of the crack. This paper describes the development of engineering methods to assess the design margin in cracked pipes. Procedures are outlined to evaluate cracks in piping, using methods consistent with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code design basis, and to develop failure diagrams for piping. A criterion based on net section collapse is shown to predict adequately the load capability of piping with cracks. The predictions of the net section collapse approach are shown to be consistent with results from elastic-plastic fracture analysis based on J-integral and R-curve methods. Finally, the methodology is used to recommend acceptance criteria for flaws in power plant piping. The proposed criteria assure that the minimum safety margins inherent in the ASME Code are preserved during operation. Since allowable flaw sizes can be determined using information already available in piping stress reports, the proposed criteria offer a simple conservative method for assessing flaws in piping.

  2. Heat Pipes Cool Power Magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, I.; Chester, M.; Luedke, E.

    1983-01-01

    Configurations originally developed for space use are effective in any orientation. Heat pipes integrated into high-power, high-frequency, highvoltage spaceflight magnetics reduce weight and improve reliability by lowering internal tempertures. Two heat pipes integrated in design of power transformer cool unit in any orientation. Electrostatic shield conducts heat from windings to heat pipe evaporator. Technology allows dramatic reductions in size and weight, while significantly improving reliability. In addition, all attitude design of heat pipes allows operation of heat pipes independent of local gravity forces.

  3. Deformability of molybdenum during the production of thin-wall pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, S. V.; Nesterenko, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.

    2008-10-01

    The deformation properties of commercial-purity MChVP molybdenum are studied. Plasticity diagrams that relate the limiting strain to failure to the state-of-stress indices are constructed. The plasticity of the material is found to depend substantially on the type of state of stress, which is characterized by the Lode parameter. The plasticity of the material is analyzed under alternating deformation conditions. A damage theory is used to study the healing of the deformation-induced damage during annealing and to determine the conditions under which irreversible damage, which cannot be healed by heat treatment, appears. The simulation results are used to analyze the damage accumulation during the production of thin-wall pipes. The plasticity margin is found to decrease most strongly during the multipass pressing of a pipe workpiece in a punch. As follows from the damage calculation results, intermediate annealing between pressing passes should be introduced at a size of 18 × 3.1 mm.

  4. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M.; Urabe, Y.

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  5. Heat Pipes For Alyeska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The heat pipes job is to keep the arctic ground frozen. The permafrost soil alternately freezes and thaws with seasonal temperature changes causing surface dislocations and problems for the builders. In winter, a phenomenon called frost-heaving uplifts the soil. It is something like the creation of highway potholes by the freezing of rainwater below the roadbed, but frost-heaving exerts a far greater force. Thawing of the frost in the summer causes the soil to settle unevenly. Therefore it is necessary to keep the soil in a continually frozen state so the pipeline won't rupture. To solve this problem, McDonnell Douglas Corp. applied heat pipe principles in the design of the vertical supports that hold up the pipeline.

  6. Drill pipe protector development

    SciTech Connect

    Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R.; Wemple, R.P.

    1996-03-01

    The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

  7. Heat Pipe Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Solar Fundamentals, Inc.'s hot water system employs space-derived heat pipe technology. It is used by a meat packing plant to heat water for cleaning processing machinery. Unit is complete system with water heater, hot water storage, electrical controls and auxiliary components. Other than fans and a circulating pump, there are no moving parts. System's unique design eliminates problems of balancing, leaking, corroding, and freezing.

  8. Electrohydrodynamic heat pipe research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.; Perry, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical applications to electrohydrodynamic heat pipe (EHDHP) research are presented. Two problems in the research which are discussed are the prediction of the effective thermal conductance of an EHDHP with threaded grooves for fluid distribution to the evaporator of an EHDHP. Hydrodynamic equations are included along with a discussion of boundary conditions and burn-out conditions. A discussion of the theoretical and experimental results is presented.

  9. Light Pipe Thermophotovoltaics (LTPV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    2007-02-01

    In a conventional thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy converter the radiation from the emitter to the photovoltaic (PV) array is transmitted in a vacuum or air where the index of refraction, n = 1. The intensity of the radiation is proportional to n2. Therefore, the incident intensity on the PV array could be greatly increase if the medium between the emitter and the PV array had n > 1. This light pipe TPV (LTPV) concept was introduced by The Quantum Group at the Third National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) TPV Conference in 1997. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the LTPV concept. The solution of the one-dimensional energy equation that includes both thermal conduction and radiation yields the temperature distribution through the light pipe. Applying the analysis to a zinc selenide (ZnSe) light pipe yielded the following result. For an emitter temperature of 1000K the convertible radiation(photon energy >PV bandgap energy) that reaches the photovoltaic(PV) cell is 1 W/cm2. At the same emitter temperature, a conventional TPV converter would have 1/8 W/cm2 of convertible radiation. Thus, the LTPV concept makes possible lower temperature operation than current TPV converters.

  10. Guidable pipe plug

    DOEpatents

    Glassell, Richard L.; Babcock, Scott M.; Lewis, Benjamin E.

    2001-01-01

    A plugging device for closing an opening defined by an end of a pipe with sealant comprises a cap, an extension, an inner seal, a guide, and at least one stop. The cap has an inner surface which defines a chamber adapted for retaining the sealant. The chamber is dimensioned slightly larger than the end so as to receive the end. The chamber and end define a gap therebetween. The extension has a distal end and is attached to the inner surface opposite the distal end. The inner seal is attached to the extension and sized larger than the opening. The guide is positioned forward of the inner seal and attached to the distal end. The guide is also dimensioned to be inserted into the opening. The stop is attached to the extender, and when the stop is disposed in the pipe, the stop is movable with respect to the conduit in one direction and also prevents misalignment of the cap with the pipe. A handle can also be included to allow the cap to be positioned robotically.

  11. Heat pipe technology: A bibliography with abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The annual supplement on heat pipe technology for 1971 is presented. The document contains 101 references with abstracts and 47 patents. The subjects discussed are: (1) heat pipe applications, (2) heat pipe theory, (3) design, development, and fabrication of heat pipes, (4) testing and operation, (5) subject and author index, and (6) heat pipe related patents.

  12. Experimenting with a ``Pipe'' Whistle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Olga

    2012-04-01

    A simple pipe whistle can be made using pieces of PVC pipe. The whistle can be used to measure the resonant frequencies of open or closed pipes. A slightly modified version of the device can be used to also investigate the interesting dependence of the sound frequencies produced on the orifice-to-edge distance. The pipe whistle described here allows students in a physics of music or introductory physics course to study an example of an "edge tone" device that produces discrete sound frequencies. From their textbooks, students likely know about standing waves produced by pipes or strings, as well as the resonant frequencies for open and closed pipes. To go a bit further, they can also learn how the frequency of the sound wave depends on the orifice-to-edge distance of the wind instrument.

  13. Wavenumber prediction and measurement of axisymmetric waves in buried fluid-filled pipes: Inclusion of shear coupling at a lubricated pipe/soil interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Yan, J.

    2013-03-01

    Acoustic methods have been widely used to detect water leaks in buried fluid-filled pipes, and these technologies also have the potential to locate buried pipes and cables. Relatively predictable for metal pipes, there is considerably more uncertainty with plastic pipes, as the wave propagation behaviour becomes highly coupled between the pipe wall, the contained fluid and surrounding medium. Based on the fully three-dimensional effect of the surrounding soil, pipe equations for n=0 axisymmetric wave motion are derived for a buried, fluid-filled pipe. The characteristics of propagation and attenuation are analysed for two n=0 waves, the s=1 wave and s=2 wave, which correspond to a predominantly fluid-borne wave and a compressional wave predominantly in the shell, respectively. At the pipe/soil interface, two extreme cases may be considered in order to investigate the effects of shear coupling: the "slip" condition representing lubricated contact; and the "no slip" condition representing compact contact. Here, the "slip" case is considered, for which, at low frequencies, analytical expressions can be derived for the two wavenumbers, corresponding to the s=1 and s=2 waves. These are both then compared with the situations in which there is no surrounding soil and in which the pipe is surrounded by fluid only, which cannot support shear. It is found that the predominant effect of shear at the pipe/soil interface is to add stiffness along with damping due to radiation. For the fluid-dominated wave, this causes the wavespeed to increase and increases the wave attenuation. For the shell-dominated wave there is little effect on the wavespeed but a marked increase in wave attenuation. Comparison with experimental measurements confirms the theoretical findings.

  14. Insulating Cryogenic Pipes With Frost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, J. G.; Bova, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Crystallized water vapor fills voids in pipe insulation. Small, carefully controlled amount of water vapor introduced into dry nitrogen gas before it enters aft fuselage. Vapor freezes on pipes, filling cracks in insulation. Ice prevents gaseous nitrogen from condensing on pipes and dripping on structure, in addition to helping to insulate all parts. Industrial applications include large refrigeration plants or facilities that use cryogenic liquids.

  15. Simplified dispersion relationships for fluid-dominated axisymmetric wave motion in buried fluid-filled pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Sui, Fusheng; Muggleton, Jennifer M.; Yang, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The dispersion characteristics of axisymmetric (n=0) waves offer a way to gain physical insight into the low-frequency vibrational behaviour of underground pipe systems. Whilst these can be found in the literature, they are generally calculated numerically. Coupled equations of motion for the n=0 waves that propagate in a buried fluid-filled pipe are presented in this paper and, from this, an analytical solution is developed for the fluid-dominated (s=1) wavenumber. The effect of the frictional stress at the pipe-soil interface on the dispersion behaviour of the s=1 wave is characterised by adopting a soil loading matrix. Overall, the fluid loading has a greater effect on the propagation wavespeed compared with the soil loading: for metal pipes, the effect of soil loading is negligible; for plastic pipes, however, simply neglecting the effect of soil loading can lead to a considerable underestimation in the calculation of the wavespeed. The wave attenuation increases significantly at higher frequencies regardless of pipe material resulting from the added damping due to radiation into the soil. Theoretical predictions of the s=1 wavenumber are compared with experimental data measured on an MDPE water pipe. The degree of agreement between prediction and experiment makes clear that, although the wavespeed is only slightly affected by the presence of the frictional stress, the frictional stress at the pipe-soil interface needs to be appropriately taken into account for attenuation predictions.

  16. Effect of dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading on fracture behavior for Japanese carbon steel pipe STS410

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Kanji; Murayama, Kouichi; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    1997-04-01

    The fracture behavior for Japanese carbon steel pipe STS410 was examined under dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading through a research program of International Piping Integrity Research Group (EPIRG-2), in order to evaluate the strength of pipe during the seismic event The tensile test and the fracture toughness test were conducted for base metal and TIG weld metal. Three base metal pipe specimens, 1,500mm in length and 6-inch diameter sch.120, were employed for a quasi-static monotonic, a dynamic monotonic and a dynamic cyclic loading pipe fracture tests. One weld joint pipe specimen was also employed for a dynamic cyclic loading test In the dynamic cyclic loading test, the displacement was controlled as applying the fully reversed load (R=-1). The pipe specimens with a circumferential through-wall crack were subjected four point bending load at 300C in air. Japanese STS410 carbon steel pipe material was found to have high toughness under dynamic loading condition through the CT fracture toughness test. As the results of pipe fracture tests, the maximum moment to pipe fracture under dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading condition, could be estimated by plastic collapse criterion and the effect of dynamic monotonic loading and cyclic loading was a little on the maximum moment to pipe fracture of the STS410 carbon steel pipe. The STS410 carbon steel pipe seemed to be less sensitive to dynamic and cyclic loading effects than the A106Gr.B carbon steel pipe evaluated in IPIRG-1 program.

  17. Thermostructural applications of heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeples, M. E.; Reeder, J. C.; Sontag, K. E.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of integrating heat pipes in high temperature structure to reduce local hot spot temperature was evaluated for a variety of hypersonic aerospace vehicles. From an initial list of twenty-two potential applications, the single stage to orbit wing leading edge showed the greatest promise and was selected for preliminary design of an integrated heat pipe thermostructural system. The design consisted of a Hastelloy X assembly with sodium heat pipe passages aligned normal to the wing leading edge. A d-shaped heat pipe cross section was determined to be optimum from the standpoint of structural weight.

  18. Cryogenic Heat Pipe Experiment (CRYOHP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, Roy

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the CRYOHP experiment is to conduct a shuttle experiment that demonstrates the reliable operation of two oxygen heat pipes in microgravity. The experiment will perform the following tasks: (1) demonstrate startup of the pipes from the supercritical state; (2) measure the heat transport capacity of the pipes; (3) measure evaporator and condenser film coefficients; and (4) work shuttle safety issues. The approach for the experiment is as follows: (1) fly two axially grooved oxygen heat pipes attached to mechanical stirling cycle tactical coolers; (2) integrate experiment in hitch-hiker canister; and (3) fly on shuttle and control from ground.

  19. Periodontal Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ...

  20. Plasticity and Geotechnics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hai-Sui

    Plasticity and Geotechnics is the first attempt to summarize and present, in one volume, the major developments achieved to date in the field of plasticity theory for geotechnical materials and its applications to geotechnical analysis and design.

  1. Ear Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  2. Plastic Surgery for Teenagers

    MedlinePlus

    ... or severe acne and scarring. Teens frequently gain self-esteem and confidence when their physical problems are corrected. ... art as a helpful index of anxiety and self-esteem with plastic surgery. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 2002. ...

  3. Plastic encapsulated parts

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, T.

    1994-10-01

    Plastic semiconductor packages were characterized as possible alternatives for canned devices, which are susceptible to internal shorts caused by conductive particles. Highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) as well as electrical and mechanical testing were conducted on plastic technology devices.

  4. Standard specification for thermoplastic gas pressure pipe, tubing, and fittings. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee F-17 on Plastic Piping Systems and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee F17.60 on Gas. The current edition was approved May 10, 1998 and published October 1998. It was originally published as D 2513-66. The last previous edition was D 2513-97.

  5. REDUCED COST SEWER PIPE RELINING USING ULTRASONIC TAPE LAMINATION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Phase I program, Foster-Miller developed techniques based on Ultrasonic Tape Lamination (UTL) for joining of plasticized PVC sewer pipe liner. This effort was undertaken in response to a need for environmentally sound and cost-effective methods for rehabilitation of...

  6. Predicting the Migration Rate of Dialkyl Organotins from PVC Pipe into Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organotins (OTs) are additives widely used as thermal and light stabilizers in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics. OTs can leach into water flowing through PVC pipes. This work examines the leaching rates of two neurotoxic OTs, dimethyl tin (DMT) and dibutyl tin (DBT), from PVC pi...

  7. Tomorrow's Plastic World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Averil

    2005-01-01

    Far from being just cheap packaging materials, plastics may be the materials of tomorrow. Plastic can conduct electricity, and this opens up a host of high-tech possibilities in the home and in energy generation. These possibilities are discussed here along with how plastic can be recycled and perhaps even grown.

  8. Processing of plastics

    PubMed Central

    Spaak, Albert

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of the processing of plastic materials from the handling of polymers in the pellet and powder form to manufacturing of a plastic fabricated product. Various types of equipment used and melt processing ranges of various polymer formulations to make the myriad of plastic products that are commercially available are discussed. PMID:1175556

  9. Plastics in Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeist, Irving, Ed.

    The evaluation and use of plastics in the construction industry are explained. The contributors offer extensive, timely, and thoroughly researched data on the chemistry, properties, functions, engineering behavior, and specific applications of plastics to building requirements. The major subjects discussed in depth are--(1) the role of plastics in…

  10. Literature survey and interpretive study on thermoplastic and reinforced-thermosetting-resin piping and component standards

    SciTech Connect

    Short, W.E. II; Leon, G.F.; Widera, G.E.O.; Ziu, C.G.

    1996-09-01

    The Committee on Polymers for Pressure Components (PPC) of the Pressure Vessel Research Council (PVRC) developed a three-phase program to address needs of design guidelines for plastic piping. This three-phase program consists of: phase 1, literature survey and interpretive study; phase 2, design development; and phase 3, fabrication, installation, and inspection. This report presents the study results for phase 1 of the PVRC-PPC Committee three-phase program. This study discusses and compares US, British, and German standards on plastic piping. Although mentioned and recognized in the report, the French and Japanese standards are not included. Key aspects considered for comparing the various standards are: allowable material properties, design criteria for internal pressure, design criteria for external pressure, pipe support, flange design, flexibility analysis, bonding/joining, and inspection criteria.