Science.gov

Sample records for platelet function assay

  1. Normalization methods in time series of platelet function assays

    PubMed Central

    Van Poucke, Sven; Zhang, Zhongheng; Roest, Mark; Vukicevic, Milan; Beran, Maud; Lauwereins, Bart; Zheng, Ming-Hua; Henskens, Yvonne; Lancé, Marcus; Marcus, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Platelet function can be quantitatively assessed by specific assays such as light-transmission aggregometry, multiple-electrode aggregometry measuring the response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid, collagen, and thrombin-receptor activating peptide and viscoelastic tests such as rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). The task of extracting meaningful statistical and clinical information from high-dimensional data spaces in temporal multivariate clinical data represented in multivariate time series is complex. Building insightful visualizations for multivariate time series demands adequate usage of normalization techniques. In this article, various methods for data normalization (z-transformation, range transformation, proportion transformation, and interquartile range) are presented and visualized discussing the most suited approach for platelet function data series. Normalization was calculated per assay (test) for all time points and per time point for all tests. Interquartile range, range transformation, and z-transformation demonstrated the correlation as calculated by the Spearman correlation test, when normalized per assay (test) for all time points. When normalizing per time point for all tests, no correlation could be abstracted from the charts as was the case when using all data as 1 dataset for normalization. PMID:27428217

  2. Evaluation of a BED-SIDE platelet function assay: performance and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wei C; Walker, C Ty; Obilby, David; Wash, Mark M; Carville, David G M; Guyer, Kirk E; Bates, Eric R

    2002-01-01

    Platelets have a pivotal role in the initial defense against insult to the vasculature and are also recognized of critical importance in the acute care settings of percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiopulmonary bypass. In these environments both platelet count and function may be markedly compromised. Unfortunately, current assays to evaluate the parameters of platelet count and function are of limited utility for bed-side testing. Moreover, it is suggested that there may be significant inter patient variation in response to antiplatelet therapy that may be exacerbated by other agents (e.g. heparin) that are routinely administered during cardiac intervention. Here we describe a practical, rapid and user-friendly whole blood platelet function assay that has been developed for use in bed-side settings. Platelet agonists were formulated with an anticoagulant and lyophilized in blood collection tubes standardised to receive a l mL fresh whole blood sample. In the presence of an agonist, platelets are activated and interact (aggregate). Using traditional cell counting principles, non-aggregated platelets are counted whereas aggregated platelets are not. The percentage (%) of functional platelets in reference to a baseline tube may then be determined. Results are available within four minutes. Platelet aggregation in whole blood demonstrated good correlation with turbidometric aggregometry for both ADP (r=0.91) and collagen (r=0.88). Moreover, in clinical settings where antiplatelet agents were administered, this rapid, bed-side, platelet function assay demonstrated utility in monitoring patient response to these therapies. This novel bed-side assay of platelet function is extremely suitable for the clinical environment with a rapid turn-around time. In addition, it provides a full haematology profile, including platelet count, and should permit enhancement of transfusion and interventional decisions. PMID:17890800

  3. Functional assay of antiplatelet drugs based on margination of platelets in flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Colin D; Fogelson, Aaron L; Hlady, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    A novel functional assay of antiplatelet drug efficacy was designed by utilizing the phenomena of platelet margination in flowing blood and transient platelet contacts with surface-immobilized platelet agonists. Flow margination enhances transient contacts of platelets with the walls of flow chambers covered with surface-immobilized proteins. Depending on the type and the surface density of the immobilized agonists, such transient interactions could "prime" the marginated platelet subpopulation for enhanced activation and adhesion downstream. By creating an upstream surface patch with an immobilized platelet agonist, platelet flow margination was used to test how effective antiplatelet drugs are in suppressing downstream platelet activation and adhesion. The platelet adhesion downstream was measured by a so-called "capture" patch region close to the distal end of the flow chamber. Platelet adhesion downstream was found to be dose-dependent on the upstream surface coverage of the "priming" patch, with immobilized fibrinogen acting as a platelet agonist. Several antiplatelet agents (acetylsalicylic acid, eptifibatide, and tirofiban) were evaluated for their efficacy in attenuating downstream adhesion after upstream platelet priming. The activation of the platelet population was found to be dependent on both the extent of the upstream agonist stimulus and the antiplatelet drug concentration. Such a relationship provides an opportunity to measure the efficacy of specific antiplatelet agents against the type and concentration of upstream platelet agonists. PMID:27030476

  4. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  5. Normalization methods in time series of platelet function assays: A SQUIRE compliant study.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Zhang, Zhongheng; Roest, Mark; Vukicevic, Milan; Beran, Maud; Lauwereins, Bart; Zheng, Ming-Hua; Henskens, Yvonne; Lancé, Marcus; Marcus, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    Platelet function can be quantitatively assessed by specific assays such as light-transmission aggregometry, multiple-electrode aggregometry measuring the response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid, collagen, and thrombin-receptor activating peptide and viscoelastic tests such as rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM).The task of extracting meaningful statistical and clinical information from high-dimensional data spaces in temporal multivariate clinical data represented in multivariate time series is complex. Building insightful visualizations for multivariate time series demands adequate usage of normalization techniques.In this article, various methods for data normalization (z-transformation, range transformation, proportion transformation, and interquartile range) are presented and visualized discussing the most suited approach for platelet function data series.Normalization was calculated per assay (test) for all time points and per time point for all tests.Interquartile range, range transformation, and z-transformation demonstrated the correlation as calculated by the Spearman correlation test, when normalized per assay (test) for all time points. When normalizing per time point for all tests, no correlation could be abstracted from the charts as was the case when using all data as 1 dataset for normalization. PMID:27428217

  6. Different Influences of Hematocrit on the Results of Two Point-Of-Care Platelet Function Tests, the VerifyNow Assay and Multiple Electrode Platelet Aggregometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Gi; Suh, Jung-Won; Park, Jin Joo; Oh, Il-Young; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Choi, Dong-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have reported a considerable association between the VerifyNow (Accumetrics, San Diego, CA, USA) P2Y12 assay results and hematocrit. No reports, however, have described an association between the multiple electrode platelet aggregometry (MEA; Dynabyte, Munich, Germany) adenosine diphosphate (ADP) assay results and hematocrit. This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of hematocrit on the results of 2 different point-of-care platelet function tests. Methods A total of 462 consecutive patients who were undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled. Platelet function was evaluated with both the VerifyNow P2Y12 and MEA ADP assays. Results Anemic patients (n = 152, 32.9%) demonstrated a significantly higher rate of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and stroke (5.3% vs. 2.3%, p = 0.046) during the follow-up (median: 18.8 months). Although the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay results demonstrated a significant inverse correlation with hematocrit (r = −0.409, p<0.001), there was no such correlation between the MEA ADP assay results and hematocrit (r = 0.039, p = 0.401). In the multivariate analysis, anemia was an independent predictor of high on-treatment platelet reactivity, defined as a VerifyNow P2Y12 reaction unit level of ≥252.5 (odds ratio = 2.21, 95% confidence interval = 1.39–3.52; p = 0.001). Importantly, this association was independent of an intrinsic change in platelet reactivity as measured by the MEA ADP assay. Adjusting for the influence of hematocrit improved the strength of the correlation between the VerifyNow P2Y12 and MEA ADP assay results. Conclusions Hematocrit significantly influenced the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay results, a phenomenon that was presumably in-vitro. Hematocrit level should therefore be considered when interpreting results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay. PMID:25427105

  7. Platelet function and ageing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris I

    2016-08-01

    There are clear age-related changes in platelet count and function, driven by changes in hematopoietic tissue, the composition of the blood and vascular health. Platelet count remains relatively stable during middle age (25-60 years old) but falls in older people. The effect of age on platelet function is slightly less clear. The longstanding view is that platelet reactivity increases with age in an almost linear fashion. There are, however, serious limitations to the data supporting this dogma. We can conclude that platelet function increases during middle age, but little evidence exists on the changes in platelet responsiveness in old age (>75 years old). This change in platelet function is driven by differential mRNA and microRNA expression, an increase in oxidative stress and changes in platelet receptors. These age-related changes in platelets are particularly pertinent given that thrombotic disease and use of anti-platelet drugs is much more prevalent in the elderly population, yet the majority of platelet research is carried out in young to middle-aged (20-50 years old) human volunteers and young mice (2-6 months old). We know relatively little about exactly how platelets from people over 75 years old differ from those of middle-aged subjects, and we know even less about the mechanisms that drive these changes. Addressing these gaps in our knowledge will provide substantial understanding in how cell signalling changes during ageing and will enable the development of more precise anti-platelet therapies. PMID:27068925

  8. Platelet Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the clotting process in the body ( in vivo ). A person with normal platelet function test results may still experience excessive bleeding or inappropriate clotting during and after a surgery. Most samples for platelet function testing are only stable for a very short period ...

  9. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Alessandrello Liotta, Agatina; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered. PMID:25733843

  10. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  11. Overview of platelet physiology and laboratory evaluation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, G M

    1999-06-01

    Appropriate laboratory testing for the platelet-type bleeding disorders hinges on an adequate assessment in the history and physical examination. Patients with histories and screening laboratory results consistent with coagulation disorders (hemophilia, disseminated intravascular coagulation) are not appropriate candidates for platelet function testing. In contrast, patients with a lifelong history of platelet-type bleeding symptoms and perhaps a positive family history of bleeding would be appropriate for testing. Figure 6 depicts one strategy to evaluate these patients. Platelet morphology can easily be evaluated to screen for two uncommon qualitative platelet disorders: Bernard-Soulier syndrome (associated with giant platelets) and gray platelet syndrome, a subtype of storage pool disorder in which platelet granulation is morphologically abnormal by light microscopy. If the bleeding disorder occurred later in life (no bleeding with surgery or trauma early in life), the focus should be on acquired disorders of platelet function. For those patients thought to have an inherited disorder, testing for vWD should be done initially because approximately 1% of the population has vWD. The complete vWD panel (factor VIII coagulant activity, vWf antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity) should be performed because many patients will have abnormalities of only one particular panel component. Patients diagnosed with vWD should be classified using multimeric analysis to identify the type 1 vWD patients likely to respond to DDAVP. If vWD studies are normal, platelet aggregation testing should be performed, ensuring that no antiplatelet medications have been ingested at least 1 week before testing. If platelet aggregation tests are normal and if suspicion for an inherited disorder remains high, vWD testing should be repeated. The evaluation of thrombocytopenia may require bone marrow examination to exclude primary hematologic disorders. If future studies with thrombopoietin assays

  12. The platelet serotonin-release assay.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Arnold, Donald M; Nazi, Ishac; Kelton, John G

    2015-06-01

    Few laboratory tests are as clinically useful as The platelet serotonin-release assay (SRA): a positive SRA in the appropriate clinical context is virtually diagnostic of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), a life- and limb-threatening prothrombotic disorder caused by anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin antibodies that activate platelets, thereby triggering serotonin-release. The SRA's performance characteristics include high sensitivity and specificity, although caveats include indeterminate reaction profiles (observed in ∼4% of test sera) and potential for false-positive reactions. As only a subset of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies detectable by enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) are additionally platelet-activating, the SRA has far greater diagnostic specificity than the EIA. However, requiring a positive EIA, either as an initial screening test or as an SRA adjunct, will reduce risk of a false-positive SRA (since a negative EIA in a patient with a "positive" SRA should prompt critical evaluation of the SRA reaction profile). The SRA also provides useful information on whether a HIT serum produces strong platelet activation even in the absence of heparin: such heparin-"independent" platelet activation is a marker of unusually severe HIT, including delayed-onset HIT and severe HIT complicated by consumptive coagulopathy with risk for microvascular thrombosis. PMID:25775976

  13. Dietary manipulation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Bachmair, E M; Ostertag, L M; Zhang, X; de Roos, B

    2014-11-01

    Activated platelets contribute to plaque formation within blood vessels in the early and late stages of atherogenesis, and therefore they have been proposed as risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Anti-platelet drugs, such as aspirin, are now the most prescribed pharmacological treatment in Europe. Certain dietary bioactives also beneficially affect platelet function, and with less side effects, albeit that effects are generally more subtle. Therefore, consumption of dietary bioactives could play a role in the prevention of atherothrombotic vascular disease. Here we review the efficacy of dietary treatment strategies, especially those involving certain dietary fatty acids and polyphenols, to modulate platelet function in healthy subjects or in patients with cardiovascular disease. Variation in study populations, small study sizes and lack of comparability between methods to assess platelet function currently limit robust evidence on the efficacy of dietary bioactives in healthy subjects or specific patient groups. Also, limited knowledge of the metabolism of dietary bioactives, and therefore of the bioavailability of bioactive ingredients, restricts our ability to identify the most effective dietary regimes to improve platelet function. Implementation of uniform point-of-care tests to assess platelet function, and enhanced knowledge of the efficacy by which specific dietary compounds and their metabolites affect platelet function, may enable the identification of functional anti-platelet ingredients that are eligible for a health claim, or combined treatment strategies, including both pharmacological anti-platelet treatment as well as dietary intervention, to tackle atherothrombotic vascular disease. PMID:24858060

  14. Acquired platelet function defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... dark black, or tarry bowel movements ; or vomiting blood or material that looks like coffee grounds Nosebleeds ... Tests that may done include: Bleeding time Platelet aggregation test Platelet count PT and PTT

  15. Congenital platelet function defects

    MedlinePlus

    Kottke-Marchant K. Platelet disorders. In: Hsi ED, ed. Hematopathology . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 2. Nichols WL. Von Willebrand disease and hemorrhagic abnormalities of platelet ...

  16. Hormonal contraception and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Saleh, A A; Ginsburg, K A; Duchon, T A; Dorey, L G; Hirata, J; Alshameeri, R S; Dombrowski, M P; Mammen, E F

    1995-05-15

    73 healthy women (29 controls, 25 using OCs, and 19 using Norplant) were selected from the clinic population at North Oakland Medical Center for inclusion in this study after obtaining informed consent. Age, race, height, weight, blood pressure, and cigarette smoking were recorded for each subject. 12 patients were on monophasic OCs while 13 were on triphasic preparations. Both hormonal contraceptive groups had used their particular contraceptive for at least 3 months prior to blood drawing. Platelet tests were performed within 2 hours of sample collection: platelet counts (PLC) and mean platelet volume (MPV) were determined on an Automated Platelet Counter (Baker 810 Platelet Analyzer). Whole blood aggregation was performed on a platelet aggregometer (Chrono-Log, Model 550) using both ADP (ADP, 5 mM) and collagen (COLL, 2 mcg/ml) as inducing agents. Demographic differences were not significant (p 0.05) among the 3 treatment groups, whose average age was 25.3-25.8 years old. Furthermore, no significant differences (p 0.05) in platelet function were detected among controls or subjects receiving either oral contraceptives or Norplant, compared to control patients. The mean platelet counts (X 10/9/L) were 223 for OC users, 231 for Norplant users, and 232 for controls. The respective platelet aggregation (ADP, ohms) values were 12.5, 18.0, and 19.2 as well as (COLL, ohms) 35.6, 40.7, and 39.0. These results demonstrated that there is no evidence for altered platelet function, with the testing methods employed, in women using either Norplant or combination low dose oral contraceptives. To date, several studies have examined this issue, with contradictory reports about the effects of hormonal contraceptives in platelet function. After controlling for differences between various steroid preparations and other such confounding variables, some of these conflicting conclusions could be the result of a lack of uniformity among the methods used to evaluate platelet aggregation

  17. Sources of variability in platelet accumulation on type 1 fibrillar collagen in microfluidic flow assays.

    PubMed

    Neeves, Keith B; Onasoga, Abimbola A; Hansen, Ryan R; Lilly, Jessica J; Venckunaite, Diana; Sumner, Meghan B; Irish, Andrew T; Brodsky, Gary; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Di Paola, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic flow assays (MFA) that measure shear dependent platelet function have potential clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding and thrombotic disorders. As a step towards clinical application, the objective of this study was to measure how phenotypic and genetic factors, as well as experimental conditions, affect the variability of platelet accumulation on type 1 collagen within a MFA. Whole blood was perfused over type 1 fibrillar collagen at wall shear rates of 150, 300, 750 and 1500 s⁻¹ through four independent channels with a height of 50 µm and a width of 500 µm. The accumulation of platelets was characterized by the lag time to 1% platelet surface coverage (Lag(T)), the rate of platelet accumulation (V(PLT)), and platelet surface coverage (SC). A cohort of normal donors was tested and the results were correlated to plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels, platelet count, hematocrit, sex, and collagen receptors genotypes. VWF levels were the strongest determinant of platelet accumulation. VWF levels were positively correlated to V(PLT) and SC at all wall shear rates. A longer Lag(T) for platelet accumulation at arterial shear rates compared to venous shear rates was attributed to the time required for plasma proteins to adsorb to collagen. There was no association between platelet accumulation and hematocrit or platelet count. Individuals with the AG genotype of the GP6 gene had lower platelet accumulation than individuals with the AA genotype at 150 s⁻¹ and 300 s⁻¹. Recalcified blood collected into sodium citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) resulted in diminished platelet accumulation compared to CTI alone, suggesting that citrate irreversibly diminishes platelet function. This study the largest association study of MFA in healthy donors (n = 104) and will likely set up the basis for the determination of the normal range of platelet responses in this type of assay. PMID:23355889

  18. Monoclonal platelet antigen capture assays (MAIPA) and reagents: a statement.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, C; Freedman, J; Foxcroft, Z; Husebekk, A; Metcalfe, P; Muniz-Diaz, E; Ouwehand, W; Panzer, S; Rozman, P; Skogen, B

    2007-11-01

    This statement concerning the monoclonal-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) has been written on behalf of the International Society of Blood Transfusion--Working Party on Platelet Immunology. The MAIPA technique is considered as the gold standard reference technique in platelet immunology. The assay performed with reagents labelled for 'research only' is acceptable as long as it is regularly evaluated by participation of laboratories in national or international workshops held with reference laboratories. PMID:18070272

  19. [Assessment of platelet function in man].

    PubMed

    Gaussem, Pascale

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of platelet function was primarily designed to explore patients with hemostatic disorders, but is becoming important for the monitoring of anti platelet agents, mostly aspirin and clopidogrel. Beside platelet counting, morphological analysis and bleeding time, a number of dedicated platelet function instruments are now available, generally allowing a rapid evaluation of platelet function in whole blood. The other tests including aggregometry and ELISA measurement of activation markers are generally restricted to specialized laboratories. Although aggregometry is still considered as the "gold standard", the recently developed flow cytometric-based platelet function analysis provides a wide choice of tests that assess the number of surface receptors, the measure of secretion and aggregation, the quantification of microparticules and leukocyte-platelet aggregates. It also allows the measure of the function of the ADP receptor P2Y12 by the phosphorylation level of the VASP protein, method currently under evaluation to monitor the platelet response to clopidogrel treatment. PMID:17243268

  20. Platelet function defects in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Mikhailidis, D P; Jenkins, W J; Barradas, M A; Jeremy, J Y; Dandona, P

    1986-01-01

    Platelet function in alcoholic patients was assessed on admission and during abstinence in hospital. On admission platelets from these patients were significantly less responsive (percentage aggregation and thromboxane A2 release) to conventional in vitro aggregating agents (adrenaline, adenosine diphosphate, and collagen) than platelets from healthy, moderate drinkers. Initially, platelet counts in platelet rich plasma tended to be low and the Simplate II bleeding times frequently prolonged. Platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release, however, were inhibited even in patients with normal platelet counts on admission. Platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release returned to normal or became hyper-responsive during two to three weeks of abstinence. Platelet counts rose during this period, the largest responses occurring in those patients with the lowest counts on admission. Bleeding times reverted to normal during abstinence and correlated significantly with changes in platelet aggregation, thromboxane A2 release, and platelet count and with the estimated ethanol consumption during the week before admission. Chronic, heavy alcohol ingestion evidently exerts an inhibitory effect on platelet function even in the absence of alcohol in the blood, and this phenomenon is reversible on abstaining. The impaired platelet function, together with the reduced platelet count, may contribute to the bleeding diathesis associated with chronic alcoholism and to the increased incidence and recurrence of gastrointestinal haemorrhage associated with excessive alcohol intake. PMID:3094624

  1. Dynamic light scattering can determine platelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet transfusions are life-saving procedures for patients who are bleeding or undergoing chemotherapy. The effectiveness of transfusions depends on the number of platelets transfused and the platelet function. Platelet function correlates with proportion of discoid to activated platelets, morphology response to temperature stress, and inversely correlates with microparticle content. ThromboLUX is a novel device that determines platelet function by measuring all of these characteristics using dynamic light scattering (DLS). During periods of stress, such as decreased temperature, cytoskeletal rearrangements will cause normal, discoid platelets to activate and become spiny spheres. The formation of pseudopods of various lengths facilitates the clotting cascade and also increases the apparent size of platelets. ThromboLUX uses a 37-20-37 C temperature cycle that mimics the bleeding, storage, and transfusion process. As the temperature fluctuates, DLS will measure the changing platelet hydrodynamic radius and the size of any microparticles present. ThromboLUX analysis of platelet concentrates in vitro would allow determination of high platelet function units before transfusion and would therefore improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety. This study examined how DLS is able to distinguish between discoid and activated platelets as well as measure the parameters that contribute to high platelet function.

  2. [Research Progress on Cytometric Bead Assay for Platelet Antibody Detection].

    PubMed

    Ling, Yun; Kong, Xin; Chen, Bao-An

    2015-08-01

    Anti-platelet specific antibody is one of the most important reasons leading to thrombocytopenia and megakaryocyte dysmaturity. The detection of platelet autoantibodies is an important step in the diagnosis of ITP because of the absence of specific clinic feature. The monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) has become a "gold standard" for determination of PLT specific antibody, which has high specificity and low sensitivity. However, this assay is time-consuming and tedious work. Routine use of this assay in hospital is difficult. Recently, some researches reporded the cytometric bead assay that has higher sensitivity than MAIPA, and so probably solves the problem of time-consuming partly, that also can use different beads for simultaneous detection. This review focuses on recent progress of the cytometric bead assay. PMID:26314475

  3. P2 receptors and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Following vessel wall injury, platelets adhere to the exposed subendothelium, become activated and release mediators such as TXA(2) and nucleotides stored at very high concentration in the so-called dense granules. Released nucleotides and other soluble agents act in a positive feedback mechanism to cause further platelet activation and amplify platelet responses induced by agents such as thrombin or collagen. Adenine nucleotides act on platelets through three distinct P2 receptors: two are G protein-coupled ADP receptors, namely the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptor subtypes, while the P2X(1) receptor ligand-gated cation channel is activated by ATP. The P2Y(1) receptor initiates platelet aggregation but is not sufficient for a full platelet aggregation in response to ADP, while the P2Y(12) receptor is responsible for completion of the aggregation to ADP. The latter receptor, the molecular target of the antithrombotic drugs clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor, is responsible for most of the potentiating effects of ADP when platelets are stimulated by agents such as thrombin, collagen or immune complexes. The P2X(1) receptor is involved in platelet shape change and in activation by collagen under shear conditions. Each of these receptors is coupled to specific signal transduction pathways in response to ADP or ATP and is differentially involved in all the sequential events involved in platelet function and haemostasis. As such, they represent potential targets for antithrombotic drugs. PMID:21792575

  4. Altered Platelet Function in Intrauterine Growth Restriction: A Cause or a Consequence of Uteroplacental Disease?

    PubMed

    Müllers, Sieglinde M; Burke, Naomi; Flood, Karen; Cowman, Jonathan; O'connor, Hugh; Cotter, Brian; Kearney, Morgan; Dempsey, Mark; Dicker, Patrick; Tully, Elizabeth; Geary, Michael P; Kenny, Dermot; Malone, Fergal D

    2016-07-01

    Objective A limited number of platelet function studies in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) have yielded conflicting results. We sought to evaluate platelet reactivity in IUGR using a novel platelet aggregation assay. Study Design Pregnancies with IUGR were recruited from 24 weeks' gestation (estimated fetal weight < 10th centile) and had platelet function testing performed after diagnosis. A modification of light transmission aggregometry created dose-response curves of platelet reactivity in response to multiple agonists at differing concentrations. Findings were compared with healthy third trimester controls. IUGR cases with a subsequent normal birth weight were analyzed separately. Results In this study, 33 pregnancies retained their IUGR diagnosis at birth, demonstrating significantly reduced platelet reactivity in response to all agonists (arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate, collagen, thrombin receptor-activating peptide, and epinephrine) when compared with 36 healthy pregnancy controls (p < 0.0001). Similar results were obtained for cases demonstrating an increasing in utero growth trajectory. When IUGR preceded preeclampsia or gestational hypertension, platelet function was significantly reduced compared with normotensive IUGR. Conclusion Using this comprehensive platelet assay, we have demonstrated a functional impairment of platelets in IUGR. This may reflect platelet-derived placental growth factor release. Further evaluation of platelet function may aid in the development of future platelet-targeted therapies for uteroplacental disease. PMID:26906182

  5. Sodium-hydrogen exchange and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Rosskopf, D

    1999-07-01

    On stimulation of platelets with agonists, for example, thrombin, a rapid rise in intracellular pH is observed. This alkalinization is mediated by an increase in transport activity of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform NHE1. In addition to this Na(+)/H(+) exchange mechanism, platelets express bicarbonate/chloride exchangers, which also contribute to pH(i) homeostasis. The main functions of NHE1 in platelets include pH(i) control, volume regulation, and participation in cell signaling. The isoform NHE1 is highly sensitive toward inhibition by EIPA, Hoe694, and Hoe642. The regulation of NHE1 activity is complex and is not completely understood. It includes the MAP kinase cascade, the Ca/calmodulin system, several heterotrimeric G proteins (Galpha12, Galpha13, Galphaq, and Galphai), small G proteins (ras, cdc42, rhoA), and downstream kinases (e.g., p160ROCK). Volume challenges stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of cytoplasmic proteins, which ultimately activate NHE1. Thrombin, thromboxane, platelet-activating factor, angiotensin II, endothelin, phorbol ester, and Ca(2+) ionophors stimulate NHE1 activity in platelets. Blockade of platelet NHE1 can inhibit platelet activation. With the development of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors, detailed investigation of the relationships between NHE1 activity and platelet activation now becomes feasible. PMID:10481210

  6. Inherited Platelet Function Disorders: Algorithms for Phenotypic and Genetic Investigation.

    PubMed

    Gresele, Paolo; Bury, Loredana; Falcinelli, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs) manifest with mucocutaneous bleeding and are frequently difficult to diagnose due to their heterogeneity, the complexity of the platelet activation pathways and a lack of standardization of the platelet function laboratory assays and of their use for this purpose. A rational diagnostic approach to IPFDs should follow an algorithm where clinical examination and a stepwise laboratory evaluation play a crucial role. A streamlined panel of laboratory tests, with consecutive steps of increasing level of complexity, allows the phenotypic characterization of most IPFDs. A first-line diagnosis of a significant fraction of the IPFD may be made also at nonspecialized centers by using relatively simple tests, including platelet count, peripheral blood smear, light transmission aggregometry, measurement of platelet granule content and release, and the expression of glycoproteins by flow cytometry. Some of the most complex, second- and third-step tests may be performed only in highly specialized laboratories. Genotyping, including the widespread application of next-generation sequencing, has enabled discovery in the last few years of several novel genes associated with platelet disorders and this method may eventually become a first-line diagnostic approach; however, a preliminary clinical and laboratory phenotypic characterization nowadays still remains crucial for diagnosis of IPFDs. PMID:26962877

  7. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets.

    PubMed

    Pineda, A A; Zylstra, V W; Clare, D E; Dewanjee, M K; Forstrom, L A

    1989-01-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous 111In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% [p less than 0.001] vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% [p greater than 0.1], respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake. PMID:2749876

  8. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  9. Detection and effects on platelet function of anti-platelet antibody in mule foals with experimentally induced neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, S; Gaunt, S D; McClure, J J; Oliver, J

    1999-01-01

    Horse mares carrying mule foals were immunized during the last trimester of pregnancy with whole acid-citrate-dextrose-anticoagulated donkey blood to experimentally induce neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia occurred in the neonatal mule foals born to immunized horse mares within 24 hours after ingestion of their dams' colostrum. Mule foals born to mares not immunized with donkey blood did not develop thrombocytopenia. These findings suggest that antibodies may have been directed against a donkey platelet antigen present in the mule foals but not present in their dams. The objectives of this study were to determine whether anti-platelet antibody could be detected in mule foals with experimentally induced neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, to identify any platelet proteins recognized by serum antibody in these foals, and to determine if platelet function was altered by sera from these mule foals. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated significantly higher absorption at 1:200 of platelet-bindable immunoglobulin G in serum from thrombocytopenic mule foals, compared with nonthrombocytopenic mule foals. Sera from thrombocytopenic and nonthrombocytopenic mule foals produced similar binding patterns in western immunoblots with donkey platelet proteins separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Maximal platelet aggregation and relative slope of aggregation in response to collagen were significantly inhibited after incubation with sera from thrombocytopenic mule foals. These results suggest that mule foals with induced alloimmune thrombocytopenia have serum antibodies that bind to platelets and may compete with collagen binding sites to impair platelet aggregation. PMID:10587252

  10. Coated platelets function in platelet-dependent fibrin formation via integrin αIIbβ3 and transglutaminase factor XIII

    PubMed Central

    Mattheij, Nadine J.A.; Swieringa, Frauke; Mastenbroek, Tom G.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; May, Frauke; Baaten, Constance C.F.M.J.; van der Meijden, Paola E.J.; Henskens, Yvonne M.C.; Beckers, Erik A.M.; Suylen, Dennis P.L.; Nolte, Marc W.; Hackeng, Tilman M.; McCarty, Owen J.T.; Heemskerk, Johan W.M.; Cosemans, Judith M.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Coated platelets, formed by collagen and thrombin activation, have been characterized in different ways: i) by the formation of a protein coat of α-granular proteins; ii) by exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine; or iii) by high fibrinogen binding. Yet, their functional role has remained unclear. Here we used a novel transglutaminase probe, Rhod-A14, to identify a subpopulation of platelets with a cross-linked protein coat, and compared this with other platelet subpopulations using a panel of functional assays. Platelet stimulation with convulxin/thrombin resulted in initial integrin αIIbβ3 activation, the appearance of a platelet population with high fibrinogen binding, (independently of active integrins, but dependent on the presence of thrombin) followed by phosphatidylserine exposure and binding of coagulation factors Va and Xa. A subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets bound Rhod-A14 both in suspension and in thrombi generated on a collagen surface. In suspension, high fibrinogen and Rhod-A14 binding were antagonized by combined inhibition of transglutaminase activity and integrin αIIbβ3. Markedly, in thrombi from mice deficient in transglutaminase factor XIII, platelet-driven fibrin formation and Rhod-A14 binding were abolished by blockage of integrin αIIbβ3. Vice versa, star-like fibrin formation from platelets of a patient with deficiency in αIIbβ3 (Glanzmann thrombasthenia) was abolished upon blockage of transglutaminase activity. We conclude that coated platelets, with initial αIIbβ3 activation and high fibrinogen binding, form a subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets, and function in platelet-dependent star-like fibrin fiber formation via transglutaminase factor XIII and integrin αIIbβ3. PMID:26721892

  11. Effects of irradiation on platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, G.; Adams, G.A.; Labow, R.S.

    1988-09-01

    Current medical practice involves the irradiation of blood components, including platelet concentrates, before their administration to patients with severe immunosuppression. The authors studied the effect of irradiation on in vitro platelet function and the leaching of plasticizers from the bag, both immediately and after 5 days of storage. The platelet count, white cell count, pH, glucose, lactate, platelet aggregation and release reaction, and serotonin uptake were not altered by the irradiation of random-donor or apheresis units with 2000 rads carried out at 0 and 24 hours and 5 days after collection. The leaching of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate from the plastic bags followed by the conversion to mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was not increased by irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to irradiate platelet concentrates on the day of collection and subsequently store them for at least 5 days while maintaining in vitro function. This procedure could have considerable benefit for blood banks involved in the provision of many platelet products.

  12. Rapid in vitro biocompatibility assay of endovascular stents by flow cytometry using platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation.

    PubMed

    Tárnok, A; Mahnke, A; Müller, M; Zotz, R J

    1999-02-15

    Clinical studies suggest that stent design and surface texture are responsible for differences in biocompatibility of metallic endovascular stents. A simple in vitro experimental setup was established to test stent-induced degree of platelet and leukocyte activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation by flow cytometry. Heparin-coated tantalum stents and gold-coated and uncoated stainless steel stents were tested. Stents were implanted into silicone tubes and exposed to blood from healthy volunteers. Platelet and leukocyte activation and percentage of leukocyte-platelet aggregates were determined in a whole-blood assay by subsequent staining for activation-associated antigens (CD41a, CD42b, CD62p, and fibrinogen binding) and leukocyte antigens (CD14 and CD45) and flow cytometric analysis. Blood taken directly after venous puncture or exposed to the silicone tube alone was used as negative controls. Positive control was in vitro stimulation with thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP-6). Low degree of platelet activation and significant increase in monocyte- and neutrophil-platelet aggregation were observed in blood exposed to stents (P < 0.05). In addition, leukocyte activation was induced as measured by increased CD45 and CD14 expression. Heparin coated stents continuously induced less platelet activation and leukocyte-platelet aggregation than uncoated stainless steel stents of the same length and shorter stents of the same structure. Stent surface coating and texture plays a role in platelet and leukocyte activation and leukocyte-platelet aggregation. Using this simple in vitro assay and whole blood and flow cytometry, it seems possible to differentiate stents by their potency to activate platelets and/or leukocytes. This assay could be applied for improving the biocompatibility of coronary stents. PMID:10088974

  13. STIM and Orai in platelet function.

    PubMed

    Varga-Szabo, David; Braun, Attila; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2011-09-01

    Physiological platelet activation and thrombus formation are essential to stop bleeding in case of vascular injury, whereas inadequate triggering of the same process in diseased vessels can lead to fatal thromboembolism and tissue ischemia of vital organs. A central step in platelet activation is agonist-induced elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. This happens on the one hand through the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores and on the other hand through Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular space. In platelets, the major Ca(2+) influx pathway is the so-called store operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), induced by store depletion. Studies in the last five years discovered the molecular background of platelet SOCE. Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) and Orai1, two so far unknown molecules, got in the focus of research. STIM1 was found to be the Ca(2+) sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, whereas Orai1 was identified as the major store operated Ca(2+) (SOC) channel in the plasma membrane. These two molecules and their role in platelet function and thrombus formation are the topic of the present review with a special focus on apoptosis and apoptosis-like processes in platelet physiology. PMID:21616531

  14. An Assay of Measuring Platelet Reactivity Using Monoclonal Antibody against Activated Platelet Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in Patients Taking Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon-Hyouk; Kim, Song-Yi; Kim, Ki-Seok; Kim, Young Ree; Kang, Sung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Residual platelet reactivity in patients who are taking clopidogrel is commonly measured with VerifyNow assay, which is based on the principle of light transmission aggregometry. However, to evaluate the residual platelet reactivity, it would be more accurate if the reactivity of platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa is directly monitored. In this study, PAC1, a monoclonal antibody against activated platelet GP IIb/IIIa, was used to measure the residual platelet reactivity. Subjects and Methods Twenty seven patients with coronary artery disease taking clopidogrel were enrolled. Platelets in whole blood were stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated PAC1. Mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) and % positive platelets (PP) were measured with flow cytometry, and the binding index (BI; MFI × %PP/100) was calculated. P2Y12 reaction unit (PRU) and % inhibition of VerifyNow assay were also measured in the usual manner. Results PRU of VerifyNow assay correlated significantly with MFI, %PP, and BI at 10 µM (r=0.59, 0.73, and 0.60, respectively, all p<0.005) and 20 µM of adenosine diphosphate (ADP; r=0.61, 0.75, and 0.63, respectively, all p<0.005). The % inhibition also correlated significantly with MFI, %PP, and BI at 10 µM (r=-0.60, -0.69, and -0.59, respectively, all p<0.005) and 20 µM of ADP (r=-0.63, -0.71, and -0.62, respectively, all p<0.005). Conclusion Direct measurements of the reactivity of platelet GP IIb/IIIa were feasible using PAC1 and flow cytometry in patients taking clopidogrel. Further clinical studies are required to determine the cut-off values which would define high residual platelet reactivity in patients on this treatment protocol. PMID:26413105

  15. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Rachael F.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa–positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP. PMID:26138687

  16. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for 5 d released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol's beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function. PMID:26683619

  17. [Analysis of platelet-derived factors that modulate functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes].

    PubMed

    Sasada, M; Asagoe, K

    1994-04-01

    Interactions between platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) modulate their functions and play a role in the development of pathogenesis of some disease. Platelets secret various kinds of factors that affect PMN functions. They seemed to have important role in vivo, but little has been elucidated on exact mechanism of action and physiological meaning of each factor in relation to PMN functions. We studied the effects of platelets and released substances from activated platelets on the functions of PMN. Results were as follows. 1) Platelets enhanced bactericidal activities of PMN against E.coli. 2) Platelets had effects on the generation of superoxide anion (O2-) of PMN. Their effects were quite different according to the assay condition of PMN, that is, platelets inhibited O2- generation when PMN were at rest or stimulated slightly and they enhanced O2-generation of PMN that were stimulated with optimal condition. 3) Thrombin-activated platelets and their supernatant elicited a transient elevation of [Ca2] of PMN. The activity of the supernatant decreased by treating with hexokinase that decomposed ATP. Further treatment with trypsin abolished its activity almost completely. Considering with our additional experiments, factors that induced [Ca2+] elevation of PMN were ATP, beta-thromboglobulin and some trypsin-sensitive factor(s). 4) Supernatant of thrombin-activated platelets decreased random migration and chemokinesis of PMN. PMID:8028184

  18. In vivo effects of eltrombopag on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia: no evidence of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Psaila, Bethan; Bussel, James B.; Linden, Matthew D.; Babula, Bracken; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R.; Tate, Chinara; Mathur, Kanika; Frelinger, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin-receptor agonist, on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are not fully characterized. This study used whole blood flow cytometry to examine platelet function in 20 patients receiving eltrombopag treatment at days 0, 7, and 28. Platelet surface expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa, P-selectin, and GPIb was measured with and without low and high adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) concentrations. Before eltrombopag treatment with no ex vivo agonist, platelet activation was higher in ITP patients than controls. Platelet GPIb and activated GPIIb/IIIa expression without added agonist was unchanged following eltrombopag treatment, whereas a slight increase in P-selectin was observed. Expression of P-selectin and activated GPIIb/IIIa in response to high-dose ADP was lower during eltrombopag treatment than at baseline. Eltrombopag led to a slight increase in platelet reactivity to TRAP only in responders to eltrombopag but not to levels above those in controls; whole blood experiments demonstrated that this increase was probably because of higher platelet counts rather than higher platelet reactivity. In conclusion, although thrombocytopenic ITP patients have higher baseline platelet activation than controls, eltrombopag did not cause platelet activation or hyper-reactivity, irrespective of whether the platelet count increased. PMID:22294727

  19. Platelets

    MedlinePlus

    ... are related to immunity and fighting infection. Platelet Production Platelets are produced in the bone marrow, the ... platelet destruction and also decreased bone marrow platelet production. These problems are caused by autoantibodies. Antibodies are ...

  20. Bidirectional effects of dexmedetomidine on human platelet functions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Shuji; Hirakata, Hideo; Sugita, Naoko; Fukuda, Kazuhiko

    2015-11-01

    Platelets express the imidazoline (I)-receptor, I1 and I2, as well as the α2-adrenoceptor. Although dexmedetomidine, a selective α2-adrenoceptor agonist with some affinity for the I-receptor is expected to affect platelet function, the effects of dexmedetomidine on platelet functions remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dexmedetomidine on human platelet functions in vitro. The effects of dexmedetomidine on platelet aggregation were examined using aggregometers. The formation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in platelets was measured by an enzyme immunoassay. In addition, P-selectin expression in platelets was estimated by flow cytometry. We showed that dexmedetomidine enhances platelet aggregation. But in the presence of yohimbine, an α2-antagonist, dexmedetomidine suppressed platelet aggregation. Efaroxan, an I1-antagonist, and methylene blue, a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, abolished the suppressive effect of dexmedetomidine, whereas idazoxan, an I2-antagonist, showed no effect. Dexmedetomidine suppressed cAMP formation and enhanced P-selectin expression in platelets, and these effects were inhibited by yohimbine. Dexmedetomidine increased cGMP formation in platelets in the presence of yohimbine, and this increase was suppressed by efaroxan. These results demonstrated that dexmedetomidine has both enhancing and suppressive effects on human platelet functions through its action on the α2-adrenoceptor and on the I1-imidazoline receptor, respectively. PMID:26435028

  1. Impact of Aspirin and Clopidogrel Interruption on Platelet Function in Patients Undergoing Major Vascular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Le Manach, Yannick; Kahn, David; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla; Le Sache, Frederic; Smadja, David M.; Remones, Veronique; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Coriat, Pierre; Gaussem, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate functional platelet recovery after preoperative withdrawal of aspirin and clopidogrel and platelet function 5 days after treatment resumption. Methods/Results We conducted an observational study, which prospectively included consecutive patients taking aspirin, taking clopidogrel, and untreated controls (15 patients in each group). The antiplatelet drugs were withdrawn five days before surgery (baseline) and were reintroduced two days after surgery. Platelet function was evaluated by optical aggregation in the presence of collagen, arachidonic acid (aspirin) and ADP (clopidogrel) and by VASP assay (clopidogrel). Platelet-leukocyte complex (PLC) level was quantified at each time-point. At baseline, platelet function was efficiently inhibited by aspirin and had recovered fully in most patients 5 days after drug withdrawal. PLC levels five days after aspirin reintroduction were similar to baseline (+4±10%; p = 0.16), in line with an effective platelet inhibition. Chronic clopidogrel treatment was associated with variable platelet inhibition and its withdrawal led to variable functional recovery. PLC levels were significantly increased five days after clopidogrel reintroduction (+10±15%; p = 0.02), compared to baseline. Conclusions Aspirin withdrawal 5 days before high-bleeding-risk procedures was associated with functional platelet recovery, and its reintroduction two days after surgery restored antiplaletet efficacy five days later. This was not the case of clopidogrel, and further work is therefore needed to define its optimal perioperative management. PMID:25141121

  2. Development of a New Method for Platelet Function Test and Its Shearing Condition in Microfludic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Choi, Seawhan; Shin, Sehyun; Korea University Department of Mechanical Engineering Team

    2015-11-01

    Platelet is a crucial blood cell on hemostasis. As platelet exposed to high shear stress, it can be activated showing morphological and functional changes to stop bleeding. When platelet is abnormal, there is high risk of cardiovascular diseases. Thus, quick and precise assay for platelet function is important in clinical treatment. In this study, we design a microfluidic system, which can test platelet function exposed with the stimulation of shear and agonists. The microfluidic system consists of three parts: 1) a shear mechanism with rotating stirrer; 2) multiple microchannels to flow samples and to stop; 3) camera-interfaced migration distance(MD) analyzing system. When sheared blood is driven by pressure through the microchannel, shear-activated platelets adhere to a collagen-coated surface, causing blood flow to significantly slow and eventually stop. As the micro-stirrer speed increases, MD decreases exponentially at first, but it increases beyond a critical rpm after all. These results are coincident with data measured by FACS flowcytometry. These results imply that the present system could quantitatively measure the degree of activation, aggregation and adhesion of platelets and that blood MD is potent index for measuring the shear-dependence of platelet function.

  3. Heparin inhibition of von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, M; McNeill, P M; Carlson, P L; Kermode, J C; Adelman, B; Conroy, R; Marques, D

    1991-01-01

    The intravenous administration of heparin to patients before open heart surgery reduced ristocetin cofactor activity by 58% (P less than 0.01, t test), and this impairment of von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet function was closely related to plasma heparin levels (r2 = 0.9), but not to plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) levels. We hypothesized that heparin may inhibit vWF-dependent platelet hemostatic functions by directly binding vWF in solution and interfering with vWF-GpIb binding. Using the in vitro techniques of ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination, fluorescent flow cytometric measurement of vWF-platelet binding, and conventional radioligand binding assays we observed that heparin inhibited both vWF-dependent platelet function and vWF-platelet binding in a parallel and dose-dependent manner. Heparin also inhibited platelet agglutination induced by bovine vWF and inhibited the binding of human asialo-vWF to platelets in ristocetin-free systems. The inhibitory potency of heparin was not dependent upon its affinity for antithrombin III, but was molecular weight dependent: homogeneous preparations of lower molecular weight were less inhibitory. Heparin impairment of vWF function may explain why some hemorrhagic complications of heparin therapy are not predictable based on techniques for monitoring the conventional anticoagulant effects of heparin. PMID:2022745

  4. Biochemical and functional abnormalities in hypercholesterolemic rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalal, K.B.; Ebbe, S.; Mazoyer, E.; Carpenter, D.; Yee, T. )

    1990-02-01

    This study was designed to elucidate changes in rabbit platelet lipids induced by a cholesterol rich diet and to explore the possible correlation of these lipid changes with platelet abnormalities. Pronounced biochemical alterations were observed when serum cholesterol levels of 700-1000 mg% were reached. Hypercholesterolemic (HC) platelets contained 37% more neutral lipids and 16% less phospholipids than the controls. Lysolecithin, cholesterol esters and phosphatidylinositol (PI) levels were increased in HC platelets, and the levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC) were decreased. The cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of lipidemic platelets increased from 0.55 +/- 0.011 to 0.89 +/- 0.016 (P less than 0.01) in eight weeks. HC platelets had 90% more arachidonic acid (AA) in the PI than normal platelets. No significant changes in AA of PC were observed. Platelet function was monitored by the uptake and release of (14C)serotonin in platelet rich plasma (PRP), using varying concentrations of collagen as an aggregating agent. The uptake of (14C)serotonin in HC and normal platelets ranged from 78-94%. The percent of (14C)serotonin released from normal and HC platelets was proportional to the concentration of collagen. However, lipidemic platelets were hyperreactive to low concentrations of collagen. Incorporation of 50 microM acetylsalicylic acid into the aggregating medium suppressed the release of (14C)serotonin in normal PRP by more than 90%, but had only a partial effect on lipidemic PRP.

  5. Misshapen/NIK-related kinase (MINK1) is involved in platelet function, hemostasis, and thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ming; Luo, Dongjiao; Yu, Shanshan; Liu, Pu; Zhou, Qi; Hu, Mengjiao; Liu, Yangyang; Wang, Shuai; Huang, Qian; Niu, Yuxi; Lu, Linrong; Hu, Hu

    2016-02-18

    The sterile-20 kinase misshapen/Nck-interacting kinase (NIK)-related kinase 1 (MINK1) is involved in many important cellular processes such as growth, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and motility. Here, with MINK1-deficient (MINK1(-/-)) mice, we showed that MINK1 plays an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis via the regulation of platelet functions. In the tail-bleeding assay, MINK1(-/-) mice exhibited a longer bleeding time than wild-type (WT) mice (575.2 ± 59.7 seconds vs 419.6 ± 66.9 seconds). In a model of ferric chloride-induced mesenteric arteriolar thrombosis, vessel occlusion times were twice as long in MINK1(-/-) mice as in WT mice. In an in vitro microfluidic whole-blood perfusion assay, thrombus formation on a collagen matrix under arterial shear conditions was significantly reduced in MINK1(-/-) platelets. Moreover, MINK1(-/-) platelets demonstrated impaired aggregation and secretion in response to low doses of thrombin and collagen. Furthermore, platelet spreading on fibrinogen was largely hampered in MINK1(-/-) platelets. The functional differences of MINK1(-/-) platelets could be attributed to impaired adenosine 5'-diphosphate secretion. Signaling events associated with MINK1 appeared to involve extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and Akt. Hence, MINK1 may be an important signaling molecule that mediates mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and participates in platelet activation and thrombus formation. PMID:26598717

  6. Platelet Function Tests: A Review of Progresses in Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Lim; Li, Shuhua

    2014-01-01

    The major goal of traditional platelet function tests has been to screen and diagnose patients who present with bleeding problems. However, as the central role of platelets implicated in the etiology of arterial thrombotic diseases such as myocardial infarction and stroke became widely known, platelet function tests are now being promoted to monitor the efficacy of antiplatelet drugs and also to potentially identify patients at increased risk of thrombosis. Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, are mediators of inflammation, and have immunomodulatory activity. As new potential biomarkers and technologies arrive at the horizon, platelet functions testing appears to take on a new aspect. This review article discusses currently available clinical application of platelet function tests, placing emphasis on essential characteristics. PMID:24895576

  7. Effects of Physical (In)activity on Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Heber, Stefan; Volf, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    As platelet activation is closely related to the liberation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, platelets play a central role in the development of CVD. Virtually all cardiovascular risk factors favor platelet hyperreactivity and, accordingly, also physical (in)activity affects platelet function. Within this paper, we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the impact of acute and habitual exercise on platelet function. Although there are apparent discrepancies regarding the reported effects of acute, strenuous exercise on platelet activation, a deeper analysis of the available literature reveals that the applied exercise intensity and the subjects' cardiorespiratory fitness represent critical determinants for the observed effects. Consideration of these factors leads to the summary that (i) acute, strenuous exercise can lead to platelet activation, (ii) regular physical activity and/or physical fitness diminish or prevent platelet activation in response to acute exercise, and (iii) habitual physical activity and/or physical fitness also favorably modulate platelet function at physical rest. Notably, these effects of exercise on platelet function show obvious similarities to the well-recognized relation between exercise and the risk for cardiovascular events where vigorous exercise transiently increases the risk for myocardial infarction and a physically active lifestyle dramatically reduces cardiovascular mortality. PMID:26557653

  8. Characterization of multiple platelet activation pathways in patients with bleeding as a high-throughput screening option: use of 96-well Optimul assay

    PubMed Central

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Chan, Melissa V.; Lundberg, Martina H.; Morgan, Neil V.; Bem, Danai; Nisar, Shaista P.; Leo, Vincenzo C.; Jones, Matthew L.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Daly, Martina E.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Warner, Timothy D.; Watson, Steve P.; Watson, Steve P.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Gissen, Paul; Daly, Martina E.; Lester, Will; Clark, Justin; Williams, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Marshall, Dianne; Nyatanga, Priscilla; Mann, Pat; Kirwan, Julie; Wilde, Jonathan; Dunkley, Tracey; Greenway, April; Makris, Michael; Pavord, Sue; Dattani, Rashesh; Grimley, Gerry Dolan Charlotte; Stokley, Simone; Astwood, Emma; Chang, Cherry; Foros, Merri; Trower, Linda; Thachil, Jecko; Hay, Charlie; Pike, Gill; Will, Andrew; Grainger, John; Foulkes, Matt; Fareh, Mona; Talks, Kate; Biss, Tina; Kesteven, Patrick; Hanley, John; Vowles, Julie; Basey, Lesley; Barnes, Michelle; Collins, Peter; Rayment, Rachel; Alikhan, Raza; Morris, Ana Guerrero Rebecca; Mansell, Dianne; Toh, Cheng Hock; Martlew, Vanessa; Murphy, Elaine; Lachmann, Robin; Rose, Peter; Chapman, Oliver; Lokare, Anand; Marshall, Kathryn; Khan, Naseem; Keeling, David; Giangrande, Paul; Austin, Steve; Bevan, David; Alamelu, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Up to 1% of the population have mild bleeding disorders, but these remain poorly characterized, particularly with regard to the roles of platelets. We have compared the usefulness of Optimul, a 96-well plate-based assay of 7 distinct pathways of platelet activation to characterize inherited platelet defects in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Using Optimul and LTA, concentration-response curves were generated for arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, epinephrine, Thrombin receptor activating-peptide, U46619, and ristocetin in samples from (1) healthy volunteers (n = 50), (2) healthy volunteers treated with antiplatelet agents in vitro (n = 10), and (3) patients with bleeding of unknown origin (n = 65). The assays gave concordant results in 82% of cases (κ = 0.62, P < .0001). Normal platelet function results were particularly predictive (sensitivity, 94%; negative predictive value, 91%), whereas a positive result was not always substantiated by LTA (specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 77%). The Optimul assay was significantly more sensitive at characterizing defects in the thromboxane pathway, which presented with normal responses with LTA. The Optimul assay is sensitive to mild platelet defects, could be used as a rapid screening assay in patients presenting with bleeding symptoms, and detects changes in platelet function more readily than LTA. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.org as #ISRCTN 77951167. PMID:24408324

  9. Characterization of multiple platelet activation pathways in patients with bleeding as a high-throughput screening option: use of 96-well Optimul assay.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Kirkby, Nicholas S; Chan, Melissa V; Lundberg, Martina H; Morgan, Neil V; Bem, Danai; Nisar, Shaista P; Leo, Vincenzo C; Jones, Matthew L; Mundell, Stuart J; Daly, Martina E; Mumford, Andrew D; Warner, Timothy D; Watson, Steve P

    2014-02-20

    Up to 1% of the population have mild bleeding disorders, but these remain poorly characterized, particularly with regard to the roles of platelets. We have compared the usefulness of Optimul, a 96-well plate-based assay of 7 distinct pathways of platelet activation to characterize inherited platelet defects in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Using Optimul and LTA, concentration-response curves were generated for arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, epinephrine, Thrombin receptor activating-peptide, U46619, and ristocetin in samples from (1) healthy volunteers (n = 50), (2) healthy volunteers treated with antiplatelet agents in vitro (n = 10), and (3) patients with bleeding of unknown origin (n = 65). The assays gave concordant results in 82% of cases (κ = 0.62, P < .0001). Normal platelet function results were particularly predictive (sensitivity, 94%; negative predictive value, 91%), whereas a positive result was not always substantiated by LTA (specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 77%). The Optimul assay was significantly more sensitive at characterizing defects in the thromboxane pathway, which presented with normal responses with LTA. The Optimul assay is sensitive to mild platelet defects, could be used as a rapid screening assay in patients presenting with bleeding symptoms, and detects changes in platelet function more readily than LTA. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.org as #ISRCTN 77951167. PMID:24408324

  10. The caspase-3 inhibitor (peptide Z-DEVD-FMK) affects the survival and function of platelets in platelet concentrate during storage

    PubMed Central

    Shiri, Reza; Ahmadinejad, Minoo; Vaeli, Shahram; Tabatabaei, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background Although apoptosis occurs in nucleated cells, studies show that this event also occurs in some anucleated cells such as platelets. During storage of platelets, the viability of platelets decreased, storage lesions were observed, and cells underwent apoptosis. We investigated the effects of caspase-3 inhibitor on the survival and function of platelets after different periods of storage. Methods Platelet concentrates were obtained from the Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization in plastic blood bags. Caspase-3 inhibitor (Z-DEVD-FMK) was added to the bags. These bags along with control bags to which no inhibitor was added were stored in a shaking incubator at 22℃ for 7 days. The effects of Z-DEVD-FMK on the functionality of platelets were analyzed by assessing their ability to bind to von Willebrand factor (vWF) and to aggregate in the presence of arachidonic acid and ristocetin. Cell survival was surveyed by MTT assay. Results At day 4 of storage, ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation was significantly higher in the inhibitor-treated (test) than in control samples; the difference was not significant at day 7. There was no significant difference in arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation between test and control samples. However, at day 7 of storage, the binding of platelets to vWF was significantly higher in test than in control samples. The MTT assay revealed significantly higher viability in test than in control samples at both days of study. Conclusion Treatment of platelets with caspase-3 inhibitor could increase their functionality and survival. PMID:24724067

  11. Function of human platelets during extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, V L; Hicks, R E; Niewiarowski, S; Edmunds, L H; Colman, R W

    1977-06-01

    The interaction between human platelets and nonbiologic surfaces was studied during in vitro recirculation of 500 ml of fresh, heparinized human blood in four different perfusion circuits. Circuits differed in surface area (0.1 m2 or 0.9 m2) and in surface composition. No important differences were observed between standard silicone-rubber and filler-free, silicone-rubber surfaces. Platelet counts decreased to 85% of control in 0.1- m2 circuits, but retained normal sensitivity to aggregating agents and released only small amounts of platelet factor 4 (PF4). In contrast, platelet counts in 0.9-m2 circuits decreased to 20% of control within 2 min and platelet sensitivity was depressed out of proportion to the fall in platelet count. Plasma PF4 progressively increased and platelet PF4 content progressively decreased during 6 h of recirculation. The results indicate that human platelets may exist in three conditions during extracorporeal circulation. Some platelets are unaltered, some are less sensitive to aggregating agents, and others have undergone extensive release. The ratio of blood volume to surface area appears to be an important determinant of platelet-surface interaction. PMID:18017

  12. Changes in platelet function following cold storage of RBC suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Qian-Li; Li, Jian-Gang; Sun, Yang; Jin, Zhan-Kui; Gao, Ying; Xu, Cui-Xiang; Chen, Ping; Ma, Ting; Yang, Jiang-Cun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To provide a basis for the cold-storage of human platelets as a way to assess changes in platelet function. Methods: Red blood cell suspensions (11 U and 50 U) were randomly selected at different storage times (3-28 days) and evidence of platelet activation (CD62P) and thromboelastography (TEG) reaction times were investigated. Results: After 21 days of storage at 4°C, a large number of activated platelets (PAC1+62P+, PAC1-62P+) within the red blood cell suspension (RBCs) retained their function and had TEG-maximum amplitude (TEG-MA) indices in the normal range. Conclusion: We report that platelets in RBC suspensions retain high activity when stored at 4°C for 21 days. The results provide important information for studies that involve storing platelets under cold conditions. PMID:26770402

  13. Platelet Consumption by Arterial Prostheses: The Effects of Endothelialization and Pharmacologic Inhibition of Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Harker, Laurence A.; Slichter, Sherrill J.; Sauvage, Lester R.

    1977-01-01

    The thrombogenic mechanism of arterial grafts has been studied by determining the relative utilization of platelets, fibrinogen and plasminogen by human arterial prostheses, and by direct examination of arterial grafts in a baboon model. Forty-one survival and turnover measurements of 51Crplatelets, 131I-fibrinogen and 125I-plasminogen in ten patients with aortofemoral knitted Dacron prostheses demonstrated platelet consumption after graft placement (platelet survival 4.2 days ± 0.5 and turnover 68,000 plat/ul/day ±10,000 compared with 8.2 days ± 0.3 and 35,000 plat/ul/day ± 5,000 respectively for control subjects with stable vascular disease, p < 0.01). In vitro platelet function test results were normal. Platelet consumption was interrupted by dipyridamole or a combination of dipyridamole and acetylsalicylic acid, and platelet survival normalized spontaneously during nine months postoperatively. No significantly increased consumption of fibrinogen or plasminogen was found in these patients with arterial grafts. Placement of impervious knitted Dacron velour aortic grafts in baboons reproduced platelet consumption that progressively normalized over six weeks postoperatively. Platelet survival measurements correlated directly with endothelial cell coverage of the graft luminal surface in these animals implying that endothelialization of the graft surface was also occurring postoperatively in patients. ImagesFig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:411428

  14. Role of platelet function and platelet membrane glycoproteins in children with primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Bai, Jing; Guo, Qu-Lian; Huang, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Bai, Yong-Qi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine and understand changes in platelet functions prior to and after the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children. An automatic hematology analyzer and whole blood flow cytometry were used to detect immature platelet fraction (IPF), IPC and membrane glycoproteins (CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b) in ITP children (ITP group), children with complete response after ITP treatment (ITP-CR group) and children with elective surgery (normal control group). The results showed that, levels of platelet count (PLT) and plateletcrit in the ITP group were lower alhtough the levels of mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio (P-LCR) were higher than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PLT in the ITP-CR group was lower than that in the normal controls. Additionally, IPF% was higher in the normal control and ITP-CR groups, IPC was lower in the ITP group compared to the normal control and ITP-CR groups. Furthermore, prior to ADP activation, the expression levels of CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b in the ITP group were lower in ITP group than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. The expression level of PAC-1 was lower in the ITP-CR and normal control groups. No differences were identified in CD62p and CD42b expression levels. Following ATP activation, CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b expression in the ITP group was lower than that in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PAC-1 expression was lower while CD62p expression was higher in the ITP-CR group compared to the normal control group. In conclusion, the activation of platelets in ITP children was low. Decreased platelet function, platelet parameters and platelet glycoproteins may be used as markers for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ITP children. PMID:27431926

  15. Metastasis: new functional implications of platelets and megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Raphael; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Platelets are essential components of hemostasis. Due to a plethora of factors released on activation, platelet functions are also connected to tumor growth, notably by acting on angiogenesis. It is now well recognized that major roles of platelets in the poor outcome of cancer patients occurs during hematogenous dissemination of cancer cells. In this review, we describe recent insights into the molecular mechanisms supporting the prometastatic activity of platelets. Platelets have been shown to promote survival of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the bloodstream by conferring resistance to the shear stress and attack from natural killer cells. Recently, platelets were found to promote and/or maintain the state of epithelial to mesenchymal transition on CTCs through platelet secretion of transforming growth factor β in response to CTC activation. At a later stage in the metastatic process, platelets promote extravasation and establishment of metastatic cells in distant organs as observed in bone. This particular environment is also the site of hematopoiesis, megakaryocytopoiesis, and platelet production. Increasing the number of megakaryocytes (MKs) in the bone marrow results in a high bone mass phenotype and inhibits skeletal metastasis formation of prostate cancer cells. As a result of their specific location in vascular niches in the bone marrow, MK activity might contribute to the "seed and soil" suitability between CTCs and bone. In conclusion, recent findings have made a great advance in our knowledge on how platelets contribute to the metastatic dissemination of cancer cells and that may support the development of new antimetastasis therapies. PMID:27154188

  16. Methodological issues in the preparation and assay of platelet 3H-imipramine binding.

    PubMed

    Severson, J A; Schneider, L S; Fredrickson, E R

    1990-07-01

    Several methodological factors in the preparation of platelets and the determination of platelet 3H-imipramine (3H-IMI) binding were examined. The ionic composition of the assay significantly affected platelet 3H-IMI binding. Approximately 25% of the specific binding of 3H-IMI to intact platelet preparations was retained in the absence of sodium and chloride ions. The addition of sodium ions enhanced the specific binding of 3H-IMI, but the addition of chloride in the presence of sodium had a more pronounced effect, enhancing binding approximately five-fold over that observed with the addition of sodium. Sodium was the only cation tested that enhanced binding. Only halides enhanced binding in the presence of sodium with the following order of potency: Cl- greater than Br- greater than I- = F-. Ions increased the density of binding sites (Bmax) and did not affect the affinity of the binding sites for 3H-IMI. In the presence of sodium and chloride, the use of serotonin (5HT) to define nonspecific binding in saturation experiments resulted in lower binding densities (Bmax) than when desipramine was used to define nonspecific binding. The component of binding that was insensitive to 5HT was roughly equal to the Bmax of 3H-IMI binding obtained in the absence of sodium and chloride using desipramine to define nonspecific binding. Overall, these data suggest that not all 3H-IMI binding that is displaced by desipramine is related to serotonergic mechanisms, and suggest that 5HT is a better choice than desipramine for the determination of the nonspecific binding of 3H-IMI. In addition, the binding of 3H-IMI to different platelet preparations was compared. The binding of 3H-IMI to intact platelets was less than that obtained using lysed platelet membranes when data were expressed per mg protein. The Coomassie Blue dye-binding method to determine platelet protein resulted in greater Bmax values than were obtained with the Folin phenol reagent method. The method of platelet

  17. The effect of time of day and exercise on platelet functions and platelet-neutrophil aggregates in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Aldemir, Hatice; Kiliç, Nedret

    2005-12-01

    Platelet activation state changes by exercise. The effect of exercise time on platelet activation state and formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates are not known yet. In this study the effect of exercise and time of day were examined on platelet activity with platelet-neutrophil aggregates. Ten moderately active males aged 27+/- 1.63 (mean+/-S.D.) years completed sub-maximal (70% VO(2max)) exercise trials for 30 min. Blood pressure (BP) was recorded. Venous blood samples were obtained at rest, immediately post-exercise and after 30 min of recovery. Whole blood was analysed for haematocrit (Hct), haemoglobin (Hb), platelet count (PC), mean platelet count (MPV) and platelet aggregation (PA). Platelet-neutrophil aggregates and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) levels were assayed. Platelet count showed significant increase after morning exercise ((236+/- 32)x10(9) l(-1) versus (202+/- 34)x10(9) l(-1) baseline, p < 0.05). Exercise resulted in significantly lower MPV after the evening exercise (9.16+/- 0.5 fl versus 9.65+/- 0.36 fl, p < 0.05). Platelet aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) decreased after morning exercise and the recovery aggregation levels were significantly different at two different times of the day (68+/- 20% a.m. versus 80+/- 12% p.m., p < 0.05). It was also showed that platelet-neutrophil aggregates increased significantly from baseline after both exercises. Exercise-induced platelet-neutrophil aggregates were higher in the evening (10.7+/- 1.3% p.m. versus 6.4+/- 1.8% a.m., p < 0.0001). It is therefore concluded that besides platelet-platelet aggregation, exercise can cause platelet- neutrophil aggregates. In addition, time of day has an effect on platelet activation related events. Circadian variations of physiological parameters may have an effect on thrombus formation by platelet activation. PMID:16311912

  18. Effect of circulating epinephrine on platelet function and hematocrit.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, S E; Weder, A B; Egan, B; Neubig, R; Zweifler, A J; Julius, S

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the effect of raising arterial plasma epinephrine within the lower pathophysiological concentration range on various indicators of blood platelet function and hematocrit. Epinephrine was raised over 60 minutes by a stepwise increasing intravenous infusion in 40 healthy men aged 20 to 40 years. Platelet count increased progressively with increasing arterial epinephrine to a maximal change of 69 +/- 6 x 10(9)/L in EDTA-anticoagulated blood and a maximal change of 42 +/- 6 x 10(9)/L in acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD)-anticoagulated blood, and the weight of circulating platelets increased by 29% (P < .001). Platelet size increased significantly in EDTA and decreased in ACD, and the difference between EDTA and ACD was significant (P < .0001) for both count and size, suggesting that epinephrine not only recruits platelets into the circulation but also induces some microaggregation in vivo or adhesion ex vivo. Aggregation of platelets in vitro induced by epinephrine decreased (P < .003 for delta optical density and P = .038 for maximal optical density) after epinephrine infusion compared with saline but did not change when stimulated with ADP or collagen. These findings suggest a selective downregulation of the epinephrine-activating mechanisms concomitant with a rise in the platelet content of epinephrine by 81% (P < .001) and no change in the platelet sodium-proton membrane exchange. The release of granular content (beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4) to the circulation in response to epinephrine was not significant. Thus, under acute conditions it seems that the platelets may protect themselves against inappropriate overstimulation by epinephrine. The importance of platelet epinephrine uptake is still unknown, but sodium-proton exchange does not seem to be involved in regulating the effects of circulating epinephrine on platelet function. Epinephrine has a pronounced effect on raising hematocrit (maximal change of 1.74 +/- 0.13 x 10(-2), P < .0001

  19. Ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrate abrogates lymphocyte activation without affecting platelet function in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, R.A.; Duffy, B.F.; Rodey, G.G.

    1985-11-01

    We studied the effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on platelet concentrates. Samples irradiated at 310 mm for 30 minutes at a dose of 1782 J per m2 showed no loss of platelet function in vitro as determined by adenosine diphosphate, collagen, or ristocetin-induced aggregation. Lymphocytes isolated from irradiated units were unable to act as responders or stimulators in a mixed-lymphocyte reaction. These data suggest that UV radiation of platelet concentrates may result in a cell suspension that is unable to evoke an immunological response.

  20. Decreased platelet function in aortic valve stenosis: high shear platelet activation then inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, J. R.; Etherington, M. D.; Brant, J.; Watkins, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To elucidate the mechanism of the bleeding tendency observed in patients with aortic valve stenosis. DESIGN--A prospective study of high and low shear platelet function tests in vitro in normal controls compared with that in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis with a mean (SD) systolic gradient by Doppler of 75 (18) mm Hg before and at least 4 months after aortic valve replacement. SETTING--District general hospital. RESULTS--The patients showed reduced retention in the high shear platelet function tests. (a) Platelet retention in the filter test was 53.6 (12.6)% in patients with aortic valve stenosis and 84.8 (9.6)% in the controls (P < 0.001). (b) Retention in the glass bead column test was 49.8 (19.2) in the patients and 87.4 (8.7) in the controls (P < 0.001). (c) The standard bleeding time was longer in the patients (P < 0.06). Results of the high shear tests (a, b, and c) after aortic valve replacement were within the normal range. The platelet count was low but within the normal range before surgery and increased postoperatively (P < 0.01). There were no differences in the results of standard clotting tests, plasma and intraplatelet von Willebrand's factor, or in 15 platelet aggregation tests using five agonists between patients with aortic valve stenosis and controls. CONCLUSIONS--The high shear haemodynamics of aortic valve stenosis modify platelet function in vivo predisposing to a bleeding tendency. This abnormality of platelet function is detectable only in vitro using high shear tests. The abnormal function is reversed by aortic valve replacement. High shear forces in vitro activate and then inactivate platelets. By the same mechanisms aortic valve stenosis seems to lead to high shear damage in vivo, resulting in a clinically important bleeding tendency in some patients. PMID:8541170

  1. Morphological and functional platelet abnormalities in Berkeley sickle cell mice.

    PubMed

    Shet, Arun S; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Jirouskova, Marketa; Janczak, Christin A; Stevens, Jacqueline R M; Adamson, Adewole; Mohandas, Narla; Manci, Elizabeth A; Cynober, Therese; Coller, Barry S

    2008-01-01

    Berkeley sickle cell mice are used as animal models of human sickle cell disease but there are no reports of platelet studies in this model. Since humans with sickle cell disease have platelet abnormalities, we studied platelet morphology and function in Berkeley mice (SS). We observed elevated mean platelet forward angle light scatter (FSC) values (an indirect measure of platelet volume) in SS compared to wild type (WT) (37+/-3.2 vs. 27+/-1.4, mean+/-SD; p<0.001), in association with moderate thrombocytopenia (505+/-49 x 10(3)/microl vs. 1151+/-162 x 10(3)/microl; p<0.001). Despite having marked splenomegaly, SS mice had elevated levels of Howell-Jolly bodies and "pocked" erythrocytes (p<0.001 for both) suggesting splenic dysfunction. SS mice also had elevated numbers of thiazole orange positive platelets (5+/-1% vs. 1+/-1%; p<0.001), normal to low plasma thrombopoietin levels, normal plasma glycocalicin levels, normal levels of platelet recovery, and near normal platelet life spans. Platelets from SS mice bound more fibrinogen and antibody to P-selectin following activation with a threshold concentration of a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide compared to WT mice. Enlarged platelets are associated with a predisposition to arterial thrombosis in humans and some humans with SCD have been reported to have large platelets. Thus, additional studies are needed to assess whether large platelets contribute either to pulmonary hypertension or the large vessel arterial occlusion that produces stroke in some children with sickle cell disease. PMID:18374611

  2. Effects of the new glycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin on platelet function and blood coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Agnelli, G; Longetti, M; Guerciolini, R; Menichetti, F; Grasselli, S; Boldrini, F; Bucaneve, G; Nenci, G G; Del Favero, A

    1987-01-01

    Teicoplanin, a new glycopeptide antibiotic, is structurally related to ristocetin, an antibiotic known to induce human platelet agglutination and, thus, thrombocytopenia and thromboembolic side effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of teicoplanin on platelet function in vitro and ex vivo and on blood coagulation ex vivo. In the in vitro studies, spontaneous platelet aggregation; platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, and ristocetin; and the release of beta-thromboglobulin from platelets were assessed. Platelets from healthy subjects were incubated with teicoplanin at final concentrations of 100, 1,500, 5,000, and 10,000 micrograms/ml. The maximal achievable concentration with therapeutic doses is 100 micrograms/ml. When compared with saline, teicoplanin at concentrations of 100 and 1,500 micrograms/ml had no effect on platelet function, but at concentrations of 5,000 and 10,000 micrograms/ml, it induced greater spontaneous platelet aggregation (P less than 0.01) and inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, and ristocetin (P less than 0.01). Teicoplanin at concentrations of 100, 1,500, and 5,000 micrograms/ml did not induce the release of beta-thromboglobulin, in contrast to teicoplanin at a concentration of 10,000 micrograms/ml and ristocetin at a concentration of 1.5 mg/ml (P less than 0.01). In the ex vivo studies, platelet count, bleeding time, plasma beta-thromboglobulin, platelet aggregation induced by ADP, ristocetin, and epinephrine, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin clotting time, and serum fibrinogen degradation products were evaluated at days 0, 3, and 6 and at 72 h after the end of therapy. All subjects completed the study without evidence of side effects. When compared with the pretreatment values, none of the values from these assays showed a significant change at any time during and after treatment. We concluded that platelet function and blood coagulation are not affected by

  3. Point-of-care platelet function tests: detection of platelet inhibition induced by nonopioid analgesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Scharbert, Gisela; Gebhardt, Kristina; Sow, Zacharia; Duris, Monika; Deusch, Engelbert; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle

    2007-12-01

    Detection of platelet inhibition is of clinical relevance in the preinterventional risk-benefit assessment in chronic low-back-pain patients scheduled for invasive pain therapy. We evaluated the sensitivity of various point-of-care platelet function tests for the detection of platelet inhibition induced by nonopioid analgesic drugs. After Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent, citrated whole blood from 40 patients with chronic unspecific low back pain was investigated before and 30 min after intravenous infusion of the study medication consisting of diclofenac 75 mg (plus orphenadrin 30 mg; Neodolpasse; Fresenius Kabi Austria GmbH, Austria), parecoxib 40 mg (Dynastat; Pharmacia Europe EEIG, UK), paracetamol 1 g (Perfalgan; Bieffe Medital S.P.A., Italy), or normal saline in a randomized, cross-over, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Platelet function was assessed using the PFA-100 platelet function analyzer and thromboelastometry, as well as impedance aggregometry (in the last 17 patients recruited after it became commercially available). Sensitivity for detecting diclofenac-induced platelet inhibition was 85% for the PFA-100 using epinephrine as agonist and 94% for arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry. ADP-induced platelet function tests, as well as cytochalasin D-modified thromboelastometry were unreliable. All tests had a low incidence of false-positive test results after normal saline. Paracetamol and parecoxib had no significant platelet inhibiting effect. The PFA-100 using epinephrine as agonist and arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry are recommended for the detection of cyclooxygenase-I-inhibiting effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as diclofenac. Our findings confirm that a single rescue dose of paracetamol and parecoxib has no antiplatelet effect. PMID:17982319

  4. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  5. Effects of microgravity and hypergravity on platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kesheng; Wang, Yuedan; Yan, Rong; Shi, Quanwei; Wang, Zhicheng; Yuan, Yanhong; Cheng, Hong; Li, Suping; Fan, Yubo; Zhuang, Fengyuan

    2009-05-01

    Many serious thrombotic and haemorrhagic diseases or fatalities have been documented in human being exposed to microgravity or hypergravity environments, such as crewmen in space, roller coaster riders, and aircrew subjected to high-G training. Some possible related organs have been examined to explore the mechanisms underlying these gravity change-related diseases. However, the role of platelets which are the primary players in both thrombosis and haemostasis is unknown. Here we show that platelet aggregation induced by ristocetin or collagen and platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor (VWF) were significantly decreased after platelets were exposed to simulated microgravity. Conversely, these platelet functions were increased after platelets were exposed to hypergravity. The tail bleeding time in vivo was significantly shortened in mice exposed to high-G force, whereas, was prolonged in hindlimb unloaded mice. Furthermore, three of 23 mice died after 15 minutes of -8 Gx stress. Platelet thrombi disseminated in the heart ventricle and blood vessels in the brain, lung, and heart from the dead mice. Finally, glycoprotein (GP) Ibalpha surface expression and its association with the cytoskeleton were significantly decreased in platelets exposed to simulated microgravity, and obviously increased in hypergravity-exposed platelets. These data indicate that the platelet functions are inhibited in microgravity environments, and activated under high-G conditions, suggesting a novel mechanism for gravity change-related haemorrhagic and thrombotic diseases. This mechanism has important implications for preventing and treating gravity change-related diseases, and also suggests that special attentions should be paid to human actions under different gravity conditions. PMID:19404544

  6. Hemostatic Function, Survival, and Membrane Glycoprotein Changes in Young versus Old Rabbit Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Blajchman, Morris A.; Senyi, Andrew F.; Hirsh, Jack; Genton, Edward; George, James N.

    1981-01-01

    Although in vitro studies have demonstrated functional differences between young and old platelets, in vivo differences have not been precisely established. Therefore the in vivo hemostatic function of young and old platelets and the survival time have been examined in rabbits. The hemostatic function was measured by performing serial ear bleeding times in irradiation-induced thrombocytopenic rabbits. After irradiation with 930 rad the platelet count gradually diminished reaching a nadir (∼20 × 103/μl) at 10 d. The platelets present in the circulation, 7-10 d after irradiation, were considered old platelets, and the platelets present after recovery, 11-14 d postirradiation, young platelets. The measurement of platelet size was consistent with the hypothesis that platelets become smaller with age: the mean size was 3.84 μm3 for old platelets and 5.86 μm3 for young platelets. Regression analysis of the relationship between the bleeding time and the platelet count in 18 rabbits showed a significantly different slope for rabbits with predominantly old platelets compared with rabbits with predominantly young platelets (P < 0.001). Young platelets were more effective giving much shorter bleeding times than old platelets at comparable platelet counts. Survival times of young and old platelets were measured using platelets harvested on day 8 postirradiation (old platelets) and day 12 postirradiation (young platelets) that were labeled and then reinjected into normal recipient animals. The mean platelet survival time, calculated by gamma function, of old platelets was 28.8 h; of young platelets, 87.4 h; and of normally circulating heterogeneous platelets, (normal platelets) 53.0 h. Notably, the survival of old platelets was found to be exponential, and of young platelets, linear. Analysis of the membrane glycoproteins in young, old and normal platelets indicated that there was no qualitative difference amongst the young, normal, and old platelets. The relative

  7. Role of platelet function and platelet membrane glycoproteins in children with primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Bai, Jing; Guo, Qu-Lian; Huang, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Bai, Yong-Qi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine and understand changes in platelet functions prior to and after the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children. An automatic hematology analyzer and whole blood flow cytometry were used to detect immature platelet fraction (IPF), IPC and membrane glycoproteins (CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b) in ITP children (ITP group), children with complete response after ITP treatment (ITP-CR group) and children with elective surgery (normal control group). The results showed that, levels of platelet count (PLT) and plateletcrit in the ITP group were lower alhtough the levels of mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio (P-LCR) were higher than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PLT in the ITP-CR group was lower than that in the normal controls. Additionally, IPF% was higher in the normal control and ITP-CR groups, IPC was lower in the ITP group compared to the normal control and ITP-CR groups. Furthermore, prior to ADP activation, the expression levels of CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b in the ITP group were lower in ITP group than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. The expression level of PAC-1 was lower in the ITP-CR and normal control groups. No differences were identified in CD62p and CD42b expression levels. Following ATP activation, CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b expression in the ITP group was lower than that in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PAC-1 expression was lower while CD62p expression was higher in the ITP-CR group compared to the normal control group. In conclusion, the activation of platelets in ITP children was low. Decreased platelet function, platelet parameters and platelet glycoproteins may be used as markers for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ITP children. PMID:27431926

  8. Modification of Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay for the Detection of Platelet Antibodies in Patients With Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Vongchan, Preeyanat; Nawarawong, Weerasak; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet refractoriness is caused by HLA antibodies and platelet-specific antibodies. Current methods used to detect antiplatelet antibodies have limitations. Solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) lacks sensitivity and requires a second assay using chloroquine-treated intact platelets to specify the response due to anti-HLA. We modified SPRCA by using 2 types of antihuman platelet antibodies with different specificities toward platelet lysate and tested samples from 361 patients (69 with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 292 with poor response to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation) and 50 from healthy volunteers. Our method compared favorably with platelet suspension direct immunofluorescence. All samples from healthy volunteers were negative; of the samples from the patient population, 240 were positive (147 samples had only antiplatelet and 3 samples had only anti-HLA antibodies). This modified technique had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 91%. PMID:18701420

  9. Platelet functional and transcriptional changes induced by intralipid infusion.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Lea M; Vitseva, Olga; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Kucukural, Alper; Mick, Eric; Hamburg, Naomi; Vita, Joseph; Freedman, Jane E

    2016-06-01

    Multiple studies have shown the effects of long-term exposure to high-fat or western diets on the vascular system. There is limited knowledge on the acute effects of high circulating fat levels, specifically on platelets, which have a role in many processes, including thrombosis and inflammation. This study investigated the effects of acute, high-fat exposure on platelet function and transcript profile. Twenty healthy participants were given an intravenous infusion of 20% Intralipid emulsion and heparin over 6 hours. Blood samples were taken prior to and the day after infusion to measure platelet function and transcript expression levels. Platelet aggregation was not significantly affected by Intralipid infusion, but, when mitochondria function was inhibited by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or oligomycin, platelet aggregation was higher in the post-infusion state compared to baseline. Through RNA sequencing, and verified by RT-qPCR, 902 miRNAs and 617 mRNAs were affected by Intralipid infusion. MicroRNAs increased include miR-4259 and miR-346, while miR-517b and miR-517c are both decreased. Pathway analysis identified two clusters significantly enriched, including cell motility. In conclusion, acute exposure to high fat affects mitochondrial-dependent platelet function, as well as the transcript profile. PMID:26940969

  10. Platelet hexosaminidase a enzyme assay effectively detects carriers missed by targeted DNA mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Sachiko; Zhan, Jie; Sun, Wei; Ferreira, Jose Carlos; Keiles, Steven; Hambuch, Tina; Kammesheidt, Anja; Mark, Brian L; Schneider, Adele; Gross, Susan; Schreiber-Agus, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical testing of hexosaminidase A (HexA) enzyme activity has been available for decades and has the ability to detect almost all Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) carriers, irrespective of ethnic background. This is increasingly important, as the gene pool of those who identify as Ashkenazi Jewish is diversifying. Here we describe the analysis of a cohort of 4,325 individuals arising from large carrier screening programs and tested by the serum and/or platelet HexA enzyme assays and by targeted DNA mutation analysis. Our results continue to support the platelet assay as a highly effective method for TSD carrier screening, with a low inconclusive rate and the ability to detect possible disease-causing mutation carriers that would have been missed by targeted DNA mutation analysis. Sequence analysis performed on one such platelet assay carrier, who had one non-Ashkenazi Jewish parent, identified the amino acid change Thr259Ala (A775G). Based on crystallographic modeling, this change is predicted to be deleterious, as threonine 259 is positioned proximal to the HexA alpha subunit active site and helps to stabilize key residues therein. Accordingly, if individuals are screened for TSD in broad-based programs by targeted molecular testing alone, they must be made aware that there is a more sensitive and inexpensive test available that can identify additional carriers. Alternatively, the enzyme assays can be offered as a first tier test, especially when screening individuals of mixed or non-Jewish ancestry. PMID:23430931

  11. Utility of the ISTH bleeding assessment tool in predicting platelet defects in participants with suspected inherited platelet function disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, G C; Lordkipanidzé, M; Watson on behalf of the uk gapp study group, S P

    2013-01-01

    Background The ISTH bleeding assessment tool (ISTH-BAT) was developed to record bleeding symptoms and to aid diagnosis in patients with a possible bleeding disorder. Objectives To investigate the utility of the ISTH-BAT in predicting functional defects in platelet activation in participants with suspected inherited platelet function disorders. Patients/Methods Participants with clinical evidence of excessive bleeding and suspected inherited platelet function disorders and healthy volunteers were recruited to the Genotyping and Phenotyping of Platelets study (GAPP; ISRCTN 77951167). The ISTH-BAT questionnaire was applied by a trained investigator prior to lumiaggregometry. Results One hundred participants were included (79 with suspected inherited platelet function disorders, and 21 healthy volunteers). The ISTH-BAT score in participants with suspected inherited platelet function disorders (median 12; interquartile range [IQR] 8–16) was significantly higher than in healthy volunteers (median 0; IQR 0–0). There was no difference between participants with suspected inherited platelet function disorders with a platelet defect detected by lumiaggregometry (median 11; IQR 8–16) and those with normal platelet function (median 12; IQR 8–14) (P > 0.05). The ISTH-BAT score was not associated with a demonstrable platelet defect on platelet function testing (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.501 [95% confidence interval 0.372–0.630, P = 0.98] and odds ratio 1.01 [95% confidence interval 0.93–1.09, P = 0.91]). Conclusions The ISTH-BAT is a powerful tool for documenting lifelong bleeding history. However, the score obtained is not predictive of the presence of a platelet defect on lumiaggregometry in patients with suspected inherited platelet function disorders. PMID:23809206

  12. Identification of platelet function defects by multi-parameter assessment of thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    de Witt, Susanne M.; Swieringa, Frauke; Cavill, Rachel; Lamers, Moniek M. E.; van Kruchten, Roger; Mastenbroek, Tom; Baaten, Constance; Coort, Susan; Pugh, Nicholas; Schulz, Ansgar; Scharrer, Inge; Jurk, Kerstin; Zieger, Barbara; Clemetson, Kenneth J.; Farndale, Richard W.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Cosemans, Judith M.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Assays measuring platelet aggregation (thrombus formation) at arterial shear rate mostly use collagen as only platelet-adhesive surface. Here we report a multi-surface and multi-parameter flow assay to characterize thrombus formation in whole blood from healthy subjects and patients with platelet function deficiencies. A systematic comparison is made of 52 adhesive surfaces with components activating the main platelet-adhesive receptors, and of eight output parameters reflecting distinct stages of thrombus formation. Three types of thrombus formation can be identified with a predicted hierarchy of the following receptors: glycoprotein (GP)VI, C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2)>GPIb>α6β1, αIIbβ3>α2β1>CD36, α5β1, αvβ3. Application with patient blood reveals distinct abnormalities in thrombus formation in patients with severe combined immune deficiency, Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia, Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome, May–Hegglin anomaly or grey platelet syndrome. We suggest this test may be useful for the diagnosis of patients with suspected bleeding disorders or a pro-thrombotic tendency. PMID:25027852

  13. Influence of gold nanoparticles on platelets functional activity in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, George G.; Ivanov, Alexey N.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Terentyuk, George S.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolay G.

    2008-02-01

    Now in the leading biomedical centers of the world approved new technology of laser photothermal destruction of cancer cells using plasmon gold nanoparticles. Investigations of influence of gold nanoparticles on white rat platelets aggregative activity in vitro have been made. Platelet aggregation was investigated in platelet rich plasma (PRP) with help of laser analyzer 230 LA <>, Russia). Aggregation inductor was ADP solution in terminal concentration 2.5 micromole (<>, Russia). Gold nanoshells soluted in salt solution were used for experiments. Samples of PRP were incubated with 50 or 100 μl gold nanoshells solution in 5 minute, after that we made definition ADP induced platelet aggregation. We found out increase platelet function activity after incubation with nanoparticles solution which shown in maximum ADP-induced aggregation degree increase. Increase platelet function activity during intravenous nanoshells injection can be cause of thrombosis on patients. That's why before clinical application of cancer cell destruction based on laser photothermal used with plasmon gold nanoparticles careful investigations of thrombosis process and detail analyze of physiological blood parameters are very necessary.

  14. Platelet Function During Hypothermia in Experimental Mock Circulation.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Stevens, Kris; Kicken, Cécile; Simons, Antoine; Marcus, Abraham; Lancé, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in platelet function are a common finding in surgical procedures involving cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia. Although the combined impact of hypothermia and artificial circulation on platelets has been studied before, the ultimate strategy to safely minimize the risk for bleeding and thrombosis is yet unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a mock circulation loop to study the impact of hypothermia for platelet-related hemostatic changes. Venous blood was collected from healthy adult humans (n = 3). Closed mock circulation loops were assembled, each consisting of a centrifugal pump, an oxygenator with integrated heat exchanger, and a hardshell venous reservoir. The experiment started with the mock circulation temperature set at 37°C (T0 [0 h]). Cooling was then initiated at T1 (+2 h), where temperature was adjusted from 37°C to 32°C. Hypothermia was maintained from T2 (+4 h) to T3 (+28 h). From that point in time, rewarming from 32°C to 37°C was initiated with similar speed as cooling. From time point T4 (+30 h), normothermia (37°C) was maintained until the experiment ended at T5 (+32 h). Blood samples were analyzed in standard hematological tests: light transmission aggregometry (LTA) (arachidonic acid [AA], adenosine diphosphate [ADP], collagen [COL], thrombin-receptor-activating-peptide-14 [TRAP]), multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) (AA, ADP, COL, TRAP), and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) (EXTEM, FIBTEM, PLTEM). Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count decrease more substantially during temperature drop (37-32°C) than during hypothermia maintenance. Hb and Hct continue to follow this trend during active rewarming (32-37°C). PC increase from the moment active rewarming was initiated. None of the values return to the initial values. LTA values demonstrate a similar decrease in aggregation after stimulation with the platelet agonists between the start of the mock circulation and the start of cooling. Except

  15. Optimized flow cytometric assay for the measurement of platelet microparticles in plasma: pre-analytic and analytic considerations.

    PubMed

    Kim, H K; Song, K S; Lee, E S; Lee, Y J; Park, Y S; Lee, K R; Lee, S N

    2002-07-01

    Platelet microparticles (PMP) are submicroscopic membrane vesicles released by platelets during activation. Flow cytometry is the most widely used method for quantifying PMP, but the optimization of the technical method has not yet been fully evaluated. This study was designed to assess the pre-analytical variables including blood sampling conditions, and to evaluate the analytical variations including effect of the platelet-specific antibodies and quantitative beads, precision, linearity and accuracy in comparison with beta-thromboglobulin, which is one of the platelet activation markers. Numbers of PMP collected into citrate-theophylline-adenosine-dipyridamole (CTAD) tubes were increased with time, but to a lesser extent than when collected into sodium citrate tubes. The precision of the PMP assay was relatively high. Excellent linear correlation was observed for dilution linearity. Regarding the platelet-specific antibodies used, anti-CD41a-labeled samples resulted in higher PMP levels than those labeled with anti-CD61 and anti-CD42a. There was no significant difference of PMP counts according to the quantitative beads. The PMP assay is well correlated with beta-thromboglobulin levels. Our findings suggest that blood samples for the PMP assay should be collected in a CTAD tube and delayed measurement is not allowed to avoid artefactual platelet activation. The PMP assay can be used successfully as a useful marker of the detection of in vivo platelet activation, provided that pre-analytical and technical points are optimally taken into consideration. PMID:12138366

  16. Microfluidic assessment of functional culture-derived platelets in human thrombi under flow.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Viraj; Muthard, Ryan W; Li, Ruizhi; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-10-01

    Despite their clinical significance, human platelets are not amenable to genetic manipulation, thus forcing a reliance on mouse models. Culture-derived platelets (CDPs) from human peripheral blood CD34(+) cells can be genetically altered and may eventually be used for transfusions. By use of microfluidics, the time-dependent incorporation of CD41(+)CD42(+) CDPs into clots was measured using only 54,000 CDPs doped into 27 μL of human whole blood perfused over collagen at a wall shear rate of 100 sec(-1). With the use of fluorescence-labeled human platelets (instead of CDPs) doped between 0.25% and 2% of total platelets, incorporation was highly quantitative and allowed monitoring of the anti-αIIbβ3 antagonism that occurred after collagen adhesion. CDPs were only 15% as efficient as human platelets in their incorporation into human thrombi under flow, although both cell types were equally antagonized by αIIbβ3 inhibition. Transient transfection allowed the monitoring of GFP(+) human CDP incorporation into clots. This assay quantifies genetically altered CDP function under flow. PMID:26145051

  17. Platelet function in dogs with bacterial infections and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Abid, Monia; Kalbantner, Kerstin; Mischke, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of bacterial infections or leishmaniasis on primary haemostasis in dogs. Capillary bleeding time, automatic platelet function analysis (PFA-100), turbidimetric platelet aggregation, impedance aggregometry, platelet count and, in addition, the haematocrit were investigated in 25 dogs with bacterial infections or leishmaniasis . Results of these diseased dogs were compared to the control group and additionally classified into two subgroups based on criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (groups "SIRS" and "Non-SIRS"). Dogs with infections had a significantly prolonged closure time of the PFA-100 using both cartridges (e. g., collagen/ADP: 83 [55-301] vs. 65 [47-99 s; median [minimum-maximum]; p < 0.0001), a significant decrease in maximal aggregation of the turbidimetric aggregometry (e. g., ADP-induced: 45.2 ± 26.8 vs. 67.3 ± 21.8%; mean ± SD; P = 0.003), a significant increase of collagen-induced impedance aggregometry and a significant suppression of arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry. An enhanced collagen-induced impedance aggregation was the only significant difference between subgroups "SIRS"and "Non-SIRS". In conclusion, although individual tests indicate enhanced platelet aggregation, most of the in vitro tests revealed a normal to moderately reduced functionality. The reduced aggregabiity may partly indicate preactivation of platelets. PMID:26281441

  18. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation during platelet storage: consequences for platelet recovery and hemostatic function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Canault, Matthias; Duerschmied, Daniel; Brill, Alexander; Stefanini, Lucia; Schatzberg, Daphne; Cifuni, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets undergo several modifications during storage that reduce their posttransfusion survival and functionality. One important feature of these changes, which are known as platelet storage lesion, is the shedding of the surface glycoproteins GPIb-α and GPV. We recently demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17) mediates mitochondrial injury-induced shedding of adhesion receptors and that TACE activity correlates with reduced posttransfusion survival of these cells. We now confirm that TACE mediates receptor shedding and clearance of platelets stored for 16 hours at 37°C or 22°C. We further demonstrate that both storage and mitochondrial injury lead to the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) in platelets and that TACE-mediated receptor shedding from mouse and human platelets requires p38 MAP kinase signaling. Protein kinase C, extracellular regulated-signal kinase MAPK, and caspases were not involved in TACE activation. Both inhibition of p38 MAPK and inactivation of TACE during platelet storage led to a markedly improved posttransfusion recovery and hemostatic function of platelets in mice. p38 MAPK inhibitors had only minor effects on the aggregation of fresh platelets under static or flow conditions in vitro. In summary, our data suggest that inhibition of p38 MAPK or TACE during storage may significantly improve the quality of stored platelets. PMID:19965619

  19. Platelet aggregation inhibitors from Philippine marine invertebrate samples screened in a new microplate assay.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Sheila Marie V; Bojo, Zenaida P; Roberto, Amy V D; Lazaro, Jose Enrico H; Mangalindan, Gina C; Florentino, Leila M; Lim-Navarro, Pilar; Tasdemir, Deniz; Ireland, Chris M; Concepcion, Gisela P

    2003-01-01

    A new microplate assay for Ca(2+)-induced platelet aggregation as detected by Giemsa dye was used to screen marine invertebrate samples from the Philippines for inhibitors of human platelet aggregation. Out of 261 crude methanol extracts of marine sponges and tunicates, 25 inhibited aggregation at 2 mg/ml. Inhibition of agonist-induced aggregation in an aggregometer was used to confirm results of the microplate assay and to determine the specific mode of inhibition of 2 samples. The marine sponge Xestospongia sp. yielded a xestospongin/araguspongine-type molecule that inhibited collagen-induced aggregation by 87% at 2 micro g/ml, and epinephrine-induced aggregation by 78% at 20 micro g/ml, while the marine sponge Aplysina sp. yielded 5,6-dibromotryptamine, which inhibited epinephrine-induced aggregation by 51% at 20 micro g/ml. In this study we have found that the microplate assay is a simple, inexpensive, yet useful preliminary tool to qualitatively screen a large number of marine samples for antiplatelet aggregation activity. PMID:14719168

  20. New gene functions in megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation

    PubMed Central

    Gieger, Christian; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Cvejic, Ana; Tang, Weihong; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Elling, Ulrich; Goodall, Alison H.; Labrune, Yann; Lopez, Lorna M.; Mägi, Reedik; Meacham, Stuart; Okada, Yukinori; Pirastu, Nicola; Sorice, Rossella; Teumer, Alexander; Voss, Katrin; Zhang, Weihua; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bis, Joshua C.; Ellinghaus, David; Gögele, Martin; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langenberg, Claudia; Kovacs, Peter; O’Reilly, Paul F.; Shin, So-Youn; Esko, Tõnu; Hartiala, Jaana; Kanoni, Stavroula; Murgia, Federico; Parsa, Afshin; Stephens, Jonathan; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Allayee, Hooman; Attwood, Antony; Balkau, Beverley; Bastardot, François; Basu, Saonli; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bomba, Lorenzo; Bonnefond, Amélie; Cambien, François; Chambers, John C.; Cucca, Francesco; D’Adamo, Pio; Davies, Gail; de Boer, Rudolf A.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Erdmann, Jeanette; Evans, David M.; Falchi, Mario; Feng, Wei; Folsom, Aaron R.; Frazer, Ian H.; Gibson, Quince D.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Hammond, Chris; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hersch, Micha; Illig, Thomas; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Jolley, Jennifer; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kühnel, Brigitte; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Lumley, Thomas; Mangino, Massimo; Maschio, Andrea; Leach, Irene Mateo; McKnight, Barbara; Memari, Yasin; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nauck, Matthias; Navis, Gerjan; Nöthlings, Ute; Nolte, Ilja M.; Porteous, David J.; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Pullat, Janne; Ring, Susan M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ruggiero, Daniela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Sala, Cinzia; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Schlessinger, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, James; Smith, Nicholas L.; Snieder, Harold; Starr, John M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Taylor, Kent; Tenesa, Albert; Thein, Swee Lay; Tönjes, Anke; Uda, Manuela; Ulivi, Sheila; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Visscher, Peter M.; Völker, Uwe; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yang, Tsun-Po; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zitting, Paavo; Bradley, John R.; Dedoussis, George V.; Gasparini, Paolo; Hazen, Stanley L.; Metspalu, Andres; Pirastu, Mario; Shuldiner, Alan R.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Zwaginga, Jaap-Jan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Deary, Ian J.; Franke, Andre; Froguel, Philippe; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Martin, Nicholas G.; Meisinger, Christa; Psaty, Bruce M.; Spector, Timothy D.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N.; Ciullo, Marina; Deloukas, Panos; Greinacher, Andreas; Jupe, Steve; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Khadake, Jyoti; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Penninger, Josef; Prokopenko, Inga; Stemple, Derek; Toniolo, Daniela; Wernisch, Lorenz; Sanna, Serena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Rendon, Augusto; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Soranzo, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are the second most abundant cell type in blood and are essential for maintaining haemostasis. Their count and volume are tightly controlled within narrow physiological ranges, but there is only limited understanding of the molecular processes controlling both traits. Here we carried out a high-powered meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in up to 66,867 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. We identified 68 genomic loci reliably associated with platelet count and volume mapping to established and putative novel regulators of megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation. These genes show megakaryocyte-specific gene expression patterns and extensive network connectivity. Using gene silencing in Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster, we identified 11 of the genes as novel regulators of blood cell formation. Taken together, our findings advance understanding of novel gene functions controlling fate-determining events during megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation, providing a new example of successful translation of GWAS to function. PMID:22139419

  1. Antiplatelet drugs in patients with enhanced platelet turnover: biomarkers versus platelet function testing.

    PubMed

    Freynhofer, Matthias K; Gruber, Susanne C; Grove, Erik L; Weiss, Thomas W; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2015-08-31

    Platelets are key players in atherothrombosis. Antiplatelet therapy comprising aspirin alone or with P2Y12-inhibitors are effective for prevention of atherothrombotic complications. However, there is interindividual variability in the response to antiplatelet drugs, leaving some patients at increased risk of recurrent atherothrombotic events. Several risk factors associated with high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR), including elevated platelet turnover, have been identified. Platelet turnover is adequately estimated from the fraction of reticulated platelets. Reticulated platelets are young platelets, characterised by residual messenger RNA. They are larger, haemostatically more active and there is evidence that platelet turnover is a causal and prognostic factor in atherothrombotic disease. Whether platelet turnover per se represents a key factor in pathogenesis, progression and prognosis of atherothrombotic diseases (with focus on acute coronary syndromes) or whether it merely facilitates insufficient platelet inhibition will be discussed in this state-of-the art review. PMID:26272640

  2. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists. PMID:25293779

  3. Methodological considerations for the human platelet 5-HT2A receptor binding kinetic assay.

    PubMed

    Khait, V D; Huang, Y Y; Mann, J J

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of an extensive database of human platelet 5-HT2A receptor binding assays has been conducted in order to identify factors that may affect the assay results. Despite anecdotal reports that storage of frozen platelet pellets may affect 5-HT2A binding affinity and capacity, no quantitative study has been reported in the literature. Analysis of binding data for 373 frozen samples with a storage time up to three years is presented in this paper. It is shown that prolonged storage significantly decreases binding. The loss of binding capacity begins in the first six month of storage. Bmax declines by half after 17 month. The impact of storage time on the binding affinity is much smaller. There is only about 20% increase in the value of affinity K(D) during the half-life of Bmax. Differences in sample storage time may partly explain discrepancies in results between different research groups. Nonspecific binding due to binding to filter material diminishes accuracy and reliability of the binding assays as a result of a decrease in the ratio of specific to nonspecific ratio. A data analysis based on our suggested mathematical model shows that this effect depends on tissue concentration in test tube and becomes pronounced when the concentration is below 0.1 mg protein/ml (at 0.2 nM of ligand). Above 0.1 mg protein/ml, percentage of specific to total binding exceeds 65%, which is an acceptable level for the ratio. The majority of the binding studies reported in the literature employed a tissue concentration more than 0.5 mg/ml, well above the minimal limit sufficient for a reliable assay. However, development of microassays to conserve precious tissue must take the limit into consideration. PMID:10619369

  4. A study on the impact of CYP2C19 genotype and platelet reactivity assay on patients undergoing PCI

    PubMed Central

    Rath, P.C.; Chidambaram, Sundar; Rath, Pallavi; Dikshit, Byomakesh; Naik, Sudhir; Sahoo, Prashant K.; Das, Brajraj; Mahalingam, Mohanshankar; Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Jain, Jugnu

    2015-01-01

    Background A thorough understanding of the patient's genotype and their functional response to a medication is necessary for improving event free survival. Several outcome studies support this view particularly if the patient is to be started on clopidogrel due to the prevalence of clopidogrel resistance. Such guided therapy has reduced the incidence of Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACE) after stent implantation. Methods Between August 2013 and August 2014, 200 patients with coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were prescribed any one of the anti-platelet medications such as clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor and offered testing to detect CYP2C19 gene mutations along with a platelet reactivity assay (PRA). Intended outcome was modification of anti-platelet therapy defined as either dose escalation of clopidogrel or replacement of clopidogrel with prasugrel or ticagrelor for the patients in clopidogrel arm, and replacement of ticagrelor or prasugrel with clopidogrel if those patients were non-carrier of mutant genes and also if they demonstrated bleeding tendencies in the ticagrelor and prasugrel arms. Conclusion Clopidogrel resistance was observed to be 16.5% in our study population. PRA was useful in monitoring the efficacy of thienopyridines. By having this test, one can be safely maintained on clopidogrel in non-carriers, or with increased dose of clopidogrel in intermediate metabolizers or with newer drugs such as ticagrelor or prasugrel in poor metabolizers. Patients on ticagrelor and prasugrel identified as non-carriers of gene mutations for clopidogrel metabolism could be offered clopidogrel resulting in economic benefits to the patients. Patients at high risk of bleeding were also identified by the PRA. PMID:26071289

  5. The interaction of sodium nitroprusside with human endothelial cells and platelets: nitroprusside and prostacyclin synergistically inhibit platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, R.I.; Weksler, B.B.; Jaffe, E.A.

    1982-12-01

    Sodium nitroprusside (NP) is a potent vasodilator that also inhibits platelet aggregation. To test the hypothesis that NP causes both of these effects by altering the balance between prostacyclin (PGI2) produced by endothelial cells and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) produced by platelets, we incubated each of these cell types with NP for 5 minutes and assayed the PGI2 and TXA2 produced. NP at pharmacologically achieved doses (0.01--30 micrograms/ml) inhibited platelet aggregation and resultant TXA2 synthesis in a dose- and time-dependent manner (p less than 0.001). The inhibition was not dependent on cAMP production, external calcium concentration, or suppression of TXA2 synthesis. NP did not alter the production of PGI2 by cultured human endothelial cells as measured by radioimmunoassay for 6-Keto-PGF1 alpha, the stable hydrolysis product of PGI2. However, supernates of NP-treated endothelial cells containing low, noninhibitory concentrations of NP unexpectedly inhibited platelet aggregation. This inhibition of platelet aggregation was due to synergy between PGI2 (0.1--3 nM) and NP (p interaction less than 0.03). The synergistic inhibition by NP and PGI2 of platelet aggregation and TXA2 synthesis in vivo may explain some of the beneficial actions of NP in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure.

  6. Assays for B lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Bondada, Subbarao; Robertson, Darrell A

    2003-11-01

    This unit describes the antigenic stimulation of in vitro antibody production by B cells and the subsequent measurement of secreted antibodies. The first basic protocol is a generalized system for inducing in vitro antibody production and can accommodate various types of antigens under study. Secreted antibodies can then be measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or other soluble-antibody detection systems. Alternatively, the number of antibody-producing cells can be quantified by plaque-forming cell (PFC) assays presented in this unit: the Cunningham-Szenberg and the Jerne-Nordin techniques. Both methods employ specially prepared slide chambers, described here, in which the antibody-producing B cells are mixed with complement and indicator sheep red blood cells (SRBC), or with trinitrophenol-modified SRBC (TNP-SRBC), with subsequent lysis and counting of plaques. Because IgM antibodies fix complement efficiently, whereas IgG and IgA antibodies do not, unmodified PFC assays measure only IgM antibodies. The assay can be modified, however, to measure all classes of antibodies or to enumerate total immunoglobulin-secreting B cells, as described in alternate protocols. Yet another method of measuring the number of antibody-producing B cells (in a class-specific fashion) is to use the ELISPOT technique described in UNIT 7.14. The resting B cells used in these procedures are prepared as described in the final support protocols for Percoll gradient centrifugation. PMID:18432909

  7. Dicer1-mediated miRNA processing shapes the mRNA profile and function of murine platelets.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Jesse W; Chappaz, Stéphane; Corduan, Aurélie; Chong, Mark M W; Campbell, Robert; Khoury, Amanda; Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Wurtzel, Jeremy G T; Michael, James V; Goldfinger, Lawrence E; Mumaw, Michele M; Nieman, Marvin T; Kile, Benjamin T; Provost, Patrick; Weyrich, Andrew S

    2016-04-01

    Human platelets contain microRNAs (miRNAs) and miRNA processing machinery, but their contribution to platelet function remains incompletely understood. Here, we show that murine megakaryocyte (MK)-specific knockdown of Dicer1, the ribonuclease that cleaves miRNA precursors into mature miRNAs, reduces the level of the majority of miRNAs in platelets. This leads to altered platelet messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles and mild thrombocytopenia. Fibrinogen receptor subunits Itga2b (αIIb) and Itgb3 (β3) mRNAs were among the differentially expressed transcripts that are increased in platelets lacking Dicer1. Argonaute 2 (Ago2), a member of the miRNA silencing complex, co-immunoprecipitated with αIIband β3mRNAs in wild-type platelets. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggested reduced αIIb/β3/Ago2 complexes in miRNA-deficient platelets. These results suggested that miRNAs regulate both integrin subunits. Subsequent 3' untranslated region luciferase reporter assays confirmed that the translation of both αIIband β3mRNAs can be regulated by miRNAs miR-326, miR-128, miR-331, and miR-500. Consistent with these molecular changes, the deletion ofDicer1resulted in increased surface expression of integrins αIIband β3, and enhanced platelet binding to fibrinogen in vivo and in vitro. Heightened platelet reactivity, shortened tail-bleeding time, and reduced survival following collagen/epinephrine-induced pulmonary embolism were also observed in Dicer1-deficient animals. CombinedPf4-cre-mediated deletion of Drosha and Dicer1 did not significantly exacerbate phenotypes observed in single Dicer1 knockout mice. In summary, these findings indicate that Dicer1-dependent generation of mature miRNAs in late-stage MKs and platelets modulates the expression of target mRNAs important for the hemostatic and thrombotic function of platelets. PMID:26773046

  8. Variability in platelet responses to collagen--comparison between whole blood perfusions, traditional platelet function tests and PFA-100.

    PubMed

    Lepäntalo, A; Beer, J H; Siljander, P; Syrjälä, M; Lassila, R

    2001-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the results obtained in platelet function tests and whole blood perfusions are associated with those in platelet function analyser (PFA)-100. We used collagen type I monomers and fibrils to analyse the distinct roles of glycoprotein (GP) Ia/IIa and other collagen receptors in flowing blood under a high shear rate (1600/s) and in aggregation studies. Also, anticoagulation [citrate vs. D-phenylalanyl-1-prolyl-1 arginine chloromethyl ketone (PPACK)] was varied to enhance the functions of GP Ia/IIa, since it has been shown that the cation-poor environment of citrated blood impairs GP Ia/IIa-dependent platelet recruitment. Large interindividual variability (45-fold) was detected in deposition of platelets in whole blood perfusions over collagen monomers, whereas this variation was only fourfold in fibrils. In PFA, this variation was reduced to 2.5-fold. However, platelet deposition on monomers is associated with epinephrine-enhanced PFA (r=-.49, P<.03), whereas platelet deposition on fibrils is correlated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-enhanced PFA (r=-.47, P<.05), suggesting a distinct synergism between epinephrine and monomers (GP Ia/IIa) as well as ADP with fibrils (other collagen receptors). Donors with 807 C/C polymorphism of GP Ia (n=14) had longer lag phase in aggregation experiments compared with C/T (n=7) both by monomers and fibrils (P<.04), but these polymorphisms with their mild impact on GP Ia/IIa activity did not markedly differ in other tests. In conclusion, the results obtained in perfusion studies and PFA experiments correlated, but PFA fails to reveal the large-scale variability related to collagen-induced platelet responses. PMID:11457470

  9. Usefulness of platelet function tests to predict bleeding with antithrombotic medications.

    PubMed

    Gorog, Diana A; Otsui, Kazunori; Inoue, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacological inhibition of platelets has always been regarded as a double-edged sword: the challenge of balancing the antithrombotic effect against the bleeding risk. Potent antiplatelet agents and novel oral anticoagulants, sometimes in combination, are increasingly used in the treatment of cardiovascular disease and for thromboprophylaxis in atrial fibrillation. Although such treatment has reduced the risk of thrombotic events, the potential for major bleeding has increased, and a technique to identify those at increased bleeding risk is greatly needed. Platelet function tests (PFTs), most frequently VerifyNow and also the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein -phosphorylation assay, have been used to identify low on-treatment platelet reactivity, to identify individuals who may be at increased bleeding risk. Such results predict nuisance bleeding, but many individuals have low on-treatment platelet reactivity and yet do not exhibit major or even minor bleeding. Although PFTs may be useful in assessing populations, they do not allow identification of individual patients at risk of bleeding on either antiplatelet or novel oral anticoagulant therapy, nor do they allow the tailoring of such therapy to optimize the risk:benefit ratio. Thrombin plays a cardinal role in both arterial thrombus formation and hemostasis, yet most PFTs fail to assess the contribution of thrombin, because they employ anticoagulated blood. Techniques such as the calibrated automated thrombogram and the point-of-care global thrombosis test, performed on native blood, which measure endogenous thrombin potential, seem to show the most promise for profiling bleeding risk, as tests that most physiologically assess the effects of medications on thrombin. PMID:25839991

  10. Thrombocytopenia model with minimal manipulation of blood cells allowing whole blood assessment of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann Skipper, Mette; Rubak, Peter; Halfdan Larsen, Ole; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-06-01

    In vitro models of thrombocytopenia are useful research tools. Previously published models have shortcomings altering properties of platelets and other blood components. The aim of the present study was to develop a whole blood method to induce thrombocytopenia with minimal manipulation, and to describe platelet function in induced thrombocytopenia in individuals with healthy platelets. Hirudin anticoagulated blood was obtained from 20 healthy volunteers. One part of the blood was gently centrifuged at 130g for 15 minutes. The platelet-rich plasma was replaced with phosphate-buffered saline to establish thrombocytopenia. Various levels of thrombocytopenia were achieved by combining different volumes of baseline whole blood and thrombocytopenic blood. Platelet counts were measured by flow cytometry (Navios, Beckman Coulter) and routine haematological analyser (Sysmex XE-5000). Platelet function was analysed by impedance aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyzer, Roche) and by flow cytometry (Navios, Beckman Coulter) using collagen, adenosine diphosphate, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 and ristocetin as agonists. Median baseline platelet count was 227×10(9)/l. The in vitro model yielded median platelet counts at 51×10(9)/l (range 26-93×10(9)/l). We observed minor, yet significant, changes in platelet size and maturity from baseline to modelled thrombocytopenia. In the thrombocytopenic samples, significant and positive linear associations were found between platelet count and platelet aggregation across all agonists (all p-values<0.001). Platelet function assessed by flow cytometry showed minimal alterations in the thrombocytopenic samples. A new whole blood-based model of thrombocytopenia was established and validated. This new model serves as a useful future tool, particularly to explore platelet function in patients with thrombocytopenia. PMID:26555800

  11. Microfluidic assay of hemophilic blood clotting: Distinct deficits in platelet and fibrin deposition at low factor levels

    PubMed Central

    Colace, T.; Fogarty, Patrick F.; Panckeri, Karen A.; Li, Ruizhi; Diamond, S.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor deficiencies create a range of bleeding phenotypes. Microfluidic devices offer controlled hemodynamics and defined procoagulant triggers for measurement of clotting under flow. Objectives We tested a flow assay of contact pathway-triggered clotting to quantify platelet and fibrin deposition distal of dysfunctional thrombin production. Microfluidic metrics were then compared with PTT or % factor activity assays. Methods Whole blood (WB) treated with low level corn trypsin inhibitor (4 µg/ml) from 9 healthy donors and 27 patients [deficient in: Factor VIII (19 patients); IX (1); XI (1); VWF (6)] was perfused over fibrillar collagen at wall shear rate=100 s−1. Results Using healthy WB, platelets deposited within 30 sec, while fibrin appeared within 6 min. Compared to healthy controls, WB from patients displayed a 50% reduction in platelet deposition only at <1 % factor activity. In contrast, striking defects in fibrin deposition occurred for patients with <13% factor activity (or PTT >40 sec). Full occlusion of the 60-micron high channel was completely absent over the 15 min test in patients with <1% factor activity, while an intermediate defect was present in patients with >1% factor. Conclusion Spontaneous bleeding in patients with < 1% factor activity may be linked to deficits in both platelet and fibrin deposition, a risk known to be mitigated when factor levels are raised to >1 % activity (PTT of ~40–60 sec), a level that does not necessarily rescue fibrin formation under flow. PMID:24261634

  12. Platelet C1- inhibitor. A secreted alpha-granule protein.

    PubMed Central

    Schmaier, A H; Smith, P M; Colman, R W

    1985-01-01

    In order to characterize which proteins of the contact phase of coagulation interact with platelets, human platelets were studied immunochemically and functionally to determine if they contain C1- inhibitor. By means of monospecific antibody to C1- inhibitor, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CELISA) was developed to measure directly platelet C1- inhibitor. With the CELISA, from 33 to 115 ng of C1- inhibitor antigen per 10(8) platelets from 15 normal donors was quantified in lysates of washed human platelets solubilized in nonionic detergent. The mean concentration in 10(8) platelets was 62 +/- 33 ng (SD). Plasma C1- inhibitor either in the platelet suspension medium or on the surface of the platelets could account for only from 6.5 to 16% of the total antigen measured in the solubilized platelets. Upon functional studies, platelets contained 84 +/- 36 ng (SD) of C1- inhibitor activity in 10(8) platelets. As assessed by the CELISA, platelet C1- inhibitor antigen was immunochemically identical to plasma and purified C1- inhibitor. In contrast, the mean concentration of platelet C1- inhibitor antigen in platelets from four patients with classical hereditary angioedema was 8.3 ng/10(8) platelets (range, 5.3 to 11.3 ng/10(8) platelets). 25 and 31% of the total platelet C1- inhibitor was secreted without cell lysis from normal platelets after exposure to collagen (20 micrograms/ml) and thrombin (1 U/ml), respectively, and this secretion was blocked by metabolic inhibitors. Platelet subcellular fractionation showed that platelet C1- inhibitor resided mostly in alpha-granules, similar to the location of platelet fibrinogen. Thus, human platelets contained C1- inhibitor, which became available by platelet secretion. The identification of platelet C1- inhibitor suggests that platelets may modulate the activation of the proteins of early blood coagulation and the classical complement pathways. Images PMID:3965505

  13. Circulating primers enhance platelet function and induce resistance to antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Blair, T A; Moore, S F; Hers, I

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists are antiplatelet compounds that are used clinically in patients with thrombosis. However, some patients are ‘resistant’ to antiplatelet therapy, which increases their risk of developing acute coronary syndromes. These patients often present with an underlying condition that is associated with altered levels of circulating platelet primers and platelet hyperactivity. Platelet primers cannot stimulate platelet activation, but, in combination with physiologic stimuli, significantly enhance platelet function. Objectives To explore the role of platelet primers in resistance to antiplatelet therapy, and to evaluate whether phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) contributes to this process. Methods and Results We used platelet aggregation, thromboxane A2 production and ex vivo thrombus formation as functional readouts of platelet activity. Platelets were treated with the potent P2Y12 inhibitor AR-C66096, aspirin, or a combination of both, in the presence or absence of the platelet primers insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and thrombopoietin (TPO), or the Gz-coupled receptor ligand epinephrine. We found that platelet primers largely overcame the inhibitory effects of antiplatelet compounds on platelet functional responses. IGF-1-mediated and TPO-mediated, but not epinephrine-mediated, enhancements in the presence of antiplatelet drugs were blocked by the PI3K inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. Conclusions These results demonstrate that platelet primers can contribute to antiplatelet resistance. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that there are PI3K-dependent and PI3K-independent mechanisms driving primer-mediated resistance to antiplatelet therapy. PMID:26039631

  14. Complement Activation in Trauma Patients Alters Platelet Function.

    PubMed

    Atefi, Gelareh; Aisiku, Omozuanvbo; Shapiro, Nathan; Hauser, Carl; Dalle Lucca, Jurandir; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Tsokos, George C

    2016-09-01

    Trauma remains the main cause of death for both civilians and those in uniform. Trauma-associated coagulopathy is a complex process involving inflammation, coagulation, and platelet dysfunction. It is unknown whether activation of complement, which occurs invariably in trauma patients, is involved in the expression of trauma-associated coagulopathy. We designed a prospective study in which we enrolled 40 trauma patients and 30 healthy donors upon arrival to the emergency department of BIDMC. Platelets from healthy individuals were incubated with sera from trauma patients and their responsiveness to a thrombin receptor-activating peptide was measured using aggregometry. Complement deposition on platelets from trauma patients was measured by flow cytometry. Normal platelets displayed hypoactivity after incubation with trauma sera even though exposure to trauma sera resulted in increased agonist-induced calcium flux. Depletion of complement from sera further blocked activation of hypoactive platelets. Conversely, complement activation increased aggregation of platelets. Platelets from trauma patients were found to have significantly higher amounts of C3a and C4d on their surface compared with platelets from controls. Depletion of complement (C4d, C3a) reversed the ability of trauma sera to augment agonist-induced calcium flux in donor platelets. Our data indicate that complement enhances platelet aggregation. Despite its complement content, trauma sera render platelets hypoactive and complement depletion further blocks activation of hypoactive platelets. The defect in platelet activation induced by trauma sera is distal to receptor activation since agonist-induced Ca2+ flux is elevated in the presence of trauma sera owing to complement deposition. PMID:27355402

  15. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a part of blood, clump together and cause blood to clot. ... Decreased platelet aggregation may be due to: Autoimmune ... Fibrin degradation products Inherited platelet function defects ...

  16. Alterations in bovine platelet function and acute phase proteins induced by Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Cheryk, L A; Hooper-McGrevy, K E; Gentry, P A

    1998-01-01

    Platelet function was assessed by aggregometry in 10 Holstein calves before and after exposure to Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) by intrabronchial challenge. At 24 h after exposure the platelets had become more reactive to stimulation with known platelet agonists such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) and the platelet aggregates that formed were more resistant to disaggregation. The activation of platelets was an early response in the challenged calves as platelet function had returned to pretreatment levels 72 h after exposure to the bacteria while the acute phase reactant proteins, haptoglobin and fibrinogen, were approaching their peak values and alpha 2-macroglobulin levels had also risen significantly (P < 0.05) at this time. The plasma levels of these proteins were still elevated and albumin levels were depressed 6 d post-treatment. At post-mortem all calves exhibited pneumonic tissue damage. When P. haemolytica leukotoxin was added directly to bovine platelet suspensions both spontaneous aggregation and an increase in the aggregation response to ADP and PAF stimulation were observed. The morphological appearance of the platelet aggregates exhibited the typical pattern for bovine platelets with 2 distinct zones of cells being visible within each aggregate. One zone contained platelets in which the cytoplasmic granules were still evident and the other zone contained irregularly shaped platelets devoid of granular content. In the latter zone, discrete gaps, or pores, were evident in the plasma membrane of numerous platelets. This pore formation is characteristic of leukotoxin action and is not observed in ADP or PAF induced aggregates. Images Figure 2. PMID:9442932

  17. Platelet function and activation in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with subclinical chronic valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Tong, Linda J; Hosgood, Giselle L; French, Anne T; Irwin, Peter J; Shiel, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess platelet closure time (CT), mean platelet component (MPC) concentration, and platelet component distribution width (PCDW) in dogs with subclinical chronic valvular heart disease. ANIMALS 89 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs) and 39 control dogs (not CKCSs). PROCEDURES Platelet count, MPC concentration, PCDW, and Hct were measured by use of a hematology analyzer, and CT was measured by use of a platelet function analyzer. Murmur grade and echocardiographic variables (mitral valve regurgitant jet size relative to left atrial area, left atrial-to-aortic diameter ratio, and left ventricular internal dimensions) were recorded. Associations between explanatory variables (sex, age, murmur grade, echocardiographic variables, platelet count, and Hct) and outcomes (CT, MPC concentration, and PCDW) were examined by use of multivariate regression models. RESULTS A model with 5 variables best explained variation in CT (R(2), 0.74), with > 60% of the variance of CT explained by mitral valve regurgitant jet size. The model of best fit to explain variation in MPC concentration included only platelet count (R(2), 0.24). The model of best fit to explain variation in PCDW included platelet count and sex (R(2), 0.25). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, a significant effect of mitral valve regurgitant jet size on CT was consistent with platelet dysfunction. However, platelet activation, as assessed on the basis of the MPC concentration and PCDW, was not a feature of subclinical chronic valvular heart disease in CKCSs. PMID:27463549

  18. Differences in Platelet Function In Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia and Myelodysplasia Compared to Equally Thrombocytopenic Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Psaila, Bethan; Bussel, James B.; Frelinger, Andrew L.; Babula, Bracken; Linden, Matthew D.; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R.; Tate, Chinara; Feldman, Eric J.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Severe thrombocytopenia is a major risk factor for haemorrhage, and yet platelet function and bleeding risk at low platelet counts are poorly understood because of limitations of platelet function testing at very low platelet counts. Objectives To examine and compare platelet function in severely thrombocytopenic patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or myelodysplasia (MDS) to patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Methods Whole blood flow cytometric measurement of platelet activation and platelet reactivity to agonists was correlated with the immature platelet fraction (IPF) and bleeding symptoms. Results Compared with patients with ITP, patients with AML/MDS had smaller platelets, lower IPF, and substantially lower platelet surface expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa and GPIb both with and without addition of ex vivo ADP or TRAP. In both ITP and AML/MDS, increased platelet surface GPIb on circulating platelets and expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa and GPIb on ex vivo activated platelets correlated with a higher IPF. Whereas platelet reactivity was higher for AML/MDS patients with bleeding than those with no bleeding, platelet reactivity was lower for ITP patients with bleeding than those with no bleeding. Conclusions AML/MDS patients have lower in vivo platelet activation and ex vivo platelet reactivity than patients with ITP. The proportion of newly-produced platelets correlates with the expression of platelet surface markers of activation. These differences might contribute to differences in bleeding tendency between AML/MDS and ITP. This study is the first to define differences in platelet function between AML/MDS patients and ITP patients with equivalent degrees of thrombocytopenia. PMID:21920014

  19. Effect of Fibrinogen on Platelet Reactivity Measured by the VerifyNow P2Y12 Assay.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolsky, A B; Laguta, P S; Guskova, E V; Yarovaya, E B; Titaeva, E V; Storozhilova, A N; Panchenko, E P

    2016-05-01

    The VerifyNow assay is based upon the ability of activated platelets to cross-link beads coated with fibrinogen. However, fibrinogen is an abundant protein of blood, and therefore it may affect test results by competing with fibrinogen of beads for binding to platelets. To test this assumption, we assessed the influence of artificial alteration of fibrinogen level in blood samples obtained from donors (n = 9) and patients on clopidogrel therapy (n = 8) on the results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay. Fibrinogen level was altered by adding to blood samples 1/10 volume of fibrinogen solution (10.56 g/liter) or corresponding buffer. Relative to baseline, addition of buffer significantly increased platelet reactivity, whereas addition of fibrinogen decreased it. Analysis of the relationship between change in platelet reactivity values (dBase and dPRU) and change in fibrinogen concentration (dFg) revealed strong negative correlations: dBase = -63.3 × dFg - 27.1 (r = -0.924, p < 0.0005) and dPRU = -54.4 × dFg - 21.8 (r = -0.764, p < 0.0005). Thus, the results of our experiments suggest that: (i) blood fibrinogen strongly influences results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay, and (ii) correcting for fibrinogen effect may be needed to improve the accuracy of the test in the measuring of antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel therapy. PMID:27297894

  20. Evaluation of store lesion in platelet obtained by apheresis compared to platelet derived from whole blood and its impact on the in vitro functionality.

    PubMed

    Quintero, M; Núñez, M; Mellado, S; Maldonado, M; Wehinger, S

    2015-12-01

    Platelet units for transfusion purposes are obtained manually from whole blood or by apheresis, in an automated process. In both methods, platelets during storage present a characteristics grouped under the name "storage lesion" that are associated with adverse effects on platelet units. Oxidative stress has been claimed to be one of major causes, leading to activation and apoptosis processes affecting their post transfusion functionality. In this work, we observed an association between apheresis and a reduced presence of oxidative stress and better results in functional markers in stored platelets, compared to manually obtained platelets. Then, apheresis which would ensure a greater number of functional platelets during the 5 days of storage, compared to concentrates obtained from whole blood. PMID:26043812

  1. Using a Filtration Technique to Isolate Platelet Free Plasma for Assaying Pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    TOLOUIAN, RAMIN; CONNERY, SEAN M.; O’NEILL, W. CHARLES; GUPTA, AJAY

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Vascular calcification (VC) is a strong prognostic marker of mortality from cardiovascular disease. Extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) is a critical inhibitor of vascular calcification and it has been reported that hemodialysis patients have reduced plasma PPi levels, suggesting that altered PPi metabolism could contribute to VC in hemodialysis patients. Platelets are rich in PPi and release of PPi from platelets during storage or processing of plasma can lead to falsely elevated plasma PPi levels. To prepare plasma samples that are suitable for measuring PPi levels, ultracentrifugation has been used to remove platelets. Consequently, plasma PPi measurements have been limited to research laboratories since the majority of clinical laboratories do not have access to an ultracentrifuge. The purpose of the present study was to test the validity of an improved method of preparing platelet free plasma that uses filtration with a 300,000 Dalton molecular weight cut-off filter to exclude platelets, while minimizing their release of PPi. Methods In 20 maintenance hemodialysis patients, PPi levels were measured in plasma samples prepared by the conventional technique of low-speed centrifugation to remove red and white blood cells versus a novel filtration technique. Results Plasma prepared by filtration had significantly lower platelet counts (0 vs. 3 – 7 103/μL) and PPi levels (1.39 ± 0.30 μM vs. 2.74 ± 1.19 μM; mean ± SD, p < 0.01). Conclusions The filtration method appears effective in excluding platelets without causing trauma to platelets and can be used by clinical laboratories to prepare platelet-depleted plasma for PPi measurement. PMID:23289181

  2. An overview of platelet indices for evaluating platelet function in children with scorpion envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Konca, Capan; Tekin, Mehmet; Colak, Pinar; Uckardes, Fatih; Turgut, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between platelet indices and scorpion envenomations (SE). Medical records of 76 children who were hospitalised for scorpion stings in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) between February 2013 and November 2013, and 55 healthy children who were similar to the patient group in terms of age and sex, were analysed retrospectively. The leucocyte (WBC), thrombocyte (PLT), plateletcrit (PCT), platelet distribution width (PDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV) values of the 76 children with SE were recorded. These values were compared with the healthy control group. Significantly higher WBC and PDW values were noted in patients with SE in comparison to the controls. Patients with SE had significantly lower mean MPV values compared to the healthy controls (9.03 ± 1.26 compared to 10.43 ± 1.44 fL, respectively; p < 0.001). Although the mean platelet count was slightly elevated in the SE group, no statistically significant difference existed between the two groups (p = 0.097). Furthermore, the mean PCT values in the SE group compared to the control group were slightly decreased, but this decrease was not statistically significant (p = 0.141). A significant inverse correlation existed between the MPV values and the WBC (r = -0.450, p < 0.01) and PLT counts (r = -0.420, p < 0.01). The PLT values were significantly correlated with the PCT values (r = 0.687, p < 0.01). This study demonstrated that SE may lead to several alterations in platelet indices. Significantly lower values of MPV and higher values of PDW were detected in SE patients. However, the increase in the platelet counts and the decrease in the PCT values were not significant. PMID:26417303

  3. An overview of platelet indices for evaluating platelet function in children with scorpion envenomation.

    PubMed

    Konca, Capan; Tekin, Mehmet; Colak, Pinar; Uckardes, Fatih; Turgut, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between platelet indices and scorpion envenomations (SE). Medical records of 76 children who were hospitalised for scorpion stings in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) between February 2013 and November 2013, and 55 healthy children who were similar to the patient group in terms of age and sex, were analysed retrospectively. The leucocyte (WBC), thrombocyte (PLT), plateletcrit (PCT), platelet distribution width (PDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV) values of the 76 children with SE were recorded. These values were compared with the healthy control group. Significantly higher WBC and PDW values were noted in patients with SE in comparison to the controls. Patients with SE had significantly lower mean MPV values compared to the healthy controls (9.03 ± 1.26 compared to 10.43 ± 1.44 fL, respectively; p < 0.001). Although the mean platelet count was slightly elevated in the SE group, no statistically significant difference existed between the two groups (p = 0.097). Furthermore, the mean PCT values in the SE group compared to the control group were slightly decreased, but this decrease was not statistically significant (p = 0.141). A significant inverse correlation existed between the MPV values and the WBC (r = -0.450, p < 0.01) and PLT counts (r = -0.420, p < 0.01). The PLT values were significantly correlated with the PCT values (r = 0.687, p < 0.01). This study demonstrated that SE may lead to several alterations in platelet indices. Significantly lower values of MPV and higher values of PDW were detected in SE patients. However, the increase in the platelet counts and the decrease in the PCT values were not significant. PMID:26417303

  4. Examination of platelet function in whole blood under dynamic flow conditions with the cone and plate(let) analyzer: effect of erythrocytosis and thrombocytosis.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I; Silver, Richard T; Weksler, Babette B; Yin, Wei; Bernhardt, Bernard; Varon, David

    2007-03-01

    We studied cone and plate(let) analysis (CPA) for evaluating global platelet function in whole blood under arterial flow conditions (approximately 1,800 seconds(-1)). CPA allows direct visualization and quantitation of platelet adhesion (surface coverage [SC]) and determination of average aggregate size (AS) following brief shearing of a small blood sample (3.2% sodium citrate) in plastic wells. By using blood from healthy volunteers manipulated to alter platelet or RBC counts and blood from patients with myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), quantitative and qualitative changes in SC and AS were observed. Thrombocytosis resulted in increased SC, whereas erythrocytosis increased AS. The RBC volume (mean corpuscular volume) had no effect. It is interesting that differences in CPA AS were discerned among subgroups of patients with MPD undergoing different treatment regimens. These studies suggest that CPA platelet deposition patterns may provide novel insight into global platelet function during hemodynamic flow. PMID:17276938

  5. Functional validation of platelet-activating factor receptor sites characterized biochemically by a specific and reproducible ( sup 3 H)platelet-activating factor binding in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tahraoui, L.; Floch, A.; Cavero, I. )

    1990-03-01

    In human platelet membranes, (3H)platelet-activating factor(PAF)-C18 binding sites exhibited high affinity (Kd 0.074 +/- 0.005 nM, n = 28 healthy volunteers), saturability, elevated stereoselectivity, marked pharmacological specificity and small intersubject variability. The maximal binding capacity was 215 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein. Saturation of (3H)PAF binding was obtained with 0.3 nM ligand, and its isotherm was compatible with a single class of binding sites. The stereoselectivity for (3H)PAF was clearly indicated by the low displacing potency of enantio-PAF-C16 (the synthetic enantiomer of PAF) that was 5000-fold less potent than PAF. Specific (3H)PAF binding attained 65% with 0.1 nM ligand and was displaced fully not only by cold PAF but also by RP 59227 (Ki = 6.2 +/- 1.3 nM, n = 7), a novel, potent and specific PAF receptor antagonist in a pure enantiomeric form and several other antagonists such as CV-6209, WEB 2086, L-652,731 and BN 52021. Various classical pharmacological agents did not interfere with the (3H)PAF binding. In intact platelets, (3H)PAF binding shared the same properties as those just described for membrane preparations. A functional role for these binding sites was suggested by the high correlation (r = 0.94, P less than .001) between the Ki values for several known PAF antagonists determined in (3H)PAF binding and the IC50 values obtained against PAF-induced aggregation in whole platelets. Thus, the present (3H)PAF binding in human platelet membranes may be a useful pharmacological tool to study possible changes in (3H)PAF binding parameters induced by pathological states for which PAF may be directly or indirectly responsible.

  6. Lactodifucotetraose, a human milk oligosaccharide, attenuates platelet function and inflammatory cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; Tanritanir, Ayse C; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Human milk strongly quenches inflammatory processes in vitro, and breastfed infants have lower incidence of inflammatory diseases than those fed artificially. Platelets from neonates, in contrast to those from adults, are less responsive to platelet agonists such as collagen, thrombin, ADP, and epinephrine. Breastfed infants absorb oligosaccharides intact from the human milk in their gut to the circulation. This study was to determine whether these oligosaccharides can attenuate platelet function and platelet secretion of pro-inflammatory proteins, and to identify the active component. The natural mixture of oligosaccharides from human milk and pure individual human milk oligosaccharides were tested for their ability to modulate responses of platelets isolated from human blood following exposure to thrombin, ADP, and collagen. Human milk and the natural mixture of human milk oligosaccharides inhibited platelet release of inflammatory proteins. Of the purified human milk oligosaccharides tested, only lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) significantly inhibited thrombin induced release of the pro-inflammatory proteins RANTES and sCD40L. LDFT also inhibited platelet adhesion to a collagen-coated surface, as well as platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. These data indicate that LDFT may help modulate hemostasis by suppressing platelet-induced inflammatory processes in breastfed infants. This activity suggests further study of LDFT for its potential as a therapeutic agent in infants and adults. PMID:26743063

  7. A shear gradient-activated microfluidic device for automated monitoring of whole blood haemostasis and platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abhishek; Graveline, Amanda; Waterhouse, Anna; Vernet, Andyna; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Ingber, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of blood haemostasis is essential for the management of patients who use extracorporeal devices, receive anticoagulation therapy or experience coagulopathies. However, current monitoring devices do not measure effects of haemodynamic forces that contribute significantly to platelet function and thrombus formation. Here we describe a microfluidic device that mimics a network of stenosed arteriolar vessels, permitting evaluation of blood clotting within small sample volumes under pathophysiological flow. By applying a clotting time analysis based on a phenomenological mathematical model of thrombus formation, coagulation and platelet function can be accurately measured in vitro in patient blood samples. When the device is integrated into an extracorporeal circuit in pig endotoxemia or heparin therapy models, it produces real-time readouts of alterations in coagulation ex vivo that are more reliable than standard clotting assays. Thus, this disposable device may be useful for personalized diagnostics and for real-time surveillance of antithrombotic therapy in clinic. PMID:26733371

  8. A shear gradient-activated microfluidic device for automated monitoring of whole blood haemostasis and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abhishek; Graveline, Amanda; Waterhouse, Anna; Vernet, Andyna; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Ingber, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of blood haemostasis is essential for the management of patients who use extracorporeal devices, receive anticoagulation therapy or experience coagulopathies. However, current monitoring devices do not measure effects of haemodynamic forces that contribute significantly to platelet function and thrombus formation. Here we describe a microfluidic device that mimics a network of stenosed arteriolar vessels, permitting evaluation of blood clotting within small sample volumes under pathophysiological flow. By applying a clotting time analysis based on a phenomenological mathematical model of thrombus formation, coagulation and platelet function can be accurately measured in vitro in patient blood samples. When the device is integrated into an extracorporeal circuit in pig endotoxemia or heparin therapy models, it produces real-time readouts of alterations in coagulation ex vivo that are more reliable than standard clotting assays. Thus, this disposable device may be useful for personalized diagnostics and for real-time surveillance of antithrombotic therapy in clinic. PMID:26733371

  9. The Genetics of Common Variation affecting Platelet Development, Function and Pharmaceutical Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Common variant effects on human platelet function and response to anti-platelet treatment have traditionally been studied using candidate gene approaches involving a limited number of variants and genes. These studies have often been undertaken in clinically defined cohorts. More recently, studies have applied genome-wide scans in larger population samples than prior candidate studies, in some cases scanning relatively healthy individuals. These studies demonstrate synergy with some prior candidate gene findings (e.g., GP6, ADRA2A) but also uncover novel loci involved in platelet function. Here, I summarise findings on common genetic variation influencing platelet development, function and therapeutics. Taken together, candidate gene and genome-wide studies begin to account for common variation in platelet function and provide information that may ultimately be useful in pharmacogenetic applications in the clinic. More than 50 loci have been identified with consistent associations with platelet phenotypes in ≥2 populations. Several variants are under further study in clinical trials relating to anti-platelet therapies. In order to have useful clinical applications, variants must have large effects on a modifiable outcome. Regardless of clinical applications, studies of common genetic influences, even of small effect, offer additional insights into platelet biology including the importance of intracellular signalling and novel receptors. Understanding of common platelet-related genetics remains behind parallel fields (e.g., lipids, blood pressure) due to challenges in phenotype ascertainment. Further work is necessary to discover and characterise loci for platelet function, and to assess whether these loci contribute to disease aetiologies or response to therapeutics. PMID:21781261

  10. Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals molecular and functional platelet bias of aged haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Grover, Amit; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Thongjuea, Supat; Carrelha, Joana; Giustacchini, Alice; Gambardella, Adriana; Macaulay, Iain; Mancini, Elena; Luis, Tiago C; Mead, Adam; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Nerlov, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Aged haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate more myeloid cells and fewer lymphoid cells compared with young HSCs, contributing to decreased adaptive immunity in aged individuals. However, it is not known how intrinsic changes to HSCs and shifts in the balance between biased HSC subsets each contribute to the altered lineage output. Here, by analysing HSC transcriptomes and HSC function at the single-cell level, we identify increased molecular platelet priming and functional platelet bias as the predominant age-dependent change to HSCs, including a significant increase in a previously unrecognized class of HSCs that exclusively produce platelets. Depletion of HSC platelet programming through loss of the FOG-1 transcription factor is accompanied by increased lymphoid output. Therefore, increased platelet bias may contribute to the age-associated decrease in lymphopoiesis. PMID:27009448

  11. Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals molecular and functional platelet bias of aged haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Amit; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Thongjuea, Supat; Carrelha, Joana; Giustacchini, Alice; Gambardella, Adriana; Macaulay, Iain; Mancini, Elena; Luis, Tiago C.; Mead, Adam; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.; Nerlov, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Aged haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate more myeloid cells and fewer lymphoid cells compared with young HSCs, contributing to decreased adaptive immunity in aged individuals. However, it is not known how intrinsic changes to HSCs and shifts in the balance between biased HSC subsets each contribute to the altered lineage output. Here, by analysing HSC transcriptomes and HSC function at the single-cell level, we identify increased molecular platelet priming and functional platelet bias as the predominant age-dependent change to HSCs, including a significant increase in a previously unrecognized class of HSCs that exclusively produce platelets. Depletion of HSC platelet programming through loss of the FOG-1 transcription factor is accompanied by increased lymphoid output. Therefore, increased platelet bias may contribute to the age-associated decrease in lymphopoiesis. PMID:27009448

  12. Peroxiredoxin II Is an Antioxidant Enzyme That Negatively Regulates Collagen-stimulated Platelet Function*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ji Yong; Wang, Su Bin; Min, Ji Hyun; Chae, Yun Hee; Baek, Jin Young; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Chang, Tong-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced platelet signaling is mediated by binding to the primary receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Reactive oxygen species produced in response to collagen have been found to be responsible for the propagation of GPVI signaling pathways in platelets. Therefore, it has been suggested that antioxidant enzymes could down-regulate GPVI-stimulated platelet activation. Although the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin II (PrxII) has emerged as having a role in negatively regulating signaling through various receptors by eliminating H2O2 generated upon receptor stimulation, the function of PrxII in collagen-stimulated platelets is not known. We tested the hypothesis that PrxII negatively regulates collagen-stimulated platelet activation. We analyzed PrxII-deficient murine platelets. PrxII deficiency enhanced GPVI-mediated platelet activation through the defective elimination of H2O2 and the impaired protection of SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) against oxidative inactivation, which resulted in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of key components for the GPVI signaling cascade, including Syk, Btk, and phospholipase Cγ2. Interestingly, PrxII-mediated antioxidative protection of SHP-2 appeared to occur in the lipid rafts. PrxII-deficient platelets exhibited increased adhesion and aggregation upon collagen stimulation. Furthermore, in vivo experiments demonstrated that PrxII deficiency facilitated platelet-dependent thrombus formation in injured carotid arteries. This study reveals that PrxII functions as a protective antioxidant enzyme against collagen-stimulated platelet activation and platelet-dependent thrombosis. PMID:25802339

  13. Measurement of platelet aggregation functions using whole blood migration ratio in a microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hong Seog; Choi, Sung Hyuk; Han, Miran; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Cho, Chi Hyun; An, Seong Soo A; Lim, Chae Seung; Shin, Sehyun

    2015-09-25

    Platelets play a major role in maintaining endothelial integrity and hemostasis. Of the various soluble agonists, ADP is an important in vivo stimulus for inducing platelet aggregation. In this study, a simple, rapid, and affordable method was designed for testing bleeding time (BT) and platelet aggregation with a two-channel microfluidic chip. Whole blood migration ratio (MR) from a microchip system was evaluated in comparison to the closure time (CT) from PFA-100 assays (Siemens, Germany) and CD62P expression on platelets. To induce platelet aggregation, a combination of collagen (1.84 mg/ml) and ADP (37.5 mg/ml) were used as agonists. After adding the agonists to samples, whole blood MR from the microchip system was measured. The outcome of the assessment depended on reaction time and agonist concentration. MR of whole blood from the microchip system was significantly correlated with CT from PFA-100 (r = 0.61, p <  0.05, n = 60). In addition, MR was negatively correlated with CD62P expression (r =-0.95, p <  0.05, n = 60). These results suggest that the measurement of MR using agonists is an easy, simple and efficient method for monitoring platelet aggregation in normal and ADP-receptors defective samples, along with the BT test. Thus, usage of the current microfluidic method could expand to diverse applications, including efficacy assessments in platelet therapy. PMID:26444593

  14. Changes in platelet morphology and function during 24 hours of storage.

    PubMed

    Braune, S; Walter, M; Schulze, F; Lendlein, A; Jung, F

    2014-01-01

    For in vitro studies assessing the interaction of platelets with implant materials, common and standardized protocols for the preparation of platelet rich plasma (PRP) are lacking, which may lead to non-matching results due to the diversity of applied protocols. Particularly, the aging of platelets during prolonged preparation and storage times is discussed to lead to an underestimation of the material thrombogenicity. Here, we study the influence of whole blood- and PRP-storage times on changes in platelet morphology and function. Blood from apparently healthy subjects was collected according to a standardized protocol and examined immediately after blood collection, four hours and twenty four hours later. The capability of platelets to adhere and form stable aggregates (PFA100, closure time) was examined in sodium citrate anticoagulated whole blood (WB) using the agonists equine type I collagen and epinephrine bitartrate (collagen/epinephrine) as well as equine type I collagen and adenosine-5'-diphosphate (collagen/ADP). Circulating platelets were quantified at each time point. Morphology of platelets and platelet aggregates were visualized microscopically and measured using an electric field multi-channel counting system (CASY). The percentage of activated platelets was assessed by means of P-selectin (CD62P) expression of circulating platelets. Furthermore, platelet factor 4 (PF4) release was measured in platelet poor plasma (PPP) at each time point. Whole blood PFA100 closure times increased after stimulation with collagen/ADP and collagen/epinephrine. Twenty four hours after blood collection, both parameters were prolonged pathologically above the upper limit of the reference range. Numbers of circulating platelets, measured in PRP, decreased after four hours, but no longer after twenty four hours. Mean platelet volumes (MPV) and platelet large cell ratios (P-LCR, 12 fL - 40 fL) decreased over time. Immediately after blood collection, no debris or platelet

  15. Platelet MAO and personality--function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Oreland, L; Hallman, J; Damberg, M

    2004-08-01

    Research on the association between platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity and personality traits, such as sensation seeking and impulsiveness, is reviewed with an emphasis on early history and current situation. The effects of MAO-inhibiting compounds in cigarette smoke for the interpretation of this association are discussed and recent results confirming a true association between platelet MAO activity and personality and vulnerability, for e.g. type 2 alcoholism are presented. From a clinical point of view, the link between platelet MAO activity, which is highly genetically regulated and is stable in the individual, and personality traits, has had its greatest impact on the understanding of the nature of constitutional factors making individuals vulnerable, for e.g. substance abuse and other forms of sociopathic behaviour. The molecular mechanisms underlying the association between platelet MAO and behaviour are discussed and evidence that common transcriptional factors, e.g. within the AP-2 family, regulating both the expression of platelet MAO and components of the central monoaminergic systems, such as synthesising enzymes, receptors and transporters, are presented. A hypothesis is put forward, that such common transcription factors may not directly regulate platelet MAO expression, but rather mitochondrial density, or outer mitochondrial membrane surface. PMID:15279564

  16. The dimeric platelet collagen receptor GPVI-Fc reduces platelet adhesion to activated endothelium and preserves myocardial function after transient ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Schönberger, Tanja; Ziegler, Melanie; Borst, Oliver; Konrad, Ildiko; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Massberg, Steffen; Ochmann, Carmen; Jürgens, Tobias; Seizer, Peter; Langer, Harald; Münch, Götz; Ungerer, Martin; Preissner, Klaus T; Elvers, Margitta; Gawaz, Meinrad

    2012-10-01

    Platelets play a critical role in the pathophysiology of reperfusion, sepsis, and cardiovascular diseases. In a multiple step process, they adhere to activated endothelium and release proinflammatory cytokines thereby promoting the inflammatory process. Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) is the major collagen receptor on the platelet surface and triggers platelet activation and primary hemostasis. Activation of GPVI leads to stable platelet adhesion and degranulation of platelet granules. However, GPVI is critically involved in platelet adhesion to activated endothelium without exposure of subendothelial matrix. Earlier studies show that the soluble GPVI-Fc binds to collagen and protects mice from atherosclerosis and decreases neointima proliferation after arterial injury. Here, we show for the first time that recombinant GPVI-Fc binds to activated endothelium mainly via vitronectin and prevents platelet/endothelial interaction. Administration of GPVI-Fc reduced infarct size and preserved cardiac function in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. This process was associated with reduced GPVI-induced platelet degranulation and release of proinflammatory cytokines in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, administration of GPVI-Fc offers a novel strategy to control platelet-mediated inflammation and to preserve myocardial function following myocardial infarction. PMID:22814400

  17. Functional responses and molecular mechanisms involved in histone-mediated platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Carestia, A; Rivadeneyra, L; Romaniuk, M A; Fondevila, C; Negrotto, S; Schattner, M

    2013-11-01

    Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in cell nuclei and they can be released by either dying or inflammatory cells. The recent observations that histones are major components of neutrophil extracellular traps and promote platelet aggregation and platelet-dependent thrombin generation have shown that these proteins are potent prothrombotic molecules. Because the mechanism(s) of platelet activation by histones are not completely understood, we explored the ability of individual recombinant human histones H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 to induce platelet activation as well as the possible molecular mechanisms involved. All histones were substrates for platelet adhesion and spreading and triggered fibrinogen binding, aggregation, von Willebrand factor release, P-selectin and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates; however, H4 was the most potent. Histone-mediated fibrinogen binding, P-selectin and PS exposure and the formation of mixed aggregates were potentiated by thrombin. Histones induced the activation of ERK, Akt, p38 and NFκB. Accordingly, histone-induced platelet activation was significantly impaired by pretreatment of platelets with inhibitors of ERK (U 0126), PI3K/Akt (Ly 294002), p38 (SB 203580) and NFκB (BAY 11-7082 and Ro 106-9920). Preincubation of platelets with either aspirin or dexamethasone markedly decreased fibrinogen binding and the adhesion mediated by histones without affecting P-selectin exposure. Functional platelet responses induced by H3 and H4, but not H1, H2A and H2B, were partially mediated through interaction with Toll-like receptors -2 and -4. Our data identify histones as important triggers of haemostatic and proinflammatory platelet responses, and only haemostatic responses are partially inhibited by anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23965842

  18. A novel assay for the detection of anti-human platelet antigen antibodies (HPA-1a) based on peptide aptamer technology

    PubMed Central

    Thibaut, Julien; Mérieux, Yves; Rigal, Dominique; Gillet, Germain

    2012-01-01

    Background Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is mostly due to the presence of maternal antibodies against the fetal platelet antigen HPA-1a on the platelet integrin GPIIb-IIIa. Accurate detection of anti-HPA-1a antibodies in the mother is, therefore, critical. Current diagnostic assays rely on the availability of pools of human platelets that vary according to donors and blood centers. There is still no satisfactory standardization of these assays. Design and Methods Peptide aptamer was used to detect and identify HPA-1a-specific antibodies in human serum that do not require human platelets. A peptide aptamer library was screened using an anti-HPA-1a human monoclonal antibody as a bait to isolate an aptamer that mimics the human platelet antigen HPA-1a. Results This is the first report in platelet immunology of the use of a peptide aptamer for diagnostic purposes. This assay gives better results than the MAIPA currently in use, detecting around 90% of the expected alloantibodies. Conclusions This assay could help define a standard for the quantitation of anti-HPA antibodies. This report also demonstrates that peptide aptamers can potentially detect a variety of biomarkers in body fluids; this is of particular interest for diagnostic purposes. PMID:22133781

  19. Effect in vitro on platelet function of two compounds developed from the pyrimido-pyrimidines

    PubMed Central

    Slater, S. D.; Turpie, A. G. G.; Douglas, A. S.; McNicol, G. P.

    1972-01-01

    VK 774 and VK 744, two new compounds developed from the pyrimido-pyrimidines, have been found to be powerful inhibitors of platelet function tested in vitro. They inhibit adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation, and the release of platelet factor 3 by kaolin, and VK 774 also reduces platelet adhesiveness and inhibits platelet aggregation (`snowstorm' effect) in the Chandler tube system. Although measured percentage whole blood clot retraction was uninfluenced by these drugs the clot produced with VK 774 was friable and soft. VK 774 appears to be the most powerful of these compounds reported so far, being active in some test systems at 10−6M, and, if the results of toxicity testing are satisfactory, it should be an important agent for therapeutic trial. PMID:5046075

  20. Lyn and PECAM-1 function as interdependent inhibitors of platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ming, Zhangyin; Hu, Yu; Xiang, Jizhou; Polewski, Peter; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2011-04-01

    Inhibition of platelet responsiveness is important to control pathologic thrombus formation. Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) and the Src family kinase Lyn inhibit platelet activation by the glycoprotein VI (GPVI) collagen receptor; however, it is not known whether PECAM-1 and Lyn function in the same or different inhibitory pathways. In these studies, we found that, relative to wild-type platelets, platelets derived from PECAM-1-deficient, Lyn-deficient, or PECAM-1/Lyn double-deficient mice were equally hyperresponsive to stimulation with a GPVI-specific agonist, indicating that PECAM-1 and Lyn participate in the same inhibitory pathway. Lyn was required for PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and subsequent binding of the Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase-2, SHP-2. These results support a model in which PECAM-1/SHP-2 complexes, formed in a Lyn-dependent manner, suppress GPVI signaling. PMID:21297004

  1. Procoagulant and platelet-derived microvesicle absolute counts determined by flow cytometry correlates with a measurement of their functional capacity

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Lisa; Harrison, Paul; Kohler, Malcolm; Ferry, Berne

    2014-01-01

    Background Flow cytometry is the most commonly used technology to measure microvesicles (MVs). Despite reported limitations of this technique, MV levels obtained using conventional flow cytometry have yielded many clinically relevant findings, such as associations with disease severity and ability to predict clinical outcomes. This study aims to determine if MV enumeration by flow cytometry correlates with a measurement of their functional capacity, as this may explain how flow cytometry generates clinically relevant results. Methods One hundred samples from healthy individuals and patients with obstructive sleep apnoea were analysed by conventional flow cytometry (FACSCalibur) and by three functional MV assays: Zymuphen MP-activity in which data were given as phosphatidylserine equivalent, STA® Phospholipid Procoag Assay expressed as clotting time and Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) reflecting in vitro thrombin generation. Correlations were determined by Spearman correlation. Results Absolute counts of lactadherin+ procoagulant MVs generated by flow cytometry weakly correlated with the results obtained from the Zymuphen MP-activity (r=0.5370, p<0.0001); correlated with ETP (r=0.7444, p<0.0001); negatively correlated with STA® Phospholipid Procoag Assay clotting time (−0.7872, p<0.0001), reflecting a positive correlation between clotting activity and flow cytometry. Levels of Annexin V+ procoagulant and platelet-derived MVs were also associated with functional assays. Absolute counts of MVs derived from other cell types were not correlated with the functional results. Conclusions Quantitative results of procoagulant and platelet-derived MVs from conventional flow cytometry are associated with the functional capability of the MVs, as defined by three functional MV assays. Flow cytometry is a valuable technique for the quantification of MVs from different cellular origins; however, a combination of several analytical techniques may give the most comprehensive

  2. Expression of the PlA2 allele of glycoprotein IIIa and its impact on platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Albert; Warner, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    Background The platelet fibrinogen receptor represents the final common pathway of platelet activation, and is formed from two glycoprotein (GP) subunits (GPIIb/IIIa). Carriage of the mutant PlA2 allele of GPIIIa has been shown to confer an increased risk of cardiovascular events, but published studies have disagreed as to the mechanism for this association. Objectives To assess whether carriage of the PlA2 allele conforms to Mendelian patterns of expression and to identify whether carriage of the mutant allele modulates platelet function. Methods Expression of the PlA2 allele was assessed in both healthy subjects (n = 25) and patients with known coronary artery disease (n = 90) through the development and validation of a liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay. Platelet function was assessed in the patient cohort in response to multiple agonists, and these data were analysed in the context of the proteomic data. Results Expression of the wild-type PlA1 allele and mutant PlA2 alleles was readily quantifiable and conformed to Mendelian patterns in both healthy and patient cohorts. Patients who were homozygous for the mutant PlA2 allele had an increased aggregatory response to adenosine diphosphate, collagen, adrenaline, ristocetin, thrombin receptor-activating peptide 6 and U46619, when assessed using agonist-concentration response curves. Conclusions These findings support the hypothesis that carriage of the mutant PlA2 allele mediates an increased risk of cardiovascular events through the modulation of platelet reactivity. PMID:26858830

  3. Platelet storage in PAS-2 or autologous plasma: impact on functional parameters.

    PubMed

    Bunescu, A; Hild, M; Lundahl, J; Egberg, N

    2001-04-01

    Currently, several platelet additive solutions for long-term platelet storage have been introduced. The aim of this study was to compare the deterioration of functional status of platelets stored for up to 5 days in autologous plasma (AP) only, with platelet stored in PAS-2, a salt solution containing acetate, citrate and sodium chloride. Change in platelet adhesion, aggregation and activation was measured by flow cytometric technique. In addition, beta-Thromboglobulin (beta-TG), lactate and glucose were determined. After 5 days of storage, the expression of P-Selectin was significantly higher, the production of lactate and the consumption of glucose were significantly lower, in platelets stored in PAS-2 than in autologous plasma. No significant differences were detected on day 5 between the two groups with regard to fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor binding capacity, or to beta-TG release. It can be concluded that neither storage medium was consistently better for the parameters tested. However, it must be emphasized that platelets stored in autologous plasma exhibited less lesion, in terms of P-Selectin expression compared with platelets stored in PAS-2. PMID:11299027

  4. Editorial Commentary: Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Knee Pain and Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that platelet-rich plasma improves knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, biologics hold promise for chondroprotection in addition to symptomatic relief. PMID:26542203

  5. Functionalized Nanofiber Meshes Enhance Immunosorbent Assays.

    PubMed

    Hersey, Joseph S; Meller, Amit; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional substrates with high surface-to-volume ratios and subsequently large protein binding capacities are of interest for advanced immunosorbent assays utilizing integrated microfluidics and nanosensing elements. A library of bioactive and antifouling electrospun nanofiber substrates, which are composed of high-molecular-weight poly(oxanorbornene) derivatives, is described. Specifically, a set of copolymers are synthesized from three 7-oxanorbornene monomers to create a set of water insoluble copolymers with both biotin (bioactive) and triethylene glycol (TEG) (antifouling) functionality. Porous three-dimensional nanofiber meshes are electrospun from these copolymers with the ability to specifically bind streptavidin while minimizing the nonspecific binding of other proteins. Fluorescently labeled streptavidin is used to quantify the streptavidin binding capacity of each mesh type through confocal microscopy. A simplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is presented to assess the protein binding capabilities and detection limits of these nanofiber meshes under both static conditions (26 h) and flow conditions (1 h) for a model target protein (i.e., mouse IgG) using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) colorimetric assay. Bioactive and antifouling nanofiber meshes outperform traditional streptavidin-coated polystyrene plates under flow, validating their use in future advanced immunosorbent assays and their compatibility with microfluidic-based biosensors. PMID:26551162

  6. Ovine platelet function is unaffected by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation within the first 24 h.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Rylan A; Foley, Samuel; Shekar, Kiran; Diab, Sara; Dunster, Kimble R; McDonald, Charles; Fraser, John F

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated platelet dysfunction during short-term extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and secondarily to determine if hyperoxaemia contributes to this dysfunction. Healthy sheep were anaesthetized and maintained on ECMO for either 2 or 24 h, with or without induction of smoke inhalation acute lung injury. A specialized animal-operating theatre was used to conduct the experimentation. Forty-three healthy female sheep were randomized into either a test or a control group. Following anaesthesia, test groups received ECMO ± smoke inhalation acute lung injury (SALI), whereas control groups were maintained with ventilation only ± SALI. Physiological, biochemical and coagulation data were obtained throughout via continuous monitoring and blood sampling. Platelet function was quantified through whole blood impedance aggregometry using Multiplate. Ovine platelet activity induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen was unaffected during the first 24 h of ECMO. However, progressive divergence of ADP-induced platelet activity was noted at cessation of the experiment. PaO2 was inversely related to ADP-dependent platelet activity in the ECMO groups--a relationship not identified in the control groups. ADP and collagen-dependent platelet activity are not significantly affected within the first 24 h of ECMO in sheep. However, dysfunction in ADP-dependent platelet activity may have continued to develop if observed beyond 24 h. Hyperoxaemia during ECMO does appear to affect how platelets react to ADP and may contribute to this developing dysfunction. Long-term animal models and investigation in clinical animals are warranted to fully investigate platelet function during ECMO. PMID:26196193

  7. Genomic landscape of megakaryopoiesis and platelet function defects

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Elisa; Norfo, Ruggiero; Pennucci, Valentina; Zini, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Megakaryopoiesis is a complex, stepwise process that takes place largely in the bone marrow. At the apex of the hierarchy, hematopoietic stem cells undergo a number of lineage commitment decisions that ultimately lead to the production of polyploid megakaryocytes. On average, megakaryocytes release 1011 platelets per day into the blood that repair vascular injuries and prevent excessive bleeding. This differentiation process is tightly controlled by exogenous and endogenous factors, which have been the topics of intense research in the hematopoietic field. Indeed, a skewing of megakaryocyte commitment and differentiation may entail the onset of myeloproliferative neoplasms and other preleukemic disorders together with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, whereas quantitative or qualitative defects in platelet production can lead to inherited platelet disorders. The recent advent of next-generation sequencing has prompted mapping of the genomic landscape of these conditions to provide an accurate view of the underlying lesions. The aims of this review are to introduce the physiological pathways of megakaryopoiesis and to present landmark studies on acquired and inherited disorders that target them. These studies have not only introduced a new era in the fields of molecular medicine and targeted therapies but may also provide us with a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying normal megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis that can inform efforts to create alternative sources of megakaryocytes and platelets. PMID:26787733

  8. Oral administration of Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors impairs GPVI-mediated platelet function.

    PubMed

    Rigg, Rachel A; Aslan, Joseph E; Healy, Laura D; Wallisch, Michael; Thierheimer, Marisa L D; Loren, Cassandra P; Pang, Jiaqing; Hinds, Monica T; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J T

    2016-03-01

    The Tec family kinase Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) plays an important signaling role downstream of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs in hematopoietic cells. Mutations in Btk are involved in impaired B-cell maturation in X-linked agammaglobulinemia, and Btk has been investigated for its role in platelet activation via activation of the effector protein phospholipase Cγ2 downstream of the platelet membrane glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Because of its role in hematopoietic cell signaling, Btk has become a target in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma; the covalent Btk inhibitor ibrutinib was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of these conditions. Antihemostatic events have been reported in some patients taking ibrutinib, although the mechanism of these events remains unknown. We sought to determine the effects of Btk inhibition on platelet function in a series of in vitro studies of platelet activation, spreading, and aggregation. Our results show that irreversible inhibition of Btk with two ibrutinib analogs in vitro decreased human platelet activation, phosphorylation of Btk, P-selectin exposure, spreading on fibrinogen, and aggregation under shear flow conditions. Short-term studies of ibrutinib analogs administered in vivo also showed abrogation of platelet aggregation in vitro, but without measurable effects on plasma clotting times or on bleeding in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of Btk significantly decreased GPVI-mediated platelet activation, spreading, and aggregation in vitro; however, prolonged bleeding was not observed in a model of bleeding. PMID:26659727

  9. Human CalDAG-GEFI gene (RASGRP2) mutation affects platelet function and causes severe bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Canault, Matthias; Ghalloussi, Dorsaf; Grosdidier, Charlotte; Guinier, Marie; Perret, Claire; Chelghoum, Nadjim; Germain, Marine; Raslova, Hana; Peiretti, Franck; Morange, Pierre E.; Saut, Noemie; Pillois, Xavier; Nurden, Alan T.; Cambien, François; Pierres, Anne; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Tregouet, David-Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The nature of an inherited platelet disorder was investigated in three siblings affected by severe bleeding. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified the culprit mutation (cG742T) in the RAS guanyl-releasing protein-2 (RASGRP2) gene coding for calcium- and DAG-regulated guanine exchange factor-1 (CalDAG-GEFI). Platelets from individuals carrying the mutation present a reduced ability to activate Rap1 and to perform proper αIIbβ3 integrin inside-out signaling. Expression of CalDAG-GEFI mutant in HEK293T cells abolished Rap1 activation upon stimulation. Nevertheless, the PKC- and ADP-dependent pathways allow residual platelet activation in the absence of functional CalDAG-GEFI. The mutation impairs the platelet’s ability to form thrombi under flow and spread normally as a consequence of reduced Rac1 GTP-binding. Functional deficiencies were confined to platelets and megakaryocytes with no leukocyte alteration. This contrasts with the phenotype seen in type III leukocyte adhesion deficiency caused by the absence of kindlin-3. Heterozygous did not suffer from bleeding and have normal platelet aggregation; however, their platelets mimicked homozygous ones by failing to undergo normal adhesion under flow and spreading. Rescue experiments on cultured patient megakaryocytes corrected the functional deficiency after transfection with wild-type RASGRP2. Remarkably, the presence of a single normal allele is sufficient to prevent bleeding, making CalDAG-GEFI a novel and potentially safe therapeutic target to prevent thrombosis. PMID:24958846

  10. The influence of herbal medicine on platelet function and coagulation: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Bradley J

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Platelet activation and aggregation play a central role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Herbal medicines have been traditionally used in the management of CVD and can play a role in modifying CVD progression, particularly in platelet function, and have the potential of altering platelet function tests, as well as some coagulation parameters. Herbal medicines, such as feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginseng, motherwort, St John's wort, and willow bark, were found to reduce platelet aggregation. In vitro studies show promise in the reduction of platelet aggregation for Andrographis, feverfew, garlic, ginger, Ginkgo, ginseng, hawthorn, horse chestnut, and turmeric. In addition, cranberry, danshen, dong quai, Ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, and St John's wort were found to have potential interactions with warfarin. Furthermore, St John's wort interacted with clopidogrel and danshen with aspirin. Therefore, repeat testing of platelet function and coagulation studies, particularly for patients on warfarin therapy, may be required after exclusion of herbal medicines that could have possibly affected initial test results. PMID:25839871

  11. Multiwavelength UV/visible spectroscopy for the quantitative investigation of platelet quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattley, Yvette D.; Leparc, German F.; Potter, Robert L.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    1998-04-01

    The quality of platelets transfused is vital to the effectiveness of the transfusion. Freshly prepared, discoid platelets are the most effective treatment for preventing spontaneous hemorrhage or for stopping an abnormal bleeding event. Current methodology for the routine testing of platelet quality involves random pH testing of platelet rich plasma and visual inspection of platelet rich plasma for a swirling pattern indicative of the discoid shape of the cells. The drawback to these methods is that they do not provide a quantitative and objective assay for platelet functionality that can be used on each platelet unit prior to transfusion. As part of a larger project aimed at characterizing whole blood and blood components with multiwavelength UV/vis spectroscopy, isolated platelets and platelet in platelet rich plasma have been investigated. Models based on Mie theory have been developed which allow for the extraction of quantitative information on platelet size, number and quality from multi-wavelength UV/vis spectra. These models have been used to quantify changes in platelet rich plasma during storage. The overall goal of this work is to develop a simple, rapid quantitative assay for platelet quality that can be used prior to platelet transfusion to ensure the effectiveness of the treatment. As a result of this work, the optical properties for isolated platelets, platelet rich plasma and leukodepleted platelet rich plasma have been determined.

  12. Effects of antihypertensive treatment on platelet function in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gomi, T; Ikeda, T; Shibuya, Y; Nagao, R

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of antihypertensive therapy on platelet activation in essential hypertension, the plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) were examined in 45 patients with essential hypertension and 20 age-matched normotensive control subjects. Hypertensive patients were assigned to monotherapy with one of five different antihypertensive drugs for 6 months, and the change of plasma levels of beta-TG was reexamined after the completion of the monotherapy. The plasma beta-TG increased in hypertensive patients compared with levels in normotensive control subjects. Monotherapy with each drug resulted in sufficient blood pressure control in all hypertensive patients. The plasma beta-TG decreased significantly after monotherapy with an alpha-blocker or an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI). The plasma beta-TG increased with the use of a diuretic but did not change with the use of a beta-blocker or calcium antagonist. The platelet activation observed in patients with essential hypertension is reversed by monotherapy with an alpha-blocker or an ACEI. It is possible that these drugs reduce the development of hypertensive vascular complications due to suppression of platelet activation in patients with essential hypertension. PMID:11131267

  13. Evaluation of platelet function using the in vitro bleeding time and corrected count increment of transfused platelets. Comparison between platelet concentrates derived from pooled buffy coates and apheresis.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, L; Kristensen, J; Olsson, K; Bring, J; Högman, C F

    1996-01-01

    The functional capacity of transfused platelets was evaluated with in vitro bleeding time (IVBT) and corrected count increment (CCI) in order to compare platelet concentrates (PCs) derived from pooled buffy coats (BC-PCs) with PCs collected by apheresis (A-PCs). The suspension medium in the BC-PCs was 30% CPD plasma and 70% of an additive solution (containing sodium and potassium chloride, sodium citrate and phosphate, mannitol), and in the A-PCs the medium was 100% CPD plasma. IVBT was evaluated using a Thrombostat 4000/2. BC-PC and A-PC were transfused 57 and 41 times, respectively to 36 patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. PCs transfused within 2 days of donation were considered fresh, and those transfused within 3-5 days were considered stored. IVBT was determined before, as well as 10-30 min and 24 h after transfusion; CCI was determined 10-30 min and 24 h after transfusion. The median pretransfusion IVBT value was 486 s. It was measurable in 21 of 98 (21%) of the transfusions, i.e. below the cutoff limit of 486 s. Ten to 30 min after transfusion, the IVBT showed a measurable reduction in 90% of the transfusions with fresh BC-PCs, 92% of those with fresh a-PCs, 63% of those with stored BC-PCs and 79% of those with stored A-PCs. After 24 h, the corresponding values were 63% for fresh BC-PCs, 50% for fresh A-PCs, 26% for stored BC-PCs and 38% for stored A-PCs. The median value of CCI 10-30 min after transfusion was 20 for fresh BC-PCs, 17 for fresh A-PCs, 16 for stored BC-PCs and 14 for stored A-PCs. The difference in IVBT between fresh and stored BC-PCs was significant (p = 0.032), unlike that between fresh and stored A-PC. After 24 h the corresponding values were 7 for fresh BC-PCs, 4 for fresh A-PCs, 4 for stored BC-PCs and 3 for stored A-PCs. When all transfusions with fresh PCs (BC-PCs + A-PCs) were compared with all transfusions with stored PCs, a statistical difference was demonstrated in both CCI (p = 0.027) and IVBT (p = 0.043). Spearman

  14. Effects on platelet function of combination etoposide and carboplatin chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, P; Properzi, E; Pisani, M; Clerico, A; Schiavetti, A; Lenti, L; Pulcinelli, F M; Ferroni, P; Gazzaniga, P P

    1998-01-01

    The effects of a therapeutic course of the combination of carboplatin and etoposide on platelet function have been evaluated in 10 pediatric patients with brain tumors. Platelet count, in vitro aggregation tests, P-selectin expression and agonist-induced ATP release were evaluated before, and 7 and 15 days after one cycle of chemotherapy. The analysis of the results demonstrated the presence of an in vitro platelet aggregation defect in response to collagen and arachidonic acid in all patients 7 days after therapy. A concomitant decrease of collagen- and arachidonic acid-induced ATP release was also observed. Both platelet aggregation and ATP release returned to baseline values 15 days after chemotherapy administration. Conversely, in vitro platelet aggregation and secretion induced by ADP and epinephrine were unaltered by carboplatin and etoposide administration. Furthermore, P-selectin expression was negative at baseline and did not change after chemotherapy. These results support the hypothesis that combination etoposide and carboplatin chemotherapy in pediatric patients is responsible for possible disturbances in biochemical pathways required for platelet secretion and aggregation. PMID:16793755

  15. Sulfasalazine and its metabolites inhibit platelet function in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    MacMullan, Paul A; Madigan, Anne M; Paul, Nevin; Peace, Aaron J; Alagha, Ahmed; Nolan, Kevin B; McCarthy, Geraldine M; Kenny, Dermot

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of sulfasalazine and its metabolites on platelet function in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA). One hundred thirty-five consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of IA were screened. Those with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), taking anti-platelet agents or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were excluded. A total of 32 patients were investigated, 15 taking sulfasalazine and 17 taking other disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and no sulfasalazine. These two cohorts were compared to 15 patients with stable CVD on long-term aspirin. The effect of sulfasalazine and its metabolites on arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation was also tested in vitro in samples from healthy donors (n = 18). Demographics, CVD risk factors and disease activity indices were similar in the sulfasalazine and other DMARD groups. AA-induced platelet aggregation was significantly inhibited in the sulfasalazine group (9 ± 7 %) and comparable to that in the aspirin group (10 ± 6 %). In contrast, there was no effect on AA-induced platelet aggregation in the other DMARDs group (77 ± 12 %) (p < 0.001). Furthermore, sulfasalazine therapy had no effect on platelet aggregation in response to multiple other agonists. Sulfasalazine and its metabolites (5-aminosalicylic acid and sulfapyridine) exerted an additive and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on AA-induced platelet aggregation in vitro (p < 0.001). The inhibition of AA-induced platelet aggregation by sulfasalazine is comparable to that achieved by aspirin and is dependent on both sulfasalazine and its metabolites. This represents a potential mechanism that may contribute to the known cardioprotective effect of sulfasalazine in patients with IA. PMID:25253538

  16. ARF6-dependent regulation of P2Y receptor traffic and function in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Owens, Sian E; Saha, Keya; Pope, Robert J; Mundell, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) in the internalization and function of P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y(1) or P2Y(12) purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function. PMID:22916275

  17. ARF6-Dependent Regulation of P2Y Receptor Traffic and Function in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Owens, Sian E.; Saha, Keya; Pope, Robert J.; Mundell, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y1 and P2Y12 purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y1 and P2Y12 purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) in the internalization and function of P2Y1 and P2Y12 purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y1 or P2Y12 purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function. PMID:22916275

  18. Desmopressin in vitro effects on platelet function, monitored with Multiplate, ROTEM and Sonoclot.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Kevin; Jensen, Hanna; Kander, Thomas; Schött, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    Background and aims The vasopressin analogue desmopressin has demonstrated efficacy in decreasing bleeding time by increasing the circulating levels of coagulation factor VIII and von Willebrand factor, but also by direct effects on platelets. Previous studies have demonstrated contrasting results regarding the effect of desmopressin on platelets in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose-response effects of in vitro desmopressin in whole blood. Our hypothesis was that desmopressin could increase platelet function in anticoagulated whole blood being stored up to 4 hours. Methods Desmopressin was administered with up to four different concentrations to venous whole blood, sampled with standard vacutainer tubes from 10 healthy volunteers after consent. Platelet function was analyzed with three different point-of-care techniques: Multiplate platelet aggregometry with adenosine diphosphate, collagen, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6, ristocetin and arachidonic acid agonists, tissue factor-activated thromboelastometry and Sonoclot glass bead viscoelastic coagulation tests at baseline and 4 hours later using different activator reagents. Results Thromboelastometry and Sonoclot did not show any significant change between baseline and 4 h later. A significant decrease in area under curve (AUC) could be seen with the Multiplate between baseline and after 4 h. Desmopressin did not improve any of these tests at baseline or during a 4 h storage and incubation period. Conclusion In vitro administered desmopressin could not increase normal platelet function or coagulation being measured with thromboelastometry and Sonoclot. Multiplate indicated decreased platelet aggregation over time, without any effect of in vitro added desmopressin. PMID:26923171

  19. Comparison between urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 detection and platelet Light Transmission Aggregometry (LTA) assays for evaluating aspirin response in elderly patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tengfei; Zhang, Jingwei; Chen, Xiahuan; Feng, Xueru; Fu, Sidney W; McCaffrey, Timothy A; Liu, Meilin

    2015-10-15

    Aspirin is widely used in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of our study was to compare between two established methods of aspirin response, urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 (11dhTXB2) and platelet Light Transmission Aggregometry (LTA) assays in elderly Chinese patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and to investigate the clinical significance of both methods in predicting cardiovascular events. Urinary 11dhTxB2 assay and arachidonic acid-induced (AA, 0.5mg/ml) platelet aggregation by Light Transmission Aggregometry (LTAAA) assay were measured to evaluate aspirin responses. High-on aspirin platelet reactivity (HAPR) was defined as urinary 11dhTxB2>1500pg/mg or AA-induced platelet aggregation≥15.22%-the upper quartile of our enrolled population. The two tests showed a poor correlation for aspirin inhibition (r=0.063) and a poor agreement in classifying HAPR (kappa=0.053). With a mean follow-up time of 12months, cardiovascular events occurred more frequently in HAPR patients who were diagnosed by LTA assay as compared with no-HAPR patients (22.5% versus 10.6%, P=0.039, OR=2.45, 95% CI=1.06-5.63). However, the HAPR status, as determined by urinary 11dTXB2 measurement, did not show a significant correlation with outcomes. PMID:26095809

  20. Platelet function testing in transient ischaemic attack and ischaemic stroke: A comprehensive systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soon Tjin; Coughlan, Catherine A; Murphy, Stephen J X; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Montaner, Joan; Thijs, Vincent; Marquardt, Lars; McCabe, Dominick J H

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) are not protected from further vascular events with antiplatelet therapy. Measurement of inhibition of platelet function ex vivo on antiplatelet therapy, using laboratory tests that correlate with the clinical effectiveness of these agents, would potentially enable physicians to tailor antiplatelet therapy to suit individuals. A systematic review of the literature was performed to collate all available data on ex vivo platelet function/reactivity in CVD patients, especially those treated with aspirin, dipyridamole or clopidogrel. Particular emphasis was paid to information from commonly available whole blood platelet function analysers (PFA-100®, VerifyNow® and Multiplate®). Data on pharmacogenetic mechanisms potentially influencing high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) on antiplatelet therapy in CVD were reviewed. Two-hundred forty-nine potentially relevant articles were identified; 93 manuscripts met criteria for inclusion. The prevalence of ex vivo HTPR in CVD varies between 3-62% with aspirin monotherapy, 8-61% with clopidogrel monotherapy and 56-59% when dipyridamole is added to aspirin in the early, subacute or late phases after TIA/stroke onset. The prevalence of HTPR on aspirin was higher on the PFA-100 than on the VerifyNow in one study (p < 0.001). Furthermore, the prevalence of HTPR on aspirin was lower when one used 'novel longitudinal' rather than 'cross-sectional, case-control' definitions of HTPR on the PFA early after TIA or stroke (p = 0.003; 1 study). Studies assessing the influence of genetic polymorphisms on HTPR in CVD patients are limited, and need validation in large multicentre studies. Available data illustrate that an important proportion of CVD patients have ex vivo HTPR on their prescribed antiplatelet regimen, and that the prevalence varies depending on the definition and assay used. Large, adequately-sized, prospective multicentre collaborative studies are

  1. Platelet function during cardiopulmonary bypass using multiple electrode aggregometry: comparison of centrifugal and roller pumps.

    PubMed

    Kehara, Hiromu; Takano, Tamaki; Ohashi, Noburo; Terasaki, Takamitsu; Amano, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Blood trauma may be lower with centrifugal pumps (CPs) than with roller pumps (RPs) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), because, unlike RPs, CPs do not compress the tubing, and shear stress is considered lower in CPs than in RPs. However, relative platelet function remains unclear. Using multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA), we compared platelet function with CP and RP. Ten swine underwent CPB for 3 h, with five weaned off using CP and five using RP. Platelet function was measured using MEA, as were hemoglobin concentration and platelet count, before sternotomy, after heparin infusion, 30 min and 3 h after starting CPB, after protamine infusion, and 60 min after stopping CPB. Platelet activation was initiated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid (AA), and thrombin receptor-activating protein 6 (TRAP). Fibrinogen, platelet factor 4 (PF4), and β-thromboglobin (β-TG) concentrations were measured before sternotomy and 60 min after stopping CPB. In the CP group and using ADP, aggregation was significantly reduced 30 min (P = 0.019) and 3 h (P = 0.027) after starting CPB, recovering to baseline 60 min after CPB was stopped. In the RP group, aggregation was significantly decreased 30 min (P = 0.007) and 3 h (P = 0.003) after starting CPB and after protamine administration (P = 0.028). With AA, aggregation significantly decreased 30 min after starting CPB in both the CP (P = 0.012) and RP (P = 0.016) groups, slightly increasing 3 h after starting CPB and after protamine infusion, and recovering to baseline 60 min after CPB cessation. With TRAP, aggregation in the CP and RP groups decreased 30 min after starting the pump, although changes were not significant; aggregation gradually recovered after 3 h and returned to baseline 60 min after the pumps were stopped. There were no significant differences at all sampling points of MEA. In both groups, fibrinogen, PF4, and β-TG concentrations were similar 60 min after pump cessation and before sternotomy

  2. Mice Lacking the ITIM-Containing Receptor G6b-B Exhibit Macrothrombocytopenia and Aberrant Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Jun; Bem, Danai; Finney, Brenda; Heising, Silke; Gissen, Paul; White, James G.; Berndt, Michael C.; Gardiner, Elizabeth E.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Douglas, Michael R.; Campbell, Robert D.; Watson, Steve P.; Senis, Yotis A.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are highly reactive cell fragments that adhere to exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) and prevent excessive blood loss by forming clots. Paradoxically, megakaryocytes, which produce platelets in the bone marrow, remain relatively refractory to the ECM-rich environment of the bone marrow despite having the same repertoire of receptors as platelets. These include the ITAM (immunoreceptor tyrosine–based activation motif)–containing collagen receptor complex, which consists of glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and the Fc receptor γ-chain, and the ITIM (immunoreceptor tyrosine–based inhibition motif)–containing receptor G6b-B. We showed that mice lacking G6b-B exhibited macrothrombocytopenia (reduced platelet numbers and the presence of enlarged platelets) and a susceptibility to bleeding as a result of aberrant platelet production and function. Platelet numbers were markedly reduced in G6b-B–deficient mice compared to those in wild-type mice because of increased platelet turnover. Furthermore, megakaryocytes in G6b-B–deficient mice showed enhanced metalloproteinase production, which led to increased shedding of cell-surface receptors, including GPVI and GPIba. In addition, G6b-B–deficient megakaryocytes exhibited reduced integrin-mediated functions and defective formation of proplatelets, the long filamentous projections from which platelets bud off. Together, these findings establish G6b-B as a major inhibitory receptor regulating megakaryocyte activation, function, and platelet production. PMID:23112346

  3. Diminished adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils with CD47 functionalized blood contacting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Finley, Matthew J; Rauova, Lubica; Alferiev, Ivan S; Weisel, John W; Levy, Robert J; Stachelek, Stanley J

    2012-08-01

    CD47 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that, through signaling mechanisms mediated by signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα1), functions as a biological marker of 'self-recognition'. We showed previously that inflammatory cell attachment to polymeric surfaces is inhibited by the attachment of biotinylated recombinant CD47 (CD47B). We test herein the hypothesis that CD47 modified blood conduits can reduce platelet and neutrophil activation under clinically relevant conditions. We appended a poly-lysine tag to the C-terminus of recombinant CD47 (CD47L) allowing for covalent linkage to the polymer. SIRPα1 expression was confirmed in isolated platelets. We then compared biocompatibility between CD47B and CD47L functionalized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces and unmodified control PVC surfaces. Quantitative and Qualitative analysis of blood cell attachment to CD47B and CD47L surfaces, via scanning electron microscopy, showed strikingly fewer platelets attached to CD47 modified surfaces compared to control. Flow cytometry analysis showed that activation markers for neutrophils (CD62L) and platelets (CD62P) exposed to CD47 modified PVC were equivalent to freshly acquired control blood, while significantly elevated in the unmodified PVC tubing. In addition, ethylene oxide gas sterilization did not inhibit the efficacy of the CD47 modification. In conclusion, CD47 modified PVC inhibits both the adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils. PMID:22613135

  4. Functional Comparison of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell- and Blood-Derived GPIIbIIIa Deficient Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Jessica; Sandrock-Lang, Kirstin; Gärtner, Florian; Jung, Christian Billy; Zieger, Barbara; Parrotta, Elvira; Kurnik, Karin; Sinnecker, Daniel; Wanner, Gerhard; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Massberg, Steffen; Moretti, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) represent a versatile tool to model genetic diseases and are a potential source for cell transfusion therapies. However, it remains elusive to which extent patient-specific hiPSC-derived cells functionally resemble their native counterparts. Here, we generated a hiPSC model of the primary platelet disease Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT), characterized by dysfunction of the integrin receptor GPIIbIIIa, and compared side-by-side healthy and diseased hiPSC-derived platelets with peripheral blood platelets. Both GT-hiPSC-derived platelets and their peripheral blood equivalents showed absence of membrane expression of GPIIbIIIa, a reduction of PAC-1 binding, surface spreading and adherence to fibrinogen. We demonstrated that GT-hiPSC-derived platelets recapitulate molecular and functional aspects of the disease and show comparable behavior to their native counterparts encouraging the further use of hiPSC-based disease models as well as the transition towards a clinical application. PMID:25607928

  5. Thrombin-linked aptamer assay for detection of platelet derived growth factor BB on magnetic beads in a sandwich format.

    PubMed

    Guo, Limin; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Here we describe a thrombin-linked aptamer assay (TLAA) for protein by using thrombin as an enzyme label, harnessing enzyme activity of thrombin and aptamer affinity binding. TLAA converts detection of specific target proteins to the detection of thrombin by using a DNA sequence that consists of two aptamers with the first aptamer binding to the specific target protein and the second aptamer binding to thrombin. Through the affinity binding, the thrombin enzyme is labeled on the protein target, and thrombin catalyzes the hydrolysis of small peptide substrate into product, generating signals for quantification. As a proof of principle, we show a sandwich TLAA for platelet derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) by using anti-PDGF-BB antibody coated on magnetic beads and an oligonucleotide containing the aptamer for PDGF-BB and the aptamer for thrombin. The binding of PDGF-BB to both the antibody and the aptamer results in labeling the complex with thrombin. We achieved detection of PDGF-BB at 16 pM. This TLAA contributes a new application of thrombin and its aptamer in bioanalysis, and shows potentials in assay developments. PMID:27343590

  6. Glycoxidized HDL, HDL enriched with oxidized phospholipids and HDL from diabetic patients inhibit platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Lê, Quang Huy; El Alaoui, Meddy; Véricel, Evelyne; Ségrestin, Bérénice; Soulère, Laurent; Guichardant, Michel; Lagarde, Michel; Moulin, Philippe; Calzada, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Context High-density lipoproteins (HDL) possess atheroprotective properties including anti-thrombotic and antioxidant effects. Very few studies relate to the functional effects of oxidized HDL on platelets in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Objective The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of in vitro glycoxidized HDL, and HDL from T2D patients on platelet aggregation and arachidonic acid signaling cascade. At the same time, the contents of hydroxylated fatty acids were assessed in HDL. Results Compared to control HDL, in vitro glycoxidized HDL had decreased proportions of linoleic (LA) and arachidonic (AA) acids in phospholipids and cholesteryl esters, and increased concentrations of hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids (9-HODE and 13-HODE) and 15-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), derived from LA and AA respectively, especially hydroxy derivatives esterified in phospholipids. Glycoxidized HDL dose-dependently decreased collagen-induced platelet aggregation by binding to SR-BI. Glycoxidized HDL prevented collagen-induced increased phosphorylation of platelet p38 MAPK and cytosolic phospholipase A2, as well as intracellular calcium mobilization. HDL enriched with oxidized phospholipids, namely PC(16:0/13-HODE) dose-dependently inhibited platelet aggregation. Increased concentrations of 9-HODE, 13-HODE and 15-HETE in phospholipids (2.1, 2.1 and 2.4-fold increase respectively) were found in HDL from patients with T2D, and these HDL also inhibited platelet aggregation via SR-BI. Conclusions Altogether, our results indicate that in vitro glycoxidized HDL as well as HDL from T2D patients inhibit platelet aggregation, and suggest that oxidized LA-containing phospholipids may contribute to the anti-aggregatory effects of glycoxidized HDL and HDL from T2D patients. PMID:25794249

  7. Poly (I:C) downregulates platelet production and function through type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Rivadeneyra, Leonardo; Pozner, Roberto Gabriel; Meiss, Roberto; Fondevila, Carlos; Gómez, Ricardo Martin; Schattner, Mirta

    2015-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a frequent complication of viral infections; the underlying mechanisms appear to depend on the identity of the virus involved. Previous research, including reports from our group, indicates that as well as having antiviral activity type I interferons (IFN I) selectively downregulate platelet production. In this study we extended understanding of the role of endogenous IFN I in megakaryo/thrombopoiesis by evaluating platelet and megakaryocyte physiology in mice treated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid [poly (I:C)], a synthetic analogue of double-stranded RNA, Toll-like receptor-3 ligand and strong IFNβ inducer. Mice-treated with poly (I:C) showed thrombocytopaenia, an increase in mean platelet volume and abnormal haemostatic and inflammatory platelet-mediated functionality, indicated by decreased fibrinogen binding and platelet adhesion, prolonged tail bleeding times and impaired P-Selectin externalisation, RANTES release and thrombin-induced platelet-neutrophil aggregate formation. These changes were associated with an increase in size and an abnormal distribution of bone marrow megakaryocytes within the vascular niche and were directly correlated with the plasmatic and bone marrow IFNβ levels. All these effects were absent in genetically modified mice lacking the IFN I receptor. Our results suggest that IFN I is the central mediator of poly (I:C)-induced thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction and indicate that these abnormalities are due to changes in the last stages of megakaryocyte development. These data provide new evidence for the role of IFN I in megakaryocyte distribution in the bone marrow niches and its influence on thrombopoiesis and haemostasis. PMID:26134179

  8. [Effects of lysine clonixinate on platelet function. Comparison with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents].

    PubMed

    Kramer, E H; Sassetti, B; Kaminker, A J; De Los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Di Girolamo, G

    2001-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of action of non steroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) consists of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. This explains many of the pharmacological effects and adverse events observed in medical practice. Administration of NSAIDs to patients with hemostatic disorders or perioperative conditions entails the risk of bleeding due to inhibition of platelet function. This study deals with platelet changes induced by lysine clonixinate vs diclofenac, ibuprofen and aspirin in classical tests such as platelet count, platelet factor 3 (PF3) activity and platelet aggregation with various inductors and more recent procedures such as P-selectin measurement by flow cytometry. Unlike control drugs, lysine clonixinate did not induce changes in platelet count or function when administered to healthy volunteers at the commonly used therapeutic doses. PMID:11474878

  9. Effect of Haemophilus influenzae infection and moxalactam on platelet function in children.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, S L; Courtney, J T; Kenal, K A

    1987-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study, children with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis received moxalactam or ampicillin or chloramphenicol. Of 41 children, 6 had prolonged bleeding times (greater than 6 min), and 7 of 9 tested had abnormal platelet aggregation at hospital admission. At the end of therapy, no children in the ampicillin-chloramphenicol group, compared with 5 of 22 moxalactam-treated children (23%) (P = 0.08), had prolonged bleeding times (6.5 to 7.5 min). Our data suggest that H. influenzae meningitis and treatment with moxalactam may each have an effect on platelet function in children. PMID:3579263

  10. Inhibitory effects of Cyperus digitatus extract on human platelet function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Forero-Doria, Oscar; Alarcón, Marcelo; Palomo, Iván

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the mechanisms of antiplatelet action of Cyperus digitatus. The antiplatelet action of C. digitatus was studied on platelet function: secretion, adhesion, aggregation, and sCD40L release. The platelet ATP secretion and aggregation were significantly inhibited by CDA (ethyl acetate extract) at 0.1 mg/ml and after the incubation of whole blood with CDA, the platelet coverage was inhibited by 96 ± 3% (p < 0.001). At the same concentration, CDA significantly decreased sCD40L levels. The mechanism of antiplatelet action of CDA could be by NF-κB inhibition and that is cAMP independent. In conclusion, C. digitatus extract may serve as a new source of antiplatelet agents for food and nutraceutical applications. PMID:25548968

  11. Blood rheology and platelet function in untreated early-stage essential hypertensives complicated with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, Hiroko; Tomoda, Fumihiro; Koike, Tsutomu; Kinuno, Hiroyuki; Kurosaki, Hiroko; Masutani, Toshitaka; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether hemorheology and platelet function are affected in essential hypertensives (EHTs) of the World Health Organization stage I when complicated with metabolic syndrome (Mets). In 156 untreated EHTs, blood viscosity and platelet surface markers were determined. Blood viscosity was significantly elevated in 54 subjects with Mets compared with 102 subjects without Mets. Hematocrit and plasma viscosity increased in the group with Mets, although red blood cell rigidity index "k" did not differ between groups. As a whole group, blood viscosity correlated positively with hematocrit and plasma viscosity. Additionally, plasma viscosity correlated positively with plasma leptin, triglyceride, homeostasis model assessment index, C-reactive protein, and plasma fibrinogen, but negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In contrast, no differences were seen in platelet surface markers between groups. In conclusion, EHTs of the early stage complicated with Mets are characterized by increased blood viscosity due to hemoconcentration and increased plasma viscosity. PMID:22570768

  12. Hemostatic function of apheresis platelets stored at 4 °C and 22 °C

    PubMed Central

    Reddoch, Kristin M.; Pidcoke, Heather F.; Montgomery, Robbie K.; Fedyk, Criselda G.; Aden, James K.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.; Cap, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Platelet refrigeration decreases the risk of bacterial contamination and may preserve function better than standard-of-care room temperature storage. Benefits could include lower transfusion-related complications, decreased costs, improved hemostasis in acutely bleeding patients, and extended shelf-life. In this study, we compared the effects of 22°C and 4°C storage on the functional and activation status of apheresis platelets (APs). Methods APs (n = 5 per group) were stored for 5 days at 22°C with agitation (RT) versus at 4°C with agitation (4C+AG) and without (4C). Measurements included platelet counts, mean platelet volume, blood gas analytes, aggregation response, thromboelastography, TxB2 and sCD40L release, activation markers and microparticle formation. Results Sample pH levels were within acceptable limits for storage products (pH 6.2-7.4). Platelet glucose metabolism (P < 0.05), aggregation response (ADP: RT 0; 4C+AG 5.0 ± 0.8; 4C 5.6 ± 0.9; P < 0.05), and clot strength (MA: RT 58 ± 2; 4C+AG 63 ± 2; 4C 67 ± 2; P < 0.05) were better preserved at 4°C compared to RT storage. Refrigerated samples were more activated compared to RT (P < 0.05), although TxB2 (P < 0.05) and sCD40L release (P < 0.05) were higher at RT. Agitation did not improve the quality of 4°C-stored samples. Conclusion AP stored at 4°C maintain more viable metabolic characteristics, are hemostatically more effective, and release fewer pro-inflammatory mediators than AP stored at RT over 5 days. Given the superior bacteriologic safety of refrigerated products, these data suggest that cold-stored platelets may improve outcomes for acutely bleeding patients. PMID:24169210

  13. Mechanism of activation and functional role of protein kinase Ceta in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Bynagari, Yamini S; Nagy, Bela; Tuluc, Florin; Bhavaraju, Kamala; Kim, Soochong; Vijayan, K Vinod; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2009-05-15

    The novel class of protein kinase C (nPKC) isoform eta is expressed in platelets, but not much is known about its activation and function. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of activation and functional implications of nPKCeta using pharmacological and gene knock-out approaches. nPKCeta was phosphorylated (at Thr-512) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by 2MeSADP. Pretreatment of platelets with MRS-2179, a P2Y1 receptor antagonist, or YM-254890, a G(q) blocker, abolished 2MeSADP-induced phosphorylation of nPKCeta. Similarly, ADP failed to activate nPKCeta in platelets isolated from P2Y1 and G(q) knock-out mice. However, pretreatment of platelets with P2Y12 receptor antagonist, AR-C69331MX did not interfere with ADP-induced nPKCeta phosphorylation. In addition, when platelets were activated with 2MeSADP under stirring conditions, although nPKCeta was phosphorylated within 30 s by ADP receptors, it was also dephosphorylated by activated integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 mediated outside-in signaling. Moreover, in the presence of SC-57101, a alpha(IIb)beta3 receptor antagonist, nPKCeta dephosphorylation was inhibited. Furthermore, in murine platelets lacking PP1cgamma, a catalytic subunit of serine/threonine phosphatase, alpha(IIb)beta3 failed to dephosphorylate nPKCeta. Thus, we conclude that ADP activates nPKCeta via P2Y1 receptor and is subsequently dephosphorylated by PP1gamma phosphatase activated by alpha(IIb)beta3 integrin. In addition, pretreatment of platelets with eta-RACK antagonistic peptides, a specific inhibitor of nPKCeta, inhibited ADP-induced thromboxane generation. However, these peptides had no affect on ADP-induced aggregation when thromboxane generation was blocked. In summary, nPKCeta positively regulates agonist-induced thromboxane generation with no effects on platelet aggregation. PMID:19286657

  14. Cocoa flavanols and platelet and leukocyte function: recent in vitro and ex vivo studies in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Heptinstall, Stan; May, Jane; Fox, Sue; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine; Zhao, Lian

    2006-01-01

    There is growing interest in possible beneficial effects of specific dietary components on cardiovascular health. Platelets and leukocytes contribute to arterial thrombosis and to inflammatory processes. Previous studies performed in vitro have demonstrated inhibition of platelet function by (-)-epicatechin and (+)-catechin, flavan-3-ols (flavanols) that are present in several foods including some cocoas. Also, some modest inhibition of platelet function has been observed ex vivo after the consumption of flavanol-containing cocoa products by healthy adults. So far there are no reports of effects of cocoa flavanols on leukocytes. This paper summarizes 2 recent investigations. The first was a study of the effects of cocoa flavanols on platelet and leukocyte function in vitro. The second was a study of the effects of consumption of a flavanol-rich cocoa beverage by healthy adults on platelet and leukocyte function ex vivo. Measurements were made of platelet aggregation, platelet-monocyte conjugate formation (P/M), platelet-neutrophil conjugate formation (P/N), platelet activation (CD62P on monocytes and neutrophils), and leukocyte activation (CD11b on monocytes and neutrophils) in response to collagen and/or arachidonic acid. In the in vitro study several cocoa flavanols and their metabolites were shown to inhibit platelet aggregation, P/M, P/N, and platelet activation. Their effects were similar to those of aspirin and the effects of a cocoa flavanol and aspirin did not seem to be additive. There was also inhibition of monocyte and neutrophil activation by flavanols, but this was not replicated by aspirin. 4'-O-methyl-epicatechin, 1 of the known metabolites of the cocoa flavanol (-)-epicatechin, was consistently effective as an inhibitor of platelet and leukocyte activation. The consumption of a flavanol-rich cocoa beverage also resulted in significant inhibition of platelet aggregation, P/M and P/N, and platelet activation induced by collagen. The inhibitory effects

  15. Moderate oral supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid improves platelet function and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Véricel, E; Colas, R; Calzada, C; Lê, Q H; Feugier, N; Cugnet, C; Vidal, H; Laville, M; Moulin, P; Lagarde, M

    2015-08-01

    Platelets from patients with type 2 diabetes are characterised by hyperactivation and high level of oxidative stress. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may have beneficial effects on platelet reactivity and redox status. We investigated whether moderate DHA supplementation, given as a triglyceride form, may correct platelet dysfunction and redox imbalance in patients with type 2 diabetes. We conducted a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-period crossover trial (n=11 post-menopausal women with type 2 diabetes) to test the effects of 400 mg/day of DHA intake for two weeks on platelet aggregation, markers of arachidonic acid metabolism, lipid peroxidation status, and lipid composition. Each two week-period was separated from the other by a six-week washout. Daily moderate dose DHA supplementation resulted in reduced platelet aggregation induced by collagen (-46.5 %, p< 0.001), and decreased platelet thromboxane B2 (-35 %, p< 0.001), urinary 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 (-13.2 %, p< 0.001) and F2-isoprostane levels (-19.6 %, p< 0.001) associated with a significant increase of plasma and platelet vitamin E concentrations (+20 % and +11.8 %, respectively, p< 0.001). The proportions of DHA increased both in plasma lipids and in platelet phospholipids. After placebo treatment, there was no effect on any parameters tested. Our findings support a significant beneficial effect of low intake of DHA on platelet function and a favourable role in reducing oxidative stress associated with diabetes. PMID:25832443

  16. Impact of an integrated treatment algorithm based on platelet function testing and clinical risk assessment: results of the TRIAGE Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Interventions To Improve Clinical Outcomes Through Optimal Platelet Inhibition study.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Baber, Usman; Mehran, Roxana; Aquino, Melissa; Sartori, Samantha; Yu, Jennifer; Kini, Annapoorna; Sharma, Samin; Skurk, Carsten; Shlofmitz, Richard A; Witzenbichler, Bernhard; Dangas, George

    2016-08-01

    Assessment of platelet reactivity alone for thienopyridine selection with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has not been associated with improved outcomes. In TRIAGE, a prospective multicenter observational pilot study we sought to evaluate the benefit of an integrated algorithm combining clinical risk and platelet function testing to select type of thienopyridine in patients undergoing PCI. Patients on chronic clopidogrel therapy underwent platelet function testing prior to PCI using the VerifyNow assay to determine high on treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR, ≥230 P2Y12 reactivity units or PRU). Based on both PRU and clinical (ischemic and bleeding) risks, patients were switched to prasugrel or continued on clopidogrel per the study algorithm. The primary endpoints were (i) 1-year major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) composite of death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or definite or probable stent thrombosis; and (ii) major bleeding, Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type 2, 3 or 5. Out of 318 clopidogrel treated patients with a mean age of 65.9 ± 9.8 years, HTPR was noted in 33.3 %. Ninety (28.0 %) patients overall were switched to prasugrel and 228 (72.0 %) continued clopidogrel. The prasugrel group had fewer smokers and more patients with heart failure. At 1-year MACE occurred in 4.4 % of majority HTPR patients on prasugrel versus 3.5 % of primarily non-HTPR patients on clopidogrel (p = 0.7). Major bleeding (5.6 vs 7.9 %, p = 0.47) was numerically higher with clopidogrel compared with prasugrel. Use of the study clinical risk algorithm for choice and intensity of thienopyridine prescription following PCI resulted in similar ischemic outcomes in HTPR patients receiving prasugrel and primarily non-HTPR patients on clopidogrel without an untoward increase in bleeding with prasugrel. However, the study was prematurely terminated and these findings are therefore hypothesis generating. PMID:27100112

  17. Platelet functional alterations in a Bernard-Soulier syndrome patient with filamin A mutation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaming; Dai, KeSheng; Wang, Zhaoyue; Cao, Lijuan; Bai, Xia; Ruan, Changgeng

    2015-01-01

    Defects in filamin A (FLNA) gene could lead to low platelet counts and decreased surface expression of glycoprotein (GP) Ibα. Here, we report and investigate the FLNA genomic alteration of a case with Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS), a rare hereditary bleeding disorder caused by quantitative or qualitative abnormalities in the GP Ib-IX-V receptor. DNA sequencing analysis reveals the presence of a GP Ibα c.987G > A mutation and a FLNA c.1582 G > A mutation in this patient. Transient transfection studies show that GP Ibα c.987G > A mutation abolishes the surface expression of GP Ibα on the transfected CHO cells. On the other hand, abnormal responses to collagen, including the platelet aggregation, secretion, and GP VI signaling pathways, are associated with FLNA c.1582G > A mutation. Our findings confirm a central role for FLNA in platelet-adhesive functions. The interaction between FLNA and GP Ibα in platelets deserves to be investigated. PMID:26133172

  18. Normal Platelet Integrin Function in Mice Lacking Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Clone-5 (Hic-5)

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Michael; Thielmann, Ina; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stegner, David

    2015-01-01

    Integrin αIIbβ3 plays a central role in the adhesion and aggregation of platelets and thus is essential for hemostasis and thrombosis. Integrin activation requires the transmission of a signal from the small cytoplasmic tails of the α or β subunit to the large extracellular domains resulting in conformational changes of the extracellular domains to enable ligand binding. Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), a member of the paxillin family, serves as a focal adhesion adaptor protein associated with αIIbβ3 at its cytoplasmic tails. Previous studies suggested Hic-5 as a novel regulator of integrin αIIbβ3 activation and platelet aggregation in mice. To assess this in more detail, we generated Hic-5-null mice and analyzed activation and aggregation of their platelets in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, lack of Hic-5 had no detectable effect on platelet integrin activation and function in vitro and in vivo under all tested conditions. These results indicate that Hic-5 is dispensable for integrin αIIbβ3 activation and consequently for arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in mice. PMID:26172113

  19. New assay for measuring binding of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa to unpurified von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Veyradier, A; Jumilly, A L; Ribba, A S; Obert, B; Houllier, A; Meyer, D; Girma, J P

    1999-07-01

    Among the numerous variants of vWD, no patient with an abnormal vWF binding to GPIIb/IIIa has been described to date. To search for such potential variants, we developed a two-site assay for measuring the binding of purified GPIIb/IIIa to vWF in biological fluids and we used it to study a large series of plasmas from various types of von Willebrand disease (vWD) and recombinant vWF (rvWF). vWF in plasma or rvWF in culture medium was immobilized onto anti-vWF monoclonal antibodies (MoAb)-coated wells of microtiter plates. After incubation with either unlabeled GPIIb/IIIa and a 125I-anti-GPIIb/IIIa MoAb or 125I-GPIIb/IIIa, binding curves and binding isotherms were respectively established. Normal pool plasma and wild-type rvWF were used as reference samples. We tested plasmas from 85 normal subjects, 115 patients with different types of vWD (64 type 1, 2 type 3, 9 type 2A, 4 type 2M, 16 type 2B, 15 type 2N, 3 type IID and 2 acquired forms) and 50 patients with various bleeding disorders. Four mutated rvWF with 2A (Glu875Lys and Pro885Ser) or 2B (Dupl.Met540 and Val551Phe) substitutions and one rvWF mutated in the RGD domain of the C-terminal part of vWF-subunit (Asp1746Gly) were also studied. Among the various samples tested, only rvWF Asp1746Gly had no affinity for GPIIb/IIIa. In contrast, GPIIb/IIIa similarly bound to the other vWF, independently of the proteic environment, the factor VIII level, the degree of multimerization or the mutation of vWF. Our results indicate that subjects with an abnormal vWF binding to GPIIb/IIIa are probably rare and difficult to target for a specific screening. PMID:10456467

  20. A comparison of platelet function tests and thromboxane metabolites to evaluate aspirin response in healthy individuals and patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Johnsen, Helle Ladefoged; Hedegaard, Sofie Sommer; Pedersen, Susanne Bendesgaard; Mortensen, Jette; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2010-06-01

    Individualised antiplatelet therapy and platelet function testing have attracted considerable clinical interest, but several aspects of test performance have not been thoroughly evaluated. We investigated repeatability and concordance of light transmission aggregometry (LTA) induced with arachidonic acid (AA) 1.0 mM, PFA-100 induced with collagen/epinephrine, multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) induced with AA 0.5 or 0.75 mM and VerifyNow Aspirin. Patients with stable coronary artery disease (n=43) and healthy individuals (n=21) were included. All tests were performed in duplicate at baseline in healthy individuals and in duplicate for four days in all study participants during aspirin treatment. Serum and urinary thromboxane metabolites were measured several times to evaluate cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition by aspirin. MEA was most sensitive for aspirin as treatment induced a 12-fold difference in AA-induced platelet aggregation. Coefficients of variation for duplicate measurements at baseline (0.4-12%), during aspirin treatment (3-46%) and for day-to-day variability (3-37%) differed markedly between tests and were lowest for VerifyNow. The prevalence of aspirin low-responsiveness also differed between tests (0-9%) and the agreement was low: kappaplatelet function test, whereas serum thromboxane correlated with VerifyNow Aspirin (r=0.41, p=0.001). Overall, repeatability was moderate and the correlation between tests was low. VerifyNow Aspirin proved most reproducible, and this was the only assay showing a significant positive correlation with serum thromboxane. This study demonstrated that conclusions based on platelet function testing strongly depend on the assay used. PMID:20352155

  1. Exosome poly-ubiquitin inhibits platelet activation, downregulates CD36, and inhibits pro-atherothombotic cellular functions

    PubMed Central

    Srikanthan, Sowmya; Li, Wei; Silverstein, Roy L.; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Activated platelets shed microparticles from plasma membranes, but also release smaller exosomes from internal compartments. While microparticles participate in athero-thrombosis, little is known of exosomes in this process. Materials & Methods Ex vivo biochemical experiments with human platelets and exosomes, and FeCl3-induced murine carotid artery thrombosis. Results Both microparticles and exosomes were abundant in human plasma. Platelet-derived exosomes suppressed ex vivo platelet aggregation and reduced adhesion to collagen-coated microfluidic channels at high shear. Injected exosomes inhibited occlusive thrombosis in FeCl3-damaged murine carotid arteries. Control platelets infused into irradiated, thrombocytopenic mice reconstituted thrombosis in damaged carotid arteries, but failed to do so after prior ex vivo incubation with exosomes. CD36 promotes platelet activation, and exosomes dramatically reduced platelet CD36. CD36 is also expressed by macrophages where it binds and internalizes oxidized LDL and microparticles, supplying lipid to promote foam cell formation. Platelet exosomes inhibited oxidized-LDL binding and cholesterol loading into macrophages. Exosomes were not competitive CD36 ligands, but instead sharply reduced total macrophage CD36 content. Exosomal proteins, in contrast to microparticle or cellular proteins, were highly adducted by ubiquitin. Exosomes enhanced ubiquitination of cellular proteins, including CD36, and blockade of proteosome proteolysis with MG-132 rescued CD36 expression. Recombinant unanchored K48 poly-ubiquitin behaved similarly to exosomes, inhibiting platelet function, macrophage CD36 expression, and macrophage particle uptake. Conclusions Platelet-derived exosomes inhibit athero-thrombotic processes by reducing CD36-dependent lipid loading of macrophages and by suppressing platelet thrombosis. Exosomes increase protein ubiquitination, and enhance proteasome degradation of CD36. PMID:25163645

  2. Inhibition of human platelet function in vitro and ex vivo by acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Lages, B; Weiss, H J

    1989-03-15

    The effects of acetaminophen (APAP) in vitro, or ex vivo following APAP ingestion, on human platelet aggregation, 14C-5HT secretion, and thromboxane B2 (TxB2) formation were assessed. APAP added in vitro to citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) inhibited aggregation, secretion, and TxB2 formation induced by collagen, epinephrine, arachidonate, and the ionophore A23187, but had no effect on the responses induced by the endoperoxide analog U44069. Arachidonate-induced responses were inhibited by lower concentrations of APAP than were the responses to the other agonists. In PRP obtained 1 hour after ingestion of 650 mg or 1000 mg APAP, arachidonate-induced TxB2 formation was inhibited by 40-99% in five subjects tested, whereas inhibition of collagen- or epinephrine-induced TxB2 formation was less consistent. Aggregation and secretion responses were not altered by APAP ingestion in 4 of the 5 subjects, but were inhibited in the remaining subject, who had the highest plasma APAP levels. In contrast to aspirin and indomethacin, APAP-induced inhibition of collagen-stimulated TxB2 formation could be partially overcome with increasing collagen concentrations. No such partial correction occurred with epinephrine, however. In washed platelet suspensions labeled with 3H-arachidonate, both APAP and aspirin inhibited the formation of labeled PGD2 and PGE2, as well as TxB2. These results suggest that APAP acts in human platelets as a reversible inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase, as found previously in other tissues, and that recent APAP ingestion can, on occasion, produce inhibition of platelet functional responses measured in vitro. PMID:2499947

  3. Distinct roles for protein kinase C isoforms in regulating platelet purinergic receptor function.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Jones, Matthew L; Hardy, Adam R; Barton, Johanna F; Beaucourt, Stephanie M; Conley, Pamela B; Poole, Alastair W

    2006-09-01

    ADP is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), P2Y1 and P2Y12. We have shown previously that the receptors are functionally desensitized, in a homologous manner, by distinct kinase-dependent mechanisms in which P2Y1 is regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) and P2Y12 by G protein-coupled receptor kinases. In this study, we addressed whether different PKC isoforms play different roles in regulating the trafficking and activity of these two GPCRs. Expression of PKCalpha and PKCdelta dominant-negative mutants in 1321N1 cells revealed that both isoforms regulated P2Y1 receptor signaling and trafficking, although only PKCdelta was capable of regulating P2Y12, in experiments in which PKC was directly activated by the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). These results were paralleled in human platelets, in which PMA reduced subsequent ADP-induced P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptor signaling. PKC isoform-selective inhibitors revealed that novel, but not conventional, isoforms of PKC regulate P2Y12 function, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 activity. It is also noteworthy that we studied receptor internalization in platelets by a radioligand binding approach showing that both receptors internalize rapidly in these cells. ADP-induced P2Y1 receptor internalization is attenuated by PKC inhibitors, whereas that of the P2Y12 receptor is unaffected. Both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors can also undergo PMA-stimulated internalization, and here again, novel but not classic PKCs regulate P2Y12, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 internalization. This study therefore is the first to reveal distinct roles for PKC isoforms in the regulation of platelet P2Y receptor function and trafficking. PMID:16804093

  4. Variability of residual platelet function despite clopidogrel treatment in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Schwonberg, Jan; Toennes, Stefan W; Mani, Helen; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2010-04-01

    Residual platelet function despite treatment with clopidogrel may predict an unfavourable cardiovascular outcome. The majority of studies have investigated the effects of clopidogrel administration in conjunction with aspirin in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The primary objective of the present study was to assess the platelet response to clopidogrel in the absence of aspirin in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and to investigate whether non-responsiveness to clopidogrel is reproducible during long-term follow-up. Fifty-four clinically stable PAOD patients on a maintenance dose of 75 mg/d clopidogrel were enrolled in this study. Platelet function was assessed at baseline and after a median follow-up of 18 months using light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) with 2 microM ADP as an agonist. HPLC-coupled mass spectrometry was used to detect clopidogrel and clopidogrel carboxylic acid, the main metabolite of clopidogrel. Residual platelet function, as defined by late aggregation values within the reference range (i.e., >43%), was observed in 35.2% of patients at baseline and 17.6% during follow-up. During the observation period, 26.5% had switched from responder to non-responder status or vice versa. Among non-responders, either clopidogrel or its metabolite was detected in 89.5% and 83.3% of patients at baseline and at follow-up, respectively. We conclude that non-responsiveness to clopidogrel as determined by ADP-induced LTA is not stable over time. This phenomenon cannot be attributed to non-compliance alone. PMID:20153859

  5. Luminal platelet aggregates in functional deficits in parenchymal vessels after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Victor; Flores, Rowena; Muller, Artur; Sehba, Fatima A.

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiology of early ischemic injury after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is not understood. This study examined the acute effect of endovascular puncture-induced SAH on parenchymal vessel function in rat, using intravascular fluorescent tracers to assess flow and vascular permeability and immunostaining to assess structural integrity and to visualize platelet aggregates. In sham-operated animals, vessels were well filled with tracer administered 10 seconds before sacrifice, and parenchymal escape of tracer was rare. At ten minutes and 3 hours after hemorrhage, patches of poor vascular filling were distributed throughout the forebrain. Close examination of these regions revealed short segments of narrowed diameter along many profiles. Most vascular profiles with reduced perfusion contained platelet aggregates and in addition showed focal loss of collagen IV, a principal component of basal lamina. In contrast, vessels were well filled at 24 hours post-hemorrhage, indicating that vascular perfusion had recovered. Parenchymal escape of intravascular tracer was detected at 10 minutes post-hemorrhage and later as plumes of fluorescence emanating into parenchyma from restricted microvascular foci. These data demonstrate that parenchymal microvessels are compromised in function by 10 minutes after SAH and identify focal microvascular constriction and local accumulation of luminal platelet aggregates as potential initiators of that compromise. PMID:20654597

  6. Modulation of platelet and leucocyte function by a Chinese herbal formulation as compared with conventional antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lian; Gaudry, Leonie; Dunkley, Scott; Brighton, Tim; Guo, Zhi Xin; Ye, Zheng Liang; Luo, Run Zhi; Chesterman, Colin N

    2008-02-01

    Platelet and leucocyte activity are important in the acute development of thrombosis and in the pathogenesis of ischaemic vascular disease. Dan Shen Di Wan (DS, Cardiotonic Pill or Dantonic(R) Pill) is one of the most commonly used Chinese herbal formulations for treating patients with atherosclerotic disease in China and several Asian countries. We studied the effect of DS on platelet and leucocyte function and compared the effects with conventional antiplatelet agents, cangrelor (ADP P2Y(12) receptor antagonist) and aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA). Measurements were made by platelet aggregation (%) and activation (CD62P %), platelet-monocyte conjugate formation (P/M, CD42a median fluorescence, mf), platelet-neutrophil conjugate formation (P/N, mf), and leucocyte activation (CD11b median fluorescence on monocytes and neutrophils, mf) in response to 3.3 micromol/L adenosine diphosphate (ADP), 1.0 micromol/L platelet activating factor (PAF), 5.0 micromol/L adrenaline and 0.5 microg/mL collagen. We also evaluated the effect of its main component, water soluble extract of salvia miltiorrhiza (SME) on intracellular calcium mobilization in platelets triggered by 10 micromol/L ADP, 10 micromol/L PAF, 2 microg/mL collagen and 15 micromol/L thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP). Overall DS showed inhibition of platelet aggregation, platelet activation, platelet-leucocyte conjugate formation and leucocyte activation in response to all the agonists apart from adrenaline (all p < 0.01). DS showed inhibition of platelet aggregation and leucocyte activation equivalent to cangrelor 100 nmol/L and ASA 100 micromol/L. SME dose-dependently inhibited intracellular calcium mobilization in platelets following stimulation with all the platelet agonists with maximum effective at 0.36 mg/mL (all p < 0.01). When used at 0.18 mg/mL its inhibitory effect was equivalent to cangrelor and ASA. We conclude that DS is a potential inhibitor of both platelet and leucocyte activation

  7. The Hydraulic Permeability of Blood Clots as a Function of Fibrin and Platelet Density

    PubMed Central

    Wufsus, A.R.; Macera, N.E.; Neeves, K.B.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow within blood clots is a biophysical mechanism that regulates clot growth and dissolution. Assuming that a clot can be modeled as a porous medium, the physical property that dictates interstitial fluid flow is the hydraulic permeability. The objective of this study was to bound the possible values of the hydraulic permeability in clots formed in vivo and present relationships that can be used to estimate clot permeability as a function of composition. A series of clots with known densities of fibrin and platelets, the two major components of a clot, were formed under static conditions. The permeability was calculated by measuring the interstitial fluid velocity through the clots at a constant pressure gradient. Fibrin gels formed with a fiber volume fraction of 0.02–0.54 had permeabilities of 1.2 × 10−1–1.5 × 10−4μm2. Platelet-rich clots with a platelet volume fraction of 0.01–0.61 and a fibrin volume fraction of 0.03 had permeabilities over a range of 1.1 × 10−2–1.5 × 10−5μm2. The permeability of fibrin gels and of clots with platelet volume fraction of <0.2 were modeled as an array of disordered cylinders with uniform diameters. Clots with a platelet volume fraction of >0.2 were modeled as a Brinkman medium of coarse solids (platelets) embedded in a mesh of fine fibers (fibrin). Our data suggest that the permeability of clots formed in vivo can vary by up to five orders of magnitude, with pore sizes that range from 4 to 350 nm. These findings have important implications for the transport of coagulation zymogens/enzymes in the interstitial spaces during clot formation, as well as the design of fibrinolytic drug delivery strategies. PMID:23601328

  8. Formulation and Storage of Platelet-Rich Plasma Homemade Product

    PubMed Central

    Giraudo, Laurent; Veran, Julie; Magalon, Jeremy; Coudreuse, Jean-Marie; Magalon, Guy; Dubois, Christophe; Serratrice, Nicolas; Dignat-George, Françoise; Sabatier, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous biotherapy based on platelet-healing properties. Here, we developed a simple and reproducible PRP purification protocol based on two successive centrifugations. We evaluated different centrifugation speeds and time-storage durations on the platelet quantity and quality. Sterility and stability of our PRP homemade product were also performed. We prepared PRP from 54 healthy volunteers. We tested activation state, reactivity, and stability of platelets by flow cytometry using basal and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced P-selectin expression markers; growth factor release after platelet activation by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); platelet aggregation capacity by aggregrometry assays; clot formation and retraction by thromboelastography; and platelet morphology by ultrastructural analysis. About 130 and 250 g successive speed centrifugations further concentrated platelets while preserving their bioactivity during 6 h (after that, platelet functions were significantly altered). In these conditions, we obtained a highly concentrated pure PRP product (with a low leukocyte count) suitable to study platelet properties. To avoid the loss of efficacy, we recommend injecting PRP under 3 h after preparation. PMID:23516671

  9. Failure of platelet parameters and biomarkers to correlate platelet function to severity and etiology of heart failure in patients enrolled in the EPCOT trial. With special reference to the Hemodyne hemostatic analyzer. Whole Blood Impedance Aggregometry for the Assessment of Platelet Function in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L; McKenzie, Marcus E; Meister, Andrew F; Fuzaylov, Sergey Y; Gurbel, Paul A; Atar, Dan; Gattis, Wendy A; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2002-01-01

    Data from small studies have suggested the presence of platelet abnormalities in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). We sought to characterize the diagnostic utility of different platelet parameters and platelet-endothelial biomarkers in a random outpatient CHF population investigated in the EPCOT ('Whole Blood Impedance Aggregometry for the Assessment of Platelet Function in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure') Trial. Blood samples were obtained for measurement of platelet contractile force (PCF), whole blood aggregation, shear-induced closure time, expression of glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, and P-selectin in 100 consecutive patients with CHF. Substantial interindividual variability of platelet characteristics exists in patients with CHF. There were no statistically significant differences when patients were grouped according to incidence of vascular events, emergency revascularization needs, survival, or etiology of heart failure. Aspirin use did not affect instrument readings either. PCF correlates very poorly with whole blood aggregometry (r(2) = 0.023), closure time (r(2) = 0.028), platelet GP IIb/IIIa (r(2) = 0.0028), and P-selectin (r(2) = 0.002) expression. Furthermore, there was no correlation with brain natriuretic peptide concentrations, a marker of severity and prognosis in heart failure reflecting the neurohumoral status. Patients with heart failure enrolled in the EPCOT Trial exhibited a marginal, sometimes oppositely directed change in platelet function, challenging the diagnostic utility of these platelet parameters and biomarkers to serve as useful tools for the identification of platelet abnormalities, for predicting clinical outcomes, or for monitoring antiplatelet strategies in this population. The usefulness of these measurements for assessing platelets in the different clinical settings remains to be explored. Taken together, opposite to our expectations, major clinical characteristics of heart failure did not correlate well with

  10. The Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 1 Gamma Regulates Thrombin-Induced Murine Platelet αIIbβ3 Function

    PubMed Central

    Gushiken, Francisca C.; Hyojeong, Han; Pradhan, Subhashree; Langlois, Kimberly W.; Alrehani, Nawaf; Cruz, Miguel A.; Rumbaut, Rolando E.; Vijayan, K. Vinod

    2009-01-01

    Background Hemostasis and thrombosis are regulated by agonist-induced activation of platelet integrin αIIbβ3. Integrin activation, in turn is mediated by cellular signaling via protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Although the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c) interacts with αIIbβ3, the role of PP1c in platelet reactivity is unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Using γ isoform of PP1c deficient mice (PP1cγ−/−), we show that the platelets have moderately decreased soluble fibrinogen binding and aggregation to low concentrations of thrombin or protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4)-activating peptide but not to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen or collagen-related peptide (CRP). Thrombin-stimulated PP1cγ−/− platelets showed decreased αIIbβ3 activation despite comparable levels of αIIbβ3, PAR3, PAR4 expression and normal granule secretion. Functions regulated by outside-in integrin αIIbβ3 signaling like adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen and clot retraction were not altered in PP1cγ−/− platelets. Thrombus formation induced by a light/dye injury in the cremaster muscle venules was significantly delayed in PP1cγ−/− mice. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3)β-serine 9 that promotes platelet function, was reduced in thrombin-stimulated PP1cγ−/− platelets by an AKT independent mechanism. Inhibition of GSK3β partially abolished the difference in fibrinogen binding between thrombin-stimulated wild type and PP1cγ−/− platelets. Conclusions/Significance These studies illustrate a role for PP1cγ in maintaining GSK3β-serine9 phosphorylation downstream of thrombin signaling and promoting thrombus formation via fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation. PMID:20016849

  11. Lymphocyte-mediated inhibition of platelet cytotoxic functions during Hymenoptera venom desensitization: characterization of a suppressive lymphokine.

    PubMed

    Tsicopoulos, A; Tonnel, A B; Vorng, H; Joseph, M; Wallaert, B; Kusnierz, J P; Pestel, J; Capron, A

    1990-06-01

    Recently, it has been shown that platelets, through a receptor for the Fc fragment of IgE, could be specially triggered by venom allergens in hypersensitivity to hymenoptera, generating cytocidal mediators toward Schistosoma mansoni larvae, and oxygen metabolites measured by chemiluminescence. After rush immunotherapy, a depressed platelet response was demonstrated to be associated with the production of lymphokine(s). Here we report the characterization of a factor present in supernatants of antigen-stimulated T cells from patients after hymenoptera venom desensitization which is able to inhibit platelet cytotoxic functions in a dose-dependent manner. The optimal inhibition was observed with supernatants obtained after T lymphocyte stimulated with 10(-5) micrograms venom allergen/ml. Once specifically produced the platelet-suppressive effect of lymphocyte supernatants was not antigen specific. The producing T cell subpopulation was identified as CD8+. This lymphokine had an approximate molecular mass of 25 kDa and a pI of 4.8. It was heat and acid stable and sensitive to trypsin and proteinase K but not to neuraminidase. This platelet inhibitory activity was absorbed by platelet membrane suggesting its binding to a receptor. These properties were very similar to a previously described platelet activity suppressive lymphokine, suggesting the participation of this lymphokine in the mechanisms of rush desensitization. PMID:2369915

  12. Alterations of platelet functions in children and adolescents with iron-deficiency anemia and response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Galila M; Ibrahim, Wafaa E; Kassim, Nevine A; Ragab, Iman A; Saad, Abeer A; Abdel Raheem, Heba G

    2015-01-01

    Several changes in platelets have been reported in patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), so a relationship between iron metabolism and thrombopoiesis should be considered. We aimed to study the alterations of platelet functions in patients with IDA by assessment of platelet aggregation with epinephrine, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and ristocetin and by measuring platelet function analyzer-100 (PFA-100) closure time together with the effect of iron therapy on the same tests. A follow-up study was conducted in Ain Shams University Children's hospital in the period from June 2011 to June 2012 including 20 patients with confirmed IDA and 20 healthy age- and sex-matched control. Bleeding manifestations were reported. Laboratory analysis included complete blood count, assessment of iron status by measuring serum iron, TIBC and ferritin, assessment of platelet functions by PFA-100 closure time and platelet aggregation with collagen, ADP and ristocetin. Patients with IDA were treated by oral iron therapy 6 mg/kg/day of ferrous sulfate and post-therapeutic re-assessment was done. Mean age of IDA patients was 5.7 ± 4.2 years. Bleeding manifestations were more common in patients group. Mean PFA-100 closure times (with epinephrine) were significantly longer in patients (179.1 ± 86.4 seconds) compared to control group (115 ± 28.5 seconds) (p < 0.05). Platelet aggregation by ADP (38.1 ± 22.2%), epinephrine (19.7 ± 14.2%) and ristocetin (58.8 ± 21.4%) were significantly reduced in patients compared to control (62.7 ± 6.2, 63.3 ± 6.9, 73.8 ± 8.3, respectively; p < 0.001). After treatment platelet aggregation tests induced by ADP (64.78 ± 18.25%), and epinephrine (55.47 ± 24%) were significantly increased in patients with IDA compared to before treatment (39.44 ± 21.85%, 20.33 ± 14.58%; p < 0.001). PFA-100 closure time as well showed significant decreased after treatment (118.4 ± 27.242) compared to before treatment (186.2 ± 90.35; p < 0.05). A negative

  13. Examining Endothelial Function and Platelet Reactivity in Patients with Depression before and after SSRI Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Tye; Barton, David A; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Gavin W

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) the mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the first signs of CVD. Using two techniques, flow-mediated dilatation in response to reactive hyperemia and laser Doppler velocimetry with iontophoresis, we examined endothelial function in the forearm before and after serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in 31 patients with MDD. Measurement of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble P-selectin, and noradrenaline in plasma was also performed. Prior to treatment, markers of endothelial and vascular function and platelet reactivity were within the normal range. Following SSRI therapy (95 ± 5 days) symptoms of depression were reduced (paired difference between pre- and post-treatment Hamilton rating -18 ± 1, P < 0.001) with 19 patients recovered and 4 remitted. There occurred no significant change in markers of endothelial or vascular function following SSRI therapy. The improvement in Hamilton depression rating in response to therapy could be independently predicted by the baseline arterial plasma noradrenaline concentration (r (2) = 0.36, P = 0.003). In this cohort of patients with MDD, SSRI therapy did not influence endothelial function or markers of vascular or platelet reactivity. Patient response to SSRI therapy could be predicted by the initial circulating level of noradrenaline, with noradrenaline levels being lower in responders. PMID:26924994

  14. Examining Endothelial Function and Platelet Reactivity in Patients with Depression before and after SSRI Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Tye; Barton, David A.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Gavin W.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) the mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the first signs of CVD. Using two techniques, flow-mediated dilatation in response to reactive hyperemia and laser Doppler velocimetry with iontophoresis, we examined endothelial function in the forearm before and after serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in 31 patients with MDD. Measurement of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble P-selectin, and noradrenaline in plasma was also performed. Prior to treatment, markers of endothelial and vascular function and platelet reactivity were within the normal range. Following SSRI therapy (95 ± 5 days) symptoms of depression were reduced (paired difference between pre- and post-treatment Hamilton rating −18 ± 1, P < 0.001) with 19 patients recovered and 4 remitted. There occurred no significant change in markers of endothelial or vascular function following SSRI therapy. The improvement in Hamilton depression rating in response to therapy could be independently predicted by the baseline arterial plasma noradrenaline concentration (r2 = 0.36, P = 0.003). In this cohort of patients with MDD, SSRI therapy did not influence endothelial function or markers of vascular or platelet reactivity. Patient response to SSRI therapy could be predicted by the initial circulating level of noradrenaline, with noradrenaline levels being lower in responders. PMID:26924994

  15. Structural functional and folding scenario of an anti platelet and thrombolytic enzyme crinumin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwar Awaneesh; Singh, Sanjay; Jagannadham, Medicherla V

    2014-07-01

    A folding pattern, conformational stability and therapeutic role of a protein helps in developing a suitable drug. Crinumin, a thrombolytic and anti platelet agent, has been studied for its functional and conformational properties by equilibrium unfolding methods. The crinumin belongs to α+β class of protein and exhibits a non native structure and two molten globule states at different conditions. Two domains in the molecular structure of the protein with altered stability are present that unfold sequentially. The enzyme maintains activity as well as structural integrity even in adverse conditions. These observations provide an understanding of protein folding as well as facilitate the development of a potential drug. PMID:24726528

  16. Most Recent Evidence Behind Aggregometry and Genotyping Methods as Platelet Function Testing for Tailored Anti-Platelet Treatment Among PCI Patients.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Sylwia N; Kołtowski, Łukasz; Tomaniak, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    Aggregometry and genotyping are methods of platelet function testing, which can be beneficial for high-risk patients undergoing invasive cardiac procedures. An optimal level of platelet reactivity (PR) should be maintained. There are discrepancies between individuals and their response to clopidogrel, accounting for the incidence of poor responders from 5% to 44%. This phenomenon predisposes the patients to increased risk of ischaemic events and thereby overall poorer clinical outcome. Prasugrel and tricagrelor are newer without genetic correlation to their action, however associated with increased bleeding risk. Aggregometry methods assess platelet reactivity at the exact moment of blood sampling. They reflect "phenotype" of the patient and vary after drug administration or dose change. The most popular tests are Light Transmission Aggregometry, Vasodilator-Stimulated Protein, VerifyNow, Multiple Electrode Aggregometry and Thrombelastography. There is proven genetic correlation between some cytochrome enzymes on clopidogrel response. The most widely tested is gene CYP2C19, which produces the enzyme transforming clopidogrel into an active metabolite. The CYP2C19*2 allele carriers have higher PR which can result in more thrombotic events. The manuscript shows the most recent evidence behind platelet function testing. Aggregometry is shown to be beneficial in 5 trials and 1 meta-analysis, while one paper was of different opinion. Ten studies show a positive clinical effect of genotyping on patients' outcome, while one does not support it. The best method of identifying high-risk individuals could be both methods and personalisation of antiplatelet therapy may decrease adverse ischaemic outcomes. PMID:26469115

  17. Sulphate conjugation of p-hydroxytriamterene by platelet phenol sulphotransferase: assay conditions and correlation with metabolism in man.

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, C; Werness, P G; Van Loon, J; Smith, L H; Weinshilboum, R M

    1983-01-01

    1 Sulphate conjugation catalyzed by phenol sulphotransferase (PST) is an important pathway in the metabolism of many drugs including triamterene. Variations in PST activity in an easily obtained tissue such as the platelet might reflect individual differences in the sulphate conjugation in other organs and tissues. Human platelets contain at least two forms of PST, a thermolabile (TL) form for which dopamine is a substrate and a thermostable (TS) form for which low concentrations of p-nitrophenol serve as a substrate. 2 p-OH-triamterene, the major metabolite of triamterene, is conjugated with sulphate in vivo. p-OH-triamterene was a substrate for platelet PST with an apparent Michaelis-Menten value of 26 microM. Thermal stability studies indicated that p-OH-triamterene was a substrate for only the TS form of platelet PST. 3 When platelet homogenates from 29 individual subjects were tested, there was a significant correlation between PST activities measured with 4 microM p-nitrophenol and with p-OH-triamterene (r = 0.985, P less than 0.0001) but not between activities measured with dopamine and with p-OH-triamterene (r = 0.023, P greater than 0.2). These results confirmed that p-OH-triamterene was a substrate for only the TS form of human platelet PST. 4 The same 29 subjects were treated with 1 mg/kg of triamterene orally. 24-h urinary excretions of triamterene, p-OH-triamterene and p-OH-triamterene sulphate averaged 15.3%, 6.3% and 78.4%, respectively, of the total of triamterene plus measured metabolites excreted. The excretion of triamterene plus the two metabolites averaged 43.1 +/- 2.6% (mean +/- s.e. mean) of the ingested dose. There was not a significant correlation between the proportion of p-OH-triamterene excreted as sulphate conjugate and the activities of either the TS or TL forms of platelet PST activity. PMID:6573903

  18. Dose-dependent platelet stimulation and inhibition induced by anti-PIA1 IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, T.; Davis, J.M.; Schwartz, K.A. )

    1990-07-01

    The PIA1 antibody produces several clinically distinct and severe thrombocytopenias. Investigations have demonstrated divergent effects on platelet function; prior reports demonstrated inhibition, while a conflicting publication showed platelet activation. We have resolved this conflict using anti-PIA1 IgG produced by a patient with posttransfusion purpura. Relatively low concentrations stimulated platelet aggregation and release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) whereas high concentrations inhibited platelet function, producing a thrombasthenia-like state. The number of molecules of platelet-associated IgG necessary to initiate aggregation and ATP release (2,086 +/- 556) or produce maximum aggregation (23,420 +/- 3,706) or complete inhibition (63,582 +/- 2654) were measured with a quantitative radiometric assay for bound anti-PIA1. Preincubation of platelets with high concentrations of PIA1 antibody inhibited platelet aggregation with 10 mumol/L adenosine diphosphate and blocked 125I-labeled fibrinogen platelet binding. Platelet activation with nonfibrinogen dependent agonist, 1 U/ml thrombin, was not inhibited by this high concentration of PIA1 IgG. In conclusion, anti-PIAI IgG produces (1) stimulation of platelet aggregation and ATP release that is initiated with 2000 molecules IgG per platelet and is associated with an increase of 125I-fibrinogen binding; (2) conversely, inhibition of platelet aggregation is observed with maximum antibody binding, 63,000 molecules IgG per platelet, and is mediated via a blockade of fibrinogen binding.

  19. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  20. Scalable Functionalized Graphene Nano-platelets as Tunable Cathodes for High-performance Lithium Rechargeable Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haegyeom; Lim, Hee-Dae; Kim, Sung-Wook; Hong, Jihyun; Seo, Dong-Hwa; Kim, Dae-chul; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Sungjin; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-01-01

    High-performance and cost-effective rechargeable batteries are key to the success of electric vehicles and large-scale energy storage systems. Extensive research has focused on the development of (i) new high-energy electrodes that can store more lithium or (ii) high-power nano-structured electrodes hybridized with carbonaceous materials. However, the current status of lithium batteries based on redox reactions of heavy transition metals still remains far below the demands required for the proposed applications. Herein, we present a novel approach using tunable functional groups on graphene nano-platelets as redox centers. The electrode can deliver high capacity of ~250 mAh g−1, power of ~20 kW kg−1 in an acceptable cathode voltage range, and provide excellent cyclability up to thousands of repeated charge/discharge cycles. The simple, mass-scalable synthetic route for the functionalized graphene nano-platelets proposed in this work suggests that the graphene cathode can be a promising new class of electrode. PMID:23514953

  1. Correlation Between the CYP2C19 Phenotype Status and the Results of Three Different Platelet Function Tests in Cardiovascular Disease Patients Receiving Antiplatelet Therapy: An Emphasis on Newly Introduced Platelet Function Analyzer-200 P2Y Test

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhua; Choi, Jae-Lim; Guo, Long Zhe; Goh, Ri-Young; Kim, Bo-Ram; Woo, Kwang-Sook; Kim, Moo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background An association has been reported between CYP2C19 polymorphism and the altered antiplatelet activity of clopidogrel. We investigated this association using the newly introduced platelet function analyzer (PFA)-200 (INNOVANCE PFA-200 System; Siemens Healthcare, Germany) P2Y test. Methods Polymorphisms of CYP2C19*2, *3, *17 and the degree of inhibition of platelet function were determined in 83 patients. Three different platelet function tests were used to evaluate the degree of platelet inhibition and to check the association with genotype. Results The post-procedure PFA-200 values of extensive metabolizers (EM) patients (285.3±38.8) were higher than those of intermediate metabolizers (IM) and poor metabolizers (PM) patients (227.7±98.3 and 133.7±99.2, respectively; P=0.024). Light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) and the VerifyNow system showed that the post-procedure values for EM patients were lower than those of IM and PM patients (LTA: 24.4±15.7, 34.1±17.6, and 42.2±16.9, respectively, P<0.001; VerifyNow: 133.2±60.5, 171.5±42.6, and 218.7±59.3, respectively, P<0.001). The high residual platelet reactivity (HPR) rates were significantly different among the EM, IM, and PM groups using PFA-200 (PM:IM:EM=82.4:40.6:11.8, P<0.001). Conclusions Approximately, 59.0% of Korean patients with cardiovascular disease receiving clopidogrel had CYP2C19 loss-of-function genotypes classified as IM or PM, and the frequency was similar to the data from Asian people. The PFA-200, LTA, and VerifyNow platelet function tests revealed evidence of a significant association between the efficacy of clopidogrel and CYP2C19 genotypes. PMID:26522758

  2. The role of peroxides as modulators of human blood platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, R.L.; Hess, M.L. )

    1990-02-26

    The ability to peroxidize lipid in the vicinity of arterial walls has been demonstrated through oxidation of the LDL-particle by monocytes/macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. The authors questioned what effect increased levels of peroxides might have on platelet function. Platelet aggregation, studied trubidometrically, was initiated by arachidonic acid (AA) alone or in the presence of a low concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, (which by itself could not initiate aggregation). Aggregation was analyzed quantitatively by measuring the time it took to reach 1/2 the maximal extent of aggregation (T1/2Max). Using the minimal concentration of AA still able to initiate aggregation (0.2-0.45 mM) the T1/2Max was 112{+-}35 (n=10). With 50% of the respective AA conc. plus 17 {mu}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the T1/2Max was 52{+-}21. Under similar circumstances, the amount of AA able to initiate aggregation could be reduced by 80% with the addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. These effects could be duplicated by glucose oxidase, 0.015-0.15 IU, and could be eliminated by the addition of catalase (<25 U/ml) at any time prior to the start of aggregation. With non-aggregating concentrations of AA alone, synthesis of Thromboxane B{sub 2} was negligible; with aggregation by the same AA plus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} it was 550{+-}79 pg/10{sup 3} platelets. Both aggregation and TxB{sub 2} synthesis were completely inhibited by aspirin or indomethacin, and by the antioxidants phenol and nor-dihydroguaretic acid, at concentrations known to inhibit cyclooxygenase. In platelets with a defect in the second wave of ADP induced aggregation, but having normal aggregation with added AA (indicating the cyclooxygenase-thromboxane axis was intact), sub-aggregating concentrations of AA, plus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resulted in brisk aggregation.

  3. Targeted drug delivery to circulating tumor cells via platelet membrane-functionalized particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiahe; Ai, Yiwei; Wang, Lihua; Bu, Pengcheng; Sharkey, Charles C; Wu, Qianhui; Wun, Brittany; Roy, Sweta; Shen, Xiling; King, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for metastases in distant organs via hematogenous dissemination. Fundamental studies in the past decade have suggested that neutralization of CTCs in circulation could represent an effective strategy to prevent metastasis. Current paradigms of targeted drug delivery into a solid tumor largely fall into two main categories: unique cancer markers (e.g. overexpression of surface receptors) and tumor-specific microenvironment (e.g. low pH, hypoxia, etc.). While relying on a surface receptor to target CTCs can be greatly challenged by cancer heterogeneity, targeting of tumor microenvironments has the advantage of recognizing a broader spectrum of cancer cells regardless of genetic differences or tumor types. The blood circulation, however, where CTCs transit through, lacks the same tumor microenvironment as that found in a solid tumor. In this study, a unique "microenvironment" was confirmed upon introduction of cancer cells of different types into circulation where activated platelets and fibrin were physically associated with blood-borne cancer cells. Inspired by this observation, synthetic silica particles were functionalized with activated platelet membrane along with surface conjugation of tumor-specific apoptosis-inducing ligand cytokine, TRAIL. Biomimetic synthetic particles incorporated into CTC-associated micro-thrombi in lung vasculature and dramatically decreased lung metastases in a mouse breast cancer metastasis model. Our results demonstrate a "Trojan Horse" strategy of neutralizing CTCs to attenuate metastasis. PMID:26519648

  4. Study of a humanized inhibitory anti-platelet glycoprotein VI phage antibody from a phage antibody library.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qinghong; Zhang, Chunmei; Yu, Lingjia; Shi, Yongyu; Zhang, Liping; Peng, Jun; Ji, Xuebin; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to study the effect of anti-platelet glycoprotein (GP) VI auto-antibodies on platelet aggregation and use phage surface display technology to produce anti-platelet GPVI phage antibody fragment, which may be developed to inhibit platelet aggregation in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Methods Plasma samples from patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) were screened by monoclonal antibody immobilization of the platelet antigen assay and the platelet aggregation test for anti-platelet GPVI auto-antibody with an inhibitory effect. The humanized anti-platelet GPVI phage antibody was produced by phage surface display technology. The function of the phage antibody fragment against platelet aggregation was examined by the platelet aggregation test. Results Of 726 ITP patients, 2 (0.27%) patients' plasma significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen-1. After five rounds of selection, enrichment, and purification, a soluble phage antibody fragment was produced, which can inhibit platelet aggregation induced by collagen-1. The results demonstrate that only a few of the screened anti-platelet GPVI auto-antibodies showed an inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Discussion A completely humanized anti-GPVI soluble phage antibody can be produced by phage surface display technology. The antibody was able to specifically block collagen-induced platelet aggregation without influencing the aggregation responses to other agonists. Conclusions Results of the present study suggest that very few anti-platelet GPVI auto-antibodies inhibit the aggregation function of platelet. The humanized anti-platelet GPVI produced by phage surface display technology is promising to be used to inhibit platelet aggregation in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26330203

  5. Human platelet antigen 1 (HPA 1) genotyping with 5' nuclease assay and sequence-specific primers reveals a single nucleotide deletion in intron 2 of the HPA 1a allele of platelet glycoprotein IIIa.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, Killie Mette; Jaegtvik, Sissel; Husebekk, Anne; Skogen, Bjorn

    2002-05-01

    We have established a 5' nuclease assay (5' NA) for human platelet antigen (HPA) 1a/b allelic discrimination. The assay is based on the simultaneous amplification and detection of the two targets in a one-tube system. The results are read optically, immediately after termination of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and no post-PCR processing is necessary. This genotyping procedure is less time-consuming and cheaper than our conventional sequence-specific primer PCR (SSP-PCR), which is run as a two-tube test, with verification of the results after electrophoresis in agarose gel. The reduction of analytical steps, simplification of the procedure and potential for automation were important advantages for our choice of system. This test system is more suitable for large-scale testing and fits better for our screening programme for HPA 1bb determination. DNA from 1093 individuals were tested in parallel with the SSP-PCR and the 5' NA. One thousand and ninety-one samples gave identical results in SSP-PCR and 5' NA. Upon repeated testing, two samples consistently came out as HPA 1bb in SSP-PCR and HPA 1ab in 5' NA. DNA sequencing revealed a defect located in an intronic area that corresponds to the consensus primer used for the SSP-PCR HPA 1a typing. PMID:11972525

  6. Glutamate release from platelets: exocytosis versus glutamate transporter reversal.

    PubMed

    Kasatkina, Ludmila A; Borisova, Tatiana A

    2013-11-01

    Platelets express neuronal and glial glutamate transporters EAAT 1-3 in the plasma membrane and vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT 1,2 in the membrane of secretory granules. This study is focused on the assessment of non-exocytotic glutamate release, that is, the unstimulated release, heteroexchange and glutamate transporter reversal in platelets. Using the glutamate dehydrogenase assay, the absence of unstimulated release of endogenous glutamate from platelets was demonstrated, even after inhibition of glutamate transporters and cytoplasmic enzyme glutamine synthetase by dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate and methionine sulfoximine, respectively. Depolarization of the plasma membrane by exposure to elevated [K(+)] did not induce the release of glutamate from platelets that was shown using the glutamate dehydrogenase assay and radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate. Glutamate efflux by means of heteroexchange with transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporters dl-threo-β-hydroxyaspartate (dl-THA) was not observed. Furthermore, the protonophore cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon (FCCP) and inhibitor of V-type H(+)-ATPase bafilomycin A1 also failed to stimulate the release of glutamate from platelets. However, exocytotic release of glutamate from secretory granules in response to thrombin stimulation was not prevented by elevated [K(+)], dl-THA, FCCP and bafilomycin A1. In contrast to nerve terminals, platelets cannot release glutamate in a non-exocytotic manner. Heteroexchange, transporter-mediated and unstimulated release of glutamate are not inherent to platelets. Therefore, platelets may be used as a peripheral marker/model for the analysis of glutamate uptake by brain nerve terminals only (direct function of transporters), whereas the mechanisms of glutamate release are different in platelets and nerve terminals. Glutamate is released by platelets exclusively by means of exocytosis. Also, reverse function of vesicular glutamate transporters of platelets is

  7. The role of anticoagulation in the measurement of platelet volumes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C B; Diaz, D D; Quinn, P G; Lapins, M; Kurtz, S R; Valeri, C R

    1983-09-01

    The effect of anticoagulation on platelet size stability was studied using blood collected in seven different anticoagulants and stored at room temperature for up to eight hours. The mean platelet volume (MPV) value was most stable in blood collected in 15% ACD and ACD/Na2EDTA. In blood collected in Na2EDTA, K3EDTA, or 11.9% ACD, there was an increase in MPV in the first two hours, after which the MPVs remained stable up to eight hours. Sodium citrate and heparin proved unreliable for the measurement of platelet volume. Platelet counts were stable (less than 5% variation) in all anticoagulants except heparin, which had 16% variation for the eight hours of study. Simultaneously, RBC counts and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) measurements were stable in all seven anticoagulants, with sodium citrate producing the most variation. A negative correlation was observed between MCV and pH of the anticoagulated blood. WBC counts showed less than 3% variation in all anticoagulants except sodium citrate and heparin. Separate experiments demonstrated that electrolyte composition, pH, tonicity, and method of calcium chelation all influenced the stability of the MPV. Of the anticoagulants studied, ACD/Na2 EDTA appeared to provide the best conditions of anticoagulation for both routine clinical and research laboratory measurement of the MPV. It inhibited platelet activation but left the platelets in their normal discoid shape. Platelets could be removed from the anticoagulant and studied in functional assays for up to eight hours after blood drawing. Both platelet counts and MPVs remained stable in blood collected in ACD/Na2 EDTA anticoagulant for up to eight hours at room temperature. In 52 volunteers studied, an inverse correlation (r = -0.72, P less than 0.001) was observed between platelet count and MPV, suggesting that the circulating platelet mass may be a more important indicator of platelet homeostasis than either the platelet count or the mean platelet volume alone. PMID

  8. The effects of haemodilution with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 solution on coagulation as assessed by thromboelastography and platelet receptor function studies in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, P; Yang, K; Kershaw, G; Wong, G; Dunkley, S; Kam, P C A

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the effects of haemodilution with either 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 (Voluven(®)) or 0.9% normal saline (NS) on blood coagulation in vitro. Haemodilution with 6% HES 130/0.4 impaired coagulation, as indicated by the changes in thromboelastographic parameters k-time, α-angle and maximum amplitude. Light transmission aggregometry and multiple electrode aggregometry demonstrated that impaired platelet receptor function occurred only at high levels of haemodilution (40%) with both fluids, but there was no significant difference between the two fluids (P=0.05). The thromboelastographic functional fibrinogen assay showed that the fibrinogen component of clot strength was significantly impaired with haemodilution with HES 130/0.4 compared with haemodilution with NS (whole blood [14.4 ± 4.6 mm] versus 40% HES dilution [3.7 ± 1.9], [P=0.001]; versus 40% NS dilution [10.4 ± 4.6], [P=0.129]). These findings suggest that there is little difference between HES or NS in relation to coagulation or platelet function during minor or moderate haemodilution, but at high levels of haemodilution with HES, fibrinogen activity is more impaired compared with NS. PMID:26603798

  9. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  10. Highly active antiretroviral therapy-related mechanisms of endothelial and platelet function alterations.

    PubMed

    Gresele, Paolo; Falcinelli, Emanuela; Momi, Stefania; Francisci, Daniela; Baldelli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic condition, which has allowed the infected population to age and become prone to chronic degenerative diseases common to the general population, including atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and coronary artery disease (CAD). Possible causative mechanisms of HIV-associated CAD are related to classic cardiovascular risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and fat redistribution, which may be due to either HIV infection or to HAART-associated toxicity. However, other mechanisms are emerging as crucial for the cardiovascular complication of HIV and HAART. This article analyzes the effects of HIV and HAART on endothelial function, endothelium-leukocyte interactions, and platelets as possible mechanisms of enhanced cardiovascular risk. PMID:24987863

  11. Platelet-derived CXCL12 regulates monocyte function, survival, differentiation into macrophages and foam cells through differential involvement of CXCR4–CXCR7

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, M; von Ungern-Sternberg, S N I; Seizer, P; Schlegel, F; Büttcher, M; Sindhu, N A; Müller, S; Mack, A; Gawaz, M

    2015-01-01

    Platelets store and release CXCL12 (SDF-1), which governs differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors into either endothelial or macrophage-foam cells. CXCL12 ligates CXCR4 and CXCR7 and regulates monocyte/macrophage functions. This study deciphers the relative contribution of CXCR4–CXCR7 in mediating the effects of platelet-derived CXCL12 on monocyte function, survival, and differentiation. CXCL12 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) that ligate CXCR4–CXCR7 induced a dynamic bidirectional trafficking of the receptors, causing CXCR4 internalization and CXCR7 externalization during chemotaxis, thereby influencing relative receptor availability, unlike MCP-1. In vivo we found enhanced accumulation of platelets and platelet-macrophage co-aggregates in peritoneal fluid following induction of peritonitis in mice. The relative surface expression of CXCL12, CXCR4, and CXCR7 among infiltrated monocytes was also enhanced as compared with peripheral blood. Platelet-derived CXCL12 from collagen-adherent platelets and recombinant CXCL12 induced monocyte chemotaxis specifically through CXCR4 engagement. Adhesion of monocytes to immobilized CXCL12 and CXCL12-enriched activated platelet surface under static and dynamic arterial flow conditions were mediated primarily through CXCR7 and were counter-regulated by neutralizing platelet-derived CXCL12. Monocytes and culture-derived-M1–M2 macrophages phagocytosed platelets, with the phagocytic potential of culture-derived-M1 macrophages higher than M2 involving CXCR4–CXCR7 participation. CXCR7 was the primary receptor in promoting monocyte survival as exerted by platelet-derived CXCL12 against BH3-mimetic induced apoptosis (phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3 activation, loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential). In co-culture experiments with platelets, monocytes predominantly differentiated into CD163+ macrophages, which was attenuated upon CXCL12 neutralization and CXCR4/CXCR7 blocking antibodies

  12. York platelet syndrome is a CRAC channelopathy due to gain-of-function mutations in STIM1.

    PubMed

    Markello, Thomas; Chen, Dong; Kwan, Justin Y; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Morrison, Alan; Simakova, Olga; Maric, Irina; Lozier, Jay; Cullinane, Andrew R; Kilo, Tatjana; Meister, Lynn; Pakzad, Kourosh; Bone, William; Chainani, Sanjay; Lee, Elizabeth; Links, Amanda; Boerkoel, Cornelius; Fischer, Roxanne; Toro, Camilo; White, James G; Gahl, William A; Gunay-Aygun, Meral

    2015-03-01

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry is the major route of replenishment of intracellular Ca(2+) in animal cells in response to the depletion of Ca(2+) stores in the endoplasmic reticulum. It is primarily mediated by the Ca(2+)-selective release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel, which consists of the pore-forming subunits ORAI1-3 and the Ca(2+) sensors, STIM1 and STIM2. Recessive loss-of-function mutations in STIM1 or ORAI1 result in immune deficiency and nonprogressive myopathy. Heterozygous gain-of-function mutations in STIM1 cause non-syndromic myopathies as well as syndromic forms of miosis and myopathy with tubular aggregates and Stormorken syndrome; some of these syndromic forms are associated with thrombocytopenia. Increased concentration of Ca(2+) as a result of store-operated Ca(2+) entry is essential for platelet activation. The York Platelet syndrome (YPS) is characterized by thrombocytopenia, striking ultrastructural platelet abnormalities including giant electron-opaque organelles and massive, multilayered target bodies and deficiency of platelet Ca(2+) storage in delta granules. We present clinical and molecular findings in 7 YPS patients from 4 families, demonstrating that YPS patients have a chronic myopathy associated with rimmed vacuoles and heterozygous gain-of-function STIM1 mutations. These findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of STIM1-related human disorders and define the molecular basis of YPS. PMID:25577287

  13. The effects of siguazodan, a selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, on human platelet function.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, K. J.; England, P. J.; Hallam, T. J.; Maguire, J.; Moores, K.; Reeves, M. L.; Simpson, A. W.; Rink, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of siguazodan (SK&F 94836) a selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor with inotropic and vasodilator activity, were studied on human platelets. 2. Siguazodan selectively inhibited the major cyclic AMP-hydrolysing PDE in human platelet supernatants. The inhibited enzyme has been variously termed cyclic GMP-inhibited PDE or PDE-III. 3. In platelet-rich plasma (PRP), siguazodan inhibited U46619-induced aggregation more potently than that induced by ADP and collagen. Treatment of the PRP with aspirin had no effect on the potency of siguazodan. 4. In washed platelets, siguazodan increased cyclic AMP levels and reduced cytoplasmic free calcium [( Ca2+]i). ADP decreased the ability of siguazodan to raise cyclic AMP and this may explain its lower potency in inhibiting responses to ADP. 5. Siguazodan has anti-platelet actions over the same concentration range that it is an inotrope and vasodilator. PMID:2158847

  14. Investigation of function similarities between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and platelet calcium-dependent adenosinetriphosphatases with the inhibitors quercetin and calmidazolium

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, T.H.; Campbell, K.P.; White, G.C. II

    1987-12-01

    The platelet and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-dependent adenosinetriphosphatases (Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPases) were functionally compared with respect to substrate activation by steady-state kinetic methods using the inhibitors quercetin and calmidazolium. Quercetin inhibited platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activities in a dose-dependent manner with IC/sub 50/ values of 25 and 10 ..mu..M, respectively. Calmidazolium also inhibited platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activities, with half-maximal inhibition measured at 5 and 4 ..mu..M, respectively. Both inhibitors also affected the (/sup 45/Ca) calcium transport activity of intact platelet microsomes at concentrations similar to those which reduced Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. These inhibitors were then used to examine substrate ligation by the platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump proteins. For both Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase proteins, quercetin has an affinity for the E-Ca/sub 2/ (fully ligated with respect to calcium at the exterior high-affinity calcium binding sites, unligated with respect to ATP) conformational state of the protein that is approximately 10-fold grater than for other conformational states in the hydrolytic cycle. Quercetin can thus be considered a competitive inhibitor of the calcium pump proteins with respect to ATP. In contrast to the effect of quercetin, calmidazolium interacts with the platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPases in an uncompetitive manner. The dissociation constants for this inhibitor for the different conformational states of the calcium pump proteins were similar, indicating that calmidazolium has equal affinity for all of the reaction intermediates probed. These observations indicate that the substrate ligation processes are similar for the two pump proteins. This supports the concept that the hydrolytic cycles of the two proteins are comparable.

  15. Platelet kinetics with indium-111 platelets: comparison with chromium-51 platelets.

    PubMed

    Peters, A M; Lavender, J P

    1983-04-01

    The application of 111In-oxine to platelet labeling has contributed to the understanding of platelet kinetics along three lines: 1. It allows the measurement of new parameters of splenic function, such as the intrasplenic platelet transit time, which has shed new light on the physiology of splenic blood cell handling. 2. It facilitates the measurement of platelet life span in conditions, such as ITP, in which 51Cr may undergo undesirable elution from the platelet as a result of platelet-antibody interaction. 3. It allows the determination of the fate of platelets, that is, the site of platelet destruction in conditions in which reduced platelet life span is associated with abnormal platelet consumption, as a result of either premature destruction of "abnormal" platelets by the RE system, or the consumption (or destruction) of normal platelets after their interaction with an abnormal vasculature. Future research using 111In platelets may yield further valuable information on the control as well as the significance of intrasplenic platelet pooling, on the role of platelets in the development of chronic vascular lesions, and on the sites of platelet destruction in ITP. With regard to the latter, methods will have to be developed for harvesting sufficient platelets representative of the total circulating platelet population from severely thrombocytopenic patients for autologous platelet labeling. This would avoid the use of homologous platelets, which is likely to be responsible for some of the contradictory data relating to the use of radiolabeled platelet studies for the prediction of the response of patients with ITP to splenectomy. PMID:6346489

  16. Platelets and galectins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A major function of platelets is keeping the vascular system intact. Platelet activation at sites of vascular injury leads to the formation of a hemostatic plug. Activation of platelets is therefore crucial for normal hemostasis; however, uncontrolled platelet activation may also lead to the formation of occlusive thrombi that can cause ischemic events. Although they are essential for proper hemostasis, platelet function extends to physiologic processes such as tissue repair, wound remodeling and antimicrobial host defense, or pathologic conditions such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis, chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Platelets can be activated by soluble molecules including thrombin, thromboxane A2 (TXA2), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), serotonin or by adhesive extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as von Willebrand factor (vWF) and collagen. Here we describe recent advances in the activation of platelets by non-canonical platelet agonists such as galectins. By acting either in soluble or immobilized form, these glycan-binding proteins trigger all platelet activation responses through modulation of discrete signaling pathways. We also offer new hypotheses and some speculations about the role of platelet-galectin interactions not only in hemostasis and thrombosis but also in inflammation and related diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. PMID:25405160

  17. Evaluation of participants with suspected heritable platelet function disorders including recommendation and validation of a streamlined agonist panel

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Gillian C.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Bem, Danai; Daly, Martina E.; Makris, Mike; Mumford, Andrew; Wilde, Jonathan T.; Watson, Steve P.

    2012-01-01

    Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) is used worldwide for the investigation of heritable platelet function disorders (PFDs), but interpretation of results is complicated by the feedback effects of ADP and thromboxane A2 (TxA2) and by the overlap with the response of healthy volunteers. Over 5 years, we have performed lumi-aggregometry on 9 platelet agonists in 111 unrelated research participants with suspected PFDs and in 70 healthy volunteers. Abnormal LTA or ATP secretion test results were identified in 58% of participants. In 84% of these, the patterns of response were consistent with defects in Gi receptor signaling, the TxA2 pathway, and dense granule secretion. Participants with defects in signaling to Gq-coupled receptor agonists and to collagen were also identified. Targeted genotyping identified 3 participants with function-disrupting mutations in the P2Y12 ADP and TxA2 receptors. The results of the present study illustrate that detailed phenotypic analysis using LTA and ATP secretion is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of PFDs. Our data also enable subdivision at the level of platelet-signaling pathways and in some cases to individual receptors. We further demonstrate that most PFDs can be reliably diagnosed using a streamlined panel of key platelet agonists and specified concentrations suitable for testing in most clinical diagnostic laboratories. PMID:23002116

  18. The predictive value of the in vitro platelet toxicity assay (iPTA) for the diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions to sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Elzagallaai, Abdelbaset A; Koren, Gideon; Rieder, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are rare but potentially fatal adverse drug reactions (ADRs). A reliable test to diagnose DHRs would be a major advance in the clinical care for patients and in the evaluation of ADRs during drug development as well as for mechanistic studies of drug hypersensitivity. Available in vitro tests including the lymphocyte toxicity assay (LTA) have been used but are time-consuming, cumbersome, and expensive. We have developed a novel diagnostic test for DHRs, the in vitro platelet toxicity assay (iPTA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of the iPTA in diagnosis of DHRs to sulfonamides. We recruited 66 individuals (36 DHS-sulfa patients and 30 healthy controls) to participate in the study. Blood samples were obtained and LTA and iPTA were performed in parallel. There was concentration-dependent toxicity in the cells of patients when incubated with the reactive hydroxylamine metabolite of sulfamethoxazole for both the LTA and iPTA (P < .05). The iPTA was more sensitive than conventional LTA test in detecting susceptibility of patient cells to in vitro toxicity (P < .05). The novel iPTA has considerable potential as an investigative tool for DHS as it is more sensitive and cheaper, requiring no special reagents. PMID:23670648

  19. Syncytiotrophoblast Extracellular Vesicles from Pre-Eclampsia Placentas Differentially Affect Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Tannetta, Dionne S.; Hunt, Kathryn; Jones, Chris I.; Davidson, Naomi; Coxon, Carmen H.; Ferguson, David; Redman, Christopher W.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Sargent, Ian L.; Tucker, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) complicates around 3% of all pregnancies and is one of the most common causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The pathophysiology of PE remains unclear however its underlying cause originates from the placenta and manifests as raised blood pressure, proteinuria, vascular or systemic inflammation and hypercoagulation in the mother. Women who develop PE are also at significantly higher risk of subsequently developing cardiovascular (CV) disease. In PE, the failing endoplasmic reticulum, oxidative and inflammatory stressed syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta sheds increased numbers of syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicles (STBEV) into the maternal circulation. Platelet reactivity, size and concentration are also known to be altered in some women who develop PE, although the underlying reasons for this have not been determined. In this study we show that STBEV from disease free placenta isolated ex vivo by dual placental perfusion associate rapidly with platelets. We provide evidence that STBEV isolated from normal placentas cause platelet activation and that this is increased with STBEV from PE pregnancies. Furthermore, treatment of platelets with aspirin, currently prescribed for women at high risk of PE to reduce platelet aggregation, also inhibits STBEV-induced reversible aggregation of washed platelets. Increased platelet reactivity as a result of exposure to PE placenta derived STBEVs correlates with increased thrombotic risk associated with PE. These observations establish a possible direct link between the clotting disturbances of PE and dysfunction of the placenta, as well as the known increased risk of thromboembolism associated with this condition. PMID:26551971

  20. Optical Assay of Erythrocyte Function in Banked Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Kandel, Mikhail; Brugnara, Carlo; Tangella, Krishna; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-09-01

    Stored red blood cells undergo numerous biochemical, structural, and functional changes, commonly referred to as storage lesion. How much these changes impede the ability of erythrocytes to perform their function and, as result, impact clinical outcomes in transfusion patients is unknown. In this study we investigate the effect of the storage on the erythrocyte membrane deformability and morphology. Using optical interferometry we imaged red blood cell (RBC) topography with nanometer sensitivity. Our time-lapse imaging quantifies membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale, which in turn report on cell stiffness. This property directly impacts the cell's ability to transport oxygen in microvasculature. Interestingly, we found that cells which apparently maintain their normal shape (discocyte) throughout the storage period, stiffen progressively with storage time. By contrast, static parameters, such as mean cell hemoglobin content and morphology do not change during the same period. We propose that our method can be used as an effective assay for monitoring erythrocyte functionality during storage time.

  1. Optical Assay of Erythrocyte Function in Banked Blood

    PubMed Central

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Kandel, Mikhail; Brugnara, Carlo; Tangella, Krishna; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Stored red blood cells undergo numerous biochemical, structural, and functional changes, commonly referred to as storage lesion. How much these changes impede the ability of erythrocytes to perform their function and, as result, impact clinical outcomes in transfusion patients is unknown. In this study we investigate the effect of the storage on the erythrocyte membrane deformability and morphology. Using optical interferometry we imaged red blood cell (RBC) topography with nanometer sensitivity. Our time-lapse imaging quantifies membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale, which in turn report on cell stiffness. This property directly impacts the cell's ability to transport oxygen in microvasculature. Interestingly, we found that cells which apparently maintain their normal shape (discocyte) throughout the storage period, stiffen progressively with storage time. By contrast, static parameters, such as mean cell hemoglobin content and morphology do not change during the same period. We propose that our method can be used as an effective assay for monitoring erythrocyte functionality during storage time. PMID:25189281

  2. Functional co-operation between the subunits in heterodimeric platelet-derived growth factor receptor complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Emaduddin, M; Ekman, S; Rönnstrand, L; Heldin, C H

    1999-01-01

    To determine the importance of the phosphorylation capacity of receptor kinase as well as the ability to serve as docking sites for SH2-domain-containing signal transduction molecules, we established pig aortic endothelial cell lines stably expressing kinase-active platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) alpha-receptors together with kinase-inactive beta-receptors, and vice versa. After stimulation with PDGF-AB, heterodimeric receptor complexes were formed in which the kinase-inactive receptor was phosphorylated by the kinase-active receptor, although less efficiently than in heterodimers of wild-type receptors. The kinase-active receptor was only minimally phosphorylated. Thus the phosphorylation within the receptor dimer occurred in trans between the components. Analyses of the abilities of heterodimeric receptor complexes of one kinase-active and one kinase-inactive receptor to mediate mitogenicity, chemotaxis and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase revealed less efficient effects than those of heterodimers of wild-type receptors. Importantly, however, the fact that signalling capacities were retained illustrates a functional co-operation between the two receptor molecules in the dimer, where one receptor provides a functional kinase and the other acts as a substrate and provides docking sites for downstream signalling molecules. PMID:10417313

  3. Identification of anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies using IgG platelet antibody detection and crossmatch system assay with Galileo Echo.

    PubMed

    Di Cristofaro, Julie; Frassati, Coralie; Montagnie, Rolande; Basire, Agnes; Merieux, Yves; Picard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Fetal/neonatal allo-immune thrombocytopenia is the most frequent and the most dangerous clinical condition involving anti-human platelet antigens (HPA)-1a allo-antibodies. Anti-HPA-1a allo-immunization requires rapid and accurate diagnosis to determine appropriate treatment. The Capture-P Ready-Screen assay (C-PRS) is a new qualitative immunoassay to detect IgG anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and anti-HPA allo-antibodies. The aim of this study is to assess the identification of anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies using the C-PRS assay, associated with HLA class I stripping reagents, on the automated benchtop analyzer Galileo Echo. Forty-nine sera were analyzed: without anti-HLA class I or anti-HPA allo-antibodies, with anti-HLA class I allo-antibodies, with anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies, among which with anti-HLA class I allo-antibodies. None of the samples without allo-antibodies were reactive. Only anti-HLA antibodies, detected by cytotoxicity-dependent complement and not by Luminex, remained positive before and after stripping reagents. Of the 13 samples, anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies that were correctly identified before and after incubation with HLA assassin reagent were 70% and 85%, respectively. Anti-glycoprotein auto-antibodies and anti-HLA allo-antibodies do not interfere with the detection of anti-HPA-1a antibodies. This preliminary study indicates that further improvement of the test will be helpful in developing a clinically useful assay in the future. PMID:25101933

  4. Mutational analysis clopidogrel resistance and platelet function in patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Correll, Mick; Johnson, Christopher K; Ferrari, Giovanni; Brizzio, Mariano; Mak, Andrew W C; Quackenbush, John; Shaw, Richard E; Zapolanski, Alex; Grau, Juan B

    2013-06-01

    Clopidogrel is an oral antiplatelet pro-drug prescribed to 40 million patients worldwide who are at risk for thrombotic events or receiving percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However about a fifth of patients treated with clopidogrel do not respond adequately to the drug. From a cohort of 105 patients on whom we had functional data on clopidogrel response, we used ultra-high throughput sequencing to assay mutations in CYP2C19 and ABCB1, the two genes genetically linked to respond. Testing for mutations in CYP2C19, as recommended by the FDA, only correctly predicted if a patient would respond to clopidogrel 52.4% of the time. Similarly, testing of the ABCB1 gene only correctly foretold response in 51 (48.6%) patients. These results are clinically relevant and suggest that until additional genetic factors are discovered that predict response more completely, functional assays are more appropriate for clinical use. PMID:23462555

  5. Increased Platelet Concentration does not Improve Functional Graft Healing in Bio-Enhanced ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Braden C.; Proffen, Benedikt L.; Vavken, Patrick; Shalvoy, Matthew R.; Machan, Jason T.; Murray, Martha M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The use of an extra-cellular matrix scaffold (ECM) combined with platelets to enhance healing of an ACL graft (“bio-enhanced ACL reconstruction”) has shown promise in animal models. However, the effects of platelet concentration on graft healing remains unknown. The objectives of this study were to determine if increasing the platelet concentration in the ECM scaffold would; 1) improve the graft biomechanical properties, and 2) decrease cartilage damage after surgery. Methods Fifty-five adolescent minipigs were randomized to 5 treatment groups; untreated ACL transection (n=10), conventional ACL reconstruction (n=15), and bio-enhanced ACL reconstruction using 1X (n=10), 3X (n=10) or 5X (n=10) platelet-rich plasma. The graft biomechanical properties, anteroposterior (AP) knee laxity, graft histology and macroscopic cartilage integrity were measured at 15 weeks. Results The mean linear stiffness of the bio-enhanced ACL reconstruction procedure using the 1X preparation was significantly greater than traditional reconstruction while the 3X and 5X preparations were not. The failure loads of all the ACL reconstructed groups were equivalent but significantly greater than untreated ACL transection. There were no significant differences in the ligament maturity index or AP laxity between reconstructed knees. Macroscopic cartilage damage was relatively minor, though significantly less when the ECM-platelet composite was used. Conclusions Only the 1X platelet concentration improved healing over traditional ACL reconstruction. Increasing the platelet concentration from 1X to 5X in the ECM scaffold did not further improve the graft mechanical properties. The use of an ECM-platelet composite decreased the amount of cartilage damage seen after ACL surgery. PMID:24633008

  6. SDF-1α is a novel autocrine activator of platelets operating through its receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Tony G; Harper, Matthew T; Poole, Alastair W

    2015-01-01

    Platelets store and secrete the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α upon platelet activation, but the ability of platelet-derived SDF-1α to signal in an autocrine/paracrine manner mediating functional platelet responses relevant to thrombosis and haemostasis is unknown. We sought to explore the role of platelet-derived SDF-1α and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7 in facilitating platelet activation and determine the mechanism facilitating SDF-1α-mediated regulation of platelet function. Using human washed platelets, CXCR4 inhibition, but not CXCR7 blockade significantly abrogated collagen-mediated platelet aggregation, dense granule secretion and thromboxane (Tx) A2 production. Time-dependent release of SDF-1α from collagen-activated platelets supports a functional role for SDF-1α in this regard. Using an in vitro whole blood perfusion assay, collagen-induced thrombus formation was substantially reduced with CXCR4 inhibition. In washed platelets, recombinant SDF-1α in the range of 20-100 ng/mL(-1) could significantly enhance platelet aggregation responses to a threshold concentration of collagen. These enhancements were completely dependent on CXCR4, but not CXCR7, which triggered TxA2 production and dense granule secretion. Rises in cAMP were significantly blunted by SDF-1α, which could also enhance collagen-mediated Ca2+ mobilisation, both of which were mediated by CXCR4. This potentiating effect of SDF-1α primarily required TxA2 signalling acting upstream of dense granule secretion, whereas blockade of ADP signalling could only partially attenuate SDF-1α-induced platelet activation. Therefore, this study supports a potentially novel autocrine/paracrine role for platelet-derived SDF-1α during thrombosis and haemostasis, through a predominantly TxA2-dependent and ADP-independent pathway. PMID:25283599

  7. Butyric acid stimulates bovine neutrophil functions and potentiates the effect of platelet activating factor.

    PubMed

    Carretta, M D; Hidalgo, A I; Burgos, J; Opazo, L; Castro, L; Hidalgo, M A; Figueroa, C D; Taubert, A; Hermosilla, C; Burgos, R A

    2016-08-01

    Increased short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production is associated with subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) and activation of inflammatory processes. In humans and rodents, SCFAs modulate inflammatory responses in the gut via free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2). In bovines, butyric acid is one of the most potent FFA2 agonists. Its expression in bovine neutrophils has recently been demonstrated, suggesting a role in innate immune response in cattle. This study aimed to evaluate if butyric acid modulates oxidative and non-oxidative functions or if it can potentiate other inflammatory mediators in bovine neutrophils. Our results showed that butyric acid can activate bovine neutrophils, inducing calcium (Ca(2+)) influx and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, two second messengers involved in FFA2 activation. Ca(2+) influx induced by butyric acid was dependent on the extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) source and phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Butyric acid alone had no significant effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and chemotaxis; however, a priming effect on platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, was observed. Butyric acid increased CD63 expression and induced the release of neutrophil granule markers matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and lactoferrin. Finally, we observed that butyric acid induced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation without affecting cellular viability. These findings suggest that butyric acid, a component of the ruminal fermentative process, can modulate the innate immune response of ruminants. PMID:27288853

  8. Effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) concentration on proliferation, neurotrophic function and migration of Schwann cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Canbin; Zhu, Qingtang; Liu, Xiaolin; Huang, Xijun; He, Caifeng; Jiang, Li; Quan, Daping; Zhou, Xiang; Zhu, Zhaowei

    2016-05-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains various growth factors and appears to have the potential to promote peripheral nerve regeneration, but evidence is lacking regarding its biological effect on Schwann cells (SCs). The present study was designed to investigate the effect of PRP concentration on SCs in order to determine the plausibility of using this plasma-derived therapy for peripheral nerve injury. PRP was obtained from rats by double-step centrifugation and was characterized by determining platelet numbers and growth factor concentrations. Primary cultures of rat SCs were exposed to various concentrations of PRP (40%, 20%, 10%, 5% and 2.5%). Cell proliferation assays and flow cytometry were performed to study to assess SC proliferation. Quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA analysis were performed to determine the ability of PRP to induce SCs to produce nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Microchemotaxis assay was used to analyse the cell migration capacity. The results obtained indicated that the platelet concentration and growth factors in our PRP preparations were significantly higher than in whole blood. Cell culture experiments showed that 2.5-20% PRP significantly stimulated SC proliferation and migration compared to untreated controls in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the expression and secretion of NGF and GDNF were significantly increased. However, the above effects of SCs were suppressed by high PRP concentrations (40%). In conclusion, the appropriate concentration of PRP had the potency to stimulate cell proliferation, induced the synthesis of neurotrophic factors and significantly increased migration of SCs dose-dependently. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23723151

  9. A functional assay-based strategy for nanomaterial risk forecasting.

    PubMed

    Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Lowry, Gregory V; Unrine, Jason M; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-12-01

    The study of nanomaterial impacts on environment, health and safety (nanoEHS) has been largely predicated on the assumption that exposure and hazard can be predicted from physical-chemical properties of nanomaterials. This approach is rooted in the view that nanoöbjects essentially resemble chemicals with additional particle-based attributes that must be included among their intrinsic physical-chemical descriptors. With the exception of the trivial case of nanomaterials made from toxic or highly reactive materials, this approach has yielded few actionable guidelines for predicting nanomaterial risk. This article addresses inherent problems in structuring a nanoEHS research strategy based on the goal of predicting outcomes directly from nanomaterial properties, and proposes a framework for organizing data and designing integrated experiments based on functional assays (FAs). FAs are intermediary, semi-empirical measures of processes or functions within a specified system that bridge the gap between nanomaterial properties and potential outcomes in complex systems. The three components of a functional assay are standardized protocols for parameter determination and reporting, a theoretical context for parameter application and reference systems. We propose the identification and adoption of reference systems where FAs may be applied to provide parameter estimates for environmental fate and effects models, as well as benchmarks for comparing the results of FAs and experiments conducted in more complex and varied systems. Surface affinity and dissolution rate are identified as two critical FAs for characterizing nanomaterial behavior in a variety of important systems. The use of these FAs to predict bioaccumulation and toxicity for initial and aged nanomaterials is illustrated for the case of silver nanoparticles and Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:26188653

  10. Static platelet adhesion, flow cytometry and serum TXB2 levels for monitoring platelet inhibiting treatment with ASA and clopidogrel in coronary artery disease: a randomised cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Andreas C; Jonasson, Lena; Lindahl, Tomas L; Hedbäck, Bo; Whiss, Per A

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the use of anti-platelet agents such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and clopidogrel in coronary heart disease, some patients continue to suffer from atherothrombosis. This has stimulated development of platelet function assays to monitor treatment effects. However, it is still not recommended to change treatment based on results from platelet function assays. This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of a static platelet adhesion assay to detect platelet inhibiting effects of ASA and clopidogrel. The adhesion assay measures several aspects of platelet adhesion simultaneously, which increases the probability of finding conditions sensitive for anti-platelet treatment. Methods With a randomised cross-over design we evaluated the anti-platelet effects of ASA combined with clopidogrel as well as monotherapy with either drug alone in 29 patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome. Also, 29 matched healthy controls were included to evaluate intra-individual variability over time. Platelet function was measured by flow cytometry, serum thromboxane B2 (TXB2)-levels and by static platelet adhesion to different protein surfaces. The results were subjected to Principal Component Analysis followed by ANOVA, t-tests and linear regression analysis. Results The majority of platelet adhesion measures were reproducible in controls over time denoting that the assay can monitor platelet activity. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet adhesion decreased significantly upon treatment with clopidogrel compared to ASA. Flow cytometric measurements showed the same pattern (r2 = 0.49). In opposite, TXB2-levels decreased with ASA compared to clopidogrel. Serum TXB2 and ADP-induced platelet activation could both be regarded as direct measures of the pharmacodynamic effects of ASA and clopidogrel respectively. Indirect pharmacodynamic measures such as adhesion to albumin induced by various soluble activators as well as SFLLRN-induced activation measured by flow

  11. Non-Carriers of Reduced-Function CYP2C19 Alleles are Most Susceptible to Impairment of the Anti-Platelet Effect of Clopidogrel by Proton-Pump Inhibitors: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jen-Kuang; Wu, Cho-Kai; Juang, Jyh-Ming; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Lin, Jiuun-Lee; Chiang, Fu-Tien

    2016-01-01

    Background The phenomenon of CYP2C19 polymorphism affects the metabolism of both clopidogrel and proton-pump inhibitors (PPI). However, concomitant use of both drugs may reduce the desired therapeutic effects. In this study, we evaluated whether individuals with different numbers of reduced-function CYP2C19 alleles were equally affected and whether PPIs with different dependencies on CYP2C19 metabolism were equally involved. Methods Thirty healthy volunteers were recruited to a six-week regimen of clopidogrel. Three PPIs with different metabolic dependencies on CYP2C19 were included and separately administered in this order. Each PPI was given for a week, followed by a one-week washout period before the intervention of the next PPI. The anti-platelet effect was examined by Thromboelastography Platelet MappingTM (TEG®) and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) assays. Results Both TEG® and VASP tests showed the same general qualitative trend, but TEG® detected a statistically significant fluctuation of platelet aggregation in response to different drug interventions. The TEG® results also demonstrated that non-carriers experienced the most significant impairment of anti-platelet effect of clopidogrel after concomitant use of PPIs. This impairment was closely related to the metabolic dependence on CYP2C19 of PPI. Conclusions Our study indicated that non-carriers of reduced-function CYP2C19 alleles are most susceptible to impairment of the anti-platelet effect of clopidogrel after concomitant PPI use. Individual subjects are not equally affected, and PPIs are not equally involved. However, large-scale randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the clinical outcome. PMID:27122952

  12. A Study of Platelet Inhibition, Using a ‘Point of Care’ Platelet Function Test, following Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction [PINPOINT-PPCI

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Thomas W.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Scott, Lauren J.; Mundell, Stuart; Butler, Mark; Strange, Julian W.; Rogers, Chris A.; Reeves, Barnaby C.; Baumbach, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background Rapid coronary recanalization following ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) requires effective anti-platelet and anti-thrombotic therapies. This study tested the impact of door to end of procedure (‘door-to-end’) time and baseline platelet activity on platelet inhibition within 24hours post-STEMI. Methods and Findings 108 patients, treated with prasugrel and procedural bivalirudin, underwent Multiplate® platelet function testing at baseline, 0, 1, 2 and 24hours post-procedure. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE), bleeding and stent thrombosis (ST) were recorded. Baseline ADP activity was high (88.3U [71.8–109.0]), procedural time and consequently bivalirudin infusion duration were short (median door-to-end time 55minutes [40–70] and infusion duration 30minutes [20–42]). Baseline ADP was observed to influence all subsequent measurements of ADP activity, whereas door-to-end time only influenced ADP immediately post-procedure. High residual platelet reactivity (HRPR ADP>46.8U) was observed in 75% of patients immediately post-procedure and persisted in 24% of patients at 2hours. Five patients suffered in-hospital MACE (4.6%). Acute ST occurred in 4 patients, all were <120mins post-procedure and had HRPR. No significant bleeding was observed. In a post-hoc analysis, pre-procedural morphine use was associated with significantly higher ADP activity following intervention. Conclusions Baseline platelet function, time to STEMI treatment and opiate use all significantly influence immediate post-procedural platelet activity. PMID:26672598

  13. Platelet glycoprotein VI binds to polymerized fibrin and promotes thrombin generation.

    PubMed

    Mammadova-Bach, Elmina; Ollivier, Véronique; Loyau, Stéphane; Schaff, Mathieu; Dumont, Bénédicte; Favier, Rémi; Freyburger, Geneviève; Latger-Cannard, Véronique; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Gachet, Christian; Mangin, Pierre H; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine

    2015-07-30

    Fibrin, the coagulation end product, consolidates the platelet plug at sites of vascular injury and supports the recruitment of circulating platelets. In addition to integrin αIIbβ3, another as-yet-unidentified receptor is thought to mediate platelet interaction with fibrin. Platelet glycoprotein VI (GPVI) interacts with collagen and several other adhesive macromolecules. We evaluated the hypothesis that GPVI could be a functional platelet receptor for fibrin. Calibrated thrombin assays using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) showed that tissue factor-triggered thrombin generation was impaired in GPVI-deficient patients and reduced by the anti-GPVI Fab 9O12. Assays on reconstituted PRP and PRP from fibrinogen-deficient patients revealed a fibrinogen-dependent enhancement of thrombin generation, which relied on functional GPVI. The effect of GPVI was found to depend on fibrin polymerization. A binding assay showed a specific interaction between GPVI-Fc and fibrin, inhibited by the Fab 9O12. This Fab also reduced platelet adhesion to fibrin at low (300 s(-1)) and high (1500 s(-1)) wall shear rates. Platelets adherent to fibrin displayed shape change, exposure of procoagulant phospholipids, and the formation of small clots. When hirudinated blood was perfused at 1500 s(-1) over preformed fibrin-rich clots, the Fab 9O12 decreased the recruitment of platelets by up to 85%. This study identifies GPVI as a platelet receptor for polymerized fibrin with 2 major functions: (1) amplification of thrombin generation and (2) recruitment of circulating platelets to clots. These so-far-unrecognized properties of GPVI confer on it a key role in thrombus growth and stabilization. PMID:25977585

  14. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process. PMID:27338300

  15. Use of 8-methoxypsoralen and long-wavelength ultraviolet radiation for decontamination of platelet concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Wiesehahn, G.P.; Morel, P.A.; Corash, L. )

    1989-07-01

    Transmission of viral diseases through blood products remains an unsolved problem in transfusion medicine. We have developed a psoralen photochemical system for decontamination of platelet concentrates in which platelets are treated with long wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA, 320-400 nm) in the presence of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP). Bacteria, RNA viruses, and DNA viruses ranging in genome size from 1.2 x 10(6) daltons, encompassing the size range of human pathogens, were inoculated into platelet concentrates and subjected to treatment. This system inactivated 25 to 30 logs/h of bacteria Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus, 6 logs/h of bacteriophage fd, 0.9 log/h of bacteriophage R17 and 1.1 logs/h of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in platelet concentrates maintained in standard storage bags. Platelet integrity and in vitro function before, immediately following photochemical treatment, and during prolonged storage after treatment, were evaluated by measuring: (1) extracellular pH; (2) platelet yields; (3) extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels; (4) platelet morphology; (5) platelet aggregation responsiveness; (6) thromboxane beta-2 (TXB-2) production; (7) dense body secretion; and (8) alpha granule secretion. These assays demonstrated that this photochemical inactivation system inactivated bacteria and viruses in platelet concentrates with minimal adverse effects on the in vitro function of platelets in comparison to untreated control concentrates maintained under current, standard blood bank conditions.

  16. The role of point-of-care assessment of platelet function in predicting postoperative bleeding and transfusion requirements after coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Thekkudan, Joyce; Sahajanandan, Raj; Gravenor, Mike; Lakshmanan, Suresh; Fayaz, Khazi Mohammed; Luckraz, Heyman

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Objective platelet function assessment after cardiac surgery can predict postoperative blood loss, guide transfusion requirements and discriminate the need for surgical re-exploration. We conducted this study to assess the predictive value of point-of-care testing platelet function using the Multiplate® device. Methods: Patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting were prospectively recruited (n = 84). Group A (n = 42) patients were on anti-platelet therapy until surgery; patients in Group B (n = 42) stopped anti-platelet treatment at least 5 days preoperatively. Multiplate® and thromboelastography (TEG) tests were performed in the perioperative period. Primary end-point was excessive bleeding (>2.5 ml/kg/h) within first 3 h postoperative. Secondary end-points included transfusion requirements, re-exploration rates, intensive care unit and in-hospital stays. Results: Patients in Group A had excessive bleeding (59% vs. 33%, P = 0.02), higher re-exploration rates (14% vs. 0%, P < 0.01) and higher rate of blood (41% vs. 14%, P < 0.01) and platelet (14% vs. 2%, P = 0.05) transfusions. On multivariate analysis, preoperative platelet function testing was the most significant predictor of excessive bleeding (odds ratio [OR]: 2.3, P = 0.08), need for blood (OR: 5.5, P < 0.01) and platelet transfusion (OR: 15.1, P < 0.01). Postoperative “ASPI test” best predicted the need for transfusion (sensitivity - 0.86) and excessive blood loss (sensitivity - 0.81). TEG results did not correlate well with any of these outcome measures. Conclusions: Peri-operative platelet functional assessment with Multiplate® was the strongest predictor for bleeding and transfusion requirements in patients on anti-platelet therapy until the time of surgery. Study registration: ISRCTN43298975 (http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN43298975/). PMID:25566711

  17. Functional evaluation of paraplegin mutations by a yeast complementation assay.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Florian; Pantakani, Krishna; Shoukier, Moneef; Langer, Thomas; Mannan, Ashraf U

    2010-05-01

    An autosomal recessive form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (AR-HSP) is primarily caused by mutations in the SPG7 gene, which codes for paraplegin, a subunit of the hetero-oligomeric m-AAA protease in mitochondria. In the current study, sequencing of the SPG7 gene in the genomic DNA of 25 unrelated HSP individuals/families led to the identification of two HSP patients with compound heterozygous mutations (p.G349S/p.W583C and p.A510V/p.N739KfsX741) in the coding sequence of the SPG7 gene. We used a yeast complementation assay to evaluate the functional consequence of novel SPG7 sequence variants detected in the HSP patients. We assessed the proteolytic activity of hetero-oligomeric m-AAA proteases composed of paraplegin variant(s) and proteolytically inactive forms of AFG3L2 (AFG3L2(E575Q) or AFG3L2(K354A)) upon expression in m-AAA protease-deficient yeast cells. We demonstrate that the newly identified paraplegin variants perturb the proteolytic function of hetero-oligomeric m-AAA protease. Moreover, commonly occurring silent polymorphisms such as p.T503A and p.R688Q could be distinguished from mutations (p.G349S, p.W583C, p.A510V, and p.N739KfsX741) in our HSP cohort. The yeast complementation assay thus can serve as a reliable system to distinguish a pathogenic mutation from a silent polymorphism for any novel SPG7 sequence variant, which will facilitate the interpretation of genetic data for SPG7. PMID:20186691

  18. Phenotypic approaches to gene mapping in platelet function disorders - identification of new variant of P2Y12, TxA2 and GPVI receptors.

    PubMed

    Watson, S; Daly, M; Dawood, B; Gissen, P; Makris, M; Mundell, S; Wilde, J; Mumford, A

    2010-01-01

    Platelet number or function disorders cause a range of bleeding symptoms from mild to severe. Patients with platelet dysfunction but normal platelet number are the most prevalent and typically have mild bleeding symptoms. The study of this group of patients is particularly difficult because of the lack of a gold-standard test of platelet function and the variable penetrance of the bleeding phenotype among affected individuals. The purpose of this short review is to discuss the way in which this group of patients can be investigated through platelet phenotyping in combination with targeted gene sequencing. This approach has been used recently to identify patients with mutations in key platelet activation receptors, namely those for ADP, collagen and thromboxane A2 (TxA2). One interesting finding from this work is that for some patients, mild bleeding is associated with heterozygous mutations in platelet proteins that are co-inherited with other genetic disorders of haemostasis such as type 1 von Willebrand's disease. Thus, the phenotype of mild bleeding may be multifactorial in some patients and may be considered to be a complex trait. PMID:20162250

  19. Human endometrial stromal stem cells differentiate into megakaryocytes with the ability to produce functional platelets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinju; Chen, Shuzhen; Zhang, Cheng; Stegeman, Samantha; Pfaff-Amesse, Teresa; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wenfeng; Amesse, Lawrence; Chen, Yanfang

    2012-01-01

    Human endometrium is a high dynamic tissue that contains endometrial stromal stem cells (hESSCs). The hESSCs have been differentiated into a number of cell lineages. However, differentiation of hESSCs into megakaryocytes (MKs) has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of MK generation from hESSCs and subsequent production of functional platelets (PLTs). In our study, hESSCs were cultured from endometrial stromal cells as confirmed by positive stromal cell specific markers (CD90 and CD29) and negative hematopoietic stem cell markers (CD45 and CD34) expression. Then, hESSCs were differentiated in a medium supplemented with thrombopoietin (TPO) for 18 days. The MK differentiation was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The differentiation medium was collected for PLT production analysis by flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and functional measurements. Our results show: 1) MKs were successfully generated from hESSCs as identified by expression of specific markers (CD41a: 1 ± 0.09% and 39 ± 3.0%; CD42b: 1.2 ± 0.06% and 28 ± 2.0%, control vs. differentiation) accompanied with reduction of pluripotent transcription factors (Oct4 and Sox2) expression; 2) The level of PLTs in the differentiation medium was 16 ± 1 number/µl as determined by size (2-4 µm) and CD41a expression (CD41a: 1 ± 0.4% and 90±2.0%, control vs. differentiation); 3) Generated PLTs were functional as evidenced by the up-regulation of CD62p expression and fibrinogen binding following thrombin stimulation; 4) Released PLTs showed similar ultra-structure characteristics (alpha granules, vacuoles and dense tubular system) as PLTs from peripheral blood determined by electron microscopic analysis. Data demonstrate the feasibility of generating MKs from hESSCs, and that the generated MKs release functional PLTs. Therefore, hESSCs could be a potential new stem cell source for in vitro MK/PLT production. PMID:22952951

  20. Calmodulin antagonists induce platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Yan, Rong; Liu, Guanglei; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) antagonists induce apoptosis in various tumor models and inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, thus some of which have been extensively used as anti-cancer agents. In platelets, CaM has been found to bind directly to the cytoplasmic domains of several platelet receptors. Incubation of platelets with CaM antagonists impairs the receptors-related platelet functions. However, it is still unknown whether CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), tamoxifen (TMX), and trifluoperazine (TFP) induce apoptotic events in human platelets, including depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. CaM antagonists did not incur platelet activation as detected by P-selectin surface expression and PAC-1 binding. However, ADP-, botrocetin-, and alpha-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor surface were significantly reduced in platelets pre-treated with CaM antagonists. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels were obviously elevated by both W7 and TMX, and membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced apoptotic events in platelets induced by W7. Therefore, these findings indicate that CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. The elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels may be involved in the regulation of CaM antagonists-induced platelet apoptosis. PMID:20172594

  1. Assessment of omega-fatty-acid-supplemented human platelets for potential improvement in long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Chitra; Stewart, Michael W; Cutting, Mary A; Rothwell, Stephen W

    2002-01-15

    Uptake of omega (omega)-3 fatty acids can influence membrane stability and cell mobility. We investigated the effects of omega-3 and -6 fatty acids on the hemostatic efficacy of human platelets using an in vivo rabbit bleeding model. In vitro assays such as platelet aggregation, vWF bead-mediated ATP release and platelet adhesion to beads (measured by the residual platelet count [RPC] [free platelet count after reacting with the beads]/[baseline platelet count]x 100=%RPC; a high %RPC indicates reduced platelet function) were conducted on platelets treated with 1% fish oil (omega-3); 2% fish oil emulsion or 1% soy oil (omega-6). Oil treatment of platelets reduced the vWF bead-induced ATP release insignificantly. Addition of omega-3 agents reduced physical reactivity (%RPC) with the vWF beads by a factor of 1.2 (oil) and 1.9 (emulsion). The omega-6 oil enhanced reactivity by a factor of 1.7. After washing to remove excess reagent, platelet resuspension was most efficient with the omega-3 emulsion. Platelet function was higher with the omega-3-treated platelets (%RPC=52.3%, omega-3 oil; 63.3%, omega-3 emulsion vs. 85%, omega-6 oil; 82% untreated platelets). Ethyl-palmitate-treated thrombocytopenic rabbits were infused with human platelets. Survival times of the treated platelets, as monitored by flow cytometry (6.2-8.2 h) were comparable to untreated platelets (8.6 h). In the rabbit kidney injury model, blood loss after infusion of the treated platelets was similar to that of saline-infused rabbits (75.3+/-3.4 g). However, platelets washed prior to infusion reduced blood loss to a value comparable to that of fresh platelets (48.3+/-5 g). Furthermore, the presence of the infused platelets at the injury site was clearly visualized using FITC-tagged anti CD42a antibody. Thus, the omega-3-based agents protect the platelets from damage during the washing procedure as demonstrated in vitro by improved platelet resuspension, low %RPC, high stimulus-responsive ATP secretion

  2. Evaluation of platelet function during extended storage in additive solution, prepared in a new container that allows manual buffy-coat platelet pooling and leucoreduction in the same system

    PubMed Central

    Plaza, Eva María; Lozano, María Luisa; Guiu, Isabel Sánchez; Egea, José Manuel; Vicente, Vicente; de Terán, Laura Collantes; Rivera, José

    2012-01-01

    Background A novel and practical storage container designed for manual buffy-coat pooling and leucodepletion was evaluated to assess its filtration performance and to analyse the quality of stored leucoreduced buffy-coat-derived platelet pools. Materials and methods. To analyse the Grifols Leucored® Transfer PL system, blood was collected from random donors into standard triple bag systems, and fractionated using standard procedures to obtain buffy-coats. Ten leucodepleted platelet pools were prepared each from five units of buffy-coats in additive solution. Concentrates were stored for 10 days at 22 °C on an end-over-end agitator. On days 0, 5, 7, and 10 of storage, samples were tested using standard in vitro platelet parameters. Results The use of this novel system for volume reduction and leucodepletion of buffy-coats resuspended in additive solution led to platelet pools that met the European requirements. pH was maintained well, declining from an initial value of 7.11±0.04 to 6.88±0.08 after 10 days. Parameters of cell lysis, response to a hypotonic stimulus and aggregation induced by agonists (arachidonic acid, ristocetin, collagen or thrombin receptor activating peptide) were also well-preserved. During storage, the quality profile of the platelet pools remained very similar to that previously reported in platelet concentrates in terms of metabolism, platelet activation (CD62, CD63, sCD62), expression of glycoproteins Ib and IIb/IIIa, capacity of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa to become activated upon ADP stimulation, and release of biological response modifiers (sCD40L and RANTES). Discussion. This new system allows the preparation of leucodepleted buffy-coat platelet pools in additive solution with good preservation of platelet function. The logistics of the procedure are relatively simple and it results in good-quality components, which may reduce costs and ease the process of buffy-coat pooling and leucocyte reduction in transfusion services. PMID:22682335

  3. Approaches to synthetic platelet analogs.

    PubMed

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Tian, Lewis L; Pan, Victor; McCrae, Keith R; Mitragotri, Samir; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is routinely used for treating bleeding complications in patients with hematologic or oncologic clotting disorders, chemo/radiotherapy-induced myelosuppression, trauma and surgery. Currently, these transfusions mostly use allogeneic platelet concentrates, while products like lyophilized platelets, cold-stored platelets and infusible platelet membranes are under investigation. These natural platelet-based products pose considerable risks of contamination, resulting in short shelf-life (3-5 days). Recent advances in pathogen reduction technologies have increased shelf-life to ~7 days. Furthermore, natural platelets are short in supply and also cause several biological side effects. Hence, there is significant clinical interest in platelet-mimetic synthetic analogs that can allow long storage-life and minimum side effects. Accordingly, several designs have been studied which decorate synthetic particles with motifs that promote platelet-mimetic adhesion or aggregation. Recent refinement in this design involves combining the adhesion and aggregation functionalities on a single particle platform. Further refinement is being focused on constructing particles that also mimic natural platelet's shape, size and elasticity, to influence margination and wall-interaction. The optimum design of a synthetic platelet analog would require efficient integration of platelet's physico-mechanical properties and biological functionalities. We present a comprehensive review of these approaches and provide our opinion regarding the future directions of this research. PMID:23092864

  4. Anti-platelet therapy and aspirin resistance - clinically and chemically relevant?

    PubMed

    Rafferty, M; Walters, M R; Dawson, J

    2010-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in the pathogenesis of the atherothrombosis which ultimately causes myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Commonly used oral anti-platelet drugs include aspirin (an irreversible inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase), clopidogrel (an ADP receptor antagonist), other thienopyridines such as ticlopidine and prasgruel, and dipyridamole (an inhibitor of adenosine reuptake and platelet phosphodiesterase). Newer agents are in development and one, ticagrelor, a reversible ADP receptor antagonist has shown promise. Despite their proven benefit, recurrent vascular events still occur in those taking anti-platelet drugs. This has led to the concept of anti-platelet resistance, most commonly aspirin resistance as this drug is the cornerstone of most regimens. The causes of aspirin resistance are numerous but potential mechanisms include lack of patient adherence, non COX-1 mediated thromboxane A2 synthesis, increased activity of alternate platelet activation pathways, interference of aspirin action by other drugs and probably pharmacogenetic factors. Measurement of platelet response to aspirin is made possible using a number of in-vitro laboratory assays of platelet function which include measurement of thromboxane A2 metabolites as well as newer point-of-care assays of platelet aggregation. The phenomenon of aspirin resistance is important as it raises the possibility of developing strategies to identify those who respond best to a particular anti-platelet regimen, or to development of newer anti-platelet therapies to which more patients respond. This review discusses important aspects of aspirin resistance both in terms of clinical medicine, alternative anti-platelet strategies, and the potential to overcome its various causes. PMID:21062249

  5. Fluorescence-based assays for RGS box function.

    PubMed

    Willard, Francis S; Kimple, Randall J; Kimple, Adam J; Johnston, Christopher A; Siderovski, David P

    2004-01-01

    Ligand-activated, seven transmembrane-spanning receptors interact with inactive G-protein heterotrimers (Galphabetagamma) to catalyze GTP loading and, consequently, activation of Galpha subunits and the liberation of Gbetagamma. Galpha.GTP and Gbetagamma are then competent to regulate independent effector pathways. The duration of heterotrimeric G-protein signaling is determined by the lifetime of the Galpha subunit in the GTP-bound state. Signal termination is facilitated by the intrinsic guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity of Galpha and subsequent reformation of the inactive heterotrimer. Regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins act enzymatically, via their hallmark "RGS box," as GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAPs) for Galpha subunits and thus function as negative regulators of G-protein signaling in vitro and in vivo. This article describes the use of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to monitor the interaction between a Galpha subunit and an RGS box protein. Furthermore, this article describes optimization of this assay for high-throughput screening and the evaluation of mutant RGS box and Galpha proteins. Finally, this article describes the novel application of this FRET technique to measure the activity of RGS protein-derived GoLoco peptides that modulate Galpha activation by aluminum tetrafluoride. PMID:15313559

  6. The effect of Sildenafil on human platelet secretory function is controlled by a complex interplay between phosphodiesterases 2, 3 and 5.

    PubMed

    Dunkern, Torsten R; Hatzelmann, Armin

    2005-03-01

    Human platelets contain the cyclic nucleotide-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterases (PDEs) 2, 3 and 5. The cGMP-PDE5 inhibitors Sildenafil and Zaprinast have been demonstrated to potentiate the anti-platelet aggregatory effect of NO donors like sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in vitro but the mechanisms of Sildenafil's action on the secretory function of human platelets have not been analysed in detail. In the present paper, we show (1) that both compounds potentiate the SNP-induced increase in cGMP in human platelets concentration-dependently. (2) However, whereas Sildenafil plus SNP treatment only partially inhibits thrombin-induced release of serotonin, the less selective Zaprinast plus SNP cause a complete inhibition. (3) The inhibition mediated by Sildenafil plus SNP is limited to low compound concentrations at which cAMP levels are increased, probably due to cGMP-mediated inhibition of PDE3. (4) High concentrations of Sildenafil (plus SNP) neither affect cAMP levels, likely due to the activation of PDE2, nor inhibits the release of serotonin. Thus, increases in both cyclic nucleotides seem to control platelet function. (5) Accordingly, treatment with increasing concentrations of Sildenafil plus SNP and a selective PDE2 inhibitor, which by its own has no effect, induced a concentration-dependent increase in cAMP and complete inhibition of platelet activation. In summary, our data indicate that Sildenafil inhibits secretory function of human platelets at least in part due to the cGMP-mediated effects on intracellular cAMP and that entire inhibition of serotonin release from thrombin-activated platelets is controlled by both cyclic nucleotides. PMID:15567064

  7. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  8. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-03-01

    Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  9. A Functional Assay for GPR55: Envision Protocol.

    PubMed

    Anavi-Goffer, Sharon; Ross, Ruth A

    2016-01-01

    AlphaScreen(®) SureFire(®) assay is a novel technology that combines luminescent oxygen channeling technology, nano-beads, and monocloncal antibodies to detect the level of a selected protein in a volume lower than 5 μl. This method is more sensitive compared with the traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), and can detect an increasing number of new targets. Here, we described a method for AlphaScreen(®) SureFire(®) assay that targets ERK1/2 phosphorylation, a primary downstream signaling pathway that conveys activation of GPR55 by L-α-lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) and certain cannabinoids. PMID:27245893

  10. A new fabrication route for PVA/graphene platelets composites with enhanced functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavecchia, Teresa; Tamburri, Emanuela; Angjellari, Mariglen; Savi, Damiano; Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the synthesis and characterization of composites made of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and oxidized graphene platelets obtained from an ad hoc treatment of graphite. The composite is produced by a modified solution mixing procedure in which the in situ crosslinking of PVA with maleic anhydride has been carried out in the presence of the carbon filler. A complete characterization of the material is presented carried out by SEM, DTGA, Raman spectroscopy and I-V characteristics analysis.

  11. Effects of single oral doses of lysine clonixinate and acetylsalicylic acid on platelet functions in man.

    PubMed

    Pallapies, D; Muhs, A; Bertram, L; Rohleder, G; Nagyiványi, P; Peskar, B A

    1996-01-01

    Lysine clonixinate is an analgesic drug with a so far unknown mechanism of action. We have determined its effect on platelet cyclooxygenase in man. Biosynthesis of thromboxane (TX)B2 and prostaglandin (PG)F2 alpha in clotting whole blood ex vivo as well as collagen-induced platelet aggregation measured before and at various time points after oral administration of 125 mg lysine clonixinate were compared to results obtained with 500 mg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). While biosynthesis of both TXB2 and PGF2 alpha measured radioimmunologically was inhibited significantly 2.5 h, but not 6 h, after administration of lysine clonixinate, inhibition by ASA was much greater and still highly significant after 48 h. Similarly, collagen-induced aggregation of platelet-rich plasma was inhibited for a longer period and to a greater extent after administration of ASA than after lysine clonixinate. Our results indicate that lysine clonixinate is a cyclooxygenase inhibitor of moderate potency. It remains to be investigated whether mechanisms other than inhibition of cyclooxygenase contribute to the analgesic activity of lysine clonixinate. PMID:8866627

  12. [Diagnosis of inherited diseases of platelet function. Interdisciplinary S2K guideline of the Permanent Paediatric Committee of the Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Research (GTH e. V.)].

    PubMed

    Knöfler, R; Eberl, W; Schulze, H; Bakchoul, T; Bergmann, F; Gehrisch, S; Geisen, C; Gottstein, S; Halimeh, S; Harbrecht, U; Kappert, G; Kirchmaier, C; Kehrel, B; Lösche, W; Krause, M; Mahnel, R; Meyer, O; Pilgrimm, A K; Pillitteri, D; Rott, H; Santoso, S; Siegemund, A; Schambeck, C; Scheer, M; Schmugge, M; Scholl, T; Strauss, G; Zieger, B; Zotz, R; Hermann, M; Streif, W

    2014-01-01

    Congenital disorders of platelet function are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are often not detected until bleeding occurs. In clinical settings only a few methods have proven to be useful for identification and classification of inherited platelet disorders. For a rational diagnostic approach, a stepwise algorithm is recommended. Patient history and clinical investigation are mandatory. Von Willebrand disease and other coagulation disorders should always be ruled out prior to specific platelet testing. Platelet count, size, volume (MPV) and morphology may guide further investigations. The PFA-100® CT is suited for screening for severe platelet defects. Platelet aggregometry allows assessment of multiple aspects of platelet function. Flow cytometry enables diagnosis of thrombasthenia Glanzmann, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and storage pool defects. Molecular genetics may confirm a putative diagnosis or pave the way for identifying new defects. We present an unabridged version of the interdisciplinary guideline. PMID:24903476

  13. Platelet Activation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Patients Is Not Altered with Cocaine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kiebala, Michelle; Singh, Meera V.; Piepenbrink, Michael S.; Qiu, Xing; Kobie, James J.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has indicated that platelets, which are anucleate blood cells, significantly contribute to inflammatory disorders. Importantly, platelets also likely contribute to various inflammatory secondary disorders that are increasingly associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV) infection including neurological impairments and cardiovascular complications. Indeed, HIV infection is often associated with increased levels of platelet activators. Additionally, cocaine, a drug commonly abused by HIV-infected individuals, leads to increased platelet activation in humans. Considering that orchestrated signaling mechanisms are essential for platelet activation, and that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitors can alter platelet function, the role of NF-κB signaling in platelet activation during HIV infection warrants further investigation. Here we tested the hypothesis that inhibitory kappa B kinase complex (IKK) activation would be central for platelet activation induced by HIV and cocaine. Whole blood from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals, with or without cocaine abuse was used to assess platelet activation via flow cytometry whereas IKK activation was analyzed by performing immunoblotting and in vitro kinase assays. We demonstrate that increased platelet activation in HIV patients, as measured by CD62P expression, is not altered with reported cocaine use. Furthermore, cocaine and HIV do not activate platelets in whole blood when treated ex vivo. Finally, HIV-induced platelet activation does not involve the NF-κB signaling intermediate, IKKβ. Platelet activation in HIV patients is not altered with cocaine abuse. These results support the notion that non-IKK targeting approaches will be better suited for the treatment of HIV-associated inflammatory disorders. PMID:26076359

  14. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  15. Structural and Functional Analysis of a Platelet-Activating Lysophosphatidylcholine of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Oliveira, Mauricio M.; Hoelz, Lucas V. B.; Vieira, Danielle P.; Marques, Alexandre F.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Gomes, Marta T.; Salloum, Nasim G.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Monteiro, Robson Q.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of the life-threatening Chagas disease, in which increased platelet aggregation related to myocarditis is observed. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent intercellular lipid mediator and second messenger that exerts its activity through a PAF-specific receptor (PAFR). Previous data from our group suggested that T. cruzi synthesizes a phospholipid with PAF-like activity. The structure of T. cruzi PAF-like molecule, however, remains elusive. Methodology/Principal findings Here, we have purified and structurally characterized the putative T. cruzi PAF-like molecule by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Our ESI-MS/MS data demonstrated that the T. cruzi PAF-like molecule is actually a lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), namely sn-1 C18:1(delta 9)-LPC. Similar to PAF, the platelet-aggregating activity of C18:1-LPC was abrogated by the PAFR antagonist, WEB 2086. Other major LPC species, i.e., C16:0-, C18:0-, and C18:2-LPC, were also characterized in all T. cruzi stages. These LPC species, however, failed to induce platelet aggregation. Quantification of T. cruzi LPC species by ESI-MS revealed that intracellular amastigote and trypomastigote forms have much higher levels of C18:1-LPC than epimastigote and metacyclic trypomastigote forms. C18:1-LPC was also found to be secreted by the parasite in extracellular vesicles (EV) and an EV-free fraction. A three-dimensional model of PAFR was constructed and a molecular docking study was performed to predict the interactions between the PAFR model and PAF, and each LPC species. Molecular docking data suggested that, contrary to other LPC species analyzed, C18:1-LPC is predicted to interact with the PAFR model in a fashion similar to PAF. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our data indicate that T. cruzi synthesizes a bioactive C18:1-LPC, which aggregates platelets via PAFR. We propose that C18:1-LPC might be an important lipid mediator in the

  16. Studies of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of adherent platelets. Paradoxical loss of luminal receptors when platelets adhere to high density fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Coller, B S; Kutok, J L; Scudder, L E; Galanakis, D K; West, S M; Rudomen, G S; Springer, K T

    1993-01-01

    The accessibility of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of platelets adherent to damaged blood vessels or atherosclerotic plaques is likely to play a crucial role in subsequent platelet recruitment. To define better the factors involved in this process, we developed a functional assay to assess the presence of activated, luminal GPIIb/IIIa receptors, based on their ability to bind erythrocytes containing a high density of covalently coupled RGD-containing peptides (thromboerythrocytes). Platelets readily adhered to wells coated with purified type I rat skin collagen and the adherent platelets bound a dense lawn of thromboerythrocytes. With fibrinogen-coated wells, platelet adhesion increased as the fibrinogen-coating concentration increased, reaching a plateau at about 11 micrograms/ml. Thromboerythrocyte binding to the platelets adherent to fibrinogen showed a paradoxical response, increasing at fibrinogen coating concentrations up to approximately 4-6 micrograms/ml and then dramatically decreasing at higher fibrinogen-coating concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the morphology of platelets adherent to collagen was similar to that of platelets adherent to low density fibrinogen, with extensive filopodia formation and ruffling. In contrast, platelets adherent to high density fibrinogen showed a bland, flattened appearance. Immunogold staining of GPIIb/IIIa receptors demonstrated concentration of the receptors on the filopodia, and depletion of receptors on the flattened portion of the platelets. Thus, there is a paradoxical loss of accessible, activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of platelets adherent to high density fibrinogen. Two factors may contribute to this result: engagement of GPIIb/IIIa receptors with fibrinogen on the abluminal surface leading to the loss of luminal receptors, and loss of luminal filopodia that interact with thromboerythrocytes. These data provide insight into the differences

  17. [Genetic variants of platelet ADP receptor P2Y12 associated with changed platelet functional activity and development of cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Sirotkina, O V; Zabotina, A M; Berkovich, O A; Bazhenova, E A; Vavilova, T V; Shvartsman, A L

    2009-02-01

    The key role in platelet aggregation is played by the platelet ADP receptor P2Y12, which is the target for antiaggregant drugs, clopidogrel and ticlopidine. At present, only sporadic data on genetic variants of platelet ADP receptor P2Y12 are available from literature, and their association with thromboembolic and cardiovascular diseases still remains obscure. Analysis of the group of subjects with high platelet reactivity resulted in identification of two nucleotide substitutions, C18T and G36T, in the coding region of the P2Y12 gene. The frequency of the P2Y12 T1 8 allele was higher in control group than in the group of patients survived from myocardial infarction at the age under 45 years (39% versus 28%, respectively, P = 0.04). Moreover, in the T18 carriers, platelet aggregation activity was lower than in the carriers of the wild-type genotype (0.84 +/- 0.05% versus 1.01 +/- 0.08%, respectively, P = 0.03). In the group of patients with early myocardial infarctions, a tendency towards the increased frequency of 16T allele in comparison with control group (20 and 12%, respectively, P = 0.07) was observed. The rate of ADP-induced platelet aggregation in the carriers of 16T allele from the control group was somewhat higher than in the subjects with the GG36 genotype (1.31 +/- 0.16% versus 1.12 +/- 0.06%, respectively, P = 0.07). The nucleotide substitutions identified were in absolute disequilibrium, i.e., allele T18 conformed to allele G36. On the contrary, allele C18 conformed to allele T36. Haplotype T18G36 was found to be responsible for the decreased risk of myocardial infarction and decreased platelet reactivity. It is suggested that polymorphisms of the P2Y12 gene identified can be used for determination of the risk group for myocardial infarction in the young males. PMID:19334620

  18. A discrepancy between platelet alpha 2-receptor density and functional circulatory changes in hypertensives

    SciTech Connect

    Mores, N.; Martire, M.; Pistritto, G.; Cardillo, C.; Folli, G. )

    1990-09-01

    To investigate whether differences exist in peripheral alpha 2-adrenoceptors between normotensive and hypertensive subjects, we determined platelet alpha 2-adrenoceptor density in 10 (7 males) untreated essential hypertensives (mean age of 51.1 years, range of 44-59 years) and in 10 age- and sex-matched normotensive controls. Moreover, in hypertensive patients, we examined the relationship between receptor density and cardiovascular reactivity to mental arithmetic, static handgrip, and bicycle exercise, to verify the hypothesis that alpha 2-adrenoceptors might play a role in modulation of hemodynamic response to sympathetic stimuli. alpha 2-Adrenoceptor density, as calculated by binding of (3H)yohimbine to platelets, was significantly higher in essential hypertensives (314.8 +/- 38.7 fmol/mg) than in normotensive subjects (213.6 +/- 34.7 fmol/mg) (p less than 0.05), whereas receptor affinity was similar in both groups (4.0 +/- 0.5 nM hypertensives, 4.3 +/- 0.5 nM normotensives; p greater than 0.05). Mental arithmetic increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) by 21.5% from basal values and heart rate (HR) by 13.2%. During isometric exercise, MAP increased by 38.1% and HR by 24.7%, while during bicycle ergometry, mean increases in MAP and HR from baseline were of 27.2 and 54.3%, respectively. No correlation was found between platelet alpha 2-adrenoceptor density and percent changes in MAP induced by all tests, or between adrenoceptors and absolute basal and peak MAP values. Our findings suggest that in hypertensive patients, peripheral alpha 2-adrenoceptors are increased with respect to matched normotensives, but these receptors seem not to be involved in the modulation of cardiovascular adaptation to enhanced sympathetic activity.

  19. Multiple and Contemporary Coronary Thrombosis inspite of Low Platelet Function Response

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Simone; Lucisano, Luigi; Pennacchi, Mauro; Sardella, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting a clinical case of a 78-year-old male who had oppressive chest pain at rest, which regressed with the intake of sublingual nitrates. Coronary angiography showed a chronic total occlusion (CTO) of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery, a normal circumflex, a hypoplasic right coronary artery and a Cardiac Magnetic Resonance showing vital tissue in anterior wall. During the procedure of CTO-PCI on LAD, patient developed multiple and contemporary coronary thrombosis in spite of low platelet reactivity, which was assessed by using Multiplate. A manual thrombectomy was performed with a good final result only after drug eluting stents (DES) implantation. PMID:25302230

  20. Impact of gender on platelet membrane functions of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Vignini, Arianna; Giusti, Lucia; Raffaelli, Francesca; Giulietti, Alessia; Salvolini, Eleonora; Luzzi, Simona; Provinciali, Leandro; Mazzanti, Laura; Nanetti, Laura

    2013-03-01

    There are many evidences suggesting that oxidative stress is one of the earliest events in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis and plays a key role in the development of the AD pathology. The existence of substantial gender-related differences in the clinical features of AD has been recently confirmed (i.e. pathophysiologic features and epidemiologic trends). In addition, study results appear to indicate that the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of AD differ significantly in the 2 sexes. Based on previous results regarding changes in AD platelet plasma membrane, the purpose of the present study was to assess the impact of gender in the same model above reported. In particular we aimed at studying platelets from AD patients (M-AD and F-AD) and matched controls (M-C and F-C), divided into gender, by studying nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) production, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), membrane Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and fluidity. NO production was significantly elevated in platelets from both F-AD and M-AD compared to matched controls. M-AD showed NO production significantly higher than F-AD and it was the same between M-C and F-C. A similar trend was seen for ONOO(-). Platelets of both M-AD and F-AD had intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations significantly higher than F-C and M-C, while membrane Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity showed an opposite trend, but these differences are still significant. M-AD male subjects showed a significantly increased DPH fluorescence anisotropy (r) compared with controls, while for F-AD this discrepancy was not significant. The difference in DHP fluorescence anisotropy remained significant between M-AD and F-AD as well as between M-C and F-C. The TMA-DPH fluorescence anisotropy showed the same trend, but there were no significant differences between M-AD and F-AD, as well as between controls. The results of the current research support the conclusion that F-AD is not at greater risk than M-AD for oxidative stress

  1. Acquisition and aggregation of canine blood platelets: basic mechanisms of function and differences because of breed origin.

    PubMed

    Clemmons, R M; Meyers, K M

    1984-01-01

    A method for obtaining reliable blood platelet yields in canine platelet-rich plasma, using increased sodium citrate concentration, is presented. Maintaining a quiet environment or anesthetizing the animals with thiamylal sodium aids in collection of platelets. Aggregation of platelets from 60 dogs of various breeds in response to arachidonic acid, collagen, adenosine diphosphate, epinephrine, and serotonin was monitored. Canine platelets reversibly or irreversibly aggregated to arachidonic acid. The percentage of arachidonate-irreversible platelets varied from 0% to 100% depending upon the breed of dogs examined. Arachidonate-irreversible platelets also aggregated irreversibly at lower concentrations of collagen and exhibited biphasic irreversible aggregation to adenosine diphosphate and serotonin. Serotonin-induced irreversible aggregation was dependent upon receptor activation and upon arachidonic acid metabolism. Irreversible aggregation to serotonin was associated with release of 3H-serotonin and thromboxane B2 formation, indicating that a couple between the serotonergic receptor and arachidonic acid metabolism may exist. PMID:6422804

  2. Functional domains on von Willebrand factor. Recognition of discrete tryptic fragments by monoclonal antibodies that inhibit interaction of von Willebrand factor with platelets and with collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Sixma, J J; Sakariassen, K S; Stel, H V; Houdijk, W P; In der Maur, D W; Hamer, R J; de Groot, P G; van Mourik, J A

    1984-01-01

    We have identified two functional domains on the von Willebrand factor (VWF) moiety of the Factor VIII-von Willebrand factor complex (FVIII-VWF), one interacting with blood platelets, and one interacting with vessel wall collagens, by means of two monoclonal antibodies directed against the VWF molecule, CLB-RAg 35 and CLB-RAg 201. The monoclonal antibody CLB-RAg 35 inhibited virtually all platelet adherence to artery subendothelium and to purified vessel wall collagen type III, at relatively high wall shear rates. CLB-RAg 35 also inhibited the ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation and the binding of FVIII-VWF to the platelet in the presence of ristocetin but did not affect the binding of FVIII-VWF to collagen. The monoclonal antibody CLB-RAg 201 inhibited the binding of FVIII-VWF to purified vessel wall collagen type I and III and all platelet adherence to collagen type III and the platelet adherence to subendothelium that was mediated by FVIII-VWF in plasma. The two functional domains on FVIII-VWF that were recognized by CLB-RAg 35 and CLB-RAg 201 were identified by means of immunoprecipitation studies of trypsin-digested FVIII-VWF. The domains resided on different polypeptide fragments, with a Mr of 48,000 for the collagen binding domain and a Mr of 116,000 for the platelet binding domain. The 116,000-mol wt fragment consisted of subunits of 52,000/56,000 mol wt and 14,000 mol wt after reduction. The 52,000/56,000-mol wt subunits possessed the epitope for CLB-RAg 35. Images PMID:6332119

  3. Arf6 controls platelet spreading and clot retraction via integrin αIIbβ3 trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yunjie; Joshi, Smita; Xiang, Binggang; Kanaho, Yasunori; Li, Zhenyu; Bouchard, Beth A.; Moncman, Carole L.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet and megakaryocyte endocytosis is important for loading certain granule cargo (ie, fibrinogen [Fg] and vascular endothelial growth factor); however, the mechanisms of platelet endocytosis and its functional acute effects are understudied. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate–ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is a small guanosine triphosphate–binding protein that regulates endocytic trafficking, especially of integrins. To study platelet endocytosis, we generated platelet-specific Arf6 knockout (KO) mice. Arf6 KO platelets had less associated Fg suggesting that Arf6 affects αIIbβ3-mediated Fg uptake and/or storage. Other cargo was unaffected. To measure Fg uptake, mice were injected with biotinylated- or fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)–labeled Fg. Platelets from the injected Arf6 KO mice showed lower accumulation of tagged Fg, suggesting an uptake defect. Ex vivo, Arf6 KO platelets were also defective in FITC-Fg uptake and storage. Immunofluorescence analysis showed initial trafficking of FITC-Fg to a Rab4-positive compartment followed by colocalization with Rab11-positive structures, suggesting that platelets contain and use both early and recycling endosomes. Resting and activated αIIbβ3 levels, as measured by flow cytometry, were unchanged; yet, Arf6 KO platelets exhibited enhanced spreading on Fg and faster clot retraction. This was not the result of alterations in αIIbβ3 signaling, because myosin light-chain phosphorylation and Rac1/RhoA activation were unaffected. Consistent with the enhanced clot retraction and spreading, Arf6 KO mice showed no deficits in tail bleeding or FeCl3-induced carotid injury assays. Our studies present the first mouse model for defining the functions of platelet endocytosis and suggest that altered integrin trafficking may affect the efficacy of platelet function. PMID:26738539

  4. Platelet Immobilization on Supported Phospholipid Bilayers for Single Platelet Studies.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Eva; Donati, Alessia; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-08-23

    The worldwide cardiovascular disease (CVD) epidemic is of grave concern. A major role in the etiology of CVDs is played by the platelets (thrombocytes). Platelets are anuclear cell fragments circulating in the blood. Their primary function is to catalyze clot formation, limiting traumatic blood loss in the case of injury. The same process leads to thrombosis in the case of CVDs, which are commonly managed with antiplatelet therapy. Platelets also have other, nonhemostatic functions in wound healing, inflammation, and tissue regeneration. They play a role in the early stages of atherosclerosis and the spread of cancer through metastases. Much remains to be learned about the regulation of these diverse platelet functions under physiological and pathological conditions. Breakthroughs in this regard are expected to come from single platelet studies and systems approaches. The immobilization of platelets at surfaces is advantageous for developing such approaches, but platelets are activated when they come in contact with foreign surfaces. In this work, we develop and validate a protocol for immobilizing platelets on supported lipid bilayers without activation due to immobilization. Our protocol can therefore be used for studying platelets with a wide variety of surface-sensitive techniques. PMID:27438059

  5. The effect of the perfluorocarbon emulsion Oxycyte on platelet count and function in the treatment of decompression sickness in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Cronin, William A; Senese, Angela L; Arnaud, Francoise G; Regis, David P; Auker, Charles R; Mahon, Richard T

    2016-09-01

    Decompression from elevated ambient pressure is associated with platelet activation and decreased platelet counts. Standard treatment for decompression sickness (DCS) is hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Intravenous perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion is a nonrecompressive therapy being examined that improves mortality in animal models of DCS. However, PFC emulsions are associated with a decreased platelet count. We used a swine model of DCS to study the effect of PFC therapy on platelet count, function, and hemostasis. Castrated male swine (n = 50) were fitted with a vascular port, recovered, randomized, and compressed to 180 feet of sea water (fsw) for 31 min followed by decompression at 30 fsw/min. Animals were observed for DCS, administered 100% oxygen, and treated with either emulsified PFC Oxycyte (DCS-PFC) or isotonic saline (DCS-NS). Controls underwent the same procedures, but were not compressed (Sham-PFC and Sham-NS). Measurements of platelet count, thromboelastometry, and coagulation were obtained 1 h before compression and 1, 24, 48, 96, 168 and 192 h after treatment. No significant changes in normalized platelet counts were observed. Prothrombin time was elevated in DCS-PFC from 48 to 192 h compared with DCS-NS, and from 96 to 192 h compared with Sham-PFC. Normalized activated partial thromboplastin time was also elevated in DCS-PFC from 168 to 192 h compared with Sham-PFC. No bleeding events were noted. DCS treated with PFC (Oxycyte) does not impact platelet numbers, whole blood clotting by thromboelastometry, or clinical bleeding. Late changes in prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time associated with PFC use in both DCS therapy and controls warrant further investigation. PMID:26650458

  6. A new variant of Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (Strasbourg I). Platelets with functionally defective glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complexes and a glycoprotein IIIa 214Arg----214Trp mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, F; Stierlé, A; Fournier, D; Morales, M; André, G; Nurden, A T; Cazenave, J P

    1992-01-01

    We describe a new variant of Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (variant Strasbourg I). The patient (M.S.) showed an absence of platelet aggregation to ADP, thrombin, and collagen, and a decreased clot retraction. Platelet fibrinogen was approximately 20% of normal levels. ADP-stimulated platelets bound markedly reduced amounts of soluble fibrinogen and platelet adhesion to surface-bound fibrinogen was defective. Normal to subnormal amounts of glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa (alpha IIb beta 3) complexes, the platelet fibrinogen receptor, were revealed by SDS-PAGE, crossed immunoelectrophoresis, and antibody binding. However, the complexes were unusually sensitive to dissociation with EDTA at room temperature. Furthermore, flow cytometry showed that the platelets failed to bind the activation-dependent monoclonal antibody, PAC-1, after stimulation. In contrast, an RGDS-containing peptide induced significant binding of the anti-ligand-induced binding site antibody, D3GP3, suggesting the presence of a functional RGD binding domain on the patient's GPIIb-IIIa complex. Sequence analysis was performed after polymerase chain reaction amplification of selected patient's GPIIIa exons, and of the patient's platelet GPIIb and GPIIIa mRNAs. A point mutation (C to T) was localized in exon D (iv) of GPIIIa that resulted in an 214Arg to 214Trp amino acid substitution. The defect has been inherited from the parents who are heterozygous for the same mutation. This substitution points to an essential amino acid in a region of GPIIIa involved in the binding of fibrinogen and influencing the Ca(2+)-dependent stability of the GPIIb-IIIa complex. Images PMID:1602006

  7. Radioimmunoassay of factor V in human plasma and platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, P.B.; Eide, L.L.; Bowie, E.J.W.; Mann, K.G.

    1982-07-01

    Homogeneous, single-chain human factor V was used to develop a double antibody competition radioimmunoassay to measure factor V concentrations in plasma and platelets. Standard curves were constructed that allow for the detection of as little as 20 ng factor V/ml of plasma. Normal factor V concentrations range from 4 to 14 ..mu..g/ml of plasma with an average value of 7.0 +/- 2.0 ..mu..g/ml (n = 64). No correlation was observed between antigen levels and age or sex. The radioimmunoassay data are consistent with factor V clotting assays, providing freshly drawn plasma is used in the bioassay. Radioimmunoassay of washed platelets indicate that 0.63-1.93 ..mu..g of factor V is present per 2.5 X 10/sup 8/ platelets (6412-14128 molecules of factor V per platelet). When normalized to individual hematocrits and platelet count, the data indicated that platelets contribute approximately 18%-25% of the factor V found in whole blood. In addition, two individuals with functionally deficient factor V were examined and found to be deficient in both antigen and activity.

  8. Platelet dysfunction-eosinophilia syndrome in parasitized Venezuelan children.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette; Sifontes, Luz Núñez; Feijoo, Rosa; Certad, Gabriela; Arenas-Pinto, Alejandro; Pocaterra, Leonor; Ferrara, Guiseppe; Giménez, Rita; Torres, Obdulita; Goldstein, Carlos; Bosch, Norma

    2005-08-01

    Platelet dysfunction was detected in six children with purpura and eosinophilia. We conducted clinical evaluations, hematologic and platelet function tests, clotting studies (bleeding time, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, factor XIII, factor VIII, and von Willebrand factor), assays for IgG and IgM antibodies to platelets, and a search for stool parasites. Mild bleeding phenomena (ecchymoses, petechiae, epistaxis, and gingival) were transient. All children showed intestinal parasites and marked eosinophilia (mean count = 2,615.2 cells/muL, 95% confidence interval = 1,259.6-5,429.8). Main abnormalities included prolonged bleeding times (50%) and defective aggregation with collagen (100%) adrenaline (66%), or ADP (66%). Antibodies to platelets were not detected. Anti-parasite therapy reversed the hemorrhagic manifestations and normalized eosinophil counts and platelet alterations. No relationship could be established between excess eosinophils, intensity of bleeding, or type and degree of platelet abnormalities. Thrombocytopathic features mimicked the intrinsic defect of storage pool disease. The possible pathogenic roles of eosinophilia and parasitism are reviewed. This is the first report of this pathologic combination in Latin American children. PMID:16103609

  9. pH-responsive drug delivery system based on AIE luminogen functionalized layered zirconium phosphate nano-platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongdong; Zhang, Yuping; Zhou, Bingbing

    2015-05-01

    Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) luminogen, quaternary tetraphenylethene cation (TPEN), was successfully incorporated into layered α-zirconium phosphate (α-ZrP) by using co-precipitation method to form inorganic-organic hybrid materials. The obtained materials show the characteristic hexagonal platelet shape with the interlayer distance did not reveal significant difference compared with pure α-ZrP. In addition, the obtained hybrid materials emit strong blue emission centered at 476 nm in aqueous media due to the electrostatic interactions of TPEN with the anionic framework of α-ZrP, which largely restrict their intramolecular rotation. More importantly, the materials provide a pH dependent release of doxorubicin (DOX), suggesting that AIE luminogen functionalized α-ZrP may be used as an imaging guided and pH-responsive delivery system for targeting therapy.

  10. Platelets and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Simeone, Paola; Liani, Rossella; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Platelet activation plays a key role in atherothrombosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and increased in vivo platelet activation with enhanced thromboxane (TX) biosynthesis has been reported in patients with impairment of glucose metabolism even in the earlier stages of disease and in the preclinical phases. In this regards, platelets appear as addresses and players carrying and transducing metabolic derangement into vascular injury. The present review critically addresses key pathophysiological aspects including (i) hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and insulin resistance as determinants and predictors of platelet activation, (ii) inflammatory mediators derived from platelets, such as soluble CD40 ligand, soluble CD36, Dickkopf-1 and probably soluble receptor for advanced glycation-end-products (sRAGE), which expand the functional repertoire of platelets from players of hemostasis and thrombosis to powerful amplifiers of inflammation by promoting the release of cytokines and chemokines, cell activation, and cell-cell interactions; (iii) molecular mechanisms underpinning the less-than-expected antithrombotic protection by aspirin (ASA), despite regular antiplatelet prophylaxis at the standard dosing regimen, and (iv) stratification of patients deserving different antiplatelet strategies, based on the metabolic phenotype. Taken together, these pathophysiological aspects may contribute to the development of promising mechanism-based therapeutic strategies to reduce the progression of atherothrombosis in diabetic subjects. PMID:25986598