Science.gov

Sample records for platelet decorated von

  1. Diagnostic Value of Measuring Platelet Von Willebrand Factor in Von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Casonato, Alessandra; Cattini, Maria Grazia; Daidone, Viviana; Pontara, Elena; Bertomoro, Antonella; Prandoni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) may be caused by an impaired von Willebrand factor (VWF) synthesis, its increased clearance or abnormal function, or combinations of these factors. It may be difficult to recognize the different contributions of these anomalies. Here we demonstrate that VWD diagnostics gains from measuring platelet VWF, which can reveal a defective VWF synthesis. Measuring platelet VWF revealed that: severe type 1 VWD always coincided with significantly lower platelet and plasma VWF levels, whereas mild forms revealed low plasma VWF levels associated with low or normal platelet VWF levels, and the latter were associated with a slightly shorter VWF survival; type Vicenza (the archetype VWD caused by a reduced VWF survival) featured normal platelet VWF levels despite significantly reduced plasma VWF levels; type 2B patients could have either normal platelet VWF levels associated with abnormal multimer patterns, or reduced platelet VWF levels associated with normal multimer patterns; type 2A patients could have reduced or normal platelet VWF levels, the former associated mainly with type 2A-I, the latter with type 2A-II; plasma and platelet VWF levels were normal in type 2N, except when the defect was associated with a quantitative VWF mutation. Our findings show that measuring platelet VWF helps to characterize VWD, especially the ambiguous phenotypes, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying the disorder. PMID:27532107

  2. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L.; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-04-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.There is substantial

  3. Heparin inhibition of von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, M; McNeill, P M; Carlson, P L; Kermode, J C; Adelman, B; Conroy, R; Marques, D

    1991-01-01

    The intravenous administration of heparin to patients before open heart surgery reduced ristocetin cofactor activity by 58% (P less than 0.01, t test), and this impairment of von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet function was closely related to plasma heparin levels (r2 = 0.9), but not to plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) levels. We hypothesized that heparin may inhibit vWF-dependent platelet hemostatic functions by directly binding vWF in solution and interfering with vWF-GpIb binding. Using the in vitro techniques of ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination, fluorescent flow cytometric measurement of vWF-platelet binding, and conventional radioligand binding assays we observed that heparin inhibited both vWF-dependent platelet function and vWF-platelet binding in a parallel and dose-dependent manner. Heparin also inhibited platelet agglutination induced by bovine vWF and inhibited the binding of human asialo-vWF to platelets in ristocetin-free systems. The inhibitory potency of heparin was not dependent upon its affinity for antithrombin III, but was molecular weight dependent: homogeneous preparations of lower molecular weight were less inhibitory. Heparin impairment of vWF function may explain why some hemorrhagic complications of heparin therapy are not predictable based on techniques for monitoring the conventional anticoagulant effects of heparin. PMID:2022745

  4. Mutation in the gene encoding the. alpha. chain of platelet glycoprotein Ib in platelet-type von Willebrand disease

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.L.; Cunningham, D.; Lyle, V.A.; Finch, C.N. )

    1991-06-01

    Platelet-type von Willebrand disease (PT-vWD) is an autosomal dominant bleeding disorder characterized by abnormally enhanced binding of von Willebrand factor (vWF) by patient platelets. Although the platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ib/IX complex is known to constitute the platelet's ristocetin-dependent receptor for vWF, a unique structural abnormality within this complex has not previously been identified in PT-vWD. Using the poly merase chain reaction to amplify genomic DNA coding for the {alpha} chain of GP Ib (GP IB{alpha}) and then sequencing the amplified DNA following cloning into M13mp18 and M13mp19 phage vectors, the authors have found a single point mutation in the GP Ib{alpha} coding region of PT-vWD DNA resulting in the substitution of valine for glycine at residue 233. This substitution within the vWF-binding region of GP Ib{alpha} is likely to exert a significant influence on the conformation of the resulting protein. Competitive oligonucleotide primer assay for this mutation showed a homozygous wild-type pattern in genomic DNA from the 161 normal volunteers studied and from 6 phenotypically normal members of a PT-vWD family. All 7 affected members of this family studied were heterozygous for the mutant allele. Platelet GP Ib{alpha} mRNA reverse-transcribed and studied by competitive oligonucleotide primer assay showed similar expression of the mutant and wild-type alleles in the affected PT-vWD patients. Absence in the normal population, tight linkage with phenotypic expression of disease, and absence of any additional abnormality of GP Ib{alpha} in these patients identify the glycine-to-valine substitution as a point mutation underlying functional abnormality of the vWF receptor in PT-vWD.

  5. Platelet-type von Willebrand disease: a rare, often misdiagnosed and underdiagnosed bleeding disorder.

    PubMed

    Othman, Maha

    2011-07-01

    Platelet-type von Willebrand disease (PT-VWD) is an autosomal dominant rare bleeding disorder characterized by hyperresponsive platelets. This inherent platelet function defect is due to a gain-of-function mutation within the GP1BA gene coding for the platelet surface glycoprotein Ib alpha protein, the receptor for the adhesive protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). The defect results in excessive and unnecessary platelet-VWF interaction with subsequent removal of the hemostatically efficient high molecular weight VWF as well as platelets from the circulation, leading to thrombocytopenia and bleeding diathesis. Patients with PT-VWD present with mild to moderate mucocutaneous bleeding, which becomes more pronounced during pregnancy and following aspirin ingestion or drugs that have antiplatelet activity. Laboratory testing shows low VWF:ristocetin cofactor and low or normal VWF:antigen and characteristically an enhanced ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination (RIPA). These laboratory features are also indicators of the closely similar and more common bleeding disorder type 2B VWD. Simplified RIPA mixing assays, cryoprecipitate challenge, and flow cytometry can differentiate between the two disorders. However, the gold standard is to identify mutations within the VWF gene (indicating type 2B VWD) or the platelet GP1BA gene (confirming PT-VWD). Treatment is based on making a correct diagnosis of PT-VWD where platelet concentrates instead of VWF/factor VIII preparations should be administered. A recent fairly large retrospective/prospective registry-based international study showed that PT-VWD is very rare, likely to be misdiagnosed as type 2B VWD or idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and represents 15% of type 2B VWD diagnoses. PMID:22102188

  6. Some interactions between human platelets and glass: von Willebrand's disease compared with normal.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, J R; Heywood, J B

    1967-01-01

    If native or heparinized blood is passed slowly through a column of glass beads at room temperature, the number of platelets removed from the initial drop emerging from the column is less than that removed from the final drop. At 4 degrees C. this difference disappears. If the blood is passed rapidly through such columns at room temperature fewer platelets are removed, but the initial-final difference persists. Von Willebrand's platelets are removed normally at slow speeds; at fast speeds abnormally few platelets are removed. Platelets emerging from all such columns are in aggregates. On adding glass beads to normal heparinized plasma, the platelets at once become more rounded and after about 50 seconds' delay they aggregate: the delay and rate of aggregation can be quantitated. Aggregation occurs best at 20 to 30 degrees C. and is not inhibited by the addition of some enzyme inhibitors. In von Willebrand's disease all these glass-induced aggregation phenomena occur normally and aggregation in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), serotonin creatinine sulphate (5-HT), adrenaline, collagen, and glass is also normal. PMID:5297360

  7. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets†

    PubMed Central

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassa n; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L.

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide–lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet’s primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF’s D′–D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF’s A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF’s A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP. PMID

  8. Evidence that the primary binding site of von Willebrand factor that mediates platelet adhesion on subendothelium is not collagen.

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, P G; Ottenhof-Rovers, M; van Mourik, J A; Sixma, J J

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the binding of von Willebrand factor to extracellular matrices of endothelial cells and to the vessel wall of human umbilical arteries in relation to its function in supporting platelet adhesion. CLB-RAg 201, an MAb against von Willebrand factor, completely inhibits the binding of von Willebrand factor to collagen type I and type III. CLB-RAg 201 does not inhibit the binding of 125I-von Willebrand factor to extracellular matrices of endothelial cells, to smooth muscle cells, or to the subendothelium. CLB-RAg 201 partly inhibits platelet adhesion to these surfaces, but this directly affects the interaction between von Willebrand factor and platelets and is not due to inhibition of binding of von Willebrand factor to these surfaces. Another MAb, CLB-RAg 38, does not inhibit the binding of von Willebrand factor to collagen. CLB-RAg 38 completely inhibits the binding of von Willebrand factor to extracellular matrices. CLB-RAg 38 inhibits platelet adhesion to cellular matrices completely insofar as it is dependent on plasma von Willebrand factor. CLB-RAg 38 does not inhibit the total binding of von Willebrand factor to subendothelium, as there are too many different binding sites, but it completely inhibits the functional binding sites for von Willebrand factor that support platelet adhesion. The epitopes for CLB-RAg 38 and 201 on the von Willebrand factor molecule are located on different fragments of the molecule. These results indicate that von Willebrand factor binds to subendothelium and matrices of cultured cells by a mechanism that is different from that by which it binds to collagen. Images PMID:2839553

  9. Paradoxical Effect of Nonphysiological Shear Stress on Platelets and von Willebrand Factor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zengsheng; Mondal, Nandan K; Ding, Jun; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2016-07-01

    Blood can become hypercoagulable by shear-induced platelet activation and generation of microparticles. It has been reported that nonphysiological shear stress (NPSS) could induce shedding of platelet receptor glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, which may result in an opposite effect to hemostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the NPSS on platelets and von Willebrand factor (vWF). Human blood was exposed to two levels of NPSS (25 Pa, 125 Pa) with an exposure time of 0.5 s, generated by using a novel blood-shearing device. Platelet activation (P-selectin expression, GPIIb/IIIa activation and generation of microparticles) and shedding of three platelet receptors (GPIbα, GPVI, GPIIb/IIIa) in sheared blood were quantified using flow cytometry. Aggregation capacity of sheared blood induced by ristocetin and collagen was evaluated using an aggregometer. Shear-induced vWF damage was characterized with Western blotting. Consistent with the published data, the NPSS caused significantly more platelets to become activated with increasing NPSS level. Meanwhile, the NPSS induced the shedding of platelet receptors. The loss of the platelet receptors increased with increasing NPSS level. The aggregation capacity of sheared blood induced by ristocetin and collagen decreased. There was a loss of high molecular weight multimers (HMWMs) of vWF in sheared blood. These results suggest that the NPSS induced a paradoxical effect. More activated platelets increase the risk of thrombosis, while the reduction in platelet receptors and the loss of HMWM-vWF increased the propensity of bleeding. The finding might provide a new perspective to understand thrombosis and acquired bleeding disorder in patients supported with blood contacting medical devices. PMID:26582038

  10. Mechanism of platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor and microparticle formation under high shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Reininger, Armin J.; Heijnen, Harry F. G.; Schumann, Hannah; Specht, Hanno M.; Schramm, Wolfgang; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2006-01-01

    We describe here the mechanism of platelet adhesion to immobilized von Willebrand factor (VWF) and subsequent formation of platelet-derived microparticles mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) under high shear stress. As visualized in whole blood perfused in a flow chamber, platelet attachment to VWF involved one or few membrane areas of 0.05 to 0.1 μm2 that formed discrete adhesion points (DAPs) capable of resisting force in excess of 160 pN. Under the influence of hydrodynamic drag, membrane tethers developed between the moving platelet body and DAPs firmly adherent to immobilized VWF. Continued stretching eventually caused the separation of many such tethers, leaving on the surface tube-shaped or spherical microparticles with a diameter as low as 50 to 100 nm. Adhesion receptors (GPIbα, αIIbβ3) and phosphatidylserine were expressed on the surface of these microparticles, which were procoagulant. Shearing platelet-rich plasma at the rate of 10 000 s–1 in a cone-and-plate viscosimeter increased microparticle counts up to 55-fold above baseline. Blocking the GPIb-VWF interaction abolished microparticle generation in both experimental conditions. Thus, a biomechanical process mediated by GPIbα-VWF bonds in rapidly flowing blood may not only initiate platelet arrest onto reactive vascular surfaces but also generate procoagulant microparticles that further enhance thrombus formation. PMID:16449527

  11. Von Willebrand factor availability in platelet concentrates stored for 5 days.

    PubMed

    Cesar, J M; García-Avello, A; Monteagudo, J; Espinosa, J I; Lodos, J C; Castillo, R; Navarro, J L

    1994-02-01

    Von Willebrand factor (vWF) availability was assessed in platelet concentrates (PCs). After 5 days of storage, 82 +/- 9% of basal levels of ristocetin cofactor activity (vWF:RCo) remained in PCs. vWF antigen (vWF:Ag) increased up to 166 +/- 38% (P < 0.05) in the same period. Autoradiograph pattern of vW:Ag showed an increase in low molecular weight multimers, and fast migrating multimeric forms were visualized by crossed immunoelectrophoresis on day 5. Studies carried out in platelet free plasma stored as PCs showed similar changes in vWF:RCo but increments in vWF:Ag were not detected. These data indicate that PCs maintain vWF:RCo levels of clinical value even after 5 days of storage and suggest that vWF comes out from platelets to plasma during storage. PMID:8141116

  12. Structural origins of misfolding propensity in the platelet adhesive von Willebrand factor A1 domain.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael T; Tischer, Alexander; Whitten, Steven T; Auton, Matthew

    2015-07-21

    The von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1 and A3 domains are structurally isomorphic yet exhibit distinct mechanisms of unfolding. The A1 domain, responsible for platelet adhesion to VWF in hemostasis, unfolds through a molten globule intermediate in an apparent three-state mechanism, while A3 unfolds by a classical two-state mechanism. Inspection of the sequences or structures alone does not elucidate the source of this thermodynamic conundrum; however, the three-state character of the A1 domain suggests that it has more than one cooperative substructure yielding two separate unfolding transitions not present in A3. We investigate the extent to which structural elements contributing to intermediate conformations can be identified using a residue-specific implementation of the structure-energy-equivalence-of-domains algorithm (SEED), which parses proteins of known structure into their constituent thermodynamically cooperative components using protein-group-specific, transfer free energies. The structural elements computed to contribute to the non-two-state character coincide with regions where Von Willebrand disease mutations induce misfolded molten globule conformations of the A1 domain. This suggests a mechanism for the regulation of rheological platelet adhesion to A1 based on cooperative flexibility of the α2 and α3 helices flanking the platelet GPIbα receptor binding interface. PMID:26200876

  13. Structural Origins of Misfolding Propensity in the Platelet Adhesive Von Willebrand Factor A1 Domain

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Michael T.; Tischer, Alexander; Whitten, Steven T.; Auton, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1 and A3 domains are structurally isomorphic yet exhibit distinct mechanisms of unfolding. The A1 domain, responsible for platelet adhesion to VWF in hemostasis, unfolds through a molten globule intermediate in an apparent three-state mechanism, while A3 unfolds by a classical two-state mechanism. Inspection of the sequences or structures alone does not elucidate the source of this thermodynamic conundrum; however, the three-state character of the A1 domain suggests that it has more than one cooperative substructure yielding two separate unfolding transitions not present in A3. We investigate the extent to which structural elements contributing to intermediate conformations can be identified using a residue-specific implementation of the structure-energy-equivalence-of-domains algorithm (SEED), which parses proteins of known structure into their constituent thermodynamically cooperative components using protein-group-specific, transfer free energies. The structural elements computed to contribute to the non-two-state character coincide with regions where Von Willebrand disease mutations induce misfolded molten globule conformations of the A1 domain. This suggests a mechanism for the regulation of rheological platelet adhesion to A1 based on cooperative flexibility of the α2 and α3 helices flanking the platelet GPIbα receptor binding interface. PMID:26200876

  14. Platelets

    MedlinePlus

    ... are related to immunity and fighting infection. Platelet Production Platelets are produced in the bone marrow, the ... platelet destruction and also decreased bone marrow platelet production. These problems are caused by autoantibodies. Antibodies are ...

  15. Circulating but not immobilized N-deglycosylated von Willebrand factor increases platelet adhesion under flow conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, M. A.; Huck, V.; Niemeyer, V.; Desch, A.; Angerer, J. I.; McKinnon, T. A. J.; Wixforth, A.; Schneider, S. W.; Schneider, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    The role of von Willebrand factor (VWF) as a shear stress activated platelet adhesive has been related to a coiled-elongated shape conformation. The forces dominating this transition have been suggested to be controlled by the proteins polymeric architecture. However, the fact that 20% of VWF molecular weight originates from glycan moieties has so far been neglected in these calculations. In this study, we present a systematic experimental investigation on the role of N-glycosylation for VWF mediated platelet adhesion under flow. A microfluidic flow chamber with a stenotic compartment that allows one to mimic various physiological flow conditions was designed for the efficient analysis of the adhesion spectrum. Surprisingly, we found an increase in platelet adhesion with elevated shear rate, both qualitatively and quantitatively fully conserved when N-deglycosylated VWF (N-deg-VWF) instead of VWF was immobilized in the microfluidic channel. This has been demonstrated consistently over four orders of magnitude in shear rate. In contrast, when N-deg-VWF was added to the supernatant, an increase in adhesion rate by a factor of two was detected compared to the addition of wild-type VWF. It appears that once immobilized, the role of glycans is at least modified if not—as found here for the case of adhesion—negated. These findings strengthen the physical impact of the circulating polymer on shear dependent platelet adhesion events. At present, there is no theoretical explanation for an increase in platelet adhesion to VWF in the absence of its N-glycans. However, our data indicate that the effective solubility of the protein and hence its shape or conformation may be altered by the degree of glycosylation and is therefore a good candidate for modifying the forces required to uncoil this biopolymer. PMID:24404057

  16. Comparison of PFA-100 testing and bleeding time for detecting platelet hypofunction and von Willebrand disease in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Posan, Emoke; McBane, Robert D; Grill, Diane E; Motsko, Cheri L; Nichols, William L

    2003-09-01

    The PFA-100 instrument (Platelet Function Analyzer, Dade Behring) has been reported to be superior to the bleeding time (BT) as a screening test of primary hemostasis. However evaluation of this device has been principally limited to selected populations. The study's aim was to determine testing performance in clinical practice, by comparing the PFA-100 to the BT for the identification of von Willebrand disease (VWD) and intrinsic platelet hypofunction. From 1998-2000, PFA-100 closure time (CT) for epinephrinecollagen (EPI) and ADP-collagen (ADP) cartridges and modified Ivy BTs were performed on outpatients referred for testing for suspected or known hemorrhagic diathesis (n = 346). Evaluation included assays of von Willebrand factor and platelet aggregometry in addition to platelet flow cytometry and electron microscopy when indicated. The normal distribution of PFA-100 CTs was determined using blood samples from 61 normal donors studied on 155 occasions. Results show that thirty-four patients met the diagnostic criteria for VWD and 31 patients were diagnosed with congenital or acquired intrinsic platelet hypofunction. The sensitivity of the PFA-100 for identification of VWD was significantly better (p < 0.01) than the BT with similar specificity. In contrast, the PFA-100 was comparable, but not superior to the BT for detecting platelet hypofunction. We conclude that the PFA-100 performance compares favorably to the BT for the identification of intrinsic platelet hypofunction in clinical practice with superior sensitivity for detecting VWD. Therefore, the PFA-100 could replace the BT for purposes of screening for VWD and intrinsic platelet hypofunction. When clinical suspicion is strong, testing should be supplemented with assays of von Willebrand factor and platelet aggregometry. PMID:12958618

  17. Functional domains on von Willebrand factor. Recognition of discrete tryptic fragments by monoclonal antibodies that inhibit interaction of von Willebrand factor with platelets and with collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Sixma, J J; Sakariassen, K S; Stel, H V; Houdijk, W P; In der Maur, D W; Hamer, R J; de Groot, P G; van Mourik, J A

    1984-01-01

    We have identified two functional domains on the von Willebrand factor (VWF) moiety of the Factor VIII-von Willebrand factor complex (FVIII-VWF), one interacting with blood platelets, and one interacting with vessel wall collagens, by means of two monoclonal antibodies directed against the VWF molecule, CLB-RAg 35 and CLB-RAg 201. The monoclonal antibody CLB-RAg 35 inhibited virtually all platelet adherence to artery subendothelium and to purified vessel wall collagen type III, at relatively high wall shear rates. CLB-RAg 35 also inhibited the ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation and the binding of FVIII-VWF to the platelet in the presence of ristocetin but did not affect the binding of FVIII-VWF to collagen. The monoclonal antibody CLB-RAg 201 inhibited the binding of FVIII-VWF to purified vessel wall collagen type I and III and all platelet adherence to collagen type III and the platelet adherence to subendothelium that was mediated by FVIII-VWF in plasma. The two functional domains on FVIII-VWF that were recognized by CLB-RAg 35 and CLB-RAg 201 were identified by means of immunoprecipitation studies of trypsin-digested FVIII-VWF. The domains resided on different polypeptide fragments, with a Mr of 48,000 for the collagen binding domain and a Mr of 116,000 for the platelet binding domain. The 116,000-mol wt fragment consisted of subunits of 52,000/56,000 mol wt and 14,000 mol wt after reduction. The 52,000/56,000-mol wt subunits possessed the epitope for CLB-RAg 35. Images PMID:6332119

  18. Identification of a Small Molecule That Modulates Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-von Willebrand Factor Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Broos, Katleen; Trekels, Mieke; Jose, Rani Alphonsa; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Vandeputte, Nele; Venken, Tom; Egle, Brecht; De Borggraeve, Wim M.; Deckmyn, Hans; De Maeyer, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1-glycoprotein (GP) Ibα interaction is of major importance during thrombosis mainly at sites of high shear stress. Inhibitors of this interaction prevent platelet-dependent thrombus formation in vivo, without major bleeding complications. However, the size and/or protein nature of the inhibitors currently in development limit oral bioavailability and clinical development. We therefore aimed to search for a small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitor interfering with the VWF-GPIbα binding. After determination of putative small molecule binding pockets on the surface of VWF-A1 and GPIbα using site-finding algorithms and molecular dynamics, high throughput molecular docking was performed on both binding partners. A selection of compounds showing good in silico docking scores into the predicted pockets was retained for testing their in vitro effect on VWF-GPIbα complex formation, by which we identified a compound that surprisingly stimulated the VWF-GPIbα binding in a ristocetin cofactor ELISA and increased platelet adhesion in whole blood to collagen under arterial shear rate but in contrast inhibited ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. The selected compound adhering to the predicted binding partner GPIbα could be confirmed by saturation transfer difference NMR spectroscopy. We thus clearly identified a small molecule that modulates VWF-GPIbα binding and that will now serve as a starting point for further studies and chemical modifications to fully characterize the interaction and to manipulate specific activity of the compound. PMID:22232560

  19. Molecular Imaging of Platelet-Endothelial Interactions and Endothelial Von Willebrand Factor In Early and Mid-Stage Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Chi Young; Liu, Ya Ni; Atkinson, Tamara; Xie, Aris; Foster, Ted; Davidson, Brian P.; Treible, Mackenzie; Qi, Yue; López, José A.; Munday, Adam; Ruggeri, Zaverio; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-thrombotic platelet-endothelial interactions may contribute to atherosclerotic plaque development, although in vivo studies examining mechanism without platelet pre-activation are lacking. Using in vivo molecular imaging at various stages of atherosclerosis, we quantified platelet-endothelial interactions and evaluated the contribution of major adhesion pathways. Methods and Results Mice deficient for the LDL-receptor and Apobec-1 were studied as an age-dependent model of atherosclerosis at 10, 20, 30, and 40 wks of age, which provided progressive increase in stage from very early fatty streak (10 wks) to large complex plaques without rupture (40 wks). Platelet-targeted contrast ultrasound molecular imaging of the thoracic aorta performed with microbubbles targeted to GPIbα demonstrated selective signal enhancement as early as 10 weeks of age. This signal increased progressively with age (almost 8-fold increase from 10 to 40 weeks, ANOVA p<0.001). Specificity for platelet targeting was confirmed by the reduction in platelet-targeted signal commensurate with the decrease in platelet count after immunodepletion with anti-GPIb or anti-CD41 antibody. Inhibition of P-selectin in 20 and 40 wk atherosclerotic mice resulted in a small (15-30%) reduction in platelet signal. Molecular imaging with microbubbles targeted to the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor (VWF) demonstrated selective signal enhancement at all time points which did not significantly increase with age. Treatment of 20 and 40 week mice with recombinant ADAMTS13 eliminated platelet and VWF molecular imaging signal. Conclusions Platelet-endothelial interactions occur in early atherosclerosis. These interactions are in part due to endothelial VWF large multimers which can be reversed with exogenous ADAMTS13. PMID:26156014

  20. Identification of a point mutation in type IIB von Willebrand disease illustrating the regulation of von Willebrand factor affinity for the platelet membrane glycoprotein Ib-IX receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, J.; Dent, J.A.; Azuma, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Kyrle, P.A.; Yoshioka, Akira; Ruggeri, Z.M. )

    1991-04-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) supports platelet adhesion on thrombogenic surfaces by binding to platelet membrane glycoprotein (GP) Ib in the GP Ib-IX receptor complex. This interaction is physiologically regulated so that it does not occur between circulating vWF and platelets but, rather, only at a site of vascular injury. The abnormal vWF found in type IIB von Willebrand disease, however, has a characteristically increased affinity for GP Ib and binds to circulating platelets. The authors have analyzed the molecular basis of this abnormality by sequence analysis of a type IIB vWF cDNA and have identified a single amino acid change, Trp{sup 550} to Cys{sup 550}, located in the GP IB-binding domain of the molecule comprising residues 449-728. Bacterial expression of recombinant fragments corresponding to this vWF domain yielded molecules that, whether containing a normal Trp{sup 550} or a mutant Cys{sup 550} residue, bound directly to GP Ib in the absence of modulators and with similar affinity. These results identify a region of vWF that, although not thought to be directly involved in binding to GP Ib, may modulate the interaction through conformational changes.

  1. Ionizing radiation enhances platelet adhesion to the extracellular matrix of human endothelial cells by an increase in the release of von Willebrand factor

    SciTech Connect

    Verheij, M.; Dewit, L.G.H. ); Boomgaard, M.N.; Brinkman, H.J.M.; Mourik, J.A. van )

    1994-02-01

    The effect of radiation on the secretion of von Willebrand factor by endothelial cells was studied in a three-compartment culture system. The release of von Willebrand factor was significantly increased at 48 h after a single [gamma]-radiation dose of 20 Gy in both the luminal and abluminal direction by 23 (P < 0.05) and 41% (P < 0.02), respectively. To establish whether the enhanced production of von Willebrand factor affected the thrombogenicity of the extracellular matrix, platelet adhesion to the matrix produced by a monolayer of cultured endothelial cells during 48 h after irradiation was analyzed in a perfusion chamber at high shear rate (1300 s[sup [minus]1]). Platelet adhesion was significantly increased by irradiation both in the presence and in the absence of plasmatic von Willebrand factor by 65 (P < 0.05) and 34.5% (P < 0.005), respectively. Incubation of the perfusate with a monoclonal antibody that blocks the binding of von Willebrand factor to platelet GPIb (CLB-RAg 35) resulted in an almost complete inhibition of platelet adhesion. These data indicate that radiation enhances platelet adhesion to the extracellular matrix by an increase in the release of von Willebrand factor by endothelial cells. This event may be important in early radiation-induced vascular pathology. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Identification of a point mutation in type IIB von Willebrand disease illustrating the regulation of von Willebrand factor affinity for the platelet membrane glycoprotein Ib-IX receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ware, J; Dent, J A; Azuma, H; Sugimoto, M; Kyrle, P A; Yoshioka, A; Ruggeri, Z M

    1991-01-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) supports platelet adhesion on thrombogenic surfaces by binding to platelet membrane glycoprotein (GP) Ib in the GP Ib-IX receptor complex. This interaction is physiologically regulated so that it does not occur between circulating vWF and platelets but, rather, only at a site of vascular injury. The abnormal vWF found in type IIB von Willebrand disease, however, has a characteristically increased affinity for GP Ib and binds to circulating platelets. We have analyzed the molecular basis of this abnormality by sequence analysis of a type IIB vWF cDNA and have identified a single amino acid change, Trp550 to Cys550, located in the GP Ib-binding domain of the molecule comprising residues 449-728. Bacterial expression of recombinant fragments corresponding to this vWF domain yielded molecules that, whether containing a normal Trp550 or a mutant Cys550 residue, bound directly to GP Ib in the absence of modulators and with similar affinity. In contrast, mammalian cell expression of the same segment of sequence yielded molecules that, when containing the normal Trp550, did not bind to GP Ib directly but, like native vWF, bound in the presence of ristocetin. However, molecules containing the point mutation (Cys550) behaved like type IIB vWF--namely, bound to GP Ib even without ristocetin modulation and, in the presence of ristocetin, had 10-fold higher affinity than molecules with normal sequence. These results identify a region of vWF that, although not thought to be directly involved in binding to GP Ib, may modulate the interaction through conformational changes. Images PMID:2011604

  3. von Willebrand factor (VWF) propeptide binding to VWF D′D3 domain attenuates platelet activation and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Madabhushi, Sri R.; Shang, Chengwei; Dayananda, Kannayakanahalli M.; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate; Murphy, Mary; Ryan, Thomas E.; Montgomery, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    Noncovalent association between the von Willebrand factor (VWF) propeptide (VWFpp) and mature VWF aids N-terminal multimerization and protein compartmentalization in storage granules. This association is currently thought to dissipate after secretion into blood. In the present study, we examined this proposition by quantifying the affinity and kinetics of VWFpp binding to mature VWF using surface plasmon resonance and by developing novel anti-VWF D′D3 mAbs. Our results show that the only binding site for VWFpp in mature VWF is in its D′D3 domain. At pH 6.2 and 10mM Ca2+, conditions mimicking intracellular compartments, VWFpp-VWF binding occurs with high affinity (KD = 0.2nM, koff = 8 × 10−5 s−1). Significant, albeit weaker, binding (KD = 25nM, koff = 4 × 10−3 s−1) occurs under physiologic conditions of pH 7.4 and 2.5mM Ca2+. This interaction was also observed in human plasma (KD = 50nM). The addition of recombinant VWFpp in both flow-chamber–based platelet adhesion assays and viscometer-based shear-induced platelet aggregation and activation studies reduced platelet adhesion and activation partially. Anti-D′D3 mAb DD3.1, which blocks VWFpp binding to VWF-D′D3, also abrogated platelet adhesion, as shown by shear-induced platelet aggregation and activation studies. Our data demonstrate that VWFpp binding to mature VWF occurs in the circulation, which can regulate the hemostatic potential of VWF by reducing VWF binding to platelet GpIbα. PMID:22452980

  4. Functional behavior of vessels from pigs with von Willebrand disease. Values of platelet deposition are identical to those obtained on normal vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Badimon, L.; Badimon, J.J.; Turitto, V.T.; Rand, J.; Fuster, V.

    1989-03-01

    Vessels from normal pigs and pigs with severe von Willebrand disease were exposed for up to 30 minutes to both nonanticoagulated and heparinized blood from normal pigs in an ex vivo perfusion system. Shear rates at the vessel surface were varied over a broad physiological range, gamma w = 212 to 3380 sec-1. The deposition of /sup 111/In-labeled platelets was determined by radiometric counting. For all shear rates and exposure times investigated, the levels of platelet deposition on de-endothelialized thoracic aorta of normal and von Willebrand disease pigs were not significantly different. Thus, the functional activity of the vessels correlated with the results obtained previously by immunofluorescence. Namely, the von Willebrand factor protein in the thoracic subendothelium of normal pigs is significantly diminished or absent and is comparable to the levels observed in von Willebrand disease pigs.

  5. A molten globule intermediate of the Von Willebrand Factor A1 domain firmly tethers platelets under shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Tischer, Alexander; Madde, Pranathi; Blancas-Mejia, Luis. M.; Auton, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Clinical mutations in patients diagnosed with Type 2A von Willebrand disease (vWD) have been identified that break the single disulfide bond linking N- and C-termini in the vWF A1 domain. We have modeled the effect of these mutations on the disulfide-bonded structure of A1 by reducing and carboxy-amidating these cysteines. Solution biophysical studies show that loss of this disulfide bond induces a molten globule conformational state lacking global tertiary structure but retaining residual secondary structure. The conformational dependence of platelet adhesion to these native and molten globule states of A1 is quantitatively compared using real-time high-speed video microscopy analysis of platelet translocation dynamics under shear flow in a parallel plate micro-fluidic flow chamber. While normal platelets translocating on surface-captured native A1 domain retain the catch-bond character of pause times that increase as a function of shear rate at low shear and decrease as a function of shear rate at high shear, platelets that interact with A1 lacking the disulfide bond remain stably attached and do not translocate. Based on these findings, we propose that the shear stress-sensitive regulation of the A1-GPIb interaction is due to folding the tertiary structure of this domain. Removal of the tertiary structure by disrupting the disulfide bond destroys this regulatory mechanism resulting in high-strength interactions between platelets and vWF A1 that are dependent only on residual secondary structure elements present in the molten globule conformation. PMID:24265179

  6. A molten globule intermediate of the von Willebrand factor A1 domain firmly tethers platelets under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Alexander; Madde, Pranathi; Blancas-Mejia, Luis M; Auton, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Clinical mutations in patients diagnosed with Type 2A von Willebrand disease (VWD) have been identified that break the single disulfide bond linking N- and C-termini in the vWF A1 domain. We have modeled the effect of these mutations on the disulfide-bonded structure of A1 by reducing and carboxy-amidating these cysteines. Solution biophysical studies show that loss of this disulfide bond induces a molten globule conformational state lacking global tertiary structure but retaining residual secondary structure. The conformational dependence of platelet adhesion to these native and molten globule states of A1 is quantitatively compared using real-time high-speed video microscopy analysis of platelet translocation dynamics under shear flow in a parallel plate microfluidic flow chamber. While normal platelets translocating on surface-captured native A1 domain retain the catch-bond character of pause times that increase as a function of shear rate at low shear and decrease as a function of shear rate at high shear, platelets that interact with A1 lacking the disulfide bond remain stably attached and do not translocate. Based on these findings, we propose that the shear stress-sensitive regulation of the A1-GPIb interaction is due to folding the tertiary structure of this domain. Removal of the tertiary structure by disrupting the disulfide bond destroys this regulatory mechanism resulting in high-strength interactions between platelets and vWF A1 that are dependent only on residual secondary structure elements present in the molten globule conformation. PMID:24265179

  7. Changes in thermodynamic stability of von Willebrand factor differentially affect the force-dependent binding to platelet GPIbalpha.

    PubMed

    Auton, Matthew; Sedlák, Erik; Marek, Jozef; Wu, Tao; Zhu, Cheng; Cruz, Miguel A

    2009-07-22

    In circulation, plasma glycoprotein von Willebrand Factor plays an important role in hemostasis and in pathological thrombosis under hydrodynamic forces. Mutations in the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor cause the hereditary types 2B and 2M von Willebrand disease that either enhance (2B) or inhibit (2M) the interaction of von Willebrand factor with the platelet receptor glycoprotein Ibalpha. To understand how type 2B and 2M mutations cause clinically opposite phenotypes, we use a combination of protein unfolding thermodynamics and atomic force microscopy to assess the effects of two type 2B mutations (R1306Q and I1309V) and a type 2M mutation (G1324S) on the conformational stability of the A1 domain and the single bond dissociation kinetics of the A1-GPIbalpha interaction. At physiological temperature, the type 2B mutations destabilize the structure of the A1 domain and shift the A1-GPIbalpha catch to slip bonding to lower forces. Conversely, the type 2M mutation stabilizes the structure of the A1 domain and shifts the A1-GPIbalpha catch to slip bonding to higher forces. As a function of increasing A1 domain stability, the bond lifetime at low force decreases and the critical force required for maximal bond lifetime increases. Our results are able to distinguish the clinical phenotypes of these naturally occurring mutations from a thermodynamic and biophysical perspective that provides a quantitative description of the allosteric coupling of A1 conformational stability with the force dependent catch to slip bonding between A1 and GPIbalpha. PMID:19619477

  8. Frequency of platelet type versus type 2B von Willebrand disease. An international registry-based study.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Alexander; Ozelo, Margareth; Leggo, Jayne; Notley, Colleen; Brown, Hannah; Frontroth, Juan Pablo; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Baghaei, Fariba; Enayat, Said M; Favaloro, Emmanuel; Lillicrap, David; Othman, Maha

    2011-03-01

    Less than 50 patients are reported with platelet type von Willebrand disease (PT-VWD) worldwide. Several reports have discussed the diagnostic challenge of this disease versus the closely similar disorder type 2B VWD. However, no systematic study has evaluated this dilemma globally. Over three years, a total of 110 samples/data from eight countries were analysed. A molecular approach was utilised, analysing exon 28 of the von Willebrand factor (VWF) gene, and in mutation negative cases the platelet GP1BA gene. Our results show that 48 cases initially diagnosed as putative type 2B/PT-VWD carried exon 28 mutations consistent with type 2B VWD, 17 carried GP1BA mutations consistent with a PT-VWD diagnosis, three had other VWD types (2A and 2M) and five expressed three non-previously published exon 28 mutations. Excluding 10 unaffected family members and one acquired VWD, 26 cases did not have mutations in either genes. Based on our study, the percentage of type 2B VWD diagnosis is 44% while the percentage of misdiagnosis of PT-VWD is 15%. This is the first large international study to investigate the occurrence of PT-VWD and type 2B VWD worldwide and to evaluate DNA analysis as a diagnostic tool for a large cohort of patients. The study highlights the diagnostic limitations due to unavailability/poor application of RIPA and related tests in some centres and proposes genetic analysis as a suitable tool for the discrimination of the two disorders worldwide. Cases that are negative for both VWF and GP1BA gene mutations require further evaluation for alternative diagnoses. PMID:21301777

  9. High-density lipoprotein modulates thrombosis by preventing von Willebrand factor self-association and subsequent platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Dominic W; Chen, Junmei; Ling, Minhua; Fu, Xiaoyun; Blevins, Teri; Parsons, Scott; Le, Jennie; Harris, Jeff; Martin, Thomas R; Konkle, Barbara A; Zheng, Ying; López, José A

    2016-02-01

    The ability of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to initiate platelet adhesion depends on the number of monomers in individual VWF multimers and on the self-association of individual VWF multimers into larger structures. VWF self-association is accelerated by shear stress. We observed that VWF self-association occurs during adsorption of VWF onto surfaces, assembly of secreted VWF into hyperadhesive VWF strings on the endothelial surface, and incorporation of fluid-phase VWF into VWF fibers. VWF adsorption under static conditions increased with increased VWF purity and was prevented by a component of plasma. We identified that component as high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and its major apolipoprotein ApoA-I. HDL and ApoA-I also prevented VWF on the endothelium from self-associating into longer strands and inhibited the attachment of fluid-phase VWF onto vessel wall strands. Platelet adhesion to VWF fibers was reduced in proportion to the reduction in self-associated VWF. In a mouse model of thrombotic microangiopathy, HDL also largely prevented the thrombocytopenia induced by injection of high doses of human VWF. Finally, a potential role for ApoA-I in microvascular occlusion associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and sepsis was revealed by the inverse relationship between the concentration of ApoA-I and that of hyperadhesive VWF. These results suggest that interference with VWF self-association would be a new approach to treating thrombotic disorders. PMID:26552698

  10. Congenital platelet function defects

    MedlinePlus

    Kottke-Marchant K. Platelet disorders. In: Hsi ED, ed. Hematopathology . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 2. Nichols WL. Von Willebrand disease and hemorrhagic abnormalities of platelet ...

  11. Modification of the platelet binding domain of von Willebrand Factor (vWF)

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, C.; Mascelli, M.A.; Karl, D.W.; Kirby, E.P.

    1986-05-01

    Bovine vWF has been modified with /sup 125/I-Bolton Hunter reagent (I/sup */-BHR) with a concomittant loss of its platelet agglutinating activity and a reduction in its ability to bind to platelets. BHR labels free alpha and epsilon amino groups. The I/sup */-BHR-vWF migrated as a single band of M/sub r/ = 210kD on reduced SDS polyacrylamide gels. Its multimeric composition on SDS agarose gels was identical to unlabeled vWF. Incorporation of an average of 1.2 moles of I/sup */-BHR/subunit vWF at pH 8.5 caused a 50% loss of platelet agglutinating activity. This represents less than 2% of the 118 lysine residues in each subunit vWF. No I/sup */-BHR was released after treatment with 1M hydroxylamine which would cleave O-acylated tyrosines. Digestion of both unlabeled and I/sup */-BHR-vWF with Protease 1, a metalloprotease from the venom of western diamondback rattlesnake, produces two fragments which have an M/sub r/ of 250kD and 200kD. The 250kD fragment contains the platelet binding site and is composed of 3 peptide chains with M/sub r/ 125kD, 78kD and 45kD. Gels of the 250kD fragment from I/sup */-BHR-vWF revealed radioactivity predominantly in the 125kD fragment, suggesting that the platelet binding site resides on the 125kD fragment.

  12. The N-terminal flanking region of the A1 domain regulates the force-dependent binding of von Willebrand factor to platelet glycoprotein Ibα.

    PubMed

    Ju, Lining; Dong, Jing-fei; Cruz, Miguel A; Zhu, Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Binding of platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) to von Willebrand factor (VWF) initiates platelet adhesion to disrupted vascular surface under arterial blood flow. Flow exerts forces on the platelet that are transmitted to VWF-GPIbα bonds, which regulate their dissociation. Mutations in VWF and/or GPIbα may alter the mechanical regulation of platelet adhesion to cause hemostatic defects as found in patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD). Using a biomembrane force probe, we observed biphasic force-decelerated (catch) and force-accelerated (slip) dissociation of GPIbα from VWF. The VWF A1 domain that contains the N-terminal flanking sequence Gln(1238)-Glu(1260) (1238-A1) formed triphasic slip-catch-slip bonds with GPIbα. By comparison, using a short form of A1 that deletes this sequence (1261-A1) abolished the catch bond, destabilizing its binding to GPIbα at high forces. Importantly, shear-dependent platelet rolling velocities on these VWF ligands in a flow chamber system mirrored the force-dependent single-bond lifetimes. Adding the Gln(1238)-Glu(1260) peptide, which interacted with GPIbα and 1261-A1 but not 1238-A1, to whole blood decreased platelet attachment under shear stress. Soluble Gln(1238)-Glu(1260) reduced the lifetimes of GPIbα bonds with VWF and 1238-A1 but rescued the catch bond of GPIbα with 1261-A1. A type 2B VWD 1238-A1 mutation eliminated the catch bond by prolonging lifetimes at low forces, a type 2M VWD 1238-A1 mutation shifted the respective slip-catch and catch-slip transition points to higher forces, whereas a platelet type VWD GPIbα mutation enhanced the bond lifetime in the entire force regime. These data reveal the structural determinants of VWF activation by hemodynamic force of the circulation. PMID:24062306

  13. von Willebrand Factor-Rich Platelet Thrombi in the Liver Cause Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome following Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nishigori, Naoto; Matsumoto, Masanori; Koyama, Fumikazu; Hayakawa, Masaki; Hatakeyayama, Kinta; Ko, Saiho; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is widely used to treat advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) due to oxaliplatin is a serious type of chemotherapy-associated liver injury (CALI) in CRC patients. SOS is thought to be caused by the sinusoidal endothelial cell damage, which results in the release of unusually-large von Willebrand factor multimers (UL-VWFMs) from endothelial cells. To investigate the pathophysiology of CALI after oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy, we analyzed plasma concentration of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and the distribution of VWFMs in CRC patients. Twenty-three patients with advanced CRC who received oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with (n = 6) and without (n = 17) bevacizumab were analyzed. CALI (n = 6) and splenomegaly (n = 9) were found only in patients who did not treated with bevacizumab. Plasma VWF antigen (VWF:Ag) and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels increased after chemotherapy only in patients without bevacizumab. VWFM analysis in patients who did not receive bevacizumab showed the presence of UL-VWFMs and absence of high molecular weight VWFMs during chemotherapy, especially in those with CALI. In addition, plasma VWF:Ag and AST levels increased after chemotherapy in patients with splenomegaly (n = 9), but not in patients without splenomegaly (n = 14). Histological findings in the liver tissue of patients who did not receive bevacizumab included sinusoidal dilatation and microthrombi in the sinusoids. Many microthrombi were positive for both anti-IIb/IIIa and anti-VWF antibodies. Plasma UL-VWFM levels might be increased by damage to endothelial cells as a result of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Bevacizumab could prevent CALI and splenomegaly through inhibition of VWF-rich platelet thrombus formation. PMID:26580395

  14. von Willebrand factor fibers promote cancer-associated platelet aggregation in malignant melanoma of mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alexander T; Suckau, Jan; Frank, Kathrin; Desch, Anna; Goertz, Lukas; Wagner, Andreas H; Hecker, Markus; Goerge, Tobias; Umansky, Ludmila; Beckhove, Philipp; Utikal, Jochen; Gorzelanny, Christian; Diaz-Valdes, Nancy; Umansky, Viktor; Schneider, Stefan W

    2015-05-14

    Tumor-mediated procoagulatory activity leads to venous thromboembolism and supports metastasis in cancer patients. A prerequisite for metastasis formation is the interaction of cancer cells with endothelial cells (ECs) followed by their extravasation. Although it is known that activation of ECs and the release of the procoagulatory protein von Willebrand factor (VWF) is essential for malignancy, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that VWF fibers in tumor vessels promote tumor-associated thromboembolism and metastasis. Using in vitro settings, mouse models, and human tumor samples, we showed that melanoma cells activate ECs followed by the luminal release of VWF fibers and platelet aggregation in tumor microvessels. Analysis of human blood samples and tumor tissue revealed that a promoted VWF release combined with a local inhibition of proteolytic activity and protein expression of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I repeats 13) accounts for this procoagulatory milieu. Blocking endothelial cell activation by the low-molecular-weight heparin tinzaparin was accompanied by a lack of VWF networks and inhibited tumor progression in a transgenic mouse model. Our findings implicate a mechanism wherein tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) promotes tumor progression and angiogenesis. Thus, targeting EC activation envisions new therapeutic strategies attenuating tumor-related angiogenesis and coagulation. PMID:25977583

  15. Platelet glycoprotein Ibalpha forms catch bonds with human WT vWF but not with type 2B von Willebrand disease vWF.

    PubMed

    Yago, Tadayuki; Lou, Jizhong; Wu, Tao; Yang, Jun; Miner, Jonathan J; Coburn, Leslie; López, José A; Cruz, Miguel A; Dong, Jing-Fei; McIntire, Larry V; McEver, Rodger P; Zhu, Cheng

    2008-09-01

    Arterial blood flow enhances glycoprotein Ibalpha (GPIbalpha) binding to vWF, which initiates platelet adhesion to injured vessels. Mutations in the vWF A1 domain that cause type 2B von Willebrand disease (vWD) reduce the flow requirement for adhesion. Here we show that increasing force on GPIbalpha/vWF bonds first prolonged ("catch") and then shortened ("slip") bond lifetimes. Two type 2B vWD A1 domain mutants, R1306Q and R1450E, converted catch bonds to slip bonds by prolonging bond lifetimes at low forces. Steered molecular dynamics simulations of GPIbalpha dissociating from the A1 domain suggested mechanisms for catch bonds and their conversion by the A1 domain mutations. Catch bonds caused platelets and GPIbalpha-coated microspheres to roll more slowly on WT vWF and WT A1 domains as flow increased from suboptimal levels, explaining flow-enhanced rolling. Longer bond lifetimes at low forces eliminated the flow requirement for rolling on R1306Q and R1450E mutant A1 domains. Flowing platelets agglutinated with microspheres bearing R1306Q or R1450E mutant A1 domains, but not WT A1 domains. Therefore, catch bonds may prevent vWF multimers from agglutinating platelets. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif-13 (ADAMTS-13) reduced platelet agglutination with microspheres bearing a tridomain A1A2A3 vWF fragment with the R1450E mutation in a shear-dependent manner. We conclude that in type 2B vWD, prolonged lifetimes of vWF bonds with GPIbalpha on circulating platelets may allow ADAMTS-13 to deplete large vWF multimers, causing bleeding. PMID:18725999

  16. New assay for measuring binding of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa to unpurified von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Veyradier, A; Jumilly, A L; Ribba, A S; Obert, B; Houllier, A; Meyer, D; Girma, J P

    1999-07-01

    Among the numerous variants of vWD, no patient with an abnormal vWF binding to GPIIb/IIIa has been described to date. To search for such potential variants, we developed a two-site assay for measuring the binding of purified GPIIb/IIIa to vWF in biological fluids and we used it to study a large series of plasmas from various types of von Willebrand disease (vWD) and recombinant vWF (rvWF). vWF in plasma or rvWF in culture medium was immobilized onto anti-vWF monoclonal antibodies (MoAb)-coated wells of microtiter plates. After incubation with either unlabeled GPIIb/IIIa and a 125I-anti-GPIIb/IIIa MoAb or 125I-GPIIb/IIIa, binding curves and binding isotherms were respectively established. Normal pool plasma and wild-type rvWF were used as reference samples. We tested plasmas from 85 normal subjects, 115 patients with different types of vWD (64 type 1, 2 type 3, 9 type 2A, 4 type 2M, 16 type 2B, 15 type 2N, 3 type IID and 2 acquired forms) and 50 patients with various bleeding disorders. Four mutated rvWF with 2A (Glu875Lys and Pro885Ser) or 2B (Dupl.Met540 and Val551Phe) substitutions and one rvWF mutated in the RGD domain of the C-terminal part of vWF-subunit (Asp1746Gly) were also studied. Among the various samples tested, only rvWF Asp1746Gly had no affinity for GPIIb/IIIa. In contrast, GPIIb/IIIa similarly bound to the other vWF, independently of the proteic environment, the factor VIII level, the degree of multimerization or the mutation of vWF. Our results indicate that subjects with an abnormal vWF binding to GPIIb/IIIa are probably rare and difficult to target for a specific screening. PMID:10456467

  17. Identification and Characterization of Novel Variations in Platelet G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Genes in Patients Historically Diagnosed with Type 1 von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Vincenzo C.; Sabi, Essa; Cunningham, Margaret R.; Eikenboom, Jeroen C.; Lethagen, Stefan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Goodeve, Anne C.; Watson, Steve P.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Daly, Martina E.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical expression of type 1 von Willebrand disease may be modified by co-inheritance of other mild bleeding diatheses. We previously showed that mutations in the platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor gene (P2RY12) could contribute to the bleeding phenotype in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease. Here we investigated whether variations in platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes other than P2RY12 also contributed to the bleeding phenotype. Platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes P2RY1, F2R, F2RL3, TBXA2R and PTGIR were sequenced in 146 index cases with type 1 von Willebrand disease and the potential effects of identified single nucleotide variations were assessed using in silico methods and heterologous expression analysis. Seven heterozygous single nucleotide variations were identified in 8 index cases. Two single nucleotide variations were detected in F2R; a novel c.-67G>C transversion which reduced F2R transcriptional activity and a rare c.1063C>T transition predicting a p.L355F substitution which did not interfere with PAR1 expression or signalling. Two synonymous single nucleotide variations were identified in F2RL3 (c.402C>G, p.A134 =; c.1029 G>C p.V343 =), both of which introduced less commonly used codons and were predicted to be deleterious, though neither of them affected PAR4 receptor expression. A third single nucleotide variation in F2RL3 (c.65 C>A; p.T22N) was co-inherited with a synonymous single nucleotide variation in TBXA2R (c.6680 C>T, p.S218 =). Expression and signalling of the p.T22N PAR4 variant was similar to wild-type, while the TBXA2R variation introduced a cryptic splice site that was predicted to cause premature termination of protein translation. The enrichment of single nucleotide variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes among type 1 von Willebrand disease patients supports the view of type 1 von Willebrand disease as a polygenic disorder. PMID:26630678

  18. Identification and Characterization of Novel Variations in Platelet G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Genes in Patients Historically Diagnosed with Type 1 von Willebrand Disease.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Nisar, Shaista P; Leo, Vincenzo C; Sabi, Essa; Cunningham, Margaret R; Eikenboom, Jeroen C; Lethagen, Stefan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Goodeve, Anne C; Watson, Steve P; Mundell, Stuart J; Daly, Martina E

    2015-01-01

    The clinical expression of type 1 von Willebrand disease may be modified by co-inheritance of other mild bleeding diatheses. We previously showed that mutations in the platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor gene (P2RY12) could contribute to the bleeding phenotype in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease. Here we investigated whether variations in platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes other than P2RY12 also contributed to the bleeding phenotype. Platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes P2RY1, F2R, F2RL3, TBXA2R and PTGIR were sequenced in 146 index cases with type 1 von Willebrand disease and the potential effects of identified single nucleotide variations were assessed using in silico methods and heterologous expression analysis. Seven heterozygous single nucleotide variations were identified in 8 index cases. Two single nucleotide variations were detected in F2R; a novel c.-67G>C transversion which reduced F2R transcriptional activity and a rare c.1063C>T transition predicting a p.L355F substitution which did not interfere with PAR1 expression or signalling. Two synonymous single nucleotide variations were identified in F2RL3 (c.402C>G, p.A134 =; c.1029 G>C p.V343 =), both of which introduced less commonly used codons and were predicted to be deleterious, though neither of them affected PAR4 receptor expression. A third single nucleotide variation in F2RL3 (c.65 C>A; p.T22N) was co-inherited with a synonymous single nucleotide variation in TBXA2R (c.6680 C>T, p.S218 =). Expression and signalling of the p.T22N PAR4 variant was similar to wild-type, while the TBXA2R variation introduced a cryptic splice site that was predicted to cause premature termination of protein translation. The enrichment of single nucleotide variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes among type 1 von Willebrand disease patients supports the view of type 1 von Willebrand disease as a polygenic disorder. PMID:26630678

  19. Role of factor VIII-von Willebrand factor and fibronectin in the interaction of platelets in flowing blood with monomeric and fibrillar human collagen types I and III.

    PubMed

    Houdijk, W P; Sakariassen, K S; Nievelstein, P F; Sixma, J J

    1985-02-01

    Platelet adhesion to monomeric collagen types I and III, which were purified from human umbilical arteries, was studied in a perfusion chamber under well defined flow conditions. For this purpose, glass coverslips were coated with 20-30 micrograms/cm2 of collagen types I and III by spraying a solution of these collagens with a retouching air brush. Platelet deposition increased with the time of perfusion. Adhesion to both collagen types was similar in the first 3 min, but increased platelet deposition occurred on collagen type III after 3 min due to thrombus formation. Adhesion at a shear rate of 800 s-1 was strongly impaired with plasma of a patient with von Willebrand's disease or with fibronectin-free plasma. Addition of purified fibronectin to fibronectin-free plasma restored adhesion to the level obtained with normal plasma. Platelet deposition in normal plasma increased with increasing shear rates. Platelet deposition in VWD-plasma was normal at 490 s-1, but there was no increase at higher shear rates. Platelet deposition in fibronectin-free plasma was diminished at all shear rates studied from 490 to 1,300 s-1. Perfusion with a human albumin solution (HAS) to which purified Factor VIII-von Willebrand factor complex (FVIII-VWF) and fibronectin had been added gave similar platelet deposition as with normal plasma. Preincubation of collagen with FVIII-VWF and perfusion with HAS containing fibronectin, or, conversely, preincubation with fibronectin and perfusion with HAS containing FVIII-VWF, also resulted in adhesion similar to that observed in normal plasma. Similar adhesion was also observed after preincubation with both FVIII-VWF and fibronectin and subsequent perfusion with HAS alone. Sequential preincubations with first FVIII-VWF and then fibronectin, or with first fibronectin and then FVIII-VWF followed by perfusion with HAS, also gave a similar adhesion as observed with normal plasma. These data indicate that platelet adhesion to monomeric collagen types

  20. Role of factor VIII-von Willebrand factor and fibronectin in the interaction of platelets in flowing blood with monomeric and fibrillar human collagen types I and III.

    PubMed Central

    Houdijk, W P; Sakariassen, K S; Nievelstein, P F; Sixma, J J

    1985-01-01

    Platelet adhesion to monomeric collagen types I and III, which were purified from human umbilical arteries, was studied in a perfusion chamber under well defined flow conditions. For this purpose, glass coverslips were coated with 20-30 micrograms/cm2 of collagen types I and III by spraying a solution of these collagens with a retouching air brush. Platelet deposition increased with the time of perfusion. Adhesion to both collagen types was similar in the first 3 min, but increased platelet deposition occurred on collagen type III after 3 min due to thrombus formation. Adhesion at a shear rate of 800 s-1 was strongly impaired with plasma of a patient with von Willebrand's disease or with fibronectin-free plasma. Addition of purified fibronectin to fibronectin-free plasma restored adhesion to the level obtained with normal plasma. Platelet deposition in normal plasma increased with increasing shear rates. Platelet deposition in VWD-plasma was normal at 490 s-1, but there was no increase at higher shear rates. Platelet deposition in fibronectin-free plasma was diminished at all shear rates studied from 490 to 1,300 s-1. Perfusion with a human albumin solution (HAS) to which purified Factor VIII-von Willebrand factor complex (FVIII-VWF) and fibronectin had been added gave similar platelet deposition as with normal plasma. Preincubation of collagen with FVIII-VWF and perfusion with HAS containing fibronectin, or, conversely, preincubation with fibronectin and perfusion with HAS containing FVIII-VWF, also resulted in adhesion similar to that observed in normal plasma. Similar adhesion was also observed after preincubation with both FVIII-VWF and fibronectin and subsequent perfusion with HAS alone. Sequential preincubations with first FVIII-VWF and then fibronectin, or with first fibronectin and then FVIII-VWF followed by perfusion with HAS, also gave a similar adhesion as observed with normal plasma. These data indicate that platelet adhesion to monomeric collagen types

  1. Apoptotic Platelet Events Are Not Observed in Severe von Willebrand Disease-Type 2B Mutation p.V1316M

    PubMed Central

    Berrou, Eliane; Kauskot, Alexandre; Adam, Frédéric; Harel, Amélie; Legendre, Paulette; Lavenu Bombled, Cécile; Rothschild, Chantal; Prevost, Nicolas; Christophe, Olivier D.; Lenting, Peter J.; Denis, Cécile V.; Rosa, Jean-Philippe; Bryckaert, Marijke

    2015-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia and increased platelet clearance observed in von Willebrand disease-type 2B (VWD-2B) may be explained by platelet apoptosis triggered by the constitutive binding of VWF to its receptor, glycoprotein Ib (GPIb). Apoptosis was assessed in platelets from two patients with a severe VWD-2B mutation VWF/p.V1316M and from mice transiently expressing VWF/p.V1316M. We now report that the VWD-2B mutation VWF/p.V1316M which binds spontaneously to its receptor GPIbα does not induce apoptosis. In 2 unrelated patients (P1 and P2) exhibiting different VWF plasma levels (70% and 36%, respectively, compared with normal pooled human plasma given as 100%), inner transmembrane depolarization of mitochondria, characteristic of apoptotic events was undetectable in platelets, whether washed or in whole blood. No or a moderate phosphatidyl serine (PS) exposure as measured by annexin-V staining was observed for P1 and P2, respectively. Expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bak and Bax, and caspase-3 activity were similar to control platelets. In the VWD-2B mouse model expressing high levels of mVWF/p.V1316M (423%), similar to what is found in inflammatory pathologies, no significant difference was observed between mice expressing mVWF/WT and mVWF/p.V1316M. These results strongly argue against apoptosis as a mechanism for the thrombocytopenia of severe VWD-2B exhibiting the VWF/p.V1316M mutation. PMID:26645283

  2. A Mechanism for Localized Dynamics-driven Affinity Regulation of the Binding of von Willebrand Factor to Platelet Glycoprotein Ibα*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangjian; Fang, Ying; Wu, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Binding of the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor (vWF) to glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) results in platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation that initiates primary hemostasis. Both the elevated shear stress and the mutations associated with type 2B von Willebrand disease enhance the interaction between A1 and GPIbα. Through molecular dynamics simulations for wild-type vWF-A1 and its eight gain of function mutants (R543Q, I546V, ΔSS, etc.), we found that the gain of function mutations destabilize the N-terminal arm, increase a clock pendulum-like movement of the α2-helix, and turn a closed A1 conformation into a partially open one favoring binding to GPIbα. The residue Arg578 at the α2-helix behaves as a pivot in the destabilization of the N-terminal arm and a consequent dynamic change of the α2-helix. These results suggest a localized dynamics-driven affinity regulation mechanism for vWF-GPIbα interaction. Allosteric drugs controlling this intrinsic protein dynamics may be effective in blocking the GPIb-vWF interaction. PMID:23902764

  3. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  4. How Is von Willebrand Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of your von Willebrand factor. The test helps your doctor diagnose what type of VWD you have. Platelet function test. This test measures how well your platelets are working. You may have these tests ...

  5. Characterization of a myeloma patient with a life-threatening hemorrhagic diathesis: presence of a lambda dimer protein inhibiting shear-induced platelet aggregation by binding to the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Berndt, Michael C; Kaneko, Shin; Suzukawa, Kazumi; Hasegawa, Yuichi; Shigeta, Osamu; Nagasawa, Toshiro

    2005-05-01

    We have identified a patient with IgD lambda-type multiple myeloma who was characterized by a severe bleeding tendency, especially after puncture of arterial vessels. Both the bleeding time (>25 min) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were prolonged. To clarify the underlying pathogenesis, we purified the APTT-prolonging activity from the patient's serum. The purified protein was a highly negatively-charged homodimer of the lambda light chain. The lambda dimer protein (M-protein) inhibited ristocetinand high shear-induced platelet aggregation, dependent on platelet glycoprotein Ibalpha (GPIbalpha), but not epinephrine-, collagen-, ADP-, thrombin-, or botrocetin-induced platelet aggregation. The lambda dimer protein inhibited the binding of platelets to immobilized or ristocetin-treated von Willebrand factor (VWF). Furthermore, a 39/34 kD fragment of VWF encompassing the A1 domain specifically bound to the immobilized lambda dimer protein in the presence of ristocetin, suggesting that the lambda dimer protein directly binds to the A1 domain of VWF. To help elucidate the binding site within the A1 domain, binding of ristocetin-treated VWF to the immobilized lambda dimer protein was assayed in the presence of various anti-A1 domain monoclonal antibodies. Based on these data, we conclude that the lambda dimer protein binds to the region of the A1 domain composed of helices alpha3 and alpha4 and thus interferes with VWF-GPIbalpha interaction. The existence of a protein that inhibits high shear-induced platelet aggregation in acquired von Willebrand disease (VWD) has only rarely been reported. The results suggest that the hemostatic function in arteries with high shear force is profoundly disrupted if the binding of GPIbalpha to VWF is abrogated, supporting the relevance of shear-induced VWF interaction with GPIbalpha in the initiation of the hemostatic process. PMID:15886805

  6. Platelets and galectins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A major function of platelets is keeping the vascular system intact. Platelet activation at sites of vascular injury leads to the formation of a hemostatic plug. Activation of platelets is therefore crucial for normal hemostasis; however, uncontrolled platelet activation may also lead to the formation of occlusive thrombi that can cause ischemic events. Although they are essential for proper hemostasis, platelet function extends to physiologic processes such as tissue repair, wound remodeling and antimicrobial host defense, or pathologic conditions such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis, chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Platelets can be activated by soluble molecules including thrombin, thromboxane A2 (TXA2), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), serotonin or by adhesive extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as von Willebrand factor (vWF) and collagen. Here we describe recent advances in the activation of platelets by non-canonical platelet agonists such as galectins. By acting either in soluble or immobilized form, these glycan-binding proteins trigger all platelet activation responses through modulation of discrete signaling pathways. We also offer new hypotheses and some speculations about the role of platelet-galectin interactions not only in hemostasis and thrombosis but also in inflammation and related diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. PMID:25405160

  7. Analysis of the role of von Willebrand factor, platelet glycoprotein VI-, and α2β1-mediated collagen binding in thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Shida, Yasuaki; Rydz, Natalia; Stegner, David; Brown, Christine; Mewburn, Jeffrey; Sponagle, Kate; Danisment, Ozge; Crawford, Bredon; Vidal, Barbara; Hegadorn, Carol A.; Pruss, Cynthia M.; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Rare missense mutations in the von Willebrand factor (VWF) A3 domain that disrupt collagen binding have been found in patients with a mild bleeding phenotype. However, the analysis of these aberrant VWF-collagen interactions has been limited. Here, we have developed mouse models of collagen-binding mutants and analyzed the function of the A3 domain using comprehensive in vitro and in vivo approaches. Five loss-of-function (p.S1731T, p.W1745C, p.S1783A, p.H1786D, A3 deletion) and 1 gain-of-function (p.L1757A) variants were generated in the mouse VWF complementary DNA. The results of these various assays were consistent, although the magnitude of the effects were different: the gain-of-function (p.L1757A) variant showed consistent enhanced collagen binding whereas the loss-of-function mutants showed variable degrees of functional deficit. We further analyzed the impact of direct platelet-collagen binding by blocking glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and integrin α2β1 in our ferric chloride murine thrombosis model. The inhibition of GPVI demonstrated a comparable functional defect in thrombosis formation to the VWF−/− mice whereas α2β1 inhibition demonstrated a milder bleeding phenotype. Furthermore, a delayed and markedly reduced thrombogenic response was still evident in VWF−/−, GPVI, and α2β1 blocked animals, suggesting that alternative primary hemostatic mechanisms can partially rescue the bleeding phenotype associated with these defects. PMID:25051961

  8. Approaches to synthetic platelet analogs.

    PubMed

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Tian, Lewis L; Pan, Victor; McCrae, Keith R; Mitragotri, Samir; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is routinely used for treating bleeding complications in patients with hematologic or oncologic clotting disorders, chemo/radiotherapy-induced myelosuppression, trauma and surgery. Currently, these transfusions mostly use allogeneic platelet concentrates, while products like lyophilized platelets, cold-stored platelets and infusible platelet membranes are under investigation. These natural platelet-based products pose considerable risks of contamination, resulting in short shelf-life (3-5 days). Recent advances in pathogen reduction technologies have increased shelf-life to ~7 days. Furthermore, natural platelets are short in supply and also cause several biological side effects. Hence, there is significant clinical interest in platelet-mimetic synthetic analogs that can allow long storage-life and minimum side effects. Accordingly, several designs have been studied which decorate synthetic particles with motifs that promote platelet-mimetic adhesion or aggregation. Recent refinement in this design involves combining the adhesion and aggregation functionalities on a single particle platform. Further refinement is being focused on constructing particles that also mimic natural platelet's shape, size and elasticity, to influence margination and wall-interaction. The optimum design of a synthetic platelet analog would require efficient integration of platelet's physico-mechanical properties and biological functionalities. We present a comprehensive review of these approaches and provide our opinion regarding the future directions of this research. PMID:23092864

  9. Platelet activation risk index as a prognostic thrombosis indicator.

    PubMed

    Zlobina, K E; Guria, G Th

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation in blood flow under high, overcritical shear rates is initiated by Von Willebrand factor. Despite the large amount of experimental data that have been obtained, the value of the critical shear rate, above which von Willebrand factor starts to activate platelets, is still controversial. Here, we recommend a theoretical approach to elucidate how the critical blood shear rate is dependent on von Willebrand factor size. We derived a diagram of platelet activation according to the shear rate and von Willebrand factor multimer size. We succeeded in deriving an explicit formula for the dependence of the critical shear rate on von Willebrand factor molecule size. The platelet activation risk index was introduced. This index is dependent on the flow conditions, number of monomers in von Willebrand factor, and platelet sensitivity. Probable medical applications of the platelet activation risk index as a universal prognostic index are discussed. PMID:27461235

  10. Platelet activation risk index as a prognostic thrombosis indicator

    PubMed Central

    Zlobina, K. E.; Guria, G. Th.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation in blood flow under high, overcritical shear rates is initiated by Von Willebrand factor. Despite the large amount of experimental data that have been obtained, the value of the critical shear rate, above which von Willebrand factor starts to activate platelets, is still controversial. Here, we recommend a theoretical approach to elucidate how the critical blood shear rate is dependent on von Willebrand factor size. We derived a diagram of platelet activation according to the shear rate and von Willebrand factor multimer size. We succeeded in deriving an explicit formula for the dependence of the critical shear rate on von Willebrand factor molecule size. The platelet activation risk index was introduced. This index is dependent on the flow conditions, number of monomers in von Willebrand factor, and platelet sensitivity. Probable medical applications of the platelet activation risk index as a universal prognostic index are discussed. PMID:27461235

  11. Calmodulin antagonists induce platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Yan, Rong; Liu, Guanglei; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) antagonists induce apoptosis in various tumor models and inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, thus some of which have been extensively used as anti-cancer agents. In platelets, CaM has been found to bind directly to the cytoplasmic domains of several platelet receptors. Incubation of platelets with CaM antagonists impairs the receptors-related platelet functions. However, it is still unknown whether CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), tamoxifen (TMX), and trifluoperazine (TFP) induce apoptotic events in human platelets, including depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. CaM antagonists did not incur platelet activation as detected by P-selectin surface expression and PAC-1 binding. However, ADP-, botrocetin-, and alpha-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor surface were significantly reduced in platelets pre-treated with CaM antagonists. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels were obviously elevated by both W7 and TMX, and membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced apoptotic events in platelets induced by W7. Therefore, these findings indicate that CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. The elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels may be involved in the regulation of CaM antagonists-induced platelet apoptosis. PMID:20172594

  12. Collection Development "Budget Decorating": Decorating Cents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumaran, Maha

    2008-01-01

    Home decorating is a popular idea these days as seen in the rise of cable television channels like TLC and HGTV (Home & Garden Television) and TV shows like "Trading Spaces, Take This House and Sell It, Design on a Dime, Decorating Cents," and many others. Throughout history, humans have always expressed the desire to personalize and beautify…

  13. Platelet GpIbα Binding to von Willebrand Factor Under Fluid Shear: Contributions of the D'D3‐Domain, A1‐Domain Flanking Peptide and O‐Linked Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Madabhushi, Sri R.; Zhang, Changjie; Kelkar, Anju; Dayananda, Kannayakanahalli M.; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Background Von Willebrand Factor (VWF) A1‐domain binding to platelet receptor GpIbα is an important fluid‐shear dependent interaction that regulates both soluble VWF binding to platelets, and platelet tethering onto immobilized VWF. We evaluated the roles of different structural elements at the N‐terminus of the A1‐domain in regulating shear dependent platelet binding. Specifically, the focus was on the VWF D′D3‐domain, A1‐domain N‐terminal flanking peptide (NFP), and O‐glycans on this peptide. Methods and Results Full‐length dimeric VWF (ΔPro‐VWF), dimeric VWF lacking the D′D3 domain (ΔD′D3‐VWF), and ΔD′D3‐VWF variants lacking either the NFP (ΔD′D3NFP─‐VWF) or just O‐glycans on this peptide (ΔD′D3OG─‐VWF) were expressed. Monomeric VWF‐A1 and D′D3‐A1 were also produced. In ELISA, the apparent dissociation constant (KD) of soluble ΔPro‐VWF binding to immobilized GpIbα (KD≈100 nmol/L) was 50‐ to 100‐fold higher than other proteins lacking the D′D3 domain (KD~0.7 to 2.5 nmol/L). Additionally, in surface plasmon resonance studies, the on‐rate of D′D3‐A1 binding to immobilized GpIbα (kon=1.8±0.4×104 (mol/L)−1·s−1; KD=1.7 μmol/L) was reduced compared with the single VWF‐A1 domain (kon=5.1±0.4×104 (mol/L)−1·s−1; KD=1.2 μmol/L). Thus, VWF‐D′D3 primarily controls soluble VWF binding to GpIbα. In contrast, upon VWF immobilization, all molecular features regulated A1‐GpIbα binding. Here, in ELISA, the number of apparent A1‐domain sites available for binding GpIbα on ΔPro‐VWF was ≈50% that of the ΔD′D3‐VWF variants. In microfluidics based platelet adhesion measurements on immobilized VWF and thrombus formation assays on collagen, human platelet recruitment varied as ΔPro‐VWF<ΔD′D3‐VWF<ΔD′D3NFP─‐VWF<ΔD′D3OG─‐VWF. Conclusions Whereas VWF‐D′D3 is the major regulator of soluble VWF binding to platelet GpIbα, both the D′D3‐domain and N

  14. Basic Cake Decorating Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdany, Mel

    Included in this student workbook for basic cake decorating are the following: (1) Drawings of steps in a basic way to ice a layer cake, how to make a paper cone, various sizes of flower nails, various sizes and types of tin pastry tubes, and special rose tubes; (2) recipes for basic decorating icings (buttercream, rose paste, and royal icing);…

  15. Multiscale model of platelet translocation and collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiwei; Mody, Nipa A.; King, Michael R.

    2013-07-01

    The tethering of platelets on the injured vessel surface mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) - Von Willebrand factor (vWF) bonds, as well as the interaction between flowing platelets and adherent platelets, are two key events that take place immediately following blood vessel injury. This early-stage platelet deposition and accumulation triggers the initiation of hemostasis, a self-defensive mechanism to prevent the body from excessive blood loss. To understand and predict this complex process, one must integrate experimentally determined information on the mechanics and biochemical kinetics of participating receptors over very small time frames (1-1000 μs) and length scales (10-100 nm), to collective phenomena occurring over seconds and tens of microns. In the present study, a unique three dimensional multiscale computational model, Platelet Adhesive Dynamics (PAD), was applied to elucidate the unique physics of (i) a non-spherical, disk-shaped platelet interacting and tethering onto the damaged vessel wall followed by (ii) collisional interactions between a flowing platelet with a downstream adherent platelet. By analyzing numerous simulations under different physiological conditions, we conclude that the platelet's unique spheroid-shape provides heterogeneous, orientation-dependent translocation (rolling) behavior which enhances cell-wall interactions. We also conclude that platelet-platelet near field interactions are critical for cell-cell communication during the initiation of microthrombi. The PAD model described here helps to identify the physical factors that control the initial stages of platelet capture during this process.

  16. New Horizons in Platelets Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Saboor, Muhammad; Moinuddin, Moinuddin; Ilyas, Samina

    2013-01-01

    Platelet flow cytometry is an emerging tool in diagnostic and therapeutic hematology. It is eminently suited to study the expression of platelet surface receptors both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. It can serve as a useful marker for the documentation of in vivo platelet activation, and thus, fore-warn the risk of thromboembolism in patients with diabetes mellitus, coronary syndromes, peripheral vascular diseases, and pre-eclampsia. This technique can also be extended to study and compare the effect of various antiplatelet drugs on the level of activation of platelets and to establish any dose-effect relationship of these drugs. Topographical localization of platelet granules and study of platelet-platelet and platelet-leukocyte interaction is also possible by this procedure. All these parameters serve as pointers towards the presence of activated platelets in the circulation with its thromboembolic consequences. This is a simple reliable and cost effective technique which has a wide application in the diagnosis of various inherited and acquired platelet disorders. Study of platelet cluster of differentiation (CD) markers in various inherited disorders i.e. Bernard Soulier’s disease, von Willebrand disease, Glanzman’s disease, and Grey platelet syndrome may help categories the molecular lesions in these oft under-studied disorders. PMID:23983579

  17. Platelet transport in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, Mathilde; Le Goff, Anne; Blin, Antoine; Pujos, Justine; Magniez, Aurélie; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Blood platelets are small enucleated cells responsible for the arrest of bleeding. These cells have the ability to tether and translocate on injured vascular endothelium, thanks to a specific interaction between a receptor of their membrane and a protein expressed by the cells composing the inner wall of the vessel, the von Willebrand factor (VWF). Others cells have such abilities of rolling. Leucocytes, for example, translocate on surface due to a specific interaction between selectin molecules and their respective glycoprotein ligands. These kinds of cells present two modes of transport: they can either be advected by the flux, or translocate on surfaces due to specific ligand-receptor interactions. Our work consists first in studying experimentally the transport of platelets along a microchannel and then in modeling this particular cell transport. Due to these two modes of transport along a channel, platelets adhering to the surface are not equally distributed along the channel axis. We describe the evolution of the density of platelets with time and distance.

  18. Ceramics with decorative aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voica, Cezara

    2009-08-01

    The last decades brought the development of bone china techniques used for producing the decorative articles. These products can be glazed with a transparent and thin glaze layer, even with more special (decorative) ones which gives new aesthetic aspect. The present article presents the results obtained after the studies performed for matte glazes for decorative bone china. As microcrystalization agent were used zinc oxide; the content of this oxide bring some changes of the basic glaze thus the chemical composition must be adjusted as the fluxes would present the desired properties after the heating process.

  19. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  20. von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goodeve, Anne C.

    2013-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is a common inherited bleeding disorder characterized by excessive mucocutaneous bleeding. Characteristic bleeding symptoms include epistaxis, easy bruising, oral cavity bleeding, menorrhagia, bleeding after dental extraction, surgery and/or childbirth and in severe cases, bleeding into joints and soft tissues. There are three subtypes: types 1 and 3 represent quantitative variants and type 2 is a group of four qualitative variants: 1) type 2A - characterized by defective von Willebrand factor (VWF) -dependent platelet adhesion because of decreased high molecular weight (HMW) VWF multimers, 2) type 2B - caused by pathologically increased VWF-platelet interactions, 3) type 2M - caused by decreased VWF-platelet interactions not based on the loss of HMW multimers and 4) type 2N - characterized by abnormal binding of VWF to FVIII. The diagnosis of VWD requires specialized assays of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and/or molecular genetic testing of VWF. Severe bleeding episodes can be prevented or controlled with intravenous infusions of virally-inactivated plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates containing both VWF and FVIII. Depending on the VWD type, mild bleeding episodes usually respond to intravenous or subcutaneous treatment with desmopressin, a vasopressin analog. Other treatments that can reduce symptoms include fibrinolytic inhibitors and hormones for menorrhagia. PMID:21289515

  1. PLATELET FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Jonathan N.; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is the underlying cause of a number of major clinical conditions and genetic disorders worldwide. While therapeutic agents that bind and stimulate the thrombopoietin receptor are currently available, the development of drugs that directly stimulate megakaryocytes to generate platelets has lagged behind. To improve the management of thrombocytopenia, we will need to define the cell biological pathways that drive the production of platelets from megakaryocytes. This review integrates the latest research of platelet biogenesis and focuses on the molecular pathways that power and regulate proplatelet production. PMID:20620432

  2. Platelet count

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactions Cancer Certain medicines Bone marrow disease called polycythemia vera Bone marrow making too many platelets without a ... leukemia (CML) Hemolytic anemia Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Polycythemia vera Thrombocytopenia Patient Instructions Deep vein thrombosis - discharge Update ...

  3. Platelet Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash Small purplish spots on the skin called purpura, caused by bleeding under the skin Testing may ... Idiopathic thrombocytopenia (ITP), also known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, is the result of antibody production against platelets. ...

  4. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a part of blood, clump together and cause blood to clot. ... Decreased platelet aggregation may be due to: Autoimmune ... Fibrin degradation products Inherited platelet function defects ...

  5. Von Willebrand factor and von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Budde, U; Schneppenheim, R

    2001-12-01

    von Willebrand disease (vWD) is caused by quantitative and/or qualitative defects of the von Willebrand factor (vWF), a multimeric high molecular weight glycoprotein. Typically, it affects the primary hemostatic system, which results in a mucocutaneous bleeding tendency simulating a platelet function defect. The vWF promotes its function in two ways: (i) by initiating platelet adhesion to the injured vessel wall under conditions of high shear forces, and (ii) by its carrier function for factor VIII in plasma. Accumulating knowledge of the different clinical phenotypes and the pathophysiological basis of the disease translated into a classification that differentiated between quantitative and qualitative defects by means of quantitative and functional parameters, and by analyzing the electrophoretic pattern of vWF multimers. The advent of molecular techniques provided the opportunity for conducting genotype-phenotype studies which have recently helped, not only to elucidate or confirm important functions of vWF and its steps in post-translational processing, but also many disease causing defects. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (avWS) has gained more attention during the recent years. An international registry was published and recommendation by the Scientific and Standardization Committee of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis in 2000. It concluded that avWS, although not a frequent disease, is nevertheless probably underdiagnosed. This should be addressed in future prospective studies. The aim of treatment is the correction of the impaired hemostatic system of the patient, ideally including the defects of both primary and secondary hemostasis. Desmopressin is the treatment of choice in about 70% of patients, mostly with type 1, while the others merit treatment with concentrates containing vWF. PMID:11844133

  6. 12 CFR 264b.7 - Decorations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... wear a decoration tendered or awarded by a foreign government in recognition of active field service in... documentation. The recipient may retain the decoration pending action on the request. (b) Decorations...

  7. 7. WEST PORTAL. NOTE DECORATIVE ELEMENTS, INCLUDING DECORATIVE CAPS COVERING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. WEST PORTAL. NOTE DECORATIVE ELEMENTS, INCLUDING DECORATIVE CAPS COVERING COMPRESSION BLOCKS. NAME OF THE BRIDGE COMPANY WITH HERALDIC CARTOUCHE BEARING NAMES OF THREE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BELOW, AND OPEN SCROLL WORK IN WROUGHT IRON. - Peevy Road Bridge, Peevy Road spanning Perkiomen Creek in Upper Hanover Township, East Greenville, Montgomery County, PA

  8. Preservation of hemostatic and structural properties of rehydrated lyophilized platelets: potential for long-term storage of dried platelets for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Read, M S; Reddick, R L; Bode, A P; Bellinger, D A; Nichols, T C; Taylor, K; Smith, S V; McMahon, D K; Griggs, T R; Brinkhous, K M

    1995-01-17

    Currently, therapeutic platelet concentrates can be stored for only 5 days. We have developed a procedure that permits long-term storage of fixed and lyophilized platelets that retain hemostatic properties after rehydration. These rehydrated lyophilized platelets (RL platelets) restore hemostasis in thrombocytopenic rats and become incorporated in the hemostatic plug of bleeding time wounds of normal dogs as well as von Willebrand disease dogs with partially replenished plasma von Willebrand factor. Ultrastructurally, these platelets are well preserved and are comparable to control normal washed platelets. Flow cytometry analysis shows that RL platelets react with antibodies to the major surface receptors, glycoprotein (GP)Ib and GPIIb/IIIa. These receptors are involved in platelet agglutination, aggregation, and adhesion. In vitro functional tests document the ability of RL platelets to adhere to denuded subendothelium and to spread on a foreign surface. Circulating RL platelets participated in carotid arterial thrombus formation induced in normal canine subjects. The participation of RL platelets in these vital hemostatic properties suggests that with further development they could become a stable platelet product for transfusion. PMID:7831298

  9. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003669.htm Platelet aggregation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a ...

  10. 22 CFR 3.7 - Decorations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Decorations. 3.7 Section 3.7 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL GIFTS AND DECORATIONS FROM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS § 3.7 Decorations. (a) Decorations tendered in recognition of active field service in time of combat operations or awarded for...

  11. Analysis of aggregation of platelets in thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    Platelets are key players in thrombus formation by first rolling over collagen bound von Willebrand factor followed by formation of a stable interaction with collagen. The first adhered platelets bind additional platelets until the whole injury is sealed off by a platelet aggregate. The coagulation system stabilizes the formed platelet plug by creating a tight fibrin network, and then wound contraction takes place because of morphological changes in platelets. Coagulation takes place by platelet activation and aggregation mainly through fibrinogen polymerization into fibrin fibers. The process includes multiple factors, such as thrombin, plasmin, and local shear-rate which regulate and control the process. Coagulation can be divided into two pathways: the intrinsic pathway and the extrinsic pathway. The intrinsic pathway is initiated by the exposure of a negatively charged. It is able to activate factor XII, using a complex reaction that includes prekallikrein and high-molecular-weight kininogen as cofactors.. Thrombin is the final enzyme that is needed to convert fibrinogen into fibrin. The extrinsic pathway starts with the exposure of tissue factor to the circulating blood, which is the major initiator of coagulation. There are several feedback loops that reinforce the coagulation cascade, resulting in large amounts of thrombin. It is dependent on the presence of pro-coagulant surfaces of cells expressing negatively charged phospholipids--which include phosphatidylserine (PS)--on their outer membrane. PS-bearing surfaces are able to increase the efficiency of the reactions by concentrating and co-localizing coagulation factors.. Aggregation of platelets are analyzed and compared to adhesion of platelet to erythrocyte and to endothelial cells. This abstract is replacing MAR16-2015-020003.

  12. Platelets deficient in glycoprotein I have normal Fc receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Pfueller, S L; de Rosbo, N K; Bilston, R A

    1984-04-01

    Platelet glycoprotein I (GPI) is known to be required for the interaction of platelets with ristocetin and factor VIII:von Willebrand factor (VIII:vWf). However, its role as Fc receptor is not clear. Some studies have shown that enzymatic removal of GPI destroys the ability of platelets to react with VIII:vWf but not their ability to bind Ig G (IgG). Others have shown that IgG immune complexes which block the Fc receptor also inhibit VIII:vWf interaction with platelets. This subject has been re-examined by testing the ability of platelets with reduced amounts of GPI to aggregate and undergo the release reaction in response to stimuli which act at the platelet Fc receptor. Platelets from two patients with Bernard-Soulier syndrome, congenitally deficient in GPI, both aggregated and released 14C-serotonin normally when exposed to latex particles coated with IgG. Levels of GPI were decreased experimentally in normal platelets by treating them with chymotrypsin. Platelets treated in this manner did not aggregate or release [14C]serotonin in response to ristocetin-VIII:vWf. They did, however, both aggregate and release when incubated with heat-aggregated IgG, antigen-antibody complexes or latex particles coated with IgG. Thus the presence of GPI is not a prerequisite for platelet stimulation via the Fc receptor. PMID:6231945

  13. Fire-Retardant, Decorative Inks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D.; Nir, Z.; Mikroyannidis, J.

    1987-01-01

    Effectiveness of fire-retardant additives evaluated. Fire retardance of decorative acrylic printing inks for aircraft interiors enhanced by certain commercial and experimental fire-retardant additives, according to study.

  14. Tunable superconductivity in decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zheng; Allain, Adrien; Marty, Laetitia; Bendiab, Nedjma; Toulemonde, Pierre; Strobel, Pierre; Coraux, Johann; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    Graphene offers an exposed bidimensional gas of high mobility charge carriers with gate tunable density. Its chemical inertness offers an outstanding platform to explore exotic 2D superconductivity. Superconductivity can be induced in graphene by means of proximity effect (by depositing a set of superconducting metal clusters such as lead or tin nanoparticles). The influence of decoration material, density or particles and disorder of graphene will be discussed. In the case of disordered graphene, Tin decoration leads to a gate-tunable superconducting-to-insulator quantum phase transition. Superconductivity in graphene is also expected to occur under strong charge doping (induced either by gating or under chemical decoration, in analogy with graphite intercalated compounds). I will also show preliminary results showing the influence of Calcium intercalation of few layer graphene and progress toward the demonstration of intrinsic superconductivity in such systems. Work supported by EU GRANT FP7-NMP GRENADA.

  15. Clinical application of radiolabelled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents papers on the clinical applications of radiolabelled platelets. The papers are grouped into six sections on platelet labelling techniques, radiolabelled platelets in cardiology, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy, platelet scintigraphy in stroke patients, platelet scintigraphy in angiology, and platelet scintigraphy in hematology and other clinical applications, including renal transplant rejection.

  16. Acquired platelet function defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... dark black, or tarry bowel movements ; or vomiting blood or material that looks like coffee grounds Nosebleeds ... Tests that may done include: Bleeding time Platelet aggregation test Platelet count PT and PTT

  17. Decreased platelet function in aortic valve stenosis: high shear platelet activation then inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, J. R.; Etherington, M. D.; Brant, J.; Watkins, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To elucidate the mechanism of the bleeding tendency observed in patients with aortic valve stenosis. DESIGN--A prospective study of high and low shear platelet function tests in vitro in normal controls compared with that in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis with a mean (SD) systolic gradient by Doppler of 75 (18) mm Hg before and at least 4 months after aortic valve replacement. SETTING--District general hospital. RESULTS--The patients showed reduced retention in the high shear platelet function tests. (a) Platelet retention in the filter test was 53.6 (12.6)% in patients with aortic valve stenosis and 84.8 (9.6)% in the controls (P < 0.001). (b) Retention in the glass bead column test was 49.8 (19.2) in the patients and 87.4 (8.7) in the controls (P < 0.001). (c) The standard bleeding time was longer in the patients (P < 0.06). Results of the high shear tests (a, b, and c) after aortic valve replacement were within the normal range. The platelet count was low but within the normal range before surgery and increased postoperatively (P < 0.01). There were no differences in the results of standard clotting tests, plasma and intraplatelet von Willebrand's factor, or in 15 platelet aggregation tests using five agonists between patients with aortic valve stenosis and controls. CONCLUSIONS--The high shear haemodynamics of aortic valve stenosis modify platelet function in vivo predisposing to a bleeding tendency. This abnormality of platelet function is detectable only in vitro using high shear tests. The abnormal function is reversed by aortic valve replacement. High shear forces in vitro activate and then inactivate platelets. By the same mechanisms aortic valve stenosis seems to lead to high shear damage in vivo, resulting in a clinically important bleeding tendency in some patients. PMID:8541170

  18. Platelets and Infections – Complex Interactions with Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Damien, Pauline; Chabert, Adrien; Pozzetto, Bruno; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Platelets can be considered sentinels of vascular system due to their high number in the circulation and to the range of functional immunoreceptors they express. Platelets express a wide range of potential bacterial receptors, including complement receptors, FcγRII, Toll-like receptors but also integrins conventionally described in the hemostatic response, such as GPIIb–IIIa or GPIb. Bacteria bind these receptors either directly, or indirectly via fibrinogen, fibronectin, the first complement C1q, the von Willebrand Factor, etc. The fate of platelet-bound bacteria is questioned. Several studies reported the ability of activated platelets to internalize bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Porphyromonas gingivalis, though there is no clue on what happens thereafter. Are they sheltered from the immune system in the cytoplasm of platelets or are they lysed? Indeed, while the presence of phagolysosome has not been demonstrated in platelets, they contain antimicrobial peptides that were shown to be efficient on S. aureus. Besides, the fact that bacteria can bind to platelets via receptors involved in hemostasis suggests that they may induce aggregation; this has indeed been described for Streptococcus sanguinis, S. epidermidis, or C. pneumoniae. On the other hand, platelets are able to display an inflammatory response to an infectious triggering. We, and others, have shown that platelet release soluble immunomodulatory factors upon stimulation by bacterial components. Moreover, interactions between bacteria and platelets are not limited to only these two partners. Indeed, platelets are also essential for the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps by neutrophils, resulting in bacterial clearance by trapping bacteria and concentrating antibacterial factors but in enhancing thrombosis. In conclusion, the platelet–bacteria interplay is a complex game; its fine analysis is complicated by the fact that the inflammatory component adds to the aggregation response

  19. The evolutionary ecology of decorating behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Ruxton, Graeme D.; Stevens, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many animals decorate themselves through the accumulation of environmental material on their exterior. Decoration has been studied across a range of different taxa, but there are substantial limits to current understanding. Decoration in non-humans appears to function predominantly in defence against predators and parasites, although an adaptive function is often assumed rather than comprehensively demonstrated. It seems predominantly an aquatic phenomenon—presumably because buoyancy helps reduce energetic costs associated with carrying the decorative material. In terrestrial examples, decorating is relatively common in the larval stages of insects. Insects are small and thus able to generate the power to carry a greater mass of material relative to their own body weight. In adult forms, the need to be lightweight for flight probably rules out decoration. We emphasize that both benefits and costs to decoration are rarely quantified, and that costs should include those associated with collecting as well as carrying the material. PMID:26041868

  20. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  1. Platelets in Lung Biology

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets and the lungs have an intimate relationship. Platelets are anucleate mammalian blood cells that continuously circulate through pulmonary vessels and that have major effector activities in hemostasis and inflammation. The lungs are reservoirs for megakaryocytes, the requisite precursor cell in thrombopoiesis, which is the intricate process by which platelets are generated. Platelets contribute to basal barrier integrity of the alveolar capillaries, which selectively restricts the transfer of water, proteins, and red blood cells out of the vessels. Platelets also contribute to pulmonary vascular repair. Although platelets bolster hemostatic and inflammatory defense of the healthy lung, experimental evidence and clinical evidence indicate that these blood cells are effectors of injury in a variety of pulmonary disorders and syndromes. Newly discovered biological capacities of platelets are being explored in the context of lung defense, disease, and remodeling. PMID:23043249

  2. Platelet Interaction with Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The interaction of several common strains of bacteria with rabbit or human platelets in vitro has been examined sequentially with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Bacteria were added to platelets in their native plasma or to washed platelets in a balanced salt solution at ratios of about 1:1 or at low bacteria to platelet ratios (down to 1:100). The platelet-bacterial interaction (PBI) was studied with recording nephelometry. Matched samples were fixed for microscopy at various points in the aggregation response. The results support these conclusions: a) Bacteria stimulate platelet aggregation by direct contact and adhesion with the platelet surface. b) Adhesion between the two cell types requires divalent cations, occurs through fusion of normal cell-surface coats and appears identical in the presence or absence of extracellular plasma protein. c) The morphologic transformation of platelets during PBI is identical to that produced by collagen. d) During PBI the bacteria are incorporated into the forming platelet aggregates and reside predominantly intercellularly. e) Phagocytosis of bacteria by a single platelet is very rare. f) Bacteria which have resided within platelet aggregates for one hour are unaltered morphologically. g) PBI occurs even at very low bacterial numbers and produces platelet-bacterial aggregates in small numbers without stimulating generalized platelet aggregation. Methods for concentration of thrombocytopenic plasma and washing human platelets are presented. ImagesFig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 1Fig 2Fig 12Fig 13Fig 3Fig 14Fig 4Fig 5 PMID:4632008

  3. Platelet function and ageing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris I

    2016-08-01

    There are clear age-related changes in platelet count and function, driven by changes in hematopoietic tissue, the composition of the blood and vascular health. Platelet count remains relatively stable during middle age (25-60 years old) but falls in older people. The effect of age on platelet function is slightly less clear. The longstanding view is that platelet reactivity increases with age in an almost linear fashion. There are, however, serious limitations to the data supporting this dogma. We can conclude that platelet function increases during middle age, but little evidence exists on the changes in platelet responsiveness in old age (>75 years old). This change in platelet function is driven by differential mRNA and microRNA expression, an increase in oxidative stress and changes in platelet receptors. These age-related changes in platelets are particularly pertinent given that thrombotic disease and use of anti-platelet drugs is much more prevalent in the elderly population, yet the majority of platelet research is carried out in young to middle-aged (20-50 years old) human volunteers and young mice (2-6 months old). We know relatively little about exactly how platelets from people over 75 years old differ from those of middle-aged subjects, and we know even less about the mechanisms that drive these changes. Addressing these gaps in our knowledge will provide substantial understanding in how cell signalling changes during ageing and will enable the development of more precise anti-platelet therapies. PMID:27068925

  4. Surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Longoni, Giuliano; Zacchini, Stefano; Zarra, Salvatore

    2012-06-01

    Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters.Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters. CCDC 867747 and 867748. For crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30400g

  5. Effects of microgravity and hypergravity on platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kesheng; Wang, Yuedan; Yan, Rong; Shi, Quanwei; Wang, Zhicheng; Yuan, Yanhong; Cheng, Hong; Li, Suping; Fan, Yubo; Zhuang, Fengyuan

    2009-05-01

    Many serious thrombotic and haemorrhagic diseases or fatalities have been documented in human being exposed to microgravity or hypergravity environments, such as crewmen in space, roller coaster riders, and aircrew subjected to high-G training. Some possible related organs have been examined to explore the mechanisms underlying these gravity change-related diseases. However, the role of platelets which are the primary players in both thrombosis and haemostasis is unknown. Here we show that platelet aggregation induced by ristocetin or collagen and platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor (VWF) were significantly decreased after platelets were exposed to simulated microgravity. Conversely, these platelet functions were increased after platelets were exposed to hypergravity. The tail bleeding time in vivo was significantly shortened in mice exposed to high-G force, whereas, was prolonged in hindlimb unloaded mice. Furthermore, three of 23 mice died after 15 minutes of -8 Gx stress. Platelet thrombi disseminated in the heart ventricle and blood vessels in the brain, lung, and heart from the dead mice. Finally, glycoprotein (GP) Ibalpha surface expression and its association with the cytoskeleton were significantly decreased in platelets exposed to simulated microgravity, and obviously increased in hypergravity-exposed platelets. These data indicate that the platelet functions are inhibited in microgravity environments, and activated under high-G conditions, suggesting a novel mechanism for gravity change-related haemorrhagic and thrombotic diseases. This mechanism has important implications for preventing and treating gravity change-related diseases, and also suggests that special attentions should be paid to human actions under different gravity conditions. PMID:19404544

  6. Red Blood Cell Hematocrit Influences Platelet Adhesion Rate in a Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, Andrew; Campbell, James; Fitzgibbon, Sean; Rodriguez, Armando; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The creation of a blood clot to stop bleeding involves platelets forming a plug at the site of injury. Red blood cells indirectly play a role in ensuring that the distribution of platelets across the height of the channel is not uniform - the contrast in deformability and size between platelets and red blood cells allows the platelets to preferentially marginate close to the walls. We perform 3D boundary integral simulations of a suspension of platelets and red blood cells in a periodic channel with a model that allows for platelet binding at the walls. The relative rate of platelet activity with varying hematocrit (volume fraction of red blood cells) is compared to experiments in which red blood cells and platelets flow through a channel coated with von Willebrand factor. In the simulations as well as the experiments, a decrease in hematocrit of red blood cells is found to reduce the rate at which platelets adhere to the channel wall in a manner that is both qualitatively and quantitatively similar. We conclude with a discussion of the tumbling and wobbling motions of platelets in 3D leading up to the time at which the platelets bind to the wall. Funded by Stanford Army High Performance Computing Research Center, experiments by US Army Institute of Surgical Research.

  7. Sources of variability in platelet accumulation on type 1 fibrillar collagen in microfluidic flow assays.

    PubMed

    Neeves, Keith B; Onasoga, Abimbola A; Hansen, Ryan R; Lilly, Jessica J; Venckunaite, Diana; Sumner, Meghan B; Irish, Andrew T; Brodsky, Gary; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Di Paola, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic flow assays (MFA) that measure shear dependent platelet function have potential clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding and thrombotic disorders. As a step towards clinical application, the objective of this study was to measure how phenotypic and genetic factors, as well as experimental conditions, affect the variability of platelet accumulation on type 1 collagen within a MFA. Whole blood was perfused over type 1 fibrillar collagen at wall shear rates of 150, 300, 750 and 1500 s⁻¹ through four independent channels with a height of 50 µm and a width of 500 µm. The accumulation of platelets was characterized by the lag time to 1% platelet surface coverage (Lag(T)), the rate of platelet accumulation (V(PLT)), and platelet surface coverage (SC). A cohort of normal donors was tested and the results were correlated to plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels, platelet count, hematocrit, sex, and collagen receptors genotypes. VWF levels were the strongest determinant of platelet accumulation. VWF levels were positively correlated to V(PLT) and SC at all wall shear rates. A longer Lag(T) for platelet accumulation at arterial shear rates compared to venous shear rates was attributed to the time required for plasma proteins to adsorb to collagen. There was no association between platelet accumulation and hematocrit or platelet count. Individuals with the AG genotype of the GP6 gene had lower platelet accumulation than individuals with the AA genotype at 150 s⁻¹ and 300 s⁻¹. Recalcified blood collected into sodium citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) resulted in diminished platelet accumulation compared to CTI alone, suggesting that citrate irreversibly diminishes platelet function. This study the largest association study of MFA in healthy donors (n = 104) and will likely set up the basis for the determination of the normal range of platelet responses in this type of assay. PMID:23355889

  8. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  9. Inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Sandrock-Lang, Kirstin; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Santoso, Sentot; Zieger, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Inherited platelet disorders may be the cause of bleeding symptoms of varying severity as platelets fail to fulfil their haemostatic role after vessel injury. Platelet disorders may be difficult to diagnose (and are likely to be misdiagnosed) and raise problems in therapy and management. This review explores the clinical and molecular genetic phenotype of several inherited disorders. Inherited platelet disorders can be classified according to their platelet defects: receptor defects (adhesion or aggregation), secretion disorder, and cytoskeleton defects. The best characterized platelet receptor defects are Glanzmann thrombasthenia (integrin αIIbβ3 defect) and Bernard-Soulier syndrome (defect of GPIb/IX/V). Detailed case reports of patients suffering from Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) or Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS) showing the bleeding diathesis as well as investigation of platelet aggregation/agglutination and platelet receptor expression will complement this review. In addition, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) as an important defect of δ-granule secretion is extensively described together with a case report of a patient suffering from HPS type 1. PMID:25707719

  10. Platelet Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the clotting process in the body ( in vivo ). A person with normal platelet function test results may still experience excessive bleeding or inappropriate clotting during and after a surgery. Most samples for platelet function testing are only stable for a very short period ...

  11. Platelet Donation (Apheresis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be ideal for a simultaneous platelet and plasma donation. Anyone in need can receive your plasma, it is universal. Only 4% of the U.S. ... can donate up to 24 times per year. Plasma can be collected simultaneously with a platelet donation. ...

  12. The Role of Decorative Pictures in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenzner, Alwine; Schnotz, Wolfgang; Müller, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Three experiments with students from 7th and 8th grade were performed to investigate the effects of decorative pictures in learning as compared to instructional pictures. Pictures were considered as instructional, when they were primarily informative, and as decorative, when they were primarily aesthetically appealing. The experiments…

  13. Painter and Decorator. Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Mike; MacCallum, Marilyn; Maddocks, Christopher

    This analysis covers tasks performed by a painter and decorator, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as painter and painter and decorator--commercial and residential. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and safety. To…

  14. Platelet dysfunction-eosinophilia syndrome in parasitized Venezuelan children.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette; Sifontes, Luz Núñez; Feijoo, Rosa; Certad, Gabriela; Arenas-Pinto, Alejandro; Pocaterra, Leonor; Ferrara, Guiseppe; Giménez, Rita; Torres, Obdulita; Goldstein, Carlos; Bosch, Norma

    2005-08-01

    Platelet dysfunction was detected in six children with purpura and eosinophilia. We conducted clinical evaluations, hematologic and platelet function tests, clotting studies (bleeding time, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, factor XIII, factor VIII, and von Willebrand factor), assays for IgG and IgM antibodies to platelets, and a search for stool parasites. Mild bleeding phenomena (ecchymoses, petechiae, epistaxis, and gingival) were transient. All children showed intestinal parasites and marked eosinophilia (mean count = 2,615.2 cells/muL, 95% confidence interval = 1,259.6-5,429.8). Main abnormalities included prolonged bleeding times (50%) and defective aggregation with collagen (100%) adrenaline (66%), or ADP (66%). Antibodies to platelets were not detected. Anti-parasite therapy reversed the hemorrhagic manifestations and normalized eosinophil counts and platelet alterations. No relationship could be established between excess eosinophils, intensity of bleeding, or type and degree of platelet abnormalities. Thrombocytopathic features mimicked the intrinsic defect of storage pool disease. The possible pathogenic roles of eosinophilia and parasitism are reviewed. This is the first report of this pathologic combination in Latin American children. PMID:16103609

  15. Platelet adhesion signalling and the regulation of thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2004-07-15

    Platelets perform a central role in haemostasis and thrombosis. They adhere to subendothelial collagens exposed at sites of blood vessel injury via the glycoprotein (GP) Ib-V-IX receptor complex, GPVI and integrin alpha(2)beta(1). These receptors perform distinct functions in the regulation of cell signalling involving non-receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g. Src, Fyn, Lyn, Syk and Btk), adaptor proteins, phospholipase C and lipid kinases such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase. They are also coupled to an increase in cytosolic calcium levels and protein kinase C activation, leading to the secretion of paracrine/autocrine platelet factors and an increase in integrin receptor affinities. Through the binding of plasma fibrinogen and von Willebrand Factor to integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), a platelet thrombus is formed. Although increasing evidence indicates that each of the adhesion receptors GPIb-V-IX and GPVI and integrins alpha(2)beta(1) and alpha(IIb)beta(3) contribute to the signalling that regulates this process, the individual roles of each are only beginning to be dissected. By contrast, adhesion receptor signalling through platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) is implicated in the inhibition of platelet function and thrombus formation in the healthy circulation. Recent studies indicate that understanding of platelet adhesion signalling mechanisms might enable the development of new strategies to treat and prevent thrombosis. PMID:15252124

  16. Decoration Increases the Conspicuousness of Raptor Nests

    PubMed Central

    Canal, David; Mulero-Pázmány, Margarita; Negro, Juan José; Sergio, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Avian nests are frequently concealed or camouflaged, but a number of species builds noticeable nests or use conspicuous materials for nest decoration. In most cases, nest decoration has a role in mate choice or provides thermoregulatory or antiparasitic benefits. In territorial species however, decorations may serve additional or complementary functions, such as extended phenotypic signaling of nest-site occupancy and social status to potential intruders. The latter may benefit both signaler and receiver by minimizing the risk of aggressive interactions, especially in organisms with dangerous weaponry. Support for this hypothesis was recently found in a population of black kites (Milvus migrans), a territorial raptor that decorates its nest with white artificial materials. However, the crucial assumption that nest decorations increased nest-site visibility to conspecifics was not assessed, a key aspect given that black kite nests may be well concealed within the canopy. Here, we used an unmanned aircraft system to take pictures of black kite nests, with and without an experimentally placed decoration, from different altitudes and distances simulating the perspective of a flying and approaching, prospecting intruder. The pictures were shown to human volunteers through a standardized routine to determine whether detection rates varied according the nest decoration status and distance. Decorated nests consistently showed a higher detection frequency and a lower detection-latency, compared to undecorated versions of the same nests. Our results confirm that nest decoration in this species may act as a signaling medium that enhances nest visibility for aerial receivers, even at large distances. This finding complements previous work on this communication system, which showed that nest decoration was a threat informing trespassing conspecifics on the social dominance, territory quality and fighting capabilities of the signaler. PMID:27455066

  17. Decoration Increases the Conspicuousness of Raptor Nests.

    PubMed

    Canal, David; Mulero-Pázmány, Margarita; Negro, Juan José; Sergio, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Avian nests are frequently concealed or camouflaged, but a number of species builds noticeable nests or use conspicuous materials for nest decoration. In most cases, nest decoration has a role in mate choice or provides thermoregulatory or antiparasitic benefits. In territorial species however, decorations may serve additional or complementary functions, such as extended phenotypic signaling of nest-site occupancy and social status to potential intruders. The latter may benefit both signaler and receiver by minimizing the risk of aggressive interactions, especially in organisms with dangerous weaponry. Support for this hypothesis was recently found in a population of black kites (Milvus migrans), a territorial raptor that decorates its nest with white artificial materials. However, the crucial assumption that nest decorations increased nest-site visibility to conspecifics was not assessed, a key aspect given that black kite nests may be well concealed within the canopy. Here, we used an unmanned aircraft system to take pictures of black kite nests, with and without an experimentally placed decoration, from different altitudes and distances simulating the perspective of a flying and approaching, prospecting intruder. The pictures were shown to human volunteers through a standardized routine to determine whether detection rates varied according the nest decoration status and distance. Decorated nests consistently showed a higher detection frequency and a lower detection-latency, compared to undecorated versions of the same nests. Our results confirm that nest decoration in this species may act as a signaling medium that enhances nest visibility for aerial receivers, even at large distances. This finding complements previous work on this communication system, which showed that nest decoration was a threat informing trespassing conspecifics on the social dominance, territory quality and fighting capabilities of the signaler. PMID:27455066

  18. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  19. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  20. 10 CFR 1050.203 - Acceptance of decorations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acceptance of decorations. 1050.203 Section 1050.203 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Guidelines for Acceptance of Foreign Gifts or Decorations § 1050.203 Acceptance of decorations. (a) An employee may...

  1. von Willebrand Factor Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Platelet Count , Platelet Function Tests , Complete Blood Count , Coagulation Factor VIII , PT , PTT At a Glance Test ... a protein , one of several components of the coagulation system that work together to stop bleeding and ...

  2. Platelet kinetics with indium-111 platelets: comparison with chromium-51 platelets.

    PubMed

    Peters, A M; Lavender, J P

    1983-04-01

    The application of 111In-oxine to platelet labeling has contributed to the understanding of platelet kinetics along three lines: 1. It allows the measurement of new parameters of splenic function, such as the intrasplenic platelet transit time, which has shed new light on the physiology of splenic blood cell handling. 2. It facilitates the measurement of platelet life span in conditions, such as ITP, in which 51Cr may undergo undesirable elution from the platelet as a result of platelet-antibody interaction. 3. It allows the determination of the fate of platelets, that is, the site of platelet destruction in conditions in which reduced platelet life span is associated with abnormal platelet consumption, as a result of either premature destruction of "abnormal" platelets by the RE system, or the consumption (or destruction) of normal platelets after their interaction with an abnormal vasculature. Future research using 111In platelets may yield further valuable information on the control as well as the significance of intrasplenic platelet pooling, on the role of platelets in the development of chronic vascular lesions, and on the sites of platelet destruction in ITP. With regard to the latter, methods will have to be developed for harvesting sufficient platelets representative of the total circulating platelet population from severely thrombocytopenic patients for autologous platelet labeling. This would avoid the use of homologous platelets, which is likely to be responsible for some of the contradictory data relating to the use of radiolabeled platelet studies for the prediction of the response of patients with ITP to splenectomy. PMID:6346489

  3. Lack of multimer organization of von Willebrand factor in an acquired von Willebrand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Casonato, A; Pontara, E; Doria, A; Bertomoro, A; Cattini, M G; Gambari, P F; Girolami, A

    2002-03-01

    We report a case of acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) in a 20-year-old-woman with systemic lupus erythematosus, in whom severe bleeding complications followed kidney biopsy. Coagulation studies demonstrated undetectable levels of ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA), von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) and VWF ristocetin cofactor activity (VWF:RCo), associated with significantly prolonged bleeding time; unlike type 3 von Willebrand disease (VWD), platelet VWF was reduced but not undetectable. The plasma VWF multimer pattern was characterized by the presence of only two bands, one of low molecular weight (MW) running as the protomer of plasma VWF in normals, the other of abnormally high MW without detectable intermediate multimers; this pattern resembles that of VWF present in endothelial cells. A search for an anti-VWF antibody demonstrated the presence of an inhibitor at high titre. This anti-VWF antibody did not interfere in the interaction of VWF with platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ib through the A1 domain, and did not react with the A2 domain of VWF; instead, it seemed to modify the relative representation of high and low MW VWF multimers released by normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). After Azathioprine and corticosteroid treatment, the anti-VWF antibody disappeared and the patient's haemostatic profile normalized, except for the platelet VWF content which still remained decreased. We suggest that the anti-VWF antibody present in the AVWS described compromised both circulating VWF levels and their multimeric organization, inducing the maintenance of the multimer structure that VWF normally has before or in the early phase after secretion from endothelial cells. PMID:11886398

  4. Nanotechnology: Platelet mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2015-10-01

    Cloaking drug-loaded nanoparticles with platelet membranes enhances the drugs' abilities to target desired cells and tissues. This technology might improve treatments for cardiovascular and infectious diseases. See Letter p.118

  5. Platelet-delivered therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lyde, R; Sabatino, D; Sullivan, S K; Poncz, M

    2015-06-01

    We have proposed that modified platelets could potentially be used to correct intrinsic platelet defects as well as for targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules to sights of vascular injury. Ectopic expression of proteins within α-granules prior to platelet activation has been achieved for several proteins, including urokinase, factor (F) VIII, and partially for FIX. Potential uses of platelet-directed therapeutics will be discussed, focusing on targeted delivery of urokinase as a thromboprophylactic agent and FVIII for the treatment of hemophilia A patients with intractable inhibitors. This presentation will discuss new strategies that may be useful in the care of patients with vascular injury as well as remaining challenges and limitations of these approaches. PMID:26149015

  6. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: For unknown reasons (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP ) Side effect of certain drugs such ... 2012:chap 134. Read More Antibody Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Platelet count Serum globulin electrophoresis Thrombocytopenia Update ...

  7. Dependence of plasmin-mediated degradation of platelet adhesive receptors on temperature and Ca sup 2+

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, K.J.; Eisenberg, P.R.; Jaffe, A.S.; Santoro, S.A. )

    1990-10-15

    The effects of activation of plasminogen by streptokinase and tissue-type-plasminogen activator on platelet activation and the membrane glycoproteins (GPs) that mediate platelet adhesion and aggregation are not yet fully defined. To clarify effects on platelets during activation of plasminogen in vitro, we used monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), flow cytometry, and platelets surface-labeled with {sup 125}I to characterize changes in receptors for fibrinogen (GPIIb-IIIa), von Willebrand factor (GPIb), and collagen (GPIa-IIa). Activation of plasminogen in plasma with pharmacologic concentrations of plasminogen activators did not degrade GPIIb-IIIa or GPIb, and caused only a modest decrease in GPIa. In washed platelets GPIIb-IIIa was extensively degraded by plasmin at 37{degrees}C in the absence of exogenous Ca{sup 2+}, conditions that destabilize the IIb-IIIa complex. Degradation of GPIb in washed platelets displayed a similar although less-marked dependence on temperature and the absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The binding of activation-specific MoAbs did not increase during activation of plasminogen in plasma. We conclude that during pharmacologic fibrinolysis, reported inhibition of platelet function in plasma is not due to degradation of platelet-adhesive receptors. In addition, platelet activation observed during thrombolytic therapy does not appear to be a direct consequence of plasminogen activation.

  8. Platelets and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Simeone, Paola; Liani, Rossella; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Platelet activation plays a key role in atherothrombosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and increased in vivo platelet activation with enhanced thromboxane (TX) biosynthesis has been reported in patients with impairment of glucose metabolism even in the earlier stages of disease and in the preclinical phases. In this regards, platelets appear as addresses and players carrying and transducing metabolic derangement into vascular injury. The present review critically addresses key pathophysiological aspects including (i) hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and insulin resistance as determinants and predictors of platelet activation, (ii) inflammatory mediators derived from platelets, such as soluble CD40 ligand, soluble CD36, Dickkopf-1 and probably soluble receptor for advanced glycation-end-products (sRAGE), which expand the functional repertoire of platelets from players of hemostasis and thrombosis to powerful amplifiers of inflammation by promoting the release of cytokines and chemokines, cell activation, and cell-cell interactions; (iii) molecular mechanisms underpinning the less-than-expected antithrombotic protection by aspirin (ASA), despite regular antiplatelet prophylaxis at the standard dosing regimen, and (iv) stratification of patients deserving different antiplatelet strategies, based on the metabolic phenotype. Taken together, these pathophysiological aspects may contribute to the development of promising mechanism-based therapeutic strategies to reduce the progression of atherothrombosis in diabetic subjects. PMID:25986598

  9. Biosynthesis of von Willebrand protein by human megakaryocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sporn, L A; Chavin, S I; Marder, V J; Wagner, D D

    1985-01-01

    Immunofluorescence staining of buffy coat smears from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia in accelerated phase showed that approximately 13% of all nucleated cells contained von Willebrand protein and, therefore, appeared to be of megakaryocytic origin. This was confirmed by positive staining with antisera against platelet factor 4 and platelet glycoproteins. Short-term cultures of the buffy coat, which lacked endothelial cells, were metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine, and von Willebrand protein was immunopurified from cell lysates and culture medium. Cultures from this patient synthesized and secreted von Willebrand protein, in contrast with cultures from other patients with leukemia, who lacked circulating megakaryocytes, and from normal volunteers. The subunit composition of the megakaryocytic von Willebrand protein was very similar to that of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The size of the processed subunit (220 kD) and of the cellular (260 kD) and secreted (275 kD) precursors from the two cell types were indistinguishable by gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, the ratio of precursor to processed subunit and the pattern of cellular and secreted nonreduced multimers were very similar. It appears, therefore, that the processing steps in biosynthesis of von Willebrand protein used by the megakaryocytes are very similar to those of umbilical vein endothelial cells. Images PMID:2413071

  10. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun with Dr. Eberhard Rees and R.W. Cook at a press conference concerning Dr. Von Braun's assignment to NASA headquarters and Dr. Rees' subsequent assignment as Marshall Center director.

  11. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted. PMID:21514232

  12. The mechanism of VWF-mediated platelet GPIbalpha binding.

    PubMed

    Auton, Matthew; Zhu, Cheng; Cruz, Miguel A

    2010-08-01

    The binding of Von Willebrand Factor to platelets is dependent on the conformation of the A1 domain which binds to platelet GPIbalpha. This interaction initiates the adherence of platelets to the subendothelial vasculature under the high shear that occurs in pathological thrombosis. We have developed a thermodynamic strategy that defines the A1:GPIbalpha interaction in terms of the free energies (DeltaG values) of A1 unfolding from the native to intermediate state and the binding of these conformational states to GPIbalpha. We have isolated the intermediate conformation of A1 under nondenaturing conditions by reduction and carboxyamidation of the disulfide bond. The circular dichroism spectrum of reduction and carboxyamidation A1 indicates that the intermediate has approximately 10% less alpha-helical structure that the native conformation. The loss of alpha-helical secondary structure increases the GPIbalpha binding affinity of the A1 domain approximately 20-fold relative to the native conformation. Knowledge of these DeltaG values illustrates that the A1:GPIbalpha complex exists in equilibrium between these two thermodynamically distinct conformations. Using this thermodynamic foundation, we have developed a quantitative allosteric model of the force-dependent catch-to-slip bonding that occurs between Von Willebrand Factor and platelets under elevated shear stress. Forced dissociation of GPIbalpha from A1 shifts the equilibrium from the low affinity native conformation to the high affinity intermediate conformation. Our results demonstrate that A1 binding to GPIbalpha is thermodynamically coupled to A1 unfolding and catch-to-slip bonding is a manifestation of this coupling. Our analysis unites thermodynamics of protein unfolding and conformation-specific binding with the force dependence of biological catch bonds and it encompasses the effects of two subtypes of mutations that cause Von Willebrand Disease. PMID:20713003

  13. Clinical uses of radiolabeled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.; Christian, P.E.; Baker, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    Platelets were first successfully radiolabeled in 1953. At that time, investigators were primarily interested in developing a technique to accurately measure platelet life span in both normal and thrombocytopenic patients. Studies using platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr have shown shortened platelet survival times in a number of diseases including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. More recently, labels such as /sup 111/In have been developed that allow in vivo imaging of platelets. Indium-111 platelets are being used to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases.

  14. Polyphosphate, Platelets, and Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Richard J.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2015-01-01

    While we have understood the basic outline of the enzymes and reactions that make up the traditional blood coagulation cascade for many years, recently our appreciation of the complexity of these interactions has greatly increased. This has resulted in unofficial “revisions” of the coagulation cascade to include new amplification pathways and connections between the standard coagulation cascade enzymes, as well as the identification of extensive connections between the immune system and the coagulation cascade. The discovery that polyphosphate is stored in platelet dense granules and is secreted during platelet activation has resulted in a recent burst of interest in the role of this ancient molecule in human biology. Here we review the increasingly complex role of platelet polyphosphate in hemostasis, thrombosis, and inflammation that has been uncovered in recent years, as well as novel therapeutics centered on modulating polyphosphate’s roles in coagulation and inflammation. PMID:25976958

  15. Development and evaluation of decorated aceclofenac nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Joo; Meghani, Nilesh; Choi, Jin-Seok; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed at achieving enhanced solubility of aceclofenac (ACF) in nanocrystaline forms (ACF-NC) and evaluating the effects of ACF-NC on cell viability. Decorated ACF-NC were prepared by nano-precipitation with stabilizers. Three kinds of stabilizers were investigated: Tween 80, Poloxamer 407, and PEG 6000. The crystal structure and morphology of ACF-NC were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The solubility of ACF-NC and ACF (pure) was evaluated in different media (pH 1.2 and pH 6.8 buffers and distilled water [DW]). A drug release study was performed in PBS for 24h. Cell viability was evaluated for 24h using a human colon cancer cell-line (HCT-116) and a human breast cancer cell-line (MCF-7). Decorated ACF-NC with a mean size of 725nm were successfully prepared. The solubility of the decorated ACF-NC were 4-7 times higher than that of ACF in DW and pH 6.8 buffer. A peak shift from 153.1°C to 150.5-151.0°C was observed in the DSC thermogram of decorated ACF-NC versus ACF. In terms of drug release, there was an initial burst in decorated ACF-NC within 1h followed by slow release for up to 4h. Decorated ACF-NC exhibited viability approximately 63.9% of HCT-116 cells and also showed viability in 58.3% of MCF-7 cells at 15μg/mL of drug concentration. In conclusion, decorated ACF-NC proved to be a promising approach for enhancing drug solubility and cytotoxicity. PMID:27011350

  16. Platelet storage in PAS-2 or autologous plasma: impact on functional parameters.

    PubMed

    Bunescu, A; Hild, M; Lundahl, J; Egberg, N

    2001-04-01

    Currently, several platelet additive solutions for long-term platelet storage have been introduced. The aim of this study was to compare the deterioration of functional status of platelets stored for up to 5 days in autologous plasma (AP) only, with platelet stored in PAS-2, a salt solution containing acetate, citrate and sodium chloride. Change in platelet adhesion, aggregation and activation was measured by flow cytometric technique. In addition, beta-Thromboglobulin (beta-TG), lactate and glucose were determined. After 5 days of storage, the expression of P-Selectin was significantly higher, the production of lactate and the consumption of glucose were significantly lower, in platelets stored in PAS-2 than in autologous plasma. No significant differences were detected on day 5 between the two groups with regard to fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor binding capacity, or to beta-TG release. It can be concluded that neither storage medium was consistently better for the parameters tested. However, it must be emphasized that platelets stored in autologous plasma exhibited less lesion, in terms of P-Selectin expression compared with platelets stored in PAS-2. PMID:11299027

  17. Dietary α-linolenic acid increases the platelet count in ApoE-/- mice by reducing clearance.

    PubMed

    Stivala, Simona; Reiner, Martin F; Lohmann, Christine; Lüscher, Thomas F; Matter, Christian M; Beer, Juerg H

    2013-08-01

    Previously we reported that dietary intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) reduces atherogenesis and inhibits arterial thrombosis. Here, we analyze the substantial increase in platelet count induced by ALA and the mechanisms of reduced platelet clearance. Eight-week-old male apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice were fed a 0.21g% cholesterol diet complemented by either a high- (7.3g%) or low-ALA (0.03g%) content. Platelet counts doubled after 16 weeks of ALA feeding, whereas the bleeding time remained similar. Plasma glycocalicin and glycocalicin index were reduced, while reticulated platelets, thrombopoietin, and bone marrow megakaryocyte colony-forming units remained unchanged. Platelet contents of liver and spleen were substantially reduced, without affecting macrophage function and number. Glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) shedding, exposure of P-selectin, and activated integrin αIIbβ3 upon activation with thrombin were reduced. Dietary ALA increased the platelet count by reducing platelet clearance in the reticulo-endothelial system. The latter appears to be mediated by reduced cleavage of GPIb by tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme and reduced platelet activation/expression of procoagulant signaling. Ex vivo, there was less adhesion of human platelets to von Willebrand factor under high shear conditions after ALA treatment. Thus, ALA may be a promising tool in transfusion medicine and in high turnover/high activation platelet disorders. PMID:23801636

  18. The caspase-3 inhibitor (peptide Z-DEVD-FMK) affects the survival and function of platelets in platelet concentrate during storage

    PubMed Central

    Shiri, Reza; Ahmadinejad, Minoo; Vaeli, Shahram; Tabatabaei, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background Although apoptosis occurs in nucleated cells, studies show that this event also occurs in some anucleated cells such as platelets. During storage of platelets, the viability of platelets decreased, storage lesions were observed, and cells underwent apoptosis. We investigated the effects of caspase-3 inhibitor on the survival and function of platelets after different periods of storage. Methods Platelet concentrates were obtained from the Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization in plastic blood bags. Caspase-3 inhibitor (Z-DEVD-FMK) was added to the bags. These bags along with control bags to which no inhibitor was added were stored in a shaking incubator at 22℃ for 7 days. The effects of Z-DEVD-FMK on the functionality of platelets were analyzed by assessing their ability to bind to von Willebrand factor (vWF) and to aggregate in the presence of arachidonic acid and ristocetin. Cell survival was surveyed by MTT assay. Results At day 4 of storage, ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation was significantly higher in the inhibitor-treated (test) than in control samples; the difference was not significant at day 7. There was no significant difference in arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation between test and control samples. However, at day 7 of storage, the binding of platelets to vWF was significantly higher in test than in control samples. The MTT assay revealed significantly higher viability in test than in control samples at both days of study. Conclusion Treatment of platelets with caspase-3 inhibitor could increase their functionality and survival. PMID:24724067

  19. [Molecular biology of von Willebrand disease].

    PubMed

    Melo-Nava, Brenda; Peñaloza, Rosenda

    2007-01-01

    Von Willebrand Factor (VWF) is a large multimeric glycoprotein expressed in the megakaryocytes and endothelial cells of all vertebrates. It participates fundamentally in the primary and secondary hemostasis because it induces the adhesion of platelets to vascular subendothelium and promotes aggregation of platelets when blood vessels and capillaries are damaged. In addition, VWF links to factor VIII which avoids its proteolysis. The deficiency or the inadequate synthesis of the VWF causes von Willebrand disease (VWD), which is the most common hereditary bleeding disorder in humans principally from mucous and cutaneous sites. VWD is difficult to detect with accuracy due to interrelation among VWF with different components of hemostasis, although it is performed by different tests of haemostatic system, and the basic mechanisms in VWD are herein emphasized. The diagnosis of VWD is difficult due to the heterogeneous manifestation of the disease, which also complicates its classification. This article focuses on the molecular aspects of the disease and discusses their possible clinical implications. PMID:18268896

  20. Misfolding of vWF to pathologically disordered conformations impacts the severity of von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Alexander; Madde, Pranathi; Moon-Tasson, Laurie; Auton, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    The primary hemostatic von Willebrand factor (vWF) functions to sequester platelets from rheological blood flow and mediates their adhesion to damaged subendothelium at sites of vascular injury. We have surveyed the effect of 16 disease-causing mutations identified in patients diagnosed with the bleeding diathesis disorder, von Willebrand disease (vWD), on the structure and rheology of vWF A1 domain adhesiveness to the platelet GPIbα receptor. These mutations have a dynamic phenotypical range of bleeding from lack of platelet adhesion to severe thrombocytopenia. Using new rheological tools in combination with classical thermodynamic, biophysical, and spectroscopic metrics, we establish a high propensity of the A1 domain to misfold to pathological molten globule conformations that differentially alter the strength of platelet adhesion under shear flow. Rheodynamic analysis establishes a quantitative rank order between shear-rate-dependent platelet-translocation pause times that linearly correlate with clinically reported measures of patient platelet counts and the severity of thrombocytopenia. These results suggest that specific secondary structure elements remaining in these pathological conformations of the A1 domain regulate GPIbα binding and the strength of vWF-platelet interactions, which affects the vWD functional phenotype and the severity of thrombocytopenia. PMID:25185554

  1. Effects of platelet inhibitors on propyl gallate-induced platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hongyan; Kovics, Richard; Jackson, Van; Remick, Daniel G

    2004-04-01

    Propyl gallate (PG) is a platelet agonist characterized by inducing platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activity. The mechanisms of platelet activation following PG stimulation were examined by pre-incubating platelets with well-defined platelet inhibitors using platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, activated plasma clotting time, and annexin V binding by flow cytometry. PG-induced platelet aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple proteins were substantially abolished by aspirin, apyrase, and abciximab (c7E3), suggesting that PG is associated with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase 1, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, respectively. The phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal enzyme pp60(c-src) increased following PG stimulation, but was blunted by pre-incubation of platelets with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3, suggesting that tyrosine kinase is important for the signal transduction of platelet aggregation. Propyl gallate also activates platelet factor 3 by decreasing the platelet coagulation time and increasing platelet annexin V binding. Platelet incubation with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3 did not alter PG-induced platelet coagulation and annexin V binding. The results suggest that platelet factor 3 activation and membrane phosphotidylserine expression were not involved with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. PG is unique in its ability to stimulate platelet aggregation and coagulation simultaneously, and platelet inhibitors in this study affect only platelet aggregation but not platelet coagulation. PMID:15060414

  2. Functional responses and molecular mechanisms involved in histone-mediated platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Carestia, A; Rivadeneyra, L; Romaniuk, M A; Fondevila, C; Negrotto, S; Schattner, M

    2013-11-01

    Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in cell nuclei and they can be released by either dying or inflammatory cells. The recent observations that histones are major components of neutrophil extracellular traps and promote platelet aggregation and platelet-dependent thrombin generation have shown that these proteins are potent prothrombotic molecules. Because the mechanism(s) of platelet activation by histones are not completely understood, we explored the ability of individual recombinant human histones H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 to induce platelet activation as well as the possible molecular mechanisms involved. All histones were substrates for platelet adhesion and spreading and triggered fibrinogen binding, aggregation, von Willebrand factor release, P-selectin and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates; however, H4 was the most potent. Histone-mediated fibrinogen binding, P-selectin and PS exposure and the formation of mixed aggregates were potentiated by thrombin. Histones induced the activation of ERK, Akt, p38 and NFκB. Accordingly, histone-induced platelet activation was significantly impaired by pretreatment of platelets with inhibitors of ERK (U 0126), PI3K/Akt (Ly 294002), p38 (SB 203580) and NFκB (BAY 11-7082 and Ro 106-9920). Preincubation of platelets with either aspirin or dexamethasone markedly decreased fibrinogen binding and the adhesion mediated by histones without affecting P-selectin exposure. Functional platelet responses induced by H3 and H4, but not H1, H2A and H2B, were partially mediated through interaction with Toll-like receptors -2 and -4. Our data identify histones as important triggers of haemostatic and proinflammatory platelet responses, and only haemostatic responses are partially inhibited by anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23965842

  3. 5. EAST ELEVATION (OFFICE BLOCK), DETAIL SHOWING DECORATIVE PILASTERS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EAST ELEVATION (OFFICE BLOCK), DETAIL SHOWING DECORATIVE PILASTERS AND STYLIZED EGG-AND-DART DECORATION AROUND WINDOWS OF UPPER FLOORS - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad & Ferry Terminal, Hudson Place, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  4. ABO blood group as a model for platelet glycan modification in arterial thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Hanrui; Reilly, John P.; Chrisitie, Jason D.; Ishihara, Mayumi; Kumagai, Tadahiro; Azadi, Parastoo; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2015-01-01

    ABO blood groups have long been associated with cardiovascular disease, thrombosis and acute coronary syndromes. Many studies over the years have shown type O blood group to be associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease compared to non-type O blood groups. However, the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. Although ABO blood group is associated with variations in concentrations of circulating von Willebrand Factor and other endothelial cell adhesion molecules, ABO antigens are also present on several platelet surface glycoproteins and glycosphingolipids. As we highlight in this platelet-centric review, these glycomic modifications may impact platelet function in arterial thrombosis. More broadly, improving our understanding of the role of platelet glycan modifications in acute coronary syndromes may inform future diagnostics and therapeutics for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26044584

  5. von Willebrand disease: a laboratory approach.

    PubMed

    Trasi, Sucheta; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati; Mohanty, Dipika

    2005-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is a common inherited bleeding disorder. Accurate diagnosis and classification of VWD is crucial for clinical management. A detailed clinical history, including that of bleeding, is required. A family and drug history are also important. Genetic factors such as blood group, and environmental factors such as stress, trauma, pregnancy and inflammation should also be considered. The age, ethnic group and hormonal status could also affect the von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels. No single test is robust enough to detect all variants of VWD. In view of the heterogeneity of the disease and limitations in assays, a battery of tests should be performed before a final diagnosis can be reached. These include the screening coagulation tests, factor VIII:C assay, VWF antigen assay, assessment of functional VWF which includes VWF ristocetin cofactor assays, VWF collagen binding assay, ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation and VWF multimer analysis. The newer ELISA techniques based on VWF binding with factor VIII glycoprotein (Gp) 1b and cerebrosides have also helped in determining certain unusual forms of VWD. The advent of new systems such as platelet function analysers (PFA), thromboelastography (TEG) and clot signature analysers (CSA), which are designed to assess either the primary platelet function or as a global haemostasis screen, have facilitated and simplified the diagnosis. However, few centres all over the world can perform all these expensive tests to provide a final diagnosis of VWD. We reviewed the laboratory investigations required for a diagnosis of VWD. Apart from congenital VWD, the possibility of acquired VWD should be considered in those with a negative past history of bleeding or in the presence of an underlying disease. PMID:15981443

  6. von Willebrand factor antigen as a therapeutic target of portal hypertension in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kalambokis, Georgios N; Baltayiannis, Gerasimos; Christodoulou, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Increased thrombotic potential within the liver sinusoids due to local endothelial production of von Willebrand factor antigen macromolecules could represent an additional therapeutic target of portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis. In this case, anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic drugs could modulate portal pressure by preventing the formation of intrahepatic platelet-induced microthrombi. PMID:27217711

  7. Diagnosis of von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Ingerslev, J; Gürsel, T

    1999-05-01

    The haemorrhagic diathesis in von Willebrand disease (vWD) is caused by a quantitative deficiency or a qualitative defect in the von Willebrand factor (vWF) in plasma and/or platelets causing insufficient primary haemostasis. Since vWF binds and protects factor VIII (FVIII) towards random proteolysis, coagulation may also be impaired in patients with a low plasma level of vWF, and in instances where vWF displays insufficient binding capacity to FVIII. The entity of vWD displays a vast heterogeneity. Apart from rarely occurring acquired cases, vWD is an inherited disorder of autosomal linkage. The major clinical hallmark in vWD is an increased tendency to mucocutaneous bleeding that rarely reach life-threatening proportions, unless vWF is severely reduced or completely absent. Increased bleeding may also occur in sites such as muscles and joints when the level of FVIII is particularly low. Significant progress has recently been achieved through extensive molecular genetic exploration of various forms of vWD. In order to guide treatment and to form a platform for genetic investigation, however, accuracy in diagnosis and phenotypic characterization is important. By means of various laboratory methods, major subclasses of vWD can be differentiated, as presented in another article of this series. Whereas most of the cases of vWD can quite easily be diagnosed and classified using today's diagnostic methods, the most frequently occurring bleeding disorder of all, vWd type 1 of mild degree, continues to challenge clinicians and diagnostic laboratories. The aim of this paper is to review the laboratory methods most commonly used in diagnostic investigation of the patient suspected of vWD. PMID:23401900

  8. Platelet satellitism: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural morphology of platelet-polymorph (platelet-polymorphonuclear leukocyte) rosettes was investigated in EDTA-anticoagulated blood obtained from two patients who exhibited the phenomenon of platelet satellitism. Most of the platelet profiles were attached to the polymorph surface by broad areas of contact. Examination of these broad areas of contact at high magnification revealed an intercellular material of low electron density. This material appeared to form strands, which bridged the intercellular space and spanned the entire area formed by the apposing plasma membranes. Phagocytosis of entire platelets was only observed in 1 case. The platelet profiles that participated in rosette formation revealed a large number of glycogen particles, compared with unattached platelets. Ultrastructural examination of "stress" platelets obtained from five normal subjects treated with steroids similarly showed a large number of glycogen particles, although no rosette formation or phagocytosis of platelets was observed. The etiology of platelet satellitism is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7223859

  9. Dietary manipulation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Bachmair, E M; Ostertag, L M; Zhang, X; de Roos, B

    2014-11-01

    Activated platelets contribute to plaque formation within blood vessels in the early and late stages of atherogenesis, and therefore they have been proposed as risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Anti-platelet drugs, such as aspirin, are now the most prescribed pharmacological treatment in Europe. Certain dietary bioactives also beneficially affect platelet function, and with less side effects, albeit that effects are generally more subtle. Therefore, consumption of dietary bioactives could play a role in the prevention of atherothrombotic vascular disease. Here we review the efficacy of dietary treatment strategies, especially those involving certain dietary fatty acids and polyphenols, to modulate platelet function in healthy subjects or in patients with cardiovascular disease. Variation in study populations, small study sizes and lack of comparability between methods to assess platelet function currently limit robust evidence on the efficacy of dietary bioactives in healthy subjects or specific patient groups. Also, limited knowledge of the metabolism of dietary bioactives, and therefore of the bioavailability of bioactive ingredients, restricts our ability to identify the most effective dietary regimes to improve platelet function. Implementation of uniform point-of-care tests to assess platelet function, and enhanced knowledge of the efficacy by which specific dietary compounds and their metabolites affect platelet function, may enable the identification of functional anti-platelet ingredients that are eligible for a health claim, or combined treatment strategies, including both pharmacological anti-platelet treatment as well as dietary intervention, to tackle atherothrombotic vascular disease. PMID:24858060

  10. Up to date concepts about Von Willebrand disease and the diagnose of this hemostatic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Buga-Corbu, I; Arion, C

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The authors review the current data in literature regarding the recent knowledge about hemostase, coagulation and clinical and laboratory diagnostic algorithms of hemostatic disorders. They also present the pathological classification of bleeding disorders - the basis to clinical approach of these diseases. Abbreviations: AD=autosomal dominant; Ag=antigen; DNA=deoxyribonucleic acid; ADAMTS13=serum metalloproteinase; AR=autosomal recessive; Arg=arginine; RNA=ribonucleic acid; VWD=von Willebrand disease; Cys=cysteine; C1—C9=factors of the seric complement; ELISA=enzyme linked immuno assay; FI---FXIII=plasmatic factors of coagulation; Glu=glutamines; Pg=platelet glycoprotein; HMW=high molecular weight; IL=interleukin; SLE=systemic lupus erythematosus; Met=methionine; PFA=automated study test of platelets aggregation; RCo=ristocetin cofactor; RI PA=ristocetin induced platelet aggregation; Tyr=tyrosine; VWF= von Willebrand factor PMID:25408749

  11. PECAM-1 negatively regulates GPIb/V/IX signaling in murine platelets.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Vipul; Stapleton, Michelle A; Hillery, Cheryl A; Montgomery, Robert R; Nichols, Timothy C; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Newman, Debra K; Newman, Peter J

    2003-11-15

    Platelet adhesion at sites of vascular injury is mediated, in part, by interaction of the platelet plasma membrane glycoprotein (GP) Ib/V/IX complex with von Willebrand Factor (VWF) presented on collagen-exposed surfaces. Recent studies indicate that GPIb/V/IX may be functionally coupled with the Fc receptor gamma (FcR gamma)-chain, which, by virtue of its cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif, sends activation signals into the cell. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is an inhibitory receptor that has previously been shown to negatively regulate platelet responses to collagen, which transduces activation signals via the GPVI/FcR gamma-chain complex. To determine whether PECAM-1 might similarly regulate signals emanating from GPIb/FcR gamma, we compared activation and aggregation responses to VWF of PECAM-1-positive and PECAM-1-deficient murine platelets. PECAM-1 and the FcR gamma-chain became rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated in platelets following botrocetin-induced VWF binding, but FcR gamma-chain tyrosine phosphorylation was delayed in PECAM-1-positive, versus PECAM-1-deficient, platelets. PECAM-1-deficient platelets were hyperaggregable to VWF, exhibited enhanced spreading and, under conditions of arterial flow, formed markedly larger thrombi on immobilized VWF than did wild-type platelets. Taken together, these data support the notion that engagement of the GPIb complex, in addition to sending activation signals, also initiates a negative feedback loop involving PECAM-1 that controls the rate and extent of platelet activation. PMID:12893757

  12. Simulation of the Effect of Red Blood Cell Collisions on Platelet Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgibbon, Sean; Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2012-11-01

    The adsorption of platelets to the endothelial wall is an important first step in the clotting process, which is critical to stopping blood loss after trauma. Initial platelet arrest is controlled by very short range interaction between two proteins, von Willibrand Factor and GPIb, so the rate of platelet adsorption is expected to be strongly dependent on the rate at which the platelets sample the wall. With Peclet numbers in the range (103 - 105) , simple diffusive arguments are not sufficient to explain the high rates of platelet adsorption. Using Stokes flow simulations, we show that the platelets' wall sampling rate is significantly increased by interactions with red blood cells. Our simulation models platelets as rigid bodies suspended in a Stokesian linear shear flow. We solve for the flow using standard boundary integral techniques with the appropriate single wall bounded Green's function. Receptor-ligand interactions are represented as Hookean springs with characteristic lifetimes, sizes, and stiffness coefficients. Drag forces are calculated with the reciprocal theorem, and RBC collisions are modelled as AR processes extracted from the large scale suspension simulations of Zhao et al.

  13. 10 Ways to...Decorate Your Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Recruit the best decorating corps you have for this year's classroom makeover--your students! Not only does involving kids save money and effort on your part, teachers agree that it increases kids' sense of involvement and respect. In this article, the author presents 10 teacher-tested ideas for a classroom that shines with color and learning: (1)…

  14. Platelet Immobilization on Supported Phospholipid Bilayers for Single Platelet Studies.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Eva; Donati, Alessia; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-08-23

    The worldwide cardiovascular disease (CVD) epidemic is of grave concern. A major role in the etiology of CVDs is played by the platelets (thrombocytes). Platelets are anuclear cell fragments circulating in the blood. Their primary function is to catalyze clot formation, limiting traumatic blood loss in the case of injury. The same process leads to thrombosis in the case of CVDs, which are commonly managed with antiplatelet therapy. Platelets also have other, nonhemostatic functions in wound healing, inflammation, and tissue regeneration. They play a role in the early stages of atherosclerosis and the spread of cancer through metastases. Much remains to be learned about the regulation of these diverse platelet functions under physiological and pathological conditions. Breakthroughs in this regard are expected to come from single platelet studies and systems approaches. The immobilization of platelets at surfaces is advantageous for developing such approaches, but platelets are activated when they come in contact with foreign surfaces. In this work, we develop and validate a protocol for immobilizing platelets on supported lipid bilayers without activation due to immobilization. Our protocol can therefore be used for studying platelets with a wide variety of surface-sensitive techniques. PMID:27438059

  15. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left) and Fred W. Kelley examine a ST-100 Stellar Instrument Platform in the astrionics lab. Dr. Von Braun, then deputy associate administrator for planning, NASA, was visiting on the anniversary of the establishment of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, stands in front of a Saturn IB Launch Vehicle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Dr. Von Braun was Marshall's first Center Director (1960-1970). Under his leadership Marshall was responsible for the development of the Saturn rockets, the Skylab project and getting the United States into Space and landing on the moon with the Apollo missions.

  17. Platelets in Inflammation and Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nording, Henry M.; Seizer, Peter; Langer, Harald F.

    2015-01-01

    Platelets contribute to processes beyond thrombus formation and may play a so far underestimated role as an immune cell in various circumstances. This review outlines immune functions of platelets in host defense, but also how they may contribute to mechanisms of infectious diseases. A particular emphasis is placed on the interaction of platelets with other immune cells. Furthermore, this article outlines the features of atherosclerosis as an inflammatory vascular disease highlighting the role of platelet crosstalk with cellular and soluble factors involved in atheroprogression. Understanding, how platelets influence these processes of vascular remodeling will shed light on their role for tissue homeostasis beyond intravascular thrombosis. Finally, translational implications of platelet-mediated inflammation in atherosclerosis are discussed. PMID:25798138

  18. Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is looking out from a 10th floor window of building 4200 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). He was the first Center Director and served as the Director from July 1960 through February 1970. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under the Project Paperclip (American acquisition of German rocket experts) to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his German Rocket Team (also called the Peenemuende Team) were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Under Dr. von Braun's leadership, MSFC developed the Saturn V launch vehicle, which placed the first men, two American astronauts, on the Moon. Wernher von Braun's life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

  19. Human blood platelets at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, D. MACN.; Ausprunk, D.; Blevins, D.; Chao, F. C.; Curby, W.

    1987-01-01

    A set of freshly collected and separated human platelet suspensions were transported, in three types of plastic containers, on a 6 day, 2 hr mission of the orbiter Columbia to study the effect of prolonged exposure of human blood cells to microgravity. A controlled environment at a temperature of 22 + or - 1 deg with air flow was provided and another set of samples held on the ground acted as controls. Paired comparisons of platelets at ug versus controls at lxg revealed superior platelet survival at microgravity. When viewed in terms of plastic type, ug platelets in containers fabricated from PVC-TOTM displayed the best overall postflight viability.

  20. Overview of platelet physiology and laboratory evaluation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, G M

    1999-06-01

    Appropriate laboratory testing for the platelet-type bleeding disorders hinges on an adequate assessment in the history and physical examination. Patients with histories and screening laboratory results consistent with coagulation disorders (hemophilia, disseminated intravascular coagulation) are not appropriate candidates for platelet function testing. In contrast, patients with a lifelong history of platelet-type bleeding symptoms and perhaps a positive family history of bleeding would be appropriate for testing. Figure 6 depicts one strategy to evaluate these patients. Platelet morphology can easily be evaluated to screen for two uncommon qualitative platelet disorders: Bernard-Soulier syndrome (associated with giant platelets) and gray platelet syndrome, a subtype of storage pool disorder in which platelet granulation is morphologically abnormal by light microscopy. If the bleeding disorder occurred later in life (no bleeding with surgery or trauma early in life), the focus should be on acquired disorders of platelet function. For those patients thought to have an inherited disorder, testing for vWD should be done initially because approximately 1% of the population has vWD. The complete vWD panel (factor VIII coagulant activity, vWf antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity) should be performed because many patients will have abnormalities of only one particular panel component. Patients diagnosed with vWD should be classified using multimeric analysis to identify the type 1 vWD patients likely to respond to DDAVP. If vWD studies are normal, platelet aggregation testing should be performed, ensuring that no antiplatelet medications have been ingested at least 1 week before testing. If platelet aggregation tests are normal and if suspicion for an inherited disorder remains high, vWD testing should be repeated. The evaluation of thrombocytopenia may require bone marrow examination to exclude primary hematologic disorders. If future studies with thrombopoietin assays

  1. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2016-02-01

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  2. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Michael G.; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M.; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza. IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza

  3. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process. PMID:27338300

  4. [Von Willebrand factor and ADAMTS13 balancing primary haemostasis].

    PubMed

    Schneppenheim, R; Budde, U

    2011-11-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is an adhesive, multi-functional huge multimerized protein with multiple domains harboring binding sites for collagen, platelet glycoprotein receptors and coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). The functional domains enable VWF to bind to the injured vessel wall, to recruit platelets to the site of injury by adhesion and aggregation and to bind and protect FVIII, an important cofactor of the coagulation cascade. VWF function in primary haemostasis is located in particular in the arterial and micro-circulation. This environment is exposed to high shear forces with hydrodynamic shear rates ranging over several orders of magnitude from 10⁻¹ to 10⁵ s-1 and requires particular mechanisms to enable platelet adhesion and aggregation under these variable conditions. The respective VWF function is strictly correlating with its multimer size. Lack or reduction of large VWF multimers is seen in patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD) type 2A which correlates with reduction of both VWF:platelet GPIb-binding and VWF:collagen binding and a bleeding phenotype. To prevent unlimited platelet adhesion and aggregation which is the cause of the microangiopathic disorder thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), VWF function is regulated by its specific protease ADAMTS13. Whereas a particular susceptibility of VWF to ADAMTS13 proteolysis is the cause of a frequent VWD type 2A phenotype, lack or dysfunction of ADAMTS13, either acquired by ADAMTS13 antibodies or by inherited ADAMTS13 deficiency (Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome), causes TTP. Therefore VWD and TTP represent the opposite manifestations of VWF related disorders, tightly linked to each other. PMID:21792464

  5. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states. PMID:27228656

  6. [Diagnosis of inherited diseases of platelet function. Interdisciplinary S2K guideline of the Permanent Paediatric Committee of the Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Research (GTH e. V.)].

    PubMed

    Knöfler, R; Eberl, W; Schulze, H; Bakchoul, T; Bergmann, F; Gehrisch, S; Geisen, C; Gottstein, S; Halimeh, S; Harbrecht, U; Kappert, G; Kirchmaier, C; Kehrel, B; Lösche, W; Krause, M; Mahnel, R; Meyer, O; Pilgrimm, A K; Pillitteri, D; Rott, H; Santoso, S; Siegemund, A; Schambeck, C; Scheer, M; Schmugge, M; Scholl, T; Strauss, G; Zieger, B; Zotz, R; Hermann, M; Streif, W

    2014-01-01

    Congenital disorders of platelet function are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are often not detected until bleeding occurs. In clinical settings only a few methods have proven to be useful for identification and classification of inherited platelet disorders. For a rational diagnostic approach, a stepwise algorithm is recommended. Patient history and clinical investigation are mandatory. Von Willebrand disease and other coagulation disorders should always be ruled out prior to specific platelet testing. Platelet count, size, volume (MPV) and morphology may guide further investigations. The PFA-100® CT is suited for screening for severe platelet defects. Platelet aggregometry allows assessment of multiple aspects of platelet function. Flow cytometry enables diagnosis of thrombasthenia Glanzmann, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and storage pool defects. Molecular genetics may confirm a putative diagnosis or pave the way for identifying new defects. We present an unabridged version of the interdisciplinary guideline. PMID:24903476

  7. Genomics of platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Westbury, S K; Mumford, A D

    2016-07-01

    Genetic diagnosis in families with inherited platelet disorders (IPD) is not performed widely because of the genetic heterogeneity of this group of disorders and because in most cases, it is not possible to select single candidate genes for analysis using clinical and laboratory phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has revolutionized the scale and cost-effectiveness of genetic testing, and has emerged as a valuable tool for IPD. This review examines the potential utility of NGS as a diagnostic tool to streamline detection of causal variants in known IPD genes and as a vehicle for new gene discovery. PMID:27405671

  8. von Willebrand factor, Jedi knight of the bloodstream.

    PubMed

    Springer, Timothy A

    2014-08-28

    When blood vessels are cut, the forces in the bloodstream increase and change character. The dark side of these forces causes hemorrhage and death. However, von Willebrand factor (VWF), with help from our circulatory system and platelets, harnesses the same forces to form a hemostatic plug. Force and VWF function are so closely intertwined that, like members of the Jedi Order in the movie Star Wars who learn to use "the Force" to do good, VWF may be considered the Jedi knight of the bloodstream. The long length of VWF enables responsiveness to flow. The shape of VWF is predicted to alter from irregularly coiled to extended thread-like in the transition from shear to elongational flow at sites of hemostasis and thrombosis. Elongational force propagated through the length of VWF in its thread-like shape exposes its monomers for multimeric binding to platelets and subendothelium and likely also increases affinity of the A1 domain for platelets. Specialized domains concatenate and compact VWF during biosynthesis. A2 domain unfolding by hydrodynamic force enables postsecretion regulation of VWF length. Mutations in VWF in von Willebrand disease contribute to and are illuminated by VWF biology. I attempt to integrate classic studies on the physiology of hemostatic plug formation into modern molecular understanding, and point out what remains to be learned. PMID:24928861

  9. von Willebrand factor, Jedi knight of the bloodstream

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    When blood vessels are cut, the forces in the bloodstream increase and change character. The dark side of these forces causes hemorrhage and death. However, von Willebrand factor (VWF), with help from our circulatory system and platelets, harnesses the same forces to form a hemostatic plug. Force and VWF function are so closely intertwined that, like members of the Jedi Order in the movie Star Wars who learn to use “the Force” to do good, VWF may be considered the Jedi knight of the bloodstream. The long length of VWF enables responsiveness to flow. The shape of VWF is predicted to alter from irregularly coiled to extended thread-like in the transition from shear to elongational flow at sites of hemostasis and thrombosis. Elongational force propagated through the length of VWF in its thread-like shape exposes its monomers for multimeric binding to platelets and subendothelium and likely also increases affinity of the A1 domain for platelets. Specialized domains concatenate and compact VWF during biosynthesis. A2 domain unfolding by hydrodynamic force enables postsecretion regulation of VWF length. Mutations in VWF in von Willebrand disease contribute to and are illuminated by VWF biology. I attempt to integrate classic studies on the physiology of hemostatic plug formation into modern molecular understanding, and point out what remains to be learned. PMID:24928861

  10. Platelet abnormalities in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eneman, Benedicte; Levtchenko, Elena; van den Heuvel, Bert; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2016-08-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is a common kidney disease associated with a significantly increased risk of thrombotic events. Alterations in plasma levels of pro- and anti-coagulant factors are involved in the pathophysiology of venous thrombosis in NS. However, the fact that the risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis is elevated in NS points to an additional role for blood platelets. Increased platelet counts and platelet hyperactivity have been observed in nephrotic children. Platelet hyperaggregability, increased release of active substances, and elevated surface expression of activation-dependent platelet markers have been documented. The mechanisms underlying those platelet alterations are multifactorial and are probably due to changes in plasma levels of platelet-interfering proteins and lipid changes, as a consequence of nephrosis. The causal relationship between platelet alterations seen in NS and the occurrence of thromboembolic phenomena remains unclear. Moreover, the efficiency of prophylactic treatment using antiplatelet agents for the prevention of thrombotic complications in nephrotic patients is also unknown. Thus, antiplatelet medication is currently not generally recommended for routine prophylactic therapy. PMID:26267676

  11. Platelet adhesiveness in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S.; Pegrum, G. D.; Wolff, Sylvia; Ashton, W. L.

    1967-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been assessed on whole blood from a series of 34 diabetics and 50 control subjects using adenosine diphosphate (A.D.P.) and by adherence to glass microspherules (ballotini). Using both techniques it was possible to demonstrate a significant increase in platelet adhesiveness in the diabetic patients. PMID:5614070

  12. Platelets: production, morphology and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate, discoid cells, roughly 2-3 μm in diameter that function primarily as regulators of hemostasis, but also play secondary roles in angiogensis and innate immunity. Although human adults contain nearly one trillion platelets in circulation that are turned over every 8-10 days, our understanding of the mechanisms involved in platelet production is still incomplete. Platelets stem from large (30-100 μm) nucleated cells called megakaryocytes that reside primarily in the bone marrow. During maturation megakaryocytes extend long proplatelet elongations into sinusoidal blood vessels from which platelets ultimately release. During this process, platelets develop a number of distinguishable structural elements including: a delimited plasma membrane; invaginations of the surface membrane that form the open canalicular system (OCS); a closed-channel network of residual endoplasmic reticulum that form the dense tubular system (DTS); a spectrin-based membrane skeleton; an actin-based cytoskeletal network; a peripheral band of microtubules; and numerous organelles including α-granules, dense-granules, peroxisomes, lysosomes, and mitochondria. Proplatelet elongation and platelet production is an elaborate and complex process that defines the morphology and ultrastructure of circulating platelets, and is critical in understanding their increasingly numerous and varied biological functions. PMID:22918725

  13. Biologic nanoparticles and platelet reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M; Hunter, Larry W; Chu, Kevin; Kaul, Vivasvat; Squillace, Phillip D; Lieske, John C; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2009-01-01

    Aim Nanosized particles (NPs) enriched in hydroxyapatite and protein isolated from calcified human tissue accelerate occlusion of endothelium-denuded arteries when injected intravenously into rabbits. Since platelet aggregation and secretory processes participate in normal hemostasis, thrombosis and vascular remodeling, experiments were designed to determine if these biologic NPs alter specific platelet functions in vitro. Methods Platelet-rich plasma was prepared from citrate anticoagulated human blood. Platelet aggregation and ATP secretion were monitored in response to thrombin receptor agonists peptide (10 μM) or convulxin (50 μg/ml) prior to and following 15 min incubation with either control solution, human-derived NPs, bovine-derived NPs or crystals of hydroxyapatite at concentrations of 50 and 150 nephelometric turbidity units. Results Incubation of platelets for 15 min with either human- or bovine-derived NPs reduced aggregation induced by thrombin receptor activator peptide and convulxin in a concentration-dependent manner. Hydroxyapatite caused a greater inhibition than either of the biologically derived NPs. Human-derived NPs increased ATP secretion by unstimulated platelets during the 15 min incubation period. Conclusion Effects of bovine-derived and hydroxyapatite NPs on basal release of ATP were both time and concentration dependent. These results suggest that biologic NPs modulate both platelet aggregation and secretion. Biologically derived NPs could modify platelet responses within the vasculature, thereby reducing blood coagulability and the vascular response to injury. PMID:19839809

  14. Platelet-derived VWF is not essential for normal thrombosis and hemostasis but fosters ischemic stroke injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Verhenne, Sebastien; Denorme, Frederik; Libbrecht, Sarah; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Pareyn, Inge; Deckmyn, Hans; Lambrecht, Antoon; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; De Meyer, Simon F

    2015-10-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a key hemostatic protein synthesized in both endothelial cells and megakaryocytes. Megakaryocyte-derived VWF is stored in α-granules of platelets and is enriched in hyperactive "ultra-large" VWF multimers. To elucidate the specific contribution of platelet VWF in hemostasis and thrombosis, we performed crossed bone marrow transplantations between C57BL/6J and Vwf(-/-) mice to generate chimeric mice. Chimeric mice specifically lacking platelet VWF showed normal tail bleeding and carotid artery thrombosis, similar to wild-type mice. Chimeric mice with VWF present only in platelets were not able to support normal thrombosis and hemostasis. However, using a mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, we observed that cerebral infarct sizes and fibrin(ogen) deposition in chimeric mice with only platelet VWF were significantly increased compared with Vwf(-/-) mice (P < .01). Blocking of the platelet VWF-glycoprotein (GP)Ib interaction abrogated this platelet VWF-mediated injury. These data suggest that whereas platelet-derived VWF does not play a crucial role in hemostasis and arterial thrombosis, it aggravates thrombo-inflammatory diseases such as stroke via a GPIb-dependent mechanism. PMID:26209660

  15. Interactions of von Willebrand factor and ADAMTS13 in von Willebrand disease and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Budde, U; Schneppenheim, R

    2014-01-01

    The function of von Willebrand factor (VWF), a huge multimeric protein and a key factor in platelet dependent primary haemostasis, is regulated by its specific protease ADAMTS13. The ADAMTS13 dependent degradation of VWF to its proteolytic fragments can be visualized as a characteristic so-called triplet structure of individual VWF oligomers by multimer analysis. Lack of VWF high molecular weight multimers (VWF-HMWM) or their pathologically enhanced degradation underlies a particular type of von Willebrand disease, VWD type 2A with a significant bleeding tendency, and may also be observed in acquired von Willebrand syndrome due to cardiovascular disease. In these conditions multimer analysis is an obligatory and powerful tool for diagnosis of VWD. The opposite condition, the persistence of ultralarge VWF (UL-VWF) multimers may cause the microangiopathic life-threatening disorder thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). During the course of active TTP, UL-VWF is consumed in the hyaline thrombi formed in the microvasculature which will ultimately result in the loss of UL-VWF and VWF-HMWM. Therefore, VWF multimer analysis is not a valid tool to diagnose TTP in the active phase of disease but may be helpful for the diagnosis of TTP patients in remission. PMID:25010251

  16. First principle study of sodium decorated graphyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Utpal; Bhattacharya, Barnali; Seriani, Nicola

    2015-11-01

    We present first-principles calculations of the electronic properties of Na-decorated graphyne. This structure of the graphyne family is a direct band gap semiconductor with a band gap of 0.44 eV in absence of sodium, but Na-decorated graphyne compounds are metallic, and can then be employed as carbon-based conductors. Metallization is due to charge donation from sodium to carbon. Pristine graphyne is more stable than Na-decorated graphyne, therefore is seems probable that, if this material should be employed as electrode in Na-ion batteries, it would lead to the formation of metallic sodium rather than well dispersed sodium ions. On the other side, this property might be useful if graphyne is employed in water desalination. Finally, the abrupt change from a semiconducting to a metallic state in presence of a small amount of sodium might be exploited in electronics, e.g. for the production of smooth metal-semiconductor interfaces through spatially selective deposition of sodium.

  17. Generalized transformation for decorated spin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Onofre; Valverde, J. S.; de Souza, S. M.

    2009-04-01

    The paper discusses the transformation of decorated Ising models into an effective undecorated spin model, using the most general Hamiltonian for interacting Ising models including a long range and high order interactions. The inverse of a Vandermonde matrix with equidistant nodes [-s,s] is used to obtain an analytical expression of the transformation. This kind of transformation is very useful to obtain the partition function of decorated systems. The method presented by Fisher is also extended, in order to obtain the correlation functions of the decorated Ising models transforming into an effective undecorated Ising model. We apply this transformation to a particular mixed spin-(1/2, 1) and (1/2, 2) square lattice with only nearest site interaction. This model could be transformed into an effective uniform spin- S square lattice with nearest and next-nearest interaction, furthermore the effective Hamiltonian also includes combinations of three-body and four-body interactions; in particular we considered spin 1 and 2.

  18. Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Brian J.; Seroyer, Shane T.; Filardo, Giuseppe; Bajaj, Sarvottam; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may affect soft tissue healing via growth factors released after platelet degranulation. Because of this potential benefit, clinicians have begun to inject PRP for the treatment of tendon, ligament, muscle, and cartilage injuries and early osteoarthritis. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was performed for studies relating to PRP, growth factors, and soft tissue injuries from 1990 to 2010. Relevant references from these studies were also retrieved. Results: Soft tissue injury is a major source of disability that may often be complicated by prolonged and incomplete recovery. Numerous growth factors may potentiate the healing and regeneration of tendons and ligaments. The potential benefits of biologically enhanced healing processes have led to a recent interest in the use of PRP in orthopaedic sports medicine. There has been widespread anecdotal use of PRP for muscle strains, tendinopathy, and ligament injuries and as a surgical adjuvant to rotator cuff repair, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and meniscal or labral repairs. Although the fascination with this emerging technology has led to a dramatic increase in its use, scientific data supporting this use are still in their infancy. Conclusions: The literature is replete with studies on the basic science of growth factors and their relation to the maintenance, proliferation, and regeneration of various tissues and tissue-derived cells. Despite the promising results of several animal studies, well-controlled human studies are lacking. PMID:23015939

  19. [Raman and EDXRF Study on Overglaze Decorations of Jingdezhen Ceramics].

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Zhang, Mao-lin; Wu, Jun-ming; Li, Qi-jiang; Cao, Jian-wen; Li, Qing-hui; Zhao, Hong-xia

    2015-05-01

    Overglaze decoration porcelain is an important category of ancient Chinese ceramics, which has significant artistic value and scientific value. Nondestructive analysis methods such as Raman spectroscopy and EDXRF were used to analyze the overglaze decorations on the Jingdezhen ceramic samples of Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasty. The recipe and color mechanism of the overglaze pigments were discussed according to the chemical composition and phase composition analysis. The study found that dark red overglaze decorations of ancient Honglvcai, Wucai and famille rose in Jingdezhen are colored by hematite, yellow color is lead tin yellow, carmine decoration is colored by gold less than 0. 1 % in concentration, and green decorations are colored by bivalent copper ion. The result also indicates that the effective combination of Raman spectroscopy and EDXRF can play an important role in the deep research on ceramic artifacts, especially for the overglaze decoration pigments which are interveined each other. PMID:26415441

  20. Platelet-Rich Plasma and Platelet Gel: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Everts, Peter A.M.; Knape, Johannes T.A.; Weibrich, Gernot; Schönberger, Jacques P.A.M.; Hoffmann, Johannes; Overdevest, Eddy P.; Box, Henk A.M.; van Zundert, André

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Strategies to reduce blood loss and transfusion of allogeneic blood products during surgical procedures are important in modern times. The most important and well-known autologous techniques are preoperative autologous predonation, hemodilution, perioperative red cell salvage, postoperative wound blood autotransfusion, and pharmacologic modulation of the hemostatic process. At present, new developments in the preparation of preoperative autologous blood component therapy by whole blood platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) sequestration have evolved. This technique has been proven to reduce the number of allogeneic blood transfusions during open heart surgery and orthopedic operations. Moreover, platelet gel and fibrin sealant derived from PRP and PPP mixed with thrombin, respectively, can be exogenously applied to tissues to promote wound healing, bone growth, and tissue sealing. However, to our disappointment, not many well-designed scientific studies are available, and many anecdotic stories exist, whereas questions remain to be answered. We therefore decided to study perioperative blood management in more detail with emphasis on the application and production of autologous platelet gel and the use of fibrin sealant. This review addresses a large variety of aspects relevant to platelets, platelet-rich plasma, and the application of platelet gel. In addition, an overview of recent animal and human studies is presented. PMID:16921694

  1. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the astronautics lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics lab.

  2. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the Astronautics Lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics Lab.

  3. Mediators and molecular pathways involved in the regulation of neutrophil extracellular trap formation mediated by activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Carestia, Agostina; Kaufman, Tomás; Rivadeneyra, Leonardo; Landoni, Verónica Inés; Pozner, Roberto Gabriel; Negrotto, Soledad; D'Atri, Lina Paola; Gómez, Ricardo Martín; Schattner, Mirta

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being key elements in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets amplify neutrophil function. We aimed to gain further insight into the stimuli, mediators, molecular pathways, and regulation of neutrophil extracellular trap formation mediated by human platelets. Platelets stimulated by lipopolysaccharide, a wall component of gram-negative bacteria, Pam3-cysteine-serine-lysine 4, a mimetic of lipopeptide from gram-positive bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, or physiologic platelet agonists promoting neutrophil extracellular trap formation and myeloperoxidase-associated DNA activity under static and flow conditions. Although P-selectin or glycoprotein IIb/IIIa were not involved, platelet glycoprotein Ib, neutrophil cluster of differentiation 18, and the release of von Willebrand factor and platelet factor 4 seemed to be critical for the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. The secretion of these molecules depended on thromboxane A(2) production triggered by lipopolysaccharide or Pam3-cysteine-serine-lysine 4 but not on high concentrations of thrombin. Accordingly, aspirin selectively inhibited platelet-mediated neutrophil extracellular trap generation. Signaling through extracellular signal-regulated kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and Src kinases, but not p38 or reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, was involved in platelet-triggered neutrophil extracellular trap release. Platelet-mediated neutrophil extracellular trap formation was inhibited by prostacyclin. Our results support a role for stimulated platelets in promoting neutrophil extracellular trap formation, reveal that an endothelium-derived molecule contributes to limiting neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and highlight platelet inhibition as a potential target for controlling neutrophil extracellular trap cell death. PMID:26320263

  4. Holiday Decorating Contest - A Way to Meet Fellow Employees | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The trolls from “Frozen,” a North Pole tunnel, and a Christmas tree­–shaped periodic table of elements were just a few of the decorations on display during the second annual Holiday Decorating Contest in December. The contest, sponsored by the R&W Club Frederick, awarded prizes to three groups and two individuals whose decorations were judged based on visual impact, creativity, and craftsmanship.

  5. Synthesis of polymer latex particles decorated with organically-modified laponite clay platelets via emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Norma Negrete; Persoz, Stéphanie; Putaux, Jean-Luc; David, Laurent; Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie

    2006-02-01

    We report a new route to colloidal nanocomposites consisting of polymer latex particles covered with Laponite clay nanoplatelets. These composite particles are prepared by seeded emulsion (co)polymerization of styrene and butyl acrylate from Laponite clay suspensions previously functionalized by ion exchange using either a free radical initiator: 2,2-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) hydrochloride (AIBA) or a cationic vinyl monomer: 2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (MADQUAT). The successful intercalation of the cationic reactive molecules was confirmed by elemental analysis, FTIR, 13C solid-state NMR and WAXD. The organically-modified clays were dispersed into water with the help of tetrasodium pyrophosphate and an anionic surfactant. stable latexes, produced under different experimental conditions, were successfully obtained from the clay suspensions. Cryo-TEM images of the resulting latexes showed spherical composite particles with diameters in the 50-250 nm range with clay sheets located on their surface. This paper reports on the effect of the processing conditions on the particle morphology and latex stability, and describes the mechanism of formation of the nanocomposite particles. PMID:16573041

  6. Platelet storage media.

    PubMed

    Gulliksson, H

    2014-10-01

    Present platelet storage media often designated platelet additive solutions (PAS) basically contain acetate, citrate and phosphate and recently also potassium and magnesium. However, there seems to be an increasing interest in developing PASs that can be used also after further reduction of residual plasma content below 15-20% plasma. Inclusion of glucose but also calcium and bicarbonate in such solutions have been suggested to improve platelet (PLT) storage, especially when plasma content is reduced to very low levels. Results from a limited number of studies using novel PAS alternatives have been presented during the last years, such as InterSol-G, PAS-5, M-sol, PAS-G and SAS. Most of them are experimental solutions. The combined results presented in those studies suggest that presence of glucose may be necessary during PLT storage, primarily to maintain ATP at acceptable levels. At plasma inclusion below 15-20%, the content of glucose will generally be too low to support PLT metabolism for more than a few days making glucose addition in PAS necessary. Significant effects associated with presence of calcium was observed in PLTs stored in PAS with 5% inclusion but not with 20-35% plasma inclusion, suggesting that the content of plasma could be of importance. Bicarbonate only seems to be of importance for pH regulation, primarily when plasma inclusion is reduced to about 5%. Reduction in rate of glycolysis was observed in some PAS alternatives containing potassium and magnesium but not in others. Differences in pH or in concentrations of the various compounds included in PAS may be possible explanations. Additionally, novel PAS containing glucose, calcium and bicarbonate does not seem to be associated with improved in vitro results as compared to SSP+ or CompoSol when PLTs are stored with 35% plasma inclusion. The results would then also suggest that excess of glucose in novel PAS environment may not be associated with additional positive effects on PLT metabolism

  7. Shiga toxin binds to activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S A; Polanowska-Grabowska, R K; Fujii, J; Obrig, T; Gear, A R L

    2004-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is associated with acute renal failure in children and can be caused by Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli. Thrombocytopenia and formation of renal thrombi are characteristic of HUS, suggesting that platelet activation is involved in its pathogenesis. However, whether Shiga toxin directly activates platelets is controversial. The present study evaluates if potential platelet sensitization during isolation by different procedures influences platelet interaction with Shiga toxin. Platelets isolated from sodium citrate anticoagulated blood were exposed during washing to EDTA and higher g forces than platelets prepared from acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) plasma. Platelet binding of Stx was significantly higher in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets. Binding of Stx was also increased with ACD-derived platelets when activated with thrombin (1 U mL-1) and exposure of the Gb3 Stx receptor was detected only on platelets subjected to EDTA, higher g forces or thrombin. EDTA-exposed platelets lost their normal discoid shape and were larger. P-selectin (CD62P) exposure was significantly increased in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets, suggesting platelet activation. Taken together, these results suggest that direct binding of Stx occurs only on 'activated' platelets rather than on resting platelets. The ability of Stx to interact with previously activated platelets may be an important element in understanding the pathogenesis of HUS. PMID:15009469

  8. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  9. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  10. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-03-01

    Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  11. Nucleation of platelets with bloodborne pathogens on Kupffer cell precedes other innate immunity and contributes to bacterial clearance

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Connie H. Y.; Jenne, Craig N.; Petri, Björn; Chrobok, Navina L.; Kubes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Using intravital imaging of the liver, we unveil a collaborative role for platelets with Kupffer cells (KCs) in eradicating bloodborne bacterial infections. Under basal conditions, platelets via glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) formed transient “touch-and-go” interactions with von Willebrand factor (vWF) constitutively expressed on KCs. Bacteria, such as Bacillus cereus and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), were rapidly caught by KCs and triggered platelets to switch from “touch-and-go” to sustained GPIIb-mediated adhesion on the KC surface to encase the bacterium. Infected GpIbα−/− mice demonstrated increased endothelial and KC damage, leading to increased fluid leakage, significant polycythemia and rapid mortality. This study identifies a novel surveillance mechanism of intravascular macrophage by platelets that rapidly converts to a critical host response against bloodborne bacteria. PMID:23770641

  12. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome with a type 2B phenotype: diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Scepansky, Ellen; Othman, Maha; Smith, Hedy

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we provide evidence of an acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) with a type 2B phenotype rather than the expected type 1 or 2A. The patient was referred prior to surgical removal of a fibrous mass within the maxillary sinus. His first bleeding 7 years earlier following a retinal tear had been complicated by monocular blindness. Several mucocutanous bleedings followed. Hematological investigations revealed von Willebrand factor (VWF):Ag 91 IU/ml, factor VIII 86 IU/ml, VWF:RCo 34 IU/ml and profound thrombocytopenia with platelet clumping. VWF multimer analysis showed a loss of high-molecular-weight multimers and his plasma aggregated normal platelets under low ristocetin concentration, consistent with type 2B von Willebrand disease (VWD). Sequencing of VWF exon 28 and of the platelet GP1BA gene to investigate the possibility of platelet-type VWD failed to reveal mutations. Serum protein electrophoresis showed a monoclonal IgG protein and led to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS), raising suspicion of an AVWS. Over 2 years, he experienced severe gingival bleedings and traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage. Following debridement of the sinus mass, the patient required 20 units of packed red blood cells, despite high-dose Humate-P, continuous Amicar and twice-daily platelet transfusions. Bleeding finally ceased following infusion of activated factor VIIa. A history of prior uncomplicated vasectomy and tendon laceration, no family history of bleeding, the inability to identify a causative mutation in either exon 28 VWF or platelet GP1BA and the MGUS led to diagnosis of AVWS with a type 2B phenotype. This case highlights the difficulties in assigning a diagnosis and the management of bleeding in a patient with an atypical presentation of AVWS. PMID:24296552

  13. Hormonal contraception and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Saleh, A A; Ginsburg, K A; Duchon, T A; Dorey, L G; Hirata, J; Alshameeri, R S; Dombrowski, M P; Mammen, E F

    1995-05-15

    73 healthy women (29 controls, 25 using OCs, and 19 using Norplant) were selected from the clinic population at North Oakland Medical Center for inclusion in this study after obtaining informed consent. Age, race, height, weight, blood pressure, and cigarette smoking were recorded for each subject. 12 patients were on monophasic OCs while 13 were on triphasic preparations. Both hormonal contraceptive groups had used their particular contraceptive for at least 3 months prior to blood drawing. Platelet tests were performed within 2 hours of sample collection: platelet counts (PLC) and mean platelet volume (MPV) were determined on an Automated Platelet Counter (Baker 810 Platelet Analyzer). Whole blood aggregation was performed on a platelet aggregometer (Chrono-Log, Model 550) using both ADP (ADP, 5 mM) and collagen (COLL, 2 mcg/ml) as inducing agents. Demographic differences were not significant (p 0.05) among the 3 treatment groups, whose average age was 25.3-25.8 years old. Furthermore, no significant differences (p 0.05) in platelet function were detected among controls or subjects receiving either oral contraceptives or Norplant, compared to control patients. The mean platelet counts (X 10/9/L) were 223 for OC users, 231 for Norplant users, and 232 for controls. The respective platelet aggregation (ADP, ohms) values were 12.5, 18.0, and 19.2 as well as (COLL, ohms) 35.6, 40.7, and 39.0. These results demonstrated that there is no evidence for altered platelet function, with the testing methods employed, in women using either Norplant or combination low dose oral contraceptives. To date, several studies have examined this issue, with contradictory reports about the effects of hormonal contraceptives in platelet function. After controlling for differences between various steroid preparations and other such confounding variables, some of these conflicting conclusions could be the result of a lack of uniformity among the methods used to evaluate platelet aggregation

  14. A monoclonal antibody directed against a granule membrane glycoprotein (GMP-140/PADGEM, P-selectin, CD62P) inhibits ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Boukerche, H; Ruchaud-Sparagano, M H; Rouen, C; Brochier, J; Kaplan, C; McGregor, J L

    1996-02-01

    P-selectin (also called CD62, GMP-140, PADGEM, CD62P) is a recently described member of a family of vascular adhesion receptors expressed by activated platelets and endothelial cells that are involved in leucocyte cell adhesion. The aim of this study was to characterize a new monoclonal antibody (LYP7) directed against activated human blood platelets that inhibits ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. Immunoadsorbent affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation studies showed that LYP7 (IgG1) bound a surface-labelled glycoprotein (GP) which changed its apparent molecular mass (M(r)) on reduction from 138 kD (situated below GPIIb) to 148 kD (above GPIIb alpha). LYP7 and S12, a monoclonal antibody directed against P-selectin immunoprecipitated the same band. Using ELISA assay, purified P-selectin was shown to bind LYP7 and S12 monoclonal antibodies. Binding sites of 125I-labelled LYP7, which was greatly increased on thrombin-stimulated (2 U/ml) washed platelets (10825 +/- 2886, mean +/- SD) Kd = 1.5 +/- 0.5 nM) compared to resting platelets (2801 +/- 1278, mean +/- SD) (Kd = 1.5 +/- 0.6 nM), was found to be normal on thrombin-stimulated platelets taken from a patient with grey platelet syndrome or a patient with Glanzmann thrombasthenia. LYP7 (IgG1, F(ab')2 or Fab fragments) inhibited ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation of platelets in a dose-dependent fashion without affecting the binding of von Willebrand (vWf) factor. However, agglutination of formaldehyde-fixed platelets induced by ristocetin was not affected by monoclonal antibody LYP7. In addition, the binding of thrombin-activated platelets to neutrophils was inhibited by monoclonal antibody LYP7. These results strongly suggest that P-selectin, by promoting cell-cell contact, may play an active role in platelet-platelet interactions. PMID:8603015

  15. Glycans and the platelet life cycle.

    PubMed

    Li, Renhao; Hoffmeister, Karin M; Falet, Hervé

    2016-09-01

    Platelet numbers are intricately regulated to avoid spontaneous bleeding or arterial occlusion and organ damage. The growth factor thrombopoietin (TPO) drives platelet biogenesis by inducing megakaryocyte production. A recent study in mice identified a feedback mechanism by which clearance of aged, desialylated platelets stimulates TPO synthesis by hepatocytes. This new finding generated renewed interest in platelet clearance mechanisms. Here, different established and emerging mechanisms of platelet senescence and clearance will be reviewed with specific emphasis on the role of posttranslational modifications. PMID:27135356

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus complicated by acquired von Willebrand's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sc; Lee, Jh; Chi, Hs; Lee, Ck; Nah, Ss; Kim, Yg; Oh, Js; Moon, Hb; Yoo, B

    2008-09-01

    Haematological abnormalities are common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In some cases of acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AvWS), von Willebrand disease (vWD) is associated with autoimmune or lymphoproliferative disorders. In this study, we describe a 36-year-old woman with SLE and AvWS. The patient was referred to our hospital because of easy bruisability and recurrent vaginal bleeding. She had no history of bleeding tendency and no family history of bleeding diathesis, but she had a history of recurrent arthralgia, photosensitivity and sicca symptoms. Tests for antinuclear, anti-double stranded DNA, anticardiolipin and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies were all positive. Analysis of haemostatic parameters showed complete absence of von Willebrand factor ristocetin cofactor (vWF:Rco), von Willebrand antigen (vWF:Ag) and ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA). Electrophoretic analysis of plasma showed a complete absence of high-molecular weight vWF multimer. The presence of antibody to vWF was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Treatment with corticosteroids improved SLE symptoms and corrected bleeding diasthesis. Also, the multimeric patterns of vWF became normalised and anti-vWF antibody disappeared. These findings indicated that this patient had SLE associated with AvWS, which was ameliorated by corticosteroid treatment. PMID:18755868

  17. Holiday Door Decorating Contest Brings Cheer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Other than the time of year, what do the following have in common: the leg lamp from the movie “A Christmas Story,” a compilation of silly holiday jokes, a gingerbread house, and Santa on a motorcycle? All four were among the individual door winners for the Holiday Door Decorating Contest, held at NCI at Frederick in December. Employees dressed up their office doors, hallways, and even stairwells to participate. Entries for the contest included individual office doors as well as groups. Some employees even “decked the halls” of whole office buildings to participate.

  18. Comparison between von Willebrand factor (VWF) and VWF antigen II in normal individuals and patients with von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    de Romeuf, C; Mazurier, C

    1998-07-01

    Von Willebrand disease is characterised by a quantitative (type 1) or qualitative (type 2) decrease in von Willebrand factor (vWF) a multimeric glycoprotein involved in primary haemostasis. The propeptide of von Willebrand, also named vWF antigen II (vWF:AgII), is released from platelets and endothelial cells and circulates in plasma as a glycoprotein of 100 kD. In the present study, we attempted to determine whether vWF:AgII level may provide information on the synthesis of vWF, specially in patients with von Willebrand disease (vWD). To elucidate that point, we developed an ELISA and quantify the vWF:AgII in normal individuals and in various vWD patients. The propeptide molar concentration was found to be 5 nM as compared to 31 nM for mature vWF. In normal individuals, the level of vWF:AgII was significantly decreased in females from O and A blood groups. In type 2 vWD patients the level of plasma vWF:AgII appears normal in the patients with normal level of platelet vWF. In type 2 B vWD characterised by increased affinity of mature vWF for platelet glycoprotein Ib, the vWF:AgII in contrast to the vWF antigen (vWF:Ag) was not decreased. In type 2A vWD patients the level of vWF:AgII was decreased in patients with absence of high molecular weight vWF in platelets and plasma but normal in patients with increased sensitivity to proteolysis. Finally, in type 1 vWD, some studied patients have a parallel decrease in vWF:AgII and vWF:Ag whereas in others, the vWF:Ag levels were much more affected than corresponding vWF:AgII levels, as observed in some type 2 vWD patients. Thus, in contrast to that already described, the plasma vWF:AgII level cannot discriminate type 1 from type 2 vWD patients. We conclude that the vWF:AgII measurement provides additional information on the mechanisms responsible for vWD and might also contribute to the classification of vWD patients. PMID:9684782

  19. Platelet aggregability and in vivo platelet deposition in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease--evaluation by indium-111-platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Isaka, Y.; Kimura, K.; Uehara, A.; Hashikawa, K.; Mieno, M.; Matsumoto, M.; Handa, N.; Nakabayashi, S.; Imaizumi, M.; Kamada, T. )

    1989-12-15

    In ischemic cerebrovascular disease, it is not clear whether platelet function in vitro actually reflects the situation in vivo. Using indium-111 platelet scintigraphy as a method for detecting platelet activation in vivo, we tried to elucidate this problem. Twenty eight patients with chronic stage of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and 17 control subjects were examined. Platelet scintigrams were positive in 9 of 28 patients in CVD, while all were negative in control. A comparison of the results obtained from qualitative platelet imaging and platelet aggregability was performed to evaluate whether threshold aggregation concentration (TAC) grade differed across the three groups (control, CVD patients without platelet deposition and CVD patients with platelet deposition). CVD patients with platelet deposition showed a higher TAC than those patients who did not show platelet deposition (P less than 0.05) or control subjects without platelet deposition (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that some patients in chronic stages of CVD may have active platelet deposition on carotid atheromatous lesions, and presence of platelet deposition in vivo could contribute to reduce platelet reactivity in peripheral blood.

  20. Platelet aggregability and in vivo platelet deposition in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease--evaluation by indium-111-platelet scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Isaka, Y; Kimura, K; Uehara, A; Hashikawa, K; Mieno, M; Matsumoto, M; Handa, N; Nakabayashi, S; Imaizumi, M; Kamada, T

    1989-12-15

    In ischemic cerebrovascular disease, it is not clear whether platelet function in vitro actually reflects the situation in vivo. Using indium-111 platelet scintigraphy as a method for detecting platelet activation in vivo, we tried to elucidate this problem. Twenty eight patients with chronic stage of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and 17 control subjects were examined. Platelet scintigrams were positive in 9 of 28 patients in CVD, while all were negative in control. A comparison of the results obtained from qualitative platelet imaging and platelet aggregability was performed to evaluate whether threshold aggregation concentration (TAC) grade differed across the three groups (control, CVD patients without platelet deposition and CVD patients with platelet deposition). CVD patients with platelet deposition showed a higher TAC than those patients who did not show platelet deposition (P less than 0.05) or control subjects without platelet deposition (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that some patients in chronic stages of CVD may have active platelet deposition on carotid atheromatous lesions, and presence of platelet deposition in vivo could contribute to reduce platelet reactivity in peripheral blood. PMID:2633402

  1. 21 CFR 109.16 - Ornamental and decorative ceramicware.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.16 Ornamental and decorative ceramicware. (a) Lead is a toxic... food may result in the leaching of lead from the glaze or decoration into the food. The provisions of... Food Use. May Poison Food,” “Not for Food Use. Glaze contains lead. Food Use May Result in...

  2. 21 CFR 109.16 - Ornamental and decorative ceramicware.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.16 Ornamental and decorative ceramicware. (a) Lead is a toxic... food may result in the leaching of lead from the glaze or decoration into the food. The provisions of... Food Use. May Poison Food,” “Not for Food Use. Glaze contains lead. Food Use May Result in...

  3. 21 CFR 109.16 - Ornamental and decorative ceramicware.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.16 Ornamental and decorative ceramicware. (a) Lead is a toxic... food may result in the leaching of lead from the glaze or decoration into the food. The provisions of... Food Use. May Poison Food,” “Not for Food Use. Glaze contains lead. Food Use May Result in...

  4. 21 CFR 109.16 - Ornamental and decorative ceramicware.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.16 Ornamental and decorative ceramicware. (a) Lead is a toxic... food may result in the leaching of lead from the glaze or decoration into the food. The provisions of... Food Use. May Poison Food,” “Not for Food Use. Glaze contains lead. Food Use May Result in...

  5. Myeloperoxidase induces the priming of platelets.

    PubMed

    Kolarova, H; Klinke, A; Kremserova, S; Adam, M; Pekarova, M; Baldus, S; Eiserich, J P; Kubala, L

    2013-08-01

    The release of myeloperoxidase (MPO) from polymorphonuclear neutrophils is a hallmark of vascular inflammation and contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular inflammatory processes. However, the effects of MPO on platelets as a contributory mechanism in vascular inflammatory diseases remain unknown. Thus, MPO interaction with platelets and its effects on platelet function were examined. First, dose-dependent binding of MPO (between 1.7 and 13.8nM) to both human and mouse platelets was observed. This was in direct contrast to the absence of MPO in megakaryocytes. MPO was localized both on the surface of and inside platelets. Cytoskeleton inhibition did not prevent MPO localization inside the three-dimensional platelet structure. MPO peroxidase activity was preserved upon the MPO binding to platelets. MPO sequestered in platelets catabolized NO, documented by the decreased production of NO (on average, an approximately 2-fold decrease). MPO treatment did not affect the viability of platelets during short incubations; however, it decreased platelet viability after long-term storage for 7 days (an approximately 2-fold decrease). The activation of platelets by MPO was documented by an MPO-mediated increase in the expression of surface platelet receptors P-selectin and PECAM-1 (of about 5 to 20%) and the increased formation of reactive oxygen species (of about 15 to 200%). However, the activation was only partial, as MPO did not induce the aggregation of platelets nor potentiate platelet response to classical activators. Nor did MPO induce a significant release of the content of granules. The activation of platelets by MPO was connected with increased MPO-treated platelet interaction with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (an approximately 1.2-fold increase) in vitro. In conclusion, it can be suggested that MPO can interact with and activate platelets, which can induce priming of platelets, rather than the classical robust activation of platelets. This can contribute to the

  6. Geometric and Electronic Properties of Edge-decorated Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shen-Lin; Lin, Shih-Yang; Lin, Shih-Kang; Lee, Chi-Hsuan; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Edge-decorated graphene nanoribbons are investigated with the density functional theory; they reveal three stable geometric structures. The first type is a tubular structure formed by the covalent bonds of decorating boron or nitrogen atoms. The second one consists of curved nanoribbons created by the dipole-dipole interactions between two edges when decorated with Be, Mg, or Al atoms. The final structure is a flat nanoribbon produced due to the repulsive force between two edges; most decorated structures belong to this type. Various decorating atoms, different curvature angles, and the zigzag edge structure are reflected in the electronic properties, magnetic properties, and bonding configurations. Most of the resulting structures are conductors with relatively high free carrier densities, whereas a few are semiconductors due to the zigzag-edge-induced anti-ferromagnetism. PMID:25123103

  7. [Acquired von Willebrand syndrome].

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (aVWS) is a rare, but probably underestimated, bleeding disorder that mimics the congenital form of von Willebrand disease (VWD) in terms of laboratory findings and clinical presentation. However, unlike congenital VWD, it arises in individuals with no personal or family history of bleeding. AVWS occurs in association with a variety of underlying disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders, myeloproliferative disorders and cardiovascular diseases. The main pathogenic, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome are concisely reported in this review. PMID:16913181

  8. Adsorption of anaphylatoxins and platelet-specific proteins by filtration of platelet concentrates with a polyester leukocyte reduction filter.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Uchigiri, C; Mizuno, S; Kamiya, T; Kokubo, Y

    1994-01-01

    Anaphylatoxins generated during storage of platelet concentrates (PCs) may potentially have side effects on platelet transfusion. We evaluated the anaphylatoxin-scavenging abilities of white blood cell reduction filters. Among the commercially available filters for PCs, one made with polyester fiber (PL50) dramatically adsorbed C3a and C4a anaphylatoxins to the respective mean level of 1,721-208 ng/ml and 1,240-141 ng/ml in 3-day-old PCs. C3a and C4a were measured as the native and des Arg form of each complement by radioimmunoassay. C3a and C4a anaphylatoxins in the supernatant plasma fraction from 3-day-old PC again decreased from 1,136 to 114 ng/ml and from 1,086 to 65 ng/ml, respectively. The filter also adsorbed 85% of platelet factor 4 (PF4) and 31% of beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG), which had been released from platelets into the plasma during storage. The plasma levels of adhesive proteins such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, and von Willebrand factor, and plasma lactate dehydrogenase activity did not decrease after filtration. Another polyester filter (PL5A), on the other hand, significantly increased C3a and C4a levels with filtration. In addition, there was no PF4 adsorption ability during the filtration. The filters for red cells (RC50, BPF4, and R500A) had no anaphylatoxin adsorption capabilities. The observed specific adsorption of anaphylatoxins might be attributed to the electrostatic force between the positively charged anaphylatoxins with high pI and the possibly negatively charged filter membranes. Since PF4 and beta-TG have positively charged moieties in the C-terminal position, the same adsorption mechanism might operate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8036783

  9. Platelet function defects in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Mikhailidis, D P; Jenkins, W J; Barradas, M A; Jeremy, J Y; Dandona, P

    1986-01-01

    Platelet function in alcoholic patients was assessed on admission and during abstinence in hospital. On admission platelets from these patients were significantly less responsive (percentage aggregation and thromboxane A2 release) to conventional in vitro aggregating agents (adrenaline, adenosine diphosphate, and collagen) than platelets from healthy, moderate drinkers. Initially, platelet counts in platelet rich plasma tended to be low and the Simplate II bleeding times frequently prolonged. Platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release, however, were inhibited even in patients with normal platelet counts on admission. Platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release returned to normal or became hyper-responsive during two to three weeks of abstinence. Platelet counts rose during this period, the largest responses occurring in those patients with the lowest counts on admission. Bleeding times reverted to normal during abstinence and correlated significantly with changes in platelet aggregation, thromboxane A2 release, and platelet count and with the estimated ethanol consumption during the week before admission. Chronic, heavy alcohol ingestion evidently exerts an inhibitory effect on platelet function even in the absence of alcohol in the blood, and this phenomenon is reversible on abstaining. The impaired platelet function, together with the reduced platelet count, may contribute to the bleeding diathesis associated with chronic alcoholism and to the increased incidence and recurrence of gastrointestinal haemorrhage associated with excessive alcohol intake. PMID:3094624

  10. von Willebrand Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... have vWD, talk with your doctor before taking medicine for pain or fever. Don't take aspirin and ibuprofen ... bleeding. It's usually OK to take acetaminophen for pain or fever, since it has no effect on platelet function. Medicines for vWD Some people with more serious vWD ...

  11. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A camerman catches Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, his son, Peter, and daughter, Martgrit, as they arrive at the employee picnic held to celebrate man's first landing on the moon 6 days earlier. In the foreground is David R. Newby, Director of Administration and Technical Services at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  12. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Shown viewing the Apollo telescope mockup are, from left to right, Charles Donlan, deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director; William Horton, astrionics lab; Dr. Thomas Paine, NASA deputy administrator; Warner Kuers, director of the ME lab.

  13. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center director Wernher Von Braun and his family were honored with a series of events prior to his relocation to Washington, D.C. where he was assigned duties at NASA headquarters as deputy associate administrator for planning. Here he is shown with General Richard Drury and Hazel Toftoy, widow of General H.N. Toftoy.

  14. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, explains the purpose of a thermal curtain in the mockup of a Saturn I workshop to U.S. Representative Armistead Seldon of Alabama. The Congressman visited the Marshall Center on March 2, 1968 to tour the workshop and to visit Marshall Center facilities.

  15. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    U.S. Representative Armistead Seldon (D.-Al) inspects the food preparation area of the Saturn I workshop mockup during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center. Explaining the operation of the food preparation area to the congressman is Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director.

  16. Analytik von Lebensmittelallergenen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmel, Anja; Hahn, Alexandra

    Ansonsten harmlose Lebensmittel oder deren Bestandteile können bei von Lebensmittelallergien betroffenen Personen Überempfindlichkeitsreaktionen auslösen. Hierbei kann es sich um immunvermittelte Lebensmittelallergien oder um Intoleranzen gegenüber bestimmten Lebensmittelbestandteilen handeln. Ein Beispiel für Letzteres ist die Laktoseintoleranz, welche durch einen Enzymdefekt hervorgerufen wird [1]. Im Gegensatz hierzu handelt es sich bei Lebensmittelallergien um Sofortreaktionen, die durch IgE-Antikörper gegen Antigene aus den Lebensmitteln hervorgerufen werden und zu verschiedenen körperlichen Beschwerden führen können. Bei den Antigenen, welche von den von Allergikern produzierten IgE-Antikörpern erkannt werden, handelt es sich vor allem um Proteine [2]. Symptome IgE-vermittelter Reaktionen können zum Beispiel Hautausschlag, eine Schwellung der Schleimhäute oder das sogenannte orale Allergiesyndrom mit allergischen Reaktionen an der Mundschleimhaut und im Magen-Darm-Trakt sein [3]. Die hierbei auftretenden Beschwerden reichen von einem Brennen im Mund und einer Schwellung der Lippen und der Zunge bis zu Atemnot verursachenden Schwellungen im Kehlkopfbereich. In besonders schlimmen Fällen können allergische Reaktionen zu einem anaphylaktischen Schock und zum Tod durch Kreislaufversagen führen [4]. Während klassische Nahrungsallergene häufig komplexe Reaktionen zur Folge haben, ist bei Pollen-assoziierten Nahrungsmittelallergien das orale Allergiesyndrom vorherrschend.

  17. Acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Petrini, P

    1999-05-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD) is a syndrome that has clinical and laboratory features similar to hereditary vWD. In contrast to the latter it occurs in patients without a family history of previous bleeding tendency. PMID:23401904

  18. Dynamic light scattering can determine platelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet transfusions are life-saving procedures for patients who are bleeding or undergoing chemotherapy. The effectiveness of transfusions depends on the number of platelets transfused and the platelet function. Platelet function correlates with proportion of discoid to activated platelets, morphology response to temperature stress, and inversely correlates with microparticle content. ThromboLUX is a novel device that determines platelet function by measuring all of these characteristics using dynamic light scattering (DLS). During periods of stress, such as decreased temperature, cytoskeletal rearrangements will cause normal, discoid platelets to activate and become spiny spheres. The formation of pseudopods of various lengths facilitates the clotting cascade and also increases the apparent size of platelets. ThromboLUX uses a 37-20-37 C temperature cycle that mimics the bleeding, storage, and transfusion process. As the temperature fluctuates, DLS will measure the changing platelet hydrodynamic radius and the size of any microparticles present. ThromboLUX analysis of platelet concentrates in vitro would allow determination of high platelet function units before transfusion and would therefore improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety. This study examined how DLS is able to distinguish between discoid and activated platelets as well as measure the parameters that contribute to high platelet function.

  19. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Alessandrello Liotta, Agatina; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered. PMID:25733843

  20. 41 CFR 102-42.85 - What gifts or decorations must we report to GSA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... decorations must we report to GSA? 102-42.85 Section 102-42.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Utilization of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.85 What gifts or decorations must we report to GSA? You must report to...

  1. 41 CFR 102-42.85 - What gifts or decorations must we report to GSA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... decorations must we report to GSA? 102-42.85 Section 102-42.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Utilization of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.85 What gifts or decorations must we report to GSA? You must report to...

  2. 41 CFR 102-42.85 - What gifts or decorations must we report to GSA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... decorations must we report to GSA? 102-42.85 Section 102-42.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Utilization of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.85 What gifts or decorations must we report to GSA? You must report to...

  3. 41 CFR 102-42.85 - What gifts or decorations must we report to GSA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... decorations must we report to GSA? 102-42.85 Section 102-42.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Utilization of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.85 What gifts or decorations must we report to GSA? You must report to...

  4. 41 CFR 102-42.85 - What gifts or decorations must we report to GSA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... decorations must we report to GSA? 102-42.85 Section 102-42.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Utilization of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.85 What gifts or decorations must we report to GSA? You must report to...

  5. Desmopressin in vitro effects on platelet function, monitored with Multiplate, ROTEM and Sonoclot.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Kevin; Jensen, Hanna; Kander, Thomas; Schött, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    Background and aims The vasopressin analogue desmopressin has demonstrated efficacy in decreasing bleeding time by increasing the circulating levels of coagulation factor VIII and von Willebrand factor, but also by direct effects on platelets. Previous studies have demonstrated contrasting results regarding the effect of desmopressin on platelets in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose-response effects of in vitro desmopressin in whole blood. Our hypothesis was that desmopressin could increase platelet function in anticoagulated whole blood being stored up to 4 hours. Methods Desmopressin was administered with up to four different concentrations to venous whole blood, sampled with standard vacutainer tubes from 10 healthy volunteers after consent. Platelet function was analyzed with three different point-of-care techniques: Multiplate platelet aggregometry with adenosine diphosphate, collagen, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6, ristocetin and arachidonic acid agonists, tissue factor-activated thromboelastometry and Sonoclot glass bead viscoelastic coagulation tests at baseline and 4 hours later using different activator reagents. Results Thromboelastometry and Sonoclot did not show any significant change between baseline and 4 h later. A significant decrease in area under curve (AUC) could be seen with the Multiplate between baseline and after 4 h. Desmopressin did not improve any of these tests at baseline or during a 4 h storage and incubation period. Conclusion In vitro administered desmopressin could not increase normal platelet function or coagulation being measured with thromboelastometry and Sonoclot. Multiplate indicated decreased platelet aggregation over time, without any effect of in vitro added desmopressin. PMID:26923171

  6. Fibrinogen-independent platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium mediated by glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex at high shear rate.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, H J; Hawiger, J; Ruggeri, Z M; Turitto, V T; Thiagarajan, P; Hoffmann, T

    1989-01-01

    Platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium, studied at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, were inhibited by two synthetic peptides known to interact with GPIIb-IIIa. One peptide (HHLGGAKQAGDV) corresponds to the carboxyl terminal segment of the fibrinogen gamma-chain (gamma 400-411) and the other (RGDS) contains the amino acid sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) common to fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, vitronectin and the alpha-chain of fibrinogen. Neither platelet adhesion nor thrombus formation were decreased in a patient with severe congenital fibrinogen deficiency and this was equally true when his blood was further depleted of the small amounts of fibrinogen present utilizing an anti-fibrinogen antibody. In normal subjects, adhesion and thrombus formation were inhibited by the Fab' fragments of a monoclonal anti-GPIIb-IIIa antibody (LJ-CP8), which interferes with the interaction of platelets with all four adhesive proteins in both the fluid and solid phase. However, another anti-GPIIb-IIIa antibody (LJ-P5) that had minimal effects on the interaction of platelets with fibrinogen, but inhibited to varying degrees platelet interaction with other adhesive proteins, was equally effective. The findings demonstrate that, at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, adhesive proteins other than fibrinogen are involved in GPIIb-IIIa-mediated platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium. In addition, since LJ-P5 inhibited the binding of soluble von Willebrand factor and vitronectin, these adhesive proteins may be involved in platelet thrombus formation. In contrast to the results obtained at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, fibrinogen could play a role in mediating platelet-platelet interactions with weak agonists or lower shear rates. PMID:2910912

  7. Characterization of aberrant splicing of von Willebrand factor in von Willebrand disease: an underrecognized mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hawke, Lindsey; Bowman, Mackenzie L; Poon, Man-Chiu; Scully, Mary-Frances; Rivard, Georges-Etienne; James, Paula D

    2016-07-28

    Approximately 10% of von Willebrand factor (VWF) gene mutations are thought to alter messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing through disruption of consensus splice sites. This mechanism is likely underrecognized and affected by mutations outside consensus splice sites. During VWF synthesis, splicing abnormalities lead to qualitative defects or quantitative deficiencies in VWF. This study investigated the pathologic mechanism acting in 3 von Willebrand disease (VWD) families with putative splicing mutations using patient-derived blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) and a heterologous human embryonic kidney (HEK 293(T)) cell model. The exonic mutation c.3538G>A causes 3 in-frame splicing variants (23del, 26del, and 23/26del) which cannot bind platelets, blood coagulation factor VIII, or collagen, causing VWD through dominant-negative intracellular retention of coexpressed wild-type (WT) VWF, and increased trafficking to lysosomes. Individuals heterozygous for the c.5842+1G>C mutation produce exon 33 skipping, exons 33-34 skipping, and WT VWF transcripts. Pathogenic intracellular retention of VWF lacking exons 33-34 causes their VWD. The branch site mutation c.6599-20A>T causes type 1 VWD through mRNA degradation of exon 38 skipping transcripts. Splicing ratios of aberrant transcripts and coexpressed WT were altered in the BOECs with exposure to shear stress. This study provides evidence of mutations outside consensus splice sites disrupting splicing and introduces the concept that VWF splicing is affected by shear stress on endothelial cells. PMID:27317792

  8. Genetics Home Reference: gray platelet syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to play a role in the formation of alpha-granules, which are sacs inside platelets that contain ... injury that causes bleeding, the proteins stored in alpha-granules help platelets stick to one another to ...

  9. [Assessment of platelet function in man].

    PubMed

    Gaussem, Pascale

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of platelet function was primarily designed to explore patients with hemostatic disorders, but is becoming important for the monitoring of anti platelet agents, mostly aspirin and clopidogrel. Beside platelet counting, morphological analysis and bleeding time, a number of dedicated platelet function instruments are now available, generally allowing a rapid evaluation of platelet function in whole blood. The other tests including aggregometry and ELISA measurement of activation markers are generally restricted to specialized laboratories. Although aggregometry is still considered as the "gold standard", the recently developed flow cytometric-based platelet function analysis provides a wide choice of tests that assess the number of surface receptors, the measure of secretion and aggregation, the quantification of microparticules and leukocyte-platelet aggregates. It also allows the measure of the function of the ADP receptor P2Y12 by the phosphorylation level of the VASP protein, method currently under evaluation to monitor the platelet response to clopidogrel treatment. PMID:17243268

  10. Effect of photodynamic therapy on mouse platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuannong; Chi, Shunji; Deng, Jinsheng; Zhang, Hua; Liang, Junlin; Ha, Xian-wen

    1993-06-01

    Normal mice received hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) i.v. prior to red light irradiation and the platelet-rich plasma was prepared and irradiated by red light. The platelets were processed for EM examination and stereological analysis. It was shown the 16 hrs after irradiation almost all platelets were necrotized; 8 hours after irradiation about one fourth of the platelets were necrotized and the remaining were considerably damaged. Immediately after irradiation a small number of platelets became necrotic and most other platelets were swollen and deformated, showing significantly increased mean area, perimeter and short axis, and mean cell volume and cell surface area. The findings indicate that platelets are highly sensitive to PDT action and can be directly and rapidly damaged by PDT even in the absence of vascular endothelial cells. The early platelet photoactivation may play an important role in the initiation of early vascular damage and microcirculatory alterations induced by PDT in vivo.

  11. CD8+ T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8+ T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8+ splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8+ splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8+ splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  12. CD8(+) T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8(+) T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8(+) splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8(+) splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8(+) splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  13. William Cowper and his decorated copperplate initials.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Mark A

    2005-01-01

    William Cowper was an 18th-century London surgeon/anatomist who made important contributions to several medical disciplines. He achieved lasting fame for describing the bulbourethral glands and lasting infamy for pirating plates for his anatomical atlas, the Anatomy of Humane Bodies. Cowper wrote the books and papers that taught the forerunners of today's surgeons and anatomists. His most famous pupil, the great surgeon William Cheselden, was one of the teachers of John Hunter, the founder of modern surgery. Cowper's magnificent atlas of human myology, the Myotomia Reformata, is a showcase for exquisitely rendered illustrations of muscles and bones. Cowper populated his masterwork with dozens of delightfully decorated initial letters depicting anatomical scenes. This article introduces readers to the long-forgotten William Cowper and exhibits his stunning historiated letters in all their glory. PMID:15672355

  14. Luminescence properties of lustre decorated majolica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, A.; Martini, M.; Sibilia, E.; Padeletti, G.; Fermo, P.

    Luminescence measurements have been performed on several Italian Renaissance ceramic shards produced in central Italy, as well as on some others from Hispano-Moresque and Fatimid periods. The aim of this study was the characterisation of the raw materials used to manufacture lustre decorated majolica. At first, the thermoluminescence (TL) dating of all ceramic bodies was performed, because the shards lacked sure chronological attribution, having been provided by private collectors, or found during emergency restoration works or archaeological surveys. To characterise the defects and the recombination centers of the different components of the ceramics (ceramic body, glaze, glaze, and lustre), radioluminescence (RL) measurements have been performed on samples representative of each historical period. The dating results are reported, as well as the preliminary RL results.

  15. Decorating Cutting as New Approach to Machine Tool System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcinkova, Zuzana; Vasilko, Karol

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents so called decorating cutting focused on turning. It uses self-excited vibrations that are typical for turning and other types of cutting operations. The decorating turning do not utilize setting of unstable technological conditions of cutting process but it actively use the acting of cutting force on machine tool without generation of unwanted chatter vibrations. The special tool fixture was developed to utilize self-excited vibrations invoked by periodical changeability of cutting force by cutting process itself. Thus the typical texture of surface appears. The various macro/micro-textures of surfaces can be applied either for decorating purpose or for better holding of oil film.

  16. New treatment for low platelets.

    PubMed

    Grodeck, B

    1995-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved WinRho SD, a new treatment for immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). A clinical trial in children with acute ITP found that WinRho SD is as effective as IVIG or prednisone, but less expensive and dramatically easier to administer. WinRho SD is the first polyclonal antibody product shown to increase platelets in ITP patients. Platelets usually rise within one to two days and peak within seven to fourteen days after initial therapy. On average, platelet levels are maintained for approximately thirty days. Each year, 50,000 people nationally suffer from ITP as a complication of HIV infection, while another 18,000 manifest the disease as a primary condition. PMID:11362579

  17. Megakaryocyte rupture for acute platelet needs

    PubMed Central

    Stritt, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Circulating platelets were thought to arise solely from the protrusion and fragmentation of megakaryocyte cytoplasm. Now, Nishimura et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201410052) show that platelet release from megakaryocytes can be induced by interleukin-1α (IL-1α) via a new rupture mechanism, which yields higher platelet numbers, occurs independently of the key regulator of megakaryopoiesis thrombopoietin, and may occur during situations of acute platelet need. PMID:25963815

  18. Megakaryocyte rupture for acute platelet needs.

    PubMed

    Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stritt, Simon

    2015-05-11

    Circulating platelets were thought to arise solely from the protrusion and fragmentation of megakaryocyte cytoplasm. Now, Nishimura et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201410052) show that platelet release from megakaryocytes can be induced by interleukin-1α (IL-1α) via a new rupture mechanism, which yields higher platelet numbers, occurs independently of the key regulator of megakaryopoiesis thrombopoietin, and may occur during situations of acute platelet need. PMID:25963815

  19. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  20. Mutational Constraints on Local Unfolding Inhibit the Rheological Adaptation of von Willebrand Factor.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Alexander; Campbell, James C; Machha, Venkata R; Moon-Tasson, Laurie; Benson, Linda M; Sankaran, Banumathi; Kim, Choel; Auton, Matthew

    2016-02-19

    Unusually large von Willebrand factor (VWF), the first responder to vascular injury in primary hemostasis, is designed to capture platelets under the high shear stress of rheological blood flow. In type 2M von Willebrand disease, two rare mutations (G1324A and G1324S) within the platelet GPIbα binding interface of the VWF A1 domain impair the hemostatic function of VWF. We investigate structural and conformational effects of these mutations on the A1 domain's efficacy to bind collagen and adhere platelets under shear flow. These mutations enhance the thermodynamic stability, reduce the rate of unfolding, and enhance the A1 domain's resistance to limited proteolysis. Collagen binding affinity is not significantly affected indicating that the primary stabilizing effect of these mutations is to diminish the platelet binding efficiency under shear flow. The enhanced stability stems from the steric consequences of adding a side chain (G1324A) and additionally a hydrogen bond (G1324S) to His(1322) across the β2-β3 hairpin in the GPIbα binding interface, which restrains the conformational degrees of freedom and the overall flexibility of the native state. These studies reveal a novel rheological strategy in which the incorporation of a single glycine within the GPIbα binding interface of normal VWF enhances the probability of local unfolding that enables the A1 domain to conformationally adapt to shear flow while maintaining its overall native structure. PMID:26677223

  1. Antiplatelet drugs in patients with enhanced platelet turnover: biomarkers versus platelet function testing.

    PubMed

    Freynhofer, Matthias K; Gruber, Susanne C; Grove, Erik L; Weiss, Thomas W; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2015-08-31

    Platelets are key players in atherothrombosis. Antiplatelet therapy comprising aspirin alone or with P2Y12-inhibitors are effective for prevention of atherothrombotic complications. However, there is interindividual variability in the response to antiplatelet drugs, leaving some patients at increased risk of recurrent atherothrombotic events. Several risk factors associated with high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR), including elevated platelet turnover, have been identified. Platelet turnover is adequately estimated from the fraction of reticulated platelets. Reticulated platelets are young platelets, characterised by residual messenger RNA. They are larger, haemostatically more active and there is evidence that platelet turnover is a causal and prognostic factor in atherothrombotic disease. Whether platelet turnover per se represents a key factor in pathogenesis, progression and prognosis of atherothrombotic diseases (with focus on acute coronary syndromes) or whether it merely facilitates insufficient platelet inhibition will be discussed in this state-of-the art review. PMID:26272640

  2. Dr. von Braun at 'Wernher von Braun Day' Celebration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    In 1970 Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. Wernher von Braun (right) was reassigned to NASA Headquarters to serve as Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning. Prior to his transfer, Dr. von Braun was honored for his career in Huntsville, Alabama, with the celebration of 'Wernher von Braun Day.' Among those participating were Alabama Governor Albert Brewer (left) and Alabama Senator John Sparkman (center). (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public library)

  3. Von Willebrand factor in patients on mechanical circulatory support – a double-edged sword between bleeding and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarski, Jacek; Pacholewicz, Jerzy; Zakliczynski, Michal; Gasior, Mariusz; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is an umbrella term describing the various technologies used in both short- and long-term management of patients with either end-stage chronic heart failure (HF) or acute HF. Most often, MCS has emerged as a bridge to transplantation, but more recently it is also used as a destination therapy. Mechanical circulatory support includes left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or bi-ventricular assist device (Bi-VAD). Currently, 2- to 3-year survival in carefully selected patients is much better than with medical therapy. However, MCS therapy is hampered by sometimes life-threatening complications including bleeding and device thrombosis. Von Willebrand factor (vWF) has two major functions in haemostasis. First, it plays a crucial role in platelet-subendothelium adhesion and platelet-platelet interactions (aggregation). Second, it is the carrier of factor VIII (FVIII) in plasma. Von Willebrand factor prolongs FVIII half-time by protecting it from proteolytic degradation. It delivers FVIII to the site of vascular injury thus enhancing haemostatic process. On one hand, high plasma levels of vWF have been associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. On the other, defects or deficiencies of vWF underlie the inherited von Willebrand disease or acquired von Willebrand syndrome. Here we review the pathophysiology of thrombosis and bleeding associated with vWF. PMID:26702279

  4. Chitosan scaffold enhances growth factor release in wound healing in von Willebrand disease

    PubMed Central

    Periayah, Mercy Halleluyah; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Saad, Arman Zaharil Mat; Yaacob, Nik Soriani; Hussein, Abdul Rahim; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Rashid, Ahmad Hazri Abdul; Ujang, Zanariah

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-derived biomaterials have been reported to adhere when in contact with blood by encouraging platelets to adhere, activate and aggregate at the sites of vascular injury, thus enhanced wound healing capacity. This study investigated platelet morphology changes and the expression level of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB) in the adherence of two different types of chitosans in von Willebrand disease (vWD): N,O-carboxymethylchitosan (NO-CMC) and oligo-chitosan (O-C). Fourteen vWD voluntary subjects were recruited, and they provided written informed consent. Scanning electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test procedures were employed to achieve the objective of the study. The results suggest that the O-C group showed dramatic changes in the platelet’s behaviors. Platelets extended filopodia and generated lamellipodia, leading to the formation of grape-like shaped aggregation. The platelet aggregation occurred depending on the severity of vWD. O-C was bound to platelets on approximately 90% of the surface membrane in vWD type 1; there was 70% and 50% coverage in vWD type II and III, respectively. The O-C chitosan group showed an elevated expression level of TGF-β1 and PDGF-AB. This finding suggests that O-C stimulates these mediators from the activated platelets to the early stage of restoring the damaged cells and tissues. This study demonstrated that the greater expression level of O-C assists in mediating the cytokine complex networks of TGF-β1 and PDGF-AB and induces platelet activities towards wound healing in vWD. With a better understanding of chitosan’s mechanisms of action, researchers are able to accurately develop novel therapies to prevent hemorrhage. PMID:26629055

  5. Exploratory studies of extended storage of apheresis platelets in a platelet additive solution (PAS).

    PubMed

    Slichter, Sherrill J; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd; Pellham, Esther; Bailey, S Lawrence; Bolgiano, Doug

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the poststorage viability of apheresis platelets stored for up to 18 days in 80% platelet additive solution (PAS)/20% plasma, 117 healthy subjects donated platelets using the Haemonetics MCS+, COBE Spectra (Spectra), or Trima Accel (Trima) systems. Control platelets from the same subjects were compared with their stored test PAS platelets by radiolabeling their stored and control platelets with either (51)chromium or (111)indium. Trima platelets met Food and Drug Administration poststorage platelet viability criteria for only 7 days vs almost 13 days for Haemonetics platelets; ie, platelet recoveries after these storage times averaged 44 ± 3% vs 49 ± 3% and survivals were 5.4 ± 0.3 vs 4.6 ± 0.3 days, respectively. The differences in storage duration are likely related to both the collection system and the storage bag. The Spectra and Trima platelets were hyperconcentrated during collection, and PAS was added, whereas the Haemonetics platelets were elutriated with PAS, which may have resulted in less collection injury. When Spectra and Trima platelets were stored in Haemonetics' bags, poststorage viability was significantly improved. Platelet viability is better maintained in vitro than in vivo, allowing substantial increases in platelet storage times. However, implementation will require resolution of potential bacterial overgrowth during storage. PMID:24258816

  6. DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRY. SHOWING THE KNEE BRACES AND DECORATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRY. SHOWING THE KNEE BRACES AND DECORATIVE CUT RAFTER TAILS. VIEW FACING EAST. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Officers' Housing Type Z, 19 Worchester Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  7. DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRY. SHOWING KNEE BRACES AND DECORATIVE CUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRY. SHOWING KNEE BRACES AND DECORATIVE CUT RAFTERS. PILASTERS, AND LAVA ROCK CHEEK CHEEK WALLS. VIEW FACING NORTH. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Officers' Housing Type Y, 27 Worchester Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  8. DETAIL VIEW OF END OF TRUSS SHOWING CONNECTION OF DECORATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF END OF TRUSS SHOWING CONNECTION OF DECORATIVE "KNEE", RAILING ENDPOST AND UPPER AND LOWER CHORDS - Scarlets Mill Bridge, Spanning former Reading Railroad, Scarlets Mill, Berks County, PA

  9. ZnO nanorods decorated with ZnS nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Joicy, S.; Sivakumar, P.; Thangadurai, P.; Ponpandian, N.

    2015-06-24

    In this study, ZnO nanorods (NRs) and ZnS nanoparticles decorated ZnO-NRs were prepared by a combination of hydrothermal and hydrolysis method. Structural and optical properties of the samples were studied by XRD, FE-SEM, UV-Vis DRS and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Microscopy analysis revealed that the diameter of ZnO-NRs was ∼500 nm and the length was ranging from a few hundred nm to several micrometers and their surface was decorated with ZnS nanoparticles. UV-Vis DRS showed the absorption of ZnS decorated ZnO-NRs was blue shifted with respect to pure ZnO-NRs which enhanced the separation of electron-hole pairs. PL spectrum of ZnS decorated ZnO-NRs showed a decrease in intensity of UV and green emissions with the appearance of blue emission at 436 nm.

  10. 4. Photocopy of photograph, date unknown DETAIL, DECORATIVE SWAG OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph, date unknown DETAIL, DECORATIVE SWAG OF EARS OF CORN - Thomas Asylum for Orphan & Destitute Indians, Dining Hall, Route 438, Cattaraugas Reservation, Irving, Chautauqua County, NY

  11. Perspective view of the front elevation (note: decorative details such ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of the front elevation (note: decorative details such as the brackets underpinning the deep cornice on the porch and house) - Philip T. Berry House, 1402 Thirty-first Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 4. DETAIL OF TERRA COTTA DECORATION AT TOP OF EXPRESSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL OF TERRA COTTA DECORATION AT TOP OF EXPRESSED COLUMN, JUST ABOVE FOURTH FLOOR WINDOWS ON SOUTH FRONT FACADE - John D. Van Allen & Son Store, South Fifth Avenue & Second Street, Clinton, Clinton County, IA

  13. 3. DETAIL OF TERRA COTTA DECORATION ON LOWER END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL OF TERRA COTTA DECORATION ON LOWER END OF EXPRESSED COLUMN, JUST BELOW SECOND FLOOR ON SOUTH FRONT FACADE - John D. Van Allen & Son Store, South Fifth Avenue & Second Street, Clinton, Clinton County, IA

  14. Calcium decorated and doped phosphorene for gas adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, Murugan; Nataraj, Yuvarani; Lakshmipathi, Senthilkumar

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the results from first-principles study based on the electronic structure and adsorption characteristics of CH4, CO2, H2 and NH3 adsorbed on Ca decorated/doped phosphorene. Our study finds that phosphorene exhibits n-type behaviour on decorating calcium, and p-type on doping calcium. Gas molecules are physisorbed on both pristine and calcium-mediated phosphorene, visible through their lower binding energy and charge transfer values. Ca decorated phosphorene is suitable for hydrogen storage due to its higher binding energy for H2. Ca doped structures shows increased binding affinity towards CH4 and NH3 in zigzag1 direction and armchair directions respectively. The extracts of our study implies that Ca doped phosphorene possess increased binding affinity towards gas molecules, and the results are highly helpful for gas adsorption and to design gas sensors based on calcium doped or decorated phosphorene.

  15. 72. 451 MADISON AVENUE, GRAND STAIR, ZODIAC CLOCK WITH DECORATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. 451 MADISON AVENUE, GRAND STAIR, ZODIAC CLOCK WITH DECORATIVE CARVING BY STANFORD WHITE AND AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS - Villard Houses, 451-457 Madison Avenue & 24 East Fifty-first Street, New York County, NY

  16. 11. DETAIL OF TERRACOTTA DECORATION, SHOWING SCROLL CONSOLE, WAVE ORNAMENT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL OF TERRACOTTA DECORATION, SHOWING SCROLL CONSOLE, WAVE ORNAMENT, EGG-AND-DART, NYMPH HEADS AND FOLIATE PATTERN AROUND WINDOWS - City Hall, Atlantic & Tennessee Avenues, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  17. Transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbon decorated with copper clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Berahman, M.; Sheikhi, M. H.

    2014-09-07

    Using non-equilibrium green function with density functional theory, the present study investigates the transport properties of decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon with a copper cluster. We have represented the decoration of zigzag graphene nanoribbon with single copper atom and cluster containing two and three copper atoms. In all the cases, copper atoms tend to occupy the edge state. In addition, we have shown that copper can alter the current-voltage characteristic of zigzag graphene nanoribbon and create new fluctuations and negative differential resistance. These alternations are made due to discontinuity in the combination of orbitals along the graphene nanoribbon. Decoration alters these discontinuities and creates more visible fluctuations. However, in low bias voltages, the changes are similar in all the cases. The study demonstrates that in the decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon, the edge states are the main states for transporting electron from one electrode to another.

  18. 11. BASRELIEF DECORATION, 'REGENERATION,' MURAL COMMEMORATING THE REBUILDING OF CHICAGO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. BAS-RELIEF DECORATION, 'REGENERATION,' MURAL COMMEMORATING THE REBUILDING OF CHICAGO AFTER THE GREAT FIRE - Chicago River Bascule Bridge, Michigan Avenue, Spanning Chicago River at North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  19. 'Colored' and Decorative Contact Lenses: A Prescription Is a Must

    MedlinePlus

    ... labeling. (See additional information about cleaning solutions with hydrogen peroxide on the FDA website.) See your eye ... For More Information Decorative Contact Lenses Contact Lenses Hydrogen Peroxide Solution Related Consumer Updates Focusing on Contact ...

  20. Detail view of the Ten Mile Creek Bridge decorative concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the Ten Mile Creek Bridge decorative concrete arched balustrade at southeast corner of bridge, view looking east. - Ten Mile Creek Bridge, Spanning Ten Mile Creek on Oregon Coast Highway, Yachats, Lincoln County, OR

  1. Detail of decorative panel featuring a monkey at Ten Mile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of decorative panel featuring a monkey at Ten Mile River Playground comfort station, looking northwest. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  2. Detail view of the decorative element at the peak of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the decorative element at the peak of the gabled dormer of the northwest corner bay of the west façade - Oregon State Fairgrounds Grandstand, 2330 Seventeenth Avenue, Northeast, Salem, Marion, OR

  3. 42. DETAIL OF TRIPLE WINDOW ELEMENT WITH DECORATIVE BRICK SURROUND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. DETAIL OF TRIPLE WINDOW ELEMENT WITH DECORATIVE BRICK SURROUND, ON EAST SIDE OF 1931 SECTION, TAKEN FROM THE EAST. - James Russell Lowell Elementary School, 4501 Crittenden Drive, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  4. 36. DETAIL OF WINDOW ELEMENT WITH DECORATIVE BRICK PATTERN ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. DETAIL OF WINDOW ELEMENT WITH DECORATIVE BRICK PATTERN ON MAIN FRONT OF 1931 SECTION, TAKEN FROM THE NORTH. - James Russell Lowell Elementary School, 4501 Crittenden Drive, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  5. 9. BASRELIEF DECORATION, 'DEFENSE', MURAL COMMEMORATING THE DEFENSE OF FORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. BAS-RELIEF DECORATION, 'DEFENSE', MURAL COMMEMORATING THE DEFENSE OF FORT DEARBORN - Chicago River Bascule Bridge, Michigan Avenue, Spanning Chicago River at North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  6. 8. BASRELIEF DECORATION, 'THE DISCOVERS', MURAL COMMEMORATING JOLLIET, FATHER MARQUETTE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. BAS-RELIEF DECORATION, 'THE DISCOVERS', MURAL COMMEMORATING JOLLIET, FATHER MARQUETTE, LASALLE AND TONTY - Chicago River Bascule Bridge, Michigan Avenue, Spanning Chicago River at North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  7. Stable parabolic Higgs bundles as asymptotically stable decorated swamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Nikolai

    2016-06-01

    Parabolic Higgs bundles can be described in terms of decorated swamps, which we studied in a recent paper. This description induces a notion of stability of parabolic Higgs bundles depending on a parameter, and we construct their moduli space inside the moduli space of decorated swamps. We then introduce asymptotic stability of decorated swamps in order to study the behaviour of the stability condition as one parameter approaches infinity. The main result is the existence of a constant, such that stability with respect to parameters greater than this constant is equivalent to asymptotic stability. This implies boundedness of all decorated swamps which are semistable with respect to some parameter. Finally, we recover the usual stability condition of parabolic Higgs bundles as asymptotic stability.

  8. Detail view of the terracotta antefixes that decorate the roof ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the terra-cotta antefixes that decorate the roof of the Justice Department Building - United States Department of Justice, Constitution Avenue between Ninth & Tenth Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. 14. Credit JTL: Detail, oblique view of Egyptian Revival decorative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Credit JTL: Detail, oblique view of Egyptian Revival decorative motifs used typically at midpoints of diagonals - Reading-Halls Station Bridge, U.S. Route 220, spanning railroad near Halls Station, Muncy, Lycoming County, PA

  10. 13. Credit JTL: Detail, orthogonal view of Egyptian Revivial decorative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Credit JTL: Detail, orthogonal view of Egyptian Revivial decorative motifs used typically at midpoints of diagonals - Reading-Halls Station Bridge, U.S. Route 220, spanning railroad near Halls Station, Muncy, Lycoming County, PA

  11. Detail of front west entry showing telescoping pilasters and decorative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of front west entry showing telescoping pilasters and decorative crawl space vents, facing east. - Albrook Air Force Station, Dispensary, East side of Canfield Avenue, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  12. Detail view of the decorative arched concrete railing with bushhammered ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the decorative arched concrete railing with bush-hammered inset panels - Pamelia Creek Bridge, Spanning Pamelia Creek at Milepoint 62.78 on North Santiam Highway (OR22), Marion Forks, Linn County, OR

  13. Heteroatom substituted and decorated graphene: preparation and applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Huang, Xianke; Qu, Liangti

    2015-12-28

    Graphenes have attracted increasing attention in a variety of scientific fields. By modification with foreign elements such as boron, sulfur, and fluorine, their unique electronic and spin structures can be effectively tuned and the substituted or decorated graphenes as promising materials have been successfully employed in electrical, optical, and catalytic fields. In this review, we summarize the recent advances of these newly derived heteroatom substituted or decorated graphenes with an emphasis on the preparation methods, applications and the mechanisms of action. We are hopeful for future developments of heteroatom substituted or decorated graphenes in precisely controlled substitution methods, and finding wide applications of heteroatom substituted or decorated graphenes in many different fields. PMID:26465923

  14. 11. Detail, southeast corner, showing decorative elements of main structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail, southeast corner, showing decorative elements of main structure, and window at the second story of the hose tower. - Independent Hose Company No. 3, Nineteenth & Belmont Streets, Bellaire, Belmont County, OH

  15. Fabrication of decorated MgO crystalline fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.J.; Li, J.B.; Han, Y.S.; Yang, X.Z.; Dai, J.H

    2003-02-20

    By depositing Mg vapor generated via carbothermal reduction on boron powder in the presence of different additives, dumbbell-like MgO nanofibers, NaCl particle-decorated MgO nanofibers and camphor tree stalk-like MgO fibers were produced. SEM, TEM and EDS analysis showed that the additives of Si and NaCl deposited in the sites of stacking faults in fiber, which resulted in the growth of different morphologies of decorated fibers.

  16. Mechanisms of platelet-mediated liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    Platelets have multiple functions beyond their roles in thrombosis and hemostasis. Platelets support liver regeneration, which is required after partial hepatectomy and acute or chronic liver injury. Although it is widely assumed that platelets stimulate liver regeneration by local excretion of mitogens stored within platelet granules, definitive evidence for this is lacking, and alternative mechanisms deserve consideration. In-depth knowledge of mechanisms of platelet-mediated liver regeneration may lead to new therapeutic strategies to treat patients with failing regenerative responses. PMID:27297793

  17. Splenic release of platelets contributes to increased circulating platelet size and inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Ming; Moore, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin-Yu; Han, Li-Ping; Su, Yidan; Tsai, Alan; Xu, Qi; Zhang, Ming; Lambert, Gavin W; Kiriazis, Helen; Gao, Wei; Dart, Anthony M; Du, Xiao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is characterized by a rapid increase in circulating platelet size but the mechanism for this is unclear. Large platelets are hyperactive and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. We determined mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet-monocyte conjugation (PMC) using blood samples from patients, and blood and the spleen from mice with AMI. We further measured changes in platelet size, PMC, cardiac and splenic contents of platelets and leucocyte infiltration into the mouse heart. In AMI patients, circulating MPV and PMC increased at 1-3 h post-MI and MPV returned to reference levels within 24 h after admission. In mice with MI, increases in platelet size and PMC became evident within 12 h and were sustained up to 72 h. Splenic platelets are bigger than circulating platelets in normal or infarct mice. At 24 h post-MI, splenic platelet storage was halved whereas cardiac platelets increased by 4-fold. Splenectomy attenuated all changes observed in the blood, reduced leucocyte and platelet accumulation in the infarct myocardium, limited infarct size and alleviated cardiac dilatation and dysfunction. AMI-induced elevated circulating levels of adenosine diphosphate and catecholamines in both human and the mouse, which may trigger splenic platelet release. Pharmacological inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme, β1-adrenergic receptor or platelet P2Y12 receptor reduced platelet abundance in the murine infarct myocardium albeit having diverse effects on platelet size and PMC. In conclusion, AMI evokes release of splenic platelets, which contributes to the increase in platelet size and PMC and facilitates myocardial accumulation of platelets and leucocytes, thereby promoting post-infarct inflammation. PMID:27129192

  18. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzano, D.; Hwang, K.; Catalano, P.; Aster, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  19. How I treat the acquired von Willebrand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Andreas; Rand, Jacob H; Budde, Ulrich; Ganser, Arnold; Federici, Augusto B

    2011-06-23

    The acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is a bleeding disorder that is frequently unrecognized or is misdiagnosed as von Willebrand disease. AVWS is characterized by structural or functional defects of von Willebrand factor (VWF) that are secondary to autoimmune, lymphoproliferative or myeloproliferative, malignant, cardiovascular, or other disorders. VWF abnormalities in these disorders can result from (1) antibody-mediated clearance or functional interference, (2) adsorption to surfaces of transformed cells or platelets, or (3) increased shear stress and subsequent proteolysis. Diagnosis can be challenging as no single test is usually sufficient to prove or exclude AVWS. Furthermore, there are no evidence-based guidelines for management. Treatments of the underlying medical condition, including chemo/radiotherapy, surgery, or immunosuppressants can result in remission of AVWS, but is not always feasible and successful. Because of the heterogeneous mechanisms of AVWS, more than one therapeutic approach is often required to treat acute bleeds and for prophylaxis during invasive procedures; the treatment options include, but are not limited to, desmopressin, VWF-containing concentrates, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis or recombinant factor VIIa. Here, we review the management of AVWS with an overview on the currently available evidence and additional considerations for typical treatment situations. PMID:21540459

  20. Point mutation in a leucine-rich repeat of platelet glycoprotein Ib alpha resulting in the Bernard-Soulier syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ware, J; Russell, S R; Marchese, P; Murata, M; Mazzucato, M; De Marco, L; Ruggeri, Z M

    1993-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeats are a conserved structural motif, of yet undefined significance, found in a group of proteins from different species. Among these are the four components of the human platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX-V complex, a membrane receptor that performs an essential role in the thrombogenic function of platelets by interacting with the adhesive protein, von Willebrand factor. We have found that a single amino acid substitution (Ala156-->Val) within one of the six leucine-rich repeats in the alpha-subunit of glycoprotein Ib results in a variant form of the congenital bleeding disorder, Bernard-Soulier syndrome, characterized by giant dysfunctional platelets. Genetic studies of the propositus and his family members were complemented by immunological and functional analysis of expressed recombinant GP Ib alpha fragments to demonstrate that the observed mutation is the cause of defective von Willebrand factor binding. These studies define the molecular basis of the Bernard-Soulier syndrome within this family and demonstrate that structural integrity of a leucine-rich repeat is necessary for normal function of the glycoprotein Ib-IX-V receptor complex and, possibly, for normal platelet morphology. Images PMID:7690774

  1. Numerical simulation of platelet margination in microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The adhesion of platelets to vascular walls is the first step in clotting. This process critically depends on the preferential concentration of platelets near walls. The presence of red blood cells, which are the predominant blood constituents, is known to affect the steady state platelet concentration and the dynamic platelet margination, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood to-day. We use a direct numerical simulation to study the platelet margination process, with particular emphasis on the Stokesian hydrodynamic interactions among red cells, platelets, and vessel walls. Well-known mechanical models are used for the shearing and bending stiffness of red cell membranes, and the stiffer platelets are modeled as rigid discoids. A boundary integral formulation is used to solve the flow field, where the numerical solution procedure is accelerated by a parallel O(N N) smooth particle-mesh Ewald method. The effects of red cell hematocrit and deformability will be discussed.

  2. Manipulating megakaryocytes to manufacture platelets ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, P; Eto, K

    2015-01-01

    Historically, platelet transfusion has proven a reliable way to treat patients suffering from thrombocytopenia or similar ailments. An undersupply of donors, however, has demanded alternative platelet sources. Scientists have therefore sought to recapitulate the biological events that convert hematopoietic stem cells into platelets in the laboratory. Such platelets have shown good function and potential for treatment. Yet the number manufactured ex vivo falls well short of clinical application. Part of the reason is the remarkable gaps in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving platelet formation. Using several stem cell sources, scientists have progressively clarified the chemical signaling and physical microenvironment that optimize ex vivo platelets and reconstituted them in synthetic environments. Key advances in cell reprogramming and the ability to propagate self-renewal have extended the lifetime of megakaryocytes to increase the pool of platelet progenitors. PMID:26149050

  3. Role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Idzko, Marco; Pitchford, Simon; Page, Clive

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests an important role for platelets and their products (e.g., platelet factor 4, β-thromboglobulin, RANTES, thromboxane, or serotonin) in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. A variety of changes in platelet function have been observed in patients with asthma, such as alterations in platelet secretion, expression of surface molecules, aggregation, and adhesion. Moreover, platelets have been found to actively contribute to most of the characteristic features of asthma, including bronchial hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and airway remodeling. This review brings together the current available data from both experimental and clinical studies that have investigated the role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation and asthma. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the role of platelets in the pathogenesis of asthma might lead to novel promising therapeutic approaches in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:26051948

  4. [The equation for platelet aggregation rate].

    PubMed

    Vrzheshch, P V; Verkhusha, V V; Varfolomeev, S D

    1990-01-01

    A platelet aggregation model in shear flow taking into account the kinetics of intercellular fibrinogen bond formation limited by aggregated platelets rotation time was considered. For this consideration the average duration of platelets interaction in flow with shear rate value G is shown to be pi/4G. One fibrinogen bond is sufficient to form a solid aggregate between two platelets. The equation for single platelets disappearance rate concerned with intercellular fibrinogen bond formation, stochastic character of bond distribution in collided platelets and hydrodynamically controlled interaction time was obtained. The Hill's approximation for the obtained aggregation rate dependences was suggested and appropriate constants were determined. The qualitative criterion of platelets aggregating systems behavior was introduced. PMID:2245229

  5. Mean platelet volume as an indicator of platelet rejuvenation following bone-marrow transplantation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Seanger, D.G.

    1986-07-01

    Thrombocytopenia of unpredictable duration and severity is an expected outcome of the radiation/chemotherapy protocols performed prior to bone-marrow transplantation. Serial evaluation of the platelet count and mean platelet volume of patients diagnosed with acute leukemia demonstrated the mean platelet volume to increase into reference limits 24 to 40 hours prior to a rise in the platelet count in those patients whose bone-marrow successfully responded to induction chemotherapy. Serial platelet counts and measurements of mean platelet volume were performed on 31 patients following bone marrow transplantation. Numerous platelet transfusions, together with sustained thrombocytopenia, inhibited accurate assessment of 29 of 31 patients. Two patients, however, demonstrated a rise in the mean platelet volume prior to an increase in the platelet count. Both of these patients received no platelet transfusions during the period preceding or following the rise in the platelet count. It was proposed that the serial evaluation of the mean platelet volume may assist practitioners in the decision-making process of deciding whether platlet transfusions are required, or an increase in the number of circulating platelets is imminent. A decision not to transfuse would have the direct benefit of decreasing patient costs, in conjunction with eliminating a potential source for the development of an antibody against platelets.

  6. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  7. Membrane Changes Associated with Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    George, James N.; Lyons, Roger M.; Morgan, Rebecca K.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of aggregation and secretion on membrane proteins was studied in washed human platelets. Reversible aggregation without secretion was stimulated by ADP and secretion without aggregation was stimulated by thrombin in the presence of EDTA. No loss of platelet surface glycoproteins occurred during reversible ADP-induced platelet aggregation, as measured by quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of platelets that were labeled with 125I-diazotized diiodosulfanilic acid (DD125ISA) before ADP stimulation. Also, no new proteins became exposed on the platelet surface after ADP aggregation, as determined by DD125ISA labeling after stimulation. Thrombin-induced platelet secretion also caused no loss of platelet surface glycoproteins. However, after platelet secretion two new proteins were labeled by DD125ISA: (a) actin and (b) the 149,000-mol wt glycoprotein (termed GP-G), which is contained in platelet granules and secreted in response to thrombin. The identity of DD125ISA-labeled actin was confirmed by four criteria: (a) comigration with actin in three different sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems, (b) elution from a particulate fraction in low ionic strength buffer, (c) co-migration with actin in isoelectric focusing, and (d) binding to DNase I. The identity of actin and its appearance on the platelet surface after thrombin-induced secretion was also demonstrated by the greater binding of an anti-actin antibody to thrombin-treated platelets, measured with 125I-staphylococcal protein A. Therefore, major platelet membrane changes occur after secretion but not after reversible aggregation. The platelet surface changes occurring with secretion may be important in the formation of irreversible platelet aggregates and in the final retraction of the blood clot. Images PMID:6772667

  8. A novel nanobody that detects the gain-of-function phenotype of von Willebrand factor in ADAMTS13 deficiency and von Willebrand disease type 2B.

    PubMed

    Hulstein, Janine J J; de Groot, Philip G; Silence, Karen; Veyradier, Agnès; Fijnheer, Rob; Lenting, Peter J

    2005-11-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is unable to interact spontaneously with platelets because this interaction requires a conversion of the VWF A1 domain into a glycoprotein Ibalpha (GpIbalpha) binding conformation. Here, we discuss a llama-derived antibody fragment (AU/VWFa-11) that specifically recognizes the GpIbalpha-binding conformation. AU/VWFa-11 is unable to bind VWF in solution, but efficiently interacts with ristocetin- or botrocetin-activated VWF, VWF comprising type 2B mutation R1306Q, or immobilized VWF. These unique properties allowed us to use AU/VWFa-11 for the detection of activated VWF in plasma of patients characterized by spontaneous VWF-platelet interactions: von Willebrand disease (VWD) type 2B and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). For VWD type 2B, levels of activated VWF were increased 12-fold (P < .001) compared to levels in healthy volunteers. An inverse correlation between activated VWF levels and platelet count was observed (R2 = 0.74; P < .003). With regard to TTP, a 2-fold (P < .001) increase in activated VWF levels was found in plasma of patients with acquired TTP, whereas an 8-fold increase (P < .003) was found in congenital TTP. No overlap in levels of activated VWF could be detected between acquired and congenital TTP, suggesting that AU/VWFa-11 could be used to distinguish between both disorders. Furthermore, it could provide a tool to investigate the role of VWF in the development of thrombocytopenia in various diseases. PMID:16014562

  9. Glycoprotein Ib-IX-V Complex Transmits Cytoskeletal Forces That Enhance Platelet Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Feghhi, Shirin; Munday, Adam D; Tooley, Wes W; Rajsekar, Shreya; Fura, Adriane M; Kulman, John D; López, Jose A; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-08-01

    Platelets bind to exposed vascular matrix at a wound site through a highly specialized surface receptor, glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX-V complex, which recognizes von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the matrix. GPIb-IX-V is a catch bond for it becomes more stable as force is applied to it. After attaching to the wound site, platelets generate cytoskeletal forces to compact and reinforce the hemostatic plug. Here, we evaluated the role of the GPIb-IX-V complex in the transmission of cytoskeletal forces. We used arrays of flexible, silicone nanoposts to measure the contractility of individual platelets on VWF. We found that a significant proportion of cytoskeletal forces were transmitted to VWF through GPIb-IX-V, an unexpected finding given the widely held notion that platelet forces are transmitted exclusively through its integrins. In particular, we found that the interaction between GPIbα and the A1 domain of VWF mediates this force transmission. We also demonstrate that the binding interaction between GPIbα and filamin A is involved in force transmission. Furthermore, our studies suggest that cytoskeletal forces acting through GPIbα are involved in maintaining platelet adhesion when external forces are absent. Thus, the GPIb-IX-V/VWF bond is able to transmit force, and uses this force to strengthen the bond through a catch-bond mechanism. This finding expands our understanding of how platelets attach to sites of vascular injury, describing a new, to the best of our knowledge, mechanism in which the catch bonds of GPIb-IX-V/VWF can be supported by internal forces produced by cytoskeletal tension. PMID:27508443

  10. Mathematical analysis of mural thrombogenesis. Concentration profiles of platelet-activating agents and effects of viscous shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Folie, B J; McIntire, L V

    1989-01-01

    The concentration profiles of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thromboxane A2 (TxA2), thrombin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) released extracellularly from the platelet granules or produced metabolically on the platelet membrane during thrombus growth, were estimated using finite element simulation of blood flow over model thrombi of various shapes and dimensions. The wall fluxes of these platelet-activating agents were estimated for each model thrombus at three different wall shear rates (100 s-1, 800 s-1, and 1,500 s-1), employing experimental data on thrombus growth rates and sizes. For that purpose, whole human blood was perfused in a parallel-plate flow chamber coated with type l fibrillar human collagen, and the kinetic data collected and analyzed by an EPl-fluorescence video microscopy system and a digital image processor. It was found that thrombin concentrations were large enough to cause irreversible platelet aggregation. Although heparin significantly accelerated thrombin inhibition by antithrombin lll, the remaining thrombin levels were still significantly above the minimum threshold required for irreversible platelet aggregation. While ADP concentrations were large enough to cause irreversible platelet aggregation at low shear rates and for small aggregate sizes, TxA2 concentrations were only sufficient to induce platelet shape change over the entire range of wall shear rates and thrombi dimensions studied. Our results also indicated that the local concentration of vWF multimers released from the platelet alpha-granules could be sufficient to modulate platelet aggregation at low and intermediate wall shear rates (less than 1,000 s-1). The sizes of standing vortices formed adjacent to a growing aggregate and the embolizing stresses and the torque, acting at the aggregate surface, were also estimated in this simulation. It was found that standing vortices developed on both sides of the thrombus even at low wall shear rates. Their sizes increased with

  11. Platelet collagen receptors and coagulation. A characteristic platelet response as possible target for antithrombotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Johan W M; Kuijpers, Marijke J E; Munnix, Imke C A; Siljander, Pia R M

    2005-04-01

    Collagen is a unique agonist of platelets, because it acts as an immobilized ligand that only causes platelet activation after stable adhesion. This review addresses the present understanding of how platelet interaction with collagen supports the process of thrombin generation and coagulation. Only some of the collagen-adhered platelets, that is, those showing profound changes in shape and shedding microparticles (resembling apoptotic cells), appear to contribute to the procoagulant activity of platelets. The main signaling receptor for collagen, glycoprotein VI, plays a key role in the platelet procoagulant response during thrombus formation; this is a reason why new anti-glycoprotein-VI antibodies are promising antithrombotic tools. PMID:16039967

  12. Defective von willebrand factor activity detected by the filterometer in three clinical conditions.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, J R; Tsai, H M; Etherington, M D

    2000-11-01

    When exposed to high levels of shear in a filterometer, platelets bind to von Willebrand factor (vWF) via receptors Ib and IIb/IIIa, forming aggregates that block the filteromer. In this study we used the filterometer to explore the mechanisms by which abnormal vWF-platelet interaction might occur. In the first phase of the study, the global vWF-platelet interaction in native blood was investigated. In the second phase, to eliminate the difference that platelets might contribute, samples of platelet-poor plasma from test individuals were added to normal control blood and the mixtures were investigated by the filterometer. The filterometer results were adjusted for the antigen concentrations to obtain vWF potency ratios. Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) agarose gel electrophoresis and SDS-Polyacylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were used to analyze multimeric size and proteolytic profiles of vWF. Pregnancy was associated with high platelet retention, high vWF antigen concentration, normal multimeric size distribution, but decreased vWF potency ratios. The plasma samples of pregnancy contained one 183-kDa fragment not detected in normal plasma. These results suggested that in pregnancy, platelets were highly active. However, presumably due to abnormal proteolytic cleavage, vWF potency was decreased. This decrease in vWF potency might minimize the risk of thrombosis in association with highly active platelets. Renal transplant patients had normal platelet retention but high vWF levels. The plasma vWF contained normal multimers. A decrease in vWF potency, presumably caused by toxic inhibitors in the plasma, was detected. Aortic valve stenosis patients had decreased platelet retention, normal or slightly increased vWF antigen concentration and a decrease in large multimers. As a result, the vWF potency was markedly decreased. However, the results obtained with the filterometer became normal when the studies were repeated 3 months postpartum, when renal function had

  13. Reconstitution of Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX Complex in Phospholipid Bilayer Nanodiscs†

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rong; Mo, Xi; Paredes, Angel M.; Dai, Kesheng; Lanza, Francois; Cruz, Miguel A.; Li, Renhao

    2012-01-01

    Glycoprotein (GP)Ib-IX complex expressed on platelet plasma membrane is involved in thrombosis and hemostasis by initiating platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor (VWF) exposed at the injured vessel wall. While most of the knowledge for GPIb-IX is obtained from studies on platelets and transfected mammalian cells expressing GPIb-IX, there is not an in vitro membrane system that allows systematic analysis of this receptor. The phospholipid bilayer Nanodisc composed of a patch of phospholipid surrounded by membrane scaffold protein is an attractive tool for membrane protein study. We show here that GPIb-IX purified from human platelets has been reconstituted into the Nanodisc. Nanodisc-reconstituted GPIb-IX was able to bind various conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, it bound to VWF in the presence of botrocetin with an apparent Kd of 0.73 ± 0.07 nM. The binding to VWF was inhibited by anti-GPIbα antibodies with epitopes overlapping with the VWF-binding site, but not by anti-GPIbβ monoclonal antibody RAM.1. Finally, Nanodisc-reconstituted GPIb-IX exhibited similar ligand-binding activity as the isolated extracellular domain of GPIbα. In conclusion, GPIb-IX in Nanodiscs adopts native-like conformation and possesses the ability to bind its natural ligands, thus making Nanodisc a suitable in vitro platform for further investigation on this hemostatically important receptor complex. PMID:22080766

  14. Identification of a juxtamembrane mechanosensitive domain in the platelet mechanosensor glycoprotein Ib-IX complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Deng, Wei; Zhou, Liang; Xu, Yan; Yang, Wenjun; Liang, Xin; Wang, Yizhen; Kulman, John D; Zhang, X Frank; Li, Renhao

    2015-01-15

    How glycoprotein (GP)Ib-IX complex on the platelet surface senses the blood flow through its binding to the plasma protein von Willebrand factor (VWF) and transmits a signal into the platelet remains unclear. Here we show that optical tweezer-controlled pulling of the A1 domain of VWF (VWF-A1) on GPIb-IX captured by its cytoplasmic domain induced unfolding of a hitherto unidentified structural domain before the dissociation of VWF-A1 from GPIb-IX. Additional studies using recombinant proteins and mutant complexes confirmed its existence in GPIb-IX and enabled localization of this quasi-stable mechanosensitive domain of ∼60 residues between the macroglycopeptide region and the transmembrane helix of the GPIbα subunit. These results suggest that VWF-mediated pulling under fluid shear induces unfolding of the mechanosensitive domain in GPIb-IX, which may possibly contribute to platelet mechanosensing and/or shear resistance of VWF-platelet interaction. The identification of the mechanosensitive domain in GPIb-IX has significant implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of related blood diseases. PMID:25359992

  15. Theodore von Karman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    Dr. Theodore von Karman, co-founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Pasadena, California was an aeronautical theoretician. His contributions in the fields of aerodynamics and aeronautical engineering are well documented and well known to every aerospace engineer. He was the first winner of the prestigious U.S. Medal of Science presented to him by President John F. Kennedy. As well as being co-founder of JPL, he also was principal founder of a major rocket propulsion firm (Aerojet-General Corp.), the top science advisor to the U.S. Air Force during its transition to jet propulsion aircraft and the top science advisor to NATO. He was, during much of this time, the fountainhead of aerodynamic thought as head of the Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology (GALCIT) in Pasadena, California. In the May 1956 issue of the Journal of Aeronautical Sciences, it was said of him that 'No other man has had so great an impact on the development of aeronautical science in this country. Hundreds of young men became his students and scientific collaborators and were inspired to greater effort.' Dr. William H. Pickering, then director of JPL said in 1960 'We wouldn't have an aeronautical science as we know it today, if it weren't for Dr. Thoedore von Karman.' Under his guidance, Caltech's 10 foot wind tunnel was designed, built and operated. Industry firms such as Douglas, Northrop, Hughes, Lockheed, North American, Vultee and Consolidated all tested new aeronautical designs and concepts in GALCIT's tunnel. Even Boeing's own high-speed wind tunnel was heavily influenced by suggestions from von Karman. The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) became so concerned about GALCIT's growing influence over West coast aviation, it erected the Ames Laboratory in Sunnyvale, California in part to deter an ever widening aeronautical gap that had formed between NACA and GALCIT. From 1936 to 1940, Caltech stood alone as the only university

  16. A genetically-engineered von Willebrand disease type 2B mouse model displays defects in hemostasis and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Frédéric; Casari, Caterina; Prévost, Nicolas; Kauskot, Alexandre; Loubière, Cécile; Legendre, Paulette; Repérant, Christelle; Baruch, Dominique; Rosa, Jean-Philippe; Bryckaert, Marijke; de Groot, Philip G.; Christophe, Olivier D.; Lenting, Peter J.; Denis, Cécile V.

    2016-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD)-type 2B is characterized by gain-of-function mutations in the von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1-domain, leading to increased affinity for its platelet-receptor, glycoprotein Ibα. We engineered the first knock-in (KI) murine model for VWD-type 2B by introducing the p.V1316M mutation in murine VWF. Homozygous KI-mice replicated human VWD-type 2B with macrothrombocytopenia (platelet counts reduced by 55%, platelet volume increased by 44%), circulating platelet-aggregates and a severe bleeding tendency. Also, vessel occlusion was deficient in the FeCl3-induced thrombosis model. Platelet aggregation induced by thrombin or collagen was defective for KI-mice at all doses. KI-mice manifested a loss of high molecular weight multimers and increased multimer degradation. In a model of VWF-string formation, the number of platelets/string and string-lifetime were surprisingly enhanced in KI-mice, suggesting that proteolysis of VWF/p.V1316M is differentially regulated in the circulation versus the endothelial surface. Furthermore, we observed increased leukocyte recruitment during an inflammatory response induced by the reverse passive Arthus reaction. This points to an active role of VWF/p.V1316M in the exfiltration of leukocytes under inflammatory conditions. In conclusion, our genetically-engineered VWD-type 2B mice represent an original model to study the consequences of spontaneous VWF-platelet interactions and the physiopathology of this human disease. PMID:27212476

  17. A genetically-engineered von Willebrand disease type 2B mouse model displays defects in hemostasis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Adam, Frédéric; Casari, Caterina; Prévost, Nicolas; Kauskot, Alexandre; Loubière, Cécile; Legendre, Paulette; Repérant, Christelle; Baruch, Dominique; Rosa, Jean-Philippe; Bryckaert, Marijke; de Groot, Philip G; Christophe, Olivier D; Lenting, Peter J; Denis, Cécile V

    2016-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD)-type 2B is characterized by gain-of-function mutations in the von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1-domain, leading to increased affinity for its platelet-receptor, glycoprotein Ibα. We engineered the first knock-in (KI) murine model for VWD-type 2B by introducing the p.V1316M mutation in murine VWF. Homozygous KI-mice replicated human VWD-type 2B with macrothrombocytopenia (platelet counts reduced by 55%, platelet volume increased by 44%), circulating platelet-aggregates and a severe bleeding tendency. Also, vessel occlusion was deficient in the FeCl3-induced thrombosis model. Platelet aggregation induced by thrombin or collagen was defective for KI-mice at all doses. KI-mice manifested a loss of high molecular weight multimers and increased multimer degradation. In a model of VWF-string formation, the number of platelets/string and string-lifetime were surprisingly enhanced in KI-mice, suggesting that proteolysis of VWF/p.V1316M is differentially regulated in the circulation versus the endothelial surface. Furthermore, we observed increased leukocyte recruitment during an inflammatory response induced by the reverse passive Arthus reaction. This points to an active role of VWF/p.V1316M in the exfiltration of leukocytes under inflammatory conditions. In conclusion, our genetically-engineered VWD-type 2B mice represent an original model to study the consequences of spontaneous VWF-platelet interactions and the physiopathology of this human disease. PMID:27212476

  18. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Thomas Paine, Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, examines an ordinary man's shoe outfitted for use in the Saturn I workshop. Pictured from the left in the Saturn I workshop mockup are William Brooksbank, propulsion and vehicle engineering laboratory; Dr. Paine; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Center director; Colonel Clare F. Farley, Executive Officer in the Office Of The Administrator; and Charles J. Donlan, Deputy Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, Technical. the shoe Dr. Paine is holding has a unique fastener built into the sole to allow an astronaut to move about on the workshop floor and to remain in one position if he desires.

  19. Detection of microbial contamination in platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Tracy L.; Leparc, German; Huffman, Debra E.; Gennaccaro, Angela L.; Garcia-Lopez, Alicia; Klungness, Greta; Stephans, Christie; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    2005-03-01

    In the United States, approximately 100 patients develop fatal sepsis associated with platelet transfusions every year. Current culture methods take 24-48 hours to acquire results, which in turn decrease the shelf life of platelets. Many of the microorganisms that contaminate platelets can replicate easily at room temperature, which is the necessary storage temperature to keep platelets functional. Therefore, there is a need for in-situ quality control assessment of the platelet quality. For this purpose, a real time spectrophotometric technique has been developed. The Spectral Acquisition Processing Detection (SAPD) method, comprised of a UV-vis spectrophotometer and modeling algorithms, is a rapid method that can be performed prior to platelet transfusion to decrease the risk of bacterial infection to patients. The SAPD method has been used to determine changes in cell suspensions, based on size, shape, chemical composition and internal structure. Changes in these cell characteristics can in turn be used to determine microbial contamination, platelet aging and other physiologic changes. Detection limits of this method for platelet suspensions seeded with bacterial contaminants were identified to be less than 100 cfu/ml of sample. Bacterial counts below 1000 cfu/ml are not considered clinically significant. The SAPD method can provide real-time identification of bacterial contamination of platelets affording patients an increased level of safety without causing undue strain on laboratory budgets or personnel while increasing the time frame that platelets can be used by dramatically shortening contaminant detection time.

  20. Characteristics of platelet gels combined with silk

    PubMed Central

    Pallotta, Isabella; Kluge, Jonathan A.; Moreau, Jodie; Calabrese, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Platelet gel, a fibrin network containing activated platelets, is widely used in regenerative medicine due the capacity of platelet-derived growth factors to accelerate and direct healing processes. However, limitations to this approach include poor mechanical properties, relatively rapid degradation, and the lack of control of release of growth factors at the site of injection. These issues compromise the ability of platelet gels for sustained function in regenerative medicine. In the present study, a combination of platelet gels with silk fibroin gel was studied to address the above limitations. Mixing sonicated silk gels with platelet gels extended the release of growth factors without inhibiting gel forming ability. The released growth factors were biologically active and their delivery was modified further by manipulation of the charge of the silk protein. Moreover, the silk gel augmented both the rheological properties and compressive stiffness of the platelet gel, tuned by the silk concentration and/or silk/platelet gel ratio. Silk-platelet gel injections in nude rats supported enhanced cell infiltration and blood vessel formation representing a step towards new platelet gel formulations with enhanced therapeutic impact. PMID:24480538

  1. Characteristics of platelet gels combined with silk.

    PubMed

    Pallotta, Isabella; Kluge, Jonathan A; Moreau, Jodie; Calabrese, Rossella; Kaplan, David L; Balduini, Alessandra

    2014-04-01

    Platelet gel, a fibrin network containing activated platelets, is widely used in regenerative medicine due the capacity of platelet-derived growth factors to accelerate and direct healing processes. However, limitations to this approach include poor mechanical properties, relatively rapid degradation, and the lack of control of release of growth factors at the site of injection. These issues compromise the ability of platelet gels for sustained function in regenerative medicine. In the present study, a combination of platelet gels with silk fibroin gel was studied to address the above limitations. Mixing sonicated silk gels with platelet gels extended the release of growth factors without inhibiting gel-forming ability. The released growth factors were biologically active and their delivery was modified further by manipulation of the charge of the silk protein. Moreover, the silk gel augmented both the rheological properties and compressive stiffness of the platelet gel, tuned by the silk concentration and/or silk/platelet gel ratio. Silk-platelet gel injections in nude rats supported enhanced cell infiltration and blood vessel formation representing a step towards new platelet gel formulations with enhanced therapeutic impact. PMID:24480538

  2. Thrombospondin-induced adhesion of human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, G P; Kowalska, M A

    1991-01-01

    Washed human unactivated platelets attached and spread on thrombospondin (TSP)-coated microtiter plates. Platelet adhesion was promoted by divalent cations Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ as compared to buffer having all divalent cations complexed with EDTA. TSP-dependent adhesion was inhibited by anti-TSP fab fragments, an anti-TSP monoclonal antibody, an RGD-containing peptide, complex-specific anti-glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa monoclonal antibodies (A2A9 or AP-2) and anti-VLA-2 monoclonal antibodies (6F1 and Gi9), but not by rabbit preimmune fab fragments, mouse IgG, an anti-GPIIIa monoclonal antibody, or monoclonal antibodies against either the human vitronectin receptor, glycocalicin, or GPIV. At saturating concentrations, anti-GPIIb-IIIa inhibited adhesion by 40-60%. Glanzman's thrombasthenic platelets, which lack GPIIb-IIIa, adhered to TSP to the same extent as anti-GPIIb-IIIa-treated normal platelets or 40-60% as well as untreated normal platelets. Antibody 6F1 (5-10 micrograms/ml) inhibited platelet adhesion of both normal and thrombasthenic platelets by 84-100%. Both VLA-2 antibodies also inhibited collagen-induced platelet adhesion, but had no effect on fibronectin-induced adhesion of normal platelets. These data indicate that platelets specifically adhere to TSP and that this adhesion is mediated through GPIIb-IIIa and/or VLA-2. Images PMID:2010551

  3. Function of human platelets during extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, V L; Hicks, R E; Niewiarowski, S; Edmunds, L H; Colman, R W

    1977-06-01

    The interaction between human platelets and nonbiologic surfaces was studied during in vitro recirculation of 500 ml of fresh, heparinized human blood in four different perfusion circuits. Circuits differed in surface area (0.1 m2 or 0.9 m2) and in surface composition. No important differences were observed between standard silicone-rubber and filler-free, silicone-rubber surfaces. Platelet counts decreased to 85% of control in 0.1- m2 circuits, but retained normal sensitivity to aggregating agents and released only small amounts of platelet factor 4 (PF4). In contrast, platelet counts in 0.9-m2 circuits decreased to 20% of control within 2 min and platelet sensitivity was depressed out of proportion to the fall in platelet count. Plasma PF4 progressively increased and platelet PF4 content progressively decreased during 6 h of recirculation. The results indicate that human platelets may exist in three conditions during extracorporeal circulation. Some platelets are unaltered, some are less sensitive to aggregating agents, and others have undergone extensive release. The ratio of blood volume to surface area appears to be an important determinant of platelet-surface interaction. PMID:18017

  4. Influence of irradiation on stored platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Moroff, G.; George, V.M.; Siegl, A.M.; Luban, N.L.

    1986-09-01

    Platelet concentrates intended for transfusion to immunosuppressed patients are irradiated to minimize transfusion-induced graft-versus-host disease. Because few reports describe how irradiation influences stored platelets, the authors studied whether 5000 rad of gamma irradiation, the maximum dose currently used clinically, altered platelets in vitro. Platelet concentrates were stored for either 1 day or 5 days in plastic (PL 732) containers before gamma irradiation. One unit of a pair of identical platelet concentrates was irradiated; the second unit served as a control. Irradiation did not alter platelet morphology, mean platelet volume, expression of platelet-factor-3 activity, response to hypotonic stress, extent of discharge of lactate dehydrogenase, release of beta-thromboglobulin, formation of thromboxane B2, nor the ability to undergo synergistic aggregation. The lack of any substantial change was observed whether the platelet concentrates were stored initially for either 1 day or 5 days. These results suggest that stored platelets are not altered deleteriously by irradiation with 5000 rad.

  5. Influence of Oxidative Stress on Stored Platelets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Platelet storage and its availability for transfusion are limited to 5-6 days. Oxidative stress (OS) is one of the causes for reduced efficacy and shelf-life of platelets. The studies on platelet storage have focused on improving the storage conditions by altering platelet storage solutions, temperature, and materials. Nevertheless, the role of OS on platelet survival during storage is still unclear. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage on platelets. Platelets were stored for 12 days at 22°C. OS markers such as aggregation, superoxides, reactive oxygen species, glucose, pH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and antioxidant enzymes were assessed. OS increased during storage as indicated by increments in aggregation, superoxides, pH, conjugate dienes, and superoxide dismutase and decrements in glucose and catalase. Thus, platelets could endure OS till 6 days during storage, due to the antioxidant defense system. An evident increase in OS was observed from day 8 of storage, which can diminish the platelet efficacy. The present study provides an insight into the gradual changes occurring during platelet storage. This lays the foundation towards new possibilities of employing various antioxidants as additives in storage solutions. PMID:26949396

  6. Platelet destruction in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura: kinetics and clearance of indium-111-labeled autologous platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J.R.; Ballem, P.J.; Gernsheimer, T.; Cerqueira, M.; Slichter, S.J.

    1989-05-01

    Using autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets, platelet kinetics and the sites of platelet destruction were assessed in 16 normal subjects (13 with and three without spleens), in 17 studies of patients with primary autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP), in six studies of patients with secondary AITP, in ten studies of patients with AITP following splenectomy, and in five thrombocytopenic patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In normal subjects, the spleen accounted for 24 +/- 4% of platelet destruction and the liver for 15 +/- 2%. Untreated patients with primary AITP had increased splenic destruction (40 +/- 14%, p less than 0.001) but not hepatic destruction (13 +/- 5%). Compared with untreated patients, prednisone treated patients did not have significantly different spleen and liver platelet sequestration. Patients with secondary AITP had similar platelet counts, platelet survivals, and increases in splenic destruction of platelets as did patients with primary AITP. In contrast, patients with myelodysplastic syndromes had a normal pattern of platelet destruction. In AITP patients following splenectomy, the five nonresponders all had a marked increase (greater than 45%) in liver destruction compared to five responders (all less than 40%). Among all patients with primary or secondary AITP, there was an inverse relationship between the percent of platelets destroyed in the liver plus spleen and both the platelet count (r = 0.75, p less than 0.001) and the platelet survival (r = 0.86, p less than 0.001). In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, total liver plus spleen platelet destruction, the platelet survival and the platelet turnover were all significant independent predictors of the platelet count. Thus platelet destruction is shifted to the spleen in primary and secondary AITP. Failure of splenectomy is associated with a marked elevation in liver destruction.

  7. Indium-111 platelet imaging for detection of platelet deposition in abdominal aneurysms and prosthetic arterial grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.L.; Stratton, J.R.; Thiele, B.; Haminton, G.W.; Warrick, L.N.; Huang, T.W.; Harker, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    Thirty-four platelet imaging studies were performed in 23 patients to determine whether platelet deposition could be detected in patients with vascular aneurysms (18 patients) or in patients in whom Dacron prosthetic grafts had been placed (5 patients). In patients in whom abnormal platelet deposition was detected, the effect of administration of platelet-active drugs on platelet deposition was examined. Of the 18 patients with an aneurysm, 12 had equivocally positive studies on initial imaging and 2 had equivocally positive images. Of five patients with Dacron arterial grafts in place, four had diffuse platelet deposition in the grafts; the fifth patient had a platelet deposition only in a pseudoaneurysm. Eight patients with an abdominal aneurysm and positive or equivocally positive baseline images were restudied during platelet-active drug therapy either with aspirin plus dipyridamole (seven patients) or with sulfinpyrazone (four patients). No patient studied during treatment with aspirin plus dipyridamole had detectably decreased platelet deposition compared with baseline determinations. In contrast, two of four patients studied while receiving sulfinpyrazone showed decreased platelet deposition. Thus, platelet imaging may be of value for studying platelet physiology in vivo and for assessing platelet-active drugs and the thrombogenicity of prosthetic graft materials in human beings.

  8. Phenotypic approaches to gene mapping in platelet function disorders - identification of new variant of P2Y12, TxA2 and GPVI receptors.

    PubMed

    Watson, S; Daly, M; Dawood, B; Gissen, P; Makris, M; Mundell, S; Wilde, J; Mumford, A

    2010-01-01

    Platelet number or function disorders cause a range of bleeding symptoms from mild to severe. Patients with platelet dysfunction but normal platelet number are the most prevalent and typically have mild bleeding symptoms. The study of this group of patients is particularly difficult because of the lack of a gold-standard test of platelet function and the variable penetrance of the bleeding phenotype among affected individuals. The purpose of this short review is to discuss the way in which this group of patients can be investigated through platelet phenotyping in combination with targeted gene sequencing. This approach has been used recently to identify patients with mutations in key platelet activation receptors, namely those for ADP, collagen and thromboxane A2 (TxA2). One interesting finding from this work is that for some patients, mild bleeding is associated with heterozygous mutations in platelet proteins that are co-inherited with other genetic disorders of haemostasis such as type 1 von Willebrand's disease. Thus, the phenotype of mild bleeding may be multifactorial in some patients and may be considered to be a complex trait. PMID:20162250

  9. Thrombin-dependent Incorporation of von Willebrand Factor into a Fibrin Network*

    PubMed Central

    Miszta, Adam; Pelkmans, Leonie; Lindhout, Theo; Krishnamoorthy, Ganeshram; de Groot, Philip G.; Hemker, Coenraad H.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Kelchtermans, Hilde; de Laat, Bas

    2014-01-01

    Attachment of platelets from the circulation onto a growing thrombus is a process involving multiple platelet receptors, endothelial matrix components, and coagulation factors. It has been indicated previously that during a transglutaminase reaction activated factor XIII (FXIIIa) covalently cross-links von Willebrand factor (VWF) to polymerizing fibrin. Bound VWF further recruits and activates platelets via interactions with the platelet receptor complex glycoprotein Ib (GPIb). In the present study we found proof for binding of VWF to a fibrin monomer layer during the process of fibrinogen-to-fibrin conversion in the presence of thrombin, arvin, or a snake venom from Crotalus atrox. Using a domain deletion mutant we demonstrated the involvement of the C domains of VWF in this binding. Substantial binding of VWF to fibrin monomers persisted in the presence of the FXIIIa inhibitor K9-DON, illustrating that cross-linking via factor XIII is not essential for this phenomenon and suggesting the identification of a second mechanism through which VWF multimers incorporate into a fibrin network. Under high shear conditions, platelets were shown to adhere to fibrin only if VWF had been incorporated. In conclusion, our experiments show that the C domains of VWF and the E domain of fibrin monomers are involved in the incorporation of VWF during the polymerization of fibrin and that this incorporation fosters binding and activation of platelets. Fibrin thus is not an inert end product but partakes in further thrombus growth. Our findings help to elucidate the mechanism of thrombus growth and platelet adhesion under conditions of arterial shear rate. PMID:25381443

  10. Force-Sensitive Autoinhibition of the von Willebrand Factor Is Mediated by Interdomain Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aponte-Santamaría, Camilo; Huck, Volker; Posch, Sandra; Bronowska, Agnieszka K.; Grässle, Sandra; Brehm, Maria A.; Obser, Tobias; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Schneider, Stefan W.; Baldauf, Carsten; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) plays a central role in hemostasis. Triggered by shear-stress, it adheres to platelets at sites of vascular injury. Inactivation of VWF has been associated to the shielding of its adhesion sites and proteolytic cleavage. However, the molecular nature of this shielding and its coupling to cleavage under shear-forces in flowing blood remain unknown. In this study, we describe, to our knowledge, a new force-sensory mechanism for VWF-platelet binding, which addresses these questions, based on a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and microfluidic experiments. Our MD simulations demonstrate that the VWF A2 domain targets a specific region at the VWF A1 domain, corresponding to the binding site of the platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) receptor, thereby causing its blockage. This implies autoinhibition of the VWF for the binding of platelets mediated by the A1-A2 protein-protein interaction. During force-probe MD simulations, a stretching force dissociated the A1A2 complex, thereby unblocking the GPIbα binding site. Dissociation was found to be coupled to the unfolding of the A2 domain, with dissociation predominantly occurring before exposure of the cleavage site in A2, an observation that is supported by our AFM experiments. This suggests that the A2 domain prevents platelet binding in a force-dependent manner, ensuring that VWF initiates hemostasis before inactivation by proteolytic cleavage. Microfluidic experiments with an A2-deletion VWF mutant resulted in increased platelet binding, corroborating the key autoinhibitory role of the A2 domain within VWF multimers. Overall, autoinhibition of VWF mediated by force-dependent interdomain interactions offers the molecular basis for the shear-sensitive growth of VWF-platelet aggregates, and might be similarly involved in shear-induced VWF self-aggregation and other force-sensing functions in hemostasis. PMID:25954888

  11. Decoration of heparin and bovine serum albumin on polysulfone membrane assisted via polydopamine strategy for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bingwu; Zhang, Ranran; Zhang, Huan; Xu, Anxiu; Deng, Yi; Lv, Yalin; Deng, Feng; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-06-01

    Renal failure brings about abnormality of waste and toxins and deposition in the body. In clinic, the waste and toxins in vitro are eliminated by hemodialysis device with polysulfone (PSF) porous membranes. In the work, decoration of heparin (Hep) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on PSF membranes would be beneficial to improve the hemocompatibility and reduce the anaphylatoxin formation during hemodialysis. The PSF porous membranes are surface-modified by simply dipping them into dopamine aqueous solution for 8 h. Then, Hep and BSA are immobilized covalently onto the resultant membrane. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra (ATR-FTIR) confirms that Hep and BSA are successfully introduced onto the surface of PSF membranes. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) display the changes of surface morphologies after modification. The result of water contact angle measurement shows that the hydrophilicity of PSF membranes is remarkably improved after coating polydopamine (pDA) and binding Hep and BSA. The experiments of hemocompatibility indicate that Hep and BSA grafted onto membranes suppress the adhesion of platelet and enhance the anticoagulation ability of PSF membranes. Furthermore, the protein adsorption tests reveal that Hep and BSA immobilized onto membranes depress the protein absorption and develop antifouling-protein ability of pristine membrane. This study proves a convenient and simple approach to graft two functional organic polymers which, respectively, play a vital role and then improve the hemocompatibility and biocompatibility of PSF membranes for their biomedical and blood-contacting applications. PMID:27018964

  12. Acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shaji; Pruthi, Rajiv K; Nichols, William L

    2002-02-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD) is a relatively rare acquired bleeding disorder that usually occurs in elderly patients, in whom its recognition may be delayed. Patients usually present predominantly with mucocutaneous bleeding, with no previous history of bleeding abnormalities and no clinically meaningful family history. Various underlying diseases have been associated with AvWD, most commonly hematoproliferative disorders, including monoclonal gammopathies, lymphoproliferative disorders, and myeloproliferative disorders. The pathogenesis of AvWD remains incompletely understood but includes autoantibodies directed against the von Willebrand factor (vWF), leading to a more rapid clearance from the circulation or interference with its function, adsorption of vWF by tumor cells, and nonimmunologic mechanisms of destruction. Laboratory evaluation usually reveals a pattern of prolonged bleeding time and decreased levels of vWF antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity, and factor VIII coagulant activity consistent with a diagnosis of vWD. Acquired vWD is distinguished from the congenital form by age at presentation, absence of a personal and family history of bleeding disorders, and, often, presence of a hematoproliferative or autoimmune disorder. The severity of the bleeding varies considerably among patients. Therapeutic options include desmopressin and certain factor VIII concentrates that also contain vWF. Successful treatment of the associated illness can reverse the clinical and laboratory manifestations. Intravenous immunoglobulins have also shown some efficacy in the management of AvWD, especially cases associated with monoclonal gammopathies. Awareness of AvWD is essential for diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:11838652

  13. [Inborn and acquired von Willebrand disease].

    PubMed

    Schneppenheim, R; Budde, U

    2008-12-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is known for its marked heterogeneity which was already recognized by von Willebrand in 1926. The basis of phenotypic differentiation are quantitative and qualitative or functional differences between the different types and subtypes of VWD. Clinical relevant facts for the practioner on diagnosis and therapy of von Willebrand disease and von Willebrand syndrome are presented. PMID:19132162

  14. [Inborn and acquired von Willebrand disease].

    PubMed

    Schneppenheim, R; Barthels, M; Budde, U

    2005-11-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is known for its marked heterogeneity which was already recognized by von Willebrand in 1926. The basis of phenotypic differentiation are quantitative and qualitative or functional differences between the different types and subtypes of VWD. Clinical relevant facts for the practitioner on diagnosis and therapy of von Willebrand disease and von Willebrand syndrome are presented. PMID:16395486

  15. Decoration of silk fibroin by click chemistry for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongshi; Heusler, Eva; Jones, Gabriel; Li, Linhao; Werner, Vera; Germershaus, Oliver; Ritzer, Jennifer; Luehmann, Tessa; Meinel, Lorenz

    2014-06-01

    Silkfibroin (SF) has an excellent biocompatibility and its remarkable structure translates into exciting mechanical properties rendering this biomaterial particularly fascinating for biomedical application. To further boost the material's biological/preclinical impact, SF is decorated with biologics, typically by carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide coupling (EDC/NHS). For biomedical application, this chemistry challenges the product risk profile due to the formation of covalent aggregates, particularly when decoration is with biologics occurring naturally in humans as these aggregates may prime for autoimmunity. Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC; click chemistry) provides the necessary specificity to avoid such intermolecular, covalent aggregates. We present a blueprint outlining the necessary chemistry rendering SF compatible with CuAAC and with a particular focus on structural consequences. For that, the number of SF carboxyl groups (carboxyl-SF; required for EDC/NHS chemistry) or azido groups (azido-SF; required for click chemistry) was tailored by means of diazonium coupling of the SF tyrosine residues. Structural impact on SF and decorated SF was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The click chemistry yielded a better controlled product as compared to the EDC/NHS chemistry with no formation of inter- and intramolecular crosslinks as demonstrated for SF decorated with fluorescent model compounds or a biologic, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), respectively. In conclusion, SF can readily be translated into a scaffold compatible with click chemistry yielding decorated products with a better risk profile for biomedical application. PMID:24576682

  16. Multiple substitutions in the von Willebrand factor gene that mimic the pseudogene sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Eikenboom, J.C.; Brieet, E.; Reitsma, P.H.; Vink, T.; Sixma, J.J.

    1994-03-15

    The authors have analyzed a type IIB and a type I von Willebrand disease family for the presence of mutations in the region coding for the glycoprotein Ib binding domain of the von Willebrand factor. Since this sequence is also present in the highly homologous von Willebrand factor pseudogene, the authors have studied genomic DNA as well as cDNA, which was produced from RNA isolated from endothelial cells or platelets. In both families, they have detected multiple consecutive nucleotide substitutions in the 5{prime} end of exon 28 that result in a sequence identical to the von Willebrand factor pseudogene. These substitutions were also found in cDNA, which proves that they are present in the active gene. The occurrence of multiple adjacent substitutions that exactly reflect a part of the sequence of the von Willebrand factor pseudogene is difficult to reconcile with sequential single mutational events. They therefore hypothesize that each of these multiple substitutions arose from one recombinational event between gene and pseudogene. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Targeting Phosphodiesterases in Anti-platelet Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rondina, Matthew T.; Weyrich, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    There are two primary modes of platelet inhibition: blockade of membrane receptors or neutralization of intracellular pathways. Both means of inhibition have proven benefits in the prevention and resolution of atherothrombotic events. With regard to intracellular inhibition, phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are fundamental for platelet function. Platelets possess several PDEs (PDE2, PDE3 and PDE5) that catalyze the hydrolysis of cyclic adenosine 3′-5′-monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine 3′-5′-monophosphate (cGMP), thereby limiting the levels of intracellular nucleotides. PDE inhibitors, such as cilostazol and dipyridamole, dampen platelet function by increasing cAMP and cGMP levels. This review focuses on the roles of PDE inhibitors in modulating platelet function, with particular attention paid to drugs that have anti-platelet clinical indications. PMID:22918733

  18. The Role of Platelets in Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Schindewolf, Marc; Stanford, Sophia; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Thiele, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Multiple factors contribute to the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Platelets have attracted much interest in arterial cardiovascular disease, whereas their role in VTE has received much less attention. Recent evidence suggests that platelets may play a more important role in VTE than previously anticipated. This review discusses the mechanisms that link platelets with venous thrombotic disease and their potential applications as novel risk factors for VTE. In addition, animal studies and randomized clinical trials that highlight the potential effect of antiplatelet therapy in venous thrombosis are evaluated to assess the role of platelets in VTE. The clinical significance of platelets for VTE risk assessment in specific patient cohorts and their role as a suitable therapeutic target for VTE prevention is acknowledged. The role of platelets in VTE is a promising field for future research. PMID:26926584

  19. Evaluation of platelet cross-matching in the management of patients refractory to platelet transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Osama S.; Aladl, Doaa A.; El Ghannam, Doaa M.; Elderiny, Wesam E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-match-compatible platelets are used to support thrombocytopenic patients who are refractory to randomly selected platelets. However, few studies have addressed the efficacy of using this strategy for patients requiring intensive platelet transfusion therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of cross-match-compatible platelets in an unselected group of patients refractory to platelets from random donors. Materials and methods A total of 406 cross-match-compatible platelet components were administered to 40 evaluable patients who were refractory to random-donor platelets. A solid-phase red cell adherence method was used for platelet cross-matching. The corrected count increment was used to monitor the effectiveness of each platelet transfusion. Multivariate analysis was performed to detect whether any variables could predict the response to transfusion. Results Statistically significant improvements were found in the mean corrected count increment when comparing cross-match-compatible platelets with randomly selected and incompatible platelets (p<0.001 for each). Compatible platelet transfusions were associated with a good response in 72.9% of cases while incompatible platelets were associated with a poor response in 66.7% of transfusion events (p<0.001). In the presence of clinical factors or alloimmunisation, compatible platelets were associated with good responses in 67.9% and 28.0% respectively vs 100% and 93.3% in their absence (p=0.009, p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that cross-matching and alloimmunisation were the strongest predictors of transfusion response at 1 hour, while ABO compatibility, type of units received, followed by alloimmunisation then clinical factors were predictors at 24 hours. Discussion Platelet cross-matching using the solid-phase red cell adherence technique is an effective and rapid first-line approach for the management of patients refractory to platelet transfusions. PMID:24931840

  20. Extending The Shelf Life Of Blood Platelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas M.

    1988-01-01

    New method of storing human blood platelets extends vitality for transfusions. Packaged as suspension in sterile liquid in plastic blood bags. Each bag placed between pair of plastic grids, and rubberbands placed around sandwich thus formed to hold together. Stored upright in open air or in container through which air pumped at rate of at least 45 L/min. Ensures that platelets receive ample oxygen and expiratory carbon dioxide form platelets removed before pH drops to harmful levels.

  1. Platelet mimicry: The emperor's new clothes?

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Hunter, Alan Christy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Here we critically examine whether coating of nanoparticles with platelet membranes can truly disguise them against recognition by elements of the innate immune system. We further assess whether the "cloaking technology" can sufficiently equip nanoparticles with platelet-mimicking functionalities to include in vivo targeting of damaged blood vessels and binding to platelet-adhering opportunistic pathogens. We present views for improved, and pharmaceutically viable nanoparticle design strategies. PMID:26409192

  2. [Improvement in cryopreservation of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Zhiburt, E B; Vil'ianinov, V N; Kaleko, S P; Sidorkevich, S V; Petrenko, G I; Bagautdinov, Sh M; Kuz'min, N S

    2000-01-01

    The first Russian solution Krimolit designed for cryopreservation of platelet concentrates down -196 degrees C was clinically tested. The therapeutical efficacy of the cryopreserved platelets was evaluated on the basis of clinical and laboratory monitoring of transfusions in 20 cancer hematological patients. They were found to have the same therapeutical action as fresh cells. The introduction of cryopreserved platelets into clinical practice allows one to form stores and to transfuse autological cells. Krimolit is recommended for clinical application. PMID:10740789

  3. Platelet C1- inhibitor. A secreted alpha-granule protein.

    PubMed Central

    Schmaier, A H; Smith, P M; Colman, R W

    1985-01-01

    In order to characterize which proteins of the contact phase of coagulation interact with platelets, human platelets were studied immunochemically and functionally to determine if they contain C1- inhibitor. By means of monospecific antibody to C1- inhibitor, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CELISA) was developed to measure directly platelet C1- inhibitor. With the CELISA, from 33 to 115 ng of C1- inhibitor antigen per 10(8) platelets from 15 normal donors was quantified in lysates of washed human platelets solubilized in nonionic detergent. The mean concentration in 10(8) platelets was 62 +/- 33 ng (SD). Plasma C1- inhibitor either in the platelet suspension medium or on the surface of the platelets could account for only from 6.5 to 16% of the total antigen measured in the solubilized platelets. Upon functional studies, platelets contained 84 +/- 36 ng (SD) of C1- inhibitor activity in 10(8) platelets. As assessed by the CELISA, platelet C1- inhibitor antigen was immunochemically identical to plasma and purified C1- inhibitor. In contrast, the mean concentration of platelet C1- inhibitor antigen in platelets from four patients with classical hereditary angioedema was 8.3 ng/10(8) platelets (range, 5.3 to 11.3 ng/10(8) platelets). 25 and 31% of the total platelet C1- inhibitor was secreted without cell lysis from normal platelets after exposure to collagen (20 micrograms/ml) and thrombin (1 U/ml), respectively, and this secretion was blocked by metabolic inhibitors. Platelet subcellular fractionation showed that platelet C1- inhibitor resided mostly in alpha-granules, similar to the location of platelet fibrinogen. Thus, human platelets contained C1- inhibitor, which became available by platelet secretion. The identification of platelet C1- inhibitor suggests that platelets may modulate the activation of the proteins of early blood coagulation and the classical complement pathways. Images PMID:3965505

  4. 41 CFR 102-42.120 - When may gifts or decorations be donated to State agencies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PROPERTY 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts... may make the gifts or decorations available for donation to State agencies under this subpart and...

  5. 41 CFR 102-42.120 - When may gifts or decorations be donated to State agencies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROPERTY 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts... may make the gifts or decorations available for donation to State agencies under this subpart and...

  6. 41 CFR 102-42.120 - When may gifts or decorations be donated to State agencies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PROPERTY 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts... may make the gifts or decorations available for donation to State agencies under this subpart and...

  7. John von Neumann Birthday Centennial

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2004-11-12

    In celebration of John von Neumann's 100th birthday, a series of four lectures were presented on the evening of February 10, 2003 during the SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering in San Diego. The venue was appropriate because von Neumann spent much of the later part of his life, in the 1950's, as an unofficial ambassador for computational science. He was then the only senior American scientist who had experience with the new computers (digital, electronic, and programmable) and a vision of their future importance. No doubt he would have relished the chance to attend a meeting such as this. The first speaker, William Aspray, described the ''interesting times'' during which computers were invented. His remarks were based on his history [1] of this period in von Neumann's life. We were honored to have John von Neumann's daughter, Marina von Neumann-Whitman, as our second speaker. Other accounts of von Neumann's life can be found in books by two of his colleagues [2] and [3]. Our third speaker, Peter Lax, provided both mathematical and international perspectives on John von Neumann's career. Finally, Pete Stewart spoke about von Neumann's numerical error analysis [4] in the context of later work; this talk did not lend itself to transcription, but readers may consult the historical notes in [5]. Our thanks to all the speakers for a remarkable evening. We are grateful to the DOE Applied Mathematical Sciences (AMS) program for partially supporting these lectures. Thanks are also due to SIAM and William Kolata, to our emcee, Gene Golub, to Paul Saylor for recording and editing, and to Barbara Lytle for the transcriptions. More about von Neumann's work can be learned from the recent American Mathematical Society proceedings [6].

  8. Identification of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline Aparecida; Zulli, Roberto; Soares, Sheila; de Castro, Vagner; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the occurrence and the causes of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients. INTRODUCTION: Platelet refractoriness (unsatisfactory post-transfusion platelet increment) is a severe problem that impairs the treatment of oncohematologic patients and is not routinely investigated in most Brazilian services. METHODS: Forty-four episodes of platelet concentrate transfusion were evaluated in 16 patients according to the following parameters: corrected count increment, clinical conditions and detection of anti-platelet antibodies by the platelet immunofluorescence test (PIFT) and panel reactive antibodies against human leukocyte antigen class I (PRA-HLA). RESULTS: Of the 16 patients evaluated (median age: 53 years), nine (56%) were women, seven of them with a history of pregnancy. An unsatisfactory increment was observed in 43% of the transfusion events, being more frequent in transfusions of random platelet concentrates (54%). Platelet refractoriness was confirmed in three patients (19%), who presented immunologic and non-immunologic causes. Alloantibodies were identified in eight patients (50%) by the PIFT and in three (19%) by the PRA-HLA. Among alloimmunized patients, nine (64%) had a history of transfusion, and three as a result of pregnancy (43%). Of the former, two were refractory (29%). No significant differences were observed, probably as a result of the small sample size. CONCLUSION: The high rate of unsatisfactory platelet increment, refractoriness and alloimmunization observed support the need to set up protocols for the investigation of this complication in all chronically transfused patients, a fundamental requirement for the guarantee of adequate management. PMID:21437433

  9. P2 receptors and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Following vessel wall injury, platelets adhere to the exposed subendothelium, become activated and release mediators such as TXA(2) and nucleotides stored at very high concentration in the so-called dense granules. Released nucleotides and other soluble agents act in a positive feedback mechanism to cause further platelet activation and amplify platelet responses induced by agents such as thrombin or collagen. Adenine nucleotides act on platelets through three distinct P2 receptors: two are G protein-coupled ADP receptors, namely the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptor subtypes, while the P2X(1) receptor ligand-gated cation channel is activated by ATP. The P2Y(1) receptor initiates platelet aggregation but is not sufficient for a full platelet aggregation in response to ADP, while the P2Y(12) receptor is responsible for completion of the aggregation to ADP. The latter receptor, the molecular target of the antithrombotic drugs clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor, is responsible for most of the potentiating effects of ADP when platelets are stimulated by agents such as thrombin, collagen or immune complexes. The P2X(1) receptor is involved in platelet shape change and in activation by collagen under shear conditions. Each of these receptors is coupled to specific signal transduction pathways in response to ADP or ATP and is differentially involved in all the sequential events involved in platelet function and haemostasis. As such, they represent potential targets for antithrombotic drugs. PMID:21792575

  10. Platelet depletion and severity of streptococcal endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dall, Lawrence; Miller, Todd; Herndon, Betty; Diez, Ireneo; Dew, Michelle

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of thrombocytopenia in streptococcal endocarditis using an animal model. DESIGN: A model of human septic endocarditis was established in rats (polyethylene catheters across the aortic valve and administration of Streptococcus sanguis, 5×107 colony forming units [cfu] intravenous). Thrombocytopenia at four levels was produced by antiplatelet serum. Secondary methods of producing thrombocytopenia were also evaluated. At sacrifice (96 h after platelet depletion and 72 h after infection), vegetations were removed, weighed, diluted, plated and counted. Potential mechanisms of the dose-response relationship between vegetation density and platelet count were evaluated. SETTING: Controlled research laboratory experiments. POPULATION STUDIED: Animal models of streptococcal endocarditis. MAIN RESULTS: The bacterial density of the aortic valve vegetations significantly increased as the platelet count decreased (P=0.0007). In severely thrombocytopenic animals (two-dose antiplatelet serum), data suggest increased vegetation embolism. Platelet depletion, which was minimal with chemical methods, was produced most effectively by antithrombocyte serum. Platelet surfaces in endocarditis were found to express elevated CD62p proteins (72.7% endocarditis, 34.7% control). Platelet protein fractions were evaluated in vitro by both streptocidal (P=0.19) and phagocytosis-stimulating assays. Platelet presence in mature aortic valve vegetations averaged only about 2%. CONCLUSIONS: In platelet depletion experiments using a rat model, a dose-response relationship of peripheral circulating platelet depletion to aortic valve vegetation density was found. The mechanism relating thrombocytopenia to endocarditis severity remains unresolved. PMID:22346555

  11. Platelets: covert regulators of lymphatic development.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi, Cara C; Hess, Paul R; Kahn, Mark L

    2010-12-01

    The field of platelet biology has rapidly expanded beyond the classical role of platelets in preventing blood loss and orchestrating clot formation. Despite the lack of transcriptional ability of these anuclear cell fragments, platelet function is now thought to encompass such diverse contexts as tissue repair, immune activation, primary tumor formation, and metastasis. Recent studies from multiple groups have turned the spotlight on an exciting new role for platelets in the formation of lymphatic vessels during embryonic development. Genetic experiments demonstrate that podoplanin, a transmembrane protein expressed on lymphatic endothelial cells, engages the platelet C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) when exposed to blood, leading to SYK-SLP-76-dependent platelet activation. When components of this pathway are disrupted, aberrant vascular connections form, resulting in blood-lymphatic mixing. Furthermore, platelet-null embryos manifest identical blood-lymphatic mixing. The identification of platelets as the critical cell type mediating blood-lymphatic vascular separation raises new questions in our understanding of lymphatic development and platelet biology. PMID:21071706

  12. Computerised method for recording platelet density distribution.

    PubMed

    Järemo, P

    1995-05-01

    In the present study a computerized apparatus was employed for scanning light transmission variations along test tubes containing density-separated platelets. The device consists of a stepping motor, a stationary halogen lamp and a photopotentiometer connected to a personal computer. Anticoagulated whole blood was layered on a performed continuous Percoll gradient having a density span from 1090 kg/l (bottom) to 1040 kg/l (top). After centrifugation at 3400g for 1.5 hours, high-density cells (i.e. erythrocytes) pass through to the bottom of the test tube and the lighter platelets remain in the gradient. The test tube is moved by the computer between the halogen lamp and the photopotentiometer. Transmission variations along the gradient were recorded and registered in the computer. Density markers beads were used as an internal standard and platelet peak density was determined. After perforating the test tube the gradient was divided into 45 aliquots. In all fractions determination of platelet counts and mean platelet volume was carried out. In addition, in the aliquots having a platelet count > 20 x 10(12)/l the ratio beta-thromboglobulin per platelet was also determined. The platelet distribution in the gradient was illustrated graphically. A good agreement was found when comparing platelet distributions in the gradients and light transmission variations along the test tubes. PMID:7781754

  13. Effect of photodynamic therapy on mouse platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuannong; Chi, Shunji; Deng, Jinsheng; Zhang, Hua; Liang, Junlin; Ha, Xian-wen

    1993-03-01

    Normal mice received hematoporphyrin derivative (10 mg/kg iv) immediately, 24 or 48 hrs prior to red light irradiation. The blood was collected and the platelet-rich plasma was irradiated by red light (100 J/cm2). The platelets were fixed immediately, 8 or 16 hrs after irradiation, and processed for EM examination. In comparison with those of control mice, the platelets of all experimental mice showed structural changes: 16 hrs after irradiation all platelets were necrotized; 8 hrs after irradiation almost one fourth of the platelets were necrotized and the remaining were considerably damaged; immediately after irradiation a small number of platelets became necrotic and most other platelets were swollen and deformed, often with many cytoplasmic projections and considerable dilatation of the canalicular membrane system. Our findings provided a clear evidence that platelets are highly sensitive to PDT action and can be directly and rapidly injured by PDT even in the absence of vascular endothelial cells. Our results give firm support to the hypothesis that both endothelial cells and platelets may play an important role in the initiation of early vascular damage and microcirculatory alterations induced by PDT in vivo.

  14. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Rachael F.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa–positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP. PMID:26138687

  15. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal peptides inhibit platelet adherence to arterial subendothelium at high wall shear rates. An effect dissociable from interference with adhesive protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J B; Kramer, W S; McKeown, L P; Williams, S B; Gralnick, H R

    1990-01-01

    Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal (GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV) peptides inhibit fibrinogen, fibronectin (Fn), vitronectin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) binding to the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (GP IIb-IIIa). GP IIb-IIIa, vWF, and Fn are essential for normal platelet adherence to subendothelium. We added peptides to normal citrated whole blood before perfusion over human umbilical artery subendothelium and evaluated platelet adherence morphometrically at high (2,600 s-1) and low (800 s-1) wall shear rates. We also examined the effects of the peptides on platelet adhesion to collagen in a static system. At the high wall shear rate, RGDS and GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV caused dose-dependent reduction in the surface coverage with spread and adherent platelets. Amino acid transposition and conservative substitutions of RGD peptides and the AGDV peptide significantly inhibited platelet adherence at 2,600 s-1. By contrast, the modified RGD peptides and AGDV do not affect adhesive protein binding to platelets. None of the native or modified RGD- or fibrinogen gamma-chain peptides significantly inhibited either platelet adherence to subendothelium at 800 s-1 or platelet adhesion to collagen. Our findings demonstrate that peptides that interfere with adhesive protein binding to GP IIb-IIIa inhibit platelet adherence to vascular subendothelium with flowing blood only at high wall shear rates. Platelet adherence to subendothelium at high wall shear rates appears to be mediated by different recognition specificities from those required for fluid-phase adhesive protein binding or static platelet adhesion. PMID:2243140

  16. Enhanced hydrogen storage by using lithium decoration on phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Wan, Neng; Lei, Shuangying; Yu, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The hydrogen storage characteristics of Li decorated phosphorene were systematically investigated based on first-principle density functional theory. It is revealed that the adsorption of H2 on pristine phosphorene is relatively weak with an adsorption energy of 0.06 eV. While this value can be dramatically enhanced to ˜0.2 eV after the phosphorene was decorated by Li, and each Li atom can adsorb up to three H2 molecules. The detailed mechanism of the enhanced hydrogen storage was discussed based on our density functional theory calculations. Our studies give a conservative prediction of hydrogen storage capacity to be 4.4 wt. % through Li decoration on pristine phosphorene. By comparing our calculations to the present molecular dynamic simulation results, we expect our adsorption system is stable under room temperature and hydrogen can be released after moderate heating.

  17. Calcium-decorated carbyne networks as hydrogen storage media.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Pavel B; Lee, Hoonkyung; Antipina, Lyubov Yu; Singh, Abhishek K; Yakobson, Boris I

    2011-07-13

    Among the carbon allotropes, carbyne chains appear outstandingly accessible for sorption and very light. Hydrogen adsorption on calcium-decorated carbyne chain was studied using ab initio density functional calculations. The estimation of surface area of carbyne gives the value four times larger than that of graphene, which makes carbyne attractive as a storage scaffold medium. Furthermore, calculations show that a Ca-decorated carbyne can adsorb up to 6 H(2) molecules per Ca atom with a binding energy of ∼0.2 eV, desirable for reversible storage, and the hydrogen storage capacity can exceed ∼8 wt %. Unlike recently reported transition metal-decorated carbon nanostructures, which suffer from the metal clustering diminishing the storage capacity, the clustering of Ca atoms on carbyne is energetically unfavorable. Thermodynamics of adsorption of H(2) molecules on the Ca atom was also investigated using equilibrium grand partition function. PMID:21648444

  18. H2 adsorption in Li-decorated porous graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seenithurai, S.; Pandyan, R. Kodi; Kumar, S. Vinodh; Munieswaran, P.; Saranya, C.; Mahendran, M.

    2015-06-01

    Porous graphene (PG) has been decorated with Li atoms and subsequently studied the hydrogen (H2) adsorption characteristics, by using Density Functional Theory (DFT)-based calculations. A 2×2 PG has been decorated with eight Li atoms. Upto four H2 molecules get adsorbed on each Li atom. The maximum H2 storage capacity that could be achieved in 2×2PG-8Li is 8.95 wt% which is higher than the U.S. DOE's revised target for the on-board vehicles. The average H2 adsorption binding energy is 0.535 eV/H2, which lies between 0.2-0.6 eV/H2 that is required for achieving adsorption and desorption at near ambient conditions. Thus, Li-decorated PG could be a viable option for on-board automobile applications.

  19. Some aspects of the characterization of decorations on ceramic glazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Arantegui, J.; Larrea, A.; Molera, J.; Pradell, T.; Vendrell-Saz, M.

    From antiquity, glazes have been one of the techniques used for decorating ceramics. Potters took advantage of the optical properties of these glazes to improve the quality of the object, especially to obtain an appearance or some characteristics that had commercial success. This is why it is important to know the reasons of the visual appearance of glazes. In this paper we present some aspects of the characterization of lustre, one of the on-glaze decorations that results in a more spectacular visual effect, as a microstructure, its composition, its raw materials and some technological aspects of its production. Lustre is a three-dimensional heterogeneous structure, where copper and silver nanoparticles play the most important role, but also alkali elements in the glaze and other components of raw lustre pigments. Lustre properties are determined by copper and silver composition and by distribution and dimension of these metallic nanocrystals in the decoration layer.

  20. Platinum nanoparticle decorated silicon nanowires for efficient solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kui-Qing; Wang, Xin; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2009-11-01

    High-density aligned n-type silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays decorated with discrete 5-10 nm platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) have been fabricated by aqueous electroless Si etching followed by an electroless platinum deposition process. Coating of PtNPs on SiNW sidewalls yielded a substantial enhancement in photoconversion efficiency and an apparent energy conversion efficiency of up to 8.14% for the PtNP-decorated SiNW-based photoelectrochemical solar cell using a liquid electrolyte containing Br(-)/Br(2) redox couple. The results demonstrate PtNP-decorated SiNWs to be a promising hybrid system for solar energy conversion. PMID:19807069

  1. Navigation Strategies of Motor Proteins on Decorated Tracks

    PubMed Central

    Bertalan, Zsolt; Budrikis, Zoe; La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Motor proteins display widely different stepping patterns as they move on microtubule tracks, from the deterministic linear or helical motion performed by the protein kinesin to the uncoordinated random steps made by dynein. How these different strategies produce an efficient navigation system needed to ensure correct cellular functioning is still unclear. Here, we show by numerical simulations that deterministic and random motor steps yield different outcomes when random obstacles decorate the microtubule tracks: kinesin moves faster on clean tracks but its motion is strongly hindered on decorated tracks, while dynein is slower on clean tracks but more efficient in avoiding obstacles. Further simulations indicate that dynein’s advantage on decorated tracks is due to its ability to step backwards. Our results explain how different navigation strategies are employed by the cell to optimize motor driven cargo transport. PMID:26323095

  2. Extraktion von DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöpping, Bert; Unterberger, Claudia

    Eine DNA-gestützte Analytik spielt im Lebensmittelbereich eine große Rolle. So wird die PCR bzw. die Real Time PCR z. B. für den Nachweis von Krankheitserreger in Lebensmitteln, zur Tier- und Pflanzenartendifferenzierung und den Nachweis von gentechnologisch veränderten Organismen eingesetzt [1]. Grundvoraussetzung für die sehr sensitiven molekularbiologischen Methoden ist eine saubere und kontaminationsfreie Nukleinsäure [2]. Die Qualität der Nukleinsäure entscheidet über Erfolg und Misserfolg der anschließenden molekularbiologischen Analytik. Deshalb werden im Bereich der Lebensmittelanalytik hohe Anforderungen an das jeweilige DNA-Extraktionsprotokoll gestellt. Durch die Anwendung eines geeigneten Extraktionsverfahrens soll die nachzuweisende DNA möglichst in hochmolekularer Form und frei von die nachfolgende Analytik hemmenden Substanzen vorliegen [1]. Gerade hier stellt die Natur der Lebensmittelmatrix eine besondere Herausforderung dar. Matrixkomponenten wie Fette, Zucker, Proteine und sekundäre Inhaltsstoffe erschweren die DNA-Extraktion und können, wenn sie nicht durch die Extraktion vollständig entfernt werden, zu einer Inhibierung der PCR führen [3]. Des Weiteren müssen auf der Matrixoberfläche vorhandene DNA-abbauende Enzyme gehemmt werden [1]. Daneben spielt der Einfluss verschiedener chemischer und physikalischer Parameter (pH-Wert, Temperatur, Enzyme, Scherkräfte) bei der Lebensmittelproduktion eine große Rolle für die Qualität der extrahierten DNA. So führen z. B. hohe Temperaturen und saure pH-Werte während der Lebensmittelverarbeitung zu einer Fragmentierung der DNA. Auch die physikalischen und chemischen Bedingungen der verwendeten Extraktionsmethode beeinflussen die Qualität der DNA [2]. Bleiben nach der Extraktion organische Lösungsmittel (Phenol, Ethanol), Enzyme, Proteine oder Salze zurück, können diese ebenfalls eine nachfolgende PCR inhibieren. Um eine Inhibition der PCR auszuschließen, sollten in der

  3. Ultrafast dynamics in unaligned MWCNTs decorated with metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, G; Ponzoni, S; Galimberti, G; Scarselli, M; Pulci, O; Camilli, L; Matthes, L; Castrucci, P; Pagliara, S

    2016-06-10

    The relaxation dynamics of unaligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with metallic nanoparticles have been studied by using transient optical measurements. The fast dynamics due to the short-lived free-charge carriers excited by the pump are not affected by the presence of nanoparticles. Conversely, a second long dynamics, absent in bare carbon nanotubes, appears only in the decorated samples. A combination of experiment and theory allows us to ascribe this long dynamics to relaxation channels involving electronic states localized at the tube-nanoparticle interface. PMID:27146216

  4. Ultrafast dynamics in unaligned MWCNTs decorated with metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, G.; Ponzoni, S.; Galimberti, G.; Scarselli, M.; Pulci, O.; Camilli, L.; Matthes, L.; Castrucci, P.; Pagliara, S.

    2016-06-01

    The relaxation dynamics of unaligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with metallic nanoparticles have been studied by using transient optical measurements. The fast dynamics due to the short-lived free-charge carriers excited by the pump are not affected by the presence of nanoparticles. Conversely, a second long dynamics, absent in bare carbon nanotubes, appears only in the decorated samples. A combination of experiment and theory allows us to ascribe this long dynamics to relaxation channels involving electronic states localized at the tube-nanoparticle interface.

  5. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  6. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  7. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  8. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  9. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  10. 22 CFR 3.4 - Restriction on acceptance of gifts and decorations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Restriction on acceptance of gifts and decorations. 3.4 Section 3.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL GIFTS AND DECORATIONS FROM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS § 3.4 Restriction on acceptance of gifts and decorations. (a) An employee is prohibited...

  11. Defective Association of the Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX Complex with the Glycosphingolipid-Enriched Membrane Domain Inhibits Murine Thrombus and Atheroma Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Ran, Yali; Da, Qi; Shaw, Tanner S; Shang, Dan; Reddy, Anilkumar K; López, José A; Ballantyne, Christie M; Ware, Jerry; Wu, Huaizhu; Peng, Yuandong

    2016-07-01

    Localization of the platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX complex to the membrane lipid domain is essential for platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor and subsequent platelet activation in vitro. Yet, the in vivo importance of this localization has never been addressed. We recently found that the disulfide linkage between Ibα and Ibβ is critical for the association of Ibα with the glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane domain; in this study, we established a transgenic mouse model expressing this mutant human Ibα that is also devoid of endogenous Ibα (HαSSMα(-/-)). Characterization of this model demonstrated a similar dissociation of Ibα from murine platelet glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane to that expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, which correlates well with the impaired adhesion of the transgenic platelets to von Willebrand factor ex vivo and in vivo. Furthermore, we bred our transgenic mice into an atherosclerosis-prone background (HαSSMα(-/-)ApoE(-/-) and HαWTMα(-/-)ApoE(-/-)). We observed that atheroma formation was significantly inhibited in mutant mice where fewer platelet-bound CD11c(+) leukocytes were circulating (CD45(+)/CD11c(+)/CD41(+)) and residing in atherosclerotic lesions (CD45(+)/CD11c(+)), suggesting that platelet-mediated adhesion and infiltration of CD11c(+) leukocytes may be one of the mechanisms. To our knowledge, these observations provide the first in vivo evidence showing that the membrane GEM is physiologically and pathophysiologically critical in the function of the glycoprotein Ib-IX complex. PMID:27206768

  12. Busulfan Triggers Intrinsic Mitochondrial-Dependent Platelet Apoptosis Independent of Platelet Activation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jianlin; Wu, Yulu; Liu, Yun; Li, Xiaoqian; Wu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Na; Zhu, Feng; Qi, Kunming; Cheng, Hai; Li, Depeng; Li, Hongchun; Li, Zhenyu; Zeng, Lingyu; Ma, Ping; Xu, Kailin

    2016-09-01

    As a nonspecific alkylating antineoplastic agent, busulfan has been widely used in the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated busulfan-induced cell apoptosis. Whether busulfan triggers platelet apoptosis remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the role of busulfan in platelet apoptosis. Isolated human platelets were incubated with busulfan followed by analysis of platelet apoptosis by flow cytometry or western blot, including mitochondrial depolarization, expression of Bcl-2, and Bax and caspase 3 activation. Meanwhile, platelet activation, expression of glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα), glycoprotein VI (GPVI), and IIb3 and platelet aggregation in response to collagen and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) were measured. Additionally, busulfan was injected into mice with or without administration of caspase inhibitor QVD-Oph to investigate its effect on platelet lifespan. Our results showed that busulfan-treated platelets displayed increased mitochondrial membrane depolarization, decreased expression of Bcl-2, increased expression of Bax and caspase 3 activation in dose-dependent manner, which were inhibited by QVD-Oph. Platelet activation was not observed in busulfan-treated platelets as showed by no increased P-selectin expression and PAC-1 binding. However, busulfan reduced collagen- or ADP-induced platelet aggregation without affecting expression of GPIbα, GPVI, and IIb3. Furthermore, busulfan reduced circulating platelet lifespan which was ameliorated by QVD-Oph in mice. In conclusion, busulfan triggers mitochondrial-dependent platelet apoptosis and reduces platelet lifespan in mice. These data suggest targeting caspase activation might be beneficial in the prophylaxis of platelet apoptosis-associated thrombocytopenia after administration of busulfan. PMID:27292166

  13. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    On September 8, 1960 President Dwight D. Eisenhower visited Huntsville, Alabama to dedicate a new NASA field center in honor of General George C. Marshall, Eisenhower's wartime colleague and the founder of the famous Marshall Plan for European recover after World War II. The new George C. Marshall Space Flight Center was placed under the control of Dr. Wernher Von Braun shown here talking with President Eisenhower. As parto f his remarks dedicating the center, President Eisenhowe refereed to General Marshall as a 'man of yar, yet a builder of peace'. the Marshall Center's first major assignment including building the huge Saturn V rocket that launched human beings on their first journey to the surface of the moon in 1969.

  14. Oncocalyxone A inhibits human platelet aggregation by increasing cGMP and by binding to GP Ibα glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, M A D; do Nascimento, N R F; de Sousa, C M; Pessoa, O D L; de Lemos, T L G; Ventura, J S; Schattner, M; Chudzinski-Tavassi, A M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Oncocalyxone A (OncoA) has a concentration-dependent anti-platelet activity. The present study aimed to further understand the mechanisms related to this effect. Experimental approach: Human platelet aggregation was measured by means of a turbidimetric method. OncoA (32–256 μM) was tested against several platelet-aggregating agents, such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen, arachidonic acid (AA), ristocetin and thrombin. Key results: OncoA completely inhibited platelet aggregation with a calculated mean inhibitory concentration (IC50-μM) of 122 for ADP, 161 for collagen, 159 for AA, 169 for ristocetin and 85 for thrombin. The anti-aggregatory activity of OncoA was not inhibited by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). OncoA, at a concentration that caused no significant anti-aggregatory activity, potentiated sodium nitroprusside (SNP) anti-aggregatory activity (18.8±2.9%-SNP vs 85.0±8.2%-SNP+OncoA). The levels of nitric oxide (NO) or cAMP were not altered by OncoA while cGMP levels were increased more than 10-fold by OncoA in resting or ADP-activated platelets. Flow cytometry revealed that OncoA does not interact with receptors for fibrinogen, collagen or P-selectin. Nevertheless, OncoA decreased the binding of antibodies to GP Ibα, a glycoprotein that is related both to von Willebrand factor and to thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Conclusion and implications: OncoA showed anti-aggregatory activity in platelets that was associated with increased cGMP levels, not dependent on NO and with blocking GP Ibα glycoprotein. This new mechanism has the prospect of leading to new anti-thrombotic drugs. PMID:18516074

  15. Metalloproteolytic receptor shedding…platelets "acting their age".

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robert K; Gardiner, Elizabeth E

    2016-09-01

    Whilst significant effort has been focused on development of tools and approaches to clinically modulate activation processes that consume platelets, the platelet receptors that initiate activation processes remain untargeted. The modulation of receptor levels is also linked to underlying platelet aging processes which influence normal platelet lifespan and also the functionality and survival of stored platelets that are used in transfusion. In this review, we will focus on platelet adhesion receptors initiating thrombus formation, and discuss how regulation of levels of these receptors impact platelet function and platelet survival. PMID:27459696

  16. von Braun and German Publisher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    In this photograph, Guenter Ogger of Capitol Magazine, West Germany, greets Marshall Space Flight Center Director, Dr. Wernher von Braun. Mr. Ogger interviewed the famous rocket scientist for his magazine.

  17. Von Hippel-Lindau Disease.

    PubMed

    Findeis-Hosey, Jennifer J; McMahon, Kelly Q; Findeis, Sarah K

    2016-06-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease is an autosomal dominant syndrome which occurs secondary to germline mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene, located on chromosome 3. Clinically von Hippel-Lindau disease is characterized by an increased risk of developing simple visceral cysts, most commonly in the pancreas and kidneys, in addition to an increased risk of developing neoplasms, often with clear cell features, in a multitude of organ systems. The most common neoplasms are cerebellar and retinal hemangioblastomas, adrenal pheochromocytomas, clear cell renal cell carcinomas, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, pancreatic serous cystadenomas, and endolymphatic sac tumors. These lesions most commonly present during adulthood; however, screening and surveillance for the development of these lesions should begin in the pediatric years for patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease. In this review article, the genetics and most common neoplasms of von Hippel-Lindau disease are reviewed, with an eye towards implications for the pediatric patient. PMID:27617152

  18. Die Kosmogonie Anton von Zachs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosche, P.

    In his "Cosmogenische Betrachtungen" (1804), Anton von Zach rediscovered - probably independently - some aspects of the theories of Kant and Laplace. More originally, he envisaged also the consequences of an era of heavy impacts in the early history of the Earth.

  19. Pregnancy and von Gierke's disease.

    PubMed

    Farber, M; Knuppel, R A; Binkiewicz, A; Kennison, R D

    1976-02-01

    A detailed description of the course of pregnancy in a patient with von Gierke's disease is presented. Careful dietary control together with proper management of the hematologic complications of the disease led to a successful outcome. PMID:1061911

  20. Regulation of actin polymerization by tropomodulin-3 controls megakaryocyte actin organization and platelet biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sui, Zhenhua; Nowak, Roberta B; Sanada, Chad; Halene, Stephanie; Krause, Diane S; Fowler, Velia M

    2015-07-23

    The actin cytoskeleton is important for platelet biogenesis. Tropomodulin-3 (Tmod3), the only Tmod isoform detected in platelets and megakaryocytes (MKs), caps actin filament (F-actin) pointed ends and binds tropomyosins (TMs), regulating actin polymerization and stability. To determine the function of Tmod3 in platelet biogenesis, we studied Tmod3(-/-) embryos, which are embryonic lethal by E18.5. Tmod3(-/-) embryos often show hemorrhaging at E14.5 with fewer and larger platelets, indicating impaired platelet biogenesis. MK numbers are moderately increased in Tmod3(-/-) fetal livers, with only a slight increase in the 8N population, suggesting that MK differentiation is not significantly affected. However, Tmod3(-/-) MKs fail to develop a normal demarcation membrane system (DMS), and cytoplasmic organelle distribution is abnormal. Moreover, cultured Tmod3(-/-) MKs exhibit impaired proplatelet formation with a wide range of proplatelet bud sizes, including abnormally large proplatelet buds containing incorrect numbers of von Willebrand factor-positive granules. Tmod3(-/-) MKs exhibit F-actin disturbances, and Tmod3(-/-) MKs spreading on collagen fail to polymerize F-actin into actomyosin contractile bundles. Tmod3 associates with TM4 and the F-actin cytoskeleton in wild-type MKs, and confocal microscopy reveals that Tmod3, TM4, and F-actin partially colocalize near the membrane of proplatelet buds. In contrast, the abnormally large proplatelets from Tmod3(-/-) MKs show increased F-actin and redistribution of F-actin and TM4 from the cortex to the cytoplasm, but normal microtubule coil organization. We conclude that F-actin capping by Tmod3 regulates F-actin organization in mouse fetal liver-derived MKs, thereby controlling MK cytoplasmic morphogenesis, including DMS formation and organelle distribution, as well as proplatelet formation and sizing. PMID:25964668

  1. Expansion of the neonatal platelet mass is achieved via an extension of platelet lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hoffmeister, Karin M.; Hu, Zhongbo; Mager, Donald E.; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Debrincat, Marlyse A.; Pleines, Irina; Josefsson, Emma C.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Italiano, Joseph; Ramsey, Haley; Grozovsky, Renata; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chavda, Chaitanya

    2014-01-01

    The fetal/neonatal hematopoietic system must generate enough blood cells to meet the demands of rapid growth. This unique challenge might underlie the high incidence of thrombocytopenia among preterm neonates. In this study, neonatal platelet production and turnover were investigated in newborn mice. Based on a combination of blood volume expansion and increasing platelet counts, the platelet mass increased sevenfold during the first 2 weeks of murine life, a time during which thrombopoiesis shifted from liver to bone marrow. Studies applying in vivo biotinylation and mathematical modeling showed that newborn and adult mice had similar platelet production rates, but neonatal platelets survived 1 day longer in circulation. This prolonged lifespan fully accounted for the rise in platelet counts observed during the second week of murine postnatal life. A study of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins showed that neonatal platelets had higher levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and were more resistant to apoptosis induced by the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 than adult platelets. However, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Bcl-2 alone did not shorten neonatal platelet survival or reduce platelet counts in newborn mice, indicating the existence of redundant or alternative mechanisms mediating the prolonged lifespan of neonatal platelets. PMID:24599546

  2. In vivo effects of eltrombopag on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia: no evidence of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Psaila, Bethan; Bussel, James B.; Linden, Matthew D.; Babula, Bracken; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R.; Tate, Chinara; Mathur, Kanika; Frelinger, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin-receptor agonist, on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are not fully characterized. This study used whole blood flow cytometry to examine platelet function in 20 patients receiving eltrombopag treatment at days 0, 7, and 28. Platelet surface expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa, P-selectin, and GPIb was measured with and without low and high adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) concentrations. Before eltrombopag treatment with no ex vivo agonist, platelet activation was higher in ITP patients than controls. Platelet GPIb and activated GPIIb/IIIa expression without added agonist was unchanged following eltrombopag treatment, whereas a slight increase in P-selectin was observed. Expression of P-selectin and activated GPIIb/IIIa in response to high-dose ADP was lower during eltrombopag treatment than at baseline. Eltrombopag led to a slight increase in platelet reactivity to TRAP only in responders to eltrombopag but not to levels above those in controls; whole blood experiments demonstrated that this increase was probably because of higher platelet counts rather than higher platelet reactivity. In conclusion, although thrombocytopenic ITP patients have higher baseline platelet activation than controls, eltrombopag did not cause platelet activation or hyper-reactivity, irrespective of whether the platelet count increased. PMID:22294727

  3. IgG platelet antibodies in EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia bind to platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb.

    PubMed

    Fiorin, F; Steffan, A; Pradella, P; Bizzaro, N; Potenza, R; De Angelis, V

    1998-08-01

    EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) consists of an inappropriate low platelet count caused by autoantibodies present in the serum samples reacting with platelets only in EDTA-anticoagulated blood. By using immunoprecipitation and Western blot techniques, we studied the immunochemical specificity of platelet agglutinating autoantibodies in the serum samples of 10 patients with PTCP. Furthermore, to evaluate a possible role of PTCP-associated IgG autoantibodies in increased platelet turnover, we assayed the plasma glycocalicin (GC) level and calculated the GC index for every patient. Our results provide direct evidence that an epitope located on platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb is recognized by PTCP-associated IgG antibodies; moreover GC levels in patients with EDTA-dependent PTCP were similar to control levels, thus excluding an increased platelet turnover. We conclude that antiplatelet antibodies directed against platelet cryptantigens are unlikely to have a major role in the increased removal of cells from circulation. PMID:9704616

  4. Reticulated platelets: analytical aspects and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Johannes J M L

    2014-08-01

    Reticulated platelets are immature platelets circulating in blood; they reflect the activity of megakaryopoiesis in the bone marrow. Therefore, they can be used as a non-invasive test in patients with thrombocytopenia in various clinical conditions. The preferred method of analysis is by flow cytometry. However, there is an evident lack of analytical standardization, making it difficult to compare results obtained in different laboratories. Currently, two types of hematology analyzers are on the market offering fully automated measurement of reticulated or immature platelets: the high end analyzers manufactured by Sysmex (XE- and XN-series) and Abbott (CELL-DYN Sapphire). Although the methods are essentially different and cannot be used interchangeably, both have been proven to have clinical utility. Reticulated or immature platelet assays are useful for the differential diagnosis of thrombocytopenia and for monitoring bone marrow recovery after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. These assays may aid clinicians in platelet transfusion decisions when recovery from thrombocytopenia is imminent. In addition, preliminary findings indicate that there is a rationale for reticulated or immature platelets for risk stratification in acute coronary syndromes and for monitoring the effect of treatment with antiplatelet drugs in patients with coronary artery diseases. The aim of this paper is to present the present technology available for measuring reticulated platelets as well as an overview of the current status of clinical application. This overview also indicates that more research is needed before reticulated or immature platelet assays can be applied in other clinical conditions than thrombocytopenia and after transplantation. PMID:24807169

  5. Platelets and fibrin strands during clot retraction.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, E; Korell, U; Richter, J

    1984-03-15

    The ultrastructure of platelet fibrin contacts (PFC) and the course of the strands was investigated in serial sections of retracted clots with the help of specimen tilting. We found after retraction in a test tube as well as under isometric conditions in the resonance thrombograph, after HARTERT, an uniform type of PFC. The side to side contact between platelet surface and fibrin strands displayed a 15 nm wide space which was bridged of 10 - 30 nm by filamentary structure. In each case the direction of the fibrin strands changed on contact with the platelet surface (bend). These bends recurred if the adhering strands ran over a longer distance on the platelet surface. The bends can be explained by non-directional movement of the platelets or of their pseudopodia. Microfilaments (actomyosin) which run straight in pseudopodia and often also twisted in the platelet body support this assumption. The described mechanism - contact of the thrombin activated platelets with fibrin strands and simultaneous nondirectional movement of the platelets which bind further sections of the adhering strands to their surface - would provide a more satisfactory explanation for the retraction of the clot to 1/10 of its original volume. PMID:6539004

  6. Platelet generation in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biao; Zheng, Jiansheng

    2016-01-01

    Platelet (PLT) transfusion, which is the primary cell therapy for thrombocytopenia, has been a source of concern in recent years due to its limitations of donor-dependent supply and soaring costs. In vitro platelet generation on an industrial scale is a possible solution requiring exploration. The technology of platelet generation ex vivo has been widely studied across the world, though the mechanisms of physiological thrombopoiesis and platelet biology function in vivo still remain elusive today. Various culture systems have been studied, most of which proved quite inefficient in generating functional platelets ex vivo, so there is still a long way to reach our ultimate goal of generating a fully functional platelet in vitro on an industrial scale. This review integrates the latest research into physiological platelet biogenesis and ex vivo-platelet/megakaryocyte (MK) generation protocols with a focus on the ability to generate PLT/MK in large quantities, summarizes current culture systems based on induced human pluripotent stem cells and adipose-derived stem cells, and discusses significant challenges that must be overcome for these approaches to be perfected. PMID:27390629

  7. Titanium surface hydrophilicity enhances platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Alfarsi, Mohammed A; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Titanium implant surface modification is a key strategy used to enhance osseointegration. Platelets are the first cells that interact with the implant surface whereupon they release a wide array of proteins that influence the subsequent healing process. This study therefore investigated the effect of titanium surface modification on the attachment and activation of human platelets. The surface characteristics of three titanium surfaces: smooth (SMO), micro-rough (SLA) and hydrophilic micro-rough (SLActive) and the subsequent attachment and activation of platelets following exposure to these surfaces were determined. The SLActive surface showed the presence of significant nanoscale topographical features. While attached platelets appeared to be morphologically similar, significantly fewer platelets attached to the SLActive surface compared to both the SMO and SLA surfaces. The SLActive surface however induced the release of the higher levels of chemokines β-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 from platelets. This study shows that titanium surface topography and chemistry have a significant effect on platelet activation and chemokine release. PMID:25311339

  8. Fractal and Euclidean descriptors of platelet shape.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Max-Joseph; Neeb, Heiko; Strasser, Erwin F

    2014-01-01

    Platelet shape change is a dynamic membrane surface process that exhibits remarkable morphological heterogeneity. Once the outline of an irregular shape is identified and segmented from a digital image, several mathematical descriptors can be applied to numerical characterize the irregularity of the shapes surface. 13072 platelet outlines (PLO) were segmented automatically from 1928 microscopic images using a newly developed algorithm for the software product Matlab R2012b. The fractal dimension (FD), circularity, eccentricity, area and perimeter of each PLO were determined. 972 PLO were randomly assigned for computer-assisted manual measurement of platelet diameter as well as number, width and length of filopodia per platelet. FD can be used as a surrogate parameter for determining the roughness of the PLO and circularity can be used as a surrogate to estimate the number and length of filopodia. The relationship between FD and perimeter of the PLO reveals the existence of distinct groups of platelets with significant structural differences which may be caused by platelet activation. This new method allows for the standardized continuous numerical classification of platelet shape and its dynamic change, which is useful for the analysis of altered platelet activity (e.g. inflammatory diseases, contact activation, drug testing). PMID:24224894

  9. Sodium-hydrogen exchange and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Rosskopf, D

    1999-07-01

    On stimulation of platelets with agonists, for example, thrombin, a rapid rise in intracellular pH is observed. This alkalinization is mediated by an increase in transport activity of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform NHE1. In addition to this Na(+)/H(+) exchange mechanism, platelets express bicarbonate/chloride exchangers, which also contribute to pH(i) homeostasis. The main functions of NHE1 in platelets include pH(i) control, volume regulation, and participation in cell signaling. The isoform NHE1 is highly sensitive toward inhibition by EIPA, Hoe694, and Hoe642. The regulation of NHE1 activity is complex and is not completely understood. It includes the MAP kinase cascade, the Ca/calmodulin system, several heterotrimeric G proteins (Galpha12, Galpha13, Galphaq, and Galphai), small G proteins (ras, cdc42, rhoA), and downstream kinases (e.g., p160ROCK). Volume challenges stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of cytoplasmic proteins, which ultimately activate NHE1. Thrombin, thromboxane, platelet-activating factor, angiotensin II, endothelin, phorbol ester, and Ca(2+) ionophors stimulate NHE1 activity in platelets. Blockade of platelet NHE1 can inhibit platelet activation. With the development of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors, detailed investigation of the relationships between NHE1 activity and platelet activation now becomes feasible. PMID:10481210

  10. Relation of platelet density to platelet age: survival of low- and high-density 111indium-labeled platelets in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, B.; McFadden, P.R.; Hanson, S.R.; Harker, L.A.

    1986-08-01

    The relationship between platelet density and platelet age has been studied using continuous linear Percoll density gradients and 111In-labeling of autologous platelets in baboons. To investigate changes in platelet density during senescence in the circulation, baboons were infused with 111In-labeled autologous platelets, and blood was collected at one hour postinfusion and twice daily thereafter for six days. Platelets were isolated from these samples in high yield (greater than 95%) and separated in continuous linear Percoll density gradients following density equilibrium centrifugation. Although at one hour postinfusion the density distribution of radiolabeled platelets coincided closely with the distribution of the total platelet population, a detectable symmetrical shift toward higher densities was observed after five days. The relative specific radioactivity (RSR) of high-density platelets (1.064 to 1.067 g/mL) decreased at a slower rate than that of the total platelet population (platelets of all densities), whereas the RSR of low-density platelets (1.053 to 1.056 g/mL) showed a more immediate and rapid decrease. These results give rise to one of two interpretations: (1) low-density platelets have a shorter survival time than more dense platelets and are therefore cleared from the circulation at a faster rate, or (2) platelets of all densities increase in density upon aging in the circulation. To determine the explanation for changing RSR of different density fractions we studied the in vivo disappearance characteristics of low- and high-density 111In-labeled platelets. There were no significant differences between the mean survival times of low-density platelets (5.0 +/- 0.49 days, +/- 1 SD, n = 6), high-density platelets (4.9 +/- 0.56 days, n = 6), or control platelets representing platelets of all densities (4.9 +/- 0.38 days, n = 6).

  11. Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of von Willebrand disease: a synopsis of the 2008 NHLBI/NIH guidelines.

    PubMed

    Nichols, William L; Rick, Margaret E; Ortel, Thomas L; Montgomery, Robert R; Sadler, J Evan; Yawn, Barbara P; James, Andra H; Hultin, Mae B; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Weinstein, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) mediates blood platelet adhesion and accumulation at sites of blood vessel injury, and also carries coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) that is important for generating procoagulant activity. Von Willebrand disease (VWD), the most common inherited bleeding disorder, affects males and females, and reflects deficiency or defects of VWF that may also cause decreased FVIII. It may also occur less commonly as an acquired disorder (acquired von Willebrand syndrome). This article briefly summarizes selected features of the March 2008 evidence-based clinical and laboratory diagnostic recommendations from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Expert Panel for assessment for VWD or other bleeding disorders or risks. Management of VWD is also addressed in the NHLBI guidelines, but is not summarized here. The VWD guidelines are available at the NHLBI Web site (http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/vwd). PMID:19415721

  12. The functions of the A1A2A3 domains in von Willebrand factor include multimerin 1 binding.

    PubMed

    Parker, D'Andra N; Tasneem, Subia; Farndale, Richard W; Bihan, Dominique; Sadler, J Evan; Sebastian, Silvie; de Groot, Philip G; Hayward, Catherine P M

    2016-07-01

    Multimerin 1 (MMRN1) is a massive, homopolymeric protein that is stored in platelets and endothelial cells for activation-induced release. In vitro, MMRN1 binds to the outer surfaces of activated platelets and endothelial cells, the extracellular matrix (including collagen) and von Willebrand factor (VWF) to support platelet adhesive functions. VWF associates with MMRN1 at high shear, not static conditions, suggesting that shear exposes cryptic sites within VWF that support MMRN1 binding. Modified ELISA and surface plasmon resonance were used to study the structural features of VWF that support MMRN1 binding, and determine the affinities for VWF-MMRN1 binding. High shear microfluidic platelet adhesion assays determined the functional consequences for VWF-MMRN1 binding. VWF binding to MMRN1 was enhanced by shear exposure and ristocetin, and required VWF A1A2A3 region, specifically the A1 and A3 domains. VWF A1A2A3 bound to MMRN1 with a physiologically relevant binding affinity (KD: 2.0 ± 0.4 nM), whereas the individual VWF A1 (KD: 39.3 ± 7.7 nM) and A3 domains (KD: 229 ± 114 nM) bound to MMRN1 with lower affinities. VWF A1A2A3 was also sufficient to support the adhesion of resting platelets to MMRN1 at high shear, by a mechanism dependent on VWF-GPIbα binding. Our study provides new information on the molecular basis of MMRN1 binding to VWF, and its role in supporting platelet adhesion at high shear. We propose that at sites of vessel injury, MMRN1 that is released following activation of platelets and endothelial cells, binds to VWF A1A2A3 region to support platelet adhesion at arterial shear rates. PMID:27052467

  13. Relationship between potential platelet activation and LCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn

    2010-11-01

    In the study of blood flow, emphasis is often directed at understanding shear stress at the vessel wall due to its potentially disruptive influence on the endothelium. However, it is also known that shear stress has a potent effect on platelet activation. Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which in turn is the cause of most forms of death. Since most platelets are contained in the flow domain, it is important to consider stresses acting on the platelet as they are convected. Locations of high stress can correspond to boundaries between different dynamic regions and locations of hyperbolic points in the Eulerian sense. In the computation of LCS, strain in typically considered in the Lagrangian sense. In this talk we discuss the relationship between locations of potential platelet activation due to increased stress and locations of LCS marking increase Lagrangian deformation.

  14. The Decorated School: Past Potency and Present Patronage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The Decorated School is an interdisciplinary research network funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. The article situates current academic and wider community engagement concerning the purpose and significance of art as part of the school building and grounds in an historical context. It goes on to discuss emerging patterns of…

  15. 21 CFR 109.16 - Ornamental and decorative ceramicware.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ornamental and decorative ceramicware. 109.16 Section 109.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION UNAVOIDABLE CONTAMINANTS IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION AND FOOD-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions §...

  16. 5. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF BUILDING 220, DECORATIVE FLOOR AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF BUILDING 220, DECORATIVE FLOOR AT ENTRANCE. VINYL TILE INLAID FLOOR WITH A RED BACKGROUND, GREEN EMBLEM, BROWN AND WHITE EAGLE, RED AND WHITE SHIELD, BLACK ANCHOR, RED ARROWS AND LETTERING. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Brig, Neville Way near Ninth Street at Marine Barracks, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Breaking Monotony: A Reflective Study of Teaching Decorative Pot Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nortey, Samuel; Okai, Frederick E.; Bodjawah, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    In art, the idea of pots being circular and cylindrical is an intuitive proposition that defines why potters have, up to the present, made wonderful decorations in the round. It is believed that potters do not want to subvert or break away from their tradition, perhaps because the art started as family craft. In this study, the authors describe…

  18. An organocatalytic route to 2-heteroarylmethylene decorated N-arylpyrroles

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Alexandre; Rouden, Jacques; Maddaluno, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Summary A concise and regioselective preparation of 2-heteroarylmethylene decorated N-arylpyrroles is described through a metal-free Mannich/Wittig/hydroamination sequence followed by isomerization of the N-arylpyrrolidine adducts. Furthermore, the C–H regioselective oxidation of these substrates is demonstrated, extending the molecular diversity and versatility of these scaffolds. PMID:23946846

  19. An organocatalytic route to 2-heteroarylmethylene decorated N-arylpyrroles.

    PubMed

    Jean, Alexandre; Blanchet, Jérôme; Rouden, Jacques; Maddaluno, Jacques; De Paolis, Michaël

    2013-01-01

    A concise and regioselective preparation of 2-heteroarylmethylene decorated N-arylpyrroles is described through a metal-free Mannich/Wittig/hydroamination sequence followed by isomerization of the N-arylpyrrolidine adducts. Furthermore, the C-H regioselective oxidation of these substrates is demonstrated, extending the molecular diversity and versatility of these scaffolds. PMID:23946846

  20. 25. LOBBY FIREPLACE. NOTE THE GEYSER DECORATING THE FIREPLACE SCREEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. LOBBY FIREPLACE. NOTE THE GEYSER DECORATING THE FIREPLACE SCREEN AND THE WEIGHTS AND PENDULUM HANGING FROM THE CLOCK DESIGNED BY ARCHITECT ROBERT C. REAMER. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  1. LANAI OF UNIT B. NOTE THE DECORATIVE PROTRUDING CONCRETE MASONRY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LANAI OF UNIT B. NOTE THE DECORATIVE PROTRUDING CONCRETE MASONRY. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE ELEMENTS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE ELEMENTS OF BUILDING 1'S MAIN ENTRY TOWER (INCLUDING THE ENGAGED COLUMN CAPITALS, PILASTERS & CAPITALS, CORNICES, AND TERRA COTTA EAGLES); LOOKING SW FROM THE E WING ROOF. (Ryan) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  3. Platelets and coagulation in infection

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Rachelle P; Miller-Dorey, Sarah; Jenne, Craig N

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a frequent complication in sepsis that is associated with worse outcomes and higher mortality in patients. In addition to the uncontrolled generation of thrombi throughout the patient's vasculature, DIC often consumes large quantities of clotting factors leaving the patient susceptible to hemorrhaging. Owing to these complications, patients often receive anticoagulants to treat the uncontrolled clotting, often with mixed outcomes. This lack of success with the current array of anticoagulants can be partly explained by the fact that during sepsis clotting is often initiated by the immune system. Systemic inflammation has the capacity to activate and amplify coagulation and, as such, potential therapies for the treatment of sepsis-associated DIC need to address the interaction between inflammation and coagulation. Recent studies have suggested that platelets and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are the key mediators of infection-induced coagulation. This review explores current anticoagulant therapies and discusses the development of future therapies to target platelet and NET-mediated coagulation. PMID:27525062

  4. Platelet interaction within giant intracranial aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.; King, M.E.; Peerless, S.J.; Vezina, W.C.; Brown, G.W.; Chamberlain, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Turbulence within intracranial aneurysms may result in tearing of the aneurysmal wall, exposing the subendothelial matrix to circulating platelets. In this study, platelet interaction in giant intracranial aneurysms was evaluated by a dual-isotope technique employing In-labeled platelets and Tc-labeled red blood cells. The use of two isotopes allows the subtraction of the blood pool and the calculation of the ratio indium deposited:indium blood pool (In(D)/In(BP)). A ratio greater than zero indicates platelet deposition within aneurysm. Thirteen patients were evaluated in this way, with platelet deposition demonstrated in six. In these six patients, the ratio In(D)/In(BP) was found to be significantly elevated, with a mean value of 0.96 +/- 0.65. Three of these six patients has symptoms of recurrent transient neurological deficits; one of these three suffered a complete stroke following documentation of platelet deposition. In this case, the aneurysm was obtained at surgery and was found to contain intraluminal platelet aggregation when viewed by scanning electron microscopy. In the remaining seven patients, the ratio IN(D)/In(BP) was found not to be significantly elevated (mean -0.03 and/- 0.06), indicating the absence of active platelet deposition. Two of these patients had prior symptoms of cerebral ischemia; one of these was found to have an ulcer in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery which was probably responsible for thromboembolic events to the hemisphere. The authors conclude that platelet aggregation occurs more frequently than previously recognized in giant intracranial aneurysms, and their data substantiate the hypothesis that platelet metabolic products or thrombi originating from a large aneurysm may embolize to distal cerebral vessels.

  5. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome associated with left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Nascimbene, Angelo; Neelamegham, Sriram; Frazier, O H; Moake, Joel L; Dong, Jing-Fei

    2016-06-23

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) provide cardiac support for patients with end-stage heart disease as either bridge or destination therapy, and have significantly improved the survival of these patients. Whereas earlier models were designed to mimic the human heart by producing a pulsatile flow in parallel with the patient's heart, newer devices, which are smaller and more durable, provide continuous blood flow along an axial path using an internal rotor in the blood. However, device-related hemostatic complications remain common and have negatively affected patients' recovery and quality of life. In most patients, the von Willebrand factor (VWF) rapidly loses large multimers and binds poorly to platelets and subendothelial collagen upon LVAD implantation, leading to the term acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS). These changes in VWF structure and adhesive activity recover quickly upon LVAD explantation and are not observed in patients with heart transplant. The VWF defects are believed to be caused by excessive cleavage of large VWF multimers by the metalloprotease ADAMTS-13 in an LVAD-driven circulation. However, evidence that this mechanism could be the primary cause for the loss of large VWF multimers and LVAD-associated bleeding remains circumstantial. This review discusses changes in VWF reactivity found in patients on LVAD support. It specifically focuses on impacts of LVAD-related mechanical stress on VWF structural stability and adhesive reactivity in exploring multiple causes of AVWS and LVAD-associated hemostatic complications. PMID:27143258

  6. von Willebrand disease: advances in pathogenetic understanding, diagnosis, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is the most common autosomally inherited bleeding disorder. The disease represents a range of quantitative and qualitative pathologies of the adhesive glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for the type 2 qualitative variants of VWF are now well characterized, with most mutations representing missense substitutions influencing VWF multimer structure and interactions with platelet GPIbα and collagen and with factor VIII. The molecular pathology of type 3 VWD has been similarly well characterized, with an array of different mutation types producing either a null phenotype or the production of VWF that is not secreted. In contrast, the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for type 1 VWD remain only partially resolved. In the hemostasis laboratory, the measurement of VWF:Ag and VWF:RCo are key components in the diagnostic algorithm for VWD, although the introduction of direct GPIbα-binding assays may become the functional assay of choice. Molecular genetic testing can provide additional benefit, but its utility is currently limited to type 2 and 3 VWD. The treatment of bleeding in VWD involves the use of desmopressin and plasma-derived VWF concentrates and a variety of adjunctive agents. Finally, a new recombinant VWF concentrate has just completed clinical trial evaluation and has demonstrated excellent hemostatic efficacy and safety. PMID:24065240

  7. The utility of the PFA-100 in the identification of von Willebrand disease: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2006-07-01

    The PFA-100 (platelet function analyser; Dade-Behring, Marburg, Germany) is a relatively new tool for the investigation of primary hemostasis. Recent studies have shown its utility as a screening tool for investigating various platelet disorders and possible von Willebrand disorder (vWD), both in the initial investigation and in subsequent therapeutic monitoring of desmopressin therapy. This article reviews current findings with respect to the identification of vWD, and highlights both the benefits and the limitations of its clinical utility. In brief, sensitivity to vWD types 2A, 2B, 2M, and 3 is > 98%, but overall sensitivity to vWD (types 1, 2A, 2B, 2M, and 3 combined) is ~85 to 90%. Ultimately, the high sensitivity of the PFA-100 to vWD and its simplicity of use provide its greatest strengths. However, because it is a global test system, and also sensitive to low hematocrit, low platelet counts, and platelet dysfunction (both congenital and acquired; e.g., secondary to medication such as aspirin) it must be recognized that the PFA-100 is neither specific for, nor predictive of, any particular disorder (inclusive of vWD). Nevertheless, used appropriately, the PFA-100 can be considered a worthwhile addition to the hemostasis laboratory involved in the diagnosis or therapeutic monitoring of vWD, and a normal PFA-100 result can be used with some confidence to exclude severe vWD. PMID:16862528

  8. Mean platelet size related to glycoprotein-specific autoantibodies and platelet-associated IgG.

    PubMed

    Javela, K; Kekomäki, R

    2007-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that platelet-associated glycoprotein-specific (GP) antibodies represent true positive autoantibodies and can therefore be taken as the gold standard. Earlier tests, which aimed at detecting platelet-associated IgG (PA-IgG), might have been hampered, e.g. by the variation of platelet size in thrombocytopenic patients. In this study, 206 samples with increased PA-IgG from consecutive thrombocytopenic patients were tested further for GP-specific antibodies with a monoclonal antibody immobilized platelet antigen test (MAIPA) using a combination of a GP IIbIIIa-specific and a GP IbIX-specific antibody for immobilization or, in a separate assay, GP V-specific antibody. Mean platelet size was recorded as forward scatter (FSC) of platelets in flow cytometric analysis of PA-IgG. GP-specific antibodies were detected in 49 (24%) of the 206 patient samples. Their presence correlated well with increased PA-IgG (R = 0.769). The mean platelet size and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of PA-IgG were both significantly increased in patients compared with healthy controls (n = 112; P < 0.0001). Notably, PA-IgG was associated with platelet size within the platelet population of both healthy controls and patients (R = 0.999). Further, the probability of GP IIbIIIa and/or IbIX and GP V-specific PA-IgG tended to increase with the mean platelet size of the patients (P = 0.045). In conclusion, large platelets bound more IgG than platelets of normal size, which may explain at least in part the reported low specificity of total PA-IgG measurement. As the PA-IgG displays low specificity compared with the gold standard, its use as such may be abandoned and replaced by tests for platelet-associated GP-specific autoantibodies. PMID:17988298

  9. Mean platelet size related to glycoprotein-specific autoantibodies and platelet-associated IgG

    PubMed Central

    JAVELA, K; KEKOMÄKI, R

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that platelet-associated glycoprotein-specific (GP) antibodies represent true positive autoantibodies and can therefore be taken as the gold standard. Earlier tests, which aimed at detecting platelet-associated IgG (PA-IgG), might have been hampered, e.g. by the variation of platelet size in thrombocytopenic patients. In this study, 206 samples with increased PA-IgG from consecutive thrombocytopenic patients were tested further for GP-specific antibodies with a monoclonal antibody immobilized platelet antigen test (MAIPA) using a combination of a GP IIbIIIa-specific and a GP IbIX-specific antibody for immobilization or, in a separate assay, GP V-specific antibody. Mean platelet size was recorded as forward scatter (FSC) of platelets in flow cytometric analysis of PA-IgG. GP-specific antibodies were detected in 49 (24%) of the 206 patient samples. Their presence correlated well with increased PA-IgG (R = 0.769). The mean platelet size and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of PA-IgG were both significantly increased in patients compared with healthy controls (n = 112; P < 0.0001). Notably, PA-IgG was associated with platelet size within the platelet population of both healthy controls and patients (R = 0.999). Further, the probability of GP IIbIIIa and/or IbIX and GP V-specific PA-IgG tended to increase with the mean platelet size of the patients (P = 0.045). In conclusion, large platelets bound more IgG than platelets of normal size, which may explain at least in part the reported low specificity of total PA-IgG measurement. As the PA-IgG displays low specificity compared with the gold standard, its use as such may be abandoned and replaced by tests for platelet-associated GP-specific autoantibodies. PMID:17988298

  10. Northern elephant seal platelets: analysis of shape change and response to platelet agonists.

    PubMed

    Field, C L; Walker, N J; Tablin, F

    2001-02-15

    Blood platelets have a vital role in the maintenance of normal mammalian hemostasis. Rapid pressure changes and temperatures lower than 20 degrees C cause activation of human and terrestrial mammal platelets. Elephant seals are routinely subjected to pressures as high as 150 atm, yet do not suffer from the thrombotic effects of platelet activation associated with rapid decompression. We examined the ultrastructure of Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) platelets and their functional and morphological response to various platelet agonists. Unstimulated elephant seal platelets are discoid cells, with a microtubule coil, randomly dispersed alpha and dense granules, and glycogen granules. There are well-defined areas of membranous invaginations that indicate the presence of an open canalicular system (OCS). Aggregometry was used to determine the response of elephant seal platelets to various platelet agonists. Dose-dependent curves were generated for thrombin, collagen, and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Platelet response to thrombin was dose-dependent and was maximal at 2.5 U/ml. Platelets collected in sodium citrate had blunted responses to both ADP and collagen. ADP stimulation caused only reversible, primary activation (shape change) at > or = 5 microM, while platelets did not aggregate in response to any concentration of collagen. Platelets collected in sodium heparin did respond fully to both to ADP and collagen. There was small, reversible shape change in response to ristocetin, but no response to epinephrine. Decreased sensitivity of elephant seal platelets to agonists may be a protective mechanism developed in response to rapid pressure changes and cold temperatures associated with adaptation to an extreme environment. PMID:11248288

  11. Breaking the Mold: Transcription Factors in the Anucleate Platelet and Platelet-Derived Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lannan, Katie L.; Sahler, Julie; Kim, Nina; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are small anucleate blood cells derived from megakaryocytes. In addition to their pivotal roles in hemostasis, platelets are the smallest, yet most abundant, immune cells and regulate inflammation, immunity, and disease progression. Although platelets lack DNA, and thus no functional transcriptional activities, they are nonetheless rich sources of RNAs, possess an intact spliceosome, and are thus capable of synthesizing proteins. Previously, it was thought that platelet RNAs and translational machinery were remnants from the megakaryocyte. We now know that the initial description of platelets as “cellular fragments” is an antiquated notion, as mounting evidence suggests otherwise. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that platelet transcription factors are not vestigial remnants from megakaryocytes, but have important, if only partly understood functions. Proteins play multiple cellular roles to minimize energy expenditure for maximum cellular function; thus, the same can be expected for transcription factors. In fact, numerous transcription factors have non-genomic roles, both in platelets and in nucleated cells. Our lab and others have discovered the presence and non-genomic roles of transcription factors in platelets, such as the nuclear factor kappa β (NFκB) family of proteins and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). In addition to numerous roles in regulating platelet activation, functional transcription factors can be transferred to vascular and immune cells through platelet microparticles. This method of transcellular delivery of key immune molecules may be a vital mechanism by which platelet transcription factors regulate inflammation and immunity. At the very least, platelets are an ideal model cell to dissect out the non-genomic roles of transcription factors in nucleated cells. There is abundant evidence to suggest that transcription factors in platelets play key roles in regulating inflammatory and hemostatic

  12. Von Willebrand factor regulates complement on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Noone, Damien G; Riedl, Magdalena; Pluthero, Fred G; Bowman, Mackenzie L; Liszewski, M Kathryn; Lu, Lily; Quan, Yi; Balgobin, Steve; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Schneppenheim, Sonja; Budde, Ulrich; James, Paula; Atkinson, John P; Palaniyar, Nades; Kahr, Walter H A; Licht, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura have traditionally been considered separate entities. Defects in the regulation of the complement alternative pathway occur in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and defects in the cleavage of von Willebrand factor (VWF)-multimers arise in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. However, recent studies suggest that both entities are related as defects in the disease-causing pathways overlap or show functional interactions. Here we investigate the possible functional link of VWF-multimers and the complement system on endothelial cells. Blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) were obtained from 3 healthy individuals and 2 patients with Type 3 von Willebrand disease lacking VWF. Cells were exposed to a standardized complement challenge via the combination of classical and alternative pathway activation and 50% normal human serum resulting in complement fixation to the endothelial surface. Under these conditions we found the expected release of VWF-multimers causing platelet adhesion onto BOECs from healthy individuals. Importantly, in BOECs derived from patients with von Willebrand disease complement C3c deposition and cytotoxicity were more pronounced than on BOECs derived from normal individuals. This is of particular importance as primary glomerular endothelial cells display a heterogeneous expression pattern of VWF with overall reduced VWF abundance. Thus, our results support a mechanistic link between VWF-multimers and the complement system. However, our findings also identify VWF as a new complement regulator on vascular endothelial cells and suggest that VWF has a protective effect on endothelial cells and complement-mediated injury. PMID:27236750

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of acquired von Willebrand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is a rare bleeding disorder that is characterized by structural or functional alterations in von Willebrand factor (VWF) caused by a range of lymphoproliferative, myeloproliferative, cardiovascular, autoimmune, and other disorders. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for the VWF abnormalities depend on the underlying condition, but include clearance due to binding of paraproteins, inhibition of VWF, adsorption to the surface of platelets, increased fluid shear stress, and resultant proteolysis or, more rarely, decreased synthesis. The diagnosis and treatment of AVWS are complicated by the need for multiple laboratory tests and the management of bleeding risk in a typically elderly population with serious underlying conditions that predispose towards thrombosis. Recently developed diagnostic algorithms, based on standard laboratory assays, may assist clinicians with the diagnostic workup and help differentiate between AVWS and von Willebrand disease (VWD) types 1 and 2. AVWS should be considered in all patients with new-onset bleeding whenever laboratory findings suggest VWD, particularly in the presence of an AVWS-associated disorder. AVWS testing is also recommended prior to surgery or an intervention with a high risk of bleeding in any individual with an AVWS-associated disorder. Treatment of the underlying condition using immunosuppressants, surgery, or chemotherapy, can lead to remission of AVWS in some individuals and should always be considered. Strategies to prevent and/or treat bleeding episodes should also be in place, including the use of VWF-containing factor VIII concentrates, desmopressin and tranexamic acid. Treatment success will depend largely on the underlying pathogenesis of the disorder. PMID:23439003

  14. Current controversies in the diagnosis and management of von Willebrand disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is the most common inherited bleeding disorder in the world. The spectrum of VWD spans quantitative and qualitative deficiencies of von Willebrand factor (VWF), a platelet adhesive protein. It manifests primarily as mucocutaneous bleeding, but severely affected patients may suffer soft tissue bleeding and hemarthroses. There is disagreement in the multiple guidelines published regarding diagnosis, especially of type 1 VWD, which also remains the most opaque with respect to molecular characterization. Treatment with desmopressin (DDAVP) is most effective in type 1 VWD, but regimens are not standardized. It is not clear which type 2 VWD patients with qualitative deficiencies can be treated with DDAVP and which ones should receive VWF concentrates. No guidelines stipulate which patients might benefit from prophylactic VWF infusions and how they should be dosed. These are some current controversies in VWD that are discussed in this review. PMID:26288715

  15. BIODEGRADABLE NANOPARTICLES MIMICKING PLATELET BINDING AS A TARGETED AND CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Kona, Soujanya; Dong, Jing-Fei; Liu, Yaling; Tan, Jifu

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to develop targeted nanoparticles as drug carriers to the injured arterial wall under fluid shear stress by mimicking the natural binding ability of platelets via interactions of glycoprotein Ib-alpha (GP Ibα) of platelets with P-selectin of damaged endothelial cells (ECs) and/or with von Willebrand factor (vWF) of the subendothelium. Drug-loaded poly (D, L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were formulated using a standard emulsion method and conjugated with glycocalicin, the external fraction of platelet GPIbα, via carbodiimide chemistry. Surface-coated and cellular uptake studies in ECs showed that conjugation of PLGA nanoparticles with GPIb significantly increased nanoparticle adhesion to P-selectin- and vWF-coated surfaces as well as nanoparticle uptake by activated ECs under fluid shear stresses. In addition, effects of nanoparticle size and shear stress on adhesion efficiency were characterized through parallel flow chamber studies. The observed decrease in bound nanoparticle density with increased particle sizes and shear stresses is also explained through a computational model. Our results demonstrate that the GPIb-conjugated PLGA nanoparticles can be used as a targeted and controlled drug delivery system under flow conditions at the site of vascular injury. PMID:22172292

  16. Quality assessment of platelet concentrates prepared by platelet rich plasma-platelet concentrate, buffy coat poor-platelet concentrate (BC-PC) and apheresis-PC methods

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravindra P.; Marwaha, Neelam; Malhotra, Pankaj; Dash, Sumitra

    2009-01-01

    Background: Platelet rich plasma-platelet concentrate (PRP-PC), buffy coat poor-platelet concentrate (BC-PC), and apheresis-PC were prepared and their quality parameters were assessed. Study Design: In this study, the following platelet products were prepared: from random donor platelets (i) platelet rich plasma - platelet concentrate (PRP-PC), and (ii) buffy coat poor-platelet concentrate (BC-PC) and (iii) single donor platelets (apheresis-PC) by different methods. Their quality was assessed using the following parameters: swirling, volume of the platelet concentrate, platelet count, WBC count and pH. Results: A total of 146 platelet concentrates (64 of PRP-PC, 62 of BC-PC and 20 of apheresis-PC) were enrolled in this study. The mean volume of PRP-PC, BC-PC and apheresis-PC was 62.30±22.68 ml, 68.81±22.95 ml and 214.05±9.91 ml and ranged from 22-135 ml, 32-133 ml and 200-251 ml respectively. The mean platelet count of PRP-PC, BC-PC and apheresis-PC was 7.6±2.97 × 1010/unit, 7.3±2.98 × 1010/unit and 4.13±1.32 × 1011/unit and ranged from 3.2 –16.2 × 1010/unit, 0.6-16.4 × 1010/unit and 1.22-8.9 × 1011/unit respectively. The mean WBC count in PRP-PC (n = 10), BC-PC (n = 10) and apheresis-PC (n = 6) units was 4.05±0.48 × 107/unit, 2.08±0.39 × 107/unit and 4.8±0.8 × 106/unit and ranged from 3.4 -4.77 × 107/unit, 1.6-2.7 × 107/unit and 3.2 – 5.2 × 106/unit respectively. A total of 26 units were analyzed for pH changes. Out of these units, 10 each were PRP-PC and BC-PC and 6 units were apheresis-PC. Their mean pH was 6.7±0.26 (mean±SD) and ranged from 6.5 – 7.0 and no difference was observed among all three types of platelet concentrate. Conclusion: PRP-PC and BC-PC units were comparable in terms of swirling, platelet count per unit and pH. As expected, we found WBC contamination to be less in BC-PC than PRP-PC units. Variation in volume was more in BC-PC than PRP-PC units and this suggests that further standardization is required for

  17. Brief Report: Platelet-Poor Plasma Serotonin in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, George M.; Hertzig, Margaret E.; McBride, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Possible explanations for the well-replicated platelet hyperserotonemia of autism include an alteration in the platelet's handling of serotonin (5-hydroxyserotonin, 5-HT) or an increased exposure of the platelet to 5-HT. Measurement of platelet-poor plasma (PPP) levels of 5-HT appears to provide the best available index of in vivo exposure of the…

  18. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. The York Platelet Syndrome: a third case.

    PubMed

    White, James G; Gunay-Aygun, Meral

    2011-01-01

    Our present study has described a third patient with the York Platelet Syndrome (YPS). The condition consists of a mitochondrial myopathy associated with unique platelet pathology. Their mitochondrial myopathy has not been completely delineated and will be the subject of further study. Platelet pathology in the new patient is essentially identical to that described in the first two patients. Thin sections of her thrombocytes reveal a normal complement of α and δ granules (dense bodies) in some, a decreased number in others and complete absence in a few. The unique pathological feature is the presence of giant organelles, including an intensely electron dense, huge body, the opaque organelle (OO) and a multilayered large body, the target organelle. In addition platelets from the new patient contain large masses and coils of smooth endoplasmic reticulum present infrequently in platelets of the first two patients. The giant opaque and target organelles appear to develop in rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum of the parent megakaryocyte and mature in the dense tubular system of circulating platelets. The relationship of the unique platelet pathology and mitochondrial myopathy has not been defined. PMID:21117861

  20. Nanoparticle biointerfacing by platelet membrane cloaking.

    PubMed

    Hu, Che-Ming J; Fang, Ronnie H; Wang, Kuei-Chun; Luk, Brian T; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Dehaini, Diana; Nguyen, Phu; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Wen, Cindy H; Kroll, Ashley V; Carpenter, Cody; Ramesh, Manikantan; Qu, Vivian; Patel, Sherrina H; Zhu, Jie; Shi, William; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Kang; Chien, Shu; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-10-01

    Development of functional nanoparticles can be encumbered by unanticipated material properties and biological events, which can affect nanoparticle effectiveness in complex, physiologically relevant systems. Despite the advances in bottom-up nanoengineering and surface chemistry, reductionist functionalization approaches remain inadequate in replicating the complex interfaces present in nature and cannot avoid exposure of foreign materials. Here we report on the preparation of polymeric nanoparticles enclosed in the plasma membrane of human platelets, which are a unique population of cellular fragments that adhere to a variety of disease-relevant substrates. The resulting nanoparticles possess a right-side-out unilamellar membrane coating functionalized with immunomodulatory and adhesion antigens associated with platelets. Compared to uncoated particles, the platelet membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have reduced cellular uptake by macrophage-like cells and lack particle-induced complement activation in autologous human plasma. The cloaked nanoparticles also display platelet-mimicking properties such as selective adhesion to damaged human and rodent vasculatures as well as enhanced binding to platelet-adhering pathogens. In an experimental rat model of coronary restenosis and a mouse model of systemic bacterial infection, docetaxel and vancomycin, respectively, show enhanced therapeutic efficacy when delivered by the platelet-mimetic nanoparticles. The multifaceted biointerfacing enabled by the platelet membrane cloaking method provides a new approach in developing functional nanoparticles for disease-targeted delivery. PMID:26374997

  1. Transport of platelets in flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, E C; Bilsker, D L; Waters, C M; Kippenhan, J S; Tilles, A W

    1987-01-01

    Distribution and transport of platelets in flowing blood were studied experimentally using suspensions of washed red cells and fluorescent latex beads as platelet analogues. Distributions of the platelet analogues were obtained from stroboscopic epifluorescence photomicrographs of flow in 50-micron channels and from images of the cut cross sections of cryogenically frozen thin-walled 200-micron tubes. Concentration profiles of platelet analogues had a substantial near-wall excess for situations with a substantial hematocrit (greater than 10%) and a substantial wall shear rate (greater than 400 s-1). The viscosity of the suspending fluid was found to affect the size of the near-wall excess and its shear-dependent onset. Additionally, the shear-rate dependence of the near-wall excess did not occur with suspensions of hardened red cells. The excess extended a substantial distance from the wall in the 200-micron tubes and a portion of the profile could be fitted to an exponential curve. The random walk model that is used to describe enhanced platelet diffusion is envisioned as a walk (lateral platelet motion) caused by shear-induced collisions with red cells. A more comprehensive random walk model that includes biased collisions produces an effective lateral motion of convective nature in addition to a diffusional motion; it is used to explain the observed nonuniform distributions of platelet analogues. PMID:3439741

  2. Nanoparticle biointerfacing via platelet membrane cloaking

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Che-Ming J.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Wang, Kuei-Chun; Luk, Brian T.; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Dehaini, Diana; Nguyen, Phu; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Wen, Cindy H.; Kroll, Ashley V.; Carpenter, Cody; Ramesh, Manikantan; Qu, Vivian; Patel, Sherrina; Zhu, Jie; Shi, William; Hofman, Florence M.; Chen, Thomas C.; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Kang; Chien, Shu; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-01-01

    Development of functional nanoparticles can be encumbered by unanticipated material properties and biological events, which can negatively impact nanoparticle effectiveness in complex, physiologically relevant systems1–3. Despite the advances in bottom-up nanoengineering and surface chemistry, reductionist functionalization approaches remain inadequate in replicating the complex interfaces present in nature and cannot avoid exposure of foreign materials. Here we report on the preparation of polymeric nanoparticles enclosed in the plasma membrane of human platelets, which are a unique population of cellular fragments that adhere to a variety of disease-relevant substrates4–7. The resulting nanoparticles possess a right-side-out unilamellar membrane coating functionalized with immunomodulatory and adhesion antigens associated with platelets. As compared to uncoated particles, the platelet membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have reduced cellular uptake by macrophage-like cells and are absent of particle-induced complement activation in autologous human plasma. The cloaked nanoparticles also display platelet-mimicking properties such as selective adhesion to damaged human and rodent vasculatures as well as enhanced binding to platelet-adhering pathogens. In an experimental rat model of coronary restenosis and a mouse model of systemic bacterial infection, docetaxel and vancomycin, respectively, show enhanced therapeutic efficacy when delivered by the platelet-mimetic nanoparticles. The multifaceted biointerfacing enabled by the platelet membrane cloaking method provides a new approach in developing functional nanoparticles for disease-targeted delivery. PMID:26374997

  3. Platelet antibody: review of detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, K.A.

    1988-10-01

    The driving force behind development of in vitro methods for platelet antibodies is identification of plasma factors causing platelet destruction. Early methods relied on measurement of platelet activation. Current methods are more specific and use a purified antibody against immunoglobulin or complement, which is usually labeled with /sup 125/I or tagged with an enzyme or fluorescein. Comparisons of quantitation of platelet-associated IgG show wide variability between different methods. The disparate results can be related both to differences in binding of secondary antibodies to immunoglobulin in solution compared to immunoglobulins attached to platelets and to the improper assumption that the binding ratio between the secondary detecting and primary antiplatelet antibody is one. Most assays can 1) identify neonatal isoimmune thrombocytopenia and posttransfusion purpura, 2) help to differentiate between immune and nonimmune thrombocytopenias, 3) help to sort out the offending drug when drug-induced thrombocytopenia is suspected, and 4) identify platelet alloantibodies and potential platelet donors via a cross match assay for refractory patients. However, the advantages of quantitative assays over qualitative methods with respect to predictions of patients clinical course and response to different treatments remain to be investigated. 61 references.

  4. The role of platelets in sepsis.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-10-01

    Platelets are small circulating anucleate cells that are of crucial importance in haemostasis. Over the last decade, it has become increasingly clear that platelets play an important role in inflammation and can influence both innate and adaptive immunity. Sepsis is a potentially lethal condition caused by detrimental host response to an invading pathogen. Dysbalanced immune response and activation of the coagulation system during sepsis are fundamental events leading to sepsis complications and organ failure. Platelets, being major effector cells in both haemostasis and inflammation, are involved in sepsis pathogenesis and contribute to sepsis complications. Platelets catalyse the development of hyperinflammation, disseminated intravascular coagulation and microthrombosis, and subsequently contribute to multiple organ failure. Inappropriate accumulation and activity of platelets are key events in the development of sepsis-related complications such as acute lung injury and acute kidney injury. Platelet activation readouts could serve as biomarkers for early sepsis recognition; inhibition of platelets in septic patients seems like an important target for immune-modulating therapy and appears promising based on animal models and retrospective human studies. PMID:24966015

  5. Alterations of platelet aggregation kinetics with ultraviolet laser emission: the "stunned platelet" phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Topaz, O; Minisi, A J; Bernardo, N L; McPherson, R A; Martin, E; Carr, S L; Carr, M E

    2001-10-01

    Platelets, a major constituent of thrombus, play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of acute ischemic coronary syndromes. The effect of ultraviolet laser emission on platelets within thrombi is unknown. The effects of increasing levels of laser energy on platelets in whole blood were investigated. Blood samples were obtained by aseptic venipuncture and anticoagulated with 3.8% sodium citrate. Samples were exposed to increased levels (0, 30, 45, 60 mJ/mm2; 25 Hz) of ultraviolet excimer laser fluence (308 nm wave-length) and then tested for ADP and collagen induced platelet aggregation, platelet concentration, and for platelet contractile force (PCF) development. Scanning electron microscopy was used to detect laser induced morphologic changes of platelets and by flow cytometric analysis to detect changes in expression of platelet surface antigens p-selectin (CD 62) and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (CD 43). Exposure to excimer laser energy produced dose dependent suppression of platelet aggregation and force development ("stunned platelets"). ADP aggregation decreased from 8.0+/-1.1 Ohms (mean+/-SEM) to 3.7+/-0.8 Ohms (p<0.001) to 2.7+/-0.6 Ohms (p <0.001) and to 1.8+/-0.5 Ohms (p <0.001) as the laser energy increased from 0 to 30 to 45 to 60 mJ/mm2, respectively. Collagen induced aggregation decreased from 21.4+/-1.4 Ohms to 15.7+/-1.2 Ohms (p <0.001) to 11.7+/-1.1 Ohms (p <0.001) and to 9.9+/-1.0 Ohms (p <0.001), in response to the same incremental range of laser energy. Platelet contractile forces declined from 34,500+/-3700 to 27.800+/-2700 dynes as laser energy increased from 0 to 60 mJ/mm2 (p <0.03). Platelet concentration did not change with increasing laser energy. The expression of platelet surface antigen p-selectin (CD 62) remained stable through increasing levels of laser energy exposures while the percentage of CD 43 positive platelets significantly increased with exposure to laser energy, yet the level of expression did not exceed 0.5% of cells. Thus

  6. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets.

    PubMed

    Pineda, A A; Zylstra, V W; Clare, D E; Dewanjee, M K; Forstrom, L A

    1989-01-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous 111In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% [p less than 0.001] vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% [p greater than 0.1], respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake. PMID:2749876

  7. Decreased mean platelet volume in panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Göğçegöz Gül, Işıl; Eryılmaz, Gül; Özten, Eylem; Hızlı Sayar, Gökben

    2014-01-01

    Aim The relationship between psychological stress and platelet activation has been widely studied. It is well known that platelets may reflect certain biochemical changes that occur in the brain when different mental conditions occur. Platelet 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is also extensively studied in psychiatry. The mean platelet volume (MPV), the accurate measure of platelet size, has been considered a marker and determinant of platelet function. The aim of the present study was to search for any probable difference in the MPV of subjects with panic disorder (PD). Methods A total of 37 drug-free subjects, aged 18 to 65 years, diagnosed with PD, with or without agoraphobia, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria and 45 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Platelet count and MPV were measured and recorded for each subject. Results There were no statistically significant differences between groups in terms of female/male ratio, age, or body mass index between the PD group and control group (P=0.91, P=0.82, and P=0.93, respectively). The MPV was found to be significantly lower in the PD group compared with the control group (8.8±0.9 fL vs 9.2±0.8 fL; P=0.02). All the participants had MPV values in the standard range of 6.9–10.8 fL. Conclusion We concluded that abnormalities of the 5-HT1A receptor function in the central nervous system of subjects with a diagnosis of PD are also mirrored in as an alteration in platelet activity. Measurements of platelet activity may be used as a tool for neuropsychiatric and psychopharmacological research and for studying how certain mental diseases and medications affect the central nervous system. PMID:25214790

  8. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  9. Platelet activity in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunqiu; Li, Yongyu; Yu, Zhen; Liu, Zhanju; Shi, Yanhong; Lewandowska, Urszula; Sobczak, Marta; Fichna, Jakub; Kreis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in immune responses. Impaired platelet activation may cause persistent mucosal inflammation through P-selectin, CD40-CD40L and other systems influencing granulocytes, macrophages or endothelial cells. Pharmacological regulation of platelet activation may reduce thromboembolism and limit the interaction of platelets with endothelial and inflammatory cells, in turn weakening the inflammatory responses. In this review we focus on pathophysiological activities of platelets in inflammatory bowel diseases and discuss the studies on currently available anti-platelet therapies in the treatment of gastrointestinal inflammation. Finally, we provide a prospective view to new anti-platelet agents currently under development. PMID:25585124

  10. Imipramine binding in subpopulations of normal human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, R.C.; Meltzer, H.Y.

    1984-02-01

    Imipramine binding was studied in platelet membranes isolated with different proportions of heavy (young) and light (old) platelets. The B/sub max/, a measure of the number of binding sites, was greater in the heavier platelets than in the light platelets. However, the dissociation constant K/sub d/ (a reflection of the affinity of imipramine binding) was greater in the lighter platelets compared to the heavy platelets. These results indicate that differences in K/sub d/ and B/sub max/ in particular membrane preparation, could be due to the differences in the relative proportion of heavy and light platelets.

  11. Platelet-cytokine Complex Suppresses Tumour Growth by Exploiting Intratumoural Thrombin-dependent Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Tung; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Tumours constitute unique microenvironments where various blood cells and factors are exposed as a result of leaky vasculature. In the present study, we report that thrombin enrichment in B16F10 melanoma led to platelet aggregation, and this property was exploited to administer an anticancer cytokine, interferon-gamma induced protein 10 (IP10), through the formation of a platelet-IP10 complex. When intravenously infused, the complex reached platelet microaggregates in the tumour. The responses induced by the complex were solely immune-mediated, and tumour cytotoxicity was not observed. The complex suppressed the growth of mouse melanoma in vivo, while both platelets and the complex suppressed the accumulation of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the tumour. These results demonstrated that thrombin-dependent platelet aggregation in B16F10 tumours defines platelets as a vector to deliver anticancer cytokines and provide specific treatment benefits. PMID:27117228

  12. Secrets of platelet exocytosis – what do we really know about platelet secretion mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    Golebiewska, Ewelina M; Poole, Alastair W

    2014-01-01

    Upon activation by extracellular matrix components or soluble agonists, platelets release in excess of 300 active molecules from intracellular granules. Those factors can both activate further platelets and mediate a range of responses in other cells. The complex microenvironment of a growing thrombus, as well as platelets' roles in both physiological and pathological processes, require platelet secretion to be highly spatially and temporally regulated to ensure appropriate responses to a range of stimuli. However, how this regulation is achieved remains incompletely understood. In this review we outline the importance of regulated secretion in thrombosis as well as in ‘novel’ scenarios beyond haemostasis and give a detailed summary of what is known about the molecular mechanisms of platelet exocytosis. We also discuss a number of theories of how different cargoes could be released in a tightly orchestrated manner, allowing complex interactions between platelets and their environment. PMID:24588354

  13. Platelets: the few, the young, and the active.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Carol; Briggs, Carol; Machin, Samuel J

    2015-03-01

    Many modern automated cell counters in high-volume clinical hematology laboratories use new, improved technologies for routine platelet analysis. The latest progress includes the use of state-of-the art information technology, specific fluorescent dyes, and monoclonal antibodies to obtain more reliable platelet counts. This information allows the accurate and precise enumeration of platelets even in thrombocytopenic patients and the reporting of novel platelet parameters. In the near future, digital image analysis may permit even better platelet analysis. PMID:25676376

  14. Evaluation of platelet thromboxane radioimmunoassay method to measure platelet life-span: Comparison with /sup 111/indium-platelet method

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhajosula, S.; Machac, J.; Badimon, L.; Lipszyc, H.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Fuster, V.

    1985-05-01

    The platelet activation during radiolabeling in vitro with Cr-51 and In-111 may affect the platelet life-span (PLS) in vivo. A new RIA method to measure PLS is being evaluated. Aspirin inhibits platelet thromboxane (TxA/sub 2/) by acetylating cyclooxygenase. The time required for the TxA/sub 2/ levels to return towards control values depends on the rate of new platelets entering circulation and is a measure of PLS. A single dose of aspirin (150mg) was given to 5 normal human subjects. Blood samples were collected for 2 days before aspirin and daily for 10 days. TxA/sub 2/ production in response to endogenous thrombin was studied by allowing 1 ml blood sample to clot at 37/sup 0/C for 90 min. Serum TxB/sub 2/ (stable breakdown product of Tx-A/sub 2/) levels determined by RIA technique. The plot of TxB/sub 2/ levels (% control) against time showed a gradual increase. The PLS calculated by linear regression analysis assuming a 2-day lag period before cyclooxygenase recovery is 9.7 +- 2.37. In the same 5 subjects, platelets from a 50ml blood sample were labeled with /sup 111/In-tropolone in 2 ml autologous plasma. Starting at 1 hr after injection of labeled platelets, 10 blood samples were obtained over a 8 day period. The PLS calculated based on a linear regression analysis is 10.2 +. 1.4. The PLS measured from the rate of platelet disappearance from circulation and the rate of platelet regeneration into circulation are quite comparable in normal subjects. TxA/sub 2/ regeneration RIA may provide a method to measure PLS without administering radioactivity to patient.

  15. Organization of the gene for platelet glycoprotein IIb

    SciTech Connect

    Heidenreich, R. ); Eisman, R.; Surrey, S.; Delgrosso, K.; Schwartz, E.; Poncz, M. Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia ); Bennett, J.S. Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia )

    1990-02-06

    The glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa heterodimer functions as a receptor for fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and fibronectin on activated platelets; it is dysfunctional in the bleeding diathesis Glanzmann's thrombasthenia. This receptor is a member of the integrin family, which includes homologous membrane receptors involved in a number of different cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions. Knowledge of the sequence and organization of the GPIIb and GPIIIa genes will help in understanding evolutionary relationships and functional homologies of this family of adhesion protein receptors and will facilitate analysis of molecular defects responsible for thrombasthenia. Using the GPIIb cDNA as a probe, the authors have isolated overlapping genomic clones encompassing the entire coding region, the 5{prime}- and 3{prime}-untranslated sequences, and the immediate flanking regions for the GPIIb gene. The gene spans approximately 17.2 kilobases (kb); all but approximately 2.6 kb of intronic DNA sequence has been determined. The GPIIb gene contains 30 exons whose demarcations do not correlate with previously suggested functional domains. Two intron/exon borders have the rare GC splice donor sequence instead of the consensus GT sequence. There are at least seven complete and three partial AluI sequence repeats within the intron sequences. The immediate 5{prime}-flanking sequence of rodent GPIIb demonstrates complete identity near the proposed cap site with its human counterpart, but again, no TATA or CAAT boxes are apparent.

  16. Adherence properties of Staphylococcus aureus under static and flow conditions: roles of agr and sar loci, platelets, and plasma ligands.

    PubMed

    Shenkman, B; Rubinstein, E; Cheung, A L; Brill, G E; Dardik, R; Tamarin, I; Savion, N; Varon, D

    2001-07-01

    Global regulatory genes in Staphylococcus aureus, including agr and sar, are known to regulate the expression of multiple virulence factors, including cell wall adhesins. In the present study, the adherence of S. aureus RN6390 (wild type), RN6911 (agr), ALC136 (sar), and ALC135 (agr sar) to immobilized fibrinogen, fibronectin, von Willebrand factor (vWF), extracellular matrix (ECM), and human endothelial cells (EC) EAhy.926 was studied. Bacteria grown to postexponential phase were subjected to light oscillation (static condition) or to shear stress at 200 s(-1) (flow condition) on tissue culture polystyrene plates coated with either protein ligands, ECM, or EC. Adherence of nonlabeled bacteria to immobilized ligands was measured by an image analysis system, while adherence of [(3)H]thymidine-labeled S. aureus to ECM and EC was measured by a beta-scintillation counter. The results showed increased adherence of agr and agr sar mutants to immobilized fibrinogen and higher potential of these mutants to induce platelet aggregation in suspension, decreased adherence of sar and agr sar mutants to immobilized fibronectin and vWF as well as to ECM and EC, increased adherence of both S. aureus wild type and sar mutant to EC treated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) compared to platelet-poor plasma (PPP) and to EC treated with PPP compared to the control, and increased adherence of S. aureus wild type to EC coated with PRP in which platelets were activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate compared to intact PRP. This finding paralleled the increased adherence to EC of activated compared to intact platelets. It is suggested that platelet-mediated S. aureus adherence to EC depends on platelet activation and the number of adherent platelets and available receptors on the platelet membrane. In conclusion, the agr locus downregulates S. aureus adherence to fibrinogen, while the sar locus upregulates S. aureus adherence to fibronectin, vWF, ECM, and EC. The effect of both agr and

  17. Adherence Properties of Staphylococcus aureus under Static and Flow Conditions: Roles of agr and sar Loci, Platelets, and Plasma Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Shenkman, Boris; Rubinstein, Ethan; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Brill, Grigory E.; Dardik, Rima; Tamarin, Ilya; Savion, Naphtali; Varon, David

    2001-01-01

    Global regulatory genes in Staphylococcus aureus, including agr and sar, are known to regulate the expression of multiple virulence factors, including cell wall adhesins. In the present study, the adherence of S. aureus RN6390 (wild type), RN6911 (agr), ALC136 (sar), and ALC135 (agr sar) to immobilized fibrinogen, fibronectin, von Willebrand factor (vWF), extracellular matrix (ECM), and human endothelial cells (EC) EAhy.926 was studied. Bacteria grown to postexponential phase were subjected to light oscillation (static condition) or to shear stress at 200 s−1 (flow condition) on tissue culture polystyrene plates coated with either protein ligands, ECM, or EC. Adherence of nonlabeled bacteria to immobilized ligands was measured by an image analysis system, while adherence of [3H]thymidine-labeled S. aureus to ECM and EC was measured by a β-scintillation counter. The results showed increased adherence of agr and agr sar mutants to immobilized fibrinogen and higher potential of these mutants to induce platelet aggregation in suspension, decreased adherence of sar and agr sar mutants to immobilized fibronectin and vWF as well as to ECM and EC, increased adherence of both S. aureus wild type and sar mutant to EC treated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) compared to platelet-poor plasma (PPP) and to EC treated with PPP compared to the control, and increased adherence of S. aureus wild type to EC coated with PRP in which platelets were activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate compared to intact PRP. This finding paralleled the increased adherence to EC of activated compared to intact platelets. It is suggested that platelet-mediated S. aureus adherence to EC depends on platelet activation and the number of adherent platelets and available receptors on the platelet membrane. In conclusion, the agr locus downregulates S. aureus adherence to fibrinogen, while the sar locus upregulates S. aureus adherence to fibronectin, vWF, ECM, and EC. The effect of both agr and sar

  18. Regulation of platelet biology by platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris I; Moraes, Leonardo A; Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif containing receptor, plays diverse and apparently contradictory roles in regulating the response of platelets to stimuli; inhibiting platelet response to immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif and G protein-coupled receptor signalling following stimulation with collagen, adenosine diphosphate, and thrombin, as well as enhancing integrin outside-in signalling. These dual, and opposing, roles suggest an important and complex role for PECAM-1 in orchestrating platelet response to vascular damage. Indeed, during thrombus formation, the influence of PECAM-1 on the multiple signalling pathways combines leading to a relatively large inhibitory effect on thrombus formation. PMID:22035359

  19. Anticoagulation inhibits tumor cell-mediated release of platelet angiogenic proteins and diminishes platelet angiogenic response.

    PubMed

    Battinelli, Elisabeth M; Markens, Beth A; Kulenthirarajan, Rajesh A; Machlus, Kellie R; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Italiano, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are a reservoir for angiogenic proteins that are secreted in a differentially regulated process. Because of the propensity for clotting, patients with malignancy are often anticoagulated with heparin products, which paradoxically offer a survival benefit by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that antithrombotic agents alter the release of angiogenesis regulatory proteins from platelets. Our data revealed that platelets exposed to heparins released significantly decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to adenosine 5'-diphosphate or tumor cells (MCF-7 cells) and exhibited a decreased angiogenic potential. The releasate from these platelets contained decreased proangiogenic proteins. The novel anticoagulant fondaparinux (Xa inhibitor) demonstrated a similar impact on the platelet angiogenic potential. Because these anticoagulants decrease thrombin generation, we hypothesized that they disrupt signaling through the platelet protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) receptor. Addition of PAR1 antagonists to platelets decreased VEGF release and angiogenic potential. Exposure to a PAR1 agonist in the presence of anticoagulants rescued the angiogenic potential. In vivo studies demonstrated that platelets from anticoagulated patients had decreased VEGF release and angiogenic potential. Our data suggest that the mechanism by which antithrombotic agents increase survival and decrease metastasis in cancer patients is through attenuation of platelet angiogenic potential. PMID:24065244

  20. Understanding platelet generation from megakaryocytes: implications for in vitro–derived platelets

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Xiuli; Poncz, Mortimer; Gadue, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate cytoplasmic discs derived from megakaryocytes that circulate in the blood and have major roles in hemostasis, thrombosis, inflammation, and vascular biology. Platelet transfusions are required to prevent the potentially life-threatening complications of severe thrombocytopenia seen in a variety of medical settings including cancer therapy, trauma, and sepsis. Platelets used in the clinic are currently donor-derived which is associated with concerns over sufficient availability, quality, and complications due to immunologic and/or infectious issues. To overcome our dependence on donor-derived platelets for transfusion, efforts have been made to generate in vitro–based platelets. Work in this area has advanced our understanding of the complex processes that megakaryocytes must undergo to generate platelets both in vivo and in vitro. This knowledge has also defined the challenges that must be overcome to bring in vitro–based platelet manufacturing to a clinical reality. This review will focus on our understanding of committed megakaryocytes and platelet release in vivo and in vitro, and how this knowledge can guide the development of in vitro–derived platelets for clinical application. PMID:26787738

  1. Aspirin inhibition of platelet deposition at angioplasty sites: demonstration by platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Cuningham, D.A.; Kumar, B.; Siegel, B.A.; Gilula, L.A.; Totty, W.G.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-05-01

    In-111 platelet scintigraphy was used to evaluate the effects of prior aspirin administration on the accumulation of In-111-labeled autologous platelets at sites of arterial injury resulting from iliac, femoral, or popliteal transluminal angioplasty in a nonrandomized study of 17 men. The degree of platelet localization at angioplasty sites was significantly less in nine men who had received aspirin in varying doses within the 4 days before angioplasty than in eight men who had not received aspirin for at least two weeks. The results suggest that aspirin treatment before angioplasty limits the early platelet deposition at the angioplasty site in men.

  2. Structure-activity relationships of alphaIIb 313-320 derived peptide inhibitors of human platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Stanica, Ruxandra Maria; Benaki, Dimitra; Rodis, Foteini I; Mikros, Emmanuel; Tsoukatos, Dimokritos; Tselepis, Alexandros; Tsikaris, Vasilios

    2008-11-01

    The alphaIIbbeta3 receptor, which is the most abundant receptor on the surface of platelets, can interact with a variety of adhesive proteins including fibrinogen, fibronectin and the von Willebrand factor. Fibrinogen binding on alphaIIbbeta3 is an event essential for platelet aggregation and thrombus formation. Mapping of the fibrinogen-binding domains on alphaIIb subunit suggested the sequence 313-332 as a possible binding site. This region was restricted to sequence alphaIIb 313-320 (Y313MESRADR320) using synthetic octapeptides overlapping by six residues. The YMESRADR octapeptide inhibits ADP-stimulated human platelets aggregation and binds to immobilized fibrinogen. In this study, we used the Ala scanning methodology within the sequence 313-320 aiming to evaluate the contribution of each amino acid in inhibiting platelet aggregation. It was found that the substitution of Y313, M314, E315 or S316 by A does not affect the activity of the parent octapeptide. The-RADR-motif seems to be the most essential for the biological activity of the alphaIIb 313-320 site. The conformational analysis of the YAESRADR, YMESAADR and YMESRAAR analogs by using NMR spectroscopy and distance geometry calculations revealed significant differences in their conformational states in DMSO-d6. PMID:18646252

  3. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches. PMID:24629305

  4. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  5. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  6. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  7. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  8. Mapuche Herbal Medicine Inhibits Blood Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup; Tarnow, Inge; Guzman, Alfonso; Mølgaard, Per; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2012-01-01

    12 plant species traditionally used by the Mapuche people in Chile to treat wounds and inflammations have been evaluated for their direct blood platelet inhibition. Seven of the 12 tested plant species showed platelet inhibitory effect in sheep blood, and four of these were also able to inhibit the ADP- (5.0 μM) and collagen- (2.0 μg/mL) induced aggregations in human blood. These four species in respective extracts (in brackets) were Blechnum chilense (MeOH), Luma apiculata (H2O), Amomyrtus luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1) and Cestrum parqui (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1). The platelet aggregating inhibitory effects of A. luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1), and L. apiculata (H2O) were substantial and confirmed by inhibition of platelet surface activation markers. PMID:22028732

  9. DISSOLUTION AND CRYSTALLIZATION OF CALCIUM SULFITE PLATELETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the dissolution and crystallization of calcium sulfite platelets. The rates of calcium sulfite dissolution and crystallization are important in slurry scrubbing processes for flue gas desulfurization. The rates affect the scrubber solution composition, SO2 abs...

  10. Acid soluble, pepsin resistant platelet aggregating material

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.D.

    1982-08-31

    Disclosed is an acid soluble, pepsin resistant, platelet aggregating material isolated from equine arterial tissue by extraction with dilute aqueous acid. The method of isolation and use to control bleeding are described. 4 figs.

  11. Platelet transfusion therapy: from 1973 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Brand, Anneke; Novotny, Vera; Tomson, Bert

    2006-06-01

    Platelet transfusions are indispensable for supportive care of patients with hematological diseases. We describe the developments in platelet products for transfusion since the 1970s, when, in particular, support for patients with allo-antibodies against human leukocyte antigens was a laborious exercise with a high failure rate. Currently, due to many stepwise innovations, platelet transfusions are of low immunogenicity and sufficiently available, they have a shelf life up to 7 days, and even matched platelets can often be routinely delivered, provided that there is good communication between all partners in the chain. Future improvements can be expected from uniform type and screen approaches for immunized patients and cross-matching by computer. For efficient use of health care resources, blood banks and stem cell donor banks could share their typed donor files. PMID:16728262

  12. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  13. Platelet cytoskeleton and its hemostatic role.

    PubMed

    Cerecedo, Doris

    2013-12-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets adhere to the exposed extracellular matrix, which triggers the platelet activation and aggregation to form a hemostatic plug to seal the wound. All of these events involve dramatic changes in shape because of the cytoskeleton reorganization. The versatility of the cytoskeleton's main elements depends on the biochemical nature of the elements, as well as on the associated proteins that confer multiple functions within the cell. The list of these associated proteins grows actively, increasing our knowledge concerning the complexity of platelet cytoskeleton machinery. The present review evidences the recently described platelet proteins that promote characteristic modifications in their cytoskeleton organization, with special focus on the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. PMID:24030121

  14. Mapuche herbal medicine inhibits blood platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup; Tarnow, Inge; Guzman, Alfonso; Mølgaard, Per; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2012-01-01

    12 plant species traditionally used by the Mapuche people in Chile to treat wounds and inflammations have been evaluated for their direct blood platelet inhibition. Seven of the 12 tested plant species showed platelet inhibitory effect in sheep blood, and four of these were also able to inhibit the ADP- (5.0 μM) and collagen- (2.0 μg/mL) induced aggregations in human blood. These four species in respective extracts (in brackets) were Blechnum chilense (MeOH), Luma apiculata (H(2)O), Amomyrtus luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1) and Cestrum parqui (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1). The platelet aggregating inhibitory effects of A. luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1), and L. apiculata (H(2)O) were substantial and confirmed by inhibition of platelet surface activation markers. PMID:22028732

  15. Decoration of vertical graphene with aerosol nanoparticles for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shumao; Guo, Xiaoru; Ren, Ren; Zhou, Guihua; Chen, Junhong

    2015-08-01

    A facile method was demonstrated to decorate aerosol Ag nanoparticles onto vertical graphene surfaces using a mini-arc plasma reactor. The vertical graphene was directly grown on a sensor electrode using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The aerosol Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple vapor condensation process using a mini-arc plasma source. Then, the nanoparticles were assembled on the surface of vertical graphene through the assistance of an electric field. Based on our observation, nonagglomerated Ag nanoparticles formed in the gas phase and were assembled onto vertical graphene sheets. Nanohybrids of Ag nanoparticle-decorated vertical graphene were characterized for ammonia gas detection at room temperature. The vertical graphene served as the conductance channel, and the conductance change upon exposure to ammonia was used as the sensing signal. The sensing results show that Ag nanoparticles significantly improve the sensitivity, response time, and recovery time of the sensor.

  16. Statistics of Gaussian packets on metric and decorated graphs

    PubMed Central

    Chernyshev, V. L.; Shafarevich, A. I.

    2014-01-01

    We study a semiclassical asymptotics of the Cauchy problem for a time-dependent Schrödinger equation on metric and decorated graphs with a localized initial function. A decorated graph is a topological space obtained from a graph via replacing vertices with smooth Riemannian manifolds. The main term of an asymptotic solution at an arbitrary finite time is a sum of Gaussian packets and generalized Gaussian packets (localized near a certain set of codimension one). We study the number of packets as time tends to infinity. We prove that under certain assumptions this number grows in time as a polynomial and packets fill the graph uniformly. We discuss a simple example of the opposite situation: in this case, a numerical experiment shows a subexponential growth. PMID:24344346

  17. Electronic transport properties of Ir-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yilin; Xiao, Shudong; Cai, Xinghan; Bao, Wenzhong; Reutt-Robey, Janice; Fuhrer, Michael S.

    2015-10-01

    Graphene decorated with 5d transitional metal atoms is predicted to exhibit many intriguing properties; for example iridium adatoms are proposed to induce a substantial topological gap in graphene. We extensively investigated the conductivity of single-layer graphene decorated with iridium deposited in ultra-high vacuum at low temperature (7 K) as a function of Ir concentration, carrier density, temperature, and annealing conditions. Our results are consistent with the formation of Ir clusters of ~100 atoms at low temperature, with each cluster donating a single electronic charge to graphene. Annealing graphene increases the cluster size, reducing the doping and increasing the mobility. We do not observe any sign of an energy gap induced by spin-orbit coupling, possibly due to the clustering of Ir.

  18. Electronic transport properties of Ir-decorated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yilin; Xiao, Shudong; Cai, Xinghan; Bao, Wenzhong; Reutt-Robey, Janice; Fuhrer, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene decorated with 5d transitional metal atoms is predicted to exhibit many intriguing properties; for example iridium adatoms are proposed to induce a substantial topological gap in graphene. We extensively investigated the conductivity of single-layer graphene decorated with iridium deposited in ultra-high vacuum at low temperature (7 K) as a function of Ir concentration, carrier density, temperature, and annealing conditions. Our results are consistent with the formation of Ir clusters of ~100 atoms at low temperature, with each cluster donating a single electronic charge to graphene. Annealing graphene increases the cluster size, reducing the doping and increasing the mobility. We do not observe any sign of an energy gap induced by spin-orbit coupling, possibly due to the clustering of Ir. PMID:26508279

  19. Assessment and treatment of pica and destruction of holiday decorations.

    PubMed

    Mitteer, Daniel R; Romani, Patrick W; Greer, Brian D; Fisher, Wayne W

    2015-12-01

    Problem behavior exhibited by individuals with autism can be disruptive to family traditions, such as decorating for the holidays. We present data for a 6-year-old girl who engaged in automatically reinforced pica and destruction of holiday decorations. Treatment was evaluated within an ABCDCD reversal design. During baseline (Phases A and B), we observed elevated rates of problem behavior. We implemented differential reinforcement of alternative behavior in Phase C to teach a response to compete with problem behavior. Little change in toy play or problem behavior occurred. In Phase D, we added a facial screen to the differential reinforcement procedures, which resulted in increases in toy play and decreases in problem behavior. Findings are discussed in terms of how interventions for problem behavior can promote alternative behavior while they facilitate household activities and traditions. PMID:26380947

  20. [Teeth decoration back after a long and forgotten history].

    PubMed

    Dijs, F

    2004-09-01

    After the last ice-age modern man started to remove, file, dye and inlay teeth. The teeth had such a central role in the imagination that the habit of more or less ritual decoration by incurable manipulation of the teeth spread all over the world. The most skillful and artistic work was done by craftsmen of the Maya. Between 1500 and 1900 modern researchers classified the habits as primitive and barbarian but during the twentieth century some of them took the question seriously. In the last decennium tooth jewelery is sold more and more often. In two articles the history of teeth decoration is outlined. In this article the significance of the manipulations is emphasized. The second will focus on the changing appreciation of the phenomenon. PMID:15495505

  1. [Tooth decoration back after a long and forgotten history 2].

    PubMed

    Dijs, F

    2004-11-01

    After the last ice-age modern man started to remove, file, dye and inlay teeth. The teeth had such a central role in the imagination that the habit of more or less ritual decoration by incurable manipulation of the teeth spread all over the world. The most skillful and artistic work was done by craftsmen of the Maya. Between 1500 and 1900 CE modern researchers classified the habits as primitive and barbarian but during the twentieth century some of them took the question serious. In the last decennium tooth jewellery is sold more and more often. In two articles the history of teeth decoration is outlined. In the first article the significance of the manipulations was emphasized. This second article will focus on the changing appreciation of the phenomenon. PMID:15626135

  2. von Willebrand disease type 2A phenotypes IIC, IID and IIE: A day in the life of shear-stressed mutant von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Brehm, M A; Huck, V; Aponte-Santamaría, C; Obser, T; Grässle, S; Oyen, F; Budde, U; Schneppenheim, S; Baldauf, C; Gräter, F; Schneider, S W; Schneppenheim, R

    2014-07-01

    The bleeding disorder von Willebrand disease (VWD) is caused by mutations of von Willebrand factor (VWF), a multimeric glycoprotein essential for platelet-dependent primary haemostasis. VWD type 2A-associated mutations each disrupt VWF biosynthesis and function at different stages, depending on the VWF domain altered by the mutation. These effects cause considerable heterogeneity in phenotypes and symptoms. To characterise the molecular mechanisms underlying the specific VWF deficiencies in VWD 2A/IIC, IID and IIE, we investigated VWF variants with patient-derived mutations either in the VWF pro-peptide or in domains D3 or CK. Additionally to static assays and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we used microfluidic approaches to perform a detailed investigation of the shear-dependent function of VWD 2A mutants. For each group, we found distinct characteristics in their intracellular localisation visualising specific defects in biosynthesis which are correlated to respective multimer patterns. Using microfluidic assays we further determined shear flow-dependent characteristics in polymer-platelet-aggregate formation, platelet binding and string formation for all mutants. The phenotypes observed under flow conditions were not related to the mutated VWF domain. By MD simulations we further investigated how VWD 2A/IID mutations might alter the ability of VWF to form carboxy-terminal dimers. In conclusion, our study offers a comprehensive picture of shear-dependent and shear-independent dysfunction of VWD type 2A mutants. Furthermore, our microfluidic assay might open new possibilities for diagnosis of new VWD phenotypes and treatment choice for VWD patients with shear-dependent VWF dysfunctions that are currently not detectable by static tests. PMID:24598842

  3. Platelet concentrates: Balancing between efficacy and safety?

    PubMed

    Lozano, Miguel; Cid, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet transfusions continue to be the mainstay to treat patients with quantitative and qualitative platelet disorders. Each year, about 10 millions of platelet transfusions are administered to patients worldwide with marked differences in usage between regions depending on socioeconomic development of the countries. Unfortunately, its use is associated to immune and non-immune side effects. Among the non-immune, bacterial contamination is still the major infectious risk. When bacterial culture methods are introduced for preventing bacterial septic reactions it has been found that this strategy reduce to one half the septic reactions, but do not eliminate completely that risk. To remove completely the risk, a new bacteria detection test at the time of issuance in the case of platelets stored for four or five days would be needed. Pathogen inactivation (PI) methods already in the market (based in the addition of amotosalen (A-L) or riboflavin (R-L) and the illumination with ultraviolet light) or under development (ultraviolet light C and agitation) have shown to be efficacious in the inactivation of bacteria and no cases of septic reactions associated to a pathogen-reduced product has been identified. However, it has been shown that PI technologies have measurable effects on platelet in vitro parameters and reduce the recovery and survival of treated platelets in vivo. Although these effects do not hamper the hemostatic capacity of treated platelets, an increased usage associated with PI technologies has been reported. This increase in utilization seems to be the toll to be paid if we want to completely eliminate the risk of bacterial sepsis in the recipients of platelet transfusion. PMID:27476010

  4. Stimulus-response coupling in platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of stimulus-response coupling in platelets, the potentiating effect of succinate and lithium on platelet activation was examined. The action of succinate was immediate; preincubation with succinate did not lead to desensitization. Succinate was comparable to ADP in lowering cAMP levels previously elevated by PGl/sub 2/. Since inhibition of cAMP is not a prerequisite for platelet activation, the mechanism of potentiation of succinate remains undefined. Lithium has also been shown to inhibit adenylate cyclase in PGl/sub 2/-pretreated platelets. Lithium, however, can also inhibit inositol phosphate (InsP) phosphatase and lead to an accumulation of InsP. In human platelets, lithium also enhanced the thrombin-induced accumulation of (/sup 3/H)inositol-labelled inositol trisphosphate (InsP/sub 3/), and inositol bisphosphate (InsP/sub 2/). One hour after thrombin addition, all 3 inositol phosphates returned to near basal levels. In the presence of lithium, while labelled InsP/sub 2/ and InsP/sub 3/ returned to their respective basal levels, the InsP level remained elevated, consistent with the known inhibitory effect of lithium on InsP phosphatase. In thrombin-stimulated platelets prelabeled with (/sup 32/P)phosphate, lithium led to a decrease in labelled phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) as well as an enhanced production of labelled lysophosphatidylinositol, suggesting multiple effects of lithium on platelet phosphoinositide metabolism. These observed effects, however, occurred too slowly to be the mechanism by which lithium potentiated agonist-induced platelet activation. To study the agonist-receptor interaction, the effect of the specific, high affinity thrombin inhibitor, hirudin, on thrombin-induced accumulation of (/sup 3/H)inositol-labelled inositol phosphates was studied.

  5. Quantum Hall effect in graphene decorated with disordered multilayer patches

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Youngwoo; Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg ; Sun, Jie Lindvall, Niclas; Kireev, Dmitry; Yurgens, August; Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong; Woo Park, Yung

    2013-12-02

    Quantum Hall effect (QHE) is observed in graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition using platinum catalyst. The QHE is even seen in samples which are irregularly decorated with disordered multilayer graphene patches and have very low mobility (<500 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}). The effect does not seem to depend on electronic mobility and uniformity of the resulting material, which indicates the robustness of QHE in graphene.

  6. Comprehensive evaluation of haemostatic function in von Willebrand disease patients using a microchip-based flow chamber system.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, K; Nogami, K; Hosokawa, K; Ohnishi, T; Matsumoto, T; Shima, M

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of von Willebrand disease (VWD) is difficult due to the wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with this disorder. We have analysed and characterized haemostatic function in VWD patients using a microchip-based flow chamber system. Microchips coated with either collagen [platelet (PL)-chip] or collagen/thromboplastin [atherome (AR)-chip] were used to evaluate platelet thrombus formation at 1000 s(-1) and fibrin-rich platelet thrombus formation at 240 s(-1) respectively. Blood samples from an asymptomatic patient with VWD type 1 [von Willebrand factor (VWF): RCo 3.2%; bleeding score (BS 2] displayed normal thrombus formation in both PL- and AR-chips, whereas blood from a symptomatic type 1 patient (VWF: RCo 14%, BS 9) had significantly delayed capillary occlusion. Nearly complete suppression of the flow pressure increase was observed in symptomatic patients with VWD type 2A (BS 13) and 2N (BS 27), whereas no flow pressure was found for the type 3 patient (BS 6). Fibrin-rich platelet thrombus formation was only weakly increased by the in vitro addition of factor VIII (FVIII) to blood samples from the type 3 patient, but was normalized by the addition of VWF/FVIII. The in vivo effects of treatment with desmopressin or VWF/FVIII for the symptomatic patients were analysed using two types of microchips. The PL-chip was highly sensitive for patients' VWF-mediated platelet functions, whereas the AR-chip allowed assessment of overall haemostatic ability, including sensitivity to both VWF and FVIII. The combined analysis with PL- and AR-chips may be potentially useful for the diagnosis of VWD based on clinical phenotypes, and for monitoring drug effects. PMID:25545301

  7. Alteration of circulatory platelet microparticles and endothelial microparticles in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guo-Yuan; Xu, Rui-Jun; Zhang, Shu-Hua; Qiao, Qing; Shen, Lei; Li, Ming; Xu, De-Yu; Wang, Zhao-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare plasma platelet microparticles (PMPs), P-selectin, endothelial microparticles (EMPs), and von Willebrand factor (vWF) between a normal control group and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to explore the significance of PMPs and EMPs in CKD. Methods: Levels of plasma PMPs, P-selectin, EMPs and vWF in 122 CKD patients and 20 normal controls were detected by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Relationships between PMPs, EMPs and blood pressure, creatinine clearance rate, 24-hour urine protein, hemoglobin, and cholesterol were analyzed. Results: (1) Plasma PMPs, P-selectin, EMPs and vWF levels in CKD patients were significantly higher than those of the control group. Plasma PMPs and P-selectin levels for nephrotic syndrome (NS) were significantly higher than for other CKD groups. No significant difference was found between other CKD groups. Plasma EMPs and vWF in NS, lupus nephritis (LN) and hypertensive nephropathy groups were significantly higher than that of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) groups. (2) Plasma PMPs, P-selectin, EMPs and vWF in stage I-II CKD patients were significantly higher than those of stage III-V CKD patients, no significant difference was found within stage I-II CKD patients or stage III-V CKD patients. (3) PMPs and EMPs were positively correlated with blood pressure and 24-hour urinary protein, but no significant correlation was found with the creatinine clearance rate, hemoglobin or cholesterol. P-selectin and vWF were positively correlated with PMPs and EMPs respectively. Conclusion: CKD patients have significant platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction, which was involved in CKD’s occurrence and development; high blood pressure and proteinuria are important reasons for platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction in patients with CKD; PMPs and EMPs can be used as new markers for dysfunctional platelet activation and endothelium. PMID

  8. Evaluation of the PFA-100 system in the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of patients with von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, M; Federici, A B; Lecchi, A; Agati, B; Lombardi, R; Stabile, F; Bucciarelli, P

    1999-07-01

    We have evaluated platelet function at high shear with the PFA-100 system in different subtypes of von Willebrand disease (vWD), before and after the intravenous infusions of desmopressin or a factor-VIII/von Willebrand factor (vWF) concentrate. Closure times with the PFA-100 system were determined for both the collagen/ADP and the collagen/epinephrine cartridges in 52 patients with vWD (9 type 1 "platelet normal", 5 type 1 "platelet-discordant", 8 type 1 "platelet-low", 6 type 2A, 9 type 2B, 6 type 2M Vicenza. 6 type 3 and 3 acquired vWD) and 40 controls. Measurements were repeated 1 and 4 h after the i.v. infusion of desmopressin (0.3 microg/Kg) in 26 patients with types 1, type 2M Vicenza or type 2A vWD, or of a factorVIII/vWF concentrate (Alphanate HT, 60 U/Kg) in 4 patients with type 3 vWD. At all time points, vWF plasma levels and the bleeding time (Symplate II) were also determined. Baseline closure times were longer in vWD patients than in controls with both the collagen/ADP and the collagen/ epinephrine cartridges. The sensitivity of the PFA-100 system (88% and 87% with the two cartridges) was higher than that of the bleeding time (65%). Treatment with desmopressin normalized the closure times in patients with type 1 "platelet-normal" or type 2M Vicenza vWD, had no significant effects in patients with type 1 "platelet-low", type 1 "platelet-discordant" or type 2A vWD. Infusion of a factorVIII/vWF concentrate in patients with type 3 vWD slightly shortened their prolonged closure times. In general, changes in PFA-100 were paralleled by shortenings of the bleeding times and increases in plasma vWF levels. The PFA-100 test reflects vWF-dependent platelet function under high shear stress and could be useful in the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of patients with vWD. PMID:10456451

  9. Nanodiamond-Decorated Silica Spheres as a Chromatographic Material.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zuqin; Vinci, John C; Colón, Luis A

    2016-02-17

    Nanodiamond (ND) particles (∼5 nm), obtained from detonation soot, were oxidized and/or thermally hydrogenated. Both, the non-hydrogenated and hydrogenated ND particles were successfully coupled to the surface of micrometer-size organo-silica particles. A thin layer of nanodiamonds (NDs) decorating the surface of the organo-silica particles was visible on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) were used to characterize the NDs prior to coupling and to confirm attachment onto the organo-silica particles. Both, ultraviolet (UV) radiation and a chemical initiator were proved to be effective radical initiators for the ND-silica coupling reaction, although for scale-up purposes the chemical initiation was more advantageous to produce the ND-silica composite. Commercially available nanodiamond primary particles were also coupled to the surface of silica particles. The ND-containing silica particles were packed into chromatographic columns to study their initial feasibility as adsorbent material for liquid chromatography. The organo-silica particles decorated with hydrogenated NDs were shown to possess reversed phase type (i.e., hydrophobic) behavior toward the probe compounds, whereas silica particles decorated with the non-hydrogenated NDs showed polar (i.e., hydrophilic) interactions, both under liquid chromatographic conditions. PMID:26790050

  10. Dirac cones in the spectrum of bond-decorated graphenes

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Heuvel, Willem Soncini, Alessandro

    2014-06-21

    We present a two-band model based on periodic Hückel theory, which is capable of predicting the existence and position of Dirac cones in the first Brillouin zone of an infinite class of two-dimensional periodic carbon networks, obtained by systematic perturbation of the graphene connectivity by bond decoration, that is by inclusion of arbitrary π-electron Hückel networks into each of the three carbon–carbon π-bonds within the graphene unit cell. The bond decoration process can fundamentally modify the graphene unit cell and honeycomb connectivity, representing a simple and general way to describe many cases of graphene chemical functionalization of experimental interest, such as graphyne, janusgraphenes, and chlorographenes. Exact mathematical conditions for the presence of Dirac cones in the spectrum of the resulting two-dimensional π-networks are formulated in terms of the spectral properties of the decorating graphs. Our method predicts the existence of Dirac cones in experimentally characterized janusgraphenes and chlorographenes, recently speculated on the basis of density functional theory calculations. For these cases, our approach provides a proof of the existence of Dirac cones, and can be carried out at the cost of a back of the envelope calculation, bypassing any diagonalization step, even within Hückel theory.

  11. The genetics of normal platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Kunicki, Thomas J; Nugent, Diane J

    2010-10-14

    Genetic and environmental factors contribute to a substantial variation in platelet function seen among normal persons. Candidate gene association studies represent a valiant effort to define the genetic component in an era where genetic tools were limited, but the single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in those studies need to be validated by more objective, comprehensive approaches, such as genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of quantitative functional traits in much larger cohorts of more carefully selected normal subjects. During the past year, platelet count and mean platelet volume, which indirectly affect platelet function, were the subjects of GWAS. The majority of the GWAS signals were located to noncoding regions, a consistent outcome of all GWAS to date, suggesting a major role for mechanisms that alter phenotype at the level of transcription or posttranscriptional modifications. Of 15 quantitative trait loci associated with mean platelet volume and platelet count, one located at 12q24 is also a risk locus for coronary artery disease. In most cases, the effect sizes of individual quantitative trait loci are admittedly small, but the results of these studies have led to new insight into regulators of hematopoiesis and megakaryopoiesis that would otherwise be unapparent and difficult to define. PMID:20610812

  12. Anti-platelet therapy: phosphodiesterase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gresele, Paolo; Momi, Stefania; Falcinelli, Emanuela

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of platelet aggregation can be achieved either by the blockade of membrane receptors or by interaction with intracellular signalling pathways. Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) are two critical intracellular second messengers provided with strong inhibitory activity on fundamental platelet functions. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs), by catalysing the hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP, limit the intracellular levels of cyclic nucleotides, thus regulating platelet function. The inhibition of PDEs may therefore exert a strong platelet inhibitory effect. Platelets possess three PDE isoforms (PDE2, PDE3 and PDE5), with different selectivity for cAMP and cGMP. Several nonselective or isoenzyme-selective PDE inhibitors have been developed, and some of them have entered clinical use as antiplatelet agents. This review focuses on the effect of PDE2, PDE3 and PDE5 inhibitors on platelet function and on the evidence for an antithrombotic action of some of them, and in particular of dipyridamole and cilostazol. PMID:21649691

  13. STIM and Orai in platelet function.

    PubMed

    Varga-Szabo, David; Braun, Attila; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2011-09-01

    Physiological platelet activation and thrombus formation are essential to stop bleeding in case of vascular injury, whereas inadequate triggering of the same process in diseased vessels can lead to fatal thromboembolism and tissue ischemia of vital organs. A central step in platelet activation is agonist-induced elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. This happens on the one hand through the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores and on the other hand through Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular space. In platelets, the major Ca(2+) influx pathway is the so-called store operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), induced by store depletion. Studies in the last five years discovered the molecular background of platelet SOCE. Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) and Orai1, two so far unknown molecules, got in the focus of research. STIM1 was found to be the Ca(2+) sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, whereas Orai1 was identified as the major store operated Ca(2+) (SOC) channel in the plasma membrane. These two molecules and their role in platelet function and thrombus formation are the topic of the present review with a special focus on apoptosis and apoptosis-like processes in platelet physiology. PMID:21616531

  14. Platelet dysfunction in vincristine treated patients.

    PubMed

    Steinherz, P G; Miller, D R; Hilgartner, M W; Schmalzer, E A

    1976-03-01

    Recent revival of interest in the use of vincristine (VCR) for the treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura prompted us to evaluate the platelet function of our patients on VCR. Eighteen patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in remission, and nine children with solid tumours were studied on 80 occasions at different time intervals after their last VCR dose. A mildly elevated threshold for epinephrine-induced second phase aggregation and a delay in the onset of collagen-induced aggregation was found in patients with ALL not on VCR. Vincristine induced unobtainable second phase aggregation to epinephrine in 67%, 38%, 30% and to ADP in 53%, 13%, 33% of the patients 1 week, 2-3 weeks and 4 weeks respectively after administration. The thrombocytopathy was relative, not absolute, since collagen induced aggregation at all times. Platelet counts, uptake and release of serotonin, bleeding times, clot retractions and release of platelet factor 3 were normal. Platelet adhesion was abnormal in five of 12 patients tested. In vitro platelets are a hundred-fold less sensitive to VCR than in vivo. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cyclic guanosine monophosphate and dimethylsulfoxide do not protect platelets from VCR. The exact mechanism by which VCR abolishes second phase aggregation in patients is uncertain. Because of VCR's narrow therapeutic index between thrombocytopenia and thrombocythaemia, the use of VCR should be reserved for life-threatening haematologic disorders when treating non-malignant conditions. PMID:175822

  15. Treatment of osteochondral injuries with platelet gel

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, Marcus Vinicius; da Rosa Pereira, Hamilton; de Sá Carneiro, Carlos Augusto; Felisbino, Sérgio Luiz; Deffune, Elenice

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Treatments for injured articular cartilage have not advanced to the point that efficient regeneration is possible. However, there has been an increase in the use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of several orthopedic disorders, including chondral injuries. Our hypothesis is that the treatment of chondral injuries with platelet gel results in higher-quality repair tissue after 180 days compared with chondral injuries not treated with gel. METHODS: A controlled experimental laboratory study was performed on 30 male rabbits to evaluate osteochondral injury repair after treatment with or without platelet gel. Osteochondral injuries were surgically induced in both knees of each rabbit at the medial femoral condyle. The left knee injury was filled with the platelet gel, and the right knee was not treated. Microscopic analysis of both knee samples was performed after 180 days using a histological grading scale. RESULTS: The only histological evaluation criterion that was not significantly different between treatments was metachromasia. The group that was treated with platelet gel exhibited superior results in all other criteria (cell morphology, surface regularity, chondral thickness and repair tissue integration) and in the total score. CONCLUSION: The repair tissue was histologically superior after 180 days in the study group treated with platelet gel compared with the group of untreated injuries. PMID:25518022

  16. Effects of irradiation on platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, G.; Adams, G.A.; Labow, R.S.

    1988-09-01

    Current medical practice involves the irradiation of blood components, including platelet concentrates, before their administration to patients with severe immunosuppression. The authors studied the effect of irradiation on in vitro platelet function and the leaching of plasticizers from the bag, both immediately and after 5 days of storage. The platelet count, white cell count, pH, glucose, lactate, platelet aggregation and release reaction, and serotonin uptake were not altered by the irradiation of random-donor or apheresis units with 2000 rads carried out at 0 and 24 hours and 5 days after collection. The leaching of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate from the plastic bags followed by the conversion to mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was not increased by irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to irradiate platelet concentrates on the day of collection and subsequently store them for at least 5 days while maintaining in vitro function. This procedure could have considerable benefit for blood banks involved in the provision of many platelet products.

  17. The platelet serotonin-release assay.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Arnold, Donald M; Nazi, Ishac; Kelton, John G

    2015-06-01

    Few laboratory tests are as clinically useful as The platelet serotonin-release assay (SRA): a positive SRA in the appropriate clinical context is virtually diagnostic of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), a life- and limb-threatening prothrombotic disorder caused by anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin antibodies that activate platelets, thereby triggering serotonin-release. The SRA's performance characteristics include high sensitivity and specificity, although caveats include indeterminate reaction profiles (observed in ∼4% of test sera) and potential for false-positive reactions. As only a subset of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies detectable by enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) are additionally platelet-activating, the SRA has far greater diagnostic specificity than the EIA. However, requiring a positive EIA, either as an initial screening test or as an SRA adjunct, will reduce risk of a false-positive SRA (since a negative EIA in a patient with a "positive" SRA should prompt critical evaluation of the SRA reaction profile). The SRA also provides useful information on whether a HIT serum produces strong platelet activation even in the absence of heparin: such heparin-"independent" platelet activation is a marker of unusually severe HIT, including delayed-onset HIT and severe HIT complicated by consumptive coagulopathy with risk for microvascular thrombosis. PMID:25775976

  18. Use of mean platelet component to measure platelet activation on the ADVIA 120 haematology system.

    PubMed

    Macey, M G; Carty, E; Webb, L; Chapman, E S; Zelmanovic, D; Okrongly, D; Rampton, D S; Newland, A C

    1999-10-15

    Platelet activation results in changes in a number of cell surface molecules including an increase in P-Selectin (CD62P) that may be rapidly and conveniently measured by immunofluorescent flow cytometry. The ADVIA 120 (Bayer) is a new system that facilitates more accurate measurement of platelet volume and in addition provides an approximate measure of the mean refractive index (RI) of the platelets reported as mean platelet component (MPC) concentration. We were interested to determine whether changes in MPC might reflect changes in platelet activation status. To investigate this, the platelet CD62P expression, determined by flow cytometry, and change in MPC, measured on the ADVIA 120 system, was first examined in vitro after stimulation of EDTA anticoagulated whole blood with submaximal concentrations of bovine thrombin in the presence or absence of the thromboxane synthase inhibitor, Ridogrel. Thrombin produced a dose-dependent increase in platelet CD62P expression and a decrease in MPC that could be inhibited by Ridogrel at physiological concentrations. In the second set of experiments, blood from 20 normal controls was collected into both EDTA and sodium citrate (SC) anticoagulants. Within 30 min of venesection and again at 3 h post-venesection after storage at room temperature, the platelet MPC and CD62P expression were determined. Platelets in all samples with both anticoagulants showed very low levels of CD62P expression when first analysed. At 3 h there was a small increase in CD62P expression on platelets in whole blood anticoagulated with SC, but a significant (P < 0.001) increase was observed on platelets anti-coagulated with EDTA. A negative correlation was found between the change in MPC of the platelets and the increase in the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) (r = -0.69, P < 0.001, n = 20) and the percentage (r = -0.72, P < 0.001, n = 20) of CD62P positive platelets at 3 h in blood anticoagulated with EDTA. We conclude that a reduction in MPC as

  19. A New Ibuprofen Derivative Inhibits Platelet Aggregation and ROS Mediated Platelet Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Paul, Manoj; Thushara, Ram M.; Sundaram, Mahalingam S.; Swaroop, Toreshettahally R.; Mohan, Chakrabhavi D.; Basappa; Sadashiva, Marilinganadoddi P.; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S.; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.

    2014-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a serious issue connected with the pathogenesis of several human diseases including chronic inflammation, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and other oxidative stress-associated pathologies. The indiscriminate use of antibiotics and other biological drugs are reported to result in thrombocytopenia, which is often neglected during the treatment regime. In addition, augmented oxidative stress induced by drugs and pathological conditions has also been shown to induce thrombocytopenia, which seems to be the most obvious consequence of elevated rate of platelet apoptosis. Thus, blocking oxidative stress-induced platelet apoptosis would be of prime importance in order to negotiate thrombocytopenia and associated human pathologies. The current study presents the synthesis and platelet protective nature of novel ibuprofen derivatives. The potent anti-oxidant ibuprofen derivative 4f was selected for the study and the platelet protective efficacy and platelet aggregation inhibitory property has been demonstrated. The compound 4f dose dependently mitigates the oxidative stress-induced platelet apoptosis in both platelet rich plasma and washed platelets. The platelet protective nature of compound 4f was determined by assessing various apoptotic markers such as ROS generation, cytosolic Ca2+ levels, PS externalization, cytochrome C translocation, Caspase activation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytotoxicity, LDH leakage and tyrosine phosphorylation of cytosolic proteins. Furthermore, compound 4f dose dependently ameliorated agonist induced platelet aggregation. Therefore, compound 4f can be estimated as a potential candidate in the treatment regime of pathological disorders associated with platelet activation and apoptosis. In addition, compound 4f can be used as an auxiliary therapeutic agent in pathologies associated with thrombocytopenia. PMID:25238069

  20. Spiders that decorate their webs at higher frequency intercept more prey and grow faster

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daiqin

    2005-01-01

    Many orb-weaving spiders decorate their webs with extra, bright white, ultraviolet light reflecting silk. Previous studies suggest that these decorations increase a spider's foraging efficiency by improving web attractiveness, which is known as the prey-attraction hypothesis. One assumption of this hypothesis is that individuals which decorate their webs at a higher frequency are expected to have a higher growth rate. Using a decoration-building orb-weaving spider, Argiope versicolor, I show a strong positive relationship between the growth rate in terms of weight gain and the frequency of decoration-building, as well as the rate of insect interception. This is the first study to reveal a fitness consequence of decorating behaviour in spiders. PMID:16096085

  1. von Willebrand Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Type 2A or Type 2B. People with Type 3 (and some with Type 2A and 2B) will need treatment with Humate-P, an intravenous medication derived from human plasma that contains factor VIII and von Willebrand factor. ...

  2. Platelet--arterial synthetic graft interaction and its modification

    SciTech Connect

    Callow, A.D.; Connolly, R.; O'Donnell, T.F. Jr.; Gembarowicz, R.; Keough, E.; Ramberg-Laskaris, K.; Valeri, C.R.

    1982-11-01

    We compared the in vivo platelet reactivity of two commonly used clinical grafts, Dacron and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), with that of a control autogenous artery graft and assessed whether platelet reactivity was modified by the platelet-antiaggregating agent prostacyclin (PGI2) (epoprostenol). Grafts were randomly placed into the carotid arteries of 21 baboons. Platelets labeled with /sup 111/In were infused within one hour after implantation graft for gamma camera scanning of platelet uptake. The accumulation of platelets on Dacron grafts began almost immediately after injection and reached a peak after one to two hours. The PTFE and control autogenous artery grafts accumulated comparable small amounts of platelets. Prostacyclin was then infused in a second series of baboons with Dacron grafts, at a rate of 150 to 200 ng/kg/min. It prevented the usual platelet uptake when administered concomitant with graft implantation and reduced previously established platelet activity.

  3. Preparation of washed platelets from non-anticoagulated human blood.

    PubMed

    Bowry, S K; Müller-Berghaus, G

    1986-09-15

    Sodium citrate is almost always used to anticoagulate blood for the preparation of washed platelet suspensions. Several adverse effects of citrate on platelet functional responses have been reported. We investigated the extent of activation of platelets and plasmatic coagulation during the preparation of washed platelets from human blood to which no anticoagulant was added. Washed platelets from native blood (PNB) were prepared by passing freshly-drawn human blood rapidly through a mixed Sephadex G-25/G-50 column to remove divalent cations. Gel-filtered blood (GFB), diluted by the elution medium containing 0.35% albumin and 2U/ml apyrase, was obtained within 5 minutes of venepuncture. Using CaCl2, the GFB was found to contain a mean of 1.65 X 10 mM calcium. Fibrinopeptide A measurements indicated less activation of plasmatic coagulation in GFB than in citrated blood. Measurements of beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 during the various stages of the preparation of PNB showed no platelet activation. No platelet aggregates, as measured by the platelet aggregate ratio method, were observed in GFB. Transmission electron microscopy showed intact discoid platelets similar to those in platelet-rich plasma. The reduced activation of platelets and of plasmatic coagulation was due to the more effective removal of calcium ions from the blood by gel filtration than chelation by citrate. PNB may thus provide a model for studying the requirements for calcium in platelet function in the absence of any citrate-platelet interactions. PMID:2945282

  4. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for 5 d released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol's beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function. PMID:26683619

  5. Platelet Inhibition by Nitrite Is Dependent on Erythrocytes and Deoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Srihirun, Sirada; Sriwantana, Thanaporn; Unchern, Supeenun; Kittikool, Dusadee; Noulsri, Egarit; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Fucharoen, Suthat; Piknova, Barbora; Schechter, Alan N.; Sibmooh, Nathawut

    2012-01-01

    Background Nitrite is a nitric oxide (NO) metabolite in tissues and blood, which can be converted to NO under hypoxia to facilitate tissue perfusion. Although nitrite is known to cause vasodilation following its reduction to NO, the effect of nitrite on platelet activity remains unclear. In this study, the effect of nitrite and nitrite+erythrocytes, with and without deoxygenation, on platelet activity was investigated. Methodology/Finding Platelet aggregation was studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and PRP+erythrocytes by turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry, respectively. In PRP, DEANONOate inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP while nitrite had no effect on platelets. In PRP+erythrocytes, the inhibitory effect of DEANONOate on platelets decreased whereas nitrite at physiologic concentration (0.1 µM) inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release. The effect of nitrite+erythrocytes on platelets was abrogated by C-PTIO (a membrane-impermeable NO scavenger), suggesting an NO-mediated action. Furthermore, deoxygenation enhanced the effect of nitrite as observed from a decrease of P-selectin expression and increase of the cGMP levels in platelets. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood showed inverse correlations with the nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes. Conclusion Nitrite alone at physiological levels has no effect on platelets in plasma. Nitrite in the presence of erythrocytes inhibits platelets through its reduction to NO, which is promoted by deoxygenation. Nitrite may have role in modulating platelet activity in the circulation, especially during hypoxia. PMID:22276188

  6. Geometric complexity identifies platelet activation in familial hypercholesterolemic patients.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Giorgio; Aglianò, Margherita; Volpi, Nila; Stefanutti, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a genetic disease, is associated with a severe incidence of athero-thrombotic events, related, also, to platelet hyperreactivity. A plethora of methods have been proposed to identify those activated circulating platelets, none of these has proved really effective. We need efficient methods to identify the circulating platelet status in order to follow the patients after therapeutic procedures. We propose the use of computerized fractal analysis for an objective characterization of the complexity of circulating platelet shapes observed by means of transmission electron microscopy in order to characterize the in vivo hyperactivated platelets of familial hypercholesterolemic patients, distinguishing them from the in vivo resting platelets of healthy individuals. Platelet boundaries were extracted by means of automatically image analysis. Geometric complexity (fractal dimension, D) by box counting was automatically calculated. The platelet boundary observed by electron microscopy is fractal, the shape of the circulating platelets is more complex in FH (n = 6) than healthy subjects (n = 5, P < 0.01), with 100% correct classification in selected individuals. In vitro activated platelets from healthy subjects show an analogous increase of D. The observed high D in the platelet boundary in FH originates from the in vivo platelet activation. Computerized fractal analysis of platelet shape observed by transmission electron microscopy can provide accurate, quantitative data to study platelet activation in familial hypercholesterolemia and after administration of drugs or other therapeutic procedures. PMID:25877374

  7. Procoagulant activity on platelets adhered to collagen or plasma clot.

    PubMed

    Ilveskero, S; Siljander, P; Lassila, R

    2001-04-01

    In a new 2-stage assay of platelet procoagulant activity (PCA), we first subjected gel-filtered platelets to adhesion on collagen (as a model of primary hemostasis) or plasma clots (as a model of preformed thrombus) for 30 minutes, and then the adherent platelets were supplemented with pooled, reptilase-treated, diluted plasma. Defibrinated plasma provided coagulation factors for assembly on platelet membranes without uncontrolled binding of thrombin to fibrin(ogen). Platelet adhesion to both surfaces showed modest individual variation, which increased at platelet densities that allowed aggregation. However, adhesion-induced PCA varied individually and surface-independently >3-fold, suggesting a uniform platelet procoagulant mechanism. Permanently adhered platelets showed markedly enhanced PCA when compared with the platelet pool in suspension, even after strong activation. The rate of thrombin generation induced by clot-adherent platelets was markedly faster than on collagen-adherent platelets during the initial phase of coagulation, whereas collagen-induced PCA proceeded slowly, strongly promoted by tissue thromboplastin. Therefore at 10 minutes, after adjustment for adhered platelets, collagen supported soluble thrombin formation as much as 5 times that of the thrombin-retaining clots. Activation of platelets by their firm adhesion was accompanied by formation of microparticles, representing about one third of the total soluble PCA. Collagen-adhered platelets provide soluble thrombin and microparticles, whereas the preformed clot serves to localize and accelerate hemostasis at the injury site, with the contribution of retained thrombin and microparticles. PMID:11304482

  8. Nitric oxide and platelet energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tomasiak, Marian; Stelmach, Halina; Rusak, Tomasz; Wysocka, Jolanta

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) can affect platelet responses through the inhibition of energy production. It was found that NO donors: S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicyllamine, SNAP, (5-50 microM) and sodium nitroprusside, SNP, (5-100 microM) inhibited collagen- and ADP-induced aggregation of porcine platelets. The corresponding IC50 values for SNAP and SNP varied from 5 to 30 microM and from 9 to 75 microM, respectively. Collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet secretion was inhibited by SNAP (IC50 = 50 microM) and by SNP (IC50 = 100 microM). SNAP (20-100 microM), SNP (10-200 microM) and collagen (20 microg/ml) stimulated glycolysis in intact platelets. The degree of glycolysis stimulation exerted by NO donors was similar to that produced by respiratory chain inhibitors (cyanide and antimycin A) or uncouplers (2,4-dinitrophenol). Neither the NO donors nor the respiratory chain blockers affected glycolysis in platelet homogenate. SNAP (20-100 microM) and SNP (50-200 microM) inhibited oxygen consumption by platelets. The effect of SNP and SNAP on glycolysis and respiration was not reduced by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, a selective inhibitor of NO-stimulated guanylate cyclase. SNAP (5-100 microM) and SNP (10-300 microM) inhibited the activity of platelet cytochrome oxidase and had no effect on NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase and succinate dehydrogenase. Blocking of the mitochondrial energy production by antimycin A slightly affected collagen-evoked aggregation and strongly inhibited platelet secretion. The results indicate that: 1) in porcine platelets NO is able to diminish mitochondrial energy production through the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase, 2) the inhibitory effect of NO on platelet secretion (but not aggregation) can be attributed to the reduction of mitochondrial energy production. PMID:15448739

  9. Platelet Consumption by Arterial Prostheses: The Effects of Endothelialization and Pharmacologic Inhibition of Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Harker, Laurence A.; Slichter, Sherrill J.; Sauvage, Lester R.

    1977-01-01

    The thrombogenic mechanism of arterial grafts has been studied by determining the relative utilization of platelets, fibrinogen and plasminogen by human arterial prostheses, and by direct examination of arterial grafts in a baboon model. Forty-one survival and turnover measurements of 51Crplatelets, 131I-fibrinogen and 125I-plasminogen in ten patients with aortofemoral knitted Dacron prostheses demonstrated platelet consumption after graft placement (platelet survival 4.2 days ± 0.5 and turnover 68,000 plat/ul/day ±10,000 compared with 8.2 days ± 0.3 and 35,000 plat/ul/day ± 5,000 respectively for control subjects with stable vascular disease, p < 0.01). In vitro platelet function test results were normal. Platelet consumption was interrupted by dipyridamole or a combination of dipyridamole and acetylsalicylic acid, and platelet survival normalized spontaneously during nine months postoperatively. No significantly increased consumption of fibrinogen or plasminogen was found in these patients with arterial grafts. Placement of impervious knitted Dacron velour aortic grafts in baboons reproduced platelet consumption that progressively normalized over six weeks postoperatively. Platelet survival measurements correlated directly with endothelial cell coverage of the graft luminal surface in these animals implying that endothelialization of the graft surface was also occurring postoperatively in patients. ImagesFig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:411428

  10. CLEC-2 expression is maintained on activated platelets and on platelet microparticles.

    PubMed

    Gitz, Eelo; Pollitt, Alice Y; Gitz-Francois, Jerney J; Alshehri, Osama; Mori, Jun; Montague, Samantha; Nash, Gerard B; Douglas, Michael R; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K; Buckley, Christopher D; Harrison, Paul; Watson, Steve P

    2014-10-01

    The C-type lectin-like receptor CLEC-2 mediates platelet activation through a hem-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (hemITAM). CLEC-2 initiates a Src- and Syk-dependent signaling cascade that is closely related to that of the 2 platelet ITAM receptors: glycoprotein (GP)VI and FcγRIIa. Activation of either of the ITAM receptors induces shedding of GPVI and proteolysis of the ITAM domain in FcγRIIa. In the present study, we generated monoclonal antibodies against human CLEC-2 and used these to measure CLEC-2 expression on resting and stimulated platelets and on other hematopoietic cells. We show that CLEC-2 is restricted to platelets with an average copy number of ∼2000 per cell and that activation of CLEC-2 induces proteolytic cleavage of GPVI and FcγRIIa but not of itself. We further show that CLEC-2 and GPVI are expressed on CD41+ microparticles in megakaryocyte cultures and in platelet-rich plasma, which are predominantly derived from megakaryocytes in healthy donors, whereas microparticles derived from activated platelets only express CLEC-2. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis, an inflammatory disease associated with increased microparticle production, had raised plasma levels of microparticles that expressed CLEC-2 but not GPVI. Thus, CLEC-2, unlike platelet ITAM receptors, is not regulated by proteolysis and can be used to monitor platelet-derived microparticles. PMID:25150298

  11. Platelets and atherogenesis: Platelet anti-aggregation activity and endothelial protection from tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.)

    PubMed Central

    PALOMO, IVÁN; FUENTES, EDUARDO; PADRÓ, TERESA; BADIMON, LINA

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that platelets are not only involved in the arterial thrombotic process, but also that they play an active role in the inflammatory process of atherogenesis from the beginning. The interaction between platelets and endothelial cells occurs in two manners: activated platelets unite with intact endothelial cells, or platelets in resting adhere to activated endothelium. In this context, inhibition of the platelet function (adhesion/aggregation) could contribute to the prevention of atherothrombosis, the leading cause of cardiovascular morbidity. This can be achieved with antiplatelet agents. However, at the public health level, the level of primary prevention, a healthy diet has also been shown to exert beneficial effects. Among those elements of a healthy diet, the consumption of tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) stands out for its effect on platelet anti-aggregation activity and endothelial protection, which may be beneficial for cardiovascular health. This article briefly discusses the involvement of platelets in atherogenesis and the possible mechanisms of action provided by tomatoes for platelet anti-aggregation activity and endothelial protection. PMID:22969932

  12. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of Incandescent A Type and Decorative Lamps and LED Replacements

    SciTech Connect

    Lingard, R. D.; Myer, M. A.; Paget, M. L.

    2008-11-01

    This benchmark report addresses common omnidirectional incandescent lamps - A-type and small decorative, candelabra-type lamps - and their commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) replacements.

  13. Update on von Willebrand factor multimers: focus on high-molecular-weight multimers and their role in hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Stockschlaeder, Marcus; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Budde, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Normal hemostasis requires von Willebrand factor (VWF) to support platelet adhesion and aggregation at sites of vascular injury. VWF is a multimeric glycoprotein built from identical subunits that contain binding sites for both platelet glycoprotein receptors and collagen. The adhesive activity of VWF depends on the size of its multimers, which range from 500 to over 10 000 kDa. There is good evidence that the high-molecular-weight multimers (HMWM), which are 5000–10 000 kDa, are the most effective in supporting interaction with collagen and platelet receptors and in facilitating wound healing under conditions of shear stress. Thus, these HMWM of VWF are of particular clinical interest. The unusually large multimers of VWF are, under normal conditions, cleaved by the plasma metalloproteinase ADAMTS13 to smaller, less adhesive multimers. A reduction or lack of HMWM, owing to a multimerization defect of VWF or to an increased susceptibility of VWF for ADAMTS13, leads to a functionally impaired VWF and the particular type 2A of von Willebrand disease. This review considers the biology and function of VWF multimers with a particular focus on the characterization of HMWM – their production, storage, release, degradation, and role in normal physiology. Evidence from basic research and the study of clinical diseases and their management highlight a pivotal role for the HMWM of VWF in hemostasis. PMID:24448155

  14. Combined blockade of ADP receptors and PI3-kinase p110β fully prevents platelet and leukocyte activation during hypothermic extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Stefanie; Kurz, Julia; Geisler, Tobias; Peter, Karlheinz; Wendel, Hans Peter; Straub, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and hypothermia are used to maintain stable circulatory parameters and improve the ischemia tolerance of patients in cardiac surgery. However, ECC and hypothermia induce activation mechanisms in platelets and leukocytes, which are mediated by the platelet agonist ADP and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) p110β. Under clinical conditions these processes are associated with life-threatening complications including thromboembolism and inflammation. This study analyzes effects of ADP receptor P(2)Y(12) and P(2)Y(1) blockade and PI3K p110β inhibition on platelets and granulocytes during hypothermic ECC. Human blood was treated with the P(2)Y(12) antagonist 2-MeSAMP, the P(2)Y(1) antagonist MRS2179, the PI3K p110β inhibitor TGX-221, combinations thereof, or PBS and propylene glycol (controls). Under static in vitro conditions a concentration-dependent effect regarding the inhibition of ADP-induced platelet activation was found using 2-MeSAMP or TGX-221. Further inhibition of ADP-mediated effects was achieved with MRS2179. Next, blood was circulated in an ex vivo ECC model at 28°C for 30 minutes and various platelet and granulocyte markers were investigated using flow cytometry, ELISA and platelet count analysis. GPIIb/IIIa activation induced by hypothermic ECC was inhibited using TGX-221 alone or in combination with P(2)Y blockers (p<0.05), while no effect of hypothermic ECC or antiplatelet agents on GPIIb/IIIa and GPIbα expression and von Willebrand factor binding was observed. Sole P(2)Y and PI3K blockade or a combination thereof inhibited P-selectin expression on platelets and platelet-derived microparticles during hypothermic ECC (p<0.05). P(2)Y blockade alone or combined with TGX-221 prevented ECC-induced platelet-granulocyte aggregate formation (p<0.05). Platelet adhesion to the ECC surface, platelet loss and Mac-1 expression on granulocytes were inhibited by combined P(2)Y and PI3K blockade (p<0.05). Combined blockade of P

  15. Activated platelet chemiluminescence and presence of CD45+ platelets in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gabbasov, Zufar; Ivanova, Oxana; Kogan-Yasny, Victor; Ryzhkova, Evgeniya; Saburova, Olga; Vorobyeva, Inna; Vasilieva, Elena

    2014-01-01

    It has been found that in 15% of acute myocardial infarction patients' platelets generate reactive oxygen species that can be detected with luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of platelet-rich plasma within 8-10 days after acute myocardial infarction. This increase in generate reactive oxygen species production coincides with the emergence of CD45(+) platelets. The ability of platelets to carry surface leukocyte antigen implies their participation in exchange of specific proteins in the course of acute myocardial infarction. Future studies of CD45(+) platelets in peripheral blood of acute myocardial infarction patients in association with generate reactive oxygen species production may provide a new insight into the complex mechanisms of cell-cell interactions associated with acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24102264

  16. Spurious automated platelet count. Enumeration of yeast forms as platelets by the cell-DYN 4000.

    PubMed

    Latif, Shahnila; Veillon, Diana M; Brown, Donald; Kaltenbach, Jenny; Curry, Sherry; Linscott, Andrea J; Oberle, Arnold; Cotelingam, James D

    2003-12-01

    We recently encountered a patient with thrombocytopenia secondary to multiple drug therapy, disseminated prostatic adenocarcinoma, and sepsis who had a sudden decrease in his platelet count as enumerated by the Cell-DYN 4000 hematology analyzer (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA). A manual platelet count performed thereafter was even lower. The etiology of the spurious platelet count was clarified when numerous yeast forms were observed on routine microscopy of the peripheral blood smear. Subsequently, these organisms were identified as Candida glabrata from a positive blood culture (BACTEC 9240, Becton Dickinson, Cockeysville, MD). To our knowledge, this is the first report of spurious enumeration of yeast forms as platelets in an automated hematology system. The principle underlying platelet enumeration by the Cell-DYN 4000 system and other hematology analyzers and the value of microscopy on peripheral smears with unexpected CBC count results are discussed. PMID:14671977

  17. Towards personalised therapy for von Willebrand disease: a future role for recombinant products.

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2016-05-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is reportedly the most common bleeding disorder and is caused by deficiencies and/or defects in the adhesive plasma protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Functionally, normal VWF prevents bleeding by promoting both primary and secondary haemostasis. In respect to primary haemostasis, VWF binds to both platelets and sub-endothelial matrix components, especially collagen, to anchor platelets to damaged vascular tissue and promote thrombus formation. VWF also stabilises and protects factor VIII in the circulation, delivering FVIII to the site of injury, which then facilitates secondary haemostasis and fibrin formation/thrombus stabilisation. As a result of this, patients with VWD suffer a bleeding diathesis reflective of a primary defect caused by defective/deficient VWF, which in some patients is compounded by a reduction in FVIII. Management of VWD, therefore, chiefly entails replacement of VWF, and sometimes also FVIII, to protect against bleeding. The current report principally focuses on the future potential for "personalised" management of VWD, given the emerging options in recombinant therapies. Recombinant VWF has been developed and is undergoing clinical trials, and this promising therapy may soon change the way in which VWD is managed. In particular, we can envisage a personalised treatment approach using recombinant VWF, with or without recombinant FVIII, depending on the type of VWD, the extent of deficiencies, and the period and duration of treatment. PMID:27136426

  18. Towards personalised therapy for von Willebrand disease: a future role for recombinant products

    PubMed Central

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J.

    2016-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is reportedly the most common bleeding disorder and is caused by deficiencies and/or defects in the adhesive plasma protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Functionally, normal VWF prevents bleeding by promoting both primary and secondary haemostasis. In respect to primary haemostasis, VWF binds to both platelets and sub-endothelial matrix components, especially collagen, to anchor platelets to damaged vascular tissue and promote thrombus formation. VWF also stabilises and protects factor VIII in the circulation, delivering FVIII to the site of injury, which then facilitates secondary haemostasis and fibrin formation/thrombus stabilisation. As a result of this, patients with VWD suffer a bleeding diathesis reflective of a primary defect caused by defective/deficient VWF, which in some patients is compounded by a reduction in FVIII. Management of VWD, therefore, chiefly entails replacement of VWF, and sometimes also FVIII, to protect against bleeding. The current report principally focuses on the future potential for “personalised” management of VWD, given the emerging options in recombinant therapies. Recombinant VWF has been developed and is undergoing clinical trials, and this promising therapy may soon change the way in which VWD is managed. In particular, we can envisage a personalised treatment approach using recombinant VWF, with or without recombinant FVIII, depending on the type of VWD, the extent of deficiencies, and the period and duration of treatment. PMID:27136426

  19. Hematopoietic transcription factor mutations and inherited platelet dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Songdej, Natthapol

    2015-01-01

    The molecular and genetic mechanisms in most patients with inherited platelet dysfunction are unknown. There is increasing evidence that mutations in hematopoietic transcription factors are major players in the pathogenesis of defective megakaryopoiesis and platelet dysfunction in patients with inherited platelet disorders. These hematopoietic transcription factors include RUNX1, FLI1, GATA-1, and GFI1B. Mutations involving these transcription factors affect diverse aspects of platelet production and function at the genetic and molecular levels, culminating in clinical manifestations of thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction. This review focuses on these hematopoietic transcription factors in the pathobiology of inherited platelet dysfunction. PMID:26097739

  20. Platelets promote osteosarcoma cell growth through activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-Akt signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Satoshi; Takemoto, Ai; Takami, Miho; Oh-hara, Tomoko; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of tumor cells with platelets contribute to the progression of tumor malignancy, and the expression levels of platelet aggregation-inducing factors positively correlate with the metastatic potential of osteosarcoma cells. However, it is unclear how tumor-platelet interaction contributes to the proliferation of osteosarcomas. We report here that osteosarcoma-platelet interactions induce the release of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from platelets, which promotes the proliferation of osteosarcomas. Co-culture of platelets with MG63 or HOS osteosarcoma cells, which could induce platelet aggregation, enhanced the proliferation of each cell line in vitro. Analysis of phospho-antibody arrays revealed that co-culture of MG63 cells with platelets induced the phosphorylation of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and Akt. The addition of supernatants of osteosarcoma-platelet reactants also increased the growth of MG63 and HOS cells as well as the level of phosphorylated-PDGFR and -Akt. Sunitinib or LY294002, but not erlotinib, significantly inhibited the platelet-induced proliferation of osteosarcoma cells, indicating that PDGF released from platelets plays an important role in the proliferation of osteosarcomas by activating the PDGFR and then Akt. Our results suggest that inhibitors that specifically target osteosarcoma-platelet interactions may eradicate osteosarcomas. PMID:24974736

  1. Platelet Activation Test in Unprocessed Blood (Pac-t-UB) to Monitor Platelet Concentrates and Whole Blood of Thrombocytopenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Roest, Mark; van Holten, Thijs C.; Fleurke, Ger-Jan; Remijn, Jasper A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Platelet concentrate transfusion is the standard treatment for hemato-oncology patients to compensate for thrombocytopenia. We have developed a novel platelet activation test in anticoagulated unprocessed blood (pac-t-UB) to determine platelet function in platelet concentrates and in blood of thrombocytopenic patients. Methods We have measured platelet activity in a platelet concentrate and in anticoagulated unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion thrombocytopenic patient. Results Our data show time-dependent platelet activation by GPVI agonist (collagen related peptide; CRP), PAR-1 agonist (SFLLRN), P2Y12 agonist (ADP), and thromboxane receptor agonist (U46619) in a platelet concentrate. Furthermore, pac-t-UB showed time-dependent platelet activation in unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion patient with thrombocytopenia. Testing platelet function by different agonists in relation to storage show that 3-day-old platelet concentrates are still reactive to the studied agonists. This reactivity rapidly drops for each agonists during longer storage. Discussion Pac-t-UB is a novel tool to estimate platelet function by different agonists in platelet concentrates and in unprocessed blood of thrombocytopenic patients. In the near future, we will validate whether pac-t-UB is an adequate test to monitor the quality of platelet concentrates and whether pac-t-UB predicts the bleeding risk of transfused thrombocytopenic patients. PMID:23652405

  2. Comparative analysis of human ex vivo-generated platelets vs megakaryocyte-generated platelets in mice: a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhuan; Hayes, Vincent; Jarocha, Danuta; Sim, Xiuli; Harper, Dawn C; Fuentes, Rudy; Sullivan, Spencer K; Gadue, Paul; Chou, Stella T; Torok-Storb, Beverly J; Marks, Michael S; French, Deborah L; Poncz, Mortimer

    2015-06-01

    Thrombopoiesis is the process by which megakaryocytes release platelets that circulate as uniform small, disc-shaped anucleate cytoplasmic fragments with critical roles in hemostasis and related biology. The exact mechanism of thrombopoiesis and the maturation pathways of platelets released into the circulation remain incompletely understood. We showed that ex vivo-generated murine megakaryocytes infused into mice release platelets within the pulmonary vasculature. Here we now show that infused human megakaryocytes also release platelets within the lungs of recipient mice. In addition, we observed a population of platelet-like particles (PLPs) in the infusate, which include platelets released during ex vivo growth conditions. By comparing these 2 platelet populations to human donor platelets, we found marked differences: platelets derived from infused megakaryocytes closely resembled infused donor platelets in morphology, size, and function. On the other hand, the PLP was a mixture of nonplatelet cellular fragments and nonuniform-sized, preactivated platelets mostly lacking surface CD42b that were rapidly cleared by macrophages. These data raise a cautionary note for the clinical use of human platelets released under standard ex vivo conditions. In contrast, human platelets released by intrapulmonary-entrapped megakaryocytes appear more physiologic in nature and nearly comparable to donor platelets for clinical application. PMID:25852052

  3. Quality of platelet concentrates irradiated with UVB light: effect of UV dose and dose rate on glycocalicin release and correlation with other markers of the platelet storage lesion.

    PubMed

    Bessos, H; Murphy, W G; Robertson, A; Vickers, M; Seghatchian, M J; Tandy, N P; Cutts, M; Pamphilon, D H

    1993-06-01

    The amount of membrane-associated glycoprotein Ib in platelet concentrates (PCs) irradiated with a high dose of UVB light has been shown to be significantly reduced after 48 h storage. We recently corroborated this finding when we noted an increase in the supernatant levels of glycocalicin (GC, a major segment of glycoprotein Ib) in UVB-treated PCs during storage. The aim of the present study was to determine whether GC release was related to both the UV dose and the rate of dose delivery. Plateletpheresis concentrates obtained from five donors were pooled and split into five equal parts. Four of these were treated with 7500 and 15,000 mJ/cm2 UVB using two prototype UV sources with differing rates of dose delivery; namely, Baxter (BAT) and British Aerospace (BAC) cabinets, with the latter having the slower rate of delivery. On days 1 and 5 of storage, GC levels in the supernatants of PCs were determined by ELISA. Moreover, the following parameters were also assessed: platelet and WBC count; hypotonic shock response (HSR) and platelet aggregation response to ADP, ADP+collagen, ADP+arachidonic acid and ristocetin; pH; supernatant levels of lactate, glucose, von Willebrand factor (vWf) and beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG). The results revealed an association of GC release with UVB dose using both UV sources, although this was more apparent in the BAC system, in which glycocalicin release at day 5 of storage was as follows (microgram/ml, mean +/- SD): 4.8 +/- 0.3 and 9.5 +/- 3.6 at 7500 and 15,000 mJ/cm2 respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8374699

  4. Role of platelet function and platelet membrane glycoproteins in children with primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Bai, Jing; Guo, Qu-Lian; Huang, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Bai, Yong-Qi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine and understand changes in platelet functions prior to and after the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children. An automatic hematology analyzer and whole blood flow cytometry were used to detect immature platelet fraction (IPF), IPC and membrane glycoproteins (CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b) in ITP children (ITP group), children with complete response after ITP treatment (ITP-CR group) and children with elective surgery (normal control group). The results showed that, levels of platelet count (PLT) and plateletcrit in the ITP group were lower alhtough the levels of mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio (P-LCR) were higher than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PLT in the ITP-CR group was lower than that in the normal controls. Additionally, IPF% was higher in the normal control and ITP-CR groups, IPC was lower in the ITP group compared to the normal control and ITP-CR groups. Furthermore, prior to ADP activation, the expression levels of CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b in the ITP group were lower in ITP group than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. The expression level of PAC-1 was lower in the ITP-CR and normal control groups. No differences were identified in CD62p and CD42b expression levels. Following ATP activation, CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b expression in the ITP group was lower than that in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PAC-1 expression was lower while CD62p expression was higher in the ITP-CR group compared to the normal control group. In conclusion, the activation of platelets in ITP children was low. Decreased platelet function, platelet parameters and platelet glycoproteins may be used as markers for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ITP children. PMID:27431926

  5. Optimized Preparation Method of Platelet-Concentrated Plasma and Noncoagulating Platelet-Derived Factor Concentrates: Maximization of Platelet Concentration and Removal of Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Jun; Jona, Masahiro; Eto, Hitomi; Aoi, Noriyuki; Kato, Harunosuke; Suga, Hirotaka; Doi, Kentaro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been clinically used as an easily prepared growth factor cocktail that can promote wound healing, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. However, the therapeutic effects of PRP are still controversial, due partly to the lack of optimized and standardized preparation protocols. We used whole blood (WB) samples to optimize the preparation protocols for PRP, white blood cell-containing (W-PRP), platelet-concentrated plasma (PCP), and noncoagulating platelet-derived factor concentrate (PFC). PRP and W-PRP were most efficiently collected by 10 min centrifugation in a 15-mL conical tube at 230–270 g and 70 g, respectively. To prepare PCP, platelets were precipitated by centrifugation of PRP at >2300 g, 90% of supernatant plasma was removed, and the platelets were resuspended. For preparation of noncoagulating PFC, the supernatant was replaced with one-tenth volume of saline, followed by platelet activation with thrombin. Platelet (before activation) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB (after activation) concentrations in PCP were approximately 20 times greater than those in WB, whereas PFC contained a 20-times greater concentration of platelets before platelet activation and a 50-times greater concentration of PDGF-BB without formation of a fibrin gel after platelet activation than WB. Surprisingly, total PDGF-BB content in the PFC was twice that of activated WB, which suggested that a substantial portion of the PDGF-BB became trapped in the fibrin glue, and replacement of plasma with saline is crucial for maximization of platelet-derived factors. As an anticoagulant, ethylene di-amine tetra-acetic acid disodium inhibited platelet aggregation more efficiently than acid citrate dextrose solution, resulting in higher nonaggregated platelet yield and final PDGF-BB content. These results increase our understanding of how to optimize and standardize preparation of platelet-derived factors at maximum concentrations. PMID

  6. Involvement of platelet cyclic GMP but not cyclic AMP suppression in leukocyte-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by platelet-activating factor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hirafuji, M.; Nezu, A.; Shinoda, H.; Minami, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence or the presence of PAF (10 nM) markedly increased platelet cyclic AMP levels, which were significantly decreased by indomethacin (3 microM). Co-incubation of endothelial cells and platelets with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) did not change the platelet cyclic AMP levels. 2. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence of PAF increased platelet cyclic GMP levels, which were increased 3.5 fold by PAF. These cyclic GMP levels were significantly decreased by NG-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM), and completely by methylene blue (10 microM). When endothelial cells and platelets were co-incubated with PMNs, the cyclic GMP level in the cell mixture was 42.5 and 65.3% lower than that in endothelial cells and platelets without and with PAF stimulation, respectively. 3. PAF induced platelet adhesion to endothelial cells only when PMNs were present. Methylene blue dose-dependently potentiated the PMN-dependent platelet adhesion induced by PAF, although it had no effect in the absence of PMNs. 4. Sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo cyclic GMP but not dibutyryl cyclic AMP significantly, although partially, inhibited the platelet adhesion. Inhibition of cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase by zaprinast slightly inhibited the PMN-induced platelet adhesion and potentiated the inhibitory effect of 8-bromo cyclic GMP, while these drugs markedly inhibited the adhesion of platelet aggregates induced by PMN sonicates. 5. These results suggest that the impairment by activated PMNs of EDRF-induced platelet cyclic GMP formation is involved in part in the mechanism of PMN-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by PAF in vitro. The precise mechanism still remains to be clarified. PMID:8789382

  7. The effect of time of day and exercise on platelet functions and platelet-neutrophil aggregates in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Aldemir, Hatice; Kiliç, Nedret

    2005-12-01

    Platelet activation state changes by exercise. The effect of exercise time on platelet activation state and formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates are not known yet. In this study the effect of exercise and time of day were examined on platelet activity with platelet-neutrophil aggregates. Ten moderately active males aged 27+/- 1.63 (mean+/-S.D.) years completed sub-maximal (70% VO(2max)) exercise trials for 30 min. Blood pressure (BP) was recorded. Venous blood samples were obtained at rest, immediately post-exercise and after 30 min of recovery. Whole blood was analysed for haematocrit (Hct), haemoglobin (Hb), platelet count (PC), mean platelet count (MPV) and platelet aggregation (PA). Platelet-neutrophil aggregates and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) levels were assayed. Platelet count showed significant increase after morning exercise ((236+/- 32)x10(9) l(-1) versus (202+/- 34)x10(9) l(-1) baseline, p < 0.05). Exercise resulted in significantly lower MPV after the evening exercise (9.16+/- 0.5 fl versus 9.65+/- 0.36 fl, p < 0.05). Platelet aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) decreased after morning exercise and the recovery aggregation levels were significantly different at two different times of the day (68+/- 20% a.m. versus 80+/- 12% p.m., p < 0.05). It was also showed that platelet-neutrophil aggregates increased significantly from baseline after both exercises. Exercise-induced platelet-neutrophil aggregates were higher in the evening (10.7+/- 1.3% p.m. versus 6.4+/- 1.8% a.m., p < 0.0001). It is therefore concluded that besides platelet-platelet aggregation, exercise can cause platelet- neutrophil aggregates. In addition, time of day has an effect on platelet activation related events. Circadian variations of physiological parameters may have an effect on thrombus formation by platelet activation. PMID:16311912

  8. Hypersensitivity to thrombin of platelets from hypercholesterolemic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Winocour, P.D.; Rand, M.L.; Kinlough-Rathbone, R.L.; Mustard, J.F.

    1986-03-01

    Hypersensitivity of platelets to thrombin has been associated with hypercholesterolemia. The authors have examined the mechanisms involved in this hypersensitivity. Rats were given diets rich in milk fat and containing added cholesterol and taurocholate to produce hypercholesterolemia (HC) (262 +/- 25 mg%) or added sitosterol as a normocholesterolemic control (NC) (89 +/- 6 mg%). Washed platelets were prelabelled with /sup 14/C-serotonin. In the presence of acetylsalicyclic acid (ASA) (to inhibit thromboxane A/sub 2/ (TXA/sub 2/) formation) and creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase (CP/CPK) (to remove released ADP), HC platelets aggregated more (26 +/- 1%) and released more /sup 14/C (9.1 +/- 2.0%) than NC platelets (aggregation: 0%, p < 0.001; /sup 14/C release: 1.5 +/- 0.5%, p < 0.002) in response to thrombin (0.075 U/ml). Thus, a pathway independent of released ADP or TXA/sub 2/ formation is involved in the hypersensitivity of HC platelets to thrombin. Total binding of /sup 125/I-thrombin to HC platelets was less than that to NC platelets but HC platelets were smaller and had less protein than NC platelets; the thrombin binding per mg platelet protein was the same for HC and NC platelets, indicating that hypersensitivity to thrombin of HC platelets does not result from increased thrombin binding. Thus, hypersensitivity of HC platelets to thrombin is not due to TXA/sub 2/ formation, the action of released ADP or increased thrombin binding.

  9. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

    PubMed

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  10. Akt signaling in platelets and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Woulfe, Donna S

    2010-01-01

    Akt is a Ser–Thr kinase with pleiotropic effects on cell survival, growth and metabolism. Recent evidence from gene-deletion studies in mice, and analysis of human platelets treated with Akt inhibitors, suggest that Akt regulates platelet activation, with potential consequences for thrombosis. Akt activation is regulated by the level of phosphoinositide 3-phosphates, and proteins that regulate concentrations of this lipid also regulate Akt activation and platelet function. Although the effectors through which Akt contributes to platelet activation are not definitively known, several candidates are discussed, including endothelial nitric oxide synthase, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, phosphodiesterase 3A and the integrin β3 tail. Selective inhibitors of Akt isoforms or of proteins that contribute to its activation, such as individual PI3K isoforms, may make attractive targets for antithrombotic therapy. This review summarizes the current literature describing Akt activity and its regulation in platelets, including speculation regarding the future of Akt or its regulatory pathways as targets for the development of antithrombotic therapies. PMID:20352060

  11. Migraine patients show increased platelet vasopressin receptors.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, J; Leppla-Wollsiffer, G; Nemeth, N; Nelson, K; Kirsten, R

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate vasopressin receptor status (Bmax and Kd) on platelets, vasopressin plasma levels, and vasopressin-induced platelet aggregation in migraine patients (21 females and 6 males) during a headache-free interval and in a matched control group. In the migraine group, Bmax was significantly higher (P = 0.02) at 53.9 +/- 20.6 fmol/mg than in the control group (36.8 +/- 21.0 fmol/mg). A correlation between Bmax and high or low sensitivity to vasopressin as an aggregator was evident in the control group, but not in the migraine group. No differences in Kd or in plasma levels of vasopressin between the migraine and control group were apparent. Men in both groups were much less sensitive to vasopressin as a platelet aggregator than were women (P < 0.01). Whether the higher Bmax in the migraine group is a reflection of temporarily higher vasopressin levels during headache or reflects a primary increase in sensitivity to vasopressin, remains to be clarified. The higher sensitivity of platelets (as a model for vessel wall receptors) from women may indicate why many more women than men suffer from migraine. Since the Bmax of the vasopressin receptor on platelets from migraine patients is increased compared to controls, treating migraine headache with vasopressin may deserve more attention. PMID:8990597

  12. Platelets in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Tanya M.; Boyce, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized clinically by the triad of asthma, nasal polyposis, and pathognomonic respiratory reactions after ingestion of aspirin. It is a distinct syndrome associated with eosinophilic infiltration of respiratory tissues and excessive production of cysteinyl leukotrienes. Despite the consistent clinical phenotype of the respiratory disease, the underlying pathogenesis of the disease remains unclear. In addition to their role in hemostasis, platelets have the capacity to influence the activation state and function of other immune cells during inflammation, and to facilitate granulocyte recruitment into the tissues. Platelets also possess a repertoire of potent pre-formed mediators of inflammation that are released upon activation, and are a rich source of newly-synthesized lipid mediators that alter vascular permeability and smooth muscle tone. Accordingly, the activity of platelets has been linked to diverse inflammatory diseases, including asthma. Both human and animal studies strongly suggest that platelet activity is uniquely associated with the pathophysiology of AERD. This article summarizes the evidence supporting an effector role for platelets in asthma in general and in AERD in particular, and considers the potential therapeutic implications. PMID:26051947

  13. Facilitating roles of murine platelet glycoprotein Ib and αIIbβ3 in phosphatidylserine exposure during vWF–collagen-induced thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, Marijke J E; Schulte, Valerie; Oury, Cécile; Lindhout, Theo; Broers, Jos; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2004-01-01

    Vessel wall damage exposes collagen fibres, to which platelets adhere directly via the collagen receptors glycoprotein (GP) VI and integrin α2β1 and indirectly by collagen-bound von Willebrand factor (vWF) via the GPIb-V-IX and integrin αIIbβ3 receptor complexes. Platelet–collagen interaction under shear stimulates thrombus formation in two ways, by integrin-dependent formation of platelet aggregates and by surface exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine (PS). GPVI is involved in both processes, complemented by α2β1. In mouse blood flowing over collagen, we investigated the additional role of platelet–vWF binding via GPIb and αIIbβ3. Inhibition of GPIb as well as blocking of vWF binding to collagen reduced stable platelet adhesion at high shear rate. This was accompanied by delayed platelet Ca2+ responses and reduced PS exposure, while microaggregates were still formed. Inhibition of integrin αIIbβ3 with JON/A antibody, which blocks αIIbβ3 binding to both vWF and fibrinogen, reduced PS exposure and aggregate formation. The JON/A effects were not enhanced by combined blocking of GPIb–vWF binding, suggesting a function for αIIbβ3 downstream of GPIb. Typically, with blood from FcR γ-chain +/− mutant mice, expressing 50% of normal platelet GPVI levels, GPIb blockage almost completely abolished platelet adhesion and PS exposure. Together, these data indicate that, under physiological conditions of flow, both adhesive receptors GPIb and αIIbβ3 facilitate GPVI-mediated PS exposure by stabilizing platelet binding to collagen. Hence, these glycoproteins have an assistant procoagulant role in collagen-dependent thrombus formation, which is most prominent at reduced GPVI activity and is independent of the presence of thrombin. PMID:15155790

  14. A manual method to obtain platelet rich plasma

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Fabiana Paulino; Ingham, Sheila Jean McNeill; Forgas, Andrea; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Sasaki, Pedro Henrique; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study is to report a manual method to obtain platelet rich plasma (PRP). METHODS: For this study 61 ml of peripheral blood was obtained and submitted to centrifugation at 541g for 5 min. The centrifugation separates the blood into three components: red blood cells, buffy coat and platelet rich plasma. Blood and platelet rich plasma samples were sent to the Hospital's Laboratory and platelets and leukocytes were measured. RESULTS: A sample of 637 blood donors was evaluated. The platelet yield efficiency was 86.77% and the increase in platelet concentration factor was 2.89 times. The increase in leukocyte concentration factor was 1.97 times. CONCLUSION: The method described here produces leukocyte-rich and platelet-rich plasma with a high platelet and leukocyte increased factor. Level of Evidence IV, Controlled Laboratory Study. PMID:24868183

  15. Platelet activation during angiotensin II infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P T; Schwieler, J H; Wallén, N H

    2000-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of an intravenous infusion of angiotensin II (10 ng/kg per min) on platelet function and coagulation in vivo in 18 healthy males. The infusion increased mean arterial pressure by 23+/-2 mm Hg. Plasma beta-thromboglobulin levels, reflecting platelet secretion, increased by 66+/-24% during the infusion, as did also platelet surface expression of P-selectin as measured by flow cytometry. Platelet fibrinogen binding increased, whereas platelet aggregability, assessed by ex vivo filtragometry, was unaltered. Angiotensin II caused mild activation of the coagulation cascade with increases in plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex and prothrombin fragment F1 + 2. In conclusion, angiotensin II has mild platelet-activating effects in vivo and also enhances coagulation. Markers of platelet secretion are significantly increased, whereas markers of platelet aggregability are less affected. The clinical relevance of these findings remains to be clarified. PMID:10691100

  16. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  17. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus), Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ye-Ming; Hsieh, Kuo-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lien, Li-Ming; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Xanthohumol inhibited platelet activation accompanied by relative [Ca2+]i mobilization, thromboxane A2 formation, hydroxyl radical (OH●) formation, and phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt phosphorylation. Neither SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, reversed the xanthohumol-mediated inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Furthermore, xanthohumol did not significantly increase nitrate formation in platelets. This study demonstrates for the first time that xanthohumol possesses potent antiplatelet activity which may initially inhibit the PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, and PLCγ2-PKC cascades, followed by inhibition of the thromboxane A2 formation, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca2+]i and finally inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, this novel role of xanthohumol may represent a high therapeutic potential for treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22611436

  18. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  19. Predictors of Symptom Development in Intermediate Carotid Artery Stenosis: Mean Platelet Volume and Platelet Distribution Width.

    PubMed

    Koklu, Erkan; Yuksel, Isa Oner; Arslan, Sakir; Cagirci, Goksel; Gencer, Elif Sarionder; Koc, Pinar; Cay, Serkan; Kizilirmak, Filiz; Esin, Murat

    2016-08-01

    Platelets play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis. Platelet activation is associated with increased mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW). In this study, we investigated the relation of MPV and PDW with the risk of stroke in patients with intermediate (50%-70%) carotid artery stenosis. A total of 254 patients (115 symptomatic and 139 asymptomatic) with intermediate carotid artery stenosis were enrolled in this study. Symptomatic and asymptomatic patients were compared in regard to MPV and PDW. Mean platelet volume was significantly greater in the symptomatic group compared with the asymptomatic group (11.1 and 9.4 fL, respectively; P < .001). Platelet distribution width was significantly greater in the symptomatic group compared with the asymptomatic group (15.0% and 11.9%, respectively; P < .001). Multivariate regression analysis showed that an MPV ≥10.2 fL and a PDW ≥14.3% were independent predictors of developing symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Mean platelet volume and PDW are increased in the presence of symptomatic intermediate carotid artery stenosis. Increased MPV and PDW may be independent predictors of developing symptomatic carotid artery plaque. PMID:26514416

  20. The content of bone morphogenetic proteins in platelets varies greatly between different platelet donors

    SciTech Connect

    Kalen, Anders; Wahlstroem, Ola; Linder, Cecilia Halling; Magnusson, Per

    2008-10-17

    Platelet derivates and platelet rich plasma have been used to stimulate bone formation and wound healing because of the rich content of potent growth factors. However, not all reports have been conclusive since some have not been able to demonstrate a positive effect. We investigated the interindividual variation of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in platelets from healthy donors, and the pH-dependent effect on the release of BMPs in preparations of lysed platelets in buffer (LPB). Platelet concentrates from 31 healthy donors were prepared in pH 4.3 and pH 7.4 buffers and investigated with respect to BMP-2, -4, -6, and -7. BMP-2 and BMP-4 were significantly more common in acidic LPBs in comparison with neutral preparations. We also observed a considerable variation among platelet donors with respect to the release of BMPs at pH 4.3 and 7.4. In conclusion, a considerable variation was found among platelet donors, which may be of importance considering the ambiguous results previously reported on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation.

  1. Flow and delta-P dictate where thrombin, fibrin, and von Willebrand Factor will be found.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Scott L

    2016-05-01

    Hemostasis occurs in two different topological scenarios: complete severing of a vessel or disruption of the vessel wall. Either to meet the daily rigors of active life or during an acute trauma, hemostasis involves the regulated and self-limiting production of thrombin to stop bleeding. In contrast, arterial and venous thrombosis typically involves the unregulated, intraluminal growth of a clot, in the absence of bleeding. For either hemostasis or thrombosis, the presence of flow and pressure gradients (delta-P, ΔP) dictates when and where thrombin and fibrin are located and in what quantity. For hemostatic clots, fibrin formation helped limit clot growth. We found that γ'-fibrinogen had a role in limiting clot growth via anti-thrombin activity at venous, but not arterial conditions. For hemophilic blood, severe factor deficiency (<1% healthy) led to a defect in both platelet and fibrin deposition under flow. However, moderate deficiency, which is associated with a less severe bleeding phenotype, had normalized platelet function but still lacked fibrin production. We conclude signaling levels of thrombin can be generated during moderate hemophilia to sufficiently activate platelets to achieve primary hemostasis, even if fibrin formation remains defective. Finally, as a clot grows, shear stresses can become sufficiently extreme in diseased arteries to drive von Willebrand Factor self-association into massive fibers, potentially the final burst of clot growth towards full thrombotic occlusion. PMID:27207416

  2. Force sensing by the vascular protein von Willebrand factor is tuned by a strong intermonomer interaction.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jochen P; Mielke, Salomé; Löf, Achim; Obser, Tobias; Beer, Christof; Bruetzel, Linda K; Pippig, Diana A; Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Benoit, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The large plasma glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF) senses hydrodynamic forces in the bloodstream and responds to elevated forces with abrupt elongation, thereby increasing its adhesiveness to platelets and collagen. Remarkably, forces on VWF are elevated at sites of vascular injury, where VWF's hemostatic potential is important to mediate platelet aggregation and to recruit platelets to the subendothelial layer. Adversely, elevated forces in stenosed vessels lead to an increased risk of VWF-mediated thrombosis. To dissect the remarkable force-sensing ability of VWF, we have performed atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force measurements on dimers, the smallest repeating subunits of VWF multimers. We have identified a strong intermonomer interaction that involves the D4 domain and critically depends on the presence of divalent ions, consistent with results from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Dissociation of this strong interaction occurred at forces above [Formula: see text]50 pN and provided [Formula: see text]80 nm of additional length to the elongation of dimers. Corroborated by the static conformation of VWF, visualized by AFM imaging, we estimate that in VWF multimers approximately one-half of the constituent dimers are firmly closed via the strong intermonomer interaction. As firmly closed dimers markedly shorten VWF's effective length contributing to force sensing, they can be expected to tune VWF's sensitivity to hydrodynamic flow in the blood and to thereby significantly affect VWF's function in hemostasis and thrombosis. PMID:26787887

  3. Force sensing by the vascular protein von Willebrand factor is tuned by a strong intermonomer interaction

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jochen P.; Mielke, Salomé; Löf, Achim; Obser, Tobias; Beer, Christof; Bruetzel, Linda K.; Pippig, Diana A.; Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Benoit, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The large plasma glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF) senses hydrodynamic forces in the bloodstream and responds to elevated forces with abrupt elongation, thereby increasing its adhesiveness to platelets and collagen. Remarkably, forces on VWF are elevated at sites of vascular injury, where VWF’s hemostatic potential is important to mediate platelet aggregation and to recruit platelets to the subendothelial layer. Adversely, elevated forces in stenosed vessels lead to an increased risk of VWF-mediated thrombosis. To dissect the remarkable force-sensing ability of VWF, we have performed atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force measurements on dimers, the smallest repeating subunits of VWF multimers. We have identified a strong intermonomer interaction that involves the D4 domain and critically depends on the presence of divalent ions, consistent with results from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Dissociation of this strong interaction occurred at forces above ∼50 pN and provided ∼80 nm of additional length to the elongation of dimers. Corroborated by the static conformation of VWF, visualized by AFM imaging, we estimate that in VWF multimers approximately one-half of the constituent dimers are firmly closed via the strong intermonomer interaction. As firmly closed dimers markedly shorten VWF’s effective length contributing to force sensing, they can be expected to tune VWF’s sensitivity to hydrodynamic flow in the blood and to thereby significantly affect VWF’s function in hemostasis and thrombosis. PMID:26787887

  4. A more practical therapy for low platelets.

    PubMed

    Torres, G

    1996-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved WinRho as a new treatment for ITP or thrombocytopenic purpura (low blood platelet count) in people with HIV. Current treatment options for ITP include AZT, corticosteroids, immunoglobulin therapy, and splenectomy. Clinical evaluation rates AZT as the best of the options. WinRho treatment will not work on Rh-negative patients or patients with no spleen. The largest WinRho study to date, involving 267 patients, shows a mean platelet increase of 76,000 cells with no adverse effect on CD4 counts or evidence of an acceleration of HIV disease progression. HIV-positive patients had a poorer platelet increase response than HIV-negative patients. PMID:11363379

  5. Casein mediated green synthesis and decoration of reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddinedi, Sireesh Babu; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Vankayala, Raviraj; Kalluru, Poliraju; Tammina, Sai Kumar; Kiran Kumar, H. A.

    This research is mainly focusing on one-step biosynthesis of graphene from graphene oxide and its stabilization using naturally occurring milk protein, casein. The synthesis of casein reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) was completed within 7 h under reflux at 90 °C with the formation of few layered fine graphene nanosheets. UV-Vis, XRD, XPS analysis data revealed the reduction process of the graphene oxide. Results of FT-IR, HPLC and TEM analysis have shown that the ensuing material consists of graphene decorated with casein molecules. Aspartic acid and glutamic acid residue present in casein molecules are responsible for the reduction of graphene oxide.

  6. Enumeration of directed site animals on the decorated square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Agha Afsar

    1994-01-01

    We study the problem of directed site lattice animals on decorated square lattice using its equivalence to the probabilistic cellular automata. By mapping this problem to a special case of a triangular Ising model in external field, we prove that the generating function of number of animals satisfy a quadratic equation, as was conjectured by Andrew Conway. The coupling constants of the latter satisfy the disorder condition, and it reduces to a problem already solved by Jaekel and Maillard. We also establish a connection of this problem with the problem of anisotropic directed bond percolation on a square lattice.

  7. Characteristics of rat platelets and relative contributions of platelets and blood coagulation to haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, O

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand some of the haemostatic mechanisms in rats for the interpretation of toxicological data, basic haemostatic parameters with a special emphasis on platelet functions were first measured in vitro. The results of reactions of rat platelets to many aggregating agents suggest that only ADP may be a consistently significant aggregator. The search for physiologic aggregators revealed ADP to be available from erythrocytes. Adhesion reaction also required ADP. Collagen was not considered to be essential for either reaction. Aggregation and adhesion were probably both reversible in flowing blood, while irreversible thrombi were formed in blood at rest ex vivo. Blood coagulation parameters determined revealed that the intrinsic pathway may be more important than the extrinsic one. The rate of intrinsic coagulation reaction was rapid, and plasma coagulation appeared to be of primary importance while the influence of platelet aggregation was minor. A simple model of rat haemostatic mechanism is proposed based on these results. Additionally, to define the relative contribution of platelets versus other cellular and plasma coagulation in vivo, rats were administered antiplatelet drugs (ticlopidine, suprofen and clopidogrel) and an anticoagulant (warfarin) intraperitoneally. Bleeding times (BTs) were significantly increased in all treated groups. ADP-induced platelet aggregations were significantly depressed by the administration of the three antiplatelet drugs, while kaolon-activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time were greatly increased in the warfarin-treated rats. The increase in BT may be due to the inhibition of platelet activity or blood coagulation defect in rats given antiplatelet drugs or warfarin, respectively. These results suggest that platelets play a key role in haemostasis in the rat. Two possible explanations of the disparity between in vitro and in vivo results may be that functional tests used here are not adequate to cover

  8. Assessing the Methodology for Calculating Platelet Contribution to Clot Strength (Platelet Component) in Thromboelastometry and Thrombelastography

    PubMed Central

    Ranucci, Marco; Hochleitner, Gerald; Schöchl, Herbert; Schlimp, Christoph J.

    2015-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of blood clot have been studied most commonly using thrombelastography (TEG®) and thromboelastometry (ROTEM®). ROTEM®-based bleeding treatment algorithms recommend administering platelets to patients with low EXTEM clot strength (e.g., clot amplitude at 10 minutes [A10] <40 mm) once clot strength of the ROTEM® fibrin-based test (FIBTEM) is corrected. Algorithms based on TEG® typically use a low value of maximum amplitude (e.g., <50 mm) as a trigger for administering platelets. However, this parameter reflects the contributions of various blood components to the clot, including platelets and fibrin/fibrinogen. The platelet component of clot strength may provide a more sensitive indication of platelet deficiency than clot amplitude from a whole blood TEG® or ROTEM® assay. The platelet component of the formed clot is derived from the results of TEG®/ROTEM® tests performed with and without platelet inhibition. In this article, we review the basis for why this calculation should be based on clot elasticity (e.g., the E parameter with TEG® and the CE parameter with ROTEM®) as opposed to clot amplitude (e.g., the A parameter with TEG® or ROTEM®). This is because clot elasticity, unlike clot amplitude, reflects the force with which the blood clot resists rotation within the device, and the relationship between clot amplitude (variable X) and clot elasticity (variable Y) is nonlinear. A specific increment of X (ΔX) will be associated with different increments of Y (ΔY), depending on the initial value of X. When calculated correctly, using clot elasticity data, the platelet component of the clot can provide a valuable insight into platelet deficiency in emergency bleeding. PMID:26378699

  9. Platelet concentration in platelet concentrates and periodontal regeneration-unscrambling the ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Suchetha, A.; Lakshmi, P.; Bhat, Divya; Mundinamane, Darshan B.; Soorya, K. V.; Bharwani, G. Ashit

    2015-01-01

    Context: Platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) and Platelet-rich-fibrin (PRF) are extensively used autologous platelet concentrates in periodontal regeneration, and PRF has a better efficacy as compared to PRP. The rationale for this difference has often been attributed to the difference in the structure of the fibrin matrix. However, the effect of concentration of platelets on the regenerative potential of these concentrates is obscure. Aims: The study was conducted to evaluate and compare, clinically and radiographically, the efficacy of PRF and PRP in the treatment of periodontal endosseous defects and to assess the effect of platelet concentration on periodontal regeneration. Materials and Methods: Twenty intrabony defects were selected and divided into two groups randomly by the coin toss method. Group I received PRP and Group II subjects were treated with PRF. The platelet counts in PRP and PRF were analyzed. Clinical and radiological parameters were assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 9 months postoperatively. Statistical Analysis: Kruskal–Wallis Chi-square test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, t-test, and Spearman's rank correlation were used for statistical analysis of data. Results: There was statistically significant improvement in all the parameters in the two groups except in relation to gingival recession. There was a statistically significant difference between the platelet count in Group I and Group II (P = 0.002). Conclusion: PRP and PRF appear to have nearly comparable effects in terms of periodontal regeneration. The concentration of platelets appears to play a paradoxical role in regeneration. The regenerative potential of platelets appears to be optimal within a limited range. PMID:26681857

  10. Treatment of von Willebrand Disease.

    PubMed

    Curnow, Jennifer; Pasalic, Leonardo; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2016-03-01

    Congenital von Willebrand disease (VWD) and acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) reflect conditions caused by von Willebrand factor (VWF) deficiency and/or defects. VWD is the most common inherited bleeding disorder and AVWS arises from a variety of causes. Since VWF stabilizes and protects factor VIII (FVIII) in the circulation, this is also reduced in many patients with VWD. The treatment of VWD and AVWS therefore primarily entails replacement of VWF, and sometimes FVIII, to protect against bleeding. This may entail the use of VWF concentrates (currently plasma-derived) and/or FVIII concentrates (currently plasma-derived or more increasingly recombinant forms), and/or desmopressin to release endogenous VWF in subgroups of patients. For AVWS additional treatment of the underlying condition is also required. Adjunct therapies include antifibrinolytics. Globally, various formulations exist for both VWF and FVIII concentrates and are differentially available based on manufacturer marketing or regulatory approvals/clearances in different geographies. Also, guidelines for treatment of VWD vary for different localities and recombinant VWF is undergoing clinical trials. The current review provides an overview of the treatment of VWD as currently practiced in developed countries, and also provides a glimpse towards the future. PMID:26838696

  11. Platelets and their interactions with other immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Fong W.; Vijayan, K. Vinod; Rumbaut, Rolando E.

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate blood cells, long known to be critically involved in hemostasis and thrombosis. In addition to their role in blood clots, increasing evidence reveals significant roles for platelets in inflammation and immunity. However, the notion that platelets represent immune cells is not broadly recognized in the field of Physiology. This manuscript reviews the role of platelets in inflammation and immune responses, and highlights their interactions with other immune cells, including examples of major functional consequences of these interactions. PMID:26140718

  12. Receptors and signalling mechanisms in the procoagulant response of platelets.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, J W; Siljander, P R; Bevers, E M; Farndale, R W; Lindhout, T

    2000-09-01

    Platelets in an advanced stage of activation change from coagulation-inactive to coagulation-promoting cells. This procoagulant response is characterised by exposure of aminophospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine, to the platelet surface and by formation of microvesicles. Under specific conditions, when both signalling and adhesive platelet receptors are occupied, collagen and also thrombin are able to trigger this response. Thus, platelets express high coagulation-promoting activity only after interacting with multiple receptors. PMID:11083453

  13. Pegylation increases platelet biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Rahme, Kamil; Corbalan, J Jose; Faulkner, Colm; Holmes, Justin D; Tajber, Lidia; Medina, Carlos; Radomski, Marek Witold

    2014-06-01

    The increasing use of gold nanoparticles in medical diagnosis and treatment has raised the concern over their blood compatibility. The interactions of nanoparticles with blood components may lead to platelet aggregation and endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, medical applications of gold nanoparticles call for increased nanoparticle stability and biocompatibility. Functionalisation of nanoparticles with polythelene glycol (PEGylation) is known to modulate cell-particle interactions. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of PEGylated-gold nanoparticles on human platelet function and endothelial cells in vitro. Gold nanoparticles, 15 nm in diameter, were synthesised in water using sodium citrate as a reducing and stabilising agent. Functionalised polyethylene glycol-based thiol polymers were used to coat and stabilise pre-synthesised gold nanoparticles. The interaction of gold nanoparticles-citrate and PEGylated-gold nanoparticles with human platelets was measured by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation. Platelet-nanoparticles interaction was imaged using phase-contrast, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The inflammatory effects of gold nanoparticles-citrate and PEGylated-gold nanoparticles in endothelial cells were measured by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. PEGylated-gold nanoparticles were stable under physiological conditions and PEGylated-gold nanoparticles-5400 and PEGylated-gold nanoparticles-10800 did not affect platelet aggregation as measured by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation. In addition, PEGylated-gold nanoparticles did not induce an inflammatory response when incubated with endothelial cells. Therefore, this study shows that PEGylated-gold nanoparticles with a higher molecular weight of the polymer chain are both platelet- and endothelium-compatible making them attractive candidates for biomedical applications. PMID:24749395

  14. Minimum wound size for clotting: flowing blood coagulates on a single collagen fiber presenting tissue factor and von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-08-01

    It is unknown if a lower size limit exists for human blood coagulation under flow over physiological vessel wall triggers as small as a single collagen fiber. Prior determinations of the smallest sized surface stimuli necessary for clotting of human blood, defined as the patch size threshold, have not deployed whole blood, hemodynamic flow, and platelet adhesive stimuli. For whole blood perfused in microfluidic devices, we report that steady venous flow (wall shear rate, 100 s(-1)) was sufficient to drive platelet deposition on 20 micron long zones of collagen fibers or on a single fiber. With tissue factor (TF)-coated collagen, flowing blood generated robust platelet deposits, platelet-localized thrombin, and fibrin on a single collagen fiber, thus demonstrating the absence of a physiological patch size threshold under venous flow. In contrast, at arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) with TF present, essentially no platelet or fibrin deposition occurred on 20 micron collagen zones or on a single collagen fiber, demonstrating a patch threshold, which was overcome by pre-coating the collagen with von Willebrand factor (vWF). For venous flows, human blood can clot on one of the smallest biological units of a single collagen fiber presenting TF. For arterial flows, vWF together with TF allows human blood to generate thrombin and fibrin on a patch stimulus as limited as a single collagen fiber. vWF-dependent platelet adhesion represents a particle-based sensing mechanism of micron-scale stimuli that then allows amplification of the molecular components of TF-driven thrombin and fibrin production under arterial flow. PMID:27339024

  15. Direct observation of von Willebrand factor elongation and fiber formation on collagen during acute whole blood exposure to pathological flow

    PubMed Central

    Colace, T. V.; Diamond, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In severe stenosis, von Willebrand Factor (vWF) experiences millisecond exposures to pathological wall shear rates (γw). We sought to evaluate the deposition of vWF onto collagen surfaces under flow in these environments. Methods and Results Distinct from shear experiments that last many seconds, we deployed microfluidic devices for single-pass perfusion of whole blood or platelet free plasma (PFP) over fibrillar type 1 collagen (< 50 msec transit time) at pathological γw or spatial wall shear rate gradient (grad γw). Using fluorescent anti-vWF, long thick vWF fibers (>20 μm) bound to collagen were visualized at constant γw > 30,000 s−1 during perfusion of PFP, a process enhanced by EDTA. Rapid acceleration or deceleration of EDTA-PFP at grad γw = ± 5.5 × 105 to 4.3 × 107 s−1/cm did not promote vWF deposition. At 19,400 s−1, EDTA-blood perfusion resulted in rolling vWF-platelet nets, while blood perfusion (normal Ca2+) generated large vWF/platelet deposits that repeatedly embolized and were blocked by anti-GPIb or the α IIbβ3 inhibitor GR144053 and did not require grad γw. Blood perfusion at venous shear rate (200 s−1) produced a stable platelet deposit that was a substrate for massive but unstable vWF-platelet aggregates when flow was increased to 7800 s−1. Conclusion Triggered by collagen and enhanced by platelet GPIb and α IIbβ3, vWF fiber formation occurred during acute exposures to pathological γw and did not require gradients in wall shear rate. PMID:23104847

  16. Enhanced sensing of NH3 gas by decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnahena, S. T.; Satpati, Biswarup; Roy, Madhusudan

    2016-05-01

    The present study describes synthesis of Barium Oxide Nanoparticles decorated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and its gas sensing behavior towards NH3 and CO gases. The decorated MWCNT sensor has an enhanced sensing towards NH3 gas compare to pure MWCNT sensor and also has much reduced response and recovery time. The prepared sensing material is characterized by TEM, XRD and Thermal Gravimetric analysis.

  17. Beyond the "Decorated Landscapes" of Educational Reform: Toward Landscapes of Pluralism in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Michael P.; Bentley, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Perhaps, we are at the fork in the road when it is imperative that we consider whether the pursuit of pluralism in science education is a worthwhile endeavor in light of recent educational reforms that seem to decorate the true aim of education. The "decorated landscapes" of educational reform concentrate on economic growth and do little to…

  18. 4 CFR 7.4 - Employment limitations, foreign gifts and decorations, and misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employment limitations, foreign gifts and decorations, and misconduct. 7.4 Section 7.4 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL SYSTEM PERSONNEL RELATIONS AND SERVICES § 7.4 Employment limitations, foreign gifts and decorations, and misconduct....

  19. 45 CFR 73.735-506 - Gifts and decorations from foreign governments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gifts and decorations from foreign governments. 73.735-506 Section 73.735-506 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Gifts, Entertainment, and Favors § 73.735-506 Gifts and decorations from foreign governments. (a) An employee may...

  20. 4 CFR 7.4 - Employment limitations, foreign gifts and decorations, and misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Employment limitations, foreign gifts and decorations, and misconduct. 7.4 Section 7.4 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL SYSTEM PERSONNEL RELATIONS AND SERVICES § 7.4 Employment limitations, foreign gifts and decorations, and misconduct....