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Sample records for platelet activating factor

  1. Effects of platelet inhibitors on propyl gallate-induced platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hongyan; Kovics, Richard; Jackson, Van; Remick, Daniel G

    2004-04-01

    Propyl gallate (PG) is a platelet agonist characterized by inducing platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activity. The mechanisms of platelet activation following PG stimulation were examined by pre-incubating platelets with well-defined platelet inhibitors using platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, activated plasma clotting time, and annexin V binding by flow cytometry. PG-induced platelet aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple proteins were substantially abolished by aspirin, apyrase, and abciximab (c7E3), suggesting that PG is associated with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase 1, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, respectively. The phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal enzyme pp60(c-src) increased following PG stimulation, but was blunted by pre-incubation of platelets with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3, suggesting that tyrosine kinase is important for the signal transduction of platelet aggregation. Propyl gallate also activates platelet factor 3 by decreasing the platelet coagulation time and increasing platelet annexin V binding. Platelet incubation with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3 did not alter PG-induced platelet coagulation and annexin V binding. The results suggest that platelet factor 3 activation and membrane phosphotidylserine expression were not involved with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. PG is unique in its ability to stimulate platelet aggregation and coagulation simultaneously, and platelet inhibitors in this study affect only platelet aggregation but not platelet coagulation. PMID:15060414

  2. Protease-induced immunoregulatory activity of platelet factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, I R; Thorbecke, G J; Bell, M K; Yin, J Z; Clarke, D; Zucker, M B

    1986-01-01

    Intravenous injection of human or mouse serum or platelet material secreted from appropriately stimulated platelets ("releasate") together with antigen alleviates the immunosuppression in SJL/J mice induced by injection of irradiated lymphoma cells or in (CB6)F1 mice induced by injection of concanavalin A. We now report that injection of releasate from 10(6) human platelets restores plaque-forming cells to the unsuppressed number; greater amounts increase responses further. Immunoregulatory activity is released from platelets exposed to thrombin in parallel with other alpha-granule components. Heparin-agarose absorbs activity. Purified platelet factor 4 (PF4) has activity; beta-thromboglobulin and platelet-derived growth factor have little or none. Activity in serum is neutralized by goat anti-human PF4. An enzymatic step is necessary for production of immunoregulatory activity. Releasates boiled immediately after platelet aggregation with 250 nM A23187 or those produced by adding A23187 in the presence of 100 microM serine protease inhibitor (p-amidinophenyl)methanesulfonyl fluoride (APMSF) are ineffective, whereas releasates boiled or mixed with APMSF after incubation for 60 min are active. Activity is generated by incubating a mixture of heparin-absorbed releasate (as enzyme source) and heparin-agarose eluate of releasate made in the presence of APMSF (as substrate source). The enzymatic step does not alter the heparin-neutralizing activity of PF4. Apparently a secreted platelet protease converts PF4 to a form with immunoregulatory activity. PMID:3517862

  3. Platelet activating factor activity in the phospholipids of bovine spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, J.E.; Hough, S.; Elrod, C. )

    1990-11-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been detected in sperm from several mammalian species and can affect sperm motility and fertilization. Because bovine sperm contain a high percentage of ether-linked phospholipid precursors required for PAF synthesis, a study was undertaken to determine the PAF activity of bovine sperm phospholipids. Total lipids of washed, ejaculated bull sperm were extracted, and phospholipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Individual phospholipid fractions were assayed for PAF activity on the basis of (3H)serotonin release from equine platelets. PAF activity was detected in the PAF fraction (1.84 pmol/mumol total phospholipid) and in serine/inositol (PS/PI), choline (CP), and ethanolamine phosphoglyceride (EP) and cardiolipin (CA) fractions. Activity was highest in the CP fraction (8.05 pmol/mumol total phospholipid). Incomplete resolution of PAF and neutral lipids may have contributed to the activity in the PS/PI and CA fractions, respectively. Phospholipids from nonsperm sources did not stimulate serotonin release. Platelet activation by purified PAF and by sperm phospholipid fractions was inhibited by the receptor antagonist SRI 63-675. These results indicate that bovine sperm contain PAF and that other sperm phospholipids, especially CP and EP, which are high in glycerylether components, are capable of receptor-mediated platelet activation.

  4. ANALYSIS OF ARACHIDONIC ACID METABOLITE AND PLATELET ACTIVATING FACTOR PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites of arachidonic acid ("eicosanoids") and platelet activating factor are important bioactive lipids that may be involved in the pathobiological alterations in animals induced by pollutant exposure. nalysis of these substances in biological tissue and fluids is important...

  5. Immunoregulatory activity of peptides related to platelet factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, M B; Katz, I R; Thorbecke, G J; Milot, D C; Holt, J

    1989-01-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4), a secreted platelet protein, alleviates concanavalin A-induced immunosuppression in mice. We now find that activity also resides in (i) the C-terminal tridecapeptide of PF4 (P13S), (ii) an analog of this in which arginine replaces the lysine residues and in which the last two amino acids are absent, (iii) the C-terminal 18 amino acids of low-affinity platelet factor 4, which is very similar to P13S, and (iv) peptide fragments of P13S that contain only 5-9 amino acids. P13S treated with fluorescamine to derivatize the free amino groups retained immunoregulatory activity but did not bind to heparin-agarose. The N-terminal and middle portions of PF4, polylysine, protamine, and three unrelated peptides were inactive in this assay. PMID:2678107

  6. Reduced serum inhibition of platelet-activating factor activity in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, C; Massobrio, M; Bertini, E; Abbondanza, M; Enrieu, N; Tetta, C

    1989-01-01

    We determined in normal nonpregnant (group 1) women, normal pregnant (group 2) women, and patients with preeclampsia (group 3) the serum inhibition of platelet-activating factor activity, the presence of detectable amounts of platelet-activating factor in the blood, and platelet responsiveness in vitro to platelet-activating factor, and to other agonists (adenosine diphosphate, collagen, and ristocetin), and prostacyclin (prostaglandin I2). In patients with preeclampsia (group 3) the serum inhibition of platelet-activating factor activity was significantly lower than that in groups 1 and 2. However, no detectable amounts of platelet-activating factor were observed. The mean values of platelet aggregation induced by platelet-activating factor, adenosine diphosphate, collagen and ristocetin, and the prostaglandin I2-inhibitory concentration of 50% which is inversely correlated with platelet sensitivity to prostaglandin I2, were not significantly different between groups 2 and 3. It is suggested that in preeclampsia the defect in serum inhibitory potential of platelet-activating factor--induced platelet aggregation may contribute to the disturbance in the homeostatic balance between proaggregant and antiaggregant substances. PMID:2912073

  7. Platelets promote osteosarcoma cell growth through activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-Akt signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Satoshi; Takemoto, Ai; Takami, Miho; Oh-hara, Tomoko; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of tumor cells with platelets contribute to the progression of tumor malignancy, and the expression levels of platelet aggregation-inducing factors positively correlate with the metastatic potential of osteosarcoma cells. However, it is unclear how tumor-platelet interaction contributes to the proliferation of osteosarcomas. We report here that osteosarcoma-platelet interactions induce the release of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from platelets, which promotes the proliferation of osteosarcomas. Co-culture of platelets with MG63 or HOS osteosarcoma cells, which could induce platelet aggregation, enhanced the proliferation of each cell line in vitro. Analysis of phospho-antibody arrays revealed that co-culture of MG63 cells with platelets induced the phosphorylation of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and Akt. The addition of supernatants of osteosarcoma-platelet reactants also increased the growth of MG63 and HOS cells as well as the level of phosphorylated-PDGFR and -Akt. Sunitinib or LY294002, but not erlotinib, significantly inhibited the platelet-induced proliferation of osteosarcoma cells, indicating that PDGF released from platelets plays an important role in the proliferation of osteosarcomas by activating the PDGFR and then Akt. Our results suggest that inhibitors that specifically target osteosarcoma-platelet interactions may eradicate osteosarcomas. PMID:24974736

  8. Platelet and growth factor concentrations in activated platelet-rich plasma: a comparison of seven commercial separation systems.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Satoshi; Kakudo, Natsuko; Morimoto, Naoki; Hara, Tomoya; Ogawa, Takeshi; Mitsui, Toshihito; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2014-06-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is blood plasma that has been enriched with platelets. It holds promise for clinical use in areas such as wound healing and regenerative medicine, including bone regeneration. This study characterized the composition of PRP produced by seven commercially available separation systems (JP200, GLO PRP, Magellan Autologous Platelet Separator System, KYOCERA Medical PRP Kit, SELPHYL, MyCells, and Dr. Shin's System THROMBO KIT) to evaluate the platelet, white blood cell, red blood cell, and growth factor concentrations, as well as platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB), transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations. PRP prepared using the Magellan Autologous Platelet Separator System and the KYOCERA Medical PRP Kit contained the highest platelet concentrations. The mean PDGF-AB concentration of activated PRP was the highest from JP200, followed by the KYOCERA Medical PRP Kit, Magellan Autologous Platelet Separator System, MyCells, and GLO PRP. TGF-β1 and VEGF concentrations varied greatly among individual samples, and there was almost no significant difference among the different systems, unlike for PDGF. The SELPHYL system produced PRP with low concentrations of both platelets and growth factors. Commercial PRP separation systems vary widely, and familiarity with their individual advantages is important to extend their clinical application to a wide variety of conditions. PMID:24748436

  9. Secretion of platelet-activating factor by periovulatory ovine follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, B.M.; Van Kirk, E.A.; Murdoch, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Secretion of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in vitro by ovine follicles and ovarian interstitium obtained at various times before, during and after the endogenous preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) and ovulation was quantified by radioimmunoassay. Release of PAF by the preovulatory follicle increased within 2 h after initiation of the surge of LH. Capacity for secretion of PAF was greatest at the time of ovulation, then declined thereafter. Production of PAF by ovarian interstitium throughout the periovulatory period was relatively low and did not change with time. It appears that PAF could act as an intrafollicular mediator in the mechanisms of ovulation and(or) luteinization.

  10. Platelet-Activating Factor-Receptor and Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P; Konger, Raymond L.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    First described in 1972 by Benveniste and colleagues, platelet-activating factor (PAF) remains one of the potent phospholipid known to date. The role of PAF produced enzymatically in mediating diverse biological and pathophysiological processes including inflammatory and allergic diseases and cancers in response to various stimuli has been extensively studied. However, little is known about the role of non-enzymatically-generated PAF-like lipids produced in response to pro-oxidative stressors, particularly in modulating the host immune responses to tumor immunity, which is the focus of this review.

  11. The involvement of platelet activating factor in endotoxin-induced pulmonary platelet recruitment in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Beijer, L.; Botting, J.; Crook, P.; Oyekan, A. O.; Page, C. P.; Rylander, R.

    1987-01-01

    1 Exposure of conscious guinea-pigs to an aerosol of endotoxin (25-100 micrograms ml-1) resulted in a dose-related, progressive accumulation of platelets in the thoracic region. Accumulation of 111indium oxine labelled erythrocytes was not observed following exposure to an aerosol of endotoxin (50 micrograms ml-1). 2 Pretreatment of guinea-pigs with the selective platelet activating factor (Paf)-antagonists. CV-3988 or brotizolam resulted in a dose-related inhibition of endotoxin-induced pulmonary platelet recruitment. Pretreatment of guinea-pigs with the selective Paf-antagonist BN 52021 resulted in significant inhibition of endotoxin-induced pulmonary platelet recruitment, although the effects of BN 52021 were not dose-related. 3 Pretreatment of guinea-pigs with indomethacin at doses known to inhibit cyclo-oxygenase did not inhibit endotoxin-induced pulmonary platelet recruitment, whereas higher doses of indomethacin produced a reduction in platelet recruitment in the lung. 4 Pretreatment of guinea-pigs with the anticoagulant heparin and the prostacyclin analogue ZK 36374 inhibited endotoxin-induced platelet recruitment. 5 These observations suggest that endotoxin-induced pulmonary platelet recruitment in the guinea-pig is secondary to the release of platelet activating factor, but not to cyclo-oxygenase products of arachidonic acid and may also involve activation of the coagulation cascade. PMID:2447993

  12. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Frelinger Iii, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-03-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications. PMID:26030682

  13. Functional validation of platelet-activating factor receptor sites characterized biochemically by a specific and reproducible ( sup 3 H)platelet-activating factor binding in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tahraoui, L.; Floch, A.; Cavero, I. )

    1990-03-01

    In human platelet membranes, (3H)platelet-activating factor(PAF)-C18 binding sites exhibited high affinity (Kd 0.074 +/- 0.005 nM, n = 28 healthy volunteers), saturability, elevated stereoselectivity, marked pharmacological specificity and small intersubject variability. The maximal binding capacity was 215 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein. Saturation of (3H)PAF binding was obtained with 0.3 nM ligand, and its isotherm was compatible with a single class of binding sites. The stereoselectivity for (3H)PAF was clearly indicated by the low displacing potency of enantio-PAF-C16 (the synthetic enantiomer of PAF) that was 5000-fold less potent than PAF. Specific (3H)PAF binding attained 65% with 0.1 nM ligand and was displaced fully not only by cold PAF but also by RP 59227 (Ki = 6.2 +/- 1.3 nM, n = 7), a novel, potent and specific PAF receptor antagonist in a pure enantiomeric form and several other antagonists such as CV-6209, WEB 2086, L-652,731 and BN 52021. Various classical pharmacological agents did not interfere with the (3H)PAF binding. In intact platelets, (3H)PAF binding shared the same properties as those just described for membrane preparations. A functional role for these binding sites was suggested by the high correlation (r = 0.94, P less than .001) between the Ki values for several known PAF antagonists determined in (3H)PAF binding and the IC50 values obtained against PAF-induced aggregation in whole platelets. Thus, the present (3H)PAF binding in human platelet membranes may be a useful pharmacological tool to study possible changes in (3H)PAF binding parameters induced by pathological states for which PAF may be directly or indirectly responsible.

  14. Platelet activating factor: regulation by mast cells and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Denburg, J A; Williams, D B; Kinlough-Rathbone, R L; Cazenave, J P; Bienenstock, J

    1984-02-01

    We have investigated some aspects of the regulation of production of rat platelet activating factor (PAF)2 in vitro. Suspensions of unseparated (PLC1), mast cell-depleted (PLC2), or mast cell (MC)-enriched rat peritoneal lavage cells (PLC) were analyzed for PAF content by extraction at alkaline pH. PAF activity extracted from PLC1 varied inversely with viable cell concentration: at 1 X 10(6) cells/ml, 32 +/- 9.3 PAF units, decreasing to 11.2 +/- 9.5 units at 10 X 10(6) cells/ml, and no activity at higher concentrations. Incubation of PLC1 in Tyrode's buffer or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), but not salicylate, resulted in a time-dependent loss of PAF activity. Mean PAF activity of PLC2 was similar to that in PLC1, while no PAF activity was extractable from MC. Co-incubation with MC extracts inhibited PAF activity of PLC1 extracts in a dose-dependent fashion. Ultracentrifugation of PAF-containing samples led to a loss of all PAF activity in PLC1 extracts, suggesting the association of PAF activity with subcellular components. PAF appears to be derived from a non-MC population of rat PLC, is not extractable from rat PLC in the presence of ASA and is inhibited by MC extracts. These studies suggest that ASA regulates PAF availability unrelated to its effect on cyclooxygenase and that MC membrane products directly inhibit PAF activity from rat PLC. PMID:6711391

  15. Purification of human plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Stafforini, D.M.; Prescott, S.M.; McIntyre, T.M.

    1986-05-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF;1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine is synthesized by a variety of cells. It induces hypotension, and activates platelets, neutrophils, and macrophages at nanomolar concentrations. Removal of the acetate abolishes biological activity, and is catalyzed by a specific PAF acetylhydrolase present in plasma and tissues. The authors developed a rapid assay, based on separation of (/sup 3/H)acetate from (/sup 3/H-acetyl)PAF by reversed-phase chromatography. In human plasma the enzyme exhibits an apparent Km of 5.7..mu..M, with a Vmax of 0.027..mu..mol/h/mg. Ultracentrifugation in density gradients showed that 30% of the activity is associated with high density lipoproteins (HDL) and 70% with low density lipoproteins (LDL). The enzyme was purified from LDL by precipitation with Na phosphotungstate and MgCl/sub 2/, solubilization with Tween 20, column chromatography and electrophoresis. This procedure resulted in a preparation that was 21,000-fold purified from plasma (spec. act. 575..mu..mol/h/mg) with a recovery of 10%. The purified enzyme has a molecular weight of about 43,000, a broad pH optimum (peak 7.5-8.0), and a pl of 4.6. It has greater activity when PAF is in a micellar, as compared to monomeric, and exhibits surface dilution kinetics, which may be important in vivo. The purification and characterization of this enzyme will allow detailed studies of its role in PAF metabolism.

  16. Platelet activating factor as a mediator of equine cell locomotion.

    PubMed

    Dawson, J; Lees, P; Sedgwick, A D

    1988-01-01

    Equine polymorphonuclear (PMN) and mononuclear (MN) leucocytes were separated on Percoll gradients and used to study the chemoattractant properties of the polar ether-linked phospholipid, platelet activating factor (PAF). Six concentrations of PAF ranging from 1 ng/ml to 100 micrograms/ml were studied in each of two in vitro assay systems, the agarose microdroplet and a microfilter technique. Very significant (p less than 0.01) increases in the movement of both PMN and MN cells were obtained with most concentrations of PAF. In two instances there was no apparent concentration-response relationship, although the action of PAF was approximately bell-shaped in two others. The possible significance of these findings for equine inflammatory conditions is discussed. PMID:3188378

  17. Platelet surface-associated activation and secretion-mediated inhibition of coagulation factor XII.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Natalia V; Artemenko, Elena O; Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Demina, Irina A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation factor XII (fXII) is important for arterial thrombosis, but its physiological activation mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we elucidated the role of platelets and platelet-derived material in fXII activation. FXII activation was only observed upon potent platelet stimulation (with thrombin, collagen-related peptide, or calcium ionophore, but not ADP) accompanied by phosphatidylserine exposure and was localised to the platelet surface. Platelets from three patients with grey platelet syndrome did not activate fXII, which suggests that platelet-associated fXII-activating material might be released from α-granules. FXII was preferentially bound by phosphotidylserine-positive platelets and annexin V abrogated platelet-dependent fXII activation; however, artificial phosphotidylserine/phosphatidylcholine microvesicles did not support fXII activation under the conditions herein. Confocal microscopy using DAPI as a poly-phosphate marker did not reveal poly-phosphates associated with an activated platelet surface. Experimental data for fXII activation indicates an auto-inhibition mechanism (ki/ka = 180 molecules/platelet). Unlike surface-associated fXII activation, platelet secretion inhibited activated fXII (fXIIa), particularly due to a released C1-inhibitor. Platelet surface-associated fXIIa formation triggered contact pathway-dependent clotting in recalcified plasma. Computer modelling suggests that fXIIa inactivation was greatly decreased in thrombi under high blood flow due to inhibitor washout. Combined, the surface-associated fXII activation and its inhibition in solution herein may be regarded as a flow-sensitive regulator that can shift the balance between surface-associated clotting and plasma-dependent inhibition, which may explain the role of fXII at high shear and why fXII is important for thrombosis but negligible in haemostasis. PMID:25688860

  18. Platelet Surface-Associated Activation and Secretion-Mediated Inhibition of Coagulation Factor XII

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Natalia V.; Artemenko, Elena O.; Podoplelova, Nadezhda A.; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N.; Demina, Irina A.; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I.; Panteleev, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation factor XII (fXII) is important for arterial thrombosis, but its physiological activation mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we elucidated the role of platelets and platelet-derived material in fXII activation. FXII activation was only observed upon potent platelet stimulation (with thrombin, collagen-related peptide, or calcium ionophore, but not ADP) accompanied by phosphatidylserine exposure and was localised to the platelet surface. Platelets from three patients with grey platelet syndrome did not activate fXII, which suggests that platelet-associated fXII-activating material might be released from α-granules. FXII was preferentially bound by phosphotidylserine-positive platelets and annexin V abrogated platelet-dependent fXII activation; however, artificial phosphotidylserine/phosphatidylcholine microvesicles did not support fXII activation under the conditions herein. Confocal microscopy using DAPI as a poly-phosphate marker did not reveal poly-phosphates associated with an activated platelet surface. Experimental data for fXII activation indicates an auto-inhibition mechanism (ki/ka = 180 molecules/platelet). Unlike surface-associated fXII activation, platelet secretion inhibited activated fXII (fXIIa), particularly due to a released C1-inhibitor. Platelet surface-associated fXIIa formation triggered contact pathway-dependent clotting in recalcified plasma. Computer modelling suggests that fXIIa inactivation was greatly decreased in thrombi under high blood flow due to inhibitor washout. Combined, the surface-associated fXII activation and its inhibition in solution herein may be regarded as a flow-sensitive regulator that can shift the balance between surface-associated clotting and plasma-dependent inhibition, which may explain the role of fXII at high shear and why fXII is important for thrombosis but negligible in haemostasis. PMID:25688860

  19. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C.; Konger, Raymond L.; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  20. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Harrison, Kathleen A; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C; Konger, Raymond L; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-04-12

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  1. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Bahnson, B

    2008-01-01

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A{sub 2}. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5{angstrom}. It has a classic lipase {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser{sup 273}, His{sup 351}, and Asp{sup 296}. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser{sup 273}. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  2. Platelet-activating factor and laser trauma of the iris

    SciTech Connect

    Verbey, N.L.; Van Delft, J.L.; Van Haeringen, N.J.; Braquet, P.

    1989-06-01

    Local application of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on the rabbit eye caused a dose-dependent significant increase in intraocular pressure (IOP). After laser irradiation of the iris the IOP showed a hypertensive phase of about 3 hr. Prophylactic treatment with the PAF antagonist BN 52021 but not with indomethacin abolished the hypertensive phase. Elevated levels of protein (10.6 +/- 0.9 g/l) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 1.7 +/- 0.2 ng/ml) were measured in the aqueous humor 2 hr after laser irradiation of the iris. Prophylactic treatment with BN 52021 showed lower levels of protein (6.1 +/- 0.7) and PGE2 (1.1 +/- 0.02); with indomethacin pretreatment the level of protein was 3.4 +/- 0.7 g/l and of PGE2 0.10 +/- 0.02 ng/ml. A role of PAF as a mediator in ocular inflammatory response is suggested.

  3. Regulation of platelet activating factor receptor coupled phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C activity

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were two-fold. The first was to establish whether binding of platelet activating factor (PAF) to its receptor was integral to the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in rabbit platelets. The second was to determine regulatory features of this receptor-coupled mechanism. ({sup 3}H)PAF binding demonstrated two binding sites, a high affinity site with a inhibitory constant (Ki) of 2.65 nM and a low affinity site with a Ki of 0.80 {mu}M. PAF receptor coupled activation of phosphoinositide-specific PLC was studied in platelets which were made refractory, by short term pretreatments, to either PAF or thrombin. Saponin-permeabilized rabbit platelets continue to regulate the mechanism(s) coupling PAF receptors to PLC stimulation. However, TRP{gamma}S and GDP{beta}S, which affect guanine nucleotide regulatory protein functions, were unable to modulate the PLC activity to any appreciable extent as compared to PAF. The possible involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) activation in regulating PAF-stimulated PLC activity was studied in rabbit platelets pretreated with staurosporine followed by pretreatments with PAF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA).

  4. Mobilization of hepatic calcium pools by platelet activating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, D.S.; Hanahan, D.J.; Olson, M.S.

    1987-03-24

    In the perfused rat liver, platelet activating factor, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (AGEPC), infusion produces an extensive but transient glycogenolytic response which at low AGEPC concentrations is markedly dependent upon the perfusate calcium levels. The role of calcium in the glycogenolytic response of the liver to AGEPC was investigated by assessing the effect of AGEPC on various calcium pools in the intact liver. Livers from fed rats were equilibrated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/, and the kinetics of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were determined in control, AGEPC-stimulated, and phenylephrine-stimulated livers during steady-state washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. AGEPC treatment had only a slight if any effect on the pattern of steady-state calcium efflux from the liver, as opposed to major perturbations in the pattern of calcium efflux effected by the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine. Infusion of short pulses of AGEPC during the washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from labeled livers caused a transient release of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ which was not abolished at low calcium concentrations in the perfusate. Infusion of latex beads, which are removed by the reticuloendothelial cells, caused the release of hepatic /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in a fashion similar to the case with AGEPC. The findings indicate that AGEPC does not perturb a major pool of calcium within the liver as occurs upon ..cap alpha..-adrenergic stimulation; it is likely that AGEPC mobilizes calcium from a smaller yet very important pool, very possibly from nonparenchymal cells in the liver.

  5. Platelet activating factor receptor blockade enhances recovery after multifocal brain ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, P.M.; Dutka, A.J.; Kumaroo, K.K.; Hallenbech, J.M.

    1987-12-14

    The authors treated four anesthetized dogs with the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist kadsurenone prior to 60 min of multifocal ischemia induced by air embolism, and measured neuronal recovery, blood flow and autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelet accumulation for 4 h after ischemia. Four anesthetized animals with identical ischemia served as controls. Kadsurenone administered 5 min prior to ischemia and continuously throughout ischemia and recovery significantly enhanced recovery of cortical somatosensory evoked response (CSER) amplitude when compared to controls. They estimated platelet accumulation as /sup 111/In activity (cmp/g tissue) in the injured hemisphere minus that in the non-injured hemisphere. Kadsurenone treated animals did not exhibit significantly altered /sup 111/In labeled platelet accumulation when compared to controls. Beneficial effects of PAF receptor blockade other than those on platelet accumulation may be involved. 20 references, 1 figure.

  6. Are the changes in the peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels due to platelet activation?

    PubMed

    Serra-Millàs, Montserrat

    2016-03-22

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in central nervous system development, neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity. BDNF is also expressed in several non-neuronal tissues, and it could play an important role in other processes, such as cancer, angiogenesis, etc. Platelets are the major source of peripheral BDNF. However, platelets also contain high amounts of serotonin; they express specific surface receptors during activation, and a multitude of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory bioactive compounds are secreted from the granules. Until recently, there was insufficient knowledge regarding the relationship between BDNF and platelets. Recent studies showed that BDNF is present in two distinct pools in platelets, in α-granules and in the cytoplasm, and only the BDNF in the granules is secreted following stimulation, representing 30% of the total BDNF in platelets. BDNF has an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Low levels of serum BDNF have been described in patients with major depressive disorder, and BDNF levels increased with chronic antidepressant treatment. Interestingly, there is an association between depression and platelet function. This review analyzed studies that evaluated the relationship between BDNF and platelet activation and the effect of treatments on both parameters. Only a few studies consider this possible confounding factor, and it could be very important in diseases such as depression, which show changes in both parameters. PMID:27014600

  7. Are the changes in the peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels due to platelet activation?

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Millàs, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in central nervous system development, neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity. BDNF is also expressed in several non-neuronal tissues, and it could play an important role in other processes, such as cancer, angiogenesis, etc. Platelets are the major source of peripheral BDNF. However, platelets also contain high amounts of serotonin; they express specific surface receptors during activation, and a multitude of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory bioactive compounds are secreted from the granules. Until recently, there was insufficient knowledge regarding the relationship between BDNF and platelets. Recent studies showed that BDNF is present in two distinct pools in platelets, in α-granules and in the cytoplasm, and only the BDNF in the granules is secreted following stimulation, representing 30% of the total BDNF in platelets. BDNF has an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Low levels of serum BDNF have been described in patients with major depressive disorder, and BDNF levels increased with chronic antidepressant treatment. Interestingly, there is an association between depression and platelet function. This review analyzed studies that evaluated the relationship between BDNF and platelet activation and the effect of treatments on both parameters. Only a few studies consider this possible confounding factor, and it could be very important in diseases such as depression, which show changes in both parameters. PMID:27014600

  8. Biochemistry of platelet-activating factor: A unique class of biologically active phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, F. )

    1989-01-01

    This brief overview describes the chemical features of this unique bioactive phospholipid that possesses biologic properties identical to platelet-activating factor (PAF) and an antihypertensive polar renal lipid (APRL). The current understanding of PAF metabolism and its regulation are emphasized, particularly in the context of explaining the enzymatic source of PAF in physiologic vs pharmacologic processes. Also included are brief accounts of the biologic properties, structural-functional relationships, antagonists, receptors and mode of action of PAF.

  9. Involvement of platelet cyclic GMP but not cyclic AMP suppression in leukocyte-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by platelet-activating factor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hirafuji, M.; Nezu, A.; Shinoda, H.; Minami, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence or the presence of PAF (10 nM) markedly increased platelet cyclic AMP levels, which were significantly decreased by indomethacin (3 microM). Co-incubation of endothelial cells and platelets with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) did not change the platelet cyclic AMP levels. 2. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence of PAF increased platelet cyclic GMP levels, which were increased 3.5 fold by PAF. These cyclic GMP levels were significantly decreased by NG-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM), and completely by methylene blue (10 microM). When endothelial cells and platelets were co-incubated with PMNs, the cyclic GMP level in the cell mixture was 42.5 and 65.3% lower than that in endothelial cells and platelets without and with PAF stimulation, respectively. 3. PAF induced platelet adhesion to endothelial cells only when PMNs were present. Methylene blue dose-dependently potentiated the PMN-dependent platelet adhesion induced by PAF, although it had no effect in the absence of PMNs. 4. Sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo cyclic GMP but not dibutyryl cyclic AMP significantly, although partially, inhibited the platelet adhesion. Inhibition of cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase by zaprinast slightly inhibited the PMN-induced platelet adhesion and potentiated the inhibitory effect of 8-bromo cyclic GMP, while these drugs markedly inhibited the adhesion of platelet aggregates induced by PMN sonicates. 5. These results suggest that the impairment by activated PMNs of EDRF-induced platelet cyclic GMP formation is involved in part in the mechanism of PMN-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by PAF in vitro. The precise mechanism still remains to be clarified. PMID:8789382

  10. EFFECT OF PHOTOPERIOD ON PLATELET-ACTIVATING FACTOR CONCENTRATION IN BOAR SPERMATOZOA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is an important phospholipid mediator shown to be involved in fertilization. We recently reported that boars with a 70% or higher fertility history have a higher concentration of PAF in their spermatozoa. In addition,...

  11. Modulation of heparin cofactor II activity by histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefsen, D M; Pestka, C A

    1985-01-01

    Heparin cofactor II is a plasma protein that inhibits thrombin rapidly in the presence of either heparin or dermatan sulfate. We have determined the effects of two glycosaminoglycan-binding proteins, i.e., histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4, on these reactions. Inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II and heparin was completely prevented by purified histidine-rich glycoprotein at the ratio of 13 micrograms histidine-rich glycoprotein/microgram heparin. In contrast, histidine-rich glycoprotein had no effect on inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II and dermatan sulfate at ratios of less than or equal to 128 micrograms histidine-rich glycoprotein/microgram dermatan sulfate. Removal of 85-90% of the histidine-rich glycoprotein from plasma resulted in a fourfold reduction in the amount of heparin required to prolong the thrombin clotting time from 14 s to greater than 180 s but had no effect on the amount of dermatan sulfate required for similar anti-coagulant activity. In contrast to histidine-rich glycoprotein, purified platelet factor 4 prevented inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II in the presence of either heparin or dermatan sulfate at the ratio of 2 micrograms platelet factor 4/micrograms glycosaminoglycan. Furthermore, the supernatant medium from platelets treated with arachidonic acid to cause secretion of platelet factor 4 prevented inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II in the presence of heparin or dermatan sulfate. We conclude that histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4 can regulate the antithrombin activity of heparin cofactor II. Images PMID:3838317

  12. Deficiency of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase is a severity factor for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Stafforini, Diana M.; Numao, Toshio; Tsodikov, Alexander; Vaitkus, Darius; Fukuda, Takeshi; Watanabe, Naoto; Fueki, Naoto; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Makino, Sohei; Prescott, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Asthma, a family of airway disorders characterized by airway inflammation, has an increasing incidence worldwide. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) may play a role in the pathophysiology of asthma. Its proinflammatory actions are antagonized by PAF acetylhydrolase. A missense mutation (V279F) in the PAF acetylhydrolase gene results in the complete loss of activity, which occurs in 4% of the Japanese population. We asked if PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency correlates with the incidence and severity of asthma in Japan. We found that the prevalence of PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency is higher in Japanese asthmatics than healthy subjects and that the severity of this syndrome is highest in homozygous-deficient subjects. We conclude that the PAF acetylhydrolase gene is a modulating locus for the severity of asthma. PMID:10194471

  13. The immunological generation of a platelet-activating factor and a platet-lytic factor in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Valone, F H; Whitmer, D I; Pickett, W C; Austen, K F; Goetzl, E J

    1979-01-01

    Antigen challenge of the rat peritoneal cavity which had been prepared with IgGa-rich antiserum generated activities which released [14C]-serotonin from pre-labelled human platelets. After adsorption of these activities onto Amberlite XAD-8 and elution in 80% ethanol, two factors of differing polarity were resolved by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl cellulose in organic solvents. The activity eluting in the 7:1 chloroform:methanol solvent contained a platelet-lytic factor (PLF) assessed by the parallel release of lactic acid dehydrogenase and [14C]-serotonin; the cytotoxicity of this fraction was confirmed by phase-contrast microscopy examination which demonstrated fragmentation of the exposed platelets. The activity eluting in the 1:1 methanol: aqueous 1.0 M ammonium carbonate solvent was a platelet-activating factor (PAF) as defined by release of [14C]-serotonin without lactic acid dehydrogenase. Both the lytic and the activating principles were separable from slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis and polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemotactic activity, and each presented a single activity peak of differing mobility when chromatographed on silica gel H plates. Human eosinophil phospholipase D inactivated the lytic factor by more than 85% in 2 h at 37 degrees without affecting the activity of the activating factor. The release of [14C]-serotonin induced by the PAF was not affected by the absence of calcium from the medium or by elevations in the platelet concentrations of cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP that resulted from pre-incubation of platelets with prostaglandin D2 or sodium ascorbate, respectively. PMID:227784

  14. Biological effects of the orally active platelet activating factor receptor antagonist SDZ 64-412.

    PubMed

    Handley, D A; Van Valen, R G; Melden, M K; Houlihan, W J; Saunders, R N

    1988-11-01

    SDZ 64-412 is a trimethoxyphenylethylphenyl imidazo[2,1-a] isoquinoline molecule that displays marked in vitro inhibition of platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced human platelet aggregation (IC50 = 60 nM) but is without inhibition (at 100 microM) of epinephrine-, ADP- or collagen-induced aggregation. SDZ 64-412 antagonized receptor binding of radiolabeled PAF to human platelet membranes with an IC50 = 60 nM. In the rat, SDZ 64-412 inhibited 100 ng kg-1 PAF-induced hypotension when given i.v. (ED50 = 0.23 mg kg-1) or p.o. (ED50 = 13 mg kg-1). In the guinea pig, SDZ 64-412 inhibited 50 ng kg-1 PAF-induced bronchoconstriction (ED50 = 4.2 mg kg-1 p.o.) and hemoconcentration (ED50 = 5.0 mg kg-1 p.o.). SDZ 64-412 exhibited oral activity in the dog against 1.5 micrograms kg-1 PAF-induced hypotension (ED50 = 5.1 mg kg-1 p.o.) and hemoconcentration (ED50 = 4.9 mg kg-1) and 3.5 micrograms kg-1 PAF-induced hemoconcentration in the cebus primate (ED50 = 12.8 mg kg-1 p.o.). SDZ 64-412 protected in a dose-dependent manner against PAF-induced lethality (LD75 = 75 micrograms kg-1 i.v.) in mice, where 20 mg kg-1 p.o. improved survival from 25 +/- 4% to 77 +/- 8%. SDZ 64-412 afforded complete protection against endotoxin-induced lethality (LD90 = 7.5 mg kg-1 endotoxin i.v.) where the ED50 was 45 mg kg-1 twice predose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3183958

  15. An antagonistic activity of etizolam on platelet-activating factor (PAF). In vitro effects on platelet aggregation and PAF receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Mikashima, H; Takehara, S; Muramoto, Y; Khomaru, T; Terasawa, M; Tahara, T; Maruyama, Y

    1987-08-01

    The antagonistic effect of etizolam, an anti-anxiety drug, on platelet-activating factor (PAF) was investigated in rabbit platelets in vitro. Etizolam inhibited PAF-induced aggregation in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 3.8 microM, about one tenth that of triazolam (IC50 = 30 microM). At 300 microM, it inhibited both ADP and arachidonic acid-induced aggregation only slightly, while the other anti-anxiety drugs tested had no effect on PAF-induced aggregation even at this concentration. Etizolam and triazolam inhibited the specific binding of 3H-PAF to PAF receptor sites on washed rabbit platelets with IC50 values of 22 nM and 320 nM, respectively. Diazepam and estazolam were inactive even at 1 microM. These results indicate that etizolam is a specific antagonist of PAF. PMID:2890779

  16. The role of prostanoids in the production of acute acalculous cholecystitis by platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, D L; Andrus, C H; German, D; Deshpande, Y G

    1990-01-01

    Gallbladder tissue from patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis contains increased amounts of prostanoids when compared to normal gallbladder tissue. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus of eicosanoid formation. It has been implicated as a mediator of acute inflammatory processes and systemic responses to shock. In this study the role of PAF in acute acalculous cholecystitis was evaluated. Anesthetized cats underwent gallbladder perfusion with a physiologic buffer solution containing [14C]polyethylene glycol as a nonabsorbable tracer to quantitate mucosal water absorption. Platelet-activating factor was infused into the hepatic artery for 2 hours. Control experiments were performed when vehicle alone was infused. Experiments also were performed when indomethacin was administered intravenously and when indomethacin and PAF were administered. Gallbladder mucosal absorption/secretion and perfusate and tissue prostaglandin E (PGE) and 6 keto prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto PGF1 alpha) levels were evaluated. Gallbladder inflammation was evaluated by beta-glucuronidase and myeloperoxidase tissue concentrations and by a histologic scoring system. Platelet-activating factor eliminated gallbladder absorption and produced net fluid secretion associated with dose-related increases in perfusate PGE concentrations and gallbladder tissue PGE and 6 keto PGF1 alpha levels when compared to control values. Platelet-activating factor produced significant inflammation in the gallbladder with increases in the histologic score of inflammation and tissue lysosomal enzyme activities. Indomethacin significantly decreased the fluid secretion, prostanoid levels, and inflammation produced by PAF. The results suggest that PAF may induce acute gallbladder inflammation associated with systemic stress through a prostanoid-mediated mechanism. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2171443

  17. CV-6209, a highly potent antagonist of platelet activating factor in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Terashita, Z; Imura, Y; Takatani, M; Tsushima, S; Nishikawa, K

    1987-07-01

    2-[N-acetyl-N-(2-methoxy-3-octadecylcarbamoyloxypropoxycarbonyl) aminomethyl]-1-ethylpyridinium chloride (CV-6209) inhibited aggregation of rabbit and human platelets induced by platelet activating factor (PAF) with the IC50 values of 7.5 X 10(-8) and 1.7 X 10(-7) M, respectively, and had little effects on the aggregation induced by arachidonic acid, ADP and collagen. The inhibitory effect of CV-6209 on the PAF-induced rabbit platelet aggregation was 104, 9, 8 and 3 times more potent than the PAF antagonists CV-3988, ONO-6240, Ginkgolide B and etizolam, respectively. CV-6209 inhibited [3H]serotonin release from rabbit platelets stimulated with PAF (3 X 10(-8) M) with a similar potency as the inhibition on the platelet aggregation. CV-6209 inhibited PAF (0.3 microgram/kg i.v.)-induced hypotension in rats (ED50, 0.009 mg/kg i.v.) with no effect on the hypotension induced by arachidonic acid, histamine, bradykinin and isoproterenol. CV-6209 (1 mg/kg) inhibited slightly the acetylcholine-induced hypotension. In rats, post-treatment with CV-6209 reversed the PAF (1 microgram/kg i.v.)-induced hypotension rapidly (ED50, 0.0046 mg/kg i.v.); CV-6209 was 74, 20, 185 and over 2100 times more potent than CV-3988, ONO-6240, Ginkgolide B and etizolam, respectively. Thus, the relative potency of the anti-PAF action of PAF analog (CV-6209, CV-3988 and ONO-6240) differed little between the inhibition of PAF-induced platelet aggregation and the reversal of PAF-induced hypotension, but that of nonPAF analogs (Ginkgolide B and etizolam) differed greatly with these assay systems, when standardized with CV-6209.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3612533

  18. Response to platelet-activating factor in human platelets stored and aged in plasma. Decrease in aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.D.; Morrison, W.J.; Klachko, D.M.

    1989-07-01

    Human platelet concentrates were stored in polyolefin bags at 22 to 24 degrees C on a horizontal shaker for up to 8 days. At different intervals, aliquots of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were removed aseptically and five variables, i.e., platelet counts, morphology, platelet-activating factor (PAF)-stimulated aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and (3H)PAF binding to platelet receptors, were studied. The number of platelets did not change during the 8 days of storage. Scanning electron microscopy of the platelets revealed a gradual morphologic change from biconcave flat discs to irregular, crenated forms. The PAF-induced aggregation of platelets declined with time of storage. A decrease to 50 percent of the Day 1 aggregatory response to PAF was evident on Day 2, and there was a further decline to about 20 percent by Day 6. Similarly, PAF receptor-coupled phosphoinositide turnover, as monitored by 32P incorporation into individual phosphoinositides, decreased dramatically with storage. After 2 to 3 days of storage, the phosphoinositide turnover was reduced to 50 percent of the original response, and it continued to decline to about 25 percent of original response by Day 5 or 6. The binding of (3H)PAF to washed human platelets indicated subtle changes between Days 2 and 4, which became more noticeable by Day 6. These results have raised the possibility of changes in the number of the receptors and/or their affinity for the ligand during storage. We conclude that although the number of platelets was maintained during storage for 8 days, a general deterioration of their responses to PAF occurred at the levels of cell surface receptor, transmembrane signaling (phosphoinositide turnover), and response (aggregation).

  19. Characterization of cutaneous vascular permeability induced by platelet-activating factor in guinea pigs and rats and its inhibition by a platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.B.; Li, C.L.; Lam, M.H.; Shen, T.Y.

    1985-06-01

    Mechanisms of platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced increases of cutaneous vascular permeability in guinea pigs and in rats were further explored. PAF so far is the most potent vasoactive mediator, being more than 1000-fold more potent than histamine and bradykinin in both species. In guinea pigs, there is a time delay of 5 to 10 minutes before PAF action, whereas, in the rat, the increased vasopermeability occurs immediately following the intradermal PAF injection. Relative vasoactive potencies of PAF and several structure-related analogues in both species correlate very well with their relative inhibition of the binding of /sup 3/H-PAF to specific receptor sites on isolated rabbit platelet plasma membranes and their aggregatory abilities of rabbit platelets. Furthermore, the PAF-induced cutaneous vascular permeability is inhibitable by a competitive specific PAF receptor antagonist, kadsurenone, suggesting that binding of PAF to its specific receptor site is the first step to initiate its action of increased cutaneous vascular permeability. Several pure cyclooxygenase inhibitors, including indomethacin, diflunisal, and flurbiprofen, and the dual cyclooxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitor, BW755C, but not the histamine antagonists, inhibit the PAF-induced vasopermeability in guinea pigs. The inhibition by indomethacin or BW755C can be fully reversed by coinjection intradermally with PAF and prostaglandin E1 but not leukotriene B4. Also, prostaglandin E1 but not leukotriene B4 enhances the guinea pig in vivo response to PAF in this model. However, in rats, none of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors, histamine antagonists, or BW755C inhibit the PAF effect of cutaneous phenomena.

  20. Regulation of platelet-activating factor receptor gene expression in vivo by endotoxin, platelet-activating factor and endogenous tumour necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Tan, X; Chang, H; Gonzalez-Crussi, F; Remick, D G; Hsueh, W

    1997-01-01

    A competitive PCR assay was developed to quantify platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor (PAF-R) transcripts in rat tissues using a synthetic RNA as a competitor. We found PAF-R mRNA constitutively expressed in the eight organs tested, with the ileum containing the highest concentration [(3.49+/-0.15) x 10(7) molecules/microg of RNA]. Significant but lower levels were also detected in the jejunum, spleen, lungs, kidneys, heart, stomach and liver. Furthermore we defined the regulatory role of inflammatory mediators in ileal PAF-R gene expression using a rat model of intestinal injury induced by PAF or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Injection of LPS or low-dose PAF resulted in a marked increase in ileal PAF-R mRNA within 30 min. The up-regulation on PAF-R elicited by PAF was biphasic, peaking first at 90 min, then again at 6 h. In contrast, LPS elicited a weak monophasic response. The second phase of PAF-R mRNA increase after PAF administration was completely abolished by WEB 2170, a PAF antagonist, and partially inhibited by antitumour necrosis factor (TNF) antibody. These observations indicate the involvement of endogenous PAF and TNF in this event. In conclusion, we found: (a) preferential PAF-R expression in the ileum, suggesting a role for PAF in intestinal inflammation; (b) induction of PAF-R expression in vivo by its own agonist; (c) a complex regulation of PAR-R gene expression in vivo involving a network of various pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:9065783

  1. Role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in platelet accumulation in rabbit skin: effect of the novel long-acting PAF antagonist, UK-74,505.

    PubMed Central

    Pons, F.; Rossi, A. G.; Norman, K. E.; Williams, T. J.; Nourshargh, S.

    1993-01-01

    1. The contribution of platelet-activating factor (PAF) to platelet deposition and oedema formation induced by exogenous soluble mediators, zymosan particles and associated with a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction in rabbit skin was investigated by use of a novel long-acting PAF receptor antagonist, UK-74,505. 2. Oedema formation and platelet accumulation were simultaneously measured by i.v. injection of [125I]-albumin and 111In-labelled rabbit platelets. UK-74,505 was either administered i.v. or used to pretreat radiolabelled platelets in vitro before their injection into recipient animals. Platelets pretreated with UK-74,505 were also labelled with the fluorescent calcium indicator, Fura-2, to assess their ex vivo reactivity to PAF at the end of the in vivo experiment. 3. UK-74,505 (0.5 mg kg-1), administered i.v., inhibited PAF-induced oedema formation, but did not affect oedema induced by zymosan particles, bradykinin (BK), histamine, formyl-methionyl-leucylphenylalanine (FMLP), zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP, as a source of C5a des Arg), leukotriene B4 (LTB4) or interleukin-8 (IL-8). 4. UK-74,505, administered i.v. also suppressed the small platelet accumulation induced by exogenous PAF, but had no effect on accumulation induced by IL-8 or ZAP. Although oedema induced by zymosan was not affected by i.v. UK-74,505, zymosan-induced platelet accumulation was significantly attenuated by the antagonist. 5. The RPA reaction in rabbit skin was associated with marked oedema formation and platelet accumulation which were both inhibited by i.v. UK-74,505.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8495241

  2. Increased levels of platelet-activating factor in blood following intestinal ischemia in the dog.

    PubMed

    Filep, J; Hermán, F; Braquet, P; Mózes, T

    1989-01-31

    The possible role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in superior mesenteric artery occlusion induced circulatory collapse was studied in anesthetized dogs. PAF was measured by platelet aggregation assay. Identity of PAF-like product in blood was ascertained by thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography and alkaline treatment. Low amount of PAF was detected in the mesenteric blood under normal conditions, during reperfusion PAF levels were significantly higher. Pretreatment of the animals with BN 52021, a specific PAF receptor antagonist abolished the fall in mean arterial pressure and the rise in hematocrit due to ischemia/reperfusion. These findings suggest that PAF may play an important role in mesenteric ischemia-induced circulatory collapse. PMID:2916986

  3. Eugenol: a dual inhibitor of platelet-activating factor and arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saeed, S A; Simjee, R U; Shamim, G; Gilani, A H

    1995-07-01

    Eugenol is an active principal and responsible for several pharmacological activities of clove oil. We studied the effects of eugenol on human platelet aggregation, arachidonic acid (AA) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) metabolism and in vivo effects on AA and PAF-induced shock in rabbits. Eugenol strongly inhibited PAF-induced platelet aggregation with lesser effect against AA and collegen. The IC(50) values were against AA: 31 ± 0.5; collagen: 64 ± 0.7 and PAF 7 ± 0.2 μM (n=9) respectively. In addition, eugenol stimulated PAF-acetylhydrolase activity suggesting that inhibition of PAF could be due to its inactivation to lyso-PAF. Pretreatment of rabbits with eugenol (50-100 mg/kg) prevented the lethal effects of intravenous PAF (11 μgg/kg) or AA (2 mg/kg) in a dose-dependent fashion. The protective effects of eugenol in the rabbits, however, were more pronounced against PAF-induced mortality (100% protection). In addition, eugenol also inhibited AA metabolism via cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways in human platelets. Both the production of thromboxane-A(2) and 12-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid was inhibited by eugenol in a concentration-related manner (30-120 μM). In vivo, eugenol (50-100 mg/kg; i.p.) inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema (P < 0.001). In this test, eugenol was 5 times more potent than aspirin. These results provide evidence that eugenol acts as a dual antagonist of AA and PAF. PMID:23196096

  4. Platelet-activating factor in bronchoalveolar lavage from patients with sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Scappaticci, E; Libertucci, D; Bottomicca, F; Da Col, R; Silvestro, L; Tetta, C; Camussi, G

    1992-08-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a lipid mediator of inflammation and anaphylaxis, may play a role in several physiopathologic alterations of the lung. A lipid compound with physicochemical and biologic characteristics similar to synthetic PAF was extracted and purified from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of 15 of 34 patients with sarcoidosis. PAF was quantitated by a bioassay on washed rabbit platelets. The specificity of platelet aggregation was assessed by using two different PAF receptor antagonists. The incidence of detectable amounts of PAF in BAL fluid of sarcoid patients was statistically significant (chi 2 = 4.064, p = 0.044) when compared with the 14 normal control subjects. The results demonstrated an increased production of PAF in the lower respiratory tract of patients with sarcoidosis. The presence of PAF in BAL fluid, however, did not correlate with radiologic stage, intensity of alveolitis, gallium scanning positivity, angiotensin-converting enzyme serum level, or lung function tests. Therefore, a direct relationship between presence of PAF in BAL fluid and activity of lung disease in patients with sarcoidosis was not directly established. PMID:1336939

  5. Albumin inhibits platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced responses in platelets and macrophages: implications for the biologically active form of PAF.

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriadis, G.; Stewart, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) binds with high affinity to albumin leading Clay et al. (1990) to suggest that the active form of PAF is the albumin-PAF complex. 2. In the present study the proposal that albumin-bound, rather than monomeric PAF, is the active form of PAF at PAF receptors was critically evaluated by examining the effect of albumin on the potency of PAF in isolated platelets and macrophages. 3. Bovine serum albumin inhibited concentration-dependently PAF-induced responses in platelets and macrophages. The most probable explanation of this finding is that BSA reduced the concentration of free PAF. 4. Thus, we conclude that free PAF, rather than the albumin-PAF complex is the active form. Consequently, local concentrations of albumin will influence profoundly the potency of endogenously released PAF. Moreover, estimates of the affinity of PAF for PAF receptors made in buffers containing BSA, underestimate the true affinity of PAF for its receptors by approximately 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:1330167

  6. Leishmania parasites possess a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase important for virulence

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowic, Mattie C.; Zhang, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania parasites are intracellular protozoans capable of salvaging and remodeling lipids from the host. To understand the role of lipid metabolism in Leishmania virulence, it is necessary to characterize the enzymes involved in the uptake and turnover of phospholipids. This study focuses on a putative phospholipase A2 (PLA2)/platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) in L. major. In mammals, PAF-AH is a subgroup of PLA2 catalyzing the hydrolysis/inactivation of platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent mediator of many leukocyte functions. By immunofluorescence microscopy, L. major PLA2/PAF-AH is predominantly localized in the ER. While wild type L. major parasites are able to hydrolyze PAF, this activity is completely absent in the PLA2/PAF-AH-null mutants. Meanwhile, deletion of PLA2/PAF-AH had no significant effect on the turnover of common glycerophospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol. PLA2/PAF-AH is not required for the growth of L. major parasites in culture, or the production of GPI-anchored virulence factors. Nonetheless, it does play a key role in the mammalian host as the PLA2/PAF-AH null mutants exhibit attenuated virulence in BALB/c mice. In conclusion, these data suggest that Leishmania parasites possess a functional PAF-AH and the degradation of PAF or PAF-like lipids is an important step in infection. PMID:22954769

  7. Antagonistic activity of etizolam on platelet-activating factor in vivo experiments.

    PubMed

    Terasawa, M; Mikashima, H; Tahara, T; Maruyama, Y

    1987-08-01

    The ability of etizolam, 6-(o-chlorophenyl)-8-ethyl-1-methyl-4H-s-triazolo[3,4-c]thieno[2,3-e] [1,4]diazepine (Y-7131), an anti-anxiety drug, to inhibit platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced reactions was investigated in experimental animals in vivo. Etizolam (0.01-0.3 mg/kg, i.v.) dose dependently inhibited PAF (0.3 microgram/kg, i.v.)-induced bronchoconstriction (Konzett and Rössler's method) in guinea pigs, but even at doses as large as 3 mg/kg, i.v., it had no effect on bronchoconstriction induced by histamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, arachidonic acid, bradykinin, angiotensin l or leukotriene D4. Etizolam (0.1-1 mg/kg, i.v.) also dose-dependently reversed PAF (1 microgram/kg, i.v.)-induced hypotension in anesthetized rats. Injection of PAF into the tail veins of mice produced lethal shock within 10-30 min. Etizolam (0.1-3 mg/kg, i.v. and 1-10 mg/kg, p.o.) protected against the lethal effect of PAF (75 micrograms/kg, i.v.) in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that etizolam specifically inhibits the action of PAF in vivo. PMID:3682404

  8. Platelet-activating factor induces phospholipid turnover, calcium flux, arachidonic acid liberation, eicosanoid generation, and oncogene expression in a human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Schulam, P.G.; Kuruvilla, A.; Putcha, G.; Mangus, L.; Franklin-Johnson, J.; Shearer, W.T. )

    1991-03-01

    Platelet-activating factor is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response. Studies of the actions of platelet-activating factor have centered mainly around neutrophils, monocytes, and platelets. In this report we begin to uncover the influence of platelet-activating factor on B lymphocytes. Employing the EBV-transformed human B cell line SKW6.4, we demonstrate that platelet-activating factor significantly alters membrane phospholipid metabolism indicated by the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid but not significantly into phosphatidylethanolamine at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M. The inactive precursor, lyso-platelet-activating factor, at a concentration as high as 10(-7) M had no effect on any of the membrane phospholipids. We also show that platelet-activating factor from 10(-12) to 10(-6) M induced rapid and significant elevation in intracellular calcium levels, whereas lyso-platelet-activating factor was again ineffective. We further demonstrate the impact of platelet-activating factor binding to B cells by measuring platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production. Moreover, platelet-activating factor was capable of inducing transcription of the nuclear proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun. Finally we explored the possible role of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as a regulator of arachidonic acid liberation demonstrating that endogenous 5-lipoxygenase activity modulates platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release perhaps acting at the level of phospholipase A2. In summary, platelet-activating factor is shown here to have a direct and profound effect on a pure B cell line.

  9. Angiotensin peptides attenuate platelet-activating factor-induced inflammatory activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Yokoyama, Izumi; Ebina, Keiichi

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)--a peptide that is part of the renin-angiotensin system-induces vasoconstriction and a subsequent increase in blood pressure; Ang peptides, especially AngII, can also act as potent pro-inflammatory mediators. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid mediator that is implicated in many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of Ang peptides (AngII, AngIII, and AngIV) on PAF-induced inflammatory activity. In experiments using a rat hind-paw oedema model, AngII markedly and dose-dependently attenuated the paw oedema induced by PAF. The inhibitory effects of AngIII and AngIV on PAF-induced paw oedema were lower than that of AngII. Two Ang receptors, the AT1 and AT2 receptors, did not affect the AngII-mediated attenuation of PAF-induced paw oedema. Moreover, intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence studies demonstrated that AngII, AngIII, and AngIV interact with PAF, and that their affinities were closely correlated with their inhibitory effects on PAF-induced rat paw oedema. Also, AngII interacted with metabolite/precursor of PAF (lyso-PAF), and an oxidized phospholipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-(5'-oxo-valeroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC), which bears a marked structural resemblance to PAF. Furthermore, POVPC dose-dependently inhibited AngII-mediated attenuation of PAF-induced paw oedema. These results suggest that Ang peptides can attenuate PAF-induced inflammatory activity through binding to PAF and lyso-PAF in rats. Therefore, Ang peptides may be closely involved in the regulation of many inflammatory diseases caused by PAF. PMID:26348270

  10. Platelet-Activating Factor Receptors Mediate Excitatory Postsynaptic Hippocampal Injury in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Geathers, Jasmine S.; Allan, Kevin C.; Gelbard, Harris A.

    2016-01-01

    Gray matter degeneration contributes to progressive disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and can occur out of proportion to measures of white matter disease. Although white matter pathology, including demyelination and axon injury, can lead to secondary gray matter changes, we hypothesized that neurons can undergo direct excitatory injury within the gray matter independent of these. We tested this using a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) with hippocampal degeneration in C57BL/6 mice, in which immunofluorescent staining showed a 28% loss of PSD95-positive excitatory postsynaptic puncta in hippocampal area CA1 compared with sham-immunized controls, despite preservation of myelin and VGLUT1-positive excitatory axon terminals. Loss of postsynaptic structures was accompanied by appearance of PSD95-positive debris that colocalized with the processes of activated microglia at 25 d after immunization, and clearance of debris was followed by persistently reduced synaptic density at 55 d. In vitro, addition of activated BV2 microglial cells to hippocampal cultures increased neuronal vulnerability to excitotoxic dendritic damage following a burst of synaptic activity in a manner dependent on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) signaling. In vivo treatment with PAFR antagonist BN52021 prevented PSD95-positive synapse loss in hippocampi of mice with EAE but did not affect development of EAE or local microglial activation. These results demonstrate that postsynaptic structures can be a primary target of injury within the gray matter in autoimmune neuroinflammatory disease, and suggest that this may occur via PAFR-mediated modulation of activity-dependent synaptic physiology downstream of microglial activation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Unraveling gray matter degeneration is critical for developing treatments for progressive disability and cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS). In a mouse model of MS, we show that neurons can undergo injury

  11. Antiplatelet aggregation and platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonistic activities of the essential oils of five Goniothalamus species.

    PubMed

    Moharam, Bushra Abdulkarim; Jantan, Ibrahim; Ahmad, Fasihuddin bin; Jalil, Juriyati

    2010-08-01

    Nine essential oils, hydrodistilled from different parts of five Goniothalamus species (G. velutinus Airy-Shaw, G. woodii Merr., G. clemensii Ban, G. tapis Miq. and G. tapisoides Mat Salleh) were evaluated for their ability to inhibit platelet aggregation in human whole blood using an electrical impedance method and their inhibitory effects on platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor binding with rabbit platelets using 3H-PAF as a ligand. The chemical composition of the oils was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The bark oil of G. velutinus was the most effective sample as it inhibited both arachidonic acid (AA) and ADP-induced platelet aggregation with IC(50) values of 93.6 and 87.7 microg/mL, respectively. Among the studied oils, the bark oils of G. clemensii, G. woodii, G. velutinus and the root oil of G. tapis showed significant inhibitory effects on PAF receptor binding, with IC(50 )values ranging from 3.5 to 10.5 microg/mL. The strong PAF antagonistic activity of the active oils is related to their high contents of sesquiterpenes and sesquiterpenoids, and the individual components in the oils could possibly produce a synergistic effect in the overall antiplatelet activity of the oils. PMID:20714290

  12. Epidermal Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Activation and Ultraviolet B Radiation Result in Synergistic Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolverton, Jay E.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Yongxue; Zhang, Qiwei; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) is a potent stimulator of epidermal cytokine production which has been implicated in photoaggravated dermatoses. In addition to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), UVB generates bioactive lipids including platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our previous studies have demonstrated that UVB-mediated production of keratinocyte TNF-α is in part due to PAF. The current studies use a human PAF-receptor (PAF-R) negative epithelial cell line transduced with PAF-Rs and PAF–R-deficient mice to demonstrate that activation of the epidermal PAF-R along with UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of TNF-α. It should be noted that PAF-R effects are mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) agonist phorbol myristic acetate, and are inhibited by pharmacological antagonists of the PKC gamma isoenzyme. These studies suggest that concomitant PAF-R activation and UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of the cytokine TNF-α which is mediated in part via PKC. These studies provide a novel potential mechanism for photosensitivity responses. PMID:19769579

  13. Crystallization and Preliminary X-Ray Crystallographic Analysis of Human Plasma Platelet Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Wilder, C; Bahnson, B

    2009-01-01

    The plasma form of the human enzyme platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) has been crystallized, and X-ray diffraction data were collected at a synchrotron source to a resolution of 1.47 {angstrom}. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit cell parameters of a = 116.18, b = 83.06, c = 96.71 {angstrom}, and {beta} = 115.09 and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PAF-AH functions as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger by reducing the levels of the signaling molecule PAF. Additionally, the LDL bound enzyme has been linked to atherosclerosis due to its hydrolytic activities of pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids.

  14. Participation of the cysteinyl leukotrienes in the acute bronchoconstrictor response to inhaled platelet activating factor in man.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, D A; Evans, J M; Green, S E; Piper, P J; Costello, J F

    1991-01-01

    To determine whether the effects of platelet activating factor on the airways may be due to the production of leukotrienes we studied the effects of pretreatment with the selective cysteinyl leukotriene antagonist SK&F 104353-Z2 on the airway and cellular responses to inhaled platelet activating factor. Eight healthy men were studied in a randomised, double blind placebo controlled cross-over study. A single dose of platelet activating factor that caused a fall of at least 35% in specific airways conductance (sGaw) was determined initially for each subject. Challenge with this dose of platelet activating factor was then carried out on two further occasions after pretreatment with a single nebulised dose of SK&F 104353-Z2 or placebo. The % reductions in specific airways conductance and of partial flow at 30% of vital capacity (PVmax30) were less after SK&F 104353-Z2 than after placebo (22 versus 34 for sGaw, 19 versus 31 for PVmax30). The mean (95% confidence limits (CL] differences in the maximum % fall from control values for SK&F 104353-Z2 and placebo were -12.6 (-23.8, -1.4) for sGaw and -12.5, (-20.8 -4.2) for PVmax30. The mean % fall in neutrophil count was similar after SK&F 104353-Z2 (46%) and after placebo (50%) (95% CL of difference 13.6, 6.6). Bronchial responsiveness to methacholine did not increase above baseline values in any subject when measured two weeks after challenge by platelet activating factor. This study suggests that leukotrienes play a part in the response to platelet activating factor in man. Images PMID:1858084

  15. Platelet-activating factor: an endogenous mediator of mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion-induced shock.

    PubMed

    Mózes, T; Braquet, P; Filep, J

    1989-10-01

    The role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in circulatory shock of intestinal origin was investigated in anesthetized dogs by measuring PAF levels in the superior mesenteric vein during reperfusion after 2-h occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery; by monitoring the effects of BN 52021, a specific PAF receptor antagonist; and by studying the circulatory effects of exogenous PAF injected into the superior mesenteric vein. PAF was measured by a platelet-aggregation assay. Identity of PAF-like bioactivity was ascertained by thin-layer chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and alkaline treatment. Removal of the superior mesenteric artery occlusion caused an immediate dramatic decrease in mean arterial blood pressure with concomitant increase in mean portal venous pressure and hematocrit values. PAF concentration in the superior mesenteric vein increased from 0.2 +/- 0.1 to 2.8 +/- 0.4 ng/ml (n = 4, P less than 0.05) within the first 5 min of reperfusion. Administration of exogenous PAF (0.1 microgram/kg) injected into the superior mesenteric vein produced similar hemodynamical effects. Pretreatment of the animals with BN 52021 (4 mg/kg), a specific PAF receptor antagonist, prevented the circulatory collapse. The present results suggest that PAF release during intestinal ischemia may play an important role in the development of circulatory collapse caused by mesenteric artery occlusion. PMID:2802004

  16. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2015-12-01

    UV radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes has a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by upregulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression; therefore, we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF, and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 upregulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome. PMID:26316070

  17. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by up regulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression, so we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 up-regulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome. PMID:26316070

  18. Platelet-activating factor induces eosinophil peroxidase release from purified human eosinophils.

    PubMed Central

    Kroegel, C; Yukawa, T; Dent, G; Chanez, P; Chung, K F; Barnes, P J

    1988-01-01

    The degranulation response of purified human eosinophils to platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been studied. PAF induced release of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and beta-glucuronidase from highly purified human eosinophils with an EC50 of 0.9 nM. The order of release was comparable with that induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The new specific PAF antagonist 3-[4-(2-chlorophenyl)-9-methyl-H-thieno[3,2-f] [1,2,4]triazolo-[4,3a][1,4]-diazepin-2-yl](4-morpholinyl)- 1-propane-one (WEB 2086) inhibited the PAF-induced enzyme release by human eosinophils in a dose-dependent manner. The viability of eosinophils were unaffected both by PAF and WEB 2086. The results suggest that PAF may amplify allergic and inflammatory reactions by release of preformed proteins from eosinophil granules. PMID:3410498

  19. Stimulation of platelet-activating factor synthesis by progesterone and A23187 in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, E; Falsetti, C; Krausz, C; Gervasi, G; Carloni, V; Casano, R; Forti, G

    1993-01-01

    The presence of platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been demonstrated recently in mammalian spermatozoa, together with evidence for a role of this phospholipid in enhancing sperm motility and fertilizing ability. To investigate whether PAF synthesis and release occurs in human spermatozoa following incubation with stimuli that induce acrosome reaction, spermatozoa were incubated with progesterone and A23187, two known inducers of the exocytotic event. PAF synthesis (remodelling pathway) was assessed by [3H]acetate incorporation into PAF. Treatment of spermatozoa with progesterone and A23187 resulted in an increase of [3H]acetate incorporation into PAF. Most of the newly synthesized [3H]PAF formed in response to acrosome reaction was found in the supernatant, suggesting a release of the phospholipid from spermatozoa. PAF-like material extracted from human spermatozoa was able to induce aggregation of rabbit platelets and showed identical retention time and the same ion m/e values as authentic PAF when analysed with g.c.-m.s. Lyso-PAF:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.67) activity in human spermatozoa was also studied and showed similar kinetic parameters to those described for other cell systems. Stimulation of spermatozoa with progesterone and A23187 induced an increase of [3H]arachidonic acid release, suggesting an activation of phospholipase A. In conclusion, our results demonstrated increased production and release of PAF in human sperm following stimulation with progesterone and A23187 and suggest a role for this phospholipid in the activation of spermatozoa. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:8503848

  20. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF-acether) induces high- and low-affinity binding of fibrinogen to human platelets via independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Kloprogge, E; Akkerman, J W

    1986-01-01

    When human platelets are incubated with 500 nM-PAF-acether (platelet-activating factor. 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) under equilibrium conditions (60 min, 22 degrees C, non-stirred suspensions), two classes of fibrinogen binding sites are exposed: one class with a high affinity [Kd (7.2 +/- 2.1) X 10(-8) M, 2367 +/- 485 sites/platelet, n = 9] and one class with a low affinity [Kd (5.9 +/- 2.4) X 10(-7) M, 26972 +/- 8267 sites/platelet]. Preincubation with inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase (acetylsalicylic acid, indomethacin) or thromboxane synthetase (UK 38.485) completely abolishes high-affinity binding, leaving low-affinity binding unchanged. In contrast, ADP scavengers (phosphocreatine/creatine kinase or phosphoenol pyruvate/pyruvate kinase) completely prevent low-affinity binding, leaving high-affinity binding unaltered. Initial binding studies (2-10 min incubation) confirm these findings with a major part of the binding being sensitive to ADP scavengers, a minor part sensitive to indomethacin and complete blockade with both inhibitors. Increasing the temperature to 37 degrees C decreases the number of low affinity-binding sites 6-fold without changing high-affinity binding. Aggregation, measured as the rate of single platelet disappearance, then depends on high-affinity binding at 10 nM-fibrinogen or less, whereas at 100 nM-fibrinogen or more low-affinity binding becomes predominant. These findings point at considerable platelet activation during binding experiments. However, arachidonate metabolism [( 3H]arachidonate mobilization and thromboxane synthesis) and secretion [( 14C]serotonin and beta-thromboglobulin) are about 10% or less of the amounts found under optimal conditions (5 units of thrombin/ml 37 degrees C, stirring). We conclude that PAF-acether induces little platelet activation under binding conditions. The amounts of thromboxane A2 and secreted ADP, however, are sufficient for initiating high- and low-affinity fibrinogen binding

  2. Butyric acid stimulates bovine neutrophil functions and potentiates the effect of platelet activating factor.

    PubMed

    Carretta, M D; Hidalgo, A I; Burgos, J; Opazo, L; Castro, L; Hidalgo, M A; Figueroa, C D; Taubert, A; Hermosilla, C; Burgos, R A

    2016-08-01

    Increased short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production is associated with subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) and activation of inflammatory processes. In humans and rodents, SCFAs modulate inflammatory responses in the gut via free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2). In bovines, butyric acid is one of the most potent FFA2 agonists. Its expression in bovine neutrophils has recently been demonstrated, suggesting a role in innate immune response in cattle. This study aimed to evaluate if butyric acid modulates oxidative and non-oxidative functions or if it can potentiate other inflammatory mediators in bovine neutrophils. Our results showed that butyric acid can activate bovine neutrophils, inducing calcium (Ca(2+)) influx and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, two second messengers involved in FFA2 activation. Ca(2+) influx induced by butyric acid was dependent on the extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) source and phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Butyric acid alone had no significant effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and chemotaxis; however, a priming effect on platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, was observed. Butyric acid increased CD63 expression and induced the release of neutrophil granule markers matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and lactoferrin. Finally, we observed that butyric acid induced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation without affecting cellular viability. These findings suggest that butyric acid, a component of the ruminal fermentative process, can modulate the innate immune response of ruminants. PMID:27288853

  3. Antigen-and ionophore-stimulated synthesis of platelet-activating factor by the cloned mast cell line, MC9

    SciTech Connect

    Musch, M.W.; Billah, M.M.; Siegel, M.I.

    1987-05-14

    MC9 mast cells stimulated by a soluble (calcium ionophore A23187) or by an Fc epsilon-receptor agonist (IgE plus hapten) produce platelet activating factor (PAF). MC9 cells incorporate either exogenous (/sup 3/H)acetic acid or (/sup 3/H)lyso-PAF into PAF. PAF was identified by mobility on thin layer chromatography, platelet aggregatory activity inhibitable by known PAF antagonists, and by enzymatic modification. Quantified by aggregation of rabbit platelets, MC9 cells produce 6 pmoles PAF/10(6) cells. MC9 cells express acetyltransferase activity of 0.19 nmole/5 min-mg protein. Analysis of MC9 phospholipids by HPLC showed that MC9 cells contain large amounts of phosphatidylcholine (82 nmoles/10(7) cells) but contain little ether-linked phosphatidylcholine (4 nmoles/10(7) cells).

  4. Nitric oxide mediates the inhibitory action of platelet-activating factor on angiotensin II-induced renal vasoconstriction, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Handa, R K; Strandhoy, J W

    1996-06-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the mechanism(s) involved in the inhibitory effect of platelet-activating factor on renal vascular reactivity, in vivo. Bolus injections of vasoconstrictor agonists were administered into the renal circulation of pentobarbital anesthetized male Wistar rats at a dose to cause a transient 45 to 50% decrease in renal blood flow. Intrarenal infusion of platelet-activating factor (PAF) at 2.5 ng/min/kg attenuated the vasoconstrictor response to angiotensin II by 66%, a significantly smaller reduction of 35% for norepinephrine-mediated vasoconstriction, 22% for vasopressin-mediated vasoconstriction and no alteration of KCl-mediated vasoconstriction. The preferential inhibitory effect of platelet-activating factor on angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction was mimicked by the intrarenal infusion of either 0.2 to 5 micrograms/min/kg methacholine (endothelium-dependent vasodilator) or 2 micrograms/min/kg sodium nitroprusside (nitric oxide donor). After inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, intrarenal infusion of PAF or methacholine reduced angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction significantly less than that observed in the absence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. Therefore, this study provides evidence that the shared ability of platelet-activating factor and methacholine to selectively reduce angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction involves endothelium-derived nitric oxide. PMID:8667214

  5. Purification and characterization of bovine brain platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase.

    PubMed

    Hattori, M; Arai, H; Inoue, K

    1993-09-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase, which removes the acetyl moiety at the sn-2 position, has been found in plasma and tissue cytosol. PAF acetylhydrolase in bovine brain cytosol was chromatographically separated into three distinct fractions, all of which exhibited pH optima in the neutral to mild alkaline region and were unaffected by EDTA. We have purified the major fraction of the enzyme to near homogeneity. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of about 100 kDa, as estimated by gel filtration chromatography, and gave three distinct bands of 45, 30, and 29 kDa, respectively, on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These polypeptides exclusively co-migrated with the activity throughout the purification steps. These data suggest that this set of polypeptides corresponds to the subunits of bovine brain PAF acetylhydrolase. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate completely inhibited the activity at 0.1 mM. [3H]Diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeled only the 29-kDa polypeptide, suggesting that this polypeptide possesses an active serine residue(s). The purified enzyme displayed similar activity against PAF and oxidatively modified phosphatidylcholine, but did not hydrolyze phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine with two long chain acyl groups. Thus, the intracellular PAF acetylhydrolase is likely to be a new member of the calcium-independent phospholipases A2 in mammalian tissues. PMID:8360169

  6. Nuclear localization of platelet-activating factor receptor controls retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    K Bhosle, Vikrant; Rivera, José Carlos; Zhou, Tianwei (Ellen); Omri, Samy; Sanchez, Melanie; Hamel, David; Zhu, Tang; Rouget, Raphael; Rabea, Areej Al; Hou, Xin; Lahaie, Isabelle; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a pleiotropic phospholipid with proinflammatory, procoagulant and angiogenic actions on the vasculature. We and others have reported the presence of PAF receptor (Ptafr) at intracellular sites such as the nucleus. However, mechanisms of localization and physiologic functions of intracellular Ptafr remain poorly understood. We hereby identify the importance of C-terminal motif of the receptor and uncover novel roles of Rab11a GTPase and importin-5 in nuclear translocation of Ptafr in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Nuclear localization of Ptafr is independent of exogenous PAF stimulation as well as intracellular PAF biosynthesis. Moreover, nuclear Ptafr is responsible for the upregulation of unique set of growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, in vitro and ex vivo. We further corroborate the intracrine PAF signaling, resulting in angiogenesis in vivo, using Ptafr antagonists with distinct plasma membrane permeability. Collectively, our findings show that nuclear Ptafr translocates in an agonist-independent manner, and distinctive functions of Ptafr based on its cellular localization point to another dimension needed for pharmacologic selectivity of drugs. PMID:27462464

  7. Essential role of platelet-activating factor in male reproduction: a review.

    PubMed

    Ali, Atef; Virirak Kattygnarath, Tiao; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Miron, Pierre

    2007-02-01

    The use of pharmacological adjuvants to enhance sperm function is a real possibility and a very attractive proposition. However, the role of such adjuvants must be well defined to maximize therapeutic outcome for specific patient populations. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent signalling phospholipid that has been implicated in a number of biological activities. In the field of reproductive biology, PAF has been shown to have an important role in ovulation, sperm function, embryo implantation, fetal lung maturation, and initiation and maintenance of parturition. Although the exact mechanisms are not clear, it has been demonstrated in several species that PAF can influence sperm function by affecting the motility, capacitation, acrosome reaction and fertility of spermatozoa. The reproductive significance of PAF activity in spermatozoa and fertilization and its role in the establishment of pregnancy requires further study. Understanding the role of PAF in a reproductive process, such as in intrauterine insemination, could eventually lead researchers to explore its role in more complex reproductive technologies. This review summarizes the current research on the significant role of PAF in male mammalian reproductive functions, as well as its possible application in some assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:17298732

  8. Chemotherapeutic agents subvert tumor immunity by generating agonists of platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Ocana, Jesus A; Harrison, Kathleen A; Ferracini, Matheus; Touloukian, Christopher E; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Sun, Louis; Loesch, Mathew; Murphy, Robert C; Althouse, Sandra K; Perkins, Susan M; Speicher, Paul J; Tyler, Douglas S; Konger, Raymond L; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress suppresses host immunity by generating oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R). Because many classical chemotherapeutic drugs induce reactive oxygen species (ROS), we investigated whether these drugs might subvert host immunity by activating PAF-R. Here, we show that PAF-R agonists are produced in melanoma cells by chemotherapy that is administered in vitro, in vivo, or in human subjects. Structural characterization of the PAF-R agonists induced revealed multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are generated nonenzymatically. In a murine model of melanoma, chemotherapeutic administration could augment tumor growth by a PAF-R-dependent process that could be blocked by treatment with antioxidants or COX-2 inhibitors or by depletion of regulatory T cells. Our findings reveal how PAF-R agonists induced by chemotherapy treatment can promote treatment failure. Furthermore, they offer new insights into how to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy by blocking its heretofore unknown impact on PAF-R activation. PMID:25304264

  9. Regional Neonatal Associates for cooperative study of platelet-activating factor (PAF). Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, F.

    1992-11-01

    Lipid inflammatory mediators are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the respiratory distress syndrome, including neonatal lung injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). One such mediator is platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent bioactive phospholipid that induces adverse airway, vascular, and microcirculatory responses. To study the role of PAF in neonatal lung disease, we used an {sup 125}I-radioimmunoassay to measure PAF in whole blood and tracheal lavage in very low birthweight infants at 1, 3, 5, 9, 21 and 28 days after birth. PAF was found in the pulmonary lavagate and blood of ventilated infants as early as one day after birth. Lavagate levels of PAF increased with acute injury (pneumothorax, pneumonia) but were not associated with BPD. Our results indicate PAF could be associated with the pathogenesis of BPD. We suggest that as a consequence of the pathophysiologic processes associated with BPD, PAF is released by pulmonary cells. Our preliminary data indicate that low birthweight infants also have lower PAF acetylhydrolase levels in cord blood and tracheal lavagate as compared to adults. Therefore, it is possible the increased levels of PAF in the blood of low birthweight infants might be due to persistent transient increases in PAF alveolar levels coupled with lower blood acetylhydrolase activities and could be important in the development of symptoms associated with BPD. Future plans for this project call for completing the enzymatic study of acetylhydrolase activity in pulmonary lavage of the BPD infants.

  10. Mechanisms of endothelial cell-dependent leukocyte adhesion stimulated by platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Ding, Z; Li, S; Wu, Z

    1992-04-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) stimulates leukocyte-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion through its effects either on leukocytes or on ECs. ECs may be injured, synthesize, or express new adhesive proteins to increase leukocyte adhesion. Intermediary mediators produced by activated ECs are also likely involved in promoting leukocyte adhesion. Our experiments demonstrated that PAF induced no obvious damage to bovine pulmonary artery ECs evaluated by lactic dehydrogenase release rate, angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, and cellular malondialdehyde content. Treatment of EC monolayers with 10(-9) M PAF increased polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) adhesion. Increasing PAF concentration did not induce more PMN adherence. PAF elicited both a rapid and prolonged increment of PMN adherence to EC monolayers. The rapid adherence was greatly attenuated by pretreatment of ECs with PAF receptor antagonist SRI 63-441 but was not affected by pretreatment of PMNs with SRI 63-441, suggesting that PAF increases PMN adherence rapidly through its effects on specific receptors on ECs. Increased PMN adherence lasted if PAF treatment of ECs was sustained for 3 or 6 h. Pretreatment of ECs with actinomycin D, a protein synthesis inhibitor, significantly decreased PAF-induced sustained PMN adherence, but the inhibition is incomplete, suggesting that other mechanisms than protein synthesis also participated in the prolonged PMN adherence. We concluded from the results that PAF may induce both rapid and prolonged PMN adhesion to ECs. The effects are receptor mediated. The prolonged PMN adhesion is partly the result of protein synthesis. PMID:1592489

  11. Regulation of platelet-activating factor synthesis in human neutrophils by MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Baker, Paul R S; Owen, John S; Nixon, Andrew B; Thomas, Leslie N; Wooten, Rhonda; Daniel, Larry W; O'Flaherty, Joseph T; Wykle, Robert L

    2002-10-21

    Human neutrophils (PMN) are potentially a major source of platelet-activating factor (PAF) produced during inflammatory responses. The stimulated synthesis of PAF in PMN is carried out by a phospholipid remodeling pathway involving three enzymes: acetyl-CoA:lyso-PAF acetyltransferase (acetyltransferase), type IV phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) and CoA-independent transacylase (CoA-IT). However, the coordinated actions and the regulatory mechanisms of these enzymes in PAF synthesis are poorly defined. A23187 has been widely used to activate the remodeling pathway, but it has not been shown how closely its actions mimic those of physiological stimuli. Here we address this important problem and compare responses of the three remodeling enzymes and PAF synthesis by intact cells. In both A23187- and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-stimulated PMN, acetyltransferase activation is blocked by SB 203580, a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, but not by PD 98059, which blocks activation of the ERKs. In contrast, either agent attenuated cPLA(2) activation. Correlating with these results, SB 203580 decreased stimulated PAF formation by 60%, whereas PD 98059 had little effect. However, the combination of both inhibitors decreased PAF formation to control levels. Although a role for CoA-IT in PAF synthesis is recognized, we did not detect activation of the enzyme in stimulated PMN. CoA-IT thus appears to exhibit full activity in resting as well as stimulated cells. We conclude that the calcium ionophore A23187 and the receptor agonist fMLP both act through common pathways to stimulate PAF synthesis, with p38 MAP kinase regulating acetyltransferase and supplementing ERK activation of cPLA(2). PMID:12379481

  12. [Comparison of platelet activity, fibrinolysis and environmental factors in 50 Africans and 50 Europeans. Role of fish consumption].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Cloitre, B; Ticolat, R; Darracq, R; Rain, S F

    1987-01-01

    The authors have studied 50 Ivorians and 50 Europeans people, all living in Abidjan for at least 10 years. Platelet aggregability with increasing ADP concentration (0.6, 1.2, 2.4 mumoles/l), collagen (0.4 mg/l), or ristocetin (1 g/l) was examined. Fibrinolysis and the euglobulin test were also studied before and after anoxia. Other blood parameters measured were: hematocrit, hemoglobin level, platelet count, bleeding time, Howell coagulation test, cephalin tests, prothrombin activity ratio, fibrinogen level. Metabolic tests included: glycemia, cholesterolemia, triglyceridemia, uricemia, A1 and B apoproteins, protidemia, gamma globulinemia. Environmental factors such as physical activity, alcohol and smoking habits, fish consumption, chloroquine prophylaxis were evaluated. The most evident result was lower platelet aggregability in Ivorian people as compared to Europeans. A more precocious and important fibrinolysis activity, either spontaneous or after anoxia was noted in the Ivorian group. Lower platelet number, fibrinogen level, and prothrombin activity were present in the Ivorian group as compared to the European people. The authors eliminated the influence of age, and considered environmental factors as predominant in the genesis of such difference, i.e., hypocholesterolemia, lower smoking and drinking levels. They emphasized the higher fish consumption in Ivorian people. PMID:2827101

  13. Inhibition of platelet activation by lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS)-silenced (tearless) onion juice.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Susan J; Rippon, Paula; Butts, Chrissie; Olsen, Sarah; Shaw, Martin; Joyce, Nigel I; Eady, Colin C

    2013-11-01

    Onion and garlic are renowned for their roles as functional foods. The health benefits of garlic are attributed to di-2-propenyl thiosulfinate (allicin), a sulfur compound found in disrupted garlic but not found in disrupted onion. Recently, onions have been grown with repressed lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS) activity, which causes these onions to produce increased amounts of di-1-propenyl thiosulfinate, an isomer of allicin. This investigation into the key health attributes of LFS-silenced (tearless) onions demonstrates that they have some attributes more similar to garlic and that this is likely due to the production of novel thiosulfinate or metabolites. The key finding was that collagen-induced in vitro platelet aggregation was significantly reduced by tearless onion extract over normal onion extract. Thiosulfinate or derived compounds were shown not to be responsible for the observed changes in the inflammatory response of AGS (stomach adenocarcinoma) cells to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) when pretreated with model onion juices. A preliminary rat feeding trial indicated that the tearless onions may also play a key role in reducing weight gain. PMID:24147811

  14. Endothelium-dependent vasodilator effects of platelet activating factor on rat resistance vessels.

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, K.; Mori, T.; Shigenobu, K.; Kasuya, Y.

    1989-01-01

    1. To elucidate the mechanisms of the powerful and long-lasting hypotension produced by platelet activating factor (PAF), its effects on perfusion pressure in the perfused mesenteric arterial bed of the rat were examined. 2. Infusion of PAF (10(-11) to 3 x 10(-10) M; EC50 = 4.0 x 10(-11) M; 95%CL = 1.6 x 10(-11) - 9.4 x 10(-11) M) and acetylcholine (ACh) (10(-10) to 10(-6) M; EC50 = 3.0 +/- 0.1 x 10(-9) M) produced marked concentration-dependent vasodilatations which were significantly inhibited by treatment with detergents (0.1% Triton X-100 for 30 s or 0.3% CHAPS for 90 s). 3. Pretreatment with CV-6209, a PAF antagonist, inhibited PAF- but not ACh-induced vasodilation. 4. Treatment with indomethacin (10(-6) M) had no effect on PAF- or ACh-induced vasodilatation. 5. These results demonstrate that extremely low concentrations of PAF produce vasodilatation of resistance vessels through the release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). This may account for the strong hypotension produced by PAF in vivo. PMID:2611496

  15. Metabolism of platelet activating factor at the whole organ and cellular level

    SciTech Connect

    Haroldsen, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-3-glycerophosphocholine) has been characterized as a phospholipid possessing a myriad of effects from the cellular to whole organism levels. Analytical methods and procedures were developed in order to measure and identify PAF precursors and metabolites. Two quantitative physicochemical methods based on isotope dilution mass spectrometry (MS) were developed to measure lyso-PAF and applied to the calcium ionophore stimulated human neutrophil. Levels of lyso-PAF were found to be significantly increased, 2-3 fold, upon cell activation with a stimulus that concomitantly elicits the production of PAF. Investigation into the metabolism of PAF by the isolated perfused rat lung by intratracheal instillation revealed (/sup 3/H)-PAF to be extensively metabolized over a 15 minute time course. Greater than 96% of the administered dose was retained by the lung and was distributed as: lyso-PAF (3.3%), phosphatidylcholine (GPC, 82.3%), phosphatidylethanolamine (2.5%), and neutral lipid (2.5%), the remainder was intact PAF.

  16. Multidrug-resistance P-glycoprotein (MDR1) secretes platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Raggers, R J; Vogels, I; van Meer, G

    2001-01-01

    The human multidrug-resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an ATP-binding-cassette transporter (ABCB1) that is ubiquitously expressed. Often its concentration is high in the plasma membrane of cancer cells, where it causes multidrug resistance by pumping lipophilic drugs out of the cell. In addition, MDR1 Pgp can transport analogues of membrane lipids with shortened acyl chains across the plasma membrane. We studied a role for MDR1 Pgp in transport to the cell surface of the signal-transduction molecule platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF is the natural short-chain phospholipid 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. [(14)C]PAF synthesized intracellularly from exogenous alkylacetylglycerol and [(14)C]choline became accessible to albumin in the extracellular medium of pig kidney epithelial LLC-PK1 cells in the absence of vesicular transport. Its translocation across the apical membrane was greatly stimulated by the expression of MDR1 Pgp, and inhibited by the MDR1 inhibitors PSC833 and cyclosporin A. Basolateral translocation was not stimulated by expression of the basolateral drug transporter MRP1 (ABCC1). It was insensitive to the MRP1 inhibitor indomethacin and to depletion of GSH which is required for MRP1 activity. While efficient transport of PAF across the apical plasma membrane may be physiologically relevant in MDR1-expressing epithelia, PAF secretion in multidrug-resistant tumours may stimulate angiogenesis and thereby tumour growth. PMID:11463358

  17. Systemic chemotherapy is modulated by platelet-activating factor-receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Ferracini, Matheus; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is used to treat numerous cancers including melanoma. However, its effectiveness in clinical settings is often hampered by various mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that prooxidative stressor-mediated generation of oxidized lipids with platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) agonistic activity induces systemic immunosuppression that augments the growth of experimental melanoma tumors. We have recently shown that treatment of murine B16F10 melanoma cells in vitro or tumors implanted into syngeneic mice and treated intratumorally with various chemotherapeutic agents generated PAF-R agonists in a process blocked by antioxidants. Notably, these intratumoral chemotherapy-generated PAF-R agonists augmented the growth of secondary (untreated) tumors in a PAF-R dependent manner. As both localized and systemic chemotherapies are used based on tumor localization/stage and metastases, the current studies were sought to determine effects of PAF-R agonists on systemic chemotherapy against experimental melanoma. Here, we show that systemic chemotherapy with etoposide (ETOP) attenuates the growth of melanoma tumors when given subsequent to the tumor cell implantation. Importantly, this ETOP-mediated suppression of melanoma tumor growth was blocked by exogenous administration of a PAF-R agonist, CPAF. These findings indicate that PAF-R agonists not only negatively affect the ability of localized chemotherapy but also compromise the efficacy of systemic chemotherapy against murine melanoma. PMID:25922565

  18. Extracellular matrix is a source of mitogenically active platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed

    Field, S L; Khachigian, L M; Sleigh, M J; Yang, G; Vandermark, S E; Hogg, P J; Chesterman, C N

    1996-08-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a chemotactic and mitogenic agent for fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells and plays a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. PDGF is produced by a number of normal and transformed cell types and occurs as homo- or heterodimers of A and B polypeptide chains. Using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with various forms of PDGF, we have previously shown that PDGF A(s) (short splice version) is secreted, PDGF A(l) (long splice version) predominantly extracellular matrix-associated, and PDGF B divided between medium, cells, and matrix. In the present study we have demonstrated the mitogenic activity of matrix-localized PDGF in artificial and more physiologically relevant models by culturing Balb/c-3T3 cells (3T3), human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF), and rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) on extracellular matrix (ECM) laid down by PDGF-expressing CHO cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). These cells responded to the local growth stimulus of PDGF-containing CHO ECM and HUVEC ECM. We showed that 3T3 cells required proteolytic activity to utilize matrix-localized PDGF, as aprotinin and epsilon-ACA inhibited growth and 3T3 cells were shown to possess plasminogen activator activity. HFF and SMC did not appear to require proteolytic activity (including metalloproteinase and serine protease activity) as a prerequisite for mitogenesis but were able to access immobilized PDGF by contact with the matrix. An understanding of the mechanisms whereby the utilization of stored PDGF is controlled in situations of excessive cellular proliferation will aid in the development of therapy for these conditions. PMID:8707868

  19. von Willebrand factor (VWF) propeptide binding to VWF D′D3 domain attenuates platelet activation and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Madabhushi, Sri R.; Shang, Chengwei; Dayananda, Kannayakanahalli M.; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate; Murphy, Mary; Ryan, Thomas E.; Montgomery, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    Noncovalent association between the von Willebrand factor (VWF) propeptide (VWFpp) and mature VWF aids N-terminal multimerization and protein compartmentalization in storage granules. This association is currently thought to dissipate after secretion into blood. In the present study, we examined this proposition by quantifying the affinity and kinetics of VWFpp binding to mature VWF using surface plasmon resonance and by developing novel anti-VWF D′D3 mAbs. Our results show that the only binding site for VWFpp in mature VWF is in its D′D3 domain. At pH 6.2 and 10mM Ca2+, conditions mimicking intracellular compartments, VWFpp-VWF binding occurs with high affinity (KD = 0.2nM, koff = 8 × 10−5 s−1). Significant, albeit weaker, binding (KD = 25nM, koff = 4 × 10−3 s−1) occurs under physiologic conditions of pH 7.4 and 2.5mM Ca2+. This interaction was also observed in human plasma (KD = 50nM). The addition of recombinant VWFpp in both flow-chamber–based platelet adhesion assays and viscometer-based shear-induced platelet aggregation and activation studies reduced platelet adhesion and activation partially. Anti-D′D3 mAb DD3.1, which blocks VWFpp binding to VWF-D′D3, also abrogated platelet adhesion, as shown by shear-induced platelet aggregation and activation studies. Our data demonstrate that VWFpp binding to mature VWF occurs in the circulation, which can regulate the hemostatic potential of VWF by reducing VWF binding to platelet GpIbα. PMID:22452980

  20. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Suganuma, A.; Sato, M.; Tohmatsu, T.; Nozawa, Y. )

    1989-08-15

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When (3H) AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of (3H)AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of (3H)AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate).

  1. Effect of platelet activating factor (PAF) on the formation of blood vessels in subcutaneous implants in mice.

    PubMed

    Andrade, S P; Vieira, L B; Bakhle, Y S; Piper, P J

    1994-03-01

    Angiogenesis accompanies inflammatory processes and many other pathological conditions. We have studied the effect of platelet-activating factor (PAF) a well-known inflammatory mediator, as a promoter of angiogenesis in the sponge implant model in mice. Development of blood vessels and blood flow were monitored by use of a 133Xe washout technique. The results showed PAF to have angiogenic activity, which was inhibited by WEB 2086, and the PAF-induced vasculature to have normal pharmacological reactivity. PMID:7516807

  2. Increased urinary excretion of platelet activating factor in mice with lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Macconi, D.; Noris, M.; Benfenati, E.; Quaglia, R.; Pagliarino, G. ); Remuzzi, G. Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo )

    1991-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is present in urine from humans and experimental animals in normal conditions. Very little is known about changes in PAF urinary excretion under pathologic conditions and no data are available about the origin of PAF in the urine. In the present study we explored the possibility that immunologic renal disease is associated with an increase in PAF urinary excretion using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. To clarify the renal or extrarenal origin of urinary PAF we evaluated whether exogenously administered PAF (1-(1{prime},2{prime}-{sup 3}H)alkyl) is filtered through the glomerulus and excreted in the urine. The results show that: (1) urine from mice with lupus nephritis in the early phase of the disease contained amounts of PAF comparable to those excreted in normal mouse urine, (2) PAF levels increased when animals started to develop high grade proteinuria, (3) after intravenous injection of ({sup 3}H) PAF In nephritic mice, a negligible amount of ({sup 3}H) ether lipid, corresponding to ({sup 3}H)1-alkyl -2-acyl-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-2-acyl-GPC), was recovered from the 24 h urine extract.

  3. UVB Generates Microvesicle Particle Release in Part Due to Platelet-activating Factor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bihl, Ji C; Rapp, Christine M; Chen, Yanfang; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    The lipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) and oxidized glycerophosphocholine PAF agonists produced by ultraviolet B (UVB) have been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in UVB-mediated processes, from acute inflammation to delayed systemic immunosuppression. Recent studies have provided evidence that microvesicle particles (MVPs) are released from cells in response to various signals including stressors. Importantly, these small membrane fragments can interact with various cell types by delivering bioactive molecules. The present studies were designed to test if UVB radiation can generate MVP release from epithelial cells, and the potential role of PAF receptor (PAF-R) signaling in this process. We demonstrate that UVB irradiation of the human keratinocyte-derived cell line HaCaT resulted in the release of MVPs. Similarly, treatment of HaCaT cells with the PAF-R agonist carbamoyl PAF also generated equivalent amounts of MVP release. Of note, pretreatment of HaCaT cells with antioxidants blocked MVP release from UVB but not PAF-R agonist N-methyl carbamyl PAF (CPAF). Importantly, UVB irradiation of the PAF-R-negative human epithelial cell line KB and KB transduced with functional PAF-Rs resulted in MVP release only in PAF-R-positive cells. These studies demonstrate that UVB can generate MVPs in vitro and that PAF-R signaling appears important in this process. PMID:26876152

  4. Isotopic exchange during derivatization of platelet activating factor for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Haroldsen, P.E.; Gaskell, S.J.; Weintraub, S.T.; Pinckard, R.N. )

    1991-04-01

    One approach to the quantitative analysis of platelet activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine; also referred to as AGEPC, alkyl glyceryl ether phosphocholine) is hydrolytic removal of the phosphocholine group and conversion to an electron-capturing derivative for gas chromatography-negative ion mass spectrometry. (2H3)Acetyl-AGEPC has been commonly employed as an internal standard. When 1-hexadecyl-2-(2H3)acetyl glycerol (obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of (2H3)-C16:0 AGEPC) is treated with pentafluorobenzoyl chloride at 120 degrees C, the resulting 3-pentafluorobenzoate derivative shows extensive loss of the deuterium label. This exchange is evidently acid-catalyzed since derivatization of 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl glycerol under the same conditions in the presence of a trace of 2HCl results in the incorporation of up to three deuterium atoms. Isotope exchange can be avoided if the reaction is carried out at low temperature in the presence of base. Direct derivatization of (2H3)-C16:0 AGEPC by treatment with pentafluorobenzoyl chloride or heptafluorobutyric anhydride also results in loss of the deuterium label. The use of (13C2)-C16:0 AGEPC as an internal standard is recommended for rigorous quantitative analysis.

  5. Platelet-activating factor mediates hemodynamic changes and lung injury in endotoxin-treated rats.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S W; Feddersen, C O; Henson, P M; Voelkel, N F

    1987-01-01

    Within 20 min after intraperitoneal injection of Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin in rats, blood platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased from 4.3 +/- 1.3 to 13.7 +/- 2.0 ng/ml (P less than 0.01) and lung PAF from 32.3 +/- 4.9 to 312.3 +/- 19.6 ng (P less than 0.01), but not lung lavage PAF. We tested the effect of PAF receptor antagonists, CV 3988 and SRI 63-441, on endotoxin-induced hemodynamic changes and lung vascular injury. Pretreatment with CV 3988 attenuated systemic hypotension, preserved hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, and prolonged survival of awake catheter-implanted endotoxin-treated (20 mg/kg) rats. Pretreatment with SRI 63-441 prevented the depressed hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction after low dose (2 mg/kg) endotoxin. Both CV 3988 and SRI 63-441 blocked the increased extravascular accumulation of 125I-albumin and water in perfused lungs isolated from endotoxin-treated rats. We conclude that PAF is produced in the lung during endotoxemia and may be an important mediator of the systemic and pulmonary hemodynamic changes as well as the acute lung vascular injury after endotoxemia. PMID:3553241

  6. Platelet-activating factor mediates angiotensin II-induced proteinuria in isolated perfused rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Perico, N; Lapinski, R; Konopka, K; Aiello, S; Noris, M; Remuzzi, G

    1997-09-01

    Isolated kidney preparations (IPK) from male Sprague Dawley rats perfused at constant pressure were used to evaluate the effect of angiotensin II (AII) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) on renal function and urinary protein excretion. Compared with basal, intrarenal infusion of AII at 8 ng/min caused a progressive increase in protein excretion (11 +/- 6 versus 73 +/- 21 micrograms/min) in parallel with a decline in renal perfusate flow (RPF) (29 +/- 3 versus 18 +/- 3 ml/min). Addition to the perfusate of PAF at 50 nM final concentration also induced proteinuria (9 +/- 4 versus 55 +/- 14 micrograms/min) but did not change RPF (29 +/- 3 versus 30 +/- 3 ml/min). Preexposure of isolated kidneys to the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2086 prevented the increase in urinary protein excretion induced by AII infusion (basal: 13 +/- 6; post-AII: 12 +/- 7 micrograms/min) but failed to prevent the vasoactive effect of AII (RPF, basal: 30 +/- 2; post-AII: 21 +/- 3 ml/min). In additional experiments, dexamethasone reduced the proteinuric effect of PAF remarkably. These results indicate that in isolated kidney preparation: (1) AII infusion induced proteinuria and decreased RPF; and (2) the effect of AII in enhancing urinary protein excretion was completely prevented by a specific PAF receptor antagonist, which, however, did not influence the AII-induced fall in RPF. It is suggested that PAF plays a major role in AII-induced changes in the permselective function of the glomerular capillary barrier. PMID:9294830

  7. Platelet-activating factor modulates pulmonary vasomotor tone in the perinatal lamb.

    PubMed

    Ibe, B O; Hibler, S; Raj, J U

    1998-09-01

    Eight near-term fetal lambs were studied acutely in utero to determine role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the regulation of vasomotor tone in systemic and pulmonary circulations in the immediate perinatal period. Four fetal lambs were studied predelivery and 2 h postdelivery to determine circulating PAF levels. Aortic and pulmonary arterial pressures and cardiac output were measured continuously, and systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances were calculated. Left pulmonary arterial blood flow was also measured in four fetal lambs. After delivery and oxygenation, circulating PAF levels fell significantly. When WEB-2170, a specific PAF-receptor antagonist, was infused to block effect of endogenous PAF in the eight near-term fetal lambs, systemic vascular resistance fell 30% but pulmonary vascular resistance fell dramatically by 68%. Specificity of WEB-2170 was tested in juvenile lambs and was found to be very specific in lowering vasomotor tone only when tone was elevated by action of PAF. Our data show that endogenous PAF levels in the fetus contribute to maintain a high basal systemic and pulmonary vasomotor tone and that a normal fall in circulating PAF levels after birth and oxygenation may facilitate fall in pulmonary vascular resistance at birth. PMID:9729586

  8. Platelet-activating factor induces collagenase expression in corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, H E; Tao, Y; Bazan, N G

    1993-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator involved in inflammatory and immune responses, accumulates rapidly in response to injury in a variety of tissues, including the corneal epithelium. However, the precise role of this compound in the cascade of events following insult has not been defined. Here we examined the effect of PAF on gene expression in the epithelial cells of rabbit corneas in organ culture. We found that incubation with 100 nM methylcarbamoyl PAF, a nonhydrolyzable analog of PAF, produced rapid transient 2.8- and 3.5-fold increases in the expression of c-fos and c-jun, respectively, at 1 hr, followed by increased expression of the collagenase type I gene beginning at 3 hr and peaking at 14-fold by 8 hr. Addition of the protein-synthesis-inhibitor cycloheximide superinduced c-fos and c-jun, strongly potentiating the PAF effect, but inhibited the induction of collagenase type I expression, suggesting the existence of a transcriptional factor linking the two events. BN-50730, a selective antagonist of intracellular PAF-binding sites, blocked the expression of the immediate-early genes as well as the increase in collagenase type I mRNA. Our results suggest that one of the functions of PAF may be to enhance the breakdown of the extracellular matrix as a part of the remodeling process during corneal wound healing after injury. Pathologically, a PAF-induced overproduction of collagenase may be a factor in the development of corneal ulcers, as well as other pathophysiological conditions such as cartilage destruction in arthritis. If so, inhibitors of this signal-transduction pathway may be useful as tools for further investigation and, eventually, as therapeutic agents to treat such disorders. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8378347

  9. Occurrence of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and an endogenous inhibitor of platelet aggregation in diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, J L; Kemp, A; Rogers, M; Mallet, A I; Toia, R F; Spur, B; Earl, J W; Chesterman, C N; Krilis, S A

    1989-01-01

    We have identified PAF in the blister fluid from a patient with bullous mastocytosis, a rare form of mast-cell disease. We have found a novel endogenous inhibitor of platelet aggregation which obscured the presence of the PAF in unprocessed blister fluid and in ethanol or lipid extracts. The PAF was characterized by the demonstration of chromatographic, mass spectral and biological properties identical to those of authentic PAF. Thus this is the first demonstration of PAF in biological fluid from a patient with mastocytosis. High levels of immunoreactive prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and histamine were also present in the blister fluid. The interaction between PAF and the inhibitor of platelet aggregation in patients with systemic mastocytosis may provide an explanation for some of the manifestations of the disease, in particular the episodic hypotension, cutaneous flushing and pallor. PMID:2805409

  10. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase: selective inhibition by potent n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Gary B; Fisher, Karl J; Owen, Sarah C; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Casida, John E

    2005-06-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent endogenous phospholipid modulator of diverse biological activities, including inflammation and shock. PAF levels are primarily regulated by PAF acetylhydrolases (PAF-AHs). These enzymes are candidate secondary targets of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and related toxicants. Previously known OP inhibitors of other serine hydrolases were tested with PAF-AH from mouse brain and testes of established functional importance compared with the structurally different human plasma enzyme. Several key OP pesticides and their oxon metabolites were very poor inhibitors of mouse brain and human plasma PAF-AH in vitro but moderately active for mouse brain and blood PAF-AH in vivo (e.g., tribufos defoliant and profenofos insecticide, presumably following oxidative bioactivation). OP compounds were then designed for maximum in vitro potency and selectivity for mouse brain PAF-AH vs. acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Lead compounds were found in a series of benzodioxaphosphorin 2-oxides. Ultrahigh potency and selectivity were achieved with n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates (long-chain sarin analogs): mouse brain and testes IC50 < or = 5 nM for C(8)-C(18) analogs and 0.1-0.6 nM for C(13) and C(14) compounds; human plasma IC50 < or = 2 nM for C(13)-C(18) analogs. AChE inhibitory potency decreased as chain length increased with maximum brain PAF-AH/AChE selectivity (>3000-fold) for C(13)-C(18) compounds. The toxicity of i.p.-administered PAF (LD50 ca. 0.5 mg/kg) was increased less than 2-fold by pretreatment with tribufos or the C(13)n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridate. These studies with a mouse model indicate that PAF-AH is not a major secondary target of OP pesticide poisoning. The optimized PAF-AH inhibitors may facilitate investigations on other aspects of PAF metabolism and action. PMID:15893542

  11. Breaking the Mold: Transcription Factors in the Anucleate Platelet and Platelet-Derived Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lannan, Katie L.; Sahler, Julie; Kim, Nina; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are small anucleate blood cells derived from megakaryocytes. In addition to their pivotal roles in hemostasis, platelets are the smallest, yet most abundant, immune cells and regulate inflammation, immunity, and disease progression. Although platelets lack DNA, and thus no functional transcriptional activities, they are nonetheless rich sources of RNAs, possess an intact spliceosome, and are thus capable of synthesizing proteins. Previously, it was thought that platelet RNAs and translational machinery were remnants from the megakaryocyte. We now know that the initial description of platelets as “cellular fragments” is an antiquated notion, as mounting evidence suggests otherwise. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that platelet transcription factors are not vestigial remnants from megakaryocytes, but have important, if only partly understood functions. Proteins play multiple cellular roles to minimize energy expenditure for maximum cellular function; thus, the same can be expected for transcription factors. In fact, numerous transcription factors have non-genomic roles, both in platelets and in nucleated cells. Our lab and others have discovered the presence and non-genomic roles of transcription factors in platelets, such as the nuclear factor kappa β (NFκB) family of proteins and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). In addition to numerous roles in regulating platelet activation, functional transcription factors can be transferred to vascular and immune cells through platelet microparticles. This method of transcellular delivery of key immune molecules may be a vital mechanism by which platelet transcription factors regulate inflammation and immunity. At the very least, platelets are an ideal model cell to dissect out the non-genomic roles of transcription factors in nucleated cells. There is abundant evidence to suggest that transcription factors in platelets play key roles in regulating inflammatory and hemostatic

  12. Characterization of platelet-activating factor-induced cutaneous edema and erythema in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Miwa; Osada, Hironari; Shimizu, Sunao; Goto, Shun; Nagai, Makoto; Shirai, Junsuke; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Shimoda, Minoru; Itoh, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Keitaro

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced edema and erythema in the skin of dogs and compare those reactions with histamine-induced cutaneous reactions. ANIMALS 6 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES Experiments were performed at ≥ 2-week intervals. Each dog received ID injections (5 μg/site) of PAF C16, PAF C18, lyso-PAF, and histamine. Edema (mean diameter) and erythema scores (none, mild, moderate, or severe) were assessed 30 minutes after the injections. Dogs received ID injections of PAF and histamine each with various concentrations of WEB 2086 (PAF receptor antagonist) or underwent ID testing with PAF and histamine before and 3 hours after oral administration of cetirizine hydrochloride or prednisolone (at 2 doses each). RESULTS ID injections of PAF C16 and PAF C18, but not lyso-PAF, induced comparable levels of edema and erythema. The PAF-induced edema and erythema peaked at 30 minutes and lasted for 6 hours after the injection; histamine-induced edema and erythema peaked at 30 minutes and lasted for 3 hours after the injection. Edema sizes and erythema scores were significantly smaller and lower, respectively, for PAF than for histamine. The WEB 2086 inhibited PAF-induced but not histamine-induced edema and erythema. Cetirizine slightly, but significantly, repressed PAF-induced edema and erythema as well as histamine-induced cutaneous reactions. Prednisolone suppressed both PAF-induced and histamine-induced edema and erythema. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In canine skin, the duration of PAF-induced inflammation was longer than that of histamine-induced inflammation. The PAF- and histamine-induced cutaneous reactions were effectively suppressed by oral administration of prednisolone. The importance of PAF in dogs with anaphylaxis and allergic disorders warrants further investigation. PMID:27580108

  13. Platelet-activating factor causes ventilation-perfusion mismatch in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Roisin, R; Félez, M A; Chung, K F; Barberà, J A; Wagner, P D; Cobos, A; Barnes, P J; Roca, J

    1994-01-01

    We hypothesized that platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, could induce gas exchange abnormalities in normal humans. To this end, the effect of aerosolized PAF (2 mg/ml solution; 24 micrograms) on ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) relationships, hemodynamics, and resistance of the respiratory system was studied in 14 healthy, nonatopic, and nonsmoking individuals (23 +/- 1 [SEM]yr) before and at 2, 4, 6, 8, 15, and 45 min after inhalation, and compared to that of inhaled lyso-PAF in 10 other healthy individuals (24 +/- 2 yr). PAF induced, compared to lyso-PAF, immediate leukopenia (P < 0.001) followed by a rebound leukocytosis (P < 0.002), increased minute ventilation (P < 0.05) and resistance of the respiratory system (P < 0.01), and decreased systemic arterial pressure (P < 0.05). Similarly, compared to lyso-PAF, PaO2 showed a trend to fall (by 12.2 +/- 4.3 mmHg, mean +/- SEM maximum change from baseline), and arterial-alveolar O2 gradient increased (by 16.7 +/- 4.3 mmHg) (P < 0.02) after PAF, because of VA/Q mismatch: the dispersion of pulmonary blood flow and that of ventilation increased by 0.45 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.01) and 0.29 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.04), respectively. We conclude that in normal subjects, inhaled PAF results in considerable immediate VA/Q inequality and gas exchange impairment. These results reinforce the notion that PAF may play a major role as a mediator of inflammation in the human lung. Images PMID:8282786

  14. Effect of platelet activating factor (PAF) on pulmonary circulation in isolated rabbit lung.

    PubMed

    Comellas, A; Tristano, S; Pesce, L; Friedman, E; Marcano, H; Sánchez de León, R

    1999-03-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of acute lung injury. The aim of this work is to study the effect of PAF on isolated and perfused rabbit lungs with blood and with a blood-free solution. 24 isolated and perfused rabbit lungs have been used: 8 control preparations (CP), 4 vehicles preparations (VP), 8 PAF preparations (PP) to which we administered PAF (1 microg/Kg of rabbit weight) and 4 acellular preparations (AP) with the same dose of PAF as in PP but dissolved in BSA-Krebs buffer solution. In the preparations pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa), airway pressure (Paw), left atria pressure (Pla) and fluid filtration rate (FFR) were registered. Ppa resulted in a significant difference in AP vs PP, with a value of 21 cm of water (CI 95%: 12-26) vs 205.1 cm of water (CI 95%: 141.3 - 271) respectively. A increase in FFR was observed in PP but it did not occur in AP, the difference being statistically significant: 5.515 g/min (CI 95 %: 2.425 - 8.865) vs 0.049 g/min (CI 95%: 0.008 - 0.32) respectively. Paw was statistically different in PP vs AP, with a value of 14.3 cm of water (CI 95%: 11.57 - 16.7) vs 8.5 cm of water (CI 95%: 8-9) respectively. These results suggest that PAF does not have a direct effect on the endothelium or smooth muscle in the production of lung edema. PMID:10494654

  15. Interaction of vasoactive substances released by platelet-activating factor in the rat perfused heart.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, W. M.; Man, R. Y.

    1991-01-01

    1. The coronary vascular effects of platelet-activating factor (PAF) have been intensively studied and it has been proposed that they are mediated by the release of vasoactive substances. In this study, a cascade perfusion model using two rat perfused hearts was developed to investigate the properties of PAF-released vasoactive substances and the interplay of these substances. The properties of the vasoactive substances after an injection of PAF (100 pmol) in the rat perfused heart were examined by collecting the effluent from the first heart for the perfusion of a second (recipient) heart. The presence of vasoconstrictor substances in the effluent was characterized by an increase in the perfusion pressure of the recipient heart. 2. Previous exposure of the recipient heart of PAF (100 pmol) abolished the response of the heart to subsequent administration of PAF, but did not affect the response of the recipient heart to the effluent. This suggested that the coronary vasoconstrictor response of the recipient heart was not due to the presence of PAF in the effluent but to other vasoactive substances. 3. Pretreatment of the recipient heart with the leukotriene receptor antagonist, L-649,923 (5 microM), partially reduced the vasoconstrictor effect of the effluent. Pretreatment of the first heart with indomethacin (2.8 microM) also partially reduced the vasoconstrictor effect of the effluent. The combination of indomethacin pretreatment of the first heart and L-649,923 pretreatment of the recipient heart completely abolished the vasoconstrictor effect of the effluent suggesting that both prostaglandins and leukotrienes are involved in the vasoconstrictor effect of the effluent. 4. Pretreatment of both hearts with L-649,923 or the first heart with the leukotriene synthesis inhibitor (MK-886, 10 microM) completely abolished the vasoconstrictor effect of the effluent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1810604

  16. Cholesterol synthesis inhibitors protect against platelet-activating factor-induced neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Rumbold, Louis; Williams, Alun

    2007-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is implicated in the neuronal damage that accompanies ischemia, prion disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since some epidemiological studies demonstrate that statins, drugs that reduce cholesterol synthesis, have a beneficial effect on mild AD, we examined the effects of two cholesterol synthesis inhibitors on neuronal responses to PAF. Methods Primary cortical neurons were treated with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors (simvastatin or squalestatin) prior to incubation with different neurotoxins. The effects of these drugs on neuronal cholesterol levels and neuronal survival were measured. Immunoblots were used to determine the effects of simvastatin or squalestatin on the distribution of the PAF receptor and an enzyme linked immunoassay was used to quantify the amounts of PAF receptor. Results PAF killed primary neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with simvastatin or squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol and increased the survival of PAF-treated neurons. Neuronal survival was increased 50% by 100 nM simvastatin, or 20 nM squalestatin. The addition of mevalonate restored cholesterol levels, and reversed the protective effect of simvastatin. Simvastatin or squalestatin did not affect the amounts of the PAF receptor but did cause it to disperse from within lipid rafts. Conclusion Treatment of neurons with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors including simvastatin and squalestatin protected neurons against PAF. Treatment caused a percentage of the PAF receptors to disperse from cholesterol-sensitive domains. These results raise the possibility that the effects of statins on neurodegenerative disease are, at least in part, due to desensitisation of neurons to PAF. PMID:17233902

  17. Platelet activating factors alters calcium homeostasis in cultured vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, T.A.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    Platelet activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphorylcholine; PAF), a potent in vivo mediator of allergic and inflammatory reactions, induced a rapid (onset less than 30 s), concentration-dependent (threshold approximately 10(-11) M, half-maximal approximately 10(-10) M, maximal approximately 10(-8)-10(-7) M) efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from preloaded cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). In contrast, deacetylated and other PAF analogues were essentially ineffective. PAF (10(-7) M) was also shown to increase cytosolic free calcium (49 +/- 5%) in suspensions of quin 2 (calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye)-loaded BAEC. PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was not blocked by aspirin treatment (100 or 500 microM, 30 min). In the absence of external calcium, PAF was still highly effective in stimulating unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, thus suggesting that PAF mobilized a sequestered pool of intracellular calcium. CV-3988, a PAF antagonist, inhibited PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of BAEC with PAF (10(-8) M, 15 min), but not with other PAF analogues, resulted in a decrease in subsequent PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, thus suggesting an agonist-specific desensitization. PAF also stimulated a 30% net decrease in the equilibrium /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ content of BAEC within 1 min, which gradually recovered to prestimulus levels in 10-15 min. PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was also observed in endothelial cells cultured from human umbilical vein and baboon cephalic vein but not from cultured human dermal fibroblasts or bovine aortic smooth muscle. These studies provide direct evidence for agonist- and cell-specific effects of PAF on vascular endothelium.

  18. Platelet-activating factor biosynthesis in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, P R; Croft, K; Harris, T; Stewart, A G

    1994-01-01

    The ability of platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonists to protect rats from the cardiovascular collapse induced by large doses of endothelin 1 led us to examine the capacity of rat cultured vascular smooth muscle cells to produce PAF and also to evaluate its potential functional roles in this cell type. Adenosine triphosphate and the vasoactive peptides, endothelin 1, angiotensin II, and arginine vasopressin, each elicited an increase in the PAF level in extracts of rat cultured vascular smooth muscle cells as determined by bioassay. PAF was not detectable (above 20 fmol/mg protein) in the supernatants of these cells. The identity of the bioactivity as PAF was confirmed by GC/MS which indicated that more than 80% of the PAF was 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-3-sn-glyceryl-phosphorylcholine. Exogenous PAF (100 nM) elicited increases in intracellular calcium that were inhibited by WEB 2086 (10 microM). Endothelin 1, at a concentration which stimulated PAF synthesis, (1 nM), elicited increases in intracellular calcium levels that were not inhibited by WEB 2086 (10 microM). Thus, endogenous PAF is unlikely to be involved in the endothelin-1-induced calcium increases. Although WEB 2086 (3-100 microM) inhibited concentration dependently fetal calf serum (10% v/v) induced [3H]-thymidine incorporation, reaching a maximum effect at 30 microM of 40-50% reduction, in parallel experiments WEB 2086 had no effect on serum-induced increases in cell numbers. We conclude that PAF is produced and retained by cultured rat vascular smooth muscle and that it is unlikely to contribute to the signaling of increases in intracellular calcium or proliferation. PMID:8148465

  19. Characterization of streptococcal platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase variants that are involved in innate immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanghui; Liu, Mengyao; Xie, Gang; Lei, Benfang

    2013-09-01

    Human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS) has developed mechanisms to subvert innate immunity. We recently reported that the secreted esterase produced by serotype M1 GAS (SsE(M1)) reduces neutrophil recruitment by targeting platelet-activating factor (PAF). SsE(M1) and SsE produced by serotype M28 GAS (SsE(M28)) have a 37% sequence difference. This study aims at determining whether SsE(M28) is also a PAF acetylhydrolase and participates in innate immune evasion. We also examined whether SsE evolved to target PAF by characterizing the PAF acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) activity and substrate specificity of SsE(M1), SsE(M28), SeE, the SsE homologue in Streptococcus equi, and human plasma PAF-AH (hpPAF-AH). PAF incubated with SsE(M28) or SeE was converted into lyso-PAF. SsE(M1) and SsE(M28) had kcat values of 373 s(-1) and 467 s(-1), respectively, that were ≥ 30-fold greater than that of hpPAF-AH (12 s(-1)). The comparison of SsE(M1), SsE(M28), and hpPAF-AH in kcat and Km in hydrolyzing triglycerides, acetyl esters, and PAF indicates that the SsE proteins are more potent hydrolases against PAF and have high affinity for PAF. SsE(M28) possesses much lower esterase activities against triglycerides and other esters than SsE(M1) but have similar potency with SsE(M1) in PAF hydrolysis. Deletion of sse(M28) in a covS deletion mutant of GAS increased neutrophil recruitment and reduced skin infection, whereas in trans expression of SsE(M28) in GAS reduced neutrophil infiltration and increased skin invasion in subcutaneous infection of mice. These results suggest that the SsE proteins evolved to target PAF for enhancing innate immune evasion and skin invasion. PMID:23774595

  20. Characterization of Streptococcal Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase Variants That Are Involved in Innate Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanghui; Liu, Mengyao; Xie, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS) has developed mechanisms to subvert innate immunity. We recently reported that the secreted esterase produced by serotype M1 GAS (SsEM1) reduces neutrophil recruitment by targeting platelet-activating factor (PAF). SsEM1 and SsE produced by serotype M28 GAS (SsEM28) have a 37% sequence difference. This study aims at determining whether SsEM28 is also a PAF acetylhydrolase and participates in innate immune evasion. We also examined whether SsE evolved to target PAF by characterizing the PAF acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) activity and substrate specificity of SsEM1, SsEM28, SeE, the SsE homologue in Streptococcus equi, and human plasma PAF-AH (hpPAF-AH). PAF incubated with SsEM28 or SeE was converted into lyso-PAF. SsEM1 and SsEM28 had kcat values of 373 s−1 and 467 s−1, respectively, that were ≥30-fold greater than that of hpPAF-AH (12 s−1). The comparison of SsEM1, SsEM28, and hpPAF-AH in kcat and Km in hydrolyzing triglycerides, acetyl esters, and PAF indicates that the SsE proteins are more potent hydrolases against PAF and have high affinity for PAF. SsEM28 possesses much lower esterase activities against triglycerides and other esters than SsEM1 but have similar potency with SsEM1 in PAF hydrolysis. Deletion of sseM28 in a covS deletion mutant of GAS increased neutrophil recruitment and reduced skin infection, whereas in trans expression of SsEM28 in GAS reduced neutrophil infiltration and increased skin invasion in subcutaneous infection of mice. These results suggest that the SsE proteins evolved to target PAF for enhancing innate immune evasion and skin invasion. PMID:23774595

  1. Relationships between tumour necrosis factor, eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor as mediators of endotoxin-induced shock in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, A. K.; Robey, J. W.; Price, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    1. The toxicity of intravenous recombinant human tumour necrosis factor (rhTNF), a TNF fragment (TNF114-130), endotoxin and combinations of rhTNF or TNF114-130 were tested in mice. Neither rhTNF nor TNF114-130 was lethal alone, but when combined with a non-lethal dose of endotoxin, rhTNF provoked dose-dependent mortality, as did higher doses of endotoxin alone. 2. Both the toxicity and the vasopermeability changes induced by endotoxin alone were blocked by the platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist BN52021, indomethacin or the dual cyclo-oxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitor BW755C. 3. The lethality of the combined low dose endotoxin/rhTNF challenge was unaffected by pretreatment with BN52021, indomethacin or BW755C, or by treatment at 6 h intervals with BN52021 or BW755C. 4. The results of these studies suggest that TNF, a putative, early mediator of septic or endotoxin shock, cannot by itself mimic all of the effects of bacterial endotoxin in the model used in this study. Apparently, TNF works synergistically with other mediators whose release is stimulated by endotoxin. 5. The results also suggest that the mechanism of shock production by the rhTNF/endotoxin combination in mice is not dependent on the early stimulation of eicosanoid or PAF synthesis by rhTNF. PMID:2110016

  2. Titanium surface hydrophilicity enhances platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Alfarsi, Mohammed A; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Titanium implant surface modification is a key strategy used to enhance osseointegration. Platelets are the first cells that interact with the implant surface whereupon they release a wide array of proteins that influence the subsequent healing process. This study therefore investigated the effect of titanium surface modification on the attachment and activation of human platelets. The surface characteristics of three titanium surfaces: smooth (SMO), micro-rough (SLA) and hydrophilic micro-rough (SLActive) and the subsequent attachment and activation of platelets following exposure to these surfaces were determined. The SLActive surface showed the presence of significant nanoscale topographical features. While attached platelets appeared to be morphologically similar, significantly fewer platelets attached to the SLActive surface compared to both the SMO and SLA surfaces. The SLActive surface however induced the release of the higher levels of chemokines β-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 from platelets. This study shows that titanium surface topography and chemistry have a significant effect on platelet activation and chemokine release. PMID:25311339

  3. Lipoteichoic Acid-Induced Nitric Oxide Production Depends on the Activation of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor and Jak21

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Hyun; Kim, Je Hak; Seo, Ho Seong; Martin, Michael H.; Chung, Gook-Hyun; Michalek, Suzanne M.; Nahm, Moon H.

    2006-01-01

    NO production by macrophages in response to lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and a synthetic lipopeptide (Pam3CSK4) was investigated. LTA and Pam3CSK4 induced the production of both TNF-α and NO. Inhibitors of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) blocked LTA- or Pam3CSK4-induced production of NO but not TNF-α. Jak2 tyrosine kinase blocked LTA-induced production of NO but not TNF-α. PAFR inhibition blocked phosphorylation of Jak2 and STAT1, a key factor for expressing inducible NO synthase. In addition, LTA did not induce IFN-β expression, and p38 mitogen-activated protein serine kinase was necessary for LTA-induced NO production but not for TNF-α production. These findings suggest that Gram-positive bacteria induce NO production using a PAFR signaling pathway to activate STAT1 via Jak2. This PAFR/Jak2/STAT1 signaling pathway resembles the IFN-β, type I IFNR/Jak/STAT1 pathway described for LPS. Consequently, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria appear to have different but analogous mechanisms for NO production. PMID:16365452

  4. Glucosamine suppresses platelet-activating factor-induced activation of microglia through inhibition of store-operated calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Jeong-Nam; Jang, Byeong-Churl; Im, Seung-Soon; Song, Dae-Kyu; Bae, Jae-Hoon

    2016-03-01

    Microglia activation and subsequent release of inflammatory mediators are implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator synthesized by microglia, is known to stimulate microglia functional responses. In this study, we determined that endogenous PAF exert autocrine effects on microglia activation, as well as the underlying mechanism involved. We also investigated the effect of D-glucosamine (GlcN) on PAF-induced cellular activation in human HMO6 microglial cells. PAF induced sustained intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) increase through store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOC) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. PAF also induced pro-inflammatory markers through NFκB/COX-2 signaling. GlcN significantly inhibited PAF-induced Ca(2+) influx and ROS generation without significant cytotoxicity. GlcN downregulated excessive expression of pro-inflammatory markers and promoted filopodia formation through NFκB/COX-2 inhibition in PAF-stimulated HMO6 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that GlcN may offer substantial therapeutic potential for treating inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases accompanied by microglial activation. PMID:26745504

  5. Direct effects of platelet-activating factor on glomerular capillary permeability.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Sharma, M; Li, J Z; McCarthy, E T; Savin, V J

    1997-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is an important mediator of injury in acute renal failure and glomerulonephritis. Intrarenal infusion of PAF reduces glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow and increases glomerular permselectivity via its renal hemodynamic and/or immunologic effects. Direct effects of PAF on glomerular capillary permeability are not known. We studied the direct effects of PAF on mesangial contraction (a measure of filtration area), glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity (L[p]) and capillary albumin permeability (P[albumin]). Glomeruli were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats and incubated with or without various concentrations of PAF (10[-9], 10[-7] and 10[-5] M) for up to 5 h at 37 degrees C. Mesangial contraction (percent change in glomerular volume) was assessed from the gradual decrease in volume of glomeruli during 20 min of incubation with PAF. L(p) was calculated from the rate of change in glomerular volume during the 0.1 s of capillary expansion in response to a transcapillary oncotic gradient. P(albumin) was calculated from a change in relative volume of glomeruli in response to an oncotic gradient. Mesangial contraction was maximal after 20 min of incubation and was concentration dependent (5.2+/-0.9, 7.9+/-1.0 and 10.0+/-1.0%, respectively, with PAF 10(-9), 10(-7) and 10(-5) M). Incubation of glomeruli with PAF 10(-7) M for 60 min at 37 degrees C caused a significant decrease in L(p) (2.25+/-0.30 vs. control 3.12+/-0.28 microl x min(-1) x mm Hg(-1) x cm(-1), n = 5). P(albumin) of glomeruli incubated with PAF was unchanged up to 2 h but increased significantly with the highest concentration of PAF (10(-5) M) after 3 h of incubation (0.60+/-0.18, n=15, vs. control 0.00+/-0.08, n = 20), whereas lower concentrations of PAF (10[-7] or 10[-9] M) required at least 5 h of incubation with glomeruli to cause a significant increase in P(albumin) (0.45+/-0.09 and 0.48+/-0.07, respectively, n=15, vs. control 0.00+/-0.08, n=15). We

  6. Involvement of platelet-activating factor and tumour necrosis factor in the pathogenesis of joint inflammation in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Zarco, P; Maestre, C; Herrero-Beaumont, G; González, E; Garcia-Hoyo, R; Navarro, F J; Braquet, P; Egido, J

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the participation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits, as well as the possible co-operation between PAF and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in their ability to induce joint inflammation when injected into the knees of healthy rabbits. The administration of two structurally different PAF receptor antagonists, BN52021 and Alprazolam, from 4 h before the intra-articular injection of ovalbumin in preimmunized rabbits, induced an important reduction in the synovial fluid volume, in the amount of cells infiltrating the articular cavity and the synovial membrane, as well as in the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration. Furthermore, proteoglycans of the articular cartilage, which were found diminished in animals with non-treated arthritis, were well preserved in rabbits treated with PAF antagonists. All the synovial fluids from joints with arthritis had detectable amounts of PAF. The injection of either TNF or PAF into the joints of normal rabbits induced a mild inflammation. When TNF was administered 1 h before PAF, a synergistic response was noted in the synovial fluid volume, in the accumulation of leucocytes, and in the amount of PGE2. The administration of BN50726, a hetrazepine with a potent PAF-receptor antagonist effect, induced a diminution in those parameters. Our results suggest that PAF may be an early and important mediator of joint damage, and that TNF can amplify the inflammatory response induced by PAF. PAF receptor antagonists could play some role in the treatment of inflammatory joint diseases. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:1315229

  7. Characterization of the de novo biosynthetic enzyme of platelet activating factor, DDT-insensitive cholinephosphotransferase, of human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsoupras, Alexandros Basilios; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Iatrou, Christos; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi; Demopoulos, Constantinos Alexandros

    2007-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, is implicated in several proinflammatory/inflammatory diseases such as glomerulonephritis, glomerulosclerosis, atherosclerosis, cancer, allergy, and diabetes. PAF can be produced by several renal cells under appropriate stimuli and it is thought to be implicated in renal diseases. The aim of this study is the characterization of DTT-insensitive cholinephosphotransferase (PAF-CPT) of human mesangial cell (HMC), the main regulatory enzyme of PAF de novo biosynthetic pathway. Microsomal fractions of mesangial cells were isolated and enzymatic activity and kinetic parameters were determined by TLC and in vitro biological test in rabbit washed platelets. The effect of bovine serum albumin (BSA), dithiothreitol (DTT), divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+), EDTA, and various chemicals on the activity of PAF-CPT of HMC was also studied. Moreover, preliminary in vitro tests have been performed with several anti-inflammatory factors such as drugs (simvastatin, IFNa, rupatadine, tinzaparin, and salicylic acid) and bioactive compounds of Mediterranean diet (resveratrol and lipids of olive oil, olive pomace, sea bass "Dicentrarchus labrax," and gilthead sea bream "Sparus aurata"). The results indicated that the above compounds can influence PAF-CPT activity of HMC. PMID:17710109

  8. Priming effect of platelet activating factor on leukotriene C4 from stimulated eosinophils of asthmatic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, K.; Koide, K.; Hirai, Y.; Sumitomo, M.; Fukumura, M.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eosinophils from asthmatic patients are known to release greater amounts of leukotrienes than normal eosinophils when stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of platelet activating factor (PAF) in priming eosinophils was investigated. METHODS: Eosinophils were obtained from 18 asthmatic patients and 18 healthy donors. Cells separated by the Percoll gradients were incubated with PAF (C-18) for 30 minutes and then stimulated with the calcium ionophore A23187 (2.5 microM) for 15 minutes. The amount of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) in supernatants was measured using a combination of high pressure liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: The mean (SD) amount of LTC4 released by eosinophils from asthmatic patients upon stimulation with the calcium ionophore A23187 alone was 27.9 (9.9) ng/10(6) cells (n = 6). The amount of LTC4 released following stimulation with the calcium ionophore A23187 after pretreatment with PAF (1, 5, and 10 microM) was 57.2 (8.9), 75.1 (14.3), and 52.6 (10.7) ng/10(6) cells (n = 6), respectively. Trace amounts of LTC4 (0.9 (0.02) ng/10(6) cells, n = 6) were detected in the supernatant of the cells after stimulation by PAF alone (5 microM). The amount of LTC4 released upon stimulation by calcium ionophore A23187 alone in eosinophils from healthy donors was 10.3 (3.7) ng/10(6) cells (n = 4). The amounts of LTC4 released upon stimulation with calcium ionophore A23187 after pretreatment with PAF at concentrations of 1, 5, and 10 microM were 11.9 (3.5), 17.8 (5.6), and 12.7 (5.1) ng/10(6) cells (n = 4), respectively. Trace amounts of LTC4 (0.6 (0.02) ng/10(6) cells, n = 4) were detected in the supernatant of the cells upon stimulation with PAF alone (5 microM). The amounts of LTC4 released upon stimulation with calcium ionophore A23187 after pretreatment with lyso-PAF at concentrations of 1, 5, and 10 microM (n = 4 or 6) were 30.8 (5.2), 22.9 (5.1), and 27.3 (4.3) ng/10(6) cells (n = 6) from the eosinophils of asthmatic

  9. Procoagulant activity on platelets adhered to collagen or plasma clot.

    PubMed

    Ilveskero, S; Siljander, P; Lassila, R

    2001-04-01

    In a new 2-stage assay of platelet procoagulant activity (PCA), we first subjected gel-filtered platelets to adhesion on collagen (as a model of primary hemostasis) or plasma clots (as a model of preformed thrombus) for 30 minutes, and then the adherent platelets were supplemented with pooled, reptilase-treated, diluted plasma. Defibrinated plasma provided coagulation factors for assembly on platelet membranes without uncontrolled binding of thrombin to fibrin(ogen). Platelet adhesion to both surfaces showed modest individual variation, which increased at platelet densities that allowed aggregation. However, adhesion-induced PCA varied individually and surface-independently >3-fold, suggesting a uniform platelet procoagulant mechanism. Permanently adhered platelets showed markedly enhanced PCA when compared with the platelet pool in suspension, even after strong activation. The rate of thrombin generation induced by clot-adherent platelets was markedly faster than on collagen-adherent platelets during the initial phase of coagulation, whereas collagen-induced PCA proceeded slowly, strongly promoted by tissue thromboplastin. Therefore at 10 minutes, after adjustment for adhered platelets, collagen supported soluble thrombin formation as much as 5 times that of the thrombin-retaining clots. Activation of platelets by their firm adhesion was accompanied by formation of microparticles, representing about one third of the total soluble PCA. Collagen-adhered platelets provide soluble thrombin and microparticles, whereas the preformed clot serves to localize and accelerate hemostasis at the injury site, with the contribution of retained thrombin and microparticles. PMID:11304482

  10. Platelet activation risk index as a prognostic thrombosis indicator.

    PubMed

    Zlobina, K E; Guria, G Th

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation in blood flow under high, overcritical shear rates is initiated by Von Willebrand factor. Despite the large amount of experimental data that have been obtained, the value of the critical shear rate, above which von Willebrand factor starts to activate platelets, is still controversial. Here, we recommend a theoretical approach to elucidate how the critical blood shear rate is dependent on von Willebrand factor size. We derived a diagram of platelet activation according to the shear rate and von Willebrand factor multimer size. We succeeded in deriving an explicit formula for the dependence of the critical shear rate on von Willebrand factor molecule size. The platelet activation risk index was introduced. This index is dependent on the flow conditions, number of monomers in von Willebrand factor, and platelet sensitivity. Probable medical applications of the platelet activation risk index as a universal prognostic index are discussed. PMID:27461235

  11. Platelet activation risk index as a prognostic thrombosis indicator

    PubMed Central

    Zlobina, K. E.; Guria, G. Th.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation in blood flow under high, overcritical shear rates is initiated by Von Willebrand factor. Despite the large amount of experimental data that have been obtained, the value of the critical shear rate, above which von Willebrand factor starts to activate platelets, is still controversial. Here, we recommend a theoretical approach to elucidate how the critical blood shear rate is dependent on von Willebrand factor size. We derived a diagram of platelet activation according to the shear rate and von Willebrand factor multimer size. We succeeded in deriving an explicit formula for the dependence of the critical shear rate on von Willebrand factor molecule size. The platelet activation risk index was introduced. This index is dependent on the flow conditions, number of monomers in von Willebrand factor, and platelet sensitivity. Probable medical applications of the platelet activation risk index as a universal prognostic index are discussed. PMID:27461235

  12. Hemodynamic depression and microthrombosis in the peripheral areas of cortical contusion in the rat: role of platelet activating factor.

    PubMed

    Maeda, T; Katayama, Y; Kawamata, T; Aoyama, N; Mori, T

    1997-01-01

    Cerebrovascular damages leading to subsequent reductions in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) may play an important role in secondary cell damages following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent studies have demonstrated that rCBF markedly decrease in experimental model of TBI (e.g. fluid percussion injury, acute subdural hematoma, contusion). However, precise mechanisms underlying post-traumatic CBF reduction remain unclear. In the present study, the rCBF changes and microthrombosis formation were investigated in a cortical contusional model in rats, and the effects of etizolam (platelet activating factor antagonist) on microthrombosis were tested. The rCBF in the peripheral areas increased transiently, and decreased to ischemic level 3 hours post- injury. The histological examinations revealed microthrombosis formation in the contused area, extending from the center to the peripheral areas within 6 hours post-injury. The rCBF decrease and the contusion necrosis volume were significantly attenuated by etizolam administration. These results indicate that platelet activating factor is involved in microthrombosis formation and hemodynamic depression, and resultant ischemic damages within areas surrounding the contusion. PMID:9416292

  13. Roles of BN52021 in platelet-activating factor pathway in inflammatory MS1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shi-Hai; Xiang, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Kai; Xu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effects of BN52021 on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) signaling molecules under lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory conditions in MS1 cells. METHODS: MS1 cells (a mouse pancreatic islet endothelial cell line) were grown in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 2 mmol/L glutamine and 100 μg/mL penicillin/streptomycin in 5% CO2 at 37 °C. After growth to confluency in media, the cells were processed for subsequent studies. The MS1 cells received 0, 0.1, 1 and 10 μg/mL LPS in this experiment. The viability/proliferation of the cells induced by LPS was observed using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay. Apoptosis and necrosis of the cells under the inflammatory condition described previously were observed using Hoechst 33342-propidium iodide staining. Adenylate cyclase (AC), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ), protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRK) and p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) mRNA in the PAFR signaling pathway were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression level of phosphorylated AC (p-AC), phosphorylated PLA2 (p-PLA2), phosphorylated PTK (p-PTK), phosphorylated p38 MAPK (p-p38 MAPK), PLCβ and GRK was measured using Western blotting analysis. RESULTS: The activity of MS1 cells incubated with different concentrations of LPS for 6 h decreased significantly in the 1 μg/mL LPS group (0.49 ± 0.10 vs 0.67 ± 0.13, P < 0.05) and 10 μg/mL LPS group (0.44 ± 0.10 vs 0.67 ± 0.13, P < 0.001), but not in 0.1 μg/mL group. When the incubation time was extended to 12 h (0.33 ± 0.05, 0.32 ± 0.03 and 0.25 ± 0.03 vs 0.69 ± 0.01) and 24 h (0.31 ± 0.01, 0.29 ± 0.03 and 0.25 ± 0.01 vs 0.63 ± 0.01), MS1 cell activity decreased in all LPS concentration groups compared with the blank control (P < 0.001). BN52021 significantly improved the cell

  14. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

    PubMed

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  15. Plasma factor XIII and platelet factor XIII in hyperlipaemia.

    PubMed

    Cucuianu, M P; Miloszewski, K; Porutiu, D; Losowsky, M S

    1976-12-31

    Plasma factor XIII activity measured by a quantitative assay was found to be significantly higher in hypertriglyceridaemic patients (type IV and combined hyperlipoproteinaemia), as compared to normolipaemic controls. No such elevation in plasma factor XIII activity was found in patients with type Ha hyperlipaemia. Plasma pseudocholinesterase was found to parallel the elevated factor XIII activity in hypertriglyceridaemic subjects. In contrast, platelet factor XIII activity was not raised in hyperlipaemic subjects, and plasma factor XIII was found to be normal in a normolipaemic subjects with thrombocythaemia. It was concluded that there is no significant contribution from platelets to plasma factor XIII activity, and that the observed increase in plasma factor XIII in hypertriglyceridaemia results from enhanced hepatic synthesis of the enzyme. PMID:1037152

  16. Evidence for Lipid Packaging in the Crystal Structure of the GM2-Activator Complex with Platelet Activating Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Christine S.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2010-11-16

    GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP) is a lipid transfer protein that has the ability to stimulate the enzymatic processing of gangliosides as well as T-cell activation through lipid presentation. Our previous X-ray crystallographic studies of GM2-AP have revealed a large lipid binding pocket as the central overall feature of the structure with non-protein electron density within this pocket suggesting bound lipid. To extend these studies, we present here the 2 {angstrom} crystal structure of GM2-AP complexed with platelet activating factor (PAF). PAF is a potent phosphoacylglycerol whose toxic patho-physiological effects can be inhibited by GM2-AP. The structure shows an ordered arrangement of two bound lipids and a fatty acid molecule. One PAF molecule binds in an extended conformation within the hydrophobic channel that has an open and closed conformation, and was seen to contain bound phospholipid in the low pH apo structure. The second molecule is submerged inside the pocket in a U-shaped conformation with its head group near the single polar residue S141. It was refined as lyso-PAF as it lacks electron density for the sn-2 acetate group. The alkyl chains of PAF interact through van der Waals contacts, while the head groups bind in different environments with their phosphocholine moieties in contact with aromatic rings (Y137, F80). The structure has revealed further insights into the lipid binding properties of GM2-AP, suggesting an unexpected unique mode of lipid packaging that may explain the efficiency of GM2-AP in inhibiting the detrimental biological effects of PAF.

  17. Synthesis, biochemical evaluation and molecular modeling studies of novel rhodium complexes with nanomolar activity against Platelet Activating Factor.

    PubMed

    Tsoupras, Alexandros B; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Demopoulos, Constantinos A; Philippopoulos, Athanassios I

    2013-03-01

    Two square planar Rh(I) organometallic complexes namely [Rh(L(1))(cod)]Cl (cod = cycloocta-1,5-diene, L(1)=2,2'-pyridylquinoxaline (1-Cl), [Rh(L1)(cod)](NO3) (1-NO(3)) and a series of novel octahedral rhodium(III) complexes of the general formulae mer-[Rh(L(1))Cl(3)(MeOH)] (2) and cis-[Rh(L(2))(2)Cl(2)]Cl (L(2)=4 carboxy 2 (2' pyridyl)quinoline (3), L(3)=2,2' bipyridine 4,4' dicarboxylic acid (4) were synthesized and characterized spectroscopically. All the synthesized compounds including the previously prepared cis-[Rh(L(1))(2)Cl(2)]Cl complex (5) were biologically evaluated as potential inhibitors of the Platelet Activation Factor (PAF) and thrombin induced aggregation. In particular compounds 1-Cl and 1-NO(3) were found to be strong inhibitors of PAF with IC(50) values in the range of 16 nM and 15 nM rendering them good candidates for further investigation. Their potency is comparable to that of the widely used PAF receptor antagonists WEB2170, BN52021, and Rupatadine (IC(50) of 20, 30 and 260 nM respectively). Molecular docking calculations suggest that 1-Cl, 1-NO3 and 2 can be accommodated within the ligand-binding site of PAF receptor and block the activity of PAF. On the other hand, the octahedral rhodium(III) complexes 3-5 that cannot fit the ligand-binding domain, could potentially exhibit their activity at the extracellular domain of the receptor. PMID:23318288

  18. Heparin platelet factor 4 antibody positivity in pseudothrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Balcik, Ozlem Sahin; Akdeniz, Derya; Cipil, Handan; Uysal, Sema; Isik, Ayse; Kosar, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) is a laboratory event of platelet clustering related to drugs used for anticoagulation. This condition is engendered by autoantibodies against platelets in usually EDTA-anticoagulated blood. Pseudothrombocytopenia has no clinical significance but when evaluated as true thrombocytopenia, this misconception may lead to unnecessary diagnostic procedures. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with thrombosis (HITT) is a complication of heparin treatment caused by heparin platelet factor 4 (HPF-4) antibodies, leading to platelet activation and hypercoagulability. In our study, 48 patients with PTCP and 36 healthy volunteers were included. Heparin platelet factor 4 antibody positivity was detected in 12 patients from PTCP group; nobody from control group had. Citrated serum samples and peripheral blood smears showed normal platelet count. Of the 4 patients using heparin derivative, 1 (2.1%) had antibody positivity but without any bleeding symptoms. In conclusion, HPF-4 antibody positivity might be a risk factor for PTCP. Clinicians should be aware of this kind of condition. PMID:21593020

  19. Platelet activating factor-induced ceramide micro-domains drive endothelial NOS activation and contribute to barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Sanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Bardita, Cristina; Neamu, Radu Florin; Brovcovych, Viktor; Predescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and functional relationship between platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lateral plane of the endothelial plasma membrane is poorly characterized. In this study, we used intact mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) as well as endothelial plasma membrane patches and subcellular fractions to define a new microdomain of plasmalemma proper where the two proteins colocalize and to demonstrate how PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production fine-tunes ECs function as gatekeepers of vascular permeability. Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold labeling electron microscopy (EM) on membrane patches we demonstrate that PAF-R is organized as clusters and colocalizes with a subcellular pool of eNOS, outside recognizable vesicular profiles. Moreover, PAF-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation generates a ceramide-based microdomain on the external leaflet of plasma membrane, inside of which a signalosome containing eNOS shapes PAF-stimulated NO production. Real-time measurements of NO after PAF-R ligation indicated a rapid (5 to 15 min) increase in NO production followed by a > 45 min period of reduction to basal levels. Moreover, at the level of this new microdomain, PAF induces a dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of eNOS that correlates with NO production. Altogether, our findings establish the existence of a functional partnership PAF-R/eNOS on EC plasma membrane, at the level of PAF-induced ceramide plasma membrane microdomains, outside recognized vesicular profiles. PMID:24086643

  20. Platelet Activating Factor-Induced Ceramide Micro-Domains Drive Endothelial NOS Activation and Contribute to Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Sanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Bardita, Cristina; Neamu, Radu Florin; Brovcovych, Viktor; Predescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and functional relationship between platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lateral plane of the endothelial plasma membrane is poorly characterized. In this study, we used intact mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) as well as endothelial plasma membrane patches and subcellular fractions to define a new microdomain of plasmalemma proper where the two proteins colocalize and to demonstrate how PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production fine-tunes ECs function as gatekeepers of vascular permeability. Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold labeling electron microscopy (EM) on membrane patches we demonstrate that PAF-R is organized as clusters and colocalizes with a subcellular pool of eNOS, outside recognizable vesicular profiles. Moreover, PAF-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation generates a ceramide-based microdomain on the external leaflet of plasma membrane, inside of which a signalosome containing eNOS shapes PAF-stimulated NO production. Real-time measurements of NO after PAF-R ligation indicated a rapid (5 to 15 min) increase in NO production followed by a > 45 min period of reduction to basal levels. Moreover, at the level of this new microdomain, PAF induces a dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of eNOS that correlates with NO production. Altogether, our findings establish the existence of a functional partnership PAF-R/eNOS on EC plasma membrane, at the level of PAF-induced ceramide plasma membrane microdomains, outside recognized vesicular profiles. PMID:24086643

  1. Human platelets stimulated by thrombin produce platelet-activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) when the degrading enzyme acetyl hydrolase is blocked.

    PubMed Central

    Touqui, L; Hatmi, M; Vargaftig, B B

    1985-01-01

    It has been shown [Touqui, Jacquemin & Vargaftig (1983) Thromb. Haemostasis 50, 163; Touqui, Jacquemin & Vargaftig (1983) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 110, 890-893; Alam, Smith & Melvin (1983) Lipids 18, 534-538; Pieroni & Hanahan (1983) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 224, 485-493] that rabbit platelets inactivate exogenous PAF (platelet-activating factor, PAF-acether) by a deacetylation-reacylation mechanism. The deacetylation step is catalysed by an acetyl hydrolase sensitive to the serine-hydrolase inhibitor PMSF (phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride) [Touqui, Jacquemin, Dumarey & Vargaftig (1985) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 833, 111-118]. We report here that human platelets can produce PAF on thrombin stimulation. This production is marginal and transient, reaching a maximum at 10 min and decreasing thereafter. In contrast, 10-12 times more PAF is produced when platelets are treated with PMSF and stimulated with thrombin. Under these conditions, the maximum formation is observed at 30 min and no decline occurs for up to 60 min after stimulation. In addition, these platelets (treated with PMSF and stimulated with thrombin) incorporate exogenous labelled acetate in the 2-position of PAF, probably by an acetyltransferase-dependent mechanism. Production of PAF by human platelets during physiological stimulation can be demonstrated when PAF degradation is suppressed by the acetyl-hydrolase inhibitor PMSF. PMID:4052028

  2. Shiga toxin binds to activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S A; Polanowska-Grabowska, R K; Fujii, J; Obrig, T; Gear, A R L

    2004-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is associated with acute renal failure in children and can be caused by Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli. Thrombocytopenia and formation of renal thrombi are characteristic of HUS, suggesting that platelet activation is involved in its pathogenesis. However, whether Shiga toxin directly activates platelets is controversial. The present study evaluates if potential platelet sensitization during isolation by different procedures influences platelet interaction with Shiga toxin. Platelets isolated from sodium citrate anticoagulated blood were exposed during washing to EDTA and higher g forces than platelets prepared from acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) plasma. Platelet binding of Stx was significantly higher in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets. Binding of Stx was also increased with ACD-derived platelets when activated with thrombin (1 U mL-1) and exposure of the Gb3 Stx receptor was detected only on platelets subjected to EDTA, higher g forces or thrombin. EDTA-exposed platelets lost their normal discoid shape and were larger. P-selectin (CD62P) exposure was significantly increased in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets, suggesting platelet activation. Taken together, these results suggest that direct binding of Stx occurs only on 'activated' platelets rather than on resting platelets. The ability of Stx to interact with previously activated platelets may be an important element in understanding the pathogenesis of HUS. PMID:15009469

  3. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor binding antagonist activity of the methanol extracts and isolated flavonoids from Chromolaena odorata (L.) King and Robinson.

    PubMed

    Ling, Sui Kiong; Pisar, Mazura Md; Man, Salbiah

    2007-06-01

    The leaf, stem and root extracts of Chromolaena odorata were evaluated for their effect on platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor binding on rabbit platelets using 3H-PAF as a ligand. The leaf extract demonstrated high PAF receptor binding inhibitory activity of 79.2+/-2.1% at 18.2 microg/ml. A total of eleven flavonoids were subsequently isolated from the active leaf extract and evaluated for their effects on PAF receptor binding. Eight of the flavonoids exhibited >50% inhibition on the binding activity at 18.2 microg/ml. These flavonoids were identified as eriodictyol 7,4'-dimethyl ether, quercetin 7,4'-methyl ether, naringenin 4'-methyl ether, kaempferol 4'-methyl ether, kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside, taxifolin 4'-methyl ether, taxifolin 7-methyl ether and quercetin 4'-methyl ether. Their IC50 values ranged from 19.5 to 62.1 microM. PMID:17541171

  4. Hageman Factor, Platelets and Polyphosphates: Early History and Recent Connection

    PubMed Central

    Caen, Jacques; Wu, Qingyu

    2010-01-01

    Summary Platelet activation and blood coagulation are essential for hemostasis and contribute to a variety of other biological processes such as inflammation, complement activation and tissue repair. Factor XII, originally called Hageman factor, plays an important role in the kallikrein-kinin system by activating prekallikrein. In the 1960s, a platelet activity that promoted factor XII activation was identified but its biochemical nature remained unknown. Inorganic polyphosphates (poly P) are polymers that consist of many phosphate residues linked by phosphoanhydride bonds. These polymers exist in all living organisms. In bacteria, poly P is important for growth and survival. Recently, poly P has been identified in human platelet dense granules. Studied have shown that upon platelet activation and secretion, poly P activates factor XII, indicating that it is most likely the elusive platelet factor XII activator. Poly P also regulates coagulation and fibrinolysis. In this review, we focus on early studies of factor XII and the identification of platelet factor XII activation activity, and discuss recent findings of poly P in factor XII activation and coagulation. PMID:20456750

  5. Identification of angiogenic activity and the cloning and expression of platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Fuyuki; Miyazono, Kohei; Hellman, Ulf; Drexler, Hannes; Wernstedt, Christer; Hagiwara, Koichi; Usuki, Kensuke; Takaku, Fumimaro; Risau, Werner; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    1989-04-01

    Cloning and sequencing of the complementary DNA for platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor indicates that it is a novel factor distinct from previously characterized proteins. The factor, a protein with a relative molecular mass of about 45,000, stimulates endothelial cell growth and chemotaxis in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo.

  6. Dysfunctional epileptic neuronal circuits and dysmorphic dendritic spines are mitigated by platelet-activating factor receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Musto, Alberto E; Rosencrans, Robert F; Walker, Chelsey P; Bhattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Raulji, Chittalsinh M; Belayev, Ludmila; Fang, Zhide; Gordon, William C; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy or limbic epilepsy lacks effective therapies due to a void in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that set in motion aberrant neuronal network formations during the course of limbic epileptogenesis (LE). Here we show in in vivo rodent models of LE that the phospholipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) increases in LE and that PAF receptor (PAF-r) ablation mitigates its progression. Synthetic PAF-r antagonists, when administered intraperitoneally in LE, re-establish hippocampal dendritic spine density and prevent formation of dysmorphic dendritic spines. Concomitantly, hippocampal interictal spikes, aberrant oscillations, and neuronal hyper-excitability, evaluated 15-16 weeks after LE using multi-array silicon probe electrodes implanted in the dorsal hippocampus, are reduced in PAF-r antagonist-treated mice. We suggest that over-activation of PAF-r signaling induces aberrant neuronal plasticity in LE and leads to chronic dysfunctional neuronal circuitry that mediates epilepsy. PMID:27444269

  7. Dysfunctional epileptic neuronal circuits and dysmorphic dendritic spines are mitigated by platelet-activating factor receptor antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Musto, Alberto E.; Rosencrans, Robert F.; Walker, Chelsey P.; Bhattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Raulji, Chittalsinh M.; Belayev, Ludmila; Fang, Zhide; Gordon, William C.; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy or limbic epilepsy lacks effective therapies due to a void in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that set in motion aberrant neuronal network formations during the course of limbic epileptogenesis (LE). Here we show in in vivo rodent models of LE that the phospholipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) increases in LE and that PAF receptor (PAF-r) ablation mitigates its progression. Synthetic PAF-r antagonists, when administered intraperitoneally in LE, re-establish hippocampal dendritic spine density and prevent formation of dysmorphic dendritic spines. Concomitantly, hippocampal interictal spikes, aberrant oscillations, and neuronal hyper-excitability, evaluated 15–16 weeks after LE using multi-array silicon probe electrodes implanted in the dorsal hippocampus, are reduced in PAF-r antagonist-treated mice. We suggest that over-activation of PAF-r signaling induces aberrant neuronal plasticity in LE and leads to chronic dysfunctional neuronal circuitry that mediates epilepsy. PMID:27444269

  8. Effects of platelet activating factor (PAF) and other vasoconstrictors on a model of angiogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Andrade, S P; Vieira, L B; Bakhle, Y S; Piper, P J

    1992-08-01

    The combination of sponge implant and 133Xe washout technique described in this paper provides a model to study neovascularization in mice which can be observed over several days in the same animal. The local blood flow within the ingrowing granulation tissue has been determined by measuring the washout rate of 133Xe injected into the implants. Tissue infiltration of the sponges was assessed by histological examination and by measurement of sponge wet weight, protein and glycosaminoglycans (GAG) content. The newly formed blood vessels, despite having abnormal configuration, responded to platelet activating factor (PAF) and to endothelin-1 (ET-1) similarly to the normal mature vessels in adjacent skin. However, the sponge blood vessels were more sensitive to angiotensin II than the skin blood vessels. Using this model we have also demonstrated an angiogenic activity of PAF substantiated by increased blood flow and biochemical variables in the implanted sponges. PMID:1382541

  9. Bleomycin-induced lung injury in rats selectively abolishes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction: evidence against a role for platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    McCormack, D G; Crawley, D E; Barnes, P J; Evans, T W

    1992-03-01

    1. The role of platelet-activating factor in the attenuated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction associated with lung injury was evaluated using specific platelet-activating factor antagonists and an isolated perfused lung preparation. 2. Intratracheal bleomycin was administered to rats to produce acute lung injury. Animals received intratracheal saline (control), intratracheal bleomycin or the platelet-activating factor antagonists BN 52021, WEB 2170 or WEB 2086 before and after bleomycin treatment. Forty-eight hours after intratracheal administration of bleomycin or saline the animals were killed. 3. The increases in pulmonary artery pressure during two periods of hypoxic ventilation and in response to 0.2 microgram of angiotensin II were measured. Acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation after pre-constriction with prostaglandin F2 alpha was also measured. To quantify lung injury, the wet/dry ratio of lung weight was determined. 4. Bleomycin treatment attenuated the first and second hypoxic pressor responses by 93% and 77%, respectively, but not the pressor response to angiotensin II nor the vasodilator response to acetylcholine. BN 52021 plus bleomycin augmented the first hypoxic pressor response compared with bleomycin treatment alone, but the structurally unrelated platelet-activating factor antagonists WEB 2170 and WEB 2086 had no significant effect on the bleomycin-induced attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. None of the platelet-activating factor antagonists blocked the increase in the wet/dry lung weight ratio induced by bleomycin. 5. Bleomycin-induced lung injury selectively attenuates hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, an effect that does not appear to be mediated by platelet-activating factor. The mechanism remains to be elucidated, but may involve destruction of the hypoxic 'sensor' within the respiratory tract. PMID:1372199

  10. Lipopolysaccharide induces nitric oxide synthase expression and platelet-activating factor increases nitric oxide production in human fetal membranes in culture

    PubMed Central

    Seyffarth, Gunter; Nelson, Paul N; Dunmore, Simon J; Rodrigo, Nalinda; Murphy, Damian J; Carson, Ray J

    2004-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor and nitric oxide may be involved in the initiation of human labour as inflammatory mediators. The aim of this study was to test whether platelet-activating factor and lipopolysaccharide were able to induce nitric oxide synthase expression and stimulate the production of nitric oxide in human fetal membrane explants in culture. Methods Fetal membranes were collected from Caesarean sections at term. RNA was extracted from membranes and subjected to a qualitative RT-PCR to assess the baseline expression of iNOS. Discs of fetal membranes were cultured for 24 hours in the presence of platelet-activating factor at a dose range of 0.1 nanomolar – 1 micomolar or 1 microgram/ml lipopolysaccharide. Nitric oxide production was measured via nitrite ions in the culture medium and mRNA for iNOS was detected by RT-PCR. Results Culturing the membrane discs in medium containing serum induced nitric oxide synthase expression and platelet-activating factor significantly stimulated the production of nitric oxide under these conditions. When cultured without serum inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was induced by lipopolysaccharide, but not by platelet-activating factor. Conclusion Platelet-activating factor may have a role in the initiation of labour, at term or preterm, via the increased local production of nitric oxide as an inflammatory mediator. In this model of intrauterine infection, lipopolysaccharide was found to induce iNOS expression by fetal membranes, and this mechanism could be involved in preterm labour. PMID:15191613

  11. Optimized Preparation Method of Platelet-Concentrated Plasma and Noncoagulating Platelet-Derived Factor Concentrates: Maximization of Platelet Concentration and Removal of Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Jun; Jona, Masahiro; Eto, Hitomi; Aoi, Noriyuki; Kato, Harunosuke; Suga, Hirotaka; Doi, Kentaro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been clinically used as an easily prepared growth factor cocktail that can promote wound healing, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. However, the therapeutic effects of PRP are still controversial, due partly to the lack of optimized and standardized preparation protocols. We used whole blood (WB) samples to optimize the preparation protocols for PRP, white blood cell-containing (W-PRP), platelet-concentrated plasma (PCP), and noncoagulating platelet-derived factor concentrate (PFC). PRP and W-PRP were most efficiently collected by 10 min centrifugation in a 15-mL conical tube at 230–270 g and 70 g, respectively. To prepare PCP, platelets were precipitated by centrifugation of PRP at >2300 g, 90% of supernatant plasma was removed, and the platelets were resuspended. For preparation of noncoagulating PFC, the supernatant was replaced with one-tenth volume of saline, followed by platelet activation with thrombin. Platelet (before activation) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB (after activation) concentrations in PCP were approximately 20 times greater than those in WB, whereas PFC contained a 20-times greater concentration of platelets before platelet activation and a 50-times greater concentration of PDGF-BB without formation of a fibrin gel after platelet activation than WB. Surprisingly, total PDGF-BB content in the PFC was twice that of activated WB, which suggested that a substantial portion of the PDGF-BB became trapped in the fibrin glue, and replacement of plasma with saline is crucial for maximization of platelet-derived factors. As an anticoagulant, ethylene di-amine tetra-acetic acid disodium inhibited platelet aggregation more efficiently than acid citrate dextrose solution, resulting in higher nonaggregated platelet yield and final PDGF-BB content. These results increase our understanding of how to optimize and standardize preparation of platelet-derived factors at maximum concentrations. PMID

  12. Effects of Physical (In)activity on Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Heber, Stefan; Volf, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    As platelet activation is closely related to the liberation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, platelets play a central role in the development of CVD. Virtually all cardiovascular risk factors favor platelet hyperreactivity and, accordingly, also physical (in)activity affects platelet function. Within this paper, we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the impact of acute and habitual exercise on platelet function. Although there are apparent discrepancies regarding the reported effects of acute, strenuous exercise on platelet activation, a deeper analysis of the available literature reveals that the applied exercise intensity and the subjects' cardiorespiratory fitness represent critical determinants for the observed effects. Consideration of these factors leads to the summary that (i) acute, strenuous exercise can lead to platelet activation, (ii) regular physical activity and/or physical fitness diminish or prevent platelet activation in response to acute exercise, and (iii) habitual physical activity and/or physical fitness also favorably modulate platelet function at physical rest. Notably, these effects of exercise on platelet function show obvious similarities to the well-recognized relation between exercise and the risk for cardiovascular events where vigorous exercise transiently increases the risk for myocardial infarction and a physically active lifestyle dramatically reduces cardiovascular mortality. PMID:26557653

  13. Platelet factor XIII increases the fibrinolytic resistance of platelet-rich clots by accelerating the crosslinking of alpha 2-antiplasmin to fibrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, G. L.; Matsueda, G. R.; Haber, E.

    1992-01-01

    Platelet clots resist fibrinolysis by plasminogen activators. We hypothesized that platelet factor XIII may enhance the fibrinolytic resistance of platelet-rich clots by catalyzing the crosslinking of alpha 2-antiplasmin (alpha 2AP) to fibrin. Analysis of plasma clot structure by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting revealed accelerated alpha 2AP-fibrin crosslinking in platelet-rich compared with platelet-depleted plasma clots. A similar study of clots formed with purified fibrinogen (depleted of factor XIII activity), isolated platelets, and specific factor XIII inhibitors indicated that this accelerated crosslinking was due to the catalytic activity of platelet factor XIII. Moreover, when washed platelets were aggregated by thrombin, there was evidence of platelet factor XIII-mediated crosslinking between platelet alpha 2AP and platelet fibrin(ogen). Specific inhibition (by a monoclonal antibody) of the alpha 2AP associated with washed platelet aggregates accelerated the fibrinolysis of the platelet aggregate. Thus in platelet-rich plasma clots, and in thrombin-induced platelet aggregates, platelet factor XIII actively formed alpha 2AP-fibrin crosslinks, which appeared to enhance the resistance of platelet-rich clots to fibrinolysis.

  14. [The effect of platelet-activating factor antagonists on early bacteria translocation of rat after burn injury].

    PubMed

    Qin, X; Yu, P; Yuan, J

    1995-04-01

    30% third degree burn model of Wistar rat was used in this experiment. The animals were divided randomly into three groups (normal control, burn, and platelet-activating factor antagonist treatment). After poured E. coli which labelled with acridine orange into intestine, the rats were killed at 6, 12, 24, and 48 hrs postburn, the bacteria in mesentery lymph node (MLN), liver and pulmonary organisms were cultured and counted, also observed by fluorescent microscopy directly. The results showed that, in PAF antagonist (WEB2170) treatment group, the quantity of bacteria in MLN, liver and lung were decreased significantly (P < 0.001). The labelled bacteria in MLN, liver and lung of burn group were 100%, 80.0%, and 50.0% respectively compared with 40.0%, 30.0%, and 20.0% in treatment group. It is suggested that WEB 2170 could protect the intestine from bacteria translocation after burn injury. PMID:7587673

  15. Evaluation of dose and route effects of platelet activating factor-induced extravasation in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Handley, D A; Van Valen, R G; Melden, M K; Saunders, R N

    1984-08-31

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a naturally occurring lipid that is reported to induce vessel hyperpermeability leading to loss of protein-rich plasma (extravasation). We have quantitated the systemic extravasation effects of synthetic PAF in the guinea pig by monitoring increases in hematocrit. When given intravenously (10-170 ng/kg), PAF produced dose-dependent increases in hematocrit, with maximal hemoconcentration developing in 5-7 min. In leukopenic animals the expected hematocrit increase was reduced by 57%. PAF given intra-arterially produced the dose-dependent changes in hematocrit similar to the intravenous effects of PAF. However, PAF given intraperitoneally (10-2500 micrograms/kg) was 800-1100-fold less effective than the other routes and hemoconcentration continued for 30-45 min until a maximal hematocrit was observed. These results show that PAF may markedly influence extravasation of plasma in a dose and route-dependent manner. PMID:6495262

  16. Platelet-derived growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta enhance tissue repair activities by unique mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pierce, G F; Mustoe, T A; Lingelbach, J; Masakowski, V R; Griffin, G L; Senior, R M; Deuel, T F

    1989-07-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) markedly potentiate tissue repair in vivo. In the present experiments, both in vitro and in vivo responses to PDGF and TGF-beta were tested to identify mechanisms whereby these growth factors might each enhance the wound-healing response. Recombinant human PDGF B-chain homodimers (PDGF-BB) and TGF-beta 1 had identical dose-response curves in chemotactic assays with monocytes and fibroblasts as the natural proteins from platelets. Single applications of PDGF-BB (2 micrograms, 80 pmol) and TGF-beta 1 (20 micrograms, 600 pmol) were next applied to linear incisions in rats and each enhanced the strength required to disrupt the wounds at 5 d up to 212% of paired control wounds. Histological analysis of treated wounds demonstrated an in vivo chemotactic response of macrophages and fibroblasts to both PDGF-BB and to TGF-beta 1 but the response to TGF-beta 1 was significantly less than that observed with PDGF-BB. Marked increases of procollagen type I were observed by immunohistochemical staining in fibroblasts in treated wounds during the first week. The augmented breaking strength of TGF-beta 1 was not observed 2 and 3 wk after wounding. However, the positive influence of PDGF-BB on wound breaking strength persisted through the 7 wk of testing. Furthermore, PDGF-BB-treated wounds had persistently increased numbers of fibroblasts and granulation tissue through day 21, whereas the enhanced cellular influx in TGF-beta 1-treated wounds was not detectable beyond day 7. Wound macrophages and fibroblasts from PDGF-BB-treated wounds contained sharply increased levels of immunohistochemically detectable intracellular TGF-beta. Furthermore, PDGF-BB in vitro induced a marked, time-dependent stimulation of TGF-beta mRNA levels in cultured normal rat kidney fibroblasts. The results suggest that TGF-beta transiently attracts fibroblasts into the wound and may stimulate collagen synthesis directly. In

  17. Evidence for immunoglobulin Fc receptor-mediated prostaglandin2 and platelet-activating factor formation by cultured rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwirth, R.; Singhal, P.; Diamond, B.; Hays, R.M.; Lobmeyer, L.; Clay, K.; Schlondorff, D.

    1988-09-01

    The possibility of Fc-dependent uptake of IgG immune complexes was examined in subcultured rat mesangial cells free of monocytes. 195Au-labeled colloidal gold particles were coated either with BSA only or with BSA followed by rabbit anti-BSA-IgG or the F(ab')2 fragment of the IgG. Mesangial cells preferentially took up 195Au particles covered with BSA-anti-BSA-IgG over those covered with BSA or the F(ab')2 fragment. This uptake was a time-dependent and saturable process inhibitable by sodium azide or cytochalasin B. Using phase-contrast microscopy in the light reflectance mode, it was established that essentially all mesangial cells took up IgG-coated gold particles. By electron microscopy the process was shown to consist of vesicular uptake with delivery to endosomes. Mesangial binding-uptake of the IgG-covered particles was associated with stimulation of PGE2 synthesis and production of platelet-activating factor, a lipid mediator of inflammation. To characterize the potential Fc receptor for IgG we used the rosetting technique with sheep red blood cells coated with IgG subclass-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies. 50% of mesangial cells exhibited rosetting with red cells coated with mouse IgG2a, whereas negligible rosetting was observed with IgG2b or IgG1. Competition experiments confirmed the specificity of IgG2a binding. We conclude that cultured rat mesangial cells exhibit specific receptors for IgG and that occupancy of Fc receptors results in endocytosis and is associated with generation of PGE2 and platelet-activating factor. These observations may be of significance for immune-mediated glomerular diseases.

  18. Evidence for platelet-activating factor as a late-phase mediator of chronic pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W. G.; Chao, W.; Levine, B. A.; Olson, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    The role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) as a mediator of pancreatic inflammation was examined in the rat pancreatic duct ligation model of obstructive pancreatitis. Pancreatic generation of PAF, as measured by bioassay (ie, platelet [3H]serotonin secretion), was determined at various times after induction of inflammation. Tissue levels of PAF in the normal pancreas averaged 600 +/- 49 pg/g, but PAF was not detectable during the initial 24 hours of pancreatitis, a time when the inflammatory reaction would be considered acute, that is, during the period of maximal serum amylase release and the development of interstitial edema. However a substantial increase in pancreatic PAF levels (12 times control levels) was observed 7 to 14 days after duct ligation during the late-phase response interval similar to the situation characteristic of chronic pancreatitis in which parenchymal atrophy, fibrosis, and pancreatic insufficiency evolve. One week after duct ligation when PAF levels peaked, an evaluation was made of the effects of PAF antagonists (BN52021 and WEB2170) on pancreatic lesions using Evan's blue extravasation, pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and acid phosphatase activity in peritoneal lavage fluid. BN52021 or WEB2170 treatment was shown to reduce pancreatic damage and inflammation significantly. Long-term in vivo administration of exogenous PAF (20 micrograms/kg/hr for 7 days) exhibited a reduction of [3H]thymidine uptake into and amylase release from pancreatic acini in vitro. Our observations 1) that pancreatic PAF levels increased significantly during the chronic phase of obstructive pancreatitis induced by duct ligation; 2) that inhibition of the action of PAF, through specific receptor antagonism, caused an attenuation of pancreatic lesions; and 3) that chronic administration of PAF resulted in decreased pancreatic regeneration and exocrine function are consistent with a pivotal role for PAF as a late-phase inflammatory mediator in chronic

  19. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates glycogen synthase activity in 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.P.; Bowen-Pope, D.F.; Ross, R.; Krebs, E.G.

    1986-05-01

    Hormonal regulation of glycogen synthase, an enzyme that can be phosphorylated on multiple sites, is often associated with changes in its phosphorylation state. Enzyme activation is conventionally monitored by determining the synthase activity ratio ((activity in the absence of glucose 6-P)/(activity in the presence of glucose 6-P)). Insulin causes an activation of glycogen synthase with a concomitant decrease in its phosphate content. In a previous report, the authors showed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) increases the glycogen synthase activity ratio in Swiss 3T3 cells. The time and dose-dependency of this response was similar to that of insulin. Their recent results indicate that PDGF also stimulates glycogen synthase activity. Enzyme activation was maximal after 30 min. of incubation with PDGF; the time course observed was very similar to that with insulin and EGF. At 1 ng/ml (0.03nM), PDGF caused a maximal stimulation of 4-fold in synthase activity ratio. Half-maximal stimulation was observed at 0.2 ng/ml (6 pM). The time course of changes in enzyme activity ratio closely followed that of /sup 125/I-PDGF binding. The authors data suggest that PDGF, as well as EFG and insulin, may be important in regulating glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation mechanisms.

  20. Molecular characterization of the constitutive expression of the plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase gene in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoqing; McIntyre, Thomas M; Zimmerman, Guy A; Prescott, Stephen M; Stafforini, Diana M

    2003-01-01

    Plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) is a phospholipase that inactivates platelet-activating factor (PAF) and PAF-like lipids to generate products with little or no biological activity. The levels of circulating PAF-AH correlate with several disease syndromes. We previously reported that mediators of inflammation regulate the expression of the human PAF-AH gene at the transcriptional level. In the present paper, we characterize the constitutive expression of plasma PAF-AH using the mouse gene as a model system, and we report comparative results obtained using human and mouse promoter constructs. We first cloned, sequenced and analysed the promoter region of the murine plasma PAF-AH (mPAF-AH) gene and found that this gene lacks a canonical TATA box. We demonstrated that the cis -elements required for basal transcription are localized within the -316 to -68 bp region. In vitro band-shift and supershift assays showed that Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors from RAW264.7 and J774A.1 macrophage nuclear extracts bound strongly to a distal GC-rich site within -278/-243 [specificity protein (Sp-A)] and to a proximal TC-rich motif within -150/-114 (Sp-B). In addition, we observed weak binding to a GA-rich site within -110/-82 (Sp-C). The regions containing Sp-B and Sp-C are highly conserved between the human and mouse genes. Forced expression of Sp1 or Sp3 in Sp-lacking Drosophila SL2 cells induced markedly the activity of the exogenous mPAF-AH promoter in a dose-dependent manner, and this induction was dependent on the presence of intact Sp-A and Sp-B. Interestingly, we found that the Sp1- and Sp3-associated DNA-binding activities increased during the maturation of primary human monocytes into macrophages in cell culture. These results demonstrate that Sp1 and Sp3 are key factors that contribute to the basal, constitutive transcription of the plasma PAF-AH gene in macrophages. PMID:12854969

  1. The effect of lysolecithin on prostanoid and platelet-activating factor formation by human gall-bladder mucosal cells

    PubMed Central

    Nag, M. K.; Deshpande, Y. G.; Beck, D.; Li, A.

    1995-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that lysolecithin (lysophosphatidyl choline, LPC) produces experimental cholecystitis in cats mediated by arachidonic acid metabolites. LPC is a cytolytic agent that has been postulated as a contributing factor in the development of cholecystitis in humans. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effect of LPC on human gall-bladder mucosal cell phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase activity. Gall-bladder mucosal cells were isolated from the gall-bladders of patients undergoing routine cholecystectomy. Fresh, isolated cells were maintained in tissue culture and stimulated with varying doses of LPC. Platelet-activating factor concentration was quantitated as an index of phospholipase A2 activity and prostanoids were measured as an index of cyclooxygenase activity. Also, the effect of LPC on cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 expression in microsomal protein was evaluated. LPC caused dose related increases in 6-keto-PGF1α and PAF produced by human gall-bladder mucosal cells. Exposure of human gall-bladder mucosal cells to LPC failed to elicit expression of constitutive cyclooxygenase-1, while the expression of inducible cyclooxygenase-2 was increased. The results of this study indicate that LPC induces the formation of prostanoids and PAF by human gall-bladder mucosal cells, suggesting that this substance may promote the development of gall-bladder inflammation. PMID:18475621

  2. A rationally designed mutant of plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase hydrolyzes the organophosphorus nerve agent soman.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Stephen D; Norris, Joseph; Sweeney, Richard; Bahnson, Brian J; Cerasoli, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPs) such as sarin and soman are some of the most toxic chemicals synthesized by man. They exert toxic effects by inactivating acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and bind secondary target protein. Organophosphorus compounds are hemi-substrates for enzymes of the serine hydrolase superfamily. Enzymes can be engineered by amino acid substitution into OP-hydrolyzing variants (bioscavengers) and used as therapeutics. Some enzymes associated with lipoproteins, such as human plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (pPAF-AH), are also inhibited by OPs; these proteins have largely been ignored for engineering purposes because of complex interfacial kinetics and a lack of structural data. We have expressed active human pPAF-AH in bacteria and previously solved the crystal structure of this enzyme with OP adducts. Using these structures as a guide, we created histidine mutations near the active site of pPAF-AH (F322H, W298H, L153H) in an attempt to generate novel OP-hydrolase activity. Wild-type pPAF-AH, L153H, and F322H have essentially no hydrolytic activity against the nerve agents tested. In contrast, the W298H mutant displayed novel somanase activity with a kcat of 5min(-1) and a KM of 590μM at pH7.5. There was no selective preference for hydrolysis of any of the four soman stereoisomers. PMID:26343853

  3. Platelet Activating Factor Enhances Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis Via PKC, Elevated Intracellular Calcium, and Modulation of Synapsin 1 Dynamics and Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Jennetta W.; Lu, Shao-Ming; Gelbard, Harris A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is an inflammatory phospholipid signaling molecule implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory and neurotoxicity during neuroinflammation. However, little is known about the intracellular mechanisms mediating PAF’s physiological or pathological effects on synaptic facilitation. We show here that PAF receptors are localized at the synapse. Using fluorescent reporters of presynaptic activity we show that a non-hydrolysable analog of PAF (cPAF) enhances synaptic vesicle release from individual presynaptic boutons by increasing the size or release of the readily releasable pool and the exocytosis rate of the total recycling pool. cPAF also activates previously silent boutons resulting in vesicle release from a larger number of terminals. The underlying mechanism involves elevated calcium within presynaptic boutons and protein kinase C activation. Furthermore, cPAF increases synapsin I phosphorylation at sites 1 and 3, and increases dispersion of synapsin I from the presynaptic compartment during stimulation, freeing synaptic vesicles for subsequent release. These findings provide a conceptual framework for how PAF, regardless of its cellular origin, can modulate synapses during normal and pathologic synaptic activity. PMID:26778968

  4. CDP-choline:alkylacetylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase catalyzes the final step in the de novo synthesis of platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Snyder, F

    1997-09-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) can be synthesized de novo or by a remodeling mechanism involving the sn-2 acyl moiety of alkylacylglycerophosphocholines, a membrane-bound precursor. The final step in the de novo pathway is catalyzed by a dithiothreitol-insensitive cholinephosphotransferase that utilizes 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol and CDP-choline as substrates. This article reviews various studies concerning the occurrence, assay, subcellular location, biochemical properties, substrate specificity, and regulatory controls of the PAF-related cholinephosphotransferase. Alkylacetylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase, which is located on the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum, is widely distributed among mammalian tissues. Both the alkyl and acyl analogs of radylacetylglycerol are utilized at equivalent rates. Optimal enzyme activity occurs at pH 8.0 and Mg2+ is required, whereas calcium, deoxycholate, ethanol, and centrophenoxine are inhibitory. Formation of CDP-choline by cytidylyltransferase appears to play a crucial role in the regulation of PAF produced via the cholinephosphotransferase route. Significant differences exist in the behavior of the cholinephosphotransferase activities responsible for the synthesis of PAF and phosphatidylcholine. However, neither enzyme activity has been purified or cloned and, therefore, it is unknown whether a single or two separate proteins are responsible for the observed catalytic activities that form these two distinctly different classes of phospholipids. PMID:9370322

  5. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  6. Platelet-activating factor mediates the cytotoxicity induced by W7FW14F apomyoglobin amyloid aggregates in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sirangelo, Ivana; Giovane, Alfonso; Maritato, Rosa; D'Onofrio, Nunzia; Iannuzzi, Clara; Giordano, Antonio; Irace, Gaetano; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa

    2014-12-01

    W7FW14F apomyoglobin (W7FW14F ApoMb) amyloid aggregates induce cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells through a mechanism not fully elucidated. Amyloid neurotoxicity process involves calcium dyshomeostasis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Another key mediator of the amyloid neurotoxicity is Platelet-Activating Factor (PAF), an inflammatory phospholipid implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, with the aim at evaluating the possible involvement of PAF signaling in the W7FW14F ApoMb-induced cytotoxicity, we show that the presence of CV3899, a PAF receptor (PAF-R) antagonist, prevented the detrimental effect of W7FW14F ApoMb aggregates on SH-SY5Y cell viability. Noticeably, we found that the activation of PAF signaling, following treatment with W7FW14F ApoMb, involves a decreased expression of the PAF acetylhydroase II (PAF-AH II). Interestingly, the reduced PAF-AH II expression was associated with a decreased acetylhydrolase (AH) activity and to an increased sphingosine-transacetylase activity (TA(S)) with production of N-acetylsphingosine (C2-ceramide), a well known mediator of neuronal caspase-dependent apoptosis. These findings suggest that an altered PAF catabolism takes part to the molecular events leading to W7FW14F ApoMb amyloid aggregates-induced cell death. PMID:25053109

  7. Role of platelet-activating factor in the reperfusion injury of rabbit ischemic heart

    SciTech Connect

    Montrucchio, G.; Alloatti, G.; Mariano, F.; de Paulis, R.; Comino, A.; Emanuelli, G.; Camussi, G. )

    1990-07-01

    This study shows that the administration of the PAF receptor antagonist SDZ 63.675 (5 mg/kg body weight) before reperfusion significantly reduced the hematologic and hemodynamic alterations, as well as the size of necrotic area in rabbits subjected to 40 minutes of coronary occlusion and reperfusion. Pretreatment with SDZ 63.675 prevented the reduction of platelet counts in the blood obtained from the right ventricle (86.6 +/- 2.8% of the control preischemia value) and the transient bradycardia (85.0 +/- 2.8%), the systemic hypotension (58.0 +/- 2.8%), and the increase in right ventricular pressure (125.0 +/- 3.6%) that were evident in the first minutes of reperfusion in untreated control rabbits. Two as well as 24 hours after reperfusion, the infarct size, judged by staining with tetrazolium, was significantly reduced in rabbits treated with SDZ 63.675 (infarct size in control animals, 66.0 +/- 2.9% and 63.46 +/- 2.09% of the risk region at 2 or 24 hours, respectively, compared with 38.9 +/- 5.2% and 37.11 +/- 2.44% of the risk region at 2 and 24 hours in rabbits treated with SDZ 63.675). This result was confirmed by histologic examination of cardiac tissue 24 hours after reperfusion. In addition, SDZ 63.675 markedly reduced the accumulation of 111In-oxine-labeled platelets that occurs 15 minutes after reperfusion in the central ischemic area of the heart and in the lungs. These results suggest that PAF plays a role in the evolution of myocardial injury observed during reperfusion.

  8. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  9. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  10. Autocrine enhancement of leukotriene synthesis by endogenous leukotriene B4 and platelet-activating factor in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, P. P.; McColl, S. R.; Braquet, P.; Borgeat, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), two potent lipid mediators synthesized by activated neutrophils, are known to stimulate several neutrophil functional responses. In this study, we have determined that endogenous LTB4 and PAF exert autocrine effects on LT synthesis, as well as the underlying mechanism involved. 2. Pretreatment of neutrophils with either pertussis toxin (PT), or with receptor antagonists for LTB4 and PAF, resulted in an inhibition of LT synthesis induced by calcium ionophore, A23187. This inhibition was most marked at submaximal (100-300 nM) A23187 concentrations, whilst it was least at ionophore concentrations which induce maximal LT synthesis (1-3 microM). Thus newly-synthesized PAF and LTB4 can enhance LT synthesis induced by A23187 under conditions where the LT-generating system is not fully activated. 3. In recombinant human (rh) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-primed neutrophils, LT synthesis in response to chemoattractants (fMet-Leu-Phe or rhC5a) was also significantly inhibited by the LTB4 receptor antagonist, and to a lesser extent by PAF receptor antagonists. 4. Further investigation revealed that LTB4 and/or PAF exert their effects on LT synthesis via an effect on arachidonic acid (AA) availability, as opposed to 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) activation. Indeed, the receptor antagonists, as well as PT, inhibited LT synthesis and AA release to a similar extent, whereas 5-LO activation (assessed with an exogenous 5-LO substrate) was virtually unaffected under the same conditions. Accordingly, we showed that addition of exogenous LTB4 could enhance AA availability in response to chemoattractant challenge in rhGM-CSF-primed cells, without significantly affecting the 5-LO activation status.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8019762

  11. Biological Role of Trichoderma harzianum-Derived Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) on Stress Response and Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Wu, Qiong; Fu, Kehe; Gao, Shigang; Wang, Meng; Gao, Jinxin; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the properties of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum. The enzyme, comprised of 572 amino acids, shares high homology with PAF-AH proteins from T. koningii and other microbial species. The optimum enzymatic activity of PAF-AH occurred at pH 6 in the absence of Ca2+ and it localized in the cytoplasm, and we observed the upregulation of PAF-AH expression in response to carbon starvation and strong heat shock. Furthermore, PAF-AH knockout transformant growth occurred more slowly than wild type cells and over-expression strains grown in SM medium at 37°C and 42°C. In addition, PAF-AH expression significantly increased under a series of maize root induction assay. Eicosanoic acid and ergosterol levels decreased in the PAF-AH knockouts compared to wild type cells, as revealed by GC/MS analysis. We also determined stress responses mediated by PAF-AH were related to proteins HEX1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and cytochrome c. Finally, PAF-AH exhibited antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani in plate confrontation assays. Our results indicate PAF-AH may play an important role in T. harzianum stress response and antagonism under diverse environmental conditions. PMID:24964161

  12. Group A Streptococcus Secreted Esterase Hydrolyzes Platelet-Activating Factor to Impede Neutrophil Recruitment and Facilitate Innate Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinquan; Garcia, Cristiana C.; Feng, Wenchao; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Hilmer, Jonathan; Tavares, Luciana P.; Layton, Arthur W.; Quinn, Mark T.; Bothner, Brian; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Lei, Benfang

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against invading organisms. Thus, pathogens have developed virulence mechanisms to evade the innate immune system. Here, we report a novel means for inhibition of neutrophil recruitment by Group A Streptococcus (GAS). Deletion of the secreted esterase gene (designated sse) in M1T1 GAS strains with (MGAS5005) and without (MGAS2221) a null covS mutation enhances neutrophil ingress to infection sites in the skin of mice. In trans expression of SsE in MGAS2221 reduces neutrophil recruitment and enhances skin invasion. The sse deletion mutant of MGAS5005 (ΔsseMGAS5005) is more efficiently cleared from skin than the parent strain. SsE hydrolyzes the sn-2 ester bond of platelet-activating factor (PAF), converting biologically active PAF into inactive lyso-PAF. KM and kcat of SsE for hydrolysis of 2-thio-PAF were similar to those of the human plasma PAF acetylhydrolase. Treatment of PAF with SsE abolishes the capacity of PAF to induce activation and chemotaxis of human neutrophils. More importantly, PAF receptor-deficient mice significantly reduce neutrophil infiltration to the site of ΔsseMGAS5005 infection. These findings identify the first secreted PAF acetylhydrolase of bacterial pathogens and support a novel GAS evasion mechanism that reduces phagocyte recruitment to sites of infection by inactivating PAF, providing a new paradigm for bacterial evasion of neutrophil responses. PMID:22496650

  13. Hysteresis-like binding of coagulation factors X/Xa to procoagulant activated platelets and phospholipids results from multistep association and membrane-dependent multimerization.

    PubMed

    Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Kurasawa, James H; Sarafanov, Andrey G; Chambost, Herve; Vasil'ev, Sergey A; Demina, Irina A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-06-01

    Binding of coagulation factors X (fX) and Xa (fXa) to activated platelets is required for the formation of membrane-dependent enzymatic complexes of intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase. We carried out an in-depth characterization of fX/fXa binding to phospholipids and gel-filtered, thrombin-activated platelets. Flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and computational modeling were used to investigate interactions of fX/fXa with the membranes. Confocal microscopy was employed to study fXa binding to platelet thrombi formed in flowing whole blood under arterial conditions. Binding of fX/fXa to either vesicles or procoagulant platelets did not follow a traditional one-step reversible binding model. Their dissociation was a two-step process resulting in a plateau that was up to 10-fold greater than the saturation value observed in the association experiments. Computational modeling and experimental evidence suggested that this was caused by a combination of two-step association (mainly for fX) and multimerization on the membrane (mainly for fXa). Importantly, fX formed multimers with fXa, thereby improving its retention. The same binding/dissociation hysteresis was observed for annexin V known to form trimers on the membranes. Experiments with platelets from gray syndrome patients showed that alpha-granular factor Va provided an additional high-affinity binding site for fXa that did not affect the hysteresis. Confocal microscopy observation of fXa binding to platelet thrombi in a flow chamber and its wash-out confirmed that this phenomenon persisted under physiologically relevant conditions. This suggests its possible role of "locking" coagulation factors on the membrane and preventing their inhibition in plasma and removal from thrombi by flow. PMID:26874201

  14. Effects of UR-12633, a new antagonist of platelet-activating factor, in rodent models of endotoxic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Giral, M.; Balsa, D.; Ferrando, R.; Merlos, M.; Garcia-Rafanell, J.; Forn, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of the selective and potent novel platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist, UR-12633 (1-(3,3-diphenylpropionyl)-4-(3-pyridylcyanomethyl)piperidin e) on several markers of endotoxic shock syndrome were evaluated in rats and mice. 2. UR-12633, administered 60 min after E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), reversed the LPS-induced sustained hypotension in rats at doses of 0.01 to 1 mg kg-1, i.v. The reference compound WEB-2086 (1 mg kg-1) also reversed the LPS-induced hypotension. UR-12633 (1 mg kg-1), administered 10 min before LPS, almost fully inhibited sustained hypotension. The immediate hypotension (within 1 min) caused by LPS was not prevented by either UR-12633 or WEB-2086. 3. Pretreatment with 10 mg kg-1, i.v. of either UR-12633 or WEB-2086 inhibited the increase in disseminated intravascular coagulation markers, such as activated partial thromboplastin time (55 and 74% inhibition, respectively), and prothrombin time (22 and 72% inhibition) and prevented the decrease in plasma fibrinogen content (100 and 29% inhibition). 4. Increases in acid phosphatase (ACP) plasma activity, a marker of lysosomal activation, and in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a marker of tissue damage, were inhibited by pretreatment with 10 mg kg-1, i.v. of either UR-12633 or WEB-2086 (100% and 69% inhibition, ACP; 62 and 48% inhibition, LDH). Hyperglycaemia (71 and 46%) and hyperlactacidaemia (92 and 56%) were also inhibited. 5. UR-12633, but not WEB-2086, inhibited the LPS-induced increase in vascular permeability in rats, as shown by prevention of haemoconcentration and, to a lesser degree, the increase in Evans blue dye extravasation. 6. In a series of nine reference compounds and UR-12633, we found a high correlation (P < 0.001) between PAF antagonist activity, measured as the inhibition of PAF-induced rabbit platelet aggregation or PAF-induced mortality in mice and the inhibition of LPS-induced mortality. 7. In spite of the multifactorial nature of endotoxic shock, in

  15. Picomolar platelet-activating factor mobilizes Ca to change platelet shape without activating phospholipase C or protein kinase C; simultaneous fluorometric measurement of intracellular free Ca concentration and aggregation.

    PubMed

    James-Kracke, M R; Sexe, R B; Shukla, S D

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate signal transduction mechanisms activated by low and high concentrations of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in rabbit platelets and to contrast the responses to those induced by thrombin. We measured changes in intracellular free calcium ([Ca++]i) with fura2, while monitoring light scatter simultaneously as a measure of shape change and aggregation in a dual-excitation dual-emission spectrofluorometer. An abrupt 20% fall in light scatter, coincident with the peak of the [Ca++]i, indicated shape change in Ca-containing or Ca-free medium and was blocked by BAPTA loading and 10 microM cytochalasin B. A secondary decline in light scatter, indicating aggregation, occurred only in Ca-containing medium and only under conditions favoring protein kinase C (PKC) activation. PAF at 10(-12) M did not increase 1,4,5-inositol triphosphate content, which suggested PKC would not be activated. However, PAF at 10(-12) rapidly increased [Ca++]i to 900 nM in 7 sec seemingly by Ca influx through receptor-operated channels inducing shape change. PAF at 10(-9) and 10(-8) M increased [Ca++]i to 2 microM in 12 sec and induced both shape change and aggregation. However, in platelets pretreated with 100 nM staurosporine to inhibit protein kinases, 10(-9) M PAF did not cause aggregation even though [Ca++]i still rose to 2 microM, which indicated that PKC plays a role in aggregation but not in Ca++ mobilization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7965802

  16. Diversity of Interstitial Lung Fibroblasts Is Regulated by Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor α Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Green, Jenna; Endale, Mehari; Auer, Herbert; Perl, Anne-Karina T

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal cell interactions and factors that control normal lung development are key players in lung injury, repair, and fibrosis. A number of studies have investigated the roles and sources of epithelial progenitors during lung regeneration; such information, however, is limited in lung fibroblasts. Thus, understanding the origin, phenotype, and roles of fibroblast progenitors in lung development, repair, and regeneration helps address these limitations. Using a combination of platelet-derived growth factor receptor α-green fluorescent protein (PDGFRα-GFP) reporter mice, microarray, real-time polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence, we characterized two distinct interstitial resident fibroblasts, myo- and matrix fibroblasts, and identified a role for PDGFRα kinase activity in regulating their activation during lung regeneration. Transcriptional profiling of the two populations revealed a myo- and matrix fibroblast gene signature. Differences in proliferation, smooth muscle actin induction, and lipid content in the two subpopulations of PDGFRα-expressing fibroblasts during alveolar regeneration were observed. Although CD140α(+)CD29(+) cells behaved as myofibroblasts, CD140α(+)CD34(+) appeared as matrix and/or lipofibroblasts. Gain or loss of PDGFRα kinase activity using the inhibitor nilotinib and a dominant-active PDGFRα-D842V mutation revealed that PDGFRα was important for matrix fibroblast differentiation. We demonstrated that PDGFRα signaling promotes alveolar septation by regulating fibroblast activation and matrix fibroblast differentiation, whereas myofibroblast differentiation was largely PDGFRα independent. These studies provide evidence for the phenotypic and functional diversity as well as the extent of specificity of interstitial resident fibroblasts differentiation during regeneration after partial pneumonectomy. PMID:26414960

  17. Platelet-activating factor promotes motility in breast cancer cells and disrupts non-transformed breast acinar structures.

    PubMed

    Anandi, V Libi; Ashiq, K A; Nitheesh, K; Lahiri, M

    2016-01-01

    A plethora of studies have demonstrated that chronic inflammatory microenvironment influences the genesis and progression of tumors. Such microenvironments are enriched with various lipid mediators. Platelet activating factor (PAF, 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is one such lipid mediator that is secreted by different immune cell types during inflammation and by breast cancer cells upon stimulation with growth factors. Overexpression of PAF-receptor has also been observed in many other cancers. Here we report the possible roles of PAF in tumor initiation and progression. MCF10A, a non-transformed and non-malignant mammary epithelial cell line, when grown as 3D 'on-top' cultures form spheroids that have a distinct hollow lumen surrounded by a monolayer of epithelial cells. Exposure of these spheroids to PAF resulted in the formation of large deformed acinar structures with disrupted lumen, implying transformation. We then examined the response of transformed cells such as MDA-MB 231 to stimulation with PAF. We observed collective cell migration as well as motility at the single cell level on PAF induction, suggesting its role during metastasis. This increase in collective cell migration is mediated via PI3-kinase and/or JNK pathway and is independent of the MAP-kinase pathway. Taken together this study signifies a novel role of PAF in inducing transformation of non-tumorigenic cells and the vital role in promotion of breast cancer cell migration. PMID:26531049

  18. Dual Pili Post-translational Modifications Synergize to Mediate Meningococcal Adherence to Platelet Activating Factor Receptor on Human Airway Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Benjamin L.; Power, Peter M.; Swords, W. Edward; Weiser, Jeffery N.; Apicella, Michael A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Pili of pathogenic Neisseria are major virulence factors associated with adhesion, twitching motility, auto-aggregation, and DNA transformation. Pili of N. meningitidis are subject to several different post-translational modifications. Among these pilin modifications, the presence of phosphorylcholine (ChoP) and a glycan on the pilin protein are phase-variable (subject to high frequency, reversible on/off switching of expression). In this study we report the location of two ChoP modifications on the C-terminus of N. meningitidis pilin. We show that the surface accessibility of ChoP on pili is affected by phase variable changes to the structure of the pilin-linked glycan. We identify for the first time that the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFr) is a key, early event receptor for meningococcal adherence to human bronchial epithelial cells and tissue, and that synergy between the pilin-linked glycan and ChoP post-translational modifications is required for pili to optimally engage PAFr to mediate adherence to human airway cells. PMID:23696740

  19. Radioimmunoassay of factor V in human plasma and platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, P.B.; Eide, L.L.; Bowie, E.J.W.; Mann, K.G.

    1982-07-01

    Homogeneous, single-chain human factor V was used to develop a double antibody competition radioimmunoassay to measure factor V concentrations in plasma and platelets. Standard curves were constructed that allow for the detection of as little as 20 ng factor V/ml of plasma. Normal factor V concentrations range from 4 to 14 ..mu..g/ml of plasma with an average value of 7.0 +/- 2.0 ..mu..g/ml (n = 64). No correlation was observed between antigen levels and age or sex. The radioimmunoassay data are consistent with factor V clotting assays, providing freshly drawn plasma is used in the bioassay. Radioimmunoassay of washed platelets indicate that 0.63-1.93 ..mu..g of factor V is present per 2.5 X 10/sup 8/ platelets (6412-14128 molecules of factor V per platelet). When normalized to individual hematocrits and platelet count, the data indicated that platelets contribute approximately 18%-25% of the factor V found in whole blood. In addition, two individuals with functionally deficient factor V were examined and found to be deficient in both antigen and activity.

  20. Platelet-activating factor induces cell cycle arrest and disrupts the DNA damage response in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Puebla-Osorio, N; Damiani, E; Bover, L; Ullrich, S E

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid modulator of inflammation that has diverse physiological and pathological functions. Previously, we demonstrated that PAF has an essential role in ultraviolet (UV)-induced immunosuppression and reduces the repair of damaged DNA, suggesting that UV-induced PAF is contributing to skin cancer initiation by inducing immune suppression and also affecting a proper DNA damage response. The exact role of PAF in modulating cell proliferation, differentiation or transformation is unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) by which PAF affects the cell cycle and impairs early DNA damage response. PAF arrests proliferation in transformed and nontransformed human mast cells by reducing the expression of cyclin-B1 and promoting the expression of p21. PAF-treated cells show a dose-dependent cell cycle arrest mainly at G2–M, and a decrease in the DNA damage response elements MCPH1/BRIT-1 and ataxia telangiectasia and rad related (ATR). In addition, PAF disrupts the localization of p-ataxia telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), and phosphorylated-ataxia telangiectasia and rad related (p-ATR) at the site of DNA damage. Whereas the potent effect on cell cycle arrest may imply a tumor suppressor activity for PAF, the impairment of proper DNA damage response might implicate PAF as a tumor promoter. The outcome of these diverse effects may be dependent on specific cues in the microenvironment. PMID:25950475

  1. Platelet-derived growth factor stimulates protein kinase D through the activation of phospholipase Cgamma and protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Van Lint, J; Ni, Y; Valius, M; Merlevede, W; Vandenheede, J R

    1998-03-20

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates protein kinase D (PKD) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. We have used a series of PDGF receptor mutants that display a selective impairment of the binding of SH2-containing proteins (GTPase-activating protein, SHP-2, phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma), or phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)) to show that Tyr-1021, the PLCgamma-binding site, is essential for PKD stimulation by PDGF in A431 cells. We next investigated whether any one of these four binding sites could mediate PKD activation in the absence of the other three sites. F5, a receptor mutant that lacks all four binding sites for GTPase-activating protein, PLCgamma, PI3K, and SHP-2, fails to activate PKD. A panel of single add-back mutants was used to investigate if any one of these four sites could restore signaling to PKD. Of the four sites, only the PLCgamma+ single add-back receptor restored PDGF-mediated activation of PKD, and only this add-back receptor produced diacylglycerol (DAG) in a PDGF-dependent manner. 1,2-Dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol, a membrane-permeant DAG analog, was found to be sufficient for activation of PKD. Taken together, these data indicate that PLCgamma activation is not only necessary, but also sufficient to mediate PDGF-induced PKD activation. Although the presence of a pleckstrin homology domain makes PKD a potential PI3K target, PKD was not stimulated by selective PI3K activation, and wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3K, did not inhibit PDGF signaling to PKD. The activation of PKD by DAG or by the wild-type and PLCgamma+ add-back PDGF receptors was inhibited by GF109203X, suggesting a role for protein kinase C in the stimulation of PKD by PDGF. PDGF induced a time-dependent phosphorylation of PKD that closely correlated with activation. The PDGF-induced activation and phosphorylation of PKD were reversed by in vitro incubation of PKD with protein phosphatase 1 or 2A, indicating that PDGF signaling to PKD involves the Ser

  2. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase: Structural Implication to Liporprotein Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Uttamkumar; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2009-02-23

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5 angstroms. It has a classic lipase alpha/beta-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser273, His351, and Asp296. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser273. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  3. Crosstalk between Protease-activated Receptor 1 and Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Regulates Melanoma Cell Adhesion Molecule (MCAM/MUC18) Expression and Melanoma Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Villares, Gabriel J.; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Zigler, Maya; Wang, Hua; Petersson, Frederik; Price, Janet E.; Schroit, Alan; Prieto, Victor G.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-01-01

    The cellular and molecular pathways that regulate platelet activation, blood coagulation, and inflammation are emerging as critical players in cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate a novel signaling mechanism whereby protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) mediates expression of melanoma cell adhesion molecule MCAM/MUC18 (MUC18), a critical marker of melanoma metastasis, via activation of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). We found that PAR1 silencing with small hairpin RNA inhibits MUC18 expression in metastatic melanoma cells by inhibiting CREB phosphorylation, activity, and binding to the MUC18 promoter. We further demonstrate that the PAF/PAFR pathway mediates MUC18 expression downstream of PAR1. Indeed, PAR1 silencing down-regulates PAFR expression and PAF production, PAFR silencing blocks MUC18 expression, and re-expression of PAFR in PAR1-silenced cells rescues MUC18 expression. We further demonstrate that the PAR1-PAFR-MUC18 pathway mediates melanoma cell adhesion to microvascular endothelial cells, transendothelial migration, and metastatic retention in the lungs. Rescuing PAFR expression in PAR1-silenced cells fully restores metastatic phenotype of melanoma, indicating that PAFR plays critical role in the molecular mechanism of PAR1 action. Our results link the two pro-inflammatory G-protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 and PAFR, with the metastatic dissemination of melanoma and suggest that PAR1, PAFR, and MUC18 are attractive therapeutic targets for preventing melanoma metastasis. PMID:19703903

  4. Crosstalk between protease-activated receptor 1 and platelet-activating factor receptor regulates melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM/MUC18) expression and melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Vladislava O; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Villares, Gabriel J; Dobroff, Andrey S; Zigler, Maya; Wang, Hua; Petersson, Frederik; Price, Janet E; Schroit, Alan; Prieto, Victor G; Hung, Mien-Chie; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-10-16

    The cellular and molecular pathways that regulate platelet activation, blood coagulation, and inflammation are emerging as critical players in cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate a novel signaling mechanism whereby protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) mediates expression of melanoma cell adhesion molecule MCAM/MUC18 (MUC18), a critical marker of melanoma metastasis, via activation of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). We found that PAR1 silencing with small hairpin RNA inhibits MUC18 expression in metastatic melanoma cells by inhibiting CREB phosphorylation, activity, and binding to the MUC18 promoter. We further demonstrate that the PAF/PAFR pathway mediates MUC18 expression downstream of PAR1. Indeed, PAR1 silencing down-regulates PAFR expression and PAF production, PAFR silencing blocks MUC18 expression, and re-expression of PAFR in PAR1-silenced cells rescues MUC18 expression. We further demonstrate that the PAR1-PAFR-MUC18 pathway mediates melanoma cell adhesion to microvascular endothelial cells, transendothelial migration, and metastatic retention in the lungs. Rescuing PAFR expression in PAR1-silenced cells fully restores metastatic phenotype of melanoma, indicating that PAFR plays critical role in the molecular mechanism of PAR1 action. Our results link the two pro-inflammatory G-protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 and PAFR, with the metastatic dissemination of melanoma and suggest that PAR1, PAFR, and MUC18 are attractive therapeutic targets for preventing melanoma metastasis. PMID:19703903

  5. Platelet activating factor amplifies human neutrophil adherence to bovine endothelial cells: evidence for a lipoxygenase dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Damtew, B; Spagnuolo, P J

    1992-10-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator that induces the release of leukotrienes and prostaglandins from various cells and tissues. We examined the capacity of PAF alone and in combination with soluble stimuli to enhance eicosanoid synthesis and adherence of human neutrophils. Neutrophils were preincubated with PAF and washed before exposure to the soluble stimuli F-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP), calcium ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristate acetate. Preincubation of neutrophils with 1 microM PAF enhanced the release of both LTB4 and LTC4 in response to each of the three agonists, in contrast with the unprimed neutrophils. Priming was specific for PAF since lyso-PAF was inactive. Priming concentrations of PAF also augmented the adherence of neutrophils to endothelium in the presence of the soluble agonists A23187, phorbol myristate acetate, and FMLP. The priming effect of PAF on eicosanoid release and neutrophil adherence was shown to have similar time- and dose-dependent effects. Further, the priming effects of PAF on adherence could be reversed by preincubation of neutrophils with the lipoxygenase inhibitors nordihydroguiaretic acid and 5,8,11,14-ETYA but not by preincubation with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. These data demonstrate that PAF amplifies neutrophil adherence to endothelium through a lipoxygenase dependent mechanism. PMID:1330924

  6. Platelet-activating factor attenuation of long-term potentiation in rat hippocampal slices via protein tyrosine kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Benjamin; Wang, Wenwei; Liu, Jianuo; Xiong, Huangui

    2016-02-26

    It is well established that HIV-1-infected mononuclear phagocytes release platelet activating factor (PAF) and elevated levels of PAF have been detected in blood and in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). It is our hypothesis that the elevated levels of PAF alter long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus, leading to neurocognitive dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effects of PAF on LTP in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices. Our results showed incubation of hippocampal slices with PAF attenuated LTP. The PAF-mediated attenuation was blocked by ginkgolide B, a PAF receptor antagonist, suggesting PAF attenuation of LTP via PAF receptors. Application of lyso-PAF, an inactive PAF analog, had no apparent effect on LTP. Further investigation revealed an involvement of tyrosine kinase in PAF attenuation of LTP, which was demonstrated by lavendustin A (a specific protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor) blockage of PAF attenuation of LTP. As LTP is widely considered as the cellular and synaptic basis for learning and memory, the attenuation of LTP by PAF may contribute at least in part to the HAND pathogenesis. PMID:26808643

  7. Oxidative response of neutrophils to platelet-activating factor is altered during acute ruminal acidosis induced by oligofructose in heifers

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Claudia; Carretta, María Daniella; Alarcón, Pablo; Conejeros, Ivan; Gallardo, Diego; Hidalgo, Alejandra Isabel; Tadich, Nestor; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Hidalgo, María Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the main mechanisms used to kill microbes during innate immune response. D-lactic acid, which is augmented during acute ruminal acidosis, reduces platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding in bovine neutrophils in vitro. This study was conducted to investigate whether acute ruminal acidosis induced by acute oligofructose overload in heifers interferes with ROS production and L-selectin shedding in blood neutrophils. Blood neutrophils and plasma were obtained by jugular venipuncture, while ruminal samples were collected using rumenocentesis. Lactic acid from plasma and ruminal samples was measured by HPLC. PAF-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding were measured in vitro in bovine neutrophils by a luminol chemiluminescence assay and flow cytometry, respectively. A significant increase in ruminal and plasma lactic acid was recorded in these animals. Specifically, a decrease in PAF-induced ROS production was observed 8 h after oligofructose overload, and this was sustained until 48 h post oligofructose overload. A reduction in PAF-induced L-selectin shedding was observed at 16 h and 32 h post oligofructose overload. Overall, the results indicated that neutrophil PAF responses were altered in heifers with ruminal acidosis, suggesting a potential dysfunction of the innate immune response. PMID:25013355

  8. Metabolism of platelet activating factor (PAF) and lyso-PAF in polymorphonuclear granulocytes from severely burned patients.

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, W; Kasimir, S; Köller, M; Erbs, G; Müller, F E; König, W

    1990-12-01

    We studied the metabolism of 3H-platelet activating factor (PAF) and lyso-PAF in human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) from severely burned patients (n = 6) on days 1, 5, 9, 15, and 25 post-trauma. All patients suffered from a severe burn trauma of more than 30% total body surface area. Stimulation of PMN in healthy donors (n = 10) with the Ca-ionophore resulted in the conversion of 3H-lyso-PAF into PAF (18 +/- 2% of total radioactivity) and alkyl-acyl-glycero-phosphorylcholine (alkyl-acyl-GPC, 50 +/- 6%). In burned patients a significantly reduced formation of 3H-PAF was observed between days 1 and 15 post-trauma (day 9: 1 +/- 1%, p less than 0.0001). This pattern was normalized again in patients (n = 5) who survived the trauma after septic periods and was observed during the second week post-trauma. In one patient who succumbed to his injuries a sustained inhibition of PAF formation was observed up to his death. The decreased formation of PAF correlated weakly with the appearance of immature granulocytes within the analyzed cell fraction (ratio of immature cells versus PAF-formation, r = -0.55, p = 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2258972

  9. Lack of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Attenuates Experimental Food Allergy but Not Its Metabolic Alterations regarding Adipokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Nathália Vieira; Fonseca, Roberta Cristelli; Perez, Denise; Pereira, Rafaela Vaz Sousa; de Lima Alves, Juliana; Pinho, Vanessa; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Cara, Denise Carmona

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is known to be an important mediator of anaphylaxis. However, there is a lack of information in the literature about the role of PAF in food allergy. The aim of this work was to elucidate the participation of PAF during food allergy development and the consequent adipose tissue inflammation along with its alterations. Our data demonstrated that, both before oral challenge and after 7 days receiving ovalbumin (OVA) diet, OVA-sensitized mice lacking the PAF receptor (PAFR) showed a decreased level of anti-OVA IgE associated with attenuated allergic markers in comparison to wild type (WT) mice. Moreover, there was less body weight and adipose tissue loss in PAFR-deficient mice. However, some features of inflamed adipose tissue presented by sensitized PAFR-deficient and WT mice after oral challenge were similar, such as a higher rate of rolling leukocytes in this tissue and lower circulating levels of adipokines (resistin and adiponectin) in comparison to nonsensitized mice. Therefore, PAF signaling through PAFR is important for the allergic response to OVA but not for the adipokine alterations caused by this inflammatory process. Our work clarifies some effects of PAF during food allergy along with its role on the metabolic consequences of this inflammatory process. PMID:27314042

  10. The role of complement, platelet-activating factor and leukotriene B4 in a reversed passive Arthus reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A. G.; Norman, K. E.; Donigi-Gale, D.; Shoupe, T. S.; Edwards, R.; Williams, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanisms underlying oedema formation induced in a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction and, for comparison, in response to zymosan in rabbit skin were investigated. 2. Oedema formation at skin sites was quantified by the accumulation of intravenously-injected 125I-labelled human serum albumin. 3. Recombinant soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), administered locally in rabbit skin, suppressed oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by zymosan. 4. The platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonists, WEB 2086 and PF10040 administered locally, inhibited oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by PAF but not by zymosan. 5. A locally administered leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonist, LY-255283, inhibited oedema formation induced by LTB4 but did not inhibit oedema responses to PAF, zymosan or the RPA reaction. 6. The results demonstrate a role for complement in oedema formation in both the RPA reaction and in response to zymosan. An important contribution by PAF is indicated in the RPA reaction but not in response to zymosan whereas no evidence was obtained to suggest a role for LTB4 in either inflammatory response. PMID:1330163

  11. The effect of platelet activating factor antagonist on ozone-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W.C.; Bethel, R.A. )

    1992-10-01

    We investigated the role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in ozone-induced airway responses by examining the effects of L659,989, a potent PAF antagonist, on bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation. Twenty-four male guinea pigs were studied in four equal groups. Total lung resistance (RL) in intubated and spontaneously breathing animals was measured in a constant-volume body plethysmograph. Dose-response curves to methacholine were determined in all animals at the start of the experiment. These were repeated on a separate day after the following types of treatments: air exposure in Group 1, intraperitoneally administered alcohol and air exposure in Group 2; intraperitoneally administered alcohol and ozone exposure in Group 3, and intraperitoneally administered L659,989 (a specific PAF antagonist), 5 mg/kg dissolved in alcohol, and ozone exposure in Group 4. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed after the second methacholine challenge, and the bronchial mucosa was also examined for inflammatory cells. Exposure to 3 ppm ozone for 2 h resulted in a three-doubling concentration increase in bronchial responsiveness, which was not significantly inhibited by prior treatment with L659,989. Ozone induced a 1.8-fold increase in BAL total cell count, increased eosinophilic influx into the airways, and increased eosinophilic infiltration in the bronchial mucosa, which were all not inhibited by L659,989 pretreatment. The results suggest that PAF may not have an essential role in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and nonallergic airway inflammation.

  12. Semi-synthetic preparation of 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (platelet activating factor) using plant cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, N.; Mangold, H.K.

    1985-04-01

    Incubation of photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures of rape (Brassica napus) and heterotrophic cell suspension cultures of soya (Glycine max) with 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-sn-glycerol or rac-1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecylglycerol leads in high yield (up to 78%) to labeled 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. Alkaline hydrolysis of the choline glycerophospholipids yields pure 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. 1-O-(1'-14C)Hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (platelet activating factor) is obtained by acetylating the lyso compound. The semi-synthetic preparation described leads to labeled platelet activating factor in an overall yield of 50-60% without loss of specific activity.

  13. Interleukin-12 is synthesized by mesangial cells and stimulates platelet-activating factor synthesis, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell shape change.

    PubMed

    Bussolati, B; Mariano, F; Biancone, L; Foà, R; David, S; Cambi, V; Camussi, G

    1999-02-01

    Preliminary studies indicate the involvement of interleukin (IL)-12 in experimental renal pathology. In the present study, we evaluated whether cultured glomerular mesangial cells are able to produce IL-12 and whether IL-12 may regulate some of their functions, including the cytoskeletal reorganization, the change in cell shape, and the production of platelet-activating factor (PAF). The results obtained indicate that pro-inflammatory stimuli, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and bacterial polysaccharides, induce the expression of IL-12 mRNA and the synthesis of the protein by cultured mesangial cells. Moreover, cultured mesangial cells were shown to bind IL-12 and to express the human low-affinity IL-12 beta1-chain receptor. When challenged with IL-12, mesangial cells produced PAF in a dose- and time-dependent manner and superoxide anions. No production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-8 was observed. Moreover, we demonstrate that IL-12 induced a delayed and sustained shape change of mesangial cells that reached its maximum between 90 and 120 minutes of incubation. The changes in cell shape occurred concomitantly with cytoskeletal rearrangements and may be consistent with cell contraction. As IL-12-dependent shape change of mesangial cells was concomitant with the synthesis of PAF, which is known to promote mesangial cell contraction, we investigated the role of PAF using two chemically different PAF receptor antagonists. Both antagonists inhibited almost completely the cell shape change induced by IL-12, whereas they were ineffective on angiotensin-II-induced cell shape change. In conclusion, our results suggest that mesangial cells can either produce IL-12 or be stimulated by this cytokine to synthesize PAF and to undergo shape changes compatible with cell contraction. PMID:10027419

  14. A Novel Direct Factor Xa Inhibitory Peptide with Anti-Platelet Aggregation Activity from Agkistrodon acutus Venom Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meimei; Ye, Xiaohui; Ming, Xin; Chen, Yahui; Wang, Ying; Su, Xingli; Su, Wen; Kong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom is a natural substance that contains numerous bioactive proteins and peptides, nearly all of which have been identified over the last several decades. In this study, we subjected snake venom to enzymatic hydrolysis to identify previously unreported bioactive peptides. The novel peptide ACH-11 with the sequence LTFPRIVFVLG was identified with both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities. ACH-11 inhibited the catalytic function of FXa towards its substrate S-2222 via a mixed model with a Ki value of 9.02 μM and inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP and U46619 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ACH-11 exhibited potent antithrombotic activity in vivo. It reduced paralysis and death in an acute pulmonary thrombosis model by 90% and attenuated thrombosis weight in an arterio-venous shunt thrombosis model by 57.91%, both at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Additionally, a tail cutting bleeding time assay revealed that ACH-11 did not prolong bleeding time in mice at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Together, our results reveal that ACH-11 is a novel antithrombotic peptide exhibiting both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities, with a low bleeding risk. We believe that it could be a candidate or lead compound for new antithrombotic drug development. PMID:26035670

  15. Modulatory effect of interleukin-10 on the production of platelet-activating factor and superoxide anions by human leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolati, B; Mariano, F; Montrucchio, G; Piccoli, G; Camussi, G

    1997-01-01

    We observed that human monocytes (MO) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produce platelet-activating factor (PAF) in a pattern characterized by an early and a delayed peak of synthesis. The early peak of PAF synthesis was due to a direct stimulation of these cells through mCD14 receptor as it was inhibited by anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody. The delayed and sustained peak of PAF synthesis was dependent on protein synthesis and cytokine production as shown by the inhibitory effect of cycloheximide on both MO and PMN, and of anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-alpha) and of anti-interleukin-8 (anti-IL-8) neutralizing antibodies on MO and PMN respectively. IL-10 completely prevented this second, cytokine-dependent peak of PAF synthesis. In contrast, IL-10 markedly enhanced the first peak of PAF synthesis both in MO and PMN. Moreover, IL-10 was shown to modulate the production of superoxide anions (O2-) on both MO and PMN. As suggested by previous studies, IL-10 inhibited the delayed production of O2-. In the present study, we observed that IL-10 directly stimulated an early production of O2-. In addition, IL-10 enhanced the synthesis of O2- by MO and PMN challenged with LPS. The IL-10-induced O2- production was dependent, at least in part, from its effect on PAF synthesis, as it was inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. These results suggest that IL-10 may upregulate the early synthesis of PAF and O2- triggered by direct LPS stimulation, whereas it may downregulate the delayed production of these mediators. PMID:9155653

  16. Platelet-activating factor stimulates metabolism of phosphoinositides via phospholipase A2 in primary cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Okayasu, T.; Hasegawa, K.; Ishibashi, T.

    1987-07-01

    Addition of platelet-activating factor (PAF) to cells doubly labeled with (/sup 14/C)glycerol plus (/sup 3/H)arachidonic acid resulted in a transient decrease of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled phosphatidylinositol (PI) and a transient increase of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI). (/sup 3/H)Arachidonate-labeled PI, on the other hand, decreased in a time-dependent manner. The radioactivity in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylserine did not change significantly. The /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio decreased in PI in a time-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of a phospholipase A2 activity. Although PAF also induced a gradual increase of diacylglycerol (DG), the increase of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled DG paralleled the loss of triacyl (/sup 14/C)glycerol and the /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio of DG was 16 times smaller than that of PI. Thus, DG seemed not to be derived from PI. In myo- (/sup 3/H)inositol-prelabeled cells, PAF induced a transient decrease of (/sup 3/H)phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bis-phosphate (TPI) and (/sup 3/H)phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (DPI) at 1 min. PAF stimulation of cultured hepatocytes prelabeled with /sup 32/Pi induced a transient decrease of (/sup 32/P)polyphosphoinositides at 20 sec to 1 min. (/sup 32/P)LPI appeared within 10 sec after stimulation and paralleled the loss of (/sup 32/P)PI. (/sup 3/H)Inositol triphosphate, (/sup 3/H)inositol diphosphate, and (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphate, which increased in a time-dependent manner upon stimulation with adrenaline, did not accumulate with the stimulation due to PAF. These observations indicate that PAF causes degradation of inositol phospholipids via phospholipase A2 and induces a subsequent resynthesis of these phospholipids.

  17. Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Plays a Role in Lung Injury and Death Caused by Influenza A in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Cristiana C.; Russo, Remo C.; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Fagundes, Caio T.; Polidoro, Rafael B.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Salgado, Ana Paula C.; Cassali, Geovanni D.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Teixeira, Mauro M.

    2010-01-01

    Influenza A virus causes annual epidemics which affect millions of people worldwide. A recent Influenza pandemic brought new awareness over the health impact of the disease. It is thought that a severe inflammatory response against the virus contributes to disease severity and death. Therefore, modulating the effects of inflammatory mediators may represent a new therapy against Influenza infection. Platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor (PAFR) deficient mice were used to evaluate the role of the gene in a model of experimental infection with Influenza A/WSN/33 H1N1 or a reassortant Influenza A H3N1 subtype. The following parameters were evaluated: lethality, cell recruitment to the airways, lung pathology, viral titers and cytokine levels in lungs. The PAFR antagonist PCA4248 was also used after the onset of flu symptoms. Absence or antagonism of PAFR caused significant protection against flu-associated lethality and lung injury. Protection was correlated with decreased neutrophil recruitment, lung edema, vascular permeability and injury. There was no increase of viral load and greater recruitment of NK1.1+ cells. Antibody responses were similar in WT and PAFR-deficient mice and animals were protected from re-infection. Influenza infection induces the enzyme that synthesizes PAF, lyso-PAF acetyltransferase, an effect linked to activation of TLR7/8. Therefore, it is suggested that PAFR is a disease-associated gene and plays an important role in driving neutrophil influx and lung damage after infection of mice with two subtypes of Influenza A. Further studies should investigate whether targeting PAFR may be useful to reduce lung pathology associated with Influenza A virus infection in humans. PMID:21079759

  18. Expression of platelet-derived growth factor and its receptors in normal human liver and during active hepatic fibrogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Pinzani, M.; Milani, S.; Herbst, H.; DeFranco, R.; Grappone, C.; Gentilini, A.; Caligiuri, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Ngo, D. V.; Romanelli, R. G.; Gentilini, P.

    1996-01-01

    Expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptor (R) subunits was evaluated in normal human liver and in cirrhotic liver tissue by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. In normal liver, PDGF and PDGF-R subunit expression was limited to a few mesenchymal cells of the portal tract stroma and vessels. In cirrhotic liver, PDGF-A and -B chain mRNA expression was markedly increased and was co-distributed with immunoreactivity for PDGF-AA and -BB in infiltrating inflammatory cells and along vascular structures within fibrous septa. These aspects were paralleled by a marked overexpression of PDGF-R alpha- and beta-subunit mRNAs and of the relative immunoreactivities in a wide range of mesenchymal cells in fibrous septa and in perisinusoidal alpha-smooth-muscle-actin-positive cells. In general expression and distribution of PDGF-R subunits appeared to be related to the activation of different mesenchymal cell types involved in the fibroproliferative process. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of PDGF-R subunits in liver tissue specimens with increasing degrees of necroinflammatory activity. The results of this additional study confirmed that expression of PDGF-R subunits is highly correlated with the severity of histological lesions and collagen deposition. Our results, providing evidence for a functional involvement of PDGF/PDGF-R in liver fibrogenesis, greatly support the results of previous in vitro studies and direct attention toward pharmacological strategies able to affect the series of signaling events arising from the autophosphorylation of PDGF-R subunits. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8774134

  19. Release of platelet activating factor by the isolated kidney is not linked to the production of prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Nies, A S; Tunney, A; Barden, A; Sturm, M; Vandongen, R

    1991-11-01

    In many isolated tissues, including glomerular mesangial cells and endothelial cells, the synthesis of platelet activating factor (PAF) occurs by remodeling the phospholipids so that the production of PAF results in the release of arachidonic acid with subsequent production of cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase products. In some tissues, including the renal medulla, another pathway for PAF biosynthesis (the de novo pathway) has been found in which the production of PAF is not linked to the production of arachidonic acid products. We tested the hypothesis that the remodeling pathway was active in the release of PAF into renal venous effluent of the isolated kidney. Isolated rat kidneys perfused at constant flow with albumin-containing buffer were stimulated to produce prostaglandin by an infusion of angiotensin II or bradykinin. Some kidneys were also challenged with the calcium ionophore A23187. Perfusate was collected for bioassay of PAF and radioimmunoassay of prostaglandin (PG) E2; urine was collected for PAF bioassay. Angiotensin II (10(-9) to 10(-8) M) increased renal vascular resistance, and bradykinin (10(-8) to 10(-7) M) and A23187 (3 x 10(-6) M) reduced renal vascular resistance. PGE2 production was increased significantly by bradykinin and angiotensin II but not by A23187. Only A23187 increased the release of PAF into the perfusate. Urine PAF was not changed by any of the stimuli. These data indicate that the release of PGE2 by the isolated, perfused rat kidney can be dissociated from the release of PAF. The findings support the suggestion that PAF released by the kidney into the renal venous effluent is not produced by remodeling the lipids that are the source of renally released prostaglandins. PMID:1941608

  20. Fish oil supplementation decreases oxidative stress but does not affect platelet-activating factor bioactivity in lungs of asthmatic rats.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, A L; Miranda, D T S Z; Dias, B C L; Campos, R M; Massaro, M C; Michelotto, P V; West, A L; Miles, E A; Calder, P C; Nishiyama, A

    2014-07-01

    Dietary fish oil supplementation increases the content of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in cellular membranes. The highly unsaturated nature of n-3 PUFA could result in an enhanced lipid peroxidation in the oxidative environment characteristic of asthma. The oxidative reaction cascade culminates in an increased production of components associated to oxidative stress and of an important proinflammatory mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF)-like lipid. We evaluated the effect of fish oil supplementation in asthmatic rats upon the PAF bioactivity and parameters related to oxidative stress in the lung. Fish oil supplementation of asthmatic rats resulted in lower concentrations of nitrite (1.719 ± 0.137 vs. 2.454 ± 0.163 nmol/mL) and lipid hydroperoxide (72.190 ± 7.327 vs. 120.200 ± 11.270 nmol/mg protein). In asthmatic animals, fish oil increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) (33.910 ± 2.325 vs. 24.110 ± 0.618 U/mg protein) and glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9) (164.100 ± 31.250 vs. 12.590 ± 5.234 U/mg protein). However, fish oil did not affect PAF bioactivity in lung tissue of asthmatic rats (0.545 ± 0.098 340/380 vs. 0.669 ± 0.101 340/380 nm ratio). Considering the two-step process--oxidative stress and PAF bioactivity--fish oil exhibited a divergent action on these aspects of asthmatic inflammation, since the supplement lowered oxidative stress in the lungs of asthmatic rats, presenting an antioxidant effect, but did not affect PAF bioactivity. This suggests a dual effect of fish oil on oxidative stress and inflammation in asthma. PMID:24858941

  1. Pharmacological actions of Y-24180, a new specific antagonist of platelet activating factor (PAF): II. Interactions with PAF and benzodiazepine receptors.

    PubMed

    Takehara, S; Mikashima, H; Muramoto, Y; Terasawa, M; Setoguchi, M; Tahara, T

    1990-12-01

    The inhibitory effect of Y-24180, 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-[2-(4-isobutylphenyl)ethyl]-6,9-dimethyl-6H-t hieno [3,2-f][1,2,4]triazolo [4,3-a][1,4]diazepine, on platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced platelet aggregation and the specific binding of 3H-PAF to platelets was compared with other thienodiazepine derivatives, WEB 2086 and etizolam. Y-24180 inhibited PAF-induced rabbit platelet aggregation in vitro (IC50 3.84 nM), but had little effect on adenosine diphosphate- or arachidonic acid-induced aggregation. WEB 2086 and etizolam also showed an inhibitory effect of PAF-induced aggregation (IC50 values are 456 and 6730 nM, respectively). In PAF-induced human platelet aggregation, Y-24180 (IC50 0.84 nM) was more potent than WEB 2086 (IC50 4.21 nM) and etizolam (IC50 998 nM). Y-24180, WEB 2086 and etizolam displaced 3H-PAF binding from the washed-platelets of rabbits with an IC50 value of 3.50, 9.35 and 29.5 nM, respectively. In rabbits, pretreatment with Y-24180 and WEB 2086 antagonized PAF-induced platelet aggregation dose-dependently. The significant inhibitory effect of Y-24180 (1 mg/kg, p.o.) lasted 72 hr after a single dose oral administration. WEB 2086 (10 mg/kg, p.o.) also antagonized the ex vivo response induced by PAF 1 hr after administration, but no significant effect was observed 3 hr after administration. Y-24180 displaced 3H-diazepam binding from the synaptosomal membranes of rat cerebral cortex with a Ki value of 3.68 microM. The affinity of Y-24180 for benzodiazepine(BZP) receptors was lower than those of WEB 2086 and etizolam and was about 1000 times lower than that for PAF receptors in platelets. PMID:1965554

  2. Regulation of the surface expression of the platelet-activating factor receptor in IC-21 peritoneal macrophages. Effects of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1992-10-15

    The effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the expression of the receptor for platelet-activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; AGEPC) was examined in cultured IC-21 peritoneal macrophages. AGEPC binding to its receptors reached saturation within 20 min at 25 degrees C and was reversible. Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of AGEPC receptors with a Bmax of approximately 170 fmol/mg cellular protein and a Kd of 0.25 nM. Preincubation of IC-21 cells with LPS (0.01-1,000 ng/ml) induced an increase in the surface expression of AGEPC receptors in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. The maximal effect of LPS on the AGEPC receptor was observed between 5 and 8 h, with a typical increase between 150 and 200%. Scatchard analysis indicated that LPS treatment of IC-21 cells increased the number of AGEPC receptors on the cell surface without any apparent change in the affinity of the receptor for the ligand. The effect of LPS on the surface expression of the AGEPC receptor was nearly abolished by cycloheximide (0.1 mM) and by actinomycin D (3 microM), suggesting the involvement of enhanced receptor protein synthesis and mRNA production in this event. Moreover, LPS treatment increased the capability of the IC-21 cell to respond to AGEPC addition by elevating intracellular free Ca2+ without causing an increase in the basal level of intracellular Ca2+. The present study demonstrates that IC-21 peritoneal macrophages possess high affinity AGEPC receptors and provides the evidence that the number of functional AGEPC receptors on a cell can be increased significantly upon exposure to LPS. PMID:1328211

  3. Quinidine, but Not Eicosanoid Antagonists or Dexamethasone, Protect the Gut from Platelet Activating Factor-Induced Vasoconstriction, Edema and Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschläger, Ingmar; Frerichs, Inéz; Dombrowsky, Heike; Sarau, Jürgen; Goldmann, Torsten; Zitta, Karina; Albrecht, Martin; Weiler, Norbert; Uhlig, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal circulatory disturbances, atony, edema and swelling are of great clinical relevance, but the related mechanisms and possible therapeutic options are poorly characterized, in part because of the difficulties to comprehensively analyze these conditions. To overcome these limitations we have developed a model of the isolated perfused rat small intestine where all of these symptoms can be studied simultaneously. Here we used this model to study the role of eicosanoids, steroids and quinidine in platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced intestinal disorders. A vascular bolus of PAF (0.5 nmol) triggered release of thromboxane and peptidoleukotrienes into the vascular bed (peak concentration 35 nM and 0.8 nM) and reproduced all symptoms of intestinal failure: mesenteric vasoconstriction, translocation of fluid and macromolecules from the vasculature to the lumen and lymphatics, intestinal edema formation, loss of intestinal peristalsis and decreased galactose uptake. All effects of PAF were abolished by the PAF-receptor antagonist ABT491 (2.5 μM). The COX and LOX inhibitors ASA and AA861 (500 μM, 10 μM) did not exhibit barrier-protective effects and the eicosanoid antagonists SQ29548 and MK571 (10 μM, each) only moderately attenuated the loss of vascular fluid, the redistribution to the lumen and the transfer of FITC dextran to the lumen. The steroid dexamethasone (10 μM) showed no barrier-protective properties and failed to prevent edema formation. Quinidine (100 μM) inhibited the increase in arterial pressure, stabilized all the intestinal barriers, and reduced lymph production and the transfer of FITC dextran to the lymph. While quinidine by itself reduced peristalsis, it also obviated paralysis, preserved intestinal functions and prevented edema formation. We conclude that quinidine exerts multiple protective effects against vasoconstriction, edema formation and paralysis in the intestine. The therapeutic use of quinidine for intestinal ailments

  4. Quinidine, but not eicosanoid antagonists or dexamethasone, protect the gut from platelet activating factor-induced vasoconstriction, edema and paralysis.

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, Ingmar; Frerichs, Inéz; Dombrowsky, Heike; Sarau, Jürgen; Goldmann, Torsten; Zitta, Karina; Albrecht, Martin; Weiler, Norbert; Uhlig, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal circulatory disturbances, atony, edema and swelling are of great clinical relevance, but the related mechanisms and possible therapeutic options are poorly characterized, in part because of the difficulties to comprehensively analyze these conditions. To overcome these limitations we have developed a model of the isolated perfused rat small intestine where all of these symptoms can be studied simultaneously. Here we used this model to study the role of eicosanoids, steroids and quinidine in platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced intestinal disorders. A vascular bolus of PAF (0.5 nmol) triggered release of thromboxane and peptidoleukotrienes into the vascular bed (peak concentration 35 nM and 0.8 nM) and reproduced all symptoms of intestinal failure: mesenteric vasoconstriction, translocation of fluid and macromolecules from the vasculature to the lumen and lymphatics, intestinal edema formation, loss of intestinal peristalsis and decreased galactose uptake. All effects of PAF were abolished by the PAF-receptor antagonist ABT491 (2.5 μM). The COX and LOX inhibitors ASA and AA861 (500 μM, 10 μM) did not exhibit barrier-protective effects and the eicosanoid antagonists SQ29548 and MK571 (10 μM, each) only moderately attenuated the loss of vascular fluid, the redistribution to the lumen and the transfer of FITC dextran to the lumen. The steroid dexamethasone (10 μM) showed no barrier-protective properties and failed to prevent edema formation. Quinidine (100 μM) inhibited the increase in arterial pressure, stabilized all the intestinal barriers, and reduced lymph production and the transfer of FITC dextran to the lymph. While quinidine by itself reduced peristalsis, it also obviated paralysis, preserved intestinal functions and prevented edema formation. We conclude that quinidine exerts multiple protective effects against vasoconstriction, edema formation and paralysis in the intestine. The therapeutic use of quinidine for intestinal ailments

  5. Platelet-activating factor is a potent pyrogen and cryogen, but it does not mediate lipopolysaccharide fever or hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Alexandre A; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether platelet-activating factor (PAF) and its receptor mediate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever and hypothermia in rats. Two highly potent, structurally distinct antagonists of the PAF receptor, CV6209 and WEB2086, were used. At a neutral ambient temperature (Ta) of 30ºC, administration of LPS at a low (10 μg/kg, i.v.) or high (1,000 μg/kg, i.v.) dose resulted in fever. The response to the high dose was turned into hypothermia at a subneutral Ta of 22ºC. Neither LPS-induced fever nor hypothermia was affected by pretreatment with CV6209 (5 mg/kg, i.v.) or WEB2086 (5 mg/kg, i.v.). However, both PAF antagonists were efficacious in blocking the thermoregulatory response caused by PAF (334 pmol/kg/min, 1 h, i.v.), regardless of whether the response was a fever (at 30ºC) or hypothermia (at 22ºC). Additional experiments showed that the thermoregulatory responses to LPS and PAF are also distinct in terms of their mediation by prostaglandins. Neither PAF fever nor PAF hypothermia was affected by pretreatment with the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor SC236 (5 mg/kg, i.p.), which is known to abrogate LPS fever. The responses to PAF were also unaffected by pretreatment with the cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor SC560 (5 mg/kg, i.p.), which is known to attenuate LPS hypothermia. In conclusion, PAF infusion at a picomolar dose causes fever at thermoneutrality but hypothermia in a subthermoneutral environment, both responses being dependent on the PAF receptor and independent of prostaglandins. However, the PAF receptor does not mediate LPS-induced fever or hypothermia, thus challenging the dogma that PAF is an upstream mediator of responses to LPS. PMID:27227073

  6. Platelet-activating factor is a potent pyrogen and cryogen, but it does not mediate lipopolysaccharide fever or hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Alexandre A; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether platelet-activating factor (PAF) and its receptor mediate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever and hypothermia in rats. Two highly potent, structurally distinct antagonists of the PAF receptor, CV6209 and WEB2086, were used. At a neutral ambient temperature (Ta) of 30ºC, administration of LPS at a low (10 μg/kg, i.v.) or high (1,000 μg/kg, i.v.) dose resulted in fever. The response to the high dose was turned into hypothermia at a subneutral Ta of 22ºC. Neither LPS-induced fever nor hypothermia was affected by pretreatment with CV6209 (5 mg/kg, i.v.) or WEB2086 (5 mg/kg, i.v.). However, both PAF antagonists were efficacious in blocking the thermoregulatory response caused by PAF (334 pmol/kg/min, 1 h, i.v.), regardless of whether the response was a fever (at 30ºC) or hypothermia (at 22ºC). Additional experiments showed that the thermoregulatory responses to LPS and PAF are also distinct in terms of their mediation by prostaglandins. Neither PAF fever nor PAF hypothermia was affected by pretreatment with the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor SC236 (5 mg/kg, i.p.), which is known to abrogate LPS fever. The responses to PAF were also unaffected by pretreatment with the cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor SC560 (5 mg/kg, i.p.), which is known to attenuate LPS hypothermia. In conclusion, PAF infusion at a picomolar dose causes fever at thermoneutrality but hypothermia in a subthermoneutral environment, both responses being dependent on the PAF receptor and independent of prostaglandins. However, the PAF receptor does not mediate LPS-induced fever or hypothermia, thus challenging the dogma that PAF is an upstream mediator of responses to LPS. PMID:27227073

  7. Effect of Follicular Fluid and Platelet-Activating Factor on Lactate Dehydrogenase C Expression in Human Asthenozoospermic Samples

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilpour, Tahereh; Zarei, Mohmmad-Reza; Bahmanpour, Soghra; Aliabadi, Elham; Hosseini, Ahmad; Jaberipour, Mansooreh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Application of follicular fluid (FF) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) in artificial insemination improves sperm motility. Lactate dehydrogenase C (LDH-C) is a key enzyme for sperm motility. In this study, the effects of FF and PAF on the sperm motility index and LDH-C expression were investigated. Moreover, LDH-C expression was compared between asthenozoospermic and normozoospermic samples. Methods: The expression of LDH-C was examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-RT PCR) and western blotting after it was treated with optimized concentrations of FF and PAF in twenty asthenozoospermic samples. Also, LDH-C expression was evaluated in five normozoospermic samples. Results: Samples with 75% FF and 100 nM of PAF had an increase in their percentages of progressive and slowly motile sperms and a decrease in their percentages of non-progressive and non-motile sperms. Moreover, LDH-C mRNA transcripts were not changed following PAF and FF treatment, and LDH-C protein was detected in highly progressive motile specimens treated with FF in the asthenozoospermic samples. Furthermore, LDH-C expression was more detectable in the normal sperms. Conclusion: Our results indicated that PAF had more beneficial effects than FF on sperm motility in the asthenozoospermic samples (P=0.0001), although the LDH-C expressions of the sperms were not changed significantly in both groups. We found no association between LDH-C expression and sperm motility after FF and PAF actions. This finding, however, requires further investigation. The fact that LDH-C protein was detected in the normozoospermic, but not asthenozoospermic, samples could be cited as a reason for the infertility in these patients. PMID:24453390

  8. Effects of endothelin-1 on vascular permeability in the conscious rat: interactions with platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Filep, J. G.; Sirois, M. G.; Rousseau, A.; Fournier, A.; Sirois, P.

    1991-01-01

    1. The objectives of the present experiments were to assess the effects of endothelin-1 on the macrovascular permeability in selected vascular beds, to study the involvement of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in vascular responses to endothelin-1 and to examine the vascular effects of combined administration of endothelin-1 and PAF in conscious rats. 2. Intravenous bolus injection of endothelin-1 (0.1-2 nmol kg-1) resulted in a dose-dependent biphasic change in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) with initial transient hypotension followed by a prolonged pressor action. These changes were accompanied by a dose-dependent increase in haematocrit values. 3. Endothelin-1 (0.1 and 1 nmol kg-1) increased dose-dependently the vascular permeability of the trachea, upper and lower bronchi, stomach, duodenum, spleen and kidney (up to 240%) as measured by the extravasation of Evans blue dye. The permeability of pulmonary parenchyma, liver and pancreas was not affected significantly by endothelin-1 treatment. 4. Pretreatment of animals with the specific PAF receptor antagonist, WEB 2086 (1 mg kg-1, i.v.) or BN 52021 (10 mg kg-1, i.v.) reduced the endothelin-1 (1 nmol kg-1)-induced rise in haematocrit by about 50 and 30%, respectively. Both antagonists were highly effective at inhibiting protein extravasation in the stomach, duodenum and kidney. On the other hand, BN 52021, but not WEB 2086, significantly attenuated the effect of endothelin-1 on permeability in the lower bronchi and spleen. Neither WEB 2086 nor BN 52021 modified the changes in MABP evoked by endothelin-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1667286

  9. Kinetics, dose response, tachyphylaxis and cross-tachyphylaxis of vascular leakage induced by endotoxin, zymosan-activated plasma and platelet-activating factor in the horse.

    PubMed

    Mills, P C; Ng, J C; Seawright, A A; Auer, D E

    1995-06-01

    Vascular leakage induced by intradermal injection of endotoxin, zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) was measured in nine Thoroughbreds using 125-iodine human serum albumin (125I-HSA) as a marker in the blood. ZAP and PAF produced dose-dependent increases in vascular permeability with the maximum occurring within the first 15 min after injection. The vascular leakage induced by endotoxin was also dose-dependent, but the maximum occurred 2 h after intradermal injection. Intradermal sites previously injected with endotoxin were refractory to a second injection of endotoxin for up to 5 days. However, sites injected with endotoxin and re-injected with either ZAP or PAF remained responsive with increased vascular leakage compared to saline injected control sites re-injected with either ZAP or PAF. Diminished response to endotoxin challenge may contribute to the poor prognosis of endotoxaemia in the horse. PMID:7674456

  10. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation during platelet storage: consequences for platelet recovery and hemostatic function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Canault, Matthias; Duerschmied, Daniel; Brill, Alexander; Stefanini, Lucia; Schatzberg, Daphne; Cifuni, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets undergo several modifications during storage that reduce their posttransfusion survival and functionality. One important feature of these changes, which are known as platelet storage lesion, is the shedding of the surface glycoproteins GPIb-α and GPV. We recently demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17) mediates mitochondrial injury-induced shedding of adhesion receptors and that TACE activity correlates with reduced posttransfusion survival of these cells. We now confirm that TACE mediates receptor shedding and clearance of platelets stored for 16 hours at 37°C or 22°C. We further demonstrate that both storage and mitochondrial injury lead to the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) in platelets and that TACE-mediated receptor shedding from mouse and human platelets requires p38 MAP kinase signaling. Protein kinase C, extracellular regulated-signal kinase MAPK, and caspases were not involved in TACE activation. Both inhibition of p38 MAPK and inactivation of TACE during platelet storage led to a markedly improved posttransfusion recovery and hemostatic function of platelets in mice. p38 MAPK inhibitors had only minor effects on the aggregation of fresh platelets under static or flow conditions in vitro. In summary, our data suggest that inhibition of p38 MAPK or TACE during storage may significantly improve the quality of stored platelets. PMID:19965619

  11. Coated platelets function in platelet-dependent fibrin formation via integrin αIIbβ3 and transglutaminase factor XIII

    PubMed Central

    Mattheij, Nadine J.A.; Swieringa, Frauke; Mastenbroek, Tom G.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; May, Frauke; Baaten, Constance C.F.M.J.; van der Meijden, Paola E.J.; Henskens, Yvonne M.C.; Beckers, Erik A.M.; Suylen, Dennis P.L.; Nolte, Marc W.; Hackeng, Tilman M.; McCarty, Owen J.T.; Heemskerk, Johan W.M.; Cosemans, Judith M.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Coated platelets, formed by collagen and thrombin activation, have been characterized in different ways: i) by the formation of a protein coat of α-granular proteins; ii) by exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine; or iii) by high fibrinogen binding. Yet, their functional role has remained unclear. Here we used a novel transglutaminase probe, Rhod-A14, to identify a subpopulation of platelets with a cross-linked protein coat, and compared this with other platelet subpopulations using a panel of functional assays. Platelet stimulation with convulxin/thrombin resulted in initial integrin αIIbβ3 activation, the appearance of a platelet population with high fibrinogen binding, (independently of active integrins, but dependent on the presence of thrombin) followed by phosphatidylserine exposure and binding of coagulation factors Va and Xa. A subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets bound Rhod-A14 both in suspension and in thrombi generated on a collagen surface. In suspension, high fibrinogen and Rhod-A14 binding were antagonized by combined inhibition of transglutaminase activity and integrin αIIbβ3. Markedly, in thrombi from mice deficient in transglutaminase factor XIII, platelet-driven fibrin formation and Rhod-A14 binding were abolished by blockage of integrin αIIbβ3. Vice versa, star-like fibrin formation from platelets of a patient with deficiency in αIIbβ3 (Glanzmann thrombasthenia) was abolished upon blockage of transglutaminase activity. We conclude that coated platelets, with initial αIIbβ3 activation and high fibrinogen binding, form a subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets, and function in platelet-dependent star-like fibrin fiber formation via transglutaminase factor XIII and integrin αIIbβ3. PMID:26721892

  12. Expression of the platelet-activating factor receptor enhances benzyl isothiocyanate-induced apoptosis in murine and human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi Prakash

    2015-07-01

    Melanoma cells often express platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R), which has been demonstrated to increase metastatic behavior. However, the effect of PAF-R on the responsiveness of melanoma to naturally occurring cytotoxic agents remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to determine the relative cytotoxicity and mechanism of benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), a component of cruciferous vegetables, in melanoma cells expressing PAF-R. To evaluate the importance of PAF-R signaling in melanoma cell growth, PAF-R-negative murine B16F10 cells were transduced with a retrovirus containing the cDNA for PAF-R to generate cells stably expressing PAF-R (B16-PAF-R) or an empty vector (MSCV) to generate PAF-R-deficient B16-MSCV control cells. Activation of PAF-R, using the PAF-R agonist, 1-hexadecyl-2-N-methylcarbamoyl-3-glycerophosphocholine, induced an increase in the proliferation of B16-PAF-R cells compared with the B16-MSCV cells. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed the presence of functional PAF-R in human melanoma SK23MEL cells, but not in SK5MEL cells. The present study investigated the effect of BITC treatments on the survival of murine and human melanoma cells, in the presence or absence of functional PAF-R. The results revealed that treatment with BITC decreased the survival rate of the PAF-R-positive and negative murine and human melanoma cells. However, the expression of PAF-R substantially augmented BITC-mediated cytotoxicity in the PAF-R-positive cells at lower concentrations compared with the PAF-R-negative cells. In order to determine the underlying mechanism, flow cytometric analysis was used, which demonstrated a significant increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the B16-PAF-R cells compared with the B16-MSCV cells, which enhanced apoptosis by BITC, as measured by increased caspase-3/7 luminescence. Notably, the BITC-mediated decreased cell survival rate, increased ROS and increased

  13. Release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and histamine. II. The cellular origin of human PAF: monocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and basophils.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G; Aglietta, M; Coda, R; Bussolino, F; Piacibello, W; Tetta, C

    1981-01-01

    The origin of platelet activating factor (PAF) from human leucocytes was investigated. Purified monocytes release PAF passively at pH 10.6, when challenged with Ionophore A 23187 or under phagocytic stimuli. Pure preparations of polymorphonuclear neutrophils liberate PAF passively, when challenged with C5a, neutrophil cationic proteins (CP), their carboxypeptidase B derived products (C5a des Arg, CP des Arg) or under phagocytic stimuli. Basophil rich buffy coat cells release PAF when challenged with C5a, CP, anti-IgE (in low amount) or Synacthen concomitantly with basophil degranulation and histamine release. Electron microscopy studies, carried out on Synacthen-stimulated basophil rich buffy coat, provide morphological evidence for platelet-basophil interaction. In conclusion our data demonstrate that PAF can be released from different leucocyte populations. However, the stimuli able to trigger such release appear to have some specificity for the cell target. Images Figure 5 PMID:6161885

  14. Hematopoietic transcription factor mutations and inherited platelet dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Songdej, Natthapol

    2015-01-01

    The molecular and genetic mechanisms in most patients with inherited platelet dysfunction are unknown. There is increasing evidence that mutations in hematopoietic transcription factors are major players in the pathogenesis of defective megakaryopoiesis and platelet dysfunction in patients with inherited platelet disorders. These hematopoietic transcription factors include RUNX1, FLI1, GATA-1, and GFI1B. Mutations involving these transcription factors affect diverse aspects of platelet production and function at the genetic and molecular levels, culminating in clinical manifestations of thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction. This review focuses on these hematopoietic transcription factors in the pathobiology of inherited platelet dysfunction. PMID:26097739

  15. Identification of selective covalent inhibitors of platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B2 from the screening of an oxadiazolone-capped peptoid-azapeptoid hybrid library.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Bani Kanta; Liu, Xiaodan; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A potent and selective inhibitor of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B2 (PAFAH1B2) is described. The compound was derived by improvement of a modest affinity primary hit isolated from the screening of a bead-displayed peptoid-azapeptoid hybrid library tethered to an oxadiazolone 'warhead'. The oxadiazolone moiety of the inhibitors was found to react covalently with the active site serine residue of PAFAH1B2. This screening strategy may be useful for the identification of many selective, covalent inhibitors of serine hydrolases. PMID:27160052

  16. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L.; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-04-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.There is substantial

  17. Relationship between potential platelet activation and LCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn

    2010-11-01

    In the study of blood flow, emphasis is often directed at understanding shear stress at the vessel wall due to its potentially disruptive influence on the endothelium. However, it is also known that shear stress has a potent effect on platelet activation. Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which in turn is the cause of most forms of death. Since most platelets are contained in the flow domain, it is important to consider stresses acting on the platelet as they are convected. Locations of high stress can correspond to boundaries between different dynamic regions and locations of hyperbolic points in the Eulerian sense. In the computation of LCS, strain in typically considered in the Lagrangian sense. In this talk we discuss the relationship between locations of potential platelet activation due to increased stress and locations of LCS marking increase Lagrangian deformation.

  18. Increased gastric production of platelet-activating factor, leukotriene-B4, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in children with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Hüseyinov, A; Kütükçüler, N; Aydogdu, S; Caglayan, S; Coker, I; Göksen, D; Yagci, R V

    1999-04-01

    The concentrations of platelet-activating factor (PAF), leukotriene-B4 (LTB4), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in homogenate supernatants of gastric mucosal biopsy specimens and in gastric juice from Helicobacter pylori-positive (N = 21) and -negative children (N = 14) were investigated in order to determine whether these lipid mediators and the cytokine are involved in the inflammatory reaction of H. pylori-associated gastritis. PAF and LTB4 concentrations were measured after high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification by specific radioimmunoassay, and TNF-alpha concentrations were determined by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The concentrations of PAF, LTB4, and TNF-alpha measured in gastric juice and biopsy homogenate supernatants of children with H. pylori-positive gastritis were found to be statistically elevated and in positive correlation with each other. This study suggested that increased local mucosal production of potent proinflammatory agents such as PAF, LTB4, and TNF-alpha may be implicated in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated gastritis in childhood. PMID:10219821

  19. Role for intracellular platelet-activating factor in the circulatory failure in a model of gram-positive shock.

    PubMed Central

    De Kimpe, S. J.; Thiemermann, C.; Vane, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    1. This study investigates the effects of two structurally different antagonists of platelet-activating factor (PAF), BN52021 and WEB2086, on the circulatory and renal failure elicited by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus (an organism without endotoxin) in anaesthetized rats. 2. Administration of LTA (10 mg kg-1, i.v.) caused hypotension and vascular hyporeactivity to noradrenaline (1 microgram kg-1, i.v.) WEB2086 (5 mg kg-1, i.v., 20 min before and 150 min after LTA) inhibited the delayed fall in mean arterial blood pressure (at 300 min: 99 +/- 6 mmHg vs. 75 +/- 6 mmHg, P < 0.01) and prevented the decrease in pressor response to noradrenaline (at 300 min: 36 +/- 5 mmHg min vs. 17 +/- 5 mmHg min, P < 0.01). Surprisingly, BN52021 (20 mg kg-1, i.v., 20 min before and 150 min after LTA) neither prevented the hypotension (74 +/- 6 mmHg) nor the vascular hyporeactivity (21 +/- 5 mmHg min). However, BN52021 inhibited the hypotension to injections of PAF as well as the circulatory failure elicited by lipopolysaccharides (10 mg kg-1, i.v.). 3. LTA caused an increase in plasma concentration of creatinine from 39 +/- 5 microM (sham-operated) to 70 +/- 8 microM and urea from 4.7 +/- 0.1 to 13.1 +/- 1.6 mM. The renal failure elicited by LTA was significantly inhibited by WEB2086 (creatinine: 45 +/- 4 microM and urea: 5.7 +/- 0.7 mM), but not by BN52021. 4. The induction of nitric oxide synthase activity in lungs by LTA was attenuated by WEB2086 from 98 +/- 17 to 40 +/- 15 pmol L-citrulline 30 min-1 mg-1 protein (P < 0.01), but not by BN52021 (148 +/- 21 pmol L-citrulline 30 min-1 mg-1 protein). Similarly, WEB2086, but not BN52021, inhibited the increase in plasma nitrite concentration associated with the delayed circulatory failure caused by LTA. The release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) after injection of LTA was not attenuated by WEB2086. 5. The induction of nitrite release by cultured macrophages activated with LTA (10 micrograms ml-1 for 24 h

  20. Role for intracellular platelet-activating factor in the circulatory failure in a model of gram-positive shock.

    PubMed

    De Kimpe, S J; Thiemermann, C; Vane, J R

    1995-12-01

    1. This study investigates the effects of two structurally different antagonists of platelet-activating factor (PAF), BN52021 and WEB2086, on the circulatory and renal failure elicited by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus (an organism without endotoxin) in anaesthetized rats. 2. Administration of LTA (10 mg kg-1, i.v.) caused hypotension and vascular hyporeactivity to noradrenaline (1 microgram kg-1, i.v.) WEB2086 (5 mg kg-1, i.v., 20 min before and 150 min after LTA) inhibited the delayed fall in mean arterial blood pressure (at 300 min: 99 +/- 6 mmHg vs. 75 +/- 6 mmHg, P < 0.01) and prevented the decrease in pressor response to noradrenaline (at 300 min: 36 +/- 5 mmHg min vs. 17 +/- 5 mmHg min, P < 0.01). Surprisingly, BN52021 (20 mg kg-1, i.v., 20 min before and 150 min after LTA) neither prevented the hypotension (74 +/- 6 mmHg) nor the vascular hyporeactivity (21 +/- 5 mmHg min). However, BN52021 inhibited the hypotension to injections of PAF as well as the circulatory failure elicited by lipopolysaccharides (10 mg kg-1, i.v.). 3. LTA caused an increase in plasma concentration of creatinine from 39 +/- 5 microM (sham-operated) to 70 +/- 8 microM and urea from 4.7 +/- 0.1 to 13.1 +/- 1.6 mM. The renal failure elicited by LTA was significantly inhibited by WEB2086 (creatinine: 45 +/- 4 microM and urea: 5.7 +/- 0.7 mM), but not by BN52021. 4. The induction of nitric oxide synthase activity in lungs by LTA was attenuated by WEB2086 from 98 +/- 17 to 40 +/- 15 pmol L-citrulline 30 min-1 mg-1 protein (P < 0.01), but not by BN52021 (148 +/- 21 pmol L-citrulline 30 min-1 mg-1 protein). Similarly, WEB2086, but not BN52021, inhibited the increase in plasma nitrite concentration associated with the delayed circulatory failure caused by LTA. The release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) after injection of LTA was not attenuated by WEB2086. 5. The induction of nitrite release by cultured macrophages activated with LTA (10 micrograms ml-1 for 24 h

  1. Baseline Platelet Activation and Reactivity in Patients with Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    de Borst, Gert Jan; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Roest, Mark; Moll, Frans L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) have a high risk to develop cardiovascular events (CVE). We hypothesized that in CLI patients platelets would display increased baseline activation and reactivity. Objectives We investigated baseline platelet activation and platelet reactivity in patients with CLI. Patients/Methods In this study baseline platelet activation and platelet reactivity in response to stimulation of all major platelet activation pathways were determined in 20 CLI patients (11 using aspirin and 9 using vitamin K-antagonists) included in the Juventas-trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00371371) and in 17 healthy controls. Platelet activation was quantified with flow cytometric measurement of platelet P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding. Results CLI patients not using aspirin showed higher baseline platelet activation compared to healthy controls. Maximal reactivity to stimulation of the collagen and thrombin activation pathway was decreased in CLI patients compared to healthy controls. In line, attenuated platelet reactivity to stimulation of multiple activation pathways was associated with several traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Conclusions Baseline platelet activation was increased in CLI patients, whereas the reactivity of circulating platelets to several stimulatory agents is decreased. Reactivity of platelets was inversely correlated with cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26148006

  2. Exosomes: novel effectors of human platelet lysate activity.

    PubMed

    Torreggiani, E; Perut, F; Roncuzzi, L; Zini, N; Baglìo, S R; Baldini, N

    2014-01-01

    Despite the popularity of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet lysate (PL) in orthopaedic practice, the mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these therapeutic tools are still controversial. So far, the activity of PRP and PL has been associated with different growth factors (GF) released during platelet degranulation. This study, for the first time, identifies exosomes, nanosized vesicles released in the extracellular compartment by a number of elements, including platelets, as one of the effectors of PL activity. Exosomes were isolated from human PL by differential ultracentrifugation, and analysed by electron microscopy and Western blotting. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) treated with three different exosome concentrations (0.6 μg, 5 μg and 50 μg) showed a significant, dose-dependent increase in cell proliferation and migration compared to the control. In addition, osteogenic differentiation assays demonstrated that exosome concentration differently affected the ability of MSC to deposit mineralised matrix. Finally, the analysis of exosome protein content revealed a higher amount of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) as compared to PL. In regards to RNA content, an enrichment of small RNAs in exosomes as compared to donor platelets has been found. These results suggest that exosomes consistently contribute to PL activity and could represent an advantageous nanodelivery system for cell-free regeneration therapies. PMID:25241964

  3. Activated platelets rescue apoptotic cells via paracrine activation of EGFR and DNA-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Au, A E-L; Sashindranath, M; Borg, R J; Kleifeld, O; Andrews, R K; Gardiner, E E; Medcalf, R L; Samson, A L

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation is a frontline response to injury, not only essential for clot formation but also important for tissue repair. Indeed, the reparative influence of platelets has long been exploited therapeutically where application of platelet concentrates expedites wound recovery. Despite this, the mechanisms of platelet-triggered cytoprotection are poorly understood. Here, we show that activated platelets accumulate in the brain to exceptionally high levels following injury and release factors that potently protect neurons from apoptosis. Kinomic microarray and subsequent kinase inhibitor studies showed that platelet-based neuroprotection relies upon paracrine activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and downstream DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). This same anti-apoptotic cascade stimulated by activated platelets also provided chemo-resistance to several cancer cell types. Surprisingly, deep proteomic profiling of the platelet releasate failed to identify any known EGFR ligand, indicating that activated platelets release an atypical activator of the EGFR. This study is the first to formally associate platelet activation to EGFR/DNA-PK – an endogenous cytoprotective cascade. PMID:25210793

  4. Effect of BN 52021, a specific antagonist of platelet activating factor (PAF-acether), on calcium movements and phosphatidic acid production induced by PAF-acether in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.F.; Chap, H.; Braquet, P.; Douste-Blazy, L.

    1987-02-15

    /sup 32/P-labelled human platelets loaded with quin 2 and pretreated with aspirin were stimulated with 1-100 nM platelet activating factor (PAF-acether or 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in a medium containing the ADP-scavenging system creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase. Under these conditions, PAF-acether evoked a characteristic fluorescence change allowing to quantify elevations in cytoplasmic free Ca/sup 2 +/ from internal stores (Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization) or from external medium (Ca/sup 2 +/ influx), as well as an increased production of phosphatidic acid, reflecting phospholipase C activation. These effects, which can be attributed to PAF-acether only and not to released products such as ADP or thromboxane A2, were strongly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by BN 52021, a specific antagonist of PAF-acether isolated from Ginkgo biloba. As the drug remained inactive against the same effects elicited by thrombin, it is concluded that BN 52021 does not interfere directly with the mechanism of transmembrane signalling involving inositol-phospholipids or (and) some putative receptor-operated channels, but rather acts on the binding of PAF-acether to its presumed membrane receptor.

  5. Effect of etizolam (Depas) on production of superoxide anion by platelet-activating factor and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Aratani, H; Nishida, Y; Terasawa, M; Maruyama, Y

    1988-06-01

    Effect of etizolam on platelet activating factor (PAF) and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced superoxide anion (O2-) production in guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) was investigated. Etizolam showed the inhibitory effect on PAF-induced O2- production concentration dependently, with an IC50 value of 4.7 microM, but it had no inhibitory effect on FMLP-induced O2- production at 100 microM. These results suggest that etizolam has a selectively strong inhibitory effect on PAF-induced O2- production in guinea pig PMNL. PMID:2848961

  6. Binding of heparin to human platelet factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, S W; Bakshi, E N; Machin, K J; Isaacs, N W

    1986-01-01

    Platelet factor 4 is a small protein (Mr 7756) from the alpha-granules of blood platelets which binds strongly to and neutralizes the anticoagulant properties of heparin. From an analysis of X-ray crystallographic data a model for the binding of platelet factor 4 to heparin is proposed. PMID:3718482

  7. Effects of aliskiren, a renin inhibitor, on biomarkers of platelet activity, coagulation and fibrinolysis in subjects with multiple risk factors for vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, V L; Malinin, A; Barsness, G; Vahabi, J; Atar, D

    2008-05-01

    Aliskiren, an octanamide, is nonpeptide, low molecular weight, orally active renin inhibitor effectively preventing angiotensin and aldosterone release. This drug has been recently approved for the treatment of hypertension. Considering potential links between hypertension, platelets, the coagulation cascade and fibrinolysis we sought to evaluate the effect of aliskiren on human biomarkers of hemostasis. In vitro effects of whole blood preincubation with escalating concentrations of aliskiren (500, 1,000 and 2,000 ng ml(-1)) were assessed in 20 aspirin-naive volunteers with multiple risk factors for vascular disease. A total of 33 biomarkers were measured, of which 18 are related to platelet function, 12 to coagulation and 3 to fibrinolysis. Pretreatment of blood samples with aliskiren 500 ng ml(-1) resulted in a significant increase of antithrombin-III (AT-III) activity (P=0.003). All other tested biomarkers were not significantly affected. Spiking whole blood with the higher aliskiren doses was associated with various trends in biomarker activity, where 1000 ng ml(-1) concentration mostly decreased (7/33), and 2,000 ng ml(-1) mostly increased (6/33) some biomarkers. In the therapeutic concentration of 500 ng ml(-1) aliskiren does not affect hemostatic biomarkers, except for a moderate but highly significant (P=0.003) increase of AT-III activity. Higher aliskiren doses were associated with more profound biomarker changes, but they are likely not to be clinically relevant since they show diverging (that is, both mild antiplatelet and platelet-activating) trends, and considering the 2- to 4-fold safety margin. It is suggested that antithrombotic properties of aliskiren be explored further in an ex vivo clinical setting. PMID:18273042

  8. Production of platelet-activating factor is a component of the angiotensin II-protein kinase C activation pathway in bovine adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Pelosin, J M; Keramidas, M; Chambaz, E M

    1991-08-15

    Lyso-platelet-activating factor (lyso-PAF): acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.67) enzyme activity was characterized for the first time in bovine adrenocortical tissue. It was found to be associated with the microsomal membrane fraction, in which it exhibited a specific activity of 0.4 nmol/min per mg of protein and catalytic properties similar to those described in other cell types. The adrenocortical acetyltransferase activity was increased by 2-3-fold on incubation of the preparation with purified protein kinase C (PKC) under phosphorylating condition. This activation was optimal after 5 min of incubation and paralleled an increase in PKC-catalysed 32P incorporation into microsomal proteins. Both acetyltransferase activation and protein phosphorylation were dependent on the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipids, and were blocked in the presence of the potent PKC inhibitor H-7. In the intact adrenocortical cell, angiotensin II and a potent phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) were able to rapidly induce an increase in the biosynthesis of PAF, which was mostly released into the extracellular medium. These data suggest that bovine adrenocortical lyso-PAF acetyltransferase may be regulated by a PKC-dependent activation pathway, whereas no evidence for an additional adrenocorticotropin/cyclic AMP-dependent stimulation process was obtained in this cell type. Bovine adrenocortical cell membrane preparations were shown to possess high-affinity PAF-binding sites (Kd approximately 0.5 nM). Altogether, these observations suggest that PAF production and release may play a role in the autocrine or paracrine control of adrenocortical cell activation. PMID:1883337

  9. Characterization of serum platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase. Correlation between deficiency of serum PAF acetylhydrolase and respiratory symptoms in asthmatic children.

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, M; Miyake, T; Yamanaka, T; Sugatani, J; Suzuki, Y; Sakata, S; Araki, Y; Matsumoto, M

    1988-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase has been recognized as an enzyme that inactivates PAF. We developed a convenient and reproducible method for determining human serum PAF acetylhydrolase activity. The assay was based on measurement of [14C]acetate produced from 1-O-alkyl-2-[14C]-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine upon precipitation of the complex of radioactive substrate and albumin with TCA. The apparent Km value of PAF acetylhydrolase (near the physiological concentration of serum protein) was 1.5 X 10(-4) M PAF. 32 subjects with serum PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency were found among 816 healthy Japanese adults. The low PAF acetylhydrolase activity in the deficient serum might not be due to the presence of enzyme inhibitor. Both the sensitivity to PAF and the metabolism of PAF in platelets from PAF acetylhydrolase-deficient subjects were almost the same as those of normal subjects. Deficiency in serum PAF acetylhydrolase appeared to be transmitted by autosomal recessive heredity among five Japanese families. Among healthy adults, healthy children, and asthmatic children, who were grouped into five classes on the basis of respiratory symptoms (remission, wheezy, mild, moderate, and severe groups), the probability of PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency was significantly higher in groups with severe symptoms (moderate and severe) (P less than 0.01). These results suggest that deficiency of serum PAF acetylhydrolase might be one of the factors leading to severe respiratory symptoms in asthmatic children. Images PMID:3198761

  10. Decreased platelet function in aortic valve stenosis: high shear platelet activation then inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, J. R.; Etherington, M. D.; Brant, J.; Watkins, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To elucidate the mechanism of the bleeding tendency observed in patients with aortic valve stenosis. DESIGN--A prospective study of high and low shear platelet function tests in vitro in normal controls compared with that in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis with a mean (SD) systolic gradient by Doppler of 75 (18) mm Hg before and at least 4 months after aortic valve replacement. SETTING--District general hospital. RESULTS--The patients showed reduced retention in the high shear platelet function tests. (a) Platelet retention in the filter test was 53.6 (12.6)% in patients with aortic valve stenosis and 84.8 (9.6)% in the controls (P < 0.001). (b) Retention in the glass bead column test was 49.8 (19.2) in the patients and 87.4 (8.7) in the controls (P < 0.001). (c) The standard bleeding time was longer in the patients (P < 0.06). Results of the high shear tests (a, b, and c) after aortic valve replacement were within the normal range. The platelet count was low but within the normal range before surgery and increased postoperatively (P < 0.01). There were no differences in the results of standard clotting tests, plasma and intraplatelet von Willebrand's factor, or in 15 platelet aggregation tests using five agonists between patients with aortic valve stenosis and controls. CONCLUSIONS--The high shear haemodynamics of aortic valve stenosis modify platelet function in vivo predisposing to a bleeding tendency. This abnormality of platelet function is detectable only in vitro using high shear tests. The abnormal function is reversed by aortic valve replacement. High shear forces in vitro activate and then inactivate platelets. By the same mechanisms aortic valve stenosis seems to lead to high shear damage in vivo, resulting in a clinically important bleeding tendency in some patients. PMID:8541170

  11. [Analysis of platelet-derived factors that modulate functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes].

    PubMed

    Sasada, M; Asagoe, K

    1994-04-01

    Interactions between platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) modulate their functions and play a role in the development of pathogenesis of some disease. Platelets secret various kinds of factors that affect PMN functions. They seemed to have important role in vivo, but little has been elucidated on exact mechanism of action and physiological meaning of each factor in relation to PMN functions. We studied the effects of platelets and released substances from activated platelets on the functions of PMN. Results were as follows. 1) Platelets enhanced bactericidal activities of PMN against E.coli. 2) Platelets had effects on the generation of superoxide anion (O2-) of PMN. Their effects were quite different according to the assay condition of PMN, that is, platelets inhibited O2- generation when PMN were at rest or stimulated slightly and they enhanced O2-generation of PMN that were stimulated with optimal condition. 3) Thrombin-activated platelets and their supernatant elicited a transient elevation of [Ca2] of PMN. The activity of the supernatant decreased by treating with hexokinase that decomposed ATP. Further treatment with trypsin abolished its activity almost completely. Considering with our additional experiments, factors that induced [Ca2+] elevation of PMN were ATP, beta-thromboglobulin and some trypsin-sensitive factor(s). 4) Supernatant of thrombin-activated platelets decreased random migration and chemokinesis of PMN. PMID:8028184

  12. High glucose concentration induces the overexpression of transforming growth factor-beta through the activation of a platelet-derived growth factor loop in human mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, S.; Gesualdo, L.; Ranieri, E.; Grandaliano, G.; Schena, F. P.

    1996-01-01

    High glucose concentration has been shown to induce the overexpression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 mRNA and protein in different cell types, including murine mesangial cells, thus possibly accounting for the expansion of mesangial extracellular matrix observed in diabetic glomerulopathy. In the present study, we evaluated platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain and PDGF-beta receptor gene expression in human mesangial cells (HMCs) exposed to different concentrations of glucose and then sought a possible relationship between a PDGF loop and the modulation of TGF-beta 1 expression. HMC [3H]thymidine incorporation was upregulated by 30 mmol/L glucose (HG) up to 24 hours, whereas it was significantly inhibited at later time points. Neutralizing antibodies to PDGF BB abolished the biphasic response to HG, whereas anti-TGF-beta antibodies reversed only the late inhibitory effect of hyperglycemic medium. HG induced an early and persistent increase of PDGF B-chain gene expression, as evaluated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, whereas PDGF-beta receptor mRNA increased by twofold after 6 hours, thereafter declining at levels 70% lower than in controls after 24 hours. 125I-Labeled PDGF BB binding studies in HMCs exposed to HG for 24 hours confirmed the decrease of PDGF-beta receptor expression. TGF-beta 1-specific transcripts showed 43 and 78% increases after 24 and 48 hours of incubation in HG, respectively, which was markedly diminished by anti-PDGF BB neutralizing antibodies or suramin. We conclude that HG induces an early activation of a PDGF loop that, in turn, causes an increase of TGF-beta 1 gene expression, thus modulating both HMC proliferation and mesangial matrix production. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8952542

  13. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sithu, Srinivas D.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W.; Conklin, Daniel J.; Haberzettl, Petra; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D'Souza, Stanley E.

    2010-10-15

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6 h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  14. EXPOSURE TO ACROLEIN BY INHALATION CAUSES PLATELET ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; O’Toole, Timothy E; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D’Souza, Stanley E

    2010-01-01

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption. PMID:20678513

  15. ERas protein is overexpressed and binds to the activated platelet-derived growth factor β receptor in bovine urothelial tumour cells associated with papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Russo, Valeria; Roperto, Franco; Esposito, Iolanda; Ceccarelli, Dora Maria; Zizzo, Nicola; Leonardi, Leonardo; Capparelli, Rosanna; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Roperto, Sante

    2016-06-01

    Embryonic stem cell-expressed Ras (ERas) encodes a constitutively active form of guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that binds to and activates phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), which in turn phosphorylates and activates downstream targets such as Akt. The current study evaluated ERas regulation and expression in papillomavirus-associated urothelial tumours in cattle grazing on lands rich in bracken fern. ERas was found upregulated and overexpressed by PCR, real time PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, protein overexpression was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry. ERas was found to interact physically and colocalise with the activated platelet derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) by coimmunoprecipitation and laser scanning confocal investigations. Phosphorylation of Akt, a downstream effector both of ERas and PDGFβR, appeared to be increased in urothelial tumour cells. Altogether, these data indicate that ERas/PDGFβR complex could play a role in the pathogenesis of bovine papillomavirus-associated bladder neoplasia. PMID:27256024

  16. Lipoxin A4 and Platelet Activating Factor Are Involved in E. coli or LPS-Induced Lung Inflammation in CFTR-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiya; Yang, Jun; Su, Emily M.; Li, Ling; Zhao, Caiqi; Yang, Xi; Gao, Zhaowei; Pan, Mengyao; Sun, Peiyu; Sun, Wei; Jiang, Yiyi; Su, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is expressed by both neutrophils and platelets. Lack of functional CFTR could lead to severe lung infection and inflammation. Here, we found that mutation of CFTR (F508del) or inhibition of CFTR in mice led to more severe thrombocytopenia, alveolar neutrocytosis and bacteriosis, and lower lipoxin A4/MIP-2 (macrophage inhibitory protein-2) or lipoxin A4/neutrophil ratios in the BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage) during acute E. coli pneumonia. In vitro, inhibition of CFTR promotes MIP-2 production in LPS-stimulated neutrophils; however, lipoxin A4 could dose-dependently suppress this effect. In LPS-induced acute lung inflammation, blockade of PSGL-1 (P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1) or P-selectin, antagonism of PAF by WEB2086, or correction of mutated CFTR trafficking by KM11060 could significantly increase plasma lipoxin A4 levels in F508del relevant to wildtype mice. Concurrently, F508del mice had higher plasma platelet activating factor (PAF) levels and PAF-AH activity compared to wildtype under LPS challenge. Inhibiting hydrolysis of PAF by a specific PAF-AH (PAF-acetylhydrolase) inhibitor, MAFP, could worsen LPS-induced lung inflammation in F508del mice compared to vehicle treated F508del group. Particularly, depletion of platelets in F508del mice could significantly decrease plasma lipoxin A4 and PAF-AH activity and deteriorate LPS-induced lung inflammation compared to control F508del mice. Taken together, lipoxin A4 and PAF are involved in E. coli or LPS-induced lung inflammation in CFTR-deficient mice, suggesting that lipoxin A4 and PAF might be therapeutic targets for ameliorating CFTR-deficiency deteriorated lung inflammation. PMID:24671173

  17. Systemic administration of platelet-activating factor in rat reduces specific pulmonary uptake of circulating monoclonal antibody to angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Atochina, E N; Hiemisch, H H; Muzykantov, V R; Danilov, S M

    1992-01-01

    The biodistribution of radiolabeled mouse monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and control, nonimmune mouse IgG in platelet activating factor (PAF)-treated rats was studied. The blood level of both preparations was slightly decreased (90% of the control) in PAF-treated rats. Specific pulmonary accumulation of anti-ACE MoAb was reduced to 50% of control in contrast to a doubling in nonspecific pulmonary uptake of non-immune IgG. The changes in anti-ACE MoAb biodistribution were lung-specific and were accompanied by decrease in the pulmonary ACE activity (to 60% of control) and increase in serum ACE activity (to 170% of control). Thus anti-ACE MoAb reveals PAF-induced changes in the status of the pulmonary ACE and therefore can be used for the studies of pathology of the pulmonary endothelium. PMID:1331624

  18. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  19. A murine platelet-activating factor receptor gene: cloning, chromosomal localization and up-regulation of expression by lipopolysaccharide in peritoneal resident macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, S; Matsuda, Y; Nakamura, M; Waga, I; Kume, K; Izumi, T; Shimizu, T

    1996-01-01

    A murine gene encoding a platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) was cloned. The gene was mapped to a region of the D2.2 band of chromosome 4 both by fluorescence in situ hybridization and by molecular linkage analysis. Northern blot analysis showed a high expression of the PAFR message in peritoneal macrophages. When C3H/HeN macrophages were treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or synthetic lipid A, the PAFR gene expression was induced. Bacterial LPS, but not lipid A, induced the level of PAFR mRNA in LPS unresponsive C3H/HeJ macrophages. These induction patterns were parallel to those of tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA. Thus the PAFR in macrophages is important in LPS-induced pathologies. PMID:8670084

  20. Prolonged activation of phospholipase D in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing platelet-activating-factor receptor lacking cytoplasmic C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Nakashima, S; Adachi, T; Ito, Y; Takano, T; Shimizu, T; Nozawa, Y

    1997-10-01

    The mechanism and role of phospholipase D (PLD) activation by platelet-activating factor (PAF) were examined with Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing wild-type PAF receptor (WT-H cells) and truncated PAF receptor lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail (D-H cells). Treatment of D-H cells with PAF resulted in the rapid formation of Ins(1,4,5)P3, which was followed by a sustained phase for more than 10 min. In these cells, PAF-induced PLD activation lasted for more than 20 min. In contrast, PLD activation in WT-H cells was transient. PAF stimulation caused the biphasic formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) in both types of cell. The first phase was rapid and transient, coinciding with the Ins(1,4,5)P3 peak. The second sustained phase of DG formation was attenuated by butanol, which produces phosphatidylbutanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA) by transphosphatidylation activity of PLD, and by propranolol, a selective inhibitor for PA phosphohydrolase catalysing the conversion of PA into DG. The DG level returned nearly to basal at 20 min after PAF stimulation in WT-H cells, whereas in D-H cells the elevated DG level was sustained for more than 20 min. The profile of translocation of protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) to membrane was similar to that of DG formation. In WT-H cells, PKCalpha was transiently associated with membranes and then returned to the cytosol. However, in D-H cells PKCalpha was rapidly translocated to and remained in membranes for more than 20 min. Butanol suppressed this sustained translocation of PKCalpha. Furthermore the mRNA levels of c-fos and c-jun by PAF in WT-H cells were much lower than those in D-H cells. Propranolol and butanol at concentrations that inhibited the formation of DG suppressed the PAF-induced mRNA expression of c-fos and c-jun. Taken together, the prolonged PLD activation in D-H cells confirmed a primary role for phospholipase C/PKC in PLD activation by PAF. Furthermore the results obtained here suggest that

  1. CD44 sensitivity of platelet activation, membrane scrambling and adhesion under high arterial shear rates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guilai; Liu, Guoxing; Alzoubi, Kousi; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Walker, Britta; Münzer, Patrick; Luo, Dong; Umbach, Anja T; Elvira, Bernat; Chen, Hong; Voelkl, Jakob; Föller, Michael; Mak, Tak W; Borst, Oliver; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    CD44 is required for signalling of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an anti-apoptotic pro-inflammatory cytokine. MIF is expressed and released from blood platelets, key players in the orchestration of occlusive vascular disease. Nothing is known about a role of CD44 in the regulation of platelet function. The present study thus explored whether CD44 modifies degranulation (P-selectin exposure), integrin activation, caspase activity, phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface, platelet volume, Orai1 protein abundance and cytosolic Ca(2+)-activity ([Ca2+]i). Platelets from mice lacking CD44 (cd44(-/-)) were compared to platelets from corresponding wild-type mice (cd44(+/+)). In resting platelets, P-selectin abundance, α(IIb)β3 integrin activation, caspase-3 activity and phosphatidylserine exposure were negligible in both genotypes and Orai1 protein abundance, [Ca2+]i, and volume were similar in cd44(-/-) and cd44(+/+) platelets. Platelet degranulation and α(IIb)β3 integrin activation were significantly increased by thrombin (0.02 U/ml), collagen related peptide (CRP, 2 µg/ml and Ca(2+)-store depletion with thapsigargin (1 µM), effects more pronounced in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Thrombin (0.02 U/ml) increased platelet [Ca2+]i, caspase-3 activity, phosphatidylserine exposure and Orai1 surface abundance, effects again significantly stronger in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Thrombin further decreased forward scatter in cd44(-/-) and cd44(+/+) platelets, an effect which tended to be again more pronounced in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Platelet adhesion and in vitro thrombus formation under high arterial shear rates (1,700 s(-1)) were significantly augmented in cd44(-/-) mice. In conclusion, genetic deficiency of CD44 augments activation, apoptosis and pro-thrombotic potential of platelets. PMID:26355696

  2. Platelet activity in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunqiu; Li, Yongyu; Yu, Zhen; Liu, Zhanju; Shi, Yanhong; Lewandowska, Urszula; Sobczak, Marta; Fichna, Jakub; Kreis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in immune responses. Impaired platelet activation may cause persistent mucosal inflammation through P-selectin, CD40-CD40L and other systems influencing granulocytes, macrophages or endothelial cells. Pharmacological regulation of platelet activation may reduce thromboembolism and limit the interaction of platelets with endothelial and inflammatory cells, in turn weakening the inflammatory responses. In this review we focus on pathophysiological activities of platelets in inflammatory bowel diseases and discuss the studies on currently available anti-platelet therapies in the treatment of gastrointestinal inflammation. Finally, we provide a prospective view to new anti-platelet agents currently under development. PMID:25585124

  3. Transcription factors in late megakaryopoiesis and related platelet disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tijssen, M R; Ghevaert, C

    2013-01-01

    Cell type-specific transcription factors regulate the repertoire of genes expressed in a cell and thereby determine its phenotype. The differentiation of megakaryocytes, the platelet progenitors, from hematopoietic stem cells is a well-known process that can be mimicked in culture. However, the efficient formation of platelets in culture remains a challenge. Platelet formation is a complicated process including megakaryocyte maturation, platelet assembly and platelet shedding. We hypothesize that a better understanding of the transcriptional regulation of this process will allow us to influence it such that sufficient numbers of platelets can be produced for clinical applications. After an introduction to gene regulation and platelet formation, this review summarizes the current knowledge of the regulation of platelet formation by the transcription factors EVI1, GATA1, FLI1, NFE2, RUNX1, SRF and its co-factor MKL1, and TAL1. Also covered is how some platelet disorders including myeloproliferative neoplasms, result from disturbances of the transcriptional regulation. These disorders give us invaluable insights into the crucial role these transcription factors play in platelet formation. Finally, there is discussion of how a better understanding of these processes will be needed to allow for efficient production of platelets in vitro. PMID:23311859

  4. Platelets

    MedlinePlus

    ... are related to immunity and fighting infection. Platelet Production Platelets are produced in the bone marrow, the ... platelet destruction and also decreased bone marrow platelet production. These problems are caused by autoantibodies. Antibodies are ...

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor concentrations in the plasma-activated platelets rich (P-APR) of healthy controls and colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Girolamo; Coviello, Maria; Patruno, Rosa; Valerio, Paolo; Martino, Domenico; Milella, Pietro; Catalano, Vittorio; Scotto, Francesco; De Ceglie, Antonella; Quaranta, Michele; Ribatti, Domenico; Pellecchia, Antonio

    2004-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is known to play a key role in tumour angiogenesis. Our preliminary published data suggest that plasma-activated platelets rich (P-APR) rather than other plasma compartments (i.e. plasma, plasma-platelets poor) or serum is the more suitable blood fraction for measuring VEGF in a miscellaneous series of gastrointestinal cancer patients. The aim of this confirmatory study was to assess VEGF in P-APR blood compartments of 30 healthy control subjects (HCS) and a homogeneous series of 62 colorectal cancer patients (CRCP), prospectively collected, to evaluate its possible clinical-biological significance. Samples of plasma (P) in both sodium citrate (SC) and sodium citrate-theophylline-adenosine-dipyridamole (CTAD) were collected from venous blood. After the centrifugation and separation methods VEGF levels were detected by ELISA in P-APR. The best differentiation between HCS and CRCP in VEGF level was seen for P-APRCTAD (median value: 255 pg/ml versus 142 pg/ml; p=0.000 by Mann-Whitney U test). No significant correlation among the P-APR VEGF concentrations and the main clinical pathological features was found. We suggest that P-APRCTAD fraction, obtained according to well standardised conditions, could represent the suitable blood compartment for the assessment of VEGF as marker of malignant intestinal transformation. PMID:15375505

  6. [Platelet activating factor in biological fluids of animals with different species-specific resistance at the stage of infective process after inoculation with mycobacterium tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kaminskaia, G O; Abdullaev, R Iu; Gedymin, L E

    1998-01-01

    Following 24 hours, 1, 2, and 6 weeks of inoculation of guinea-pigs and albino rats by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT), the levels of platelet activation factor (PAF) were determined in the plasma, leukocytes, alveolar macrophages, nonfractionated cellular sediment and fluid of bronchoalveolar lavage (FBAL) by testing rabbit platelets. The guinea-pigs developed generalized tuberculosis, the rats receiving a small dose of MT developed nonspecific inflammation and those taking a large dose had specific foci. In both experiments, spontaneous regression of inflammatory changes began in rats after 6 weeks. In the guinea-pigs inoculated by MT, there was a steady increase in PAF synthesis in all cell populations, PAF levels dropped in fluids. In the rats receiving a small dose of MT, the cellular levels PAF levels periodically rose in early infection, but decreased below the control values during regression of inflammatory changes. Concurrently, the level of PAF became lower in plasma and FBAL. With high-dose inoculation, it drastically fell in the cells just after MT administration, then moderately increased during the development of specific changes and again dropped at the end of the experiment. In early infection the changes in PAF levels in the body's fluids were mirror as regards to the respective cells, but at regression of specific changes, the content of PAF was lower than the normal values in all the fluids under study. PMID:10067355

  7. Eosinophil accumulation in pulmonary airways of guinea-pigs induced by exposure to an aerosol of platelet-activating factor: effect of anti-asthma drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Sanjar, S.; Aoki, S.; Boubekeur, K.; Chapman, I. D.; Smith, D.; Kings, M. A.; Morley, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. Exposure of guinea-pigs to aerosols of platelet activating factor (PAF) (0.01 to 100 micrograms ml-1) induced a dose-dependent increased incidence of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) at 48 h. Total leucocyte numbers and the percentages of lymphocytes and neutrophils were unchanged in BAL fluid. 2. Increased numbers of eosinophils were detected in BAL 1 h after exposure to PAF but eosinophilia was not maximal until 48 h. One week after exposure to PAF, the percentage of eosinophils in BAL was within the normal range. 3. Depletion of circulating platelets or neutrophils by intravenous injection of specific antisera did not modify accumulation of eosinophils in the airway lumen following inhalation of PAF (10 micrograms ml-1). 4. PAF-induced pulmonary airway eosinophil accumulation was inhibited by treatment with SDZ 64-412, a selective PAF-antagonist, whether the compound was administered before, or 30 min after, inhalation of PAF. 5. Pulmonary airway eosinophil accumulation due to inhaled PAF (10 micrograms ml-1) was inhibited by prior treatment with aminophylline, cromoglycate, ketotifen, dexamethasone and AH 21-132. 6. Pulmonary airway eosinophil accumulation due to inhaled PAF (10 micrograms ml-1) was not inhibited by prior treatment with indomethacin, salbutamol or mepyramine. PMID:2328394

  8. The mixed-lineage kinase DLK undergoes Src-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation and activation in cells exposed to vanadate or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF).

    PubMed

    Daviau, Alex; Di Fruscio, Marco; Blouin, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Some data in the literature suggest that serine/threonine phosphorylation is required for activation of the mixed-lineage kinases (MLKs), a subgroup of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs). In this report, we demonstrate that the MLK family member DLK is activated and concurrently tyrosine-phosphorylated in cells exposed to the protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate. Tyrosine phosphorylation appears crucial for activation as incubation of vanadate-activated DLK molecules with a tyrosine phosphatase substantially reduced DLK enzymatic activity. Interestingly, the effects of vanadate on DLK are completely blocked by treatment with a Src family kinase inhibitor, PP2, or the expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed against Src. DLK also fails to undergo vanadate-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation and activation in fibroblasts which lack expression of Src, Yes and Fyn, but reintroduction of wild-type Src or Fyn followed by vanadate treatment restores this response. In addition to vanadate, stimulation of cells with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) also induces tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of DLK by a Src-dependent mechanism. DLK seems important for PDGF signaling because its depletion by RNA interference substantially reduces PDGF-stimulated ERK and Akt kinase activation. Thus, our findings suggest that Src-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of DLK may be important for regulation of its activity, and they support a role for DLK in PDGF signaling. PMID:19146952

  9. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) stimulates the production of PAF acetylhydrolase by the human hepatoma cell line, HepG2.

    PubMed

    Satoh, K; Imaizumi, T; Kawamura, Y; Yoshida, H; Hiramoto, M; Takamatsu, S; Takamatsu, M

    1991-02-01

    The human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, secreted an activity that degrades platelet-activating factor (PAF) by the hydrolysis of the sn-2 acetyl group. This activity was Ca++ independent, inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate but not by p-bromophenacyl bromide, and resistant to treatment with trypsin or pronase. Separation of HepG2-conditioned medium by gel filtration disclosed that the activity was associated with lipoproteins. An antiserum against PAF acetylhydrolase immunoprecipitated this activity. It was not recognized by an antibody against lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), which also is secreted by HepG2 cells. Therefore the phospholipase A2 activity of LCAT was excluded as a source of the observed activity. PAF added to the culture medium stimulated the secretion of the PAF-degrading activity by HepG2 cells, while lyso-PAF was inactive. Maximal stimulation was observed with 5 ng/ml PAF, which induced a fivefold increase. The presence of 5 ng/ml PAF, enhanced the secretion of [35S]methionine-labeled PAF acetylhydrolase and cycloheximide inhibited both the basal and PAF-stimulated secretion of the labeled enzyme. We conclude that HepG2 cells produce PAF acetylhydrolase. The liver may be a major source of plasma PAF acetylhydrolase, and PAF may induce the production of its inactivating enzyme by the liver. PMID:1846878

  10. In vivo effects of eltrombopag on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia: no evidence of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Psaila, Bethan; Bussel, James B.; Linden, Matthew D.; Babula, Bracken; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R.; Tate, Chinara; Mathur, Kanika; Frelinger, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin-receptor agonist, on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are not fully characterized. This study used whole blood flow cytometry to examine platelet function in 20 patients receiving eltrombopag treatment at days 0, 7, and 28. Platelet surface expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa, P-selectin, and GPIb was measured with and without low and high adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) concentrations. Before eltrombopag treatment with no ex vivo agonist, platelet activation was higher in ITP patients than controls. Platelet GPIb and activated GPIIb/IIIa expression without added agonist was unchanged following eltrombopag treatment, whereas a slight increase in P-selectin was observed. Expression of P-selectin and activated GPIIb/IIIa in response to high-dose ADP was lower during eltrombopag treatment than at baseline. Eltrombopag led to a slight increase in platelet reactivity to TRAP only in responders to eltrombopag but not to levels above those in controls; whole blood experiments demonstrated that this increase was probably because of higher platelet counts rather than higher platelet reactivity. In conclusion, although thrombocytopenic ITP patients have higher baseline platelet activation than controls, eltrombopag did not cause platelet activation or hyper-reactivity, irrespective of whether the platelet count increased. PMID:22294727

  11. Busulfan Triggers Intrinsic Mitochondrial-Dependent Platelet Apoptosis Independent of Platelet Activation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jianlin; Wu, Yulu; Liu, Yun; Li, Xiaoqian; Wu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Na; Zhu, Feng; Qi, Kunming; Cheng, Hai; Li, Depeng; Li, Hongchun; Li, Zhenyu; Zeng, Lingyu; Ma, Ping; Xu, Kailin

    2016-09-01

    As a nonspecific alkylating antineoplastic agent, busulfan has been widely used in the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated busulfan-induced cell apoptosis. Whether busulfan triggers platelet apoptosis remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the role of busulfan in platelet apoptosis. Isolated human platelets were incubated with busulfan followed by analysis of platelet apoptosis by flow cytometry or western blot, including mitochondrial depolarization, expression of Bcl-2, and Bax and caspase 3 activation. Meanwhile, platelet activation, expression of glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα), glycoprotein VI (GPVI), and IIb3 and platelet aggregation in response to collagen and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) were measured. Additionally, busulfan was injected into mice with or without administration of caspase inhibitor QVD-Oph to investigate its effect on platelet lifespan. Our results showed that busulfan-treated platelets displayed increased mitochondrial membrane depolarization, decreased expression of Bcl-2, increased expression of Bax and caspase 3 activation in dose-dependent manner, which were inhibited by QVD-Oph. Platelet activation was not observed in busulfan-treated platelets as showed by no increased P-selectin expression and PAC-1 binding. However, busulfan reduced collagen- or ADP-induced platelet aggregation without affecting expression of GPIbα, GPVI, and IIb3. Furthermore, busulfan reduced circulating platelet lifespan which was ameliorated by QVD-Oph in mice. In conclusion, busulfan triggers mitochondrial-dependent platelet apoptosis and reduces platelet lifespan in mice. These data suggest targeting caspase activation might be beneficial in the prophylaxis of platelet apoptosis-associated thrombocytopenia after administration of busulfan. PMID:27292166

  12. Pneumolysin Mediates Platelet Activation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Nel, Jan Gert; Durandt, Chrisna; Mitchell, Timothy J; Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald; Tintinger, Gregory R

    2016-08-01

    This study has explored the role of the pneumococcal toxin, pneumolysin (Ply), in activating human platelets. Following exposure to Ply (10-80 ng/ml), platelet activation and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations were measured flow cytometrically according to the level of expression of CD62P (P-selectin) and spectrofluorimetrically, respectively. Exposure to Ply resulted in marked upregulation of expression of platelet CD62P, achieving statistical significance at concentrations of 40 ng/ml and higher (P < 0.05), in the setting of increased influx of Ca(2+). These potentially pro-thrombotic actions of Ply were attenuated by depletion of Ca(2+) from the extracellular medium or by exposure of the cells to a pneumolysoid devoid of pore-forming activity. These findings are consistent with a mechanism of Ply-mediated platelet activation involving sub-lytic pore formation, Ca(2+) influx, and mobilization of CD62P-expressing α-granules, which, if operative in vivo, may contribute to the pathogenesis of associated acute lung and myocardial injury during invasive pneumococcal disease. PMID:27192991

  13. 21 CFR 864.7695 - Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay. 864.7695 Section 864.7695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7695 Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay....

  14. Interdependent effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme and platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase gene polymorphisms on the progression of immunoglobulin A nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, H-J; Kim, H; Kim, H L; Lee, S G; Zheng, S-H; Shin, J H; Lim, C S; Kim, S; Lee, J S; Lee, D S; Kim, Y S

    2002-08-01

    In order to investigate the interdependent action of the insertion/deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene and polymorphism in exon 11 (C1136-->T; Ala379Val) of the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) gene, which encodes a functional antagonist of PAF, on the progression of immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy, we analysed both polymorphisms in patients with primary IgA nephropathy, who were followed-up for longer than 3 years. During the follow-up (87.3 +/- 50.0 months), the disease progressed in 38 of the 191 patients (19.9%). The D allele of the ACE gene in the absence of the T allele of the PAF-AH gene did not affect the prognosis [odds ratio (OR), 3.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.8-16.4] and neither did the T allele in the absence of the D allele (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 0.4-24.2). However, the presence of both was a significant prognostic factor (OR, 6.6; 95% CI, 1.4-31.3). After adjusting for other risk factors, the presence of both proved to be an independent risk factor (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.6-12.7). These results suggest that the interdependent effects of ACE and PAF-AH polymorphisms on the progression of IgA nephropathy might be more important than the effect of the individual polymorphisms. PMID:12220450

  15. Geometric complexity identifies platelet activation in familial hypercholesterolemic patients.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Giorgio; Aglianò, Margherita; Volpi, Nila; Stefanutti, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a genetic disease, is associated with a severe incidence of athero-thrombotic events, related, also, to platelet hyperreactivity. A plethora of methods have been proposed to identify those activated circulating platelets, none of these has proved really effective. We need efficient methods to identify the circulating platelet status in order to follow the patients after therapeutic procedures. We propose the use of computerized fractal analysis for an objective characterization of the complexity of circulating platelet shapes observed by means of transmission electron microscopy in order to characterize the in vivo hyperactivated platelets of familial hypercholesterolemic patients, distinguishing them from the in vivo resting platelets of healthy individuals. Platelet boundaries were extracted by means of automatically image analysis. Geometric complexity (fractal dimension, D) by box counting was automatically calculated. The platelet boundary observed by electron microscopy is fractal, the shape of the circulating platelets is more complex in FH (n = 6) than healthy subjects (n = 5, P < 0.01), with 100% correct classification in selected individuals. In vitro activated platelets from healthy subjects show an analogous increase of D. The observed high D in the platelet boundary in FH originates from the in vivo platelet activation. Computerized fractal analysis of platelet shape observed by transmission electron microscopy can provide accurate, quantitative data to study platelet activation in familial hypercholesterolemia and after administration of drugs or other therapeutic procedures. PMID:25877374

  16. BN 52021 (a platelet activating factor-receptor antagonist) decreases alveolar macrophage-mediated lung injury in experimental extrinsic allergic alveolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Arellano, J L; Martín, T; López-Novoa, J M; Sánchez, M L; Montero, A; Jiménez, A

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of research indirectly suggest that platelet activating factor (PAF) may intervene in the pathogenesis of extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA). The specific aim of our study was to evaluate the participation of PAF on macrophage activation during the acute phase of EAA in an experimental model of this disease developed in guinea pigs. Initially we measured the concentration of PAF in bronchoalvedar lavage fluid, blood and lung tissue. In a second phase we evaluate the participation of PAF on alveolar macrophage activation and parenchymal lung injury. The effect of PAF on parenchymal lung injury was evaluated by measuring several lung parenchymatous lesion indices (lung index, bronchoalvedar lavage fluid (BALF) lactic hydrogenase activity and BALF alkaline phosphatase activity) and parameters of systemic response to the challenge (acute phase reagents). We observed that induction of the experimental EAA gave rise to an increase in the concentration of PAF in blood and in lung tissue. The use of the PAF-receptor antagonist BN52021 decreases the release of lysosomal enzymes (beta-glucuronidase and tartrate-sensitive acid phosphatase) to the extracellular environment both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, antagonism of the PAF receptors notably decreases pulmonary parenchymatous lesion. These data suggest that lung lesions from acute EAA are partly mediated by local production of PAF. PMID:9705608

  17. Platelet Activation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Patients Is Not Altered with Cocaine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kiebala, Michelle; Singh, Meera V.; Piepenbrink, Michael S.; Qiu, Xing; Kobie, James J.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has indicated that platelets, which are anucleate blood cells, significantly contribute to inflammatory disorders. Importantly, platelets also likely contribute to various inflammatory secondary disorders that are increasingly associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV) infection including neurological impairments and cardiovascular complications. Indeed, HIV infection is often associated with increased levels of platelet activators. Additionally, cocaine, a drug commonly abused by HIV-infected individuals, leads to increased platelet activation in humans. Considering that orchestrated signaling mechanisms are essential for platelet activation, and that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitors can alter platelet function, the role of NF-κB signaling in platelet activation during HIV infection warrants further investigation. Here we tested the hypothesis that inhibitory kappa B kinase complex (IKK) activation would be central for platelet activation induced by HIV and cocaine. Whole blood from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals, with or without cocaine abuse was used to assess platelet activation via flow cytometry whereas IKK activation was analyzed by performing immunoblotting and in vitro kinase assays. We demonstrate that increased platelet activation in HIV patients, as measured by CD62P expression, is not altered with reported cocaine use. Furthermore, cocaine and HIV do not activate platelets in whole blood when treated ex vivo. Finally, HIV-induced platelet activation does not involve the NF-κB signaling intermediate, IKKβ. Platelet activation in HIV patients is not altered with cocaine abuse. These results support the notion that non-IKK targeting approaches will be better suited for the treatment of HIV-associated inflammatory disorders. PMID:26076359

  18. Pharmacological inhibition of eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor signaling impairs zymosan-induced release of IL-23 by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mario; Márquez, Saioa; Montero, Olimpio; Alonso, Sara; Frade, Javier García; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez; Fernández, Nieves

    2016-02-15

    The engagement of the receptors for fungal patterns induces the expression of cytokines, the release of arachidonic acid, and the production of PGE2 in human dendritic cells (DC), but few data are available about other lipid mediators that may modulate DC function. The combined antagonism of leukotriene (LT) B4, cysteinyl-LT, and platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) inhibited IL23A mRNA expression in response to the fungal surrogate zymosan and to a lower extent TNFA (tumor necrosis factor-α) and CSF2 (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) mRNA. The combination of lipid mediators and the lipid extract of zymosan-conditioned medium increased the induction of IL23A by LPS (bacterial lipopolysaccharide), thus suggesting that unlike LPS, zymosan elicits the production of mediators at a concentration enough for optimal response. Zymosan induced the release of LTB4, LTE4, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), and PAF C16:0. DC showed a high expression and detectable Ser663 phosphorylation of 5-lipoxygenase in response to zymosan, and a high expression and activity of LPCAT1/2 (lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 and 2), the enzymes that incorporate acetate from acetyl-CoA into choline-containing lysophospholipids to produce PAF. Pharmacological modulation of the arachidonic acid cascade and the PAF receptor inhibited the binding of P-71Thr-ATF2 (activating transcription factor 2) to the IL23A promoter, thus mirroring their effects on the expression of IL23A mRNA and IL-23 protein. These results indicate that LTB4, cysteinyl-LT, and PAF, acting through their cognate G protein-coupled receptors, contribute to the phosphorylation of ATF2 and play a central role in IL23A promoter trans-activation and the cytokine signature induced by fungal patterns. PMID:26673542

  19. Epithelial sodium channel modulates platelet collagen activation.

    PubMed

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Alonso-Rangel, Lea; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Ortega, Arturo

    2014-03-01

    Activated platelets adhere to the exposed subendothelial extracellular matrix and undergo a rapid cytoskeletal rearrangement resulting in shape change and release of their intracellular dense and alpha granule contents to avoid hemorrhage. A central step in this process is the elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration through its release from intracellular stores and on throughout its influx from the extracellular space. The Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a highly selective Na(+) channel involved in mechanosensation, nociception, fluid volume homeostasis, and control of arterial blood pressure. The present study describes the expression, distribution, and participation of ENaC in platelet migration and granule secretion using pharmacological inhibition with amiloride. Our biochemical and confocal analysis in suspended and adhered platelets suggests that ENaC is associated with Intermediate filaments (IF) and with Dystrophin-associated proteins (DAP) via α-syntrophin and β-dystroglycan. Migration assays, quantification of soluble P-selectin, and serotonin release suggest that ENaC is dispensable for migration and alpha and dense granule secretion, whereas Na(+) influx through this channel is fundamental for platelet collagen activation. PMID:24679405

  20. Platelet-activating factor-induced pulmonary edema is partly mediated by prostaglandin E(2), E-prostanoid 3-receptors, and potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Göggel, Rolf; Hoffman, Sven; Nüsing, Rolf; Narumiya, Suh; Uhlig, Stefan

    2002-09-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is an important endogenous mediator of pulmonary edema in many models of acute lung injury. PAF triggers edema formation by simultaneous activation of two independent pathways; one is mediated by a cyclooxygenase metabolite, and the other is blocked by quinine. We examined the hypothesis that the cyclooxygenase-dependent part of PAF-induced edema is mediated by prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). In isolated rat lungs, PAF administration stimulated release of PGE(2) into the venous effluate and increased lung weight as a measure of edema formation. Perfusion with a neutralizing PGE(2) antibody attenuated the PAF-induced edema formation. In vivo, E-prostanoid 3-receptor-deficient mice showed less pulmonary Evans blue extravasation in response to PAF injection than did mice deficient in EP1, EP2, or EP4 receptors. Perfusion of rat lungs with PGE(2) caused pulmonary edema, which was largely prevented by inhibition of voltage-gated potassium channels (25 nM beta-dendrotoxin), but not by blocking calcium-dependent potassium currents (100 micro M paxilline). In line with its effects on PGE(2)-induced edema formation, beta-dendrotoxin attenuated PAF-induced edema partly if given alone, and completely in combination with quinine. Our findings suggest that PAF-triggered edema is partly mediated by the release of PGE(2), activation of EP3 receptors, and activation of voltage-gated potassium channels. PMID:12204861

  1. Cigarette smoke induces cell motility via platelet-activating factor accumulation in breast cancer cells: a potential mechanism for metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Kispert, Shannon; Marentette, John; McHowat, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer deaths are a result of metastasis rather than the primary tumor. Although cigarette smoking has been determined as a risk factor for several cancers, its role in metastasis has not been studied in detail. We propose that cigarette smoking contributes to metastatic disease via inhibition of breast cancer cell platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), resulting in PAF accumulation and a subsequent increase in cell motility. We studied several breast cell lines, including immortalized mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A), luminal A hormone positive MCF-7, basal-like triple negative MDA-MB-468, and claudin-low triple-negative highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells. We exposed cells to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for up to 48 h. CSE inhibited PAF-AH activity, increased PAF accumulation, and increased cell motility in MDA-MB-231 metastatic triple negative breast cancer cells. The calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) inhibitor, (S) bromoenol lactone ((S)-BEL) was used to prevent the accumulation of PAF and further prevented the increase in cell motility seen previously when cells were exposed to CSE. Thus, iPLA2 or PAF may represent a therapeutic target to manage metastatic disease, particularly in triple-negative breast cancer patients who smoke. PMID:25802360

  2. Captopril and platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist prevent cardiac allograft vasculopathy in rats: role of endogenous PAF and PAF-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Crawford, S E; Huang, L; Hsueh, W; Takami, H; Gonzalez-Crussi, F; Backer, C L; Mu, Y; Liu, H; Mavroudis, C

    1999-05-01

    Accelerated coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of late mortality following cardiac transplantation. The vascular lesions are characterized by myointimal proliferation and perivascular mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates. Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is a potent phospholipid mediator produced by inflammatory cells and activated endothelial cells. Angiotensin II is known to activate phospholipase A2, a critical enzyme in PAF synthesis. Using a rat heterotopic cardiac transplant model known to induce graft CAD, we previously reported that chronic administration of captopril, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, reduces intimal proliferation and maintains luminal patency. The purpose of the current study was to determine if captopril regulates vascular remodeling by suppressing PAF synthesis and whether administration of a PAF antagonist ameliorates graft CAD. Captopril was found to decrease levels of PAF and PAF-like compounds as well as reduce intimal lesions, decrease cellular rejection grade, and diminish allograft heart weights. Treatment with a PAF antagonist significantly decreased proliferation of the intimal component of the vasculopathy and caused regression of the cardiac hypertrophy, but had no significant effect on cellular rejection. In contrast, untreated animals had elevated plasma PAF levels, elevated heart weights, and severe myointimal proliferation with luminal stenosis 21 days post-transplantation. These observations suggest that graft CAD is mediated, in part, by PAF and PAF-like compounds, and suppression of endogenous PAF may prevent cardiac allograft vasculopathy. PMID:10363692

  3. A Neutralizing Monoclonal IgG1 Antibody of Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase SsE Protects Mice against Lethal Subcutaneous Group A Streptococcus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengyao; Feng, Wenchao; Zhu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) can cause life-threatening invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. There are no effective treatments for severe invasive GAS infections. The platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase SsE produced by GAS is required for invasive GAS to evade innate immune responses and to invade soft tissues. This study determined whether the enzymatic activity of SsE is critical for its function in GAS skin invasion and inhibition of neutrophil recruitment and whether SsE is a viable target for immunotherapy for severe invasive GAS infections. An isogenic derivative of M1T1 strain MGAS5005 producing SsE with an S178A substitution (SsES178A), an enzymatically inactive SsE mutant protein, was generated. This strain induced higher levels of neutrophil infiltration and caused smaller lesions than MGAS5005 in subcutaneous infections of mice. This phenotype is similar to that of MGAS5005 sse deletion mutants, indicating that the enzymatic activity of SsE is critical for its function. An anti-SsE IgG1 monoclonal antibody (MAb), 2B11, neutralized the PAF acetylhydrolase activity of SsE. Passive immunization with 2B11 increased neutrophil infiltration, reduced skin invasion, and protected mice against MGAS5005 infection. However, 2B11 did not protect mice when it was administered after MGAS5005 inoculation. MGAS5005 induced vascular effusion at infection sites at early hours after GAS inoculation, suggesting that 2B11 did not always have access to infection sites. Thus, the enzymatic activity of SsE mediates its function, and SsE has the potential to be included in a vaccine but is not a therapeutic target. An effective MAb-based immunotherapy for severe invasive GAS infections may need to target virulence factors that are critical for systemic survival of GAS. PMID:25916987

  4. Tiam1 and Rac1 are required for platelet-activating factor-induced endothelial junctional disassembly and increase in vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Knezevic, Ivana I; Predescu, Sanda A; Neamu, Radu F; Gorovoy, Matvey S; Knezevic, Nebojsa M; Easington, Cordus; Malik, Asrar B; Predescu, Dan N

    2009-02-20

    It is known that platelet-activating factor (PAF) induces severe endothelial barrier leakiness, but the signaling mechanisms remain unclear. Here, using a wide range of biochemical and morphological approaches applied in both mouse models and cultured endothelial cells, we addressed the mechanisms of PAF-induced disruption of interendothelial junctions (IEJs) and of increased endothelial permeability. The formation of interendothelial gaps filled with filopodia and lamellipodia is the cellular event responsible for the disruption of endothelial barrier. We observed that PAF ligation of its receptor induced the activation of the Rho GTPase Rac1. Following PAF exposure, both Rac1 and its guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1 were found associated with a membrane fraction from which they co-immunoprecipitated with PAF receptor. In the same time frame with Tiam1-Rac1 translocation, the junctional proteins ZO-1 and VE-cadherin were relocated from the IEJs, and formation of numerous interendothelial gaps was recorded. Notably, the response was independent of myosin light chain phosphorylation and thus distinct from other mediators, such as histamine and thrombin. The changes in actin status are driven by the PAF-induced localized actin polymerization as a consequence of Rac1 translocation and activation. Tiam1 was required for the activation of Rac1, actin polymerization, relocation of junctional associated proteins, and disruption of IEJs. Thus, PAF-induced IEJ disruption and increased endothelial permeability requires the activation of a Tiam1-Rac1 signaling module, suggesting a novel therapeutic target against increased vascular permeability associated with inflammatory diseases. PMID:19095647

  5. Tiam1 and Rac1 Are Required for Platelet-activating Factor-induced Endothelial Junctional Disassembly and Increase in Vascular Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Knezevic, Ivana I.; Predescu, Sanda A.; Neamu, Radu F.; Gorovoy, Matvey S.; Knezevic, Nebojsa M.; Easington, Cordus; Malik, Asrar B.; Predescu, Dan N.

    2009-01-01

    It is known that platelet-activating factor (PAF) induces severe endothelial barrier leakiness, but the signaling mechanisms remain unclear. Here, using a wide range of biochemical and morphological approaches applied in both mouse models and cultured endothelial cells, we addressed the mechanisms of PAF-induced disruption of interendothelial junctions (IEJs) and of increased endothelial permeability. The formation of interendothelial gaps filled with filopodia and lamellipodia is the cellular event responsible for the disruption of endothelial barrier. We observed that PAF ligation of its receptor induced the activation of the Rho GTPase Rac1. Following PAF exposure, both Rac1 and its guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1 were found associated with a membrane fraction from which they co-immunoprecipitated with PAF receptor. In the same time frame with Tiam1-Rac1 translocation, the junctional proteins ZO-1 and VE-cadherin were relocated from the IEJs, and formation of numerous interendothelial gaps was recorded. Notably, the response was independent of myosin light chain phosphorylation and thus distinct from other mediators, such as histamine and thrombin. The changes in actin status are driven by the PAF-induced localized actin polymerization as a consequence of Rac1 translocation and activation. Tiam1 was required for the activation of Rac1, actin polymerization, relocation of junctional associated proteins, and disruption of IEJs. Thus, PAF-induced IEJ disruption and increased endothelial permeability requires the activation of a Tiam1-Rac1 signaling module, suggesting a novel therapeutic target against increased vascular permeability associated with inflammatory diseases. PMID:19095647

  6. Effect of platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist, etizolam, on resolution of chronic subdural hematoma--a prospective study to investigate use as conservative therapy.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Yutaka; Kurimoto, Masanori; Nagai, Shoichi; Hori, Emiko; Origasa, Hideki; Endo, Shunro

    2005-12-01

    Inflammatory reaction is very important for formation of the neomembrane of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The present study evaluated medical treatment with the platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist, etizolam, for the resolution of CSDH, and the factors indicating surgery or conservative therapy. Alternate patients were assigned to the etizolam group or control group without medical treatment. Patients in the etizolam group received 3.0 mg etizolam per day for 14 days. A total of 53 patients were followed up for at least 6 months. Univariate analysis of differences in demographic characteristics, clinical findings, and initial computed tomography (CT) findings, and multiple logistic regression analysis of the relationship between etizolam treatment and requirement for surgery using age, sex, low density of hematoma on CT, and paresis as confounders were performed. Etizolam treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.156, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.024-0.999, p = 0.049) was negatively correlated with requirement for surgery. Low density of hematoma (adjusted OR 0.125, 95% CI 0.019-0.846, p = 0.033) was found to be an independent negative predictor, and paresis as an initial symptom (adjusted OR 6.35, 95% CI 1.04-38.7, p = 0.045) was an independent positive predictor of requirement for surgery. Etizolam administration can promote the resolution of CSDH, especially at the stage of hygroma appearing as low density on CT. Surgery is recommended if the patient presents with paresis. PMID:16377949

  7. IL-1 beta and IL-6 stimulate the production of platelet-activating factor (PAF) by cultured rabbit synovial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, S; Palacios, I; Egido, J; Zarco, P; Miguelez, R; González, E; Herrero-Beaumont, G

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether synovial cells are capable of producing PAF in the presence of cytokines such as IL-1 beta and IL-6 and other stimuli. Synovial cells were obtained from joints of healthy rabbits. PAF production was assayed by measurement of serotonin release in rabbit platelets and the incorporation of 3H-acetate into PAF. Synovial cells produced PAF after 5 min of incubation with ionophore A23187, reaching the maximal amount at 15 min (4.3 +/- 0.7 x 10(-3) pmol of PAF/mg protein, P < 0.005, n = 4), and declining afterwards. The treatment of synoviocytes with IL-1 beta and IL-6 induced synthesis of PAF after 5 min of stimulation, reaching the greatest production at 15 min with IL-6 and 30 min with IL-1 beta (3.6 +/- 1.1 x 10(-3) and 3.3 +/- 1.2 pmol of PAF/mg protein, respectively, P < 0.05, n = 4). The incubation of the cells with PMSF, an inhibitor of acetylhydrolase, before the addition of the stimuli, increased the incorporation rate of 3H-acetate, suggesting a rapid degradation of PAF by synoviocytes. These results demonstrate that synovial cells can produce PAF after stimulation with agonists, such as ionophore, and cytokines. Thus, PAF, acting alone or with other mediators, could amplify the inflammatory joint reaction. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7882558

  8. SDF-1α is a novel autocrine activator of platelets operating through its receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Tony G; Harper, Matthew T; Poole, Alastair W

    2015-01-01

    Platelets store and secrete the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α upon platelet activation, but the ability of platelet-derived SDF-1α to signal in an autocrine/paracrine manner mediating functional platelet responses relevant to thrombosis and haemostasis is unknown. We sought to explore the role of platelet-derived SDF-1α and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7 in facilitating platelet activation and determine the mechanism facilitating SDF-1α-mediated regulation of platelet function. Using human washed platelets, CXCR4 inhibition, but not CXCR7 blockade significantly abrogated collagen-mediated platelet aggregation, dense granule secretion and thromboxane (Tx) A2 production. Time-dependent release of SDF-1α from collagen-activated platelets supports a functional role for SDF-1α in this regard. Using an in vitro whole blood perfusion assay, collagen-induced thrombus formation was substantially reduced with CXCR4 inhibition. In washed platelets, recombinant SDF-1α in the range of 20-100 ng/mL(-1) could significantly enhance platelet aggregation responses to a threshold concentration of collagen. These enhancements were completely dependent on CXCR4, but not CXCR7, which triggered TxA2 production and dense granule secretion. Rises in cAMP were significantly blunted by SDF-1α, which could also enhance collagen-mediated Ca2+ mobilisation, both of which were mediated by CXCR4. This potentiating effect of SDF-1α primarily required TxA2 signalling acting upstream of dense granule secretion, whereas blockade of ADP signalling could only partially attenuate SDF-1α-induced platelet activation. Therefore, this study supports a potentially novel autocrine/paracrine role for platelet-derived SDF-1α during thrombosis and haemostasis, through a predominantly TxA2-dependent and ADP-independent pathway. PMID:25283599

  9. Coupling factor 6 downregulates platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 via c-Src activation and acts as a proatherogenic molecule.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Akiko; Osanai, Tomohiro; Katoh, Chisato; Tanaka, Makoto; Tomita, Hirofumi; Morimoto, Takeshi; Murakami, Reiichi; Magota, Koji; Okumura, Ken

    2008-09-01

    Coupling factor 6 (CF6), a component of ATP synthase, suppresses the generation of prostacyclin and nitric oxide (NO). Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is involved in shear-induced NO production. To investigate the linkage between the actions of CF6 and PECAM-1, we examined the effects of CF6 on PECAM-1 expression and shear-mediated NO release, comparatively with those of angiotensin II (AngII). Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) with CF6 at 10(-7)M or AngII at 10(-7)M for 24h suppressed PECAM-1 gene and protein expression. CF6 or AngII activated c-Src at 15 min in HUVEC, and blockade of c-Src with PP1, its specific inhibitor, restored them. Efrapeptin, an inhibitor of ATPase, attenuated CF6-induced suppression of PECAM-1 gene expression by blockade of acidification, whereas superoxide dismutase or apocinin, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, blocked AngII-induced suppression of PECAM-1. Exposure of the cells to shear stress at 25 dynes/cm(2) for 30 min enhanced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(1177) and NO release. Pretreatment with CF6 or AngII for 24h attenuated them in HUVEC and HAEC. These suggest that CF6 downregulates PECAM-1 expression via c-Src activation and attenuates shear-induced NO release presumably by suppressing eNOS phosphorylation. PMID:18243211

  10. The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule surrogate of the Bacillus anthracis capsule induces nitric oxide production via the platelet activating factor receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Ri; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Kyu; Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Jungchan; Rhie, Gi-Eun

    2015-12-01

    The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule, a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, confers protection of the bacillus from phagocytosis and allows its unimpeded growth in the host. PGA capsules released from B. anthracis are associated with lethal toxin in the blood of experimentally infected animals and enhance the cytotoxic effect of lethal toxin on macrophages. In addition, PGA capsule itself activates macrophages and dendritic cells to produce proinflammatory cytokine such as IL-1β, indicating multiple roles of PGA capsule in anthrax pathogenesis. Here we report that PGA capsule of Bacillus licheniformis, a surrogate of B. anthracis capsule, induces production of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. NO production was induced by PGA in a dose-dependent manner and was markedly reduced by inhibitors of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), suggesting iNOS-dependent production of NO. Induction of NO production by PGA was not observed in macrophages from TLR2-deficient mice and was also substantially inhibited in RAW264.7 cells by pretreatment of TLR2 blocking antibody. Subsequently, the downstream signaling events such as ERK, JNK and p38 of MAPK pathways as well as NF-κB activation were required for PGA-induced NO production. In addition, the induced NO production was significantly suppressed by treatment with antagonists of platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) or PAFR siRNA, and mediated through PAFR/Jak2/STAT-1 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that PGA capsule induces NO production in macrophages by triggering both TLR2 and PAFR signaling pathways which lead to activation of NF-kB and STAT-1, respectively. PMID:26350415

  11. Platelet activation during angiotensin II infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P T; Schwieler, J H; Wallén, N H

    2000-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of an intravenous infusion of angiotensin II (10 ng/kg per min) on platelet function and coagulation in vivo in 18 healthy males. The infusion increased mean arterial pressure by 23+/-2 mm Hg. Plasma beta-thromboglobulin levels, reflecting platelet secretion, increased by 66+/-24% during the infusion, as did also platelet surface expression of P-selectin as measured by flow cytometry. Platelet fibrinogen binding increased, whereas platelet aggregability, assessed by ex vivo filtragometry, was unaltered. Angiotensin II caused mild activation of the coagulation cascade with increases in plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex and prothrombin fragment F1 + 2. In conclusion, angiotensin II has mild platelet-activating effects in vivo and also enhances coagulation. Markers of platelet secretion are significantly increased, whereas markers of platelet aggregability are less affected. The clinical relevance of these findings remains to be clarified. PMID:10691100

  12. Platelet-activating factor increases VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation in mouse endothelial cells and its association with the PtdIns3'-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hudry-Clergeon, Hélène; Stengel, Dominique; Ninio, Ewa; Vilgrain, Isabelle

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-activating-Factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, is involved in endothelial permeability. This study was designed to characterize PAF receptor (PAF-R) expression and its specific contribution to the modifications of adherens junctions in mouse endothelial cells. We demonstrated that PAF-R was expressed in mouse endothelial cells and was functionally active in stimulating p42/p44 MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3′-kinase)/Akt activities. Treatment of cells with PAF induced a rapid, time- and dose-dependent (10−7 to 10−10M) increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of a subset of proteins ranging from 90 kDa to 220 kDa, including the VE-cadherin, the latter effect being prevented by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, herbimycin A and bis-tyrphostin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PAF promoted formation of multimeric aggregates of VE-cadherin with PtdIns3′-kinase which was also inhibited by herbimycin and bis-tyrphostin. Finally, we showed by immunostaining of endothelial cells VE-cadherin, that PAF dissociated adherens junctions. The present data provide the first evidence that the treatment of endothelial cells with PAF promoted activation of tyrosine kinases and the VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation and PtdIns3′-kinase association, that ultimately lead to the dissociation of adherens junctions. Physical association between PtdIns3′-kinase, serving as a docking protein, and VE-cadherin may thus provide an efficient mechanism for amplification and perpetuation of PAF-induced cellular activation. PMID:15791001

  13. Segregation of Platelet Aggregatory and Procoagulant Microdomains in Thrombus Formation Regulation by Transient Integrin Activation

    PubMed Central

    Munnix, Imke C.A.; Kuijpers, Marijke J.E.; Auger, Jocelyn; Thomassen, Christella M.L.G.D.; Panizzi, Peter; van Zandvoort, Marc A.M.; Rosing, Jan; Bock, Paul E.; Watson, Steve P.; Heemskerk, Johan W.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Platelets play a dual role in thrombosis by forming aggregates and stimulating coagulation. We investigated the commitment of platelets to these separate functions during collagen-induced thrombus formation in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results High-resolution 2-photon fluorescence microscopy revealed that in thrombus formation under flow, fibrin(ogen)-binding platelets assembled into separate aggregates, whereas distinct patches of nonaggregated platelets exposed phosphatidylserine. The latter platelet population had inactivated αIibβ3 integrins and displayed increased binding of coagulation factors. Coated platelets, expressing serotonin binding sites, were not identified as a separate population. Thrombin generation and coagulation favored the transformation to phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets with inactivated integrins and reduced adhesion. Prolonged tyrosine phosphorylation in vitro resulted in secondary downregulation of active αIIbβ3. Conclusions These results lead to a new spatial model of thrombus formation, in which aggregated platelets ensure thrombus stability, whereas distinct patches of nonaggregated platelets effectuate procoagulant activity and generate thrombin and fibrin. Herein, the hemostatic activity of a developing thrombus is determined by the balance in formation of proaggregatory and procoagulant platelets. This balance is influenced by antiplatelet and anticoagulant medication. PMID:17761939

  14. Interleukin-6 and asymmetric dimethylarginine are associated with platelet activation after percutaneous angioplasty with stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Gremmel, Thomas; Perkmann, Thomas; Kopp, Christoph W; Seidinger, Daniela; Eichelberger, Beate; Koppensteiner, Renate; Steiner, Sabine; Panzer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Data linking in vivo platelet activation with inflammation and cardiovascular risk factors are scarce. Moreover, the interrelation between endothelial dysfunction as early marker of atherosclerosis and platelet activation has not been studied, so far. We therefore sought to investigate the associations of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk factors with platelet activation and monocyte-platelet aggregate (MPA) formation in 330 patients undergoing angioplasty with stent implantation for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. P-selectin expression, activation of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and MPA formation were determined by flow cytometry. Interleukin (IL)-6, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) were measured by commercially available assays. IL-6 was the only parameter which was independently associated with platelet P-selectin expression and activated GPIIb/IIIa as well as with leukocyte-platelet interaction in multivariate regression analysis (all p<0.05). ADMA was independently associated with GPIIb/IIIa activation (p<0.05). Patients with high IL-6 exhibited a significantly higher expression of P-selectin than patients with low IL-6 (p=0.001), whereas patients with high ADMA levels showed a more pronounced activation of GPIIb/IIIa than patients with low ADMA (p=0.003). In conclusion, IL-6 and ADMA are associated with platelet activation after percutaneous angioplasty with stent implantation. It remains to be established whether they act prothrombotic and atherogenic themselves or are just surrogate markers for atherosclerosis with concomitant platelet activation. PMID:25807315

  15. Interleukin-6 and Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Are Associated with Platelet Activation after Percutaneous Angioplasty with Stent Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gremmel, Thomas; Perkmann, Thomas; Kopp, Christoph W.; Seidinger, Daniela; Eichelberger, Beate; Koppensteiner, Renate; Steiner, Sabine; Panzer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Data linking in vivo platelet activation with inflammation and cardiovascular risk factors are scarce. Moreover, the interrelation between endothelial dysfunction as early marker of atherosclerosis and platelet activation has not been studied, so far. We therefore sought to investigate the associations of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk factors with platelet activation and monocyte-platelet aggregate (MPA) formation in 330 patients undergoing angioplasty with stent implantation for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. P-selectin expression, activation of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and MPA formation were determined by flow cytometry. Interleukin (IL)-6, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) were measured by commercially available assays. IL-6 was the only parameter which was independently associated with platelet P-selectin expression and activated GPIIb/IIIa as well as with leukocyte-platelet interaction in multivariate regression analysis (all p<0.05). ADMA was independently associated with GPIIb/IIIa activation (p<0.05). Patients with high IL-6 exhibited a significantly higher expression of P-selectin than patients with low IL-6 (p=0.001), whereas patients with high ADMA levels showed a more pronounced activation of GPIIb/IIIa than patients with low ADMA (p=0.003). In conclusion, IL-6 and ADMA are associated with platelet activation after percutaneous angioplasty with stent implantation. It remains to be established whether they act prothrombotic and atherogenic themselves or are just surrogate markers for atherosclerosis with concomitant platelet activation. PMID:25807315

  16. Effects of the platelet-activating factor (PAF) on selected quality parameters of cryopreserved bull semen (AI) with reduced sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Lecewicz, M; Kordan, W; Majewska, A; Kamiński, S; Dziekońska, A; Mietelska, K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on selected quality parameters of cryopreserved bull semen with reduced sperm motility used for artificial insemination. The aim of experiment 1 was to identify the optimal concentration of the phospholipid able to preserve sperm viability. Cryopreserved semen was treated with different PAF concentrations: 1×10(-5) M, 1×10(-6) M, 1×10(-7) M, 1×10(-8) M and 1×10(-9) M. The experiment demonstrated that PAF at concentration 1×10(-9) M increased most the sperm viability parameters (motility parameters, plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial function) after 120 min of incubation of thawed semen at 37°C. Cryopreserved bull semen with reduced sperm motility (below 70%) was supplemented with PAF in a concentration of 1×10(-9) M. A statistically significant increase in sperm motility, percentage of linear motile spermatozoa and VSL value was observed after 120 min incubation of sperm with 1×10(-9) M PAF. Sperm supplementation with PAF also had positive effects on plasma membrane integrity and percentage of spermatozoa with preserved mitochondrial transmembrane potential, but the differences were not statistically significant. The results indicated positive effects of PAF supplementation at a concentration of 1×10(-9) M on the selected sperm quality parameters in cryopreserved bull semen with reduced motility. PMID:27096799

  17. Effects of nitric oxide (NO) on platelet-activating factor (PAF)- and. alpha. -adrenergic-stimulated vasoconstriction and glycogenolysis in the perfused rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, J.A.; Bates, J.N.; Fisher, R.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Effects of NO on hemodynamic and glycogenolytic responses to platelet-activating factor (PAF) and phenylephrine were investigated in perfused livers derived from fed rats. Infusion of NO into perfused livers inhibited PAF-induced increases in hepatic glucose output and portal pressure approximately 90% and 85%, respectively, and abolished effects of PAF on hepatic oxygen consumption. NO attenuated PAF-stimulated increases in glucose output and portal pressure, the latter indicative of hepatic vasoconstriction, with a similar dose-dependence with an IC{sub 50} of approximately 8 {mu}M. In contrast to its effects on PAF-induced responses in the perfused liver, NO inhibited increases in hepatic portal pressure in response to phenylephrine approximately 75% without altering phenylephrine-stimulated glucose output and oxygen consumption. Similarly, infusion of NO into perfused livers inhibited significantly increases in hepatic portal pressure but not increases in glucose output in response to a submaximal concentration of phenylephrine. Like NO, sodium nitroprusside significantly inhibited hemodynamic but not glycogenolytic responses to phenylephrine in perfused livers. However, PAF-stimulated alterations in hepatic portal pressure, glucose output and oxygen consumption were unaffected by infusion of sodium nitroprusside into perfused livers. These results provide the first evidence for regulatory effects of NO in the perfused liver and support the contention that PAF, unlike phenylephrine, stimulates glycogenolysis by mechanisms secondary to hepatic vasoconstriction. These observations raise the intriguing possibility that NO may act in liver to regulate hemodynamic responses to vasoactive mediators.

  18. Platelet-activating factor in Iberian pig spermatozoa: receptor expression and role as enhancer of the calcium-induced acrosome reaction.

    PubMed

    Bragado, M J; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J

    2011-12-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid involved in reproductive physiology. PAF receptor is expressed in some mammalian spermatozoa species where it plays a role in these germ-cell-specific processes. The aim of this study is to identify PAF receptor in Iberian pig spermatozoa and to evaluate PAF's effects on motility, viability and acrosome reaction. Semen samples from Iberian boars were used. PAF receptor identification was performed by Western blotting. Spermatozoa motility was analysed by computer-assisted sperm analysis system, whereas spermatozoa viability and acrosome reaction were evaluated by flow cytometry. Different PAF concentrations added to non-capacitating medium during 60 min have no effect on any spermatozoa motility parameter measured. Acrosome reaction was rapid and potently induced by 1 μm calcium ionophore A23187 showing an effect at 60 min and maximum at 240 min. PAF added to a capacitating medium is not able to induce spermatozoa acrosome reaction at any time studied. However, PAF, in the presence of A23187, significantly accelerates and enhances the calcium-induced acrosome reaction in a concentration-dependent manner in Iberian boar spermatozoa. Exogenous PAF does not affect at all spermatozoa viability, whereas slightly exacerbated the A23187-induced loss in viability. This work demonstrates that PAF receptor is expressed in Iberian pig spermatozoa and that its stimulation by PAF regulates the calcium-induced acrosome reaction. This work contributes to further elucidate the physiological regulation of the most relevant spermatozoa functions for successful fertilization: acrosome reaction. PMID:22023717

  19. Interaction of Platelet Activating Factor, Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by Xanthine Oxidase, and Leukocytes in the Generation of Hepatic Injury After Shock/Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Yasuhiko; Takano, Manabu; Patel, Mayur; Tien, Nevin; Takada, Tadahiro; Bulkley, Gregory B.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the putative relation of platelet activating factor (PAF), xanthine oxidase, reactive oxidants, and leukocytes in the pathogenesis of hepatic injury after shock/resuscitation (S/R) in vivo. Background Reactive oxygen metabolites generated by xanthine oxidase at reperfusion have been found to trigger postischemic injury in many organs, including the liver. However, the precise linear sequence of the mechanism of consequent hepatic injury after S/R remains to be characterized. Methods Unheparinized male rats were bled to a mean blood pressure of 45 ± 3 mmHg. After 2 hours of shock, they were resuscitated by reinfusion of shed blood (anticoagulated with citrate-phosphate-dextrose) and crystalloid and observed for the next 6 or 24 hours. Results S/R caused the oxidation of hepatic glutathione and generated centrolobular leukocyte accumulation at 6 hours, followed by predominantly centrolobular hepatocellular injury at 24 hours. Each of these components was attenuated by PAF inhibition with WEB 2170, xanthine oxidase inhibition with allopurinol, antioxidant treatment with N-acetylcysteine, or severe leukopenia induced by vinblastine. In each case, the degree of leukocyte accumulation at 6 hours correlated with the hepatocellular injury seen at 24 hours. However, xanthine oxidase inhibition with allopurinol failed to attenuate further the small level of residual hepatocellular injury seen in leukopenic rats. Conclusion These findings suggest that reactive oxidants generated by xanthine oxidase at reperfusion, stimulated by PAF, mediate hepatocellular injury by triggering leukocyte accumulation, primarily within the centrolobular sinusoids. PMID:10714632

  20. Tissue-specific response of the human platelet-activating factor receptor gene to retinoic acid and thyroid hormone by alternative promoter usage.

    PubMed Central

    Mutoh, H; Fukuda, T; Kitamaoto, T; Masushige, S; Sasaki, H; Shimizu, T; Kato, S

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the effects of retinoic acid (RA) and thyroid hormone (3,3',5-triiodothyronine; T3) on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) gene expression in intact rats and the ability of two human PAFR gene promoters (PAFR promoters 1 and 2) to generate two transcripts (PAFR transcripts 1 and 2). Northern blotting showed that RA and T3 regulated PAFR gene expression only in rat tissues that express PAFR transcript 2. Functional analysis of the human PAFR promoter 2 revealed that responsiveness to RA and T3 was conferred through a 24-bp element [PAFR-hormone response element (HRE) located from -67 to -44 bp of the transcription start site, whereas PAFR promoter 1 did not respond to these hormones. The PAFR-HRE is composed of three direct repeated TGACCT-like hexamer motifs with 2-and 4-bp spaces, and the two upstream and two downstream motifs were identified as response elements for RA and T3. Thus, the PAF-PAFR pathway is regulated by the PAFR level altered by a tissue-specific response to RA and T3 through the PAFR-HRE of the PAFR promoter 2. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8570633

  1. Platelet-rich plasma preparation for regenerative medicine: optimization and quantification of cytokines and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is nowadays widely applied in different clinical scenarios, such as orthopedics, ophthalmology and healing therapies, as a growth factor pool for improving tissue regeneration. Studies into its clinical efficiency are not conclusive and one of the main reasons for this is that different PRP preparations are used, eliciting different responses that cannot be compared. Platelet quantification and the growth factor content definition must be defined in order to understand molecular mechanisms behind PRP regenerative strength. Standardization of PRP preparations is thus urgently needed. Methods PRP was prepared by centrifugation varying the relative centrifugal force, temperature, and time. Having quantified platelet recovery and yield, the two-step procedure that rendered the highest output was chosen and further analyzed. Cytokine content was determined in different fractions obtained throughout the whole centrifugation procedure. Results Our method showed reproducibility when applied to different blood donors. We recovered 46.9 to 69.5% of total initial platelets and the procedure resulted in a 5.4-fold to 7.3-fold increase in platelet concentration (1.4 × 106 to 1.9 × 106 platelets/μl). Platelets were highly purified, because only <0.3% from the initial red blood cells and leukocytes was present in the final PRP preparation. We also quantified growth factors, cytokines and chemokines secreted by the concentrated platelets after activation with calcium and calcium/thrombin. High concentrations of platelet-derived growth factor, endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF) were secreted, together with the anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-8, IL-13, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-α. No cytokines were secreted before platelet activation. TGF-β3 and IFNγ were not detected in any studied fraction. Clots obtained after platelet coagulation

  2. Heparin inhibition of von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, M; McNeill, P M; Carlson, P L; Kermode, J C; Adelman, B; Conroy, R; Marques, D

    1991-01-01

    The intravenous administration of heparin to patients before open heart surgery reduced ristocetin cofactor activity by 58% (P less than 0.01, t test), and this impairment of von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet function was closely related to plasma heparin levels (r2 = 0.9), but not to plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) levels. We hypothesized that heparin may inhibit vWF-dependent platelet hemostatic functions by directly binding vWF in solution and interfering with vWF-GpIb binding. Using the in vitro techniques of ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination, fluorescent flow cytometric measurement of vWF-platelet binding, and conventional radioligand binding assays we observed that heparin inhibited both vWF-dependent platelet function and vWF-platelet binding in a parallel and dose-dependent manner. Heparin also inhibited platelet agglutination induced by bovine vWF and inhibited the binding of human asialo-vWF to platelets in ristocetin-free systems. The inhibitory potency of heparin was not dependent upon its affinity for antithrombin III, but was molecular weight dependent: homogeneous preparations of lower molecular weight were less inhibitory. Heparin impairment of vWF function may explain why some hemorrhagic complications of heparin therapy are not predictable based on techniques for monitoring the conventional anticoagulant effects of heparin. PMID:2022745

  3. The membrane attack complex of complement contributes to plasmin-induced synthesis of platelet-activating factor by endothelial cells and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lupia, Enrico; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Bergerone, Serena; Emanuelli, Giorgio; Camussi, Giovanni; Montrucchio, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Thrombolytic agents, used to restore blood flow to ischaemic tissues, activate several enzymatic systems with pro-inflammatory effects, thus potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of ischaemia–reperfusion injury. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a phospholipid mediator of inflammation, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of this process. We previously showed that the infusion of streptokinase (SK) induces the intravascular release of PAF in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and that cultured human endothelial cells (EC) synthesized PAF in response to SK and plasmin (PLN). In the present study, we investigated the role of the membrane attack complex (MAC) of complement in the PLN-induced synthesis of PAF. In vivo, we showed a correlation between the levels of soluble terminal complement components (sC5b-9) and the concentrations of PAF detected in blood of patients with AMI infused with SK. In vitro both EC and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), incubated in the presence of PLN and normal human serum, showed an intense staining for the MAC neoepitope, while no staining was detected when they were incubated with PLN in the presence of heat-inactivated normal human serum. Moreover, the insertion of MAC on EC and PMN plasmamembrane elicited the synthesis of PAF. In conclusion, our results elucidate the mechanisms involved in PAF production during the activation of the fibrinolytic system, showing a role for complement products in this setting. The release of PAF may increase the inflammatory response, thus limiting the beneficial effects of thrombolytic therapy. Moreover, it may have a pathogenic role in other pathological conditions, such as transplant rejection, tumoral angiogenesis, and septic shock, where fibrinolysis is activated. PMID:12871223

  4. Attenuated Reactive Gliosis and Enhanced Functional Recovery Following Spinal Cord Injury in Null Mutant Mice of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyi; Gao, Zhongwen; Zhang, Yiping; Feng, Shi-Qing; Liu, Yulong; Shields, Lisa B E; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Zhu, Qingsan; Gozal, David; Shields, Christopher B; Cai, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a unique phosphoglycerine that mediates the biological functions of both immune and nervous systems. Excessive PAF plays an important role in neural injury via its specific receptor (PAFR). In this study, we hypothesized that PAF signaling activates reactive gliosis after spinal cord injury (SCI), and blocking the PAF pathway would modify the glia scar formation and promote functional recovery. PAF microinjected into the normal wild-type spinal cord induced a dose-dependent activation of microglia and astrocytes. In the SCI mice, PAFR null mutant mice showed a better functional recovery in grip and rotarod performances than wild-type mice. Although both microglia and astrocytes were activated after SCI in wild-type and PAFR null mutant mice, expressions of IL-6, vimentin, nestin, and GFAP were not significantly elevated in PAFR null mutants. Disruption of PAF signaling inhibited the expressions of proteoglycan CS56 and neurocan (CSPG3). Intriguingly, compared to the wild-type SCI mice, less axonal retraction/dieback at 7 dpi but more NFH-labeled axons at 28 dpi was found in the area adjacent to the epicenter in PAFR null mutant SCI mice. Moreover, treatment with PAFR antagonist Ginkgolide B (GB) at the chronic phase rather than acute phase enhanced the functional recovery in the wild-type SCI mice. These findings suggest that PAF signaling participates in reactive gliosis after SCI, and blocking of this signaling enhances functional recovery and to some extent may promote axon regrowth. PMID:26084439

  5. The GTPase-activating protein of Ras suppresses platelet-derived growth factor beta receptor signaling by silencing phospholipase C-gamma 1.

    PubMed Central

    Valius, M; Secrist, J P; Kazlauskas, A

    1995-01-01

    The beta receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (beta PDGFR) is activated by binding of PDGF and undergoes phosphorylation at multiple tyrosine residues. The tyrosine-phosphorylated receptor associates with numerous SH2-domain-containing proteins which include phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma), the GTPase-activating protein of Ras (GAP), the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), the phosphotyrosine phosphatase Syp, and several other proteins. Our previous studies indicated that PI3K and PLC gamma were required for relay of the mitogenic signal of beta PDGFR, whereas GAP and Syp did not appear to be required for this response. In this study, we further investigated the role of GAP and Syp in mitogenic signaling by beta PDGFR. Focusing on the PLC gamma-dependent branch of beta PDGFR signaling, we constructed a series of mutant beta PDGFRs that contained the binding sites for pairs of the receptor-associated proteins: PLC gamma and PI3K, PLC gamma and GAP, or PLC gamma and Syp. Characterization of these mutants showed that while all receptors were catalytically active and bound similar amounts of PLC gamma, they differed dramatically in their ability to initiate DNA synthesis. This signaling deficiency related to an inability to efficiently tyrosine phosphorylate and activate PLC gamma. Surprisingly, the crippled receptor was the one that recruited PLC gamma and GAP. Thus, GAP functions to suppress signal relay by the beta PDGFR, and it does so by silencing PLC gamma. These findings demonstrate that the biological response to PDGF depends not only on the ability of the beta PDGFR to recruit signal relay enzymes but also on the blend of these receptor-associated proteins. PMID:7760802

  6. Concentration of platelets and growth factors in platelet-rich plasma from Goettingen minipigs.

    PubMed

    Jungbluth, Pascal; Grassmann, Jan-Peter; Thelen, Simon; Wild, Michael; Sager, Martin; Windolf, Joachim; Hakimi, Mohssen

    2014-01-01

    In minipigs little is known about the concentration of growth factors in plasma, despite their major role in several patho-physiological processes such as healing of fractures. This prompted us to study the concentration of platelets and selected growth factors in plasma and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparation of sixteen Goettingen minipigs. Platelet concentrations increased significantly in PRP in comparison to native blood plasma. Generally, significant increase in the concentration of all growth factors tested was observed in the PRP in comparison to the corresponding plasma or serum. Five of the plasma samples examined contained detectable levels of bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2) whereas eleven of the plasma or serum samples contained minimal amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-bb) respectively. On the other hand variable concentrations of bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP-7) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) were measured in all plasma samples. In contrast, all PRP samples contained significantly increased amounts of growth factors. The level of BMP-2, BMP-7, TGF-β1, VEGF and PDGF-bb increased by 17.6, 1.5, 7.1, 7.2 and 103.3 fold, in comparison to the corresponding non-enriched preparations. Moreover significant positive correlations were found between platelet count and the concentrations of BMP-2 (r=0.62, p<0.001), TGF-β1 (r=0.85, p<0.001), VEGF (r=0.46, p<0.01) and PDGF-bb (r=0.9, p<0.001). Our results demonstrate that selected growth factors are present in the platelet-rich plasma of minipigs which might thus serve as a source of autologous growth factors. PMID:26504722

  7. Paradoxical Effect of Nonphysiological Shear Stress on Platelets and von Willebrand Factor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zengsheng; Mondal, Nandan K; Ding, Jun; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2016-07-01

    Blood can become hypercoagulable by shear-induced platelet activation and generation of microparticles. It has been reported that nonphysiological shear stress (NPSS) could induce shedding of platelet receptor glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, which may result in an opposite effect to hemostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the NPSS on platelets and von Willebrand factor (vWF). Human blood was exposed to two levels of NPSS (25 Pa, 125 Pa) with an exposure time of 0.5 s, generated by using a novel blood-shearing device. Platelet activation (P-selectin expression, GPIIb/IIIa activation and generation of microparticles) and shedding of three platelet receptors (GPIbα, GPVI, GPIIb/IIIa) in sheared blood were quantified using flow cytometry. Aggregation capacity of sheared blood induced by ristocetin and collagen was evaluated using an aggregometer. Shear-induced vWF damage was characterized with Western blotting. Consistent with the published data, the NPSS caused significantly more platelets to become activated with increasing NPSS level. Meanwhile, the NPSS induced the shedding of platelet receptors. The loss of the platelet receptors increased with increasing NPSS level. The aggregation capacity of sheared blood induced by ristocetin and collagen decreased. There was a loss of high molecular weight multimers (HMWMs) of vWF in sheared blood. These results suggest that the NPSS induced a paradoxical effect. More activated platelets increase the risk of thrombosis, while the reduction in platelet receptors and the loss of HMWM-vWF increased the propensity of bleeding. The finding might provide a new perspective to understand thrombosis and acquired bleeding disorder in patients supported with blood contacting medical devices. PMID:26582038

  8. CLEC-2 expression is maintained on activated platelets and on platelet microparticles.

    PubMed

    Gitz, Eelo; Pollitt, Alice Y; Gitz-Francois, Jerney J; Alshehri, Osama; Mori, Jun; Montague, Samantha; Nash, Gerard B; Douglas, Michael R; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K; Buckley, Christopher D; Harrison, Paul; Watson, Steve P

    2014-10-01

    The C-type lectin-like receptor CLEC-2 mediates platelet activation through a hem-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (hemITAM). CLEC-2 initiates a Src- and Syk-dependent signaling cascade that is closely related to that of the 2 platelet ITAM receptors: glycoprotein (GP)VI and FcγRIIa. Activation of either of the ITAM receptors induces shedding of GPVI and proteolysis of the ITAM domain in FcγRIIa. In the present study, we generated monoclonal antibodies against human CLEC-2 and used these to measure CLEC-2 expression on resting and stimulated platelets and on other hematopoietic cells. We show that CLEC-2 is restricted to platelets with an average copy number of ∼2000 per cell and that activation of CLEC-2 induces proteolytic cleavage of GPVI and FcγRIIa but not of itself. We further show that CLEC-2 and GPVI are expressed on CD41+ microparticles in megakaryocyte cultures and in platelet-rich plasma, which are predominantly derived from megakaryocytes in healthy donors, whereas microparticles derived from activated platelets only express CLEC-2. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis, an inflammatory disease associated with increased microparticle production, had raised plasma levels of microparticles that expressed CLEC-2 but not GPVI. Thus, CLEC-2, unlike platelet ITAM receptors, is not regulated by proteolysis and can be used to monitor platelet-derived microparticles. PMID:25150298

  9. Platelets and atherogenesis: Platelet anti-aggregation activity and endothelial protection from tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.)

    PubMed Central

    PALOMO, IVÁN; FUENTES, EDUARDO; PADRÓ, TERESA; BADIMON, LINA

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that platelets are not only involved in the arterial thrombotic process, but also that they play an active role in the inflammatory process of atherogenesis from the beginning. The interaction between platelets and endothelial cells occurs in two manners: activated platelets unite with intact endothelial cells, or platelets in resting adhere to activated endothelium. In this context, inhibition of the platelet function (adhesion/aggregation) could contribute to the prevention of atherothrombosis, the leading cause of cardiovascular morbidity. This can be achieved with antiplatelet agents. However, at the public health level, the level of primary prevention, a healthy diet has also been shown to exert beneficial effects. Among those elements of a healthy diet, the consumption of tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) stands out for its effect on platelet anti-aggregation activity and endothelial protection, which may be beneficial for cardiovascular health. This article briefly discusses the involvement of platelets in atherogenesis and the possible mechanisms of action provided by tomatoes for platelet anti-aggregation activity and endothelial protection. PMID:22969932

  10. Differential effects of carboxy-terminal sequence deletions on platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling activities and interactions with cellular substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Seedorf, K; Millauer, B; Kostka, G; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1992-01-01

    Chimeric receptors composed of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) extracellular domain fused to wild-type and truncated platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R) intracellular sequences were stably expressed in NIH 3T3 cells devoid of endogenous EGF-Rs. This experimental system allowed us to investigate the biological activity of PDGF-R cytoplasmic-domain mutants in PDGF-R-responsive NIH 3T3 cells by activating PDGF-specific signaling pathways with EGF. Deletion of 74 carboxy-terminal amino acids severely impaired the ability of the PDGF-R cytoplasmic domain to associate with cellular substrates in vitro. This deletion also inhibited receptor and substrate phosphorylation, reduced the receptor's mitogenic activity, and completely abolished its oncogenic signaling potential. Surprisingly, removal of only six additional amino acids, including Tyr-989, restored substantial receptor and substrate phosphorylation capacity as well as transforming potential and yielded a receptor with wild-type levels of ligand-induced mitogenic activity. However, the ability of this chimera to bind phospholipase C gamma was severely impaired in comparison with the ability of the wild-type receptor, while the association with other cellular proteins was not affected. Further deletion of 35 residues, including Tyr-977, nearly abolished all PDGF-R cytoplasmic-domain biological signaling activities. None of the three C-terminal truncations completely abolished the mitogenic potential of the receptors or had any influence on ligand binding or receptor down regulation. Together, these data implicate the 80 C-terminal-most residues of the PDGF-R, and possibly Tyr-989, in phospholipase C gamma binding, while receptor sequences upstream from Asp-988 appear to be essential for specific interactions with other cellular polypeptides such as ras GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Thus, the mutants described here allow the separation of distinct PDGF-activated

  11. Platelet and coagulation factors in proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Borsey, D Q; Prowse, C V; Gray, R S; Dawes, J; James, K; Elton, R A; Clarke, B F

    1984-01-01

    Plasma beta-thromboglobulin, platelet factor 4, fibrinogen, fibrinopeptide A, antithrombin III, factor VIII related antigen, alpha 2-macroglobulin, platelet count, and total glycosylated haemoglobin were measured in three well matched groups of subjects: non-diabetic controls, diabetics without retinopathy, and diabetics with proliferative retinopathy. beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 concentrations were significantly higher in the diabetics with retinopathy than in the controls and platelet factor 4 was also increased in the diabetics without retinopathy compared with controls. Fibrinogen concentration was raised in diabetics without retinopathy compared with controls, diabetics with retinopathy compared with controls, and diabetics with retinopathy compared with those without. Fibrinopeptide A concentration did not differ significantly between groups. Antithrombin III levels were increased in diabetics with retinopathy compared with controls, and in diabetics with retinopathy compared with those without. Factor VIII related antigen values were higher in both the diabetic groups when compared with the controls. Fibrinopeptide A concentration correlated with both beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 in each of the three groups. Haemostatic abnormalities in diabetes have been shown, although a hypercoagulable state has not been confirmed. These changes in platelet and coagulation function may be secondary to the development of microvascular disease and their role in the pathogenesis of retinopathy remains uncertain. PMID:6202721

  12. Minimal regulation of platelet activity by PECAM-1.

    PubMed

    Dhanjal, Tarvinder S; Ross, Ewan A; Auger, Jocelyn M; McCarty, Owen J T; Hughes, Craig E; Senis, Yotis A; Buckley, Chris D; Watson, Steve P

    2007-02-01

    PECAM-1 is a member of the superfamily of immunoglobulins (Ig) and is expressed on platelets at moderate level. PECAM-1 has been reported to have contrasting effects on platelet activation by the collagen receptor GPVI and the integrin, alphaIIbbeta3, even though both receptors signal through Src-kinase regulation of PLCgamma2. The present study compares the role of PECAM-1 on platelet activation by these two receptors and by the lectin receptor, CLEC-2, which also signals via PLCgamma2. Studies using PECAM-1 knockout-mice and cross-linking of PECAM-1 using specific antibodies demonstrated a minor inhibitory role on platelet responses to the above three receptors and also under some conditions to the G-protein agonist thrombin. The degree of inhibition was considerably less than that produced by PGI2, which elevates cAMP. There was no significant difference in thrombus formation on collagen in PECAM-1-/- platelets relative to litter-matched controls. The very weak inhibitory effect of PECAM-1 on platelet activation relative to that of PGI2 indicate that the Ig-receptor is not a major regulator of platelet activation. PECAM-1 has been reported to have contrasting effects on platelet activation. The present study demonstrates a very mild or negligible effect on platelet activation in response to stimulation by a variety of agonists, thereby questioning the physiological role of the immunoglobulin receptor as a major regulator of platelet activation. PMID:17365855

  13. Use of mean platelet component to measure platelet activation on the ADVIA 120 haematology system.

    PubMed

    Macey, M G; Carty, E; Webb, L; Chapman, E S; Zelmanovic, D; Okrongly, D; Rampton, D S; Newland, A C

    1999-10-15

    Platelet activation results in changes in a number of cell surface molecules including an increase in P-Selectin (CD62P) that may be rapidly and conveniently measured by immunofluorescent flow cytometry. The ADVIA 120 (Bayer) is a new system that facilitates more accurate measurement of platelet volume and in addition provides an approximate measure of the mean refractive index (RI) of the platelets reported as mean platelet component (MPC) concentration. We were interested to determine whether changes in MPC might reflect changes in platelet activation status. To investigate this, the platelet CD62P expression, determined by flow cytometry, and change in MPC, measured on the ADVIA 120 system, was first examined in vitro after stimulation of EDTA anticoagulated whole blood with submaximal concentrations of bovine thrombin in the presence or absence of the thromboxane synthase inhibitor, Ridogrel. Thrombin produced a dose-dependent increase in platelet CD62P expression and a decrease in MPC that could be inhibited by Ridogrel at physiological concentrations. In the second set of experiments, blood from 20 normal controls was collected into both EDTA and sodium citrate (SC) anticoagulants. Within 30 min of venesection and again at 3 h post-venesection after storage at room temperature, the platelet MPC and CD62P expression were determined. Platelets in all samples with both anticoagulants showed very low levels of CD62P expression when first analysed. At 3 h there was a small increase in CD62P expression on platelets in whole blood anticoagulated with SC, but a significant (P < 0.001) increase was observed on platelets anti-coagulated with EDTA. A negative correlation was found between the change in MPC of the platelets and the increase in the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) (r = -0.69, P < 0.001, n = 20) and the percentage (r = -0.72, P < 0.001, n = 20) of CD62P positive platelets at 3 h in blood anticoagulated with EDTA. We conclude that a reduction in MPC as

  14. Geometric complexity is increased in in vitro activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Giorgio

    2015-06-01

    This article investigates the use of computerized fractal analysis for objective characterization of the complexity of platelets in vitro stimulated by low level thrombin (0.02 U mL(-1) ), collected from healthy individuals and observed by means of transmission electron microscopy. Platelet boundaries were extracted by means of automatically image analysis. Local fractal dimension was evaluated by the box-counting technique (measure of geometric complexity of the platelet outline). The results showed that the platelet boundary is fractal when observed by transmission electron microscopy and that, after an in vitro platelet activation test, the shape of platelets present increased geometric complexity in comparison to the no stimulated platelets (P < 0.001), with 100% correct classification. Computerized fractal analysis of platelet shape by transmission electron microscopy can provide accurate, quantitative, data to study platelet activation. The results may play important roles in the evaluation of the platelets status in pathological conditions, like as atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus, where in in vivo activated platelets have been described. PMID:25808036

  15. Ligustrazine attenuates oxidative stress-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells by interrupting platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor-mediated ERK and p38 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ni, Chunyan; Kong, Desong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhu, Xiaojing; Chen, Li; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2012-11-15

    Hepatic fibrosis represents a frequent event following chronic insult to trigger wound healing reactions with accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the liver. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the pivotal event during liver fibrogenesis. Compelling evidence indicates that oxidative stress is concomitant with liver fibrosis irrespective of the underlying etiology. Natural antioxidant ligustrazine exhibits potent antifibrotic activities, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Our studies were to investigate the ligustrazine effects on HSC activation stimulated by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), an in vitro model mimicking the oxidative stress in liver fibrogenesis, and to elucidate the possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at 5 μM significantly stimulated HSC proliferation and expression of marker genes of HSC activation; whereas ligustrazine dose-dependently suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-activated HSCs, and attenuated expression of fibrotic marker genes. Mechanistic investigations revealed that ligustrazine reduced platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor (PDGF-βR) expression and blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase, two downstream effectors of PDGF-βR. Further molecular evidence suggested that ligustrazine interruption of ERK and p38 pathways was dependent on the blockade of PDGF-βR and might be involved in ligustrazine reduction of fibrotic marker gene expression under H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation. Furthermore, ligustrazine modulated some proteins critical for HSC activation and ECM homeostasis in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-stimulated HSCs. These data collectively indicated that ligustrazine could attenuate HSC activation caused by oxidative stress, providing novel insights into ligustrazine as a therapeutic option for hepatic fibrosis. Highlights: ► Ligustrazine inhibits oxidative stress-induced HSC activation.

  16. Agonist-independent desensitization and internalization of the human platelet-activating factor receptor by coumermycin-gyrase B-induced dimerization.

    PubMed

    Perron, Amelie; Chen, Zhang-Guo; Gingras, Denis; Dupre, Denis J; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2003-07-25

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid with potent and diverse physiological actions, particularly as a mediator of inflammation. We have reported previously that mutant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) affect the functional properties of coexpressed wild-type human PAF receptor (hPAFR) (Le Gouill, C., Parent, J. L., Caron, C. A., Gaudreau, R., Volkov, L., Rola-Pleszczynski, M., and Stankova, J. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 12548-12554). Increasing evidence suggests that dimerization of GPCRs may play an important role in the regulation of their biological activity. Additional data have also suggested that dimerization may be important in the subsequent internalization of the delta-opioid receptor. To investigate the specific role of dimerization in the internalization process of GPCRs, we generated a fusion protein of hPAFR and bacterial DNA gyrase B (GyrB), dimerized through the addition of coumermycin. We found that dimerization potentiates PAF-induced internalization of hPAFR-GyrB in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing c-Myc-hPAFR-GyrB. Coumermycin-driven dimerization was also sufficient to induce an agonist-independent sequestration process in an arrestin- and clathrin-independent manner. Moreover, the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine and GF109203X blocked the coumermycin-induced desensitization of hPAFR-GyrB, suggesting the implication of protein kinase C in the molecular mechanism mediating the agonist-independent desensitization of the receptor. Taken together, these findings suggest a novel mechanism of GPCR desensitization and internalization triggered by dimerization. PMID:12756251

  17. Complement Activation in Trauma Patients Alters Platelet Function.

    PubMed

    Atefi, Gelareh; Aisiku, Omozuanvbo; Shapiro, Nathan; Hauser, Carl; Dalle Lucca, Jurandir; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Tsokos, George C

    2016-09-01

    Trauma remains the main cause of death for both civilians and those in uniform. Trauma-associated coagulopathy is a complex process involving inflammation, coagulation, and platelet dysfunction. It is unknown whether activation of complement, which occurs invariably in trauma patients, is involved in the expression of trauma-associated coagulopathy. We designed a prospective study in which we enrolled 40 trauma patients and 30 healthy donors upon arrival to the emergency department of BIDMC. Platelets from healthy individuals were incubated with sera from trauma patients and their responsiveness to a thrombin receptor-activating peptide was measured using aggregometry. Complement deposition on platelets from trauma patients was measured by flow cytometry. Normal platelets displayed hypoactivity after incubation with trauma sera even though exposure to trauma sera resulted in increased agonist-induced calcium flux. Depletion of complement from sera further blocked activation of hypoactive platelets. Conversely, complement activation increased aggregation of platelets. Platelets from trauma patients were found to have significantly higher amounts of C3a and C4d on their surface compared with platelets from controls. Depletion of complement (C4d, C3a) reversed the ability of trauma sera to augment agonist-induced calcium flux in donor platelets. Our data indicate that complement enhances platelet aggregation. Despite its complement content, trauma sera render platelets hypoactive and complement depletion further blocks activation of hypoactive platelets. The defect in platelet activation induced by trauma sera is distal to receptor activation since agonist-induced Ca2+ flux is elevated in the presence of trauma sera owing to complement deposition. PMID:27355402

  18. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects. PMID:27146004

  19. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects. PMID:27146004

  20. Platelet-derived growth factor-D modulates extracellular matrix homeostasis and remodeling through TIMP-1 induction and attenuation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 gelatinase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan Alexi, Pascal; Tihaa, Lidia; Haas, Ute; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2015-02-13

    Platelet-derived growth factor-D (PDGF-D) is a more recent recognized growth factor involved in the regulation of several cellular processes, including cell proliferation, transformation, invasion, and angiogenesis by binding to and activating its cognate receptor PDGFR-β. After bile duct ligation or in the carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis model{sub ,} PDGF-D showed upregulation comparable to PDGF-B. Moreover, adenoviral PDGF-D gene transfer induced hepatic stellate cell proliferation and liver fibrosis. We here investigated the molecular mechanism of PDGF-D involvement in liver fibrogenesis. Therefore, the GRX mouse cell line was stimulated with PDGF-D and evaluated for fibrotic markers and PDGF-D signaling pathways in comparison to the other PDGF isoforms. We found that PDGF-D failed to enhance Col I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) production but has capacity to upregulate expression of the tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 1 (TIMP-1) resulting in attenuation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 gelatinase activity as indicated by gelatinase zymography. This phenomenon was restored through application of a PDGF-D neutralizing antibody. Unexpectedly, PDGF-D incubation decreased both PDGFR-α and -β in mRNA and protein levels, and PDGF-D phosphorylated typrosines specific for PDGFR-α and -β. We conclude that PDGF-D intensifies fibrogenesis by interfering with the fibrolytic activity of the TIMP-1/MMP system and that PDGF-D signaling is mediated through both PDGF-α and -β receptors. - Highlights: • PDGF-D signals through PDGF receptor type α and β. • PDGF-D modulates extracellular matrix homeostasis and remodeling. • Like PDGF-B, PDGF-D triggers phosphorylation of PLC-γ, Akt/PKB, JNK, ERK1/2, and p38. • PDGF-D induces TIMP-1 expression through ERK and p38 MAPK. • PDGF-D attenuates MMP-2 and MMP-9 gelatinase activities.

  1. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus), Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ye-Ming; Hsieh, Kuo-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lien, Li-Ming; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Xanthohumol inhibited platelet activation accompanied by relative [Ca2+]i mobilization, thromboxane A2 formation, hydroxyl radical (OH●) formation, and phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt phosphorylation. Neither SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, reversed the xanthohumol-mediated inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Furthermore, xanthohumol did not significantly increase nitrate formation in platelets. This study demonstrates for the first time that xanthohumol possesses potent antiplatelet activity which may initially inhibit the PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, and PLCγ2-PKC cascades, followed by inhibition of the thromboxane A2 formation, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca2+]i and finally inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, this novel role of xanthohumol may represent a high therapeutic potential for treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22611436

  2. A novel enhancing effect of platelet activating factor (PAF) on glucose oxidation in uteri from pregnant rats. Participation of prostaglandins and leukotrienes.

    PubMed

    González, E; Gimeno, A L; Gimeno, M A

    1990-05-01

    The effects of platelet activating factor (PAF) on glucose oxidation in uterine strips isolated from rats in the 4 th and 5 th day of pregnancy, were explored. PAF, at a concentration of 10(-10) and 10(-8) M, augmented significantly the generation of 14CO2 from labelled glucose in uteri from pregnant rats in the 4 th day of pregnancy. When the tissue was obtained from 5 days pregnant rats, the addition of PAF at 10(-8) increased significantly more than PAF at 10(-10) M the metabolism of glucose. On the other hand, PAF at 10(-8) M failed to alter the uterine basal production of 14CO2 from labelled glucose in animals at estrus. BN52021, a specific PAF antagonist employed at 10(-5) M, blocked completely the action of PAF in the pregnant rat uterus. PGE1, PGE2 and PGF2 alpha enhanced significantly the formation of 14CO2 from labelled glucose in uteri from 5 days pregnant rats. Indomethacin, a well known inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, did not alter the basal glucose metabolism in uteri from 5 days pregnant rats, but antagonized completely the stimulating action of PAF on 14CO2 production from labelled glucose an effect that was partially reverted by the addition of PGE1, PGE2 or PGF2 alpha (10(-7) M). Furthermore, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDHGA), a specific inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase at 10(-5) M, as well as FPL-55712, an antagonist of leukotrienes (LTs), at the same concentration, blocked the action of PAF on the metabolism of glucose. The action of NDHGA was partially counteracted by the addition of LTC4 at 10(-7) M.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2399270

  3. Mechanism of action of platelet activating factor in the pulmonary circulation: an investigation using a novel isotopic system in rabbit isolated lung.

    PubMed Central

    Seale, J. P.; Nourshargh, S.; Hellewell, P. G.; Williams, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    1. Rabbit isolated lungs were perfused via the pulmonary artery with Tyrode solution containing 4.5% Ficoll and 0.1% bovine serum albumin at a constant rate of 20 ml min-1. Lung perfusate was drawn for alternating 5 min periods from two reservoirs, one containing 125I-albumin and the other unlabelled albumin to wash out the intravascular label. Microvascular 125I-albumin leakage was determined from the count remaining at the end of the washout phase with an external gamma scintillation probe. In addition, perfusion pressure was monitored continuously. Each experiment comprised 6 cycles over a total period of 60 min. 2. Infusion of platelet activating factor (PAF, 3 nmol min-1 for 10 min) resulted in microvascular 125I-albumin leakage, whereas lyso-PAF was without effect. During PAF infusions there was also an increase in perfusion pressure. Both the permeability and pressor effects of PAF were inhibited by the PAF antagonist L-652731. 3. Infusion of the thromboxane analogue U-46619 (0.6 nmol min-1 for 10 min) caused an increase in perfusion pressure but protein accumulation was not significantly different from that observed with control infusions. 4. Bolus injections of PAF (1 nmol) caused increases in perfusion pressure which were reduced by indomethacin, dazmegrel and BW 755C. Bolus injections of PAF, repeated at 30 min intervals caused reproducible pressor responses; however, repeated injections at 60 min intervals resulted in augmented responses. This augmentation did not occur in the presence of indomethacin. 5. Retrograde perfusion of PAF via the pulmonary vein induced increased perfusion pressure and microvascular 125I-albumin leakage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1786514

  4. Effect of long-term infusion of platelet-activating factor on pulmonary responsiveness and morphology in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Touvay, C; Pfister, A; Vilain, B; Carré, C; Page, C P; Lellouch-Tubiana, A; Pignol, B; Mencia-Huerta, J M; Braquet, P

    1991-01-01

    The effect of chronic administration of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on airway reactivity, cell recruitment and lung morphology in the guinea-pig has been investigated. Alzet osmotic minipumps delivering either PAF (7.2 mg/kg/14 days) in 0.25% (w/v) bovine serum albumin in saline (saline-BSA), acetylcholine or saline-BSA alone were implanted s.c. in the neck region of guinea-pigs and connected to the jugular vein. In some experiments, implanted and non-implanted animals were treated daily with the PAF antagonist, BN 52021 (15 mg/kg, twice a day, p.o.). On day 15 after minipump implantation, the animals were anesthetized with urethane (1.2 g/kg, i.p.) and tracheal cannula was inserted for mechanical ventilation. Pulmonary inflation pressure (PIP) was monitored and airway responsiveness was assessed by administration of increasing doses of histamine (0.2-100 micrograms/kg, i.v.). As compared to saline-BSA-treated or non-implanted guinea-pigs, chronic treatment of the animals with PAF induced a significant (p less than 0.01) increase in airway response. No significant change in airway responsiveness was observed following chronic acetylcholine administration. In contrast, regardless of the treatment of the animals, no change in the threshold dose of histamine inducing alteration in PIP was noted, suggesting that PAF induces bronchopulmonary hyperreactivity rather than hyperresponsiveness. In addition, no significant difference was observed in the in vitro responsiveness to histamine of lung parenchymal strips from animals having received PAF or saline-BSA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1804494

  5. Lipopolysaccharide Cross-Tolerance Delays Platelet-Activating Factor-Induced Sudden Death in Swiss Albino Mice: Involvement of Cyclooxygenase in Cross-Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Shancy Petsel; Lakshmikanth, Chikkamenahalli Lakshminarayana; Chaithra, Vyala Hanumanthareddy; Kumari, Titus Ruth Shantha; Chen, Chu-Huang; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Marathe, Gopal Kedihitlu

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling through Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many infectious diseases. Some believe that TLR-mediated pathogenicity is due, in part, to the lipid pro-inflammatory mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF), but this has been questioned. To test the direct contribution of PAF in endotoxemia in murine models, we injected PAF intraperitoneally into Swiss albino mice in the presence and absence of LPS. PAF alone (5 μg/mouse) caused death within 15–20 min, but this could be prevented by pretreating mice with PAF-receptor (PAF-R) antagonists or PAF-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH). A low dose of LPS (5 mg/kg body wt) did not impair PAF-induced death, whereas higher doses (10 or 20 mg/kg body wt) delayed death, probably via LPS cross-tolerance. Cross-tolerance occurred only when PAF was injected simultaneously with LPS or within 30 min of LPS injection. Tolerance does not appear to be due to an abundant soluble mediator. Histologic examination of lungs and liver and measurement of circulating TNF-α and IL-10 levels suggested that the inflammatory response is not diminished during cross-tolerance. Interestingly, aspirin, a non-specific cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, partially blocked PAF-induced sudden death, whereas NS-398, a specific COX-2 inhibitor, completely protected mice from the lethal effects of PAF. Both COX inhibitors (at 20 mg/kg body wt) independently amplified the cross-tolerance exerted by higher dose of LPS, suggesting that COX-derived eicosanoids may be involved in these events. Thus, PAF does not seem to have a protective role in endotoxemia, but its effects are delayed by LPS in a COX-sensitive way. These findings are likely to shed light on basic aspects of the endotoxin cross-tolerance occurring in many disease conditions and may offer new opportunities for clinical intervention. PMID:27064683

  6. Role of R-type calcium channels in the response of the perfused arterial and venous mesenteric vasculature of the rat to platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Claing, A.; Bkaily, G.; Berthiaume, N.; Sirois, P.; Rola-Pleszczynski, M.; D'Orléans-Juste, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. The vasoactive properties of platelet-activating factor (PAF) were studied in the arterial and venous vasculature of the rat double-perfused mesenteric bed. Although PAF (0.01-0.3 pmol) induced a dose-dependent vasodilatation of the arterial mesenteric vasculature, it triggered only vasoconstrictions on the venous side, with an intact endothelium as bradykinin induced a significant venodilatation. 2. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 microM), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, markedly reduced the vasodilatation induced by PAF in the arterial mesenteric vasculature and potentiated the contractile responses of the venous side to the same agent. 3. The PAF antagonist, WEB-2170, markedly reduced the response to PAF on both sides of the mesenteric vasculature. However, the IC50 of WEB-2170 against PAF was reached at a much higher concentration (1 x 10(-8) M) on the arterial side than on the venous side (5.3 x 10(-11) M). Furthermore, a second antagonist of PAF receptors, SRI-63441, although being less potent on the venous vasculature than WEB-2170, was equipotent in antagonizing the venoconstriction and the arterial dilatation induced by PAF (IC50 of SRI-63441, arterial side: 2.9 x 10(-9) M; venous side: 3.1 x 10(-9) M). 4. The dual L- and R-calcium channel blocker, isradipine (PN 200-110), but not the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, markedly reduced the PAF-induced vasoactive properties on both sides of the mesenteric vasculature. 5. Our results illustrate the differential vasoactive properties of PAF in the mesenteric vasculature of the rat.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7952882

  7. Primed stimulation of isolated perfused rabbit lung by endotoxin and platelet activating factor induces enhanced production of thromboxane and lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Salzer, W L; McCall, C E

    1990-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis often precedes the development of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and bacterial endotoxin (LPS) produces a syndrome similar to ARDS when infused into experimental animals. We determined in isolated, buffer-perfused rabbit lungs, free of plasma and circulating blood cells that LPS synergized with platelet activating factor (PAF) to injure the lung. In lungs perfused for 2 h with LPS-free buffer (less than 100 pg/ml), stimulation with 1, 10, or 100 nM PAF produced transient pulmonary hypertension and minimal edema. Lungs perfused for 2 h with buffer containing 100 ng/ml of Escherichia coli 0111:B4 LPS had slight elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and did not develop edema. In contrast, lungs exposed to 100 ng/ml of LPS for 2 h had marked increases in PAP and developed significant edema when stimulated with PAF. LPS treatment increased capillary filtration coefficient, suggesting that capillary leak contributed to pulmonary edema. LPS-primed, PAF-stimulated lungs had enhanced production of thromboxane B2 (TXB) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6KPF). Indomethacin completely inhibited PAF-stimulated production of TXB and 6KPF in control and LPS-primed preparations, did not inhibit the rise in PAP produced by PAF in control lungs, but blocked the exaggerated rise in PAP and edema seen in LPS-primed, PAF-stimulated lungs. The thromboxane synthetase inhibitor dazoxiben, and the thromboxane receptor antagonist, SQ 29,548, similarly inhibited LPS-primed pulmonary hypertension and edema after PAF-stimulation. These studies indicate that LPS primes the lung for enhanced injury in response to the physiologic mediator PAF by amplifying the synthesis and release of thromboxane in lung tissue. PMID:2318970

  8. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists inhibit basal as well as low-density lipoprotein and platelet-activating factor-stimulated human monocyte chemoattractant protein-1.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Julie M; Croft, Kevin D; Puddey, Ian B; Beilin, Lawrence J

    2003-06-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a potent chemotactic agent for monocytes and other cells and is thought to be involved in atherosclerosis, recruiting monocytes to the subendothelial space or to the site of inflammation. Angiotensin II has been demonstrated, at least in animal models, to stimulate MCP-1 expression. We investigated the effect of the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonists irbesartan and losartan on MCP-1 production by freshly isolated human monocytes. Irbesartan and losartan inhibited basal MCP-1 production in a dose-dependent manner. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) stimulated MCP-1 in a concentration-dependent manner, with 200 microg/ml LDL protein giving a 2-fold increase in MCP-1. Irbesartan and losartan dose dependently blocked LDL-stimulated MCP-1. An angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonist, S-(+)-1-([4-(dimethylamino)-3-methylphenyl]methyl)-5-(diphenylacetyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo(4,5-c)pyridine-6-carboxylic acid (PD123319), had no significant effect on basal MCP-1 levels or LDL-stimulated MCP-1. After noting homology between the AT1 receptor and the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor, we showed that irbesartan inhibited both [3H]PAF binding to human monocytes and carbamyl-PAF stimulation of MCP-1. However, irbesartan affinity for the PAF receptor was 700 times less than PAF, suggesting that there may be another mechanism for irbesartan inhibition of PAF-stimulated MCP-1. This is the first report showing that AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit basal as well as LDL- and PAF-stimulated MCP-1 production in freshly isolated human monocytes. PMID:12626661

  9. Role of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase in the metabolism of oxidized phospholipids in plasma: studies with platelet-activating factor-acetyl hydrolase-deficient plasma.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, V S; Goyal, J; Miwa, M; Sugatami, J; Akiyama, M; Liu, M; Subbaiah, P V

    1999-07-01

    To determine the relative importance of platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) in the hydrolysis of oxidized phosphatidylcholines (OXPCs) to lyso-phosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), we studied the formation and metabolism of OXPCs in the plasma of normal and PAF-AH-deficient subjects. Whereas the loss of PC following oxidation was similar in the deficient and normal plasmas, the formation of lyso-PC was significantly lower, and the accumulation of OXPC was higher in the deficient plasma. Isolated LDL from the PAF-AH-deficient subjects was more susceptible to oxidation, and stimulated adhesion molecule synthesis in endothelial cells, more than the normal LDL. Oxidation of 16:0-[1-14C]-18:2 PC, equilibrated with plasma PC, resulted in the accumulation of labeled short- and long-chain OXPCs, in addition to the labeled aqueous products. The formation of the aqueous products decreased by 80%, and the accumulation of short-chain OXPC increased by 110% in the deficient plasma, compared to the normal plasma, showing that PAF-AH is predominantly involved in the hydrolysis of the truncated OXPCs. Labeled sn-2-acyl group from the long-chain OXPC was not only hydrolyzed to free fatty acid, but was preferentially transferred to diacylglycerol, in both the normal and deficient plasmas. In contrast, the acyl group from unoxidized PC was transferred only to cholesterol, showing that the specificity of LCAT is altered by OXPC. It is concluded that, while PAF-AH carries out the hydrolysis of mainly truncated OXPCs, LCAT hydrolyzes and transesterifies the long-chain OXPCs. PMID:10395969

  10. Involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B in platelet CD40 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hachem, Ahmed; Yacoub, Daniel; Zaid, Younes; Mourad, Walid; Merhi, Yahye

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer sCD40L induces TRAF2 association to CD40 and NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation downstream of CD40L/CD40 signaling is independent of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} is required for sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of aggregation. -- Abstract: CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a thrombo-inflammatory molecule that predicts cardiovascular events. Platelets constitute the major source of soluble CD40L (sCD40L), which has been shown to potentiate platelet activation and aggregation, in a CD40-dependent manner, via p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 signaling. In many cells, the CD40L/CD40 dyad also induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). Given that platelets contain NF-{kappa}B, we hypothesized that it may be involved in platelet CD40 signaling and function. In human platelets, sCD40L induces association of CD40 with its adaptor protein the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 2 and triggers phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which are abolished by CD40L blockade. Inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation has no effect on I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, indicating a divergence in the signaling pathway originating from CD40 upon its ligation. In functional studies, inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to a sub-threshold concentration of collagen. This study demonstrates that the sCD40L/CD40 axis triggers NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. This signaling pathway plays a critical role in platelet activation and aggregation upon sCD40L stimulation and may represent an important target against thrombo

  11. Studies of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of adherent platelets. Paradoxical loss of luminal receptors when platelets adhere to high density fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Coller, B S; Kutok, J L; Scudder, L E; Galanakis, D K; West, S M; Rudomen, G S; Springer, K T

    1993-01-01

    The accessibility of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of platelets adherent to damaged blood vessels or atherosclerotic plaques is likely to play a crucial role in subsequent platelet recruitment. To define better the factors involved in this process, we developed a functional assay to assess the presence of activated, luminal GPIIb/IIIa receptors, based on their ability to bind erythrocytes containing a high density of covalently coupled RGD-containing peptides (thromboerythrocytes). Platelets readily adhered to wells coated with purified type I rat skin collagen and the adherent platelets bound a dense lawn of thromboerythrocytes. With fibrinogen-coated wells, platelet adhesion increased as the fibrinogen-coating concentration increased, reaching a plateau at about 11 micrograms/ml. Thromboerythrocyte binding to the platelets adherent to fibrinogen showed a paradoxical response, increasing at fibrinogen coating concentrations up to approximately 4-6 micrograms/ml and then dramatically decreasing at higher fibrinogen-coating concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the morphology of platelets adherent to collagen was similar to that of platelets adherent to low density fibrinogen, with extensive filopodia formation and ruffling. In contrast, platelets adherent to high density fibrinogen showed a bland, flattened appearance. Immunogold staining of GPIIb/IIIa receptors demonstrated concentration of the receptors on the filopodia, and depletion of receptors on the flattened portion of the platelets. Thus, there is a paradoxical loss of accessible, activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of platelets adherent to high density fibrinogen. Two factors may contribute to this result: engagement of GPIIb/IIIa receptors with fibrinogen on the abluminal surface leading to the loss of luminal receptors, and loss of luminal filopodia that interact with thromboerythrocytes. These data provide insight into the differences

  12. Platelet factor XIIIa release during platelet aggregation and plasma clot strength measured by thrombelastography in patients with coronary artery disease treated with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Rolf P; Owens, Janelle; Lu, Deshun; Nystrom, Perry; Jin, Yan; Kreutz, Yvonne; Desta, Zeruesenay; Flockhart, David A

    2015-01-01

    It has been estimated that up to half of circulating factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) is stored in platelets. The release of FXIIIa from platelets upon stimulation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in patients with coronary artery disease treated with dual antiplatelet therapy has not been previously examined. Samples from 96 patients with established coronary artery disease treated with aspirin and clopidogrel were examined. Platelet aggregation was performed by light transmittance aggregometry in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), with platelet-poor plasma (PPP) as reference, and ADP 5 µM as agonist. Kaolin-activated thrombelastography (TEG) was performed in citrate PPP. PRP after aggregation was centrifuged and plasma supernatant (PSN) collected. FXIIIa was measured in PPP and PSN. Platelet aggregation after stimulation with ADP 5 µM resulted in 24% additional FXIIIa release in PSN as compared to PPP (99.3 ± 27 vs. 80.3 ± 24%, p < 0.0001). FXIIIa concentration in PSN correlated with maximal plasma clot strength (TEG-G) (r = 0.48, p < 0.0001), but not in PPP (r = 0.15, p = 0.14). Increasing quartiles of platelet-derived FXIIIa were associated with incrementally higher TEG-G (p = 0.012). FXIIIa release was similar between clopidogrel responders and non-responders (p = 0.18). In summary, platelets treated with aspirin and clopidogrel release a significant amount of FXIIIa upon aggregation by ADP. Platelet-derived FXIIIa may contribute to differences in plasma TEG-G, and thus, in part, provide a mechanistic explanation for high clot strength observed as a consequence of platelet activation. Variability in clopidogrel response does not significantly influence FXIIIa release from platelets. PMID:24833046

  13. Platelet Factor XIIIa Release During Platelet Aggregation and Plasma Clot Strength Measured by Thrombelastography in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Treated with Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Rolf P.; Owens, Janelle; Lu, Deshun; Nystrom, Perry; Jin, Yan; Kreutz, Yvonne; Desta, Zeruesenay; Flockhart, David A.

    2016-01-01

    It has been estimated that up to half of circulating Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) is stored in platelets. The release of FXIIIa from platelets upon stimulation with ADP in patients with coronary artery disease treated with dual antiplatelet therapy has not been previously examined. Samples from 96 patients with established coronary artery disease treated with aspirin and clopidogrel were examined. Platelet aggregation was performed by light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) in platelet rich plasma (PRP) with platelet poor plasma (PPP) as reference and ADP 5μM as agonist. Kaolin activated TEG was performed in citrate PPP. PRP after aggregation was centrifuged and plasma supernatant (PSN) collected. FXIIIa was measured in PPP and PSN. Platelet aggregation after stimulation with ADP 5μM resulted in 24% additional FXIIIa release in PSN as compared to PPP (99.3 ± 27 vs. 80.3 ± 24 %, p<0.0001). FXIIIa concentration in PSN correlated with maximal plasma clot strength (TEG-G) (r=0.48, p<0.0001), but not in PPP (r=0.15, p=0.14). Increasing quartiles of platelet derived FXIIIa were associated with incrementally higher TEG-G (p=0.012). FXIIIa release was similar between clopidogrel responders and non-responders (p=0.18). In summary, platelets treated with aspirin and clopidogrel release a significant amount of FXIIIa upon aggregation by ADP. Platelet derived FXIIIa may contribute to differences in plasma TEG-G, and thus in part provide a mechanistic explanation for high clot strength observed as a consequence of platelet activation. Variability in clopidogrel response does not significantly influence FXIIIa release from platelets. PMID:24833046

  14. Thrombin-Mediated Platelet Activation of Lysed Whole Blood and Platelet-Rich Plasma: A Comparison Between Platelet Activation Markers and Ultrastructural Alterations.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tanya N; van der Spuy, Wendy J; Kaberry, Lindsay L; Shayi, Millicent

    2016-06-01

    Platelet ultrastructural alterations representing spurious activation have been identified in pathological conditions. A limitation of platelet studies is that sample preparation may lead to artifactual activation processes which may confound results, impacting the use of scanning electron microscopy as a supplemental diagnostic tool. We used scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometry to analyze platelet activation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood (WB) samples. PRP generated using a single high g force centrifugation, and WB samples treated with a red blood cell lysis buffer, were exposed to increasing concentrations of the agonist thrombin. Platelets in lysed WB samples responded to thrombin by elevating the activation marker CD62p definitively, with corresponding ultrastructural changes indicating activation. Conversely, CD62p expression in PRP preparations remained static. Ultrastructural analysis revealed fully activated platelets even under low concentration thrombin stimulation, with considerable fibrin deposition. It is proposed that the method for PRP production induced premature platelet activation, preventable by using an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and fibrin polymerization. Nevertheless, our results show a definitive correspondence between flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy in platelet activation studies, highlighting the potential of the latter technique as a supplemental diagnostic tool. PMID:27329313

  15. Platelet-activating factor and hydrogen peroxide exert a dual modulatory effect on the transcription of LXRα and its target genes in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Quiroz, María E; Alba, Gonzalo; Sáenz, Javier; Geniz, Isabel; Jiménez, Juan; Martín-Nieto, José; Santa-María, Consuelo; Sobrino, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are ligand-activated nuclear receptors involved mainly in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism in many organs, including liver and intestine, as well as in macrophages and neutrophils. Besides, both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory properties have been ascribed to LXRs. The effect of the inflammatory condition on the expression of LXRα and its target genes has not been previously addressed in human neutrophils. We have described that platelet-activating factor (PAF) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are potent pro-inflammatory mediators that link the haemostatic and innate immune systems. In this work we report that H2O2 at low doses (1 pM-1μM) exerts an inhibitory effect on TO901317-induced mRNA expression of LXRα and of its target genes encoding the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, and the sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c). However, an opposite behaviour, i.e., a transcription-enhancing effect, was found at higher H2O2 doses (100-500μM) on most of these genes. A similar dual effect was observed when the pro-inflammatory molecule PAF was used. Interestingly, H2O2 production separately elicited by 10nM PAF or 1μM H2O2 was similarly low, and analogously, H2O2 production levels elicited by 5μM PAF or 100μM H2O2 were similarly high when they were compared. On the other hand, low doses of PAF or H2O2 induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK 1/2) and NF-κB activation, However, PAF or H2O2 at high doses did not produce changes in NF-κB activation levels. In summary, our results show that H2O2, either exogenous or PAF-induced, exerts a dual regulation on mRNA expression of LXRα and its target genes. PMID:27351826

  16. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  17. Membrane Changes Associated with Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    George, James N.; Lyons, Roger M.; Morgan, Rebecca K.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of aggregation and secretion on membrane proteins was studied in washed human platelets. Reversible aggregation without secretion was stimulated by ADP and secretion without aggregation was stimulated by thrombin in the presence of EDTA. No loss of platelet surface glycoproteins occurred during reversible ADP-induced platelet aggregation, as measured by quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of platelets that were labeled with 125I-diazotized diiodosulfanilic acid (DD125ISA) before ADP stimulation. Also, no new proteins became exposed on the platelet surface after ADP aggregation, as determined by DD125ISA labeling after stimulation. Thrombin-induced platelet secretion also caused no loss of platelet surface glycoproteins. However, after platelet secretion two new proteins were labeled by DD125ISA: (a) actin and (b) the 149,000-mol wt glycoprotein (termed GP-G), which is contained in platelet granules and secreted in response to thrombin. The identity of DD125ISA-labeled actin was confirmed by four criteria: (a) comigration with actin in three different sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems, (b) elution from a particulate fraction in low ionic strength buffer, (c) co-migration with actin in isoelectric focusing, and (d) binding to DNase I. The identity of actin and its appearance on the platelet surface after thrombin-induced secretion was also demonstrated by the greater binding of an anti-actin antibody to thrombin-treated platelets, measured with 125I-staphylococcal protein A. Therefore, major platelet membrane changes occur after secretion but not after reversible aggregation. The platelet surface changes occurring with secretion may be important in the formation of irreversible platelet aggregates and in the final retraction of the blood clot. Images PMID:6772667

  18. Platelet and monocyte activity markers and mediators of inflammation in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pirzer, Rainer; Elmas, Elif; Haghi, Dariusch; Lippert, Christiane; Kralev, Stefan; Lang, Siegfried; Borggrefe, Martin; Kälsch, Thorsten

    2012-03-01

    Patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) often present with symptoms similar to those of myocardial infarction (MI). We analyzed blood concentrations of mediators of inflammation and platelet- and monocyte-activity markers in patients with TC and MI for significant differences. Clinical data of patients with TC (n = 16) and acute MI (n = 16) were obtained. Serial blood samples were taken at the time of hospital admission (t(0)), after 2-4 days (t(1)) and after 4-7 weeks (t(2)), respectively. Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-7, soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) were determined with an ELISA. Tissue factor binding on monocytes, platelet-activation marker CD62P, platelet CD40-ligand (CD40L), and platelet-monocyte aggregates were measured using flow cytometry. Expression of CD62P on platelets and IL-6 plasma levels were significantly lower in patients with TC compared to MI at the time of hospital admission. IL-7 plasma levels were significantly elevated in patients with TC compared to patients with MI at 2-4 days after hospital admission. No significant differences were observed concerning sCD40L and MCP-1 plasma levels, tissue factor binding on monocytes, CD40L expression on platelets, and platelet-monocyte aggregates at any point in time. Our results indicate that inflammatory mediators and platelet-activity markers contribute to the differences in the pathogenesis of MI and TC. PMID:21416113

  19. FR-900452, a specific antagonist of platelet activating factor (PAF) produced by Streptomyces phaeofaciens. I. Taxonomy, fermentation, isolation, and physico-chemical and biological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, M; Yoshida, K; Nishikawa, M; Ando, T; Iwami, M; Kohsaka, M; Aoki, H

    1986-02-01

    A PAF antagonist, designated as FR-900452, was isolated from fermentation products of Streptomyces phaeofaciens and the molecular formula was determined as C22H25N3O3S. The compound inhibited PAF-induced rabbit platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 3.7 X 10(-7)M, but was much less active against collagen-, arachidonic acid- or ADP-induced aggregation (IC50; 6.4 X 10(-5), greater than 10(-4) or greater than 10(-4)M, respectively). PMID:3082838

  20. Modification of Pulsed Electric Field Conditions Results in Distinct Activation Profiles of Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Frelinger, Andrew L.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Garner, Allen L.; Torres, Andrew S.; Caiafa, Antonio; Morton, Christine A.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neculaes, V. Bogdan; Michelson, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) used in therapeutic wound healing applications is poorly characterized and standardized. Using pulsed electric fields (PEF) to activate platelets may reduce variability and eliminate complications associated with the use of bovine thrombin. We previously reported that exposing PRP to sub-microsecond duration, high electric field (SMHEF) pulses generates a greater number of platelet-derived microparticles, increased expression of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, and differential release of growth factors compared to thrombin. Moreover, the platelet releasate produced by SMHEF pulses induced greater cell proliferation than plasma. Aims To determine whether sub-microsecond duration, low electric field (SMLEF) bipolar pulses results in differential activation of PRP compared to SMHEF, with respect to profiles of activation markers, growth factor release, and cell proliferation capacity. Methods PRP activation by SMLEF bipolar pulses was compared to SMHEF pulses and bovine thrombin. PRP was prepared using the Harvest SmartPreP2 System from acid citrate dextrose anticoagulated healthy donor blood. PEF activation by either SMHEF or SMLEF pulses was performed using a standard electroporation cuvette preloaded with CaCl2 and a prototype instrument designed to take into account the electrical properties of PRP. Flow cytometry was used to assess platelet surface P-selectin expression, and annexin V binding. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial growth factor (EGF) and platelet factor 4 (PF4), and were measured by ELISA. The ability of supernatants to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture was also evaluated. Controls included vehicle-treated, unactivated PRP and PRP with 10 mM CaCl2 activated with 1 U/mL bovine thrombin. Results PRP activated with SMLEF bipolar pulses or thrombin had similar light scatter profiles, consistent with the

  1. Platelet-derived growth factor stimulated mechanisms of glucosamine incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, M.A.; Pledger, W.J. )

    1987-10-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) treatment of density-arrested BALB/c-3T3 cells results in increased ({sup 3}H)glucosamine (GlcN) incorporation into cellular material. The enhanced GlcN incorporation is not due to a preferential increase in proteoglycan synthesis as measured by ({sup 35}S)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} incorporation. Approximately 50% of the GlcN incorporated in PDGF or platelet-poor plasma (PPP)-treated cultures enters N-linked glycoproteins. Addition of dolichol-phosphate (dolichol-P), a required intermediate in N-linked glycosylation, did not alter ({sup 3}H)GlcN incorporation in PDGF-treated cells but did increase incorporation in PPP-treated cultures to a level comparable to that observed for PDGF-treated cultures. PDGF-treated cultures contained twofold greater quantities of ({sup 3}H)GlcN dolichol intermediates and lipid-free glycoprotein. Over a 12-h time course 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) activity was similar in cultures treated with PDGF or PPP. Results of these studies reveal that enhanced protein glycosylation in response to PDGF treatment is not the result of a direct effect on HMG CoA reductase.

  2. Uptake and processing of human platelet factor 4 by hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, B.; Steward, G.J.; de Feo, P.A.; Boden, G.; Niewiarowski, S.

    1987-12-01

    We previously demonstrated rapid clearance of human platelet factor 4 (PF4) from rabbit and rat blood, its accumulation in the liver, and elimination of PF4 degradation products in urine. The purpose of the present experiments was to characterize interaction of PF4 with cultured rat hepatocytes. /sup 125/I-PF4 was taken up by hepatocytes reaching maximum at 180 min. The association of /sup 125/I-PF4 with hepatocytes was two times greater at 37/sup 0/C than at 4/sup 0/C. At 37/sup 0/C degradation of /sup 125/-PF4 by hepatocytes was also observed as indicated by the increase of /sup 125/I-PF4 radioactivity soluble in 6% trichloroacetic acid. By contrast, no uptake of /sup 125/I-..beta..-thromboglobulin antigen was observed. Autoradiography demonstrated that short incubation (5-20 min) of /sup 125/I-PF4 with hepatocytes results in the association of /sup 125/I-radioactivity with cell membranes while after longer incubation (60 min) radioactivity was also localized in the endosomes. Heparin inhibited binding and uptake of /sup 125/I-PF4 radioactivity by hepatocytes. We propose that part of PF4 released in the circulating blood by activated platelets is bound to the surface of hepatocytes and that it is further processed by these cells.

  3. Platelet Activation Test in Unprocessed Blood (Pac-t-UB) to Monitor Platelet Concentrates and Whole Blood of Thrombocytopenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Roest, Mark; van Holten, Thijs C.; Fleurke, Ger-Jan; Remijn, Jasper A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Platelet concentrate transfusion is the standard treatment for hemato-oncology patients to compensate for thrombocytopenia. We have developed a novel platelet activation test in anticoagulated unprocessed blood (pac-t-UB) to determine platelet function in platelet concentrates and in blood of thrombocytopenic patients. Methods We have measured platelet activity in a platelet concentrate and in anticoagulated unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion thrombocytopenic patient. Results Our data show time-dependent platelet activation by GPVI agonist (collagen related peptide; CRP), PAR-1 agonist (SFLLRN), P2Y12 agonist (ADP), and thromboxane receptor agonist (U46619) in a platelet concentrate. Furthermore, pac-t-UB showed time-dependent platelet activation in unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion patient with thrombocytopenia. Testing platelet function by different agonists in relation to storage show that 3-day-old platelet concentrates are still reactive to the studied agonists. This reactivity rapidly drops for each agonists during longer storage. Discussion Pac-t-UB is a novel tool to estimate platelet function by different agonists in platelet concentrates and in unprocessed blood of thrombocytopenic patients. In the near future, we will validate whether pac-t-UB is an adequate test to monitor the quality of platelet concentrates and whether pac-t-UB predicts the bleeding risk of transfused thrombocytopenic patients. PMID:23652405

  4. Biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor in glandular gastric mucosa. Evidence for the involvement of the 'de novo' pathway and modulation by fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gallardo, S; Gijon, M A; Garcia, M C; Cano, E; Sanchez Crespo, M

    1988-09-15

    The biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF), a phospholipid autocoid with potent ulcerogenic properties that is produced in secretory exocrine glands by physiological secretagogues, was assessed in microsomal preparations of glandular gastric mucosa. For this purpose, 1-O-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (lyso-PAF):acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.67); the enzymes of the 'de novo' pathway: 1-O-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (alkyl-lyso-GP):acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase and 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (alkylacetyl-G):CDP-choline cholinephosphotransferase (EC 2.7.8.16); and some enzymes involved in the catabolism of PAF and lyso-PAF were assayed. Only the enzymes of the 'de novo' pathway and small amounts of PAF acetylhydrolase, phospholipase A2 and a lysophospholipase D acting on either lipids could be detected in the gastric preparations, whereas lyso-PAF:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase activity was undetectable. The specific activity of alkyl-lyso-GP:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase in the gastric mucosa was about one-tenth of that found in spleen microsomes and its apparent Km for acetyl-CoA was 454 microM compared with 277 microM in spleen microsomes. Glandular mucosa homogenates contained preformed PAF at a concentration of 2.7 +/- 0.7 ng equivalents of PAF (hexadecyl)/mg of protein. When gastric microsomes were incubated with micromolar concentrations of fatty acids (arachidonic, palmitic and oleic) prior to the assay of dithiothreitol (DTT)-insensitive cholinephosphotransferase, a dose-dependent reduction in the formation of PAF was observed, arachidonic acid being the most potent inhibitor, followed by linoleic acid (only tested on spleen microsomes) and oleic acid. By contrast, 1,2-diolein and phosphatidylcholine (dipalmitoyl) showed no or little effect. These results indicate that glandular gastric mucosa can produce PAF through the 'de novo' pathway, and that fatty acids, especially unsaturated, can reduce that synthesis by

  5. Functional responses and molecular mechanisms involved in histone-mediated platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Carestia, A; Rivadeneyra, L; Romaniuk, M A; Fondevila, C; Negrotto, S; Schattner, M

    2013-11-01

    Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in cell nuclei and they can be released by either dying or inflammatory cells. The recent observations that histones are major components of neutrophil extracellular traps and promote platelet aggregation and platelet-dependent thrombin generation have shown that these proteins are potent prothrombotic molecules. Because the mechanism(s) of platelet activation by histones are not completely understood, we explored the ability of individual recombinant human histones H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 to induce platelet activation as well as the possible molecular mechanisms involved. All histones were substrates for platelet adhesion and spreading and triggered fibrinogen binding, aggregation, von Willebrand factor release, P-selectin and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates; however, H4 was the most potent. Histone-mediated fibrinogen binding, P-selectin and PS exposure and the formation of mixed aggregates were potentiated by thrombin. Histones induced the activation of ERK, Akt, p38 and NFκB. Accordingly, histone-induced platelet activation was significantly impaired by pretreatment of platelets with inhibitors of ERK (U 0126), PI3K/Akt (Ly 294002), p38 (SB 203580) and NFκB (BAY 11-7082 and Ro 106-9920). Preincubation of platelets with either aspirin or dexamethasone markedly decreased fibrinogen binding and the adhesion mediated by histones without affecting P-selectin exposure. Functional platelet responses induced by H3 and H4, but not H1, H2A and H2B, were partially mediated through interaction with Toll-like receptors -2 and -4. Our data identify histones as important triggers of haemostatic and proinflammatory platelet responses, and only haemostatic responses are partially inhibited by anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23965842

  6. Cytofluorometric identification of plasmin-sensitive factor XIIIa binding to platelets.

    PubMed

    Kreager, J A; Devine, D V; Greenberg, C S

    1988-08-30

    We have investigated the binding of blood coagulation factor XIIIa to thrombin-stimulated platelets using cytofluorometric analysis. Washed thrombin-stimulated platelets bound exogenously added factor XIIIa in a calcium-dependent reaction. The expression of endogenous platelet factor XIII was also detected on the surface of thrombin-stimulated platelets. When fluorescence analysis was performed based on particle size, factor XIIIa bound to the surface of greater than 95% of particles which contained more than one platelet, but only 50% of single platelets. The binding of factor XIIIa to thrombin-stimulated platelets was inhibited by plasmin. Plasmin also inhibited thrombin-dependent expression of the factor XIIIa binding site on platelets. Experiments in which thrombin-stimulated platelets were incubated with factor XIIIa in the presence of 125I-dimethylcasein or 3H-putrescine demonstrated that platelets bear both glutamyl and lysyl substrates for factor XIIIa. Thrombin increased the expression of factor XIIIa substrates by platelets. Plasmin inhibited both the expression of factor XIIIa substrates and degraded them. The binding of factor XIIIa to thrombin-stimulated platelets and the availability of factor XIIIa substrates on the platelet surface could provide a mechanism by which factor XIIIa stabilizes the hemostatic plug by promoting crosslinking reactions between platelet membrane proteins and adhesive glycoproteins. In contrast, plasmin inhibition of factor XIIIa binding and crosslinking could disrupt hemostasis. PMID:2903577

  7. Oxidized plasma albumin promotes platelet-endothelial crosstalk and endothelial tissue factor expression

    PubMed Central

    Pasterk, Lisa; Lemesch, Sandra; Leber, Bettina; Trieb, Markus; Curcic, Sanja; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Schuligoi, Rufina; Schicho, Rudolf; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    Plasma advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), a class of pro-inflammatory pathogenic mediators, accumulate in subjects with chronic kidney disease. Whether AOPPs contribute to coagulation abnormalities, which are frequently seen in uremic patients, is unknown. Here we report that AOPPs activate platelets via a CD36-mediated signaling pathway. Activation of signaling pathways by AOPP-platelet interaction resulted in the expression of several platelet activation markers and rapidly induced the expression of CD40 ligand, triggering platelet adhesion to endothelial cells and promoting endothelial tissue factor expression. AOPPs and serum tissue factor levels were considerably increased in end stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis and a significant correlation of AOPPs and serum tissue factor was found. Interestingly, serum levels of AOPPs and tissue factor were substantially lower in stable kidney transplant patients when compared with hemodialysis patients. Given that CD36 is known to transduce the effects of oxidized lipids into platelet hyperactivity, our findings reveal previously unknown pro-thrombotic activities of oxidized plasma albumin via a CD36 dependent pathway. PMID:26905525

  8. Plasma Components and Platelet Activation Are Essential for the Antimicrobial Properties of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Drago, Lorenzo; Bortolin, Monica; Vassena, Christian; Romanò, Carlo L.; Taschieri, Silvio; Fabbro, Massimo Del

    2014-01-01

    Autologous platelet concentrates are successfully adopted in a variety of medical fields to stimulate bone and soft tissue regeneration. The rationale for their use consists in the delivery of a wide range of platelet-derived bioactive molecules that promotes wound healing. In addition, antimicrobial properties of platelet concentrates have been pointed out. In this study, the effect of the platelet concentration, of the activation step and of the presence of plasmatic components on the antimicrobial activity of pure platelet-rich plasma was investigated against gram positive bacteria isolated from oral cavity. The antibacterial activity, evaluated as the minimum inhibitory concentration, was determined through the microdilution two-fold serial method. Results seem to suggest that the antimicrobial activity of platelet-rich plasma against Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus oralis and Staphylococcus aureus is sustained by a co-operation between plasma components and platelet-derived factors and that the activation of coagulation is a fundamental step. The findings of this study may have practical implications in the modality of application of platelet concentrates. PMID:25232963

  9. Influence of activating hormones on human platelet membrane Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Resink, T.J.; Dimitrov, D.; Stucki, S.; Buehler, F.R.

    1986-07-16

    Intact platelets were pretreated with hormones and thereafter membranes were prepared and Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity determined. Thrombin decreased the V/sub max/ of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase after pretreatment of intact platelets. Platelet activating factor, vasopressin and ADP also decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or A23187 or ionomycin alone had no effect, while the simultaneous pretreatment with TPA and Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophore decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. cAMP elevating agents prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/) and forskolin had no influence per se on Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase, but antagonized the inhibitory effect of thrombin. The data suggest a close connection between phosphoinositide metabolism and the Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase system.

  10. TMEM16F is required for phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release in activated mouse platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Sakata, Asuka; Nishimura, Satoshi; Eto, Koji; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of activated platelets requires the action of a phospholipid scramblase(s), and serves as a scaffold for the assembly of the tenase and prothrombinase complexes involved in blood coagulation. Here, we found that the activation of mouse platelets with thrombin/collagen or Ca2+ ionophore at 20 °C induces PtdSer exposure without compromising plasma membrane integrity. Among five transmembrane protein 16 (TMEM16) members that support Ca2+-dependent phospholipid scrambling, TMEM16F was the only one that showed high expression in mouse platelets. Platelets from platelet-specific TMEM16F-deficient mice exhibited defects in activation-induced PtdSer exposure and microparticle shedding, although α-granule and dense granule release remained intact. The rate of tissue factor-induced thrombin generation by TMEM16F-deficient platelets was severely reduced, whereas thrombin-induced clot retraction was unaffected. The imaging of laser-induced thrombus formation in whole animals showed that PtdSer exposure on aggregated platelets was TMEM16F-dependent in vivo. The phenotypes of the platelet-specific TMEM16F-null mice resemble those of patients with Scott syndrome, a mild bleeding disorder, indicating that these mice may provide a useful model for human Scott syndrome. PMID:26417084

  11. Effect of Drotrecogin alfa (activated) on platelet receptor expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schuerholz, Tobias; Friedrich, Lars; Marx, Gernot; Kornau, Ines; Sümpelmann, Robert; Scheinichen, Dirk

    2007-08-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common problem in critically ill patients, which is associated with increased mortality. Recently, Drotrecogin alfa (activated) (recombinant human activated protein C (APC)) was shown to reduce mortality in patients with severe sepsis. Only minimal effect of APC on coagulation markers was demonstrated. Nevertheless, low platelet count was identified as a risk factor for bleeding with use of this drug. We conducted this study to evaluate possible influence of APC on in vitro expression of platelet receptors at therapeutic and supra-therapeutic concentrations. Blood samples of volunteers and patients with severe sepsis were adjusted with APC to final concentrations of 0.045 microg mL(-1) APC (APC-45, therapeutic dose) and 0.225 microg mL(-1) APC (APC-225, five-fold therapeutic dose), respectively. The activation of platelets was mediated by two different agonists. APC had no significant influence on platelet activation, with or without stimulation at both concentrations. In group APC-225, CD62P showed a non-significant decrease. This in vitro study demonstrates that therapeutic plasma concentrations of Drotrecogin alfa (activated) have neither influence on expression of platelet activation markers nor on platelet-granulocyte complexes in blood of volunteers and patients with severe sepsis. Thus, a direct drug-platelet interaction seems unlikely. PMID:17654307

  12. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  13. Platelet activation and apoptosis modulate monocyte inflammatory responses in dengue

    PubMed Central

    Hottz, Eugenio D.; Medeiros-de-Moraes, Isabel M.; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; de Assis, Edson F.; Vals-de-Souza, Rogério; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Bozza, Patrícia T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease in the world. Dengue infection has a large spectrum of clinical manifestations from self-limited febrile illness to severe syndromes accompanied by bleeding and shock. Thrombocytopenia and vascular leak with altered cytokine profiles in plasma are features of severe dengue. Although monocytes have been recognized as important sources of cytokines in dengue, the contributions of platelet-monocyte interactions to inflammatory responses in dengue have not been addressed. Patients/Methods Patients with dengue were investigated for platelet-monocyte aggregate formation and markers of monocyte activation. Platelet-induced cytokine responses by monocytes and underlying mechanisms were also investigated in vitro. Results We observed increased levels of platelet-monocyte aggregates in blood samples from patients with dengue, especially patients with thrombocytopenia and increased vascular permeability. Moreover, the exposure of monocytes from healthy volunteers to platelets from patients with dengue induced the secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10 and MCP-1, while the exposure to platelets from healthy volunteers only induced the secretion of MCP-1. In addition to the well-established modulation of monocyte cytokine responses by activated platelets through P-selectin binding, we found that interaction of monocytes with apoptotic platelets mediate IL-10 secretion through phosphatidylserine recognition in platelet-monocyte aggregates. Moreover, IL-10 secretion required platelet-monocyte contact but not phagocytosis. Conclusions Together, our results demonstrate that activated and apoptotic platelets aggregate with monocytes during dengue infection and signal specific cytokine responses that may contribute to the pathogenesis of dengue. PMID:25015827

  14. Structure-guided creation of AcAP5-derived and platelet targeted factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Aihua; Shui, Mengyang; Li, Ruyi; Liu, Xiaoyan; Hu, Wenhui; Wang, Yinye

    2015-06-15

    Anticoagulants and anti-platelet agents are simultaneously administrated in clinical practice (i.e. percutaneous coronary intervention), which cause significant risk of systemic bleeding. Targeted delivery of anticoagulants to the activated platelets at sites of vascular injuries may condense the site-specific anticoagulant effect and reduce the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. To this end, we prepared three ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5) variants NR1, NR2 and NR3 engineered with a platelet-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif and evaluated their anti-Factor Xa (FXa) and platelet-binding effects. These RGD-containing AcAP5 variants were capable of interacting with platelet receptor αIIbβ3 as shown in computational analysis. All variants, especially NR2 and NR3, retained entirely the anti-FXa function of parent AcAP5. Moreover, they prevented the formation of occlusive thrombi in rat carotid artery injury model, suggesting that they inhibit platelet aggregation in vivo. Further functional investigation of NR3 demonstrated that NR3 inhibited platelet aggregation in vitro and FXa activity in vivo, and prolonged the coagulation time, all in a dose-dependent manner. Through flow cytometry assay, we confirmed the binding of NR3 to αIIbβ3 receptor. In mouse model of carotid artery endothelium injury, NR3-treated mice showed less tail bleeding time than AcAP5-treated mice, and aspirin plus NR3 treatment exhibited moderate reduction of blood loss compared with aspirin plus AcAP5 treatment. These results indicate the feasibility to engineer a novel FXa inhibitor specifically targeting the activated platelets, which centralizes its anticoagulation efficacy in the injured vascular endothelium and reduces the risk of systemic bleeding. PMID:25887920

  15. Platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte interaction in dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Amelia; Leisewitz, Andrew L; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Schoeman, Johan P

    2015-09-01

    Using flow cytometry, platelet-leukocyte aggregate (PLA) formation has previously been documented in dogs with a variety of systemic inflammatory disorders and immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia. Platelet activation and subsequent interaction between platelets and leukocytes are important for regulating innate immunity and systemic inflammation. The objective of this study was to investigate PLA formation in canine babesiosis and to determine whether it was associated with outcome. Blood was collected from 36 client-owned dogs diagnosed with Babesia rossi infection and 15 healthy controls using EDTA as anticoagulant. Activated platelets and PLA formation were detected by measuring surface expression of P-selectin (CD62P) on platelets, monocytes and neutrophils. Of the Babesia-infected dogs, 29 survived and seven died. The percentage of CD62P-positive monocytes was significantly higher (P = 0.036) in the Babesia-infected dogs (54%) than in healthy control dogs (35.3%). However, there were no significant differences between the Babesia-infected and control groups for CD62P-positive platelets (4.9% and 1.2%, respectively) and CD62P-positive neutrophils (28.3% and 17.9%, respectively). The percentage of CD62P-positive monocytes was significantly higher (P = 0.019) in the survivors (58.9%) than in healthy control dogs; however, there were no significant differences between the non-survivors (39.2%) and the controls or between survivors and non-survivors. There were no significant differences between groups for the percentage of CD62P-positive platelets (survivors 4.8%; non-survivors 5.3%; controls 1.2%) or CD62P-positive neutrophils (survivors 31.6%; non-survivors 5.6%; controls 17.9%). In conclusion, Babesia-infected dogs, specifically dogs that survived, had a significantly increased percentage of platelet-monocyte aggregates compared to healthy control dogs. PMID:26088270

  16. Accuracy of platelet counting by automated hematologic analyzers in acute leukemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation: potential effects of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon Young; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Han, Kyou-Sup; Toh, Cheng Hock

    2010-10-01

    Platelet counting in patients with acute leukemia or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) may have a risk for erroneous counts owing to the presence of nonplatelet particles or platelet activation. We evaluated automated platelet counting methods using the Abbott Cell-Dyn Sapphire (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA), Sysmex XE-2100 (Sysmex, Kobe, Japan), ADVIA 2120 (Siemens Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY), and Beckman Coulter LH 750 (Beckman Coulter, Miami, FL) compared with the international reference method (IRM). Automated platelet counting methods were inaccurate compared with the IRM, without evidence of interfering nonplatelet particles. It is interesting that platelet activation markers were associated with DIC severity and erroneous platelet counting, suggesting that platelet activation is a potential source of inaccuracy. Furthermore, the artifactual in vitro platelet activation induced a high degree of intermethod variation in platelet counts. The inaccuracy of automated platelet counts increased the risk for misdiagnosis of DIC. More attention needs to be given to the accuracy of platelet counts, especially in clinical conditions with florid platelet activation. PMID:20855645

  17. Detection and partial characterization of an inhibitor of plasminogen activator in human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, L A; Ginsberg, M H; Loskutoff, D J

    1984-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the presence of a previously undescribed fibrinolytic inhibitor in human serum. It has an apparent molecular weight of 50,000 and is not detected in serum derived from platelet-poor plasma, suggesting that it originates from platelets. This conclusion is supported by a number of observations. For example, extracts of washed, gel-filtered human platelets contain an inhibitor of similar activity and size, and physiological concentrations of thrombin induce its release from the platelets. Moreover, the kinetics and dose dependency of this release are similar to those observed for the release of platelet factor 4, and the release of both molecules is blocked by pretreating the platelets with prostaglandin E1 and theophylline. Mixing experiments, which were devised to investigate the specificity of the inhibitor, showed that the fibrinolytic activity initiated by both urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator was blocked by platelet releasate in a dose-dependent manner. In both cases, the amount of inhibition increased when the releasates were preincubated with the purified activators, indicating a direct interaction between the activators and an inhibitor(s). The inhibitory activity was removed by preincubating the releasates with antiserum prepared against an antiactivator purified from cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. These results indicate that platelets contain an inhibitor which is released by thrombin, inhibits both urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator, and is immunologically similar to an inhibitor produced by endothelial cells. This molecule may represent a new class of inhibitors, the antiactivators, which function together with alpha 2-antiplasmin to regulate the fibrinolytic system of the blood. Its release from platelets by thrombin may protect the growing thrombus against premature dissolution initiated by plasminogen activators released by the endothelium. Images PMID:6434594

  18. 21 CFR 864.7695 - Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay. 864.7695 Section 864.7695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7695...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7695 - Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay. 864.7695 Section 864.7695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7695...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7695 - Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay. 864.7695 Section 864.7695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7695...

  1. 21 CFR 864.7695 - Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay. 864.7695 Section 864.7695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7695...

  2. Hypergravity and hypobaric hypoxic conditions promote endothelial cell and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, David A; Yin, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk is heightened during exposure to altered gravity and/or altered barometric conditions. Previous work has suggested that this heightened cardiovascular risk is due to enhancements of endothelial cell inflammatory and/or thrombogenic responses. In recent work, the role of platelets on instigating or inhibiting endothelial cell responses associated with cardiovascular disease has been found to be dependent on both biochemical and biophysical factors. In this work, we aimed to determine how two biophysical forces, gravity and atmospheric pressure, alter endothelial cell and platelet functions and their interactions to instigate or inhibit cardiovascular disease responses. To address this aim, endothelial cells and platelets were subjected to a force 8 times greater than the normal gravitational force, for up to 30 minutes. In separate experiments, endothelial cells and platelets were subjected to 50% of normal atmospheric pressure. Endothelial cell and platelet responses, associated with cardiovascular diseases, were measured as a time course during exposure. In general, the exposure of endothelial cells to either hypergravity or hypobaric conditions enhanced cardiovascular disease responses. However, the presence of platelets generally inhibited endothelial cell responses. Platelet activation was, however, somewhat enhanced under both hypergravity and hypobaric conditions. Our data suggest that altered biophysical forces can modulate endothelial cell and platelet responses that are salient for cardiovascular disease progression. However, the interaction of these two cells tends to restrain the progression of the pro-cardiovascular disease responses. PMID:25211651

  3. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets†

    PubMed Central

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassa n; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L.

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide–lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet’s primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF’s D′–D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF’s A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF’s A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP. PMID

  4. Unaltered Angiogenesis-Regulating Activities of Platelets in Mild Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus despite a Marked Platelet Hyperreactivity.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xinyan; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Zhangsen; Li, Nailin

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with platelet dysfunction and impaired angiogenesis. Aim of the study is to investigate if platelet dysfunction might hamper platelet angiogenic activities in T2DM patients. Sixteen T2DM patients and gender/age-matched non-diabetic controls were studied. Flow cytometry and endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC) tube formation on matrigel were used to assess platelet reactivity and angiogenic activity, respectively. Thrombin receptor PAR1-activating peptide (PAR1-AP) induced higher platelet P-selectin expression, and evoked more rapid and intense platelet annexin V binding in T2DM patients, seen as a more rapid increase of annexin V+ platelets (24.3±6.4% vs 12.6±3.8% in control at 2 min) and a higher elevation (30.9±5.1% vs 24.3±3.0% at 8 min). However, PAR1-AP and PAR4-AP induced similar releases of angiogenic regulators from platelets, and both stimuli evoked platelet release of platelet angiogenic regulators to similar extents in T2DM and control subjects. Thus, PAR1-stimulated platelet releasate (PAR1-PR) and PAR4-PR similarly enhanced capillary-like network/tube formation of ECFCs, and the enhancements did not differ between T2DM and control subjects. Direct supplementation of platelets to ECFCs at the ratio of 1:200 enhanced ECFC tube formation even more markedly, leading to approximately 100% increases of the total branch points of ECFC tube formation, for which the enhancements were also similar between patients and controls. In conclusion, platelets from T2DM subjects are hyperreactive. Platelet activation induced by high doses of PAR1-AP, however, results in similar releases of angiogenic regulators in mild T2DM and control subjects. Platelets from T2DM and control subjects also demonstrate similar enhancements on ECFC angiogenic activities. PMID:27612088

  5. Control of angiogenesis by galectins involves the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Tribulatti, María Virginia; Croci, Diego Omar; Carabelli, Julieta; Campetella, Oscar; Rabinovich, Gabriel Adrián; Schattner, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Platelets contribute to vessel formation through the release of angiogenesis-modulating factors stored in their α-granules. Galectins, a family of lectins that bind β-galactoside residues, are up-regulated in inflammatory and cancerous tissues, trigger platelet activation and mediate vascularization processes. Here we aimed to elucidate whether the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic molecules could represent an alternative mechanism through which galectins promote neovascularization. We show that different members of the galectin family can selectively regulate the release of angiogenic molecules by human platelets. Whereas Galectin (Gal)-1, -3, and -8 triggered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release, only Gal-8 induced endostatin secretion. Release of VEGF induced by Gal-8 was partially prevented by COX-1, PKC, p38 and Src kinases inhibitors, whereas Gal-1-induced VEGF secretion was inhibited by PKC and ERK blockade, and Gal-3 triggered VEGF release selectively through a PKC-dependent pathway. Regarding endostatin, Gal-8 failed to stimulate its release in the presence of PKC, Src and ERK inhibitors, whereas aspirin or p38 inhibitor had no effect on endostatin release. Despite VEGF or endostatin secretion, platelet releasates generated by stimulation with each galectin stimulated angiogenic responses in vitro including endothelial cell proliferation and tubulogenesis. The platelet angiogenic activity was independent of VEGF and was attributed to the concerted action of other proangiogenic molecules distinctly released by each galectin. Thus, secretion of platelet-derived angiogenic molecules may represent an alternative mechanism by which galectins promote angiogenic responses and its selective blockade may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:24788652

  6. Control of Angiogenesis by Galectins Involves the Release of Platelet-Derived Proangiogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Tribulatti, María Virginia; Croci, Diego Omar; Carabelli, Julieta; Campetella, Oscar; Rabinovich, Gabriel Adrián; Schattner, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Platelets contribute to vessel formation through the release of angiogenesis-modulating factors stored in their α-granules. Galectins, a family of lectins that bind β-galactoside residues, are up-regulated in inflammatory and cancerous tissues, trigger platelet activation and mediate vascularization processes. Here we aimed to elucidate whether the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic molecules could represent an alternative mechanism through which galectins promote neovascularization. We show that different members of the galectin family can selectively regulate the release of angiogenic molecules by human platelets. Whereas Galectin (Gal)-1, -3, and -8 triggered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release, only Gal-8 induced endostatin secretion. Release of VEGF induced by Gal-8 was partially prevented by COX-1, PKC, p38 and Src kinases inhibitors, whereas Gal-1-induced VEGF secretion was inhibited by PKC and ERK blockade, and Gal-3 triggered VEGF release selectively through a PKC-dependent pathway. Regarding endostatin, Gal-8 failed to stimulate its release in the presence of PKC, Src and ERK inhibitors, whereas aspirin or p38 inhibitor had no effect on endostatin release. Despite VEGF or endostatin secretion, platelet releasates generated by stimulation with each galectin stimulated angiogenic responses in vitro including endothelial cell proliferation and tubulogenesis. The platelet angiogenic activity was independent of VEGF and was attributed to the concerted action of other proangiogenic molecules distinctly released by each galectin. Thus, secretion of platelet-derived angiogenic molecules may represent an alternative mechanism by which galectins promote angiogenic responses and its selective blockade may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:24788652

  7. Degranulation of rabbit platelets with PAF-acether: a new procedure for unravelling the mode of action of platelet-activating substances.

    PubMed

    Vargaftig, B B; Joseph, D; Marlas, G; Chevance, L G

    1982-08-24

    Aggregation and secretion of ATP induced by thrombin, collagen, the snake venom component convulxin and platelet-activating factor (PAF-acether) were studied after the exposure of rabbit platelets to 1 microM of PAF-acether. This concentration, which is around 6 orders of magnitude above the concentration needed to induce full aggregation, was required to remove most of the releasable ATP from the platelets. The depleted platelets aggregated to PAF-acether, to thrombin and to convulxin under conditions where only very low amounts of ATP were secreted, confirming that these agents do not require the release of dense body components to trigger aggregation. Furthermore, when exposure to PAF-acether was associated to inactivation of platelet cyclooxygenase with aspirin, aggregation to thrombin persisted, validating the claim that thrombin induces aggregation by a third pathway unrelated to ADP and to thromboxane A2. Aggregation by collagen was markedly reduced by exposure of the platelets to PAF-acether or to aspirin; when both procedures were associated, aggregation was suppressed. Failure to desensitize the rabbit platelets to PAF-acether upon exposure to high amounts of it indicates the absence of irreversible membrane changes due to PAF-acether, and allows its use as a depleting procedure for the dense body materials, which does not affect platelet membrane components as is the case for thrombin. PMID:7135345

  8. Hemocompatibility of Polyvinyl Alcohol-Gelatin Core-Shell Electrospun Nanofibers: A Novel Scaffold for Modulating Platelet Deposition and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Merkle, Valerie M.; Martin, Daniel; Hutchinson, Marcus; Tran, Phat L.; Behrens, Alana; Hossainy, Samir; Bluestein, Danny; Wu, Xiaoyi; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate coaxial electrospun nanofibers with gelatin in the shell and polyvinyl (PVA) in the core as a potential vascular material by determining fiber surface roughness, as well as human platelet deposition and activation under varying conditions. PVA scaffolds had the highest surface roughness (Ra = 65.5 ± 6.8 nm) but the lowest platelet deposition (34.2 ± 5.8 platelets) in comparison to gelatin nanofibers (Ra = 36.8 ± 3.0 nm & 168.9 ± 29.8 platelets) and coaxial nanofibers (1 Gel: 1 PVA coaxial – Ra = 24.0 ± 1.5 nm & 150.2 ± 17.4 platelets; 3 Gel: 1 PVA coaxial – Ra = 37.1 ± 2.8 nm & 167.8 ± 15.4 platelets). Therefore, the chemical structure of the gelatin nanofibers dominated surface roughness in platelet deposition. Due to their increased stiffness, the coaxial nanofibers had the highest platelet activation rate – rate of thrombin formation, in comparison to gelatin and PVA fibers. Our studies indicate that mechanical stiffness is a dominating factor for platelet deposition and activation, followed by biochemical moieties, and lastly surface roughness. Overall, these coaxial nanofibers are an appealing material for vascular applications by supporting cellular growth while minimizing platelet deposition and activation. PMID:25815434

  9. Invasive pneumococcal disease leads to activation and hyperreactivity of platelets.

    PubMed

    Tunjungputri, Rahajeng N; de Jonge, Marien I; de Greeff, Astrid; van Selm, Saskia; Buys, Herma; Harders-Westerveen, Jose F; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert; Urbanus, Rolf T; de Groot, Phillip G; Smith, Hilde E; van der Ven, Andre J; de Mast, Quirijn

    2016-08-01

    Using a novel porcine model of intravenous Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, we showed that invasive pneumococcal infections induce marked platelet activation and hyperreactivity. This may contribute to the vascular complications seen in pneumococcal infection. PMID:27322088

  10. A balance between TFPI and thrombin-mediated platelet activation is required for murine embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Ellery, Paul E. R.; Maroney, Susan A.; Cooley, Brian C.; Luyendyk, James P.; Zogg, Mark; Weiler, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a critical anticoagulant protein present in endothelium and platelets. Mice lacking TFPI (Tfpi−/−) die in utero from disseminated intravascular coagulation. They are rescued by concomitant tissue factor (TF) deficiency, demonstrating that TFPI modulates TF function in vivo. Recent studies have found TFPI inhibits prothrombinase activity during the initiation of coagulation and limits platelet accumulation during thrombus formation, implicating TFPI in modulating platelet procoagulant activity. To examine whether altered platelet function would compensate for the lack of TFPI and rescue TFPI-null embryonic lethality, Tfpi+/− mice lacking the platelet thrombin receptor, protease activated receptor 4 (PAR4; Par4−/−), or its coreceptor, PAR3, were mated. PAR3 deficiency did not rescue Tfpi−/− embryos, but >40% of expected Tfpi−/−:Par4−/− offspring survived to adulthood. Adult Tfpi−/−:Par4−/− mice did not exhibit overt thrombosis. However, they had focal sterile inflammation with fibrin(ogen) deposition in the liver and elevated plasma thrombin-antithrombin complexes, indicating activation of coagulation at baseline. Tfpi−/−:Par4−/− mice have platelet and fibrin accumulation similar to Par4−/− mice following venous electrolytic injury but were more susceptible than Par4−/− mice to TF-induced pulmonary embolism. In addition, ∼30% of the Tfpi−/−:Par4−/− mice were born with short tails. Tfpi−/−:Par4−/− mice are the first adult mice described that lack TFPI with unaltered TF. They demonstrate that TFPI physiologically modulates thrombin-dependent platelet activation in a manner that is required for successful embryonic development and identify a role for TFPI in dampening intravascular procoagulant stimuli that lead to thrombin generation, even in the absence of thrombin-mediated platelet activation. PMID:25954015

  11. Wdr1-Dependent Actin Reorganization in Platelet Activation.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Swapan K; Le, Anhquyen; Da, Qi; Cruz, Miguel; Rumbaut, Rolando E; Thiagarajan, Perumal

    2016-01-01

    In resting platelets, the integrin αIIbβ3 is present in a low-affinity "bent" state. During platelet aggregation, intracytoplasmic signals induce conformational changes (inside-out signaling) that result in a "swung-out" conformation competent to bind ligands such as fibrinogen. The cytoskeleton plays an essential role in αIIbβ3 activation. We investigated the role of the actin interacting protein Wdr1 in αIIbβ3 activation. Wdr1-hypomorphic mice had a prolonged bleeding time (> 10 minutes) compared to that of wild-type mice (2.1 ± 0.7 minutes). Their platelets had impaired aggregation to collagen and thrombin. In a FeCl3 induced carotid artery thrombosis model, vessel occlusion in Wdr1-hypomorphic mice was prolonged significantly compared to wild-type mice (9.0 ± 10.5 minutes versus 5.8 ± 12.6 minutes (p = 0.041). Activation-induced binding of JON/A (a conformation-specific antibody to activated αIIbβ3) was significantly less in Wdr1-hypomorphic platelets at various concentrations of collagen, indicating impaired inside-out activation of αIIbβ3, despite a normal calcium response. Actin turnover, assessed by measuring F-actin and G-actin ratios during collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, was highly impaired in Wdr1-hypomorphic platelets. Furthermore, talin failed to redistribute and translocate to the cytoskeleton following activation in Wdr1-hypomorphic platelets. These studies show that Wdr1 is essential for talin-induced activation of αIIbβ3 during platelet activation. PMID:27627652

  12. A novel role of sesamol in inhibiting NF-κB-mediated signaling in platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Our previous studies revealed that sesamol possesses potent antiplatelet activity through increasing cyclic AMP formation. Although platelets are anucleated cells, they also express the transcription factor, NF-κB, that may exert non-genomic functions in platelet activation. Therefore, we further investigated the inhibitory roles of sesamol in NF-κB-mediated platelet function. Methods Platelet aggregation, Fura 2-AM fluorescence, and immunoblotting analysis were used in this study. Results NF-κB signaling events, including IKKβ phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and p65 phosphorylation, were markedly activated by collagen (1 μg/ml) in washed human platelets, and these signaling events were attenuated by sesamol (2.5~25 μM). Furthermore, SQ22536 and ODQ, inhibitors of adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase, respectively, strongly reversed the sesamol (25 μM)-mediated inhibitory effects of IKKβ phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and p65 phosphorylation stimulated by collagen. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, also reversed sesamol-mediated inhibition of IκBα degradation. Moreover, BAY11-7082, an NF-κB inhibitor, abolished IκBα degradation, phospholipase C (PLC)γ2 phosphorylation, protein kinase C (PKC) activation, [Ca2+]i mobilization, and platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Preincubation of platelets with the inhibitors, SQ22536 and H89, both strongly reversed sesamol-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation and [Ca2+]i mobilization. Conclusions Sesamol activates cAMP-PKA signaling, followed by inhibition of the NF-κB-PLC-PKC cascade, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca2+]i mobilization and platelet aggregation. Because platelet activation is not only linked to hemostasis, but also has a relevant role in inflammation and metastasis, our data demonstrating that inhibition of NF-κB interferes with platelet function may have a great impact when

  13. The Role of Tissue Factor in Atherothrombosis and Coronary Artery Disease: Insights into Platelet Tissue Factor.

    PubMed

    Camera, Marina; Toschi, Vincenzo; Brambilla, Marta; Lettino, Maddalena; Rossetti, Laura; Canzano, Paola; Di Minno, Alessandro; Tremoli, Elena

    2015-10-01

    The contribution of vessel wall-derived tissue factor (TF) to atherothrombosis is well established, whereas the pathophysiological relevance of the blood-borne TF is still a matter of debate, and controversies on the presence of platelet-associated TF still exist. In the past 15 years, several studies have documented the presence of TF in human platelets, the capacity of human platelets to use TF mRNA to make de novo protein synthesis, and the increase in the percentage of TF positive platelets in pathological conditions such as coronary artery disease (CAD). The exposure of vessel wall-derived TF at the site of vascular injury would play its main role in the initiation phase, whereas the blood-borne TF carried by platelets would be involved in the propagation phase of thrombus formation. More recent data indicate that megakaryocytes are committed to release into the bloodstream a well-defined number of TF-carrying platelets, which represents only a fraction of the whole platelet population. These findings are in line with the evidence that platelets are heterogeneous in their functions and only a subset of them is involved in the hemostatic process. In this review we summarize the existing knowledge on platelet associated TF and speculate on its relevance to physiology and to atherothrombosis and CAD. PMID:26408918

  14. The systemic activation of platelets by Dacron grafts.

    PubMed

    Shoenfeld, N A; Connolly, R; Ramberg, K; Valeri, C R; Eldrup-Jorgensen, J; Callow, A D

    1988-05-01

    Dacron (polyester fiber), a stimulus to platelet aggregation in vitro, accumulates platelets to a greater extent in vivo than autogenous artery, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or human umbilical vein (HUV). We conducted a series of experiments using the ex vivo shunt in the baboon to determine whether or not systemic activation of platelet function was produced by a Dacron graft. Two 5 centimeter segments of 4 millimeter internal diameter graft materials were placed in series in the ex vivo shunt perfused at 25 milliliters per minute flow rate for two and one-half hours. Deposition of autologous Indium 111 labeled platelets was monitored. The ex vivo shunt procedures were divided into two groups, both with PTFE as the proximal graft: one with a distal Dacron graft (n = 21), the second with PTFE or HUV distally (n = 17). In this study, an increase in platelet deposition on the proximal PTFE graft represents systemic platelet activation caused by the distal graft. Increased platelet deposition on PTFE was noted at all time points in the presence of a Dacron graft (p less than 0.05). This property of Dacron has important clinical implications, potentially accelerating the progression of vascular disease, increasing the failure rate of composite grafts and subsequent arterial reconstruction. PMID:2966442

  15. Assessment of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Fresh versus Frozen Platelet Rich Plasma.

    PubMed

    Hosny, Nada; Goubran, Fikry; BadrEldin Hasan, Basma; Kamel, Noha

    2015-01-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is hemoconcentration with platelets concentration above baseline values and high concentration of many growth factors. The aim of this study was to assess freezing effect on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release from PRP using two different activation methods to simplify its use in different clinical applications. PRP was prepared using two-centrifugation steps method from 12 qualified blood donors. VEGF concentrations were measured in fresh PRP and after freezing/thawing for one and three weeks with two methods of activation using (i) calcium gluconate and (ii) calcium gluconate and thrombin. Platelets count was significantly increased compared to baseline whole blood values in all fresh and frozen PRP samples (p value was <0.05). No significant difference was found between VEGF concentrations after activating fresh and frozen-thawed PRP samples for one and three weeks by calcium alone or calcium with thrombin, and also no significant difference was found when freezing period was extended from one to three weeks. Our results showed that platelets count does not correlate with variable levels of VEGF. PRP could be prepared once and preserved frozen for at least three weeks for the next treatment sessions and activation with thrombin addition to calcium will not augment the growth factor release. PMID:26301115

  16. Platelets aggregation in pathological conditions: role of local shear rates and platelet activation delay time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Zarif Khalili Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    Platelets play an essential role in the initiation and formation of a thrombus, however their detailed motion in blood vessels with complex geometries, such as in the aneurysmal vessel or stenotic vessel in atherosclerosis, has not been studied systematically. Here, we perform spectral element simulations (NEKTAR code) to obtain the 3D flow field in blood vessel with cavities, and we apply the force coupling method (FCM) to simulate the motion of platelets in blood flow. Specifically, simulations of platelets are performed in a 0.25 mm diameter circular blood vessel with 1 mm length. Corresponding coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are employed to provide input to the NEKTAR-FCM code. Simulations are conducted at several different Reynolds numbers (Re). An ellipsoid-shaped cavity is selected to intersect with the middle part of the circular vessel to represent the aneurysmal part of the blood vessel. Based on the simulation results, we quantify how the platelets motion and aggregation in the blood vessel cavities depend on Re, platelet activation delay time, and the geometry of the cavities.

  17. Effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on coagulation and platelet activity

    SciTech Connect

    Imbriani, M.; Ghittori, S.; Prestinoni, A.; Longoni, P.; Cascone, G.; Gamba, G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on hemostatic functions, especially on platelet activity, were examined both in vitro and in vivo in 15 workers exposed to DMF (27 mg/m3, median value). Twenty-eight control subjects who were not exposed to DMF, but comparable for age, anthropometric data, and smoking habits, were also studied. Workers exposed to DMF showed a decrease in the number of platelets and had longer coagulation times, probably due to a change caused by DMF on the membrane receptor of platelets and on the phospholipid components of the clotting system.

  18. Highly electronegative LDL from patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction triggers platelet activation and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hua-Chen; Ke, Liang-Yin; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lee, An-Sheng; Shen, Ming-Yi; Cruz, Miguel A.; Hsu, Jing-Fang; Cheng, Kai-Hung; Chan, Hsiu-Chuan Bonnie; Lu, Jonathan; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    Platelet activation and aggregation underlie acute thrombosis that leads to ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). L5—highly electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL)—is significantly elevated in patients with STEMI. Thus, we examined the role of L5 in thrombogenesis. Plasma LDL from patients with STEMI (n = 30) was chromatographically resolved into 5 subfractions (L1-L5) with increasing electronegativity. In vitro, L5 enhanced adenosine diphosphate–stimulated platelet aggregation twofold more than did L1 and induced platelet-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion. L5 also increased P-selectin expression and glycoprotein (GP)IIb/IIIa activation and decreased cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels (n = 6, P < .01) in platelets. In vivo, injection of L5 (5 mg/kg) into C57BL/6 mice twice weekly for 6 weeks shortened tail bleeding time by 43% (n = 3; P < .01 vs L1-injected mice) and increased P-selectin expression and GPIIb/IIIa activation in platelets. Pharmacologic blockade experiments revealed that L5 signals through platelet-activating factor receptor and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 to attenuate Akt activation and trigger granule release and GPIIb/IIIa activation via protein kinase C-α. L5 but not L1 induced tissue factor and P-selectin expression in human aortic ECs (P < .01), thereby triggering platelet activation and aggregation with activated ECs. These findings indicate that elevated plasma levels of L5 may promote thrombosis that leads to STEMI. PMID:24030386

  19. Treatment of Platelet Concentrates with the Mirasol Pathogen Inactivation System Modulates Platelet Oxidative Stress and NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lacey; Marks, Denese

    2015-01-01

    Background Pathogen inactivation (PI) technologies for platelets aim to improve transfusion safety by preventing the replication of contaminating pathogens. However, as a consequence of treatment, aspects of the platelet storage lesion are amplified. Mirasol treatment also affects platelet signal transduction and apoptotic protein expression. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Mirasol treatment on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent oxidative stress. Methods Pooled platelet concentrates were prepared in platelet-additive solution (70% SSP+ / 30% plasma). ABO-matched platelets were pooled and split, and treated with the Mirasol system (TerumoBCT) or left untreated as a control. Platelet samples were tested on day 1, 5, and 7 post-collection. Results Mirasol-treated platelets had increased formation of ROS by day 5 of storage. Oxidative damage, in the form of protein carbonylation, was higher in Mirasol-treated platelets, whilst no effect on nitrotyrosine formation or lipid peroxidation was detected. The NF-κB signaling pathway was also activated in Mirasol-treated platelets, with increased expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and IκBα. Conclusion These data demonstrate that Mirasol-treated platelets produce more ROS and display protein alterations consistent with oxidative damage. PMID:26195930

  20. Influence of gold nanoparticles on platelets functional activity in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, George G.; Ivanov, Alexey N.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Terentyuk, George S.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolay G.

    2008-02-01

    Now in the leading biomedical centers of the world approved new technology of laser photothermal destruction of cancer cells using plasmon gold nanoparticles. Investigations of influence of gold nanoparticles on white rat platelets aggregative activity in vitro have been made. Platelet aggregation was investigated in platelet rich plasma (PRP) with help of laser analyzer 230 LA <>, Russia). Aggregation inductor was ADP solution in terminal concentration 2.5 micromole (<>, Russia). Gold nanoshells soluted in salt solution were used for experiments. Samples of PRP were incubated with 50 or 100 μl gold nanoshells solution in 5 minute, after that we made definition ADP induced platelet aggregation. We found out increase platelet function activity after incubation with nanoparticles solution which shown in maximum ADP-induced aggregation degree increase. Increase platelet function activity during intravenous nanoshells injection can be cause of thrombosis on patients. That's why before clinical application of cancer cell destruction based on laser photothermal used with plasmon gold nanoparticles careful investigations of thrombosis process and detail analyze of physiological blood parameters are very necessary.

  1. Von Willebrand factor availability in platelet concentrates stored for 5 days.

    PubMed

    Cesar, J M; García-Avello, A; Monteagudo, J; Espinosa, J I; Lodos, J C; Castillo, R; Navarro, J L

    1994-02-01

    Von Willebrand factor (vWF) availability was assessed in platelet concentrates (PCs). After 5 days of storage, 82 +/- 9% of basal levels of ristocetin cofactor activity (vWF:RCo) remained in PCs. vWF antigen (vWF:Ag) increased up to 166 +/- 38% (P < 0.05) in the same period. Autoradiograph pattern of vW:Ag showed an increase in low molecular weight multimers, and fast migrating multimeric forms were visualized by crossed immunoelectrophoresis on day 5. Studies carried out in platelet free plasma stored as PCs showed similar changes in vWF:RCo but increments in vWF:Ag were not detected. These data indicate that PCs maintain vWF:RCo levels of clinical value even after 5 days of storage and suggest that vWF comes out from platelets to plasma during storage. PMID:8141116

  2. Inhibition of platelet-aggregating activity in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura plasma by normal adult immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Lian, E C; Mui, P T; Siddiqui, F A; Chiu, A Y; Chiu, L L

    1984-01-01

    Plasma from patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) caused the aggregation of autologous and homologous platelets, and effect which was inhibited by normal plasma. IgG purified from seven normal adults at a concentration of 0.7 mg/ml completely inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by plasma obtained from two TTP patients with active disease. The inhibition of platelet aggregation by human adult IgG was concentration dependent, and the inhibitory activity of human IgG was neutralized by rabbit antihuman IgG. Fab fragments inhibited the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation as well as intact IgG, whereas Fc fragments had no effect. Platelet aggregation caused by ADP, collagen, epinephrine, or thrombin was not affected by purified human IgG. The prior incubation of IgG with TTP plasma caused a significantly greater reduction of platelet aggregation by TTP plasma than that of IgG and platelet suspension, suggesting that the IgG inhibits TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation through direct interaction with platelet aggregating factor in TTP plasma. IgG obtained initially from five infants and young children under the age of 4 yr did not possess any inhibitory activity. When one of the children reached 3 yr of age, his IgG inhibited the aggregation induced by one TTP plasma, but not that caused by another plasma. The IgG procured from the same boy at 4 yr of age inhibited the aggregation induced by both TTP plasmas. The IgG purified from the TTP plasma during active disease failed to inhibit the aggregation caused by the same plasma. After recovery, however, the IgG effectively inhibited aggregation. These observations suggest that platelet-aggregating factors present in the TTP plasma are heterogeneous in nature and that the IgG present in the normal adult plasma, which inhibits the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation, may be partially responsible for the success of plasma infusion therapy in TTP. Images PMID:6538207

  3. Metabolic Plasticity in Resting and Thrombin Activated Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Saranya; Chacko, Balu; Sawada, Hirotaka; Kramer, Philip A.; Johnson, Michelle S.; Benavides, Gloria A.; O’Donnell, Valerie; Marques, Marisa B.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet thrombus formation includes several integrated processes involving aggregation, secretion of granules, release of arachidonic acid and clot retraction, but it is not clear which metabolic fuels are required to support these events. We hypothesized that there is flexibility in the fuels that can be utilized to serve the energetic and metabolic needs for resting and thrombin-dependent platelet aggregation. Using platelets from healthy human donors, we found that there was a rapid thrombin-dependent increase in oxidative phosphorylation which required both glutamine and fatty acids but not glucose. Inhibition of fatty acid oxidation or glutamine utilization could be compensated for by increased glycolytic flux. No evidence for significant mitochondrial dysfunction was found, and ATP/ADP ratios were maintained following the addition of thrombin, indicating the presence of functional and active mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation during the early stages of aggregation. Interestingly, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation and glutaminolysis alone or in combination is not sufficient to prevent platelet aggregation, due to compensation from glycolysis, whereas inhibitors of glycolysis inhibited aggregation approximately 50%. The combined effects of inhibitors of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation were synergistic in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. In summary, both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation contribute to platelet metabolism in the resting and activated state, with fatty acid oxidation and to a smaller extent glutaminolysis contributing to the increased energy demand. PMID:25875958

  4. Effects of Rivaroxaban on Platelet Activation and Platelet–Coagulation Pathway Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Heitmeier, Stefan; Laux, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activation of coagulation and platelets is closely linked, and arterial thrombosis involves coagulation activation as well as platelet activation and aggregation. In these studies, we investigated the possible synergistic effects of rivaroxaban in combination with antiplatelet agents on thrombin generation and platelet aggregation in vitro and on arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in rat models. Materials and Methods: Thrombin generation was measured by the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram method (0.5 pmol/L tissue factor) using human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) spiked with rivaroxaban (15, 30, or 60 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1.0 µg/mL), and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 100 µg/mL). Tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation was measured in PRP spiked with rivaroxaban (15 or 30 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1 or 3 µg/mL), or a combination of these. An arteriovenous (AV) shunt model in rats was used to determine the effects of rivaroxaban (0.01, 0.03, or 0.1 mg/kg), clopidogrel (1 mg/kg), ASA (3 mg/kg), and combinations on arterial thrombosis. Results: Rivaroxaban inhibited thrombin generation in a concentration-dependent manner and the effect was enhanced with ticagrelor and ticagrelor plus ASA. Rivaroxaban and ticagrelor also concentration-dependently inhibited tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation, and their combination increased the inhibition synergistically. In the AV shunt model, rivaroxaban dose-dependently reduced thrombus formation. Combining subefficacious or weakly efficacious doses of rivaroxaban with ASA or ASA plus clopidogrel increased the antithrombotic effect. Conclusion: These data indicate that the combination of rivaroxaban with single or dual antiplatelet agents works synergistically to reduce platelet activation, which may in turn lead to the delayed/reduced formation of coagulation complexes and vice versa, thereby enhancing antithrombotic potency. PMID:25848131

  5. Collagen-induced binding to human platelets of platelet-derived growth factor leading to inhibition of P43 and P20 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Bryckaert, M.C.; Rendu, F.; Tobelem, G.; Wasteson, A.

    1989-03-15

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is known to inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Collagen-induced binding of /sup 125/I-PDGF to human washed platelets was therefore investigated. It was found to be time-dependent, reaching a plateau at 20 degrees C after 30 min, collagen concentration-dependent, specifically inhibited by unlabeled PDGF, and saturable. Scatchard plot analysis showed a single class of sites with 3000 +/- 450 molecules bound/cell and an apparent KD of 1.2 +/- 0.2 10(-8) M. The effects of PDGF on collagen-induced phosphoinositide breakdown and protein phosphorylation were also investigated. At 50 ng/ml PDGF, a concentration which completely inhibited collagen-induced aggregation, the breakdown of (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) and (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) was observed, but the subsequent replenishment of (/sup 32/P)PIP2 was inhibited. The same PDGF concentration totally inhibited collagen-induced phosphatidic acid formation. PDGF also completely prevented phosphorylation of P43 and P20, as a result of protein kinase C activation consecutive to phosphoinositide metabolism. These results suggest that a specific PDGF receptor can be induced by collagen, and PDGF can effect the early events of collagen-induced platelet activation by inhibiting PIP2 resynthesis and P43 and P20 phosphorylation. It is concluded that PDGF might be involved in a negative feed-back control of platelet activation.

  6. The novel platelet activation receptor CLEC-2.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Inoue, Osamu; Ozaki, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The c-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) was first identified from a bio-informatic screen for c-type lectin-like receptors. However, neither its function nor its ligand(s) had been elucidated for several years. In 2006, we reported that the receptor is expressed on the surface of platelets and serves as a receptor for the snake venom rhodocytin, which potently stimulates platelet aggregation. Since then CLEC-2 has been intensively investigated, and its endogenous/exogenous ligands and several physiological/pathological roles have been clarified. In this article and its accompanying poster, we outline the structure, distribution, signal transduction mechanism and functions of CLEC-2. PMID:21714702

  7. Rapid in vitro biocompatibility assay of endovascular stents by flow cytometry using platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation.

    PubMed

    Tárnok, A; Mahnke, A; Müller, M; Zotz, R J

    1999-02-15

    Clinical studies suggest that stent design and surface texture are responsible for differences in biocompatibility of metallic endovascular stents. A simple in vitro experimental setup was established to test stent-induced degree of platelet and leukocyte activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation by flow cytometry. Heparin-coated tantalum stents and gold-coated and uncoated stainless steel stents were tested. Stents were implanted into silicone tubes and exposed to blood from healthy volunteers. Platelet and leukocyte activation and percentage of leukocyte-platelet aggregates were determined in a whole-blood assay by subsequent staining for activation-associated antigens (CD41a, CD42b, CD62p, and fibrinogen binding) and leukocyte antigens (CD14 and CD45) and flow cytometric analysis. Blood taken directly after venous puncture or exposed to the silicone tube alone was used as negative controls. Positive control was in vitro stimulation with thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP-6). Low degree of platelet activation and significant increase in monocyte- and neutrophil-platelet aggregation were observed in blood exposed to stents (P < 0.05). In addition, leukocyte activation was induced as measured by increased CD45 and CD14 expression. Heparin coated stents continuously induced less platelet activation and leukocyte-platelet aggregation than uncoated stainless steel stents of the same length and shorter stents of the same structure. Stent surface coating and texture plays a role in platelet and leukocyte activation and leukocyte-platelet aggregation. Using this simple in vitro assay and whole blood and flow cytometry, it seems possible to differentiate stents by their potency to activate platelets and/or leukocytes. This assay could be applied for improving the biocompatibility of coronary stents. PMID:10088974

  8. P-selectin increases angiotensin II-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis via platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    LIU, GAIZHEN; LIANG, BIN; SONG, XIAOSU; BAI, RUI; QIN, WEIWEI; SUN, XU; LU, YAN; BIAN, YUNFEI; XIAO, CHUANSHI

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation is important in hypertension-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin expression significantly (P<0.05) increases when platelets are activated during hypertension. Although P-selectin recruits leukocytes to sites of inflammation, the role of P-selectin in cardiac inflammation and fibrosis remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate whether platelet-derived P-selectin promotes hypertensive cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin knockout (P-sel KO) mice and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 littermates were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) at 1,500 ng/kg/min for 7 days and then cross-transplanted with platelets originating from either WT or P-sel KO mice. P-selectin expression was increased in the myocardium and plasma of hypertensive mice, and the P-sel KO mice exhibited significantly (P<0.05) reduced cardiac fibrosis. The fibrotic areas were markedly smaller in the hearts of P-sel KO mice compared with WT mice, as assessed by Masson's trichrome staining. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) expression levels were decreased in the P-sel KO mice, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Following platelet transplantation into P-sel KO mice, the number of Mac-2 (galectin-3)- and TGF-β1-positive cells was increased in mice that received WT platelets compared with those that received P-sel KO platelets, and the mRNA expression levels of collagen I and TGF-β1 were also increased. The results from the present study suggest that activated platelets secrete P-selectin to promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in Ang II-induced hypertension. PMID:27121797

  9. Bryostatins activate protein kinase C in intact human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.B.; Tallant, E.A.; Pettit, G.R.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    Bryostatins, macrocyclic lactones isolated from a marine bryozoan, have antineoplastic activity in the P388 lymphocytic leukemia system. These compounds also stimulate growth in Swiss 3T3 cells, induce secretion in leukocytes, inhibit phorbol dibutyrate binding to a high affinity receptor, and activate the C-kinase in vitro. In human platelets, phorbol esters induce aggregation and activate protein kinase C, resulting in phosphorylation of a 47K protein and the 20K myosin light chain. The authors now show that bryostatin 7 (B-7) triggers platelet aggregation to the same rate and extent as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). B-7 also causes the in vivo activation of the C-kinase, resulting in phosphorylation of both the 47K and the 20K proteins; the time courses and dose-responses of these B-7-induced phosphorylations were similar to those found with PMA. In addition, B-7 increases the level of /sup 32/P-incorporation into the platelet polyphosphoinositides, which also occurs in response to PMA. Bryostatin 3 (B-3), which has been shown to be much less potent than B-7 in mimicking other PMA effects, was much less effective than PMA or B-7 in inducing platelet aggregation and in stimulating /sup 32/P-incorporation into both proteins and the phosphoinositides. These results demonstrate that, intact human platelets, bryostatins mimic the phorbol esters tumor promoters and directly activate protein kinase C.

  10. Flow cytometric analysis of platelet activation under calcium ion-chelating conditions.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, T; Yokota, M; Tsuda, I; Tatsumi, N

    2002-04-01

    Platelet activation and aggregation results in factitious counting and sizing in routine haematology testing. In this study, the possibility of platelet activation in anticoagulated solutions was examined. Whole blood was examined using an automated counter and a flow cytometer before and after strong vortex agitation. Blood treated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) exhibited platelet activation both pre- and postagitation but activated platelets did not cause platelet aggregation. With sodium citrate, platelets were only minimally activated both pre- and postagitation. Heparin-treated blood exhibited minimal platelet activation preagitation, but agitation resulted in strong platelet activation and aggregation. Platelet size was increased by agitation in blood with EDTA and with sodium citrate, in association with significant increases in mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW), but MPV and PDW were significantly higher in EDTA solution than in sodium citrate solution. Change in platelet size was observed even in the presence of EDTA, indicating that careful sampling and processing are needed in the collection of specimens. Specimens obtained from patients with EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia exhibited the same level of activation as controls, although platelets exhibited aggregation in such specimens. In conclusion, platelet activation involving platelet size change can occur in the absence of calcium ions in blood treated with EDTA. PMID:11985558

  11. Platelet factor 4 limits Th17 differentiation and cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guanfang; Field, David J; Ko, Kyung-ae; Ture, Sara; Srivastava, Kalyan; Levy, Scott; Kowalska, M Anna; Poncz, Mortimer; Fowell, Deborah J; Morrell, Craig N

    2014-02-01

    Th cells are the major effector cells in transplant rejection and can be divided into Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg subsets. Th differentiation is controlled by transcription factor expression, which is driven by positive and negative cytokine and chemokine stimuli at the time of T cell activation. Here we discovered that chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) is a negative regulator of Th17 differentiation. PF4-deficient and platelet-deficient mice had exaggerated immune responses to cardiac transplantation, including increased numbers of infiltrating Th17 cells and increased plasma IL-17. Although PF4 has been described as a platelet-specific molecule, we found that activated T cells also express PF4. Furthermore, bone marrow transplantation experiments revealed that T cell-derived PF4 contributes to a restriction in Th17 differentiation. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate that PF4 is a key regulator of Th cell development that is necessary to limit Th17 differentiation. These data likely will impact our understanding of platelet-dependent regulation of T cell development, which is important in many diseases, in addition to transplantation. PMID:24463452

  12. Regulation of platelet activating factor synthesis: modulation of 1-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in rat spleen microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lenihan, D.J.; Lee, T.C.

    1984-05-16

    1-Alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase plays an important regulatory role in the biosynthesis of platelet activating factor, a potent bioactive mediator. The authors tested the hypothesis that the activity of acetyltransferase may be modulated by enzymatic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The results showed that acetyltransferase activity in rat spleens was 2- to 3-fold higher in microsomes isolated in the presence of F/sup -/ than in those isolated in the presence of Cl/sup -/. The microsomal acetyltransferase could be activated by preincubation of microsomes, isolated in the presence of Cl/sup -/, with ATP, Mg/sup 2 +/, and the soluble fraction from rat spleen. Addition of phosphatidylserine, diacylglycerols, plus Ca/sup 2 +/ further enhanced the activity. The increase in the activity of acetyltranferase was abolished by treatment of the activated microsomes with alkaline phosphatase. Conversely, the activity of acetyltransferase can be reactivated in the alkaline phosphatase-treated microsomes with incubation conditions that favor phosphorylation. Therefore, the findings suggest that acetyltransferase activity is regulated by reversible activation/inactivation through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation.

  13. Effects of class I heparin binding growth factor and fibronectin on platelet adhesion and aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Greisler, H.P.; Klosak, J.J.; Steinam, S.J.; Lam, T.M.; Burgess, W.H.; Kim, D.U. )

    1990-05-01

    Fibronectin and heparin binding growth factor-type 1 have been affixed to vascular graft surfaces to enhance the attachment and the proliferation of transplanted endothelial cells, respectively. The current study examines the effect of fibronectin and heparin binding growth factor-type 1 on platelet adhesion and activation in vivo and on platelet aggregation in vitro. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene prostheses (5 cm x 4 mm internal diameter) were treated either with fibronectin (n = 9), fibronectin/heparin/heparin binding growth factor-type 1/heparin (n = 12), or neither (n = 13) and were interposed into canine aortoiliac systems bilaterally. Autogenous radiolabeled (Indium 111 oxine, 650 microCi) platelets were injected intravenously before reestablishment of circulation. Perfusion was maintained for 30 minutes, and prostheses were removed with segments of native aorta and distal iliac arteries bilaterally. Specimens were examined for thrombus-free surface area, by gamma well counting for adherent radiolabeled platelets, and by light microscopy and transmission and scanning electron microscopic techniques. Results showed that both the fibronectin and fibronectin/heparin/heparin binding growth factor-type 1/heparin pretreated prostheses contained significantly greater numbers of platelets and adherent radioactivity than did control graft segments when normalized to their ipsilateral iliac arteries. Fibronectin/heparin/heparin binding growth factor-type 1/heparin pretreated prostheses contained 27 +/- 16 times more radioactivity per square millimeter than ipsilateral iliac arteries, fibronectin pretreated prostheses had 13 +/- 8 times more radioactivity per square millimeter than ipsilateral iliac arteries, and untreated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene had 4 +/- 3 times more radioactivity per square millimeter than ipsilateral iliac arteries.

  14. Resolvin E1 Regulates ADP Activation of Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fredman, Gabrielle; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Resolvin E1 (RvE1) is an eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-derived specialized pro-resolving mediator generated during resolution of acute inflammation. RvE1 exhibits potent organ-protective actions in vivo and acts on specific cell types including platelets. Here, we investigated the ability of RvE1 to regulate adenosine diphosphate (ADP) activation of platelets via specific receptors because RvE1 reduces platelet aggregation with certain agonists including ADP. Methods and Results RvE1 (0.1nM–100nM) incubated with platelets gave reduced ADP-stimulated P-selectin mobilization (IC50 ~1.6×10−12 M) and polymerized actin content compared to control platelets. RvE1 (1–100nM) did not stimulate or block intracellular calcium mobilization. Using a new P2Y12-β-arrestin-coupled cell system, ADP-activated P2Y12 with an EC50 of 5×10−6 M and RvE1 did not directly stimulate P2Y12 or block ADP-P2Y12 signals. In this system, another eicosanoid LTE4 (EC50 1.3×10−11 M) dose dependently activated P2Y12. When recombinant P2Y12-expressing cells were transiently transfected with an RvE1 receptor, human ChemR23 (present on human platelets), addition of RvE1 (0.1nM-10.0nM) blocked ADP signals (IC50 ~1.6×10−11 M) in P2Y12-ChemR23-expressing cells compared to mock transfections. Conclusions These results demonstrate that RvE1’s regulatory actions (i.e reducing ADP-stimulated P-selectin mobilization and actin polymerization) are hChemR23-dependent. Moreover, they document specific platelet actions of RvE1 selectively engaged with ADP-activated platelets that illuminate a new cellular mechanism and impact of omega-3 EPA that may contribute to both resolution of vascular inflammation and ADP-dependent platelet activation relevant in pathologic cardiovascular events. PMID:20702811

  15. Platelet activating factor-acylhydrolase (PAF-ase) activity is higher in serum of men than women and is related to levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL)

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, R.S.; Howell, S.E.; Wardlow, M.L.

    1986-03-05

    PAF-ase is a specific serum enzyme that inactivates PAF by hydrolyzing acetate from the sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone. A reproducible PAF-ase activity assay was developed. A unit is based on the amount of serum required to release 3.61 +/- 0.042 pm /sup 3/H-acetate from 10 pm /sup 3/H-labeled PAF after incubation for 1 hr at 37/sup 0/C. Assays on two single reference serums repeated 7 days were 0.63 +/- 0.013 U and 1.33 +/- 0.031 U. Serum from 20 normal men and 20 normal premenopausal women had significantly different (p = <0.001) levels of 1.32 +/- 0.072 U and 0.97 +/- 0.051 U respectively. They previously reported that PAF-ase is associated with B-lipoprotein. Therefore, total cholesterol (TC), LDL and high density lipoproteins (HDL) were determined on these 40 serums. Regression analysis revealed PAF-ase units were correlated with LDL (r = 0.740; p = < 0.001) and, parenthetically, with the TC (r = 0.620; p = < 0.001) but not with HDL. These correlations were similar for men and women. Thus, serum PAF-ase was partially controlled by serum LDL levels and the higher PAF-ase levels in serum from men were due in part to higher (p = < 0.01) LDL levels in men (147.6 +/- 6.9 mg/dl) as contrasted to women (119.0 +/- 7.6 mg/dl). PAF is a potent inflammatory, bronchoconstrictive and hypotensive agent. These data indicate that sex and serum LDL levels of subjects must be considered during future studies of the role of PAF vs PAF-ase in different disease states.

  16. Arf6 plays an early role in platelet activation by collagen and convulxin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wangsun; Karim, Zubair A; Whiteheart, Sidney W

    2006-04-15

    Small GTPases play critical roles in hemostasis, though the roster of such molecules in platelets is not complete. In this study, we report the presence of Ras-related GTPases of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family. Platelets contain Arf1 or 3 and Arf6, with the latter being predominantly membrane associated. Using effector domain pull-down assays, we show, counter to other GTPases, that Arf6-GTP is present in resting platelets and decreases rapidly upon activation with collagen or convulxin. This decrease does not completely rely on secondary agonists (ADP and thromboxane A2) or require integrin signaling. The decrease in free Arf6-GTP temporally precedes activation of Rho family GTPases (RhoA, Cdc42, and Rac1). Using a membrane-permeant, myristoylated peptide, which mimics the N-terminus of Arf6, we show that the Arf6-GTP decrease is essential for collagen- and convulxin-induced aggregation, platelet adherence, and spreading on collagen-coated glass. Treatment with this peptide also affects the activation of Rho family GTPases, but has little effect on RalA and Rap1 or on agonist-induced calcium mobilization. These data show that Arf6 is a key element in activation through GPVI, and is required for activation of the Rho family GTPases and the subsequent cytoskeletal rearrangements needed for full platelet function. PMID:16352809

  17. Anti-platelet activity of erythro-(7S,8R)-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetramethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan from Myristica fragrans.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung Won; Min, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Platelets play a critical role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders and strokes. The inhibition of platelet function is beneficial for the treatment and prevention of these diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-platelet activity of erythro-(7S,8R)-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetramethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (EATN), a neolignan isolated from Myristica fragrans, using human platelets. EATN preferentially inhibited thrombin- and platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced platelet aggregation without affecting platelet damage in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 3.2 ± 0.4 and 3.4 ± 0.3 μM, respectively. However, much higher concentrations of EATN were required to inhibit platelet aggregation induced by arachidonic acid. EATN also inhibited thrombin-induced serotonin and ATP release, and thromboxane B2 formation in human platelets. Moreover, EATN caused an increase in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and attenuated intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in thrombin-activated human platelets. Therefore, we conclude that the inhibitory mechanism of EATN on platelet aggregation may increase cAMP levels and subsequently inhibit intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization by interfering with a common signaling pathway rather than by directly inhibiting the binding of thrombin or PAF to their receptors. This is the first report of the anti-platelet activity of EATN isolated from M. fragrans. PMID:23296979

  18. Microfluidic assay of hemophilic blood clotting: Distinct deficits in platelet and fibrin deposition at low factor levels

    PubMed Central

    Colace, T.; Fogarty, Patrick F.; Panckeri, Karen A.; Li, Ruizhi; Diamond, S.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor deficiencies create a range of bleeding phenotypes. Microfluidic devices offer controlled hemodynamics and defined procoagulant triggers for measurement of clotting under flow. Objectives We tested a flow assay of contact pathway-triggered clotting to quantify platelet and fibrin deposition distal of dysfunctional thrombin production. Microfluidic metrics were then compared with PTT or % factor activity assays. Methods Whole blood (WB) treated with low level corn trypsin inhibitor (4 µg/ml) from 9 healthy donors and 27 patients [deficient in: Factor VIII (19 patients); IX (1); XI (1); VWF (6)] was perfused over fibrillar collagen at wall shear rate=100 s−1. Results Using healthy WB, platelets deposited within 30 sec, while fibrin appeared within 6 min. Compared to healthy controls, WB from patients displayed a 50% reduction in platelet deposition only at <1 % factor activity. In contrast, striking defects in fibrin deposition occurred for patients with <13% factor activity (or PTT >40 sec). Full occlusion of the 60-micron high channel was completely absent over the 15 min test in patients with <1% factor activity, while an intermediate defect was present in patients with >1% factor. Conclusion Spontaneous bleeding in patients with < 1% factor activity may be linked to deficits in both platelet and fibrin deposition, a risk known to be mitigated when factor levels are raised to >1 % activity (PTT of ~40–60 sec), a level that does not necessarily rescue fibrin formation under flow. PMID:24261634

  19. Molecular Imaging of Platelet-Endothelial Interactions and Endothelial Von Willebrand Factor In Early and Mid-Stage Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Chi Young; Liu, Ya Ni; Atkinson, Tamara; Xie, Aris; Foster, Ted; Davidson, Brian P.; Treible, Mackenzie; Qi, Yue; López, José A.; Munday, Adam; Ruggeri, Zaverio; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-thrombotic platelet-endothelial interactions may contribute to atherosclerotic plaque development, although in vivo studies examining mechanism without platelet pre-activation are lacking. Using in vivo molecular imaging at various stages of atherosclerosis, we quantified platelet-endothelial interactions and evaluated the contribution of major adhesion pathways. Methods and Results Mice deficient for the LDL-receptor and Apobec-1 were studied as an age-dependent model of atherosclerosis at 10, 20, 30, and 40 wks of age, which provided progressive increase in stage from very early fatty streak (10 wks) to large complex plaques without rupture (40 wks). Platelet-targeted contrast ultrasound molecular imaging of the thoracic aorta performed with microbubbles targeted to GPIbα demonstrated selective signal enhancement as early as 10 weeks of age. This signal increased progressively with age (almost 8-fold increase from 10 to 40 weeks, ANOVA p<0.001). Specificity for platelet targeting was confirmed by the reduction in platelet-targeted signal commensurate with the decrease in platelet count after immunodepletion with anti-GPIb or anti-CD41 antibody. Inhibition of P-selectin in 20 and 40 wk atherosclerotic mice resulted in a small (15-30%) reduction in platelet signal. Molecular imaging with microbubbles targeted to the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor (VWF) demonstrated selective signal enhancement at all time points which did not significantly increase with age. Treatment of 20 and 40 week mice with recombinant ADAMTS13 eliminated platelet and VWF molecular imaging signal. Conclusions Platelet-endothelial interactions occur in early atherosclerosis. These interactions are in part due to endothelial VWF large multimers which can be reversed with exogenous ADAMTS13. PMID:26156014

  20. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    SciTech Connect

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C.; Sudano, Isabella; Luescher, Thomas F.; Camici, Giovanni G.

    2010-01-22

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 {+-} 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% {+-} 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 {+-} 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  1. gamma. -hexachlorocyclohexane (. gamma. -HCH) activates washed rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Lalau-Keraly, C.; Delautier, D.; Benveniste, J.; Puiseux-Dao, S.

    1986-03-01

    In guinea-pig macrophages, ..gamma..-HCH triggers activation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle and Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization. Since these two biochemical events are also involved in platelet activation, the authors examined the effects of ..gamma..-HCH on washed rabbit platelets. Release of /sup 14/C-serotonin (/sup 14/C-5HT) and ATP from platelets prelabelled with /sup 14/C-5HT was measured simultaneously with aggregation. ..gamma..-HCH induced shape-change, aggregation and release reaction of platelets. Maximal aggregation (89 arbitrary units, AU), was observed using 170 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH, and was associated with 38.1 +/- 6.9% and 161 +/- 48 nM for /sup 14/C-5HT and ATP release respectively (mean +/- 1 SD, n=3). Using 80 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH yielded 18 AU, 12.8 +/- 1.0% and 27 +/- 14 nM for aggregation, C-5HT and ATP release respectively (n=3). No effect was observed with 40 ..mu.. M ..gamma..-HCH. Aspirin (ASA), a cyclooxygenase blocker, did not affect ..gamma..-HCH-induced platelet activation. Apyrase (APY), an ADP scavenger, inhibited by 90% aggregation induced by 170 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH and slightly inhibited (15%) the /sup 14/C-5HT release. In the presence of both ASA and APY, 96% inhibition of aggregation and 48% inhibition of /sup 14/C-5HT release were observed. Thus, ..gamma..-HCH induced platelet activation in a dose-dependent manner ADP, but not cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonate metabolites, is involved in ..gamma..-HCH-induced aggregation, whereas, both appear to play a role in ..gamma..-HCH-induced release reaction.

  2. Platelet receptor recognition and cross-talk in collagen-induced activation of platelets.

    PubMed

    Farndale, R W; Slatter, D A; Siljander, P R-M; Jarvis, G E

    2007-07-01

    Comprehensive mapping of protein-binding sites within human collagen III has allowed the recognition motifs for integrin alpha(2)beta(1) and VWF A3 domain to be identified. Glycoprotein VI-binding sites are understood, although less well defined. This information, together with recent developments in understanding collagen fiber architecture, and crystal structures of the receptor collagen-binding domains, allows a coherent model for the interaction of collagen with the platelet surface to be developed. This complements our understanding of the orchestration of receptor presentation by membrane microdomains, such that the polyvalent collagen surface may stabilize signaling complexes within the heterogeneous receptor composition of the lipid raft. The ensuing interactions lead to the convergence of signals from each of the adhesive receptors, mediated by FcR gamma-chain and/or FcgammaRIIa, leading to concerted and co-operative platelet activation. Each receptor has a shear-dependent role, VWF/GpIb essential at high shear, and alpha(2)beta(1) at low and intermediate shear, whilst GpVI provides core signals that contribute to enhanced integrin affinity, tighter binding to collagen and consequent platelet activation. PMID:17635730

  3. Platelets Contain Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-2 Derived from Megakaryocytes and Inhibits Fibrinolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Vadivel, Kanagasabai; Ponnuraj, Sathya-Moorthy; Kumar, Yogesh; Zaiss, Anne K.; Bunce, Matthew W.; Camire, Rodney M.; Wu, Ling; Evseenko, Denis; Herschman, Harvey R.; Bajaj, Madhu S.; Bajaj, S. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) is a homologue of TFPI-1 and contains three Kunitz-type domains and a basic C terminus region. The N-terminal domain of TFPI-2 is the only inhibitory domain, and it inhibits plasma kallikrein, factor XIa, and plasmin. However, plasma TFPI-2 levels are negligible (≤20 pm) in the context of influencing clotting or fibrinolysis. Here, we report that platelets contain significant amounts of TFPI-2 derived from megakaryocytes. We employed RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and confocal microscopy to determine that platelets, MEG-01 megakaryoblastic cells, and bone marrow megakaryocytes contain TFPI-2. ELISA data reveal that TFPI-2 binds factor V (FV) and partially B-domain-deleted FV (FV-1033) with Kd ∼9 nm and binds FVa with Kd ∼100 nm. Steady state analysis of surface plasmon resonance data reveal that TFPI-2 and TFPI-1 bind FV-1033 with Kd ∼36–48 nm and bind FVa with Kd ∼252–456 nm. Further, TFPI-1 (but not TFPI-1161) competes with TFPI-2 in binding to FV. These data indicate that the C-terminal basic region of TFPI-2 is similar to that of TFPI-1 and plays a role in binding to the FV B-domain acidic region. Using pull-down assays and Western blots, we show that TFPI-2 is associated with platelet FV/FVa. TFPI-2 (∼7 nm) in plasma of women at the onset of labor is also, in part, associated with FV. Importantly, TFPI-2 in platelets and in plasma of pregnant women inhibits FXIa and tissue-type plasminogen activator-induced clot fibrinolysis. In conclusion, TFPI-2 in platelets from normal or pregnant subjects and in plasma from pregnant women binds FV/Va and regulates intrinsic coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:25262870

  4. Fibrin activates GPVI in human and mouse platelets.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Osama M; Hughes, Craig E; Montague, Samantha; Watson, Stephanie K; Frampton, Jon; Bender, Markus; Watson, Steve P

    2015-09-24

    The glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor γ (FcRγ) chain is the major platelet signaling receptor for collagen. Paradoxically, in a FeCl3 injury model, occlusion, but not initiation of thrombus formation, is delayed in GPVI-deficient and GPVI-depleted mice. In this study, we demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and speculate that this contributes to development of an occlusive thrombus. We observed a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, including the FcRγ chain and Syk, in human and mouse platelets induced by thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 blocker eptifibatide. This was not seen in platelets stimulated by a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide, which is unable to generate fibrin from fibrinogen. The pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was similar to that induced by activation of GPVI. Consistent with this, thrombin did not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and the FcRγ chain in GPVI-deficient mouse platelets. Mouse platelets underwent full spreading on fibrin but not fibrinogen, which was blocked in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor or in the absence of GPVI. Spreading on fibrin was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure (procoagulant activity), and this too was blocked in GPVI-deficient platelets. The ectodomain of GPVI was shown to bind to immobilized monomeric and polymerized fibrin. A marked increase in embolization was seen following FeCl3 injury in GPVI-deficient mice, likely contributing to the delay in occlusion in this model. These results demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and provide evidence that this interaction contributes to thrombus growth and stability. PMID:26282541

  5. Fibrin activates GPVI in human and mouse platelets

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Osama M.; Montague, Samantha; Watson, Stephanie K.; Frampton, Jon; Bender, Markus; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    The glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor γ (FcRγ) chain is the major platelet signaling receptor for collagen. Paradoxically, in a FeCl3 injury model, occlusion, but not initiation of thrombus formation, is delayed in GPVI-deficient and GPVI-depleted mice. In this study, we demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and speculate that this contributes to development of an occlusive thrombus. We observed a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, including the FcRγ chain and Syk, in human and mouse platelets induced by thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 blocker eptifibatide. This was not seen in platelets stimulated by a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide, which is unable to generate fibrin from fibrinogen. The pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was similar to that induced by activation of GPVI. Consistent with this, thrombin did not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and the FcRγ chain in GPVI-deficient mouse platelets. Mouse platelets underwent full spreading on fibrin but not fibrinogen, which was blocked in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor or in the absence of GPVI. Spreading on fibrin was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure (procoagulant activity), and this too was blocked in GPVI-deficient platelets. The ectodomain of GPVI was shown to bind to immobilized monomeric and polymerized fibrin. A marked increase in embolization was seen following FeCl3 injury in GPVI-deficient mice, likely contributing to the delay in occlusion in this model. These results demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and provide evidence that this interaction contributes to thrombus growth and stability. PMID:26282541

  6. P‑selectin increases angiotensin II‑induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis via platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gaizhen; Liang, Bin; Song, Xiaosu; Bai, Rui; Qin, Weiwei; Sun, Xu; Lu, Yan; Bian, Yunfei; Xiao, Chuanshi

    2016-06-01

    Platelet activation is important in hypertension‑induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin expression significantly (P<0.05) increases when platelets are activated during hypertension. Although P‑selectin recruits leukocytes to sites of inflammation, the role of P‑selectin in cardiac inflammation and fibrosis remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate whether platelet‑derived P‑selectin promotes hypertensive cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P‑selectin knockout (P‑sel KO) mice and wild‑type (WT) C57BL/6 littermates were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) at 1,500 ng/kg/min for 7 days and then cross‑transplanted with platelets originating from either WT or P‑sel KO mice. P‑selectin expression was increased in the myocardium and plasma of hypertensive mice, and the P‑sel KO mice exhibited significantly (P<0.05) reduced cardiac fibrosis. The fibrotic areas were markedly smaller in the hearts of P‑sel KO mice compared with WT mice, as assessed by Masson's trichrome staining. In addition, α‑smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF‑β1) expression levels were decreased in the P‑sel KO mice, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Following platelet transplantation into P‑sel KO mice, the number of Mac‑2 (galectin‑3)‑ and TGF‑β1‑positive cells was increased in mice that received WT platelets compared with those that received P‑sel KO platelets, and the mRNA expression levels of collagen I and TGF‑β1 were also increased. The results from the present study suggest that activated platelets secrete P‑selectin to promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in Ang II‑induced hypertension. PMID:27121797

  7. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced activation of Erk5 MAP-kinase is dependent on Mekk2, Mek1/2, PKC and PI3-kinase, and affects BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Tsioumpekou, Maria; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Burovic, Fatima; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lennartsson, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) binds to its tyrosine kinase receptors (PDGFRs) and stimulates mitogenicity and survival of cells of mesenchymal origin. Activation of PDGFRs initiates a number of downstream signaling pathways, including phosphatidyl 3'-inositol kinase (PI3-kinase), phospholipase Cγ and MAP kinase pathways. In this report, we show that Erk5 MAP kinase is activated in response to PDGF-BB in the smooth muscle cell line MOVAS in a manner dependent on Mekk2, Mek1/2, Mek5, PI3-kinase and protein kinase C (PKC). The co-operation of Mek1/2 and Mekk2 in the activation of Erk5, suggests a close co-regulation between the Erk1/2 and Erk5 MAP kinase pathways. Furthermore, we found that classical PKCs are important for Erk5 activation. In addition, we found that PKCζ interacts with Erk5 and may exert a negative feed-back effect. We observed no nuclear accumulation of Erk5 in response to PDGF-BB stimulation, however, we identified a mechanism by which cytoplasmic Erk5 influences gene expression; Erk5 was essential for PDGF-BB-mediated Smad1/5/8 signaling by stimulating release and/or activation of bone morphogenetic protein(s) (BMPs). Thus, PDGF-BB-induced Erk5 activation involves parallel stimulatory and inhibitory pathways and promotes Smad1/5/8 signaling. PMID:27339033

  8. Development of a novel scintillation proximity radiommunoassay for platelet-activating factor measurement: Comparison with bioassay and GD/MS techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sagatani, Junko; Saito, Kunihiko ); Lee, D.Y.; Hughes, K.T. )

    1990-01-01

    A novel, facile and sensitive scintillation proximity radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) for quantitation of PAF has been developed. No separation of antibody bound ({sup 3}H)PAF from free ({sup 3}H)PAF is required as the assay employs protein A - coated fluomicrospheres (beads containing scintillant). The assay system was suitable for the quantitation of 0.03 to 2 pmol of 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. The cross-reactivity was high with 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine but was very low with PAF analogs such as 1-alkyl- and 1-acyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-acyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and 1-alk-1{prime}-enyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and 1-alk-1{prime}-enyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. The specificity of SPRIA was higher than that of bioassay (platelet degranulation assay). PAF receptor antagonists (L-652,731, WEB2086, and FR900452) at up to 10 nmol per tube had no affect on the SPRIA. These observations indicate that the specificity of the PAF antibody is quite different from that of the platelet receptor. The values obtained using SPRIA for the measurement of PAF produced in polymorphonuclear leukocytes with stimuli are comparable to those obtained by SIM/GC/MS analysis.

  9. Endothelial Activation by Platelets from Sickle Cell Anemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Proença-Ferreira, Renata; Brugnerotto, Ana Flávia; Garrido, Vanessa Tonin; Dominical, Venina Marcela; Vital, Daiana Morelli; Ribeiro, Marilene de Fátima Reis; dos Santos, Melissa Ercolin; Traina, Fabíola; Olalla-Saad, Sara T.; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is associated with a hypercoagulable state. Increased platelet activation is reported in SCA and SCA platelets may present augmented adhesion to the vascular endothelium, potentially contributing to the vaso-occlusive process. We sought to observe the effects of platelets (PLTs) from healthy control (CON) individuals and SCA individuals on endothelial activation, in vitro. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured, in the presence, or not, of washed PLTs from CON or steady-state SCA individuals. Supernatants were reserved for cytokine quantification, and endothelial adhesion molecules (EAM) were analyzed by flow cytometry; gene expressions of ICAM1 and genes of the NF-κB pathway were analyzed by qPCR. SCA PLTs were found to be more inflammatory, displaying increased adhesive properties, an increased production of IL-1β and a tendency towards elevated expressions of P-selectin and activated αIIbβ3. Following culture in the presence of SCA PLTs, HUVEC presented significant augmentations in the expressions of the EAM, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, as well as increased IL-8 production and increased ICAM1 and NFKB1 (encodes p50 subunit of NF-κB) gene expressions. Interestingly, transwell inserts abolished the effects of SCA PLTs on EAM expression. Furthermore, an inhibitor of the NF-κB pathway, BAY 11-7082, also prevented the induction of EAM expression on the HUVEC surface by SCA PLTs. In conclusion, we find further evidence to indicate that platelets circulate in an activated state in sickle cell disease and are capable of stimulating endothelial cell activation. This effect appears to be mediated by direct contact, or even adhesion, between the platelets and endothelial cells and via NFκB-dependent signaling. As such, activated platelets in SCD may contribute to endothelial activation and, therefore, to the vaso-occlusive process. Results provide further evidence to support the use of anti-platelet approaches in association

  10. Endothelial activation by platelets from sickle cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Proença-Ferreira, Renata; Brugnerotto, Ana Flávia; Garrido, Vanessa Tonin; Dominical, Venina Marcela; Vital, Daiana Morelli; Ribeiro, Marilene de Fátima Reis; dos Santos, Melissa Ercolin; Traina, Fabíola; Olalla-Saad, Sara T; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is associated with a hypercoagulable state. Increased platelet activation is reported in SCA and SCA platelets may present augmented adhesion to the vascular endothelium, potentially contributing to the vaso-occlusive process. We sought to observe the effects of platelets (PLTs) from healthy control (CON) individuals and SCA individuals on endothelial activation, in vitro. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured, in the presence, or not, of washed PLTs from CON or steady-state SCA individuals. Supernatants were reserved for cytokine quantification, and endothelial adhesion molecules (EAM) were analyzed by flow cytometry; gene expressions of ICAM1 and genes of the NF-κB pathway were analyzed by qPCR. SCA PLTs were found to be more inflammatory, displaying increased adhesive properties, an increased production of IL-1β and a tendency towards elevated expressions of P-selectin and activated αIIbβ3. Following culture in the presence of SCA PLTs, HUVEC presented significant augmentations in the expressions of the EAM, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, as well as increased IL-8 production and increased ICAM1 and NFKB1 (encodes p50 subunit of NF-κB) gene expressions. Interestingly, transwell inserts abolished the effects of SCA PLTs on EAM expression. Furthermore, an inhibitor of the NF-κB pathway, BAY 11-7082, also prevented the induction of EAM expression on the HUVEC surface by SCA PLTs. In conclusion, we find further evidence to indicate that platelets circulate in an activated state in sickle cell disease and are capable of stimulating endothelial cell activation. This effect appears to be mediated by direct contact, or even adhesion, between the platelets and endothelial cells and via NFκB-dependent signaling. As such, activated platelets in SCD may contribute to endothelial activation and, therefore, to the vaso-occlusive process. Results provide further evidence to support the use of anti-platelet approaches in association

  11. Mediators and molecular pathways involved in the regulation of neutrophil extracellular trap formation mediated by activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Carestia, Agostina; Kaufman, Tomás; Rivadeneyra, Leonardo; Landoni, Verónica Inés; Pozner, Roberto Gabriel; Negrotto, Soledad; D'Atri, Lina Paola; Gómez, Ricardo Martín; Schattner, Mirta

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being key elements in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets amplify neutrophil function. We aimed to gain further insight into the stimuli, mediators, molecular pathways, and regulation of neutrophil extracellular trap formation mediated by human platelets. Platelets stimulated by lipopolysaccharide, a wall component of gram-negative bacteria, Pam3-cysteine-serine-lysine 4, a mimetic of lipopeptide from gram-positive bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, or physiologic platelet agonists promoting neutrophil extracellular trap formation and myeloperoxidase-associated DNA activity under static and flow conditions. Although P-selectin or glycoprotein IIb/IIIa were not involved, platelet glycoprotein Ib, neutrophil cluster of differentiation 18, and the release of von Willebrand factor and platelet factor 4 seemed to be critical for the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. The secretion of these molecules depended on thromboxane A(2) production triggered by lipopolysaccharide or Pam3-cysteine-serine-lysine 4 but not on high concentrations of thrombin. Accordingly, aspirin selectively inhibited platelet-mediated neutrophil extracellular trap generation. Signaling through extracellular signal-regulated kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and Src kinases, but not p38 or reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, was involved in platelet-triggered neutrophil extracellular trap release. Platelet-mediated neutrophil extracellular trap formation was inhibited by prostacyclin. Our results support a role for stimulated platelets in promoting neutrophil extracellular trap formation, reveal that an endothelium-derived molecule contributes to limiting neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and highlight platelet inhibition as a potential target for controlling neutrophil extracellular trap cell death. PMID:26320263

  12. Circulating but not immobilized N-deglycosylated von Willebrand factor increases platelet adhesion under flow conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, M. A.; Huck, V.; Niemeyer, V.; Desch, A.; Angerer, J. I.; McKinnon, T. A. J.; Wixforth, A.; Schneider, S. W.; Schneider, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    The role of von Willebrand factor (VWF) as a shear stress activated platelet adhesive has been related to a coiled-elongated shape conformation. The forces dominating this transition have been suggested to be controlled by the proteins polymeric architecture. However, the fact that 20% of VWF molecular weight originates from glycan moieties has so far been neglected in these calculations. In this study, we present a systematic experimental investigation on the role of N-glycosylation for VWF mediated platelet adhesion under flow. A microfluidic flow chamber with a stenotic compartment that allows one to mimic various physiological flow conditions was designed for the efficient analysis of the adhesion spectrum. Surprisingly, we found an increase in platelet adhesion with elevated shear rate, both qualitatively and quantitatively fully conserved when N-deglycosylated VWF (N-deg-VWF) instead of VWF was immobilized in the microfluidic channel. This has been demonstrated consistently over four orders of magnitude in shear rate. In contrast, when N-deg-VWF was added to the supernatant, an increase in adhesion rate by a factor of two was detected compared to the addition of wild-type VWF. It appears that once immobilized, the role of glycans is at least modified if not—as found here for the case of adhesion—negated. These findings strengthen the physical impact of the circulating polymer on shear dependent platelet adhesion events. At present, there is no theoretical explanation for an increase in platelet adhesion to VWF in the absence of its N-glycans. However, our data indicate that the effective solubility of the protein and hence its shape or conformation may be altered by the degree of glycosylation and is therefore a good candidate for modifying the forces required to uncoil this biopolymer. PMID:24404057

  13. In vitro platelet activation, aggregation and platelet-granulocyte complex formation induced by surface modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fent, János; Bihari, Péter; Vippola, Minnamari; Sarlin, Essi; Lakatos, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Surface modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) such as carboxylation, amidation, hydroxylation and pegylation is used to reduce the nanotube toxicity and render them more suitable for biomedical applications than their pristine counterparts. Toxicity can be manifested in platelet activation as it has been shown for SWCNTs. However, the effect of various surface modifications on the platelet activating potential of SWCNTs has not been tested yet. In vitro platelet activation (CD62P) as well as the platelet-granulocyte complex formation (CD15/CD41 double positivity) in human whole blood were measured by flow cytometry in the presence of 0.1mg/ml of pristine or various surface modified SWCNTs. The effect of various SWCNTs was tested by whole blood impedance aggregometry, too. All tested SWCNTs but the hydroxylated ones activate platelets and promote platelet-granulocyte complex formation in vitro. Carboxylated, pegylated and pristine SWCNTs induce whole blood aggregation as well. Although pegylation is preferred from biomedical point of view, among the samples tested by us pegylated SWCNTs induced far the most prominent activation and a well detectable aggregation of platelets in whole blood. PMID:25956790

  14. A novel mathematical model of activation and sensitization of platelets subjected to dynamic stress histories

    PubMed Central

    Soares, João S.; Sheriff, Jawaad

    2013-01-01

    Blood recirculating devices, such as ventricular assist devices and prosthetic heart valves, are burdened by thromboembolic complications requiring complex and lifelong anticoagulant therapy with its inherent hemorrhagic risks. Pathologic flow patterns occurring in such devices chronically activate platelets, and the optimization of their thrombogenic performance requires the development of flow-induced platelet activation models. However, existing models are based on empirical correlations using the well-established power law paradigm of constant levels of shear stress during certain exposure times as factors for mechanical platelet activation. These models are limited by their range of application and do not account for other relevant phenomena, such as loading rate dependence and platelet sensitization to high stress conditions, which characterize the dynamic flow conditions in devices. These limitations were addressed by developing a new class of phenomenological stress-induced platelet activation models that specifies the rate of platelet activation as a function of the entire stress history and results in a differential equation that can be directly integrated to calculate the cumulative levels of activation. The proposed model reverts to the power law under constant shear stress conditions and is able to describe experimental results in response to a diverse range of highly dynamic stress conditions found in blood recirculating devices. The model was tested in vitro under emulated device flow conditions and correlates well with experimental results. This new model provides a reliable and robust mathematical tool that can be incorporated into computational fluid dynamic studies in order to optimize design, with the goal of improving the thrombogenic performance of blood recirculating devices. PMID:23359062

  15. Carotid endarterectomy in patients with heparin-induced platelet activation: comparative efficacy of aspirin and iloprost (ZK36374).

    PubMed

    Kappa, J R; Cottrell, E D; Berkowitz, H D; Fisher, C A; Sobel, M; Ellison, N; Addonizio, V P

    1987-05-01

    Patients with heparin-induced platelet activation who are reexposed to heparin may have recurrent thrombocytopenia, intravascular thrombosis, arterial emboli, or sudden death. To permit carotid endarterectomy in two patients with confirmed heparin-induced platelet activation, we compared the efficacies of aspirin and iloprost, a stable analogue of prostacyclin, in preventing heparin-induced platelet activation. In the first patient, although aspirin prevented both in vitro heparin-induced platelet aggregation (70% without and 7.5% with aspirin) and 14C serotonin release (48% without and 0% with aspirin), intraoperative administration of heparin resulted in an increase in plasma levels of platelet factor 4 from 8 to 260 ng/ml and beta-thromboglobulin levels from 29 to 39 ng/ml. In addition, the circulating platelet count decreased from 221,000 to 174,000 microliters, and 15% spontaneous platelet aggregation was observed. Fortunately, fibrinopeptide A levels remained less than 10 ng/ml intraoperatively, and no thrombotic complications occurred. In the second patient, aspirin did not prevent heparin-induced platelet aggregation in vitro (65% without and 41% with aspirin); however, iloprost (0.01 mumol/L) prevented both in vitro heparin-induced platelet aggregation (59.5% without and 0.0% with iloprost) and 14C serotonin release (56.7% without and 0.0% with iloprost). Therefore, a continuous infusion of iloprost was begun before administration of heparin and was continued until 20 minutes after reversal of heparin with protamine. After intraoperative administration of heparin, plasma levels of platelet factor 4 increased from 19 to 200 ng/ml, and beta-thromboglobulin levels increased from 56 to 76 ng/ml.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2437338

  16. Antithrombotic activity of Vitis labrusca extract on rat platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Se-Uk; Lee, Hoon-Yeon; Xin, Mingjie; Ji, Su-Jeong; Cho, Hyoung-Kwon; Kim, Dae-Sung; Kim, Dae-Ki; Lee, Young-Mi

    2016-03-01

    Vitis labrusca is a grapevine that has antioxidant, neuroprotective, hepatoprotective, and anticarcinogenic activity. However, the antithrombotic effect of Vitis labrusca leaves on platelets is yet to be ascertained. We investigated the inhibitory effect of V. labrusca leaf extract (VLE) on platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo. The thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and serotonin concentrations were measured by ELISA. The flavonoids content was measured by ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC). The antithrombotic activity of VLE was evaluated using various agonists in vitro. VLE strongly inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation. In rats, VLE treatment (100 mg/kg) reduced ADP-stimulated platelet aggregation, without affecting tail bleeding and coagulation time. Moreover, VLE significantly suppressed TXB2 and serotonin secretion. UPLC analysis indicated that VLE contains quercetin, isorhamnetin, and rutin. Our results indicate that VLE possesses antiplatelet activity via the suppression of TXB2 and serotonin, without affecting bleeding. Further, we identified the flavonoids present in VLE. Thus, VLE may be a potential agent for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26340455

  17. The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E5 transforming protein specifically binds and activates the beta-type receptor for the platelet-derived growth factor but not other related tyrosine kinase-containing receptors to induce cellular transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D J; Li, W; Wang, L M; Heidaran, M A; Aaronson, S; Shinn, R; Schlegel, R; Pierce, J H

    1994-01-01

    The 44-amino-acid E5 protein of bovine papillomavirus type 1 is a highly hydrophobic protein which appears to transform cells through the activation of growth factor receptors. To investigate the specificity of E5-growth factor receptor interactions required for mitogenic signaling, we utilized a nontumorigenic, murine myeloid cell line (32D) which is strictly dependent on interleukin-3 (IL-3) for sustained proliferation in culture. This IL-3 dependence can be functionally substituted by the expression of a variety of surrogate growth factor receptors and the addition of the corresponding ligand. Several receptor cDNAs for the alpha- and beta-type platelet-derived growth factor receptors [alpha PDGFR and beta PDGFR], the epidermal growth factor receptor, and the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor) were transfected into 32D cells constitutively expressing the E5 protein to test for IL-3-independent growth. Only beta PDGFR was capable of abrogating the IL-3 dependence of 32D cells. The proliferative signal induced by the coexpression of beta PDGFR and E5 was accompanied by stable complex formation between these proteins, constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor, and tumorigenicity in nude mice. The lack of cooperative interaction between E5 and the epidermal growth factor receptor, the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor, and the highly related alpha PDGFR was paralleled by the inability of E5 to bind to these receptors and failure to increase receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, these data indicate that the ability of E5 to induce sustained proliferation and transformation of 32D cells is a direct consequence of specific interaction between the E5 protein and the beta PDGFR signaling complex and the subsequent stimulation of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Images PMID:8207816

  18. Gender differences in platelet brain derived neurotrophic factor in patients with cardiovascular disease and depression.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marlene S; Ngongang, Chelsea K; Ouyang, Pam; Betoudji, Fabrice; Harrer, Christine; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Ziegelstein, Roy C

    2016-07-01

    Women have a higher prevalence of depression compared to men. Serum levels of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are decreased in depression. BDNF may also have a protective role in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD) or events. We examined whether there are gender differences in BDNF levels in patients with stable CAD and comorbid depression. We enrolled 37 patients (17 women) with stable CAD with and without depression from a single medical center. All patients had depression assessment with the Beck Depression Inventory-II questionnaire. Both plasma and platelet BDNF were measured in all patients using a standard ELISA method. Platelet BDNF levels were higher than plasma BDNF levels in the entire group (5903.9 ± 1915.6 vs 848.5 ± 460.5 pg/ml, p < 0.001). Women had higher platelet BDNF levels than men (6954.2 ± 1685.6 vs. 5011.2 ± 1653.5 pg/ml, p < 0.001). Women without depression (BDI-II < 5, n = 8) had higher platelet BDNF than men without depression (n = 8, 7382.8 ± 1633.1 vs 4811.7 ± 1642.3 pg/ml, p = 0.007). Women with no or minimal depression (BDI < 14, n = 14) had higher platelet BDNF levels than men with no or minimal depression (n = 18, 6900.2 ± 1486.6 vs 4972.9 ± 1568.9 pg/ml, p = 0.001). The plasma BDNF levels were similar between men and women in all categories of depression. In conclusion, women with stable CAD have increased platelet BDNF levels when compared to men with stable CAD regardless of their level of depression. Sex specific differences in BDNF could possibly indicate differences in factors linking platelet activation and depression in men and women. PMID:27082490

  19. Platelets and galectins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A major function of platelets is keeping the vascular system intact. Platelet activation at sites of vascular injury leads to the formation of a hemostatic plug. Activation of platelets is therefore crucial for normal hemostasis; however, uncontrolled platelet activation may also lead to the formation of occlusive thrombi that can cause ischemic events. Although they are essential for proper hemostasis, platelet function extends to physiologic processes such as tissue repair, wound remodeling and antimicrobial host defense, or pathologic conditions such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis, chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Platelets can be activated by soluble molecules including thrombin, thromboxane A2 (TXA2), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), serotonin or by adhesive extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as von Willebrand factor (vWF) and collagen. Here we describe recent advances in the activation of platelets by non-canonical platelet agonists such as galectins. By acting either in soluble or immobilized form, these glycan-binding proteins trigger all platelet activation responses through modulation of discrete signaling pathways. We also offer new hypotheses and some speculations about the role of platelet-galectin interactions not only in hemostasis and thrombosis but also in inflammation and related diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. PMID:25405160

  20. Diagnostic Value of Measuring Platelet Von Willebrand Factor in Von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Casonato, Alessandra; Cattini, Maria Grazia; Daidone, Viviana; Pontara, Elena; Bertomoro, Antonella; Prandoni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) may be caused by an impaired von Willebrand factor (VWF) synthesis, its increased clearance or abnormal function, or combinations of these factors. It may be difficult to recognize the different contributions of these anomalies. Here we demonstrate that VWD diagnostics gains from measuring platelet VWF, which can reveal a defective VWF synthesis. Measuring platelet VWF revealed that: severe type 1 VWD always coincided with significantly lower platelet and plasma VWF levels, whereas mild forms revealed low plasma VWF levels associated with low or normal platelet VWF levels, and the latter were associated with a slightly shorter VWF survival; type Vicenza (the archetype VWD caused by a reduced VWF survival) featured normal platelet VWF levels despite significantly reduced plasma VWF levels; type 2B patients could have either normal platelet VWF levels associated with abnormal multimer patterns, or reduced platelet VWF levels associated with normal multimer patterns; type 2A patients could have reduced or normal platelet VWF levels, the former associated mainly with type 2A-I, the latter with type 2A-II; plasma and platelet VWF levels were normal in type 2N, except when the defect was associated with a quantitative VWF mutation. Our findings show that measuring platelet VWF helps to characterize VWD, especially the ambiguous phenotypes, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying the disorder. PMID:27532107

  1. Platelet-derived-growth-factor stimulation of the p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in airway smooth muscle: role of pertussis-toxin-sensitive G-proteins, c-Src tyrosine kinases and phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, A M; Rakhit, S; Pyne, S; Pyne, N J

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism used by the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) to activate the mitogen-activated- protein-kinase (p42/p44 MAPK) pathway was investigated in cultured airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. We have found that pertussis toxin (PTX, which was used to inactivate the heterotrimeric G-protein Gi) induced an approx. 40-50% decrease in the activation of c-Src and p42/p44 MAPK by PDGF. An essential role for c-Src was confirmed using the c-Src inhibitor, PP1, which abolished p42/p44 MAPK activation (PP1 and PTX were without effect on PDGFR tyrosine phosphorylation). Furthermore, the PTX-dependent decrease in c-Src and p42/p44 MAPK activation appeared correlated. These findings suggest that the PDGFR can utilize the PTX-sensitive G-protein, Gi, to regulate c-Src and subsequent p42/p44 MAPK activation. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) has been shown by others to be involved in p42/p44 MAPK activation. This is confirmed here by experiments which showed that PI3K inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002) reduced the activation of p42/p44 MAPK by PDGF. PI3K activity was increased in Grb-2 immunoprecipitates from PDGF-stimulated cells and was decreased by pretreating these cells with PTX. These findings show that Gi might also promote Grb-2-PI3K complex formation and that Grb-2 may be a site at which PI3K is integrated into the p42/p44 MAPK cascade. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Gi enables the PDGFR to signal more efficiently to p42/p44 MAPK, and this appears to be achieved through the regulation of c-Src and Grb-2/PI3K, which are intermediates in the p42/p44 MAPK cascade. PMID:9882612

  2. Intraosseous Delivery of Lentiviral Vectors Targeting Factor VIII Expression in Platelets Corrects Murine Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefeng; Shin, Simon C; Chiang, Andy F J; Khan, Iram; Pan, Dao; Rawlings, David J; Miao, Carol H

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for in situ gene transfer into bone marrow may avoid specific challenges posed by ex vivo gene delivery, including, in particular, the requirement of preconditioning. We utilized IO delivery of LVs encoding a GFP or factor VIII (FVIII) transgene directed by ubiquitous promoters (a MND or EF-1α-short element; M-GFP-LV, E-F8-LV) or a platelet-specific, glycoprotein-1bα promoter (G-GFP-LV, G-F8-LV). A single IO infusion of M-GFP-LV or G-GFP-LV achieved long-term and efficient GFP expression in Lineage-Sca1+c-Kit+ hematopoietic stem cells and platelets, respectively. While E-F8-LV produced initially high-level FVIII expression, robust anti-FVIII immune responses eliminated functional FVIII in circulation. In contrast, IO delivery of G-F8-LV achieved long-term platelet-specific expression of FVIII, resulting in partial correction of hemophilia A. Furthermore, similar clinical benefit with G-F8-LV was achieved in animals with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. These findings further support platelets as an ideal FVIII delivery vehicle, as FVIII, stored in α-granules, is protected from neutralizing antibodies and, during bleeding, activated platelets locally excrete FVIII to promote clot formation. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV was sufficient to correct hemophilia phenotype for long term, indicating that this approach may provide an effective means to permanently treat FVIII deficiency. PMID:25655313

  3. Structural and Functional Properties of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor and Stem Cell Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lennartsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The receptors for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) are members of the type III class of PTK receptors, which are characterized by five Ig-like domains extracellularly and a split kinase domain intracellularly. The receptors are activated by ligand-induced dimerization, leading to autophosphorylation on specific tyrosine residues. Thereby the kinase activities of the receptors are activated and docking sites for downstream SH2 domain signal transduction molecules are created; activation of these pathways promotes cell growth, survival, and migration. These receptors mediate important signals during the embryonal development, and control tissue homeostasis in the adult. Their overactivity is seen in malignancies and other diseases involving excessive cell proliferation, such as atherosclerosis and fibrotic diseases. In cancer, mutations of PDGF and SCF receptors—including gene fusions, point mutations, and amplifications—drive subpopulations of certain malignancies, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, hypereosinophilic syndrome, glioblastoma, acute myeloid leukemia, mastocytosis, and melanoma. PMID:23906712

  4. Inhibitory effects of kiwifruit extract on human platelet aggregation and plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Dizdarevic, Lili L; Biswas, Dipankar; Uddin, M D Main; Jørgenesen, Aud; Falch, Eva; Bastani, Nasser E; Duttaroy, Asim K

    2014-01-01

    Previous human studies suggest that supplementation with kiwifruits lowers several cardiovascular risk factors such as platelet hyperactivity, blood pressure and plasma lipids. The cardiovascular health benefit of fruit and vegetables is usually attributed to the complex mixture of phytochemicals therein; however, kiwifruit's cardioprotective factors are not well studied. In this study, we investigated the effects of kiwifruit extract on human blood platelet aggregation and plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. A sugar-free, heat-stable aqueous extract with molecular mass less than 1000 Da was prepared from kiwifruits. Typically, 100 g kiwifruits produced 66.3 ± 5.8 mg (1.2 ± 0.1 mg CE) of sugar-free kiwifruit extract (KFE). KFE inhibited both human platelet aggregation and plasma ACE activity in a dose-dependent manner. KFE inhibited platelet aggregation in response to ADP, collagen and arachidonic acid, and inhibitory action was mediated in part by reducing TxA2 synthesis. The IC50 for ADP-induced platelet aggregation was 1.6 ± 0.2 mg/ml (29.0 ± 3.0 μg CE/ml), whereas IC50 for serum ACE was 0.6 ± 0.1 mg/ml (11.0 ± 1.2 μg CE/ml). Consuming 500 mg of KFE (9.0 mg CE) in 10 g margarine inhibited ex vivo platelet aggregation by 12.7%, 2 h after consumption by healthy volunteers (n = 9). All these data indicate that kiwifruit contains very potent antiplatelet and anti-ACE components. Consuming kiwifruits might be beneficial as both preventive and therapeutic regime in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24219176

  5. Observations on human smooth muscle cell cultures from hyperplastic lesions of prosthetic bypass grafts: Production of a platelet-derived growth factor-like mitogen and expression of a gene for a platelet-derived growth factor receptor--a preliminary study

    SciTech Connect

    Birinyi, L.K.; Warner, S.J.; Salomon, R.N.; Callow, A.D.; Libby, P. )

    1989-08-01

    Prosthetic bypass grafts placed to the distal lower extremity often fail because of an occlusive tissue response in the perianastomotic region. The origin of the cells that comprise this occlusive lesion and the causes of the cellular proliferation are not known. To increase our understanding of this process we cultured cells from hyperplastic lesions obtained from patients at the time of reexploration for lower extremity graft failure, and we studied their identity and growth factor production in tissue culture. These cultures contain cells that express muscle-specific actin isoforms, shown by immunohistochemical staining, consistent with vascular smooth muscle origin. These cultures also released material that stimulated smooth muscle cell growth. A portion of this activity was similar to platelet-derived growth factor, since preincubation with antibody-to-human platelet-derived growth factor partially blocked the mitogenic effect of medium conditioned by human anastomotic hyperplastic cells. These conditioned media also contained material that competed with platelet-derived growth factor for its receptor, as measured in a radioreceptor assay. Northern blot analysis showed that these cells contain messenger RNA that encodes the A chain but not the B chain of platelet-derived growth factor. In addition, these cells contain messenger RNA that encodes a platelet-derived growth factor receptor. We conclude that cultured smooth muscle cells from human anastomotic hyperplastic lesions express genes for platelet-derived growth factor A chain and a platelet-derived growth factor receptor and secrete biologically active molecules similar to platelet-derived growth factor.

  6. Serotonin content of platelets in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Correlation with clinical activity.

    PubMed

    Zeller, J; Weissbarth, E; Baruth, B; Mielke, H; Deicher, H

    1983-04-01

    Significantly decreased platelet serotonin contents were measured in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), progressive systemic sclerosis, and mixed connective tissue disease. An inverse relationship between platelet serotonin levels and clinical disease activity was observed in both rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. SLE patients with multiple organ involvement showed the lowest platelet serotonin values. No correlation was observed between platelet serotonin contents and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug treatment, presence of circulating platelet reactive IgG, or the amount of circulating immune complexes. The results are interpreted as indicating platelet release occurring in vivo during inflammatory episodes of the rheumatic disorders investigated. PMID:6838676

  7. PPARγ Ligands Decrease Hydrostatic Pressure-Induced Platelet Aggregation and Proinflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Shu; Xu, Jin-Song; Fu, Hui-Min; Su, Hai; Wang, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is known to be associated with platelet overactivity, but the direct effects of hydrostatic pressure on platelet function remain unclear. The present study sought to investigate whether elevated hydrostatic pressure is responsible for platelet activation and to address the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). We observed that hypertensive patients had significantly higher platelet volume and rate of ADP-induced platelets aggregation compared to the controls. In vitro, Primary human platelets were cultured under standard (0 mmHg) or increased (120, 180, 240 mmHg) hydrostatic pressure for 18 h. Exposure to elevated pressure was associated with morphological changes in platelets. Platelet aggregation and PAC-1 (the active confirmation of GPIIb/IIIa) binding were increased, CD40L was translocated from cytoplasm to the surface of platelet and soluble CD40L (sCD40L) was released into the medium in response to elevated hydrostatic pressure (180 and 240 mmHg). The PPARγ activity was up-regulated as the pressure was increased from 120 mmHg to 180 mmHg. Pressure-induced platelet aggregation, PAC-1 binding, and translocation and release of CD40L were all attenuated by the PPARγ agonist Thiazolidinediones (TZDs). These results demonstrate that platelet activation and aggregation are increased by exposure to elevated pressure and that PPARγ may modulate platelet activation induced by high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:24586940

  8. Lack of association between serum paraoxonase-1 activity and residual platelet aggregation during dual anti-platelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Tsukasa; Yano, Yuichiro; Sakata, Asuka; Ikemoto, Tomokazu; Shimpo, Masahisa; Madoiwa, Seiji; Katsuki, Takaaki; Mimuro, Jun; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Kario, Kazuomi; Sakata, Yoichi

    2012-04-01

    High residual platelet aggregability during thienopyridine treatment occurs because of low levels of the active drug metabolite, and is associated with an increased rate of major adverse cardiovascular events. Recent findings suggest that paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is a major determinant for clopidogrel efficacy. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of serum PON1 activity on platelet aggregability in thienopyridine-treated patients. In 72 patients receiving treatment with aspirin and ticlopidine after acute coronary syndrome, various laboratory data including the formation of platelet aggregations induced by agonists were compared with serum PON1 activities, measured as paraoxonase and homocysteine thiolactone hydrolase (HTLase). Serum paraoxonase activity was significantly associated with HTLase activity (R=0.4487, P<0.0001). These PON1 activities were not correlated with any parameters for platelet aggregation, hypertension, sleep apnea, and diabetes mellitus. In contrast, serum PON1 activities seemed to be involved in cardiac function, with brain natriuretic peptide and ejection fraction being significantly correlated with serum HTLase activity (R=-0.2767, P=0.0214) and paraoxonase activity (R=0.2558, P=0.0339), respectively. Paraoxonase activity also demonstrated a significant association with increased levels of ankle-brachial index (R=0.267, P=0.0255). Serum PON1 activities did not influence platelet aggregability during treatment with thienopyridine. However, they might modulate cardiac function after acute coronary syndrome and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:22115701

  9. Associations between arterial stiffness and platelet activation in normotensive overweight and obese young adults.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jennifer N; Evans, Rhobert W; Mori Brooks, Maria; Fried, Linda; Holmes, Chris; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Obese individuals have elevated platelet activation and arterial stiffness, but the strength and temporality of the relationship between these factors remain unclear. We aimed to determine the effect of increased arterial stiffness on circulating platelet activity in overweight/obese young adults. This analysis included 92 participants (mean age 40 years, 60 women) in the Slow Adverse Vascular Effects of excess weight (SAVE) trial, a clinical trial examining the effects of a lifestyle intervention with or without sodium restriction on vascular health in normotensive overweight/obese young adults. Carotid-femoral (cf), brachial-ankle (ba) and femoral-ankle (fa) pulse wave velocity (PWV) served as measures of arterial stiffness and were measured at baseline and 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. Platelet activity was measured as plasma β-thromboglobulin (β-TG) at 24 months. Higher plasma β-TG was correlated with greater exposure to elevated cfPWV (p = 0.02) and baPWV (p = 0.04) during the preceding two years. After adjustment for serum leptin, greater exposure to elevated baPWV remained significant (p = 0.03) and exposure to elevated cfPWV marginally significant (p = 0.054) in predicting greater plasma β-TG. Greater arterial stiffness, particularly central arterial stiffness, predicts greater platelet activation in overweight/obese individuals. This relationship might partly explain the association between increased arterial stiffness and incident atherothrombotic events. PMID:23654212

  10. Platelet lysate from whole blood-derived pooled platelet concentrates and apheresis-derived platelet concentrates for the isolation and expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells: production process, content and identification of active components

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Natalie; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Fürst, Daniel; Maurer, Caroline; Dausend, Julia; Fleury-Cappellesso, Sandrine; Mailänder, Volker; Lotfi, Ramin; Ignatius, Anita; Sensebé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Rojewski, Markus Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background aims The clinical use of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) requires ex vivo expansion in media containing supplements such as fetal bovine serum or, alternatively, human platelet lysate (PL). Methods Platelet concentrates were frozen, quarantine stored, thawed and sterile filtered to obtain PL. PL content and its effect on fibroblast-colony-forming unit (CFU-F) formation, MSC proliferation and large-scale expansion were studied. Results PL contained high levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), soluble CD40L (sCD40L), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), platelet-derived growth factor AA (PDGF-AA), platelet-derived growth factor AB/BB (PDGF-AB/BB), chemokine (C-C) ligand 5 (CCL5; RANTES) transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and chemokine (C-X-C) ligand 1/2/3 (GRO), with low batch-to-batch variability, and most were stable for up to 14 days. Inhibition of PDGF-BB and bFGF decreased MSC proliferation by about 20% and 50%, respectively. The strongest inhibition (about 75%) was observed with a combination of anti-bFGF + anti-PDGF-BB and anti-bFGF + anti-TGF-β1 + anti-PDGF-BB. Interestingly, various combinations of recombinant PDGF-BB, bFGF and TGF-β1 were not sufficient to promote cell proliferation. PL from whole blood-derived pooled platelet concentrates and apheresis platelet concentrates did not differ significantly in their growth-promoting activity on MSC. Conclusions PL enhances MSC proliferation and can be regarded as a safe tool for MSC expansion for clinical purposes. \\in particular, PDGF-BB and bFGF are essential components for the growth-promoting effect of PL, but are not sufficient for MSC proliferation. PMID:22296115

  11. An Assay of Measuring Platelet Reactivity Using Monoclonal Antibody against Activated Platelet Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in Patients Taking Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon-Hyouk; Kim, Song-Yi; Kim, Ki-Seok; Kim, Young Ree; Kang, Sung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Residual platelet reactivity in patients who are taking clopidogrel is commonly measured with VerifyNow assay, which is based on the principle of light transmission aggregometry. However, to evaluate the residual platelet reactivity, it would be more accurate if the reactivity of platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa is directly monitored. In this study, PAC1, a monoclonal antibody against activated platelet GP IIb/IIIa, was used to measure the residual platelet reactivity. Subjects and Methods Twenty seven patients with coronary artery disease taking clopidogrel were enrolled. Platelets in whole blood were stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated PAC1. Mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) and % positive platelets (PP) were measured with flow cytometry, and the binding index (BI; MFI × %PP/100) was calculated. P2Y12 reaction unit (PRU) and % inhibition of VerifyNow assay were also measured in the usual manner. Results PRU of VerifyNow assay correlated significantly with MFI, %PP, and BI at 10 µM (r=0.59, 0.73, and 0.60, respectively, all p<0.005) and 20 µM of adenosine diphosphate (ADP; r=0.61, 0.75, and 0.63, respectively, all p<0.005). The % inhibition also correlated significantly with MFI, %PP, and BI at 10 µM (r=-0.60, -0.69, and -0.59, respectively, all p<0.005) and 20 µM of ADP (r=-0.63, -0.71, and -0.62, respectively, all p<0.005). Conclusion Direct measurements of the reactivity of platelet GP IIb/IIIa were feasible using PAC1 and flow cytometry in patients taking clopidogrel. Further clinical studies are required to determine the cut-off values which would define high residual platelet reactivity in patients on this treatment protocol. PMID:26413105

  12. Hemocompatibility of Poly(vinyl alcohol)-Gelatin Core-Shell Electrospun Nanofibers: A Scaffold for Modulating Platelet Deposition and Activation.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Valerie M; Martin, Daniel; Hutchinson, Marcus; Tran, Phat L; Behrens, Alana; Hossainy, Samir; Sheriff, Jawaad; Bluestein, Danny; Wu, Xiaoyi; Slepian, Marvin J

    2015-04-22

    In this study, we evaluate coaxial electrospun nanofibers with gelatin in the shell and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in the core as a potential vascular material by determining fiber surface roughness, as well as human platelet deposition and activation under varying conditions. PVA scaffolds had the highest surface roughness (Ra=65.5±6.8 nm) but the lowest platelet deposition (34.2±5.8 platelets) in comparison to gelatin nanofibers (Ra=36.8±3.0 nm and 168.9±29.8 platelets) and coaxial nanofibers (1 Gel:1 PVA coaxial, Ra=24.0±1.5 nm and 150.2±17.4 platelets. 3 Gel:1 PVA coaxial, Ra=37.1±2.8 nm and 167.8±15.4 platelets). Therefore, the chemical structure of the gelatin nanofibers dominated surface roughness in platelet deposition. Due to their increased stiffness, the coaxial nanofibers had the highest platelet activation rate, rate of thrombin formation, in comparison to gelatin and PVA fibers. Our studies indicate that mechanical stiffness is a dominating factor for platelet deposition and activation, followed by biochemical signals, and lastly surface roughness. Overall, these coaxial nanofibers are an appealing material for vascular applications by supporting cellular growth while minimizing platelet deposition and activation. PMID:25815434

  13. Prothrombin Activation by Platelet-associated Prothrombinase Proceeds through the Prethrombin-2 Pathway via a Concerted Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Laura M.; Bouchard, Beth A.; Tracy, Paula B.; Mann, Kenneth G.

    2012-01-01

    The protease α-thrombin is a key enzyme of the coagulation process as it is at the cross-roads of both the pro- and anti-coagulant pathways. The main source of α-thrombin in vivo is the activation of prothrombin by the prothrombinase complex assembled on either an activated cell membrane or cell fragment, the most relevant of which is the activated platelet surface. When prothrombinase is assembled on synthetic phospholipid vesicles, prothrombin activation proceeds with an initial cleavage at Arg-320 yielding the catalytically active, yet effectively anticoagulant intermediate meizothrombin, which is released from the enzyme complex ∼30–40% of the time. Prothrombinase assembled on the surface of activated platelets has been shown to proceed through the inactive intermediate prethrombin-2 via an initial cleavage at Arg-271 followed by cleavage at Arg-320. The current work tests whether or not platelet-associated prothrombinase proceeds via a concerted mechanism through a study of prothrombinase assembly and function on collagen-adhered, thrombin-activated, washed human platelets in a flow chamber. Prothrombinase assembly was demonstrated through visualization of bound factor Xa by confocal microscopy using a fluorophore-labeled anti-factor Xa antibody, which demonstrated the presence of distinct platelet subpopulations capable of binding factor Xa. When prothrombin activation was monitored at a typical venous shear rate over preassembled platelet-associated prothrombinase neither potential intermediate, meizothrombin or prethrombin-2, was observed in the effluent. Collectively, these findings suggest that platelet-associated prothrombinase activates prothrombin via an efficient concerted mechanism in which neither intermediate is released. PMID:22989889

  14. Thrombin Receptor-Activating Protein (TRAP)-Activated Akt Is Involved in the Release of Phosphorylated-HSP27 (HSPB1) from Platelets in DM Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Tsujimoto, Masanori; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Akamatsu, Shigeru; Enomoto, Yukiko; Iida, Hiroki; Otsuka, Takanobu; Ogura, Shinji; Iwama, Toru; Kojima, Kumi; Kozawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    It is generally known that heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is phosphorylated through p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. We have previously reported that HSP27 is released from human platelets associated with collagen-induced phosphorylation. In the present study, we conducted an investigation into the effect of thrombin receptor-activating protein (TRAP) on the release of HSP27 in platelets in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. The phosphorylated-HSP27 levels induced by TRAP were directly proportional to the aggregation of platelets. The levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 (Ser-78) were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylated-Akt in the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP but not with those of phosphorylated-p44/p42 MAP kinase. The levels of HSP27 released from the TRAP (10 µM)-stimulated platelets were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 in the platelets. The released platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB) levels were in parallel with the HSP27 levels released from the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP. Although the area under the curve (AUC) of small aggregates (9–25 µm) induced by 10 µM TRAP showed no significant correlation with the released HSP27 levels, AUC of medium aggregates (25–50 µm), large aggregates (50–70 µm) and light transmittance were significantly correlated with the released HSP27 levels. TRAP-induced phosphorylation of HSP27 was truly suppressed by deguelin, an inhibitor of Akt, in the platelets from a healthy subject. These results strongly suggest that TRAP-induced activation of Akt in addition to p38 MAP kinase positively regulates the release of phosphorylated-HSP27 from human platelets, which is closely related to the platelet hyper-aggregation in type 2 DM patients. PMID:27187380

  15. Thrombin Receptor-Activating Protein (TRAP)-Activated Akt Is Involved in the Release of Phosphorylated-HSP27 (HSPB1) from Platelets in DM Patients.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Tsujimoto, Masanori; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Akamatsu, Shigeru; Enomoto, Yukiko; Iida, Hiroki; Otsuka, Takanobu; Ogura, Shinji; Iwama, Toru; Kojima, Kumi; Kozawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    It is generally known that heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is phosphorylated through p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. We have previously reported that HSP27 is released from human platelets associated with collagen-induced phosphorylation. In the present study, we conducted an investigation into the effect of thrombin receptor-activating protein (TRAP) on the release of HSP27 in platelets in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. The phosphorylated-HSP27 levels induced by TRAP were directly proportional to the aggregation of platelets. The levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 (Ser-78) were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylated-Akt in the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP but not with those of phosphorylated-p44/p42 MAP kinase. The levels of HSP27 released from the TRAP (10 µM)-stimulated platelets were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 in the platelets. The released platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB) levels were in parallel with the HSP27 levels released from the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP. Although the area under the curve (AUC) of small aggregates (9-25 µm) induced by 10 µM TRAP showed no significant correlation with the released HSP27 levels, AUC of medium aggregates (25-50 µm), large aggregates (50-70 µm) and light transmittance were significantly correlated with the released HSP27 levels. TRAP-induced phosphorylation of HSP27 was truly suppressed by deguelin, an inhibitor of Akt, in the platelets from a healthy subject. These results strongly suggest that TRAP-induced activation of Akt in addition to p38 MAP kinase positively regulates the release of phosphorylated-HSP27 from human platelets, which is closely related to the platelet hyper-aggregation in type 2 DM patients. PMID:27187380

  16. Factor Xa Inhibitor Suppresses the Release of Phosphorylated HSP27 from Collagen-Stimulated Human Platelets: Inhibition of HSP27 Phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kito, Yuko; Enomoto, Yukiko; Iida, Hiroki; Ogura, Shinji; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Iwama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of factor Xa (FXa) are widely recognized as useful therapeutic tools for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation or venous thrombosis. Thrombin, which is rapidly generated from pro-thrombin through the activation of factor X to FXa, acts as a potent activator of human platelets. Thus, the reduction of thrombin generation by FXa inhibitor eventually causes a suppressive effect on platelet aggregation. However, little is known whether FXa inhibitors directly affect the function of human platelets. We have previously reported that collagen induces the phosphorylation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a low-molecular weight heat shock protein via Rac-dependent activation of p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in human platelets, eventually resulting in the release of HSP27. In the present study, we investigated the direct effect of FXa inhibitor on the collagen-induced human platelet activation. Rivaroxaban as well as edoxaban significantly reduced the collagen-induced phosphorylation of both HSP27 and p44/p42 MAP kinase without affecting the platelet aggregation. Rivaroxaban significantly inhibited the release of phosphorylated HSP27 from collagen-stimulated platelets but not the secretion of platelet derived growth factor-AB. In patients administrated with rivaroxaban, the collagen-induced levels of phosphorylated HSP27 were markedly diminished after 2 days of administration, which failed to affect the platelet aggregation. These results strongly suggest that FXa inhibitor reduces the collagen-stimulated release of phosphorylated HSP27 from human platelets due to the inhibition of HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase. PMID:26867010

  17. Electronic platelet counts with the Coulter counter. Reassessment of a correction factor.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, E L; Wehman, J; Wall, B

    1976-09-01

    Platelet counts are determined on the Coulter electronic counter by counting the diluted platelet-rich plasma obtained by sedimentation or centrifugation of whole blood. In calculating the whole-blood platelet count, an empirical correction factor for platelet-free plasma trapped by sedimented erythrocytes has been recommended, and a widely-distributed circular slide rule calculator incorporates the correction factor. In this study, visual and electronic platelet counts were compared in 100 specimens with counts ranging from 10 to 1,100 X 10(3) per mul and hematocrits ranging from 17.5 to 48.5%. Platelet-rich plasma samples prepared by a centrifugation method (Plateletfuge) gave machine counts in close agreement with those of samples prepared by sedimentation. Whole-blood platelet counts determined with the circular calculator were consistently lower than visual counts, with an average difference of -17%. The electronic counts were recalculated after elimination of the correction factor, and agreement then improved to an average difference of only +1.6%. The correction factor for trapped platelet-free plasma leads to erroneously low values and should not be used. PMID:961629

  18. Net platelet angiogenic activity (NPAA) correlates with progression and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lijuan; Dong, Hang; Luo, Yiqin; Du, Jianping; Hu, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Circulating platelets are abundant sources of angiogensis molecules for the tumor vasculature affecting tumor growth and metastasis. The relationship between non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and intra-platelet levels of VEGF, TSP-1 and net platelet angiogenic activity (NPAA) is unclear. The aim of this study was to better understand the role of these factors in the progression of NSCLC cancer and to assess its clinical significance. Platelet VEGF and TSP-1 and NPAA were measured preoperatively in 68 patients with NSCLC by ELISA or Capillary tube formation assay. VEGF, TSP-1 and NPAA distributions in cancer patients and healthy volunteers were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The Kaplan-Meier method, univariate and multivariate regression analysis was used to analyze the correlation between these factors and clinicopathological features, overall survival and disease-free survival. Mean intra-platelet TSP-1 level was slightly higher in patients than in healthy subjects (p = 0.092). Intra-platelet TSP-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with involvement greater than T2 or stage III, compared to other patients. Mean intra-platelet VEGF level was 40.8 pg/10⁶ in patients compared to 21.9 ng/10⁶ in healthy subjects (p = 0.041). Median value of NPAA in patients was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (p<0.001). Patients with high NPAA are more likely to exhibit aggressive clinical pathological features. NPAA greater than the median are associated with poor prognosis. The elevated NPAA have better correlation with tumor microvessel density (MVD) than platelet-derived VEGF. The areas under receiver operating curve (AUROC) of NPAA were higher than that of platelet derived VEGF in different groups. A multivariate analysis showed that NPAA are independent prognostic factors. These results indicated that NPAA may be a clinically useful indicator for diagnostic and prognostic evaluation in NSCLC patients. PMID:24788022

  19. RASA3 is a critical inhibitor of RAP1-dependent platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Lucia; Paul, David S.; Robledo, Raymond F.; Chan, E. Ricky; Getz, Todd M.; Campbell, Robert A.; Kechele, Daniel O.; Casari, Caterina; Piatt, Raymond; Caron, Kathleen M.; Mackman, Nigel; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Parrott, Matthew C.; Boulaftali, Yacine; Adams, Mark D.; Peters, Luanne L.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase RAP1 is critical for platelet activation and thrombus formation. RAP1 activity in platelets is controlled by the GEF CalDAG-GEFI and an unknown regulator that operates downstream of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor, P2Y12, a target of antithrombotic therapy. Here, we provide evidence that the GAP, RASA3, inhibits platelet activation and provides a link between P2Y12 and activation of the RAP1 signaling pathway. In mice, reduced expression of RASA3 led to premature platelet activation and markedly reduced the life span of circulating platelets. The increased platelet turnover and the resulting thrombocytopenia were reversed by concomitant deletion of the gene encoding CalDAG-GEFI. Rasa3 mutant platelets were hyperresponsive to agonist stimulation, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, activation of Rasa3 mutant platelets occurred independently of ADP feedback signaling and was insensitive to inhibitors of P2Y12 or PI3 kinase. Together, our results indicate that RASA3 ensures that circulating platelets remain quiescent by restraining CalDAG-GEFI/RAP1 signaling and suggest that P2Y12 signaling is required to inhibit RASA3 and enable sustained RAP1-dependent platelet activation and thrombus formation at sites of vascular injury. These findings provide insight into the antithrombotic effect of P2Y12 inhibitors and may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of platelet-related disorders. PMID:25705885

  20. Purification and characterization of a growth factor from rat platelets for mature parenchymal hepatocytes in primary cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, T; Teramoto, H; Ichihara, A

    1986-01-01

    A growth factor (HGF) stimulating DNA synthesis of adult rat hepatocytes in primary culture was found in rat platelets. HGF was purified from rat platelets to homogeneity by a three-step procedure: stimulation of its release from platelets by thrombin, cation-exchanger fast protein liquid chromatography on a Mono S column, and heparin-Sepharose chromatography. HGF was clearly distinguishable from the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) by fast protein liquid chromatography. HGF was a heat- and acid-labile cationic protein that was inactivated by reduction with dithiothreitol. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 27 kDa by NaDodSO4/PAGE and its amino acid composition was very different from that of PDGF. The purified HGF stimulated DNA synthesis in adult rat hepatocytes at 2 ng/ml and was maximally effective at 20 ng/ml; its effect was additive or synergistic with those of insulin and EGF, depending on their combinations. HGF did not stimulate DNA synthesis of Swiss 3T3 cells, while PDGF did not stimulate that of hepatocytes. Thus, HGF showed clearly different cell specificity from PDGF in its growth-promoting activities. These findings indicate that HGF is a growth factor in platelets for mature hepatocytes. Images PMID:3529086

  1. Partially transformed, anchorage-independent human diploid fibroblasts result from overexpression of the c-sis oncogene: mitogenic activity of an apparent monomeric platelet-derived growth factor 2 species.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, C W; Brondyk, W H; Burgess, J A; Manoharan, T H; Häne, B G; Fahl, W E

    1988-01-01

    A human c-sis cDNA in an expression vector was introduced into human diploid fibroblasts by transfection or electroporation. Fibroblast clones showing an aberrant, densely packed colony morphology were isolated and found to overexpress a 3.6-kilobase sis mRNA species and associated immunoprecipitable platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) 2 proteins. Parallel analyses in cell clones of sis mRNA expression and colony formation in agar indicated that, above a threshold, a linear, positive correlation existed between sis overexpression and acquired anchorage independence. The sis-overexpressing cells formed transient, regressing tumor nodules when injected into nude mice, consistent with the finite life span which they retained. Protein products generated from the transfected c-sis construct in two overexpressing clones were immunoprecipitated with anti-human PDGF antibodies. One clone contained an apparent PDGF dimer of 21 kilodaltons; the second clone contained only an apparent PDGF monomer of 12 kilodaltons, which was shown to account for all of the mitogenic activity present in the cells, essentially all of which was concentrated in the membrane fraction. The results demonstrate a clear link between sis overexpression and acquisition of a partially transformed, anchorage-independent phenotype, and when combined with previous observations of sis overexpression in human tumors, clearly implicate sis overexpression as a genetic mechanism which contributes to human cell transformation. Images PMID:3290648

  2. Effect of ozone on platelet-activating factor production in phorbol-differentiated HL60 cells, a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS S6), and primary human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.; Noah, T.L.; Devlin, R.B.; Yankaskas, J.R.; McKinnon, K.; Dailey, L.A.; Friedman, M. )

    1992-11-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid with a wide spectrum of pro-inflammatory properties. In the lung, PAF induces airway hyperresponsiveness, neutrophil sequestration, and increased vascular permeability. The alveolar macrophage and the bronchial epithelium are tissues that are exposed to inhaled ozone (O3). We studied the effect of an in vitro O3 exposure on PAF production in a macrophage-like HL60 human cell line (dHL60), a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS S6), and also in primary human bronchial epithelial cells. PAF was quantified by thin-layer chromatographic separation of lipid extracts from cells radiolabeled with [3H]lysoPAF and by radioimmunoassay. In vitro exposure of dHL60 cells to 0.05 to 1.0 ppm O3 for 15 to 120 min was found to significantly increase PAF levels above air control values at all exposure levels and time points (average increase of 92%). Similarly, BEAS S6 cells grown on collagen-coated filter supports and exposed to 0.05 to 1.0 ppm O3 for 60 min released an average increase in PAF of 626% above control values. Primary human bronchial epithelial cells also demonstrated significant increases in [3H]PAF release (average increase of 289% after exposure to 1.0 ppm O3 for 60 min) compared with paired air controls. These findings suggest that some of the effects of O3 inhalation may be mediated by PAF.

  3. Ambroxol inhibits platelet-derived growth factor production in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Utsugi, Mitsuyoshi; Dobashi, Kunio; Koga, Yasuhiko; Masubuchi, Ken; Shimizu, Yasuo; Endou, Katsuaki; Nakazawa, Tsugio; Mori, Masatomo

    2002-02-01

    Several growth factors, including platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), have been implicated in the mechanism of lung and airway remodeling. We investigated the effect of ambroxol, trans-4-[(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzyl) amino] cyclohexanol hydrochloride, on the lipopolysaccharide-induced PDGF production in human monocytic cells, THP-1. Ambroxol inhibited the lipopolysaccharide-induced PDGF-AB production via PDGF-A mRNA expression. Lipopolysaccharide activated p44/42 extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and ambroxol attenuated the lipopolysaccharide-induced p44/42 ERK activation. Furthermore, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)-1-specific inhibitor, 2-(2-amino-3-methoxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (PD 98059), blocked the lipopolysaccharide-induced p44/42 ERK activation and PDGF production. These findings indicate that ambroxol inhibits the lipopolysaccharide-induced PDGF production due to the suppression of p44/42 ERK activity. PMID:11834245

  4. Thrombospondin 1 expression and angiogenesis in breast carcinoma and their relation with platelet activity

    PubMed Central

    Ersoz, Gulriz; Dilek, Fatma Husniye; Gencer, Ercan; Kosar, Mehmet Nuri; Dilek, Osman Nuri

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates angiogenesis and the expression of thrombospondin 1 in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and their possible relation to platelet counts and platelet activity. The study included 20 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma. Platelet activity was evaluated by determining thromboxane B2 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels by enzyme immunoassay (EIA).Thrombospondin (TSP) 1 and CD34 expression was studied immunohistochemically. Mean platelet count of the patient group was significantly greater than the mean platelet count of the control group (P < 0.05). The platelet counts were positively correlated with tumour size (r=0.609; P < 0.01). Platelet counts were higher in the patients who had grade 3 microvessel density (P < 0.05). The mean basal platelet cGMP level in the patient group was significantly lower than it was in the control group (P < 0.05). Focal TSP immunoreactivity was detectable in 5 (20%) cases in the tumour cells, and in 9 (45%) cases in the stroma. We did not find any correlation between TSP-1 staining and angiogenesis, platelet counts, platelet activity, and the histological prognostic parameters. Our study confirms the essential role of platelets in tumour growth and angiogenesis. Decreased levels of cGMP in the patient group may cause platelet hyperreactivity. Although thrombospondin 1 may be upregulated in malignant breast tissue, this is not sufficient for tumour growth and dissemination according to our results. PMID:19396698

  5. Impaired platelet activation and cAMP homeostasis in MRP4-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Decouture, Benoit; Dreano, Elise; Belleville-Rolland, Tiphaine; Kuci, Orjeta; Dizier, Blandine; Bazaa, Amine; Coqueran, Bérard; Lompre, Anne-Marie; Denis, Cécile V.; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Gaussem, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Molecules that reduce the level of cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) in the platelet cytosol, such as adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP) secreted from dense granules, trigger platelet activation. Therefore, any change in the distribution and/or availability of cyclic nucleotides or ADP may interfere with platelet reactivity. In this study, we evaluated the role of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4, or ABCC4), a nucleotide transporter, in platelet functions in vivo and in vitro by investigating MRP4-deficient mice. MRP4 deletion resulted in a slight increase in platelet count but had no impact on platelet ultrastructure. In MRP4-deficient mice, the arterial occlusion was delayed and the tail bleeding time was prolonged. In a model of platelet depletion and transfusion mimicking a platelet-specific knockout, mice injected with MRP4−/− platelets also showed a significant increase in blood loss compared with mice injected with wild-type platelets. Defective thrombus formation and platelet activation were confirmed in vitro by studying platelet adhesion to collagen in flow conditions, integrin αIIbβ3 activation, washed platelet secretion, and aggregation induced by low concentrations of proteinase-activated receptor 4–activating peptide, U46619, or ADP. We found no role of MRP4 in ADP dense-granule storage, but MRP4 redistributed cAMP from the cytosol to dense granules, as confirmed by increased vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation in MRP4-deficient platelets. These data suggest that MRP4 promotes platelet aggregation by modulating the cAMP–protein kinase A signaling pathway, suggesting that MRP4 might serve as a target for novel antiplatelet agents. PMID:26316625

  6. Complex formation with nucleic acids and aptamers alters the antigenic properties of platelet factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Jaax, Miriam E.; Krauel, Krystin; Marschall, Thomas; Brandt, Sven; Gansler, Julia; Fürll, Birgitt; Appel, Bettina; Fischer, Silvia; Block, Stephan; Helm, Christiane A.; Müller, Sabine; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2013-01-01

    The tight electrostatic binding of the chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) to polyanions induces heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, a prothrombotic adverse drug reaction caused by immunoglobulin G directed against PF4/polyanion complexes. This study demonstrates that nucleic acids, including aptamers, also bind to PF4 and enhance PF4 binding to platelets. Systematic assessment of RNA and DNA constructs, as well as 4 aptamers of different lengths and secondary structures, revealed that increasing length and double-stranded segments of nucleic acids augment complex formation with PF4, while single nucleotides or single-stranded polyA or polyC constructs do not. Aptamers were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to induce structural changes in PF4 that resemble those induced by heparin. Moreover, heparin-induced anti-human–PF4/heparin antibodies cross-reacted with human PF4/nucleic acid and PF4/aptamer complexes, as shown by an enzyme immunoassay and a functional platelet activation assay. Finally, administration of PF4/44mer–DNA protein C aptamer complexes in mice induced anti–PF4/aptamer antibodies, which cross-reacted with murine PF4/heparin complexes. These data indicate that the formation of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies in postoperative patients may be augmented by PF4/nucleic acid complexes. Moreover, administration of therapeutic aptamers has the potential to induce anti-PF4/polyanion antibodies and a prothrombotic diathesis. PMID:23673861

  7. Platelets: the few, the young, and the active.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Carol; Briggs, Carol; Machin, Samuel J

    2015-03-01

    Many modern automated cell counters in high-volume clinical hematology laboratories use new, improved technologies for routine platelet analysis. The latest progress includes the use of state-of-the art information technology, specific fluorescent dyes, and monoclonal antibodies to obtain more reliable platelet counts. This information allows the accurate and precise enumeration of platelets even in thrombocytopenic patients and the reporting of novel platelet parameters. In the near future, digital image analysis may permit even better platelet analysis. PMID:25676376

  8. Calmodulin antagonists induce platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Yan, Rong; Liu, Guanglei; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) antagonists induce apoptosis in various tumor models and inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, thus some of which have been extensively used as anti-cancer agents. In platelets, CaM has been found to bind directly to the cytoplasmic domains of several platelet receptors. Incubation of platelets with CaM antagonists impairs the receptors-related platelet functions. However, it is still unknown whether CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), tamoxifen (TMX), and trifluoperazine (TFP) induce apoptotic events in human platelets, including depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. CaM antagonists did not incur platelet activation as detected by P-selectin surface expression and PAC-1 binding. However, ADP-, botrocetin-, and alpha-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor surface were significantly reduced in platelets pre-treated with CaM antagonists. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels were obviously elevated by both W7 and TMX, and membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced apoptotic events in platelets induced by W7. Therefore, these findings indicate that CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. The elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels may be involved in the regulation of CaM antagonists-induced platelet apoptosis. PMID:20172594

  9. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT). PMID:10704074

  10. Novel phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives accumulate in circulation in hyperlipidemic ApoE-/- mice and activate platelets via TLR2.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sudipta; Xin, Liang; Panigrahi, Soumya; Zimman, Alejandro; Wang, Hua; Yakubenko, Valentin P; Byzova, Tatiana V; Salomon, Robert G; Podrez, Eugene A

    2016-05-26

    A prothrombotic state and increased platelet reactivity are common in dyslipidemia and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation, a major consequence of oxidative stress, generates highly reactive products, including hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids that modify autologous proteins generating biologically active derivatives. Phosphatidylethanolamine, the second most abundant eukaryotic phospholipid, can also be modified by hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids. However, the conditions leading to accumulation of such derivatives in circulation and their biological activities remain poorly understood. We now show that carboxyalkylpyrrole-phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives (CAP-PEs) are present in the plasma of hyperlipidemic ApoE(-/-) mice. CAP-PEs directly bind to TLR2 and induces platelet integrin αIIbβ3 activation and P-selectin expression in a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner. Platelet activation by CAP-PEs includes assembly of TLR2/TLR1 receptor complex, induction of downstream signaling via MyD88/TIRAP, phosphorylation of IRAK4, and subsequent activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6. This in turn activates the Src family kinases, spleen tyrosine kinase and PLCγ2, and platelet integrins. Murine intravital thrombosis studies demonstrated that CAP-PEs accelerate thrombosis in TLR2-dependent manner and that TLR2 contributes to accelerate thrombosis in mice in the settings of hyperlipidemia. Our study identified the novel end-products of lipid peroxidation, accumulating in circulation in hyperlipidemia and inducing platelet activation by promoting cross-talk between innate immunity and integrin activation signaling pathways. PMID:27015965

  11. Novel phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives accumulate in circulation in hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice and activate platelets via TLR2

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sudipta; Xin, Liang; Panigrahi, Soumya; Zimman, Alejandro; Wang, Hua; Yakubenko, Valentin P.; Byzova, Tatiana V.; Salomon, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    A prothrombotic state and increased platelet reactivity are common in dyslipidemia and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation, a major consequence of oxidative stress, generates highly reactive products, including hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids that modify autologous proteins generating biologically active derivatives. Phosphatidylethanolamine, the second most abundant eukaryotic phospholipid, can also be modified by hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids. However, the conditions leading to accumulation of such derivatives in circulation and their biological activities remain poorly understood. We now show that carboxyalkylpyrrole-phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives (CAP-PEs) are present in the plasma of hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice. CAP-PEs directly bind to TLR2 and induces platelet integrin αIIbβ3 activation and P-selectin expression in a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner. Platelet activation by CAP-PEs includes assembly of TLR2/TLR1 receptor complex, induction of downstream signaling via MyD88/TIRAP, phosphorylation of IRAK4, and subsequent activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6. This in turn activates the Src family kinases, spleen tyrosine kinase and PLCγ2, and platelet integrins. Murine intravital thrombosis studies demonstrated that CAP-PEs accelerate thrombosis in TLR2-dependent manner and that TLR2 contributes to accelerate thrombosis in mice in the settings of hyperlipidemia. Our study identified the novel end-products of lipid peroxidation, accumulating in circulation in hyperlipidemia and inducing platelet activation by promoting cross-talk between innate immunity and integrin activation signaling pathways. PMID:27015965

  12. In vitro model of platelet-endothelial activation due to cigarette smoke under cardiovascular circulation conditions.

    PubMed

    Girdhar, Gaurav; Xu, Sulan; Jesty, Jolyon; Bluestein, Danny

    2008-07-01

    Cigarette smoke has been shown to increase platelet activation and endothelial cell (EC) adhesion molecule expression. In the present study, we utilized a hemodynamic shearing device (HSD) to investigate the above effects in vitro in a combined system of platelets and cultured HUVECs (Human Umblical Vein ECs) under physiological shear stress. We investigated the alteration of E-selectin expression on ECs upon exposure to: (1) platelets and nicotine-free smoke extract (NFE), (2) platelets alone, (3) NFE alone, under physiological shear stress. We additionally confirmed the protective effect of nicotine on platelet activation. We found that: (i) surface expression of E-selectin on ECs was significantly increased upon simultaneous exposure of ECs and platelets to NFE relative to exposure of ECs to either platelets or NFE alone (p < 0.05). (ii) Platelet activation was significantly increased in the presence of NFE (p < 0.05). (iii) Nicotine (200 nM) when added to NFE, significantly reduced platelet activation due to NFE (p < 0.05), an effect additionally confirmed by conventional cigarette extracts which contain nicotine (p < 0.05). We therefore conclude that: (a) NFE and platelets additively increase EC E-selectin surface expression, and (b) nicotine modulates platelet activation regardless of ECs. PMID:18452059

  13. Hinokitiol inhibits platelet activation ex vivo and thrombus formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan H; Kuo, Jinn R; Lu, Wan J; Chung, Chi L; Chou, Duen S; Huang, Shih Y; Lee, Hsiu C; Sheu, Joen R

    2013-05-15

    Hinokitiol is a tropolone-related bioactive compound that has been used in hair tonics, cosmetics, and food as an antimicrobial agent. Recently, hinokitiol has attracted considerable interest because of its anticancer activities. Platelet activation plays a crucial role in atherothrombotic processes. We examined the effects of hinokitiol treatment on platelet activation using human platelets. In the present study, hinokitiol (1 and 2 μM) inhibited the collagen-induced aggregation of human platelets, but did not inhibit the activation of platelets by other agonists, including thrombin, arachidonic acid, and ADP. Hinokitiol inhibited the phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Akt in collagen-activated human platelets, and significantly reduced intracellular calcium mobilization and hydroxyl radical (OH·) formation. Hinokitiol also reduced the PKC activation and platelet aggregation stimulated by PDBu. In addition, hinokitiol significantly prolonged thrombogenesis in mice. Hinokitiol did not influence the binding of a fluorescent triflavin probe to the αIIbβ3 integrin on platelet membrane, and neither ODQ nor SQ22536 significantly reversed the hinokitiol-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation. In conclusion, hinokitiol may inhibit platelet activation by inhibiting the PLCγ2-PKC cascade and hydroxyl radical formation, followed by suppressing the activation of MAPKs and Akt. Our study suggests that hinokitiol may represent a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention or treatment of thromboembolic disorders. PMID:23473801

  14. Antiplatelet drugs in patients with enhanced platelet turnover: biomarkers versus platelet function testing.

    PubMed

    Freynhofer, Matthias K; Gruber, Susanne C; Grove, Erik L; Weiss, Thomas W; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2015-08-31

    Platelets are key players in atherothrombosis. Antiplatelet therapy comprising aspirin alone or with P2Y12-inhibitors are effective for prevention of atherothrombotic complications. However, there is interindividual variability in the response to antiplatelet drugs, leaving some patients at increased risk of recurrent atherothrombotic events. Several risk factors associated with high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR), including elevated platelet turnover, have been identified. Platelet turnover is adequately estimated from the fraction of reticulated platelets. Reticulated platelets are young platelets, characterised by residual messenger RNA. They are larger, haemostatically more active and there is evidence that platelet turnover is a causal and prognostic factor in atherothrombotic disease. Whether platelet turnover per se represents a key factor in pathogenesis, progression and prognosis of atherothrombotic diseases (with focus on acute coronary syndromes) or whether it merely facilitates insufficient platelet inhibition will be discussed in this state-of-the art review. PMID:26272640

  15. Rapid intracellular calcium changes in U937 monocyte cell line: transient increases in response to platelet-activating factor and chemotactic peptide but not interferon-gamma or lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Maudsley, D J; Morris, A G

    1987-06-01

    The dye fura-2, a potentially more sensitive successor to quin2 for measuring intracellular free calcium ion concentrations [(Ca2+]i), has been applied here to investigate the possible involvement of early changes in [Ca2+]i in the stimulation of the human monocyte-macrophage-like cell line U937. The calcium ionophores A23187 and ionomycin, known pharmacological stimuli for macrophages, were found to cause sharp rises in [Ca2+]i as expected. Responses analogous to those reported for a murine macrophage cell (J774) were obtained on stimulation of U937 cells with ATP which caused rapid, but transient, increases in [Ca2+]i (from resting levels of about 70 nM to peaks of about 200 mM). In addition to ATP, several agents known to activate macrophages were used as stimuli. In particular, platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) was found to cause rapid, but transient, increases in [Ca2+]i (from resting levels of about 70 nM to peaks of about 400 nM) even at concentrations as low as 10(-10) M. This contrasts with responses to ATP that were markedly reduced at 10(-6) M compared with 10(-5) M or above, suggesting that PAF is a highly potent stimulus for intracellular calcium mobilization in macrophages. Similar responses were obtained with chemotactic peptide (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine). On the other hand, two agents known to be potent activators of macrophages, interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide, had no rapid effect on [Ca2+]i. This may reflect differences in the kinetics of signal-response coupling or alternatively a different mechanism of action by-passing the need for rapid elevation of [Ca2+]i. PMID:3110054

  16. Complement activation on platelets correlates with a decrease in circulating immature platelets in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Andemariam, Biree; Yin, Wei; Bussel, James B

    2010-02-01

    The role of the complement system in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is not well defined. We examined plasma from 79 patients with ITP, 50 healthy volunteers, and 25 patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia, to investigate their complement activation/fixation capacity (CAC) on immobilized heterologous platelets. Enhanced CAC was found in 46 plasma samples (59%) from patients with ITP, but no samples from patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia. Plasma from healthy volunteers was used for comparison. In patients with ITP, an enhanced plasma CAC was associated with a decreased circulating absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) (<15 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.027) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.024). The positive predictive value of an enhanced CAC for a low A-IPF was 93%, with a specificity of 77%. The specificity and positive predictive values increased to 100% when plasma CAC was defined strictly by enhanced C1q and/or C4d deposition on test platelets. Although no statistically significant correlation emerged between CAC and response to different pharmacological therapies, an enhanced response to splenectomy was noted (P < 0.063). Thus, complement fixation may contribute to the thrombocytopenia of ITP by enhancing clearance of opsonized platelets from the circulation, and/or directly damaging platelets and megakaryocytes. PMID:19925495

  17. Complement Activation on Platelets Correlates with a Decrease in Circulating Immature Platelets in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Peerschke, Ellinor I.B.; Andemariam, Biree; Yin, Wei; Bussel, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The role of the complement system in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is not well defined. We examined plasma from 79 patients with ITP, 50 healthy volunteers, and 25 patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia, to investigate their complement activation/fixation capacity (CAC) on immobilized heterologous platelets. Enhanced CAC was found in 46 plasma samples (59%) from patients with ITP, but no samples from patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia. Plasma from healthy volunteers was used for comparison. In patients with ITP, an enhanced plasma CAC was associated with a decreased circulating absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) (<15 × 109/L) (p = 0.027) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count less than 100K/μl) (p= 0.024). The positive predictive value of an enhanced CAC for a low A-IPF was 93%, with a specificity of 77%. The specificity and positive predictive values increased to 100% when plasma CAC was defined strictly by enhanced C1q and/or C4d deposition on test platelets. Although no statistically significant correlation emerged between CAC and response to different pharmacologic therapies, an enhanced response to splenectomy was noted (p <0.063). Thus, complement fixation may contribute to the thrombocytopenia of ITP by enhancing clearance of opsonized platelets from the circulation, and/or directly damaging platelets and megakaryocytes. PMID:19925495

  18. Platelet microparticles are internalized in neutrophils via the concerted activity of 12-lipoxygenase and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA

    PubMed Central

    Duchez, Anne-Claire; Boudreau, Luc H.; Naika, Gajendra S.; Bollinger, James; Belleannée, Clémence; Cloutier, Nathalie; Laffont, Benoit; Mendoza-Villarroel, Raifish E.; Lévesque, Tania; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Matthieu; Allaeys, Isabelle; Tremblay, Jacques J.; Poubelle, Patrice E.; Lambeau, Gérard; Pouliot, Marc; Provost, Patrick; Soulet, Denis; Gelb, Michael H.; Boilard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are anucleated blood elements highly potent at generating extracellular vesicles (EVs) called microparticles (MPs). Whereas EVs are accepted as an important means of intercellular communication, the mechanisms underlying platelet MP internalization in recipient cells are poorly understood. Our lipidomic analyses identified 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid [12(S)-HETE] as the predominant eicosanoid generated by MPs. Mechanistically, 12(S)-HETE is produced through the concerted activity of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), present in inflammatory fluids, and platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO), expressed by platelet MPs. Platelet MPs convey an elaborate set of transcription factors and nucleic acids, and contain mitochondria. We observed that MPs and their cargo are internalized by activated neutrophils in the endomembrane system via 12(S)-HETE. Platelet MPs are found inside neutrophils isolated from the joints of arthritic patients, and are found in neutrophils only in the presence of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO in an in vivo model of autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Using a combination of genetically modified mice, we show that the coordinated action of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO promotes inflammatory arthritis. These findings identify 12(S)-HETE as a trigger of platelet MP internalization by neutrophils, a mechanism highly relevant to inflammatory processes. Because sPLA2-IIA is induced during inflammation, and 12-LO expression is restricted mainly to platelets, these observations demonstrate that platelet MPs promote their internalization in recipient cells through highly regulated mechanisms. PMID:26106157

  19. Pravastatin and C reactive protein modulate protease- activated receptor-1 expression in vitro blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Chu, L-X; Zhou, S-X; Yang, F; Qin, Y-Q; Liang, Z-S; Mo, C-G; Wang, X-D; Xie, J; He, L-P

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) plays an important role in mediating activation of human platelets by thrombin. However, mechanism of statin in ADP-induced platelet PAR-1 expression is also unknown. Aggregometry, flow cytometry, immunoblotting and ELISA were used to determine role of pravastatin participating in ADP-induced platelet activation and PAR-1 expression. ADP stimulation significantly increased PAR-1 expression on platelets. PAR-1 antagonist SCH-79797 inhibited platelet aggregation as well as decreased platelet P-selectin expression induced by ADP. CRP inhibited PAR-1 expression induced by ADP in a concentration-dependent manner. Pravastatin treatment reduced PAR-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination treatment of CRP and Pravastatin significantly reduced platelet PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. By western-blot analysis, pravastatin treatment did not influence total PAR-1 after ADP treatment. CRP decreased platelet total PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. Pravastatin and CRP reduced TXB2 formation by ADP significantly. CRP decreased thrombin fragment F1+2 level with ADP treatment. Pravastatin, in contrast, did not influence F1+2 level. Upon treatment with Pravastatin reduced platelet LOX-1 expression induced by ADP. In conclusion, PAR-1 served as a critical mechanism to relay platelet activation process induced by ADP. CRP and pravastatin reduce PAR-1 expression in platelet by ADP pathway. PMID:26950455

  20. Human platelet glycoprotein Ia. One component is only expressed on the surface of activated platelets and may be a granule constituent

    SciTech Connect

    Bienz, D.; Clemetson, K.J.

    1989-01-05

    Glycoprotein Ia (GP Ia) is a relatively minor component of human blood platelets thought to be a receptor involved in collagen-induced platelet activation. However, some difficulties exist with the definition of this glycoprotein. The expression of GP Ia on resting (prostacyclin analogue-treated) and thrombin-activated platelets was compared by surface labeling with /sup 125/I-lactoperoxidase. Intact platelets or platelets solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate were labeled with periodate/(/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/. Analysis on two-dimensional isoelectric focusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels showed that GP Ia is very poorly labeled in resting platelets. After activation a new spot (GP Ia*) appears with the same relative molecular mass as GP Ia under reducing conditions. GP Ia and Ia* can be clearly separated by two-dimensional nonreduced/reduced gel electrophoresis. Therefore, two glycoproteins which have been termed GP Ia exist in platelets with similar molecular weight and pI under reducing conditions. One of these (GP Ia*) is only surface-labeled when platelets are activated, indicating that it is only exposed on the surface of activated platelets. Supernatant from activated platelets contains this glycoprotein as well as other granule components. This glycoprotein is missing in platelets from two patients with collagen-response defects.

  1. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shakti D; Fairbairn, Rory L; Gell, David A; Latham, Roger D; Sohal, Sukhwinder S; Walters, Eugene H; O’Toole, Ronan F

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disease and stroke. Tobacco smoking, the primary risk factor for the development of COPD, induces increased expression of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr) in the lung epithelium. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Streptococcus pneumoniae adhere to PAFr on the luminal surface of human respiratory tract epithelial cells. Objective To investigate PAFr as a potential drug target for the prevention of infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of acute exacerbations in COPD patients, NTHi and S. pneumoniae. Methods Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). PAFr expression levels were determined using immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The epithelial cells were challenged with either NTHi or S. pneumoniae labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and bacterial adhesion was measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of a well-evaluated antagonist of PAFr, WEB-2086, on binding of the bacterial pathogens to BEAS-2B cells was then assessed. In silico studies of the tertiary structure of PAFr and the binding pocket for PAF and its antagonist WEB-2086 were undertaken. Results PAFr expression by bronchial epithelial cells was upregulated by CSE, and significantly associated with increased bacterial adhesion. WEB-2086 reduced the epithelial adhesion by both NTHi and S. pneumoniae to levels observed for non-CSE-exposed cells. Furthermore, it was nontoxic toward the bronchial epithelial cells. In silico analyses identified a binding pocket for PAF/WEB-2086 in the predicted PAFr structure. Conclusion WEB-2086 represents an innovative class of candidate drugs for inhibiting PAFr-dependent lung infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of smoking-related COPD. PMID:27524890

  2. Activated platelet chemiluminescence and presence of CD45+ platelets in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gabbasov, Zufar; Ivanova, Oxana; Kogan-Yasny, Victor; Ryzhkova, Evgeniya; Saburova, Olga; Vorobyeva, Inna; Vasilieva, Elena

    2014-01-01

    It has been found that in 15% of acute myocardial infarction patients' platelets generate reactive oxygen species that can be detected with luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of platelet-rich plasma within 8-10 days after acute myocardial infarction. This increase in generate reactive oxygen species production coincides with the emergence of CD45(+) platelets. The ability of platelets to carry surface leuk