Science.gov

Sample records for plateaus numerical instabilities

  1. Peaks, plateaus, numerical instabilities, and achievable accuracy in Galerkin and norm minimizing procedures for solving Ax=b

    SciTech Connect

    Cullum, J.

    1994-12-31

    Plots of the residual norms generated by Galerkin procedures for solving Ax = b often exhibit strings of irregular peaks. At seemingly erratic stages in the iterations, peaks appear in the residual norm plot, intervals of iterations over which the norms initially increase and then decrease. Plots of the residual norms generated by related norm minimizing procedures often exhibit long plateaus, sequences of iterations over which reductions in the size of the residual norm are unacceptably small. In an earlier paper the author discussed and derived relationships between such peaks and plateaus within corresponding Galerkin/Norm Minimizing pairs of such methods. In this paper, through a set of numerical experiments, the author examines connections between peaks, plateaus, numerical instabilities, and the achievable accuracy for such pairs of iterative methods. Three pairs of methods, GMRES/Arnoldi, QMR/BCG, and two bidiagonalization methods are studied.

  2. NUMERICAL STUDY ON GROUNDWATER POLLUTION MECHANISM IN THE TWO SHIRASU PLATEAUS IN THE SAME CATCHMENT AREA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Kei; Saito, Masahiko; Momii, Kazuro

    Groundwater pollution by nitrate due to agricultural activities has become serious environmental issues in the two shirasu plateaus of Kasanohara and Kanoyabaru of Osumi peninsula, Kagoshima prefecture. We developed a groundwater recharge model and examined the water budget characteristics. Furthermore, two-dimensional numerical simulations were carried out to evaluate the effects of countermeasures for the contaminated source. The results of water balance analysis showed that runoff is 10-15%, groundwater recharge is 65%, and evapotranspiration is 20-25% of precipitation in the catchment area. The numerical results indicate that it takes 50 years for Kasanohara and 80 years for Kanoyabaru to display the effects of countermeasure of 80% reduction in concentration of the source zone. The long-term numerical simulation suggested that detailed recharge rate fluctuation rather than constant recharge rate should be applied.

  3. Numerical analysis of engine instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habiballah, M.; Dubois, I.

    Following a literature review on numerical analyses of combustion instability, to give the state of the art in the area, the paper describes the ONERA methodology used to analyze the combustion instability in liquid propellant engines. Attention is also given to a model (named Phedre) which describes the unsteady turbulent two-phase reacting flow in a liquid rocket engine combustion chamber. The model formulation includes axial or radial propellant injection, baffles, and acoustic resonators modeling, and makes it possible to treat different engine types. A numerical analysis of a cryogenic engine stability is presented, and the results of the analysis are compared with results of tests of the Viking engine and the gas generator of the Vulcain engine, showing good qualitative agreement and some general trends between experiments and numerical analysis.

  4. Mountain growth, orographic precipitation, and the formation of high-plateaus. Insights from numerical modeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Castellanos, D.

    2011-12-01

    Orographic precipitation is thought to exert a significant control on the growth of orogens, namely on the distribution of tectonic uplift and deformation in the multi-million-year time-scale. Computer tectonic models based on simple physical laws predict that the concentration of erosional surface mass removal in either side of an orogen can have a significant impact on the how tectonic deformation propagates within the orogenic building. Proxies or simple formulations of climatic processes such as precipitation and evaporation are key to such coupled tectonic/climatic models. Intramountain high plateaus are extreme cases of climatic control on sediment flow, because they often consist of internally-drained (endorheic) basins that trap most erosional products within the orogen. Such intramountain sediment accumulation leads to high-plateaus characterized by high topography and, in spite of the compressional tectonics, low relief. The development of high-plateaus has been extensively studied in relation to the tectonic setting and to inherited structures in the crust, but in this presentation I will concentrate on the potential climatic controls. Computer modeling results will be shown suggesting that a preexisting dry climate, through its effects on surface transport and orogenic evolution, may significantly modify tectonic deformation and contribute to the later formation of a high plateau. This is due to the following feedback: (1) dry climatic conditions at the early stages of orogenesis favor the tectonic defeat of rivers draining the orogen, promoting internal drainage (endorheism); (2) endorheism extends the life of intramountain basins maximizing the mass trapped within the orogen, rising lithostatic stress underneath and expelling fault deformation towards the flanks of the orogen; and (3) this propagation of deformation further isolates the central parts of the orogen from incoming precipitation, reinforcing sediment trapping and topographic leveling of

  5. Oceanic Plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, A. C.

    2003-12-01

    Although the existence of large continental flood basalt provinces has been known for some considerable time, e.g., Holmes (1918), the recognition that similar flood basalt provinces also exist below the oceans is relatively recent. In the early 1970s increasing amounts of evidence from seismic reflection and refraction studies revealed that the crust in several large portions of the ocean floor is significantly thicker than "normal" oceanic crust, which is 6-7 km thick. One of the first areas of such over-thickened crust to be identified was the Caribbean plate ( Edgar et al., 1971) which Donnelly (1973) proposed to be an "oceanic flood basalt province". The term oceanic plateau was coined by Kroenke (1974), and was prompted by the discovery of a large area of thickened crust (>30 km) in the western Pacific known as the Ontong Java plateau (OJP). As our knowledge of the ocean basins has improved over the last 25 years, many more oceanic plateaus have been identified ( Figure 1). Coffin and Eldholm (1992) introduced the term "large igneous provinces" (LIPs) as a generic term encompassing oceanic plateaus, continental flood basalt provinces, and those provinces which form at the continent-ocean boundary (volcanic rifted margins). (22K)Figure 1. Map showing all major oceanic plateaus, and other large igneous provinces discussed in the text (after Saunders et al., 1992). LIPs are generally believed to be formed by decompression melting of upwelling hotter mantle, known as mantle plumes. Although ideas about hotpots and mantle plumes have been around for almost 40 years (Wilson, 1963), it is only in the past 15 years that LIPs have become the focus of major research. One of the main reasons for the increased research activity into LIPs is the realization that significant proportions of these LIPs erupted over a relatively short time, often less than 2-3 Myr (see review in Coffin, 1994). This has important implications for mantle processes and source regions ( Hart et

  6. A Numerical Study of Feathering Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wing-Kit; Wang, Hsiang-Hsu

    2016-06-01

    The stability of a spiral shock of self-gravitating, magnetized interstellar medium is studied by performing two-dimensional numerical simulations of a local patch of tight-winding spiral arm. As previously suggested by the linear studies, two types of instabilities are identified, namely, wiggle instability and feathering instability. The former instability occurs in the hydrodynamics limit and results in short wavelength perturbations. On the other hand, the feathering instability requires both self-gravitating and magnetic fields and results in wider structures.

  7. The development of topographic plateaus in an India-Asia-like collision zone using 3D numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2014-05-01

    . We also address the question of how large topographic plateaus, such as the Tibetan Plateau, can form in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. Acknowledgements: Funding was provided by the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC Grant agreement #258830. Numerical computations have been performed on MOGON (ZDV Mainz computing center) and JUQUEEN (Jülich high-performance computing center).

  8. Understanding Etna flank instability through numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apuani, Tiziana; Corazzato, Claudia; Merri, Andrea; Tibaldi, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    As many active volcanoes, Mount Etna shows clear evidence of flank instability, and different mechanisms were suggested to explain this flank dynamics, based on the recorded deformation pattern and character. Shallow and deep deformations, mainly associated with both eruptive and seismic events, are concentrated along recognised fracture and fault systems, mobilising the eastern and south-eastern flank of the volcano. Several interacting causes were postulated to control the phenomenon, including gravity force, magma ascent along the feeding system, and a very complex local and/or regional tectonic activity. Nevertheless, the complexity of such dynamics is still an open subject of research and being the volcano flanks heavily urbanised, the comprehension of the gravitative dynamics is a major issue for public safety and civil protection. The present research explores the effects of the main geological features (in particular the role of the subetnean clays, interposed between the Apennine-Maghrebian flysch and the volcanic products) and the role of weakness zones, identified by fracture and fault systems, on the slope instability process. The effects of magma intrusions are also investigated. The problem is addressed by integrating field data, laboratory tests and numerical modelling. A bi- and tri-dimensional stress-strain analysis was performed by a finite difference numerical code (FLAC and FLAC3D), mainly aimed at evaluating the relationship among geological features, volcano-tectonic structures and magmatic activity in controlling the deformation processes. The analyses are well supported by dedicated structural-mechanical field surveys, which allowed to estimate the rock mass strength and deformability parameters. To take into account the uncertainties which inevitably occur in a so complicated model, many efforts were done in performing a sensitivity analysis along a WNW-ESE section crossing the volcano summit and the Valle del Bove depression. This was

  9. Numerical Modelling Of Pumpkin Balloon Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, D.

    Tensys have been involved in the numerical formfinding and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures for 15 years. They have recently broadened this range of activities into the `lighter than air' field with significant involvement in aerostat and heavy-lift hybrid airship design. Since early 2004 they have been investigating pumpkin balloon instability on behalf of the NASA ULDB programme. These studies are undertaken using inTENS, an in-house finite element program suite based upon the Dynamic Relaxation solution method and developed especially for the non-linear analysis and patterning of membrane structures. The paper describes the current state of an investigation that started with a numerical simulation of the lobed cylinder problem first studied by Calladine. The influence of material properties and local geometric deformation on stability is demonstrated. A number of models of complete pumpkin balloons have then been established, including a 64-gore balloon with geometry based upon Julian Nott's Endeavour. This latter clefted dramatically upon initial inflation, a phenomenon that has been reproduced in the numerical model. Ongoing investigations include the introduction of membrane contact modelling into inTENS and correlation studies with the series of large-scale ULDB models currently in preparation.

  10. Numerical simulation of surface waves instability on a homogeneous grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkevich, Alexander O.; Dyachenko, Alexander I.; Zakharov, Vladimir E.

    2016-05-01

    We performed full-scale numerical simulation of instability of weakly nonlinear waves on the surface of deep fluid. We show that the instability development leads to chaotization and formation of wave turbulence. Instability of both propagating and standing waves was studied. We separately studied pure capillary wave, that was unstable due to three-wave interactions and pure gravity waves, that were unstable due to four-wave interactions. The theoretical description of instabilities in all cases is included in the article. The numerical algorithm used in these and many other previous simulations performed by the authors is described in detail.

  11. Tube Feeding Transition Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    2007-01-01

    The journey children make from tube feeding to oral feeding is personal for each child and family. There is a sequence of predictable plateaus that children climb as they move toward orally eating. By better understanding this sequence, parents and children can maximize the development, learning, enjoyment and confidence at each plateau. The…

  12. Numerical Simulations of Instabilities in Single-Hole Office Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Hitt, Matthew A.; Lineberry, David M.

    2013-01-01

    An orifice element is commonly used in liquid rocket engine test facilities either as a flow metering device, a damper for acoustic resonance or to provide a large reduction in pressure over a very small distance in the piping system. While the orifice as a device is largely effective in stepping down pressure, it is also susceptible to a wake-vortex type instability that generates pressure fluctuations that propagate downstream and interact with other elements of the test facility resulting in structural vibrations. Furthermore in piping systems an unstable feedback loop can exist between the vortex shedding and acoustic perturbations from upstream components resulting in an amplification of the modes convecting downstream. Such was the case in several tests conducted at NASA as well as in the Ariane 5 strap-on P230 engine in a static firing test where pressure oscillations of 0.5% resulted in 5% thrust oscillations. Exacerbating the situation in cryogenic test facilities, is the possibility of the formation of vapor clouds when the pressure in the wake falls below the vapor pressure leading to a cavitation instability that has a lower frequency than the primary wake-vortex instability. The cavitation instability has the potential for high amplitude fluctuations that can cause catastrophic damage in the facility. In this paper high-fidelity multi-phase numerical simulations of an orifice element are used to characterize the different instabilities, understand the dominant instability mechanisms and identify the tonal content of the instabilities.

  13. Numerical modeling of the Parker instability in a rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Brown, Ben; Katz, Noam; Forest, Cary

    2011-10-01

    We study numerically the analogue of the Parker (magnetic buoyancy) instability in a rotating plasma screw pinch confined in a bounded cylinder. The goal of the study is to show the possibility of reaching the Parker instability for the plasma parameters achievable in the Madison Plasma Couette Experiment (MPCX). Simulations are performed using the extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code NIMROD for an isothermal compressible plasma model. Both linear and nonlinear regimes of the instability are studied, and the obtained results are compared with analytic results for a slab geometry. It is shown that the effect of plasma rotation in a cylindrical geometry is two-fold: first, centrifugal acceleration acts as analogue of gravity and provides the equilibrium density stratification; second, the presence of Coriolis force results in increase of critical gradient of magnetic field required for the onset of instability.

  14. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instability experiments and flow mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jingsong; Wang, Tao; Li, Ping; Zou, Liyong; Liu, Cangli

    2009-12-01

    Based on the numerical methods of volume of fluid (VOF) and piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and parallel circumstance of Message Passing Interface (MPI), a parallel multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and performed to study the hydrodynamic instability and flow mixing. Firstly, the MVPPM code is verified and validated by simulating three instability cases: The first one is a Riemann problem of viscous flow on the shock tube; the second one is the hydrodynamic instability and mixing of gaseous flows under re-shocks; the third one is a half height experiment of interfacial instability, which is conducted on the AWE’s shock tube. By comparing the numerical results with experimental data, good agreement is achieved. Then the MVPPM code is applied to simulate the two cases of the interfacial instabilities of jelly models accelerated by explosion products of a gaseous explosive mixture (GEM), which are adopted in our experiments. The first is implosive dynamic interfacial instability of cylindrical symmetry and mixing. The evolving process of inner and outer interfaces, and the late distribution of mixing mass caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the center of different radius are given. The second is jelly layer experiment which is initialized with one periodic perturbation with different amplitude and wave length. It reveals the complex processes of evolution of interface, and presents the displacement of front face of jelly layer, bubble head and top of spike relative to initial equilibrium position vs. time. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with that experimental images, and show that the amplitude of initial perturbations affects the evolvement of fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth rate extremely, especially at late times.

  15. Collisional plateaus. [in earth and Venus lithospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Burke, K.

    1985-01-01

    Aspects of the geology of collisional plateaus formed by the thickening of continental crust are briefly reviewed. The history of studies of collisional plateaus is summarized, and igneous activity in collisional plateaus is discussed. Isostatic considerations pertaining to these plateaus are addressed, developing models of isostatic support of topography which illustrate the importance of compressional tectonics in the creation of high altitude plateaus. Possible analogous environments on Venus are considered. Finally, the paradox of extension associated with compression in the plateaus is discussed.

  16. Proposed Ozark Plateaus Province Hydrologic Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. K.; Brahana, J. V.; Matlock, M. D.; Chaubey, I.; Pavlowsky, R. T.; Gilzow, F.

    2004-12-01

    The Upper White River, which drains about 40 percent of the Ozarks Ecoregion, is the main drain for the Ozark Plateaus and is characteristic of rivers draining other karst areas within the United States and the world. The proposed Ozark Plateaus Hydrologic Observatory (OPHO) encompasses twelve 8-digit hydrologic units covering about 67,000 km2 in parts of three states (Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma). Six major U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoirs are within the OPHO including four on the main stem of the White River and one on the Illinois River. Karst features are prominent in the Salem, Ozark, and Springfield Plateaus of the OPHO, and include numerous solutionally enlarged fractures, caves, sinkholes, and sinking streams. Within the basin are numerous and diverse biological communities, representing influences from 1) eastern deciduous forest, 2) Great Plains prairies, 3) arid southwest, and 4) relicts of northern species from the Pleistocene Ice Age. Also contain in the OPHO is a diverse and unique array of mussels, an imperiled river organism (38 species), and crayfish. In the extensive karst regions of the OPHO are found largely endemic subterranean organisms also dependent on good water quality: for example, the Ozark Cavefish, Bristly Cave Crayfish and the recently federally- listed Tumbling Creek Cave Snail. Mantled karst aquifers characteristic of the Ozark Plateaus Region represent a coupled atmospheric/surface water/groundwater system that is highly susceptible to external forcing. Little attenuation of contaminants occurs as water moves from surface sources into and through the mantled karst aquifer to discharge naturally at springs and streams throughout the Ozark Plateau Region, and to wells. Because of the very open character of the aquifer, extremely dynamic biogeochemical cycling of nutrients occurs. Upper White River Reservoir development, filling and operation historically have altered and continue to alter the hydrologic and ecosystems

  17. Numerical investigation of galloping instabilities in Z-shaped profiles.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Ignacio; Chavez, Miguel; Alonso, Gustavo; Valero, Eusebio

    2014-01-01

    Aeroelastic effects are relatively common in the design of modern civil constructions such as office blocks, airport terminal buildings, and factories. Typical flexible structures exposed to the action of wind are shading devices, normally slats or louvers. A typical cross-section for such elements is a Z-shaped profile, made out of a central web and two-side wings. Galloping instabilities are often determined in practice using the Glauert-Den Hartog criterion. This criterion relies on accurate predictions of the dependence of the aerodynamic force coefficients with the angle of attack. The results of a parametric analysis based on a numerical analysis and performed on different Z-shaped louvers to determine translational galloping instability regions are presented in this paper. These numerical analysis results have been validated with a parametric analysis of Z-shaped profiles based on static wind tunnel tests. In order to perform this validation, the DLR TAU Code, which is a standard code within the European aeronautical industry, has been used. This study highlights the focus on the numerical prediction of the effect of galloping, which is shown in a visible way, through stability maps. Comparisons between numerical and experimental data are presented with respect to various meshes and turbulence models. PMID:25054176

  18. Numerical Investigation of Galloping Instabilities in Z-Shaped Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Miguel; Valero, Eusebio

    2014-01-01

    Aeroelastic effects are relatively common in the design of modern civil constructions such as office blocks, airport terminal buildings, and factories. Typical flexible structures exposed to the action of wind are shading devices, normally slats or louvers. A typical cross-section for such elements is a Z-shaped profile, made out of a central web and two-side wings. Galloping instabilities are often determined in practice using the Glauert-Den Hartog criterion. This criterion relies on accurate predictions of the dependence of the aerodynamic force coefficients with the angle of attack. The results of a parametric analysis based on a numerical analysis and performed on different Z-shaped louvers to determine translational galloping instability regions are presented in this paper. These numerical analysis results have been validated with a parametric analysis of Z-shaped profiles based on static wind tunnel tests. In order to perform this validation, the DLR TAU Code, which is a standard code within the European aeronautical industry, has been used. This study highlights the focus on the numerical prediction of the effect of galloping, which is shown in a visible way, through stability maps. Comparisons between numerical and experimental data are presented with respect to various meshes and turbulence models. PMID:25054176

  19. Numerical aspects of searching convective/absolute instability transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, Sergey A.

    2006-02-01

    An overview of various numerical techniques used to determine the spatio-temporal character of instabilities in fluid flows is given. The advantageous features of various previously known individual techniques are discussed and a practical procedure combining them is suggested for a specific task of determining the complete boundary between linearly convectively and absolutely unstable regimes in a multi-parameter space in problems with a fully numerical dispersion relation. Special attention is paid to aspects of automatization of computations as this is a crucial condition for their efficiency. The suggested procedure is successfully used and is shown to provide a high degree of automatism in the physical example of non-Boussinesq mixed convection in a vertical channel. This example comprises most of the major numerical difficulties found in various spatio-temporal instability studies of two-dimensional fluid flows which previously could not be handled without frequent human intervention and visual inspection of intermediate results. This paper focuses on the general numerical aspects of the computations leaving the detailed discussion of the obtained physical results for a separate publication.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Flow Instability and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hua-Shu; Jiang, Gang

    2014-11-01

    This paper numerically investigates the physical mechanism of flow instability and heat transfer of natural convection in a cavity with thin fin(s). The left and the right walls of the cavity are differentially heated. The cavity is given an initial temperature, and the thin fin(s) is fixed on the hot wall in order to control the heat transfer. The finite volume method with the SIMPLE scheme is used to simulate the flow. Distributions of the temperature, the pressure, the velocity and the total pressure are achieved. Then, the energy gradient method is employed to study the physical mechanism of flow instability and the effect of the thin fin(s) on heat transfer. Based on the energy gradient method, the energy gradient function K represents the characteristic of flow instability. It is observed from the simulation results that the positions where instabilities take place in the temperature contours accord well with those of higher K value, which demonstrates that the energy gradient method reveals the physical mechanism of flow instability. Furthermore, the effect of the fin length, the fin position, the fin number, and Ra on heat transfer is also investigated. It is found that the effect of the fin length on heat transfer is negligible when Ra is relatively high. When there is only one fin, the most efficient heat transfer rate is achieved as the fin is fixed at the middle height of the cavity. The fin blocks heat transfer with a relatively small Ra, but the fin enhances heat transfer with a relatively large Ra. The fin(s) enhances heat transfer gradually with the increase of Ra under the influence of the thin fin(s). Finally, it is observed that both Kmax and Ra can reveal the physical mechanism of natural convection from different approaches.

  1. A Numerical Instability in an ADI Algorithm for Gyrokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. Belli; G.W. Hammett

    2004-12-17

    We explore the implementation of an Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) algorithm for a gyrokinetic plasma problem and its resulting numerical stability properties. This algorithm, which uses a standard ADI scheme to divide the field solve from the particle distribution function advance, has previously been found to work well for certain plasma kinetic problems involving one spatial and two velocity dimensions, including collisions and an electric field. However, for the gyrokinetic problem we find a severe stability restriction on the time step. Furthermore, we find that this numerical instability limitation also affects some other algorithms, such as a partially implicit Adams-Bashforth algorithm, where the parallel motion operator v{sub {parallel}} {partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}z is treated implicitly and the field terms are treated with an Adams-Bashforth explicit scheme. Fully explicit algorithms applied to all terms can be better at long wavelengths than these ADI or partially implicit algorithms.

  2. NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE VISHNIAC INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michaut, C.; Cavet, C.; Bouquet, S. E.; Roy, F.; Nguyen, H. C.

    2012-11-10

    The Vishniac instability is thought to explain the complex structure of radiative supernova remnants in their Pressure-Driven Thin Shell (PDTS) phase after a blast wave (BW) has propagated from a central explosion. In this paper, the propagation of the BW and the evolution of the PDTS stage are studied numerically with the two-dimensional (2D) code HYDRO-MUSCL for a finite-thickness shell expanding in the interstellar medium (ISM). Special attention is paid to the adiabatic index, {gamma}, and three distinct values are taken for the cavity ({gamma}{sub 1}), the shell ({gamma}{sub 2}), and the ISM ({gamma}{sub 3}) with the condition {gamma}{sub 2} < {gamma}{sub 1}, {gamma}{sub 3}. This low value of {gamma}{sub 2} accounts for the high density in the shell achieved by a strong radiative cooling. Once the spherical background flow is obtained, the evolution of a 2D-axisymmetric perturbation is computed from the linear to the nonlinear regime. The overstable mechanism, previously demonstrated theoretically by E. T. Vishniac in 1983, is recovered numerically in the linear stage and is expected to produce and enhance anisotropies and clumps on the shock front, leading to the disruption of the shell in the nonlinear phase. The period of the increasing oscillations and the growth rate of the instability are derived from several points of view (the position of the perturbed shock front, mass fluxes along the shell, and density maps), and the most unstable mode differing from the value given by Vishniac is computed. In addition, the influence of several parameters (the Mach number, amplitude and wavelength of the perturbation, and adiabatic index) is examined and for wavelengths that are large enough compared to the shell thickness, the same conclusion arises: in the late stage of the evolution of the radiative supernova remnant, the instability is dampened and the angular initial deformation of the shock front is smoothed while the mass density becomes uniform with the

  3. A numerical and analytical investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a solid tungsten plate

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A.C.; Swegle, J.W.

    1987-07-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability response of an elastic-plastic tungsten plate is investigated by numerical experiments and an approximate modal analysis. The so-called ''minimum amplitude'' instability criteria derived from plasticity analyses is shown to be incomplete as a general indicator of instability or stability at very large driving pressures. Model equations are derived which are able to reproduce the basic qualitative features of the observed instability response given by the numerical calculations. 11 refs., 29 figs.

  4. Plasma self-heating and saturation due to numerical instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, C.K.; Maron, N.

    1980-06-01

    The cold-beam nonphysical instability due to the aliases produced by the numerical spatial grid is presented in detail for momentum-conserving linear weighting codes. Additions to previous work include: linear analysis dispersion diagrams showing large growth rates, ..omega../sub i/< or =0.2 ..omega../sub p/; methods for reducing ..omega../sub i/, effectively broadening the finite-size particle width; simulation results verifying the linear theory, plus plots showing the p=1 alias in phase space (..nu../sub x/, x); the growth of beam, thermal spread (..nu../sub t//sup 2/ in temperature) an loss of energy conservation; end-of-growth (saturation at small thermal spread (lambda/sub D//..delta..x=upsilon/sub t//..omega../sub p/..delta..xapprox. =0.046, for lambda/sub B//..delta..xequivalent upsilon/sub 0//..omega../sub p/..delta..x> or =0.3, i.e., upsilon/sub t/< or =0.14upsilon/sub 0/), with return to near energy conservation (stability); demonstration of no growth for a warm beam, with upsilon/sub t/(initial)> or =upsilon/sub t/(saturation); and the mechanism of stabilization (trapping). A thermal (Maxwellian) plasma, also nonphysically unstable at small lambda/sub D//..delta..x, is also found to approach stabilization by self-heating. The two-stream physical instability is affected by the grid, with the aliasing instability also present; the linear theory for this is presented, with guidelines for minimizing the effects of the grid.

  5. A Cartesian parametrization for the numerical analysis of material instability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mota, Alejandro; Chen, Qiushi; Foulk, III, James W.; Ostien, Jakob T.; Lai, Zhengshou

    2016-02-25

    We examine four parametrizations of the unit sphere in the context of material stability analysis by means of the singularity of the acoustic tensor. We then propose a Cartesian parametrization for vectors that lie a cube of side length two and use these vectors in lieu of unit normals to test for the loss of the ellipticity condition. This parametrization is then used to construct a tensor akin to the acoustic tensor. It is shown that both of these tensors become singular at the same time and in the same planes in the presence of a material instability. Furthermore, themore » performance of the Cartesian parametrization is compared against the other parametrizations, with the results of these comparisons showing that in general, the Cartesian parametrization is more robust and more numerically efficient than the others.« less

  6. Convective instability in sedimentation: 3-D numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao; Hsu, Tian-Jian; Balachandar, S.

    2014-11-01

    To provide a probable explanation on the field observed rapid sedimentation process near river mouths, we investigate the convective sedimentation in stably stratified saltwater using 3-D numerical simulations. Guided by the linear stability analysis, this study focuses on the nonlinear interactions of several mechanisms, which lead to various sediment finger patterns, and the effective settling velocity for sediment ranging from clay (single-particle settling velocity V0 = 0.0036 and 0.0144 mm/s, or particle diameter d = 2 and 4 μm) to silt (V0 = 0.36 mm/s, or d = 20 μm). For very fine sediment with V0 = 0.0036 mm/s, the convective instability is dominated by double diffusion, characterized by millimeter-scale fingers. Gravitational settling slightly increases the growth rate; however, it has notable effect on the downward development of vertical mixing shortly after the sediment interface migrates below the salt interface. For sediment with V0 = 0.0144 mm/s, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities become dominant before double-diffusive modes grow sufficiently large. Centimeter-scale and highly asymmetric sediment fingers are obtained due to nonlinear interactions between different modes. For sediment with V0 = 0.36 mm/s, Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism dominates and the resulting centimeter-scale sediment fingers show a plume-like structure. The flow pattern is similar to that without ambient salt stratification. Rapid sedimentation with effective settling velocity on the order of 1 cm/s is likely driven by convective sedimentation for sediment with V0 greater than 0.1 mm/s at concentration greater than 10-20 g/L.

  7. Dynamics of plume-triple junction interaction: Results from a series of three-dimensional numerical models and implications for the formation of oceanic plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dordevic, Mladen; Georgen, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Mantle plumes rising in the vicinity of mid-ocean ridges often generate anomalies in melt production and seafloor depth. This study investigates the dynamical interactions between a mantle plume and a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction, using a parameter space approach and a suite of steady state, three-dimensional finite element numerical models. The top domain boundary is composed of three diverging plates, with each assigned half-spreading rates with respect to a fixed triple junction point. The bottom boundary is kept at a constant temperature of 1350°C except where a two-dimensional, Gaussian-shaped thermal anomaly simulating a plume is imposed. Models vary plume diameter, plume location, the viscosity contrast between plume and ambient mantle material, and the use of dehydration rheology in calculating viscosity. Importantly, the model results quantify how plume-related anomalies in mantle temperature pattern, seafloor depth, and crustal thickness depend on the specific set of parameters. To provide an example, one way of assessing the effect of conduit position is to calculate normalized area, defined to be the spatial dispersion of a given plume at specific depth (here selected to be 50 km) divided by the area occupied by the same plume when it is located under the triple junction. For one particular case modeled where the plume is centered in an intraplate position 100 km from the triple junction, normalized area is just 55%. Overall, these models provide a framework for better understanding plateau formation at triple junctions in the natural setting and a tool for constraining subsurface geodynamical processes and plume properties.

  8. Numerical Study of a Hydrodynamic Instability Driven by Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Zapata, Sergio; Romo-Cruz, Julio Cesar Ruben; Lopez-Sanchez, Erick Javier; Ruiz-Chavarria, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    The study of hydrodynamic instabilities in liquid layers produced by evaporation has several applications on industry and technology. In this work we study numerically the conditions under which a liquid layer becomes unstable when evaporation in the vapor-liquid interphase is present. The evaporation process follows the Hertz-Knudsen law (the evaporation rate is proportional to the difference between the saturated vapor pressure at the liquid layer temperature and the vapor partial pressure in the environment). Additionally to the usual boundary conditions on solid walls (for example, the non-slip condition for the velocity), we analyze the boundary conditions in the vapor-liquid interphase where the momentum and energy balances have to be taken into account and where the evaporation plays a crucial role. To solve this problem the linear theory of stability is used; that is, a small perturbation around the basic solution is applied (flow at rest and a temperature stationary field). The equations are solved using the Chebyshev pseudo-spectral method. The results are compared with the more usual Rayleigh-Bénard and Marangoni mechanisms as well as with some experiments carried out by our team. Authors acknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project IN116312, ``Vorticidad y Ondas no lineales en fluidos.''

  9. Numerical investigation of the transverse instability on the radiation-pressure-driven foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. Q.; Yin, Y.; Yu, T. P.; Xu, H.; Zou, D. B.; Shao, F. Q.

    2015-12-01

    The development of transverse instability in the radiation-pressure-acceleration dominant laser-foil interaction is numerically examined by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. When a plane laser impinges on a foil with modulated surface, the transverse instability is incited, and periodic perturbations of the proton density develop. The growth rate of the transverse instability is numerically diagnosed. It is found that the linear growth of the transverse instability lasts only a few laser periods, then the instability gets saturated. In order to optimize the modulation wavelength of the target, a method of information entropy is put forward to describe the chaos degree of the transverse instability. With appropriate modulation, the transverse instability shows a low chaos degree, and a quasi-monoenergetic proton beam is produced.

  10. Numerical Prediction of Laminar Instability Noise for NACA 0012 Aerofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gennaro, Michele; Hueppe, Andreas; Kuehnelt, Helmut; Kaltenbacher, Manfred

    2011-09-01

    Aerofoil self-generated noise is recognized to be of fundamental importance in the frame of applied aeroacoustics and the use of computational methods to assess the acoustic behaviour of airframe components challenges an even larger community of engineers and scientists. Several noise generation mechanisms can be found which are mainly related to the physical development of turbulence over the boundary layer. They can be classified in 3 main categories: the Turbulent Boundary Layer—Trailing Edge noise (TBL-TE), the Laminar Boundary Layer—Vortex Shedding (LBL-VS) noise and the Separation Stall (S-S) noise. The TBL-TE is mainly related to the noise generated by turbulent eddies which develop into the boundary layer and usually exhibits a broadband spectrum. The LBL-VS is related to laminar instabilities that can occur within the boundary layer which are responsible for a very late transition and generate a typical peaked tonal noise, while the S-S noise mainly results from the development of large vortices after the separation point. In this paper we propose a numerical analysis targeted to the simulation the LBL-VS noise mechanisms on a NACA 0012 aerofoil, tested at a Reynolds number of 1.1 M and Mach number of 0.2. The aerodynamic simulation is performed with a 2D transient RANS approach using the k-ω transitional turbulence model, while the acoustic computations are performed with the FfowcsWilliams-Hawkings (FW-H) acoustic analogy and with a Finite Element (FE) approach solving Lighthill's wave equation. Computed noise spectra are compared with experimental data published by NASA showing a good agreement both for peak location as well as for the predicted noise level.

  11. Comprehensive numerical methodology for direct numerical simulations of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, Scott J.; Livescu, Daniel; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2016-05-01

    An investigation of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) requires efficient numerical methods, advanced boundary conditions, and consistent initialization in order to capture the wide range of scales and vortex dynamics present in the system, while reducing the computational impact associated with acoustic wave generation and the subsequent interaction with the flow. An advanced computational framework is presented that handles the challenges introduced by considering the compressive nature of RTI systems, which include sharp interfacial density gradients on strongly stratified background states, acoustic wave generation and removal at computational boundaries, and stratification dependent vorticity production. The foundation of the numerical methodology described here is the wavelet-based grid adaptivity of the Parallel Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method (PAWCM) that maintains symmetry in single-mode RTI systems to extreme late-times. PAWCM is combined with a consistent initialization, which reduces the generation of acoustic disturbances, and effective boundary treatments, which prevent acoustic reflections. A dynamic time integration scheme that can handle highly nonlinear and potentially stiff systems, such as compressible RTI, completes the computational framework. The numerical methodology is used to simulate two-dimensional single-mode RTI to extreme late-times for a wide range of flow compressibility and variable density effects. The results show that flow compressibility acts to reduce the growth of RTI for low Atwood numbers, as predicted from linear stability analysis.

  12. Lessons Learned from Numerical Simulations of Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities serve as efficient mixing mechanisms in a wide variety of flows, from supernovae to jet engines. Over the past decade, we have used the Miranda code to temporally integrate the multi-component Navier-Stokes equations at spatial resolutions up to 29 billion grid points. The code employs 10th-order compact schemes for spatial derivatives, combined with 4th-order Runge-Kutta time advancement. Some of our major findings are as follows: The rate of growth of a mixing layer is equivalent to the net mass flux through the equi-molar plane. RT growth rates can be significantly reduced by adding shear. RT instability can produce shock waves. The growth rate of RM instability can be predicted from known interfacial perturbations. RM vortex projectiles can far outrun the mixing region. Thermal fluctuations in molecular dynamics simulations can seed instabilities along the braids in KH instability. And finally, enthalpy diffusion is essential in preserving the second law of thermodynamics. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. On the Numerical Dispersion of Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell Code : Finite Grid Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Michael David; Huang, Chengkun; Zeng, Yong; Yi, Sunghwan; Albright, Brian James

    2014-07-15

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the electromagnetic PIC algorithm to analyze the origin of these instabilities. We rigorously derive the faithful 3D numerical dispersion of the PIC algorithm, and then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we account for the manner in which the PIC algorithm updates and samples the fields and distribution function. Temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme are also explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical 1D modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Extensional Necking Instabilities: Application to Ganymede's Grooved Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, M. T.; Showman, A. P.

    2005-01-01

    Ganymede s pervasive 5-10 km-wavelength grooves have been suggested to result from a necking instability during an epoch of lithospheric extension, but to date few quantitative studies of groove formation have been performed. We present two-dimensional numerical models of necking instabilities under conditions that are appropriate to Ganymede at the time of groove formation. Preliminary simulations indicate that extensional necking instabilities can occur under a range of conditions, many of which may be relevant to Ganymede. The form of the surface topography produced by these instabilities varies as a function of the strain rate, amount of extension, initial topographic perturbation, and rheological parameters.

  15. Numerical studies of baroclinic instability at small Richardson number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Baroclinic instability at small Richardson number consists of competition between symmetric (Solberg) modes, zonal (Eady) modes, and possibly other modes whose orientation is neither symmetric nor zonal. In FY-84, a study of the fully nonlinear development and energetics of the symmetric modes was completed. The nonlinear effects were quite strong and, in some senses, unexpected. Secondly, a study of the dependency of the energetics of the symmetric modes upon the physical parameters was completed.

  16. Direct Numerical Simulations of Flame Instabilities in Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingale, M.; Bell, J. B.; Day, M. S.; Rendleman, C. A.; Woosley, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    Instabilities serve an important role in accelerating a thermonuclear flame in a white dwarf to a large fraction of the speed of sound (perhaps to a supersonic detonation), consuming the carbon/oxygen, and producing a Type Ia supernovae. The precise mechanism for this acceleration is not well understood, but large scale simulations show that a deflagration alone can unbind the star. We present fully resolved, multidimensional calculations of Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flames in conditions appropriate to the late stages of Type Ia SNe, using a low Mach number hydrodynamics code. At densities below 1.e7 g/cc, a fundamental change in the burning is observed, as the flame transitions from the wrinkled flame to the distributed burning regime. Significant acceleration is observed for all densities we study, limited only by the size of the domain we can address. We compare with corresponding simulations of the Landau-Darrieus instability. We discuss the physics of these instabilities on the small scales and the implications they have for large scale flame modeling and the possibility for deflagration to detonation transitions. Support for this work was provided by the DOE grant No. DE-FC02-01ER41176 to the Supernova Science Center/UCSC and the Applied Mathematics Program of the DOE Office of Mathematics, Information, and Computational Sciences under the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  17. The Zombie Instability: Using Numerical Simulation to Design a Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Pei, Suyang; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Marcus, Philip

    2014-11-01

    A new type of finite amplitude-instability has been found in numerical simulations of stratified, rotating, shear flows. The instability occurs via baroclinic critical layers that create linearly unstable vortex layers, which roll-up into vortices. Under the right conditions, those vortices can form a new generation of vortices, resulting in ``vortex self-replication'' that fills the fluid with vortices. Creating this instability in a laboratory would provide further evidence for the existence of the instability, which we first found in numerical simulations of protoplanetary disks. To design a laboratory experiment we need to know how the flow parameters-- shear, rotation and stratification, etc. affect the instability. To build an experiment economically, we also need to know how the finite-amplitude trigger of the instability scales with viscosity and the size of the domain. In this talk, we summarize our findings. We present a map, in terms of the experimentally controllable parameters, that shows where the instability occurs and whether the instability creates a few isolated transient vortices, a few long-lived vortices, or long-lived, self-replicating vortices that fill the entire flow.

  18. Mountains and Plateaus on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These two views of Io were acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft during its seventh orbit (G7) of Jupiter. The images were designed to view large features on Io at low sun angles when the lighting conditions emphasize the topography or relief of the volcanic satellite. Sun angles are low near the terminator which is the day-night boundary near the left side of the images. These images reveal that the topography is very flat near the active volcanic centers such as Loki Patera (the large dark horseshoe-shaped feature near the terminator in the left-hand image) and that a variety of mountains and plateaus exist elsewhere.

    North is to the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers per picture element (6.1 for the left hand image and 5.7 for the right). The images were taken on April 4th, 1997 at a ranges of 600,000 kilometers (left image) and 563,000 kilometers (right image) by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  19. Numerical analysis of hydrodynamic instability in magnetized laser ablation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Naofumi; Ishii, Ayako; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Morita, Taichi; Sakawa, Youichi; Takabe, Hideaki

    2015-12-01

    We have conducted radiation magneto-hydrodynamics (RMHD) simulations of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) in a magnetized counter flow produced by intense lasers. A jet-like plasma from a planar plastic target is formed and maintained in several-tens of nanoseconds by expanding plasma from rear side of two separated laser spots, and parallelly located another target is ablated by the radiation from the plasma, reproducing past experimental works. A planar shock driven by the radiation interacts with the jet as a nonuniform density structure, resulting in the RMI. The magnetic field is amplified up to ∼40 times greater than the background value at the interface at which the instability occurs. However, a certain extent of the amplification results from the compression effect induced by the counter flow, and the obtained amplification level is difficult to be measured in the experiments. An experiment for observing a clear amplification must be designed through the RMHD simulations so that the RMI takes place in the low-density area between two targets.

  20. Numerical simulations of multifrequency instability-wave growth and suppression in the Blasius boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, A.; Bower, W. W.; Meyer, G. H.

    1991-02-01

    A mathematical model based on the Orr-Sommerfeld equation is developed to describe the growth and suppression of multifrequency, two-dimensional instability waves in the Blasius boundary layer over a flat place through localized perturbations at the surface caused by time-varying suction/blowing. It is shown for harmonic (single-frequency) perturbations that the instability wave can be decomposed into two components: an idealized Tollmien-Schlichting wave and a second perturbation that approximately cancels the first component upstream of the surface disturbance and becomes small downstream. Because the first component alone fully expresses the instability of the flow, the need to perform numerical Fourier transformation over the wave number is eliminated, permitting easy extension of the analysis to the more general case of arbitrary waveform of the perturbation. Numerical results are presented for examples of instability-wave generation and suppression in the boundary layer.

  1. Direct numerical simulations of the elliptic instability of a vortex pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, F.; Corjon, A.

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study is to perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the three-dimensional short-wavelength elliptic instability developing in a counter-rotating vortex pair, and to reproduce numerically a water-tank experiment. The main features of the elliptic instability are recovered by the simulations. In particular, the spatial structure and the temporal evolution of the most amplified perturbation mode during the linear regime correspond to both experimental measurements and theoretical predictions. The long-term evolution is also simulated, and the stages leading to transition to turbulence are described. Some elements resulting from simulations related to the interaction between the short-wavelength elliptic instability and the long-wavelength Crow instability are provided.

  2. Scale separation in granular packings: stress plateaus and fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, C; Atman, A P F; Claudin, P; Combe, G; Goldhirsch, I

    2006-04-28

    It is demonstrated, by numerical simulations of a 2D assembly of polydisperse disks, that there exists a range (plateau) of coarse-graining scales for which the stress tensor field in a granular solid is nearly resolution independent, thereby enabling an "objective" definition of this field. Expectedly, it is not the mere size of the system but the (related) magnitudes of the gradients that determine the widths of the plateaus. Ensemble averaging (even over "small" ensembles) extends the widths of the plateaus to subparticle scales. The fluctuations within the ensemble are studied as well. Both the response to homogeneous forcing and to an external compressive localized load (and gravity) are studied. Implications to small solid systems and constitutive relations are briefly discussed. PMID:16712277

  3. Termination of the MRI via parasitic instabilities in core-collapse supernovae: influence of numerical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembiasz, T.; Obergaulinger, M.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Aloy, M. Á.; Müller, E.

    2016-05-01

    We study the influence of numerical methods and grid resolution on the termination of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) by means of parasitic instabilities in threedimensional shearing-disc simulations reproducing typical conditions found in core-collapse supernovae. Whether or not the MRI is able to amplify weak magnetic fields in this context strongly depends, among other factors, on the amplitude at which its growth terminates. The qualitative results of our study do not depend on the numerical scheme. In all our models, MRI termination is caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, consistent with theoretical predictions. Quantitatively, however, there are differences, but numerical convergence can be achieved even at relatively low grid resolutions if high-order reconstruction methods are used.

  4. On physical and numerical instabilities arising in simulations of non-stationary radiatively cooling shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badjin, D. A.; Glazyrin, S. I.; Manukovskiy, K. V.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    2016-06-01

    We describe our modelling of the radiatively cooling shocks and their thin shells with various numerical tools in different physical and calculational setups. We inspect structure of the dense shell, its formation and evolution, pointing out physical and numerical factors that sustain its shape and also may lead to instabilities. We have found that under certain physical conditions, the circular shaped shells show a strong bending instability and successive fragmentation on Cartesian grids soon after their formation, while remain almost unperturbed when simulated on polar meshes. We explain this by physical Rayleigh-Taylor-like instabilities triggered by corrugation of the dense shell surfaces by numerical noise. Conditions for these instabilities follow from both the shell structure itself and from episodes of transient acceleration during re-establishing of dynamical pressure balance after sudden radiative cooling onset. They are also easily excited by physical perturbations of the ambient medium. The widely mentioned non-linear thin shell instability, in contrast, in tests with physical perturbations is shown to have only limited chances to develop in real radiative shocks, as it seems to require a special spatial arrangement of fluctuations to be excited efficiently. The described phenomena also set new requirements on further simulations of the radiatively cooling shocks in order to be physically correct and free of numerical artefacts.

  5. On the numerical dispersion of electromagnetic particle-in-cell code: Finite grid instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, M. D.; Huang, C.-K.; Zeng, Y.; Yi, S. A.; Albright, B. J.

    2015-09-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the Electromagnetic PIC model. We rigorously derive the faithful 3-D numerical dispersion relation of the PIC model, for a simple, direct current deposition scheme, which does not conserve electric charge exactly. We then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we clarify the presence of alias modes in an eigenmode analysis of the PIC model, which combines both discrete and continuous variables. The manner in which the PIC model updates and samples the fields and distribution function, together with the temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme, is explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1-D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction, which is then verified by simulation. We demonstrate that our analysis is readily extendable to charge conserving models.

  6. On the numerical dispersion of electromagnetic particle-in-cell code: Finite grid instability

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, M.D.; Huang, C.-K.; Zeng, Y.; Yi, S.A.; Albright, B.J.

    2015-09-15

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the Electromagnetic PIC model. We rigorously derive the faithful 3-D numerical dispersion relation of the PIC model, for a simple, direct current deposition scheme, which does not conserve electric charge exactly. We then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we clarify the presence of alias modes in an eigenmode analysis of the PIC model, which combines both discrete and continuous variables. The manner in which the PIC model updates and samples the fields and distribution function, together with the temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme, is explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1-D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction, which is then verified by simulation. We demonstrate that our analysis is readily extendable to charge conserving models.

  7. Lithospheric Architecture, Heterogenities, Instabilities, Melting - insight form numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczyk, Weronika; Hobbs, Bruce; Ord, Alison; Gessner, Klaus; Gerya, Taras V.

    2010-05-01

    yield stress of the blocks (representing heterogeneous fused material) nucleates localised deformation and creates conditions for delamination via a Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Above the site of localised delamination of the mantle lithosphere, a series of deep crustal faults develop that may extend into the upper mantle. These deep structures can act as the pathways for mantle derived CO2±H2O fluids and alkaline igneous complexes. Isotherms are commonly elevated throughout the lithosphere in the hanging wall of deep through-going structures and are depressed in the footwalls. This means that some architectures favour devolatilisation and melting in the hanging wall. A large spectrum of behaviour is observed and results from minor changes in the orientation and strength of the blocks.

  8. A numerical simulation of barotropic instability. II Wave-wave interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, J. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    A fully nonlinear numerical model of the point jet barotropic instability is used to test and confirm the hypothesis that the magnitude of the wave vorticity does not exceed the magnitude of the initial shear. This result arises directly from the local conservation of vorticity following a parcel and the fact that unstable waves are principally confined to the region where the zonal mean vorticity can be smoothed by the wave so as to eliminate the instability. Comparisons are made between fully nonlinear and quasi-linear models of the point jet instability and their tracer transport properties. Differences become particularly evident after wave saturation. The most important effect neglected by the wave-mean flow model appears to be the advection of wave vorticity by the most unstable mode. However, as equilibration of the instability proceeds, the globally averaged properties of both models are found to be similar.

  9. Electron cloud buildup and instability: Numerical simulations for the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannozzi, M.; Métral, E.; Métral, G.; Rumolo, G.; Zimmermann, F.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental observations on the electron cloud have been collected at the CERN Proton Synchrotron machine throughout the last two years. At the same time, an intense campaign of simulations has been carried out to understand the observed electron cloud buildup and the related instability. In this paper, the results of the numerical simulations are presented and discussed.

  10. Numerical study of self modulation instability of 1 nC electron bunch at ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Yun; Mori, Warren; Muggli, Patric

    2012-12-21

    The development of self-modulation instability (SMI) is investigated numerically for the 1 nC electron bunch available at Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Possible experiment based on the simulation results is proposed. All the simulations are performed with the 2D-cylindrically symmetric particle-in-cell code.

  11. Linear and nonlinear evolution of the ion resonance instability in cylindrical traps: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2015-07-15

    Numerical experiments have been performed to investigate the linear and nonlinear dynamics, and energetics of the ion resonance instability in cylindrically confined nonneutral plasma. The instability is excited on a set of parametrically different unstable equilibria of a cylindrical nonneutral cloud, composed of electrons partially neutralized by a much heavier ion species of single ionization. A particle-in-cell code has been developed and employed to carry out these simulations. The results obtained from the initial exponential growth phase of the instability in these numerical experiments are in agreement with the linearised analytical model of the ion resonance instability. As the simulations delve much further in time beyond the exponential growth phase, very interesting nonlinear phenomena of the ion resonance instability are revealed, such as a process of simultaneous wave breaking of the excited poloidal mode on the ion cloud and pinching of the poloidal perturbations on the electron cloud. This simultaneous nonlinear dynamics of the two components is associated with an energy transfer process from the electrons to the ions. At later stages there is heating induced cross-field transport of the heavier ions and tearing across the pinches on the electron cloud followed by an inverse cascade of the torn sections.

  12. Numerical study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the lightning return stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Bin Shi, Lihua; Yi, Yun; Wang, Yangyang

    2015-09-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities are important hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) phenomena that are found in systems in high energy density physics and normal fluids. The formation and evolution of the R-T instability at channel boundary during back-flow of the lightning return stroke are analyzed using the linear perturbation theory and normal mode analysis methods, and the linear growth rate of the R-T instability in typical condition for lightning return stroke channel is obtained. Then, the R-T instability phenomena of lightning return stroke are simulated using a two-dimensional Eulerian finite volumes resistive radiation MHD code. The numerical results show that the evolution characteristics of the R-T instability in the early stage of back-flow are consistent with theoretical predictions obtained by linear analysis. The simulation also yields more evolution characteristics for the R-T instability beyond the linear theory. The results of this work apply to some observed features of the return stroke channel and further advance previous theoretical and experimental work.

  13. High order numerical simulations of the Richtmyer- Meshkov instability in a relativistic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, O.; Dumbser, M.

    2015-07-01

    We study the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability of a relativistic perfect fluid by means of high order numerical simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The numerical scheme combines a finite volume reconstruction in space, a local space-time discontinuous Galerkin predictor method, a high order one-step time update scheme, and a "cell-by-cell" space-time AMR strategy with time-accurate local time stepping. In this way, third order accurate (both in space and in time) numerical simulations of the RM instability are performed, spanning a wide parameter space. We present results both for the case in which a light fluid penetrates into a higher density one (Atwood number A > 0) and for the case in which a heavy fluid penetrates into a lower density one (Atwood number A < 0). We find that for large Lorentz factors γs of the incident shock wave, the relativistic RM instability is substantially weakened and ultimately suppressed. More specifically, the growth rate of the RM instability in the linear phase has a local maximum which occurs at a critical value of γs ≈ [1.2, 2]. Moreover, we have also revealed a genuinely relativistic effect, absent in Newtonian hydrodynamics, which arises in three dimensional configurations with a non-zero velocity component tangent to the incident shock front. In particular, in A > 0 models, the tangential velocity has a net magnification effect, while in A < 0 models, the tangential velocity has a net suppression effect.

  14. Numerical investigation of the instability and nonlinear evolution of narrow-band directional ocean waves.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, P K

    2010-07-01

    The instability and nonlinear evolution of directional ocean waves is investigated numerically by means of simulations of the governing kinetic equation for narrow-band surface waves. Our simulation results reveal the onset of the modulational instability for long-crested wave trains, which agrees well with recent large-scale experiments in wave basins, where it was found that narrower directional spectra lead to self-focusing of ocean waves and an enhanced probability of extreme events. We find that the modulational instability is nonlinearly saturated by a broadening of the wave spectrum, which leads to the stabilization of the water-wave system. Applications of our results to other fields of physics, such as nonlinear optics and plasma physics, are discussed. PMID:20867450

  15. A semi-numerical algorithm for instability of compressible multilayered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shan; Yang, Yang; Peng, Xiang He; Liu, Wing Kam; Huang, Xiao Xu; Elkhodary, Khalil

    2015-07-01

    A computational method is proposed for the analysis and prediction of instability (wrinkling or necking) of multilayered compressible plates and sheets made by metals or polymers under plane strain conditions. In previous works, a basic assumption (or a physical argument) that has been frequently made is that materials are incompressible to simplify mathematical derivations. To account for the compressibility of metals and polymers (the lower Poisson's ratio leads to the more compressible material), we propose a combined semi-numerical algorithm and finite element method for instability analysis. Our proposed algorithm is herein verified by comparing its predictions with published results in literature for thin films with polymer/metal substrates and for polymer/metal systems. The new combined method is then used to predict the effects of compressibility on instability behaviors. Results suggest potential utility for compressibility in the design of multilayered structures.

  16. Shear-induced instability and arch filament eruption - A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Song, M. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Dryer, M.

    1991-01-01

    A situation wherein a bipolar magnetic field embedded in a stratified solar atmosphere undergoes symmetrical shear motion at the footpoints is investigated via a 2D (nonplanar) MHD simulation. It was found that the vertical plasma flow velocities grow exponentially, leading to a new type of global MHD instability. The growth rate increases almost linearly until it reaches the same order of magnitude as the Alfven speed. Then a nonlinear MHD instability occurs beyond this point. It was found that the central loops are pinched by opposing Lorentz forces, and the outer closed loops stretch upward with the vertically-rising mass flow. The nonlinear dynamical shearing instability is illustrated by a numerical example that is given for three different values of the plasma beta that span several orders of magnitude.

  17. Experimental demonstration of bow-shock instability and its numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Ohnishi, N.; Ohtani, K.

    2016-07-01

    An experimental demonstration was carried out in a ballistic range at high Mach numbers with the low specific heat ratio gas hydrofluorocarbon HFC-134a to observe the unstable bow-shock wave generated in front of supersonic blunt objects. The shadowgraph images obtained from the experiments showed instability characteristics, in which the disturbances grow and flow downstream and the wake flow appears wavy because of the shock oscillation. Moreover, the influence of the body shape and specific heat ratio on the instability was investigated for various experimental conditions. Furthermore, the observed features, such as wave structure and disturbance amplitude, were captured by numerical simulations, and it was demonstrated that computational fluid dynamics could effectively simulate the physical instability. In addition, it was deduced that the shock instability is induced by sound emissions from the edge of the object. This inference supports the dependence of the instability on the specific heat ratio and Mach number because the shock stand-off distance is affected by these parameters and limits the sound wave propagation.

  18. System dynamic instabilities induced by sliding contact: A numerical analysis with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, J.; Massi, F.; Saulot, A.; Renouf, M.; D`Ambrogio, W.

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical systems present several contact surfaces between deformable bodies. The contact interface can be either static (joints) or in sliding (active interfaces). The sliding interfaces can have several roles and according to their application they can be developed either for maximizing the friction coefficient and the energy dissipation (e.g. brakes) or rather to allow the relative displacement at joints with a maximum efficiency. In both cases the coupling between system and local contact dynamics can bring to system dynamics instabilities (e.g. brake squeal or squeaking of hip prostheses). This results in unstable vibrations of the system, induced by the oscillation of the contact forces. In the literature, a large number of works deal with such kind of instabilities and are mainly focused on applied problems such as brake squeal noise. This paper shows a more general numerical analysis of a simple system constituted by two bodies in sliding contact: a rigid cylinder rotating inside a deformable one. The parametrical Complex Eigenvalue Analysis and the transient numerical simulations show how the friction forces can give rise to in-plane dynamic instabilities due to the interaction between two system modes, even for such a simple system characterized by one deformable body. Results from transient simulations highlight the key role of realistic values of the material damping to have convergence of the model and, consequently, reliable physical results. To this aim an experimental estimation of the material damping has been carried out. Moreover, the simplicity of the system allows for a deeper analysis of the contact instability and a balance of the energy flux among friction, system vibrations and damping. The numerical results have been validated by comparison with experimental ones, obtained by a specific test bench developed to reproduce and analyze the contact friction instabilities.

  19. Experimental and numerical investigations on flashing-induced instabilities in a single channel

    SciTech Connect

    Marcel, Christian P.; Rohde, M.; Van Der Hagen, T.H.J.J.

    2009-11-15

    During the start-up phase, natural circulation BWRs (NC-BWRs) need to be operated at low pressure conditions. Such conditions favor flashing-induced instabilities due to the large hydrostatic pressure drop induced by the tall chimney. Moreover, in novel NC-BWR designs the steam separation is performed in the steam separators which create large pressure drops at the chimney outlet, which effect on stability has not been investigated yet. In this work, flashing-induced oscillations occurring in a tall, bottom heated channel are numerically investigated by using a simple linear model with three regions and an accurate implementation for estimating the water properties. The model is used to investigate flashing-induced instabilities in a channel for different values of the core inlet friction value. The results are compared with experiments obtained by using the CIRCUS facility at the same conditions, showing a good agreement. In addition, the experiments on flashing-induced instabilities are presented in a novel manner allowing visualizing new details of the phenomenon numerical stability investigations on the effect of the friction distribution are also done. It is found that by increasing the total restriction in the channel the system is destabilized. In addition, the chimney outlet restriction has a stronger destabilizing effect than the core inlet restriction. A stable two-phase region is observed prior to the instabilities in the experiments and the numerical simulations which may help to pressurize the vessel of NC-BWRs and thus reducing the effects of flashing instabilities during start-up. (author)

  20. A numerical model for elliptical instability of the Earth's fluid outer core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Mahmoud, Behnam; Henderson, Gary; Aldridge, Keith

    2000-01-01

    A dynamical model is proposed for the elliptical instability that has been reported by Aldridge et al. [Aldridge, K.D., Seyed-Mahmoud, B., Henderson, G.A., van Wijngaarden, W., 1997. Elliptical instability of the Earth's fluid core. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 103, 365-374] in connection with recent experiments on an ellipsoidal shell of rotating fluid. The frequencies and growth rates of the instability are obtained numerically by means of a Galerkin method that is based upon the normal modes of the contained fluid. A finite-element method has been employed to approximately solve the ill-posed Poincaré problem for the normal modes. The numerical results for a special case are compared with their analytical counterparts, and the agreement is to within 0.1% for shells of small ellipticity. Results are presented for other cases, including some where the boundary perturbation is allowed to rotate slowly with respect to the inertial frame. The conclusion is that such investigations are of geophysical interest, since tidal forcing might be sufficient to excite an elliptical instability of the fluid outer core of the Earth and thus contribute to the geomagnetic field.

  1. Instability of surface lenticular vortices: results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaye, Noé; Paci, Alexandre; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2016-04-01

    We examine the instability of lenticular vortices -- or lenses -- in a stratified rotating fluid. The simplest configuration is one in which the lenses overlay a deep layer and have a free surface, and this can be studied using a two-layer rotating shallow water model. We report results from laboratory experiments and high-resolution direct numerical simulations of the destabilization of vortices with constant potential vorticity, and compare these to a linear stability analysis. The stability properties of the system are governed by two parameters: the typical upper-layer potential vorticity and the size (depth) of the vortex. Good agreement is found between analytical, numerical and experimental results for the growth rate and wavenumber of the instability. The nonlinear saturation of the instability is associated with conversion from potential to kinetic energy and weak emission of gravity waves, giving rise to the formation of coherent vortex multipoles with trapped waves. The impact of flow in the lower layer is examined. In particular, it is shown that the growth rate can be strongly affected and the instability can be suppressed for certain types of weak co-rotating flow.

  2. Numerical simulations of magnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at a twisted solar flux tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, K.; Chmielewski, P.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-04-01

    The paper aims to study the response of a solar small-scale and weak magnetic flux tube to photospheric twisting motions. We numerically solve three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations to describe the evolution of the perturbation within the initially static flux tube, excited by twists in the azimuthal component of the velocity. These twists produce rotation of the magnetic field lines. Perturbation of magnetic field lines propagates upwardly, driving vertical and azimuthal flow as well as plasma compressions and rarefactions in the form of eddies. We conclude that these eddies result from the sheared azimuthal flow which seeds Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) between the flux tube and the ambient medium. Numerically obtained properties of the KHI confirm the analytical predictions for the occurrence of the instability.

  3. Numerical techniques for solving nonlinear instability problems in smokeless tactical solid rocket motors. [finite difference technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, J. D.; Levine, J. N.

    1980-01-01

    The selection of a satisfactory numerical method for calculating the propagation of steep fronted shock life waveforms in a solid rocket motor combustion chamber is discussed. A number of different numerical schemes were evaluated by comparing the results obtained for three problems: the shock tube problems; the linear wave equation, and nonlinear wave propagation in a closed tube. The most promising method--a combination of the Lax-Wendroff, Hybrid and Artificial Compression techniques, was incorporated into an existing nonlinear instability program. The capability of the modified program to treat steep fronted wave instabilities in low smoke tactical motors was verified by solving a number of motor test cases with disturbance amplitudes as high as 80% of the mean pressure.

  4. Numerical simulations of magnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at a twisted solar flux tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, K.; Chmielewski, P.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-07-01

    The paper aims to study the response of a solar small-scale and weak magnetic flux tube to photospheric twisting motions. We numerically solve three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations to describe the evolution of the perturbation within the initially static flux tube, excited by twists in the azimuthal component of the velocity. These twists produce rotation of the magnetic field lines. Perturbation of magnetic field lines propagates upwardly, driving vertical and azimuthal flow as well as plasma compressions and rarefactions in the form of eddies. We conclude that these eddies result from the sheared azimuthal flow which seeds Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) between the flux tube and the ambient medium. Numerically obtained properties of the KHI confirm the analytical predictions for the occurrence of the instability.

  5. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  6. Three-dimensional numerical studies of the temperature anisotropy instability in intense charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2005-05-01

    In neutral plasmas with a uniform magnetic field and strongly anisotropic distribution function (T∥/T⊥≪1) an electrostatic Harris-type collective instability may develop if the plasma is sufficiently dense. Such anisotropies develop naturally in accelerators, and a similar instability may lead to a deterioration of the beam quality in a one-component nonneutral charged particle beam. The instability may also lead to an increase in the longitudinal velocity spread, which would make the focusing of the beam difficult and impose a limit on the minimum spot size achievable in heavy ion fusion experiments. This paper reports the results of recent numerical studies of the temperature anisotropy instability using the newly developed Beam Eigenmodes And Spectra (bEASt) code for space-charge-dominated, low-emittance beams with large tune depression (ν/ν0≪1). Such high-intensity beams are relevant to next-step experiments such as the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), which would serve as proof-of-principal experiment for heavy-ion fusion.

  7. Numerical Analysis of Standing Accretion Shock Instability with Neutrino Heating in Supernova Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Naofumi; Kotake, Kei; Yamada, Shoichi

    2006-04-01

    We have numerically studied the instability of the spherically symmetric standing accretion shock wave against nonspherical perturbations. We have in mind the application to collapse-driven supernovae in the postbounce phase, where the prompt shock wave generated by core bounce is commonly stalled. We take an experimental standpoint in this paper. Using spherically symmetric, completely steady, shocked accretion flows as unperturbed states, we have clearly observed both the linear growth and the subsequent nonlinear saturation of the instability. In so doing, we have employed a realistic equation of state, together with heating and cooling via neutrino reactions with nucleons. We have performed a mode analysis based on the spherical harmonics decomposition and found that the modes with l=1,2 are dominant not only in the linear regime but also after nonlinear couplings generate various modes and saturation occurs. By varying the neutrino luminosity, we have constructed unperturbed states both with and without a negative entropy gradient. We have found that in both cases the growth of the instability is similar, suggesting that convection does not play a dominant role, which also appears to be supported by the recent linear analysis of the convection in accretion flows by Foglizzo et al. The oscillation period of the unstable l=1 mode is found to fit better with the advection time rather than with the sound crossing time. Whatever the cause may be, the instability favors a shock revival.

  8. Experimental and numerical study of the shear layer instability between two counter-rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisy, F.; Doaré, O.; Pasutto, T.; Daube, O.; Rabaud, M.

    2004-05-01

    The shear layer instability in the flow between two counter-rotating disks enclosed by a cylinder is investigated experimentally and numerically, for radius-to-height ratio Gamma {=} R/h between 2 and 21. For sufficiently large rotation ratio, the internal shear layer that separates two regions of opposite azimuthal velocities is prone to an azimuthal symmetry breaking, which is investigated experimentally by means of visualization and particle image velocimetry. The associated pattern is a combination of a sharp-cornered polygonal pattern, as observed by Lopez et al. (2002) for low aspect ratio, surrounded by a set of spiral arms, first described by Gauthier et al. (2002) for high aspect ratio. The spiral arms result from the interaction of the shear layer instability with the Ekman boundary layer over the faster rotating disk. Stability curves and critical modes are experimentally measured for the whole range of aspect ratios, and are found to compare well with numerical simulations of the three-dimensional time-dependent Navier Stokes equations over an extensive range of parameters. Measurements of a local Reynolds number based on the shear layer thickness confirm that a shear layer instability, with only weak curvature effect, is responsible for the observed patterns. This scenario is supported by the observed onset modes, which scale as the shear layer radius, and by the measured phase velocities.

  9. How common are ALS plateaus and reversals?

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Timothy; Wicks, Paul; Heywood, Jamie; Sinani, Ervin; Selsov, Roger; Macklin, Eric A.; Schoenfeld, David; Cudkowicz, Merit; Sherman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) plateaus and reversals in the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT) database. Methods: We analyzed Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS) and ALSFRS–revised (ALSFRS-R) data from PRO-ACT participants. The frequencies of participants experiencing plateaus (periods where scores did not change) were calculated over 6-, 12-, and 18-month epochs. The percentage of participants ever experiencing reversals (periods where scores improved) of different lengths were also calculated and plotted. Results: Over 6 months, 25% of 3,132 participants did not decline. Over 12 months, 16% of 2,105 participants did not decline. Over 18 months, 7% of 1,218 participants did not decline. Small ALS reversals were also common, especially over shorter follow-up intervals; 14% of 1,343 participants had a 180-day interval where their ALSFRS-R slope was greater than zero. Fewer than 1% of participants ever experienced improvements of 4 or more ALSFRS-R points lasting at least 12 months. Conclusion: ALS plateaus and small reversals are common, especially over brief intervals. In light of these data, stable disease, especially for a short period of time, should not be interpreted as an ALS treatment effect. Large sustained ALS reversals, on the other hand, are rare, potentially important, and warrant further study. PMID:26658909

  10. Numerical simulations of turbulent trapping in the weak beam-plasma instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theilhaber, K.; Laval, G.; Pesme, D.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the weak beam-plasma instability were done in the turbulent regime where small-scale trapping is a dominant feature of the instability, a regime with behavior not predicted by quasi-linear theory. The results of the simulations were compared with those of a specific model of the turbulence, the so-called 'turbulent trapping' model, which gives precise formulas for the particle correlation functions, and predicts a growth rate well enhanced over the quasi-linear value. It was found that the model gives accurate predictions for the correlation functions. On the other hand, while growth rates were enhanced over the quasi-linear values, the enhancements observed are smaller than expected from the quantitative predictions of the model.

  11. Numerical analysis of the Eckhaus instability in travelling-wave convection in binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mercader, I; Alonso, A; Batiste, O

    2004-11-01

    The Eckhaus stability boundaries of travelling periodic roll patterns arising in binary fluid convection is analysed using high-resolution numerical methods. We present results corresponding to three different values of the separation ratio used in experiments. Our results show that the subcritical branches of travelling waves bifurcating at the onset of convection suffer sideband instabilities that are restabilised further away in the branch. If this restabilisation is produced after the turning point of the travelling-wave branch, these waves do not become stable in a saddle node bifurcation as would have been the case in a smaller domain. In the regions of instability of the uniform travelling waves we expect to find either transitions between states of different wave number or modulated travelling waves arising in these bifurcations. PMID:15592771

  12. Numerical study of baroclinic instability associated with thermobaric deep convection at high latitudes: Idealized cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akitomo, Kazunori

    2005-06-01

    Numerical experiments with a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic model in a rotating frame have been executed to investigate baroclinic instability associated with thermobaric deep convection in weakly stratified polar oceans and its role in the transport processes. The model ocean has a two-layered structure with the cold, fresh mixed layer overlying the warm, saline deep water cell, as in the Weddell Sea. In contrast with a scenario based on the linear equation of state, thermobaric overturning of the water column enhances the horizontal density gradient (baroclinicity) through nonlinearity of the equation of state. If temperature controls water density (TEM cases), baroclinicity is intensified at the bottom of the overturned layer while at the surface if salinity does (SAL cases). Such intensification causes further development of baroclinic instability or baroclinic destabilization and more effective vertical heat transport. In the post-overturning stage, on the other hand, surface cooling (convective motion) has two oppositely operating effects on baroclinic instability and the associated heat transport. One is that horizontal convergence due to convective motion enhances baroclinic instability in the surface layer, as in previous studies focusing on strongly stratified oceans. This is observed in SAL cases with weak cooling, but not in TEM cases. The other is that strong cooling suppresses baroclinic instability by homogenizing the overturned layer vertically. This effect has not been found in the strongly stratified oceans. As a result, the vertical heat transport is most effective at low cooling rates (˜125Wm-2) in SAL cases while it monotonically decreases with cooling rate in TEM cases. When baroclinicity is initially weak as in the Weddell Sea, the most effective transport occurs with the cooling rate of 25Wm-2 which is a possible value under sea-ice cover in the actual situation.

  13. Elimination of the numerical Cerenkov instability for spectral EM-PIC codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Decyk, Viktor K.; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Tsung, Frank S.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2015-07-01

    When using an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) code to simulate a relativistically drifting plasma, a violent numerical instability known as the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) occurs. The NCI is due to the unphysical coupling of electromagnetic waves on a grid to wave-particle resonances, including aliased resonances, i.e., ω + 2 πμ / Δt =(k1 + 2 πν1 / Δx1) v0, where μ and ν1 refer to the time and space aliases and the plasma is drifting relativistically at velocity v0 in the 1 ˆ -direction. We extend our previous work Xu et al. (2013) by recasting the numerical dispersion relation of a relativistically drifting plasma into a form which shows explicitly how the instability results from the coupling modes which are purely transverse electromagnetic (EM) modes and purely longitudinal modes in the rest frame of the plasma for each time and space aliasing. The dispersion relation for each μ and ν1 is the product of the dispersion relation of these two modes set equal to a coupling term that vanishes in the continuous limit. The new form of the numerical dispersion relation provides an accurate method of systematically calculating the growth rate and location of the mode in the fundamental Brillouin zone for any Maxwell solver for each μ and ν1. We then focus on the spectral Maxwell solver and systematically discuss its NCI modes. We show that the second fastest growing NCI mode for the spectral solver corresponds to μ =ν1 = 0, that it has a growth rate approximately one order of magnitude smaller than the fastest growing μ = 0 and ν1 = 1 mode, and that its location in the k space fundamental Brillouin zone is sensitive to the grid size and time step. Based on these studies, strategies to systematically eliminate the NCI modes for a spectral solver are developed. We apply these strategies to both relativistic collisionless shock and LWFA simulations, and demonstrate that high-fidelity multi-dimensional simulations of drifting plasmas

  14. Fluid Instabilities in the Crab Nebula Jet: Results from Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, A.; Striani, E.; Bodo, G.; Anjiri, M.

    2014-09-01

    We present an overview of high-resolution relativistic MHD numerical simulations of the Crab Nebula South-East jet. The models are based on hot and relativistic hollow outflows initially carrying a purely toroidal magnetic field. Our results indicate that weakly relativistic (γ˜ 2) and strongly magnetized jets are prone to kink instabilities leading to a noticeable deflection of the jet. These conclusions are in good agreement with the recent X-ray (Chandra) data of Crab Nebula South-East jet indicating a change in the direction of propagation on a time scale of the order of few years.

  15. Numerical Simulations Studies of the Convective Instability Onset in a Supercritical Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furukawa, A.; Meyer, H.; Onuki, A.

    2004-01-01

    Numerical simulation studies are reported for the convection of a supercritical fluid, He-3, in a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The calculations provide the temporal profile DeltaT(t) of the temperature drop across the fluid layer. In a previous article, systematic delays in the onset of the convective instability in simulations relative to experiments were reported, as seen from the DeltaT(t) profiles. They were attributed to the smallness of the noise which is needed to start the instability. Therefore i) homogeneous temperature noise and ii) spatial lateral periodic temperature variations in the top plate were programmed into the simulations, and DeltaT(t) compared with that of an experiment with the same fluid parameters. An effective speed-up in the instability onset was obtained, with the best results obtained through the spatial temperature variations with a period of 2L, close to the wavelength of a pair of convections rolls. For a small amplitude of 0.5 micro-K, this perturbation gave a semiquantitative agreement with experimental observations. Results for various noise amplitudes are presented and discussed in relation to predictions by El Khouri and Carl es.

  16. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional multimode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Thornber, B.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-03-15

    The two-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instability occurs as shock waves pass through a perturbed material interface, triggering transition to an inhomogeneous turbulence variable density flow. This paper presents a series of large-eddy-simulations of the two dimensional turbulent RM instability and compares the results to the fully three dimensional simulations. There are two aims for this paper, the first is to explore what numerical resolution is required for a statistically converged solution for a two dimensional inhomogeneous flow field. The second aim is to elucidate the key differences in flow physics between the two dimensional and three dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities, particularly their asymptotic self-similar regime. Convergence is achieved using 64 independent realisations and grid resolutions up to 4096{sup 2} in the plane. It is shown that for narrowband cases the growth rate θ = 0.48 which is substantially higher than the three-dimensional equivalent. Mix measures are consistently lower compared to three-dimensional, and the kinetic energy distribution is homogeneous at late time. The broadband case has a similar initial growth rate as the three-dimensional case, with a marginally lower θ = 0.63. Mix is similar in magnitude, but is reducing at late time. The spectra in both cases exhibit the dual-cascade expected from two-dimensional turbulence.

  17. Analytical and numerical treatment of resistive drift instability in a plasma slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Sauppe, J. P.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2016-05-01

    An analytic approach combining the effect of equilibrium diamagnetic flows and the finite ionsound gyroradius associated with electron-ion decoupling and kinetic Alfvén wave dispersion is derived to study resistive drift instabilities in a plasma slab. Linear numerical computations using the NIMROD code are performed with cold ions and hot electrons in a plasma slab with a doubly periodic box bounded by two perfectly conducting walls. A linearly unstable resistive drift mode is observed in computations with a growth rate that is consistent with the analytic dispersion relation. The resistive drift mode is expected to be suppressed by magnetic shear in unbounded domains, but the mode is observed in numerical computations with and without magnetic shear. In the slab model, the finite slab thickness and the perfectly conducting boundary conditions are likely to account for the lack of suppression.

  18. Numerical analysis of instability processes in underground cavities and of the related effects at the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lollino, Piernicola; Parise, Mario

    2010-05-01

    Natural and anthropogenic caves may represent a potential hazard for the built-up environment, due to the occurrence of underground instability processes, that may propagate upward and eventually reach the ground surface, thus inducing the occurrence of sinkholes. Especially when the caves are at shallow depth, the effects at the ground surface may result extremely severe. In the Apulia region of southern Italy, there are many sites where underground quarrying developed in the past, due to presence at a certain depth of rock of good quality for building purposes. Development of underground quarries, rather than open pit mines, was also favoured by the preservation of the terrains on the ground surface for agricultural practices. The Pliocene-Pleistocene calcarenite (a typical soft rock) was therefore quarried underground, by digging extensive networks of galleries in those levels within the local geological succession most suitable for the quarrying activity. With time, these underground activities have progressively been abandoned, and later on many quarries were used for other purposes, including illegal discharge of solid and liquid wastes. Many Apulian towns are nowadays located just above these caves, due to urban expansion in the last decades and loss of memory of the presence of the underground quarries. Thus, a serious risk exists for civil society, which should not be left uninvestigated. The present contribution deals with the analysis of the main factors at the origin of the instability processes described, also including those causing weathering of the soft rock wihich induces gradual decay of the physical and mechanical properties of the rock mass. Aimed at exploring the evolution with time of the stability conditions within the cavities, numerical analysis have been implemented by using finite element methods with respect to ideal situations which are representative of typical case studies in Apulia. Both the effects of local instability processes

  19. Numerical investigation of a single-mode chemically reacting Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, N.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2015-07-01

    We report on high-resolution, numerical simulations of a single-mode, chemically reacting, Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability, at different interface thicknesses. The gases on either side of the diffuse interface were Hydrogen (H and Oxygen (O, with a pre-shock Atwood number of 0.5. An incident shock with a Mach number of 1.2 is allowed to traverse from the light (H to the heavy (O medium in the 2D numerical shock tube. The simulations were performed using the astrophysical FLASH code developed at the University of Chicago, with extensive modifications implemented by the authors to describe detailed H-O chemistry, temperature-dependent specific heats, and multi-species equation of state. The interface thickness was systematically varied in the simulations to study the effect of the total mass of fuel burnt and heat added on the hydrodynamic instability growth rates. In the absence of an incident shock, burning results in the formation of so-called combustion waves, which spontaneously trigger RM and Rayleigh-Taylor like instability growth of the interface. We are able to obtain the resulting growth rates of an imposed sinusoidal perturbation, and compare them with the predictions of an impulsive model, with simple modifications to account for the finite thickness of the interface, density changes due to heat addition, and compression of the material line due to the combustion wave. When additionally an incident shock is present, we observe complex interactions between the shock and the aforementioned combustion waves, resulting in significant non-planar distortions of each. When the unstable interface is subjected to a reshock, significant mixing enhancement is observed, accompanied by a dramatic increase in combustion product formation, and combustion efficiency.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Liquid Sheet Instability in a Multiphase Flow Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvick, Chatterjee; Mahapatra, Soumik; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya; Sen, Swarnendu

    2013-11-01

    Instability of a liquid sheet leading to the formation of droplets is a classical problem finding a wide range of multi-scale applications like gas turbine engines and inkjet printers. Numerical simulation of such a phenomenon is crucial because of its cost and time effective nature. In this work, the hydrodynamics in a custom designed nozzle is analyzed using Volume of Fluid method in Ansys Fluent. This innovative nozzle design includes an annular liquid sheet sandwiched between two air streams such that the inner air channel is recessed to a certain length. Such a recession leads to interaction between the two multiphase streams inside the atomizer resulting to an increased shear layer instability which augments the disintegration process. The numerical technique employed in this work couples Navier Stokes equation with VoF surface tracking technique. A parametric study with the hydrodynamic parameters involved in the problem, as well as the recession length, is performed while monitoring the axial and tangential exit velocities along with the spray cone angle. Comparison between the full 3D model and two different equivalent 2D axisymmetric models have been shown. The two axisymmetric models vary based on conserving different physical parameters between the 2D and 3D cases.

  1. Compressible magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in stratified plasmas: Comparison of analytical and numerical results in the linear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Liberatore, S.; Jaouen, S.; Tabakhoff, E.; Canaud, B.

    2009-04-15

    Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability is addressed in compressible hydrostatic media. A full model is presented and compared to numerical results from a linear perturbation code. A perfect agreement between both approaches is obtained in a wide range of parameters. Compressibility effects are examined and substantial deviations from classical Chandrasekhar growth rates are obtained and confirmed by the model and the numerical calculations.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of instabilities in parallel flow with spherical roughness elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deanna, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    Results from a direct numerical simulation of laminar flow over a flat surface with spherical roughness elements using a spectral-element method are given. The numerical simulation approximates roughness as a cellular pattern of identical spheres protruding from a smooth wall. Periodic boundary conditions on the domain's horizontal faces simulate an infinite array of roughness elements extending in the streamwise and spanwise directions, which implies the parallel-flow assumption, and results in a closed domain. A body force, designed to yield the horizontal Blasius velocity in the absence of roughness, sustains the flow. Instabilities above a critical Reynolds number reveal negligible oscillations in the recirculation regions behind each sphere and in the free stream, high-amplitude oscillations in the layer directly above the spheres, and a mean profile with an inflection point near the sphere's crest. The inflection point yields an unstable layer above the roughness (where U''(y) is less than 0) and a stable region within the roughness (where U''(y) is greater than 0). Evidently, the instability begins when the low-momentum or wake region behind an element, being the region most affected by disturbances (purely numerical in this case), goes unstable and moves. In compressible flow with periodic boundaries, this motion sends disturbances to all regions of the domain. In the unstable layer just above the inflection point, the disturbances grow while being carried downstream with a propagation speed equal to the local mean velocity; they do not grow amid the low energy region near the roughness patch. The most amplified disturbance eventually arrives at the next roughness element downstream, perturbing its wake and inducing a global response at a frequency governed by the streamwise spacing between spheres and the mean velocity of the most amplified layer.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of electrokinetic instability and transition to chaotic motion

    SciTech Connect

    Demekhin, E. A.; Nikitin, N. V.; Shelistov, V. S.

    2013-12-15

    A new type of instability—electrokinetic instability—and an unusual transition to chaotic motion near a charge-selective surface (semiselective electric membrane, electrode, or system of micro-/nanochannels) was studied by the numerical integration of the Nernst-Planck-Poisson-Stokes system and a weakly nonlinear analysis near the threshold of instability. A special finite-difference method was used for the space discretization along with a semi-implicit 31/3 -step Runge-Kutta scheme for the integration in time. Two kinds of initial conditions were considered: (a) white-noise initial conditions to mimic “room disturbances” and subsequent natural evolution of the solution, and (b) an artificial monochromatic ion distribution with a fixed wave number to simulate regular wave patterns. The results were studied from the viewpoint of hydrodynamic stability and bifurcation theory. The threshold of electroconvective movement was found by the linear spectral stability theory, the results of which were confirmed by numerical simulation of the entire system. Our weakly nonlinear analysis and numerical integration of the entire system predict possibility of both kinds of bifurcations at the critical point, supercritical and subcritical, depending on the system parameters. The following regimes, which replace each other as the potential drop between the selective surfaces increases, were obtained: one-dimensional steady solution, two-dimensional steady electroconvective vortices (stationary point in a proper phase space), unsteady vortices aperiodically changing their parameters (homoclinic contour), periodic motion (limit cycle), and chaotic motion. The transition to chaotic motion does not include Hopf bifurcation. The numerical resolution of the thin concentration polarization layer showed spike-like charge profiles along the surface, which could be, depending on the regime, either steady or aperiodically coalescent. The numerical investigation confirmed the

  4. Analytical and numerical study of the transverse Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in tokamak edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myra, J. R.; D’Ippolito, D. A.; Russell, D. A.; Umansky, M. V.; Baver, D. A.

    2016-04-01

    > Sheared flows perpendicular to the magnetic field can be driven by the Reynolds stress or ion pressure gradient effects and can potentially influence the stability and turbulent saturation level of edge plasma modes. On the other hand, such flows are subject to the transverse Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. Here, the linear theory of KH instabilities is first addressed with an analytic model in the asymptotic limit of long wavelengths compared with the flow scale length. The analytic model treats sheared flows, ion diamagnetism (including gyro-viscous terms), density gradients and parallel currents in a slab geometry, enabling a unified summary that encompasses and extends previous results. In particular, while ion diamagnetism, density gradients and parallel currents each individually reduce KH growth rates, the combined effect of density and ion pressure gradients is more complicated and partially counteracting. Secondly, the important role of realistic toroidal geometry is explored numerically using an invariant scaling analysis together with the 2DX eigenvalue code to examine KH modes in both closed and open field line regions. For a typical spherical torus magnetic geometry, it is found that KH modes are more unstable at, and just outside of, the separatrix as a result of the distribution of magnetic shear. Finally implications for reduced edge turbulence modelling codes are discussed.

  5. Analytical and numerical treatment of drift-tearing and resistive drift instabilities in plasma slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Hegna, C. C.; Sauppe, J. P.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2015-11-01

    We consider modification to linear resistive MHD instability theory in a slab due to two categories of non-MHD effects: (1) electron and ion diamagnetic flows caused by equilibrium pressure gradients and (2) electron and ion decoupling on short scales associated with kinetic Alfven and whistler waves. The relationship between the expected stabilizing response due to the effects (1) and the destabilizing contribution caused by the dispersive waves (2) is investigated. An analytic solution combining the effect of diamagnetic flows and the ion-sound gyroradius contribution is derived using a perturbative approach. Linear numerical simulations using the NIMROD code are performed with cold ions and hot electrons in plasma slab with a doubly periodic box bounded by two perfectly conducting walls. Configurations with magnetic shear are unstable to current-driven drift-tearing instability. A second linearly unstable resistive drift type mode with largely electrostatic perturbations is also observed in simulations. The resistive-drift mode is suppressed by magnetic shear in unbounded domains but can remain unstable in the simulations with finite slab thickness and perfectly conducting wall. Additionally, the growth rate is sensitive to the magnetic shear length. We analyze whether these modes can be unstable in cylindrical configurations with magnetic shear typical for reversed field pinches. The material is based on work supported by the U.S. DOE and NSF.

  6. Analytical and numerical study of the transverse Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in tokamak edge plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.; Russell, David A.; Umansky, Maxim V.; Baver, Derek A.

    2016-04-11

    Sheared flows perpendicular to the magnetic field can be driven by the Reynolds stress or ion pressure gradient effects and can potentially influence the stability and turbulent saturation level of edge plasma modes. On the other hand, such flows are subject to the transverse Kelvin- Helmholtz (KH) instability. Here, the linear theory of KH instabilities is first addressed with an analytic model in the asymptotic limit of long wavelengths compared with the flow scale length. The analytic model treats sheared ExB flows, ion diamagnetism (including gyro-viscous terms), density gradients and parallel currents in a slab geometry, enabling a unified summarymore » that encompasses and extends previous results. In particular, while ion diamagnetism, density gradients and parallel currents each individually reduce KH growth rates, the combined effect of density and ion pressure gradients is more complicated and partially counteracting. Secondly, the important role of realistic toroidal geometry is explored numerically using an invariant scaling analysis together with the 2DX eigenvalue code to examine KH modes in both closed and open field line regions. For a typical spherical torus magnetic geometry, it is found that KH modes are more unstable at and just outside the separatrix as a result of the distribution of magnetic shear. Lastly implications for reduced edge turbulence modeling codes are discussed.« less

  7. Numerical Experiments with a Turbulent Single-Mode Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    2000-04-01

    Direct numerical simulation is a powerful tool for studying turbulent flows. Unfortunately, it is also computationally expensive and often beyond the reach of the largest, fastest computers. Consequently, a variety of turbulence models have been devised to allow tractable and affordable simulations of averaged flow fields. Unfortunately, these present a variety of practical difficulties, including the incorporation of varying degrees of empiricism and phenomenology, which leads to a lack of universality. This unsatisfactory state of affairs has led to the speculation that one can avoid the expense and bother of using a turbulence model by relying on the grid and numerical diffusion of the computational fluid dynamics algorithm to introduce a spectral cutoff on the flow field and to provide dissipation at the grid scale, thereby mimicking two main effects of a large eddy simulation model. This paper shows numerical examples of a single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which this procedure produces questionable results. We then show a dramatic improvement when two simple subgrid-scale models are employed. This study also illustrates the extreme sensitivity to initial conditions that is a common feature of turbulent flows.

  8. Numerical Study of Electrolytic Flow Instabilities Driven by an Azimuthal Lorentz Force in a Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Barrera, James; Pérez-Espinoza, José Enrique; Ortíz, Alejandro; Cuevas, Sergio; Ramos, Eduardo

    2014-11-01

    We present numerical simulations of the flow produced by an azimuthal Lorentz force in an electromagnetic stirrer. The stirrer consists of a cylindrical cavity with two copper concentric cylindrical electrodes, filled with an electrolytic solution. Underneath the cavity, a permanent magnet creates an almost uniform magnetic field, perpendicular to the circular section of the stirrer. An electric potential difference between the electrodes produces a radial D.C. current that passes through the fluid and interacts with the axial magnetic field, generating an azimuthal Lorentz force that drives the fluid. Experiments have shown the appearance of a flow instability that gives rise to a varying number of anticyclonic vortices for given values of the current intensity and fluid layer thickness. The MHD governing equations are expressed in terms of the velocity, pressure and electric potential. Numerical simulations are carried out using a hybrid Finite volume-Fourier method to ensure periodicity in the azimuthal direction. Numerical results show the formation of different modes of perturbation in the velocity field, which give rise to a varying number of traveling vortical structures. Work supported by CONACYT, Mexico under Project 131399. JPB acknowledges a Grant from CONACYT.

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Nanofilm Instability Driven by Liquid/Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahady, Kyle; Afkhami, Shahriar; Kondic, Lou

    2015-11-01

    The nanoscale interaction between liquid and solid molecules underlies fundamental phenomena for systems involving liquids on surfaces. In addition to giving rise to the contact angle of drops, this interaction drives the spontaneous rupture of nanofilms. We study this process by means of direct simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations using the Volume of Fluid interface tracking method. Our numerical method simulates the liquid/solid interaction, and permits the study of the film rupture process with inertial effects and arbitrarily large contact angles, in both two and three dimensions. We focus in particular on the evolution of length scales in a perturbed film as it breaks up, and the spatial organization of the resulting drops. We compare our results to recent experiments, where this instability mechanism has been harnessed for the self-assembly of ordered arrays of metallic nanoparticles (ACS App. Mat. and Int., 2014, 6, 5835).

  10. Numerical simulations of the Single-mode, Doubly-shocked Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkhanis, Varad; Ramaprabhu, Praveen

    2014-11-01

    We describe results from numerical simulations of a single-mode, doubly-shocked material interface between gases of different densities. The time interval between the shocks was varied to observe interfacial growth due to Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability initialized with different amplitudes. The simulations were performed with low and high density ratio fluids (A = 0.15 and A = -0.99), where the latter case is relevant to ejecta formation. We compare the growth rates from our simulations after the first and second shocks with linear, nonlinear and ejecta models. In the heavy to light configuration (A = -0.99), we observe two consecutive phase inversions following each shock. We have also investigated the effect of variations in the initial interface perturbation to include sine, chevron, sawtooth, and square-wave form, and find our results to be of relevance to machined target experiments.

  11. Numerical analysis of gas-dynamic instabilities during the laser drilling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A. H.; O'Neill, W.; Tunna, L.; Sutcliffe, C. J.

    2006-08-01

    The use of high-pressure gas jets in the laser-drilling process has significant influence on the melt ejection mechanism. These jets are highly unstable and this directly relates to the gas pressure and the geometry of the hole being drilled. The evolution of gas-dynamic instabilities during the laser-drilling process was investigated numerically. A minimum length nozzle (MLN) with a 300 μm throat diameter was modelled at various gas pressures, with the gas jet impinging on a range of simulated holes with different aspect ratios. The simulations predict the formation of surface pressure fluctuations that have a broad spectrum due to both the turbulent nature of the jet and the blunt shock oscillation on the surface. The surface pressure variations and the blunt shock oscillation govern the gas dynamic conditions inside the hole, which strongly influence the melt ejection phenomena during the laser-drilling process.

  12. Experimental and numerical study of plastic shear instability under high-speed loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sokovikov, Mikhail E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Chudinov, Vasiliy E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Bilalov, Dmitry E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Oborin, Vladimir E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Uvarov, Sergey E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Plekhov, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Terekhina, Alena E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Naimark, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru

    2014-11-14

    The behavior of specimens dynamically loaded during the split Hopkinson (Kolsky) bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions was studied. The lateral surface of the specimens was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was examined using a high-speed infra-red camera and a VISAR velocity measurement system. The microstructure of tested specimens was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The development of plastic shear instability regions has been simulated numerically.

  13. Full-Scale Direct Numerical Simulation of Two- and Three-Dimensional Instabilities and Rivulet Formulation in Heated Falling Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamoorthy, S.; Ramaswamy, B.; Joo, S. W.

    1995-01-01

    A thin film draining on an inclined plate has been studied numerically using finite element method. Three-dimensional governing equations of continuity, momentum and energy with a moving boundary are integrated in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian frame of reference. Kinematic equation is solved to precisely update interface location. Rivulet formation based on instability mechanism has been simulated using full-scale computation. Comparisons with long-wave theory are made to validate the numerical scheme. Detailed analysis of two- and three-dimensional nonlinear wave formation and spontaneous rupture forming rivulets under the influence of combined thermocapillary and surface-wave instabilities is performed.

  14. Numerical simulations of combustion instabilities in gas turbine combustors, with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Grant Douglas

    Recent advances in technology have opened up a potential market for small gas turbine power systems in the 50--100 MW range. In an effort to improve their systems, the gas-turbine industry is interested in understanding and controlling combustion instabilities as well as reducing pollutant production. To understand the dynamics inherent in a combustion system, information about the flow field behavior is required. Because of a scarcity of available experimental or numerical results for full-scale gas-turbine combustors, we decided to use numerical simulations to provide the required information about the flow field dynamics. The ability of the numerical simulations to reproduce unstable behavior in combustion environments will be presented. The investigation of the flow field dynamics has been conducted for three test cases; a planar heat source in a tube, premixed flow in a dump combustor, and premixed and diffusion flames in a full-scale gas turbine combustor. The numerically determined unsteady acoustic modes will be shown to compare well with theory and experiments. An investigation of the local heat release response to an unsteady flow field is conducted for incorporation into an approximate analysis method. The results of including a Helmholtz resonator in a dump combustor as a passive control mechanism will be presented. The production of NOx and CO will be compared between stable and unstable flow configurations. The pollutant results indicate that for the planar flame in a tube and the dump combustor, the NOx levels at the exit plane are reduced when the system is unstable.

  15. Numerical simulation of multi-material mixing in an inclined interface Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Akshay; Lele, Sanjiva

    2015-06-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability arises when a shock wave interacts with an interface separating two fluids. In this work, high fidelity simulations of shock induced multi-material mixing between air and SF6 in a shock tube are performed for a Mach 1.5 shock interacting with a planar material interface that is inclined with respect to the shock propagating direction. In the current configuration, unlike in the classical sinusoidal interface case, the evolution of the interface is fully non-linear from early time onwards. The simulations attempt to replicate an experiment conducted at the Texas A&M fluid mixing shock tube facility. Simulations of this problem at multiple spatial resolutions (upto 270 million grid points) have shown that even low order statistics like the net circulation are hard to capture at resolutions where the classical RM cases yield good results. Tight coupling between numerics and flow physics and large range of spatial scales make this a challenging problem to simulate numerically. Simulations shown are conducted with an extended version of the MIRANDA solver developed by Cook et al. (2007) which combines high-order compact finite differences with localized non-linear artificial properties for shock and interface capturing.

  16. Numerical simulation on macro-instability of coupling flow field structure in jet-stirred tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, D. Y.; Lu, J. P.; Bu, Q. X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zheng, S. X.

    2016-05-01

    The velocity field macro-instability (MI) can help to improve the mixing efficiency. In this work, the MI features of flow field induced by jet-stirred coupling action is studied by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The numerical simulation method of jet-stirred model was established based on standard turbulent equations, and the impeller rotation was modeled by means of the Sliding Mesh (SM) technology. The numerical results of test fluid (water) power consumption were compared with the data obtained by power test experiments. The effects of jet flow velocity and impeller speed on MI frequency were analyzed thoroughly. The results show that the calculated values of power consumption agree well with the experiment measured data, which validates the turbulent model, and the flow structure and MI frequency distribution are affected by both impeller speed and jet flow rate. The amplitude of MI frequency increases obviously with the increasing rotation speed of impeller and the eccentric jet rate, and it can be enhanced observably by eccentric jet rate, in condition of comparatively high impeller speed. At this time, the MI phenomenon disappears with the overall chaotic mixing.

  17. Perturbation theory and numerical modelling of weakly and moderately nonlinear incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2014-10-01

    A study of incompressible two-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instability by means of high-order Eulerian perturbation theory and numerical simulations is reported. Nonlinear corrections to Richtmyer's impulsive formula for the bubble and spike growth rates have been calculated analytically for arbitrary Atwood number and an explicit formula has been obtained for it in the Boussinesq limit. Conditions for early-time acceleration and deceleration of the bubble and the spike have been derived. In our simulations we have solved 2D unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for immiscible incompressible fluids using the finite volume fractional step flow solver NGA developed by, coupled to the level set based interface solver LIT,. The impact of small amounts of viscosity and surface tension on the RMI flow dynamics is studied numerically. Simulation results are compared to the theory to demonstrate successful code verification and highlight the influence of the theory's ideal inviscid flow assumption. Theoretical time histories of the interface curvature at the bubble and spike tip and the profiles of vertical and horizontal velocities have been favorably compared to simulation results, which converge to the theoretical predictions as the Reynolds and Weber numbers are increased. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  18. Numerical simulation of three-dimensional reconnection due to the instability of collisionless current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büchner, J.; Kuska, J.-P.

    1997-01-01

    Based on analytical calculations we have currently argued that spontaneous reconnection through thin collisionless current sheets is an essentially three-dimensional (3 D) process (Büchner, 1996 a, b). Since 3 D kinetic PIC codes have become available, the three dimensional nature of the collisionless current sheet decay are now illustrated by numerical simulations (Büchner and Kuska, 1996; Pritchett and Coroniti, 1996; Zhu and Winglee, 1996). While the latter two claim a coupling to a longer wavelength kink mode as a main factor, destabilizing thin current sheets in 3 D, our simulations have revealed that even shorter scale perturbations in the current direction suffice to destabilize thin sheets very quickly. Since past simulation runs, however, were limited to mass ratios near unity, the influence of the electrons was not treated adequately. We have now investigated the stability of thin collisionless current sheets including 64 times lighter negatively charged particles. We can now show that while the two-dimensional tearing instability slows down for M = M_p/m_e = 64, the three-dimensional current sheet decay is a much faster process - practically as fast as the mass ratio M = 1 3 D sheet decay, even without kinking the sheet. We further conclude that, unlike the two-dimensional tearing instability, the three-dimensional decay of thin current sheets is not controlled by the electrons. For a sheet width comparable with the ion inertial length, we also recovered signatures of the Hall effect as predicted by Vasyliunas (1975) in the mass ratio M = 64 case. The ion inertial length seems to be the critical scale at which the sheet starts to decay.

  19. Adaptive Wavelet-Based Direct Numerical Simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, Scott J.

    The compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) occurs when a fluid of low molar mass supports a fluid of higher molar mass against a gravity-like body force or in the presence of an accelerating front. Intrinsic to the problem are highly stratified background states, acoustic waves, and a wide range of physical scales. The objective of this thesis is to develop a specialized computational framework that addresses these challenges and to apply the advanced methodologies for direct numerical simulations of compressible RTI. Simulations are performed using the Parallel Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method (PAWCM). Due to the physics-based adaptivity and direct error control of the method, PAWCM is ideal for resolving the wide range of scales present in RTI growth. Characteristics-based non-reflecting boundary conditions are developed for highly stratified systems to be used in conjunction with PAWCM. This combination allows for extremely long domains, which is necessary for observing the late time growth of compressible RTI. Initial conditions that minimize acoustic disturbances are also developed. The initialization is consistent with linear stability theory, where the background state consists of two diffusively mixed stratified fluids of differing molar masses. The compressibility effects on the departure from the linear growth, the onset of strong non-linear interactions, and the late-time behavior of the fluid structures are investigated. It is discovered that, for the thermal equilibrium case, the background stratification acts to suppress the instability growth when the molar mass difference is small. A reversal in this monotonic behavior is observed for large molar mass differences, where stratification enhances the bubble growth. Stratification also affects the vortex creation and the associated induced velocities. The enhancement and suppression of the RTI growth has important consequences for a detailed understanding of supernovae flame front

  20. Numerical simulations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in a poloidal divertor tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchimoto, E.

    1988-03-01

    A new 3-D resistive MHD initial value code RPD has been successfully developed from scratch to study the linear and nonlinear evolution of long wavelength resistive MHD instabilities in a square cross-section tokamak with or without a poloidal divertor. The code numerically advances the full set of compressible resistive MHD equations in a toroidal geometry, with an important option of permitting the divertor separatrix and the region outside it to be in the computational domain. A severe temporal step size restriction for numerical stability imposed by the fast compressional waves was removed by developing and implementing a new, efficient semi-implicit scheme extending one first proposed by Harned and Kerner. As a result, the code typically runs faster than that with a mostly explicit scheme by a factor of about the aspect ratio. The equilibrium input for RPD is generated by a new 2-D code EQPD that is based on the Chodura-Schluter method. The RPD code, as well as the new semi-implicit scheme, has passed very extensive numerical tests in both divertor and divertorless geometries. Linear and nonlinear simulations in a divertorless geometry have reproduced the standard, previously known results. In a geometry with a four-node divertor the m = 2, n = 1 (2/1) tearing mode tends to be linearly stabilized as the q = 2 surface approaches the divertor separatrix. However, the m = 1, n = 1 (1/1) resistive kink mode remains relatively unaffected by the nearness of the q = 1 surface to the divertor separatrix. When plasma current is added to the region outside the divertor separatrix, the 2/1 tearing mode is linearly stabilized not by this current, but by the profile modifications induced near the q = 2 surface and the divertor separatrix. A similar stabilization effect is seen for the 1/1 resistive kink mode, but to a lesser extent.

  1. Are oceanic plateaus sites of komatiite formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, M.; Mahoney, J. J.; Kroenke, L. W.; Saunders, A. D.

    1991-04-01

    During Cretaceous and Tertiary time a series of oceanic terranes were accreted onto the Pacific continental margin of Colombia. The island of Gorgona is thought to represent part of the most recent, early Eocene, terrane-forming event. Gorgona is remarkable for the occurrence of komatiites of middle Cretaceous age, having MgO contents up to 24%. The geochemistry of spatially and temporally associated tholeiites suggests that Gorgona is an obducted fragment of the oceanic Caribbean Plateau, postulated by Duncan and Hargraves (1984) to have formed at 100 to 75 Ma over the Galapagos hotspot. Further examples of high-MgO oceanic lavas that may represent fragments of the Caribbean Plateau occur in allochthonous terranes on the island of Curaçao in the Netherlands Antilles and in the Romeral zone ophiolites in the southwestern Colombian Andes. These and other examples suggest that the formation of high-MgO liquids may be a feature of oceanic-plateau settings. The association of Phanerozoic komatiites with oceanic plateaus, coupled with thermal considerations, provides a plausible analogue for the origin of some komatiite-tholeiite sequences in Archean greenstone belts.

  2. Numerical analysis of flow instability in the water wall of a supercritical CFB boiler with annular furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Beibei; Yang, Dong; Xie, Haiyan; Nie, Xin; Liu, Wanyu

    2016-08-01

    In order to expand the study on flow instability of supercritical circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, a new numerical computational model considering the heat storage of the tube wall metal was presented in this paper. The lumped parameter method was proposed for wall temperature calculation and the single channel model was adopted for the analysis of flow instability. Based on the time-domain method, a new numerical computational program suitable for the analysis of flow instability in the water wall of supercritical CFB boiler with annular furnace was established. To verify the code, calculation results were respectively compared with data of commercial software. According to the comparisons, the new code was proved to be reasonable and accurate for practical engineering application in analysis of flow instability. Based on the new program, the flow instability of supercritical CFB boiler with annular furnace was simulated by time-domain method. When 1.2 times heat load disturbance was applied on the loop, results showed that the inlet flow rate, outlet flow rate and wall temperature fluctuated with time eventually remained at constant values, suggesting that the hydrodynamic flow was stable. The results also showed that in the case of considering the heat storage, the flow in the water wall is easier to return to stable state than without considering heat storage.

  3. Laboratory and numerical simulation of internal wave attractors and their instability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouzet, Christophe; Dauxois, Thierry; Ermanyuk, Evgeny; Joubaud, Sylvain; Sibgatullin, Ilias

    2015-04-01

    Internal wave attractors are formed as result of focusing of internal gravity waves in a confined domain of stably stratified fluid due to peculiarities of reflections properties [1]. The energy injected into domain due to external perturbation, is concentrated along the path formed by the attractor. The existence of attractors was predicted theoretically and proved both experimentally and numerically [1-4]. Dynamics of attractors is greatly influenced by geometrical focusing, viscous dissipation and nonlinearity. The experimental setup features Schmidt number equal to 700 which impose constraints on resolution in numerical schemes. Also for investigation of stability on large time intervals (about 1000 periods of external forcing) numerical viscosity may have significant impact. For these reasons, we have chosen spectral element method for investigation of this problem, what allows to carefully follow the nonlinear dynamics. We present cross-comparison of experimental observations and numerical simulations of long-term behavior of wave attractors. Fourier analysis and subsequent application of Hilbert transform are used for filtering of spatial components of internal-wave field [5]. The observed dynamics shows a complicated coupling between the effects of local instability and global confinement of the fluid domain. The unstable attractor is shown to act as highly efficient mixing box providing the efficient energy pathway from global-scale excitation to small-scale wave motions and mixing. Acknowledgement, IS has been partially supported by Russian Ministry of Education and Science (agreement id RFMEFI60714X0090) and Russian Foundation for Basic Research, grant N 15-01-06363. EVE gratefully acknowledges his appointment as a Marie Curie incoming fellow at Laboratoire de physique ENS de Lyon. This work has been partially supported by the ONLITUR grant (ANR-2011-BS04-006-01) and achieved thanks to the resources of PSMN from ENS de Lyon 1. Maas, L. R. M. & Lam, F

  4. Evolution of length scales and statistics of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability from direct numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Tritschler, V K; Zubel, M; Hickel, S; Adams, N A

    2014-12-01

    In this study we present direct numerical simulation results of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) initiated by Ma=1.05,Ma=1.2, and Ma=1.5 shock waves interacting with a perturbed planar interface between air and SF(6). At the lowest shock Mach number the fluids slowly mix due to viscous diffusion, whereas at the highest shock Mach number the mixing zone becomes turbulent. When a minimum critical Taylor microscale Reynolds number is exceeded, an inertial range spectrum emerges, providing further evidence of transition to turbulence. The scales of turbulent motion, i.e., the Kolmogorov length scale, the Taylor microscale, and the integral length, scale are presented. The separation of these scales is found to increase as the Reynolds number is increased. Turbulence statistics, i.e., the probability density functions of the velocity and its longitudinal and transverse derivatives, show a self-similar decay and thus that turbulence evolving from RMI is not fundamentally different from isotropic turbulence, though nominally being only isotropic and homogeneous in the transverse directions. PMID:25615181

  5. Numerical simulations of the magnetorotational instability in protoneutron stars - I. Influence of buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilet, Jérôme; Müller, Ewald

    2015-06-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is considered to be a promising mechanism to amplify the magnetic field in fast-rotating protoneutron stars. In contrast to accretion discs, radial buoyancy driven by entropy and lepton fraction gradients is expected to have a dynamical role as important as rotation and shear. We investigate the poorly known impact of buoyancy on the non-linear phase of the MRI, by means of three-dimensional numerical simulations of a local model in the equatorial plane of a protoneutron star. The use of the Boussinesq approximation allows us to utilize a shearing box model with clean shearing periodic boundary conditions, while taking into account the buoyancy driven by radial entropy and composition gradients. We find significantly stronger turbulence and magnetic fields in buoyantly unstable flows. On the other hand, buoyancy has only a limited impact on the strength of turbulence and magnetic field amplification for buoyantly stable flows in the presence of a realistic thermal diffusion. The properties of the turbulence are, however, significantly affected in the latter case. In particular, the toroidal components of the magnetic field and of the velocity become even more dominant with respect to the poloidal ones. Furthermore, we observed in the regime of stable buoyancy the formation of long-lived coherent structures such as channel flows and zonal flows. Overall, our results support the ability of the MRI to amplify the magnetic field significantly even in stably stratified regions of protoneutron stars.

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of Richtmeyer-Meshkov Instability Using pWAMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenga, Temistocle; Paolucci, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    The parallel Wavelet Adaptive Multiresolution Representation (pWAMR) method is used to simulate the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability caused by a shock interacting with a density-stratified interface. The physical problem is studied in several configurations. We present results of numerical studies that investigate the influence of initial condition parameters (amplitude and wavelength of perturbations) on mixing and transition. In addition, the evaluation of turbulence statistics provides a measure of the mixing across the scales and the correlation with the initial condition parameters. The problem is modeled using the compressible reactive Navier-Stokes equations for a gas mixture, including multi-component diffusion, Soret and Dufour effects, and state dependent thermodynamic and transport properties. Since the amplitudes of wavelets provide a direct measure of the local error, the method is able to efficiently capture to any desired accuracy a wide range of spatial scales using a relatively small number of degrees of freedom by evolving the dynamically adaptive grid. In an effective fashion, the multilevel structure of the algorithm provides a simple way to adapt computational refinements to local demands of the solution, thus automatically producing verified solutions. Supported by C-SWARM through the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, under Award Number DE-NA0002377.

  7. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of Marangoni instabilities in liquid bridges: influence of geometrical aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappa, M.; Savino, R.; Monti, R.

    2001-05-01

    Oscillatory Marangoni convection in silicone oil-liquid bridges with different geometrical aspect ratios is investigated by three-dimensional and time-dependent numerical simulations, based on control volume methods in staggered cylindrical non-uniform grids. The three-dimensional oscillatory flow regimes are studied and compared with previous experimental and theoretical results. The results show that the critical wavenumber (m), related to the azimuthal spatio-temporal flow structure, is a monotonically decreasing function of the geometrical aspect ratio of the liquid bridge (defined as the ratio of length to diameter). For this function, a general correlation formula is found, which is in agreement with the previous experimental findings. The critical Marangoni number and the oscillation frequency are decreasing functions of the aspect ratio; however, the critical Marangoni number, based on the axial length of the bridge, does not change much with the aspect ratio. For each aspect ratio investigated, the onset of the instability from the axisymmetric steady state to the three-dimensional oscillatory one is characterized by the appearance of a standing wave regime that exhibits, after a certain time, a second transition to a travelling wave regime. The standing wave regime is more stable for lower aspect ratios since it lasts for a long time. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the propagation velocity of the disturbances in the liquid phase. For this velocity, a general correlation law is found as a function of the aspect ratio and of the Marangoni number. Copyright

  8. Numerical study of acoustic instability in a partly lined flow duct using the full linearized Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Bo; Sun, Dakun; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-07-01

    Lined ducts are extensively applied to suppress noise emission from aero-engines and other turbomachines. The complex noise/flow interaction in a lined duct possibly leads to acoustic instability in certain conditions. To investigate the instability, the full linearized Navier-Stokes equations with eddy viscosity considered are solved in frequency domain using a Galerkin finite element method to compute the sound transmission in shear flow in the lined duct as well as the flow perturbation over the impedance wall. A good agreement between the numerical predictions and the published experimental results is obtained for the sound transmission, showing that a transmission peak occurs around the resonant frequency of the acoustic liner in the presence of shear flow. The eddy viscosity is an important influential factor that plays the roles of both providing destabilizing and making coupling between the acoustic and flow motions over the acoustic liner. Moreover, it is shown from the numerical investigation that the occurrence of the sound amplification and the magnitude of transmission coefficient are closely related to the realistic velocity profile, and we find it essential that the actual variation of the velocity profile in the axial direction over the liner surface be included in the computation. The simulation results of the periodic flow patterns possess the proper features of the convective instability over the liner, as observed in Marx et al.'s experiment. A quantitative comparison between numerical and experimental results of amplitude and phase of the instability is performed. The corresponding eigenvalues achieve great agreement.

  9. Numerical Experiments Using a Convective Flux Limiter on a Turbulent Single-Mode Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    2000-07-10

    Direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulations are powerful tools for studying turbulent flows. Unfortunately, they are computationally demanding in terms of run times, storage, and accuracy of the numerical method used. In particular, high order methods promise high accuracy on a given grid, but they often fail to deliver the expected accuracy due to dispersive truncation errors that appear as unphysical oscillations in the numerical solutions. This report describes a nonlinear flux limiter that has been applied to the second-order tensor viscosity method and markedly reduces the dispersive truncation errors. A Rayleigh-Taylor instability is simulated to show how well the flux limiter works.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of transitional mixed convection flows: Viscous and inviscid instability mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, T. K.; Bhaumik, S.; Bose, Rikhi

    2013-09-01

    Receptivity studies using direct numerical simulation require computations of equilibrium flow and its response to deterministic excitation. Equivalent flow problem, without heat interaction for zero-pressure gradient boundary layer, has been studied with respect to wall-excitation by a finite difference high accuracy method based on the solution of Navier-Stokes equation in Sengupta and Bhaumik [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 154501 (2011)] and Sengupta et al. [Phys. Rev. E 85, 026308 (2012)]. One of the key features of this study has been that the same methodology is used for computing the equilibrium flow and the disturbance field. Computation of equilibrium flow was performed by solving Navier-Stokes equation to include the leading edge of the plate, so that the effects of leading edge singularity and the growth of the boundary layer is included in the nonlinear framework. When the same methodology is attempted for mixed convection flows past horizontal plate (with Boussinesq approximation to model heat transfer effects) some of the equilibrium flow features could not be explained with linear viscous instability theory results. For horizontal hot flat plate with adiabatic wall conditions, the equilibrium flow could be computed and its receptivity could be correlated with linear spatial theory for lower buoyancy parameter. Here, we focus on receptivity of mixed convection flows to wall excitation for the following cases which do not allow computing the equilibrium flows from the solution of Navier-Stokes equation: (i) Aadiabatic horizontal flat plate cooled significantly at the leading edge only and (ii) strongly heated isothermal wedge flow for a wedge angle of 60°. The cold plate case is particularly interesting as the linear spatial theory indicates enhanced stabilization for higher magnitude of the buoyancy parameter. Results presented for the cold plate case indicates disturbance growth outside the shear layer. This prompted us to re-investigate various mechanisms

  11. Experimental and numerical study on the wavy instability in a Rayleigh-Bénard-Poiseuille flow: non linear effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seychelles, F.; Mergui, S.; Nicolas, X.

    2012-11-01

    A combined experimental and numerical study of a Rayleigh-Bénard-Poiseuille air flow in a rectangular channel is presented. The aim of the present paper is to characterize a secondary instability, referred to as wavy instability and known to be a convective instability, with the objective to identify the best situation for an optimal homogenization of heat transfers in the system. A periodic mechanical excitation is introduced at channel inlet and the spatial and temporal evolution of the temperature fluctuations are analyzed, depending on the Rayleigh number, the frequency and the amplitude of the perturbation. The Reynolds number is fixed. As the saturated state is a priori the best situation to homogenize the transfers, the objective is to expand the saturation area and to generate a maximum saturation amplitude value. It is shown that the best choice is a high Rayleigh number or/and a large magnitude of perturbation associated with a specific low value of the forcing frequency.

  12. Numerical simulation of unsteady heat release of low frequency instabilities in a dump combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverdant, A.

    The influence of combustion instabilities on heat transfer is investigated using an adaptation of KIVA code. A simulation of low-frequency instabilities observed on a small burner is described. It is shown that the turbulence is distributed in the flame zone, and the heat transfer increases by acoustic pulsation emitted from the entrance plane of the cavity.

  13. Material property discontinuities in intervertebral disc porohyperelastic finite element models generate numerical instabilities due to volumetric strain variations.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, C; Noailly, J; Lacroix, D

    2013-10-01

    Numerical studies of the intervertebral disc (IVD) are important to better understand the load transfer and the mechanobiological processes within the disc. Among the relevant calculations, fluid-related outputs are critical to describe and explore accurately the tissue properties. Porohyperelastic finite element models of IVD can describe accurately the disc behaviour at the organ level and allow the inclusion of fluid effects. However, results may be affected by numerical instabilities when fast load rates are applied. We hypothesized that such instabilities would appear preferentially at material discontinuities such as the annulus-nucleus boundary and should be considered when testing mesh convergence. A L4-L5 IVD model including the nucleus, annulus and cartilage endplates were tested under pure rotational loads, with different levels of mesh refinement. The effect of load relaxation and swelling were also studied. Simulations indicated that fluid velocity oscillations appeared due to numerical instability of the pore pressure spatial derivative at material discontinuities. Applying local refinement only was not enough to eliminate these oscillations. In fact, mesh refinements had to be local, material-dependent, and supplemented by the creation of a material transition zone, including interpolated material properties. Results also indicated that oscillations vanished along load relaxation, and faster attenuation occurred with the incorporation of the osmotic pressure. We concluded that material discontinuities are a major cause of instability for poromechanical calculations in multi-tissue models when load velocities are simulated. A strategy was presented to address these instabilities and recommendations on the use of IVD porohyperelastic models were given. PMID:23796430

  14. Thermal and Magnetorotational Instability in the Interstellar Medium: Two-dimensional Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piontek, Robert A.; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2004-02-01

    The structure and dynamics of diffuse gas in the Milky Way and other disk galaxies may be strongly influenced by thermal and magnetorotational instabilities (TI and MRI, respectively) on scales ~1-100 pc. We initiate a study of these processes, using two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations with conditions appropriate for the atomic interstellar medium (ISM). Our simulations incorporate thermal conduction and adopt local ``shearing-periodic'' equations of motion and boundary conditions to study dynamics of a (100 pc) 2 radial-vertical section of the disk. We demonstrate, consistent with previous work, that nonlinear development of ``pure TI'' produces a network of filaments that condense into cold clouds at their intersections, yielding a distinct two-phase warm/cold medium within ~20 Myr. TI-driven turbulent motions of the clouds and warm intercloud medium are present but saturate at quite subsonic amplitudes for uniform initial P/k=2000 K cm -3. MRI has previously been studied in near-uniform media; our simulations include both TI+MRI models, which begin from uniform-density conditions, and cloud+MRI models, which begin with a two-phase cloudy medium. Both the TI+MRI and cloud+MRI models show that MRI develops within a few galactic orbital times, just as for a uniform medium. The mean separation between clouds can affect which MRI mode dominates the evolution. Provided intercloud separations do not exceed half the MRI wavelength, we find the MRI growth rates are similar to those for the corresponding uniform medium. This opens the possibility that if low cloud volume filling factors increase MRI dissipation times compared to those in a uniform medium, then MRI-driven motions in the ISM could reach amplitudes comparable to observed H I turbulent line widths.

  15. Analysis of Stationary Crossflow Instability on HIFiRE-5 Using Direct Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinzl, Derek John

    Direct numerical simulation is performed on a 38.1% scale HIFiRE-5 forebody to study stationary crossflow instability. Computations use the US3D Navier-Stokes solver to simulate Mach 6 flow at Reynolds numbers of 8.1 x 10 6 /m and 11.8 x 106 /m, which are conditions used by quiet tunnel experiments at Purdue University. Distributed roughness with point-to-point height variation on the computational grid and maximum heights of 0.5-4.0 mum is used with the intent to emulate smooth-body transition and excite the naturally-occurring most unstable disturbance wavenumber. Cases at the low Reynolds number condition use three grid sizes, and hence three different roughness patterns of varying wavelength, and demonstrate that the final flow solution is extremely dependent on the particular roughness pattern. The same roughness pattern is interpolated onto each grid which yields similar solutions, indicating grid convergence. At the high Reynolds number condition, a steady physical mechanism is introduced which explains sharp increases seen in the wall heat flux for both computations and experiment. Namely, the sharp increase is caused by large streamwise velocity disturbances impinging on the wall. Evolution of disturbance spanwise wavelength is computed, and it is found that this wavelength is more sensitive to Reynolds number than roughness, indicating that the disturbance wavelength is primarily flow--selected for these cases. The calculation of disturbance growth rates shows the region over which crossflow disturbances behave linearly and where nonlinear effects become important. The effect of roughness height and nose sharpness are considered, and both were found to have a large effect on the resulting heating pattern. Crossflow vortex coalescence is observed and a possible cause is discussed.

  16. Numerical study of particle-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Effects of particle settling and entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yi-Ju; Shao, Yun-Chuan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which the density stratification is caused by the suspension of particles in liquid flows using the conventional single-phase model and Euler-Lagrange (EL) two-phase model. The single-phase model is valid only when the particles are small and number densities are large, such that the continuum approximation applies. The present single-phase results show that the constant settling of the particle concentration restricts the lateral development of the vortex ring, which results in a decrease of the rising speed of the Rayleigh-Taylor bubbles. The EL model enables the investigation of particle-flow interaction and the influence of particle entrainment, resulting from local non-uniformity in the particle distribution. We compare bubble dynamics in the single-phase and EL cases, and our results show that the deviation between the two cases becomes more pronounced when the particle size increases. The main mechanism responsible for the deviation is particle entrainment, which can only be resolved in the EL model. We provide a theoretical argument for the small-scale local entrainment resulting from the local velocity shear and non-uniformity of the particle concentration. The theoretical argument is supported by numerical evidence. Energy budget analysis is also performed and shows that potential energy is released due to the interphase drag and buoyant effect. The buoyant effect, which results in the transformation of potential energy into kinetic energy and shear dissipation, plays a key role in settling enhancement. We also find that particle entrainment increases the shear dissipation, which in turn enhances the release of potential energy.

  17. Direct numerical simulation of interfacial instabilities: A consistent, conservative, all-speed, sharp-interface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Deng, Xiaolong; Theofanous, Theo G.

    2013-06-01

    We present a conservative and consistent numerical method for solving the Navier-Stokes equations in flow domains that may be separated by any number of material interfaces, at arbitrarily-high density/viscosity ratios and acoustic-impedance mismatches, subjected to strong shock waves and flow speeds that can range from highly supersonic to near-zero Mach numbers. A principal aim is prediction of interfacial instabilities under superposition of multiple potentially-active modes (Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Richtmyer-Meshkov) as found for example with shock-driven, immersed fluid bodies (locally oblique shocks)—accordingly we emphasize fidelity supported by physics-based validation, including experiments. Consistency is achieved by satisfying the jump discontinuities at the interface within a conservative 2nd-order scheme that is coupled, in a conservative manner, to the bulk-fluid motions. The jump conditions are embedded into a Riemann problem, solved exactly to provide the pressures and velocities along the interface, which is tracked by a level set function to accuracy of O(Δx5, Δt4). Subgrid representation of the interface is achieved by allowing curvature of its constituent interfacial elements to obtain O(Δx3) accuracy in cut-cell volume, with attendant benefits in calculating cell- geometric features and interface curvature (O(Δx3)). Overall the computation converges at near-theoretical O(Δx2). Spurious-currents are down to machine error and there is no time-step restriction due to surface tension. Our method is built upon a quadtree-like adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure. When necessary, this is supplemented by body-fitted grids to enhance resolution of the gas dynamics, including flow separation, shear layers, slip lines, and critical layers. Comprehensive comparisons with exact solutions for the linearized Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz problems demonstrate excellent performance. Sample simulations of liquid drops subjected to

  18. Numerical methods for instability mitigation in the modeling of laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz-boosted frame

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2011-07-01

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference has been shown to produce orders of magnitude speed-up of calculations from first principles. Obtaining these speedups required mitigation of a high-frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness. In this paper, methods are presented which mitigated the observed instability, including an electromagnetic solver with tunable coefficients, its extension to accommodate Perfectly Matched Layers and Friedman's damping algorithms, as well as an efficient large bandwidth digital filter. It is observed that choosing the frame of the wake as the frame of reference allows for higher levels of filtering or damping than is possible in other frames for the same accuracy. Detailed testing also revealed the existence of a singular time step at which the instability level is minimized, independently of numerical dispersion. A combination of the techniques presented in this paper prove to be very efficient at controlling the instability, allowing for efficient direct modeling of 10 GeV class laser plasma accelerator stages. The methods developed in this paper may have broader application, to other Lorentz-boosted simulations and Particle-In-Cell simulations in general.

  19. High resolution numerical investigation on the effect of convective instability on long term CO2 storage in saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Lichtner, P. C.

    2007-07-01

    CO2 sequestration (capture, separation, and long term storage) in various geologic media including depleted oil reservoirs, saline aquifers, and oceanic sediments is being considered as a possible solution to reduce green house gas emissions. Dissolution of supercritical CO2 in formation brines is considered an important storage mechanism to prevent possible leakage. Accurate prediction of the plume dissolution rate and migration is essential. Analytical analysis and numerical experiments have demonstrated that convective instability (Rayleigh instability) has a crucial effect on the dissolution behavior and subsequent mineralization reactions. Global stability analysis indicates that a certain grid resolution is needed to capture the features of density-driven fingering phenomena. For 3-D field scale simulations, high resolution leads to large numbers of grid nodes, unfeasible for a single workstation. In this study, we investigate the effects of convective instability on geologic sequestration of CO2 by taking advantage of parallel computing using the code PFLOTRAN, a massively parallel 3-D reservoir simulator for modeling subsurface multiphase, multicomponent reactive flow and transport based on continuum scale mass and energy conservation equations. The onset, development and long-term fate of a supercritical CO2 plume will be resolved with high resolution numerical simulations to investigate the rate of plume dissolution caused by fingering phenomena.

  20. Fundamental form of the electrostatic δf-PIC algorithm and discovery of a converged numerical instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkie, George J.; Dorland, William

    2016-05-01

    The δf particle-in-cell algorithm has been a useful tool in studying the physics of plasmas, particularly turbulent magnetized plasmas in the context of gyrokinetics. The reduction in noise due to not having to resolve the full distribution function indicates an efficiency advantage over the standard ("full-f") particle-in-cell. Despite its successes, the algorithm behaves strangely in some circumstances. In this work, we document a fully resolved numerical instability that occurs in the simplest of multiple-species test cases: the electrostatic ΩH mode. There is also a poorly understood numerical instability that occurs when one is under-resolved in particle number, which may require a prohibitively large number of particles to stabilize. Both of these are independent of the time-stepping scheme, and we conclude that they exist if the time advancement were exact. The exact analytic form of the algorithm is presented, and several schemes for mitigating these instabilities are also presented.

  1. An Experimental and Numerical Study of Roughness-Induced Instabilities in a Mach 3.5 Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; King, Rudolph A.; Owens, Lewis R.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Norris, Andrew T.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Layn

    2012-01-01

    Progress on a joint experimental and numerical study of laminar-to-turbulent transition induced by an isolated roughness element in a high-speed laminar boundary layer is reported in this paper. The numerical analysis suggests that transition is driven by the instability of high- and low-speed streaks embedded in the wake of the isolated roughness element. In addition, spatial stability analysis revealed that the wake flow supports multiple modes (even and odd) of convective instabilities that experience strong enough growth to cause transition. The experimental measurements, which included hot-wire and pitot-probe surveys, confirmed the existence of embedded high- and low-speed streaks in the roughness wake. Furthermore, the measurements indicate the presence of both even and odd modes of instability, although their relative magnitude depends on the specifics of the roughness geometry and flow conditions (e.g., the value of Re(sub kk) or k/delta. For the two test cases considered in the measurements (Re(sub kk) values of 462 and 319), the even mode and the odd mode were respectively dominant and appear to play a primary role in the transition process.

  2. Numerical studies of the Weibel Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-11-01

    In intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy free energy is available to drive a transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instability. The finite transverse geometry of the confined beam makes a detailed theoretical investigation difficult. In this paper the newly developed bEASt (beam eigenmode and spectra) code which solves the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations is used to investigate the detailed properties of the Weibel instability for a long charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical pipe of radius r_w. The stability analysis is carried out for azimuthally symmetric perturbations about a two-temperature thermal equilibrium distribution in the smooth-focusing approximation. To study the nonlinear stage of the instability, the Darwin model is being developed and incorporated into the Beam Equilibrium Stability and Transport(BEST) code.

  3. Release of potential instability by mesoscale triggering - An objective model simulation. [in precipitation numerical weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of mesoscale triggering on organized nonsevere convective cloud systems in the High Plains are considered. Two experiments were conducted to determine if a one-dimensional quasi-time dependent model could (1) detect soundings which were sensitive to mesoscale triggering, and (2) discriminate between cases which had mesoscale organized convection and those with no organized convection. The MESOCU model was used to analyze the available potential instability and thermodynamic potential for cloud growth. It is noted that lifting is a key factor in the release of available potential instability on the High Plains.

  4. Axisymmetric numerical and analytical studies of the magnetorotational instability in a magnetized Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2007-08-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is probably the main cause of turbulence and accretion in sufficiently ionized astrophysical disks. However, despite much theoretical and computational work, the nonlinear saturation of MRI is imperfectly understood. In Chap. 2 and Chap. 3 of this thesis we present non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the Princeton MRI experiment. In vertically infinite or periodic cylinders, MRI saturates in a resistive current-sheet with a significant reduction of the mean shear, and with poloidal circulation scaling as the square root of resistivity. Angular momentum transport scales as the reciprocal square root of viscosity but only weakly depends on resistivity. For finite cylinders with insulating end caps, a method for implementing the fully insulating boundary condition is introduced. MRI grows with a clear linear phase from small amplitudes at rates in good agreement with linear analysis. In the final state one inflowing "jet" opposite to the usual Ekman "jet" is found near the inner cylinder. The MRI enhances the angular momentum transport at saturation. Under proper conditions, our experimental facility is a good platform to show that MRI could be suppressed by a strong magnetic field. Recently, Hollerbach and Rüdiger have reported that MRI modes may grow at much reduced magnetic Reynolds number ( Re m ) and Lundquist number S in the presence of a helical background field, a current-free combination of axial and toroidal field. We have investigated these helical MRI modes in Chap. 4 and Chap. 5. In vertically infinite or periodic cylinders, resistive HMRI is a weakly destabilized hydrodynamic inertial oscillation propagating axially along the background Poynting flux. Growth rates are small, however, and require large axial currents. Furthermore, finite cylinders with insulating endcaps were shown to reduce the growth rate and to stabilize highly resistive, inviscid flows entirely, and the new mode is stable in Keplerian

  5. Conceptual model of hydrogeology in the Ozark Plateaus region during Pennsylvanian time

    SciTech Connect

    Brahana, J.V. )

    1993-03-01

    Recently completed studies of the Ozark Plateaus region of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas provide a conceptual framework for understanding current hydrogeology, and form the basis for numerical models that can be used to quantitatively assess flow and solute transport in the aquifers of this area. Three separate investigations were completed as part of the Regional Aquifer-Systems Analysis (RASA) program of the US Geological Survey during 1985--1993. Although the objectives of these RASA studies [Northern Midwest (NM) RASA, Gulf Coast (GC) RASA, and Central Midwest (CM) RASA] focused on recent hydrologic conditions, each study has contributed o increased understanding of the evolution of the hydrogeology of the region.

  6. Comprehensive experimental and numerical analysis of instability phenomena in pump turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentner, Ch; Sallaberger, M.; Widmer, Ch; Bobach, B.-J.; Jaberg, H.; Schiffer, J.; Senn, F.; Guggenberger, M.

    2014-03-01

    The changes in the electricity market have led to changed requirements for the operation of pump turbines. Utilities need to change fast and frequently between pumping and generating modes and increasingly want to operate at off-design conditions for extended periods. Operation of the units in instable areas of the machine characteristic is not acceptable and may lead to self-excited vibration of the hydraulic system. In turbine operation of pump turbines unstable behaviour can occur at low load off-design operation close to runaway conditions (S-shape of the turbine characteristic). This type of instability may impede the synchronization of the machine in turbine mode and thus increase start-up and switch over times. A pronounced S-shaped instability can also lead to significant drop of discharge in the event of load rejection. Low pressure on the suction side and in the tail-race tunnel could cause dangerous separation of the water column. Understanding the flow features that lead to the instable behaviour of pump turbines is a prerequisite to the design of machines that can fulfil the growing requirements relating to operational flexibility. Flow simulation in these instability zones is demanding due to the complex and highly unsteady flow patterns. Only unsteady simulation methods are able to reproduce the governing physical effects in these operating regions. ANDRITZ HYDRO has been investigating the stability behaviour of pump turbines in turbine operation in cooperation with several universities using simulation and measurements. In order to validate the results of flow simulation of unstable operating points, the Graz University of Technology (Austria) performed detailed experimental investigations. Within the scope of a long term research project, the operating characteristics of several pump turbine runners have been measured and flow patterns in the pump turbine at speed no load and runaway have been examined by 2D Laser particle image velocimetry (PIV

  7. Effects of chemical reactions on density-dependent fluid flow: On the numerical formulation and the development of instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Ibaraki, Motomu

    2002-04-01

    A three-dimensional, reactive numerical flow model is developed that couples chemical reactions with density-dependent mass transport and fluid flow. The model includes equilibrium reactions for the aqueous species, kinetic reactions between the solid and aqueous phases, and full coupling of porosity and permeability changes that result from precipitation and dissolution reactions in the porous media. The coupled effects of the processes driving flow and the chemical reactions occurring during solute transport is studied using a carbonate system in fully saturated porous media. Results demonstrate that instability development is sensitive to the initial perturbation caused by density differences between the solute plume and the ambient ground water. If the initial perturbation is large, then it acts as a''trigger'' in the flow system that causes instabilities to develop in a planar reaction front. When permeability changes occur due to dissolution reactions occurring in the porous media, a reactive feedback loop is created by calcite dissolution and the mixed convective transport of the system. Although the feedback loop does not have a significant impact on plume shape, complex concentration distributions develop as a result of the instabilities generated in the flow system.

  8. Numerical and experimental studies of magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in solid liners

    SciTech Connect

    Faehl, R.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Morgan, D.V.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have studied the nonlinear evolution of Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability in solid aluminum liners. Two-dimensional MHD modeling of the configuration have been performed using the measured current pulseform of the PEGASUS II capacitor bank as a magnetic field source. The liner configuration consisted of a solid aluminum annulus 20 mm long and 0.4 mm thick. The outer surface of the liner was machined with a sinusoidal ripple. Half of the liner was scribed with one wavelength, the other half with another wavelength. A series of experiments was conducted with a smooth surface and ripple wavelengths of 0.5, 0.75, and 2.0 mm. The peak-to-peak ripple amplitude was varied between 0.025 and 0.10 mm, but the ratio of the initial amplitude to wavelength never exceeded 7%. Diagnostics consisted of radiography, a center-conductor B-dot probe, and transmission line pulsed power diagnostics. The inner surfaces of the liners were coated with a thin film of gold (Au) to permit measurement of material deformation at various stages of the instability growth. Three radiographs, at different times, were taken for each experiment. The center-conductor magnetic probe was used to measure the magnetic field penetration through the liner. Initial comparisons between the data and the MHD calculations showed excellent agreement with respect to nonlinear instability growth and with the time of field rupture of the liner.

  9. Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames II: The Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.

    2004-01-12

    A Type Ia supernova explosion likely begins as a nuclear runaway near the center of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The outward propagating flame is unstable to the Landau-Darrieus, Rayleigh-Taylor, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, which serve to accelerate it to a large fraction of the speed of sound. We investigate the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flame at the transition from the flamelet regime to the distributed-burning regime, around densities of 10e7 gm/cc, through detailed, fully resolved simulations. A low Mach number, adaptive mesh hydrodynamics code is used to achieve the necessary resolution and long time scales. As the density is varied, we see a fundamental change in the character of the burning--at the low end of the density range the Rayleigh-Taylor instability dominates the burning, whereas at the high end the burning suppresses the instability. In all cases, significant acceleration of the flame is observed, limited only by the size of the domain we are able to study. We discuss the implications of these results on the potential for a deflagration to detonation transition.

  10. Numerical study of the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of laser-irradiated deuterium and deuterium-tritium targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocchino, Alberto; Atzeni, Stefano; Schiavi, Angelo

    2010-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at the ablation front of laser-irradiated planar targets is investigated by two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations. The linear evolution of perturbations seeded either by surface roughness or target inhomogeneity is studied for perturbation wavelengths in the range 10≤λ≤400 μm and laser intensity 4×1012≤I≤4×1014 W/cm2 (with laser wavelength λlaser=0.35 μm). Thin and thick cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium (DT) planar targets are considered. For targets irradiated at constant intensity, it is found that perturbations with wavelength below a given threshold perform damped oscillations, while perturbations above such a threshold are unstable and oscillate with growing amplitude. This is qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions by Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)], according to which ablation related processes stabilize perturbations with kDc≫1, where Dc is the distance between the ablation front and critical density for laser propagation. For kDc<1 a weakly growing Landau-Darrieus instability (LDI) is instead excited. The stability threshold increases substantially with laser intensity, given the dependence of Dc on laser intensity I (roughly Dc∝I, according to the present simulations). Direct-drive laser fusion targets are irradiated by time-shaped pulses, with a low intensity initial foot. In this case, perturbations with wavelengths below some threshold (about 10 μm, for typical ignition-class all-DT targets) are damped after an initial growth. In a thin target, initial perturbations, either damped or amplified by RMI and LDI, seed the subsequent Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Finally, it is shown that RMI growth of fusion targets can be reduced by using laser pulses including an initial adiabat-shaping picket (originally proposed to reduce the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instability).

  11. A method for the direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer instability with finite-rate chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Marxen, Olaf; Magin, Thierry E.; Shaqfeh, Eric S.G.; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2013-12-15

    A new numerical method is presented here that allows to consider chemically reacting gases during the direct numerical simulation of a hypersonic fluid flow. The method comprises the direct coupling of a solver for the fluid mechanical model and a library providing the physio-chemical model. The numerical method for the fluid mechanical model integrates the compressible Navier–Stokes equations using an explicit time advancement scheme and high-order finite differences. This Navier–Stokes code can be applied to the investigation of laminar-turbulent transition and boundary-layer instability. The numerical method for the physio-chemical model provides thermodynamic and transport properties for different gases as well as chemical production rates, while here we exclusively consider a five species air mixture. The new method is verified for a number of test cases at Mach 10, including the one-dimensional high-temperature flow downstream of a normal shock, a hypersonic chemical reacting boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium and a hypersonic reacting boundary layer with finite-rate chemistry. We are able to confirm that the diffusion flux plays an important role for a high-temperature boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Moreover, we demonstrate that the flow for a case previously considered as a benchmark for the investigation of non-equilibrium chemistry can be regarded as frozen. Finally, the new method is applied to investigate the effect of finite-rate chemistry on boundary layer instability by considering the downstream evolution of a small-amplitude wave and comparing results with those obtained for a frozen gas as well as a gas in local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  12. Numerical aspects in modeling high Deborah number flow and elastic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Youngdon

    2014-05-01

    Investigating highly nonlinear viscoelastic flow in 2D domain, we explore problem as well as property possibly inherent in the streamline upwinding technique (SUPG) and then present various results of elastic instability. The mathematically stable Leonov model written in tensor-logarithmic formulation is employed in the framework of finite element method for spatial discretization of several representative problem domains. For enhancement of computation speed, decoupled integration scheme is applied for shear thinning and Boger-type fluids. From the analysis of 4:1 contraction flow at low and moderate values of the Deborah number (De) the solution with SUPG method does not show noticeable difference from the one by the computation without upwinding. On the other hand, in the flow regime of high De, especially in the state of elastic instability the SUPG significantly distorts the flow field and the result differs considerably from the solution acquired straightforwardly. When the strength of elastic flow and thus the nonlinearity further increase, the computational scheme with upwinding fails to converge and evolutionary solution does not become available any more. All this result suggests that extreme care has to be taken on occasions where upwinding is applied, and one has to first of all prove validity of this algorithm in the case of high nonlinearity. On the contrary, the straightforward computation with no upwinding can efficiently model representative phenomena of elastic instability in such benchmark problems as 4:1 contraction flow, flow over a circular cylinder and flow over asymmetric array of cylinders. Asymmetry of the flow field occurring in the symmetric domain, enhanced spatial and temporal fluctuation of dynamic variables and flow effects caused by extension hardening are properly described in this study.

  13. Gas Evolution Dynamics in Godunov-Type Schemes and Analysis of Numerical Shock Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kun

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we are going to study the gas evolution dynamics of the exact and approximate Riemann solvers, e.g., the Flux Vector Splitting (FVS) and the Flux Difference Splitting (FDS) schemes. Since the FVS scheme and the Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting (KFVS) scheme have the same physical mechanism and similar flux function, based on the analysis of the discretized KFVS scheme the weakness and advantage of the FVS scheme are closely observed. The subtle dissipative mechanism of the Godunov method in the 2D case is also analyzed, and the physical reason for shock instability, i.e., carbuncle phenomena and odd-even decoupling, is presented.

  14. Collisional interchange instability 2. A comparison of the numerical simulations with the in situ experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, M.C.; Seyler, C.E.; Zargham, S. )

    1987-09-01

    A two-dimensional model applicable to F region ionosphere plasma instabilities has been developed and described in a comparison paper. Here the authors apply the model to equatorial F region irregularities and in particular test the model against rocket and satellite data. As a diagnostic they create simulated data sets similar to the one-dimensional measurements of plasma density performed by space probes and take the Fourier transform of these data in the same manner and used by the space experimentors. To their knowledge this is the first attempt to directly relate a simulation to in situ data in this way, diagnostic technique which resolves the ambiguity inherent to one-dimensional measurements. The comparison is in excellent agreement with the in situ data. In particular, they have been able to resolve the apparent differences between satellite quasi-sinusoidal observations with the shocklike observations made on rockets. Unlike previous simulations of this phenomenon they find an inherent anisotropy in the instability development which is mirrored in the in situ data. They also present evidence that the shallow spectral slopes which often characterize spread F rocket spectra near the F peak may be due to a change in the angle between the rocket velocity vector and the characteristic directions in the medium.

  15. Continental accretion: From oceanic plateaus to allochthonous terranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ben-Avraham, Z.; Nur, A.; Jones, D.; Cox, A.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the regions of the anomalously high sea-floor topography in today's oceans may be modern allochthonous terranes moving with their oceanic plates. Fated to collide with and be accreted to adjacent continents, they may create complex volcanism, cut off and trap oceanic crust, and cause orogenic deformation. The accretion of plateaus during subduction of oceanic plates may be responsible for mountain building comparable to that produced by the collision of continents. Copyright ?? 1981 AAAS.

  16. Shock tube experiments and numerical simulation of the single-mode, three-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. C.; Krivets, V. V.; Greenough, J. A.; Jacobs, J. W.

    2009-11-01

    A vertical shock tube is used to perform experiments in which an interface is formed using opposed flows of air and SF6. A three-dimensional single-mode perturbation is created by the periodic vertical motion of the gases within the shock tube. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is produced by an impulsive acceleration by a weak shock wave (Ms=1.2). Planar laser induced fluorescence produces still images, and planar Mie scattering produces movies of the experiment. A three-dimensional numerical simulation of this experiment utilizing the Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement code, RAPTOR, was also conducted. Good agreement is obtained between experiments and the simulations. However, existing late time models, which have a 1/t dependence, disagree with measurements of the late time instability development. In contrast, both the experiments and simulation suggest a t-0.54 late time dependence for the overall growth rate. Comparisons with individual bubble and spike velocities show the bubbles appear to decay approximately at 1/t and the spikes to decay at a much slower rate of t-0.38.

  17. Role of Magnetic Field Strength and Numerical Resolution in Simulations of the Heat-flux-driven Buoyancy Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avara, Mark J.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Bogdanović, Tamara

    2013-08-01

    The role played by magnetic fields in the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters is complex. The weakly collisional nature of the ICM leads to thermal conduction that is channeled along field lines. This anisotropic heat conduction profoundly changes the instabilities of the ICM atmosphere, with convective stabilities being driven by temperature gradients of either sign. Here, we employ the Athena magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the local non-linear behavior of the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI) relevant in the cores of cooling-core clusters where the temperature increases with radius. We study a grid of two-dimensional simulations that span a large range of initial magnetic field strengths and numerical resolutions. For very weak initial fields, we recover the previously known result that the HBI wraps the field in the horizontal direction, thereby shutting off the heat flux. However, we find that simulations that begin with intermediate initial field strengths have a qualitatively different behavior, forming HBI-stable filaments that resist field-line wrapping and enable sustained vertical conductive heat flux at a level of 10%-25% of the Spitzer value. While astrophysical conclusions regarding the role of conduction in cooling cores require detailed global models, our local study proves that systems dominated by the HBI do not necessarily quench the conductive heat flux.

  18. Numerical investigations and analysis on the effects of geometrical parameters on the group velocity of transverse magnetic pump mode and free electron laser instability

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, B. S.; Jaiman, N. K.

    2009-02-15

    In this paper, we have numerically investigated the effects of various geometrical parameters of a backward wave oscillator, filled with a magnetized plasma of uniform density and driven by a mild relativistic solid electron beam, on the instability growth rate R{sub 0} of a seeded free electron laser. On changing mean radius corrugation amplitude h and corrugation period z{sub 0} of backward wave oscillator; the ponderomotive potential of space charge wave changes. This in turn, changes the coupling strength of TM mode with negative beam space charge mode and hence the growth rate of parametric instability of free electron laser. A dispersion relation is derived and numerically solved for various geometrical parameters of backward wave oscillator and beam profile. A relation for {Gamma} is also derived and computed numerically. The instability growth scales directly to the square root of beam density and inversely as seven power of relativistic gamma factor {gamma}{sub 0}.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Multi-Material Mixing in an Inclined Interface Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Akshay; Lele, Sanjiva

    2015-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability arises when a shock wave interacts with an interface separating two fluids. In this work, high fidelity simulations of shock induced multi-material mixing between N2 and CO2 in a shock tube are performed for a Mach 1.55 shock interacting with a planar material interface that is inclined with respect to the shock propagation direction. In the current configuration, unlike the classical perturbed flat interface case, the evolution of the interface is non-linear from early time onwards. Our previous simulations of this problem at multiple spatial resolutions have shown that very small 3D perturbations have a large effect on vortex breakdown mechanisms and hence fine scale turbulence. We propose a comparison of our simulations to the experiments performed at the Georgia Tech Shock Tube and Advanced Mixing Laboratory (STAML). Results before and after reshock of the interface will be shown. Results from simulations of a second case with a more complex initial interface will also be presented. Simulations shown are conducted with an extended version of the Miranda solver developed by Cook et al. (2007) which combines high-order compact finite differences with localized non-linear artificial properties for shock and interface capturing. This research is part of the Blue Waters sustained-petascale computing project, which is supported by the National Science Foundation (awards OCI-0725070 and ACI-1238993) and the state of Illinois.

  20. Numerical 3D Hydrodynamics Study of Gravitational Instabilities in a Circumbinary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Karna Mahadev; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Michael, Scott; Cai, Kai; Durisen, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 3D hydrodynamical study of gravitational instabilities (GIs) in a circumbinary protoplanetary disk around a Solar mass star and a brown dwarf companion (0.02 M⊙). GIs can play an important, and at times dominant, role in driving the structural evolution of protoplanetary disks. The reported simulations were performed employing CHYMERA, a radiative 3D hydrodynamics code developed by the Indiana University Hydrodynamics Group. The simulations include disk self-gravity and radiative cooling governed by realistic dust opacities. We examine the role of GIs in modulating the thermodynamic state of the disks, and determine the strengths of GI-induced density waves, non-axisymmetric density structures, radial mass transport, and gravitational torques. The principal goal of this study is to determine how the presence of the companion affects the nature and strength of GIs. Results are compared with a parallel simulation of a protoplanetary disk without the presence of the brown dwarf binary companion. We detect no fragmentation in either disk. A persistent vortex forms in the inner region of both disks. The vortex seems to be stabilized by the presence of the binary companion.

  1. Geodynamic models of terrane accretion: Testing the fate of island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and continental fragments in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault, J. L.; Buiter, S. J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Crustal growth at convergent margins can occur by the accretion of future allochthonous terranes (FATs), such as island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, and continental fragments. Using geodynamic numerical experiments, we demonstrate how crustal properties of FATs impact the amount of FAT crust that is accreted or subducted, the type of accretionary process, and the style of deformation on the overriding plate. Our results show that (1) accretion of crustal units occurs when there is a weak detachment layer within the FAT, (2) the depth of detachment controls the amount of crust accreted onto the overriding plate, and (3) lithospheric buoyancy does not prevent FAT subduction during constant convergence. Island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and continental fragments will completely subduct, despite having buoyant lithospheric densities, if they have rheologically strong crusts. Weak basal layers, representing pre-existing weaknesses or detachment layers, will either lead to underplating of faulted blocks of FAT crust to the overriding plate or collision and suturing of an unbroken FAT crust. Our experiments show that the weak, ultramafic layer found at the base of island arcs and oceanic plateaus plays a significant role in terrane accretion. The different types of accretionary processes also affect deformation and uplift patterns in the overriding plate, trench migration and jumping, and the dip of the plate interface. The resulting accreted terranes produced from our numerical experiments resemble observed accreted terranes, such as the Wrangellia Terrane and Klamath Mountain terranes in the North American Cordilleran Belt.

  2. Numerical analysis of MHD instability suppression in a double gas puff

    SciTech Connect

    Glazyrin, Igor V.; Diyankov, Oleg V.; Karlykhanov, Nikolai G.; Koshelev, Sergei V.

    1997-05-05

    The process of double gas-puff implosion is numerically analyzed. Various liner configurations are considered: 1) the outer cascade is ten times lighter then the inner one, 2) the masses of cascades are equal, 3) the outer cascade is ten times heavier then the inner one. The mechanism of liner implosions stabilization is discussed. The comparison of two-cascade and single-cascade schemes is performed. The role of magnetic field penetration at the initial time into liner's body is also discussed.

  3. Numerical simulations of instabilities in the implosion process of inertial confined fusion in 2D cylindrical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Heng; Zhai, ChuanLei; Jiang, Song; Song, Peng; Dai, ZhenSheng; Gu, JianFa

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a multi-material arbitrary Lagrangian and Eulerian method for the hydrodynamic radiative multi-group diffusion model in 2D cylindrical coordinates. The basic idea in the construction of the method is the following: In the Lagrangian step, a closure model of radiation-hydrodynamics is used to give the states of equations for materials in mixed cells. In the mesh rezoning step, we couple the rezoning principle with the Lagrangian interface tracking method and an Eulerian interface capturing scheme to compute interfaces sharply according to their deformation and to keep cells in good geometric quality. In the interface reconstruction step, a dual-material Moment-of-Fluid method is introduced to obtain the unique interface in mixed cells. In the remapping step, a conservative remapping algorithm of conserved quantities is presented. A number of numerical tests are carried out and the numerical results show that the new method can simulate instabilities in complex fluid field under large deformation, and are accurate and robust.

  4. Geological and numerical modelling of sinkholes induced by instability of man-made underground caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lollino, P.; Margiotta, S.; Parise, M.

    2012-04-01

    An increasing number of areas in southern Italy are being interested by sinkholes related to the presence of artificial cavities, and in particular of underground quarries. Aimed at defining the most proper criteria for the study of such phenomena, the case of Cutrofiano (Apulia, SE Italy) is here presented as an example. This territory is well known for the underground quarrying activity of soft calcarenitic rocks that caused in the last decades widespread phenomena of subsidence at the surface, with extensive damages and problems to the main communication routes in the area. A very complex and intricate network of subterranean galleries is present underground, for a total development on the order of several tens of kilometres. The Gravina Calcarenite Formation, that is the object of the underground quarries, consists of whitish calcarenite with an upper greenish clayey-sandy interval rich in fossils. This formation is overlain by grey sandy clays (Subapennine Clays) grading upward to fossil-rich sands (Brindisi Sands). In recent years, clay mining has been resumed at the ground surface, following to the opening of a cement factory, and resulting in the realization of wide open quarries. The local sedimentary sequence is closed by terraced calcarenite deposits rich in ostreids, holding a phreatic groundwater body and overlain by a shallow soil cover. The results of detailed geological, geomorphological and geomechanical surveys, supported by laboratory tests, show that in the Cutrofiano area the thickness of the stratigraphical succession, the depth of the underground galleries, the structural conditions of the rock mass, and the failure mechanisms observed within the quarries are variable. The geological model reconstructed represents the base for the numerical simulations, which are aimed at defining the eventual mechanisms of rock failure, up to the formation of the sinkhole. In particular, two different geological settings have been considered: the first is

  5. Numerical and physical instabilities in massively parallel LES of reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinsot, Thierry

    LES of reacting flows is rapidly becoming mature and providing levels of precision which can not be reached with any RANS (Reynolds Averaged) technique. In addition to the multiple subgrid scale models required for such LES and to the questions raised by the required numerical accurcay of LES solvers, various issues related the reliability, mesh independence and repetitivity of LES must still be addressed, especially when LES is used on massively parallel machines. This talk discusses some of these issues: (1) the existence of non physical waves (known as `wiggles' by most LES practitioners) in LES, (2) the effects of mesh size on LES of reacting flows, (3) the growth of rounding errors in LES on massively parallel machines and more generally (4) the ability to qualify a LES code as `bug free' and `accurate'. Examples range from academic cases (minimum non-reacting turbulent channel) to applied configurations (a sector of an helicopter combustion chamber).

  6. Numerical Study of Three-dimensional Spatial Instability of a Supersonic Flat Plate Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, A.; Krishnan, R.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of spatially growing three-dimensional waves in a supersonic boundary layer was studied numerically by solving the complete Navier-Stokes equations. Satisfactory comparison with linear parallel and non-parallel stability theories, and experiment are obtained when a small amplitude inflow disturbance is used. The three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a finite difference method which is fourth-order and second-order accurate in the convection and viscous terms respectively, and second-order accurate in time. Spanwise periodicity is assumed. The inflow disturbance is composed of eigenfunctions from linear stability theory. By increasing the amplitude of the inflow disturbance, nonlinear effects in the form of a relaxation type oscillation of the time signal of rho(u) are observed.

  7. Numerical 3D study of FZ growth: dependence on growth parameters and melt instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnieks, G.; Muižnieks, A.; Mühlbauer, A.; Raming, G.

    2001-08-01

    Three-dimensional modelling of the floating zone (needle-eye) crystal growth process is carried out to analyse numerically the stability of the melt flow and the influence of the crystal rotation rate and inductor slit width on the 3D flow field and on the grown crystal resistivity. The unsteadiness of the melt is simulated and it is found that for the considered growth parameters a steady-state flow can be a reasonable approximation to the unsteady melt motion. The parametric studies have shown that increasing the rotation rate essentially changes the flow pattern and weakens the rotational striations, while the inductor slit width has a more local influence on these characteristics.

  8. Three-dimensional instabilities of pantographic sheets with parabolic lattices: numerical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scerrato, Daria; Giorgio, Ivan; Rizzi, Nicola Luigi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we determine numerically a large class of equilibrium configurations of an elastic two-dimensional continuous pantographic sheet in three-dimensional deformation consisting of two families of fibers which are parabolic prior to deformation. The fibers are assumed (1) to be continuously distributed over the sample, (2) to be endowed of bending and torsional stiffnesses, and (3) tied together at their points of intersection to avoid relative slipping by means of internal (elastic) pivots. This last condition characterizes the system as a pantographic lattice (Alibert and Della Corte in Zeitschrift für angewandte Mathematik und Physik 66(5):2855-2870, 2015; Alibert et al. in Math Mech Solids 8(1):51-73, 2003; dell'Isola et al. in Int J Non-Linear Mech 80:200-208, 2016; Int J Solids Struct 81:1-12, 2016). The model that we employ here, developed by Steigmann and dell'Isola (Acta Mech Sin 31(3):373-382, 2015) and first investigated in Giorgio et al. (Comptes rendus Mecanique 2016, doi: 10.1016/j.crme.2016.02.009), is applicable to fiber lattices in which three-dimensional bending, twisting, and stretching are significant as well as a resistance to shear distortion, i.e., to the angle change between the fibers. Some relevant numerical examples are exhibited in order to highlight the main features of the model adopted: In particular, buckling and post-buckling behaviors of pantographic parabolic lattices are investigated. The fabric of the metamaterial presented in this paper has been conceived to resist more effectively in the extensional bias tests by storing more elastic bending energy and less energy in the deformation of elastic pivots: A comparison with a fabric constituted by beams which are straight in the reference configuration shows that the proposed concept is promising.

  9. A joint experimental and numerical study of mechanisms associated to instability of partial cavitation on two-dimensional hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, Jean-Baptiste; Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier; Astolfi, Jacques André

    2005-05-01

    The present work was carried out in the scope of a numerical-experimental collaborative research program, whose main objective is to understand the mechanisms of instabilities in partial cavitating flow. Experiments were conducted in the configuration of a rectangular foil located in a cavitation tunnel. Partial cavitation was investigated by multipoint wall-pressure measurements together with lift and drag measurements and numerical videos. The computations were conducted on two-dimensional hydrofoil section and are based on a single fluid model of cavitation: the liquid/vapor mixture is considered as a homogeneous fluid whose composition is regulated by a barotropic state law. The algorithm of resolution is derived from the SIMPLE approach, modified to take into account the high compressibility of the medium. Several physical features were pointed out by this joint approach. Particularly two distinct cavity self-oscillation dynamics characterized by two different frequencies (dynamics 1 and dynamics 2) were obtained experimentally and numerically at the angles of incidence of 6° and 8°. In both cases, the reentrant jet was found to be mainly responsible for the cavity breakdown. Dynamics 2 corresponds to the "classical" cavity breakdown and resulting cloud cavitation. A more complex flow pattern was evidenced for dynamics 1. In this case the growth/breakdown cycle of the cavity was observed at a lower Strouhal number (˜0.07/0.09) than dynamics 2 (˜0.3). Moreover, the mechanism is composed of two successive steps: (i) an interaction between the reentrant jet and the cavity interface in the closure region leading to the periodic shedding of secondary cavitation clouds before the main cloud detachment occurs, and (ii) a shock wave induced by the collapse of the main cloud, which influences the growth of the residual cavity.

  10. Direct numerical simulations of trailing-edge noise generated by boundary-layer instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, R. D.; Sandham, N. D.; Joseph, P. F.

    2007-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are conducted of noise generated at an infinitely thin trailing edge (TE). The aim is to predict the far-field sound and the near-field hydrodynamics, thereby providing an insight into the physical mechanisms of sound generation at airfoil TEs and potentially helping to validate acoustic theories. One of the theories widely used is the classical inviscid theory of Amiet, where the far-field sound can be evaluated in closed form if the convecting surface pressure spectrum upstream of the TE is known. For the first time, data from DNS including viscous effects are compared to the classical inviscid TE noise theory. In the present investigation, Tollmien-Schlichting waves are introduced close to the inflow boundary. The disturbances propagate downstream producing pressure fluctuations at the TE. In conducting two-dimensional DNS the theoretical method requires modification to account for the radiation of the total pressure difference in two dimensions only, as opposed to the three-dimensional sound radiation originally considered by Amiet. The modified theoretical analysis and a comparison between DNS and theoretical results are presented, scrutinizing the assumptions made in the derivation. Amiet's surface pressure jump transfer function is found to predict the scattered pressure field accurately. Directivity plots of DNS data show that viscous effects appear to smear individual lobes and that a downstream pointing lobe is present at higher Mach number which is attributed to an additional wake source.

  11. Numerical study of chiral plasma instability within the classical statistical field theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buividovich, P. V.; Ulybyshev, M. V.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a numerical study of real-time dynamics of electromagnetically interacting chirally imbalanced lattice Dirac fermions within the classical statistical field theory approach. Namely, we perform exact simulations of the real-time quantum evolution of fermionic fields coupled to classical electromagnetic fields, which are in turn coupled to the vacuum expectation value of the fermionic electric current. We use Wilson-Dirac Hamiltonian for fermions, and noncompact action for the gauge field. In general, we observe that the backreaction of fermions on the electromagnetic field prevents the system from acquiring chirality imbalance. In the case of chirality pumping in parallel electric and magnetic fields, the electric field is screened by the produced on-shell fermions and the accumulation of chirality is hence stopped. In the case of evolution with initially present chirality imbalance, axial charge tends to transform to helicity of the electromagnetic field. By performing simulations on large lattices we show that in most cases this decay process is accompanied by the inverse cascade phenomenon, which transfers energy from short-wavelength to long-wavelength electromagnetic fields. In some simulations, however, we observe a very clear signature of inverse cascade for the helical magnetic fields that is not accompanied by the axial charge decay. This suggests that the relation between the inverse cascade and axial charge decay is not as straightforward as predicted by the simplest form of anomalous Maxwell equations.

  12. Partition function zeros and magnetization plateaus of the spin-1 Ising-Heisenberg diamond chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, V. V.; Ananikian, N. S.; Kenna, R.

    2016-07-01

    We study the properties of the generalized spin-1 Ising-Heisenberg model on a diamond chain, which can be considered as a theoretical model for the homometallic magnetic complex [Ni3(C4H2O4)2 -(μ3 - OH) 2(H2O)4 ] n ṡ(2H2 O) n. The model possesses a large variety of ground-state phases due to the presence of biquadratic and single-ion anisotropy parameters. Magnetization and quadrupole moment plateaus are observed at one- and two-thirds of the saturation value. The distributions of Yang-Lee and Fisher zeros are studied numerically for a variety of values of the model parameters. The usual value σ = -1/2 alongside an unusual value σ = -2/3 ​is determined for the Yang-Lee edge singularity exponents.

  13. Numerical simulations of two-fluid turbulent mixing at large density ratios and applications to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    PubMed

    Livescu, D

    2013-11-28

    A tentative review is presented of various approaches for numerical simulations of two-fluid gaseous mixtures at high density ratios, as they have been applied to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI). Systems exhibiting such RTI behaviour extend from atomistic sizes to scales where the continuum approximation becomes valid. Each level of description can fit into a hierarchy of theoretical models and the governing equations appropriate for each model, with their assumptions, are presented. In particular, because the compressible to incompressible limit of the Navier-Stokes equations is not unique and understanding compressibility effects in the RTI critically depends on having the appropriate basis for comparison, two relevant incompressible limits are presented. One of these limits has not been considered before. Recent results from RTI simulations, spanning the levels of description presented, are reviewed in connection to the material mixing problem. Owing to the computational limitations, most in-depth RTI results have been obtained for the incompressible case. Two such results, concerning the asymmetry of the mixing and small-scale anisotropy anomaly, as well as the possibility of a mixing transition in the RTI, are surveyed. New lines for further investigation are suggested and it is hoped that bringing together such diverse levels of description may provide new ideas and increased motivation for studying such flows. PMID:24146007

  14. Sn Attenuation in the Iranian and Tibetan Plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, W.; Kaviani, A.; Bao, X.; Christopher, J.; Sandvol, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Iranian and Tibetan plateaus are both part of the Alpine-Himalayan mountain belt and both formed as a result of the continental collision (between Arabian plate, Indian plate and Eurasia plates). The two plateaus illustrate many of the same processes but at different stages of development. The Iranian plateau is a much less mature continental plateau than the Tibetan plateau with about half the elevation and a much thinner crust. In order to better understand the nature of the lithosphere mantle and origin of the measure seismic velocity anomalies we have made detailed measurements of the uppermost mantle attenuation using the high frequency regional phase Sn. In order to measure Sn attenuation. We have collected a large data set consisting of 18 years (1995-2012) of waveforms recorded by 305 permanent and temporary stations in Iran and 3 years (2007-2009) of waveforms recorded by 136 permanent and temporary stations in Tibet separately. We used a bandpass filter (0.1-0.5Hz) to identify efficient longer period Sn phases. In order to determine Sn Q we applied a Two Station Method (TSM) and Reverse Two Station Method (RTM) to eliminate the source effects. We have used the LSQR algorithm to tomographically map Sn attenuation tomography across the Iranian plateau. Our results show moderately low Q values beneath the Iranian plateau (~250) and high Q values beneath the south Caspian sea (~400) and Arabian shield (~400). The pattern we observe is roughly consistent with previous studies. We also observe high Q values beneath the Zagros mountains (~450) that is consistent with the Arabian plate underthrusting beneath the Eurasia plate. In Tibet we find high Q values beneath the Qaidam basin (~500) and low Q values beneath much of the Kunlun fault (~200). We also observe high Q values beneath the Bangong-Nujiang suture (~400) which can be explained that the Indian plate is underthrusting beneath the Eurasia plate. Comparing the Sn Q values beneath the Iranian and

  15. Geoid height versus topography for oceanic plateaus and swells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Mackenzie, Kevin R.

    1989-01-01

    Gridded geoid height data (Marsh et al.l, 1986) and gridded bathymetry data (Van Wykhouse, 1973) are used to estimate the average compensation depths of 53 oceanic swells and plateaus. The relationship between geoid height and topography is examined using Airy and thermal compensation models. It is shown that geoid height is linearly related to topography between wavelengths of 400 and 4000 m as predicted by isostatic compensation models. The geoid/topography ratio is dependent on the average depth of compensation. The intermediate geoid/topography ratios of most thermal swells are interpreted as a linear combination of the decaying thermal swell signature and that of the persisting Airy-compensated volcanic edifice.

  16. On the numerical simulation of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in laser-driven ICF targets using the FastRad3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Jason; Schmitt, Andrew; Zalesak, Steve

    2015-11-01

    The ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is a key factor in the performance of directly-drive inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) targets. Although this subject has been studied for quite some time, the accurate simulation of the ablative RT instability has proven to be a challenging task for many radiation hydrodynamics codes, particularly when it comes to capturing the ablatively-stabilized region of the linear dispersion spectrum and modeling ab initio perturbations. In this poster, we present results from recent two-dimensional numerical simulations of the ablative RT instability that were performed using the Eulerian code FastRad3D at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. We consider both planar and spherical geometries, low and moderate-Z target materials, different laser wavelengths and where possible, compare our findings with experiment data, linearized theory and/or results from other radiation hydrodynamics codes. Overall, we find that FastRad3D is capable of simulating the ablative RT instability quite accurately, although some uncertainties/discrepancies persist. We discuss these issues, as well as some of the numerical challenges associated with modeling this class of problems. Work supported by U.S. DOE/NNSA.

  17. Magnetization plateaus and phase diagrams of the Ising model on the Shastry-Sutherland lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deviren, Seyma Akkaya

    2015-11-01

    The magnetization properties of a two-dimensional spin-1/2 Ising model on the Shastry-Sutherland lattice are studied within the effective-field theory (EFT) with correlations. The thermal behavior of the magnetizations is investigated in order to characterize the nature (the first- or second-order) of the phase transitions as well as to obtain the phase diagrams of the model. The internal energy, specific heat, entropy and free energy of the system are also examined numerically as a function of the temperature in order to confirm the stability of the phase transitions. The applied field dependence of the magnetizations is also examined to find the existence of the magnetization plateaus. For strong enough magnetic fields, several magnetization plateaus are observed, e.g., at 1/9, 1/8, 1/3 and 1/2 of the saturation. The phase diagrams of the model are constructed in two different planes, namely (h/|J|, |J‧|/|J|) and (h/|J|, T/|J|) planes. It was found that the model exhibits first- and second-order phase transitions; hence tricitical point is also observed in additional to the zero-temperature critical point. Moreover the Néel order (N), collinear order (C) and ferromagnetic (F) phases are also found with appropriate values of the system parameters. The reentrant behavior is also obtained whenever model displays two Néel temperatures. These results are compared with some theoretical and experimental works and a good overall agreement has been obtained.

  18. Role of Magnetic Field Strength and Numerical Resolution in Simulations of the Heat-flux Driven Buoyancy Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avara, Mark J.; Reynolds, C. S.; Bogdanovic, T.

    2013-04-01

    The role played by magnetic fields in the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters is complex. The weakly collisional nature of the ICM leads to thermal conduction that is channeled along field lines. This anisotropic heat conduction profoundly changes the stability of the ICM atmosphere, with convective stabilities being driven by temperature gradients of either sign. We employ the Athena magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the local non-linear behavior of the heat-flux driven buoyancy instability (HBI), relevant in the cores of cooling-core clusters where the temperature increases with radius. We study a grid of 2-d simulations that span a large range of initial magnetic field strengths and numerical resolutions. For very weak initial fields, we recover the previously known result that the HBI wraps the field in the horizontal direction thereby shutting off the heat flux. However, we find that simulations which begin with intermediate initial field strengths have a qualitatively different behavior, forming HBI-stable filaments that resist field-line wrapping and enable sustained vertical conductive heat flux at a level of 10-25% of the Spitzer value. We explain the presence and persistence of these filaments in terms of the linear stability of the HBI and the total energetics of the plasma. A complimentary 3-d simulation of high resolution confirms the presence of sustained filaments and shows they can be formed in the ideal MHD regime, even without anisotropic viscosity, previously thought to be necessary. While astrophysical conclusions regarding the role of conduction in cooling cores require detailed global models and a better understanding of conduction in the ICM, our local study proves that systems dominated by HBI do not necessarily quench the conductive heat flux.

  19. Modelling Rayleigh Taylor instability of a sedimenting suspension of several thousand circular particles in a direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, T. W.; Joseph, D. D.; Glowinski, R.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper we study the sedimentation of several thousand circular particles in two dimensions using the method of distributed Lagrange multipliers for solid liquid flow. The simulation gives rise to fingering which resembles Rayleigh Taylor instabilities. The waves have a well-defined wavelength and growth rate which can be modelled as a conventional Rayleigh Taylor instability of heavy fluid above light. The heavy fluid is modelled as a composite solid liquid fluid with an effective composite density and viscosity. Surface tension cannot enter this problem and the characteristic shortwave instability is regularized by the viscosity of the solid liquid dispersion. The dynamics of the Rayleigh Taylor instability are studied using viscous potential flow, generalizing work of Joseph, Belanger & Beavers (1999) to a rectangular domain bounded by solid walls; an exact solution is obtained.

  20. Development of a 3D numerical model to evaluate the Stromboli NW flank instability in relation to magma intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apuani, T.; Merri, A.

    2009-04-01

    A stress-strain analysis of the Stromboli volcano was performed using a three-dimensional explicit finite difference numerical code (FLAC 3D, ITASCA, 2005), to evaluate the effects associated to the presence of magma pressure in magmatic conduit and to foresee the evolution of the magmatic feeding complex. The simulations considered both the ordinary state for the Stromboli, characterized by a partial fill of the active dyke with regular emission of gas and lava fountains and the paroxysmal conditions observed during the March 2007's eruptive crisis, with the magma level in the active dyke reaching the topographic surface along the Sciara del Fuoco depression. The modeling contributes to identify the most probable directions of propagation of new dikes, and the effects of their propagation on the stability of the volcano edifice. The numerical model extends 6 x 6 x 2.6 km3, with a mesh resolution of 100 m, adjusting the grid to fit the shape of the object to be modeled. An elasto-plastic constitutive law was adopted and an homogeneous Mohr-Coulomb strength criterion was chosen for the volcanic cone, assuming one lithotechnical unit (alternation of lava and breccia layers "lava-breccia unit"- Apuani et al 2005). The dykes are represented as discontinuities of the grid, and are modeled by means of interfaces. The magmatic pressure is imposed to the model as normal pressure applied on both sides of the interfaces. The magmastatic pressure was calculated as Pm=d•h, where d is the magma unit weight assumed equal to 25 KN/m3, and h (m) is the height of the magma column. Values of overpressure between 0 and 1 MPa were added to simulate the paroxysmal eruption. The simulation was implemented in successive stages, assuming the results of the previous stages as condition for the next one. A progressive propagation of the dike was simulated, in accordance with the stress conditions identified step by step, and in accordance with the evidences detected by in situ survey, and

  1. Karst morphology and groundwater vulnerability of high alpine karst plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plan, Lukas; Decker, Kurt; Faber, Robert; Wagreich, Michael; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    High alpine karst plateaus are recharge areas for major drinking water resources in the Alps and many other regions. Well-established methods for the vulnerability mapping of groundwater to contamination have not been applied to such areas yet. The paper characterises this karst type and shows that two common vulnerability assessment methods (COP and PI) classify most of the areas with high vulnerability classes. In the test site on the Hochschwab plateau (Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria), overlying layers are mostly absent, not protective or even enhance point recharge, where they have aquiclude character. The COP method classifies 82% of the area as highly or extremely vulnerable. The resulting maps are reasonable, but do not differentiate vulnerabilities to the extent that the results can be used for protective measures. An extension for the upper end of the vulnerability scale is presented that allows identifying ultra vulnerable areas. The proposed enhancement of the conventional approach points out that infiltration conditions are of key importance for vulnerability. The method accounts for karst genetical and hydrologic processes using qualitative and quantitative properties of karst depressions and sinking streams including parameters calculated from digital elevations models. The method is tested on the Hochschwab plateau where 1.7% of the area is delineated as ultra vulnerable. This differentiation could not be reached by the COP and PI methods. The resulting vulnerability map highlights spots of maximum vulnerability and the combination with a hazard map enables protective measures for a manageable area and number of sites.

  2. Line defects and quantum Hall plateaus in graphene.

    PubMed

    Dal Lago, V; Torres, L E F Foa

    2015-04-15

    Line defects in graphene can be either tailored-growth or arise naturally and are at the center of many discussions. Here we study the multiterminal conductance of graphene with an extended line defect in the quantum Hall regime analyzing the effects of the geometry of the setup, disorder and strain on the quantum Hall plateaus. We show that the defect turns out to affect the local and non-local conductance in very different ways depending on the geometrical configuration. When the defect is parallel to the sample edges one gets an equivalent circuit formed by parallel resistors. In contrast, when the defect bridges opposite edges, the Hall conductance may remain unaltered depending on the geometry of the voltage/current probes. The role of disorder, strain and the microscopic details of the defect in our results is also discussed. We show that the defect provides a realization of the electrical analog of an optical beam splitter. Its peculiar energy dependent inter-edge transmission allows it to be turned on or off at will and it may be used for routing the chiral edge states. PMID:25786352

  3. Report on the geology of the high plateaus of Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, C.E.; Powell, John Wesley

    1880-01-01

    In the year 1874 my kind friend Prof. J.W. Powell proposed to me that I should undertake, under his direction, the study of a large volcanic tract in the Territory of Utah, provided the consent of proper authority could be entertained. Distrusting my own fitness for the work, I felt that it would be better for him if his proposals were thankfully declined. In 1875, however, he renewed the proposition in such a friendly and complimentary manner that a refusal seemed ungracious. He therefore laid the matter before the Secretary of War, the General of the Army, and the Chief of Ordnance, all of whom gave their cordial approbation; and by order of the Ward Department I was detailed for duty in connection with the survey of the Rocky Mountain Region in charge of Professor Powell. The field which he assigned me to study was the District of the High Plateaus, and the investigations were made during the summers of 1875, 1876, and 1877. The preparation of a report or monograph upon the district has several times between interrupted by the pressure of other official duties to which the writer has been assigned during the last three years.

  4. Crustal volumes of the continents and of oceanic and continental submarine plateaus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Sandwell, D.

    1989-01-01

    Using global topographic data and the assumption of Airy isostasy, it is estimated that the crustal volume of the continents is 7182 X 10 to the 6th cu km. The crustal volumes of the oceanic and continental submarine plateaus are calculated at 369 X 10 to the 6th cu km and 242 X 10 to the 6th cu km, respectively. The total continental crustal volume is found to be 7581 X 10 to the 6th cu km, 3.2 percent of which is comprised of continental submarine plateaus on the seafloor. An upper bound on the contintental crust addition rate by the accretion of oceanic plateaus is set at 3.7 cu km/yr. Subduction of continental submarine plateaus with the oceanic lithosphere on a 100 Myr time scale yields an upper bound to the continental crustal subtraction rate of 2.4 cu km/yr.

  5. Clustering of cochlear oscillations in frequency plateaus as a tool to investigate SOAE generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epp, Bastian; Wit, Hero; van Dijk, Pim

    2015-12-01

    Spontonaeous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE) reflect the net effect of self-sustained activity in the cochlea, but do not directly provide information about the underlying mechanism and place of origin within the cochlea. The present study investigates if frequency plateaus as found in a linear array of coupled oscillators (OAM) [7] are also found in a transmission line model (TLM) which is able to generate realistic SOAEs [2] and if these frequency plateaus can be used to explain the formation of SOAEs. The simulations showed a clustering of oscillators along the simulated basilar membrane Both, the OAM and the TLM show traveling-wave like behavior along the oscillators coupled into one frequency plateau. While in the TLM roughness is required in order to produce SOAEs, no roughness is required to trigger frequency plateaus in the linear array of oscillators. The formation of frequency plateaus as a consequence of coupling between neighbored active oscillators might be the mechanism underlying SOAEs.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Hydrodynamic Instability Growth in Polar-Direct-Drive Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvydky, A.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Craxton, R. S.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    Control of shell nonuniformities imprinted by the laser and amplified by hydrodynamic instabilities in the imploding target is critical to the success of polar-direct-drive ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To develop a platform for laser-imprint studies, hydrodynamic instability growth experiments in laser-driven implosions were performed on the NIF. The experiments used cone-in-shell targets with sinusoidal modulations of various wavelengths and amplitudes machined on the surface. Throughshell x-ray radiography was used to measure optical depth variations, from which the amplitudes of the shell areal-density modulations were extracted. Results of DRACO simulations of the growth of preimposed modulations and imprint-seeded perturbations will be presented and compared with the experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. TWO-DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL STUDY FOR RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR AND RICHTMYER-MESHKOV INSTABILITIES IN RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Jin; Masada, Youhei

    2013-07-20

    We study the stability of a non-rotating single-component jet using two-dimensional special relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. By assuming translational invariance along the jet axis, we exclude the destabilization effect by Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. The nonlinear evolution of the transverse structure of the jet with a normal jet velocity is highlighted. An intriguing finding in our study is that Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov type instabilities can destroy cylindrical jet configuration as a result of spontaneously induced radial oscillating motion. This is powered by in situ energy conversion between the thermal and bulk kinetic energies. The effective inertia ratio of the jet to the surrounding medium {eta} determines a threshold for the onset of instabilities. The condition {eta} < 1 should be satisfied for the transverse structure of the jet being persisted.

  8. Self-Consistant Numerical Modeling of E-Cloud Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J-L.; Furman, M.A.; Secondo, R.; Venturini, M.; Fox, J.D.; Rivetta, C.H,

    2010-09-01

    The simulation package WARP-POSINST was recently upgraded for handling multiple bunches and modeling concurrently the electron cloud buildup and its effect on the beam, allowing for direct self-consistent simulation of bunch trains generating, and interacting with, electron clouds. We have used the WARP-POSINST package on massively parallel supercomputers to study the growth rate and frequency patterns in space-time of the electron cloud driven transverse instability for a proton bunch train in the CERN SPS accelerator. Results suggest that a positive feedback mechanism exists between the electron buildup and the e-cloud driven transverse instability, leading to a net increase in predicted electron density. Comparisons to selected experimental data are also given. Electron clouds have been shown to trigger fast growing instabilities on proton beams circulating in the SPS and other accelerators. So far, simulations of electron cloud buildup and their effects on beam dynamics have been performed separately. This is a consequence of the large computational cost of the combined calculation due to large space and time scale disparities between the two processes. We have presented the latest improvements of the simulation package WARP-POSINST for the simulation of self-consistent ecloud effects, including mesh refinement, and generation of electrons from gas ionization and impact at the pipe walls. We also presented simulations of two consecutive bunches interacting with electrons clouds in the SPS, which included generation of secondary electrons. The distribution of electrons in front of the first beam was initialized from a dump taken from a preceding buildup calculation using the POSINST code. In this paper, we present an extension of this work where one full batch of 72 bunches is simulated in the SPS, including the entire buildup calculation and the self-consistent interaction between the bunches and the electrons. Comparisons to experimental data are also given.

  9. Mitigation of numerical Cerenkov radiation and instability using a hybrid finite difference-FFT Maxwell solver and a local charge conserving current deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Tableman, Adam; Decyk, Viktor K.; Tsung, Frank S.; Fiuza, Frederico; Davidson, Asher; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2015-12-01

    A hybrid Maxwell solver for fully relativistic and electromagnetic (EM) particle-in-cell (PIC) codes is described. In this solver, the EM fields are solved in k space by performing an FFT in one direction, while using finite difference operators in the other direction(s). This solver eliminates the numerical Cerenkov radiation for particles moving in the preferred direction. Moreover, the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) induced by the relativistically drifting plasma and beam can be eliminated using this hybrid solver by applying strategies that are similar to those recently developed for pure FFT solvers. A current correction is applied for the charge conserving current deposit to ensure that Gauss's Law is satisfied. A theoretical analysis of the dispersion properties in vacuum and in a drifting plasma for the hybrid solver is presented, and compared with PIC simulations with good agreement obtained. This hybrid solver is applied to both 2D and 3D Cartesian and quasi-3D (in which the fields and current are decomposed into azimuthal harmonics) geometries. Illustrative results for laser wakefield accelerator simulation in a Lorentz boosted frame using the hybrid solver in the 2D Cartesian geometry are presented, and compared against results from 2D UPIC-EMMA simulation which uses a pure spectral Maxwell solver, and from OSIRIS 2D lab frame simulation using the standard Yee solver. Very good agreement is obtained which demonstrates the feasibility of using the hybrid solver for high fidelity simulation of relativistically drifting plasma with no evidence of the numerical Cerenkov instability.

  10. Direct Numerical Modeling of E-Cloud Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J-L.; Furman, M.A.; Venturini, M.

    2011-03-01

    The simulation package WARP-POSINST was recently upgraded for handling multiple bunches and modeling concurrently the electron cloud buildup and its effect on the beam, allowing for direct self-consistent simulation of bunch trains generating, and interacting with, electron clouds. We have used the WARP-POSINST package on massively parallel supercomputers to study the buildup and interaction of electron clouds with a proton bunch train in the CERN SPS accelerator. Results suggest that a positive feedback mechanism exists between the electron buildup and the e-cloud driven transverse instability, leading to a net increase in predicted electron density. Electron clouds have been shown to trigger fast growing instabilities on proton beams circulating in the SPS and other accelerators. So far, simulations of electron cloud buildup and their effects on beam dynamics have been performed separately. This is a consequence of the large computational cost of the combined calculation due to large space and time scale disparities between the two processes. We have presented the latest improvements of the simulation package WARP-POSINST for the simulation of self-consistent ecloud effects, including mesh refinement, and generation of electrons from gas ionization and impact at the pipe walls. We also presented simulations of two consecutive bunches interacting with electrons clouds in the SPS, which included generation of secondary electrons. The distribution of electrons in front of the first beam was initialized from a dump taken from a preceding buildup calculation using the POSINST code. In this paper, we present an extension of this work where one full batch of 72 bunches is simulated in the SPS, including the entire buildup calculation and the self-consistent interaction between the bunches and the electrons.

  11. Magnetization plateaus in the antiferromagnetic Ising chain with single-ion anisotropy and quenched disorder.

    PubMed

    Neto, Minos A; de Sousa, J Ricardo; Branco, N S

    2015-05-01

    We have studied the presence of plateaus on the low-temperature magnetization of an antiferromagnetic spin-1 chain, as an external uniform magnetic field is varied. A crystal-field interaction is present in the model and the exchange constants follow a random quenched (Bernoulli or Gaussian) distribution. Using a transfer-matrix technique we calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent and, from it, the magnetization at low temperatures as a function of the magnetic field, for different values of the crystal field and the width of the distributions. For the Bernoulli distribution, the number of plateaus increases, with respect to the uniform case [Litaiff et al., Solid State Commun. 147, 494 (2008)] and their presence can be linked to different ground states, when the magnetic field is varied. For the Gaussian distributions, the uniform scenario is maintained, for small widths, but the plateaus structure disappears as the width increases. PMID:26066165

  12. Pressure dependence of the magnetization plateaus of SrCu2(BO3)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, David A.; Coester, Kris; Mila, Frédéric; Schmidt, Kai Phillip

    2016-06-01

    We show that the critical fields of the magnetization plateaus of the Shastry-Sutherland model decrease significantly upon increasing the ratio of inter- to intradimer coupling and accordingly that the magnetization plateaus of SrCu2(BO3)2 shift to lower field under pressure, making the first two plateaus at 1 /8 and 2 /15 potentially accessible to neutron scattering experiments. These conclusions are based on the derivation of an effective classical model of interacting pinwheel-shaped spin-2 bound states using a combination of perturbative and graph-based continuous unitary transformations, showing that pinwheel crystals are indeed the lowest-energy plateau structures at low magnetization and that a simple model of intermediate-range two-body repulsion between pinwheels is able to account quantitatively for the plateau sequence.

  13. Franciscan complex calera limestones: Accreted remnants of farallon plate oceanic plateaus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarduno, J.A.; McWilliams, M.; Debiche, M.G.; Sliter, W.V.; Blake, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Calera Limestone, part of the Franciscan Complex of northern California, may have formed in a palaeoenvironment similar to Hess and Shatsky Rises of the present north-west Pacific1. We report here new palaeomagnetic results, palaeontological data and recent plate-motion models that reinforce this assertion. The Calera Limestone may have formed on Farallon Plate plateaus, north of the Pacific-Farallon spreading centre as a counterpart to Hess or Shatsky Rises. In one model2, the plateaus were formed by hotspots close to the Farallon_Pacific ridge axis. On accretion to North America, plateau dissection in the late Cretaceous to Eocene (50-70 Myr) could explain the occurrence of large volumes of pillow basalt and exotic blocks of limestone in the Franciscan Complex. Partial subduction of the plateaus could have contributed to Laramide (70-40 Myr) compressional events3. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. Theoretical and numerical treatment of modal instability in high-power core and cladding-pumped Raman fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Shadi; Dajani, Iyad; Grosek, Jacob; Madden, Timothy

    2016-07-25

    Raman fiber lasers have been proposed as potential candidates for scaling beyond the power limitations imposed on near diffraction-limited rare-earth doped fiber lasers. One limitation is the modal instability (MI) and we explore the physics of this phenomenon in Raman fiber amplifiers (RFAs). By utilizing the conservation of number of photons and conservation of energy in the absence of loss, the 3 × 3 governing system of nonlinear equations describing the pump and the signal modal content are decoupled and solved analytically for cladding-pumped RFAs. By comparing the extracted signal at MI threshold for the same step index-fiber, it is found that the MI threshold is independent of the length of the amplifier or whether the amplifier is co-pumped or counter-pumped; dictated by the integrated heat load along the length of fiber. We extend our treatment to gain-tailored RFAs and show that this approach is of limited utility in suppressing MI. Finally, we formulate the physics of MI in core-pumped RFAs where both pump and signal interferences participate in writing the time-dependent index of refraction grating. PMID:27464110

  15. Crustal structure in the eastern Colorado Plateaus Provence from seismic-refraction measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roller, John C.

    1964-01-01

    A reversed seismic-refraction profile was recorded in the Colorado Plateaus Province from Hanksville, Utah, to Chinle, Arizona, The velocity of Pg is 6.2 km/sec, and the true velocity of Pn is 7.8 km/sec, Waves identified as reflections indicate that an intermediate layer in the crust has a velocity of approximately 6.8 km/sec. Thickness of the crust is 43 km at Chinle and 40 km at Hanksville. The Pn velocity in the Colorado Plateaus Province is the same as that in the Basin and Range Province, but is significantly lower than Pn in the High Plains of Colorado.

  16. Erosion and tectonics at the margins of continental plateaus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, Jeffrey G.; Isacks, Bryan L.; Gubbels, Timothy L.; Fielding, Eric J.

    1994-01-01

    We hypothesize that the steep frontal slope and high peaks of the Beni region and Himalayan front largely reflect the high orographic precipitation and high erosion rates occurring in these regions and that the more gentle topography of the semiarid Pilcomayo region reflects a tectonic landform only slightly modified by erosion. We propose that orographic precipitation impinging on a plateau margin will generally tend to drop moisture low on the slope, eroding back the plateau while enhancing or maintaining the steep long-wavelength slope. A numerical model coupling orographic precipitation, erosion, and tectonic uplift demonstrates the plausibility of this hypothesis. The erosional efflux in both the Beni and Nepal Himalaya have been considerable, and simple mass balance calculations for the Himalaya suggest that during the Neogene, the erosional mass efflux has generally outpaced the tectonic mass influx. This contrasts with the apparent prior domination of tectonic influx and may reflect a decrease in the rate of tectonic addition during the same period, and/or increased late Cenozoic erosion rates.

  17. The tectonic setting of the Seychelles, Mascarene and Amirante Plateaus in the Western Equatorial Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mart, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A system of marine plateaus occurs in the western equatorial Indian Ocean, forming an arcuate series of wide and shallow banks with small islands in places. The oceanic basins that surround the Seychelles - Amirante region are of various ages and reflect a complex seafloor spreading pattern. The structural analysis of the Seychelle - Amirante - Mascarene region reflects the tectonic evolution of the western equatorial Indian Ocean. It is suggested that due to the seafloor spreading during a tectonic stage, the Seychelles continental block drifted southwestwards to collide with the oceanic crust of the Mascarene Basin, forming an elongated folded structure at first, and then a subduction zone. The morphological similarity, the lithological variability and the different origin of the Seychelles Bank, the Mascarene Plateau and the Amirante Arc emphasizes the significant convergent effects of various plate tectonic processes on the development of marine plateaus.

  18. Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units within the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system, northwestern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czarnecki, John B.; Bolyard, Susan E.; Hart, Rheannon M.; Clark, Jimmy M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital surfaces and thicknesses of nine hydrogeologic units of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system from land surface to the top of the Gunter Sandstone in northwestern Arkansas were created using geophysical logs, drillers’ logs, geologist-interpreted formation tops, and previously published maps. The 6,040 square mile study area in the Ozark Plateaus Province includes Benton, Washington, Carroll, Madison, Boone, Newton, Marion, and Searcy Counties. The top of each hydrogeologic unit delineated on geophysical logs was based partly on previously published reports and maps and also from drillers’ logs. These logs were then used as a basis to contour digital surfaces showing the top and thickness of the Fayetteville Shale, the Boone Formation, the Chattanooga Shale, the Everton Formation, the Powell Dolomite, the Cotter Dolomite, the Roubidoux Formation, the Gasconade Dolomite, and the Gunter Sandstone.

  19. Crustal thinning between the Ethiopian and East African Plateaus from modeling Rayleigh wave dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, M H; Nyblade, A A; Pasyanos, M E

    2006-01-17

    The East African and Ethiopian Plateaus have long been recognized to be part of a much larger topographic anomaly on the African Plate called the African Superswell. One of the few places within the African Superswell that exhibit elevations of less than 1 km is southeastern Sudan and northern Kenya, an area containing both Mesozoic and Cenozoic rift basins. Crustal structure and uppermost mantle velocities are investigated in this area by modeling Rayleigh wave dispersion. Modeling results indicate an average crustal thickness of 25 {+-} 5 km, some 10-15 km thinner than the crust beneath the adjacent East African and Ethiopian Plateaus. The low elevations can therefore be readily attributed to an isostatic response from crustal thinning. Low Sn velocities of 4.1-4.3 km/s also characterize this region.

  20. Identification and occurrence of uranium and vanadium minerals from the Colorado Plateaus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, A.D.; Thompson, M.E.

    1954-01-01

    This report, designed to make available to field geologists and others informa- tion obtained in recent investigations by the Geological Survey on identification and occurrence of uranium minerals of the Colorado Plateaus, contains descriptions of the physical properties, X-ray data, and in some instances results of chemical and spectrographic analysis of 48 uranium and vanadium minerals. Also included is a list of locations of mines from which the minerals have been identified.

  1. Retired flies, hidden plateaus, and the evolution of senescence in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Curtsinger, James W

    2016-06-01

    Late-life plateaus in age-specific mortality have been an evolutionary and biodemographic puzzle for decades. Although classic theory on the evolution of senescence predicts late-life walls of death, observations in experimental organisms document the opposite trend: a slowing in the rate of increase of mortality at advanced ages. Here, I analyze published life-history data on individual Drosophila melanogaster females and argue for a fundamental change in our understanding of mortality in this important model system. Mortality plateaus are not, as widely assumed, exclusive to late life, and are not explained by population heterogeneity-they are intimately connected to individual fecundity. Female flies begin adult life in the working stage, a period of active oviposition and low but accelerating mortality. Later they transition to the retired stage, a terminal period characterized by limited fecundity and relatively constant mortality. Because ages of transition differ between flies, age-synchronized cohorts contain a mix of working and retired flies. Early- and mid-life plateaus are obscured by the presence of working flies, but can be detected when cohorts are stratified by retirement status. Stage-specificity may be an important component of Drosophila life-history evolution. PMID:27166620

  2. Superplumes and ridge interactions between Ontong Java and Manihiki Plateaus and the Nova-Canton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Roger L.

    1997-09-01

    The initial pulse of volcanism on the Ontong Java and Manihiki Plateaus began prior to 123 124 Ma and had largely ceased by about 122 Ma, whereas the intervening Pacific-Phoenix spreading ridge probably was disrupted between 120 and 115 Ma by formation of the Nova-Canton Trough rift system. Plateau formation may have resulted from a large plume head that rose beneath each of the two plateau sites. During the plateau eruption phase, these two plumes spread beyond the plateaus and within the asthenosphere. They eventually coalesced beneath the intervening spreading ridge, where the Nova-Canton Trough rift system is now located, at about the time volcanism ceased on the plateaus. The two plumes combined to form the Nova-Canton Trough rift system by reheating the nascent lithosphere near the ridge crest and widening the plate boundary from the usual 1 10 km to a much broader region. The present rift system is a maximum of 500 km wide, and much of this area may have formed by normal faulting and crustal accretion across the broadened plate boundary as plate divergence continued. Eventually, coherent spreading resumed somewhere south of the Nova-Canton Trough rift system.

  3. Detection of vertebral plateaus in lateral lumbar spinal X-ray images with Gabor filters.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Ribeiro, Eduardo; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Azevedo-Marques, Paulo M

    2010-01-01

    A few recent studies have proposed computed-aided methods for the detection and analysis of vertebral bodies in radiographic images. This paper presents a method based on Gabor filters. Forty-one lateral lumbar spinal X-ray images from different patients were included in the study. For each image, a radiologist manually delineated the vertebral plateaus of L1, L2, L3, and L4 using a software tool for image display and mark-up. Each original image was filtered with a bank of 180 Gabor filters. The angle of the Gabor filter with the highest response at each pixel was used to derive a measure of the strength of orientation or alignment. In order to limit the spatial extent of the image data and the derived features in further analysis, a semi-automated procedure was applied to the original image. A neural network utilizing the logistic sigmoid function was trained with pixel intensity from the original image, the result of manual delineation of the plateaus, the Gabor magnitude response, and the alignment image. The average overlap between the results of detection by image processing and manual delineation of the plateaus of L1-L4 in the 41 images tested was 0.917. The results are expected to be useful in the analysis of vertebral deformities and fractures. PMID:21097095

  4. Two-fluid instability

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, H.B.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of interpenetrating flow models to represent multidimensional instabilities is probed by numerical experiments with an L-shaped two-fluid jet. Periodic and nonperiodic oscillations of various types are observed, and a partial phase portrait is constructed. The numerical experiments suggest new approaches to verifying transient interpenetrating flow models. 18 references.

  5. Numerical study of friction-induced instability and acoustic radiation - Effect of ramp loading on the squeal propensity for a simplified brake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soobbarayen, K.; Sinou, J.-J.; Besset, S.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the influence of loading conditions on the vibrational and acoustic responses of a disc brake system subjected to squeal. A simplified model composed of a circular disc and a pad is proposed. Nonlinear effects of contact and friction over the frictional interface are modelled with a cubic law and a classical Coulomb's law with a constant friction coefficient. The stability analysis of this system shows the presence of two instabilities with one and two unstable modes that lead to friction-induced nonlinear vibrations and squeal noise. Nonlinear time analysis by temporal integration is conducted for two cases of loadings and initial conditions: a static load near the associated sliding equilibrium and a slow and a fast ramp loading. The analysis of the time responses shows that a sufficiently fast ramp loading can destabilize a stable configuration and generate nonlinear vibrations. Moreover, the fast ramp loading applied for the two unstable cases generates higher amplitudes of velocity than for the static load cases. The frequency analysis shows that the fast ramp loading generates a more complex spectrum than for the static load with the appearance of new resonance peaks. The acoustic responses for these cases are estimated by applying the multi-frequency acoustic calculation method based on the Fourier series decomposition of the velocity and the Boundary Element Method. Squeal noise emissions for the fast ramp loading present lower or higher levels than for the static load due to the different amplitudes of velocities. Moreover, the directivity is more complex for the fast ramp loading due to the appearance of new harmonic components in the velocity spectrum. Finally, the sound pressure convergence study shows that only the first harmonic components are sufficient to well describe the acoustic response.

  6. Correlating Cordilleran Ice Sheet Collapse with North Atlantic Heinrich Events using Global Radiocarbon Plateaus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, I. L.; Cosma, T.

    2006-12-01

    The small, ephemeral Cordilleran Ice Sheet, present in Alaska, British Columbia and northern Washington during the last glacial cycle is believed to have behaved differently than the larger Laurentice Ice Sheet to climate forcing. High quality chronology is required to understand the relationship between this ice sheet and global climate change. Presently MD02-2496 (48°58.47N: 127°02.14W; 1190m water depth) is the highest resolution paleoclimate record available for the last 50 Ka in the Pacific northwest and contains intervals of glacial-marine sedimentation. High resolution dating based on 36 radiocarbon dates provide a chronology that includes radiocarbon age plateaus, while planktonic foraminiferal stable isotopes offer a continuous record of climate change. Glacial-marine sediments collected from this site on the continental slope west of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, document three intervals of iceberg discharge during the last ~50 Ka. Gradually increasing quantities of ice rafted detritus (grains >250μm, g-1; IRD) followed by abrupt cessation within ~500 years is strongly suggestive of catastrophic iceberg discharge. The penultimate event is correlated to marine invasion of the Juan de Fuca Strait, and Puget Sound, while the final IRD event with that of Georgia Strait. We posit that these previously unknown IRD events represent repeated rapid iceberg discharge related to Cordilleran Ice Sheet collapse. The events occur near the end of radiocarbon plateaus at 13.35 ±90 and 14.05 ±70 14C Kyr BP (not reservoir corrected). If these plateaus correlate with the 12.2 and 13.3 14C Kyr BP plateaus recorded in Carriaco Basin and elsewhere, local reservoir ages can be calculated and vary between 1,150 and 1,550 years similar to those derived locally from glacial wood-shell pairs. Furthermore, if the plateaus result from reduced North Atlantic Deep Water export and consequently Heinrich Events, the Cordilleran IRD events are related to North Atlantic iceberg

  7. Effects of Coarse Legacy Sediment on Rivers of the Ozark Plateaus and Implications for Native Mussel Fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, S. O.; Jacobson, R. B.; Eric, A. B.; Jones, J. C.; Anderson, B. W.

    2015-12-01

    Perturbations to sediment regimes due to anthropogenic activities may have long lasting effects, especially in systems dominated by coarse sediment where travel times are relatively long. Effectively evaluating management alternatives requires understanding the future trajectory of river response at both the river network and reach scales. The Ozark Plateaus physiographic province is a montane region in the interior US composed primarily of Paleozoic sedimentary rock. Historic land-use practices around the turn of the last century accelerated delivery of coarse sediment to river channels. Effects of this legacy sediment persist in two national parks, Ozark National Scenic Riverways, MO and Buffalo National River, AR, and are of special concern for management of native mussel fauna. These species require stable habitat, yet they occupy inherently dynamic environments: alluvial rivers. At the river-network scale, analysis of historical data reveals the signature of sediment waves moving through river networks in the Ozarks. Channel planform alternates between relatively stable, straight reaches, and wider, multithread reaches which have been more dynamic over the past several decades. These alternate planform configurations route and store sediment differently, and translate into different patterns of bed stability at the reach scale, which in turn affects the distribution and availability of habitat for native biota. Geomorphic mapping and hydrodynamic modeling reveal the complex relations between planform (in)stability, flow dynamics, bed mobility, and aquatic habitat in systems responding to increased sediment supply. Reaches that have a more dynamic planform may provide more hydraulic refugia and habitat heterogeneity compared to stable, homogeneous reaches. This research provides new insights that may inform management of sediment and mussel habitat in rivers subject to coarse legacy sediment.

  8. Shoulder Instability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Factors Is shoulder instability the same as shoulder dislocation? No. The signs of dislocation and instability might ... the same to you--weakness and pain. However, dislocation occurs when your shoulder goes completely out of place. The shoulder ligaments ...

  9. Water quality in the Ozark Plateaus, Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma, 1992-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, James C.; Adamski, James C.; Bell, Richard W.; Davis, Jerri V.; Femmer, Suzanne R.; Freiwald, David A.; Joseph, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This report is intended to summarize major findings that emerged between 1992 and 1995 from the water-quality assessment of the Ozark Plateaus Study Unit and to relate these findings to water-quality issues of regional and national concern. The information is primarily intended for those who are involved in water-resource management. Yet, the information contained here may also interest those who simply wish to know more about the quality of water in the rivers and aquifers in the area where they live.

  10. Ground water in the Springfield-Salem plateaus of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Edward Joseph

    1980-01-01

    Average ground-water conditions have not changed significantly in the Springfield-Salem plateaus section of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas in the past 25 years except in the vicinity of well fields. The amount of ground water pumped is approximately 200 cubic feet per second, which is about 5 percent of the total discharge at the 80 percent point on flow-duration curves for major streams. Ground-water recharge is variable and occurs through sinkholes by infiltration in upland areas of good permeability, and through streambeds that lose flow. Main waterbearing zones lie in the Potosi Dolomite and the lower dolomite and sandstone of the Gasconade Dolomite. Cavernous connections from ground surface to depths as great as 1,500 feet occur in the West Plains area, Mo., and result in deep circulation of water. Municipal well-water in the area often becomes turbid after rainstorms, despite well depths of 1 ,500 feet and 950 to 1,000 feet of pressure-grouted casing. Ground-water movement is generaly north and south from the crest of the Springfield-Salem plateaus, which extend across southern Missouri from the St. Francois Mountains to the southwest. Interbasin diversion of surface- and ground-water flow is common. (USGS)

  11. Key wintertime meteorological features of the Grand Canyon and the Colorado Plateaus Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Allwine, K.J.

    1992-06-01

    In the winter of 1989--1990 a major meteorological and air pollution experiment was conducted in the Colorado Plateaus Basin (Richards et al., 1991). The focus of the experiment, conducted by Arizona`s Soft River Project, was to investigate the influence of three 750-MW coal-fired power plant units at the Navajo Generating Station near Page, Arizona, on visibility at Grand Canyon National Park. As part of the meteorological experiment, surface and upper air data were collected from multiple sites within the basin. This data set is the most comprehensive meteorological data set ever collected within the region, and the purpose of this paper is to briefly summarize the key wintertime meteorological features of the Colorado Plateaus Basin and the Grand Canyon, through which the basin drains, using analyses of the Winter Visibility Study data. Our analyses focused primarily on thermally driven circulations within the basin and the Grand Canyon, but we also investigated the surface energy budget that drives these circulations and the interactions between the thermal circulations and the overlying synoptic-scale flows.

  12. Key wintertime meteorological features of the Grand Canyon and the Colorado Plateaus Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Allwine, K.J.

    1992-06-01

    In the winter of 1989--1990 a major meteorological and air pollution experiment was conducted in the Colorado Plateaus Basin (Richards et al., 1991). The focus of the experiment, conducted by Arizona's Soft River Project, was to investigate the influence of three 750-MW coal-fired power plant units at the Navajo Generating Station near Page, Arizona, on visibility at Grand Canyon National Park. As part of the meteorological experiment, surface and upper air data were collected from multiple sites within the basin. This data set is the most comprehensive meteorological data set ever collected within the region, and the purpose of this paper is to briefly summarize the key wintertime meteorological features of the Colorado Plateaus Basin and the Grand Canyon, through which the basin drains, using analyses of the Winter Visibility Study data. Our analyses focused primarily on thermally driven circulations within the basin and the Grand Canyon, but we also investigated the surface energy budget that drives these circulations and the interactions between the thermal circulations and the overlying synoptic-scale flows.

  13. Colorado Plateaus Ecoregion: Chapter 21 in Status and trends of land change in the Western United States--1973 to 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stier, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The Colorado Plateaus Ecoregion covers approximately 129,617 km2 (50,045 mi2) within southern and eastern Utah, western Colorado, and the extreme northern part of Arizona (fig. 1). The terrain of this ecoregion is characterized by broad plateaus, ancient volcanoes, and deeply dissected canyons (Booth and others, 1999; fig. 2). The ecoregion is bounded on the east by the Wyoming Basin and Southern Rockies Ecoregions in Colorado and on the northwest by the Wasatch and Uinta Mountains Ecoregion in northern and central Utah. To the south, the ecoregion borders the Arizona/New Mexico Plateau Ecoregion, which has a higher elevation and more grasslands than the Colorado Plateaus Ecoregion (Omernik, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997).

  14. Hip instability.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew V; Sekiya, Jon K

    2010-06-01

    Hip instability is becoming a more commonly recognized source of pain and disability in patients. Traumatic causes of hip instability are often clear. Appropriate treatment includes immediate reduction, early surgery for acetabular rim fractures greater than 25% or incarcerated fragments in the joint, and close follow-up to monitor for avascular necrosis. Late surgical intervention may be necessary for residual symptomatic hip instability. Atraumatic causes of hip instability include repetitive external rotation with axial loading, generalized ligamentous laxity, and collagen disorders like Ehlers-Danlos. Symptoms caused by atraumatic hip instability often have an insidious onset. Patients may have a wide array of hip symptoms while demonstrating only subtle findings suggestive of capsular laxity. Traction views of the affected hip can be helpful in diagnosing hip instability. Open and arthroscopic techniques can be used to treat capsular laxity. We describe an arthroscopic anterior hip capsular plication using a suture technique. PMID:20473129

  15. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  16. Crustal Structure of the Ethiopian Rift and Adjacent Plateaus: Results of new integrated interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, K.; Keller, G. R.

    2006-12-01

    The Ethiopian rift is the large part of the East African Rift system, which represents an incipient divergent plate boundary. This important structure provides excellent opportunities to study the transition from continental to oceanic. As a result, geophysical data are becoming increasingly available but some results are contradictory. We used a newly enhanced gravity database and seismic information to produce an integrated interpretation of the crustal structure beneath the Ethiopian rift and the adjacent plateaus. Wide regions have been covered to assess the regional structures including the Kenyan and Ethiopian rifts and the area covered by the Ethiopian flood basalt. Broad negative Bouguer gravity anomalies are delineated over the Ethiopian Plateaus and the Kenyan dome. Residual gravity anomalies, which parallel the major border faults clearly highlight the segregation between the plateaus and the rift valleys. Results of other filtering techniques have clearly revealed individual volcanic centers within the rift valleys. Positive gravity anomalies outside the rift valleys may be associated with older structures, shield volcanoes, or structures that are related to the initiation and propagation of rifting. A long axial profile from the central part of Kenya to the Afar triple junction has been modeled to investigate along-axis crustal variation of the East African rift system, with emphasis on the Ethiopian rift. This modeling has been constrained using seismic refraction data from the Ethiopian Afar Geoscientific Lithospheric Experiment (EAGLE) and Kenya Rift International Seismic Project (KRISP) results. We are able to see a thin crust (~26 km) in the Afar triangle with a gradual thickening (~40 km) southwards towards the Main Central Ethiopian rift (MER). The crust thickness decreases towards Turkana rift (~22 km), and increases again towards the central eastern rift section in Kenya. Our profile model across the MER has revealed that the eastern rift

  17. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF THE MAGNETIC RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY IN THE KIPPENHAHN-SCHLUeTER PROMINENCE MODEL. I. FORMATION OF UPFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Hillier, Andrew; Isobe, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazunari; Berger, Thomas

    2012-02-20

    The launch of the Hinode satellite led to the discovery of rising plumes, dark in chromospheric lines, that propagate from large ({approx}10 Mm) bubbles that form at the base of quiescent prominences. The plumes move through a height of approximately 10 Mm while developing highly turbulent profiles. The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability was hypothesized to be the mechanism that drives these flows. In this study, using three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations, we investigate the nonlinear stability of the Kippenhahn-Schlueter prominence model for the interchange mode of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The model simulates the rise of a buoyant tube inside the quiescent prominence model, where the interchange of magnetic field lines becomes possible at the boundary between the buoyant tube and the prominence. Hillier et al. presented the initial results of this study, where upflows of constant velocity (maximum found 6 km s{sup -1}) and a maximum plume width Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Mm which propagate through a height of approximately 6 Mm were found. Nonlinear interaction between plumes was found to be important for determining the plume dynamics. In this paper, using the results of ideal MHD simulations, we determine how the initial parameters for the model and buoyant tube affect the evolution of instability. We find that the 3D mode of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability grows, creating upflows aligned with the magnetic field of constant velocity (maximum found 7.3 km s{sup -1}). The width of the upflows is dependent on the initial conditions, with a range of 0.5-4 Mm which propagate through heights of 3-6 Mm. These results are in general agreement with the observations of the rising plumes.

  18. Giant quantum Hall plateaus generated by charge transfer in epitaxial graphene.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Webber, J A; Huang, J; Maude, D K; Janssen, T J B M; Tzalenchuk, A; Antonov, V; Yager, T; Lara-Avila, S; Kubatkin, S; Yakimova, R; Nicholas, R J

    2016-01-01

    Epitaxial graphene has proven itself to be the best candidate for quantum electrical resistance standards due to its wide quantum Hall plateaus with exceptionally high breakdown currents. However one key underlying mechanism, a magnetic field dependent charge transfer process, is yet to be fully understood. Here we report measurements of the quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene showing the widest quantum Hall plateau observed to date extending over 50 T, attributed to an almost linear increase in carrier density with magnetic field. This behaviour is strong evidence for field dependent charge transfer from charge reservoirs with exceptionally high densities of states in close proximity to the graphene. Using a realistic framework of broadened Landau levels we model the densities of donor states and predict the field dependence of charge transfer in excellent agreement with experimental results, thus providing a guide towards engineering epitaxial graphene for applications such as quantum metrology. PMID:27456765

  19. Do Children With Fragile X Syndrome Show Declines or Plateaus in Adaptive Behavior?

    PubMed

    Hahn, Laura J; Brady, Nancy C; Warren, Steven F; Fleming, Kandace K

    2015-09-01

    This study explores if children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) show advances, declines, or plateaus in adaptive behavior over time and the relationship of nonverbal cognitive abilities and autistic behavior on these trajectories. Parents of 55 children with FXS completed the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales ( Sparrow, Balla, & Cicchetti, 1984 ; Sparrow, Cicchetti, & Balla, 2005 ) between 3 and 6 times from 2 to 10 years of age. Using raw scores, results indicate that about half of the sample showed advances in adaptive behavior, whereas the other half showed declines, indicating a regression in skills. Children who were more cognitively advanced and had less autistic behaviors had higher trajectories. Understanding the developmental course of adaptive behavior in FXS has implications for educational planning and intervention, especially for those children showing declines. PMID:26322389

  20. Giant quantum Hall plateaus generated by charge transfer in epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander-Webber, J. A.; Huang, J.; Maude, D. K.; Janssen, T. J. B. M.; Tzalenchuk, A.; Antonov, V.; Yager, T.; Lara-Avila, S.; Kubatkin, S.; Yakimova, R.; Nicholas, R. J.

    2016-07-01

    Epitaxial graphene has proven itself to be the best candidate for quantum electrical resistance standards due to its wide quantum Hall plateaus with exceptionally high breakdown currents. However one key underlying mechanism, a magnetic field dependent charge transfer process, is yet to be fully understood. Here we report measurements of the quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene showing the widest quantum Hall plateau observed to date extending over 50 T, attributed to an almost linear increase in carrier density with magnetic field. This behaviour is strong evidence for field dependent charge transfer from charge reservoirs with exceptionally high densities of states in close proximity to the graphene. Using a realistic framework of broadened Landau levels we model the densities of donor states and predict the field dependence of charge transfer in excellent agreement with experimental results, thus providing a guide towards engineering epitaxial graphene for applications such as quantum metrology.

  1. Landau-level dispersion and the quantum Hall plateaus in bilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zarenia, M.; Peeters, F. M.; Vasilopoulos, P.; Pourtolami, N.

    2013-12-04

    We study the quantum Hall effect (QHE) in bilayer graphene using the Kubo-Greenwood formula. At zero temperature the Hall conductivity σ{sub yx} is given by σ{sub yx} = 4(N+1)e{sup 2}/h with N the index of the highest occupied Landau level (LL). Including the dispersion of the LLs and their width, due to e.g. scattering by impurities, produces the plateau of the n = 0 LL in agreement with experimental results on doped samples and similar theoretical results on single-layer graphene plateaus widen with impurity concentration. Further, the evaluated resistivity ρ{sub xx} exhibits a strong, oscillatory dependence on the electron concentration. Explicit results are obtained for δ-function impurities.

  2. 2D seismic data processing for straight lines in the loess plateaus in Fuxian of Shanbei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minjie; Chen, Yequan; Zhang, Hai; Pang, Shangming; Deng, Guozhen

    2005-01-01

    The crooked seismic lines along valleys were irregular previously in Fuxian of Shanbei, showing an irregular branch in plane, and hard to complete close grids. Therefore, it’s difficult to conduct reservoir inversion of 2D seismic data. In 2001, Zhongyuan Oilfield Company carried out the study on field acquisition methods and seismic processing technology in Fuxian. Straight lines were passing through plateaus and formed seismic grids by using flexible geometry with variable linear bins. Data processing involved model-inversion based refraction static correction, surface consistent amplitude compensation, deconvolution, and pre-stack noise attenuation. As the result, seismic data with a high fidelity was provided for the subsequent reservoir predictions, small-amplitude structure interpretation and integrative geologic study. Because all lines were jointed to form grids, comprehensive interpretation of reservoir inversion could be finally implemented by using the pseudo logging method to control lines without wells.

  3. A Fundamental Plane for Long Gamma-Ray Bursts with X-Ray Plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainotti, M. G.; Postnikov, S.; Hernandez, X.; Ostrowski, M.

    2016-07-01

    A class of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) presenting light curves with an extended plateau phase in their X-ray afterglows obeys a correlation between the rest-frame end-time of the plateau, T a , and its corresponding X-ray luminosity, L a , (Dainotti et al). In this work we perform an analysis of a total sample of 176 Swift GRBs with known redshifts, exhibiting afterglow plateaus. By adding a third parameter that is the peak luminosity in the prompt emission, L peak, we discover the existence of a new three-parameter correlation. The scatter of data about this plane becomes smaller when a class-specific GRB sample is defined. This sample of 122 GRBs is selected from the total sample by excluding GRBs with associated supernovae (SNe), X-ray flashes and short GRBs with extended emission. With this sample the three-parameter correlation identifies a GRB “fundamental plane.” Moreover, we further limit our analysis to GRBs with light curves with good data coverage and almost flat plateaus, 40 GRBs forming our “gold sample.” The intrinsic scatter, {σ }{int}=0.27+/- 0.04, for the three-parameter correlation for this last sub-class is more than two times smaller than the value for the {L}a-{T}a one, making this the tightest three-parameter correlation that involves the afterglow plateau phase. Finally, we also show that a slightly less tight correlation is present between L peak and a proxy for the total energy emitted during the plateau phase, {L}a{T}a, confirming the existence of an energy scaling between the prompt and afterglow phases.

  4. Solitons versus parametric instabilities during ionospheric heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, D. R.; Payne, G. L.; Downie, R. M.; Sheerin, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Various effects associated with ionospheric heating are investigated by numerically solving the modified Zakharov (1972) equations. It is shown that, for typical ionospheric parameters, the modulational instability is more important than the parametric decay instability in the spatial region of strongest heater electric field. It is concluded that the modulational instability leads to the formation of solitons, as originally predicted by Petviashvili (1976).

  5. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  6. Jurassic plume-origin ophiolites in Japan: accreted fragments of oceanic plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiyama, Yuji; Ishiwatari, Akira; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Senda, Ryoko; Miyamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2014-07-01

    later and in lower temperatures than the E- and D-type rocks. The Mikabu and Sorachi Plateaus were formed in a low-latitude region of the Late Jurassic Pacific Ocean possibly near a subduction zone, partially experienced high P/ T metamorphism during subduction, and then uplifted in association with (or without, in case of Mikabu) the supra-subduction zone ophiolite. The Mikabu and Sorachi Plateaus may be the Late Jurassic oceanic LIPs that could have been formed in brotherhood with the Shatsky Rise.

  7. 2014/2015 Investigations of the Ontong Java and Kerguelen Plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, M. F.; Whittaker, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The two largest oceanic plateaus, Ontong Java in the western Pacific, and Kerguelen in the southern Indian Ocean, will be the focus of scheduled multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary shipboard expeditions in 2014 and 2015. In mid-2014, scientists aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute's RV Falkor will investigate the origin and evolution of two large atolls, Ontong Java and Nukumanu, surmounting the ca 122 Ma Ontong Java Plateau, as well how Kroenke Canyon, which deeply incises the plateau, formed and evolved. First-ever multibeam bathymetry and sub-bottom profiling data from the atolls and canyon will reveal their submarine and shallow sub-seafloor morphology, and, if combined with geochemical and geochronological analyses of potential igneous basement samples, will yield important information on their origin and evolution. The primary goals of this atoll and canyon project are: to test potential genetic relationships between a) the atolls and the OJP, and b) the atolls and Kroenke Canyon; to understand and model how atolls and canyons form and evolve on oceanic plateaus, isolated from terrestrial influences and subject to sea level fluctuations; and to contribute to understanding tsunami risk on low-lying atolls. In late 2014 and early 2015, researchers aboard Australia's new Marine National Facility, RV Investigator, will investigate active submarine hotspot volcanism on the Kerguelen Plateau and its consequences. The project's overall aim is to test the hypothesis that hydrothermal activity driven by active submarine magmatism fertilizes surface waters with iron that enhances primary biological productivity. Surmounting the Cretaceous plateau, Heard and McDonald Islands are among the world's most active hotspot volcanoes, and new multibeam bathymetry and sub-bottom profiling data will enable identification of candidate active submarine volcanoes, which we will sample. In the overlying water column, we will collect samples to test for the presence or absence of

  8. Regional Curves for Bankfull Channel Characteristics in the Appalachian Plateaus, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messinger, Terence

    2009-01-01

    Streams in the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province in West Virginia were classified as a single region on the basis of bankfull characteristics. Regression lines for annual peak flow and drainage area measured at streamgages in the study area at recurrence intervals between 1.2 and 1.7 years fell within the 99-percent confidence interval of the regression line for bankfull flow. Channel characteristics were intermediate among those from surrounding states and regions where comparable studies have been done. The stream reaches that were surveyed were selected for apparent stability, and to represent gradients of drainage area, elevation, and mean annual precipitation. Profiles of high-water marks left by bankfull and near-bankfull peaks were surveyed, either as part of slope-area flow measurements at ungaged reaches, or to transfer known flow information to cross sections for gaged reaches. The slope-area measurements made it possible to include ungaged sites in the study, but still relate bankfull dimensions to peak flow and frequency.

  9. The Occurrence of Anomalous Conductance Plateaus and Spin Textures in Quantum Point Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J.; Cahay, M.; Debray, P.; Newrock, R.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, we used a NEGF formalism [1] to provide a theoretical explanation for the experimentally observed 0.5G0 (G0=2e^2/h) plateau in the conductance of side-gated quantum point contacts (QPCs) in the presence of lateral spin-orbit coupling (LSOC) [2]. We showed that the 0.5G0 plateau appears in the QPCs without any external magnetic field as a result of three ingredients: an asymmetric lateral confinement, a LSOC, and a strong electron-electron (e-e) interaction. In this report, we present the results of simulations for a wide range of QPC dimensions and biasing parameters showing that the same physics predicts the appearance of other anomalous plateaus at non-integer values of G0, including the well-known 0.7G0 anomaly. These features are related to a plethora of spin textures in the QPC that depend sensitively on material, device, biasing parameters, temperature, and the strength of the e-e interaction. [1] J. Wan, M. Cahay, P. Debray, and R.S. Newrock, Phys. Rev. B 80, 155440 (2009). [2] P. Debray, S.M. Rahman, J. Wan, R.S. Newrock, M. Cahay, A.T. Ngo, S.E. Ulloa, S.T. Herbert, M. Muhammad, and M. Johnson, Nature Nanotech. 4, 759 (2009).

  10. Magnetization plateaus of an easy-axis kagome antiferromagnet with extended interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plat, X.; Alet, F.; Capponi, S.; Totsuka, K.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the properties in finite magnetic field of an extended anisotropic X X Z spin-1/2 model on the kagome lattice, originally introduced by Balents, Fisher, and Girvin [Phys. Rev. B 65, 224412 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevB.65.224412]. The magnetization curve displays plateaus at magnetization m =1 /6 and 1 /3 when the anisotropy is large. Using low-energy effective constrained models (quantum loop and quantum dimer models), we discuss the nature of the plateau phases, found to be crystals that break discrete rotation and/or translation symmetries. Large-scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations were carried out in particular for the m =1 /6 plateau. We first map out the phase diagram of the effective quantum loop model with an additional loop-loop interaction to find stripe order around the point relevant for the original model as well as a topological Z2 spin liquid. The existence of a stripe crystalline phase is further evidenced by measuring both standard structure factor and entanglement entropy of the original microscopic model.

  11. A fundamental plane for Gamma Ray Bursts with X-Ray plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainotti, Maria; Petrosian, Vahe'; Postnikov, Sergey; Hernandez, Xavier; Ostrowski, Michal

    2016-06-01

    A class of long Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) presenting light curves with an extended plateau phase in their X-ray afterglows obey a two parameter correlation (Dainotti et al. 2008) betweenthe rest frame end time of the plateau, T_a, and its corresponding X-ray luminosity, L_{a}. This correlation is a useful tool towards cosmological parameter inferences and yields important constraints on physical GRB models.We here show through an analysis of 122 Swift long GRBs with known redshifts and presentingafterglow plateaus, that including also the peak luminosity in the prompt emission, L_{peak}, as a third parameter, a fundamental plane appears. A careful statistical analysis excludes the possibility of this correlation being due to detection thresholds or observational selection biases. The correlation is tightest when a class-specific GRB sample is defined excluding GRB-SNe, X-ray flashes and short GRBs with extended emission, and required also to have a good data coverage and an almost flat plateau. The intrinsic scatter, σ_{int}=0.27 ± 0.04, for the three-parameter correlation for this specific subclass (40 GRBs) is 53.5% smaller than the (L_{a}, T_a) one,making this the tighest three parameter correlation involving the plateau phase. This result will hence enhance cosmological parameter determinations and GRB model constraints. Finally, we also show that a slightly noisier correlation is also present between L_{peak} and a proxy of the total energy emitted during the plateau phase, the product L_{a}T_{a}, hinting at the presence of an energy scaling between prompt and afterglow phases.

  12. Carbon Abundance Plateaus among Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jinmi; He, Siyu; Placco, Vinicius; Carollo, Daniela; Beers, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    A substantial fraction of low-metallicity stars in the Milky Way, the Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor (CEMP) stars, exhibit enhancements of their carbon-to-iron relative to the solar value ([C/Fe] > +0.7). They can be divided into several sub-classes, depending on the nature and degree of the observed enhancements of their neutron-capture elements, providing information on their likely progenitors. CEMP-s stars (which exhibit enhanced s-process elements) are thought to be enhanced by mass transfer from an evolved AGB companion, while CEMP-no stars (which exhibit no over-abundances of neutron-capture elements) appear to be associated with explosions of the very first generations of stars. High-resolution spectroscopic analyses are generally required in order to make these sub-classifications.Several recent studies have suggested the existence of bimodality in the distribution of absolute carbon abundances among CEMP stars -- most CEMP-no stars belong to a low-C band ((A(C) ˜ 6.5), while most CEMP-s stars reside on a high-C band (A(C) ˜ 8.25). The number of CEMP stars considered by individual studies is, however, quite small, so we have compiled all available high-resolution spectroscopic data for CEMP stars, in order to further investigate the existence of the claimed carbon bi-modality, and to consider what can be learned about the progenitors of CEMP-s and CEMP-no stars based on the observed distribution of A(C) on the individual plateaus.We acknowledge partial support from the grant PHY 14-30152; Physics Frontier Center/JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements (JINA-CEE), awarded by the US National Science Foundation.

  13. Hybrid rocket instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, B.; Frederick, R. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides a brief review of theoretical and experimental studies concerned with hybrid rocket instability. The instabilities discussed include atomization and mixing instabilities, chuffing instabilities, pressure coupled combustion instabilities, and vortex shedding. It is emphasized that the future use of hybrid motor systems as viable design alternatives will depend on a better understanding of hybrid instability.

  14. Hybrid rocket instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, B.; Frederick, R. A., Jr.

    1993-06-01

    The paper provides a brief review of theoretical and experimental studies concerned with hybrid rocket instability. The instabilities discussed include atomization and mixing instabilities, chuffing instabilities, pressure coupled combustion instabilities, and vortex shedding. It is emphasized that the future use of hybrid motor systems as viable design alternatives will depend on a better understanding of hybrid instability.

  15. Surface Uplift History of the Central Andes: Implications for the Growth of Orogenic Plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzione, C. N.; Hoke, G. D.; Libarkin, J. C.; MacFadden, B. J.; Withers, S.

    2007-05-01

    have occurred in the Andes in late Miocene time, including removal of high density lower lithosphere and redistribution of crust by erosion/sedimentation and flow of low density middle-lower crust, are likely mechanisms for building broad, flat, high elevation plateaus in convergent tectonic settings.

  16. Pleistocene periglacial cryogenic mounds (lithalsas) on basalt plateaus in the western Pannonian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebe, Krisztina; Csillag, Gábor

    2015-04-01

    On some basalt plateaus of the western Pannonian Basin, Hungary, fields of circular depressions occur. They are traditionally called "basalt karst' and their formation has been attributed either to collapse over karstifying rocks or to anthropogenic action (quarrying); however, both of these theories are questionable. The depressions are situated between elevations of 350-500 m a.s.l. and are characteristically surrounded by circular raised rims or ramparts. They measure a few m-s (up to ~10 m) in diameter, the ramparts emerge 0.5-1.5 m above the surrounding level ground and encircle a depression of 1-2 (-3) m deep in the middle. Depressions cluster in well delineated, high-density groups, with individual fields containing several dozens of these forms. Neighbouring ramparts are tightly packed, often interfere and depressions can thus coalesce creating composite forms. The ramparts are composed of coarse (dm-sized) basalt blocks, whose material is identical to that of the surrounding terrain and seems to originate from the depression. Many of the depressions host ephemeral ponds. Raised rims exclude formation of these landforms by any karstic processes. The anthropogenic theory is opposed by the lack of the remains of any facilities (e.g. roads), of tools and by the very illogical distribution and geometry of depressions from the point of human use. On the contrary, we interpret these ramparted depressions as being of periglacial origin, remnants of cryogenic mounds. The central depression and the emergent rampart can be well explained by the ice core raising the overlying rock and by the radial downsliding of this material on the ice core to the margins. Within cryogenic mounds, clustering and size of the forms fits the characteristics of perennial frost mound without peat cover, i.e. lithalsas or minerogenic palsas. Cryogenic mounds are important paleoclimatic indicators. Based on modern analogs, these lithalsa scars indicate the former presence of discontinuous

  17. Progressive Landslides in Uplifted Volcanic Plateaus: Persistent Loci of Channel Perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, E. B.; Anderson, S. W.; Mills-Novoa, M.; Othus, S.; Ely, L.; House, P. K.; O'Connor, J. E.; Grant, G.; Fenton, C.; Beebee, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    The semi-arid uplifted volcanic plateaus of the southern interior Columbia River basin contain over 300 large landslides or landslide complexes, ranging in area from several tenths of a km2 to several tens of km2. The distribution of these landslides is dominated by the outcropping of key stratigraphic contacts between coherent, volcanic cap rock atop weak sedimentary or volcaniclastic units in areas of >100 m local relief. The morphologies of many of these landslide complexes suggest a progressive mode of mass movement, with rubble-capped failure slices arrayed downslope at intervals of 10s to 100s of meters and deep tension cracks separating incipient failure blocks from the intact headscarp. Field evidence from the Owyhee River in southeastern Oregon indicates that individual landslide complexes can persist for millions of years. In one reach, for example, remnants of a 1.9 million year old intracanyon lava flow are inset against ancient landslide blocks. In the same location, cosmogenic isotope dating of boulders on a likely dam-burst flood deposit reveal a channel-blocking mass movement that may be as young as Holocene in age. The persistence of these landslide complexes has important implications for channel evolution, as it suggests that, in some environments, sediment supply may be chronically elevated at point sources. On the basis of GIS-based mapping of regional landslides and on field study of individual landslide complexes, we hypothesize that: 1) this sediment supply becomes increasingly dominated by fine-grained material as channels progressively incise into the weak units underlying coherent lava caps; and 2) the mass movements that impinge on the channels become correspondingly more earthflow-like. Loci of persistent landsliding are also subject to episodic variations in channel width due to physical constrictions caused by impinging failure masses. The discrete localization of large landslide complexes by particular stratigraphic and topographic

  18. Age and geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Hikurangi and Manihiki oceanic Plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoernle, Kaj; Hauff, Folkmar; van den Bogaard, Paul; Werner, Reinhard; Mortimer, Nick; Geldmacher, Jörg; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Davy, Bryan

    2010-12-01

    Here we present the first radiometric age data and a comprehensive geochemical data set (including major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotope ratios) for samples from the Hikurangi Plateau basement and seamounts on and adjacent to the plateau obtained during the R/V Sonne 168 cruise, in addition to age and geochemical data from DSDP Site 317 on the Manihiki Plateau. The 40Ar/ 39Ar age and geochemical data show that the Hikurangi basement lavas (118-96 Ma) have surprisingly similar major and trace element and isotopic characteristics to the Ontong Java Plateau lavas (ca. 120 and 90 Ma), primarily the Kwaimbaita-type composition, whereas the Manihiki DSDP Site 317 lavas (117 Ma) have similar compositions to the Singgalo lavas on the Ontong Java Plateau. Alkalic, incompatible-element-enriched seamount lavas (99-87 Ma and 67 Ma) on the Hikurangi Plateau and adjacent to it (Kiore Seamount), however, were derived from a distinct high time-integrated U/Pb (HIMU)-type mantle source. The seamount lavas are similar in composition to similar-aged alkalic volcanism on New Zealand, indicating a second wide-spread event from a distinct source beginning ca. 20 Ma after the plateau-forming event. Tholeiitic lavas from two Osbourn seamounts on the abyssal plain adjacent to the northeast Hikurangi Plateau margin have extremely depleted incompatible element compositions, but incompatible element characteristics similar to the Hikurangi and Ontong Java Plateau lavas and enriched isotopic compositions intermediate between normal mid-ocean-ridge basalt (N-MORB) and the plateau basement. These younger (˜52 Ma) seamounts may have formed through remelting of mafic cumulate rocks associated with the plateau formation. The similarity in age and geochemistry of the Hikurangi, Ontong Java and Manihiki Plateaus suggest derivation from a common mantle source. We propose that the Greater Ontong Java Event, during which ˜1% of the Earth's surface was covered with volcanism, resulted from a

  19. Extensional instability in electro-osmotic microflows of polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, R. M.; Freeman, M. R.

    2010-03-01

    Fluid transport in microfluidic systems typically is laminar due to the low Reynolds number characteristic of the flow. The inclusion of suspended polymers imparts elasticity to fluids, allowing instabilities to be excited when substantial polymer stretching occurs. For high molecular weight polymer chains we find that flow velocities achievable by standard electro-osmotic pumping are sufficient to excite extensional instabilities in dilute polymer solutions. We observe a dependence in measured fluctuations on polymer concentration which plateaus at a threshold corresponding to the onset of significant molecular crowding in macromolecular solutions; plateauing occurs well below the overlap concentration. Our results show that electro-osmotic flows of complex fluids are disturbed from the steady regime, suggesting potential for enhanced mixing and requiring care in modeling the flow of complex liquids such as biopolymer suspensions.

  20. Instability mechanisms in swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaire, F.; Chomaz, J.-M.

    2003-09-01

    We investigate the stability of the screened Rankine vortex with added plug flow where the azimuthal velocity decreases abruptly outside the core of the vortex. The jump in circulation is known to induce centrifugal and azimuthal Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Their effect on the stability of the different azimuthal wave number m is discussed using physical considerations associated with asymptotic expansions and numerical computations of the dispersion relation. It is shown that the axial shear and centrifugal instability are active for all m, and that modes with |m|⩾2 are also destabilized by azimuthal shear. In contrast, the bending modes m=±1 are stabilized by a coupling with Kelvin waves in the core. Effects of rotation on the absolute/convective transition are also discussed. The absolute instability of positive helical modes is seen to be promoted by centrifugal instability and azimuthal shear.

  1. X-ray flares, plateaus and chromatic breaks of GRB afterglows from up-scattered forward-shock emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaitescu, A.

    2008-01-01

    Scattering of the forward-shock synchrotron emission by a relativistic outflow located behind the leading blast wave may produce an X-ray emission brighter than that coming directly from the forward shock and may explain four features displayed by Swift X-ray afterglows: flares, plateaus (slow decays), chromatic light-curve breaks and fast post-plateau decays. For a cold scattering outflow, the reflected flux overshines the primary one if the scattering outflow is nearly baryon-free and highly relativistic. These two requirements can be relaxed if the scattering outflow is energized by weak internal shocks, so that the incident forward-shock photons are also inverse-Compton scattered, in addition to bulk scattering. Sweeping-up of the photons left behind by the forward shock naturally yields short X-ray flares. Owing to the boost in photon energy produced by bulk scattering, the reflected emission is more likely to overshine that coming directly from the forward shock at higher photon energies, yielding light-curve plateaus and breaks that appear only in the X-ray. The brightness, shape and decay of the X-ray light-curve plateau depend on the radial distribution of the scatterer's Lorentz factor and mass flux. Chromatic X-ray light-curve breaks and sharp post-plateau decays cannot be accommodated by the direct forward-shock emission and argue in favour of the scattering-outflow model proposed here. On the other hand, the X-ray afterglows without plateaus, those with achromatic breaks and those with very long lived power-law decays are more naturally accommodated by the standard forward-shock model. Thus, the diversity of X-ray light curves arises from the interplay of the scattered and direct forward-shock emissions.

  2. Superresonant instability of a compressible hydrodynamic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Leandro A.; Cardoso, Vitor; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2016-06-01

    We show that a purely circulating and compressible system, in an adiabatic regime of acoustic propagation, presents superresonant instabilities. To show the existence these instabilities, we compute the quasinormal mode frequencies of this system numerically using two different frequency domain methods.

  3. New insights on lithospheric foundering from thermo-mechanically coupled numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Galán, Daniel; Thieulot, Cedric

    2015-04-01

    Earth's lithosphere is recycled into the mantle as required by global mass considerations. At least during the latest 1 G.y. the main mechanism of lithospheric foundering into the mantle has been subduction. Yet other mechanisms of mantle removal such as Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability or delamination have significant influence at present as revealed by mantle anomalies, and are considered to be likely candidates for the main recycling mechanisms of lithospheric during the Archean. Although lithospheric mantle removal has been geophysically imaged, e.g. Carpathians, Colorado Plateau, at many other locations geophysical and geological observations also seem to indicate that mantle lithosphere is anomalously thin or absent. Potential places where lithospheric mantle foundering processes took place are The Urals, the Variscides, underneath the Ibero Armorican Orocline in western Europe, and the Tibetan, Puna and Anatolian Plateaus. Lithospheric foundering has been blamed for, among others, cratonization processes, rapid surface uplift, generation of voluminous magmatism, changes in crustal stress from compression to extension and a long etc. However, its triggering mechanisms are not well studied, and a variety of possible explanations have been given for lithospheric foundering processes, including convective instability following orogenic thickening or some other perturbation of thermal boundary layers, development of eclogitic roots, erosion of the lithosphere by a flat-subducting slab or partial melting of the asthenosphere, and partial intruding pyroxenites into the base of lithosphere. To understand the mechanisms, causes and consequences of lithospheric foundering, we explored lithospheric foundering in an assortment of scenarios using the numerical code, ELEFANT, an user-friendly multipurpose geodynamics code. Preliminary results indicate that changes in geometry, thermal state and composition of the lithosphere, associated with mantle flow, can have a first

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Cargill, P.; Forbes, T. G.; Hood, A. W.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    There have been major advances in the theory of magnetic reconnection and of magnetic instability, with important implications for the observations, as follows: (1) Fast and slow magnetic shock waves are produced by the magnetohydrodynamics of reconnection and are potential particle accelerators. (2) The impulsive bursty regime of reconnection gives a rapid release of magnetic energy in a series of bursts. (3) The radiative tearing mode creates cool filamentary structures in the reconnection process. (4) The stability analyses imply that an arcade can become unstable when either its height or twist of plasma pressure become too great.

  5. Quantification of subaerial and episodic subglacial erosion rates on high latitude upland plateaus: Cumberland Peninsula, Baffin Island, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margreth, Annina; Gosse, John C.; Dyke, Arthur S.

    2016-02-01

    Long-term rates of subaerial and episodic subglacial erosion by predominately cold-based ice cover are determined for tors on weathered plateaus on Cumberland Peninsula. By measuring terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in differentially weathered surfaces on a given tor, we reconstruct the complex exposure and erosion history involving recurring cold-based ice cover. The style and rate of subaerial and subglacial erosion at multiple tor sites on Cumberland Peninsula are assessed with a Monte Carlo approach that computes plausible exposure histories based on a proxy record of global ice volume. Constant subaerial erosion rates by weathering are low (<2 mm ka-1), corroborated by nuclide concentrations measured on two tors located on coastal ridge crests that have likely never been glaciated. Summit plateaus intermittently covered by cold-based ice throughout the Quaternary have experienced episodic subglacial erosion by plucking of fractured bedrock with rates between 1 and 16 mm ka-1. Variation of episodic erosion rates is associated with topographic position of the sampled tors and bedrock fracture density. Most of the tors were last glacially plucked in pre-ultimate glaciations, not during the Wisconsinan glaciation. Furthermore, the new approach provides evidence for the extent of ice coverage during the late Wisconsinan, which is significant if no erratics are available for exposure dating. Despite late Pleistocene intervals of ice cover and glacial plucking, tor-studded landscapes of Cumberland Peninsula are of considerable antiquity.

  6. Late Cretaceous - Paleogene forearc sedimentation and accretion of oceanic plateaus and seamounts along the Middle American convergent margin (Costa Rica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Peter O.; Baumgartner-Mora, Claudia; Andjic, Goran

    2016-04-01

    The Late Cretaceous-Paleogene sedimentation pattern in space and time along the Middle American convergent margin was controlled by the accretion of Pacific plateaus and seamounts. The accretion of more voluminous plateaus must have caused the temporary extinction of the arc and tectonic uplift, resulting in short lived episodes of both pelagic and neritic biogenic sedimentation. By the Late Eocene, shallow carbonate environments became widespread on a supposed mature arc edifice, that is so far only documented in arc-derived sediments. In northern Costa Rica forearc sedimentation started during the Coniacian-Santonian on the Aptian-Turonian basement of the Manzanillo Terrane. The arrival and collision of the Nicoya Terrane (a CLIP-like, 139-83 Ma Pacific plateau) and the Santa Elena Terrane caused the extinction of the arc during late Campanian- Early Maastrichtian times, indicated by the change to pelagic limestone sedimentation (Piedras Blancas Formation) in deeper areas and shallow-water rudistid - Larger Benthic Foraminfera limestone on tectonically uplifted areas of all terranes. Arc-derived turbidite sedimentation resumed in the Late Maastrichtian and was again interrupted during the Late Paleocene - Early Eocene, perhaps due to the underplating of a yet unknown large seamount. The extinction of the arc resulted in the deposition of the siliceous pelagic Buenavista Formation, as well as the principally Thanetian Barra Honda carbonate platform on a deeply eroded structural high in the Tempisque area. In southern Costa Rica the basement is thought to be the western edge of the CLIP. It is Santonian-Campanian in age and is only exposed in the southwestern corner of Herradura. Cretaceous arc-forearc sequences are unknown, except for the Maastrichtian-Paleocene Golfito Terrane in southeastern Costa Rica. The distribution and age of shallow/pelagic carbonates vs. arc-derived detrital sediments is controlled by the history of accretion of Galápagos hot spot

  7. Subwavelength modulational instability and plasmon oscillons in nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Noskov, Roman E; Belov, Pavel A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2012-03-01

    We study modulational instability in nonlinear arrays of subwavelength metallic nanoparticles and analyze numerically nonlinear scenarios of the instability development. We demonstrate that modulational instability can lead to the formation of regular periodic or quasiperiodic modulations of the polarization. We reveal that such nonlinear nanoparticle arrays can support long-lived standing and moving oscillating nonlinear localized modes--plasmon oscillons. PMID:22463637

  8. Instability of EDS maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.

    1993-09-01

    Instabilities of an EDS maglev suspension system with 3 D.O.F. and 5 D.O.F. vehicles traveling on a double L-shaped set of guideway conductors have been investigated with various experimentally measured magnetical force data incorporated into the theoretical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained from both analytical and numerical solutions for coupled vibration of the 3 D.O.F. maglev vehicle model. Instabilities of five direction motions (heave, slip, rill, pitch and yaw) are observed for the 4 D.O.F. vehicle model. It demonstrates that system parameters, such as, system damping, vehicle geometry and coupling effects among five different motions play very important roles in the occurrence of dynamic instabilities of maglev vehicles.

  9. Tidal instability in exoplanetary systems evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cébron, D.; Moutou, C.; Le Bars, M.; Le Gal, P.; Farès, R.

    2011-02-01

    A new element is proposed to play a role in the evolution of extrasolar planetary systems: the tidal (or elliptical) instability. It comes from a parametric resonance and takes place in any rotating fluid whose streamlines are (even slightly) elliptically deformed. Based on theoretical, experimental and numerical works, we estimate the growth rate of the instability for hot-jupiter systems, when the rotation period of the star is known. We present the physical process, its application to stars, and preliminary results obtained on a few dozen systems, summarized in the form of a stability diagram. Most of the systems are trapped in the so-called "forbidden zone", where the instability cannot grow. In some systems, the tidal instability is able to grow, at short timescales compared to the system evolution. Implications are discussed in the framework of misaligned transiting systems, as the rotational axis of the star would be unstable in systems where this elliptical instability grows.

  10. Combustion Instabilities Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Advanced Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch is investigating active control strategies to mitigate or eliminate the combustion instabilities prevalent in lean-burning, low-emission combustors. These instabilities result from coupling between the heat-release mechanisms of the burning process and the acoustic flow field of the combustor. Control design and implementation require a simulation capability that is both fast and accurate. It must capture the essential physics of the system, yet be as simple as possible. A quasi-one-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based simulation has been developed which may meet these requirements. The Euler equations of mass, momentum, and energy have been used, along with a single reactive species transport equation to simulate coupled thermoacoustic oscillations. A very simple numerical integration scheme was chosen to reduce computing time. Robust boundary condition procedures were incorporated to simulate various flow conditions (e.g., valves, open ends, and choked inflow) as well as to accommodate flow reversals that may arise during large flow-field oscillations. The accompanying figure shows a sample simulation result. A combustor with an open inlet, a choked outlet, and a large constriction approximately two thirds of the way down the length is shown. The middle plot shows normalized, time-averaged distributions of the relevant flow quantities, and the bottom plot illustrates the acoustic mode shape of the resulting thermoacoustic oscillation. For this simulation, the limit cycle peak-to-peak pressure fluctuations were 13 percent of the mean. The simulation used 100 numerical cells. The total normalized simulation time was 50 units (approximately 15 oscillations), which took 26 sec on a Sun Ultra2.

  11. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  12. Water-quality assessment of the Ozark Plateaus study unit, Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma- fish communities in streams of the Ozark Plateaus and their relations to selected environmental factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, James C.

    1998-01-01

    Fish communities from 22 reaches at 18 stations in the Ozark Plateaus were sampled in 1993, 1994, and 1995. The 18 stations were chosen to represent selected combinations of major environmental factors (geology/physiographic area, land use, and basin size). Additional physical, chemical, and biological factors also were measured for each of the 22 reaches and the influence of these factors upon the fish communities was investigated. Fish community samples collected at the 22 reaches identified differences in these communities that can be attributed to differences in land use and related water-quality and habitat characteristics. Communities from agriculture reaches tended to have more species, increased relative abundance of stonerollers and members of the sucker family, and decreased relative abundance of members of the sunfish and darter families. Several groups of environmental factors (concentrations of nutrients, organic carbon, suspended sediment, and dissolved oxygen; measures related to ionic strength; measures related to riparian vegetation; measures related to substrate; and measures related to stream size) appear to be related to land-use differences and fish community differences. Three multivariate analysis techniques (two ordination techniques and a classification technique) yielded similar results when applied to the fish community data. Fish communities from reaches with more similar land use in their basins and with similar drainage areas generally were grouped closer together in the analysis. Water quality, substrate, stream morphology, and riparian measures appear to be affecting fish communities at these reaches. The relations between land use, stream size, and fish communities have implications for waterquality assessments of Ozark streams. Compared to other parts of the United States, many fish species live in the Ozark Plateaus. At least 19 of these species are endemic to the Ozarks area. Many of these species are intolerant of habitat or

  13. Computational methods for probability of instability calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Burnside, O. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of the methods and a computer program to compute the probability of instability of a dynamic system than can be represented by a system of second-order ordinary linear differential equations. Two instability criteria based upon the roots of the characteristics equation or Routh-Hurwitz test functions are investigated. Computational methods based on system reliability analysis methods and importance sampling concepts are proposed to perform efficient probabilistic analysis. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the methods.

  14. On the convective-absolute nature of river bedform instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesipa, Riccardo; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca; Chomaz, Jean Marc

    2014-12-01

    River dunes and antidunes are induced by the morphological instability of stream-sediment boundary. Such bedforms raise a number of subtle theoretical questions and are crucial for many engineering and environmental problems. Despite their importance, the absolute/convective nature of the instability has never been addressed. The present work fills this gap as we demonstrate, by the cusp map method, that dune instability is convective for all values of the physical control parameters, while the antidune instability exhibits both behaviors. These theoretical predictions explain some previous experimental and numerical observations and are important to correctly plan flume experiments, numerical simulations, paleo-hydraulic reconstructions, and river works.

  15. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A.; Sheppard, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  16. TRANSVERSE INSTABILITIES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M; Cameron, P; Catalan-Lasheras, N; Dawson, C; Degen, C; Drees, K; Fischer, W; Koropsak, E; Michnoff, R; Montag, C; Roser, T

    2003-05-12

    The beam quality in RHIC can be significantly impacted by a transverse instability which can occur just after transition [1]. Data characterizing the instability are presented and analyzed. Techniques for ameliorating the situation are considered.

  17. Turbine instabilities: Case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Several possible causes of turbine rotor instability are discussed and the related design features of a wide range of turbomachinery types and sizes are considered. The instrumentation options available for detecting rotor instability and assessing its severity are also discussed.

  18. Dust deposition during the Early Holocene on the loess plateaus of the Vojvodina region in Northern Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Slobodan; Timar-Gabor, Alida; Stevens, Thomas; Guo, Zhengtang; Hao, Qingzhen; Song, Yang; Hambach, Ulrich; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Peric, Zoran; Obreht, Igor; Zeeden, Christian; Veres, Daniel; Gavrilov, Milivoj

    2015-04-01

    The Northern Serbian province of Vojvodina is a lowland area encompassing the confluence of the Danube, Sava, Tisa (Tisza), Drava, Morava and Tamiš (Temes, Timiş) rivers, which separate several remnant loess plateaus. Loess sediments in the Vojvodina region are among the oldest and most complete loess-paleosol formations in Europe. These thick sequences contain a detailed paleoclimatic record since the Early Pleistocene. The better preservation of Serbian loess-paleosol sequences compared to other European loess records is most likely related to the persistence of much drier conditions in the region, coupled with "plateau-like" dust accumulation style. Recently and through detailed luminescence-based chronological investigations of accumulation derived from several loess sections we aimed at addressing the timing of the onset of Holocene soil (S0) formation in the wider region. So far, the chronological results demonstrate a lack of intensive pedogenesis coeval with the postulated Holocene onset (ie., 11.7 ka BP), and continuation of Aeolian dust deposition during the Early Holocene in some of the investigated sections. Lake sediment and speleothem records from the wider area also suggest that, at least regionally, the hydroclimatic characteristics of the Early Holocene differed markedly. This evidence leads to an important question about the validity of previously generalized direct stratigraphic correlations between regional terrestrial environmental archives and global marine and ice core records (direct synchronization of records vs. acknowledging leads/lags), that employ the Late Pleistocene/Holocene boundary at 11.7 as an absolute tie point.

  19. A Compilation of Provisional Karst Geospatial Data for the Interior Low Plateaus Physiographic Region, Central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Charles J.; Nelson, Hugh L.

    2008-01-01

    Geospatial data needed to visualize and evaluate the hydrogeologic framework and distribution of karst features in the Interior Low Plateaus physiographic region of the central United States were compiled during 2004-2007 as part of the Ground-Water Resources Program Karst Hydrology Initiative (KHI) project. Because of the potential usefulness to environmental and water-resources regulators, private consultants, academic researchers, and others, the geospatial data files created during the KHI project are being made available to the public as a provisional regional karst dataset. To enhance accessibility and visualization, the geospatial data files have been compiled as ESRI ArcReader data folders and user interactive Published Map Files (.pmf files), all of which are catalogued by the boundaries of surface watersheds using U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) eight-digit hydrologic unit codes (HUC-8s). Specific karst features included in the dataset include mapped sinkhole locations, sinking (or disappearing) streams, internally drained catchments, karst springs inventoried in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) database, relic stream valleys, and karst flow paths obtained from results of previously reported water-tracer tests.

  20. Rogue Waves and Modulational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Dyachenko, A.

    2015-12-01

    The most plausible cause of rogue wave formation in a deep ocean is development of modulational instability of quasimonochromatic wave trains. An adequate model for study of this phenomenon is the Euler equation for potential flow of incompressible fluid with free surface in 2-D geometry. Numerical integration of these equations confirms completely the conjecture of rogue wave formation from modulational instability but the procedure is time consuming for determination of rogue wave appearance probability for a given shape of wave energy spectrum. This program can be realized in framework of simpler model using replacement of the exact interaction Hamiltonian by more compact Hamiltonian. There is a family of such models. The popular one is the Nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE). This model is completely integrable and suitable for numerical simulation but we consider that it is oversimplified. It misses such important phenomenon as wave breaking. Recently, we elaborated much more reliable model that describes wave breaking but is as suitable as NLSE from the point of numerical modeling. This model allows to perform massive numerical experiments and study statistics of rogue wave formation in details.

  1. The plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Young, Aleida K.; Shen, Chengcai; Lin, Jun; Ni, Lei

    2013-06-15

    Theoretical studies of the plasmoid instability generally assume that the reconnecting magnetic fields are symmetric. We relax this assumption by performing two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection. Magnetic asymmetry modifies the onset, scaling, and dynamics of this instability. Magnetic islands develop preferentially into the weak magnetic field upstream region. Outflow jets from individual X-points impact plasmoids obliquely rather than directly as in the symmetric case. Consequently, deposition of momentum by the outflow jets into the plasmoids is less efficient, the plasmoids develop net vorticity, and shear flow slows down secondary merging between islands. Secondary merging events have asymmetry along both the inflow and outflow directions. Downstream plasma is more turbulent in cases with magnetic asymmetry because islands are able to roll around each other after exiting the current sheet. As in the symmetric case, plasmoid formation facilitates faster reconnection for at least small and moderate magnetic asymmetries. However, when the upstream magnetic field strengths differ by a factor of 4, the reconnection rate plateaus at a lower value than expected from scaling the symmetric results. We perform a parameter study to investigate the onset of the plasmoid instability as a function of magnetic asymmetry and domain size. There exist domain sizes for which symmetric simulations are stable but asymmetric simulations are unstable, suggesting that moderate magnetic asymmetry is somewhat destabilizing. We discuss the implications for plasmoid and flux rope formation in solar eruptions, laboratory reconnection experiments, and space plasmas. The differences between symmetric and asymmetric simulations provide some hints regarding the nature of the three-dimensional plasmoid instability.

  2. The plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Young, Aleida K.; Shen, Chengcai; Lin, Jun; Ni, Lei

    2013-06-01

    Theoretical studies of the plasmoid instability generally assume that the reconnecting magnetic fields are symmetric. We relax this assumption by performing two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection. Magnetic asymmetry modifies the onset, scaling, and dynamics of this instability. Magnetic islands develop preferentially into the weak magnetic field upstream region. Outflow jets from individual X-points impact plasmoids obliquely rather than directly as in the symmetric case. Consequently, deposition of momentum by the outflow jets into the plasmoids is less efficient, the plasmoids develop net vorticity, and shear flow slows down secondary merging between islands. Secondary merging events have asymmetry along both the inflow and outflow directions. Downstream plasma is more turbulent in cases with magnetic asymmetry because islands are able to roll around each other after exiting the current sheet. As in the symmetric case, plasmoid formation facilitates faster reconnection for at least small and moderate magnetic asymmetries. However, when the upstream magnetic field strengths differ by a factor of 4, the reconnection rate plateaus at a lower value than expected from scaling the symmetric results. We perform a parameter study to investigate the onset of the plasmoid instability as a function of magnetic asymmetry and domain size. There exist domain sizes for which symmetric simulations are stable but asymmetric simulations are unstable, suggesting that moderate magnetic asymmetry is somewhat destabilizing. We discuss the implications for plasmoid and flux rope formation in solar eruptions, laboratory reconnection experiments, and space plasmas. The differences between symmetric and asymmetric simulations provide some hints regarding the nature of the three-dimensional plasmoid instability.

  3. Granular Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Johnsen, Oistein; Flekkoey, Eirik G.; Maaloey, Knut Joergen; Toussaint, Renaud

    2009-06-18

    A granular instability driven by gravity is studied experimentally and numerically. The instability arises as grains fall in a closed Hele-Shaw cell where a layer of dense granular material is positioned above a layer of air. The initially flat front defined by the grains subsequently develops into a pattern of falling granular fingers separated by rising bubbles of air. A transient coarsening of the front is observed right from the start by a finger merging process. The coarsening is later stabilized by new fingers growing from the center of the rising bubbles. The structures are quantified by means of Fourier analysis and quantitative agreement between experiment and computation is shown. This analysis also reveals scale invariance of the flow structures under overall change of spatial scale.

  4. Nonlinear evolution of Buneman instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, O.; Hirose, A.; Langdon, A. B.

    1981-03-01

    The nonlinear evolution of one-dimensional electron-ion two-stream instability in a field-free plasma is investigated analytically and by computer simulation. The instability is dominated by the fastest growing mode and its harmonics, provided that the initial fluctuation level is sufficiently small. A nonlinear dispersion relation is obtained and solved numerically, with allowance for the frequency and growth rate modulation, the electric field up to a specified order, and the renormalized particle distribution functions. It is shown that the model can explain computer simulation results, including the presence of an algebraic growth stage following the breakdown of the exponential linear growth, the appearance of harmonics, and the final saturation level.

  5. Beam instabilities in the scale-free regime.

    PubMed

    Folli, V; DelRe, E; Conti, C

    2012-01-20

    The instabilities arising in a one-dimensional beam sustained by the diffusive photorefractive nonlinearity in out-of-equilibrium ferroelectrics are theoretically and numerically investigated. In the "scale-free model," in striking contrast with the well-known spatial modulational instability, two different beam instabilities dominate: a defocusing and a fragmenting process. Both are independent of the beam power and are not associated with any specific periodic pattern. PMID:22400741

  6. Ion-beam-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, A.; Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1982-10-01

    We present results of numerical simulations on the electrostatic ion cyclotron instabilities driven by the ion beam parallel to the magnetic field. For the beam speed exceeding the thermal speed of background ions and the beam temperature much lower than the background ion temperature, it is found that the instability results in strong perpendicular heating and slowing down of parallel drift of the beam ions, leading to the saturation of the instability. Applications to plasma heating and space plasma physics are discussed.

  7. Reduced modeling of the magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamroz, Ben F.

    2009-06-01

    well understood. Many recent numerical investigations of this problem are performed in a local domain, where the global cylindrical background state is projected onto a local Cartesian domain. The resulting system is then numerically modeled within a "shearing box" framework to obtain estimates of angular momentum transport and therefore accretion. However, the simplified geometry of the local domain, and the projection of global quantities leads to a model where the instability is able to grow unboundedly. Utilizing disparate characteristic scales, this thesis presents a reduced asymptotic model for the magnetorotational instability that allows a large scale feedback of local stresses (Reynolds, Maxwell and mixed) onto the projected background state. This system is investigated numerically to determine the impact of allowing this feedback on the saturated level of angular momentum transport.

  8. Baroclinic instability in stellar radiation zones

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchatinov, L. L.

    2014-03-20

    Surfaces of constant pressure and constant density do not coincide in differentially rotating stars. Stellar radiation zones with baroclinic stratification can be unstable. Instabilities in radiation zones are of crucial importance for angular momentum transport, mixing of chemical species, and, possibly, for magnetic field generation. This paper performs linear analysis of baroclinic instability in differentially rotating stars. Linear stability equations are formulated for differential rotation of arbitrary shape and then solved numerically for rotation nonuniform in radius. As the differential rotation increases, r- and g-modes of initially stable global oscillations transform smoothly into growing modes of baroclinic instability. The instability can therefore be interpreted as stability loss to r- and g-modes excitation. Regions of stellar parameters where r- or g-modes are preferentially excited are defined. Baroclinic instability onsets at a very small differential rotation of below 1%. The characteristic time of instability growth is about 1000 rotation periods. Growing disturbances possess kinetic helicity. Magnetic field generation by the turbulence resulting from baroclinic instability in differentially rotating radiation zones is therefore possible.

  9. Perturbation solutions of combustion instability problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Googerdy, A.; Peddieson, J., Jr.; Ventrice, M.

    1979-01-01

    A method involving approximate modal analysis using the Galerkin method followed by an approximate solution of the resulting modal-amplitude equations by the two-variable perturbation method (method of multiple scales) is applied to two problems of pressure-sensitive nonlinear combustion instability in liquid-fuel rocket motors. One problem exhibits self-coupled instability while the other exhibits mode-coupled instability. In both cases it is possible to carry out the entire linear stability analysis and significant portions of the nonlinear stability analysis in closed form. In the problem of self-coupled instability the nonlinear stability boundary and approximate forms of the limit-cycle amplitudes and growth and decay rates are determined in closed form while the exact limit-cycle amplitudes and growth and decay rates are found numerically. In the problem of mode-coupled instability the limit-cycle amplitudes are found in closed form while the growth and decay rates are found numerically. The behavior of the solutions found by the perturbation method are in agreement with solutions obtained using complex numerical methods.

  10. Extracting dynamic topography from river profiles and cosmogenic nuclide geochronology in the Middle Atlas and the High Plateaus of Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Alvar; Babault, Julien; Owen, Lewis A.; Teixell, Antonio; Arboleya, María-Luisa

    2015-11-01

    The Moulouya river system has intensely eroded the Arhbalou, Missour, and Guercif Neogene foreland basins in northeastern Morocco, having changed from net aggradation during the Miocene-early Pliocene to net incision punctuated by alluvial fan deposition at late Pliocene or early Quaternary time. This region as a whole has experienced mantle-driven, surface uplift (dynamic topography) since the late Cenozoic, being locally affected by uplift due to crustal shortening and thickening of the Middle Atlas too. Knickpoints located along the major streams of the Moulouya fluvial network, appear on both the undeformed margins of the Missour and Guercif foreland basins (High Plateaus), as well as along the thrust mountain front of the southern Middle Atlas, where they reach heights of 800-1000 m. 500-550 m of the knickpoint vertical incision might be explained by long-wavelength mantle-driven dynamic surface uplift, whereas the remaining 450-500 m in the southern Middle Atlas front and 200-300 m in the northeastern Middle Atlas front seem to be thrust-related uplift of the Jebel Bou Naceur. Be-10 terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides have been used to date two Quaternary river terraces in the Chegg Ard valley at 62 ± 14 ka and 411 ± 55 ka. The dated terraces allow the incision rates associated with the frontal structures of the Middle Atlas to be estimated at ~ 0.3 mm yr- 1. Furthermore, these ages have served to evaluate mantle-driven regional surface uplift since the middle Pleistocene in the central Missour basin, yielding values of ~ 0.1-0.2 mm yr- 1.

  11. Electrokinetic instability of isotachophoresis shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Giancarlo; Santiago, Juan; Mani, Ali

    2013-11-01

    Isotachophoresis (ITP) is an electrokinetic focusing technique used in a variety of life science and analytical chemistry applications. In ITP, an electrokinetic shock wave forms at the interface between leading and trailing electrolytes with relatively high and low conductivities. The ITP interface is self-sharpening, as restoring electromigration fluxes counteract molecular diffusion. However, the large electric field gradient at the shock interface also gives rise to free charge and strong electrostatic body forces. At large applied currents, electrostatic forces cause recirculating flows which destabilize the ITP interface. We performed stability analysis and direct simulation of ITP shocks through numerical solutions to the coupled Nernst-Planck and Navier-Stokes equations using a quasi-electroneutral approximation. In both experiments and numerical simulations, we observe two modes of instability: 1) a distorted ITP interface which is steady in time, and 2) an oscillating perturbation which persists. In addition, at the highest simulated electric fields, we observe transition towards more chaotic oscillatory modes. We use our stability analysis and numerical simulations to characterize instability of ITP shocks using two dimensionless parameters.

  12. Identification and spatial distribution of light-toned deposits enriched in Al-phyllosilicates on the plateaus around Valles Marineris, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Deit, L.; Flahaut, J.; Quantin, C.; Allemand, P.

    2009-12-01

    The plateaus around Valles Marineris consist in series of mafic rocks suggested to be flood basalts (McEwen et al., 1998), lavas interbedded with sediments (Malin and Edgett, 2000), layered intrusive rocks (Williams et al., 2003), or lava flows dated from the Noachian to the late Hesperian epochs (Scott and Carr, 1978). Recent studies show the occurrence of light layered deposits of hundred meters thick cropping out on plateaus near Ius Chasma, Melas Chasma, Candor Chasma, Juventae Chasma and Ganges Chasma deposited during the Hesperian epoch by fluvio-lacustrine processes (Weitz et al., 2009), or by air-fall processes (Le Deit et al., 2009). These layered deposits are enriched in hydrated minerals including opaline silica (Milliken et al., 2008), hydroxylated ferric sulfates (Bishop et al., 2009), and possibly Al-rich phyllosilicates (Le Deit et al., 2009). We identified another type of formation corresponding to light-toned massive deposits cropping out around Valles Marineris. It appears that these light-toned deposits are associated to bright, rough, and highly cratered terrains, located beneath a dark and thin capping unit. Previous studies report the occurrence of phyllosilicates on few locations around Valles Marineris based on OMEGA data analyses (Gondet et al., 2007; Carter et al., 2009). The analysis of CRISM data show that the light-toned deposits are associated with spectra displaying absorption bands at 1.4 μm, 1.9 μm, and a narrow band at 2.2 μm. These spectral characteristics are consistent with the presence of Al-rich phyllosilicates such as montmorillonite, or illite in the light-toned deposits. They constitute dozens of outcrops located on the plateaus south and east of Coprates Chasma and Capri Chasma, and west of Ganges Chasma. All outcrops investigated so far are present over Noachian terrains mapped as the unit Npl2 by Scott and Tanaka (1986), and Witbeck et al. (1991). These light-toned deposits could result from in situ aqueous alteration

  13. Sheared Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Lim, Kiang Meng; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-11-01

    Recently, ion concentration polarization (ICP) and related phenomena draw attention from physicists, due to its importance in understanding electrochemical systems. Researchers have been actively studying, but the complexity of this multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon has been limitation for gaining a detailed picture. Here, we consider electroconvective(EC) instability initiated by ICP under pressure-driven flow, a scenario often found in electrochemical desalinations. Combining scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we reveal unique behaviors of sheared EC: unidirectional vortex structures, its size selection and vortex propagation. Selected by balancing the external pressure gradient and the electric body force, which generates Hagen-Poiseuille(HP) flow and vortical EC, the dimensionless EC thickness scales as (φ2 /UHP)1/3. The pressure-driven flow(or shear) suppresses unfavorably-directed vortices, and simultaneously pushes favorably-directed vortices with constant speed, which is linearly proportional to the total shear of HP flow. This is the first systematic characterization of sheared EC, which has significant implications on the optimization of electrodialysis and other electrochemical systems.

  14. Tidal instability in a rotating heated core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebron, D.; Maubert, P.; Le Bars, M.

    2011-12-01

    The tidal (or elliptical) instability comes from a triadic parametric resonance between two inertial waves of a rotating fluid and an imposed elliptic deformation. Previous studies of this instability have been conducted with an isothermal fluid. Nevertheless, in all natural systems, temperature differences are also present, which lead to stratification or to convection. The previous studies need then to be reinvestigated in order to quantify the impact of a temperature field on the elliptical instability. Conversely, from a thermal point of view, many studies have been performed regarding the convective flow of an incompressible homogeneous fluid in a rotating spherical shell. However, since most astrophysical bodies are tidally deformed, these studies have to be reinvestigated to account for the potential presence of an elliptical instability. Note that this is different from the direct resonance of a forced gravito-inertial wave considered by Kumazawa et al. (1994). The guideline of our study is given by the following questions: (i) how is the growth rate of the tidal instability modified by an imposed temperature difference in an ellipsoidal geometry? (ii) Does the tidal instability grow over an established convective flow? (iii) Is the heat flux modified by the instability, and what are the scaling laws involved? In this work, we tackle these questions using a systematic numerical study of the thermo-elliptical rotating flow in a fixed triaxial ellipsoidal shell. In particular, we validate general physical processes of direct relevance for planetary dynamics. We demonstrate also that the tidal instability can grow on a convective flow, and may disrupt the famous Busse columns in planetary cores. Finally, we show that the heat flux at planetary scales may be controlled by the forced convection due to this tidal instability, which in any case plays a fundamental role in the organization of fluid motions. Kumazawa, M., Yoshida, S., Ito, T., Yoshioka, H., 1994

  15. Joint instability and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  16. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  17. Fingering Instabilities in Dewetting Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauliac-Vaujour, E.; Stannard, A.; Martin, C. P.; Blunt, M. O.; Notingher, I.; Moriarty, P. J.; Vancea, I.; Thiele, U.

    2008-05-01

    The growth of fingering patterns in dewetting nanofluids (colloidal solutions of thiol-passivated gold nanoparticles) has been followed in real time using contrast-enhanced video microscopy. The fingering instability on which we focus here arises from evaporatively driven nucleation and growth in a nanoscopically thin precursor solvent film behind the macroscopic contact line. We find that well-developed isotropic fingering structures only form for a narrow range of experimental parameters. Numerical simulations, based on a modification of the Monte Carlo approach introduced by Rabani et al. [Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836 426, 271 (2003)10.1038/nature02087], reproduce the patterns we observe experimentally.

  18. Fingering instabilities in dewetting nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Pauliac-Vaujour, E; Stannard, A; Martin, C P; Blunt, M O; Notingher, I; Moriarty, P J; Vancea, I; Thiele, U

    2008-05-01

    The growth of fingering patterns in dewetting nanofluids (colloidal solutions of thiol-passivated gold nanoparticles) has been followed in real time using contrast-enhanced video microscopy. The fingering instability on which we focus here arises from evaporatively driven nucleation and growth in a nanoscopically thin precursor solvent film behind the macroscopic contact line. We find that well-developed isotropic fingering structures only form for a narrow range of experimental parameters. Numerical simulations, based on a modification of the Monte Carlo approach introduced by Rabani et al. [Nature (London) 426, 271 (2003)10.1038/nature02087], reproduce the patterns we observe experimentally. PMID:18518311

  19. Surface instability in windblown sand.

    PubMed

    Kurtze, D A; Both, J A; Hong, D C

    2000-06-01

    We investigate the formation of ripples on the surface of windblown sand based on the one-dimensional model of Nishimori and Ouchi [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 197 (1993)], which contains the processes of saltation and grain relaxation. We carry out a nonlinear analysis to determine the propagation speed of the restabilized ripple patterns, and the amplitudes and phases of their first, second, and third harmonics. The agreement between the theory and our numerical simulations is excellent near the onset of the instability. We also determine the Eckhaus boundary, outside which the steady ripple patterns are unstable. PMID:11088369

  20. Bathtub vortex induced by instability.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Jiro; Abe, Kazuki; Yokoyama, Naoto

    2014-10-01

    The driving mechanism and the swirl direction of the bathtub vortex are investigated by the linear stability analysis of the no-vortex flow as well as numerical simulations. We find that only systems having plane symmetries with respect to vertical planes deserve research for the swirl direction. The bathtub vortex appearing in a vessel with a rectangular cross section having a drain hole at the center of the bottom is proved to be induced by instability when the flow rate exceeds a threshold. The Coriolis force is capable of determining the swirl direction to be cyclonic. PMID:25375427

  1. Streaming instability of aggregating slime mold amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Herbert; Reynolds, William

    1991-05-01

    We propose a new model of aggregation in the cellular slime mold D. Discoideum. Our approach couples the excitable signaling system to amoeba chemotaxis; the resultant system of equations is tractable to analytical and numerical approaches. Using our model, we derive the existence of a streaming instability for the concentric target aggregation pattern.

  2. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  3. Nonlocal magnetorotational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Erokhin, N. N.; Lominadze, J. G.; Galvao, R. M. O.; Churikov, A. P.; Kharshiladze, O. A.; Amador, C. H. S.

    2008-05-15

    An analytical theory of the nonlocal magnetorotational instability (MRI) is developed for the simplest astrophysical plasma model. It is assumed that the rotation frequency profile has a steplike character, so that there are two regions in which it has constant different values, separated by a narrow transition layer. The surface wave approach is employed to investigate the MRI in this configuration. It is shown that the main regularities of the nonlocal MRI are similar to those of the local instability and that driving the nonaxisymmetric MRI is less effective than the axisymmetric one, also for the case of the nonlocal instability. The existence of nonlocal instabilities in nonmagnetized plasma is predicted.

  4. Hydrodynamic instability in eccentric astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A. J.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2014-12-01

    Eccentric Keplerian discs are believed to be unstable to three-dimensional hydrodynamical instabilities driven by the time-dependence of fluid properties around an orbit. These instabilities could lead to small-scale turbulence, and ultimately modify the global disc properties. We use a local model of an eccentric disc, derived in a companion paper, to compute the non-linear vertical (`breathing mode') oscillations of the disc. We then analyse their linear stability to locally axisymmetric disturbances for any disc eccentricity and eccentricity gradient using a numerical Floquet method. In the limit of small departures from a circular reference orbit, the instability of an isothermal disc is explained analytically. We also study analytically the small-scale instability of an eccentric neutrally stratified polytropic disc with any polytropic index using a Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. We find that eccentric discs are generically unstable to the parametric excitation of small-scale inertial waves. The non-linear evolution of these instabilities should be studied in numerical simulations, where we expect them to lead to a decay of the disc eccentricity and eccentricity gradient as well as to induce additional transport and mixing. Our results highlight that it is essential to consider the three-dimensional structure of eccentric discs, and their resulting vertical oscillatory flows, in order to correctly capture their evolution.

  5. Instabilities In The Flow Between Rotating Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisy, F.; Gauthier, G.; Gondret, P.; Rabaud, M.

    Instabilities in the flow between two close rotating disks enclosed by a cylinder are investigated experimentally. This flow undergoes a large gallery of instability patterns, presented in the plane of parameters (Reb, Ret) of the Reynolds numbers based on the velocity of each disk and the distance between them. The corotation case and the counter-rotation case with low counter-rotation ratio are very similar to the rotor-stator case: instabilities of the Bödewadt type boundary layer leads to axisymmetric vortices and positive spirals. The counter-rotation case with higher counter-rotation ratio is more complex: above a given rotation ratio, the radial recirculation flow gets organized in a two-cell structure with the apparition of a stagnation circle on the slower disk. A new kind of instability pattern is observed, called negative spirals, that may coexist with the positive spirals (Gauthier et al, subm. J. Fluid Mech. 2001). This new spiral pattern seems to arise from an azimuthal shear layer instability, rather than a boundary layer instability as for the two other patterns. Negative spirals are characterized for different aspect ratios (azimuthal mode, phase velocity), allowing comparisons with recent numerical simulations (Lopez et al, to appear in J. Fluid Mech. 2002).

  6. MHD thermal instabilities in cool inhomogeneous atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodo, G.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.; Rosner, R.

    1983-01-01

    The formation of a coronal state in a stellar atmosphere is investigated. A numerical code is used to study the effects of atmospheric gradients and finite loop dimension on the scale of unstable perturbations, solving for oscillatory perturbations as eigenfunctions of a boundary value problem. The atmosphere is considered as initially isothermal, with density and pressure having scale heights fixed by the hydrostatic equations. Joule mode instability is found to be an efficient mechanism for current filamentation and subsequent heating in initially cool atmospheres. This instability is mainly effective at the top of magnetic loops and is not suppressed by thermal conduction.

  7. Plasma Instabilities in Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Attems, M.; Rebhan, A.; Strickland, M.

    2011-05-23

    Non-Abelian plasma instabilities play a crucial role in the nonequilibrium dynamics of a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma. The Chromo-Weibel instabilities have been proposed as a possible mechanism for the fast apparent thermalization of the quark-gluon plasma and have been extensively studied in stationary anisotropic plasmas using the so-called hard-loop approximation. The generalization to the hard-expanding-loop (HEL) formalism allows the (numerical) calculation of the time evolution of gluonic mean fields in the more realistic dynamical case of anisotropic expansion.

  8. Interplay of instabilities in mounded surface growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Buddhapriya; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2005-02-01

    We numerically study a one-dimensional conserved growth equation with competing linear (Ehrlich-Schwoebel) and nonlinear instabilities. As a control parameter is varied, this model exhibits a nonequilibrium phase transition between two mounded states, one of which exhibits slope selection and the other does not. The coarsening behavior of the mounds in these two phases is studied in detail. In the absence of noise, the steady-state configuration depends crucially on which of the two instabilities dominates the early time behavior.

  9. Mixed Pierce-two-stream instability development in an extraction system of a negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barminova, H. Y.; Chikhachev, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    Mixed Pierce-two-stream instability may occur in an extraction system of a negative ion source based on a volume-produced plasma. The reasons for instability development are discussed. Analytically the conditions of unstable beam propagation are determined. The instability threshold is shown to be increased compared with the pure Pierce instability. The influence of inclined perturbations on the instability behavior is investigated. The numerical calculations are performed in COMSOL Multiphysics. The simulation results confirm the existence of such a mixed instability appearance that develops due to both the electrons of the external circuit and the background positive ions.

  10. Mixed Pierce-two-stream instability development in an extraction system of a negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Barminova, H Y; Chikhachev, A S

    2016-02-01

    Mixed Pierce-two-stream instability may occur in an extraction system of a negative ion source based on a volume-produced plasma. The reasons for instability development are discussed. Analytically the conditions of unstable beam propagation are determined. The instability threshold is shown to be increased compared with the pure Pierce instability. The influence of inclined perturbations on the instability behavior is investigated. The numerical calculations are performed in COMSOL Multiphysics. The simulation results confirm the existence of such a mixed instability appearance that develops due to both the electrons of the external circuit and the background positive ions. PMID:26931917

  11. Southwest Pacific Oceanic Plateaus and the Greater Ontong Java Plateau Event: A Unique Magmatic Episode in Earth History?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) in the Southwest Pacific is the world's largest oceanic plateau and the most voluminous LIP on Earth. Recent data from the Hikurangi and Manihiki Plateaus and the Nauru Basin strongly suggest that basement lavas from these areas are related. The implication is that the Great OJP Volcanic Event covered ~1% of the Earth's surface. Published 40-39 Ar age dates from basement lavas indicate the following: two volcanic LIP events have been recorded from the OJP (ca. 120 and 90 Ma); for the Manihiki Plateau, DSDP Site 317 lavas gave ages of ca. 117 Ma and dredge samples from the R/V Sonne expedition 193 gave ages of ca. 124.5 Ma; dredge samples recovered during R/V Sonne expedition 168 give ages spanning 118-96 Ma for Hikurangi Plateau basement lavas; in the Nauru Basin DSDP Legs 61 and 89 indicate that basaltic basement lavas erupted between 130-110 Ma. To form these different constructs at the same time would require a unique event in Earth's history. The current data are consistent with initiation of volcanism beneath the Manihiki Plateau/Nauru Basin with the main eruptive event focusing on the OJP, before waning and moving to the Hikurangi Plateau. However, there are a number of magmatic events recorded by samples from each location that suggest periodic rejuvenation of the LIP source region. Ages of 90 Ma and ~60 Ma have been recorded on the OJP by drilling (Site 803) and sampling on the island of Santa Isabel, as well as on the Hikurangi Plateau. OJP-type lavas with ages of ~90 Ma, ~60 Ma, and ~35 Ma have been recovered from the island of San Cristobal. Emplacement of basaltic sills occurred in the Nauru Basin 100-75 Ma. Finally, MORB- and OIB-type lavas have been recovered from the Solomon Islands and from the Hikurangi plateau that appear to be intercalated with OJP-type lavas, but (at least from San Cristobal) these appear to be associated with the ~60 Ma and ~35 Ma events. These observations need to be explained in modeling the

  12. Before They Were Plateaus: Views of Early Orogenesis from the Greater Caucasus in the Arabia-Eurasia Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Cowgill, E.

    2012-12-01

    The mechanisms by which orogenic systems and plateaus develop inherently cannibalize stratigraphic records of early orogenic processes within marginal basins. Understanding initial stages of structural growth and feedbacks with surface processes is essential, because these determine subsequent evolution of an orogeny. The Greater Caucasus (GC) form the northern margin of the Arabia-Eurasia collision from 40° to 50°E and are the main locus of ~15 mm/yr NE-SW shortening. Rapid exhumation of the GC starting at 5 Ma and initiation of foreland thrust belts along their southern margin at 1.5 Ma make the GC ideal to investigate early stages of orogeny. Synthesis of our recent structural, stratigraphic, and provenance work in the GC highlight two mechanisms that played primary roles in both the structural evolution of the range and the stratigraphic record of tectonic processes: 1) disruption of the southern, pro-wedge of the GC bivergent orogenic wedge via collision with the Lesser Caucasus (LC) Mountains to the south and 2) extremely high amplitude base-level variations in the large, internally-drained Caspian Sea controlling the stratigraphy of the GC foreland basin. The first order structure of the GC is consistent with bivergent orogenic wedge models, however, the symmetric morphology of the GC and locations of actively propagating fold-thrust belts are inconsistent with these standard models. We suggest that collision between the southern GC and the LC has effectively increased basal friction within the central GC pro-wedge, causing spatially variable accretion of material into both the pro- and retro-wedges. Provenance of sediments within the foreland Kura Basin, southeast of the GC, suggest that wedge disruption in the GC coincides with a large drainage reorganization event in the main range, driven by initiation of new, south-directed thrust systems. While provenance of late Cenozoic Kura Basin sediments indicate a GC source, the stratigraphic architecture is

  13. Oscillatory interfacial instability between miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Gaponenko, Yuri; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Torregrosa, Marita; Yasnou, Viktar

    Interfacial instabilities occurring between two fluids are of fundamental interest in fluid dynamics, biological systems and engineering applications such as liquid storage, solvent extraction, oil recovery and mixing. Horizontal vibrations applied to stratified layers of immiscible liquids may generate spatially periodic waving of the interface, stationary in the reference frame of the vibrated cell, referred to as a "frozen wave". We present experimental evidence that frozen wave instability exists between two ordinary miscible liquids of similar densities and viscosities. At the experiments and at the numerical model, two superimposed layers of ordinary liquids, water-alcohol of different concentrations, are placed in a closed cavity in a gravitationally stable configuration. The density and viscosity of these fluids are somewhat similar. Similar to the immiscible fluids this instability has a threshold. When the value of forcing is increased the amplitudes of perturbations grow continuously displaying a saw-tooth structure. The decrease of gravity drastically changes the structure of frozen waves.

  14. Turing instabilities on Cartesian product networks

    PubMed Central

    Asllani, Malbor; Busiello, Daniel M.; Carletti, Timoteo; Fanelli, Duccio; Planchon, Gwendoline

    2015-01-01

    The problem of Turing instabilities for a reaction-diffusion system defined on a complex Cartesian product network is considered. To this end we operate in the linear regime and expand the time dependent perturbation on a basis formed by the tensor product of the eigenvectors of the discrete Laplacian operators, associated to each of the individual networks that build the Cartesian product. The dispersion relation which controls the onset of the instability depends on a set of discrete wavelengths, the eigenvalues of the aforementioned Laplacians. Patterns can develop on the Cartesian network, if they are supported on at least one of its constitutive sub-graphs. Multiplex networks are also obtained under specific prescriptions. In this case, the criteria for the instability reduce to compact explicit formulae. Numerical simulations carried out for the Mimura-Murray reaction kinetics confirm the adequacy of the proposed theory. PMID:26245138

  15. Filtering of non-linear instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khosla, P. K.; Rubin, S. G.

    1978-01-01

    For Courant numbers larger than one and cell Reynolds numbers larger than two, oscillations and in some cases instabilities are typically found with implicit numerical solutions of the fluid dynamics equations. This behavior has sometimes been associated with the loss of diagonal dominance of the coefficient matrix. It is shown that these problems can be related to the choice of the spatial differences, with the resulting instability related to aliasing or nonlinear interaction. Appropriate filtering can reduce the intensity of these oscillations and possibly eliminate the instability. These filtering procedures are equivalent to a weighted average of conservation and nonconservation differencing. The entire spectrum of filtered equations retains a three point character as well as second order spatial accuracy. Burgers equation was considered as a model.

  16. Nodal analysis of two-phase instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Garea, V.P.

    1995-10-01

    Nodal models having moving nodal boundaries have been developed for the analysis of two-phase flow instabilities in a boiling channel. The first model, which was based on a Galerkin method for the discretization, has been found to be accurate in the prediction of the onset of instabilities as well as the frequency of oscillations. This model however, had some problems with the prediction of chaotic phenomena and did not allow for flow reversal in the channel. A second nodal model, based on a finite difference approach, has been found to perform better for the prediction of non-linear response and it also allows for flow reversal. Both models are numerically more efficient than the existing fixed grid models for instabilities analysis.

  17. The mirror and ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The linear dispersion equation for fully electromagnetic waves and instabilities at arbitrary directions of propagation relative to a background magnetic field B(0) in a homogeneous Vlasov plasma is solved numerically for bi-Maxwellian particle distributions. For isotropic plasmas the dispersion and damping of the three modes below the proton cyclotron frequency are studied as functions of Beta(i) and T(e)/T(i). The transport ratios of helicity, cross-helicity, Alfven ratio, compressibility, and parallel compressibility are defined. Under the condition that the proton temperature perpendicular to B(0) is greater than the parallel temperature, the growth rates and transport ratios of the mirror instability and the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability are examined and compared. Both the proton parallel compressibility and the proton Alfven ratio are significantly different for the two growing modes.

  18. Octopus-shaped Instabilities of Evaporating Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murisic, Nebojsa; Kondic, Lou; Gotkis, Yehiel; Ivanov, Igor

    2006-11-01

    We report on curious phenomena recorded recently during spreading of evaporating isopropyl alcohol droplets on silicon wafer surfaces. Novel ``octopus''-shaped instabilities were noticed appearing close to the contact line. In addition to our desire to understand the instability, a motivation for this study is the fact that the region close to the contact line carries significant amounts of solid residue which can deteriorate electrical and other properties of the semiconductor devices. After presenting the experimental results, we discuss a lubrication-based mathematical model describing spreading of volatile drops. Through linear stability analysis and numerical simulations, we show that essential factors influencing occurrence of ``octopus''-shaped instabilities include volatility of liquid, and thermal conductivity of both liquid and solid. see http://m.njit.edu/~kondic/thinfilms/octopi.html.

  19. Turing instabilities on Cartesian product networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asllani, Malbor; Busiello, Daniel M.; Carletti, Timoteo; Fanelli, Duccio; Planchon, Gwendoline

    2015-08-01

    The problem of Turing instabilities for a reaction-diffusion system defined on a complex Cartesian product network is considered. To this end we operate in the linear regime and expand the time dependent perturbation on a basis formed by the tensor product of the eigenvectors of the discrete Laplacian operators, associated to each of the individual networks that build the Cartesian product. The dispersion relation which controls the onset of the instability depends on a set of discrete wavelengths, the eigenvalues of the aforementioned Laplacians. Patterns can develop on the Cartesian network, if they are supported on at least one of its constitutive sub-graphs. Multiplex networks are also obtained under specific prescriptions. In this case, the criteria for the instability reduce to compact explicit formulae. Numerical simulations carried out for the Mimura-Murray reaction kinetics confirm the adequacy of the proposed theory.

  20. Turing instabilities on Cartesian product networks.

    PubMed

    Asllani, Malbor; Busiello, Daniel M; Carletti, Timoteo; Fanelli, Duccio; Planchon, Gwendoline

    2015-01-01

    The problem of Turing instabilities for a reaction-diffusion system defined on a complex Cartesian product network is considered. To this end we operate in the linear regime and expand the time dependent perturbation on a basis formed by the tensor product of the eigenvectors of the discrete Laplacian operators, associated to each of the individual networks that build the Cartesian product. The dispersion relation which controls the onset of the instability depends on a set of discrete wavelengths, the eigenvalues of the aforementioned Laplacians. Patterns can develop on the Cartesian network, if they are supported on at least one of its constitutive sub-graphs. Multiplex networks are also obtained under specific prescriptions. In this case, the criteria for the instability reduce to compact explicit formulae. Numerical simulations carried out for the Mimura-Murray reaction kinetics confirm the adequacy of the proposed theory. PMID:26245138

  1. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  2. Chiral plasma instabilities.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2013-08-01

    We study the collective modes in relativistic electromagnetic or quark-gluon plasmas with an asymmetry between left- and right-handed chiral fermions, based on the recently formulated kinetic theory with Berry curvature corrections. We find that there exists an unstable mode, signaling the presence of a plasma instability. We argue the fate of this "chiral plasma instability" including the effect of collisions, and briefly discuss its relevance in heavy ion collisions and compact stars. PMID:23952387

  3. Rotor internal friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bently, D. E.; Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two aspects of internal friction affecting stability of rotating machines are discussed. The first role of internal friction consists of decreasing the level of effective damping during rotor subsynchronous and backward precessional vibrations caused by some other instability mechanisms. The second role of internal frication consists of creating rotor instability, i.e., causing self-excited subsynchronous vibrations. Experimental test results document both of these aspects.

  4. Equilibrium Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, I.; Zaltzman, B.

    2015-03-01

    Since its prediction 15 years ago, hydrodynamic instability in concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface has been attributed to nonequilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current. This attribution had a double basis. On the one hand, it has been recognized that neither equilibrium electro-osmosis nor bulk electroconvection can yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. On the other hand, it has been shown that nonequilibrium electro-osmosis can. The first theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this Letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential of counterions in the solid) allows for the equilibrium electroconvective instability. In addition, we suggest a simple experimental test for determining the true, either equilibrium or nonequilibrium, origin of instability in concentration polarization.

  5. Numerical calculations of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.; Vogel, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical calculations were made of flow fields generated by various aerodynamic configurations. Data cover flow fields generated by a finitely thick lifting three dimensional wing with subsonic tips moving at supersonic speeds, cross flow instability associated with lifting delta wing configurations such as space shuttles, and flow fields produced by a lifting elliptic cone. Finite difference techniques were used to determine elliptic cone flow.

  6. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A.

    1995-10-01

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. Clearly, the key to successful gas turbine development is based on understanding the effects of geometry and operating conditions on combustion instability, emissions (including UHC, CO and NO{sub x}) and performance. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors.

  7. Goertler instability of compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, N. M.; Verma, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    The instability of the laminar compressible boundary-layer flows along concave surfaces is investigated. The linearized disturbance equations for the three-dimensional, counter-rotating, longitudinal-type vortices in two-dimensional boundary layers are presented in an orthogonal curvilinear system of coordinates. The basic approximation of the disturbance equations, which includes the effect of the growth of the boundary layer, is considered and solved numerically.

  8. Scaling the Incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrell, D; Cook, A

    2007-01-09

    We derive a scaling relation for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of incompressible fluids. The relation is tested using both numerical simulations and experimental data. We obtain collapse of growth rates for a wide range of initial conditions by using vorticity and velocity scales associated with the interfacial perturbations and the acceleration impulse. A curve fit to the collapsed growth rates yields a fairly universal model for the mixing layer thickness versus time.

  9. Generalized lower-hybrid-drift instability. [of plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, J. B.; Chiu, S. M.; Hsia, M. F.; Chou, R. L.; Wu, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of lower-hybrid-drift instability is extended to include a finite value of the component of wave vector parallel to the ambient magnetic field so that the analysis bridges the usual lower-hybrid-drift instability of flute modes and the modified-two-stream instability. The present theory also includes electromagnetic and ambient magnetic field-gradient effects. It is found that in the cold-electron limit the density and magnetic gradients can qualitatively modify the conclusion obtained in the early theory of the modified-two-stream instability. For example, even if the relative drift far exceeds the Alfven speed of the plasma, the instability may still persist. This result is in contrast to that established in the literature. When the electron temperature is finite, the problem is complicated. Numerical solutions are obtained for a number of cases.

  10. Interfacial instabilities and fingering formation in Hele-Shaw flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1996-10-01

    The interfacial instability of Hele-Shaw flow has been a crucial issue for the understanding of the pattern formation of viscous fingers in a Hele-Shaw cell. By using a unified asymptotic approach, we derive two different types of instability mechanisms for slightly' time-dependent finger solutions; namely, (i) the global-trapped-wave (GTW) instability; and (ii) the zero-frequency (null-f) instability. On the basis of these instability mechanisms, the selection of viscous finger formation is clarified; the apparent contradiction between the previous linearstability analysis by Tanveer (1987, Phys. Fluid 30, 1589) and others and the numerical simulations by DeGregoria & Schwartz (1986, J. Fluid Mech. 164, 383)and the experimental evidence is reconciled.

  11. Estimating aboveground forest biomass carbon and fire consumption in the U.S. Utah High Plateaus using data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis program, Landsat, and LANDFIRE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, X.; Liu, S.; Zhu, Z.; Vogelmann, J.; Li, Z.; Ohlen, D.

    2011-01-01

    The concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have been increasing and greatly affecting global climate and socio-economic systems. Actively growing forests are generally considered to be a major carbon sink, but forest wildfires lead to large releases of biomass carbon into the atmosphere. Aboveground forest biomass carbon (AFBC), an important ecological indicator, and fireinduced carbon emissions at regional scales are highly relevant to forest sustainable management and climate change. It is challenging to accurately estimate the spatial distribution of AFBC across large areas because of the spatial heterogeneity of forest cover types and canopy structure. In this study, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data, Landsat, and Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools Project (LANDFIRE) data were integrated in a regression tree model for estimating AFBC at a 30-m resolution in the Utah High Plateaus. AFBC were calculated from 225 FIA field plots and used as the dependent variable in the model. Of these plots, 10% were held out for model evaluation with stratified random sampling, and the other 90% were used as training data to develop the regression tree model. Independent variable layers included Landsat imagery and the derived spectral indicators, digital elevation model (DEM) data and derivatives, biophysical gradient data, existing vegetation cover type and vegetation structure. The cross-validation correlation coefficient (r value) was 0.81 for the training model. Independent validation using withheld plot data was similar with r value of 0.82. This validated regression tree model was applied to map AFBC in the Utah High Plateaus and then combined with burn severity information to estimate loss of AFBC in the Longston fire of Zion National Park in 2001. The final dataset represented 24 forest cover types for a 4 million ha forested area. We estimated a total of 353 Tg AFBC with an average of 87 MgC/ha in the Utah High

  12. Streaming instability of slime mold amoebae: An analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfer, Thomas; Maini, Philip K.

    1997-08-01

    During the aggregation of amoebae of the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium, the interaction of chemical waves of the signaling molecule cAMP with cAMP-directed cell movement causes the breakup of a uniform cell layer into branching patterns of cell streams. Recent numerical and experimental investigations emphasize the pivotal role of the cell-density dependence of the chemical wave speed for the occurrence of the streaming instability. A simple, analytically tractable, model of Dictyostelium aggregation is developed to test this idea. The interaction of cAMP waves with cAMP-directed cell movement is studied in the form of coupled dynamics of wave front geometries and cell density. Comparing the resulting explicit instability criterion and dispersion relation for cell streaming with the previous findings of model simulations and numerical stability analyses, a unifying interpretation of the streaming instability as a cAMP wave-driven chemotactic instability is proposed.

  13. Linear analysis of incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solids.

    PubMed

    Piriz, A R; Cela, J J López; Tahir, N A

    2009-10-01

    The study of the linear stage of the incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic-plastic solids is performed by considering thick plates under a constant acceleration that is also uniform except for a small sinusoidal ripple in the horizontal plane. The analysis is carried out by using an analytical model based on the Newton second law and it is complemented with extensive two-dimensional numerical simulations. The conditions for marginal stability that determine the instability threshold are derived. Besides, the boundary for the transition from the elastic to the plastic regime is obtained and it is demonstrated that such a transition is not a sufficient condition for instability. The model yields complete analytical solutions for the perturbation amplitude evolution and reveals the main physical process that governs the instability. The theory is in general agreement with the numerical simulations and provides useful quantitative results. Implications for high-energy-density-physics experiments are also discussed. PMID:19905434

  14. Buckling instability in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Rebecca M

    2015-04-21

    Arteries can become tortuous in response to abnormal growth stimuli, genetic defects and aging. It is suggested that a buckling instability is a mechanism that might lead to artery tortuosity. Here, the buckling instability in arteries is studied by examining asymmetric modes of bifurcation of two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic responses to stresses. Strain-softening and reduced opening angle are shown to lower the critical internal pressure leading to buckling. In addition, the ratio of the media thickness to the adventitia thickness is shown to have a dramatic impact on arterial instability. PMID:25661070

  15. Electrokinetic instability in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Demekhin, Evgeny A.; Ganchenko, Georgy

    2012-05-01

    The effect of geometric confinement on electroconvective instability due to nonequilibrium electro-osmotic slip at the interface of an electrolytic fluid and charge-selective solid is studied. It is shown that the topology of the marginal stability curves and the behavior of the critical parameters depend strongly on both channel geometry and dimensionless Debye length at low voltages for sufficiently deep channels, corresponding to the Rubinstein-Zaltzman instability mechanism, but that stability is governed almost entirely by channel depth for narrow channels at higher voltages. For shallow channels, it is shown that above a transition threshold, determined by both channel depth and Debye length, the low-voltage instability is completely suppressed.

  16. Modulational Instability in a Layered Kerr Medium: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centurion, Martin; Porter, Mason A.; Pu, Ye; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Psaltis, Demetri

    2006-12-01

    We present the first experimental investigation of modulational instability in a layered Kerr medium. The particularly interesting and appealing feature of our configuration, consisting of alternating glass-air layers, is the piecewise-constant nature of the material properties, which allows a theoretical linear stability analysis leading to a Kronig-Penney equation whose forbidden bands correspond to the modulationally unstable regimes. We find very good quantitative agreement between theoretical, numerical, and experimental diagnostics of the modulational instability. Because of the periodicity in the evolution variable arising from the layered medium, there are multiple instability regions rather than just one as in a uniform medium.

  17. The Evolution of a Double Diffusive Magnetic Buoyancy Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvers, Lara J.; Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Brummell, Nicholas H.; Proctor, Michael R. E.

    2011-08-01

    Recently, Silvers et al. (2009b), using numerical simulations, confirmed the existence of a double diffusive magnetic buoyancy instability of a layer of horizontal magnetic field produced by the interaction of a shear velocity field with a weak vertical field. Here, we demonstrate the longer term nonlinear evolution of such an instability in the simulations. We find that a quasi two-dimensional interchange instability rides (or ``surfs'') on the growing shear-induced background downstream field gradients. The region of activity expands since three-dimensional perturbations remain unstable in the wake of this upward-moving activity front, and so the three-dimensional nature becomes more noticeable with time.

  18. Electrokinetic instability near charge-selective hydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelistov, V. S.; Demekhin, E. A.; Ganchenko, G. S.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of the texture of a hydrophobic surface on the electro-osmotic slip of the second kind and the electrokinetic instability near charge selective surfaces (permselective membranes, electrodes, or systems of microchannels and nanochannels) is investigated theoretically using a simple model based on the Rubinstein-Zaltzman approach. A simple formula is derived to evaluate the decrease in the instability threshold due to hydrophobicity. The study is complemented by numerical investigations both of linear and nonlinear instabilities near a hydrophobic membrane surface. Theory predicts a significant enhancement of the ion flux to the surface and shows a good qualitative agreement with the available experimental data.

  19. Ringed Accretion Disks: Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the possibility that several instability points may be formed, due to the Paczyński mechanism of violation of mechanical equilibrium, in the orbiting matter around a supermassive Kerr black hole. We consider a recently proposed model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several tori (rings) that can be corotating or counter-rotating relative to the Kerr attractor due to the history of the accretion process. Each torus is governed by the general relativistic hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. We prove that the number of the instability points is generally limited and depends on the dimensionless spin of the rotating attractor.

  20. Varus Posteromedial Instability.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Miguel A; Stein, Jason A; Murthi, Anand M

    2015-11-01

    Varus posteromedial instability of the elbow is a result of traumatic injury to the medial facet of the coronoid and usually the lateral collateral ligament. Treatment of these fractures is usually surgical; poor outcomes have been described with nonoperative treatment. Surgical management consists of coronoid fracture fixation with plates, screws, or sutures and radial collateral ligament repair. Outcomes of these injuries are mixed, but most series report fair to good objective scores. The purpose of this article is to describe the pathophysiology of varus posteromedial instability, discuss the management of this injury, and report the outcomes of treatment. PMID:26498545

  1. Measurement of runaway electron energy distribution function during high-Z gas injection into runaway electron plateaus in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Rudakov, D. L.; Parks, P. B.; Eidietis, N. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Commaux, N.; Shiraki, D.; Austin, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.

    2015-05-15

    The evolution of the runaway electron (RE) energy distribution function f{sub ε} during massive gas injection into centered post-disruption runaway electron plateaus has been reconstructed. Overall, f{sub ε} is found to be much more skewed toward low energy than predicted by avalanche theory. The reconstructions also indicate that the RE pitch angle θ is not uniform, but tends to be large at low energies and small θ ∼ 0.1–0.2 at high energies. Overall power loss from the RE plateau appears to be dominated by collisions with background free and bound electrons, leading to line radiation. However, the drag on the plasma current appears to be dominated by collisions with impurity ions in most cases. Synchrotron emission appears not to be significant for overall RE energy dissipation but may be important for limiting the peak RE energy.

  2. Measurement of runaway electron energy distribution function during high-Z gas injection into runaway electron plateaus in DIII-Da)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollmann, E. M.; Parks, P. B.; Commaux, N.; Eidietis, N. W.; Moyer, R. A.; Shiraki, D.; Austin, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Rudakov, D. L.

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of the runaway electron (RE) energy distribution function f ɛ during massive gas injection into centered post-disruption runaway electron plateaus has been reconstructed. Overall, f ɛ is found to be much more skewed toward low energy than predicted by avalanche theory. The reconstructions also indicate that the RE pitch angle θ is not uniform, but tends to be large at low energies and small θ ˜ 0.1-0.2 at high energies. Overall power loss from the RE plateau appears to be dominated by collisions with background free and bound electrons, leading to line radiation. However, the drag on the plasma current appears to be dominated by collisions with impurity ions in most cases. Synchrotron emission appears not to be significant for overall RE energy dissipation but may be important for limiting the peak RE energy.

  3. Control and simulation of thermoacoustic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinsot, Thierry

    2014-11-01

    Combustion instabilities (CI), due to thermoacoustic coupling between acoustic waves and chemical reaction, constitute a major danger for all combustion systems. They can drive the system to unstable states where the whole combustor can oscillate, vibrate, quench or in extreme cases explode or burn. Such phenomena are commonly observed in the final phases of development programs, leading to major difficulties and significant additional costs. One of the most famous examples of combustion instabilities is the F1 engine of the Apollo program which required more than 1000 engine tests to obtain a stable regime satisfying all other constraints (performance, ignition, etc). CIs constitute one of the most challenging problems in fluid mechanics: they combine turbulence, acoustics, chemistry, unsteady two-phase flow in complex geometries. Since combustion instabilities have been identified (more than hundred years ago), the combustion community has followed two paths: (1) improve our understanding of the phenomena controlling stability to build engines which would be ``stable by design'' and (2) give up on a detailed understanding of mechanisms and add control systems either in open or closed loop devices to inhibit unstable modes. Of course, understanding phenomena driving combustion instabilities to suppress them would be the most satisfying approach but there is no fully reliable theory or numerical method today which can predict whether a combustor will be stable or not before it is fired. This talk will present an overview of combustion instabilities phenomenology before focusing on: (1) active control methods for combustion instabilities and (2) recent methods to predict unstable modes in combustors. These methods are based on recent Large Eddy Simulation codes for compressible reacting flows on HPC systems but we will also describe recent fully analytical methods which provide new insights into unstable modes in annular combustion chambers. Support: European

  4. Coherent betatron instability in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, S.A.; Harrison, M.; Ng, K.Y.

    1988-06-09

    The coherent betatron instability was first observed during the recent 1987-88 Tevatron fixed target run. In this operating mode 1000 consecutive bunches are loaded into the machine at 150 GeV with a bunch spacing of 18.8 /times/ 10/sup -9/ sec (53 MHz). The normalized transverse emittance is typically 15 ..pi.. /times/ 10/sup -6/ m rad in each plane with a longitudinal emittance of about 1.5 eV-sec. The beam is accelerated to 800 GeV in 13 sec. and then it is resonantly extracted during a 23 sec flat top. As the run progressed the bunch intensities were increased until at about 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 10/ppb (protons per bunch) we experienced the onset of a coherent horizontal oscillation taking place in the later stages of the acceleration cycle (>600 GeV). This rapidly developing coherent instability results in a significant emittance growth, which limits machine performance and in a catastrophic scenario it even prevents extraction of the beam. In this paper we will present a simple analytic description of the observed instability. We will show that a combination of a resistive wall coupled bunch effect and a single bunch slow head-tail instability is consistent with the above observations. Finally, a systematic numerical analysis of our model (growth-time vs chromaticity plots) points to the existence of the greater than or equal to1 slow head-tail modes as a plausible mechanism for the observed coherent instability. This last claim, as mentioned before, does not have conclusive experimental evidence, although it is based on a very good agreement between the measured values of the instability growth-time and the ones calculated on the basis of our model. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Pair instability supernovae of very massive population III stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan; Heger, Alexander; Almgren, Ann; Whalen, Daniel J.

    2014-09-01

    Numerical studies of primordial star formation suggest that the first stars in the universe may have been very massive. Stellar models indicate that non-rotating Population III stars with initial masses of 140-260 M {sub ☉} die as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We present new two-dimensional simulations of primordial pair-instability supernovae done with the CASTRO code. Our simulations begin at earlier times than previous multidimensional models, at the onset of core contraction, to capture any dynamical instabilities that may be seeded by core contraction and explosive burning. Such instabilities could enhance explosive yields by mixing hot ash with fuel, thereby accelerating nuclear burning, and affect the spectra of the supernova by dredging up heavy elements from greater depths in the star at early times. Our grid of models includes both blue supergiants and red supergiants over the range in progenitor mass expected for these events. We find that fluid instabilities driven by oxygen and helium burning arise at the upper and lower boundaries of the oxygen shell ∼20-100 s after core bounce. Instabilities driven by burning freeze out after the SN shock exits the helium core. As the shock later propagates through the hydrogen envelope, a strong reverse shock forms that drives the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. In red supergiant progenitors, the amplitudes of these instabilities are sufficient to mix the supernova ejecta.

  6. INSTABILITIES IN THE SNS.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.

    1999-03-29

    The 2MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will have a D.C. beam current of 40 A at extraction, making it one of the worlds most intense accelerators. Coherent instabilities are a major concern and efforts to predict beam behavior are described.

  7. Electrostatic heat flux instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, P. J.; Ionson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The electrostatic cyclotron and ion acoustic instabilities in a plasma driven by a combined heat flux and current were investigated. The minimum critical heat conduction speed (above which the plasma is unstable) is given as a function of the ratio of electron to ion temperatures.

  8. Global Linear Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theofilis, Vassilios

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews linear instability analysis of flows over or through complex two-dimensional (2D) and 3D geometries. In the three decades since it first appeared in the literature, global instability analysis, based on the solution of the multidimensional eigenvalue and/or initial value problem, is continuously broadening both in scope and in depth. To date it has dealt successfully with a wide range of applications arising in aerospace engineering, physiological flows, food processing, and nuclear-reactor safety. In recent years, nonmodal analysis has complemented the more traditional modal approach and increased knowledge of flow instability physics. Recent highlights delivered by the application of either modal or nonmodal global analysis are briefly discussed. A conscious effort is made to demystify both the tools currently utilized and the jargon employed to describe them, demonstrating the simplicity of the analysis. Hopefully this will provide new impulses for the creation of next-generation algorithms capable of coping with the main open research areas in which step-change progress can be expected by the application of the theory: instability analysis of fully inhomogeneous, 3D flows and control thereof.

  9. Instabilities of volatile films and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murisic, Nebojsa

    2008-12-01

    the focus to the gas phase, where the problem of vapor mass diffusion is to be solved, which invokes analogy with the problem of lens-shaped conductor from electrostatics. On the other hand, NEOS model assumes non-equilibrium at the liquid-gas interface and a reaction-limited regime of evaporation; the liquid and gas phases are decoupled using the one-sided assumption, and hence, the problem is to be solved in the liquid phase only. We use lubrication approximation and derive a single governing equation for the evolution of drop thickness, which includes both models. An experimental procedure is described next, which we use in order to estimate the volatility parameter corresponding to each model. We also describe the numerical code, which we use to solve the governing equation for drop thickness, and show how this equation can be used to predict which evaporation model is more appropriate for a particular physical problem. Next, we perform linear stability analysis (LSA) of perturbed thin film configuration. We find excellent agreement between our numerical results and LSA predictions. Furthermore, these results indicate that the IPA/Si configuration is the most unstable one, in direct agreement with experimental results. We perform numerical simulations in the simplified 2d geometry (cross section of the drop) for both planar and radial symmetry and show that our theoretical model reproduces the main features of the experiment, namely, the formation of "octopus"-like features ahead of the contact line of an evaporating drop. Finally, we perform quasi-3d numerical simulations of evaporating drops, where stability to azimuthal perturbations of the contact line is examined. We recover the "octopi" instability for IPA/Si configuration, similarly as seen in the experiments.

  10. Tracking Code for Microwave Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.; /SLAC

    2006-09-21

    To study microwave instability the tracking code is developed. For bench marking, results are compared with Oide-Yokoya results [1] for broad-band Q = 1 impedance. Results hint to two possible mechanisms determining the threshold of instability.

  11. Termination of the magnetorotational instability via parasitic instabilities in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembiasz, T.; Obergaulinger, M.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Müller, E.; Aloy, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) can be a powerful mechanism amplifying the magnetic field in core-collapse supernovae. Whether initially weak magnetic fields can be amplified by this instability to dynamically relevant strengths is still a matter of debate. One of the main uncertainties concerns the process that terminates the growth of the instability. Parasitic instabilities of both Kelvin-Helmholtz and tearing-mode type have been suggested to play a crucial role in this process, disrupting MRI channel flows and quenching magnetic field amplification. We perform two-dimensional and three-dimensional sheering-disc simulations of a differentially rotating protoneutron star layer in non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics with unprecedented high numerical accuracy, finding that Kelvin-Helmholtz parasitic modes dominate tearing modes in the regime of large hydrodynamic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, as encountered close to the surface of protoneutron stars. They also determine the maximum magnetic field stress achievable during the exponential growth of the MRI. Our results are consistent with the theory of parasitic instabilities based on a local stability analysis. To simulate the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities properly, a very high numerical resolution is necessary. Using ninth-order spatial reconstruction schemes, we find that at least eight grid zones per MRI channel are necessary to simulate the growth phase of the MRI and reach an accuracy of ˜10 per cent in the growth rate, while more than ˜60 zones per channel are required to achieve convergent results for the value of the magnetic stress at MRI termination.

  12. Ultraspinning instability of rotating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Oscar J. C.; Figueras, Pau; Monteiro, Ricardo; Santos, Jorge E.

    2010-11-15

    Rapidly rotating Myers-Perry black holes in d{>=}6 dimensions were conjectured to be unstable by Emparan and Myers. In a previous publication, we found numerically the onset of the axisymmetric ultraspinning instability in the singly spinning Myers-Perry black hole in d=7, 8, 9. This threshold also signals a bifurcation to new branches of axisymmetric solutions with pinched horizons that are conjectured to connect to the black ring, black Saturn and other families in the phase diagram of stationary solutions. We firmly establish that this instability is also present in d=6 and in d=10, 11. The boundary conditions of the perturbations are discussed in detail for the first time, and we prove that they preserve the angular velocity and temperature of the original Myers-Perry black hole. This property is fundamental to establishing a thermodynamic necessary condition for the existence of this instability in general rotating backgrounds. We also prove a previous claim that the ultraspinning modes cannot be pure gauge modes. Finally we find new ultraspinning Gregory-Laflamme instabilities of rotating black strings and branes that appear exactly at the critical rotation predicted by the aforementioned thermodynamic criterium. The latter is a refinement of the Gubser-Mitra conjecture.

  13. Perception and self-organized instability

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl; Breakspear, Michael; Deco, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers state-dependent dynamics that mediate perception in the brain. In particular, it considers the formal basis of self-organized instabilities that enable perceptual transitions during Bayes-optimal perception. The basic phenomena we consider are perceptual transitions that lead to conscious ignition (Dehaene and Changeux, 2011) and how they depend on dynamical instabilities that underlie chaotic itinerancy (Breakspear, 2001; Tsuda, 2001) and self-organized criticality (Beggs and Plenz, 2003; Plenz and Thiagarajan, 2007; Shew et al., 2011). Our approach is based on a dynamical formulation of perception as approximate Bayesian inference, in terms of variational free energy minimization. This formulation suggests that perception has an inherent tendency to induce dynamical instabilities (critical slowing) that enable the brain to respond sensitively to sensory perturbations. We briefly review the dynamics of perception, in terms of generalized Bayesian filtering and free energy minimization, present a formal conjecture about self-organized instability and then test this conjecture, using neuronal (numerical) simulations of perceptual categorization. PMID:22783185

  14. On the numerical dispersion and the spectral fidelity of the Particle-In-Cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengkun; Meyers, M. D.; Zeng, Y.; Yi, S.; Albright, B. J.

    2015-11-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits grid type numerical instabilities, including the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability that can render unphysical simulation results or disrupt the simulation. A faithful numerical dispersion of the electromagnetic PIC algorithm is obtained and analyzed to obtain the insight about the numerical instabilities inherent in such a computation model. Using this dispersion, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical modes admitted in the system and their aliases. Compared with the gridless model, we show that the lack of spectral fidelity relative to the real system due to the aliasing effect is a major cause of the numerical instabilities in the PIC model. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LDRD program at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  15. Traveling wave instability in helical coil flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, D. R.; Humphrey, J. A. C.

    1997-02-01

    Complementary flow visualization photographs and numerical calculations are presented for the transitional state between the laminar and turbulent flow regimes in a helically coiled pipe. The flow visualization covers a Reynolds number range from 3800 to 8650 (890instability are made from photographs and video recordings at Re=5060 and 5480 (De=1190 and 1280). The unsteady three-dimensional finite difference approximations of the Navier-Stokes equations formulated for the toroidal coordinate system are solved numerically. The calculations are performed in a curved pipe with a radius of curvature to pipe radius ratio equal to 18.2 and Re=5480 (De=1280). These test conditions match the flow visualization and previously reported laser Doppler velocimetry measurements. The calculations reveal a complex interaction between the centrifugal force and the cross-stream velocity, hence explaining the mechanism for maintaining the traveling wave. An analogy is made with known centrifugal instabilities to explain the character of the motion observed in the inner half of the pipe along planes defined by the radial and streamwise coordinate directions. Simple considerations show that the cross-stream flow has the potential for a centrifugal instability.

  16. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    that leads to splitting (fluid separation). We investigate the interaction of these prominent interfacial instabilities in the absence of gravity, concentrating on harmonically vibrated rectangular containers of fluid. We compare vibroequilibria theory with direct numerical simulations and consider the effect of surfaces waves, which can excite sloshing motion of the vibroequilibria. We systematically investigate the saddle-node bifurcation experienced by a symmetric singly connected vibroequilibria solution, for sufficiently deep containers, as forcing is increased. Beyond this instability, the fluid rapidly separates into (at least) two distinct masses. Pronounced hysteresis is associated with this transition, even in the presence of gravity. The interaction of vibroequilibria and frozen waves is investigated in two-fluid systems. Preparations for a parabolic flight experiment on fluids vibrated at high frequencies are discussed.

  17. Testing the gravitational instability hypothesis?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babul, Arif; Weinberg, David H.; Dekel, Avishai; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    We challenge a widely accepted assumption of observational cosmology: that successful reconstruction of observed galaxy density fields from measured galaxy velocity fields (or vice versa), using the methods of gravitational instability theory, implies that the observed large-scale structures and large-scale flows were produced by the action of gravity. This assumption is false, in that there exist nongravitational theories that pass the reconstruction tests and gravitational theories with certain forms of biased galaxy formation that fail them. Gravitational instability theory predicts specific correlations between large-scale velocity and mass density fields, but the same correlations arise in any model where (a) structures in the galaxy distribution grow from homogeneous initial conditions in a way that satisfies the continuity equation, and (b) the present-day velocity field is irrotational and proportional to the time-averaged velocity field. We demonstrate these assertions using analytical arguments and N-body simulations. If large-scale structure is formed by gravitational instability, then the ratio of the galaxy density contrast to the divergence of the velocity field yields an estimate of the density parameter Omega (or, more generally, an estimate of beta identically equal to Omega(exp 0.6)/b, where b is an assumed constant of proportionality between galaxy and mass density fluctuations. In nongravitational scenarios, the values of Omega or beta estimated in this way may fail to represent the true cosmological values. However, even if nongravitational forces initiate and shape the growth of structure, gravitationally induced accelerations can dominate the velocity field at late times, long after the action of any nongravitational impulses. The estimated beta approaches the true value in such cases, and in our numerical simulations the estimated beta values are reasonably accurate for both gravitational and nongravitational models. Reconstruction tests

  18. Genomic Instability and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yixin; Dai, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Genomic instability is a characteristic of most cancer cells. It is an increased tendency of genome alteration during cell division. Cancer frequently results from damage to multiple genes controlling cell division and tumor suppressors. It is known that genomic integrity is closely monitored by several surveillance mechanisms, DNA damage checkpoint, DNA repair machinery and mitotic checkpoint. A defect in the regulation of any of these mechanisms often results in genomic instability, which predisposes the cell to malignant transformation. Posttranslational modifications of the histone tails are closely associated with regulation of the cell cycle as well as chromatin structure. Nevertheless, DNA methylation status is also related to genomic integrity. We attempt to summarize recent developments in this field and discuss the debate of driving force of tumor initiation and progression. PMID:25541596

  19. Open field lines instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzoli, R. |

    1995-09-01

    The results of some recent theoretical papers dealing with flute-like instabilities in the scrape-off layer of a tokamak with limiter configuration, where the magnetic field intersects conducting walls, are briefly recalled. Attention is then paid to the instability driven by the electron temperature gradient across the field in conjunction with the formation of the Debye sheath at the boundary, and to the effects due to the inclination of the end walls with respect to the magnetic field. When a divertor configuration is considered, important modifications are found owing to the strong deformations of the flux tubes passing near the {ital x}-point, which contrast the onset of flute-like perturbations, and to the stochasticity of field lines that can be excited by magnetic field perturbations. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Beam-beam instability

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-08-01

    The subject of beam-beam instability has been studied since the invention of the colliding beam storage rings. Today, with several colliding beam storage rings in operation, it is not yet fully understood and remains an outstanding problem for the storage ring designers. No doubt that good progress has been made over the years, but what we have at present is still rather primitive. It is perhaps possible to divide the beam-beam subject into two areas: one on luminosity optimization and another on the dynamics of the beam-beam interaction. The former area concerns mostly the design and operational features of a colliding beam storage ring, while the later concentrates on the experimental and theoretical aspects of the beam-beam interaction. Although both areas are of interest, our emphasis is on the second area only. In particular, we are most interested in the various possible mechanisms that cause the beam-beam instability.

  1. Whistler modulational instability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinca, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    Derivation of the modulational instability characteristics of whistlers in cold and hot plasmas. The cold-plasma analysis considers both ion motion and relativistic effects; the unstable band, with a growth rate proportional to (B/B sub zero)squared, is contiguous to Omega sub e/4 and, depending on the plasma density, lies above or below that frequency (Omega sub e is the electron cyclotron frequency of the static magnetic field; B and B sub zero are the whistler and static magnetic fields). In hot plasmas, stability occurs between Omega sub e/4 and Omega prime (less than Omega sub e), with Omega prime depending mainly on the mean energy and anisotropy of the energetic electron population; the complementary unstable band has a growth rate proportional to (B/B sub zero) to the 1/2 power. The relevance of the instability to whistlers in the magnetosphere is discussed.

  2. Deployment Instabilities of Lobed-Pumpkin Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi

    A lobed-pumpkin balloon, currently being developed in ISAS/JAXA as well as in NASA, is a promising vehicle for long duration scientific observations in the stratosphere. Recent ground and flight experiments, however, have revealed that the balloon has deployment instabilities under certain conditions. In order to overcome the instability problems, a next generation SPB called 'tawara' type balloon has been proposed, in which an additional cylindrical part is appended to the standard lobed-pumpkin balloon. The present study investigates the deployment stability of tawara type SPB in comparison to that of standard lobed-pumpkin SPB through eigenvalue analysis on the basis of finite element methods. Our numerical results show that tawara type SPB enjoys excellent deployment performance over the standard lobed-pumpkin SPBs.

  3. Fluctuations and correlations in modulation instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solli, D. R.; Herink, G.; Jalali, B.; Ropers, C.

    2012-07-01

    Stochastically driven nonlinear processes are responsible for spontaneous pattern formation and instabilities in numerous natural and artificial systems, including well-known examples such as sand ripples, cloud formations, water waves, animal pigmentation and heart rhythms. Technologically, a type of such self-amplification drives free-electron lasers and optical supercontinuum sources whose radiation qualities, however, suffer from the stochastic origins. Through time-resolved observations, we identify intrinsic properties of these fluctuations that are hidden in ensemble measurements. We acquire single-shot spectra of modulation instability produced by laser pulses in glass fibre at megahertz real-time capture rates. The temporally confined nature of the gain physically limits the number of amplified modes, which form an antibunched arrangement as identified from a statistical analysis of the data. These dynamics provide an example of pattern competition and interaction in confined nonlinear systems.

  4. Solar Dynamo and Toroidal Field Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2013-10-01

    The possibility of non-axisymmetric (kink) instabilities of a toroidal field seated in the tachocline is much discussed in the literature. In this work, the basic properties of kink and quasi-interchange instabilities, produced by mixed toroidal and poloidal configuration, will be briefly reviewed. In particular, it will be shown that the unstable modes are strongly localized near the Equator and not near the Poles as often claimed in the literature. Based on the results of recent numerical simulations, it is argued that a non-zero helicity can already be produced at a non-linear level. A mean-field solar dynamo is then constructed with a positive α-effect in the overshoot layer localized near the Equator, and a meridional circulation with deep return flow. Finally, the possibility that the solar cycle is driven by an αΩ dynamo generated by the negative subsurface shear in the supergranulation layer will also be discussed.

  5. Instability in electromagnetically driven flows. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gissinger, Christophe; Rodriguez Imazio, Paola; Fauve, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic flow driven by a travelling magnetic field in an annular channel is investigated numerically. For sufficiently large magnetic Reynolds number Rm, or if a large enough pressure gradient is externally applied, the system undergoes an instability in which the flow rate in the channel dramatically drops from synchronism with the wave to much smaller velocities. This transition takes the form of a saddle-node bifurcation for the time-averaged quantities. In this first paper, we characterize the bifurcation and study the stability of the flow as a function of several parameters. We show that the bifurcation of the flow involves a bistability between Poiseuille-like and Hartman-like regimes and relies on magnetic flux expulsion. Based on this observation, new predictions are made for the occurrence of this stalling instability.

  6. Patterns and instability of grannular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E; Borzsonyi, Tamas; Mcelwaine, Jim N

    2009-01-01

    Dense granular flows are often observed to become unstable and form inhomogeneous structures in nature or industry. Although recently significant advances have been made in understanding simple flows, instabilities are often not understood in detail. We present experimental and numerical results that show the formation of longitudinal stripes. These arise from instability of the uniform flowing state of granular media on a rough inclined plane. The form of the stripes depends critically on the mean density of the flow with a robust form of stripes at high density that consists of fast sliding plug-like regions (stripes) on top of highly agitated boiling material -- a configuration reminiscent of the Leidenfrost effect when a droplet of liquid lifted by its vapor is hovering above a hot surface.

  7. The optomechanical instability in the quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Max; Kubala, Björn; Marquardt, Florian

    2008-09-01

    We consider a generic optomechanical system, consisting of a driven optical cavity and a movable mirror attached to a cantilever. Systems of this kind (and analogues) have been realized in many recent experiments. It is well known that these systems can exhibit an instability towards a regime where the cantilever settles into self-sustained oscillations. In this paper, we briefly review the classical theory of the optomechanical instability, and then discuss the features arising in the quantum regime. We solve numerically a full quantum master equation for the coupled system, and use it to analyze the photon number, the cantilever's mechanical energy, the phonon probability distribution and the mechanical Wigner density, as a function of experimentally accessible control parameters. When a suitable dimensionless 'quantum parameter' is sent to zero, the results of the quantum mechanical model converge towards the classical predictions. We discuss this quantum-to-classical transition in some detail.

  8. Instabilities of wrinkled membranes with pressure loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Amit; Nordmark, Arne; Eriksson, Anders

    2016-09-01

    Wrinkling can affect the functionality of thin membranes subjected to various loadings or boundary conditions. The concept of relaxed strain energy was studied for isotropic, hyperelastic, axisymmetric membranes pressurized by gas or fluid. Non-intuitive instabilities were observed when axisymmetric wrinkled membranes were perturbed with angle dependent displacement fields. A linearized theory showed that static equilibrium states of pressurized membranes, modelled by a relaxed strain energy formulation, are unstable, when the wrinkled surface is subjected to pressure loadings. The theory is extended to the non-axisymmetric membranes and it is shown that these instabilities are local phenomena. Simulations for the pressurized cylindrical membranes with non-uniform thickness and hemispherical membranes support the claims in both theoretical and numerical contexts including finite element simulations.

  9. Robust dynamic mitigation of instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kawata, S.; Karino, T.

    2015-04-15

    A dynamic mitigation mechanism for instability growth was proposed and discussed in the paper [S. Kawata, Phys. Plasmas 19, 024503 (2012)]. In the present paper, the robustness of the dynamic instability mitigation mechanism is discussed further. The results presented here show that the mechanism of the dynamic instability mitigation is rather robust against changes in the phase, the amplitude, and the wavelength of the wobbling perturbation applied. Generally, instability would emerge from the perturbation of the physical quantity. Normally, the perturbation phase is unknown so that the instability growth rate is discussed. However, if the perturbation phase is known, the instability growth can be controlled by a superposition of perturbations imposed actively: If the perturbation is induced by, for example, a driving beam axis oscillation or wobbling, the perturbation phase could be controlled, and the instability growth is mitigated by the superposition of the growing perturbations.

  10. Planetesimal Formation through the Streaming Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Johansen, Anders; Schäfer, Urs

    2015-12-01

    The streaming instability is a promising mechanism to circumvent the barriers in direct dust growth and lead to the formation of planetesimals, as demonstrated by many previous studies. In order to resolve the thin layer of solids, however, most of these studies were focused on a local region of a protoplanetary disk with a limited simulation domain. It remains uncertain how the streaming instability is affected by the disk gas on large scales, and models that have sufficient dynamical range to capture both the thin particle layer and the large-scale disk dynamics are required.We hereby systematically push the limits of the computational domain up to more than the gas scale height, and study the particle-gas interaction on large scales in the saturated state of the streaming instability and the initial mass function of the resulting planetesimals. To overcome the numerical challenges posed by this kind of models, we have developed a new technique to simultaneously relieve the stringent time step constraints due to small-sized particles and strong local solid concentrations. Using these models, we demonstrate that the streaming instability can drive multiple radial, filamentary concentrations of solids, implying that planetesimals are born in well separated belt-like structures. We also find that the initial mass function of planetesimals via the streaming instability has a characteristic exponential form, which is robust against computational domain as well as resolution. These findings will help us further constrain the cosmochemical history of the Solar system as well as the planet formation theory in general.

  11. Combustion instability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    A theory and computer program for combustion instability analysis are presented. The basic theoretical foundation resides in the concept of entropy-controlled energy growth or decay. Third order perturbation expansion is performed on the entropy-controlled acoustic energy equation to obtain the first order integrodifferential equation for the energy growth factor in terms of the linear, second, and third order energy growth parameters. These parameters are calculated from Navier-Stokes solutions with time averages performed on as many Navier-Stokes time steps as required to cover at least one peak wave period. Applications are made for a 1-D Navier-Stokes solution for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) thrust chamber with cross section area variations taken into account. It is shown that instability occurs when the mean pressure is set at 2000 psi with 30 percent disturbances. Instability also arises when the mean pressure is set at 2935 psi with 20 percent disturbances. The system with mean pressures and disturbances more adverse that these cases were shown to be unstable.

  12. Parametric instabilities of circularly polarized Alfven waves in high-beta plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamabata, Hiromitsu

    1993-01-01

    CGL relations including the effect of finite ion Larmor radius are used to consider a class of parametric instabilities of finite-amplitude, circularly polarized Alfven waves in high-beta plasmas. The disperison relation governing the instabilities is a sixth-order polynomial which is solved numerically. There are two types of instabilities: a modulational instability at k is less than k(0) and a relatively weak and narrow bandwidth instability at k is less than approximately k(0), where k and k(0) are the wavenumbers of the unstable density fluctuation and the 'pump' wave, respectively. It is shown that these instabilities can occur for left-handed pump waves and that the modulational instability is unstable over a very broad band in k with a maximum growth rate at finite k is not equal to 0.

  13. Multidimensional instability and dynamics of spin avalanches in crystals of nanomagnets.

    PubMed

    Jukimenko, O; Dion, C M; Marklund, M; Bychkov, V

    2014-11-21

    We obtain a fundamental instability of the magnetization-switching fronts in superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic materials such as crystals of nanomagnets, ferromagnetic nanowires, and systems of quantum dots with large spin. We develop the instability theory for both linear and nonlinear stages. By using numerical simulations we investigate the instability properties focusing on spin avalanches in crystals of nanomagnets. The instability distorts spontaneously the fronts and leads to a complex multidimensional front dynamics. We show that the instability has a universal physical nature, with a deep relationship to a wide variety of physical systems, such as the Darrieus-Landau instability of deflagration fronts in combustion, inertial confinement fusion, and thermonuclear supernovae, and the instability of doping fronts in organic semiconductors. PMID:25479521

  14. On the instability of the flow in an oscillating tank of fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Philip

    1993-02-01

    The instability of a viscous fluid inside a rectangular tank oscillating about an axis parallel to the largest face of the tank is investigated in the linear regime. The flow is shown to be unstable to both longitudinal roll and standing wave instabilities. The particular cases of low and high oscillation frequencies are discussed in detail and the results obtained for the standing wave instability at low frequencies shed light on the corresponding steady flow instability problem. The relationship between the roll instability and convective or centrifugal instabilities in unsteady boundary layers is discussed. The eigenvalue problems associated with the roll and standing wave instabilities are solved using Floquet theory and a combination of numerical and asymptotic methods. The results obtained are compared to the recent experimental investigation of Bolton and Maurer (1992).

  15. On the ordinary mode instability for low beta plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hadi, F.; Qamar, A.; Bashir, M. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2014-05-15

    The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability, first discussed by Davidson and Wu [Phys. Fluids 13, 1407 (1970)], has recently received renewed attention owing to its potential applicability to the solar wind plasma. In a series of papers, Ibscher, Schlickeiser, and their colleagues [Phys. Plasmas 19, 072116 (2012); ibid. 20, 012103 (2013); ibid. 20, 042121 (2013); ibid. 21, 022110 (2014)] revisited the O mode instability and extended it to the low-beta plasma regime by considering a counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian model. However, the O-mode instability is, thus, far discussed only on the basis of the marginal stability condition rather than actual numerical solutions of the dispersion relation. The present paper revisits the O-mode instability by considering the actual complex roots. The marginal stability condition as a function of the (electron) temperature anisotropy and beta naturally emerges in such a scheme.

  16. Joule Heating Effects on Electrokinetic Flow Instabilities in Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumme, Christian; Shaw, Ryan; Zhou, Yilong; Prabhakaran, Rama; Xuan, Xiangchun

    We have demonstrated in our earlier work that the application of a tangential electric field can draw fluid instabilities at the interface of a ferrofluid/water co-flow. These electrokinetic flow instabilities are produced primarily by the mismatch of electric conductivities of the two fluids. We demonstrate in this talk that the Joule heating induced fluid temperature rises and gradients can significantly suppress the electrokinetic flow instabilities. We also develop a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical model to predict the fluid temperature, flow and concentration fields in the two-fluid system with the goal to understand the Joule heating effects on electric field-driven ferrofluid flow instabilities. This work was supported by the Honors and Creative Inquiry programs at Clemson University.

  17. Growth instabilities in mechanical breakdown under mechanical and thermal stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.-Z.; Louis, E.; Plá, O.; Guinea, F.

    1995-12-01

    A linear stability analysis is used to investigate crack growth in two dimensional elastic media, and under mechanical or thermal stresses. Although in most cases a circular geometry is considered, the instability of a planar crack is also discussed. Several boundary conditions and size effects are considered. The results indicate that the tendency towards instabilities in mechanical breakdown is stronger than in the case of growth in fields governed by the Laplace equation (diffusion or electrostatic fields), in line with the smaller fractal dimensions obtained in the first case. Instabilities under thermal stresses are shown to depend on the actual thermal gradients. Finally, a model previously investigated numerically is used to show that plasticity decreases the strength of the instability. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  18. A study of short wave instability on vortex filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong Yun

    1996-12-01

    The numerical stability and accuracy of the vortex method are studied. The effect of the ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver and of the time step on the numerical stability is analyzed. Various ODE solvers are compared and a best performer is chosen. A new constraint on the time step based on numerical stability is proposed and verified in numerical simulations. It is shown through numerical examples that empirical rules for selecting the spatial discretization obtained in simple test problems may not be extended to more general problems. The thin tube vortex filament method is applied to the problem of Widnall`s instability on vortex rings. Numerical results different from previous calculations are presented and the source of the discrepancies is explained. The long time behavior of the unstable mode on thin vortex rings is simulated and analyzed. The short wave instability on vortex filaments is investigated both theoretically and numerically. It is shown that the short wave instability always occurs on co-rotating vortex filaments of fixed core structure. Furthermore when they are close to each other, vortex filaments produce short wave unstable modes which lead to wild stretching and folding. However, when the inter-filament distance is large in comparison with the core size of the filaments, unstable modes are bounded by a small fraction of the core size and the vortex filaments do not create hairpins nor wild stretching. These findings may explain the smooth behavior of the superfluid vortices. The formation of hairpin structures on numerical vortex filaments is investigated. It is shown that the formation of hairpin structures is independent of the ODE solver, of the time step and of other numerical parameters. The hairpin structures are primarily caused by short wave instability on co-rotating vortex filaments.

  19. Modulational instability in nonlinearity-managed optical media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centurion, Martin; Porter, Mason A.; Pu, Ye; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Psaltis, Demetri

    2007-06-01

    We investigate analytically, numerically, and experimentally the modulational instability in a layered, cubically nonlinear (Kerr) optical medium that consists of alternating layers of glass and air. We model this setting using a nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with a piecewise constant nonlinearity coefficient and conduct a theoretical analysis of its linear stability, obtaining a Kronig-Penney equation whose forbidden bands correspond to the modulationally unstable regimes. We find very good quantitative agreement between the theoretical analysis of the Kronig-Penney equation, numerical simulations of the NLS equation, and the experimental results for the modulational instability. Because of the periodicity in the evolution variable arising from the layered medium, we find multiple instability regions rather than just the one that would occur in uniform media.

  20. Modulational instability in nonlinearity-managed optical media

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin; Porter, Mason A.; Pu Ye; Psaltis, Demetri; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.

    2007-06-15

    We investigate analytically, numerically, and experimentally the modulational instability in a layered, cubically nonlinear (Kerr) optical medium that consists of alternating layers of glass and air. We model this setting using a nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equation with a piecewise constant nonlinearity coefficient and conduct a theoretical analysis of its linear stability, obtaining a Kronig-Penney equation whose forbidden bands correspond to the modulationally unstable regimes. We find very good quantitative agreement between the theoretical analysis of the Kronig-Penney equation, numerical simulations of the NLS equation, and the experimental results for the modulational instability. Because of the periodicity in the evolution variable arising from the layered medium, we find multiple instability regions rather than just the one that would occur in uniform media.

  1. Ion sound instability driven by the ion flows

    SciTech Connect

    Koshkarov, O.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Ilgisonis, V. I.

    2015-05-15

    Ion sound instabilities driven by the ion flow in a system of a finite length are considered by analytical and numerical methods. The ion sound waves are modified by the presence of stationary ion flow resulting in negative and positive energy modes. The instability develops due to coupling of negative and positive energy modes mediated by reflections from the boundary. It is shown that the wave dispersion due to deviation from quasineutrality is crucial for the stability. In finite length system, the dispersion is characterized by the length of the system measured in units of the Debye length. The instability is studied analytically and the results are compared with direct, initial value numerical simulations.

  2. Adaptive wavelet collocation method simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, S. J.; Livescu, D.; Vasilyev, O. V.

    2010-12-01

    Numerical simulations of single-mode, compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability are performed using the adaptive wavelet collocation method (AWCM), which utilizes wavelets for dynamic grid adaptation. Due to the physics-based adaptivity and direct error control of the method, AWCM is ideal for resolving the wide range of scales present in the development of the instability. The problem is initialized consistent with the solutions from linear stability theory. Non-reflecting boundary conditions are applied to prevent the contamination of the instability growth by pressure waves created at the interface. AWCM is used to perform direct numerical simulations that match the early-time linear growth, the terminal bubble velocity and a reacceleration region.

  3. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  4. Numerical chromosomal instability mediates susceptibility to radiation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bakhoum, Samuel F.; Kabeche, Lilian; Wood, Matthew D.; Laucius, Christopher D.; Qu, Dian; Laughney, Ashley M.; Reynolds, Gloria E.; Louie, Raymond J.; Phillips, Joanna; Chan, Denise A.; Zaki, Bassem I.; Murnane, John P.; Petritsch, Claudia; Compton, Duane A.

    2015-01-01

    The exquisite sensitivity of mitotic cancer cells to ionizing radiation (IR) underlies an important rationale for the widely used fractionated radiation therapy. However, the mechanism for this cell cycle-dependent vulnerability is unknown. Here we show that treatment with IR leads to mitotic chromosome segregation errors in vivo and long-lasting aneuploidy in tumour-derived cell lines. These mitotic errors generate an abundance of micronuclei that predispose chromosomes to subsequent catastrophic pulverization thereby independently amplifying radiation-induced genome damage. Experimentally suppressing whole-chromosome missegregation reduces downstream chromosomal defects and significantly increases the viability of irradiated mitotic cells. Further, orthotopically transplanted human glioblastoma tumours in which chromosome missegregation rates have been reduced are rendered markedly more resistant to IR, exhibiting diminished markers of cell death in response to treatment. This work identifies a novel mitotic pathway for radiation-induced genome damage, which occurs outside of the primary nucleus and augments chromosomal breaks. This relationship between radiation treatment and whole-chromosome missegregation can be exploited to modulate therapeutic response in a clinically relevant manner. PMID:25606712

  5. The numerical study of nonlinear instabilities in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chunyang; Hao, Liang; Liu, Zhanjun

    2013-10-01

    Convective Raman or Brillouin amplification and competition between them in inhomogeneous, drifting plasmas are discussed. Based on a five-wave model, relations of the backscattering reflectivity between Raman and Brillouin are deduced, and the influence of inhomogeneity, drift, damping to the pattern of competition is analyzed. For the given plasma conditions and noise source, the backscatter spectrum can be constructed. Recent gas-filled hohlraum experiments at the SHEN-GUANG laser facility show good agreement between measured reflectivity and our model predictions. The features of side-scatter in overlapping laser beams are also studied. We observe that backward Raman scattering level of one pump beam can be significantly enhanced when the second beam crosses it. This can be explained as the induced stimulated Raman side scattering, and the scattering wave of the first beam is as the seed light of the second beam. The variance of Raman scattering level with the different crossing angles is investigated. An extended five-wave model including nonlinear damping and detuning of plasma wave is under consideration.

  6. Numerical instabilities and three-dimensional electromagnetic articulography.

    PubMed

    Stella, Massimo; Bernardini, Paolo; Sigona, Francesco; Stella, Antonio; Grimaldi, Mirko; Fivela, Barbara Gili

    2012-12-01

    The AG500 electromagnetic articulograph is widely used to reconstruct the movements of the articulatory organs. Nevertheless, some anomalies in its performance have been observed. It is well known that accuracy of the device is affected by electromagnetic interference and possible hardware failures or damage to the sensors. In this study, after eliminating any hardware or electromagnetic source of disturbance, a set of trials was carried out. The tests prove that anomalies in sensor position tracking are systematic in certain regions within the recording volume and, more importantly, show a specific pattern that can be clearly attributed to a wrong convergence of the calculation method. PMID:23231124

  7. Annual and average estimates of water-budget components based on hydrograph separation and PRISM precipitation for gaged basins in the Appalachian Plateaus Region, 1900-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelms, David L.; Messinger, Terence; McCoy, Kurt J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Groundwater Resources Program study of the Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, annual and average estimates of water-budget components based on hydrograph separation and precipitation data from parameter-elevation regressions on independent slopes model (PRISM) were determined at 849 continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations from Mississippi to New York and covered the period of 1900 to 2011. Only complete calendar years (January to December) of streamflow record at each gage were used to determine estimates of base flow, which is that part of streamflow attributed to groundwater discharge; such estimates can serve as a proxy for annual recharge. For each year, estimates of annual base flow, runoff, and base-flow index were determined using computer programs—PART, HYSEP, and BFI—that have automated the separation procedures. These streamflow-hydrograph analysis methods are provided with version 1.0 of the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Toolbox, which is a new program that provides graphing, mapping, and analysis capabilities in a Windows environment. Annual values of precipitation were estimated by calculating the average of cell values intercepted by basin boundaries where previously defined in the GAGES–II dataset. Estimates of annual evapotranspiration were then calculated from the difference between precipitation and streamflow.

  8. THE MAGNETOVISCOUS-THERMAL INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Tanim

    2012-02-10

    Accretion flows onto underluminous black holes, such as Sagittarius A* at the center of our galaxy, are dilute (mildly collisional to highly collisionless), optically thin, and radiatively inefficient. Therefore, the accretion properties of such dilute flows are expected to be modified by their large viscosities and thermal conductivities. Second, turbulence within these systems needs to transport angular momentum as well as thermal energy generated through gravitational infall outward in order to allow accretion to occur. This is in contrast to classical accretion flows, in which the energy generated through accretion down a gravitational well is locally radiated. In this paper, using an incompressible fluid treatment of an ionized gas, we expand on previous research by considering the stability properties of a magnetized rotating plasma wherein the thermal conductivity and viscosity are not negligible and may be dynamically important. We find a class of MHD instabilities that can transport angular momentum and thermal energy outward. They are plausible candidates to describe accretion in radiatively inefficient accretion flows. We finish by discussing the implications for analytic models and numerical MHD simulations of mildly dilute or collisionless astrophysical plasmas, and immediate directions for further research.

  9. Genome instability and aging.

    PubMed

    Vijg, Jan; Suh, Yousin

    2013-01-01

    Genome instability has long been implicated as the main causal factor in aging. Somatic cells are continuously exposed to various sources of DNA damage, from reactive oxygen species to UV radiation to environmental mutagens. To cope with the tens of thousands of chemical lesions introduced into the genome of a typical cell each day, a complex network of genome maintenance systems acts to remove damage and restore the correct base pair sequence. Occasionally, however, repair is erroneous, and such errors, as well as the occasional failure to correctly replicate the genome during cell division, are the basis for mutations and epimutations. There is now ample evidence that mutations accumulate in various organs and tissues of higher animals, including humans, mice, and flies. What is not known, however, is whether the frequency of these random changes is sufficient to cause the phenotypic effects generally associated with aging. The exception is cancer, an age-related disease caused by the accumulation of mutations and epimutations. Here, we first review current concepts regarding the relationship between DNA damage, repair, and mutation, as well as the data regarding genome alterations as a function of age. We then describe a model for how randomly induced DNA sequence and epigenomic variants in the somatic genomes of animals can result in functional decline and disease in old age. Finally, we discuss the genetics of genome instability in relation to longevity to address the importance of alterations in the somatic genome as a causal factor in aging and to underscore the opportunities provided by genetic approaches to develop interventions that attenuate genome instability, reduce disease risk, and increase life span. PMID:23398157

  10. Axisymmetric MHD Instabilities in Solar/Stellar Tachoclines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Gilman, Peter A.; Cally, Paul S.; Miesch, Mark S.

    2009-02-01

    Extensive studies over the past decade showed that HD and MHD nonaxisymmetric instabilities exist in the solar tachocline for a wide range of toroidal field profiles, amplitudes, and latitude locations. Axisymmetric instabilities (m = 0) do not exist in two dimensions, and are excited in quasi-three-dimensional shallow-water systems only for very high field strengths (2 mG). We investigate here MHD axisymmetric instabilities in a three-dimensional thin-shell model of the solar/stellar tachocline, employing a hydrostatic, non-Boussinesq system of equations. We deduce a number of general properties of the instability by use of an integral theorem, as well as finding detailed numerical solutions for unstable modes. Toroidal bands become unstable to axisymmetric perturbations for solar-like field strengths (100 kG). The e-folding time can be months down to a few hours if the field strength is 1 mG or higher, which might occur in the solar core, white dwarfs, or neutron stars. These instabilities exist without rotation, with rotation, and with differential rotation, although both rotation and differential rotation have stabilizing effects. Broad toroidal fields are stable. The instability for modes with m = 0 is driven from the poleward shoulder of banded profiles by a perturbation magnetic curvature stress that overcomes the stabilizing Coriolis force. The nonaxisymmetric instability tips or deforms a band; with axisymmetric instability, the fluid can roll in latitude and radius, and can convert bands into tubes stacked in radius. The velocity produced by this instability in the case of low-latitude bands crosses the equator, and hence can provide a mechanism for interhemispheric coupling.

  11. Gas turbine combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Lee, G.T.

    1996-09-01

    Combustion oscillations are a common problem in development of LPM (lean premix) combustors. Unlike earlier, diffusion style combustors, LPM combustors are especially susceptible to oscillations because acoustic losses are smaller and operation near lean blowoff produces a greater combustion response to disturbances in reactant supply, mixing, etc. In ongoing tests at METC, five instability mechanisms have been identified in subscale and commercial scale nozzle tests. Changes to fuel nozzle geometry showed that it is possible to stabilize combustion by altering the timing of the feedback between acoustic waves and the variation in heat release.

  12. Dynamic fission instability of dissipative protoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Mizuno, H.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical and numerical approaches are taken to consider if a rapidly rotating, viscous protoearth would have lost mass by a fission process and thereby given birth to the moon. The fast rotation is assumed as the source of the instability in the dissipative liquid protoearth. Governing hydrodynamic equations are defined for the evolution of the protoearth. Account is taken of viscous dissipation, the pressure equation of state for the atmospheric material sent on a ballistic trajectory, and the effective viscosity. The results indicate that dynamic fission was probably not the process by which the protomoon came into existence.

  13. CSR instability in a Bunch Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupakov, G. V.

    2002-03-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation of a bunch in a bunch compressor may lead to the microwave instability producing longitudinal modulation of the bunch with wavelengths small compared to the bunch length. It can also be a source of an undesirable emittance growth in the compressor. We derive and analyze the equation that describes linear evolution of the microwave modulation taking into account incoherent energy spread and nite emittance of the beam. Numerical solution of this equatierenton for the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) bunch compressor gives the amplication factor for different wavelengths of the beam microbunching.

  14. Rarefaction solitons initiated by sheath instability

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry

    2015-09-15

    The instability of the cathode sheath initiated by the cold energetic electron beam is studied by the one-dimensional fluid model. Numerical simulations show the generation of travelling rarefaction solitons at the cathode. It is obtained that the parameters of these solitons strongly depend on the parameters of electron beam. The “stretched” variables are derived using the small-amplitude analysis. These variables are used in order to obtain the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the propagation of the rarefaction solitons through the plasma with cold energetic electron beam.

  15. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of liquid rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Sankaran; Grenda, Jeffrey; Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents a computational analysis of liquid rocket combustion instability. Consideration is given to both a fully nonlinear unsteady calculation as well as a new CFD-based linearized stability analysis. An analytical solution for the linear stability problem in a constant area combustion chamber with uniform mean flow is developed to verify the numerical analyses.

  16. Modulational instability and solitons in nonlocal media with competing nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, B. K.; Bache, M.; Bang, O.; Wlotzka, A.; Krolikowski, W.

    2011-11-15

    We investigate analytically and numerically propagation and spatial localization of light in nonlocal media with competing nonlinearities. In particular, we discuss conditions for the modulational instability of plane waves and formation of spatial solitons. We show that the competing focusing and defocusing nonlinearities enable coexistence of dark or bright spatial solitons in the same medium by varying the intensity of the beam.

  17. A signature for the Lorenz instability in quantum optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Selker, M. David; Lee, Kayee

    1987-01-01

    The time averaged output power of a Lorenz laser in the self-pulsing and chaotic regime has been numerically examined. The results indicate that the change in average power when unstable behavior occurs are of the order of 1-5 percent. This negligible change could serve as an additional signature of the Lorenz instability in quantum optics.

  18. Nonaxisymmetric instability of rapidly rotating black hole in five dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Masaru; Yoshino, Hirotaka

    2010-01-15

    We present results from numerical solution of Einstein's equation in five dimensions describing evolution of rapidly rotating black holes. We show, for the first time, that the rapidly rotating black holes in higher dimensions are unstable against nonaxisymmetric deformation; for the five-dimensional case, the critical value of spin parameter for onset of the instability is {approx_equal}0.87.

  19. Surface instabilities and nuclear multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Tso, K.; Colonna, N.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1992-03-01

    Central heavy-ion collisions, as described by a Boltzman-Nordheim-Vlasov calculation, form nuclear disks that break up into several fragments due to surface instabilities of the Rayleigh-Taylor kind. We demonstrate that a sheet of liquid, nuclear or otherwise, stable in the limit of infinitely sharp surfaces, becomes unstable due to surface-surface interactions. The onset of this instability is determined analytically. The relevance of these instabilities to nuclear multifragmentation is discussed.

  20. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  1. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  2. Editorial Commentary: Multidirectional Shoulder Instability.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-12-01

    Multidirectional shoulder instability responds to physical therapy and rehabilitation. For patients who fail rehabilitation, arthroscopic capsular plication seems the treatment of choice. PMID:26652151

  3. Instability and Electroconvection at a Electrodialysis Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapar, Elena; Demekhin, Eugeny; Lapchenko, Vladimir

    2006-11-01

    Electrolyte layer covered electrodialysis membrane under constant drop of potensial is considered. Self-similar solution of one-dimensional problem for second kind elecroosmosis (overlimitiny current) is found. Using special decomposition method analytical asymptotic solution of the problem is obtained; limiting current for the self-similar solution [ j*=4/√π 2.25. ] Hydrodinamic instability of this solution with respect to linear 2D-perturbations is studied for the full system of equations. In contract to the works of Rubinstein is found that the region of instability is finite with respect to the wavenumber α, growth rate λ(α) has maximum at some α=αm and 1D-solution is stable for sufficiently short perturbations. Direct numerical simulation of the full system of equations with a special non-uniform finite-differential grid shows that filtering mechanism of the linear stability singles out from the initial white-noise perturbations the maximum growth rate mode with α=αm. Secondary instability leads to chaostic flow.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic thermal instabilities in cool inhomogeneous atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodo, G.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    The stability of magnetic loops to current-driven filamentation instabilities is investigated. The unperturbed atmosphere is assumed to be composed of an (upper) isothermal optically thin low-density portion and a (lower) higher-density portion which is in radiative equilibrium; in both cases, the atmosphere is in hydrostatic equilibrium, so that gravitational stratification is taken into account. In order to provide specific equilibrium conditions for evaluation of the dispersion relation, conditions appropriate for the surface of a solar-type star are adopted; i.e., a fairly low temperature (T = 5000 K) appropriate for a 'precoronal' state associated, for example, with magnetic flux emerging from photospheric levels under the action of magnetic buoyancy. A linear stability analysis is performed, and numerical results show that physically plausible current densities, which would be generated by typical loop-footpoint motions, are effective in driving MHD instabilities in such a plasma. The instability growth rates are strongly dependent on the assumed current density distribution and on the density scale height.

  5. Electrokinetic instability: The sharp interface limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2011-01-01

    An instability between two miscible liquid regions of identical mechanical properties but different electrical conductivities stressed by an external electric field parallel to the interface is studied. The problem is of interest due to its applications to mixing in microchannels. It is shown that the problem can be modeled by considering a sharp interface and an appropriate jump condition for the electrical conductivity. The transport of the electrical conductivity is governed by a diffusive equation. An infinite domain case and a shallow channel case are considered. It is shown that any velocity perturbation at the interface leads to a varying electrical conductivity in its vicinity due to the electromechanical coupling in the jump condition for the electrical conductivity. This in turns leads to a bulk charge density that gives a body force in the fluid equations. The body force generates a cellular motion that results in the instability. The results compare favorably with the experimental data and the numerical analysis for the diffuse interface case by Chen et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 524, 263 (2005)]. The critical condition for the instability is given in terms of a nondimensional parameter PΣ, which is a product of the Péclet number and another nondimensional parameter that depends on the conductivity ratio of the two liquids.

  6. Digital instability of a confined elastic meniscus.

    PubMed

    Biggins, John S; Saintyves, Baudouin; Wei, Zhiyan; Bouchaud, Elisabeth; Mahadevan, L

    2013-07-30

    Thin soft elastic layers serving as joints between relatively rigid bodies may function as sealants, thermal, electrical, or mechanical insulators, bearings, or adhesives. When such a joint is stressed, even though perfect adhesion is maintained, the exposed free meniscus in the thin elastic layer becomes unstable, leading to the formation of spatially periodic digits of air that invade the elastic layer, reminiscent of viscous fingering in a thin fluid layer. However, the elastic instability is reversible and rate-independent, disappearing when the joint is unstressed. We use theory, experiments, and numerical simulations to show that the transition to the digital state is sudden (first-order), the wavelength and amplitude of the fingers are proportional to the thickness of the elastic layer, and the required separation to trigger the instability is inversely proportional to the in-plane dimension of the layer. Our study reveals the energetic origin of this instability and has implications for the strength of polymeric adhesives; it also suggests a method for patterning thin films reversibly with any arrangement of localized fingers in a digital elastic memory, which we confirm experimentally. PMID:23858433

  7. Digital instability of a confined elastic meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Biggins, John S.; Saintyves, Baudouin; Wei, Zhiyan; Bouchaud, Elisabeth; Mahadevan, L.

    2013-01-01

    Thin soft elastic layers serving as joints between relatively rigid bodies may function as sealants, thermal, electrical, or mechanical insulators, bearings, or adhesives. When such a joint is stressed, even though perfect adhesion is maintained, the exposed free meniscus in the thin elastic layer becomes unstable, leading to the formation of spatially periodic digits of air that invade the elastic layer, reminiscent of viscous fingering in a thin fluid layer. However, the elastic instability is reversible and rate-independent, disappearing when the joint is unstressed. We use theory, experiments, and numerical simulations to show that the transition to the digital state is sudden (first-order), the wavelength and amplitude of the fingers are proportional to the thickness of the elastic layer, and the required separation to trigger the instability is inversely proportional to the in-plane dimension of the layer. Our study reveals the energetic origin of this instability and has implications for the strength of polymeric adhesives; it also suggests a method for patterning thin films reversibly with any arrangement of localized fingers in a digital elastic memory, which we confirm experimentally. PMID:23858433

  8. The Parker Instability in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, L. F. S.; Sarson, G. R.; Shukurov, A.; Bushby, P. J.; Fletcher, A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the evolution of the Parker instability in galactic disks using 3D numerical simulations. We consider a local Cartesian box section of a galactic disk, where gas, magnetic fields, and cosmic rays are all initially in a magnetohydrostatic equilibrium. This is done for different choices of initial cosmic-ray density and magnetic field. The growth rates and characteristic scales obtained from the models, as well as their dependences on the density of cosmic rays and magnetic fields, are in broad agreement with previous (linearized, ideal) analytical work. However, this nonideal instability develops a multimodal 3D structure, which cannot be quantitatively predicted from the earlier linearized studies. This 3D signature of the instability will be of importance in interpreting observations. As a preliminary step toward such interpretations, we calculate synthetic polarized intensity and Faraday rotation measure (RM) maps, and the associated structure functions of the latter, from our simulations; these suggest that the correlation scales inferred from RM maps are a possible probe for the cosmic-ray content of a given galaxy. Our calculations highlight the importance of cosmic rays in these measures, making them an essential ingredient of realistic models of the interstellar medium.

  9. Ballooning mode instability at the plasmapause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakhina, G. S.; Mond, M.; Hameiri, E.

    1990-01-01

    The ballooning mode instability, which can excite hydromagnetic waves at the plasmapause, is studied in the presence of azimuthal plasma flows induced during geomagnetically disturbed periods. A general sufficient criterion for the ballooning mode stability is derived, for a change in the potential energy greater than or equal to 0, which involves the integration over an entire field line. A local stability analysis at the equatorial plasmapause region shows that the ballooning modes could be spontaneously generated via instability under at least two conditions: one is similar to the usual interchange condition, and the second to the quasi-interchange modes. Both of these local instability conditions can be derived from the general stability criterion. Finally an exact solution for the equilibrium state with flow is derived analytically, and the change in the potential energy is computed numerically. It is found that, in the cases studied, the flow does not spontaneously excite the ballooning modes; it only further stabilizes (or destabilizes) the ballooning spectrum if originally the system is stable (or unstable). The analysis would be useful for the interpretation of some of the low-frequency modes observed at the ground and near the equatorial plasmapause.

  10. PARTIAL TORUS INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang Jie

    2010-07-20

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior to or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its stability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index of the overlying constraining magnetic field. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding as the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, a partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches 1, the critical index goes to a maximum value. We demonstrate that the PTI helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux-rope CME.

  11. Instability characteristics of fluidelastic instability of tube rows in crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    An experimental study is reported to investigate the jump phenomenon in critical flow velocities for tube rows with different pitch-to-diameter ratios and the excited and intrinsic instabilities for a tube row with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.75. The experimental data provide additional insights into the instability phenomena of tube arrays in crossflow. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Instability vaccination: A structural design to reduce Rayleigh Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Amin

    2013-10-01

    Instability vaccination can be defined as designing a structure to stimulate the system in order to develop immunity against its instability. In this work we have tried to do this stabilization by a new technique. Previously some suppression of R-M instability was done by insertion of magnetic field, but in this work we have tried to do this suppression by proposing a configuration similar to the shape of instability, we call it instability vaccination. This design will reduce the rotations (mostly rotations of Rayleigh Taylor instability) in the fluids that cause more mixing and instabilities. In this paper, we consider the evolution of the interface between two ideal semi-infinite fluid surfaces, using two-dimensional Riemann solver, to solve the Euler equations. First, we performed evolution of a rectangular disorder between the 2 surfaces using two-dimensional Riemann problem for the equations of Euler. Next, the interface was replaced with a perturbation that was part rectangular and part semi-circular (like a mushroom). The simulation was continued till some time steps using the HLL method. We have seen that the rotations of Rayleigh Taylor (R-T) instability were decreased in the second case. Email: amin@cavelab.cs.tsukuba.ac.jp

  13. Benjamin - Feir instability on the variable current.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugan, Igor; Hwung, Hwung-Hweng; Yang, Ray-Yeng

    2013-04-01

    Modulational instability (Benjamin-Feir instability) is one of fundamental principles of nonlinear water wave dynamics. This phenomenon is of the utmost importance for description of dynamics and downshifting of energy spectrum among sea surface waves, formation of freak (or giant) waves in oceans and wave breaking. As for surface gravity waves on deep water resonant interactions occur at the third order, BF-instability can be described at early stages of the process as interaction of three monochromatic wave trains: carrier, upper and lower side-band waves with a small differences in frequencies and wave numbers from carrier wave which form a resonant quartet. Side band instability of the initially monochromatic wave gives a rise of super- and sub- harmonics of the carrier Stokes wave. The latter stages of this process are much less investigated and many observed experimentally physical phenomena still need the extended theoretical analysis. How modulation instability develops on the variable adverse or following current? This problem merges with another fundamental phenomenon which is still a big challenge in physical oceanography - interaction of waves with current. In spite of numerous numbers of papers devoting to the analysis of the phenomenon some very strong effects are still waiting for its clear description. For example, modulated waves in linear theory will be blocked by strong enough adverse current. Nevertheless, experiments show something different: waves can be blocked only partly and overpass the opposite current barrier at the lower side band resonance frequency. This effect until now has no satisfactory theoretical description. We derived the set of modulation equations to describe the resonance interaction of surface waves in the presence of the variable current. Analytical research of wave dynamics on adverse and following currents with horizontal-velocity gradient was conducted. We describe the surface wave overpass the opposite current

  14. Widnall instabilities in vortex pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipp, Denis; Jacquin, Laurent

    2003-07-01

    In this article we analyze the cooperative three-dimensional short-wave instabilities developing on concentrated vortex dipoles that have been obtained by means of two-dimensional direct numerical simulations. These dipoles are characterized by their aspect ratio a/b where a is the radius of the vortices based on the polar moments of vorticity and b is the separation between the vortex centroids. In the inviscid case, we show that the selection of the antisymmetric eigenmode smoothly increases with a/b: for a/b=0.208, the amplification rate of the antisymmetric eigenmode is only 1.4% larger than the amplification rate of the symmetric eigenmode. When a/b=0.288, this difference increases up to 7%. The results of the normal mode analysis may be compared to those of an asymptotic stability analysis of a Lamb-Oseen vortex subjected to a weak straining field, following Moore and Saffman [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 346, 413 (1975)]. This theory shows that the instability may occur whenever two Kelvin waves exist with the same frequency ω, the same axial wavenumber k and with azimuthal wavenumbers m and m+2. Contrary to the case of a Rankine vortex [Tsai and Widnall, J. Fluid Mech. 73, 721 (1976)], the presence of critical layers in a Lamb-Oseen vortex prevents a large number of possible resonances. For example, resonances between m=-2 and m=0 modes lead to damped modes. The only resonances that occur are related to the stationary (ω=0) bending waves (m=±1) obtained for specific values of the axial wavenumber. All these predictions are found to be in good agreement with the results obtained by the stability analysis of the considered vortex pairs. At last, we present a nonautonomous amplitude equation which takes into account all effects of viscosity, i.e., the viscous damping of the amplification rate of the perturbation but also the increase of the dipole aspect ratio a/b due to the viscous diffusion of the basic flowfield. The low-Reynolds number experiment of

  15. Linear Instability of a Uni-Directional Transversely Sheared Mean Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of spanwise-periodic mean-flow distortions (i.e. streamwise-vortex structures) on the evolution of small-amplitude, single-frequency instability waves in an otherwise two-dimensional shear flow is investigated. The streamwise-vortex structures are taken to be just weak enough so that the spatially growing instability waves behave (locally) like linear perturbations about a uni-directional transversely sheared mean flow. Numerical solutions are computed and discussed for both the mean flow and the instability waves. The influence of the streamwise-vortex wavelength on the properties of the most rapidly growing instability wave is also discussed.

  16. Analysis of optical instability in a double-coupler nonlinear fiber ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongpu; Ogusu, Kazuhiko

    1998-12-01

    Instability in a double-coupler nonlinear fiber ring resonator has been investigated by using a linear stability analysis. Numerical results show that although Ikeda instability appears in the positive-branch regions, it hardly interrupts bistable device application since the threshold power for instability is one or two orders of magnitude larger than the switching power for optical bistability. By the transient analysis when an optical pulse with a finite pulse duration is incident, we moreover confirm that period-doubling oscillations, being one of characteristics of Ikeda instability, take place in the unstable state.

  17. THE THERMAL INSTABILITY OF SOLAR PROMINENCE THREADS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Goossens, M.; Ballester, J. L.

    2011-04-10

    The fine structure of solar prominences and filaments appears as thin and long threads in high-resolution images. In H{alpha} observations of filaments, some threads can be observed for only 5-20 minutes before they seem to fade and eventually disappear, suggesting that these threads may have very short lifetimes. The presence of an instability might be the cause of this quick disappearance. Here, we study the thermal instability of prominence threads as an explanation of their sudden disappearance from H{alpha} observations. We model a prominence thread as a magnetic tube with prominence conditions embedded in a coronal environment. We assume a variation of the physical properties in the transverse direction so that the temperature and density continuously change from internal to external values in an inhomogeneous transitional layer representing the particular prominence-corona transition region (PCTR) of the thread. We use the nonadiabatic and resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations, which include terms due to thermal conduction parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, radiative losses, heating, and magnetic diffusion. We combine both analytical and numerical methods to study linear perturbations from the equilibrium state, focusing on unstable thermal solutions. We find that thermal modes are unstable in the PCTR for temperatures higher than 80,000 K, approximately. These modes are related to temperature disturbances that can lead to changes in the equilibrium due to rapid plasma heating or cooling. For typical prominence parameters, the instability timescale is of the order of a few minutes and is independent of the form of the temperature profile within the PCTR of the thread. This result indicates that thermal instability may play an important role for the short lifetimes of threads in the observations.

  18. Study of hydrodynamic instabilities with a multiphase lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Ali Mauricio; Muñoz, José Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz hydrodynamic instabilities are frequent in many natural and industrial processes, but their numerical simulation is not an easy challenge. This work simulates both instabilities by using a lattice Boltzmann model on multiphase fluids at a liquid-vapour interface, instead of multicomponent systems like the oil-water one. The model, proposed by He, Chen and Zhang (1999) [1] was modified to increase the precision by computing the pressure gradients with a higher order, as proposed by McCracken and Abraham (2005) [2]. The resulting model correctly simulates both instabilities by using almost the same parameter set. It also reproduces the relation γ ∝√{ A} between the growing rate γ of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the relative density difference between the fluids (known as the Atwood number A), but including also deviations observed in experiments at low density differences. The results show that the implemented model is a useful tool for the study of hydrodynamic instabilities, drawing a sharp interface and exhibiting numerical stability for moderately high Reynolds numbers.

  19. Explosive magnetorotational instability in Keplerian disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtemler, Yu.; Liverts, E.; Mond, M.

    2016-06-01

    Differentially rotating disks under the effect of axial magnetic field are prone to a nonlinear explosive magnetorotational instability (EMRI). The dynamic equations that govern the temporal evolution of the amplitudes of three weakly detuned resonantly interacting modes are derived. As distinct from exponential growth in the strict resonance triads, EMRI occurs due to the resonant interactions of an MRI mode with stable Alfvén-Coriolis and magnetosonic modes. Numerical solutions of the dynamic equations for amplitudes of a triad indicate that two types of perturbations behavior can be excited for resonance conditions: (i) EMRI which leads to infinite values of the three amplitudes within a finite time, and (ii) bounded irregular oscillations of all three amplitudes. Asymptotic explicit solutions of the dynamic equations are obtained for EMRI regimes and are shown to match the numerical solutions near the explosion time.

  20. Feedback instability of the ionospheric resonant cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    A model is developed that provides a theoretical basis for previous numerical results showing a feedback instability with frequencies characteristic of Alfven travel times within the region of the large increase of Alfven speed above the ionosphere. These results have been extended to arbitrary ionospheric conductivity by developing a numerical solution of the cavity dispersion relation that involves Bessel functions of complex order and argument. It is concluded that the large contrast between the magnetospheric and ionospheric Alfven speed leads to the formation of resonant cavity modes with frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 1 Hz. The presence of the cavity leads to a modification of the reflection characteristics of Alfven waves with frequencies that compare to the cavity's normal modes.

  1. Compressible inviscid instability of rapidly expanding spherical material interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankbadi, Mina R.; Balachandar, S.

    2012-03-01

    A high-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme is employed to investigate the stability of a rapidly expanding material interface produced by a spherical shock tube. The flow structure is characterized by a forward moving primary shock, a backward moving secondary shock, and a spherical contact interface in-between. We consider herein the linear inviscid regime and focus on the development of the three-dimensional perturbations around the contact interface by solving a one-dimensional system of partial differential equations. Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the effects of the contact interface's density discontinuity on the growth of the disturbances for various spherical wave numbers. In a spherical shock tube the instability is influenced by various mechanisms which include classical Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) effects, Bell-Plesset or geometry/curvature effects, the effects of impulsively accelerating the interface, and compressibility effects. Henceforth, the present instability will be referred to as non-classical RT instability to distinguish it from classical RT instability. For an extended intermediate time period, it can be shown that the small disturbances grow exponentially as in the classical RT instability. During this stage, the exponential growth rate increases with the spherical wave number, until it saturates for very large wave numbers due to the finite thickness limitation of the numerical representation of the contact interface. The results compare favorably with previous theoretical models; but indicate that in addition to compressibility, the space-time evolution of the contact interface's thickness plays a significant role. A parametric study is performed that varies the pressure and density ratios of the initial spherical container. The characteristics of the contact interface and the applicability of various instability theories is investigated for these regimes. Furthermore, varying the pressure and density ratios aids

  2. Magnetic effects on the low-T /|W | instability in differentially rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhlberger, Curran D.; Nouri, Fatemeh Hossein; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2014-11-01

    Dynamical instabilities in protoneutron stars may produce gravitational waves whose observation could shed light on the physics of core-collapse supernovae. When born with sufficient differential rotation, these stars are susceptible to a shear instability (the "low-T /|W | instability"), but such rotation can also amplify magnetic fields to strengths where they have a considerable impact on the dynamics of the stellar matter. Using a new magnetohydrodynamics module for the Spectral Einstein Code, we have simulated a differentially-rotating neutron star in full 3D to study the effects of magnetic fields on this instability. Though strong toroidal fields were predicted to suppress the low-T /|W | instability, we find that they do so only in a small range of field strengths. Below 4 ×1 013 G , poloidal seed fields do not wind up fast enough to have an effect before the instability saturates, while above 5 ×1 014 G , magnetic instabilities can actually amplify a global quadrupole mode (this threshold may be even lower in reality, as small-scale magnetic instabilities remain difficult to resolve numerically). Thus, the prospects for observing gravitational waves from such systems are not in fact diminished over most of the magnetic parameter space. Additionally, we report that the detailed development of the low-T /|W | instability, including its growth rate, depends strongly on the particular numerical methods used. The high-order methods we employ suggest that growth might be considerably slower than found in some previous simulations.

  3. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Simulation of Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability with Flux-Corrected Transport Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Feng; Ye, Wen-Hua; Fan, Zheng-Feng; Li, Ying-Jun

    2009-05-01

    The sixth-order accurate phase error flux-corrected transport numerical algorithm is introduced, and used to simulate Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Linear growth rates of the simulation agree with the linear theories of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. It indicates the validity and accuracy of this simulation method. The method also has good capturing ability of the instability interface deformation.

  4. Cohabitation and Children's Family Instability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly Raley, R.; Wildsmith, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    This study estimates how much children's family instability is missed when we do not count transitions into and out of cohabitation, and examines early life course trajectories of children to see whether children who experience maternal cohabitation face more family instability than children who do not. Using data from the 1995 National Survey of…

  5. Liquid propellant rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrje, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    The solution of problems of combustion instability for more effective communication between the various workers in this field is considered. The extent of combustion instability problems in liquid propellant rocket engines and recommendations for their solution are discussed. The most significant developments, both theoretical and experimental, are presented, with emphasis on fundamental principles and relationships between alternative approaches.

  6. Instability of liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ning; Li, Meie; Zhou, Jinxiong

    2016-01-01

    Nematic liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) contract in the director direction but expand in other directions, perpendicular to the director, when heated. If the expansion of an LCE is constrained, compressive stress builds up in the LCE, and it wrinkles or buckles to release the stored elastic energy. Although the instability of soft materials is ubiquitous, the mechanism and programmable modulation of LCE instability has not yet been fully explored. We describe a finite element method (FEM) scheme to model the inhomogeneous deformation and instability of LCEs. A constrained LCE beam working as a valve for microfluidic flow, and a piece of LCE laminated with a nanoscale poly(styrene) (PS) film are analyzed in detail. The former uses the buckling of the LCE beam to occlude the microfluidic channel, while the latter utilizes wrinkling or buckling to measure the mechanical properties of hard film or to realize self-folding. Through rigorous instability analysis, we predict the critical conditions for the onset of instability, the wavelength and amplitude evolution of instability, and the instability patterns. The FEM results are found to correlate well with analytical results and reported experiments. These efforts shed light on the understanding and exploitation of the instabilities of LCEs.

  7. Research on aviation fuel instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.; Bittker, D. A.; Cohen, S. M.; Seng, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The underlying causes of fuel thermal degradation are discussed. Topics covered include: nature of fuel instability and its temperature dependence, methods of measuring the instability, chemical mechanisms involved in deposit formation, and instrumental methods for characterizing fuel deposits. Finally, some preliminary thoughts on design approaches for minimizing the effects of lowered thermal stability are briefly discussed.

  8. Neurocardiovascular Instability and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    O’Callaghan, Susan; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2016-01-01

    Neurocardiovascular instability (NCVI) refers to abnormal neural control of the cardiovascular system affecting blood pressure and heart rate behavior. Autonomic dysfunction and impaired cerebral autoregulation in aging contribute to this phenomenon characterized by hypotension and bradyarrhythmia. Ultimately, this increases the risk of falls and syncope in older people. NCVI is common in patients with neurodegenerative disorders including dementia. This review discusses the various syndromes that characterize NCVI icluding hypotension, carotid sinus hypersensitivity, postprandial hypotension and vasovagal syncope and how they may contribute to the aetiology of cognitive decline. Conversely, they may also be a consequence of a common neurodegenerative process. Regardless, recognition of their association is paramount in optimizing management of these patients. PMID:27505017

  9. Plateau Rayleigh instability simulation.

    PubMed

    Mead-Hunter, Ryan; King, Andrew J C; Mullins, Benjamin J

    2012-05-01

    The well-known phenomena of Plateau-Rayleigh instability has been simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The breakup of a liquid film into an array of droplets on a cylindrical element was simulated using a volume-of-fluid (VOF) solver and compared to experimental observations and existing theory. It is demonstrated that the VOF method can correctly predict the breakup of thins films into an array of either axisymmetric droplets or clam-shell droplets, depending on the surface energy. The existence of unrealistically large films is precluded. Droplet spacing was found to show reasonable agreement with theory. Droplet motion and displacement under fluid flow was also examined and compared to that in previous studies. It was found that the presence of air flow around the droplet does not influence the stable film thickness; however, it reduces the time required for droplet formation. Novel relationships for droplet displacement were derived from the results. PMID:22512475

  10. Tectonic and magmatic evolution of the northwestern Basin and Range and its transition to unextended volcanic plateaus: Black Rock Range, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lerch, D.W.; Miller, E.; McWilliams, M.; Colgan, J.

    2008-01-01

    The seismically active eastern and western margins of the northern Basin and Range have been extensively studied, yet the northwestern margin of the province remains incompletely understood. The Black Rock Range of northwestern Nevada straddles the transition from the Basin and Range province to the south and east, and flat-lying volcanic plateaus to the west. This poorly understood range preserves a remarkably complete record of Cenozoic magmatism and provides an important window into the pre-Miocene history of the unextended volcanic plateaus of northeastern California and southern Oregon. Geologic mapping and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology from the northern Black Rock Range document three significant episodes of Eocene to middle Miocene volcanism. Eocene (35 Ma) basalts directly overlie Mesozoic granites and arc-related volcanic and sedimentary rocks. Locally erupted Oligocene to early Miocene (27-21 Ma) bimodal volcanic rocks comprise the bulk of the Cenozoic section and conformably overlie the Eocene basalt flows. These bimodal units include rhyolitic lavas, variably welded rhyolitic ash flows, unwelded ash-fall deposits, and thin basalt flows. In the neighboring Pine Forest Range ???20 km to the north, similar Oligocene to early Miocene units are overlain by more than 500 m of ca. 16.4 Ma Steens-equivalent basalt flows and are capped by ca. 16 Ma rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs. In the northern Black Rock Range, the ca. 16.4 Ma middle Miocene basalts are absent from the section, and a 16.2 Ma rhyolitic ash-flow tuff directly overlies the early Miocene flows. Basaltic and rhyolitic volcanic products in the northern Black Rock Range span 35-16 Ma, with many of the Oligocene volcanic units derived from local vents and dikes. Despite the map-scale complexities of locally derived lava flows, the Cenozoic section is broadly conformable and dips gently (???5??-10??) to the northwest. The region experienced no significant tilting between 35 and 16 Ma, with moderate tilting (???5

  11. Internal rotor friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  12. Parametric instabilities of large amplitude Alfven waves with obliquely propagating sidebands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief report on properties of the parametric decay and modulational, filamentation, and magnetoacoustic instabilities of a large amplitude, circularly polarized Alfven wave. We allow the daughter and sideband waves to propagate at an arbitrary angle to the background magnetic field so that the electrostatic and electromagnetic characteristics of these waves are coupled. We investigate the dependance of these instabilities on dispersion, plasma/beta, pump wave amplitude, and propagation angle. Analytical and numerical results are compared with numerical simulations to investigate the full nonlinear evolution of these instabilities.

  13. Quantitative study of the trapped particle bunching instability in Langmuir waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Kentaro Boyd, Iain D.; Chapman, Thomas; Joseph, Ilon; Berger, Richard L.; Banks, Jeffrey W.; Brunner, Stephan

    2015-02-15

    The bunching instability of particles trapped in Langmuir waves is studied using Vlasov simulations. A measure of particle bunching is defined and used to extract the growth rate from numerical simulations, which are compared with theory [Dodin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 215006 (2013)]. In addition, the general theory of trapped particle instability in 1D is revisited and a more accurate description of the dispersion relation is obtained. Excellent agreement between numerical and theoretical predictions of growth rates of the bunching instability is shown over a range of parameters.

  14. Empirical model of whistler anisotropy instability

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Seough, Jung Joon; Lee, Junggi; An, Junmo; Lee, Jae Ok

    2011-10-15

    Empirical formulae for the real frequency and growth rate associated with the whistler anisotropy instability are obtained. The electrons are assumed to have an anisotropic distribution function, with Maxwellian parallel distribution. Under such an assumption complex roots of the dispersion relation depend only on two dimensionless parameters, namely, the temperature anisotropy factor A = T{sub perpendiculare}/T{sub ||e} - 1, where T{sub perpendiculare} and T{sub ||e} are the perpendicular and parallel electron temperatures, respectively, and parallel electron beta, {beta}{sub ||} = (8{pi}nT{sub ||e}/B{sup 2}){sup 1/2}, where n and B are the plasma density and magnetic field intensity, respectively. Comparison against exact numerical roots show that analytical formulae describe the whistler instability over a wide range of parallel electron beta and temperature anisotropy factor. The present result may be useful for circumstances in which the use of exact numerical roots becomes impractical, such as in the radiation belt quasi-linear transport coefficient calculation.

  15. Linear instability of supersonic plane wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, D. T.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical and numerical study of the growth of linear disturbances in the high-Reynolds-number and laminar compressible wake behind a flat plate which is aligned with a uniform stream. No ad hoc assumptions are made as to the nature of the undisturbed flow (in contrast to previous investigations) but instead the theory is developed rationally by use of proper wake-profiles which satisfy the steady equations of motion. The initial growth of near wake perturbation is governed by the compressible Rayleigh equation which is studied analytically for long- and short-waves. These solutions emphasize the asymptotic structures involved and provide a rational basis for a nonlinear development. The evolution of arbitrary wavelength perturbations is addressed numerically and spatial stability solutions are presented that account for the relative importance of the different physical mechanisms present, such as three-dimensionality, increasing Mach numbers enough (subsonic) Mach numbers, there exists a region of absolute instability very close to the trailing-edge with the majority of the wake being convectively unstable. At higher Mach numbers (but still not large-hypersonic) the absolute instability region seems to disappear and the maximum available growth-rates decrease considerably. Three-dimensional perturbations provide the highest spatial growth-rates.

  16. Methods for Monitoring Fish Communities of Buffalo National River and Ozark National Scenic Riverways in the Ozark Plateaus of Arkansas and Missouri: Version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, James C.; Justus, B.G.; Dodd, H.R.; Bowles, D.E.; Morrison, L.W.; Williams, M.H.; Rowell, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Buffalo National River located in north-central Arkansas, and Ozark National Scenic Riverways, located in southeastern Missouri, are the two largest units of the National Park Service in the Ozark Plateaus physiographic province. The purpose of this report is to provide a protocol that will be used by the National Park Service to sample fish communities and collect related water-quality, habitat, and stream discharge data of Buffalo National River and Ozark National Scenic Riverways to meet inventory and long-term monitoring objectives. The protocol includes (1) a protocol narrative, (2) several standard operating procedures, and (3) supplemental information helpful for implementation of the protocol. The protocol narrative provides background information about the protocol such as the rationale of why a particular resource or resource issue was selected for monitoring, information concerning the resource or resource issue of interest, a description of how monitoring results will inform management decisions, and a discussion of the linkages between this and other monitoring projects. The standard operating procedures cover preparation, training, reach selection, water-quality sampling, fish community sampling, physical habitat collection, measuring stream discharge, equipment maintenance and storage, data management and analysis, reporting, and protocol revision procedures. Much of the information in the standard operating procedures was gathered from existing protocols of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment program or other sources. Supplemental information that would be helpful for implementing the protocol is included. This information includes information on fish species known or suspected to occur in the parks, sample sites, sample design, fish species traits, index of biotic integrity metrics, sampling equipment, and field forms.

  17. Instability in Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Flows of an Electrically Conducting Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakir, Hussain; Liu, Chan; Zhang, Nianmei; Ni, Mingjiu

    2013-12-01

    The three-dimensional instability of an electrically conducting fluid between two parallel plates affected by an imposed transversal magnetic field is numerically investigated by a Chebyshev collocation method. The QZ method is utilized to obtain neutral curves of the linear instability. The details of instability are analyzed by solving the generalized Orr-Sommerfeld equation. The critical Reynolds number Rec, the stream-wise and span-wise critical wave numbers αc and βc are obtained for a wide range of Hartmann number Ha. The effects of Lorentz force and span-wise perturbation on three-dimensional instability are investigated. The results show that magnetic field would suppress the instability and critical Reynolds number tends to be larger than that for two-dimensional instability.

  18. Water-quality assessment of the Ozark Plateaus study unit, Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma- summary of information on pesticides, 1970-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, Richard W.; Joseph, Robert L.; Freiwald, David A.

    1996-01-01

    Historical pesticide data from 1970-90 were compiled for 140 surface-water, 92 ground-water, 55 streambed-sediment, and 120 biological-tissue sampling sites within the Ozark Plateaus National Water-Quality Assessment Program study unit. Surface-water, bed-sediment, and biological-tissue sites have drainage basins predominantly in the Springfield and Salem Plateaus; ground-water sites are predominantly located in the Osage Plains and Mississippi Alluvial Plain. Many sites were sampled only once or twice during this period. A large percentage of the samples were collected in the mid-1970's and early 1980's for surface water, 1990 for ground water, the late 1980's for surface water, 1990 for ground water, the late 1980's for bed sediment, and the early 1980's for biological tissue. Pesticide use was approximately 4.2 million pounds per year of active ingredients from 1982-85 in the study unit and was generally greatest in the Springfield and Salem Plateaus pasturelands and in the Osage Plains and Mississippi Alluvial Plain cropland areas. The most frequently applied pesticide in the study unit was 2,4-D. Alachlor was the second most applied pesticide. Corn, pasture, rice, sorghum, and soybeans received approximately 90 percent of the pesticides applied within the study unit. The highest pesticide application rate per acre occurred on these crops in the Osage Plains and Mississippi Alluvial Plain. Pastureland was the predominant crop type in 50 of the 94 counties in the study unit. Toxaphene, the pesticide having the most number of detections in surface water, was found in 17 of 866 samples from 5 of 112 sites. Concentrations ranged from 0.1 to 6.0 micrograms per liter. Six other pesticides or pesticide metabolites were detected in 12 or more surface-water samples: DDE, dieldrin, DDT, aldrin, 2,4-D, and lindane. The maximum concentration for these pesticides was less than 1.0 micrograms per liter. Atrazine, the pesticide having the most number of detections in ground

  19. Topographically generated internal waves and boundary layer instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soontiens, Nancy; Stastna, Marek; Waite, Michael L.

    2015-08-01

    Flow over topography has been shown to generate finite amplitude internal waves upstream, over the topography and downstream. Such waves can interact with the viscous bottom boundary layer to produce vigorous instabilities. However, the strength and size of such instabilities depends on whether viscosity significantly modifies the wave generation process, which is usually treated using inviscid theory in the literature. In this work, we contrast cases in which boundary layer separation profoundly alters the wave generation process and cases for which the generated internal waves largely match inviscid theory. All results are generated using a numerical model that simulates stratified flow over topography. Several issues with using a wave-based Reynolds number to describe boundary layer properties are discussed by comparing simulations with modifications to the domain depth, background velocity, and viscosity. For hill-like topography, three-dimensional aspects of the instabilities are also discussed. Decreasing the Reynolds number by a factor of four (by increasing the viscosity), while leaving the primary two-dimensional instabilities largely unchanged, drastically affects their three-dimensionalization. Several cases at the laboratory scale with a depth of 1 m are examined in both two and three dimensions and a subset of the cases is scaled up to a field scale 10-m deep fluid while maintaining similar values for the background current and viscosity. At this scale, increasing the viscosity by an order of magnitude does not significantly change the wave properties but does alter the wave's interaction with the bottom boundary layer through the bottom shear stress. Finally, two subcritical cases for which disturbances are able to propagate upstream showcase a set of instabilities forming on the upstream slope of the elevated topography. The time scale over which these instabilities develop is related to but distinct from the advective time scale of the waves. At a

  20. Modeling the Parker instability in a rotating plasma screw pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Katz, N.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-02-01

    We analytically and numerically study the analogue of the Parker (magnetic buoyancy) instability in a uniformly rotating plasma screw pinch confined in a cylinder. Uniform plasma rotation is imposed to create a centrifugal acceleration, which mimics the gravity required for the classical Parker instability. The goal of this study is to determine how the Parker instability could be unambiguously identified in a weakly magnetized, rapidly rotating screw pinch, in which the rotation provides an effective gravity and a radially varying azimuthal field is controlled to give conditions for which the plasma is magnetically buoyant to inward motion. We show that an axial magnetic field is also required to circumvent conventional current driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities such as the sausage and kink modes that would obscure the Parker instability. These conditions can be realized in the Madison plasma Couette experiment (MPCX). Simulations are performed using the extended MHD code NIMROD for an isothermal compressible plasma model. Both linear and nonlinear regimes of the instability are studied, and the results obtained for the linear regime are compared with analytical results from a slab geometry. Based on this comparison, it is found that in a cylindrical pinch, the magnetic buoyancy mechanism dominates at relatively large Mach numbers (M > 5), while at low Mach numbers (M < 1), the instability is due to the curvature of magnetic field lines. At intermediate values of Mach number (1 < M < 5), the Coriolis force has a strong stabilizing effect on the plasma. A possible scenario for experimental demonstration of the Parker instability in MPCX is discussed.

  1. Solar wind driven dust acoustic instability with Lorentzian kappa distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, Kashif; Ehsan, Zahida; Khan, S. A.; Mahmood, S.

    2014-02-15

    In a three species electron-ion-dust plasma following a generalized non-Maxwellian distribution function (Lorentzian or kappa), it is shown that a kinetic instability of dust-acoustic mode exists. The instability threshold is affected when such (quasineutral) plasma permeates through another static plasma. Such case is of interest when the solar wind is streaming through the cometary plasma in the presence of interstellar dust. In the limits of phase velocity of the waves larger and smaller than the thermal velocity of dust particles, the dispersion properties and growth rate of dust-acoustic mode are investigated analytically with validation via numerical analysis.

  2. A thermobaric instability of Lagrangian vertical coordinate ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Robert

    Lagrangian- (and isopycnic-) vertical coordinate ocean models are subject to an exponentially growing numerical instability in weakly stratified regions when thermobaricity is not accurately compensated. Inaccurate compensation for compressibility in the pressure gradient terms leads to pressure gradient truncation errors (due to the vertical discretization) that can drive the Lagrangian coordinate surfaces to reinforce these errors. It is possible to avoid this instability while using the full non-linear equation of state for seawater by using an optimal alternate discretization of the pressure gradient terms and extracting a slowly spatially varying reference compressibility that approximates the compressibility of the ocean's mean state.

  3. Nonlinear evolution of the lower-hybrid drift instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, J. U.; Forslund, D. W.; Quest, K. B.; Winske, D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of simulations of the lower-hybrid drift instability in a neutral sheet configuration are described. The simulations use an implict formulation to relax the usual time step limitations and thus extend previous explicit calculations to weaker gradients, larger mass ratios, and long times compared with the linear growth time. The numerical results give the scaling of the saturation level, heating rates, resistivity, and cross-field diffusion and a demonstration by comparison with a fluid electron model that dissipation in the lower-hybrid drift instability is caused by electron kinetic effects.

  4. Suppressing the numerical Cherenkov radiation in the Yee numerical scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuter, Rachel; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of laser facilities will routinely produce relativistic particle beams from the interaction of intense laser pulses with solids and/or gases. Their modeling with Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes needs dispersion-free Maxwell solvers in order to properly describe the interaction of electromagnetic waves with relativistic particles. A particular attention is devoted to the suppression of the numerical Cherenkov instability, responsible for the noise generation. It occurs when the electromagnetic wave is artificially slowed down because of the finite mesh size, thus allowing for the high energy particles to propagate with super-luminous velocities. In the present paper, we show how a slight increase of the light velocity in the Maxwell's equations enables to suppress this instability while keeping a good overall precision of calculations.

  5. Lower-hybrid drift and Buneman instabilities in current sheets with guide field

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P. H.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    2008-11-15

    Lower-hybrid drift and Buneman instabilities operate in current sheets with or without the guide field. The lower-hybrid drift instability is a universal instability in that it operates for all parameters. In contrast, the excitation of Buneman instability requires sufficiently thin current sheet. That is, the relative electron-ion drift speed must exceed the threshold in order for Buneman instability to operate. Traditionally, the two instabilities were treated separately with different mathematical formalisms. In a recent paper, an improved electrostatic dispersion relation was derived that is valid for both unstable modes [P. H. Yoon and A. T. Y. Lui, Phys. Plasmas 15, 072101 (2008)]. However, the actual numerical analysis was restricted to a one-dimensional situation. The present paper generalizes the previous analysis and investigates the two-dimensional nature of both instabilities. It is found that the lower-hybrid drift instability is a flute mode satisfying k{center_dot}B=0 and k{center_dot}{nabla}n=0, where k represents the wave number for the most unstable mode, B stands for the total local magnetic field, and {nabla}n is the density gradient. This finding is not totally unexpected. However, a somewhat surprising finding is that the Buneman instability is a field-aligned mode characterized by kxB=0 and k{center_dot}{nabla}n=0, rather than being a beam-aligned instability.

  6. Temperature anisotropy and beam type whistler instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    1976-01-01

    Whistler instabilities have been investigated for two different types; i.e., a temperature-anisotropy type instability and a beam-type instability. A comparison between the two types of whistler instabilities is made within the framework of linear theory. A transition from one type to the other is also discussed, which is an extension of the work on electrostatic beam and Landau instabilities performed by O'Neil and Malmberg (1968) for electromagnetic whistler instabilities. It is clarified that the essential source of the whistler instability is not beam kinetic energy but a temperature anisotropy, even for the beam-type whistler instability.

  7. Cross-shelf transport and dispersion due to baroclinic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyng, Kristen; Hetland, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The dominant forcing mechanisms for the circulation in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico are largely determined by location relative to the shelf break. On the inner shelf, the flow is mostly controlled by the wind and on the outer shelf is affected by the mesoscale loop-current eddies. However, in the summer, baroclinic instabilities can develop along the boundary of the mid-shelf river plume front, leading to large eddies (~50 km length scale) that can reach across the entire shelf and strongly affect the local flow field. These instabilities advect fresher water toward the shelf edge and pull denser water back toward the coast. The details of how the flow crosses between these two regimes is of interest because it controls the flux of river-borne biogeochemical properties to the deep ocean, as well as for the potential onshore transport of oil from offshore spills. We approach this problem using a high resolution numerical model of the Texas-Louisiana shelf run using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and a Lagrangian particle tracking model (TRACMASS). By initializing drifters at the sources of fresh water (the Atchafalaya and Mississippi rivers) in the numerical model, we are able to explicitly track its trajectory through the numerical domain in time. These trajectories can then be used to characterize the cross-shelf transport and lateral dispersion due to the instabilities caused by the presence of the fresher water. We expect the transport and dispersion to be enhanced when compared with these quantities at other times of the year when the instabilities are not present, as well as with other regions of the shelf break that are farther from the plume edge area. Additionally, an idealized numerical model of a shelf break with both horizontal and vertical density gradients has been run through relevant parameter spaces to examine the range of baroclinic instabilities. Drifters are run in these simulations for comparison of transport and dispersion with

  8. Numerical tokamak turbulence project (OFES grand challenge)

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M; Cohen, B I; Crotinger, J; Dawson, J; Decyk, V; Dimits, A M; Dorland, W D; Hammett, G W; Kerbel, G D; Leboeuf, J N; Lee, W W; Lin, Z; Nevins, W M; Reynders, J; Shumaker, D E; Smith, S; Sydora, R; Waltz, R E; Williams, T

    1999-08-27

    The primary research objective of the Numerical Tokamak Turbulence Project (NTTP) is to develop a predictive ability in modeling turbulent transport due to drift-type instabilities in the core of tokamak fusion experiments, through the use of three-dimensional kinetic and fluid simulations and the derivation of reduced models.

  9. Approaches to Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Inverno, Ray

    2005-07-01

    Introduction Ray d'Inverno; Preface C. J. S. Clarke; Part I. Theoretical Approaches: 1. Numerical relativity on a transputer array Ray d'Inverno; 2. Some aspects of the characteristic initial value problem in numerical relativity Nigel Bishop; 3. The characteristic initial value problem in general relativity J. M. Stewart; 4. Algebraic approachs to the characteristic initial value problem in general relativity Jõrg Frauendiener; 5. On hyperboidal hypersurfaces Helmut Friedrich; 6. The initial value problem on null cones J. A. Vickers; 7. Introduction to dual-null dynamics S. A. Hayward; 8. On colliding plane wave space-times J. B. Griffiths; 9. Boundary conditions for the momentum constraint Niall O Murchadha; 10. On the choice of matter model in general relativity A. D. Rendall; 11. A mathematical approach to numerical relativity J. W. Barrett; 12. Making sense of the effects of rotation in general relativity J. C. Miller; 13. Stability of charged boson stars and catastrophe theory Franz E. Schunck, Fjodor V. Kusmartsev and Eckehard W. Mielke; Part II. Practical Approaches: 14. Numerical asymptotics R. Gómez and J. Winicour; 15. Instabilities in rapidly rotating polytropes Scott C. Smith and Joan M. Centrella; 16. Gravitational radiation from coalescing binary neutron stars Ken-Ichi Oohara and Takashi Nakamura; 17. 'Critical' behaviour in massless scalar field collapse M. W. Choptuik; 18. Goudunov-type methods applied to general relativistic gravitational collapse José Ma. Ibánez, José Ma. Martí, Juan A. Miralles and J. V. Romero; 19. Astrophysical sources of gravitational waves and neutrinos Silvano Bonazzola, Eric Gourgoulhon, Pawel Haensel and Jean-Alain Marck; 20. Gravitational radiation from triaxial core collapse Jean-Alain Marck and Silvano Bonazzola; 21. A vacuum fully relativistic 3D numerical code C. Bona and J. Massó; 22. Solution of elliptic equations in numerical relativity using multiquadrics M. R. Dubal, S. R. Oliveira and R. A. Matzner; 23

  10. ROTATIONAL INSTABILITIES AND CENTRIFUGAL HANGUP

    SciTech Connect

    K. NEW; J. CENTRELLA

    2000-12-01

    One interesting class of gravitational radiation sources includes rapidly rotating astrophysical objects that encounter dynamical instabilities. We have carried out a set of simulations of rotationally induced instabilities in differentially rotating polytropes. An n=1.5 polytrope with the Maclaurin rotation law will encounter the m=2 bar instability at T/{vert_bar}W{vert_bar} {ge} 0.27. Our results indicate that the remnant of this in-stability is a persistent bar-like structure that emits a long-lived gravitational radiation signal. Furthermore, dynamical instability is shown to occur in n=3.33 polytropes with the j-constant rotation law at T/{vert_bar}W{vert_bar} {ge} 0:14. In this case, the dominant mode of instability is m=1. Such instability may allow a centrifugally-hung core to begin collapsing to neutron star densities on a dynamical timescale. If it occurs in a supermassive star, it may produce gravitational radiation detectable by LISA.

  11. Yet another instability in glasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Shoichiro; Iida, Hideaki; Kunihiro, Teiji; Ohnishi, Akira

    2014-09-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions (HIC), hydrodynamic models can describe many experimental data and suggest that the quark-gluon plasma formed at RHIC and LHC is almost perfect fluid. We need very short thermalization time and far-from-equilibrium dynamics may be important in thermalization processes of HIC. In the earliest stages of HIC, classical gluon dynamics is dominant and many types of instabilities emerge there. These instabilities may strongly affect the later stages of dynamics; realization of chaoticity and field-particle conversions. We investigate instabilities of classical gluon fields under the homogeneous, but time dependent background color magnetic fields. The background field become periodic function of time and we can analyze the stability of fluctuations based on the Floquet theory which consists the basis of the Bloch theory. As a result, we get the complete structure of instability bands for physical degrees of freedom appearing from parametric resonance. We also find that the parametric instabilities considered here have different natures from the several known instabilities; Weibel and Nielsen-Olesen instabilities. We also discuss some implications of parametric resonance to the particle productions in HIC.

  12. Observations of a tropical instability vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennan, Sean Christopher

    1997-11-01

    Observations of an upper ocean vortex associated with tropical instabilities in the tropical Pacific were made in the vicinity of the South Equatorial Current and North Equatorial Counter Current (SEC-NECC) shear at 140oW during November-December of 1990. The dynamic and thermohaline structure of the observed vortex is mapped in three dimensions using a suite of measurements from shipboard, hydrographic, and satellite sensors and drifting buoys. Evidence that the sampled flow field is steady in a frame of reference moving with the disturbance is used to study the underlying dynamical balances and the effects on heat, fresh water, and eddy energy fluxes in the region. The vortex translated westward at 30 cm/s (0.24o/day), less than half the speed of westward propagating meridional oscillations of the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) and SEC system. The associated flow deformed the North Equatorial Front through northward advection of cold equatorial water and southward entrainment of warmer tropical water, giving the surface temperature field the cusp-like pattern which is commonly associated with tropical instabilities. A dipole of convergence and divergence had magnitudes comparable to the local inertial frequency and confirms predictions by various numerical models. Relative vorticity advection balanced convergence at the front, allowing northward moving cold water to subduct beneath the warmer tropical water. The growth of the vortex appears to have been limited by the inertial frequency via a vortex instability mechanism. The same features are present in shear vortices in a general circulation model. The vortex transported heat and fresh water equatorward at rates of about 0.2 MW/m2 and 5 g/(m2s), respectively. The heat flux agrees with previous estimates from observations and models. The region from 2-5oN gained heat and fresh water at 2-5 W/m3 and 0.1 μg/(m3s). Eddy kinetic energy increased via barotropic instability at a rate of 0.15 mW/m3 and via baroclinic

  13. New instability of Saturn's ring

    SciTech Connect

    Goertz, C.K.; Morfill, G.

    1988-05-01

    Perturbations in the Saturn ring's mass density are noted to be prone to instabilities through the sporadic elevation of submicron-size dust particles above the rings, which furnishes an effective angular momentum exchange between the rings and Saturn. The dust thus elevated from the ring settles back onto it at a different radial distance. The range of wavelength instability is determinable in light of the dust charge, the average radial displacement of the dust, and the fluctuation of these quantities. It is suggested that at least some of the B-ring's ringlets may arise from the instability.

  14. Microbunching Instability in Velocity Bunching

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2009-05-26

    Microbunching instability is one of the most challenging threats to FEL performances. The most effective ways to cure the microbunching instability include suppression of the density modulation sources and suppression of the amplification process. In this paper we study the microbunching instability in velocity bunching. Our simulations show that the initial current and energy modulations are suppressed in velocity bunching process, which may be attributed to the strong plasma oscillation and Landau damping from the relatively low beam energy and large relative slice energy spread. A heating effect that may be present in a long solenoid is also preliminarily analyzed.

  15. Shock-induced crystalline instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo, Ramon; Holian, Brad Lee; Germann, Timothy C.

    2007-03-01

    Uniaxial deformations of single crystals such as those produced under planar shock loading can produce structural instabilities which compete with defect nucleation mechanisms. In fcc single crystals under (110) shock loading, the resulting body-centered orthorhombic crystal structure develops a long-wavelength dynamical instability associated with tetragonal shear distortions, which occurs at lower strains (pressures) than those predicted by the vanishing of the elastic constants at finite pressure (stiffness coefficients). The criterion for these instabilities is derived and verified by equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations [2]J. Wang, S. Yip, S.R. Phillpot, D. Wolf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 4182 (1993)

  16. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  17. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  18. Resistive instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, P.H.

    1985-10-01

    Low-m tearing modes constitute the dominant instability problem in present-day tokamaks. In this lecture, the stability criteria for representative current profiles with q(0)-values slightly less than unit are reviewed; ''sawtooth'' reconnection to q(0)-values just at, or slightly exceeding, unity is generally destabilizing to the m = 2, n = 1 and m = 3, n = 2 modes, and severely limits the range of stable profile shapes. Feedback stabilization of m greater than or equal to 2 modes by rf heating or current drive, applied locally at the magnetic islands, appears feasible; feedback by island current drive is much more efficient, in terms of the radio-frequency power required, then feedback by island heating. Feedback stabilization of the m = 1 mode - although yielding particularly beneficial effects for resistive-tearing and high-beta stability by allowing q(0)-values substantially below unity - is more problematical, unless the m = 1 ideal-MHD mode can be made positively stable by strong triangular shaping of the central flux surfaces. Feedback techniques require a detectable, rotating MHD-like signal; the slowing of mode rotation - or the excitation of non-rotating modes - by an imperfectly conducting wall is also discussed.

  19. Instabilities in the aether

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Sean M.; Dulaney, Timothy R.; Gresham, Moira I.; Tam, Heywood

    2009-03-15

    We investigate the stability of theories in which Lorentz invariance is spontaneously broken by fixed-norm vector 'aether' fields. Models with generic kinetic terms are plagued either by ghosts or by tachyons, and are therefore physically unacceptable. There are precisely three kinetic terms that are not manifestly unstable: a sigma model ({partial_derivative}{sub {mu}}A{sub {nu}}){sup 2}, the Maxwell Lagrangian F{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}F{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}}, and a scalar Lagrangian ({partial_derivative}{sub {mu}}A{sup {mu}}){sup 2}. The timelike sigma-model case is well defined and stable when the vector norm is fixed by a constraint; however, when it is determined by minimizing a potential there is necessarily a tachyonic ghost, and therefore an instability. In the Maxwell and scalar cases, the Hamiltonian is unbounded below, but at the level of perturbation theory there are fewer degrees of freedom and the models are stable. However, in these two theories there are obstacles to smooth evolution for certain choices of initial data.

  20. Effect of bone loss in anterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Grant H; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, David M; Dines, Joshua S

    2015-01-01

    Anterior shoulder instability with bone loss can be a difficult problem to treat. It usually involves a component of either glenoid deficiency or a Hill-Sachs lesion. Recent data shows that soft tissue procedures alone are typically not adequate to provide stability to the shoulder. As such, numerous surgical procedures have been described to directly address these bony deficits. For glenoid defects, coracoid transfer and iliac crest bone block procedures are popular and effective. For humeral head defects, both remplissage and osteochondral allografts have decreased the rates of recurrent instability. Our review provides an overview of current literature addressing these treatment options and others for addressing bone loss complicating anterior glenohumeral instability. PMID:26085984

  1. Suppression of microbunching instability via a transverse gradient undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao; Huang, Dazhang; Deng, Haixiao; Gu, Qiang; Zhao, Zhentang

    2015-07-01

    The microbunching instability in the linear accelerator (linac) of a free-electron laser facility has always been a problem that degrades the electron beam quality. In this paper, a quite simple and inexpensive technique is proposed to smooth the electron beam current profile to suppress the instability. By directly adding a short undulator with a transverse gradient field right after the injector to couple the transverse spread into the longitudinal direction, additional density mixing in the electron beam is introduced to smooth the current profile, which results in the reduction of the gain of the microbunching instability. The magnitude of the density mixing can be easily controlled by varying the strength of the undulator magnetic field. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations demonstrate the capability of the proposed technique in the accelerator of an x-ray free-electron laser.

  2. Transient growth of droplet instabilities in a stream

    SciTech Connect

    Jalaal, M. E-mail: m-jalaal@yahoo.com; Mehravaran, K.

    2014-01-15

    Droplet deformation is the first stage of all aerodynamically induced-breakups, considerably affecting the characteristics of the atomization. In the present study, using an adaptive volume of fluid method, two and three-dimensional direct numerical simulations have been performed to understand droplet deformation. A high Reynolds number and a range of relatively high Weber numbers are chosen, addressing the shear breakup of droplets in a stream. The study is focused on the initiation and growth of instabilities over the droplet. The role of Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in wave formation and azimuthal transverse modulation are shown and the obtained results for the most amplified wave-numbers are compared with instability theories for zero and non-zero vorticity layers. The present results for the most amplified wave-numbers and deformation topologies are in good agreement with the previous experimental results.

  3. Algebraic instability in shallow water flows with horizontally nonuniform density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. P.; Pavlov, V. I.

    2015-04-01

    The regimes and mechanisms of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability have been studied in the scope of the nonhydrostatic shallow water model with horizontally nonuniform density. As analysis shows, the nonhydrostaticity has a crucial influence on the instability. It is for this reason that at the final stage a collapse tendency predicted on the base of the hydrostatic scenario slows down and turns into the regime of algebraic instability. The numerical testing has shown that in spite of its simplicity, the model is quite able to describe realistically a number of effects. For example, the model captures the shallowing effect, which manifests itself as profile concavities on either side of the jet coming out of the boundary layer.

  4. The superradiant instability regime of the spinning Kerr black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-07-01

    Spinning Kerr black holes are known to be superradiantly unstable to massive scalar perturbations. We here prove that the instability regime of the composed Kerr-black-hole-massive-scalar-field system is bounded from above by the dimensionless inequality Mμ < m ṡ√{2 (1 + γ)/(1 -√1 -γ2 ) -γ2 4γ2 , where { μ , m } are respectively the proper mass and azimuthal harmonic index of the scalar field and γ ≡r- /r+ is the dimensionless ratio between the horizon radii of the black hole. It is further shown that this analytically derived upper bound on the superradiant instability regime of the spinning Kerr black hole agrees with recent numerical computations of the instability resonance spectrum.

  5. Global Instability on Laminar Separation Bubbles-Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theofilis, Vassilis; Rodriquez, Daniel; Smith, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    In the last 3 years, global linear instability of LSB has been revisited, using state-of-the-art hardware and algorithms. Eigenspectra of LSB flows have been understood and classified in branches of known and newly-discovered eigenmodes. Major achievements: World-largest numerical solutions of global eigenvalue problems are routinely performed. Key aerodynamic phenomena have been explained via critical point theory, applied to our global mode results. Theoretical foundation for control of LSB flows has been laid. Global mode of LSB at the origin of observable phenomena. U-separation on semi-infinite plate. Stall cells on (stalled) airfoil. Receptivity/Sensitivity/AFC feasible (practical?) via: Adjoint EVP solution. Direct/adjoint coupling (the Crete connection). Minor effect of compressibility on global instability in the subsonic compressible regime. Global instability analysis of LSB in realistic supersonic flows apparently quite some way down the horizon.

  6. LINEAR ELECTROSTATIC INSTABILITY OF THE ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Litwin, C.; Vella, M.C.; Sessler, A.

    1981-12-01

    Linear plasma fluid theory is used to study the stability of a cold electron beam in Brillouin equilibrium which passes through a stationary cold ion background, with particular interest in stability for parameters relevant to EBIS devices. Dispersion is studied both analytically and numerically. For {ell}=0, the usual infinite medium two stream instability condition is shown to correspond to a requirement that beam perveance exceed a minimum value, P>33 {micro}pervs; hence, this mode is stable for EBIS (P {approx} l{micro}perv). The Brillouin equilibrium rotation is shown to cause an electron-ion rotating stream instability, which is convectively unstable. The {ell}=1 mode is also found to be unstable. Higher modes numbers, {ell}>1, are unstable, but have reduced growth. Instability is only weakly affected by finite beam radius and boundary conditions.

  7. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of shocked gaseous interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.F. ); Besnard, D.; Haas, J.F. )

    1991-01-01

    The instability of shocked and reshocked perturbed interface between gases of different densities is analyzed by comparing flow visualization from 2D and 3D shock-tube experiments with 2D numerical simulations and theory. The shadowgraphs and calculations show similar large scales of mixing by fluid interpenetration induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkhov instability. In 2D, experimental instability growth following acceleration by the initial shock is less than calculated by linear theory or simulated. The 3D experiments are approximately simulated by 2D calculations with an increased initial amplitude of the interface. The kinetic energy of the interpenetrating velocity field from the simulations are also compared to a theoretical estimate derived from the linear theory. 2 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Microwave instability near transition energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Lee, S.Y.

    1989-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation for the microwave instability agrees with analytic calculation solving the Vlasov equation, provided that bunch shape distortion due to coupling is taken into account. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Analyses of liquid rocket instabilities using a computational testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Grenda, J.M.; Venkateswaran, S.; Merkle, C.L.

    1994-12-31

    A synergistic hierarchy of numerical and analytical models is used to simulate three-dimensional combustion instability in liquid rocket engines. Existing phenomenological models for vaporization and atomization are used in quasi-steady form to describe the liquid phase processes. In addition to a complete nonlinear numerical model, linearized numerical and closed-form analytical models are used to validate the numerical solution and to obtain initial estimates of stable and unstable operating regimes. All three models are fully three dimensional. The simultaneous application of these approaches permits computationally inexpensive surveys to be performed in rapid parametric fashion for a wide variety of operating conditions. Stability maps obtained from the computations indicate that, when droplet temperature fluctuations are present, vaporization and atomization can drive instability. The presence of droplet temperature fluctuations introduces areas of instability for smaller drop sizes and colder drop temperatures. The computational procedures are demonstrated to accurately capture the three-dimensional wave propagation within the combustion chamber. The validated results indicate excellent amplitude and phase agreement for properly selected grid resolution. The nonlinear model demonstrates limit cycle behavior for growing waves and wave steepening for large-amplitude disturbances. The current work represents a validated computational testbed upon which more comprehensive physical modeling may be incorporated.

  10. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Plasma as a Dielectric Medium; Nyquist Technique; Absolute and Convective Instabilities; Landau Damping and Phase Mixing; Particle Trapping and Breakdown of Linear Theory; Solution of Viasov Equation via Guilding-Center Transformation; Kinetic Theory of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves; Geometric Optics; Wave-Kinetic Equation; Cutoff and Resonance; Resonant Absorption; Mode Conversion; Gyrokinetic Equation; Drift Waves; Quasi-Linear Theory; Ponderomotive Force; Parametric Instabilities; Problem Sets for Homework, Midterm and Final Examinations.

  11. Material Instabilities in Particulate Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Following is a brief summary of a theoretical investigation of material (or constitutive) instability associated with shear induced particle migration in dense particulate suspensions or granular media. It is shown that one can obtain a fairly general linear-stability analysis, including the effects of shear-induced anisotropy in the base flow as well as Reynolds dilatancy. A criterion is presented here for simple shearing instability in the absence of inertia and dilatancy.

  12. Flare instability and driving mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhuri, Probhas

    A mechanism is described for the generation of solar flares in which a Buneman instability is produced by electrons moving faster than thermal speed. A trapped population of particles accelerates in the magnetic field of active solar regions causing a streaming of ions relative to electrons which moves and heats the electrons. The theoretical argument also concludes that instability at the inner solar core directly bears on solar activities at the outer heliosphere.

  13. Stability and instability in evolution.

    PubMed

    Benci, V; Galleni, L

    1998-10-21

    In this paper we propose a mechanism which tries to explain the presence of periods of stability and instability which occur during the evolution of living forms. According to the Gaia hypothesis there are feedback mechanisms which stabilise the biosphere. Adding the presence of parameters which are out of control of the biosphere and of different time-scales, we propose a model which might explain the periods of instability. PMID:9790828

  14. Aerodynamic instability: A case history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenmann, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The identification, diagnosis, and final correction of complex machinery malfunctions typically require the correlation of many parameters such as mechanical construction, process influence, maintenance history, and vibration response characteristics. The progression is reviewed of field testing, diagnosis, and final correction of a specific machinery instability problem. The case history presented addresses a unique low frequency instability problem on a high pressure barrel compressor. The malfunction was eventually diagnosed as a fluidic mechanism that manifested as an aerodynamic disturbance to the rotor assembly.

  15. Shoulder instability surgery in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose In January 2008, we established the Norwegian Register for Shoulder Instability Surgery. We report on the establishment, the baseline data, and the results at 1-year follow-up. Methods Primary and revision shoulder stabilization is reported by the surgeon on a 1-page paper form containing the patient's history of shoulder injury, clinical findings, and perioperative findings. The WOSI questionnaire for self-assessment of shoulder function is completed at baseline and at follow-up after 1, 2, and 5 years. To evaluate the completeness of registration, we compared our data with those in the Norwegian Patient Registry (NPR). Results The NPR reported 39 hospitals performing shoulder stabilizations. 20 of these started to report to our register during 2009, and 464 procedures (404 primary, 59 revisions) were included up to December 31, 2009, which represented 54% of the procedures reported to NPR. Of the 404 primary procedures, 83% were operations due to anterior instability, 10% were operations due to posterior instability, and 7% were operations due to multidirectional instability. Arthroscopic soft tissue techniques were used in 88% of the patients treated for primary anterior instability and open coracoid transfer was used in 10% of such patients. At 1-year follow-up of 213 patients, we found a statistically significantly improved WOSI score in all types of instability. 10% of the patients treated with arthroscopic anterior labral repair and 16% treated with arthroscopic posterior labral repair reported recurrent instability. No statistically significant difference in functional improvement or rate of recurrence was found between these groups. Interpretation The functional results are in accordance with those in previous studies. However, the incidence of recurrent instability 1 year after arthroscopic labral repair is higher than expected. PMID:22112155

  16. Vertical Instability at IPNS RCS.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Brumwell, F. R.; Dooling, J. C.; Harkay, K. C.; Kustom, R.; McMichael, G. E.; Middendorf, M. E.; Nassiri, A.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    The rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at ANL accelerates > 3.0 times 10{sup 12} protons from 50 MeV to 450 MeV with 30-Hz repetition frequency. During the acceleration cycle, the rf frequency varies from 2.21 MHz to 5.14 MHz. Presently, the beam current is limited by a vertical instability. By analyzing turn-by-turn beam position monitor (BPM) data, large- amplitude mode 0 and mode 1 vertical beam centroid oscillations were observed in the later part of the acceleration cycle. The oscillations start in the tail of the bunch, build up, and remain localized in the tail half of the bunch. This vertical instability was compared with a head-tail instability that was intentionally induced in the RCS by adjusting the trim sextupoles. It appears that our vertical instability is not a classical head-tail instability [1]. More data analysis and experiments were performed to characterize the instability.

  17. Pattern Formation in Convective Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, R.; Bestehorn, M.; Haken, H.

    The present article reviews recent progress in the study of pattern formation in convective instabilities. After a brief discussion of the relevant basic hydrodynamic equations as well as a short outline of the mathematical treatment of pattern formation in complex systems the self-organization of spatial and spatio-temporal structures due to convective instabilities is considered. The formation of various forms of convective patterns arising in the Bénard experiment, i.e. in a horizontal fluid layer heated from below, is discussed. Then the review considers pattern formation in the Bénard instability in spherical geometries. In that case it can be demonstrated how the interaction among several convective cells may lead to time dependent as well as chaotic evolution of the spatial structures. Finally, the convective instability in a binary fluid mixture is discussed. In contrast to the instability in a single component fluid the instability may be oscillatory. In that case convection sets in in the form of travelling wave patterns which in addition to a complicated and chaotic temporal behaviour exhibit more or less spatial irregularity already close to threshold.

  18. Observations of the parametric decay instability of nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Spangler, S.R.; Leckband, J.A.; Cairns, I.H.

    1997-03-01

    One of the most important nonlinear processes for Alfven and fast magnetosonic waves is the decay instability, in which a forward propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave is converted into a forward propagating ion acoustic wave and a backward propagating MHD wave. Despite an extensive theoretical literature and numerous computer simulations of the process, there is minimal experimental or observational evidence for its existence. In this paper we report an extensive search for evidence of the decay instability in the MHD wave field upstream of the Earth`s bow shock. Twenty intervals of spacecraft magnetometer and density data with durations between 21 and 168 min were examined. The observational signature of the decay instability sought was a quasi-monochromatic feature in the density power spectrum, attributable to the daughter ion acoustic wave, at a frequency higher than the main wave features in the magnetic power spectra. Such a feature was in fact observed for the interval in which the theoretically predicted instability growth rate was highest, as well as in a second interval for which the instability was permitted with a slower growth rate. However, the data set also contains three long intervals of data in which the {open_quotes}decay line{close_quotes} signature is not seen, although theoretically permitted. The decay line is also absent in four shorter intervals in which the plasma {beta} is less than unity, and the instability accordingly facilitated. Possible reasons for the absence of the instability in these intervals are discussed, such as a finite bandwidth for the parent wave field and plasma kinetic effects. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Observations of the parametric decay instability of nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Leckband, James A.; Cairns, Iver H.

    1997-03-01

    One of the most important nonlinear processes for Alfvén and fast magnetosonic waves is the decay instability, in which a forward propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave is converted into a forward propagating ion acoustic wave and a backward propagating MHD wave. Despite an extensive theoretical literature and numerous computer simulations of the process, there is minimal experimental or observational evidence for its existence. In this paper we report an extensive search for evidence of the decay instability in the MHD wave field upstream of the Earth's bow shock. Twenty intervals of spacecraft magnetometer and density data with durations between 21 and 168 min were examined. The observational signature of the decay instability sought was a quasi-monochromatic feature in the density power spectrum, attributable to the daughter ion acoustic wave, at a frequency higher than the main wave features in the magnetic power spectra. Such a feature was in fact observed for the interval in which the theoretically predicted instability growth rate was highest, as well as in a second interval for which the instability was permitted with a slower growth rate. However, the data set also contains three long intervals of data in which the "decay line'' signature is not seen, although theoretically permitted. The decay line is also absent in four shorter intervals in which the plasma β is less than unity, and the instability accordingly facilitated. Possible reasons for the absence of the instability in these intervals are discussed, such as a finite bandwidth for the parent wave field and plasma kinetic effects.

  20. The Role of Thermal Instability in Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inutsuka, Shu-Ichiro; Koyama, Hiroshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2005-09-01

    Our understanding on the physical processes in the transition between warm neutral medium (WNM) and cold neutral medium (CNM) is dramatically increased in the last few years. This article reviews the role of thermal instability in interstellar medium. First we explain the basic property of thermal instability in terms of linear stability analysis. Then we analyze the propagation of a shock wave into WNM or CNM by taking into account radiative heating/cooling, thermal conduction, and physical viscosity, in one-, two-, and three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations. The results show that the thermal instability in the post-shock gas produces high-density molecular cloudlets embedded in warm neutral medium. The molecular cloudlets have velocity dispersion which is supersonic with respect to the sound speed of the cold medium but is sub-sonic with respect to the warm medium. The dynamical evolution driven by thermal instability in the post-shock layer is an important basic process for the transition from warm gases to cold molecular gases, because the shock waves are frequently generated by supernovae in the Galaxy. The mechanism for maintaining the turbulent motion in two-phase medium is analyzed further by identifying the dynamical instability of the transition layer between WNM and CNM, that has analogy to Darrieus-Landau Instability of flame fronts and the corrugation instability of MHD slow shocks. Once the total column density of the ensemble of cold clouds becomes larger than the critical value (~ 1021cm-2), the two-phase medium is expected to become one phase medium with the cooling timescale. This process is not well understood and remains to be studied. Attempts to compare the numerical results of dynamical calculations with observation are suggested.

  1. Spatially Developing Secondary Instabilities and Attachment Line Instability in Supersonic Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on progress towards developing a spatial stability code for compressible shear flows with two inhomogeneous directions, such as crossflow dominated swept-wing boundary layers and attachment line flows. Certain unique aspects of formulating a spatial, two-dimensional eigenvalue problem for the secondary instability of finite amplitude crossflow vortices are discussed. A primary test case used for parameter study corresponds to the low-speed, NLF-0415(b) airfoil configuration as tested in the ASU Unsteady Wind Tunnel, wherein a spanwise periodic array of roughness elements was placed near the leading edge in order to excite stationary crossflow modes with a specified fundamental wavelength. The two classes of flow conditions selected for this analysis include those for which the roughness array spacing corresponds to either the naturally dominant crossflow wavelength, or a subcritical wavelength that serves to reduce the growth of the naturally excited dominant crossflow modes. Numerical predictions are compared with the measured database, both as indirect validation for the spatial instability analysis and to provide a basis for comparison with a higher Reynolds number, supersonic swept-wing configuration. Application of the eigenvalue analysis to the supersonic configuration reveals that a broad spectrum of stationary crossflow modes can sustain sufficiently strong secondary instabilities as to potentially cause transition over this configuration. Implications of this finding for transition control in swept wing boundary layers are examined. Finally, extension of the spatial stability analysis to supersonic attachment line flows is also considered.

  2. Elastic instabilities in rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gent, Alan

    2009-03-01

    Materials that undergo large elastic deformations can exhibit novel instabilities. Several examples are described: development of an aneurysm on inflating a rubber tube; non-uniform stretching on inflating a spherical balloon; formation of internal cracks in rubber blocks at a critical level of triaxial tension or when supersaturated with a dissolved gas; surface wrinkling of a block at a critical amount of compression; debonding or fracture of constrained films on swelling, and formation of ``knots'' on twisting stretched cylindrical rods. These various deformations are analyzed in terms of a simple strain energy function, using Rivlin's theory of large elastic deformations, and the results are compared with experimental measurements of the onset of unstable states. Such comparisons provide new tests of Rivlin's theory and, at least in principle, critical tests of proposed strain energy functions for rubber. Moreover the onset of highly non-uniform deformations has serious implications for the fatigue life and fracture resistance of rubber components. [4pt] References: [0pt] R. S. Rivlin, Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond. Ser. A241 (1948) 379--397. [0pt] A. Mallock, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. 49 (1890--1891) 458--463. [0pt] M. A. Biot, ``Mechanics of Incremental Deformations'', Wiley, New York, 1965. [0pt] A. N. Gent and P. B. Lindley, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 249 (1958) 195--205. [0pt] A. N. Gent, W. J. Hung and M. F. Tse, Rubb. Chem. Technol. 74 (2001) 89--99. [0pt] A. N. Gent, Internatl. J. Non-Linear Mech. 40 (2005) 165--175.

  3. Instability of enclosed horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Bernard S.

    2015-03-01

    We point out that there are solutions to the scalar wave equation on dimensional Minkowski space with finite energy tails which, if they reflect off a uniformly accelerated mirror due to (say) Dirichlet boundary conditions on it, develop an infinite stress-energy tensor on the mirror's Rindler horizon. We also show that, in the presence of an image mirror in the opposite Rindler wedge, suitable compactly supported arbitrarily small initial data on a suitable initial surface will develop an arbitrarily large stress-energy scalar near where the two horizons cross. Also, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state for the quantum theory between these two mirrors, there are coherent states built on it for which there are similar singularities in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in other situations with analogous enclosed horizons such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a (stationary spherical) box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be similar stress-energy singularities and almost-singularities—leading to instability of the horizons when gravity is switched on and matter and gravity perturbations are allowed for. All this suggests it is incorrect to picture a black hole in equilibrium in a box or a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as extending beyond the past and future horizons of a single Schwarzschild (/Schwarzschild-AdS) wedge. It would thus provide new evidence for 't Hooft's brick wall model while seeming to invalidate the picture in Maldacena's ` Eternal black holes in AdS'. It would thereby also support the validity of the author's matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis and of the paper ` Brick walls and AdS/CFT' by the author and Ortíz.

  4. An analytical description of hydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Sasorov, P. V.

    The proper approach to the investigation of the nonlinear stage of hydrodynamic instabilities in a plasma has been discussed. Both the Buneman instability and the beam instability have been considered. A similarity between the nonlinear stage of the beam plasma instability and the process of self-modulation and self-focusing of nonlinear waves is revealed.

  5. Analysis and suppression of instabilities in viscoelastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Karkala Arun

    2001-10-01

    The viscoelastic character of polymer solutions and melts gives rise to instabilities not seen in the flows of Newtonian liquids. In this thesis, we computationally study four such instabilities. The first instability we discuss is melt fracture, which takes the form of gross distortions of the polymer surface during extrusion. This instability is linked to multiplicity in the slip curve. We show here that when the dependence of slip velocity on pressure is taken into account, multiplicity in the slip law does not necessarily imply a multi-valued flow curve or melt fracture. Next, we study the ``filament-stretching'' instability, which takes the form of non-axisymmetric deviations of the free surface of a polymeric liquid bridge being extended between two parallel plates. We model the portion of the filament near the endplates as an elastic membrane enclosing an incompressible fluid and show that this is unstable to non-axisymmetric disturbances. The third instability we discuss is the purely elastic instability in Dean flow. This instability is linked to elastic instabilities in more complicated and industrially important coating flows with curved streamlines. We show how the addition of a small secondary axial flow in a steady or periodic fashion can significantly delay the onset of the instability. Recent experimental observations by Groisman and Steinberg ( Phys. Rev. Lett. 78(8), 1460-1463, 1997) and Baumert and Muller (Phys. Fluids, 9(3), 566-586, 1999) have shown the formation of spatially isolated, stationary, axisymmetric patterns in the nonlinear regime of circular Couette flow, termed ``diwhirls'' or ``flame patterns.'' Modeling these patterns is complicated by the absence of a stationary bifurcation in isothermal circular Couette flow. We show here how these solutions may be accessed by numerical continuation from stationary bifurcations in Couette-Dean flows. Although the solutions we compute are unstable, they show qualitative and quantitative

  6. A coupled "AB" system: Rogue waves and modulation instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. F.; Grimshaw, R. H. J.; Chow, K. W.; Chan, H. N.

    2015-10-01

    Rogue waves are unexpectedly large and localized displacements from an equilibrium position or an otherwise calm background. For the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) model widely used in fluid mechanics and optics, these waves can occur only when dispersion and nonlinearity are of the same sign, a regime of modulation instability. For coupled NLS equations, rogue waves will arise even if dispersion and nonlinearity are of opposite signs in each component as new regimes of modulation instability will appear in the coupled system. The same phenomenon will be demonstrated here for a coupled "AB" system, a wave-current interaction model describing baroclinic instability processes in geophysical flows. Indeed, the onset of modulation instability correlates precisely with the existence criterion for rogue waves for this system. Transitions from "elevation" rogue waves to "depression" rogue waves are elucidated analytically. The dispersion relation as a polynomial of the fourth order may possess double pairs of complex roots, leading to multiple configurations of rogue waves for a given set of input parameters. For special parameter regimes, the dispersion relation reduces to a cubic polynomial, allowing the existence criterion for rogue waves to be computed explicitly. Numerical tests correlating modulation instability and evolution of rogue waves were conducted.

  7. Co-Extrusion Instabilities Modeled with a Single Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, T.; Sahin, M.; Wilson, H.

    2008-07-01

    Industrial processes involving co-extrusion of multiple fluids to produce multi-layered products are rife with instabilities. We consider a simple indicative instance of co-extrusion, in which there is only a single fluid involved in the flow, but two different channel branches impose differing flow histories on it. The channels merge and, ideally, a smooth film is extruded with two layers having different stress histories. In experimental studies a wavelike instability is observed with a well defined wavelength in the flow direction and a `zig-zag' like structure, indicating that the extra flow caused by the instability is three-dimensional. Suggested mechanisms for instabilities in co-extrusion include a jump in viscosity and/or first normal stress difference across a flat interface, and a coupling of normal stresses with streamline curvature in the region where the two streams merge. Using a numerical linear stability tool we investigate this instability (using a single mode fluid model throughout) and explore which of the known mechanisms is the most likely culprit here.

  8. Parametric instabilities of the circularly polarized Alfven waves including dispersion. [for solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    A class of parametric instabilities of large-amplitude, circularly polarized Alfven waves is considered in which finite frequency (dispersive) effects are included. The dispersion equation governing the instabilities is a sixth-order polynomial which is solved numerically. As a function of K identically equal to k/k-sub-0 (where k-sub-0 and k are the wave number of the 'pump' wave and unstable sound wave, respectively), there are three regionals of instability: a modulation instability at K less than 1, a decay instability at K greater than 1, and a relatively weak and narrow instability at K close to squared divided by v-sub-A squared (where c-sub-s and v-sub-A are the sound and Alfven speeds respectively), the modulational instability occurs when beta is less than 1 (more than 1) for left-hand (right-hand) pump waves, in agreement with the previous results of Sakai and Sonnerup (1983). The growth rate of the decay instability of left-hand waves is greater than the modulational instability at all values of beta. Applications to large-amplitude wave observed in the solar wind, in computer simulations, and in the vicinity of planetary and interplanetary collisionless shocks are discussed.

  9. Various regimes of instability and formation of coastal eddies along the shelf bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimoli, Laura; Stegner, Alexandre; Roullet, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    The impact of shelf slope on the stability of coastal currents and the nonlinear formation of coastal meanders and eddies are investigated by linear analysis and numerical simulations using an idealized channel configuration of the ROMS model. The impact of the shelf bathymetry leads to different regimes of instability of coastal currents that can both enhance or prevent the cross-shore transport. While keeping unchanged a coastal jet, we tested its unstable evolution for various depth and topographic slopes. Unlike standard linear stability analysis devoted to the very first stage of instability we focus on the non-linear end state, i.e. the formation of coastal eddies or meanders, to classify the various dynamical regimes. Two dimensionless numbers are used to quantify the parameter space of theses various regimes: the vertical aspect ratio gamma and the topographic parameter Tp, which is defined as the ratio of the topographic Rossby waves speed over the jet speed and is proportional to the shelf slope. We found four distinct regimes of instability, namely: standard baroclinic instability, horizontal shear instability, trapped coastal instability and quasi-stable jet. Our results show that Tp is the key parameter that controls the non-linear saturation of the coastal current, while gamma controls the transition from the standard baroclinic instability to the horizontal shear instability. Moreover, our analysis exhibit a new regime of formation of submeso-scale eddies. Contrary to the standard baroclinic instability regime, these eddies are trapped over the slope and never escape off-shore.

  10. Transverse instability of dunes.

    PubMed

    Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2011-10-28

    The simplest type of dune is the transverse one, which propagates with invariant profile orthogonally to a fixed wind direction. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations, that transverse dunes are unstable with respect to along-axis perturbations in their profile and decay on the bedrock into barchan dunes. Any forcing modulation amplifies exponentially with growth rate determined by the dune turnover time. We estimate the distance covered by a transverse dune before fully decaying into barchans and identify the patterns produced by different types of perturbation. PMID:22107675

  11. Transverse Instability of Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parteli, Eric J. R.; Andrade, José S., Jr.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2011-10-01

    The simplest type of dune is the transverse one, which propagates with invariant profile orthogonally to a fixed wind direction. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations, that transverse dunes are unstable with respect to along-axis perturbations in their profile and decay on the bedrock into barchan dunes. Any forcing modulation amplifies exponentially with growth rate determined by the dune turnover time. We estimate the distance covered by a transverse dune before fully decaying into barchans and identify the patterns produced by different types of perturbation.

  12. Cometary ion instabilities in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, L.; Schwartz, S. J.; Hellinger, P.

    2015-12-01

    We review some of the processes that characterize the interaction of the solar wind with newborn cometary ions. Instabilities generated by the typical ring-beam velocity-space configuration of the pick-up ions in the solar wind frame are studied by means of one- and two-dimensional hybrid numerical simulations. In agreement with previous studies, we find that instabilities generated by the cometary ions play an important role in shaping the properties of the plasma. The resulting ion distributions are in good agreement with observations, showing the presence of energy shells in velocity space. Bi-spherical shells for the heavy oxygen ions are also observed in the late phase of the simulations. Moreover, we also investigate some new aspects of the dynamics, such as the generation of turbulent cascade from the initial spectra of unstable waves, and the related heating and back reaction of the solar wind plasma. We also consider the case of initial non-gyrotropic pick-up ion distributions, and we focus on the polarization of the associated waves, suggesting that linear polarization can be a signature of this configuration, possibly observed by the Rosetta spacecraft in orbit around comet 67P/CG.

  13. Orbital Instability of the Peregrine Soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-05-01

    The Peregrine soliton is one possible model of a rogue wave. Importantly, this type of soliton corresponds nicely to rogue waves recently observed experimentally in a water tank [A. Chabchoub, N. P. Hoffmann, and N. Akhmediev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 204502 (2011)] and in optical fiber [B. Kibler, J. Fatome, C. Finot, G. Millot, F. Dias, G. Genty, N. Akhmediev, and J. M. Dudley, Nat. Phys. 6, 790 (2010)]. Starting with a family of Peregrine solitons indexed by their spectral parameter, we analytically demonstrate a type of instability in the Peregrine soliton through a concise orbital stability analysis. This analysis is completely analytical, and to verify the approach we also discuss a numerical linear instability analysis. We give the growth/decay rate for these solitons as a function of the initial amplitude, which for each soliton shall depend on the spectral parameter.

  14. A Reduced Model for the Magnetorotational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamroz, Ben; Julien, Keith; Knobloch, Edgar

    2008-11-01

    The magnetorotational instability is investigated within the shearing box approximation in the large Elsasser number regime. In this regime, which is of fundamental importance to astrophysical accretion disk theory, shear is the dominant source of energy, but the instability itself requires the presence of a weaker vertical magnetic field. Dissipative effects are weaker still. However, they are sufficiently large to permit a nonlinear feedback mechanism whereby the turbulent stresses generated by the MRI act on and modify the local background shear in the angular velocity profile. To date this response has been omitted in shearing box simulations and is captured by a reduced pde model derived here from the global MHD fluid equations using multiscale asymptotic perturbation theory. Results from numerical simulations of the reduced pde model indicate a linear phase of exponential growth followed by a nonlinear adjustment to algebraic growth and decay in the fluctuating quantities. Remarkably, the velocity and magnetic field correlations associated with these algebraic growth and decay laws conspire to achieve saturation of the angular momentum transport. The inclusion of subdominant ohmic dissipation arrests the algebraic growth of the fluctuations on a longer, dissipative time scale.

  15. Instabilities and Magnetic Reconnection near the Heliopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Kryukov, I.; Borovikov, S.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations from the Voyager 1 spacecraft show that it is sampling the local interstellar medium (LISM). This is quite surprising because standard steady-state and time-dependent models of the solar wind (SW) interaction with the LISM cannot give the heliopause position at about 120 AU without unrealistic assumptions about the LISM properties. This includes such models that assume a strong redistribution of the ion energy to the tails in the pickup ion distribution function. We investigate the heliopause (HP) stability with increased spatial resolution to reveal the details of the coupling between the heliospheric and interstellar magnetic fields (HMF and ISMF) at the heliospheric interface. In particular, this resolution makes it possible to perform a detailed comparison with Voyager observations. We also analyze magnetic field simulation results to identify the areas of possible magnetic reconnection between the HMF and ISMF lines. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is considerably suppressed near the HP nose by the heliospheric magnetic field in steady-state models, but reveals itself in the presence of solar cycle effects. We argue that Voyager 1 may have penetrated into the LISM through such instability region. We also compare numerical simulations with the LISM properties taken from either Ulysses or IBEX observations.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic instability of a two fluid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.

    1992-02-01

    The stability of a gas cylinder (density ϱ) immersed in a liquid (density ϱ') subjected to capillary, pressure gradient, inertia and electro-magnetic forces has been developed analytically and numerically. A general hydromagnetic eigenvalue relation describing the characteristics of that model is derived based on the linearized perturbation technique. In the absence of a magnetic field, the model is only unstable to axisymmetric disturbances whose wavelength is longer than the circumference of the gas cylinder and stable in all other disturbance states. The instability of the model rapidly decreases with increasing (ϱ'/ϱ) but can never be suppressed, however large the (ϱ'/ϱ) value is. The magnetic field has a strong stabilizing effect on all perturbation modes for all wavelengths. Its influence is to decrease the wavelength at which the capillary instability occurs. The latter could be completely suppressed above a certain value of the applied magnetic field strength, independent of (ϱ'/ϱ) values, then the stability arises. However, in a two-dimensional perturbation ( k = 0, k is the axial wavenumber) it is found that the capillary force remains unaffected by such a magnetic field. The present results coincide with our results [A.E. Radwan, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 72 (1988) 219] if we neglect here the gas inertia force and with some Chandrasekhar's results [S. Chandrasekhar, Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability (Dover, New York, 1981)] with appropriate choices.

  17. Mitotic Stress and Chromosomal Instability in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malumbres, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is a common motif in human cancer, and multiple therapeutic strategies are aimed to prevent tumor cell proliferation. Whereas most current therapies are designed to arrest cell cycle progression either in G1/S or in mitosis, new proposals include targeting the intrinsic chromosomal instability (CIN, an increased rate of gain or losses of chromosomes during cell division) or aneuploidy (a genomic composition that differs from diploid) that many tumor cells display. Why tumors cells are chromosomally unstable or aneuploid and what are the consequences of these alterations are not completely clear at present. Several mitotic regulators are overexpressed as a consequence of oncogenic alterations, and they are likely to alter the proper regulation of chromosome segregation in cancer cells. In this review, we propose the relevance of TPX2, a mitotic regulator involved in the formation of the mitotic spindle, in oncogene-induced mitotic stress. This protein, as well as its partner Aurora-A, is frequently overexpressed in human cancer, and its deregulation may participate not only in chromosome numeric aberrations but also in other forms of genomic instability in cancer cells. PMID:23634259

  18. Mix and Instability Growth from Oblique Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molitoris, John D.; Batteux, Jan D.; Garza, Raul G.; Tringe, Joseph W.; Souers, P. Clark; Energetic Materials Center Team

    2011-06-01

    We have studied the formation and evolution of shock-induced turbulent mix resulting from pre-emplaced interface features in a cylindrical geometry. In this research a solid cylindrical core of high-explosive was detonated to create an oblique shock wave that is driven through a cylindrical interface. Pre-emplaced surface features in plastic and aluminum were studied. Time sequence radiographic imaging was utilized to observe the resulting instability formation from the growth phase to onset of mix and turbulence. Different types of pre-emplaced structures at the interface resulted in a range of mix and instability conditions, with some much more effective at creating a well-mixed region. The plastic used here was porous polyethylene. Interfaces studied were between the high-explosive/aluminum, aluminum/plastic, and finally plastic/air. Radiographic image data will be compared with numerical simulations of the experiments. Partial support for this research was obtained from the Advanced Energetics Program, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. This work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Startup process in Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardini, Manuel; Pullin, D. I.

    2007-11-01

    A simple analytical model is presented for the initial growth of the planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in the case of a reflected shock. The model captures the main features of the interfacial perturbation growth before the asymptotic linear regime is attained, over a wide range of incident shock Mach number and Atwood ratio. The problem is formulated in the general framework of the compressible Euler equations for ideal gases, and consists of solving the initial-value problem describing a shock impacting a slightly sinusoidally perturbed density interface. The equations are linearized about a base flow corresponding to the 1D Riemann problem of the shock interaction with an unperturbed interface. An appropriate scaling, similar to the Rayleigh-Jansen method, is then used to construct a perturbation expansion about the basic state. Linearized boundary conditions are applied at both reflected and transmitted perturbed shocks and at the contact interface. The zeroth order of the expansion is retained and leads to an explicit expression for the growth of the interface perturbation. Results are compared with computations obtained from two-dimensional, highly-resolved numerical simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

  20. Measurements of entropy-layer instabilities over cone-ogive-cylinders at Mach 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Roger T.

    . Results show a smooth variation of the location of this instability descent with nosetip angle. As the angle increases, the instability approaches the model further upstream. Cross-correlations between the surface transducer and hot-wire anemometry measurements confirm that the same instability is being measured at both locations. Cross-correlations between axially-displaced surface sensors were used to calculate an instability convection velocity that is approximately equal to the numerically-calculated flow velocity. And cross-correlations between azimuthally-displaced sensors show that the instability is primarily axisymmetric. The model angle of attack for all measurements was nominally zero. However, the actual angle of attack may vary by up to 0.1 degrees. The experimental results were also compared with mean-flow computations for several of the model configurations.

  1. Instability in electromagnetically driven flows. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Imazio, Paola; Gissinger, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    In a previous paper, we have reported numerical simulations of the magnetohydrodynamic flow driven by a travelling magnetic field in an annular channel, at low Reynolds number. It was shown that the stalling of such induction pump is strongly related to magnetic flux expulsion. In the present article, we show that for larger hydrodynamic Reynolds number, and with more realistic boundary conditions, this instability takes the form of a large axisymmetric vortex flow in the (r, z)-plane, in which the fluid is locally pumped in the direction opposite to the one of the magnetic field. Close to the marginal stability of this vortex flow, a low-frequency pulsation is generated. Finally, these results are compared to theoretical predictions and are discussed within the framework of experimental annular linear induction electromagnetic pumps.

  2. MIX and Instability Growth from Oblique Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Molitoris, J D; Batteux, J D; Garza, R G; Tringe, J W; Souers, P C; Forbes, J W

    2011-07-22

    We have studied the formation and evolution of shock-induced mix resulting from interface features in a divergent cylindrical geometry. In this research a cylindrical core of high-explosive was detonated to create an oblique shock wave and accelerate the interface. The interfaces studied were between the high-explosive/aluminum, aluminum/plastic, and finally plastic/air. Pre-emplaced surface features added to the aluminum were used to modify this interface. Time sequence radiographic imaging quantified the resulting instability formation from the growth phase to over 60 {micro}s post-detonation. Thus allowing the study of the onset of mix and evolution to turbulence. The plastic used here was porous polyethylene. Radiographic image data are compared with numerical simulations of the experiments.

  3. Intrinsic Instabilities Of Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, A. J.; Moynihan, C. T.; Loehr, S. R.; Opalka, S. M.; Mossadegh, R.; Perazzo, N. L.; Bansal, N. P.; Doremus, R. H.; Doremus; Drexhage, M. G.

    1985-06-01

    Heavy metal fluoride glasses (HMFG) are potentially useful as optical components in a wide range of devices. Their utilization has so far been delayed mainly because of insufficient material purity and inadequate processing conditions. However, as the result of numerous research efforts, these problems are gradually diminishing, and it now seems likely that the ultimate limitations for use of HMFG components, at least in those applications in which high optical transparency is not a prerequisite, will be imposed by more intrinsic instabilities of the glasses themselves. These include their strong tendency to crystallize on quenching and subsequent reheating, low mechanical and chemical durability, and the possibility that they will undergo significant physical aging in situ. Experimental data relating to these problems have now been obtained, and their relative importance is assessed in this paper.

  4. Vortex ring instability and its sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verzicco, R.; Shariff, K.

    1994-01-01

    This work carries earlier finite-difference calculations of the Widnall instability of vortex rings into the late non-linear stage. Plots of energy in azimuthal Fourier modes indicate that low-order modes dominate at large times; their structure and dynamics remain unexplored, however. An attempt was made to calculate the acoustic signal using the theory of Mohring (1978), valid for unbounded flow. This theory shows that only low-order azimuthal modes contribute to the sound. As a check on the effects of axial periodicity and a slip wall at large radius imposed by the numerical scheme, the acoustic integrals were also computed in a truncated region. Half of the terms contributing to the sound have large differences between the two regions, and the results are therefore unreliable. The error is less severe for a contribution involving only the m = 2 mode, and its low frequency is consistent with a free elliptic bending wave on a thin ring.

  5. Helical vortices: viscous dynamics and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Maurice; Selcuk, Can; Delbende, Ivan; Ijlra-Upmc Team; Limsi-Cnrs Team

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamical properties of helical vortices is of great importance for numerous applications such as wind turbines, helicopter rotors, ship propellers. Locally these flows often display a helical symmetry: fields are invariant through combined axial translation of distance Δz and rotation of angle θ = Δz / L around the same z-axis, where 2 πL denotes the helix pitch. A DNS code with built-in helical symmetry has been developed in order to compute viscous quasi-steady basic states with one or multiple vortices. These states will be characterized (core structure, ellipticity, ...) as a function of the pitch, without or with an axial flow component. The instability modes growing in the above base flows and their growth rates are investigated by a linearized version of the DNS code coupled to an Arnoldi procedure. This analysis is complemented by a helical thin-cored vortex filaments model. ANR HELIX.

  6. Physical diffusion suppresses the carbuncle instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ke; Jemcov, Aleksander; Powers, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a simple antidote exists to the numerical carbuncle instability predicted by some shock-capturing schemes: inclusion of physical momentum and energy diffusion via a compressible Navier-Stokes solution to the supersonic flow of a calorically perfect ideal gas past a circular cylinder. We demonstrate the carbuncle phenomenon and its rectification by solving two problems. Both employ the same geometry, initial conditions, computational grid, time step size, advective flux model of a Roe-based scheme without an entropy fix, and time-advancement scheme. For the first problem, we neglect physical diffusion, while for the second we include it. When physical diffusion is neglected, we predict a carbuncle phenomenon; however, when it is included and sufficiently resolved, no carbuncle is predicted, in agreement with experiment.

  7. Modulational instability in dispersion oscillating fiber ring cavities.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Matteo; Mussot, Arnaud; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Trillo, Stefano

    2014-07-15

    We show that the use of a dispersion oscillating fiber in passive cavities significantly extends the modulational instability to novel high-frequency bands, which also destabilizes the branches of the steady response that are stable with homogeneous dispersion. By means of Floquet theory, we obtain the exact explicit expression for the sideband gain, and a simple analytical estimate for the frequencies of the maximum gain. Numerical simulations show that stable stationary trains of pulses can be excited in the cavity. PMID:25121686

  8. Viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability in spherical geometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-02-08

    We consider viscous fluids in spherical geometry, a lighter fluid supporting a heavier one. Chandrasekhar [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 8, 1 (1955)] analyzed this unstable configuration providing the equations needed to find, numerically, the exact growth rates for the ensuing Rayleigh-Taylor instability. He also derived an analytic but approximate solution. We point out a weakness in his approximate dispersion relation (DR) and offer one that is to some extent improved.

  9. Low-frequency flute instabilities of self-pinched ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2005-12-15

    The stability properties of the low-frequency flute instabilities in a self-pinched ion beam propagating through a preformed plasma channel are investigated for long-wavelength and low-frequency perturbations. Consistent with the flute instabilities, the stability analysis is restricted to the surface perturbations on the ion beam. A closed algebraic dispersion relation of the flute instabilities for Bennett [Phys. Rev. 45, 890 (1934)] density profile is obtained, by making use of the energy group model. From the analytical and numerical calculations of the dispersion relation for highly collisional plasma, we find the necessary condition for instability in terms of the fractional current neutralization f. Threshold values of the fractional current neutralization for instability are tabulated for each azimuthal mode number l.

  10. Noise-Sustained Convective Instability in a Magnetized Taylor-Couette Flow

    SciTech Connect

    W. Liu

    2009-02-20

    The helical magnetorotational instability of the magnetized Taylor-Couette flow is studied numerically in a finite cylinder. A distant upstream insulating boundary is shown to stabilize the convective instability entirely while reducing the growth rate of the absolute instability. The reduction is less severe with larger height. After modeling the boundary conditions properly, the wave patterns observed in the experiment turn out to be a noise-sustained convective instability. After the source of the noise resulted from unstable Ekman and Stewartson layers is switched off, a slowly-decaying inertial oscillation is observed in the simulation. We reach the conclusion that the experiments completed to date have not yet reached the regime of absolute instability.

  11. Noise-sustained convective instability in a magnetized Taylor-Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The helical magnetorotational instability of the magnetized Taylor-Couette flow is studied numerically in a finite cylinder. A distant upstream insulating boundary is shown to stabilize the convective instability entirely while reducing the growth rate of the absolute instability. The reduction is less severe with larger height. After modeling the boundary conditions properly, the wave patterns observed in the experiment turn out to be a noise-sustained convective instability. After the source of the noise resulted from unstable Ekman and Stewartson layers is switched off, a slowly-decaying inertial oscillation is observed in the simulation. We reach the conclusion that the experiments completed to date have not yet reached the regime of absolute instability.

  12. Instabilities and waves on a columnar vortex in a strongly stratified and rotating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junho; Billant, Paul

    2013-08-01

    This paper investigates the effect of the background rotation on the radiative instability of a columnar Rankine vortex in a strongly stratified fluid. We show that a cyclonic background rotation strongly stabilizes the radiative instability. The modes become neutral when the Rossby number Ro is below a critical value which depends on the azimuthal wavenumber of the wave. In the limit of small Rossby number, there exist fast neutral waves that are not captured by the quasi-geostrophic theory. In the presence of anticyclonic background rotation, the centrifugal instability dominates the radiative instability only when -400 ≲ Ro < -1. The numerical stability analysis is completed by asymptotic analyses for large wavenumbers which explain the properties and mechanisms of the waves and the instabilities. The stability of a continuous smoothed Rankine vortex is also investigated. The most amplified azimuthal wavenumber is then finite instead of infinite for the Rankine vortex.

  13. Transition and laminar instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The linear stability theory was applied to the problem of boundary layer transition in incompressible flow. The theory was put into a form suitable for three-dimensional boundary layers; both the temporal and spatial theories were examined; and a generalized Gaster relation for three-dimensional boundary layers was derived. Numerical examples include the stability characteristics of Falkner-Skan boundary layers, the accuracy of the two-dimensional Gaster relation for these boundary layers, and the magnitude and direction of the group velocity for oblique waves in the Blasius boundary layer. Available experiments which bear on the validity of stability theory and its relation to transition are reviewed and the stability theory is applied to transition prediction. The amplitude method is described in which the wide band disturbance amplitude in the boundary layer is estimated from stability theory and an interaction relation for the initial amplitude density of the most unstable frequency.

  14. Fermi liquids near Pomeranchuk instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidy, Kelly Elizabeth

    We explore features of a Fermi liquid near generalized Pomeranchuk instabilities (PIs) starting from both ordered and disordered phases. These PIs can be viewed as quantum critical points in parameter space, and thus provide an alternate viewpoint on quantum criticality. We employ the tractable crossing symmetric equation method, which is a non-perturbative diagrammatic many-particle method used to calculate the Fermi liquid interaction functions and scattering amplitudes. We consider both repulsive and attractive underlying interactions of arbitrary strength. Starting from a ferromagnetically ordered ground state, we find that upon approach to an s-wave instability in one critical channel, the system simultaneously approaches instabilities in non-critical channels. We study origins and implications of this "quantum multicriticality". We also find that a nematic (non-s-wave) instability precedes and is driven by Pomeranchuk instabilities in both the s-wave spin and density channels. Finally, we discuss potential applications of our results to physical systems, such as ferromagnetic superconductors.

  15. The Energetics of Centrifugal Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, W. K.; Jiao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A recent study has argued that the California Undercurrent, and poleward eastern boundary currents in general, generate mixing events through centrifugal instability (CI). Conditions favorable for CI are created by the strong horizontal shears developed in turbulent bottom layers of currents flowing in the direction of topographic waves. At points of abrupt topographic change, like promontories and capes, the coastal current separates from the boundary and injects gravitationally stable but dynamically unstable flow into the interior. The resulting finite amplitude development of the instability involves overturnings and diabatic mixing. The purpose of this study is to examine the energetics of CI in order to characterize it as has been done for other instabilities and develop a framework in which to estimate its regional and global impacts. We argue that CI is roughly twice as efficient at mixing as is Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and that roughly 10% of the initial energy in a CUC-like current is lost to either local mixing or the generation of unbalanced flows. The latter probably leads to non-local mixing. Thus centrifugal instability is an effective process by which energy is lost from the balanced flow and spent in mixing neighboring water masses. We argue the importance of the mixing is regional in nature, but of less importance to the global budgets given its regional specificity.

  16. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh–Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, Oleg; Mueschke, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-18

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipation and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy

  17. Theoretical Studies of Low Frequency Instabilities in the Ionosphere. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dimant, Y. S.

    2003-08-20

    The objective of the current project is to provide a theoretical basis for better understanding of numerous radar and rocket observations of density irregularities and related effects in the lower equatorial and high-latitude ionospheres. The research focused on: (1) continuing efforts to develop a theory of nonlinear saturation of the Farley-Buneman instability; (2) revision of the kinetic theory of electron-thermal instability at low altitudes; (3) studying the effects of strong anomalous electron heating in the high-latitude electrojet; (4) analytical and numerical studies of the combined Farley-Bunemadion-thermal instabilities in the E-region ionosphere; (5) studying the effect of dust charging in Polar Mesospheric Clouds. Revision of the kinetic theory of electron thermal instability at low altitudes.

  18. The stabilizing effect of shear thinning on the onset of purely elastic instabilities in serpentine microflows.

    PubMed

    Casanellas, Laura; Alves, Manuel A; Poole, Robert J; Lerouge, Sandra; Lindner, Anke

    2016-07-20

    We determine both experimentally and numerically the onset of elastic flow instabilities in viscoelastic polymer solutions with different levels of shear thinning. Previous experiments realized in microfluidic serpentine channels using dilute polymeric solutions showed that the onset of elastic instabilities strongly depends on the channel curvature. The scaling dependence is well captured by the general instability scaling criterion proposed by Pakdel and McKinley [Phys. Rev. Lett., 1996, 76, 2459:1-4]. We determine here the influence of fluid shear thinning on the onset of such purely-elastic flow instabilities. By testing a set of polyethylene oxide solutions of high molecular weight at different polymer concentrations in microfluidic serpentine channels we observe that shear thinning has a stabilizing effect on the microfluidic flow. Three-dimensional numerical simulations performed using the White-Metzner model predict similar trends, which are not captured by a simple scaling analysis using the Pakdel-McKinley criterion. PMID:27265240

  19. The potential for SLM, facing human constraints, the case of the semi-arid agro-pastoral lands in the Atlantic plateaus, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laouina, A.; Chaker, M.; Aderghal, M.; Machouri, N.; Alkarkouri, J.

    2012-04-01

    The agro-pastoral activity through its evolution, in the Atlantic plateaus of Morocco, led to unsuitable forms of resources use, which carried damage in the balance of water and the stability of land. It was thus necessary to start a revision of these practices and to set up improved forms of land use. The research made in the framework of the DESIRE project concerns the Sehoul commune, which presents a high rate of poverty and illiteracy, in spite of its location near Rabat, the capital of the country. Farming has as main objective to feed the livestock. The rain-based cereal cultivations, which still occupy more than 80% of the agricultural surface, reveals the stagnation of the techniques adopted and of the local knowledge. In collaboration with various stakeholders, technicians and farmers, the assessment with the WOCAT approach permitted to identify the main factors of constraints, responsible of the current spreading of land degradation mechanisms (forest clearing, shrubs cutting on the pastoral slopes, soil erosion, constitution of rills in the recently ploughed fields, incision of gullies and channels, mass movements on the banks of the deepest channels). These constraints derive from social evolution of the population during the last 60 years and mainly the rapid transformation of the rural structure of families to a new kind of farmers, more interested by what they can earn during their frequent movements to the city than by their own traditional agriculture. Due to the penetration of urban investment, direct overgrazing and indirect effect related to mismanagement of land for fodder production, operate massive damages to the vegetation cover and to the soil. It is why the SLM behavior, approaches and techniques have a very low rate of chance for success, without a deep change in term of land ownership, law constraints, agrarian structures, relations between the city and its vicinity, etc. Scenarios were built, based on various rates of land management

  20. Collective Temperature Anisotropy Instabilities in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, Edward

    2006-10-01

    Periodic focusing accelerators, transport systems and storage rings have a wide range of applications ranging from basic scientific research in high energy and nuclear physics, to applications such as ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and fusion, and spallation neutron sources. Of particular importance at the high beam currents and charge densities of practical interest, are the effects of the intense self fields produced by the beam space charge and current on determining the detailed equilibrium, stability and transport properties. Charged particle beams confined by external focusing fields represent an example of nonneutral plasma. A characteristic feature of such plasmas is the non-uniformity of the equilibrium density profiles and the nonlinearity of the self fields, which makes detailed analytical investigation very difficult. The development and application of advanced numerical tools such as eigenmode codes [1] and Monte-Carlo particle simulation methods [2] are often the only tractable approach to understand the underlying physics of different instabilities familiar in electrically neutral plasmas which may cause a degradation in beam quality. Two such instabilities are the electrostatic Harris instability [2] and the electromagnetic Weibel instability [1], both driven by a large temperature anisotropy which develops naturally in accelerators. The beam acceleration causes a large reduction in the longitudinal temperature and provides the free energy to drive collective temperature anisotropy instabilities. Such instabilities may lead to an increase in the longitudinal velocity spread, which will make focusing the beam difficult, and may impose a limit on the beam luminosity and the minimum spot size achievable in focusing experiments. This paper reviews recent advances in the theory and simulation of collective instabilities in intense charged particle beams caused by temperature anisotropy. We also describe new simulation tools that have been

  1. Numerical simulations of hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Michael L.

    Numerical simulations of hot spots and their associated jets are examined with emphasis on their dynamical variability. Attention is given to two-dimensional simulations, which incorporate dynamically passive and important magnetic fields in the ideal MHD limit. Distributions of total and polarized radio brightness have been derived for comparison with observations. The move toward three-dimensional simulations is documented, and hydrodynamical models for multiple hot spots are discussed. It is suggested that useful insights can be obtained from two-dimensional slab jet simulation, which relax the axisymmetric constraints while allowing high numerical resolution. In particular the dentist-drill model of Scheuer (1982) for working-surface variability is substantiated, and it is shown to result from self-excited jet instabilities near the working surface.

  2. Instabilities and pattern evolution in a vertically heated annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, BoFu; Guo, ZhiWei; Ma, DongJun; Sun, DeJun

    2013-02-01

    The convection in an annular container with heated bottom, cooled top and insulated side walls are studied by both linear instability analysis and direct numerical simulation. The onset of convection is investigated by linear stability analysis and corresponding pattern selection mechanisms are discussed. The nonlinear evolution of different flow patterns and the convective heat transfer are simulated. The transition to oscillatory flow is also given by stability analysis where the base flow is a steady three dimensional flow. The stability predictions are in good agreement with the numerical simulations, including both the growth rate and the dimensionless frequency.

  3. Interfacial Instability during Granular Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Merceron, Aymeric; Jop, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The complex interplay between the topography and the erosion and deposition phenomena is a key feature to model granular flows such as landslides. Here, we investigated the instability that develops during the erosion of a wet granular pile by a dry dense granular flow. The morphology and the propagation of the generated steps are analyzed in relation to the specific erosion mechanism. The selected flowing angle of the confined flow on a dry heap appears to play an important role both in the final state of the experiment, and for the shape of the structures. We show that the development of the instability is governed by the inertia of the flow through the Froude number. We model this instability and predict growth rates that are in agreement with the experiment results.

  4. Interfacial instabilities and Kapitsa pendula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Madison

    2015-11-01

    Determining the critera for onset and amplitude growth of instabilities is one of the central problems of fluid mechanics. We develop a parallel between the Kapitsa effect, in which a pendulum subject to high-frequency low-amplitude vibrations becomes stable in the inverted position, and interfaces separating fluids of different density. It has long been known that such interfaces can be stabilized by vibrations, even when the denser fluid is on top. We demonstrate that the stability diagram for these fluid interfaces is identical to the stability diagram for an appopriate Kapitsa pendulum. We expand the robust, ``dictionary''-type relationship between Kapitsa pendula and interfacial instabilities by considering the classical Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Plateau instabilities, as well as less-canonical examples ranging in scale from the micron to the width of a galaxy.

  5. Interfacial Instability during Granular Erosion.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Merceron, Aymeric; Jop, Pierre

    2016-02-12

    The complex interplay between the topography and the erosion and deposition phenomena is a key feature to model granular flows such as landslides. Here, we investigated the instability that develops during the erosion of a wet granular pile by a dry dense granular flow. The morphology and the propagation of the generated steps are analyzed in relation to the specific erosion mechanism. The selected flowing angle of the confined flow on a dry heap appears to play an important role both in the final state of the experiment, and for the shape of the structures. We show that the development of the instability is governed by the inertia of the flow through the Froude number. We model this instability and predict growth rates that are in agreement with the experiment results. PMID:26919014

  6. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Ben Amar, Martine; Couder, Yves

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the Faraday instability in floating liquid lenses, as an example of hydrodynamic instability that develops in a domain with flexible boundaries. We show that a mutual adaptation of the instability pattern and the domain shape occurs, as a result of the competition between the wave radiation pressure and the capillary response of the lens border. Two archetypes of behaviour are observed. In the first, stable shapes are obtained experimentally and predicted theoretically as the exact solutions of a Riccati equation, and they result from the equilibrium between wave radiation pressure and capillarity. In the second, the radiation pressure exceeds the capillary response of the lens border and leads to non-equilibrium behaviours, with breaking into smaller domains that have a complex dynamics including spontaneous propagation. The authors are grateful to Université Franco-Italienne (UFI) for financial support.

  7. A Plasma, Magnetorotational Instability Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C.; Forest, C. B.; Kendrick, R.; Seltzman, A.

    2007-11-01

    A new experiment is underway at the University of Wisconsin to investigate the magnetorotational instability in a plasma. Magnetorotational instability (MRI) is a likely mechanism that could account for the observed accretion rates in astrophysical objects. The instability occurs when a weak magnetic field is present, so that tension in perturbed field lines transfers angular momentum outward while mass moves towards the center. In the Plasma Dynamo Experiment Prototype, a cylindrical, axisymmetric, ring cusp confinement geometry is used to produce a large unmagnetized plasma, confined by a highly localized magnetic field at the plasma boundary. The plasma is stirred by a novel axisymmetric electrode set that can control the rotation (angular momentum profile). The feasibility of observing the MRI will be discussed and initial results from a protoype experiment will be presented.

  8. Longitudinal instability in HIF beams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.

    1991-04-01

    In contrast to an electron induction accelerator, in which the particle velocity is virtually constant, the resistive and inductive components of accelerating module impedances can cause instability for an intense non-relativistic heavy ion beam accelerated in a similar structure. Since focusing requirements at the fusion pellet imply a momentum spread {approx lt}3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} at the end of the accelerator, it is essential to understand and suppress this instability. There is also an economic issue involved for this application; selection of parameters to control the instability must not unduly affect the efficiency and cost of the accelerator. This paper will present the results of analytic and computational work on module impedances, growth rates and feed back (forward) systems. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Hydrodynamick instabilities on ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, S.W.

    1991-06-07

    This article summarizes our current understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities as relevant to ICF. First we discuss classical, single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and nonlinear effects in the evolution of a single mode. Then we discuss multimode systems, considering: (1) the onset of nonlinearity; (2) a second order mode coupling theory for weakly nonlinear effects, and (3) the fully nonlinear regime. Two stabilization mechanisms relevant to ICF are described next: gradient scale length and convective stabilization. Then we describe a model which is meant to estimate the weakly nonlinear evolution of multi-mode systems as relevant to ICF, given the short-wavelength stabilization. Finally, we discuss the relevant code simulation capability, and experiments. At this time we are quite optimistic about our ability to estimate instability growth on ICF capsules, but further experiments and simulations are needed to verify the modeling. 52 refs.

  10. Performance through Deformation and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    Materials capable of undergoing large deformations like elastomers and gels are ubiquitous in daily life and nature. An exciting field of engineering is emerging that uses these compliant materials to design active devices, such as actuators, adaptive optical systems and self-regulating fluidics. Compliant structures may significantly change their architecture in response to diverse stimuli. When excessive deformation is applied, they may eventually become unstable. Traditionally, mechanical instabilities have been viewed as an inconvenience, with research focusing on how to avoid them. Here, I will demonstrate that these instabilities can be exploited to design materials with novel, switchable functionalities. The abrupt changes introduced into the architecture of soft materials by instabilities will be used to change their shape in a sudden, but controlled manner. Possible and exciting applications include materials with unusual properties such negative Poisson's ratio, phononic crystals with tunable low-frequency acoustic band gaps and reversible encapsulation systems.

  11. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K; Tsai, Y C; Spruck, C H; Miyao, N; Nichols, P W; Hermann, G G; Horn, T; Steven, K

    1993-12-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X chromosome for three tumors. Single locus alterations were detected in three tumors, while three other tumors revealed changes in two or more loci. In one tumor we found microsatellite instability in all five loci analyzed on chromosome 9. The alterations detected were either minor 2-base pair changes or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis. PMID:8242615

  12. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATELLOFEMORAL INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Marco Antônio Percope; de Abreu e Silva, Guilherme Moreira; Freire, Marcelo Machado; Teixeira, Luiz Eduardo Moreira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe functional outcomes following surgical treatment of patients with patellofemoral instability submitted to patellar realignment. Methods: This was a retrospective study evaluating 34 operated knees for patellofemoral instability between 1989 and 2004. The patients were evaluated in the late postoperative period when a functional questionnaire was applied. Results: After a mean follow-up time of 6 years and 5 months, the mean score was 82.94 in the surgical group (p=0.00037). The results of this investigation showed pain relief in 97.05% and low rate of recurrent dislocation (5.88%), although lower scores were seen in intense articular activities (squatting, running and jumping). No patient developed osteoarthritis while being followed up. Conclusion: The procedure for joint described in this paper was shown to be effective for treating patients with recurrent patellofemoral instability. PMID:27077065

  13. Chondral Injury in Patellofemoral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Sébastien; Servien, Elvire; Neyret, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Patellofemoral instability is common and affects a predominantly young age group. Chondral injury occurs in up to 95%, and includes osteochondral fractures and loose bodies acutely and secondary degenerative changes in recurrent cases. Biomechanical abnormalities, such as trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, and increased tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance, predispose to both recurrent dislocations and patellofemoral arthrosis. Design: In this article, we review the mechanisms of chondral injury in patellofemoral instability, diagnostic modalities, the distribution of lesions seen in acute and episodic dislocation, and treatments for articular cartilage lesions of the patellofemoral joint. Results: Little specific evidence exists for cartilage treatments in patellofemoral instability. In general, the results of reparative and restorative procedures in the patellofemoral joint are inferior to those observed in other compartments of the knee. Conclusion: Given the increased severity of chondral lesions and progression to osteoarthritis seen with recurrent dislocations, careful consideration should be given to early stabilisation in patients with predisposing factors. PMID:26069693

  14. Stellar explosions, instabilities, and turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Miles, A. R.; Muthsam, H. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-04-15

    It has become very clear that the evolution of structure during supernovae is centrally dependent on the pre-existing structure in the star. Modeling of the pre-existing structure has advanced significantly, leading to improved understanding and to a physically based assessment of the structure that will be present when a star explodes. It remains an open question whether low-mode asymmetries in the explosion process can produce the observed effects or whether the explosion mechanism somehow produces jets of material. In any event, the workhorse processes that produce structure in an exploding star are blast-wave driven instabilities. Laboratory experiments have explored these blast-wave-driven instabilities and specifically their dependence on initial conditions. Theoretical work has shown that the relative importance of Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities varies with the initial conditions and does so in ways that can make sense of a range of astrophysical observations.

  15. Transverse instability of transverse-magnetic solitons and nonlinear surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Yao; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2009-10-01

    We analyze stability of the TM polarized optical solitons and nonlinear guided waves localized at a metal-dielectric interface. We demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that the spatial solitons can experience vectorial transverse modulational instability that leads to the generation of arrays of two-dimensional TM polarized self-trapped localized beams. In a sharp contrast, we reveal that the transverse instability is completely eliminated for nonlinear surface plasmons. PMID:19794789

  16. Pulsating Instability of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Uttam; Kostrun, Marijan; Javanainen, Juha

    2008-08-15

    We find numerically that in the limit of weak atom-atom interactions a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice may develop a pulsating dynamical instability in which the atoms nearly periodically form a peak in the occupation numbers of the lattice sites, and then return to the unstable initial state. Multiple peaks behaving similarly are also found. Simple arguments show that the pulsating instability is a remnant of integrability, and give a handle on the relevant physical scales.

  17. Modulational instability windows in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation involving higher-order Kerr responses.

    PubMed

    Novoa, David; Tommasini, Daniele; Nóvoa-López, José A

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a complete analytical and numerical study of the modulational instability process in a system governed by a canonical nonlinear Schrödinger equation involving local, arbitrary nonlinear responses to the applied field. In particular, our theory accounts for the recently proposed higher-order Kerr nonlinearities, providing very simple analytical criteria for the identification of multiple regimes of stability and instability of plane-wave solutions in such systems. Moreover, we discuss a new parametric regime in the higher-order Kerr response, which allows for the observation of several, alternating stability-instability windows defining a yet unexplored instability landscape. PMID:25679679

  18. Direct numerical simulation of hot jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Marc C.

    1993-01-01

    The ultimate motivation of this work is to investigate the stability of two dimensional heated jets and its implications for aerodynamic sound generation from data obtained with direct numerical simulations (DNS). As pointed out in our last report, these flows undergo two types of instabilities, convective or absolute, depending on their temperature. We also described the limits of earlier experimental and theoretical studies and explained why a numerical investigation could give us new insight into the physics of these instabilities. The aeroacoustical interest of these flows was also underlined. In order to reach this goal, we first need to succeed in the DNS of heated jets. Our past efforts have been focused on this issue which encountered several difficulties. Our numerical difficulties are directly related to the physical problem we want to investigate since these absolutely or almost absolutely unstable flows are by definition very sensitive to the smallest disturbances and are very likely to reach nonlinear saturation through a numerical feedback mechanism. As a result, it is very difficult to compute a steady laminar solution using a spatial DNS. A steady state was reached only for strongly co-flowed jets, but these flows are almost equivalent to two independent mixing layers. Thus they are far from absolute instability and have much lower growth rates.

  19. Similarities and contrasts in tectonic and volcanic style and history along the Colorado plateaus-to-basin and range transition zone in Western Arizona: Geologic framework for tertiary extensional tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. A.; Mckee, E. H.; Hartman, J. H.; Simmons, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    The overall temporal and spatial relations between middle Tertiary volcanism and tectonism from the Basin and Range province onto the edge of the Colorado Plateaus province suggest that a single magnetic-tectonic episode affected the entire region more or less simultaneously during this period. The episode followed a post-Laramide (late Eocene through Oligocene) period of 25 million years of relative stability. Middle Tertiary volcanism did not migrate gradually eastward in a simple fashion onto the Colorado Plateau. In fact, late Oligocene volcanism appears to be more voluminous near the Aquarius Mountains than throughout the adjacent Basin and Range province westward to the Colorado River. Any model proposed to explain the cause of extension and detachment faulting in the eastern part of the Basin and Range province must consider that the onset of volcanism appears to have been approximately synchronous from the Colorado River region of the Basin and Range across the transition zone and onto the edge of the Colorado Plateaus.

  20. Catching the First Cosmic Explosions: Explosion and Mixing of Pair-Instability Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Heger, Alexander; Woosley, Stan

    2014-03-01

    We present multidimensional simulations of the thermonuclear supernovae from massive primordial stars. Numerical and theoretical study of the primordial star formation in the early Universe suggest that these stars could have been very massive. Primordial stars with initial masses of 150-260 solar masses may have died as energetic thermonuclear supernovae, so-called pair-instability supernovae (PSNe). We model the explosion of PSNe by using a new radiation-hydro code, CASTRO and find the fluid instabilities driven by nuclear burning and hydrodynamics during the explosion. For red supergiant models, amplitudes of these instabilities are sufficient to break down the spherical symmetry of the supernova ejecta.