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Sample records for platelet storage lesion

  1. Overview on platelet preservation: better controls over storage lesion.

    PubMed

    Ohto, Hitoshi; Nollet, Kenneth E

    2011-06-01

    Platelet storage lesion (PSL), correlating with reduced in vivo recovery/survival and hemostatic capacity after transfusion, is characterized essentially by morphological and molecular evidence of platelet activation and energy consumption in the medium. Processes that limit shelf-life are multifactorial, and include both necrosis and apoptosis. PSL is greatly influenced by factors including duration of storage, temperature, ratio of platelet number to media volume, solution composition with respect to energy content and buffering capacity, and gas permeability of the container. Recent progress for slowing PSL has been made with storage media that more effectively fuel ATP production and buffer the inevitable effects of metabolism. Improved oxygen-permeability of containers also helps to maintain aerobic-dominant glycolysis. Patients stand to benefit from platelet products of higher intrinsic quality that store well until the moment of transfusion. PMID:21507724

  2. Early increase in DcR2 expression and late activation of caspases in the platelet storage lesion.

    PubMed

    Plenchette, S; Moutet, M; Benguella, M; N'Gondara, J P; Guigner, F; Coffe, C; Corcos, L; Bettaieb, A; Solary, E

    2001-10-01

    Platelet transfusion is widely used to prevent bleeding in patients with severe thrombocytopenia. The maximal storage duration of platelet concentrates is usually 5 days, due to the platelet storage lesion that impairs their functions when stored for longer times. Some of the morphological and biochemical changes that characterize this storage lesion are reminiscent of cell death by apoptosis. The present study analyzed whether proteins involved in nucleated cell apoptosis could play a role in the platelet storage lesion. Storage of leukocyte-depleted platelets obtained by apheresis is associated with a late and limited activation of caspases, mainly caspase-3. This event correlates with an increased expression of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim in the particulate fraction and a slight and late release of the pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein Diablo/Smac in the cytosol. Platelets do not express the death receptors Fas, DR4 and DR5 on their plasma membrane, while the expression of the decoy receptor DcR2 increases progressively during platelet storage. Addition of low concentrations of the cryoprotector dimethylsulfoxide accelerates platelet caspase activation during storage, an effect that is partially prevented by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Altogether, DcR2 expression on the plasma membrane is an early event while caspase activation is a late event during platelet storage. These observations suggest that caspases are unlikely to account for the platelet storage lesion. As a consequence, addition of caspase inhibitors may not improve the quality of platelet concentrates stored in standard conditions. PMID:11587215

  3. A new platelet storage lesion index based on paired samples, without and with EDTA and cell counting: comparison of three types of leukoreduced preparations.

    PubMed

    Seghatchian, Jerard

    2006-12-01

    Platelets derived from whole blood and diverse apheresis procedures come in contact with various artificial surfaces and undergo contact activation, sheer stress-induced shape changes, aggregation and microvesiculation during collection, processing and storage. These dynamic changes are qualitatively reflected in the log-normal platelet size distribution patterns seen, when using modern automated cell counters and can be measured quantitatively by counting the paired samples, without and with added EDTA, and calculating the differences (d) in platelet cellular indices (dPLT/dMPV/dPDW). Reporting the differences instead of the absolute values of cellular indices makes the measurements independent of basic principles used for cell counting (i.e. aperture-impedance or flow-optic). The measurements can be performed either in blood centres, hospital blood banks or nearby patient clinics equipped with a validated cell counter. At least three useful quality indices could be derived simultaneously from this procedure (accurate estimation of platelet yields using the value of the EDTA-containing sample); quantitative assessment of the % of reversible platelet aggregates, an age/pH/temperature-dependent degree of microvesiculation/apoptosis/PS exposure, based on the response to EDTA. This new set of indices correlate significantly with other conventional tests for platelet quality; hence, provide additional supportive evidence for confirming the low pH values and the subjective poor swirling data occasionally seen with stored PC. In the following study, the Sysmex SE 9000 was successfully employed for estimation of platelet cellular indices comparing the platelet storage lesion index of three types of leukoreduced platelet concentrates in current practice. The relationship between this in vitro response to clinical outcome remains to be established. PMID:17113347

  4. Quality of platelet concentrates irradiated with UVB light: effect of UV dose and dose rate on glycocalicin release and correlation with other markers of the platelet storage lesion.

    PubMed

    Bessos, H; Murphy, W G; Robertson, A; Vickers, M; Seghatchian, M J; Tandy, N P; Cutts, M; Pamphilon, D H

    1993-06-01

    The amount of membrane-associated glycoprotein Ib in platelet concentrates (PCs) irradiated with a high dose of UVB light has been shown to be significantly reduced after 48 h storage. We recently corroborated this finding when we noted an increase in the supernatant levels of glycocalicin (GC, a major segment of glycoprotein Ib) in UVB-treated PCs during storage. The aim of the present study was to determine whether GC release was related to both the UV dose and the rate of dose delivery. Plateletpheresis concentrates obtained from five donors were pooled and split into five equal parts. Four of these were treated with 7500 and 15,000 mJ/cm2 UVB using two prototype UV sources with differing rates of dose delivery; namely, Baxter (BAT) and British Aerospace (BAC) cabinets, with the latter having the slower rate of delivery. On days 1 and 5 of storage, GC levels in the supernatants of PCs were determined by ELISA. Moreover, the following parameters were also assessed: platelet and WBC count; hypotonic shock response (HSR) and platelet aggregation response to ADP, ADP+collagen, ADP+arachidonic acid and ristocetin; pH; supernatant levels of lactate, glucose, von Willebrand factor (vWf) and beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG). The results revealed an association of GC release with UVB dose using both UV sources, although this was more apparent in the BAC system, in which glycocalicin release at day 5 of storage was as follows (microgram/ml, mean +/- SD): 4.8 +/- 0.3 and 9.5 +/- 3.6 at 7500 and 15,000 mJ/cm2 respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8374699

  5. Platelet storage media.

    PubMed

    Gulliksson, H

    2014-10-01

    Present platelet storage media often designated platelet additive solutions (PAS) basically contain acetate, citrate and phosphate and recently also potassium and magnesium. However, there seems to be an increasing interest in developing PASs that can be used also after further reduction of residual plasma content below 15-20% plasma. Inclusion of glucose but also calcium and bicarbonate in such solutions have been suggested to improve platelet (PLT) storage, especially when plasma content is reduced to very low levels. Results from a limited number of studies using novel PAS alternatives have been presented during the last years, such as InterSol-G, PAS-5, M-sol, PAS-G and SAS. Most of them are experimental solutions. The combined results presented in those studies suggest that presence of glucose may be necessary during PLT storage, primarily to maintain ATP at acceptable levels. At plasma inclusion below 15-20%, the content of glucose will generally be too low to support PLT metabolism for more than a few days making glucose addition in PAS necessary. Significant effects associated with presence of calcium was observed in PLTs stored in PAS with 5% inclusion but not with 20-35% plasma inclusion, suggesting that the content of plasma could be of importance. Bicarbonate only seems to be of importance for pH regulation, primarily when plasma inclusion is reduced to about 5%. Reduction in rate of glycolysis was observed in some PAS alternatives containing potassium and magnesium but not in others. Differences in pH or in concentrations of the various compounds included in PAS may be possible explanations. Additionally, novel PAS containing glucose, calcium and bicarbonate does not seem to be associated with improved in vitro results as compared to SSP+ or CompoSol when PLTs are stored with 35% plasma inclusion. The results would then also suggest that excess of glucose in novel PAS environment may not be associated with additional positive effects on PLT metabolism

  6. Insights into Platelet Storage and the Need for Multiple Approaches.

    PubMed

    Handigund, Mallikarjun; Cho, Yong Gon

    2015-01-01

    Upon accidental injury and the treatment of many diseases, patients may need a transfusion of blood components in order to achieve hemostasis. Platelets are small enucleated cells derived from bone marrow megakaryocytes that undergo change upon activation at sites of vascular injury and play a vital role in vascular repair and antimicrobial host defense, collectively contributing to hemostasis. They are the common blood components transfused whenever there is need, but supplies do not equal the demand as platelets are required in many medical and surgical procedures. In addition, surplus supplies of platelet concentrate are often discarded as they have a short shelf life. Currently, platelet concentrates are stored at room temperature for a maximum of 5 days from the date of collection; the temporal aspect is an added hurdle in the growing demand for platelet concentrates. Many investigations have been carried out in attempt to improve the quality and lengthen the shelf life of platelets, but the few that have succeeded are not commercially viable. Moreover, currently there is a declining trend in platelet research, quelling the hope of platelet storage improvement. Successful strategies would be a boon for medicine in particular and humanity in general. This review deals with past and current efforts toward improving the quality of platelet concentrates by reducing platelet storage lesions and increasing the viable storage period for platelets. Also presented are new perspectives based on past and current efforts, which should be investigated for platelet research in this decade. PMID:26663804

  7. Storage of human red blood cells and platelets. Some aspects concerning the factors leading to storage lesion characterized as morphological changes and vesiculation. Minireview based on a doctoral thesis.

    PubMed

    Solberg, C

    1988-01-01

    1. Storage renders erythrocytes more responsive to thermally induced morphological changes, especially the shedding of microvesicles. 4-8 week old cells can be morphologically "rejuvenated" by heating. 2. If pH increases during storage of platelets an extensive loss of small particles occurs. The platelet disintegration is associated with a loss in the metabolic activity, discharge of LDH, increased susceptibility to phospholipid hydrolysis by phospholipase C and is found to be initiated during the actual preparation of platelet concentrates. 3. Activation of platelets during preparation can be decreased by shortening the first centrifugation time or by using adenine in the anticoagulant. 4. A 4 hour prestorage of the whole blood unit prior to centrifugation strongly decreases the activation of platelets upon stimuli and results in platelet concentrates much more stable to storage. PMID:3070889

  8. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation during platelet storage: consequences for platelet recovery and hemostatic function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Canault, Matthias; Duerschmied, Daniel; Brill, Alexander; Stefanini, Lucia; Schatzberg, Daphne; Cifuni, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets undergo several modifications during storage that reduce their posttransfusion survival and functionality. One important feature of these changes, which are known as platelet storage lesion, is the shedding of the surface glycoproteins GPIb-α and GPV. We recently demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17) mediates mitochondrial injury-induced shedding of adhesion receptors and that TACE activity correlates with reduced posttransfusion survival of these cells. We now confirm that TACE mediates receptor shedding and clearance of platelets stored for 16 hours at 37°C or 22°C. We further demonstrate that both storage and mitochondrial injury lead to the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) in platelets and that TACE-mediated receptor shedding from mouse and human platelets requires p38 MAP kinase signaling. Protein kinase C, extracellular regulated-signal kinase MAPK, and caspases were not involved in TACE activation. Both inhibition of p38 MAPK and inactivation of TACE during platelet storage led to a markedly improved posttransfusion recovery and hemostatic function of platelets in mice. p38 MAPK inhibitors had only minor effects on the aggregation of fresh platelets under static or flow conditions in vitro. In summary, our data suggest that inhibition of p38 MAPK or TACE during storage may significantly improve the quality of stored platelets. PMID:19965619

  9. Evaluation of store lesion in platelet obtained by apheresis compared to platelet derived from whole blood and its impact on the in vitro functionality.

    PubMed

    Quintero, M; Núñez, M; Mellado, S; Maldonado, M; Wehinger, S

    2015-12-01

    Platelet units for transfusion purposes are obtained manually from whole blood or by apheresis, in an automated process. In both methods, platelets during storage present a characteristics grouped under the name "storage lesion" that are associated with adverse effects on platelet units. Oxidative stress has been claimed to be one of major causes, leading to activation and apoptosis processes affecting their post transfusion functionality. In this work, we observed an association between apheresis and a reduced presence of oxidative stress and better results in functional markers in stored platelets, compared to manually obtained platelets. Then, apheresis which would ensure a greater number of functional platelets during the 5 days of storage, compared to concentrates obtained from whole blood. PMID:26043812

  10. Exploratory studies of extended storage of apheresis platelets in a platelet additive solution (PAS).

    PubMed

    Slichter, Sherrill J; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd; Pellham, Esther; Bailey, S Lawrence; Bolgiano, Doug

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the poststorage viability of apheresis platelets stored for up to 18 days in 80% platelet additive solution (PAS)/20% plasma, 117 healthy subjects donated platelets using the Haemonetics MCS+, COBE Spectra (Spectra), or Trima Accel (Trima) systems. Control platelets from the same subjects were compared with their stored test PAS platelets by radiolabeling their stored and control platelets with either (51)chromium or (111)indium. Trima platelets met Food and Drug Administration poststorage platelet viability criteria for only 7 days vs almost 13 days for Haemonetics platelets; ie, platelet recoveries after these storage times averaged 44 ± 3% vs 49 ± 3% and survivals were 5.4 ± 0.3 vs 4.6 ± 0.3 days, respectively. The differences in storage duration are likely related to both the collection system and the storage bag. The Spectra and Trima platelets were hyperconcentrated during collection, and PAS was added, whereas the Haemonetics platelets were elutriated with PAS, which may have resulted in less collection injury. When Spectra and Trima platelets were stored in Haemonetics' bags, poststorage viability was significantly improved. Platelet viability is better maintained in vitro than in vivo, allowing substantial increases in platelet storage times. However, implementation will require resolution of potential bacterial overgrowth during storage. PMID:24258816

  11. Platelet storage in PAS-2 or autologous plasma: impact on functional parameters.

    PubMed

    Bunescu, A; Hild, M; Lundahl, J; Egberg, N

    2001-04-01

    Currently, several platelet additive solutions for long-term platelet storage have been introduced. The aim of this study was to compare the deterioration of functional status of platelets stored for up to 5 days in autologous plasma (AP) only, with platelet stored in PAS-2, a salt solution containing acetate, citrate and sodium chloride. Change in platelet adhesion, aggregation and activation was measured by flow cytometric technique. In addition, beta-Thromboglobulin (beta-TG), lactate and glucose were determined. After 5 days of storage, the expression of P-Selectin was significantly higher, the production of lactate and the consumption of glucose were significantly lower, in platelets stored in PAS-2 than in autologous plasma. No significant differences were detected on day 5 between the two groups with regard to fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor binding capacity, or to beta-TG release. It can be concluded that neither storage medium was consistently better for the parameters tested. However, it must be emphasized that platelets stored in autologous plasma exhibited less lesion, in terms of P-Selectin expression compared with platelets stored in PAS-2. PMID:11299027

  12. Changes in platelet function following cold storage of RBC suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Qian-Li; Li, Jian-Gang; Sun, Yang; Jin, Zhan-Kui; Gao, Ying; Xu, Cui-Xiang; Chen, Ping; Ma, Ting; Yang, Jiang-Cun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To provide a basis for the cold-storage of human platelets as a way to assess changes in platelet function. Methods: Red blood cell suspensions (11 U and 50 U) were randomly selected at different storage times (3-28 days) and evidence of platelet activation (CD62P) and thromboelastography (TEG) reaction times were investigated. Results: After 21 days of storage at 4°C, a large number of activated platelets (PAC1+62P+, PAC1-62P+) within the red blood cell suspension (RBCs) retained their function and had TEG-maximum amplitude (TEG-MA) indices in the normal range. Conclusion: We report that platelets in RBC suspensions retain high activity when stored at 4°C for 21 days. The results provide important information for studies that involve storing platelets under cold conditions. PMID:26770402

  13. The hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel as a model organism for potential cold storage of platelets

    PubMed Central

    Richters, Karl E.; Melin, Travis E.; Liu, Zhi-jian; Hordyk, Peter J.; Benrud, Ryan R.; Geiser, Lauren R.; Cash, Steve E.; Simon Shelley, C.; Howard, David R.; Ereth, Mark H.; Sola-Visner, Martha C.

    2012-01-01

    Hibernating mammals have developed many physiological adaptations to extreme environments. During hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) must suppress hemostasis to survive prolonged body temperatures of 4–8°C and 3–5 heartbeats per minute without forming lethal clots. Upon arousal in the spring, these ground squirrels must be able to quickly restore normal clotting activity to avoid bleeding. Here we show that ground squirrel platelets stored in vivo at 4–8°C were released back into the blood within 2 h of arousal in the spring with a body temperature of 37°C but were not rapidly cleared from circulation. These released platelets were capable of forming stable clots and remained in circulation for at least 2 days before newly synthesized platelets were detected. Transfusion of autologous platelets stored at 4°C or 37°C showed the same clearance rates in ground squirrels, whereas rat platelets stored in the cold had a 140-fold increase in clearance rate. Our results demonstrate that ground squirrel platelets appear to be resistant to the platelet cold storage lesions observed in other mammals, allowing prolonged storage in cold stasis and preventing rapid clearance upon spring arousal. Elucidating these adaptations could lead to the development of methods to store human platelets in the cold, extending their shelf life. PMID:22492817

  14. The caspase-3 inhibitor (peptide Z-DEVD-FMK) affects the survival and function of platelets in platelet concentrate during storage

    PubMed Central

    Shiri, Reza; Ahmadinejad, Minoo; Vaeli, Shahram; Tabatabaei, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background Although apoptosis occurs in nucleated cells, studies show that this event also occurs in some anucleated cells such as platelets. During storage of platelets, the viability of platelets decreased, storage lesions were observed, and cells underwent apoptosis. We investigated the effects of caspase-3 inhibitor on the survival and function of platelets after different periods of storage. Methods Platelet concentrates were obtained from the Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization in plastic blood bags. Caspase-3 inhibitor (Z-DEVD-FMK) was added to the bags. These bags along with control bags to which no inhibitor was added were stored in a shaking incubator at 22℃ for 7 days. The effects of Z-DEVD-FMK on the functionality of platelets were analyzed by assessing their ability to bind to von Willebrand factor (vWF) and to aggregate in the presence of arachidonic acid and ristocetin. Cell survival was surveyed by MTT assay. Results At day 4 of storage, ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation was significantly higher in the inhibitor-treated (test) than in control samples; the difference was not significant at day 7. There was no significant difference in arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation between test and control samples. However, at day 7 of storage, the binding of platelets to vWF was significantly higher in test than in control samples. The MTT assay revealed significantly higher viability in test than in control samples at both days of study. Conclusion Treatment of platelets with caspase-3 inhibitor could increase their functionality and survival. PMID:24724067

  15. The platelet storage defect as measured in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Cerdas-Quesada, César

    2010-10-01

    The platelet storage defect emcompasses all untoward effects on platelet morphology structure and function with storage and the mechanisms responsible are not fully understood but are clearly multifactorial. The presence of swirling may correlate with acceptable pH values and the volume of suspending plasma to be effective to maintain a pH greater than 6,4 is between 75-85 g. PMID:20702139

  16. Formulation and Storage of Platelet-Rich Plasma Homemade Product

    PubMed Central

    Giraudo, Laurent; Veran, Julie; Magalon, Jeremy; Coudreuse, Jean-Marie; Magalon, Guy; Dubois, Christophe; Serratrice, Nicolas; Dignat-George, Françoise; Sabatier, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous biotherapy based on platelet-healing properties. Here, we developed a simple and reproducible PRP purification protocol based on two successive centrifugations. We evaluated different centrifugation speeds and time-storage durations on the platelet quantity and quality. Sterility and stability of our PRP homemade product were also performed. We prepared PRP from 54 healthy volunteers. We tested activation state, reactivity, and stability of platelets by flow cytometry using basal and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced P-selectin expression markers; growth factor release after platelet activation by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); platelet aggregation capacity by aggregrometry assays; clot formation and retraction by thromboelastography; and platelet morphology by ultrastructural analysis. About 130 and 250 g successive speed centrifugations further concentrated platelets while preserving their bioactivity during 6 h (after that, platelet functions were significantly altered). In these conditions, we obtained a highly concentrated pure PRP product (with a low leukocyte count) suitable to study platelet properties. To avoid the loss of efficacy, we recommend injecting PRP under 3 h after preparation. PMID:23516671

  17. Metabolic status of platelet concentrates during extended storage: improvement with pharmacological inhibitors and reduced surface-to-volume ratio.

    PubMed

    Bode, A P; Miller, D T

    1989-01-01

    The depletion of plasma nutrients and buffering capacity may present a potential barrier to the long-term liquid storage of platelet concentrates (PC). We have found that PC prepared with reversible inhibitors of platelet activation added to the citrate anticoagulant and stored at a reduced surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio have a much slower rate of lactate build-up (p less than 0.01), slower consumption of glucose (p = 0.05), and more stable pH (p less than 0.01) than controls. By pO2 and pCO2 measurements, PC prepared with inhibitors showed evidence of continued respiration and responsiveness even after storage at 22 degrees C for 15 days. In addition, these PC released only 11% of the total cellular LDH during the storage period as compared to the release of 43-67% of the total LDH in control PC. Maximum benefit of the inhibitors was seen after reduction of the S/V ratio of the storage container, which was made possible by the reduced metabolic demands of platelets stored in the unactivated state. These data suggest that the fall in pH and loss of platelet integrity associated with the platelet storage lesion are correlated with a high metabolic rate which can be controlled by inhibiting the activation of platelets during preparation and storage. The use of these inhibitors and reduced bag surface area may make prolonged liquid storage of platelets feasible. PMID:2477949

  18. Stable storage of helium in nanoscale platelets at semicoherent interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kashinath, A; Misra, A; Demkowicz, M J

    2013-02-22

    He implanted into metals precipitates into nanoscale bubbles that may later grow into voids, degrading the properties of engineering alloys. Using multiscale modeling, we show that a different class of He precipitates may form at semicoherent interfaces: nanoscale platelets. These platelets grow by wetting high-energy interface regions, remain stable under irradiation, and reduce He-induced swelling. Stable storage of He at interfaces may impart unprecedented He resistance to future structural materials. PMID:23473167

  19. Platelets are relevant mediators of renal injury induced by primary endothelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Sradnick, Jan; Lerea, Kenneth M; Goligorsky, Michael S; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hugo, Christian P M; Hohenstein, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    Several studies have suggested a prominent (pro)inflammatory and harmful role of platelets in renal disease, and newer work has also demonstrated platelet release of proangiogenic factors. In the present study, we investigated the role of platelets in a mouse model of selective endothelial cell injury using either platelet depletion or the pharmacological P2Y12 receptor blocker clopidogrel as an interventional strategy. The concanavalin A/anti-concanavalin A model was induced in left kidneys of C57bl/6J wild-type mice after initial platelet depletion or platelet-inhibiting therapy using clopidogrel. FACS analysis of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa/P-selectin double-positive platelets and platelet-derived microparticles demonstrated relevant platelet activation after the induction of selective endothelial injury in mice. Enhanced platelet activation persisted for 5 days after disease induction and was accompanied by increased amounts of circulating platelet-derived microparticles as potential mediators of a prolonged procoagulant state. By immunohistochemistry, we detected significantly reduced glomerular injury in platelet-depleted mice compared with control mice. In parallel, we also saw reduced endothelial loss and a consequently reduced repair response as indicated by diminished proliferative activity. The P2Y12 receptor blocker clopidogrel demonstrated efficacy in limiting platelet activation and subsequent endothelial injury in this mouse model of renal microvascular injury. In conclusion, platelets are relevant mediators of renal injury induced by primary endothelial lesions early on, as demonstrated by platelet depletion as well as platelet inhibition via the P2Y12 receptor. While strategies to prevent platelet-endothelial interactions have shown protective effects, the contribution of platelets during renal regeneration remains unknown. PMID:25834071

  20. Platelets are relevant mediators of renal injury induced by primary endothelial lesions

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Sradnick, Jan; Lerea, Kenneth M.; Goligorsky, Michael S.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hugo, Christian P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested a prominent (pro)inflammatory and harmful role of platelets in renal disease, and newer work has also demonstrated platelet release of proangiogenic factors. In the present study, we investigated the role of platelets in a mouse model of selective endothelial cell injury using either platelet depletion or the pharmacological P2Y12 receptor blocker clopidogrel as an interventional strategy. The concanavalin A/anti-concanavalin A model was induced in left kidneys of C57bl/6J wild-type mice after initial platelet depletion or platelet-inhibiting therapy using clopidogrel. FACS analysis of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa/P-selectin double-positive platelets and platelet-derived microparticles demonstrated relevant platelet activation after the induction of selective endothelial injury in mice. Enhanced platelet activation persisted for 5 days after disease induction and was accompanied by increased amounts of circulating platelet-derived microparticles as potential mediators of a prolonged procoagulant state. By immunohistochemistry, we detected significantly reduced glomerular injury in platelet-depleted mice compared with control mice. In parallel, we also saw reduced endothelial loss and a consequently reduced repair response as indicated by diminished proliferative activity. The P2Y12 receptor blocker clopidogrel demonstrated efficacy in limiting platelet activation and subsequent endothelial injury in this mouse model of renal microvascular injury. In conclusion, platelets are relevant mediators of renal injury induced by primary endothelial lesions early on, as demonstrated by platelet depletion as well as platelet inhibition via the P2Y12 receptor. While strategies to prevent platelet-endothelial interactions have shown protective effects, the contribution of platelets during renal regeneration remains unknown. PMID:25834071

  1. Storage of platelets in additive solutions: a new method for storage using sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Gulliksson, H; Sallander, S; Pedajas, I; Christenson, M; Wiechel, B

    1992-06-01

    The in vitro effect of 6-day storage of platelets prepared from 6 pooled buffy coat (BC) units and stored in a platelet storage medium containing approximately 40 percent CPD-plasma and 60 percent platelet additive solution (PAS) was evaluated. PAS is composed of sodium and potassium chloride, citrate, phosphate, and mannitol. The total count of platelets per pooled unit included in the in vitro studies (n = 25) was 376 +/- 59 x 10(9) (mean +/- SD). The present study included three steps. 1. Evaluation of platelet storage in one (n = 7) and two (n = 6) 1000-mL polyolefin containers using PAS. During storage in one container, significantly lower values were found for pH, pO2, glucose, ATP, and the ratio of ATP to AMP+ADP+ATP. The values for mean platelet volume, pCO2, lactate, and extracellular adenylate kinase activity were significantly higher. These results indicate that storage in only one polyolefin container is not appropriate for maintaining satisfactory platelet quality. During storage in two polyolefin containers, a remarkably decreased lactate production (0.07 +/- 0.02 mmol/day/10(11) platelets) was noted. 2. PAS was substituted for saline during 6-day storage in two 1000-mL polyolefin containers (n = 12). The composition of the platelet preparations was the same in all other respects. Similar in vitro results were noted with PAS and saline, which indicated that PAS has no specific effect on the storage of platelets different from that of saline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1626346

  2. Platelet storage media change the expression characteristics of the platelet-derived microparticles.

    PubMed

    Yari, Fatemeh; Azadpour, Shima; Shiri, Reza

    2014-09-01

    Activated platelets shed microparticles in vivo and definitely in vitro upon aging under storage. Studies about the platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) produced in different storage media of PC were very limited. The aim of this research was to compare some surface molecules of these microvesicles in dissimilar microenvironments; plasma and the candidate medium for the platelet concentrate, Composol. Thirty units of PCs were prepared from Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization. Each unit was divided into two portions. In one of the portions, plasma was replaced with Composol using a connecting device instrument. MPs were isolated from PC and the levels of PS exposure (the annexin-binding capacity) and binding to vWF were surveyed on their surface using ELISA and flow cytometry techniques. The levels of PS exposure were increased on MPs during 7 days storage in the both media but the differences were not significant (P value >0.05). In addition, binding of PMP to vWF was declined during storage. The binding capabilities of PMP were significantly higher in Composol than that of plasma at the day 4 or 7 of storage (P value = 001). It seemed that the binding of PMPs to vWF was affected from the storage media of PC (plasma and Composol) but PS exposure was not affected from the type of storage media. PMID:25114402

  3. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate. (a) Identification. An environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate is a device...

  4. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate. (a) Identification. An environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate is a device...

  5. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate. (a) Identification. An environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate is a device...

  6. Platelets

    MedlinePlus

    ... are related to immunity and fighting infection. Platelet Production Platelets are produced in the bone marrow, the ... platelet destruction and also decreased bone marrow platelet production. These problems are caused by autoantibodies. Antibodies are ...

  7. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate. 864.9575 Section 864.9575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... concentrate. (a) Identification. An environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate is a device...

  8. Platelet lysate and chondroitin sulfate loaded contact lenses to heal corneal lesions.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Giuseppina; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Rossi, Silvia; Delfino, Alessio; Riva, Federica; Icaro Cornaglia, Antonia; Marrubini, Giorgio; Musitelli, Giorgio; Del Fante, Claudia; Perotti, Cesare; Caramella, Carla; Ferrari, Franca

    2016-07-25

    Hemoderivative tear substitutes contain various ephiteliotrophic factors, such as growth factors (GF), involved in ocular surface homeostasis without immunogenic properties. The aim of the present work was the loading of platelet lysate into contact lenses to improve the precorneal permanence of platelet lysate growth factors on the ocular surface to enhance the treatment of corneal lesions. To this purpose, chondroitin sulfate, a sulfated glycosaminoglycan, which is normally present in the extracellular matrix, was associated with platelet lysate. In fact, chondroitin sulfate is capable of electrostatic interaction with positively charged growth factors, in particular, with bFGF, IGF, VEGF, PDGF and TGF-β, resulting in their stabilization and reduced degradation in solution. In the present work, various types of commercially available contact lenses have been loaded with chondroitin sulfate or chondroitin sulfate in association with platelet lysate to achieve a release of growth factors directly onto the corneal surface lesions. One type of contact lenses (PureVision(®)) showed in vitro good proliferation properties towards corneal cells and were able to enhance cut closure in cornea constructs. PMID:27234702

  9. Viability of platelets following storage in the irradiated state. A pair-controlled study

    SciTech Connect

    Read, E.J.; Kodis, C.; Carter, C.S.; Leitman, S.F.

    1988-09-01

    Gamma irradiation of blood products is a standard practice recommended for the prevention of posttransfusion graft-versus-host disease in susceptible hosts. We studied the effects of irradiation on stored platelet concentrates and evaluated whether platelets could be stored for 5 days in the irradiated state without adverse effects on their viability. Using a pair-controlled design in which each of six normal subjects acted as his or her own control, we compared in vitro storage characteristics and in vivo kinetics of platelet concentrates exposed to 30 Gy and stored for 5 days with those of platelet concentrates simply stored for 5 days without irradiation. Irradiation had no significant effects on in vitro storage characteristics (platelet count, mean platelet volume, pH, and white cell count) or on in vivo kinetics, including initial recovery and mean platelet survival. Using the multiple-hit model, initial recovery was 49.6 +/- 10.8 percent, and mean platelet survival was 5.6 +/- 1.05 days for irradiated concentrates, compared with 51.3 +/- 13.0 percent and 5.9 +/- 0.50 days, respectively, for the unirradiated control concentrates. We conclude that irradiation of platelet concentrates with up to 30 Gy has no effect on their in vivo recovery or survival, and that irradiation administered before storage of platelet concentrates does not interfere with their clinical efficacy.

  10. Plasma free fatty acid metabolism during storage of platelet concentrates for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Cesar, J; DiMinno, G; Alam, I; Silver, M; Murphy, S

    1987-01-01

    New containers allow storage of platelet concentrates (PC) at 22 degrees C for up to 7 days, during which glycolytic and oxidative metabolism is vigorous. Recent evidence suggests that 85 percent of adenosine triphosphate regeneration is based on oxidative metabolism and that substrates other than glucose may be used. Because platelets can oxidize free fatty acids (FFA) as a possible source of energy during storage, the authors studied their availability, distribution, and turnover. Plasma FFA concentration was unchanged after 1 day of PC storage but significantly increased on Days 3, 5, and 7. Platelet-free plasma (PFP) stored under the same conditions as PC demonstrated a progressive increase in FFA, suggesting that some of the FFA accumulating in PC were derived from plasma rather than platelets. Indeed, during PC storage, plasma triglycerides decreased significantly, suggesting that they are a possible source of the increased levels of FFA found on Day 3 and thereafter. Thus, PC have a plasma FFA pool available continuously for oxidation during storage. Studies with radiolabeled palmitate suggested that FFA oxidation by platelets occurs during storage. The current findings show that plasma FFA could be a significant substrate for oxidative metabolism during storage of PC and that the oxidized FFA are replenished at least in part from plasma. These results may allow platelet storage to be improved, particularly in synthetic media. PMID:3629676

  11. Storage of platelets in earth orbit. Effect of gravity and the formulation of plastic storage containers on platelet IgG and C3.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, I O; Odgren, P R; Teno, R A; Jacobson, M S; Surgenor, D M

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the effects of gravitational force and three different plastic formulations of the storage bags on the quality of stored platelets by measuring the changes in platelet-associated immunoglobulin G (IgG) and two antigenic markers of the third component of human complement (C3), C3d and C3c. Pooled platelets were stored in parallel at microgravity (MG) and on the ground (1 g) using three different plastic polymers: (1) polyvinylchloride (PVC) plasticized with di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP); (2) PVC plasticized with trioctyl trimellitate (TOTM), and (3) unplasticized polyolefin (PO). The IgG and C3 were quantified by an automated antiglobulin consumption test in freeze/thaw disrupted platelets (total IgG or C3). The baseline values for platelet associated IgG and C3, measured after 2.5 days of storage at 1 g just prior to the launch, fell within the normal range. Following an additional 6.5 day storage, platelets stored at MG had accumulated significantly less C3d than those stored at 1 g, suggesting that MG storage was beneficial. Specific plastic formulations also exerted a significant effect on the accumulation of these immunoproteins, the effect being particularly pronounced at MG. The smallest increases of IgG and C3 were seen in platelets stored in TOTM and the largest in those stored in DEHP. It is possible that further studies at MG would permit a clear characterization of the effects of other independent storage variables. PMID:2781740

  12. Molecular determinants of platelet delta storage pool deficiencies: an update.

    PubMed

    Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Darnige, Luc; Bellucci, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Delta storage pool deficiency (δ-SPD) is a rare heterogeneous group of platelet disorders characterized by a reduction in the number or content of dense granules. δ-SPD causes a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis characterized mainly by mucocutaneous bleeding. Currently, no specific treatment is available and the therapeutic approach is based on prevention of excessive bleeding. However, during the last few years, important insights into the pathophysiology of δ-SPD have been achieved using mouse models and dense granule deficiency-associated congenital diseases, such as Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome and Chediak-Higashi syndrome. It thus appears that δ-SPD represents a genetically heterogeneous group of intracellular vesicle biogenesis and/or trafficking disorders. This review summarizes recent data regarding the molecular mechanisms together with clinical features of the different types of δ-SPD. Although the molecular basis of isolated inherited δ-SPD remains currently unknown, next-generation sequencing strategies should enable researchers to identify the causative genes. Identification of those genes should contribute to our understanding of the pathophysiology, represent useful tools for genetic diagnosis, and eventually lead to new specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23025459

  13. Evaluation of in vitro storage characteristics of cold stored platelet concentrates with N acetylcysteine (NAC).

    PubMed

    Handigund, Mallikarjun; Bae, Tae Won; Lee, Jaehyeon; Cho, Yong Gon

    2016-02-01

    Platelets play a vital role in hemostasis and thrombosis, and their demand and usage has multiplied many folds over the years. However, due to the short life span and storage constraints on platelets, it is allowed to store them for up to 7 days at room temperature (RT); thus, there is a need for an alternative storage strategy for extension of shelf life. Current investigation involves the addition of 50 mM N acetylcysteine (NAC) in refrigerated concentrates. Investigation results revealed that addition of NAC to refrigerated concentrates prevented platelet activation and reduced the sialidase activity upon rewarming as well as on prolonged storage. Refrigerated concentrates with 50 mM NAC expressed a 23.91 ± 6.23% of CD62P (P-Selectin) and 22.33 ± 3.42% of phosphotidylserine (PS), whereas RT-stored platelets showed a 46.87 ± 5.23% of CD62P and 25.9 ± 6.48% of phosphotidylserine (PS) after 5 days of storage. Further, key metabolic parameters such as glucose and lactate accumulation indicated reduced metabolic activity. Taken together, investigation and observations indicate that addition of NAC potentially protects refrigerated concentrates by preventing platelet activation, stabilizing sialidase activity, and further reducing the metabolic activity. Hence, we believe that NAC can be a good candidate for an additive solution to retain platelet characteristics during cold storage and may pave the way for extension of storage shelf life. PMID:26847865

  14. Changes in platelet morphology and function during 24 hours of storage.

    PubMed

    Braune, S; Walter, M; Schulze, F; Lendlein, A; Jung, F

    2014-01-01

    For in vitro studies assessing the interaction of platelets with implant materials, common and standardized protocols for the preparation of platelet rich plasma (PRP) are lacking, which may lead to non-matching results due to the diversity of applied protocols. Particularly, the aging of platelets during prolonged preparation and storage times is discussed to lead to an underestimation of the material thrombogenicity. Here, we study the influence of whole blood- and PRP-storage times on changes in platelet morphology and function. Blood from apparently healthy subjects was collected according to a standardized protocol and examined immediately after blood collection, four hours and twenty four hours later. The capability of platelets to adhere and form stable aggregates (PFA100, closure time) was examined in sodium citrate anticoagulated whole blood (WB) using the agonists equine type I collagen and epinephrine bitartrate (collagen/epinephrine) as well as equine type I collagen and adenosine-5'-diphosphate (collagen/ADP). Circulating platelets were quantified at each time point. Morphology of platelets and platelet aggregates were visualized microscopically and measured using an electric field multi-channel counting system (CASY). The percentage of activated platelets was assessed by means of P-selectin (CD62P) expression of circulating platelets. Furthermore, platelet factor 4 (PF4) release was measured in platelet poor plasma (PPP) at each time point. Whole blood PFA100 closure times increased after stimulation with collagen/ADP and collagen/epinephrine. Twenty four hours after blood collection, both parameters were prolonged pathologically above the upper limit of the reference range. Numbers of circulating platelets, measured in PRP, decreased after four hours, but no longer after twenty four hours. Mean platelet volumes (MPV) and platelet large cell ratios (P-LCR, 12 fL - 40 fL) decreased over time. Immediately after blood collection, no debris or platelet

  15. TAILS N-terminomics of human platelets reveals pervasive metalloproteinase-dependent proteolytic processing in storage.

    PubMed

    Prudova, Anna; Serrano, Katherine; Eckhard, Ulrich; Fortelny, Nikolaus; Devine, Dana V; Overall, Christopher M

    2014-12-18

    Proteases, and specifically metalloproteinases, have been linked to the loss of platelet function during storage before transfusion, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We used a dedicated N-terminomics technique, iTRAQ terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates (TAILS), to characterize the human platelet N-terminome, proteome, and posttranslational modifications throughout platelet storage over 9 days under blood-banking conditions. From the identified 2938 proteins and 7503 unique peptides, we characterized N-terminal methionine excision, co- and posttranslational Nα acetylation, protein maturation, and proteolytic processing of proteins in human platelets. We also identified for the first time 10 proteins previously classified by the Human Proteome Organization as "missing" in the human proteome. Most N termini (77%) were internal neo-N termini (105 were novel potential alternative translation start sites, and 2180 represented stable proteolytic products), thus highlighting a prominent yet previously uncharacterized role of proteolytic processing during platelet storage. Protease inhibitor studies revealed metalloproteinases as being primarily responsible for proteolytic processing (as opposed to degradation) during storage. System-wide identification of metalloproteinase and other proteinase substrates and their respective cleavage sites suggests novel mechanisms of the effect of proteases on protein activity and platelet function during storage. All data sets and metadata are available through ProteomeXchange with the data set identifier PXD000906. PMID:25331112

  16. Acquired storage pool deficiency with increased platelet-associated IgG. Report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, H J; Rosove, M H; Lages, B A; Kaplan, K L

    1980-11-01

    Acquired abnormalities of platelet aggregation have been reported with increasing frequency. We studied five patients (including two with systemic lupus erythematosus and one with compensated chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura) in whom platelet aggregation responses to collagen, epinephrine and ADP are impaired; in all cases, we found that levels of platelet-associated immunoglobulin G (IgG) were increased. In all five patients substances stored in platelet-dense granules (ATP, ADP, serotonin and calcium) were diminished. The content of the alpha-granule substance, beta-thromboglobulin, was also decreased in most cases, whereas the levels of two secretable acid hydrolase enzymes (beta-glucuronidase and beta-N-acetyl glucosaminidase) were within normal limits. These findings are similar to those observed in subtypes of congenital storage pool deficiency. However, in contrast to the congenital disorder, a membrane-bound (nonsecretable) acid phosphatase was also decreased in the patients with acquired storage pool deficiency. These findings suggest that impaired platelet aggregation on an acquired basis may, in some patients, be due to immune platelet damage resulting in a distinctive type of platelet storage pool deficiency. PMID:6449150

  17. Preservation of hemostatic and structural properties of rehydrated lyophilized platelets: potential for long-term storage of dried platelets for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Read, M S; Reddick, R L; Bode, A P; Bellinger, D A; Nichols, T C; Taylor, K; Smith, S V; McMahon, D K; Griggs, T R; Brinkhous, K M

    1995-01-17

    Currently, therapeutic platelet concentrates can be stored for only 5 days. We have developed a procedure that permits long-term storage of fixed and lyophilized platelets that retain hemostatic properties after rehydration. These rehydrated lyophilized platelets (RL platelets) restore hemostasis in thrombocytopenic rats and become incorporated in the hemostatic plug of bleeding time wounds of normal dogs as well as von Willebrand disease dogs with partially replenished plasma von Willebrand factor. Ultrastructurally, these platelets are well preserved and are comparable to control normal washed platelets. Flow cytometry analysis shows that RL platelets react with antibodies to the major surface receptors, glycoprotein (GP)Ib and GPIIb/IIIa. These receptors are involved in platelet agglutination, aggregation, and adhesion. In vitro functional tests document the ability of RL platelets to adhere to denuded subendothelium and to spread on a foreign surface. Circulating RL platelets participated in carotid arterial thrombus formation induced in normal canine subjects. The participation of RL platelets in these vital hemostatic properties suggests that with further development they could become a stable platelet product for transfusion. PMID:7831298

  18. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Products Used In Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of...

  19. Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism during platelet storage at 22 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Edenbrandt, C.M.; Murphy, S. )

    1990-11-01

    Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism of platelet concentrates (PCs) was studied during storage for transfusion at 22 +/- 2 degrees C over a 7-day period using high-pressure liquid chromatography. There was a steady decrease in platelet adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP), which was balanced quantitatively by an increase in plasma hypoxanthine. As expected, ammonia accumulated along with hypoxanthine but at a far greater rate. A fall in platelet guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and guanosine diphosphate (GDP) paralleled the fall in ATP + ADP. When adenine was present in the primary anticoagulant, it was carried over into the PC and metabolized. ATP, GTP, total adenine nucleotides, and total guanine nucleotides declined more slowly in the presence of adenine than in its absence. With adenine, the increase in hypoxanthine concentration was more rapid and quantitatively balanced the decrease in adenine and platelet ATP + ADP. Plasma xanthine rose during storage but at a rate that exceeded the decline in GTP + GDP. When platelet ATP + ADP was labeled with 14C-adenine at the initiation of storage, half of the radioactivity was transferred to hypoxanthine (45%) and GTP + GDP + xanthine (5%) by the time storage was completed. The isotopic data were consistent with the presence of a radioactive (metabolic) and a nonradioactive (storage) pool of ATP + ADP at the initiation of storage with each pool contributing approximately equally to the decline in ATP + ADP during storage. The results suggested a continuing synthesis of GTP + GDP from ATP + ADP, explaining the slower rate of fall of GTP + GDP relative to the rate of rise of plasma xanthine. Throughout storage, platelets were able to incorporate 14C-hypoxanthine into both adenine and guanine nucleotides but at a rate that was only one fourth the rate of hypoxanthine accumulation.

  20. Percutaneous injections of Platelet rich plasma for treatment of intrasubstance meniscal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Fabian; Vavken, Patrick; Haenle, Maximilian; von Wehren, Lutz; Pagenstert, Geert; Majewski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction management of intrasubstance meniscal lesions is still controversial. Intrasubstance meniscal lesions can lead to reduced sports activity and meniscal rupture. Physical therapy is often not satisfactory. Therefore new treatment methods are requested. Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) has the ability to regenerate tissue; this was proved in several experimental studies. Whether percutaneous injections of PRP are effective in intrasubstance meniscal lesions is unknown. We hypothesize that percutaneous PRP injections lead to pain relief and halt of progression on MRI over 6 months in patients with grade 2 meniscal lesions. Materials and methods ten recreational athletes with intrasubstance meniscal lesions (grade II according to Reicher) proven by MR-Imaging (MRI) were treated by percutaneous injections of PRP in the affected meniscal area. Three sequential injections in seven day intervals were performed in every patient. All injections were performed with image converter. Follow-up MRI was done six months after last injection in every patient. Level of sports activity and amount of pain at athletic loads according to numeric rating scale (NRS-11) were noted in each patient before injections and at the time of follow up MRI after six months. The t-test was used to determine statistical differences. Results four of ten patients (40%) showed decrease of meniscal lesion in follow up MRI after six months. Nine of ten patients (90%) complained about short episodes of heavy pain after the injections with average NRS-Score of 7.9 at daily loads after the last injection. Six of ten patients (60%) showed Improvement of NRS-Score at final follow up. Average NRS-Score improved significantly (p=0.027) from 6.9 before injections to 4.5 six month after treatment. Six of ten patients (60%) reported increase of sports activity compared to the situation before injections. In four patients (40%) additional surgical treatment was necessary because of persistent knee pain

  1. Storage of platelet concentrates after high-dose ultraviolet B irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, E.L.; Beardsley, D.S.; Smith, B.R.; Horne, W.; Johnson, R.; Wooten, T.; Napychank, P.A.; Male, P.; Buchholz, D.H. )

    1991-07-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation of platelet concentrates (PCs) may prevent the development of posttransfusion HLA alloimmunization. As irradiation performed in a blood center or a hospital will probably be associated with a variable postirradiation delay before transfusion, the ability to store PCs after UVB irradiation becomes important. The effects have been studied of a UVB dose of 10,000 mJ per cm2, the dose used in our institution for UVB clinical trials, on PCs pooled and stored for up to 96 hours after irradiation. Results showed that after 96 hours of storage, though there were no changes in pH, platelet count, white cell count, percent discharge of lactate dehydrogenase, or {beta}-thromboglobulin, there were significant decreases in morphology score and osmotic recovery. These changes, however, were not evident after 24 hours of storage. Similarly, there was a 60% decrease in immunoreactive membrane glycoprotein (GP) Ib after 96 hours of storage, but these changes were not seen after 48 hours of storage. No changes were seen in levels of GPIIb/IIIa in either group during the 96 hours of storage. On computer-analyzed two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, PCs irradiated at 10,000 mJ per cm2 and stored for 72 hours had changes in over 50 platelet proteins as compared to those proteins in nonirradiated age-matched control PCs. It can be concluded that UVB irradiation of PCs at 10,000 mJ per cm2 does not lead to significant platelet deterioration after short-term storage (24-48 hours) but is likely to be deleterious after long-term (72-96 hours) storage.

  2. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches. PMID:24629305

  3. The use of platelet rich plasma in the treatment of immature tooth with periapical lesion: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırım, Ceren; Akgün, Özlem Martı; Altun, Ceyhan; Dinçer, Didem; Özkan, Cansel Köse

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the treatment of an immature permanent tooth with periapical lesion which was treated with regenerative approach using platelet rich plasma (PRP). The root canal of immature human permanent tooth with periapical lesion was gently debrided of necrotic tissue and disinfected with 2.5% NaOCl, and then medicated with triple antibiotic paste comprised of ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and tetracycline. When the tooth was asymptomatic, PRP and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) were placed into the root canal. Six months after PRP treatment, radiographical examination revealed resolution of the radiolucency and progressive thickening of the root wall and apical closure. Our findings suggest that PRP can be used for the treatment of immature permanent teeth with periapical lesion, as part of a regenerative endodontic treatment procedure. PMID:25110649

  4. Platelet storage pool deficiency associated with inherited abnormalities of the inner ear in the mouse pigment mutants muted and mocha.

    PubMed

    Swank, R T; Reddington, M; Howlett, O; Novak, E K

    1991-10-15

    Several inherited human syndromes have combined platelet, auditory, and/or pigment abnormalities. In the mouse the pallid pigment mutant has abnormalities of the otoliths of the inner ear together with a bleeding abnormality caused by platelet storage pool deficiency (SPD). To determine if this association is common, two other mouse pigment mutants, muted and mocha, which are known to have inner ear abnormalities, were examined for hematologic abnormalities. Both mutants had prolonged bleeding times accompanied by abnormalities of dense granules as determined by whole mount electron microscopy of platelets and by labeling platelets with mepacrine. When mutant platelets were treated with collagen, there was minimal secretion of adenosine triphosphate and aggregation was reduced. Lysosomal enzyme secretion in response to thrombin treatment was partially reduced in muted platelets and markedly reduced in mocha platelets. Similar reductions in constitutive lysosomal enzyme secretion from kidney proximal tubule cells were noted in the two mutants. These studies show that several mutations that cause pigment dilution and platelet SPD are associated with abnormalities of the inner ear. Also, these mutants, like previously described mouse pigment mutants, are models for human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome and provide additional examples of single genes that simultaneously affect melanosomes, lysosomes, and platelet dense granules. PMID:1912584

  5. Proteoglycan distribution in lesions of atherosclerosis depends on lesion severity, structural characteristics, and the proximity of platelet-derived growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Evanko, S. P.; Raines, E. W.; Ross, R.; Gold, L. I.; Wight, T. N.

    1998-01-01

    The accumulation of proteoglycans (PGs) in atherosclerosis contributes to disease progression and stenosis and may partly depend on local regulation by growth factors such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. In this study, the distribution of the major extracellular PGs is compared with that of PDGF and TGF-beta isoforms in developing lesions of atherosclerosis from hypercholesterolemic nonhuman primates. Strong immunostaining for decorin, biglycan, versican, and hyaluronan is observed in both intermediate and advanced lesions. Perlecan staining is weak in intermediate lesions but strong in advanced lesions in areas bordering the plaque core. Immunostaining for PDGF-B and TGF-beta1 is particularly prominent in macrophages in intermediate and advanced lesions. In contrast, TGF-beta2 and TGF-beta3 and PDGF-A are present in both macrophages and smooth muscle cells. Overall, PG deposits parallel areas of intense growth factor immunostaining, with trends in relative localization that suggest interrelationships among certain PGs and growth factors. Notably, decorin and TGF-beta1 are distributed similarly, predominantly in the macrophage-rich core, whereas biglycan is prominent in the smooth muscle cell matrix adjoining TGF-beta1-positive macrophages. Versican and hyaluronan are enriched in the extracellular matrix adjacent to both PDGF- and TGF-beta1-positive cells. These data demonstrate that PG accumulation varies with lesion severity, structural characteristics, and the proximity of PDGF and TGF-beta. Images Figure 1 p537-a Figure 2 p539-a Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9466580

  6. Established and theoretical factors to consider in assessing the red cell storage lesion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The collection and storage of red blood cells (RBCs) is a logistical necessity to provide sufficient blood products. However, RBC storage is an unnatural state, resulting in complicated biological changes, referred to collectively as the “storage lesion.” Specifics of the storage lesion have been studied for decades, including alterations to cellular properties, morphology, molecular biology of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids, and basic metabolism. Recently, mass spectrometry–based “omics” technology has been applied to the RBC storage lesion, resulting in many new observations, the initial effects of which are more information than understanding. Meanwhile, clinical research on RBC transfusion is considering both the efficacy and also the potential untoward effects of transfusing stored RBCs of different ages and storage conditions. The myriad biological changes that have now been observed during the storage lesion have been extensively reviewed elsewhere. This article focuses rather on an analysis of our current understanding of the biological effects of different elements of the storage lesion, in the context of evolving new clinical understanding. A synopsis is presented of both established and theoretical considerations of the RBC storage lesion and ongoing efforts to create a safer and more efficacious product. PMID:25651844

  7. Platelets are efficient and protective depots for storage, distribution, and delivery of lysosomal enzyme in mice with Hurler Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Mei; Han, Jingfen; El-Amouri, Salim S.; Brady, Roscoe O.; Pan, Dao

    2014-01-01

    Use of megakaryocytes/platelets for transgene expression may take advantage of their rapid turnover and protective storage in platelets and reduce the risk of activating oncogenes in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs). Here, we show that human megakaryocytic cells could overexpress the lysosomal enzyme, α-l-iduronidase (IDUA), which is deficient in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I). Upon megakaryocytic differentiation, the amount of released enzyme increased rapidly and steadily by 30-fold. Using a murine MPS I model, we demonstrated that megakaryocyte/platelets were capable of producing, packaging, and storing large amounts of IDUA with proper catalytic activity, lysosomal trafficking, and receptor-mediated uptake. IDUA can be released directly into extracellular space or within microparticles during megakaryocyte maturation or platelet activation, while retaining the capacity for cross-correction in patient’s cells. Gene transfer into 1.7% of HSCs led to long-term normalization of plasma IDUA and preferential distribution of enzyme in liver and spleen with complete metabolic correction in MPS I mice. Detection of GFP (coexpressed with IDUA) in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes suggested liver delivery of platelet-derived IDUA possibly via the clearance pathway for senile platelets. These findings provide proof of concept that cells from megakaryocytic lineage and platelets are capable of generating and storing fully functional lysosomal enzymes and can also lead to efficient delivery of both the enzymes released into the circulation and those protected within platelets/microparticles. This study opens a door for use of the megakaryocytes/platelets as a depot for efficient production, delivery, and effective tissue distribution of lysosomal enzymes. PMID:24550296

  8. Platelets are efficient and protective depots for storage, distribution, and delivery of lysosomal enzyme in mice with Hurler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dai, Mei; Han, Jingfen; El-Amouri, Salim S; Brady, Roscoe O; Pan, Dao

    2014-02-18

    Use of megakaryocytes/platelets for transgene expression may take advantage of their rapid turnover and protective storage in platelets and reduce the risk of activating oncogenes in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs). Here, we show that human megakaryocytic cells could overexpress the lysosomal enzyme, α-l-iduronidase (IDUA), which is deficient in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I). Upon megakaryocytic differentiation, the amount of released enzyme increased rapidly and steadily by 30-fold. Using a murine MPS I model, we demonstrated that megakaryocyte/platelets were capable of producing, packaging, and storing large amounts of IDUA with proper catalytic activity, lysosomal trafficking, and receptor-mediated uptake. IDUA can be released directly into extracellular space or within microparticles during megakaryocyte maturation or platelet activation, while retaining the capacity for cross-correction in patient's cells. Gene transfer into 1.7% of HSCs led to long-term normalization of plasma IDUA and preferential distribution of enzyme in liver and spleen with complete metabolic correction in MPS I mice. Detection of GFP (coexpressed with IDUA) in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes suggested liver delivery of platelet-derived IDUA possibly via the clearance pathway for senile platelets. These findings provide proof of concept that cells from megakaryocytic lineage and platelets are capable of generating and storing fully functional lysosomal enzymes and can also lead to efficient delivery of both the enzymes released into the circulation and those protected within platelets/microparticles. This study opens a door for use of the megakaryocytes/platelets as a depot for efficient production, delivery, and effective tissue distribution of lysosomal enzymes. PMID:24550296

  9. Extracting Biological Meaning From Global Proteomic Data on Circulating-Blood Platelets: Effects of Diabetes and Storage Time

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John H.; Suleiman, Atef; Daly, Don S.; Springer, David L.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P.

    2008-11-25

    Transfusion of platelets into patients suffering from trauma and a variety of disease is a common medical practice that involves millions of units per year. Partial activation of platelets can result in the release of bioactive proteins and lipid mediators that increase the risk of adverse post-transfusion effects. Type-2 diabetes and storage are two factors known to cause partial activation of platelets. A global proteomic study was undertaken to investigate these effects. In this paper we discuss the methods used to interpret these data in terms of biological processes affected by diabetes and storage. The main emphasis is on the processing of proteomic data for gene ontology enrichment analysis by techniques originally designed for microarray data.

  10. Initial blood storage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas MACN.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of conducting experiments with the formed elements of the blood under conditions of microgravity opens up important opportunities to improve the understanding of basic formed element physiology, as well as, contribution to improved preservation of the formed elements for use in transfusion. The physiological, biochemical, and physical changes of the membrane of the erythrocyte, platelet, and leukocyte was studied during storage under two specific conditions: standard blood bank conditions and microgravity, utilizing three FDA approved plastic bags. Storage lesions; red cell storage on Earth; platelet storage on Earth; and leukocyte storage Earth were examined. The interaction of biomaterials and blood cells was studied during storage.

  11. The miRNA Profile of Platelets Stored in a Blood Bank and Its Relation to Cellular Damage from Storage

    PubMed Central

    Maués, Jersey Heitor da Silva; Lamarão, Letícia Martins; de Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mário Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Millions of blood products are transfused each year, and many lives are directly affected by transfusion. Platelet concentrate (PC) is one of the main products derived from blood. Even under good storage conditions, PC is likely to suffer cell damage. The shape of platelets changes after 5 to 7 days of storage at 22°C. Taking into consideration that some platelet proteins undergo changes in their shape and functionality during PC storage. Sixteen PC bags were collected and each PC bag tube was cut into six equal pieces to perform experiments with platelets from six different days of storage. Thus, on the first day of storage, 1/6 of the tube was used for miRNA extraction, and the remaining 5/6 was stored under the same conditions until extraction of miRNAs on each the following five days. Samples were sequenced on an Illumina Platform to demonstrate the most highly expressed miRNAs. Three miRNAs, mir127, mir191 and mir320a were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) in 100 PC bags tubes. Our method suggests, the use of the miRNAs mir127 and mir320a as biomarkers to assess the "validity period" of PC bags stored in blood banks for long periods. Thus, bags can be tested on the 5th day of storage for the relative expression levels of mir127 and mir320a. Thus, we highlight candidate miRNAs as biomarkers of storage damage that can be used as tools to evaluate the quality of stored PC. The use of miRNAs as biomarkers of damage is unprecedented and will contribute to improved quality of blood products for transfusions. PMID:26121269

  12. The miRNA Profile of Platelets Stored in a Blood Bank and Its Relation to Cellular Damage from Storage.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Thaís Brilhante; Moreira-Nunes, Caroline de Fátima Aquino; Maués, Jersey Heitor da Silva; Lamarão, Letícia Martins; de Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mário Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Millions of blood products are transfused each year, and many lives are directly affected by transfusion. Platelet concentrate (PC) is one of the main products derived from blood. Even under good storage conditions, PC is likely to suffer cell damage. The shape of platelets changes after 5 to 7 days of storage at 22°C. Taking into consideration that some platelet proteins undergo changes in their shape and functionality during PC storage. Sixteen PC bags were collected and each PC bag tube was cut into six equal pieces to perform experiments with platelets from six different days of storage. Thus, on the first day of storage, 1/6 of the tube was used for miRNA extraction, and the remaining 5/6 was stored under the same conditions until extraction of miRNAs on each the following five days. Samples were sequenced on an Illumina Platform to demonstrate the most highly expressed miRNAs. Three miRNAs, mir127, mir191 and mir320a were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) in 100 PC bags tubes. Our method suggests, the use of the miRNAs mir127 and mir320a as biomarkers to assess the "validity period" of PC bags stored in blood banks for long periods. Thus, bags can be tested on the 5th day of storage for the relative expression levels of mir127 and mir320a. Thus, we highlight candidate miRNAs as biomarkers of storage damage that can be used as tools to evaluate the quality of stored PC. The use of miRNAs as biomarkers of damage is unprecedented and will contribute to improved quality of blood products for transfusions. PMID:26121269

  13. Biochemical Storage Lesions Occurring in Nonirradiated and Irradiated Red Blood Cells: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Adams, F.; Bellairs, G.; Bird, A. R.; Oguntibeju, O. O.

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cells undergo a series of biochemical fluctuations during 35–42-day storage period at 1°C to 6°C. The sodium/potassium pump is immobilised causing a decrease in intracellular potassium with an increase in cytoplasmic sodium levels, glucose levels decline, and acidosis occurs as a result of low pH levels. The frailty of stored erythrocytes triggers the formation of haemoglobin-containing microparticles and the release of cell-free haemoglobin which may add to transfusion difficulties. Lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress to band 3 structures, and other morphological and structural molecular changes also occur leading to spheroechinocytes and osmotic fragility. These changes that transpire in the red cells during the storage period are referred to as “storage lesions.” It is well documented that gamma irradiation exacerbates storage lesions and the reports of increased potassium levels leading to adverse reactions observed in neonates and infants have been of particular concern. There are, however, remarkably few systematic studies comparing the in vitro storage lesions of irradiated and nonirradiated red cell concentrates and it has been suggested that the impact of storage lesions on leucocyte reduced red blood cell concentrate (RBCC) is incomplete. The review examines storage lesions in red blood cells and their adverse effects in reference to blood transfusion. PMID:25710038

  14. Multicolor fluorescence nanoscopy by photobleaching: concept, verification, and its application to resolve selective storage of proteins in platelets.

    PubMed

    Rönnlund, Daniel; Xu, Lei; Perols, Anna; Gad, Annica K B; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Auer, Gert; Widengren, Jerker

    2014-05-27

    Fluorescence nanoscopy provides means to discern the finer details of protein localization and interaction in cells by offering an order of magnitude higher resolution than conventional optical imaging techniques. However, these super resolution techniques put higher demands on the optical system and the fluorescent probes, making multicolor fluorescence nanoscopy a challenging task. Here we present a new and simple procedure, which exploits the photostability and excitation spectra of dyes to increase the number of simultaneous recordable targets in STED nanoscopy. We use this procedure to demonstrate four-color STED imaging of platelets with ≤40 nm resolution and low crosstalk. Platelets can selectively store, sequester, and release a multitude of different proteins, in a manner specific for different physiological and disease states. By applying multicolor nanoscopy to study platelets, we can achieve spatial mapping of the protein organization with a high resolution for multiple proteins at the same time and in the same cell. This provides a means to identify specific platelet activation states for diagnostic purposes and to understand the underlying protein storage and release mechanisms. We studied the organization of the pro- and antiangiogenic proteins VEGF and PF-4, together with fibrinogen and filamentous actin, and found distinct features in their respective protein localization. Further, colocalization analysis revealed only minor overlap between the proteins VEGF and PF-4 indicating that they have separate storage and release mechanisms, corresponding well with their opposite roles as pro- and antiangiogenic proteins, respectively. PMID:24730587

  15. Treatment of Platelet Concentrates with the Mirasol Pathogen Inactivation System Modulates Platelet Oxidative Stress and NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lacey; Marks, Denese

    2015-01-01

    Background Pathogen inactivation (PI) technologies for platelets aim to improve transfusion safety by preventing the replication of contaminating pathogens. However, as a consequence of treatment, aspects of the platelet storage lesion are amplified. Mirasol treatment also affects platelet signal transduction and apoptotic protein expression. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Mirasol treatment on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent oxidative stress. Methods Pooled platelet concentrates were prepared in platelet-additive solution (70% SSP+ / 30% plasma). ABO-matched platelets were pooled and split, and treated with the Mirasol system (TerumoBCT) or left untreated as a control. Platelet samples were tested on day 1, 5, and 7 post-collection. Results Mirasol-treated platelets had increased formation of ROS by day 5 of storage. Oxidative damage, in the form of protein carbonylation, was higher in Mirasol-treated platelets, whilst no effect on nitrotyrosine formation or lipid peroxidation was detected. The NF-κB signaling pathway was also activated in Mirasol-treated platelets, with increased expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and IκBα. Conclusion These data demonstrate that Mirasol-treated platelets produce more ROS and display protein alterations consistent with oxidative damage. PMID:26195930

  16. Influence of apheresis container size on the maintenance of platelet in vitro storage properties after a 30-h interruption of agitation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stephen J; Skripchenko, Andrey; Seetharaman, Shalini; Myrup, Andrew; Kurtz, James; Thomas-Montgomery, Dedeene; Awatefe, Helen; Moroff, Gary

    2010-08-01

    We have previously conducted studies investigating maintenance of apheresis platelet in vitro quality measures during storage under simulated shipping conditions in which agitation was interrupted. This study examines the effect of increasing bag surface area on the preservation of in vitro platelet properties during storage with continuous agitation and with a 30 h interruption of agitation. Apheresis platelets were collected in 100% plasma with the Amicus separator to provide two identical platelet products, each with approximately 4-5 x 10(11) platelets. After collection, the volume was divided equally between 1.0 and 1.3 L PL2410 containers. In an initial study, both products were continuously agitated. In a second study, both products were subjected to a single 30-h period of interrupted agitation between Days 2 and 3 of storage by placement in a standard shipping box at room temperature. In each study, units were assayed during storage for standard in vitro platelet quality measures. Platelets stored in the 1.3 L container maintained slightly greater mean pH during 7 day storage with either continuous agitation (n=6) or with a 30-h interruption of agitation (n=12) than those of similarly treated identical platelets stored in the 1.0 L container. Most noteworthy, in experiments with products stored in the 1.0 L container in which there was a large decrease in pH to levels <6.7 or <6.3 on days 5 or 7, respectively, the pH in the matched product stored in the 1.3 L container was substantially greater (0.17+/-06 and 0.37+/-0.09 pH units greater, n=4, respectively). Other measures showed either small differences or comparability of platelet in vitro parameters with storage in the two containers after an interruption of agitation. PMID:20554476

  17. ( sup 3 H)Dopamine uptake by platelet storage granules in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Rabey, J.M.; Graff, E.; Oberman, Z. ); Lerner, A.; Sigal, M. )

    1992-01-01

    ({sup 3}H)Dopamine (DA) uptake by platelet storage granules was determined in 26 schizophrenic male patients, paranoid type (14 acute stage; 12 in remission) and 20 age-matched, normal controls. maximum velocity (Vmax) of DA uptake was significantly higher in acute patients, than patients in remission or controls (p>0.05). The apparent Michaelis constant (kM) of DA uptake in acute patients was also significantly different from chronic patients a substantial diminution of DA uptake, while haloperidol produced a substantial diminution of DA uptake, while haloperidol (10{sup {minus}4}, 10{sup {minus}5} M) did not affect the assay. Considering that a DA disequilibrium in schizophrenia may be expressed not only in the brain, but also in the periphery and that an increased amount of DA accumulated in the vesicles, implies that an increased quantity of catecholamine is available for release, our findings suggest additional evidence for the role of DA overactivity in the pathophysiology of this disorder.

  18. Observations on human smooth muscle cell cultures from hyperplastic lesions of prosthetic bypass grafts: Production of a platelet-derived growth factor-like mitogen and expression of a gene for a platelet-derived growth factor receptor--a preliminary study

    SciTech Connect

    Birinyi, L.K.; Warner, S.J.; Salomon, R.N.; Callow, A.D.; Libby, P. )

    1989-08-01

    Prosthetic bypass grafts placed to the distal lower extremity often fail because of an occlusive tissue response in the perianastomotic region. The origin of the cells that comprise this occlusive lesion and the causes of the cellular proliferation are not known. To increase our understanding of this process we cultured cells from hyperplastic lesions obtained from patients at the time of reexploration for lower extremity graft failure, and we studied their identity and growth factor production in tissue culture. These cultures contain cells that express muscle-specific actin isoforms, shown by immunohistochemical staining, consistent with vascular smooth muscle origin. These cultures also released material that stimulated smooth muscle cell growth. A portion of this activity was similar to platelet-derived growth factor, since preincubation with antibody-to-human platelet-derived growth factor partially blocked the mitogenic effect of medium conditioned by human anastomotic hyperplastic cells. These conditioned media also contained material that competed with platelet-derived growth factor for its receptor, as measured in a radioreceptor assay. Northern blot analysis showed that these cells contain messenger RNA that encodes the A chain but not the B chain of platelet-derived growth factor. In addition, these cells contain messenger RNA that encodes a platelet-derived growth factor receptor. We conclude that cultured smooth muscle cells from human anastomotic hyperplastic lesions express genes for platelet-derived growth factor A chain and a platelet-derived growth factor receptor and secrete biologically active molecules similar to platelet-derived growth factor.

  19. Role of Siglec-7 in Apoptosis in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim Anh; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Palle, Sabine; Anselme-Bertrand, Isabelle; Arthaud, Charles-Antoine; Chavarin, Patricia; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelets participate in tissue repair and innate immune responses. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are well-characterized I-type lectins, which control apoptosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized the expression of Siglec-7 in human platelets isolated from healthy volunteers using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Siglec-7 is primarily expressed on α granular membranes and colocalized with CD62P. Siglec-7 expression was increased upon platelet activation and correlated closely with CD62P expression. Cross-linking Siglec-7 with its ligand, ganglioside, resulted in platelet apoptosis without any significant effects on activation, aggregation, cell morphology by electron microscopy analysis or secretion. We show that ganglioside triggered four key pathways leading to apoptosis in human platelets: (i) mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) depolarization; (ii) elevated expression of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak proteins with reduced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein; (iii) phosphatidylserine exposure and (iv), microparticle formation. Inhibition of NAPDH oxidase, PI3K, or PKC rescued platelets from apoptosis induced by Siglec-7 recruitment, suggesting that the platelet receptors P2Y1 and GPIIbIIIa are essential for ganglioside-induced platelet apoptosis. Conclusions/Significance The present work characterizes the role of Siglec-7 and platelet receptors in regulating apoptosis and death. Because some platelet pathology involves apoptosis (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and possibly storage lesions), Siglec-7 might be a molecular target for therapeutic intervention/prevention. PMID:25230315

  20. Evaluation of platelet function during extended storage in additive solution, prepared in a new container that allows manual buffy-coat platelet pooling and leucoreduction in the same system

    PubMed Central

    Plaza, Eva María; Lozano, María Luisa; Guiu, Isabel Sánchez; Egea, José Manuel; Vicente, Vicente; de Terán, Laura Collantes; Rivera, José

    2012-01-01

    Background A novel and practical storage container designed for manual buffy-coat pooling and leucodepletion was evaluated to assess its filtration performance and to analyse the quality of stored leucoreduced buffy-coat-derived platelet pools. Materials and methods. To analyse the Grifols Leucored® Transfer PL system, blood was collected from random donors into standard triple bag systems, and fractionated using standard procedures to obtain buffy-coats. Ten leucodepleted platelet pools were prepared each from five units of buffy-coats in additive solution. Concentrates were stored for 10 days at 22 °C on an end-over-end agitator. On days 0, 5, 7, and 10 of storage, samples were tested using standard in vitro platelet parameters. Results The use of this novel system for volume reduction and leucodepletion of buffy-coats resuspended in additive solution led to platelet pools that met the European requirements. pH was maintained well, declining from an initial value of 7.11±0.04 to 6.88±0.08 after 10 days. Parameters of cell lysis, response to a hypotonic stimulus and aggregation induced by agonists (arachidonic acid, ristocetin, collagen or thrombin receptor activating peptide) were also well-preserved. During storage, the quality profile of the platelet pools remained very similar to that previously reported in platelet concentrates in terms of metabolism, platelet activation (CD62, CD63, sCD62), expression of glycoproteins Ib and IIb/IIIa, capacity of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa to become activated upon ADP stimulation, and release of biological response modifiers (sCD40L and RANTES). Discussion. This new system allows the preparation of leucodepleted buffy-coat platelet pools in additive solution with good preservation of platelet function. The logistics of the procedure are relatively simple and it results in good-quality components, which may reduce costs and ease the process of buffy-coat pooling and leucocyte reduction in transfusion services. PMID:22682335

  1. Donor-variation effect on red blood cell storage lesion: A close relationship emerges.

    PubMed

    Tzounakas, Vassilis L; Kriebardis, Anastasios G; Papassideri, Issidora S; Antonelou, Marianna H

    2016-08-01

    Although the molecular pathways leading to the progressive deterioration of stored red blood cells (RBC storage lesion) and the clinical relevance of storage-induced changes remain uncertain, substantial donor-specific variability in RBC performance during storage, and posttransfusion has been established ("donor-variation effect"). In-bag hemolysis and numerous properties of the RBC units that may affect transfusion efficacy have proved to be strongly donor-specific. Donor-variation effect may lead to the production of highly unequal blood labile products even when similar storage strategy and duration are applied. Genetic, undiagnosed/subclinical medical conditions and lifestyle factors that affect RBC characteristics at baseline, including RBC lifespan, energy metabolism, and sensitivity to oxidative stress, are all likely to influence the storage capacity of individual donors' cells, although not evident by the donor's health or hematological status at blood donation. Consequently, baseline characteristics of the donors, such as membrane peroxiredoxin-2 and serum uric acid concentration, have been proposed as candidate biomarkers of storage quality. This review article focuses on specific factors that might contribute to the donor-variation effect and emphasizes the emerging need for using omics-based technologies in association with in vitro and in vivo transfusion models and clinical trials to discover biomarkers of storage quality and posttransfusion recovery in donor blood. PMID:27095294

  2. In vitro evaluation of pathogen-inactivated buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates during storage: psoralen-based photochemical treatment step-by-step

    PubMed Central

    Abonnenc, Mélanie; Sonego, Giona; Kaiser-Guignard, Julie; Crettaz, David; Prudent, Michel; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Lion, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Background The Intercept Blood SystemTM (Cerus) is used to inactivate pathogens in platelet concentrates (PC). The aim of this study was to elucidate the extent to which the Intercept treatment modifies the functional properties of platelets. Material and methods A two-arm study was conducted initially to compare buffy coat-derived pathogen-inactivated PC to untreated PC (n=5) throughout storage. A four-arm study was then designed to evaluate the contribution of the compound adsorbing device (CAD) and ultraviolet (UV) illumination to the changes observed upon Intercept treatment. Intercept-treated PC, CAD-incubated PC, and UV-illuminated PC were compared to untreated PC (n=5). Functional characteristics were assessed using flow cytometry, hypotonic shock response (HSR), aggregation, adhesion assays and flow cytometry for the detection of CD62P, CD42b, GPIIb-IIIa, phosphatidylserine exposure and JC-1 aggregates. Results Compared to fresh platelets, end-of-storage platelets exhibited greater passive activation, disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm), and phosphatidylserine exposure accompanied by a decreased capacity to respond to agonist-induced aggregation, lower HSR, and CD42b expression. The Intercept treatment resulted in significantly lower HSR and CD42b expression compared to controls on day 7, with no significant changes in CD62P, Δψm, or phosphatidylserine exposure. GPIIbIIIa expression was significantly increased in Intercept-treated platelets throughout the storage period. The agonist-induced aggregation response was highly dependent on the type and concentration of agonist used, indicating a minor effect of the Intercept treatment. The CAD and UV steps alone had a negligible effect on platelet aggregation. Discussion The Intercept treatment moderately affects platelet function in vitro. CAD and UV illumination alone make negligible contributions to the changes in aggregation observed in Intercept-treated PC. PMID:25369598

  3. Focal splenic lesions in type I Gaucher disease are associated with poor platelet and splenic response to macrophage-targeted enzyme replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Philip; Malhotra, Advitya; Haims, Andrew; Pastores, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    Focal splenic lesions (FSL) occur in Gaucher disease type I (GD1), but their clinical significance is not known. Previous studies estimated the prevalence of FSL at 4% (pediatric) to 33% (adult) of GD1 patients and reported an association with splenomegaly. We tested the hypothesis that the presence of FSL is associated with suboptimal response to macrophage-directed enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Additionally we investigated whether FSL were associated with other phenotypic features of GD1. The splenic parenchyma was assessed by MRI performed for routine evaluation of GD1 in 239 consecutive GD1 patients with intact spleens. The prevalence of FSL was 18.4% (44/239). Following a mean of 3.5 years of ERT, platelet response was inferior among patients with FSL (80,700± 9,600 to 90,100±7,200/mm3, P=0.2) compared to patients without FSL in whom there was a robust platelet response: 108,600±5,670 to 150,200±6,710/mm3, P<0.001. Compared to patients without FSL, patients harboring FSL had worse thrombocytopenia (platelet count: 83,700±8,800 vs. 112,100±4,200/mm3, P=0.004), greater frequency of pre-ERT splenomegaly, and greater post-ERT splenomegaly (8.5±0.77 vs. 4.8±0.25× normal, P<0.001). Additionally, the prevalence of osteonecrosis was higher among patients with FSL compared to patients without FSL (38 vs. 20.7%, P=0.026). FSL appear to be a determinant of response to ERT, suggesting studies comparing relative efficacy of newly emerging therapies for GD1 should adjust for this factor. Moreover, occurrences of FSL coincide with more severe manifestations of GD1 such as avascular osteonecrosis. PMID:20683668

  4. The involvement of cation leaks in the storage lesion of red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Flatt, Joanna F.; Bawazir, Waleed M.; Bruce, Lesley J.

    2014-01-01

    Stored blood components are a critical life-saving tool provided to patients by health services worldwide. Red cells may be stored for up to 42 days, allowing for efficient blood bank inventory management, but with prolonged storage comes an unwanted side-effect known as the “storage lesion”, which has been implicated in poorer patient outcomes. This lesion is comprised of a number of processes that are inter-dependent. Metabolic changes include a reduction in glycolysis and ATP production after the first week of storage. This leads to an accumulation of lactate and drop in pH. Longer term damage may be done by the consequent reduction in anti-oxidant enzymes, which contributes to protein and lipid oxidation via reactive oxygen species. The oxidative damage to the cytoskeleton and membrane is involved in increased vesiculation and loss of cation gradients across the membrane. The irreversible damage caused by extensive membrane loss via vesiculation alongside dehydration is likely to result in immediate splenic sequestration of these dense, spherocytic cells. Although often overlooked in the literature, the loss of the cation gradient in stored cells will be considered in more depth in this review as well as the possible effects it may have on other elements of the storage lesion. It has now become clear that blood donors can exhibit quite large variations in the properties of their red cells, including microvesicle production and the rate of cation leak. The implications for the quality of stored red cells from such donors is discussed. PMID:24987374

  5. Artificial Dense Granules: A Procoagulant Liposomal Formulation Modeled after Platelet Polyphosphate Storage Pools.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Alexander J; Kalkowski, Joseph; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Wang, Canhui; Smith, Stephanie A; Klie, Robert F; Morrissey, James H; Liu, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Granular platelet-sized polyphosphate nanoparticles (polyP NPs) were encapsulated in sterically stabilized liposomes, forming a potential, targeted procoagulant nanotherapy resembling human platelet dense granules in both structure and functionality. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements reveal that artificial dense granules (ADGs) are colloidally stable and that the granular polyP NPs are encapsulated at high efficiencies. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR-STEM) indicates that the ADGs are monodisperse particles with a 150 nm diameter dense core consisting of P, Ca, and O surrounded by a corrugated 25 nm thick shell containing P, C, and O. Further, the ADGs manifest promising procoagulant activity: Detergent solubilization by Tween 20 or digestion of the lipid envelope by phospholipase C (PLC) allows for ADGs to trigger autoactivation of Factor XII (FXII), the first proteolytic step in the activation of the contact pathway of clotting. Moreover, ADGs' ability to reduce the clotting time of human plasma in the presence of PLC further demonstrate the feasibility to develop ADGs into a potential procoagulant nanomedicine. PMID:27405511

  6. Assessment of omega-fatty-acid-supplemented human platelets for potential improvement in long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Chitra; Stewart, Michael W; Cutting, Mary A; Rothwell, Stephen W

    2002-01-15

    Uptake of omega (omega)-3 fatty acids can influence membrane stability and cell mobility. We investigated the effects of omega-3 and -6 fatty acids on the hemostatic efficacy of human platelets using an in vivo rabbit bleeding model. In vitro assays such as platelet aggregation, vWF bead-mediated ATP release and platelet adhesion to beads (measured by the residual platelet count [RPC] [free platelet count after reacting with the beads]/[baseline platelet count]x 100=%RPC; a high %RPC indicates reduced platelet function) were conducted on platelets treated with 1% fish oil (omega-3); 2% fish oil emulsion or 1% soy oil (omega-6). Oil treatment of platelets reduced the vWF bead-induced ATP release insignificantly. Addition of omega-3 agents reduced physical reactivity (%RPC) with the vWF beads by a factor of 1.2 (oil) and 1.9 (emulsion). The omega-6 oil enhanced reactivity by a factor of 1.7. After washing to remove excess reagent, platelet resuspension was most efficient with the omega-3 emulsion. Platelet function was higher with the omega-3-treated platelets (%RPC=52.3%, omega-3 oil; 63.3%, omega-3 emulsion vs. 85%, omega-6 oil; 82% untreated platelets). Ethyl-palmitate-treated thrombocytopenic rabbits were infused with human platelets. Survival times of the treated platelets, as monitored by flow cytometry (6.2-8.2 h) were comparable to untreated platelets (8.6 h). In the rabbit kidney injury model, blood loss after infusion of the treated platelets was similar to that of saline-infused rabbits (75.3+/-3.4 g). However, platelets washed prior to infusion reduced blood loss to a value comparable to that of fresh platelets (48.3+/-5 g). Furthermore, the presence of the infused platelets at the injury site was clearly visualized using FITC-tagged anti CD42a antibody. Thus, the omega-3-based agents protect the platelets from damage during the washing procedure as demonstrated in vitro by improved platelet resuspension, low %RPC, high stimulus-responsive ATP secretion

  7. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB has neurorestorative effects and modulates the pericyte response in a partial 6-hydroxydopamine lesion mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Padel, Thomas; Özen, Ilknur; Boix, Jordi; Barbariga, Marco; Gaceb, Abderahim; Roth, Michaela; Paul, Gesine

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease where the degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway leads to specific motor deficits. There is an unmet medical need for regenerative treatments that stop or reverse disease progression. Several growth factors have been investigated in clinical trials to restore the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway damaged in PD. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), a molecule that recruits pericytes to stabilize microvessels, was recently investigated in a phase-1 clinical trial, showing a dose-dependent increase in dopamine transporter binding in the putamen of PD patients. Interestingly, evidence is accumulating that PD is paralleled by microvascular changes, however, whether PDGF-BB modifies pericytes in PD is not known. Using a pericyte reporter mouse strain, we investigate the functional and restorative effect of PDGF-BB in a partial 6-hydroxydopamine medial forebrain bundle lesion mouse model of PD, and whether this restorative effect is accompanied by changes in pericyte features. We demonstrate that a 2-week treatment with PDGF-BB leads to behavioural recovery using several behavioural tests, and partially restores the nigrostriatal pathway. Interestingly, we find that pericytes are activated in the striatum of PD lesioned mice and that these changes are reversed by PDGF-BB treatment. The modulation of brain pericytes may contribute to the PDGF-BB-induced neurorestorative effects, PDGF-BB allowing for vascular stabilization in PD. Pericytes might be a new cell target of interest for future regenerative therapies. PMID:27288154

  8. Platelet kinetics with indium-111 platelets: comparison with chromium-51 platelets.

    PubMed

    Peters, A M; Lavender, J P

    1983-04-01

    The application of 111In-oxine to platelet labeling has contributed to the understanding of platelet kinetics along three lines: 1. It allows the measurement of new parameters of splenic function, such as the intrasplenic platelet transit time, which has shed new light on the physiology of splenic blood cell handling. 2. It facilitates the measurement of platelet life span in conditions, such as ITP, in which 51Cr may undergo undesirable elution from the platelet as a result of platelet-antibody interaction. 3. It allows the determination of the fate of platelets, that is, the site of platelet destruction in conditions in which reduced platelet life span is associated with abnormal platelet consumption, as a result of either premature destruction of "abnormal" platelets by the RE system, or the consumption (or destruction) of normal platelets after their interaction with an abnormal vasculature. Future research using 111In platelets may yield further valuable information on the control as well as the significance of intrasplenic platelet pooling, on the role of platelets in the development of chronic vascular lesions, and on the sites of platelet destruction in ITP. With regard to the latter, methods will have to be developed for harvesting sufficient platelets representative of the total circulating platelet population from severely thrombocytopenic patients for autologous platelet labeling. This would avoid the use of homologous platelets, which is likely to be responsible for some of the contradictory data relating to the use of radiolabeled platelet studies for the prediction of the response of patients with ITP to splenectomy. PMID:6346489

  9. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted. PMID:21514232

  10. Erythropoietin reduces storage lesions and decreases apoptosis indices in blood bank red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Penuela, Oscar Andrés; Palomino, Fernando; Gómez, Lina Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent evidence shows a selective destruction of the youngest circulating red blood cells (neocytolysis) trigged by a drop in erythropoietin levels. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin beta on the red blood cell storage lesion and apoptosis indices under blood bank conditions. Methods Each one of ten red blood cell units preserved in additive solution 5 was divided in two volumes of 100 mL and assigned to one of two groups: erythropoietin (addition of 665 IU of recombinant human erythropoietin) and control (isotonic buffer solution was added). The pharmacokinetic parameters of erythropoietin were estimated and the following parameters were measured weekly, for six weeks: Immunoreactive erythropoietin, hemolysis, percentage of non-discocytes, adenosine triphosphate, glucose, lactate, lactate dehydrogenase, and annexin-V/esterase activity. The t-test or Wilcoxon's test was used for statistical analysis with significance being set for a p-value <0.05. Results Erythropoietin, when added to red blood cell units, has a half-life >6 weeks under blood bank conditions, with persistent supernatant concentrations of erythropoietin during the entire storage period. Adenosine triphosphate was higher in the Erythropoietin Group in Week 6 (4.19 ± 0.05 μmol/L vs. 3.53 ± 0.02 μmol/L; p-value = 0.009). The number of viable cells in the Erythropoietin Group was higher than in the Control Group (77% ± 3.8% vs. 71% ± 2.3%; p-value <0.05), while the number of apoptotic cells was lower (9.4% ± 0.3% vs. 22% ± 0.8%; p-value <0.05). Conclusions Under standard blood bank conditions, an important proportion of red blood cells satisfy the criteria of apoptosis. Recombinant human erythropoietin beta seems to improve storage lesion parameters and mitigate apoptosis. PMID:26969770

  11. Establishing proof of concept: Platelet-rich plasma and bone marrow aspirate concentrate may improve cartilage repair following surgical treatment for osteochondral lesions of the talus

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Niall A; Murawski, Christopher D; Haleem, Amgad M; Hannon, Charles P; Savage-Elliott, Ian; Kennedy, John G

    2012-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are common injuries in the athletic patient. They present a challenging clinical problem as cartilage has a poor potential for healing. Current surgical treatments consist of reparative (microfracture) or replacement (autologous osteochondral graft) strategies and demonstrate good clinical outcomes at the short and medium term follow-up. Radiological findings and second-look arthroscopy however, indicate possible poor cartilage repair with evidence of fibrous infill and fissuring of the regenerative tissue following microfracture. Longer-term follow-up echoes these findings as it demonstrates a decline in clinical outcome. The nature of the cartilage repair that occurs for an osteochondral graft to become integrated with the native surround tissue is also of concern. Studies have shown evidence of poor cartilage integration, with chondrocyte death at the periphery of the graft, possibly causing cyst formation due to synovial fluid ingress. Biological adjuncts, in the form of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC), have been investigated with regard to their potential in improving cartilage repair in both in vitro and in vitro settings. The in vitro literature indicates that these biological adjuncts may increase chondrocyte proliferation as well as synthetic capability, while limiting the catabolic effects of an inflammatory joint environment. These findings have been extrapolated to in vitro animal models, with results showing that both PRP and BMAC improve cartilage repair. The basic science literature therefore establishes the proof of concept that biological adjuncts may improve cartilage repair when used in conjunction with reparative and replacement treatment strategies for osteochondral lesions of the talus. PMID:22816065

  12. Mutation in AP-3 delta in the mocha mouse links endosomal transport to storage deficiency in platelets, melanosomes, and synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kantheti, P; Qiao, X; Diaz, M E; Peden, A A; Meyer, G E; Carskadon, S L; Kapfhamer, D; Sufalko, D; Robinson, M S; Noebels, J L; Burmeister, M

    1998-07-01

    The mouse mutant mocha, a model for the Hermansky-Pudlak storage pool deficiency syndrome, is characterized by defective platelets, coat and eye color dilution, lysosomal abnormalities, inner ear degeneration, and neurological deficits. Here, we show that mocha is a null allele of the delta subunit of the adaptor-like protein complex AP-3, which is associated with coated vesicles budding from the trans-Golgi network, and that AP-3 is missing in mocha tissues. In mocha brain, the ZnT-3 transporter is reduced, resulting in a lack of zinc-associated Timm historeactivity in hippocampal mossy fibers. Our results demonstrate that the AP-3 complex is responsible for cargo selection to lysosome-related organelles such as melanosomes and platelet dense granules as well as to neurotransmitter vesicles. PMID:9697856

  13. Perspectives on the use of biomaterials to store platelets for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Brooke L; Chandrasekar, Keerthana; Johnson, Lacey; Whitelock, John M; Marks, Denese C; Irving, David O; Lord, Megan S

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are routinely stored enabling transfusions for a range of conditions. While the current platelet storage bags, composed of either polyvinylchloride or polyolefin, are well-established, the storage of platelets in these bags beyond 7 days reduces platelet viability below clinically usable levels. New materials and coatings that promote platelet respiration while not supporting platelet adhesion or activation have started to emerge, with the potential to enable platelet storage beyond 7 days. This review focuses on the literature describing currently used biomaterials for platelet storage and emerging materials that are showing promise for improving platelet storage. PMID:27233532

  14. Influence of Oxidative Stress on Stored Platelets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Platelet storage and its availability for transfusion are limited to 5-6 days. Oxidative stress (OS) is one of the causes for reduced efficacy and shelf-life of platelets. The studies on platelet storage have focused on improving the storage conditions by altering platelet storage solutions, temperature, and materials. Nevertheless, the role of OS on platelet survival during storage is still unclear. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage on platelets. Platelets were stored for 12 days at 22°C. OS markers such as aggregation, superoxides, reactive oxygen species, glucose, pH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and antioxidant enzymes were assessed. OS increased during storage as indicated by increments in aggregation, superoxides, pH, conjugate dienes, and superoxide dismutase and decrements in glucose and catalase. Thus, platelets could endure OS till 6 days during storage, due to the antioxidant defense system. An evident increase in OS was observed from day 8 of storage, which can diminish the platelet efficacy. The present study provides an insight into the gradual changes occurring during platelet storage. This lays the foundation towards new possibilities of employing various antioxidants as additives in storage solutions. PMID:26949396

  15. Proteome changes in platelets after pathogen inactivation--an interlaboratory consensus.

    PubMed

    Prudent, Michel; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Devine, Dana V; Gachet, Christian; Greinacher, Andreas; Lion, Niels; Schubert, Peter; Steil, Leif; Thiele, Thomas; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Völker, Uwe; Zolla, Lello

    2014-04-01

    Pathogen inactivation (PI) of platelet concentrates (PCs) reduces the proliferation/replication of a large range of bacteria, viruses, and parasites as well as residual leucocytes. Pathogen-inactivated PCs were evaluated in various clinical trials showing their efficacy and safety. Today, there is some debate over the hemostatic activity of treated PCs as the overall survival of PI platelets seems to be somewhat reduced, and in vitro measurements have identified some alterations in platelet function. Although the specific lesions resulting from PI of PCs are still not fully understood, proteomic studies have revealed potential damages at the protein level. This review merges the key findings of the proteomic analyses of PCs treated by the Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology, the Intercept Blood System, and the Theraflex UV-C system, respectively, and discusses the potential impact on the biological functions of platelets. The complementarities of the applied proteomic approaches allow the coverage of a wide range of proteins and provide a comprehensive overview of PI-mediated protein damage. It emerges that there is a relatively weak impact of PI on the overall proteome of platelets. However, some data show that the different PI treatments lead to an acceleration of platelet storage lesions, which is in agreement with the current model of platelet storage lesion in pathogen-inactivated PCs. Overall, the impact of the PI treatment on the proteome appears to be different among the PI systems. Mirasol impacts adhesion and platelet shape change, whereas Intercept seems to impact proteins of intracellular platelet activation pathways. Theraflex influences platelet shape change and aggregation, but the data reported to date are limited. This information provides the basis to understand the impact of different PI on the molecular mechanisms of platelet function. Moreover, these data may serve as basis for future developments of PI technologies for PCs. Further studies

  16. Approaches to synthetic platelet analogs.

    PubMed

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Tian, Lewis L; Pan, Victor; McCrae, Keith R; Mitragotri, Samir; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is routinely used for treating bleeding complications in patients with hematologic or oncologic clotting disorders, chemo/radiotherapy-induced myelosuppression, trauma and surgery. Currently, these transfusions mostly use allogeneic platelet concentrates, while products like lyophilized platelets, cold-stored platelets and infusible platelet membranes are under investigation. These natural platelet-based products pose considerable risks of contamination, resulting in short shelf-life (3-5 days). Recent advances in pathogen reduction technologies have increased shelf-life to ~7 days. Furthermore, natural platelets are short in supply and also cause several biological side effects. Hence, there is significant clinical interest in platelet-mimetic synthetic analogs that can allow long storage-life and minimum side effects. Accordingly, several designs have been studied which decorate synthetic particles with motifs that promote platelet-mimetic adhesion or aggregation. Recent refinement in this design involves combining the adhesion and aggregation functionalities on a single particle platform. Further refinement is being focused on constructing particles that also mimic natural platelet's shape, size and elasticity, to influence margination and wall-interaction. The optimum design of a synthetic platelet analog would require efficient integration of platelet's physico-mechanical properties and biological functionalities. We present a comprehensive review of these approaches and provide our opinion regarding the future directions of this research. PMID:23092864

  17. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  18. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-03-01

    Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  19. Platelet aggregability and in vivo platelet deposition in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease--evaluation by indium-111-platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Isaka, Y.; Kimura, K.; Uehara, A.; Hashikawa, K.; Mieno, M.; Matsumoto, M.; Handa, N.; Nakabayashi, S.; Imaizumi, M.; Kamada, T. )

    1989-12-15

    In ischemic cerebrovascular disease, it is not clear whether platelet function in vitro actually reflects the situation in vivo. Using indium-111 platelet scintigraphy as a method for detecting platelet activation in vivo, we tried to elucidate this problem. Twenty eight patients with chronic stage of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and 17 control subjects were examined. Platelet scintigrams were positive in 9 of 28 patients in CVD, while all were negative in control. A comparison of the results obtained from qualitative platelet imaging and platelet aggregability was performed to evaluate whether threshold aggregation concentration (TAC) grade differed across the three groups (control, CVD patients without platelet deposition and CVD patients with platelet deposition). CVD patients with platelet deposition showed a higher TAC than those patients who did not show platelet deposition (P less than 0.05) or control subjects without platelet deposition (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that some patients in chronic stages of CVD may have active platelet deposition on carotid atheromatous lesions, and presence of platelet deposition in vivo could contribute to reduce platelet reactivity in peripheral blood.

  20. Platelet aggregability and in vivo platelet deposition in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease--evaluation by indium-111-platelet scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Isaka, Y; Kimura, K; Uehara, A; Hashikawa, K; Mieno, M; Matsumoto, M; Handa, N; Nakabayashi, S; Imaizumi, M; Kamada, T

    1989-12-15

    In ischemic cerebrovascular disease, it is not clear whether platelet function in vitro actually reflects the situation in vivo. Using indium-111 platelet scintigraphy as a method for detecting platelet activation in vivo, we tried to elucidate this problem. Twenty eight patients with chronic stage of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and 17 control subjects were examined. Platelet scintigrams were positive in 9 of 28 patients in CVD, while all were negative in control. A comparison of the results obtained from qualitative platelet imaging and platelet aggregability was performed to evaluate whether threshold aggregation concentration (TAC) grade differed across the three groups (control, CVD patients without platelet deposition and CVD patients with platelet deposition). CVD patients with platelet deposition showed a higher TAC than those patients who did not show platelet deposition (P less than 0.05) or control subjects without platelet deposition (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that some patients in chronic stages of CVD may have active platelet deposition on carotid atheromatous lesions, and presence of platelet deposition in vivo could contribute to reduce platelet reactivity in peripheral blood. PMID:2633402

  1. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for 5 d released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol's beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function. PMID:26683619

  2. Flow cytometric comparison of platelets from a whole blood and finger-prick sample: impact of 24 hours storage.

    PubMed

    Swanepoel, Albe C; Stander, Andre; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the validity and laboratory utility of flow cytometry when analyzing platelet activation by studying CD41, CD42b, CD62P and CD63. We compare flow cytometry results from citrated whole-blood and finger-prick samples directly after collection and also after storing both a finger-prick and whole-blood sample for 24 hours. Citrated whole-blood and finger-prick samples were taken from three healthy individuals on two occasions, and a total of 60,000 cells were analyzed for each of the four phycoerythrin-labeled monoclonal antibodies. Half of each sample was analyzed immediately after sampling while the other half was kept in the fridge at 6 °C for 24 hours before analysis. No significant difference was found between the sampling methods or the period of time before analysis. Results therefore suggest that an appropriately prepared finger-prick sample can be used for platelet function analysis, and samples can be stored for 24 hours in the fridge at 6 °C before analysis. PMID:23320994

  3. Myeloperoxidase induces the priming of platelets.

    PubMed

    Kolarova, H; Klinke, A; Kremserova, S; Adam, M; Pekarova, M; Baldus, S; Eiserich, J P; Kubala, L

    2013-08-01

    The release of myeloperoxidase (MPO) from polymorphonuclear neutrophils is a hallmark of vascular inflammation and contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular inflammatory processes. However, the effects of MPO on platelets as a contributory mechanism in vascular inflammatory diseases remain unknown. Thus, MPO interaction with platelets and its effects on platelet function were examined. First, dose-dependent binding of MPO (between 1.7 and 13.8nM) to both human and mouse platelets was observed. This was in direct contrast to the absence of MPO in megakaryocytes. MPO was localized both on the surface of and inside platelets. Cytoskeleton inhibition did not prevent MPO localization inside the three-dimensional platelet structure. MPO peroxidase activity was preserved upon the MPO binding to platelets. MPO sequestered in platelets catabolized NO, documented by the decreased production of NO (on average, an approximately 2-fold decrease). MPO treatment did not affect the viability of platelets during short incubations; however, it decreased platelet viability after long-term storage for 7 days (an approximately 2-fold decrease). The activation of platelets by MPO was documented by an MPO-mediated increase in the expression of surface platelet receptors P-selectin and PECAM-1 (of about 5 to 20%) and the increased formation of reactive oxygen species (of about 15 to 200%). However, the activation was only partial, as MPO did not induce the aggregation of platelets nor potentiate platelet response to classical activators. Nor did MPO induce a significant release of the content of granules. The activation of platelets by MPO was connected with increased MPO-treated platelet interaction with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (an approximately 1.2-fold increase) in vitro. In conclusion, it can be suggested that MPO can interact with and activate platelets, which can induce priming of platelets, rather than the classical robust activation of platelets. This can contribute to the

  4. Platelet-rich plasma supplemented revascularization of an immature tooth associated with a periapical lesion in a 40-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath; Shah, Naseem; Logani, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The present case report is the first of its kind that documents the successful outcome of "revascularization," a regeneration-based treatment protocol in a mature adult patient. It belies the myth that "revascularization" should only be done in children and young, adolescent patients. The misconception that stem cells number as well as viability in older age group patients will not allow revascularization to be successful is also contradicted by this case. The paper highlights all the mechanisms that come into play and the enhancing of regenerative response by supplementation with platelet-rich plasma (PRP). PMID:24707409

  5. Characteristics of the THERAFLEX UV-Platelets pathogen inactivation system - an update.

    PubMed

    Seghatchian, Jerard; Tolksdorf, Frank

    2012-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the last decade in producing purer, safer, leucocyte and plasma reduced platelet concentrates (PC) with an extended shelf life. The development of different pathogen inactivation technologies (PIT) has made a substantial contribution to this trend. Preceding platelet PIT (INTERCEPT Blood System/Cerus Corporation, Concord, CA, USA; MIRASOL/Caridian BCT, Lakewood, CO, USA) are based on adding a photosensitive compound to PC. The mixture is then activated by UV light in the UVB and/or UVA spectral regions. A novel procedure, THERAFLEX UV-Platelets (MacoPharma, Mouvaux, France), was recently developed that uses short-wave ultraviolet light (UVC), without addition of any photoactive agent. This technology has proven to be highly effective in sterilising bacteria (the major cause of morbidity/mortality after platelet transfusion) as well as inactivating other transfusion transmitted DNA/RNA containing pathogens and residual leucocytes. Any PIT reflects a balance between the efficacy of pathogen inactivation and preservation of platelet quality and function. A broad spectrum of in vitro tests have become available for the assessment of platelet storage lesion (PSL), aiming to better predict clinical outcome and untoward effects of platelet therapy. Recent paired studies on the release of platelet-derived cytokines, as new platelet performance indicators, revealed a parallel increase in both THERAFLEX UV-treated and control PC throughout storage, supporting the notion that the bioavailability of platelet function is not grossly affected by UVC treatment. This is corroborated by some newer technologies for proteomic analysis, showing that the THERAFLEX UV-Platelets system results in limited disruption of integrin-regulating extracellular disulfide bonds and minimal protein alterations when compared to UVB and gamma irradiation. Moreover, standard in vitro parameters reflecting activation, metabolic activity and function of platelets

  6. Dynamic light scattering can determine platelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet transfusions are life-saving procedures for patients who are bleeding or undergoing chemotherapy. The effectiveness of transfusions depends on the number of platelets transfused and the platelet function. Platelet function correlates with proportion of discoid to activated platelets, morphology response to temperature stress, and inversely correlates with microparticle content. ThromboLUX is a novel device that determines platelet function by measuring all of these characteristics using dynamic light scattering (DLS). During periods of stress, such as decreased temperature, cytoskeletal rearrangements will cause normal, discoid platelets to activate and become spiny spheres. The formation of pseudopods of various lengths facilitates the clotting cascade and also increases the apparent size of platelets. ThromboLUX uses a 37-20-37 C temperature cycle that mimics the bleeding, storage, and transfusion process. As the temperature fluctuates, DLS will measure the changing platelet hydrodynamic radius and the size of any microparticles present. ThromboLUX analysis of platelet concentrates in vitro would allow determination of high platelet function units before transfusion and would therefore improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety. This study examined how DLS is able to distinguish between discoid and activated platelets as well as measure the parameters that contribute to high platelet function.

  7. New Horizons in Platelets Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Saboor, Muhammad; Moinuddin, Moinuddin; Ilyas, Samina

    2013-01-01

    Platelet flow cytometry is an emerging tool in diagnostic and therapeutic hematology. It is eminently suited to study the expression of platelet surface receptors both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. It can serve as a useful marker for the documentation of in vivo platelet activation, and thus, fore-warn the risk of thromboembolism in patients with diabetes mellitus, coronary syndromes, peripheral vascular diseases, and pre-eclampsia. This technique can also be extended to study and compare the effect of various antiplatelet drugs on the level of activation of platelets and to establish any dose-effect relationship of these drugs. Topographical localization of platelet granules and study of platelet-platelet and platelet-leukocyte interaction is also possible by this procedure. All these parameters serve as pointers towards the presence of activated platelets in the circulation with its thromboembolic consequences. This is a simple reliable and cost effective technique which has a wide application in the diagnosis of various inherited and acquired platelet disorders. Study of platelet cluster of differentiation (CD) markers in various inherited disorders i.e. Bernard Soulier’s disease, von Willebrand disease, Glanzman’s disease, and Grey platelet syndrome may help categories the molecular lesions in these oft under-studied disorders. PMID:23983579

  8. Hemoglobin-driven pathophysiology is an in vivo consequence of the red blood cell storage lesion that can be attenuated in guinea pigs by haptoglobin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jin Hyen; D’Agnillo, Felice; Vallelian, Florence; Pereira, Claudia P.; Williams, Matthew C.; Jia, Yiping; Schaer, Dominik J.; Buehler, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    Massive transfusion of blood can lead to clinical complications, including multiorgan dysfunction and even death. Such severe clinical outcomes have been associated with longer red blood cell (rbc) storage times. Collectively referred to as the rbc storage lesion, rbc storage results in multiple biochemical changes that impact intracellular processes as well as membrane and cytoskeletal properties, resulting in cellular injury in vitro. However, how the rbc storage lesion triggers pathophysiology in vivo remains poorly defined. In this study, we developed a guinea pig transfusion model with blood stored under standard blood banking conditions for 2 (new), 21 (intermediate), or 28 days (old blood). Transfusion with old but not new blood led to intravascular hemolysis, acute hypertension, vascular injury, and kidney dysfunction associated with pathophysiology driven by hemoglobin (Hb). These adverse effects were dramatically attenuated when the high-affinity Hb scavenger haptoglobin (Hp) was administered at the time of transfusion with old blood. Pathologies observed after transfusion with old blood, together with the favorable response to Hp supplementation, allowed us to define the in vivo consequences of the rbc storage lesion as storage-related posttransfusion hemolysis producing Hb-driven pathophysiology. Hb sequestration by Hp might therefore be a therapeutic modality for enhancing transfusion safety in severely ill or massively transfused patients. PMID:22446185

  9. Overview of platelet physiology and laboratory evaluation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, G M

    1999-06-01

    Appropriate laboratory testing for the platelet-type bleeding disorders hinges on an adequate assessment in the history and physical examination. Patients with histories and screening laboratory results consistent with coagulation disorders (hemophilia, disseminated intravascular coagulation) are not appropriate candidates for platelet function testing. In contrast, patients with a lifelong history of platelet-type bleeding symptoms and perhaps a positive family history of bleeding would be appropriate for testing. Figure 6 depicts one strategy to evaluate these patients. Platelet morphology can easily be evaluated to screen for two uncommon qualitative platelet disorders: Bernard-Soulier syndrome (associated with giant platelets) and gray platelet syndrome, a subtype of storage pool disorder in which platelet granulation is morphologically abnormal by light microscopy. If the bleeding disorder occurred later in life (no bleeding with surgery or trauma early in life), the focus should be on acquired disorders of platelet function. For those patients thought to have an inherited disorder, testing for vWD should be done initially because approximately 1% of the population has vWD. The complete vWD panel (factor VIII coagulant activity, vWf antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity) should be performed because many patients will have abnormalities of only one particular panel component. Patients diagnosed with vWD should be classified using multimeric analysis to identify the type 1 vWD patients likely to respond to DDAVP. If vWD studies are normal, platelet aggregation testing should be performed, ensuring that no antiplatelet medications have been ingested at least 1 week before testing. If platelet aggregation tests are normal and if suspicion for an inherited disorder remains high, vWD testing should be repeated. The evaluation of thrombocytopenia may require bone marrow examination to exclude primary hematologic disorders. If future studies with thrombopoietin assays

  10. Splenic release of platelets contributes to increased circulating platelet size and inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Ming; Moore, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin-Yu; Han, Li-Ping; Su, Yidan; Tsai, Alan; Xu, Qi; Zhang, Ming; Lambert, Gavin W; Kiriazis, Helen; Gao, Wei; Dart, Anthony M; Du, Xiao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is characterized by a rapid increase in circulating platelet size but the mechanism for this is unclear. Large platelets are hyperactive and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. We determined mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet-monocyte conjugation (PMC) using blood samples from patients, and blood and the spleen from mice with AMI. We further measured changes in platelet size, PMC, cardiac and splenic contents of platelets and leucocyte infiltration into the mouse heart. In AMI patients, circulating MPV and PMC increased at 1-3 h post-MI and MPV returned to reference levels within 24 h after admission. In mice with MI, increases in platelet size and PMC became evident within 12 h and were sustained up to 72 h. Splenic platelets are bigger than circulating platelets in normal or infarct mice. At 24 h post-MI, splenic platelet storage was halved whereas cardiac platelets increased by 4-fold. Splenectomy attenuated all changes observed in the blood, reduced leucocyte and platelet accumulation in the infarct myocardium, limited infarct size and alleviated cardiac dilatation and dysfunction. AMI-induced elevated circulating levels of adenosine diphosphate and catecholamines in both human and the mouse, which may trigger splenic platelet release. Pharmacological inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme, β1-adrenergic receptor or platelet P2Y12 receptor reduced platelet abundance in the murine infarct myocardium albeit having diverse effects on platelet size and PMC. In conclusion, AMI evokes release of splenic platelets, which contributes to the increase in platelet size and PMC and facilitates myocardial accumulation of platelets and leucocytes, thereby promoting post-infarct inflammation. PMID:27129192

  11. PLATELET FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Jonathan N.; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is the underlying cause of a number of major clinical conditions and genetic disorders worldwide. While therapeutic agents that bind and stimulate the thrombopoietin receptor are currently available, the development of drugs that directly stimulate megakaryocytes to generate platelets has lagged behind. To improve the management of thrombocytopenia, we will need to define the cell biological pathways that drive the production of platelets from megakaryocytes. This review integrates the latest research of platelet biogenesis and focuses on the molecular pathways that power and regulate proplatelet production. PMID:20620432

  12. Evaluation of the red cell storage lesion after irradiation in filtered packed red cell units

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyer, C.D.; Tiegerman, K.O.; Berkman, E.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Packed red cell units (n = 10) were filtered and divided equally. One-half unit from each donor was irradiated (x) (3500 cGy). On Days 0, 14, 28, and 42, ATP, K+, Na+, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), plasma-free hemoglobin (PFH), and pH were determined. The reduction in ATP was greater in the irradiated than the nonirradiated (y) units by Day 42 (mean x-y: -70, p = 0.0005). The increase in K+ was greater in the irradiated than nonirradiated units on Days 14, 28, and 42 (mean x-y: 17-20, p = 0.0001). Decrease in pH and increases in LDH and PFH were significant (p less than 0.05) on Day 42 only. K+ increases added only 1.7 to 2.0 mmol per unit, a difference felt to be clinically insignificant. The changes noted in ATP, pH, LDH, and PFH are significant but minimal on Day 42 and imply that viability changes would also be minimal. These biochemical data support the storage of irradiated units for at least 28 days.

  13. Which is the best anticoagulant for whole blood aggregometry platelet function testing? Comparison of six anticoagulants and diverse storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas Friedrich Christoph; Neubauer, Horst; Franken, Cora Christina; Krüger, Jan-Christoph; Mügge, Andreas; Meves, Saskia Hannah

    2012-01-01

    Major hindrances of impedance aggregometry are caused by limited storage time and the requirement of ex vivo anticoagulation. Data on the influence of different anticoagulants and storage conditions are rare and incomplete. This study has systematically examined the influence of six different anticoagulants (sodium and lithium heparin, 20 µg/mL and 45 µg/mL r-hirudin, benzylsulfonyl-D-Arg-Pro-4-amidinobenzylamide (BAPA), and citrate) on the results of Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) and arachidonic acid (AA) induced measurements using multiple-electrode impedance aggregometer (MEA). Measurements were carried out in a time frame of 0 min up to 48 h after blood withdrawal. In addition, the influence of storage temperatures of 4°C and 37°C was evaluated. Results of ADP-induced tests significantly varied within the first 30 min in all tested anticoagulants, in citrated blood even within the first 60 min. They remained stable up to 2 h in 20 µg/mL r-hirudin and BAPA, 4 h in citrate, 8 h in 45 µg/mL r-hirudin, and lithium heparin and up to a maximum of 12 h in sodium heparin anticoagulated blood. The analysis of AA-induced tests revealed no significantly different results up to 6 h when BAPA was used, 8 h in lithium heparin, 20 µg/mL r-hirudin and citrate, 12 h in 45 µg/mL r-hirudin, and even 24 h in sodium heparin-anticoagulated samples. A storage temperature of either 4°C or 37°C in contrast to room temperature had a negative influence on the stability of results. In conclusion, sodium heparin and 45 µg/mL r-hirudin as anticoagulants guarantee the longest storage time for impedance aggregometry. PMID:21999185

  14. Platelet Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash Small purplish spots on the skin called purpura, caused by bleeding under the skin Testing may ... Idiopathic thrombocytopenia (ITP), also known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, is the result of antibody production against platelets. ...

  15. Platelet count

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactions Cancer Certain medicines Bone marrow disease called polycythemia vera Bone marrow making too many platelets without a ... leukemia (CML) Hemolytic anemia Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Polycythemia vera Thrombocytopenia Patient Instructions Deep vein thrombosis - discharge Update ...

  16. Quantitative investigation of red blood cell three-dimensional geometric and chemical changes in the storage lesion using digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jaferzadeh, Keyvan; Moon, Inkyu

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative phase information obtained by digital holographic microscopy (DHM) can provide new insight into the functions and morphology of single red blood cells (RBCs). Since the functionality of a RBC is related to its three-dimensional (3-D) shape, quantitative 3-D geometric changes induced by storage time can help hematologists realize its optimal functionality period. We quantitatively investigate RBC 3-D geometric changes in the storage lesion using DHM. Our experimental results show that the substantial geometric transformation of the biconcave-shaped RBCs to the spherocyte occurs due to RBC storage lesion. This transformation leads to progressive loss of cell surface area, surface-to-volume ratio, and functionality of RBCs. Furthermore, our quantitative analysis shows that there are significant correlations between chemical and morphological properties of RBCs. PMID:26502322

  17. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a part of blood, clump together and cause blood to clot. ... Decreased platelet aggregation may be due to: Autoimmune ... Fibrin degradation products Inherited platelet function defects ...

  18. Human platelets frozen with glycerol in liquid nitrogen: biological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Herve, P; Potron, G; Droule, C; Beduchaud, M P; Masse, M; Coffe, C; Bosset, J F; Peters, A

    1981-01-01

    Platelets were frozen using glycerol (3% in plasma) as a cryoprotective agent, a rapid cooling rate, and liquid nitrogen for storage. The cryopreserved platelets were thawed at 42 C and infused without washing. The results indicate that the quality of the thawed platelets is equivalent to platelets stored for 24 to 48 hours at room temperature. The availability of HLA phenotyped leukocyte poor platelets can reduce the frequency of sensitization to strong antigens and provide clinically effective platelets for alloimmunized patients. PMID:7268863

  19. Platelet Activation Test in Unprocessed Blood (Pac-t-UB) to Monitor Platelet Concentrates and Whole Blood of Thrombocytopenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Roest, Mark; van Holten, Thijs C.; Fleurke, Ger-Jan; Remijn, Jasper A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Platelet concentrate transfusion is the standard treatment for hemato-oncology patients to compensate for thrombocytopenia. We have developed a novel platelet activation test in anticoagulated unprocessed blood (pac-t-UB) to determine platelet function in platelet concentrates and in blood of thrombocytopenic patients. Methods We have measured platelet activity in a platelet concentrate and in anticoagulated unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion thrombocytopenic patient. Results Our data show time-dependent platelet activation by GPVI agonist (collagen related peptide; CRP), PAR-1 agonist (SFLLRN), P2Y12 agonist (ADP), and thromboxane receptor agonist (U46619) in a platelet concentrate. Furthermore, pac-t-UB showed time-dependent platelet activation in unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion patient with thrombocytopenia. Testing platelet function by different agonists in relation to storage show that 3-day-old platelet concentrates are still reactive to the studied agonists. This reactivity rapidly drops for each agonists during longer storage. Discussion Pac-t-UB is a novel tool to estimate platelet function by different agonists in platelet concentrates and in unprocessed blood of thrombocytopenic patients. In the near future, we will validate whether pac-t-UB is an adequate test to monitor the quality of platelet concentrates and whether pac-t-UB predicts the bleeding risk of transfused thrombocytopenic patients. PMID:23652405

  20. Detection of microbial contamination in platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Tracy L.; Leparc, German; Huffman, Debra E.; Gennaccaro, Angela L.; Garcia-Lopez, Alicia; Klungness, Greta; Stephans, Christie; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    2005-03-01

    In the United States, approximately 100 patients develop fatal sepsis associated with platelet transfusions every year. Current culture methods take 24-48 hours to acquire results, which in turn decrease the shelf life of platelets. Many of the microorganisms that contaminate platelets can replicate easily at room temperature, which is the necessary storage temperature to keep platelets functional. Therefore, there is a need for in-situ quality control assessment of the platelet quality. For this purpose, a real time spectrophotometric technique has been developed. The Spectral Acquisition Processing Detection (SAPD) method, comprised of a UV-vis spectrophotometer and modeling algorithms, is a rapid method that can be performed prior to platelet transfusion to decrease the risk of bacterial infection to patients. The SAPD method has been used to determine changes in cell suspensions, based on size, shape, chemical composition and internal structure. Changes in these cell characteristics can in turn be used to determine microbial contamination, platelet aging and other physiologic changes. Detection limits of this method for platelet suspensions seeded with bacterial contaminants were identified to be less than 100 cfu/ml of sample. Bacterial counts below 1000 cfu/ml are not considered clinically significant. The SAPD method can provide real-time identification of bacterial contamination of platelets affording patients an increased level of safety without causing undue strain on laboratory budgets or personnel while increasing the time frame that platelets can be used by dramatically shortening contaminant detection time.

  1. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003669.htm Platelet aggregation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a ...

  2. Modified expression of surface glyconjugates in stored human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dhar, A.; Ganguly, P.

    1987-05-01

    Platelets are anucleated cells which play an important part in blood coagulation and thrombosis. These cells may be stored in the blood bank for only 4/5 days. In order to improve the storage of platelets, it is essential to first understand the changes in these cells due to storage. In this work, human platelets were stored in autologous plasma at 4/sup 0/ or 22/sup 0/ and their surface changes were monitored with three lectins - wheat germ afflutinin (WGA), concanavalin A (Con A) and lentil lectin (LL). Blood was drawn from healthy donors and platelet rich plasma (PRP) was collected by slow speed centrifugation. Platelets stored at either temperature for different times showed increased sensitivity to agglutination by WGA after 34-48 hrs. Lectins, Con A and LL, which were not agglutinating to fresh platelets readily caused agglutination after 48-72 hrs. The platelets stored for 25 hrs or longer period were insensitive to thrombin but showed enhanced aggregation with WGA. Labelling of surface glycoconjugates of stored platelets with /sup 3/H-boro-hydride revealed progressive loss of a glycoprotein of Mr 150,000 (GPIb infinity) together with the appearance of components of Mr 69,000; Mr 60,000; Mr 25,000. New high molecular weight glycoproteins were also detected only in stored platelets. The author studies clearly indicate that modification or altered expression of platelets surface glycoproteins may be one factor of storage related dysfunction of platelets.

  3. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the “material” itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing - after years of exhaustive haemovigilance - that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  4. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the "material" itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing--after years of exhaustive haemovigilance--that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  5. Multiwavelength UV/visible spectroscopy for the quantitative investigation of platelet quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattley, Yvette D.; Leparc, German F.; Potter, Robert L.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    1998-04-01

    The quality of platelets transfused is vital to the effectiveness of the transfusion. Freshly prepared, discoid platelets are the most effective treatment for preventing spontaneous hemorrhage or for stopping an abnormal bleeding event. Current methodology for the routine testing of platelet quality involves random pH testing of platelet rich plasma and visual inspection of platelet rich plasma for a swirling pattern indicative of the discoid shape of the cells. The drawback to these methods is that they do not provide a quantitative and objective assay for platelet functionality that can be used on each platelet unit prior to transfusion. As part of a larger project aimed at characterizing whole blood and blood components with multiwavelength UV/vis spectroscopy, isolated platelets and platelet in platelet rich plasma have been investigated. Models based on Mie theory have been developed which allow for the extraction of quantitative information on platelet size, number and quality from multi-wavelength UV/vis spectra. These models have been used to quantify changes in platelet rich plasma during storage. The overall goal of this work is to develop a simple, rapid quantitative assay for platelet quality that can be used prior to platelet transfusion to ensure the effectiveness of the treatment. As a result of this work, the optical properties for isolated platelets, platelet rich plasma and leukodepleted platelet rich plasma have been determined.

  6. Microfluidic Flow Chambers Using Reconstituted Blood to Model Hemostasis and Platelet Transfusion In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Van Aelst, Britt; Feys, Hendrik B; Devloo, Rosalie; Vandekerckhove, Philippe; Compernolle, Veerle

    2016-01-01

    Blood platelets prepared for transfusion gradually lose hemostatic function during storage. Platelet function can be investigated using a variety of (indirect) in vitro experiments, but none of these is as comprehensive as microfluidic flow chambers. In this protocol, the reconstitution of thrombocytopenic fresh blood with stored blood bank platelets is used to simulate platelet transfusion. Next, the reconstituted sample is perfused in microfluidic flow chambers which mimic hemostasis on exposed subendothelial matrix proteins. Effects of blood donation, transport, component separation, storage and pathogen inactivation can be measured in paired experimental designs. This allows reliable comparison of the impact every manipulation in blood component preparation has on hemostasis. Our results demonstrate the impact of temperature cycling, shear rates, platelet concentration and storage duration on platelet function. In conclusion, this protocol analyzes the function of blood bank platelets and this ultimately aids in optimization of the processing chain including phlebotomy, transport, component preparation, storage and transfusion. PMID:27023054

  7. Clinical application of radiolabelled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents papers on the clinical applications of radiolabelled platelets. The papers are grouped into six sections on platelet labelling techniques, radiolabelled platelets in cardiology, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy, platelet scintigraphy in stroke patients, platelet scintigraphy in angiology, and platelet scintigraphy in hematology and other clinical applications, including renal transplant rejection.

  8. Acquired platelet function defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... dark black, or tarry bowel movements ; or vomiting blood or material that looks like coffee grounds Nosebleeds ... Tests that may done include: Bleeding time Platelet aggregation test Platelet count PT and PTT

  9. Congenital platelet function defects

    MedlinePlus

    Kottke-Marchant K. Platelet disorders. In: Hsi ED, ed. Hematopathology . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 2. Nichols WL. Von Willebrand disease and hemorrhagic abnormalities of platelet ...

  10. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF THE LESIONS ASSOCIATED WITH IRON STORAGE DISEASE IN CAPTIVE EGYPTIAN FRUIT BATS (ROUSETTUS AEGYPTIACUS).

    PubMed

    Leone, Angelique M; Crawshaw, Graham J; Garner, Michael M; Frasca, Salvatore; Stasiak, Iga; Rose, Karrie; Neal, Dan; Farina, Lisa L

    2016-03-01

    Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) are one of many species within zoologic collections that frequently develop iron storage disease. The goals of this retrospective multi-institutional study were to determine the tissue distribution of iron storage in captive adult Egyptian fruit bats and the incidence of intercurrent neoplasia and infection, which may be directly or indirectly related to iron overload. Tissue sections from 83 adult Egyptian fruit bats were histologically evaluated by using tissue sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, trichrome, and Prussian blue techniques. The liver and spleen consistently had the largest amount of iron, but significant amounts of iron were also detected in the pancreas, kidney, skeletal muscle, and lung. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; 11) was the most common neoplasm, followed by cholangiocarcinoma (4). Extrahepatic neoplasms included bronchioloalveolar adenoma (3), pulmonary carcinosarcoma (1), oral sarcoma (1), renal adenocarcinoma (1), transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (1), mammary gland adenoma (1), and parathyroid adenoma (1). There were also metastatic neoplasms of undetermined primary origin that included three poorly differentiated carcinomas, a poorly differentiated sarcoma, and a neuroendocrine tumor. Bats with hemochromatosis were significantly more likely to have HCC than bats with hemosiderosis (P = 0.032). Cardiomyopathy was identified in 35/77 bats with evaluable heart tissue, but no direct association was found between cardiac damage and the amount of iron observed within the liver or heart. Hepatic abscesses occurred in multiple bats, although a significant association was not observed between hemochromatosis and bacterial infection. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first publication providing evidence of a positive correlation between hemochromatosis and HCC in any species other than humans. PMID:27010264

  11. Use of mean platelet component to measure platelet activation on the ADVIA 120 haematology system.

    PubMed

    Macey, M G; Carty, E; Webb, L; Chapman, E S; Zelmanovic, D; Okrongly, D; Rampton, D S; Newland, A C

    1999-10-15

    Platelet activation results in changes in a number of cell surface molecules including an increase in P-Selectin (CD62P) that may be rapidly and conveniently measured by immunofluorescent flow cytometry. The ADVIA 120 (Bayer) is a new system that facilitates more accurate measurement of platelet volume and in addition provides an approximate measure of the mean refractive index (RI) of the platelets reported as mean platelet component (MPC) concentration. We were interested to determine whether changes in MPC might reflect changes in platelet activation status. To investigate this, the platelet CD62P expression, determined by flow cytometry, and change in MPC, measured on the ADVIA 120 system, was first examined in vitro after stimulation of EDTA anticoagulated whole blood with submaximal concentrations of bovine thrombin in the presence or absence of the thromboxane synthase inhibitor, Ridogrel. Thrombin produced a dose-dependent increase in platelet CD62P expression and a decrease in MPC that could be inhibited by Ridogrel at physiological concentrations. In the second set of experiments, blood from 20 normal controls was collected into both EDTA and sodium citrate (SC) anticoagulants. Within 30 min of venesection and again at 3 h post-venesection after storage at room temperature, the platelet MPC and CD62P expression were determined. Platelets in all samples with both anticoagulants showed very low levels of CD62P expression when first analysed. At 3 h there was a small increase in CD62P expression on platelets in whole blood anticoagulated with SC, but a significant (P < 0.001) increase was observed on platelets anti-coagulated with EDTA. A negative correlation was found between the change in MPC of the platelets and the increase in the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) (r = -0.69, P < 0.001, n = 20) and the percentage (r = -0.72, P < 0.001, n = 20) of CD62P positive platelets at 3 h in blood anticoagulated with EDTA. We conclude that a reduction in MPC as

  12. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  13. Platelets in Lung Biology

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets and the lungs have an intimate relationship. Platelets are anucleate mammalian blood cells that continuously circulate through pulmonary vessels and that have major effector activities in hemostasis and inflammation. The lungs are reservoirs for megakaryocytes, the requisite precursor cell in thrombopoiesis, which is the intricate process by which platelets are generated. Platelets contribute to basal barrier integrity of the alveolar capillaries, which selectively restricts the transfer of water, proteins, and red blood cells out of the vessels. Platelets also contribute to pulmonary vascular repair. Although platelets bolster hemostatic and inflammatory defense of the healthy lung, experimental evidence and clinical evidence indicate that these blood cells are effectors of injury in a variety of pulmonary disorders and syndromes. Newly discovered biological capacities of platelets are being explored in the context of lung defense, disease, and remodeling. PMID:23043249

  14. Acquired dysfunction due to the circulation of "exhausted" platelets.

    PubMed

    Pareti, F I; Capitanio, A; Mannucci, L; Ponticelli, C; Mannucci, P M

    1980-08-01

    An acquired platelet functional defect was found to be present in eight patients who presented with various clinical conditions--three with renal allograft rejection, three with the hemolytic uremic syndrome or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, one with acute consumption coagulopathy due to an incompatible transfusion and one with systemic lupus erythematosus. They showed defective platelet aggregation and reduced levels of adenine nucleotides and serotonin with abnormal uptake and storage of the amine. The bleeding time was more prolonged than predicted from the platelet count. These abnormalities were strikingly similar to those occurring in patients with congenital storage pool deficiency. The acquired defect is thought to be related to the presence in the circulation of "exhausted" platelets following their in vivo exposure to inducers of the release reaction such as damaged endothelium, thrombin and immune complexes. The bleeding tendency of the underlying diseases might be aggravated by the impairment of platelet function. PMID:7405945

  15. Platelet Interaction with Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The interaction of several common strains of bacteria with rabbit or human platelets in vitro has been examined sequentially with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Bacteria were added to platelets in their native plasma or to washed platelets in a balanced salt solution at ratios of about 1:1 or at low bacteria to platelet ratios (down to 1:100). The platelet-bacterial interaction (PBI) was studied with recording nephelometry. Matched samples were fixed for microscopy at various points in the aggregation response. The results support these conclusions: a) Bacteria stimulate platelet aggregation by direct contact and adhesion with the platelet surface. b) Adhesion between the two cell types requires divalent cations, occurs through fusion of normal cell-surface coats and appears identical in the presence or absence of extracellular plasma protein. c) The morphologic transformation of platelets during PBI is identical to that produced by collagen. d) During PBI the bacteria are incorporated into the forming platelet aggregates and reside predominantly intercellularly. e) Phagocytosis of bacteria by a single platelet is very rare. f) Bacteria which have resided within platelet aggregates for one hour are unaltered morphologically. g) PBI occurs even at very low bacterial numbers and produces platelet-bacterial aggregates in small numbers without stimulating generalized platelet aggregation. Methods for concentration of thrombocytopenic plasma and washing human platelets are presented. ImagesFig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 1Fig 2Fig 12Fig 13Fig 3Fig 14Fig 4Fig 5 PMID:4632008

  16. Effects of irradiation on platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, G.; Adams, G.A.; Labow, R.S.

    1988-09-01

    Current medical practice involves the irradiation of blood components, including platelet concentrates, before their administration to patients with severe immunosuppression. The authors studied the effect of irradiation on in vitro platelet function and the leaching of plasticizers from the bag, both immediately and after 5 days of storage. The platelet count, white cell count, pH, glucose, lactate, platelet aggregation and release reaction, and serotonin uptake were not altered by the irradiation of random-donor or apheresis units with 2000 rads carried out at 0 and 24 hours and 5 days after collection. The leaching of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate from the plastic bags followed by the conversion to mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was not increased by irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to irradiate platelet concentrates on the day of collection and subsequently store them for at least 5 days while maintaining in vitro function. This procedure could have considerable benefit for blood banks involved in the provision of many platelet products.

  17. Expired and Pathogen-Inactivated Platelet Concentrates Support Differentiation and Immunomodulation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Culture.

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir-Buch, Sandra Mjoll; Sigurgrimsdottir, Hildur; Lieder, Ramona; Sigurjonsson, Olafur Eysteinn

    2015-01-01

    Platelet lysates have been reported as suitable cell culture supplement for cultures of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). The demand for safe and animal-free cultures of MSCs is linked to the potential application of MSCs in clinics. While the use of platelet lysates offers an alternative to animal serum in MSC cultures, obtaining supplies of fresh platelet concentrates for lysate production is challenging and raises concerns due to the already existing shortage of platelet donors. We have previously demonstrated that expired platelet concentrates may represent a good source of platelets for lysate production without competing with blood banks for platelet donors. The INTERCEPT Blood System™ treatment of platelet concentrates allows for prolonged storage up to 7 days, using highly specific technology based on amotosalen and UV-A light. The INTERCEPT system has therefore been implemented in blood processing facilities worldwide. In this study, we evaluated the suitability of INTERCEPT-treated, expired platelet concentrates, processed into platelet lysates, for the culture of MSCs compared to nontreated expired platelets. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were cultured in media supplemented with either platelet lysates from traditionally prepared expired platelet concentrates or in platelet lysates from expired and pathogen-inactivated platelet concentrates. The effects of pathogen inactivation on the ability of the platelets to support MSCs in culture were determined by evaluating MSC immunomodulation, immunophenotype, proliferation, and trilineage differentiation. Platelet lysates prepared from expired and pathogen-inactivated platelet concentrates supported MSC differentiation and immunosuppression better compared to traditionally prepared platelet lysates from expired platelet units. Pathogen inactivation of platelets with the INTERCEPT system prior to use in MSC culture had no negative effects on MSC immunophenotype or proliferation. In conclusion, the use of expired

  18. Platelets and cancer: a casual or causal relationship: revisited

    PubMed Central

    Menter, David G.; Tucker, Stephanie C.; Kopetz, Scott; Sood, Anil K.; Crissman, John D.; Honn, Kenneth V.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets arise as subcellular fragments of megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The physiologic demand, presence of disease such as cancer, or drug effects can regulate the production circulating platelets. Platelet biology is essential to hemostasis, vascular integrity, angiogenesis, inflammation, innate immunity, wound healing, and cancer biology. The most critical biological platelet response is serving as “First Responders” during the wounding process. The exposure of extracellular matrix proteins and intracellular components occurs after wounding. Numerous platelet receptors recognize matrix proteins that trigger platelet activation, adhesion, aggregation, and stabilization. Once activated, platelets change shape and degranulate to release growth factors and bioactive lipids into the blood stream. This cyclic process recruits and aggregates platelets along with thrombogenesis. This process facilitates wound closure or can recognize circulating pathologic bodies. Cancer cell entry into the blood stream triggers platelet-mediated recognition and is amplified by cell surface receptors, cellular products, extracellular factors, and immune cells. In some cases, these interactions suppress immune recognition and elimination of cancer cells or promote arrest at the endothelium, or entrapment in the microvasculature, and survival. This supports survival and spread of cancer cells and the establishment of secondary lesions to serve as important targets for prevention and therapy. PMID:24696047

  19. Platelets and galectins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A major function of platelets is keeping the vascular system intact. Platelet activation at sites of vascular injury leads to the formation of a hemostatic plug. Activation of platelets is therefore crucial for normal hemostasis; however, uncontrolled platelet activation may also lead to the formation of occlusive thrombi that can cause ischemic events. Although they are essential for proper hemostasis, platelet function extends to physiologic processes such as tissue repair, wound remodeling and antimicrobial host defense, or pathologic conditions such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis, chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Platelets can be activated by soluble molecules including thrombin, thromboxane A2 (TXA2), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), serotonin or by adhesive extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as von Willebrand factor (vWF) and collagen. Here we describe recent advances in the activation of platelets by non-canonical platelet agonists such as galectins. By acting either in soluble or immobilized form, these glycan-binding proteins trigger all platelet activation responses through modulation of discrete signaling pathways. We also offer new hypotheses and some speculations about the role of platelet-galectin interactions not only in hemostasis and thrombosis but also in inflammation and related diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. PMID:25405160

  20. Platelet function and ageing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris I

    2016-08-01

    There are clear age-related changes in platelet count and function, driven by changes in hematopoietic tissue, the composition of the blood and vascular health. Platelet count remains relatively stable during middle age (25-60 years old) but falls in older people. The effect of age on platelet function is slightly less clear. The longstanding view is that platelet reactivity increases with age in an almost linear fashion. There are, however, serious limitations to the data supporting this dogma. We can conclude that platelet function increases during middle age, but little evidence exists on the changes in platelet responsiveness in old age (>75 years old). This change in platelet function is driven by differential mRNA and microRNA expression, an increase in oxidative stress and changes in platelet receptors. These age-related changes in platelets are particularly pertinent given that thrombotic disease and use of anti-platelet drugs is much more prevalent in the elderly population, yet the majority of platelet research is carried out in young to middle-aged (20-50 years old) human volunteers and young mice (2-6 months old). We know relatively little about exactly how platelets from people over 75 years old differ from those of middle-aged subjects, and we know even less about the mechanisms that drive these changes. Addressing these gaps in our knowledge will provide substantial understanding in how cell signalling changes during ageing and will enable the development of more precise anti-platelet therapies. PMID:27068925

  1. Platelet transfusion - the new immunology of an old therapy.

    PubMed

    Stolla, Moritz; Refaai, Majed A; Heal, Joanna M; Spinelli, Sherry L; Garraud, Olivier; Phipps, Richard P; Blumberg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients, experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet-derived lipids are implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes. This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long-employed therapy. PMID:25699046

  2. Platelet Transfusion – The New Immunology of an Old Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stolla, Moritz; Refaai, Majed A.; Heal, Joanna M.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Garraud, Olivier; Phipps, Richard P.; Blumberg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients, experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet-derived lipids are implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes. This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long-employed therapy. PMID:25699046

  3. Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Type 3 in Ashkenazi Jews and Other Non–Puerto Rican Patients with Hypopigmentation and Platelet Storage-Pool Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Huizing, Marjan; Anikster, Yair; Fitzpatrick, Diana L.; Jeong, Anna B.; D’Souza, Maria; Rausche, Melanie; Toro, Jorge R.; Kaiser-Kupfer, Muriel I.; White, James G.; Gahl, William A.

    2001-01-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS), consisting of oculocutaneous albinism and a bleeding diathesis due to the absence of platelet dense granules, displays extensive locus heterogeneity. HPS1 mutations cause HPS-1 disease, and ADTB3A mutations cause HPS-2 disease, which is known to involve abnormal intracellular vesicle formation. A third HPS-causing gene, HPS3, was recently identified on the basis of homozygosity mapping of a genetic isolate of HPS in central Puerto Rico. We now describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of eight patients with HPS-3 who are of non–Puerto Rican heritage. Five are Ashkenazi Jews; three of these are homozygous for a 1303+1G→A splice-site mutation that causes skipping of exon 5, deleting an RsaI restriction site and decreasing the amounts of mRNA found on northern blotting. The other two are heterozygous for the 1303+1G→A mutation and for either an 1831+2T→G or a 2621-2A→G splicing mutation. Of 235 anonymous Ashkenazi Jewish DNA samples, one was heterozygous for the 1303+1G→A mutation. One seven-year-old boy of German/Swiss extraction was compound heterozygous for a 2729+1G→C mutation, causing skipping of exon 14, and resulting in a C1329T missense (R396W), with decreased mRNA production. A 15-year-old Irish/English boy was heterozygous for an 89-bp insertion between exons 16 and 17 resulting from abnormal splicing; his fibroblast HPS3 mRNA is normal in amount but is increased in size. A 12-year-old girl of Puerto Rican and Italian background has the 3,904-bp founder deletion from central Puerto Rico on one allele. All eight patients have mild symptoms of HPS; two Jewish patients had received the diagnosis of ocular, rather than oculocutaneous, albinism. These findings expand the molecular diagnosis of HPS, provide a screening method for a mutation common among Jews, and suggest that other patients with mild hypopigmentation and decreased vision should be examined for HPS. PMID:11590544

  4. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  5. Platelet Donation (Apheresis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be ideal for a simultaneous platelet and plasma donation. Anyone in need can receive your plasma, it is universal. Only 4% of the U.S. ... can donate up to 24 times per year. Plasma can be collected simultaneously with a platelet donation. ...

  6. Inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Sandrock-Lang, Kirstin; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Santoso, Sentot; Zieger, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Inherited platelet disorders may be the cause of bleeding symptoms of varying severity as platelets fail to fulfil their haemostatic role after vessel injury. Platelet disorders may be difficult to diagnose (and are likely to be misdiagnosed) and raise problems in therapy and management. This review explores the clinical and molecular genetic phenotype of several inherited disorders. Inherited platelet disorders can be classified according to their platelet defects: receptor defects (adhesion or aggregation), secretion disorder, and cytoskeleton defects. The best characterized platelet receptor defects are Glanzmann thrombasthenia (integrin αIIbβ3 defect) and Bernard-Soulier syndrome (defect of GPIb/IX/V). Detailed case reports of patients suffering from Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) or Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS) showing the bleeding diathesis as well as investigation of platelet aggregation/agglutination and platelet receptor expression will complement this review. In addition, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) as an important defect of δ-granule secretion is extensively described together with a case report of a patient suffering from HPS type 1. PMID:25707719

  7. Platelet Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the clotting process in the body ( in vivo ). A person with normal platelet function test results may still experience excessive bleeding or inappropriate clotting during and after a surgery. Most samples for platelet function testing are only stable for a very short period ...

  8. Platelets Potentiate Brain Endothelial Alterations Induced by Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wassmer, Samuel C.; Combes, Valéry; Candal, Francisco J.; Juhan-Vague, Irène; Grau, Georges E.

    2006-01-01

    Brain lesions of cerebral malaria (CM) are characterized by a sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized red blood cells (PRBC) and platelets within brain microvessels, as well as by blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. In the present study, we evaluated the possibility that PRBC and platelets induce functional alterations in brain endothelium. In a human brain endothelial cell line, named HBEC-5i, exhibiting most of the features demanded for a pathophysiological study of BBB, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or lymphotoxin α (LT-α) reduced transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER), enhanced the permeability to 70-kDa dextran, and increased the release of microparticles, a recently described indicator of disease severity in CM patients. In vitro cocultures showed that platelets or PRBC can have a direct cytotoxic effect on activated, but not on resting, HBEC-5i cells. Platelet binding was required, as platelet supernatant had no effect. Furthermore, platelets potentiated the cytotoxicity of PRBC for TNF- or LT-α-activated HBEC-5i cells when they were added prior to these cells on the endothelial monolayers. This effect was not observed when platelets were added after PRBC. Both permeability and TEER were strongly affected, and the apoptosis rate of HBEC-5i cells was dramatically increased. These findings provide insights into the mechanisms by which platelets can be deleterious to the brain endothelium during CM. PMID:16369021

  9. Pathogen inactivation of whole blood and red cell components: an overview of concept, design, developments, criteria of acceptability and storage lesion.

    PubMed

    Seghatchian, Jerard; Putter, Jeffrey S

    2013-10-01

    Multilayer preventative strategies have been instituted to enhance transfusion safety for patients in need of critical blood components. Presently blood safety is at its highest levels, with the implementation of precautionary/preventative measures against vCJD, bacterial and viral contamination of the blood supply. The implementation of these strategies together with advances in automation and computerization led to significant improvements in standardisation for transfusion practices. These include validation, verification, adherence to GLP and GMP and other regulatory requirements. In most European countries, universal prestorage leukodepletion is routine practice. In France proactive pathogen inactivation treatments [PITs] have been implemented emphasizing patient safety. This at least conceptually reduces the risk of transfusing viable WBCs, emerging bacteria and viruses, all with potential transfusion complications. In the UK, prion removal filters for red cell products are used selectively for special groups of patients. Some research establishments are exploring the potential impact of pathogen inactivation of whole blood or red cell components, using the new generation of S-303 PIT and the prion removal filters in combination. It needs to be determined whether such a combined strategy, applied synergistically, enhances red cell transfusion safety without compromising the overall criteria of acceptability. It is necessary to critically examine the impact of a new generation of PIT technologies, which may exacerbate the red cell storage lesion and cause the development of undesirable antibodies in the recipient. The development of innovative laboratory tools is vital to study impacts of these measures on the quality of stored blood and their clinical outcome. The ultimate aim of red cell transfusion is to provide oxygen enriched red blood cells to the microcirculations and tissues. Definitive studies are needed to establish the potential unforeseen negative

  10. Effective ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrates in teflon bags

    SciTech Connect

    Capon, S.M.; Sacher, R.A.; Deeg, H.J. )

    1990-10-01

    Several plastic materials used in blood storage were evaluated for their ability to transmit ultraviolet B (UVB) light. A plastic bag manufactured from sheets of transparent Teflon efficiently (78-86%) transmitted UVB light and was employed in subsequent functional studies of lymphocytes and platelets exposed to UVB light while contained in these bags. In vitro experiments showed a UVB dose-dependent abrogation of lymphocyte responder and stimulator functions, with concurrent preservation of platelet aggregation responses. In a phase I pilot study, UVB-treated platelet concentrates were administered to four bone marrow transplant recipients. Adverse effects attributable to the transfusions were not observed, and patients showed clinically effective transfusion responses. No patient developed lymphocytotoxic HLA or platelet antibodies. These studies suggest that platelets can be effectively irradiated with UVB light in a closed system. However, numerous variables, including container material, volume and composition of contents, steady exposure versus agitation, and exact UV wavelength, must be considered.

  11. [Interactions between the platelets and the vessel wall. Part 2: physiopathology (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tobelem, G; Drouet, L; Caen, J

    1980-03-29

    The role of the blood platelets in the aetiogenesis of arterial lesions has been underlined in recent years by studies of platelet elastase and above all the mitogenic factor of smooth muscle cells. A truly thrombogenic theory of atherosclerosis can now be envisaged. In the context of arterial thromboses, it is interaction between the damaged vessel wall, the lesion most often being atherosclerosis, and blood platelets which gives rise to the thrombus. In certain conditions such as diabetes abnormalities in the interaction between platelets and vessel walls may favour the development of vascular lesions and thromboses. With regard to venous thrombosis, the participation of the vessel and/or platelets is less clear. However, recently described platelet procoagulant activities could activate coagulation mechanisms. Knowledge of diseases of primary haemostasis has benefited from studies of platelet-vessel interaction. Whilst the spontaneous haemorrhagic syndrome of major thrombocytopaenia remains mysterious, platelet membrane molecular abnormalities in thrombopathies such as Bernard Soulier syndrome or thrombasthenia offer an explanation for their mechanisms. By their interaction with the vessel, platelets finally participate in mechanisms of inflammation, immunological conflicts, disseminated intravascular coagulation and metastatic dissemination. PMID:7465376

  12. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  13. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  14. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  15. Response to platelet-activating factor in human platelets stored and aged in plasma. Decrease in aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.D.; Morrison, W.J.; Klachko, D.M.

    1989-07-01

    Human platelet concentrates were stored in polyolefin bags at 22 to 24 degrees C on a horizontal shaker for up to 8 days. At different intervals, aliquots of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were removed aseptically and five variables, i.e., platelet counts, morphology, platelet-activating factor (PAF)-stimulated aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and (3H)PAF binding to platelet receptors, were studied. The number of platelets did not change during the 8 days of storage. Scanning electron microscopy of the platelets revealed a gradual morphologic change from biconcave flat discs to irregular, crenated forms. The PAF-induced aggregation of platelets declined with time of storage. A decrease to 50 percent of the Day 1 aggregatory response to PAF was evident on Day 2, and there was a further decline to about 20 percent by Day 6. Similarly, PAF receptor-coupled phosphoinositide turnover, as monitored by 32P incorporation into individual phosphoinositides, decreased dramatically with storage. After 2 to 3 days of storage, the phosphoinositide turnover was reduced to 50 percent of the original response, and it continued to decline to about 25 percent of original response by Day 5 or 6. The binding of (3H)PAF to washed human platelets indicated subtle changes between Days 2 and 4, which became more noticeable by Day 6. These results have raised the possibility of changes in the number of the receptors and/or their affinity for the ligand during storage. We conclude that although the number of platelets was maintained during storage for 8 days, a general deterioration of their responses to PAF occurred at the levels of cell surface receptor, transmembrane signaling (phosphoinositide turnover), and response (aggregation).

  16. Nanotechnology: Platelet mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2015-10-01

    Cloaking drug-loaded nanoparticles with platelet membranes enhances the drugs' abilities to target desired cells and tissues. This technology might improve treatments for cardiovascular and infectious diseases. See Letter p.118

  17. Platelet-delivered therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lyde, R; Sabatino, D; Sullivan, S K; Poncz, M

    2015-06-01

    We have proposed that modified platelets could potentially be used to correct intrinsic platelet defects as well as for targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules to sights of vascular injury. Ectopic expression of proteins within α-granules prior to platelet activation has been achieved for several proteins, including urokinase, factor (F) VIII, and partially for FIX. Potential uses of platelet-directed therapeutics will be discussed, focusing on targeted delivery of urokinase as a thromboprophylactic agent and FVIII for the treatment of hemophilia A patients with intractable inhibitors. This presentation will discuss new strategies that may be useful in the care of patients with vascular injury as well as remaining challenges and limitations of these approaches. PMID:26149015

  18. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: For unknown reasons (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP ) Side effect of certain drugs such ... 2012:chap 134. Read More Antibody Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Platelet count Serum globulin electrophoresis Thrombocytopenia Update ...

  19. Platelets Roll on Stimulated Endothelium in vivo: An Interaction Mediated by Endothelial P-Selectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenette, Paul S.; Johnson, Robert C.; Hynes, Richard O.; Wagner, Denisa D.

    1995-08-01

    P-selectin, found in storage granules of platelets and endothelial cells, can be rapidly expressed upon stimulation. Mice lacking this membrane receptor exhibit a severe impairment of leukocyte rolling. We observed that, in addition to leukocytes, platelets were rolling in mesenteric venules of wild-type mice. To investigate the role of P-selectin in this process, resting or activated platelets from wild-type or P-selectin-deficient mice were fluorescently labeled and transfused into recipients of either genotype. Platelet-endothelial interactions were monitored by intravital microscopy. We observed rolling of either wild-type or P-selectin-deficient resting platelets on wild-type endothelium. Endothelial stimulation with the calcium ionophore A23187 increased the number of platelets rolling 4-fold. Activated P-selectin-deficient platelets behaved similarly, whereas activated wild-type platelets bound to leukocytes and were seen rolling together. Platelets of either genotype, resting or activated, interacted minimally with mutant endothelium even after A23187 treatment. The velocity of platelet rolling was 6- to 9-fold greater than that of leukocytes. Our results demonstrate that (i) platelets roll on endothelium in vivo, (ii) this interaction requires endothelial but not platelet P-selectin, and (iii) platelet rolling appears to be independent of platelet activation, indicating constitutive expression of a P-selectin ligand(s) on platelets. We have therefore observed an interesting parallel between platelets and leukocytes in that both of these blood cell types roll on stimulated vessel wall and that this process is dependent on the expression of endothelial P-selectin.

  20. Platelets and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Simeone, Paola; Liani, Rossella; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Platelet activation plays a key role in atherothrombosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and increased in vivo platelet activation with enhanced thromboxane (TX) biosynthesis has been reported in patients with impairment of glucose metabolism even in the earlier stages of disease and in the preclinical phases. In this regards, platelets appear as addresses and players carrying and transducing metabolic derangement into vascular injury. The present review critically addresses key pathophysiological aspects including (i) hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and insulin resistance as determinants and predictors of platelet activation, (ii) inflammatory mediators derived from platelets, such as soluble CD40 ligand, soluble CD36, Dickkopf-1 and probably soluble receptor for advanced glycation-end-products (sRAGE), which expand the functional repertoire of platelets from players of hemostasis and thrombosis to powerful amplifiers of inflammation by promoting the release of cytokines and chemokines, cell activation, and cell-cell interactions; (iii) molecular mechanisms underpinning the less-than-expected antithrombotic protection by aspirin (ASA), despite regular antiplatelet prophylaxis at the standard dosing regimen, and (iv) stratification of patients deserving different antiplatelet strategies, based on the metabolic phenotype. Taken together, these pathophysiological aspects may contribute to the development of promising mechanism-based therapeutic strategies to reduce the progression of atherothrombosis in diabetic subjects. PMID:25986598

  1. Platelet Dynamics during Natural and Pharmacologically Induced Torpor and Forced Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    de Vrij, Edwin L.; Vogelaar, Pieter C.; Goris, Maaike; Houwertjes, Martin C.; Herwig, Annika; Dugbartey, George J.; Boerema, Ate S.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Henning, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Hibernation is an energy-conserving behavior in winter characterized by two phases: torpor and arousal. During torpor, markedly reduced metabolic activity results in inactivity and decreased body temperature. Arousal periods intersperse the torpor bouts and feature increased metabolism and euthermic body temperature. Alterations in physiological parameters, such as suppression of hemostasis, are thought to allow hibernators to survive periods of torpor and arousal without organ injury. While the state of torpor is potentially procoagulant, due to low blood flow, increased viscosity, immobility, hypoxia, and low body temperature, organ injury due to thromboembolism is absent. To investigate platelet dynamics during hibernation, we measured platelet count and function during and after natural torpor, pharmacologically induced torpor and forced hypothermia. Splenectomies were performed to unravel potential storage sites of platelets during torpor. Here we show that decreasing body temperature drives thrombocytopenia during torpor in hamster with maintained functionality of circulating platelets. Interestingly, hamster platelets during torpor do not express P-selectin, but expression is induced by treatment with ADP. Platelet count rapidly restores during arousal and rewarming. Platelet dynamics in hibernation are not affected by splenectomy before or during torpor. Reversible thrombocytopenia was also induced by forced hypothermia in both hibernating (hamster) and non-hibernating (rat and mouse) species without changing platelet function. Pharmacological torpor induced by injection of 5′-AMP in mice did not induce thrombocytopenia, possibly because 5′-AMP inhibits platelet function. The rapidness of changes in the numbers of circulating platelets, as well as marginal changes in immature platelet fractions upon arousal, strongly suggest that storage-and-release underlies the reversible thrombocytopenia during natural torpor. Possibly, margination of platelets

  2. Use of 8-methoxypsoralen and long-wavelength ultraviolet radiation for decontamination of platelet concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Wiesehahn, G.P.; Morel, P.A.; Corash, L. )

    1989-07-01

    Transmission of viral diseases through blood products remains an unsolved problem in transfusion medicine. We have developed a psoralen photochemical system for decontamination of platelet concentrates in which platelets are treated with long wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA, 320-400 nm) in the presence of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP). Bacteria, RNA viruses, and DNA viruses ranging in genome size from 1.2 x 10(6) daltons, encompassing the size range of human pathogens, were inoculated into platelet concentrates and subjected to treatment. This system inactivated 25 to 30 logs/h of bacteria Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus, 6 logs/h of bacteriophage fd, 0.9 log/h of bacteriophage R17 and 1.1 logs/h of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in platelet concentrates maintained in standard storage bags. Platelet integrity and in vitro function before, immediately following photochemical treatment, and during prolonged storage after treatment, were evaluated by measuring: (1) extracellular pH; (2) platelet yields; (3) extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels; (4) platelet morphology; (5) platelet aggregation responsiveness; (6) thromboxane beta-2 (TXB-2) production; (7) dense body secretion; and (8) alpha granule secretion. These assays demonstrated that this photochemical inactivation system inactivated bacteria and viruses in platelet concentrates with minimal adverse effects on the in vitro function of platelets in comparison to untreated control concentrates maintained under current, standard blood bank conditions.

  3. Clinical uses of radiolabeled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.; Christian, P.E.; Baker, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    Platelets were first successfully radiolabeled in 1953. At that time, investigators were primarily interested in developing a technique to accurately measure platelet life span in both normal and thrombocytopenic patients. Studies using platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr have shown shortened platelet survival times in a number of diseases including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. More recently, labels such as /sup 111/In have been developed that allow in vivo imaging of platelets. Indium-111 platelets are being used to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases.

  4. Should any genetic defect affecting α-granules in platelets be classified as gray platelet syndrome?

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T; Nurden, Paquita

    2016-07-01

    There is much current interest in the role of the platelet storage pool of α-granule proteins both in hemostasis and non-hemostatic events. As well as in the arrest of bleeding, the secreted proteins participate in wound healing, inflammation, and innate immunity while in pathology they may be actors in arterial thrombosis and atherosclerosis as well as cancer and metastasis. For a long time, gray platelet syndrome (GPS) has been regarded as the classic inherited platelet disorder caused by an absence of α-granules and their contents. While NBEAL2 is the major source of mutations in GPS, other gene variants may give rise to significant α-granule deficiencies in platelets. These include GATA1, VPS33B, or VIPAS39 in the arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome and now GFI1B. Nevertheless, many phenotypic differences are associated with mutations in these genes. This critical review was aimed to assess genotype/phenotype variability in disorders of platelet α-granule biogenesis and to urge caution in grouping all genetic defects of α-granules as GPS. Am. J. Hematol. 91:714-718, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26971401

  5. Calmodulin antagonists induce platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Yan, Rong; Liu, Guanglei; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) antagonists induce apoptosis in various tumor models and inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, thus some of which have been extensively used as anti-cancer agents. In platelets, CaM has been found to bind directly to the cytoplasmic domains of several platelet receptors. Incubation of platelets with CaM antagonists impairs the receptors-related platelet functions. However, it is still unknown whether CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), tamoxifen (TMX), and trifluoperazine (TFP) induce apoptotic events in human platelets, including depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. CaM antagonists did not incur platelet activation as detected by P-selectin surface expression and PAC-1 binding. However, ADP-, botrocetin-, and alpha-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor surface were significantly reduced in platelets pre-treated with CaM antagonists. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels were obviously elevated by both W7 and TMX, and membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced apoptotic events in platelets induced by W7. Therefore, these findings indicate that CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. The elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels may be involved in the regulation of CaM antagonists-induced platelet apoptosis. PMID:20172594

  6. Impaired platelet activation and cAMP homeostasis in MRP4-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Decouture, Benoit; Dreano, Elise; Belleville-Rolland, Tiphaine; Kuci, Orjeta; Dizier, Blandine; Bazaa, Amine; Coqueran, Bérard; Lompre, Anne-Marie; Denis, Cécile V.; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Gaussem, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Molecules that reduce the level of cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) in the platelet cytosol, such as adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP) secreted from dense granules, trigger platelet activation. Therefore, any change in the distribution and/or availability of cyclic nucleotides or ADP may interfere with platelet reactivity. In this study, we evaluated the role of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4, or ABCC4), a nucleotide transporter, in platelet functions in vivo and in vitro by investigating MRP4-deficient mice. MRP4 deletion resulted in a slight increase in platelet count but had no impact on platelet ultrastructure. In MRP4-deficient mice, the arterial occlusion was delayed and the tail bleeding time was prolonged. In a model of platelet depletion and transfusion mimicking a platelet-specific knockout, mice injected with MRP4−/− platelets also showed a significant increase in blood loss compared with mice injected with wild-type platelets. Defective thrombus formation and platelet activation were confirmed in vitro by studying platelet adhesion to collagen in flow conditions, integrin αIIbβ3 activation, washed platelet secretion, and aggregation induced by low concentrations of proteinase-activated receptor 4–activating peptide, U46619, or ADP. We found no role of MRP4 in ADP dense-granule storage, but MRP4 redistributed cAMP from the cytosol to dense granules, as confirmed by increased vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation in MRP4-deficient platelets. These data suggest that MRP4 promotes platelet aggregation by modulating the cAMP–protein kinase A signaling pathway, suggesting that MRP4 might serve as a target for novel antiplatelet agents. PMID:26316625

  7. Polyphosphate, Platelets, and Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Richard J.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2015-01-01

    While we have understood the basic outline of the enzymes and reactions that make up the traditional blood coagulation cascade for many years, recently our appreciation of the complexity of these interactions has greatly increased. This has resulted in unofficial “revisions” of the coagulation cascade to include new amplification pathways and connections between the standard coagulation cascade enzymes, as well as the identification of extensive connections between the immune system and the coagulation cascade. The discovery that polyphosphate is stored in platelet dense granules and is secreted during platelet activation has resulted in a recent burst of interest in the role of this ancient molecule in human biology. Here we review the increasingly complex role of platelet polyphosphate in hemostasis, thrombosis, and inflammation that has been uncovered in recent years, as well as novel therapeutics centered on modulating polyphosphate’s roles in coagulation and inflammation. PMID:25976958

  8. Platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis: Novel mechanisms of fibrinogen-independent platelet aggregation and fibronectin-mediated protein wave of hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yan; Carrim, Naadiya; Wang, Yiming; Gallant, Reid C.; Marshall, Alexandra; Ni, Heyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Platelets are small anucleate cells generated from megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. Although platelet generation, maturation, and clearance are still not fully understood, significant progress has been made in the last 1-2 decades. In blood circulation, platelets can quickly adhere and aggregate at sites of vascular injury, forming the platelet plug (i.e. the first wave of hemostasis). Activated platelets can also provide negatively charged phosphatidylserine-rich membrane surface that enhances cell-based thrombin generation, which facilitates blood coagulation (i.e. the second wave of hemostasis). Platelets therefore play central roles in hemostasis. However, the same process of hemostasis may also cause thrombosis and vessel occlusion, which are the most common mechanisms leading to heart attack and stroke following ruptured atherosclerotic lesions. In this review, we will introduce the classical mechanisms and newly discovered pathways of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis, including fibrinogen-independent platelet aggregation and thrombosis, and the plasma fibronectin-mediated “protein wave” of hemostasis that precedes the classical first wave of hemostasis. Furthermore, we briefly discuss the roles of platelets in inflammation and atherosclerosis and the potential strategies to control atherothrombosis. PMID:26541706

  9. In vitro Quality of Platelets with Low Plasma Carryover Treated with Ultraviolet C Light for Pathogen Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lacey; Hyland, Ryan; Tan, Shereen; Tolksdorf, Frank; Sumian, Chryslain; Seltsam, Axel; Marks, Denese

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The THERAFLEX UV-Platelets system uses shortwave ultraviolet C light (UVC, 254 nm) to inactivate pathogens in platelet components. Plasma carryover influences pathogen inactivation and platelet quality following treatment. The plasma carryover in the standard platelets produced by our institution are below the intended specification (<30%). Methods A pool and split study was carried out comparing untreated and UVC-treated platelets with <30% plasma carryover (n = 10 pairs). This data was compared to components that met specifications (>30% plasma). The platelets were tested over storage for in vitro quality. Results Platelet metabolism was accelerated following UVC treatment, as demonstrated by increased glucose consumption and lactate production. UVC treatment caused increased externalization of phosphatidylserine on platelets and microparticles, activation of the GPIIb/IIIa receptor (PAC-1 binding), and reduced hypotonic shock response. Platelet function, as measured with thrombelastogram, was not affected by UVC treatment. Components with <30% plasma were similar to those meeting specification with the exception of enhanced glycolytic metabolism. Conclusion This in vitro analysis demonstrates that treatment of platelets with <30% plasma carryover with the THERAFLEX UV-Platelets system affects some aspects of platelet metabolism and activation, although in vitro platelet function was not negatively impacted. This study also provides evidence that the treatment specifications of plasma carryover could be extended to below 30%. PMID:27403091

  10. Effects of platelet inhibitors on propyl gallate-induced platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hongyan; Kovics, Richard; Jackson, Van; Remick, Daniel G

    2004-04-01

    Propyl gallate (PG) is a platelet agonist characterized by inducing platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activity. The mechanisms of platelet activation following PG stimulation were examined by pre-incubating platelets with well-defined platelet inhibitors using platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, activated plasma clotting time, and annexin V binding by flow cytometry. PG-induced platelet aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple proteins were substantially abolished by aspirin, apyrase, and abciximab (c7E3), suggesting that PG is associated with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase 1, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, respectively. The phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal enzyme pp60(c-src) increased following PG stimulation, but was blunted by pre-incubation of platelets with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3, suggesting that tyrosine kinase is important for the signal transduction of platelet aggregation. Propyl gallate also activates platelet factor 3 by decreasing the platelet coagulation time and increasing platelet annexin V binding. Platelet incubation with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3 did not alter PG-induced platelet coagulation and annexin V binding. The results suggest that platelet factor 3 activation and membrane phosphotidylserine expression were not involved with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. PG is unique in its ability to stimulate platelet aggregation and coagulation simultaneously, and platelet inhibitors in this study affect only platelet aggregation but not platelet coagulation. PMID:15060414

  11. Platelet transport in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, Mathilde; Le Goff, Anne; Blin, Antoine; Pujos, Justine; Magniez, Aurélie; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Blood platelets are small enucleated cells responsible for the arrest of bleeding. These cells have the ability to tether and translocate on injured vascular endothelium, thanks to a specific interaction between a receptor of their membrane and a protein expressed by the cells composing the inner wall of the vessel, the von Willebrand factor (VWF). Others cells have such abilities of rolling. Leucocytes, for example, translocate on surface due to a specific interaction between selectin molecules and their respective glycoprotein ligands. These kinds of cells present two modes of transport: they can either be advected by the flux, or translocate on surfaces due to specific ligand-receptor interactions. Our work consists first in studying experimentally the transport of platelets along a microchannel and then in modeling this particular cell transport. Due to these two modes of transport along a channel, platelets adhering to the surface are not equally distributed along the channel axis. We describe the evolution of the density of platelets with time and distance.

  12. Evaluation of platelets prepared by apheresis and stored for 5 days. In vitro and in vivo studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shanwell, A.; Gulliksson, H.; Berg, B.K.; Jansson, B.A.; Svensson, L.A.

    1989-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of storage on apheresis platelets collected with a closed-system blood cell separator, an in vitro investigation was performed, with measurements of pH, lactate, ATP, the ratio of ATP to the total adenine nucleotide content, and adenylate kinase. Unmodified apheresis platelets and apheresis platelets with plasma added were compared with conventional platelets stored in PL-1240 or PL-732 plastic containers. During 6 days of storage, there were similar changes in all variables with one exception: the extracellular activity of adenylate kinase was lower in apheresis platelets with plasma than in the other three groups (p less than 0.01). In vivo studies were carried out with 111Indium-labeled autologous platelets in eight volunteers. Apheresis platelets with 100 mL of plasma added were stored in two 1000-mL containers (PL-732) at 22 degrees C during agitation. Platelets from one of the containers were labeled with 111Indium and transfused into the volunteer within 24 hours. Platelets from the other container were labeled after 5 days of storage and transfused into the same donor. There were no significant differences between apheresis platelets stored for 1 day and those stored for 5 days: the mean percentage of recovery was 58.4 and 57.6 percent, t1/2 was 69 and 67 hours, and the survival time was 5.5 and 5.6 days, respectively.

  13. Platelet dysfunction-eosinophilia syndrome in parasitized Venezuelan children.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette; Sifontes, Luz Núñez; Feijoo, Rosa; Certad, Gabriela; Arenas-Pinto, Alejandro; Pocaterra, Leonor; Ferrara, Guiseppe; Giménez, Rita; Torres, Obdulita; Goldstein, Carlos; Bosch, Norma

    2005-08-01

    Platelet dysfunction was detected in six children with purpura and eosinophilia. We conducted clinical evaluations, hematologic and platelet function tests, clotting studies (bleeding time, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, factor XIII, factor VIII, and von Willebrand factor), assays for IgG and IgM antibodies to platelets, and a search for stool parasites. Mild bleeding phenomena (ecchymoses, petechiae, epistaxis, and gingival) were transient. All children showed intestinal parasites and marked eosinophilia (mean count = 2,615.2 cells/muL, 95% confidence interval = 1,259.6-5,429.8). Main abnormalities included prolonged bleeding times (50%) and defective aggregation with collagen (100%) adrenaline (66%), or ADP (66%). Antibodies to platelets were not detected. Anti-parasite therapy reversed the hemorrhagic manifestations and normalized eosinophil counts and platelet alterations. No relationship could be established between excess eosinophils, intensity of bleeding, or type and degree of platelet abnormalities. Thrombocytopathic features mimicked the intrinsic defect of storage pool disease. The possible pathogenic roles of eosinophilia and parasitism are reviewed. This is the first report of this pathologic combination in Latin American children. PMID:16103609

  14. Arachidonic acid metabolism in the platelets and neutrophils of diabetic rabbit and human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    An alteration of arachidonic acid metabolism to prostaglandins and leukotrienes from platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes respectively is evident in subjects with diabetes mellitus. There is evidence of altered platelet/vascular wall interactions in diabetes mellitus and evidence that polymorphonuclear leukocytes influence the vascular walls. Theories on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis include both blood cells. Platelet hypersensitivity is evident in those platelets from the alloxan-induced diabetic rabbit either suspended in plasma or buffer. Arachidonic acid- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation, release of /sup 14/serotonin, and T x B/sub 2/ and 12-HETE production is enhanced when responses of diabetic platelets are compared to control platelets. Control rabbit neutrophils produce more LTB/sub 4/, LTB/sub 4/ isomers and 5-HETE than diabetic rabbits neutrophils. Decreased synthesis from diabetic rabbit neutrophils is not explained by increased catabolism of LTB/sub 4/, reesterification of 5-HETE, or increased eicosanoid formation. These experiments demonstrate both platelet and neutrophil dysfunction in diabetic subjects. Because of the involvement of these cells in regulating circulatory homeostatis, abnormal behavior could aggravate the atherosclerotic process. Platelet and neutrophil dysfunctions are noted before macroscopic vascular lesions are apparent suggesting an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  15. Dietary manipulation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Bachmair, E M; Ostertag, L M; Zhang, X; de Roos, B

    2014-11-01

    Activated platelets contribute to plaque formation within blood vessels in the early and late stages of atherogenesis, and therefore they have been proposed as risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Anti-platelet drugs, such as aspirin, are now the most prescribed pharmacological treatment in Europe. Certain dietary bioactives also beneficially affect platelet function, and with less side effects, albeit that effects are generally more subtle. Therefore, consumption of dietary bioactives could play a role in the prevention of atherothrombotic vascular disease. Here we review the efficacy of dietary treatment strategies, especially those involving certain dietary fatty acids and polyphenols, to modulate platelet function in healthy subjects or in patients with cardiovascular disease. Variation in study populations, small study sizes and lack of comparability between methods to assess platelet function currently limit robust evidence on the efficacy of dietary bioactives in healthy subjects or specific patient groups. Also, limited knowledge of the metabolism of dietary bioactives, and therefore of the bioavailability of bioactive ingredients, restricts our ability to identify the most effective dietary regimes to improve platelet function. Implementation of uniform point-of-care tests to assess platelet function, and enhanced knowledge of the efficacy by which specific dietary compounds and their metabolites affect platelet function, may enable the identification of functional anti-platelet ingredients that are eligible for a health claim, or combined treatment strategies, including both pharmacological anti-platelet treatment as well as dietary intervention, to tackle atherothrombotic vascular disease. PMID:24858060

  16. Platelet satellitism: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural morphology of platelet-polymorph (platelet-polymorphonuclear leukocyte) rosettes was investigated in EDTA-anticoagulated blood obtained from two patients who exhibited the phenomenon of platelet satellitism. Most of the platelet profiles were attached to the polymorph surface by broad areas of contact. Examination of these broad areas of contact at high magnification revealed an intercellular material of low electron density. This material appeared to form strands, which bridged the intercellular space and spanned the entire area formed by the apposing plasma membranes. Phagocytosis of entire platelets was only observed in 1 case. The platelet profiles that participated in rosette formation revealed a large number of glycogen particles, compared with unattached platelets. Ultrastructural examination of "stress" platelets obtained from five normal subjects treated with steroids similarly showed a large number of glycogen particles, although no rosette formation or phagocytosis of platelets was observed. The etiology of platelet satellitism is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7223859

  17. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  18. Platelet Immobilization on Supported Phospholipid Bilayers for Single Platelet Studies.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Eva; Donati, Alessia; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-08-23

    The worldwide cardiovascular disease (CVD) epidemic is of grave concern. A major role in the etiology of CVDs is played by the platelets (thrombocytes). Platelets are anuclear cell fragments circulating in the blood. Their primary function is to catalyze clot formation, limiting traumatic blood loss in the case of injury. The same process leads to thrombosis in the case of CVDs, which are commonly managed with antiplatelet therapy. Platelets also have other, nonhemostatic functions in wound healing, inflammation, and tissue regeneration. They play a role in the early stages of atherosclerosis and the spread of cancer through metastases. Much remains to be learned about the regulation of these diverse platelet functions under physiological and pathological conditions. Breakthroughs in this regard are expected to come from single platelet studies and systems approaches. The immobilization of platelets at surfaces is advantageous for developing such approaches, but platelets are activated when they come in contact with foreign surfaces. In this work, we develop and validate a protocol for immobilizing platelets on supported lipid bilayers without activation due to immobilization. Our protocol can therefore be used for studying platelets with a wide variety of surface-sensitive techniques. PMID:27438059

  19. Platelets in Inflammation and Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nording, Henry M.; Seizer, Peter; Langer, Harald F.

    2015-01-01

    Platelets contribute to processes beyond thrombus formation and may play a so far underestimated role as an immune cell in various circumstances. This review outlines immune functions of platelets in host defense, but also how they may contribute to mechanisms of infectious diseases. A particular emphasis is placed on the interaction of platelets with other immune cells. Furthermore, this article outlines the features of atherosclerosis as an inflammatory vascular disease highlighting the role of platelet crosstalk with cellular and soluble factors involved in atheroprogression. Understanding, how platelets influence these processes of vascular remodeling will shed light on their role for tissue homeostasis beyond intravascular thrombosis. Finally, translational implications of platelet-mediated inflammation in atherosclerosis are discussed. PMID:25798138

  20. Applications of ultraviolet light in the preparation of platelet concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pamphilon, D.H.; Corbin, S.A.; Saunders, J.; Tandy, N.P.

    1989-06-01

    Passenger lymphocytes in platelet concentrates (PCs) may induce the formation of lymphocytotoxic antibodies (LCTAbs) and subsequent refractoriness to platelet transfusions. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can prevent lymphocytes' acting as stimulator or responder cells in mixed-lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) and could theoretically prevent LCTAb formation in vivo. A system has been devised for the delivery of UV irradiation to PCs; platelet storage characteristics and MLRs were evaluated in UV-irradiated PCs harvested from healthy donors with the Haemonetics V50 and PCS cell separators. MLR and response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation were abolished by a dose of 3000 joules per m2 at a mean wavelength of 310 nm. Platelet aggregatory responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ristocetin, collagen and epinephrine, hypotonic shock response, and pH showed no important differences when control PCs and PCs irradiated as above were compared during 5 days of storage in Fenwal PL-1240 packs. Lactate production during storage was significantly higher in UV-treated PCs (p less than 0.001), but values did not exceed 20 mmol per L. UV transmission at 310 nm in standard blood product containers, including the Fenwal PL-146, PL-1240, and PL-732, was low (less than 30%), but it was acceptable in the Delmed Cryostorage and DuPont SteriCell packs (greater than 50%). UV irradiation may provide a simple and inexpensive means of producing nonimmunogenic PCs.

  1. Human blood platelets at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, D. MACN.; Ausprunk, D.; Blevins, D.; Chao, F. C.; Curby, W.

    1987-01-01

    A set of freshly collected and separated human platelet suspensions were transported, in three types of plastic containers, on a 6 day, 2 hr mission of the orbiter Columbia to study the effect of prolonged exposure of human blood cells to microgravity. A controlled environment at a temperature of 22 + or - 1 deg with air flow was provided and another set of samples held on the ground acted as controls. Paired comparisons of platelets at ug versus controls at lxg revealed superior platelet survival at microgravity. When viewed in terms of plastic type, ug platelets in containers fabricated from PVC-TOTM displayed the best overall postflight viability.

  2. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stimulate Platelets and Facilitate Thrombus Formation through Platelet CLEC-2: Implications in Atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Osamu; Hokamura, Kazuya; Shirai, Toshiaki; Osada, Makoto; Tsukiji, Nagaharu; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Umemura, Kazuo; Asada, Yujiro; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Ozaki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The platelet receptor CLEC-2 is involved in thrombosis/hemostasis, but its ligand, podoplanin, is expressed only in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. We investigated CLEC-2 ligands in vessel walls. Recombinant CLEC-2 bound to early atherosclerotic lesions and normal arterial walls, co-localizing with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry showed that recombinant CLEC-2, but not an anti-podoplanin antibody, bound to VSMCs, suggesting that CLEC-2 ligands other than podoplanin are present in VSMCs. VSMCs stimulated platelet granule release and supported thrombus formation under flow, dependent on CLEC-2. The time to occlusion in a FeCl3-induced animal thrombosis model was significantly prolonged in the absence of CLEC-2. Because the internal elastic lamina was lacerated in our FeCl3-induced model, we assume that the interaction between CLEC-2 and its ligands in VSMCs induces thrombus formation. Protein arrays and Biacore analysis were used to identify S100A13 as a CLEC-2 ligand in VSMCs. However, S100A13 is not responsible for the above-described VSMC-induced platelet activation, because S100A13 is not expressed on the surface of normal VSMCs. S100A13 was released upon oxidative stress and expressed in the luminal area of atherosclerotic lesions. Suspended S100A13 did not activate platelets, but immobilized S100A13 significantly increased thrombus formation on collagen-coated surfaces. Taken together, we proposed that VSMCs stimulate platelets through CLEC-2, possibly leading to thrombus formation after plaque erosion and stent implantation, where VSMCs are exposed to blood flow. Furthermore, we identified S100A13 as one of the ligands on VSMCs. PMID:26418160

  3. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stimulate Platelets and Facilitate Thrombus Formation through Platelet CLEC-2: Implications in Atherothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Osamu; Hokamura, Kazuya; Shirai, Toshiaki; Osada, Makoto; Tsukiji, Nagaharu; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Umemura, Kazuo; Asada, Yujiro; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Ozaki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The platelet receptor CLEC-2 is involved in thrombosis/hemostasis, but its ligand, podoplanin, is expressed only in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. We investigated CLEC-2 ligands in vessel walls. Recombinant CLEC-2 bound to early atherosclerotic lesions and normal arterial walls, co-localizing with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry showed that recombinant CLEC-2, but not an anti-podoplanin antibody, bound to VSMCs, suggesting that CLEC-2 ligands other than podoplanin are present in VSMCs. VSMCs stimulated platelet granule release and supported thrombus formation under flow, dependent on CLEC-2. The time to occlusion in a FeCl3-induced animal thrombosis model was significantly prolonged in the absence of CLEC-2. Because the internal elastic lamina was lacerated in our FeCl3-induced model, we assume that the interaction between CLEC-2 and its ligands in VSMCs induces thrombus formation. Protein arrays and Biacore analysis were used to identify S100A13 as a CLEC-2 ligand in VSMCs. However, S100A13 is not responsible for the above-described VSMC-induced platelet activation, because S100A13 is not expressed on the surface of normal VSMCs. S100A13 was released upon oxidative stress and expressed in the luminal area of atherosclerotic lesions. Suspended S100A13 did not activate platelets, but immobilized S100A13 significantly increased thrombus formation on collagen-coated surfaces. Taken together, we proposed that VSMCs stimulate platelets through CLEC-2, possibly leading to thrombus formation after plaque erosion and stent implantation, where VSMCs are exposed to blood flow. Furthermore, we identified S100A13 as one of the ligands on VSMCs. PMID:26418160

  4. Arf6 controls platelet spreading and clot retraction via integrin αIIbβ3 trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yunjie; Joshi, Smita; Xiang, Binggang; Kanaho, Yasunori; Li, Zhenyu; Bouchard, Beth A.; Moncman, Carole L.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet and megakaryocyte endocytosis is important for loading certain granule cargo (ie, fibrinogen [Fg] and vascular endothelial growth factor); however, the mechanisms of platelet endocytosis and its functional acute effects are understudied. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate–ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is a small guanosine triphosphate–binding protein that regulates endocytic trafficking, especially of integrins. To study platelet endocytosis, we generated platelet-specific Arf6 knockout (KO) mice. Arf6 KO platelets had less associated Fg suggesting that Arf6 affects αIIbβ3-mediated Fg uptake and/or storage. Other cargo was unaffected. To measure Fg uptake, mice were injected with biotinylated- or fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)–labeled Fg. Platelets from the injected Arf6 KO mice showed lower accumulation of tagged Fg, suggesting an uptake defect. Ex vivo, Arf6 KO platelets were also defective in FITC-Fg uptake and storage. Immunofluorescence analysis showed initial trafficking of FITC-Fg to a Rab4-positive compartment followed by colocalization with Rab11-positive structures, suggesting that platelets contain and use both early and recycling endosomes. Resting and activated αIIbβ3 levels, as measured by flow cytometry, were unchanged; yet, Arf6 KO platelets exhibited enhanced spreading on Fg and faster clot retraction. This was not the result of alterations in αIIbβ3 signaling, because myosin light-chain phosphorylation and Rac1/RhoA activation were unaffected. Consistent with the enhanced clot retraction and spreading, Arf6 KO mice showed no deficits in tail bleeding or FeCl3-induced carotid injury assays. Our studies present the first mouse model for defining the functions of platelet endocytosis and suggest that altered integrin trafficking may affect the efficacy of platelet function. PMID:26738539

  5. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process. PMID:27338300

  6. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states. PMID:27228656

  7. ENDOTHELIUM-DERIVED INHIBITORS EFFICIENTLY ATTENUATE THE AGGREGATION AND ADHESION RESPONSES OF REFRIGERATED PLATELETS

    PubMed Central

    Reddoch, Kristin M.; Montgomery, Robbie K.; Rodriguez, Armando C.; Meledeo, M. Adam; Pidcoke, Heather F.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.; Cap, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Refrigeration of platelets (4°C) provides the possibility of improving transfusion practice over the current standard-of-care, room temperature (RT) storage. However, the increased level of platelet activation observed at 4°C in vitro is cause for concern of uncontrolled thrombosis in vivo. In this study, we assessed the safety of 4°C-stored platelets by evaluating their response to physiologic inhibitors prostacyclin (PGI2) and nitric oxide (NO). Apheresis platelets were collected from healthy donors (n = 4) and tested on Day 1 (fresh) or Day 5 (RT- and 4°C-stored) after treatment with PGI2 and NO or not for: thrombin generation; factor V (FV) activity; intracellular free calcium, cAMP and cGMP; ATP release; TRAP-induced activation; aggregation to ADP, collagen, and TRAP, and adhesion to collagen under arterial flow. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey test for multiple comparisons, with significance set at P < 0.05. Treatment with inhibitors increased intracellular cAMP and cGMP levels in fresh and stored platelets. Thrombin generation was significantly accelerated in stored platelets consistent with increased factor V levels, PS exposure, CD62P expression, intracellular free calcium, and ATP release. While treatment with inhibitors did not attenuate thrombin generation in stored platelets, activation, aggregation, and adhesion responses were inhibited by both PGI2 and NO in 4°C-stored platelets. In contrast, though RT-stored platelets were activated, they did not adhere or aggregate in response to agonists. Thus, refrigerated platelets maintain their intracellular machinery, are responsive to agonists and platelet function inhibitors, and perform hemostatically better than RT-stored platelets. PMID:26555740

  8. Platelet-rich plasma as treatment for persistent ocular epithelial defects.

    PubMed

    Ronci, Corrado; Ferraro, Angelo Salvatore; Lanti, Alessandro; Missiroli, Filippo; Sinopoli, Silvia; Del Proposto, Gianpaolo; Cipriani, Chiara; De Felici, Cecilia; Ricci, Federico; Ciotti, Marco; Cudillo, Laura; Arcese, William; Adorno, Gaspare

    2015-06-01

    Platelet- rich plasma (PRP) exhibits regenerative proprieties in wound healing but the biochemical mechanisms are unclear. In this study, autologous PRP with a mean value of 338 × 10(3) platelets/µL was used to treat corneal lesions of different aetiology, while homologous PRP with 1 × 10(6) platelets/µL was used to treat cornel lesions induced by a graft versus host disease. The impact of platelet count on the levels of PDGF AA and BB, VEGF, and EGF in the two PRPs was evaluated after a cycle of freezing/thawing. Treated corneal lesions healed or improved. The levels of PDGF AA and BB, VEGF, and EGF in the autologous PRP raised from 296 ± 61; 201.8 ± 24; 53 ± 14 and 8.9 ± 2 to 1017 ± 253; 924.7 ± 222; 101 ± 46.5 and 174 ± 15.5 pg/mL, while in the homologous PRP were 3.4, 4.5, 3.2 and 2 folds higher, respectively. High level of platelet counts seems not required to treat corneal lesions. PMID:25728718

  9. Quality of packed red blood cells and platelet concentrates collected by multicomponent collection using the MCS plus device.

    PubMed

    Leitner, G C; Jilma-Stohlawetz, P; Stiegler, G; Weigel, G; Horvath, M; Tanzmann, A; Höcker, P; Fischer, M B

    2003-01-01

    The demand for blood components is constantly increasing, while the exclusion criteria for donors are strengthened in order to reach maximal safety for donors and patients. To counterbalance reduced availability of volunteers, multicomponent collections (MCC) is an attractive approach to produce more than one component during a single apheresis procedure from one donor, such as packed red blood cells (PRBCs) and platelet concentrates (PCs). Further, the exposures of patients to a limited number of donors reduces the possibility of alloimmunization and transfusion-related diseases. We measured the quality of PRBCs and PCs obtained by MCC, using the MCS+ device with the LDPRBC program, Revision B, and compared them with the quality of manually collected PRBCs and PCs collected with the Revision C2 of the MCS+. We found higher pH levels and lower hemolysis assessed by means of fHb and K+ in the supernatant of PRBCs over the whole storage period of 42 days in MCC-derived PRBCs. The functional metabolism assessed by intracellular ATP was higher in PRBCs collected by MCC than in manually collected units. Furthermore, PCs obtained during MCC showed an increase in p-selectin expression on day 5 of storage compared to PCs collected with the Revision C2 of the MCS+. The p-selectin expression on MCC platelets was within the range of p-selectin expression found in PCs obtained by other apheresis devices. These results indicate less storage lesion in MCC-derived PRBCs compared to manually collected units and no compromise in the quality of MCC PCs obtained in the same apheresis procedure. PMID:12717789

  10. Genomics of platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Westbury, S K; Mumford, A D

    2016-07-01

    Genetic diagnosis in families with inherited platelet disorders (IPD) is not performed widely because of the genetic heterogeneity of this group of disorders and because in most cases, it is not possible to select single candidate genes for analysis using clinical and laboratory phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has revolutionized the scale and cost-effectiveness of genetic testing, and has emerged as a valuable tool for IPD. This review examines the potential utility of NGS as a diagnostic tool to streamline detection of causal variants in known IPD genes and as a vehicle for new gene discovery. PMID:27405671

  11. [Foot lesions].

    PubMed

    Stelzner, C; Schellong, S; Wollina, U; Machetanz, J; Unger, L

    2013-11-01

    The foot is the target organ of a variety of internal diseases. Of upmost importance is the diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). Its complex pathophysiology is driven by the diabetic neuropathy, a vastly worsening effect is contributed by infection and ischemia. Seemingly localised lesions have the potential for phlegmone and septicaemia if not diagnosed and drained early. The acral lesions of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) have unique features as well. However, their life-threatening potential is lower than that of DFS even if the limb is critical. Notably, isolated foot lesions with a mere venous cause may arise from insufficient perforator veins; the accompanying areas of haemosiderosis will lead the diagnostic path. Cholesterol embolization (blue toe syndrome, trash foot) elicits a unique clinical picture and will become more frequent with increasing numbers of catheter-based procedures. Finally, descriptions are given of podagra and of foot mycosis as disease entities not linked to perfusion. The present review focuses on the depiction of disease and its diagnosis, leaving therapeutic considerations untouched. PMID:24114468

  12. Biologic nanoparticles and platelet reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M; Hunter, Larry W; Chu, Kevin; Kaul, Vivasvat; Squillace, Phillip D; Lieske, John C; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2009-01-01

    Aim Nanosized particles (NPs) enriched in hydroxyapatite and protein isolated from calcified human tissue accelerate occlusion of endothelium-denuded arteries when injected intravenously into rabbits. Since platelet aggregation and secretory processes participate in normal hemostasis, thrombosis and vascular remodeling, experiments were designed to determine if these biologic NPs alter specific platelet functions in vitro. Methods Platelet-rich plasma was prepared from citrate anticoagulated human blood. Platelet aggregation and ATP secretion were monitored in response to thrombin receptor agonists peptide (10 μM) or convulxin (50 μg/ml) prior to and following 15 min incubation with either control solution, human-derived NPs, bovine-derived NPs or crystals of hydroxyapatite at concentrations of 50 and 150 nephelometric turbidity units. Results Incubation of platelets for 15 min with either human- or bovine-derived NPs reduced aggregation induced by thrombin receptor activator peptide and convulxin in a concentration-dependent manner. Hydroxyapatite caused a greater inhibition than either of the biologically derived NPs. Human-derived NPs increased ATP secretion by unstimulated platelets during the 15 min incubation period. Conclusion Effects of bovine-derived and hydroxyapatite NPs on basal release of ATP were both time and concentration dependent. These results suggest that biologic NPs modulate both platelet aggregation and secretion. Biologically derived NPs could modify platelet responses within the vasculature, thereby reducing blood coagulability and the vascular response to injury. PMID:19839809

  13. Platelets: production, morphology and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate, discoid cells, roughly 2-3 μm in diameter that function primarily as regulators of hemostasis, but also play secondary roles in angiogensis and innate immunity. Although human adults contain nearly one trillion platelets in circulation that are turned over every 8-10 days, our understanding of the mechanisms involved in platelet production is still incomplete. Platelets stem from large (30-100 μm) nucleated cells called megakaryocytes that reside primarily in the bone marrow. During maturation megakaryocytes extend long proplatelet elongations into sinusoidal blood vessels from which platelets ultimately release. During this process, platelets develop a number of distinguishable structural elements including: a delimited plasma membrane; invaginations of the surface membrane that form the open canalicular system (OCS); a closed-channel network of residual endoplasmic reticulum that form the dense tubular system (DTS); a spectrin-based membrane skeleton; an actin-based cytoskeletal network; a peripheral band of microtubules; and numerous organelles including α-granules, dense-granules, peroxisomes, lysosomes, and mitochondria. Proplatelet elongation and platelet production is an elaborate and complex process that defines the morphology and ultrastructure of circulating platelets, and is critical in understanding their increasingly numerous and varied biological functions. PMID:22918725

  14. Platelet abnormalities in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eneman, Benedicte; Levtchenko, Elena; van den Heuvel, Bert; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2016-08-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is a common kidney disease associated with a significantly increased risk of thrombotic events. Alterations in plasma levels of pro- and anti-coagulant factors are involved in the pathophysiology of venous thrombosis in NS. However, the fact that the risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis is elevated in NS points to an additional role for blood platelets. Increased platelet counts and platelet hyperactivity have been observed in nephrotic children. Platelet hyperaggregability, increased release of active substances, and elevated surface expression of activation-dependent platelet markers have been documented. The mechanisms underlying those platelet alterations are multifactorial and are probably due to changes in plasma levels of platelet-interfering proteins and lipid changes, as a consequence of nephrosis. The causal relationship between platelet alterations seen in NS and the occurrence of thromboembolic phenomena remains unclear. Moreover, the efficiency of prophylactic treatment using antiplatelet agents for the prevention of thrombotic complications in nephrotic patients is also unknown. Thus, antiplatelet medication is currently not generally recommended for routine prophylactic therapy. PMID:26267676

  15. Platelet adhesiveness in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S.; Pegrum, G. D.; Wolff, Sylvia; Ashton, W. L.

    1967-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been assessed on whole blood from a series of 34 diabetics and 50 control subjects using adenosine diphosphate (A.D.P.) and by adherence to glass microspherules (ballotini). Using both techniques it was possible to demonstrate a significant increase in platelet adhesiveness in the diabetic patients. PMID:5614070

  16. Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Brian J.; Seroyer, Shane T.; Filardo, Giuseppe; Bajaj, Sarvottam; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may affect soft tissue healing via growth factors released after platelet degranulation. Because of this potential benefit, clinicians have begun to inject PRP for the treatment of tendon, ligament, muscle, and cartilage injuries and early osteoarthritis. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was performed for studies relating to PRP, growth factors, and soft tissue injuries from 1990 to 2010. Relevant references from these studies were also retrieved. Results: Soft tissue injury is a major source of disability that may often be complicated by prolonged and incomplete recovery. Numerous growth factors may potentiate the healing and regeneration of tendons and ligaments. The potential benefits of biologically enhanced healing processes have led to a recent interest in the use of PRP in orthopaedic sports medicine. There has been widespread anecdotal use of PRP for muscle strains, tendinopathy, and ligament injuries and as a surgical adjuvant to rotator cuff repair, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and meniscal or labral repairs. Although the fascination with this emerging technology has led to a dramatic increase in its use, scientific data supporting this use are still in their infancy. Conclusions: The literature is replete with studies on the basic science of growth factors and their relation to the maintenance, proliferation, and regeneration of various tissues and tissue-derived cells. Despite the promising results of several animal studies, well-controlled human studies are lacking. PMID:23015939

  17. Soluble Mediators in Platelet Concentrates Modulate Dendritic Cell Inflammatory Responses in an Experimental Model of Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Perros, Alexis J; Christensen, Anne-Marie; Flower, Robert L; Dean, Melinda M

    2015-10-01

    The transfusion of platelet concentrates (PCs) is widely used to treat thrombocytopenia and severe trauma. Ex vivo storage of PCs is associated with a storage lesion characterized by partial platelet activation and the release of soluble mediators, such as soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), RANTES, and interleukin (IL)-8. An in vitro whole blood culture transfusion model was employed to assess whether mediators present in PC supernatants (PC-SNs) modulated dendritic cell (DC)-specific inflammatory responses (intracellular staining) and the overall inflammatory response (cytometric bead array). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was included in parallel cultures to model the impact of PC-SNs on cell responses following toll-like receptor-mediated pathogen recognition. The impact of both the PC dose (10%, 25%) and ex vivo storage period was investigated [day 2 (D2), day 5 (D5), day 7 (D7)]. PC-SNs alone had minimal impact on DC-specific inflammatory responses and the overall inflammatory response. However, in the presence of LPS, exposure to PC-SNs resulted in a significant dose-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-12, IL-6, IL-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β and storage-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-8. For the overall inflammatory response, IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and inflammatory protein (IP)-10 were significantly suppressed and IL-8, IL-10, and IL-1β significantly increased following exposure to PC-SNs in the presence of LPS. These data suggest that soluble mediators present in PCs significantly suppress DC function and modulate the overall inflammatory response, particularly in the presence of an infectious stimulus. Given the central role of DCs in the initiation and regulation of the immune response, these results suggest that modulation of the DC inflammatory profile is a probable mechanism contributing to transfusion-related complications. PMID:26133961

  18. Platelet-Rich Plasma and Platelet Gel: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Everts, Peter A.M.; Knape, Johannes T.A.; Weibrich, Gernot; Schönberger, Jacques P.A.M.; Hoffmann, Johannes; Overdevest, Eddy P.; Box, Henk A.M.; van Zundert, André

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Strategies to reduce blood loss and transfusion of allogeneic blood products during surgical procedures are important in modern times. The most important and well-known autologous techniques are preoperative autologous predonation, hemodilution, perioperative red cell salvage, postoperative wound blood autotransfusion, and pharmacologic modulation of the hemostatic process. At present, new developments in the preparation of preoperative autologous blood component therapy by whole blood platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) sequestration have evolved. This technique has been proven to reduce the number of allogeneic blood transfusions during open heart surgery and orthopedic operations. Moreover, platelet gel and fibrin sealant derived from PRP and PPP mixed with thrombin, respectively, can be exogenously applied to tissues to promote wound healing, bone growth, and tissue sealing. However, to our disappointment, not many well-designed scientific studies are available, and many anecdotic stories exist, whereas questions remain to be answered. We therefore decided to study perioperative blood management in more detail with emphasis on the application and production of autologous platelet gel and the use of fibrin sealant. This review addresses a large variety of aspects relevant to platelets, platelet-rich plasma, and the application of platelet gel. In addition, an overview of recent animal and human studies is presented. PMID:16921694

  19. [Effects of N-Arachidonoylethanolamine on the quality of platelets stored in M-sol platelet preservative solution in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yun-Long; Zhang, Yi; Qiao, Wen-Ben; Yu, Yuan; Lin, Ming; Zhu, Qing; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Gui-Zhi; Zhao, Cui-Yun; Nie, Xiang-Min; Liu, Hong; Chen, Yuan-Feng; Zhu, Chuan-Fu

    2013-10-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the effects of N-Arachidonoylethanolamine (ANA) on the quality of platelets (Plt) stored in Plt M-sol preservative solution at 22 ± 2°C. Samples taken from collecting apheresis Plt by the Amicus instrument and splited into two equal parts were stored in Plt M-sol preservative solution on a shaker at 22 ± 2°C. Different working concentrations of ANA (from 0.1 to 50 µmol/L) were then added into one part of stored Plt as the experimental group, the other without ANA was used as the control group. The viability of Plts stored at 22 ± 2°C for 7 days was evaluated by MTT colorimetric assay. The most effective concentration of ANA was selected and added to the subsequent experimental group. Plt count (BPC), mean Plt volume (MPV), Plt distribution width (PDW), phosphatidyl serine (PS) and soluble P-selectin were detected on the 1(st), 5(th), 7(th), 9(th) and 11(th) day of storage. The results showed that the most effective working concentration of ANA was 0.5 µmol/L, which showed significant increasing Plt viability (91.23 ± 5.44%) compared to the control group (62.54 ± 4.79%). Thus, ANA concentration at 0.5 µmol/L was choose to perform subsequent experiments. During 11 days of storage, the BPC, MPV and PDW were not changed significantly between the experimental group and control group, although there was decreasing trend in the BPC and increasing trends in MPV and PDW in the two groups. The rate of Plt PS positive was enhanced during the storage period: the rate of PS positive in experimental group increased from 7.69 ± 1.82% to 10.74 ± 1.78% while it in control group increased from 11.21 ± 2.03% to 15.37 ± 1.95%, with significant differences between the two groups (P < 0.05) on the 9(th) and 11(th) day of storage, respectively. Soluble P-selectin contents in experimental group on the 9(th) and 11(th) day of storage were 30.19 ± 2.03 ng/ml and 34.52 ± 2.64 ng/mL, respectively, while those in control group were 39

  20. Loss of PIKfyve in platelets causes a lysosomal disease leading to inflammation and thrombosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sang H.; Suzuki, Aae; Stalker, Timothy J.; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Yuhuan; McKennan, Chris; Riese, Matthew J.; Guzman, Jessica F.; Zhang, Suhong; Lian, Lurong; Joshi, Rohan; Meng, Ronghua; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Choi, John K.; Koretzky, Gary; Marks, Michael S.; Abrams, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    PIKfyve is a lipid kinase that is essential for the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(3,5)P2], and for the regulation of membrane dynamics within the endolysosomal system in mammals. Depletion of intracellular pools of PtdIns(3,5)P2 in humans and in mice is associated with neurodegeneration and early lethality. However, the biological role of PtdIns(3,5)P2 in non-neural tissues is not well understood. Platelets are hematopoietic cells that function in a variety of physiological responses. Essential to many of these functions is the activation-dependent release of effectors from distinct storage granules - alpha granules, dense granules, and lysosomes - that derive from the endolysosomal system. Here we show that platelet-specific ablation of the PIKfyve gene in mice results in accelerated arterial thrombosis, but also unexpectedly to multiorgan defects that impair development, body mass, fertility, and survival by inducing inappropriate inflammatory responses characterized by macrophage accumulation in multiple tissues. Platelet depletion in vivo significantly impairs the progression of multiorgan defects in these mice, confirming that these defects reflect a platelet-specific process. Although PIKfyve-null platelets generate and release normal amounts of alpha granule and dense granule contents, they develop defective maturation and excessive storage of lysosomal enzymes, which are released upon platelet activation. Remarkably, impairing the secretion of lysosomes from PIKfyve-deficient platelets in vivo significantly attenuates the multiorgan defects in mice, suggesting that platelet lysosome secretion contributes to pathogenesis. Together, these results demonstrate that PIKfyve is an essential regulator for the biogenesis of platelet lysosomes, and highlight the previously unrecognized and important pathological contributions of platelet lysosomes in inflammation, arterial thrombosis, and macrophage biology. PMID:25178411

  1. Quantitative study of starving platelets in a minimal medium: maintenance by acetate or plasma but not by glucose.

    PubMed

    Whisson, M E; Nakhoul, A; Howman, P; Niu, X; Guppy, M

    1993-06-01

    The requirement of donor platelets for fuels, plasma and calcium were studied using platelets washed, filtered to remove leucocytes and resuspended in a new glucose-free minimal platelet storage medium with low citrate (3 mmol/l), low buffer capacity and no calcium. This is the first study of platelets stored without plasma, glucose or calcium and it was shown that platelets continued to aggregate with collagen plus adrenaline for 48 h and showed only a 50% fall in 'swirl index', an objective morphology score, after 3 days, showing that by these criteria human platelets do not require glucose. Sodium acetate extended the storage time by between 2 and 4 days, depending on the index parameter. This is the first evidence showing that failure of platelets in these conditions is at least partly due to exhaustion of fuel, and the first evidence that acetate prolongs in vitro survival. As little as 10% low-glucose plasma extended the storage time, but it was no better than acetate. New observations using this system included a very rapid fall in pH during resuspension of the washed platelet pellet, a rising pH in the absence of added fuel and an increased pH with added acetate. PMID:8374698

  2. Shiga toxin binds to activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S A; Polanowska-Grabowska, R K; Fujii, J; Obrig, T; Gear, A R L

    2004-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is associated with acute renal failure in children and can be caused by Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli. Thrombocytopenia and formation of renal thrombi are characteristic of HUS, suggesting that platelet activation is involved in its pathogenesis. However, whether Shiga toxin directly activates platelets is controversial. The present study evaluates if potential platelet sensitization during isolation by different procedures influences platelet interaction with Shiga toxin. Platelets isolated from sodium citrate anticoagulated blood were exposed during washing to EDTA and higher g forces than platelets prepared from acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) plasma. Platelet binding of Stx was significantly higher in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets. Binding of Stx was also increased with ACD-derived platelets when activated with thrombin (1 U mL-1) and exposure of the Gb3 Stx receptor was detected only on platelets subjected to EDTA, higher g forces or thrombin. EDTA-exposed platelets lost their normal discoid shape and were larger. P-selectin (CD62P) exposure was significantly increased in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets, suggesting platelet activation. Taken together, these results suggest that direct binding of Stx occurs only on 'activated' platelets rather than on resting platelets. The ability of Stx to interact with previously activated platelets may be an important element in understanding the pathogenesis of HUS. PMID:15009469

  3. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  4. Hormonal contraception and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Saleh, A A; Ginsburg, K A; Duchon, T A; Dorey, L G; Hirata, J; Alshameeri, R S; Dombrowski, M P; Mammen, E F

    1995-05-15

    73 healthy women (29 controls, 25 using OCs, and 19 using Norplant) were selected from the clinic population at North Oakland Medical Center for inclusion in this study after obtaining informed consent. Age, race, height, weight, blood pressure, and cigarette smoking were recorded for each subject. 12 patients were on monophasic OCs while 13 were on triphasic preparations. Both hormonal contraceptive groups had used their particular contraceptive for at least 3 months prior to blood drawing. Platelet tests were performed within 2 hours of sample collection: platelet counts (PLC) and mean platelet volume (MPV) were determined on an Automated Platelet Counter (Baker 810 Platelet Analyzer). Whole blood aggregation was performed on a platelet aggregometer (Chrono-Log, Model 550) using both ADP (ADP, 5 mM) and collagen (COLL, 2 mcg/ml) as inducing agents. Demographic differences were not significant (p 0.05) among the 3 treatment groups, whose average age was 25.3-25.8 years old. Furthermore, no significant differences (p 0.05) in platelet function were detected among controls or subjects receiving either oral contraceptives or Norplant, compared to control patients. The mean platelet counts (X 10/9/L) were 223 for OC users, 231 for Norplant users, and 232 for controls. The respective platelet aggregation (ADP, ohms) values were 12.5, 18.0, and 19.2 as well as (COLL, ohms) 35.6, 40.7, and 39.0. These results demonstrated that there is no evidence for altered platelet function, with the testing methods employed, in women using either Norplant or combination low dose oral contraceptives. To date, several studies have examined this issue, with contradictory reports about the effects of hormonal contraceptives in platelet function. After controlling for differences between various steroid preparations and other such confounding variables, some of these conflicting conclusions could be the result of a lack of uniformity among the methods used to evaluate platelet aggregation

  5. Leukocyte accumulation promoting fibrin deposition is mediated in vivo by P-selectin on adherent platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palabrica, Theresa; Lobb, Roy; Furie, Barbara C.; Aronovitz, Mark; Benjamin, Christopher; Hsu, Yen-Ming; Sajer, Susan A.; Furie, Bruce

    1992-10-01

    THE glycoprotein P-selectin is a cell adhesion molecule of stimulated platelets and endothelial cells, which mediates the interaction of these cells with neutrophils and monocytes1,2. It is a membrane component of cell storage granules3-6, and is a member of the selectin family which includes E-selectin and L-selectin7,8. P-selectin recognizes both lineage-specific carbohydrate ligands on monocytes and neutrophils, including the Lewis x antigen, sialic acid, and a protein component9-12. In inflammation and thrombosis, P-selectin may mediate the interaction of leukocytes with platelets bound in the region of tissue injury and with stimulated endothelium1,2. To evaluate the role of P-selectin in platelet-leukocyte adhesion in vivo, the accumulation of leukocytes within an experimental thrombus was explored in an arteriovenous shunt model in baboons13. A Dacron graft implanted within an arteriovenous shunt is thrombogenic, accumulating platelets and fibrin within its lumen. These bound platelets express P-selectin14. Here we show that antibody inhibition of leukocyte binding to P-selectin expressed on platelets immobilized on the graft blocks leukocyte accumulation and inhibits the deposition of fibrin within the thrombus. These results indicate that P-selectin is an important adhesion molecule on platelets, mediating platelet-leukocyte binding in vivo, that the presence of leukocytes in thrombi is mediated by P-selectin, and that these leukocytes promote fibrin deposition.

  6. Glycans and the platelet life cycle.

    PubMed

    Li, Renhao; Hoffmeister, Karin M; Falet, Hervé

    2016-09-01

    Platelet numbers are intricately regulated to avoid spontaneous bleeding or arterial occlusion and organ damage. The growth factor thrombopoietin (TPO) drives platelet biogenesis by inducing megakaryocyte production. A recent study in mice identified a feedback mechanism by which clearance of aged, desialylated platelets stimulates TPO synthesis by hepatocytes. This new finding generated renewed interest in platelet clearance mechanisms. Here, different established and emerging mechanisms of platelet senescence and clearance will be reviewed with specific emphasis on the role of posttranslational modifications. PMID:27135356

  7. Pulmonary Platelet Thrombi and Vascular Pathology in Acute Chest Syndrome in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anea, Ciprian B.; Lyon, Matthew; Lee, Itia; Gonzales, Joyce N.; Adeyemi, Amidat; Falls, Greer; Kutlar, Abdullah; Brittain, Julia E.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests a role for platelets in sickle cell disease (SCD). Despite the pro-inflammatory, occlusive nature of platelets, a role for platelets in acute chest syndrome (ACS), however, remains understudied. To provide evidence and potentially describe contributory factors for a putative link between ACS and platelets, we performed an autopsy study of 20 SCD cases – 10 of whom died from ACS and 10 whose deaths were not ACS-related. Pulmonary histopathology and case history were collected. We discovered that disseminated pulmonary platelet thrombi were present in 3 out of 10 of cases with ACS, but none of the matched cases without ACS. Those cases with detected thrombi were associated with significant deposition of endothelial vWF and detection of large vWF aggregates adhered to endothelium. Potential clinical risk factors were younger age and higher platelet count at presentation. However, we also noted a sharp and significant decline in platelet count prior to death in each case with platelet thrombi in the lungs. In this study, neither hydroxyurea use nor perimortem transfusion was associated with platelet thrombi. Surprisingly, in all cases, there was profound pulmonary artery remodeling with both thrombotic and proliferative pulmonary plexiform lesions. The severity of remodeling was not associated with a severe history of ACS, or hydroxyurea use, but was inversely correlated with age. We thus provide evidence of undocumented presence of platelet thrombi in cases of fatal ACS describe clinical correlates. We also provide novel correlates of pulmonary remodeling in SCD. PMID:26492581

  8. Platelet morphology and membrane bound calcium in porcine stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basrur, P K; Frombach, S; McDonell, W N

    1983-01-01

    Platelets of normal and stress susceptible pigs were subjected to electron microscopic examination and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis in an attempt to study whether the cell membrane defect implicated in porcine stress syndrome is detectable at the platelet level. Electron microscopic studies revealed that the platelets of stress susceptible pigs are morphologically distinguishable from those of normal pigs by virtue of their highly dilated surface connected open canalicular system rendering the "Swiss cheese" appearance and the absence of the circumferential band of microtubules. A comparison of the data from spot analysis of cell membrane and the membranes of the open canalicular system using the energy dispersive microanalysis system showed that the calcium content of the plasma membrane of stress susceptible pigs is significantly lower than that of normal pigs. It would appear that the morphologic feature and the reduced levels of calcium bound to platelet membrane are related to the generalized membrane defect postulated to be the primary lesion in porcine stress syndrome and that these parameters could be included among the criteria for the detection of stress susceptible pigs. PMID:6635547

  9. Genomic landscape of megakaryopoiesis and platelet function defects

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Elisa; Norfo, Ruggiero; Pennucci, Valentina; Zini, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Megakaryopoiesis is a complex, stepwise process that takes place largely in the bone marrow. At the apex of the hierarchy, hematopoietic stem cells undergo a number of lineage commitment decisions that ultimately lead to the production of polyploid megakaryocytes. On average, megakaryocytes release 1011 platelets per day into the blood that repair vascular injuries and prevent excessive bleeding. This differentiation process is tightly controlled by exogenous and endogenous factors, which have been the topics of intense research in the hematopoietic field. Indeed, a skewing of megakaryocyte commitment and differentiation may entail the onset of myeloproliferative neoplasms and other preleukemic disorders together with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, whereas quantitative or qualitative defects in platelet production can lead to inherited platelet disorders. The recent advent of next-generation sequencing has prompted mapping of the genomic landscape of these conditions to provide an accurate view of the underlying lesions. The aims of this review are to introduce the physiological pathways of megakaryopoiesis and to present landmark studies on acquired and inherited disorders that target them. These studies have not only introduced a new era in the fields of molecular medicine and targeted therapies but may also provide us with a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying normal megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis that can inform efforts to create alternative sources of megakaryocytes and platelets. PMID:26787733

  10. Phorbol ester stimulates calcium sequestration in saponized human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, K.; Nachmias, V.T.

    1987-11-25

    When platelets are activated by agonists, calcium (Ca2+) is released from an intracellular storage site. Recent studies using fura-2 show that, after thrombin stimulation, the rise in free calcium is transient and returns to base-line levels in 2-3 min, while the transient following ADP stimulation lasts only 15-20 s. We reported previously that the phorbol ester 12,13-phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), added at nanomolar levels after thrombin, immediately accelerated the rate of return of calcium to the base line severalfold. In the present study, we used both intact and saponized platelets to determine whether this is due to stimulation of calcium sequestration. Using fura-2 and intact platelets, we found 1) that PMA stimulated the restoration of free Ca2+ levels after ADP as well as after thrombin, and 2) that H-7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme), slowed the return of Ca2+ to baseline levels. Using saponized platelets, we also found 3) that pretreatment of platelets with PMA before saponin treatment increased the ATP-dependent /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake 2-fold, with a half-maximal effect at 5 nm; 4) that most of the Ca2+ released by ionomycin or by myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate; and 5) that a GTP-binding protein inhibitor, guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate), decreased basal or PMA-stimulated /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake in saponin-treated platelets. Our data suggest that activation of protein kinase C stimulates the sequestration of Ca2+ independently of cAMP or myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate.

  11. Von Willebrand factor availability in platelet concentrates stored for 5 days.

    PubMed

    Cesar, J M; García-Avello, A; Monteagudo, J; Espinosa, J I; Lodos, J C; Castillo, R; Navarro, J L

    1994-02-01

    Von Willebrand factor (vWF) availability was assessed in platelet concentrates (PCs). After 5 days of storage, 82 +/- 9% of basal levels of ristocetin cofactor activity (vWF:RCo) remained in PCs. vWF antigen (vWF:Ag) increased up to 166 +/- 38% (P < 0.05) in the same period. Autoradiograph pattern of vW:Ag showed an increase in low molecular weight multimers, and fast migrating multimeric forms were visualized by crossed immunoelectrophoresis on day 5. Studies carried out in platelet free plasma stored as PCs showed similar changes in vWF:RCo but increments in vWF:Ag were not detected. These data indicate that PCs maintain vWF:RCo levels of clinical value even after 5 days of storage and suggest that vWF comes out from platelets to plasma during storage. PMID:8141116

  12. Commercially available blood storage containers.

    PubMed

    Prowse, C V; de Korte, D; Hess, J R; van der Meer, P F

    2014-01-01

    Plastic blood bags improve the safety and effectiveness of blood component separation and storage. Progress towards optimal storage systems is driven by medical, scientific, business and environmental concerns and is limited by available materials, consumer acceptance and manufacturing and regulatory concerns. Blood bag manufacturers were invited to submit lists of the bags they manufacture. The lists were combined and sorted by planned use. The lists were analysed by experts to assess the degree to which the products attend to scientific problems. Specific issues addressed included the use of di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) as plasticizer for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) blood bags, the size, material and thickness of platelet bags, and the fracture resistance of plasma bags. Alternatives to DEHP for red blood cell (RBC) storage exist, but are mostly in a developmental stage. Plastic bags (DEHP-free, PVC-free) for platelet storage with better gas diffusion capabilities are widely available. Alternatives for plasma storage with better fracture resistance at low temperatures exist. Most RBC products are stored in DEHP-plasticized PVC as no fully satisfactory alternative exists that ensures adequate storage with low haemolysis. A variety of alternative platelet storage systems are available, but their significance - other than improved oxygen transport - is poorly understood. The necessity to remove DEHP from blood bags still needs to be determined. PMID:24102543

  13. Platelet function defects in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Mikhailidis, D P; Jenkins, W J; Barradas, M A; Jeremy, J Y; Dandona, P

    1986-01-01

    Platelet function in alcoholic patients was assessed on admission and during abstinence in hospital. On admission platelets from these patients were significantly less responsive (percentage aggregation and thromboxane A2 release) to conventional in vitro aggregating agents (adrenaline, adenosine diphosphate, and collagen) than platelets from healthy, moderate drinkers. Initially, platelet counts in platelet rich plasma tended to be low and the Simplate II bleeding times frequently prolonged. Platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release, however, were inhibited even in patients with normal platelet counts on admission. Platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release returned to normal or became hyper-responsive during two to three weeks of abstinence. Platelet counts rose during this period, the largest responses occurring in those patients with the lowest counts on admission. Bleeding times reverted to normal during abstinence and correlated significantly with changes in platelet aggregation, thromboxane A2 release, and platelet count and with the estimated ethanol consumption during the week before admission. Chronic, heavy alcohol ingestion evidently exerts an inhibitory effect on platelet function even in the absence of alcohol in the blood, and this phenomenon is reversible on abstaining. The impaired platelet function, together with the reduced platelet count, may contribute to the bleeding diathesis associated with chronic alcoholism and to the increased incidence and recurrence of gastrointestinal haemorrhage associated with excessive alcohol intake. PMID:3094624

  14. Current Strategies in Diagnosis of Inherited Storage Pool Defects

    PubMed Central

    Sandrock, Kirstin; Zieger, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Summary Inherited platelet defects lead to bleeding symptoms of varying severity. Typically, easy bruising, petechiae, epistaxis, and mucocutaneous bleeding are observed in affected patients. The platelet defects are classified into disorders affecting either platelet surface receptors or intracellular organelles of platelets. The latter are represented by platelet storage pool diseases (SPD) which share a defect of platelet granules. Platelet α-granules, δ-granules, or both may be affected resulting in the clinical picture of α-SPD (e.g. Gray platelet syndrome, Quebec platelet disorder, arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis syndrome), δ-SPD (e.g. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, Chediak-Higashi syndrome, Griscelli syndrome), or αδ-SPD (e.g. X-linked thrombocytopenia, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome). Diagnosis of SPD is very extensive and requires platelet aggregation and flow cytometry analyses with interpretation from a specialist. Many of these disorders share common treatments, however, efficacy can vary between different patients. Therapy regiments with tranexamic acid, DDAVP, activated FVIIa, and platelet transfusions have been published. Stem cell or bone marrow transplantations are preserved for severe defects. Here, we describe the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of the major human SPDs. PMID:21113247

  15. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Alessandrello Liotta, Agatina; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered. PMID:25733843

  16. Effect of aspirin and ticlopidine on platelet deposition in carotid atherosclerosis: assessment by indium-111 platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Isaka, Y.; Kimura, K.; Etani, H.; Uehara, A.; Uyama, O.; Yoneda, S.; Kamada, T.; Kusunoki, M.

    1986-11-01

    The antiplatelet effects of aspirin and ticlopidine were studied by a dual-tracer method, using indium-111 labeled platelets and technetium-99m human serum albumin, in a group of 12 patients with suspected ischemic cerebrovascular disease. The magnitude of platelet accumulation at the carotid bifurcation was expressed as the ratio of radioactivity of indium-111 platelets deposited on the vascular wall to those circulating in the blood-pool (PAI, platelet accumulation index), 48 hr after injection of labeled platelets. PAI values were measured before (baseline studies) and after the antithrombotic therapies (aspirin studies: 325 mg bid for 22.3 +/- 1.3 days, ticlopidine studies: 100 mg tid for 21.8 +/- 2.1 days). At the baseline, the mean PAI value at 24 carotid bifurcations in the patient group was 15.7 +/- 15.3% (mean +/- S.D.) compared to -4.3 +/- 9.1 at 24 carotid bifurcations in 12 normal subjects (p less than 0.01). We defined the upper limit for a normal PAI (%) value to be +13.9, namely the mean PAI plus 2 SD for the carotid bifurcation in normal subjects and used this value for semiquantitative analysis. At the baseline, significant elevation of PAI (more than 13.9%; positive scintigram) was observed at 12 of 24 vessels, while 12 other regions were negative (less than 13.9%). In the lesions with positive scintigraphic results at the baseline, the mean PAI (%) value from the baseline, aspirin and ticlopidine studies was 29.5 +/- 7.0, 11.2 +/- 8.5 (p less than 0.01 versus baseline) and 21.4 +/- 21.3 (not significant from baseline), respectively.

  17. CD8(+) T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8(+) T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8(+) splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8(+) splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8(+) splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  18. CD8+ T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8+ T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8+ splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8+ splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8+ splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  19. Genetics Home Reference: gray platelet syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to play a role in the formation of alpha-granules, which are sacs inside platelets that contain ... injury that causes bleeding, the proteins stored in alpha-granules help platelets stick to one another to ...

  20. [Assessment of platelet function in man].

    PubMed

    Gaussem, Pascale

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of platelet function was primarily designed to explore patients with hemostatic disorders, but is becoming important for the monitoring of anti platelet agents, mostly aspirin and clopidogrel. Beside platelet counting, morphological analysis and bleeding time, a number of dedicated platelet function instruments are now available, generally allowing a rapid evaluation of platelet function in whole blood. The other tests including aggregometry and ELISA measurement of activation markers are generally restricted to specialized laboratories. Although aggregometry is still considered as the "gold standard", the recently developed flow cytometric-based platelet function analysis provides a wide choice of tests that assess the number of surface receptors, the measure of secretion and aggregation, the quantification of microparticules and leukocyte-platelet aggregates. It also allows the measure of the function of the ADP receptor P2Y12 by the phosphorylation level of the VASP protein, method currently under evaluation to monitor the platelet response to clopidogrel treatment. PMID:17243268

  1. Effect of photodynamic therapy on mouse platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuannong; Chi, Shunji; Deng, Jinsheng; Zhang, Hua; Liang, Junlin; Ha, Xian-wen

    1993-06-01

    Normal mice received hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) i.v. prior to red light irradiation and the platelet-rich plasma was prepared and irradiated by red light. The platelets were processed for EM examination and stereological analysis. It was shown the 16 hrs after irradiation almost all platelets were necrotized; 8 hours after irradiation about one fourth of the platelets were necrotized and the remaining were considerably damaged. Immediately after irradiation a small number of platelets became necrotic and most other platelets were swollen and deformated, showing significantly increased mean area, perimeter and short axis, and mean cell volume and cell surface area. The findings indicate that platelets are highly sensitive to PDT action and can be directly and rapidly damaged by PDT even in the absence of vascular endothelial cells. The early platelet photoactivation may play an important role in the initiation of early vascular damage and microcirculatory alterations induced by PDT in vivo.

  2. New treatment for low platelets.

    PubMed

    Grodeck, B

    1995-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved WinRho SD, a new treatment for immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). A clinical trial in children with acute ITP found that WinRho SD is as effective as IVIG or prednisone, but less expensive and dramatically easier to administer. WinRho SD is the first polyclonal antibody product shown to increase platelets in ITP patients. Platelets usually rise within one to two days and peak within seven to fourteen days after initial therapy. On average, platelet levels are maintained for approximately thirty days. Each year, 50,000 people nationally suffer from ITP as a complication of HIV infection, while another 18,000 manifest the disease as a primary condition. PMID:11362579

  3. Megakaryocyte rupture for acute platelet needs

    PubMed Central

    Stritt, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Circulating platelets were thought to arise solely from the protrusion and fragmentation of megakaryocyte cytoplasm. Now, Nishimura et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201410052) show that platelet release from megakaryocytes can be induced by interleukin-1α (IL-1α) via a new rupture mechanism, which yields higher platelet numbers, occurs independently of the key regulator of megakaryopoiesis thrombopoietin, and may occur during situations of acute platelet need. PMID:25963815

  4. Megakaryocyte rupture for acute platelet needs.

    PubMed

    Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stritt, Simon

    2015-05-11

    Circulating platelets were thought to arise solely from the protrusion and fragmentation of megakaryocyte cytoplasm. Now, Nishimura et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201410052) show that platelet release from megakaryocytes can be induced by interleukin-1α (IL-1α) via a new rupture mechanism, which yields higher platelet numbers, occurs independently of the key regulator of megakaryopoiesis thrombopoietin, and may occur during situations of acute platelet need. PMID:25963815

  5. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  6. High Fat Diet Induces Adhesion of Platelets to Endothelium in Two Models of Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jaime; Donoso, Wendy; Díaz, Natalia; Albornoz, María Eliana; Huilcaman, Ricardo; Morales, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) represent about 30% of all global deaths. It is currently accepted that, in the atherogenic process, platelets play an important role, contributing to endothelial activation and modulation of the inflammatory phenomenon, promoting the beginning and formation of lesions and their subsequent thrombotic complications. The objective of the present work was to study using immunohistochemistry, the presence of platelets, monocytes/macrophages, and cell adhesion molecules (CD61, CD163, and CD54), in two stages of the atheromatous process. CF-1 mice fed a fat diet were used to obtain early stages of atheromatous process, denominated early stage of atherosclerosis, and ApoE−/− mice fed a fat diet were used to observe advanced stages of atherosclerosis. The CF-1 mice model presented immunostaining on endothelial surface for all three markers studied; the advanced atherosclerosis model in ApoE−/− mice also presented granular immunostaining on lesion thickness, for the same markers. These results suggest that platelets participate in atheromatous process from early stages to advance d stages. High fat diet induces adhesion of platelets to endothelial cells in vivo. These findings support studying the participation of platelets in the formation of atheromatous plate. PMID:25328689

  7. Antiplatelet drugs in patients with enhanced platelet turnover: biomarkers versus platelet function testing.

    PubMed

    Freynhofer, Matthias K; Gruber, Susanne C; Grove, Erik L; Weiss, Thomas W; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2015-08-31

    Platelets are key players in atherothrombosis. Antiplatelet therapy comprising aspirin alone or with P2Y12-inhibitors are effective for prevention of atherothrombotic complications. However, there is interindividual variability in the response to antiplatelet drugs, leaving some patients at increased risk of recurrent atherothrombotic events. Several risk factors associated with high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR), including elevated platelet turnover, have been identified. Platelet turnover is adequately estimated from the fraction of reticulated platelets. Reticulated platelets are young platelets, characterised by residual messenger RNA. They are larger, haemostatically more active and there is evidence that platelet turnover is a causal and prognostic factor in atherothrombotic disease. Whether platelet turnover per se represents a key factor in pathogenesis, progression and prognosis of atherothrombotic diseases (with focus on acute coronary syndromes) or whether it merely facilitates insufficient platelet inhibition will be discussed in this state-of-the art review. PMID:26272640

  8. Multiscale model of platelet translocation and collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiwei; Mody, Nipa A.; King, Michael R.

    2013-07-01

    The tethering of platelets on the injured vessel surface mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) - Von Willebrand factor (vWF) bonds, as well as the interaction between flowing platelets and adherent platelets, are two key events that take place immediately following blood vessel injury. This early-stage platelet deposition and accumulation triggers the initiation of hemostasis, a self-defensive mechanism to prevent the body from excessive blood loss. To understand and predict this complex process, one must integrate experimentally determined information on the mechanics and biochemical kinetics of participating receptors over very small time frames (1-1000 μs) and length scales (10-100 nm), to collective phenomena occurring over seconds and tens of microns. In the present study, a unique three dimensional multiscale computational model, Platelet Adhesive Dynamics (PAD), was applied to elucidate the unique physics of (i) a non-spherical, disk-shaped platelet interacting and tethering onto the damaged vessel wall followed by (ii) collisional interactions between a flowing platelet with a downstream adherent platelet. By analyzing numerous simulations under different physiological conditions, we conclude that the platelet's unique spheroid-shape provides heterogeneous, orientation-dependent translocation (rolling) behavior which enhances cell-wall interactions. We also conclude that platelet-platelet near field interactions are critical for cell-cell communication during the initiation of microthrombi. The PAD model described here helps to identify the physical factors that control the initial stages of platelet capture during this process.

  9. Lateral diffusion of lipid probes in the surface membrane of human platelets. An electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) study.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, C S; Wirt, M D; Yin, J J; Froncisz, W; Feix, J B; Kunicki, T J; Hyde, J S

    1986-01-01

    Electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) techniques employing [14N], [15N] 16-Doxylstearate spin-label pairs have been used to measure the lateral diffusion constant, D, of lipids in the surface membrane of intact human blood platelets. For freshly prepared platelets, D is 1.0 X 10(-8) cm2/s at 37 degrees C and for platelets stored for 3 d at room temperature under accepted routine blood bank conditions, D is 2.6 X 10(-8) cm2/s at 37 degrees C. This is the first time that D in the surface membrane of platelets is reported. The marked increase in D for stored platelets may be attributed at least partly to loss of cholesterol during storage, suggesting a correlation between lipid lateral diffusion and cholesterol levels in cell membranes. PMID:3019445

  10. Interaction of inorganic nanoparticles of lunar soil simulant with blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy; Slenzka, Klaus

    Blood platelets play a central role in the physiology of primary hemostasis and in the patholog-ical processes of arterial thrombosis. Also, blood platelets contain neuronal high-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate transporters (EAAT 1 -3) and are able to uptake glutamate, thereby playing possible physiological role in extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS as an additional powerful target for excessive neurotoxic glutamate accumulation and storage. The health effects of lunar soil exposure are almost completely unknown, whereas the observations suggest that it can be deleterious to human physiology. It is important that the components of lunar soil may be internalized with lipid fractions of the lung epithelium, which in turn may help ions to overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of JSC-1a Lunar Soil Simulant (LSS) (Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, USA) on platelets isolated from rabbit blood. We revealed that platelets were not indifferent to the expo-sure to LSS. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the incubation of platelets with LSS resulted in an upper shift of platelet spot in histograms presenting cell size (FS) and granularity (SS) as x and y coordinates, thereby demonstrating apparent increase in platelet granularity. Analysis of control platelet preparation did not reveal the alterations in platelet size and granularity during the same incubation period. LSS scatter per se did not cover area of platelet prepara-tion in histogram. Using Zetasizer Nanosystem (Malvern Instruments) with helium-neon laser for dynamic light scattering (DLS), the platelet size before and after the addition of LSS was measured. We have found the increase in the mean size of the population of platelets from 2.45 ±0.09 µm in control to 3.0 ± 0.25 µm in the presence of LSS. Thus, we report that inorganic nanoparticles of LSS bind to blood platelets and this fact may have considerable harmful conse-quences to human

  11. Life span and tissue distribution of 111indium-labeled blood platelets in hypomagnesemic lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.D.; Miller, J.K.; White, P.K.; Ramsey, N.

    1983-05-01

    Circulating platelets may be activated by exposed triple-helical collagen in atherosclerotic lesions in Mg-deficient ruminants. Autologous platelets, labeled in vitro with 111In and determined to be active, were injected into 5 hypomagnesemic and 3 control lambs fed semipurified diets with 100 or 2,000 mg of Mg/kg of feed for 3 months. During the first 68 hours, 111In concentrations were 11 times higher in packed cells than in plasma. Packed-cell 111In increased 60% during the first 2 hours, probably due to initial tissue sequestration and later release of labeled platelets. Thereafter, platelet half-life span averaged 60 and 63 hours for hypomagnesemic and control lambs. After 68 hours, lambs were injected with native vascular collagen fibrils at 500 micrograms/kg of body weight to initiate reversible platelet aggregation. Within 1 minute, 83% of packed-cell 111In disappeared from circulation. Thirty minutes later, the lambs were euthanatized and necropsied and in the lungs, liver, and spleen, 111In averaged 24%, 19%, and 9%, respectively, of 111In injected 68 hours earlier. Organ deposits were not affected by Mg intake, but 111In in the lungs was somewhat lower in 2 lambs injected with inactivated collagen. Pathologic changes induced by reversible platelet aggregation were compatible with right ventricular failure complicated by pulmonary edema, similar to changes in hypomagnesemic lambs that died spontaneously. Platelets in blood exposed to vascular lesions in hypomagnesemic ruminants could be a major mortality risk factor in grass tetany disease.

  12. First autoclave-sterilized platelet-additive solution containing glucose with a physiological pH for the preparation of plasma-poor platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Shibata, K; Kora, S

    1992-01-01

    The glucose-free platelet-additive solution (termed AR solution), developed by Adams and Rock [Transfusion 1988;28:217-220], was modified by adding glucose as an energy substrate for platelets and maltose to prevent platelet lysis and by replacing sodium gluconate with sodium phosphate for better pH maintenance. The new platelet-additive solution (termed Seto solution) contained 90 mM NaCl, 5 mM KCl, 3 mM MgCl2, 17 mM tri-sodium citrate, 4.9 mM NaH2PO4, 20.1 mM Na2HPO4, 23 mM sodium acetate, 28.8 mM maltose, and 23.5 mM glucose with a pH of 7.4. The solution was sterilized by autoclaving in plastic bags in nitrogen to prevent glucose caramelization at high pH. Plasma-poor platelet concentrates prepared by adding Seto solution to the pelleted platelet buttons were stored in a LE-2 polyolefin bag at 22 degrees C with constant agitation for 5 days. The platelets suspended in Seto solution maintained oxygen consumption at a rate of 1.1 nmol/min/10(9) platelets after 5-day storage, with glucose consumption and lactate production rates of 0.5 +/- 0.2 and 1.2 +/- 0.2 nmol/min/10(9) platelets, respectively. This resulted in a final mean pH of 7.0. Those suspended in AR solution ceased glycolysis within 3 days because residual plasma glucose had been consumed. This was associated with decreases in percent hypotonic shock response and aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate and collagen. Lactate dehydrogenase discharge in AR solution was 5 and 8 times higher at day 3 and day 5, respectively, than that of Seto solution. Morphologically, there were no ballooned platelets after storage in Seto solution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1519373

  13. Using a Filtration Technique to Isolate Platelet Free Plasma for Assaying Pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    TOLOUIAN, RAMIN; CONNERY, SEAN M.; O’NEILL, W. CHARLES; GUPTA, AJAY

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Vascular calcification (VC) is a strong prognostic marker of mortality from cardiovascular disease. Extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) is a critical inhibitor of vascular calcification and it has been reported that hemodialysis patients have reduced plasma PPi levels, suggesting that altered PPi metabolism could contribute to VC in hemodialysis patients. Platelets are rich in PPi and release of PPi from platelets during storage or processing of plasma can lead to falsely elevated plasma PPi levels. To prepare plasma samples that are suitable for measuring PPi levels, ultracentrifugation has been used to remove platelets. Consequently, plasma PPi measurements have been limited to research laboratories since the majority of clinical laboratories do not have access to an ultracentrifuge. The purpose of the present study was to test the validity of an improved method of preparing platelet free plasma that uses filtration with a 300,000 Dalton molecular weight cut-off filter to exclude platelets, while minimizing their release of PPi. Methods In 20 maintenance hemodialysis patients, PPi levels were measured in plasma samples prepared by the conventional technique of low-speed centrifugation to remove red and white blood cells versus a novel filtration technique. Results Plasma prepared by filtration had significantly lower platelet counts (0 vs. 3 – 7 103/μL) and PPi levels (1.39 ± 0.30 μM vs. 2.74 ± 1.19 μM; mean ± SD, p < 0.01). Conclusions The filtration method appears effective in excluding platelets without causing trauma to platelets and can be used by clinical laboratories to prepare platelet-depleted plasma for PPi measurement. PMID:23289181

  14. Plasma-depleted platelet concentrates prepared with a new washing solution.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Shibata, K; Kora, S

    1993-01-01

    In certain clinical situations, complete removal of the plasma proteins from the platelet concentrates (PCs) is necessary by washing prior to transfusion. A simple electrolyte solution with a pH of 6.5 was developed for washing PCs. The platelet-rich plasma collected with acid-citrate-dextrose solution by apheresis in a 0.6-liter polyolefin bag was centrifuged. After removal of the supernatant plasma from pelleted platelet buttons, 200 ml of a washing solution consisting of 90 mM NaCl, 5 mM KCl, 3 mM MgCl2, 17 mM NaH2PO4, 8 mM Na2HPO4, 23 mM Na acetate, 17 mM Na3 citrate, 23.5 mM glucose, 2 mM adenine, 0.1% dextran, and 28.8 mM maltose (pH 6.5) was added to the pelleted platelet button. Steam sterilization of the solution was carried out under nitrogen to avoid caramelization of glucose. After resuspension of the pelleted platelet button with a washing solution and a second centrifugation, Seto additive solution (Seto sol, pH 7.4) was introduced into the bag to resuspend the platelet buttons for storage for 3 days at 22 degrees C. All of these procedures were completed within 3 h using a sterile docking device. In washed PCs, 99.1% of the plasma was removed and platelet recovery was 96%. The washed PCs were compared for 3 days with plasma-poor PCs consisting of 11% plasma and 89% Seto solution. There were no significant differences in percent hypotonic shock response, aggregation, energy metabolism, and morphology of platelets between the two groups during 3 days, except for significant swelling of 3-day-old platelets in washed PCs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8447117

  15. Point of care platelet activity measurement in primary PCI [PINPOINT-PPCI]: a protocol paper

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Optimal treatment of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) involves rapid diagnosis, and transfer to a cardiac centre capable of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for immediate mechanical revascularisation. Successful treatment requires rapid return of perfusion to the myocardium achieved by thromboaspiration, passivation of the culprit lesion with stent scaffolding and systemic inhibition of thrombosis and platelet activation. A delicate balance exists between thrombosis and bleeding and consequently anti-thrombotic and antiplatelet treatment regimens continue to evolve. The desire to achieve reperfusion as soon as possible, in the setting of high platelet reactivity, requires potent and fast-acting anti-thrombotic/anti-platelet therapies. The associated bleeding risk may be minimised by use of short-acting anti-thrombotic intravenous agents. However, effective oral platelet inhibition is required to prevent recurrent thrombosis. The interaction between baseline platelet reactivity, timing of revascularisation and effective inhibition of thrombosis is yet to be formally investigated. Methods/Design We present a protocol for a prospective observational study in patients presenting with acute STEMI treated with primary PCI (PPCI) and receiving bolus/infusion bivalirudin and prasugrel therapy. The objective of this study is to describe variation in platelet reactivity, as measured by the multiplate platelet function analyser, at presentation, the end of the PPCI procedure and 1, 2, & 24 hours post-procedure. We intend to assess the prevalence of high residual platelet reactivity within 24 hours of PPCI in acute STEMI patients receiving prasugrel and bivalirudin. Additionally, we will investigate the association between high platelet reactivity before and after PPCI and the door-to-procedure completion time. This is a single centre study with a target sample size of 108 participants. Discussion The baseline platelet reactivity on

  16. Mechanisms of platelet-mediated liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    Platelets have multiple functions beyond their roles in thrombosis and hemostasis. Platelets support liver regeneration, which is required after partial hepatectomy and acute or chronic liver injury. Although it is widely assumed that platelets stimulate liver regeneration by local excretion of mitogens stored within platelet granules, definitive evidence for this is lacking, and alternative mechanisms deserve consideration. In-depth knowledge of mechanisms of platelet-mediated liver regeneration may lead to new therapeutic strategies to treat patients with failing regenerative responses. PMID:27297793

  17. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzano, D.; Hwang, K.; Catalano, P.; Aster, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  18. Hemostatic function of apheresis platelets stored at 4 °C and 22 °C

    PubMed Central

    Reddoch, Kristin M.; Pidcoke, Heather F.; Montgomery, Robbie K.; Fedyk, Criselda G.; Aden, James K.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.; Cap, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Platelet refrigeration decreases the risk of bacterial contamination and may preserve function better than standard-of-care room temperature storage. Benefits could include lower transfusion-related complications, decreased costs, improved hemostasis in acutely bleeding patients, and extended shelf-life. In this study, we compared the effects of 22°C and 4°C storage on the functional and activation status of apheresis platelets (APs). Methods APs (n = 5 per group) were stored for 5 days at 22°C with agitation (RT) versus at 4°C with agitation (4C+AG) and without (4C). Measurements included platelet counts, mean platelet volume, blood gas analytes, aggregation response, thromboelastography, TxB2 and sCD40L release, activation markers and microparticle formation. Results Sample pH levels were within acceptable limits for storage products (pH 6.2-7.4). Platelet glucose metabolism (P < 0.05), aggregation response (ADP: RT 0; 4C+AG 5.0 ± 0.8; 4C 5.6 ± 0.9; P < 0.05), and clot strength (MA: RT 58 ± 2; 4C+AG 63 ± 2; 4C 67 ± 2; P < 0.05) were better preserved at 4°C compared to RT storage. Refrigerated samples were more activated compared to RT (P < 0.05), although TxB2 (P < 0.05) and sCD40L release (P < 0.05) were higher at RT. Agitation did not improve the quality of 4°C-stored samples. Conclusion AP stored at 4°C maintain more viable metabolic characteristics, are hemostatically more effective, and release fewer pro-inflammatory mediators than AP stored at RT over 5 days. Given the superior bacteriologic safety of refrigerated products, these data suggest that cold-stored platelets may improve outcomes for acutely bleeding patients. PMID:24169210

  19. Quality of pooled platelet concentrates prepared from buffy coats and stored in an additive solution after filtration.

    PubMed

    Koerner, K; Weihe, R; Sahlmen, P; Zeller, B; Seifried, E; Cardoso, M; Kubanek, B

    1995-02-01

    Platelet concentrates prepared from buffy coat were pooled and stored for 6 days after removal of leukocytes by filtration. The platelets were stored in plasma or in an additive solution, Plasmalyte-A. In vitro platelet function was better preserved using Plasmalyte-A than plasma with regard to osmotic reversal and aggregation. No significant differences for the release of platelet markers beta-thromboglobulin, platelet factor 4, or lactate dehydrogenase pre- and post-filtration and storage in plasma or Plasmalyte-A was observed. Expression of the surface membrane glycoproteins Ib, Ia/IIa, IIb/IIIa, and IV measured by flow cytometry after binding of monoclonal antibodies did not change during storage. The expression of activation-dependent alpha-granula glycoprotein GMP140, the thrombospondin, and the glycoprotein 53 from the lysosomal granules was not different between platelet pools stored in plasma or in Plasmalyte-A. The in vitro quality of platelets stored as pools is comparable for plasma and the additive solution Plasmalyte-A. PMID:7880932

  20. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  1. Adsorption of anaphylatoxins and platelet-specific proteins by filtration of platelet concentrates with a polyester leukocyte reduction filter.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Uchigiri, C; Mizuno, S; Kamiya, T; Kokubo, Y

    1994-01-01

    Anaphylatoxins generated during storage of platelet concentrates (PCs) may potentially have side effects on platelet transfusion. We evaluated the anaphylatoxin-scavenging abilities of white blood cell reduction filters. Among the commercially available filters for PCs, one made with polyester fiber (PL50) dramatically adsorbed C3a and C4a anaphylatoxins to the respective mean level of 1,721-208 ng/ml and 1,240-141 ng/ml in 3-day-old PCs. C3a and C4a were measured as the native and des Arg form of each complement by radioimmunoassay. C3a and C4a anaphylatoxins in the supernatant plasma fraction from 3-day-old PC again decreased from 1,136 to 114 ng/ml and from 1,086 to 65 ng/ml, respectively. The filter also adsorbed 85% of platelet factor 4 (PF4) and 31% of beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG), which had been released from platelets into the plasma during storage. The plasma levels of adhesive proteins such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, and von Willebrand factor, and plasma lactate dehydrogenase activity did not decrease after filtration. Another polyester filter (PL5A), on the other hand, significantly increased C3a and C4a levels with filtration. In addition, there was no PF4 adsorption ability during the filtration. The filters for red cells (RC50, BPF4, and R500A) had no anaphylatoxin adsorption capabilities. The observed specific adsorption of anaphylatoxins might be attributed to the electrostatic force between the positively charged anaphylatoxins with high pI and the possibly negatively charged filter membranes. Since PF4 and beta-TG have positively charged moieties in the C-terminal position, the same adsorption mechanism might operate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8036783

  2. Role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Idzko, Marco; Pitchford, Simon; Page, Clive

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests an important role for platelets and their products (e.g., platelet factor 4, β-thromboglobulin, RANTES, thromboxane, or serotonin) in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. A variety of changes in platelet function have been observed in patients with asthma, such as alterations in platelet secretion, expression of surface molecules, aggregation, and adhesion. Moreover, platelets have been found to actively contribute to most of the characteristic features of asthma, including bronchial hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and airway remodeling. This review brings together the current available data from both experimental and clinical studies that have investigated the role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation and asthma. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the role of platelets in the pathogenesis of asthma might lead to novel promising therapeutic approaches in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:26051948

  3. Numerical simulation of platelet margination in microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The adhesion of platelets to vascular walls is the first step in clotting. This process critically depends on the preferential concentration of platelets near walls. The presence of red blood cells, which are the predominant blood constituents, is known to affect the steady state platelet concentration and the dynamic platelet margination, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood to-day. We use a direct numerical simulation to study the platelet margination process, with particular emphasis on the Stokesian hydrodynamic interactions among red cells, platelets, and vessel walls. Well-known mechanical models are used for the shearing and bending stiffness of red cell membranes, and the stiffer platelets are modeled as rigid discoids. A boundary integral formulation is used to solve the flow field, where the numerical solution procedure is accelerated by a parallel O(N N) smooth particle-mesh Ewald method. The effects of red cell hematocrit and deformability will be discussed.

  4. Manipulating megakaryocytes to manufacture platelets ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, P; Eto, K

    2015-01-01

    Historically, platelet transfusion has proven a reliable way to treat patients suffering from thrombocytopenia or similar ailments. An undersupply of donors, however, has demanded alternative platelet sources. Scientists have therefore sought to recapitulate the biological events that convert hematopoietic stem cells into platelets in the laboratory. Such platelets have shown good function and potential for treatment. Yet the number manufactured ex vivo falls well short of clinical application. Part of the reason is the remarkable gaps in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving platelet formation. Using several stem cell sources, scientists have progressively clarified the chemical signaling and physical microenvironment that optimize ex vivo platelets and reconstituted them in synthetic environments. Key advances in cell reprogramming and the ability to propagate self-renewal have extended the lifetime of megakaryocytes to increase the pool of platelet progenitors. PMID:26149050

  5. [The equation for platelet aggregation rate].

    PubMed

    Vrzheshch, P V; Verkhusha, V V; Varfolomeev, S D

    1990-01-01

    A platelet aggregation model in shear flow taking into account the kinetics of intercellular fibrinogen bond formation limited by aggregated platelets rotation time was considered. For this consideration the average duration of platelets interaction in flow with shear rate value G is shown to be pi/4G. One fibrinogen bond is sufficient to form a solid aggregate between two platelets. The equation for single platelets disappearance rate concerned with intercellular fibrinogen bond formation, stochastic character of bond distribution in collided platelets and hydrodynamically controlled interaction time was obtained. The Hill's approximation for the obtained aggregation rate dependences was suggested and appropriate constants were determined. The qualitative criterion of platelets aggregating systems behavior was introduced. PMID:2245229

  6. Mean platelet volume as an indicator of platelet rejuvenation following bone-marrow transplantation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Seanger, D.G.

    1986-07-01

    Thrombocytopenia of unpredictable duration and severity is an expected outcome of the radiation/chemotherapy protocols performed prior to bone-marrow transplantation. Serial evaluation of the platelet count and mean platelet volume of patients diagnosed with acute leukemia demonstrated the mean platelet volume to increase into reference limits 24 to 40 hours prior to a rise in the platelet count in those patients whose bone-marrow successfully responded to induction chemotherapy. Serial platelet counts and measurements of mean platelet volume were performed on 31 patients following bone marrow transplantation. Numerous platelet transfusions, together with sustained thrombocytopenia, inhibited accurate assessment of 29 of 31 patients. Two patients, however, demonstrated a rise in the mean platelet volume prior to an increase in the platelet count. Both of these patients received no platelet transfusions during the period preceding or following the rise in the platelet count. It was proposed that the serial evaluation of the mean platelet volume may assist practitioners in the decision-making process of deciding whether platlet transfusions are required, or an increase in the number of circulating platelets is imminent. A decision not to transfuse would have the direct benefit of decreasing patient costs, in conjunction with eliminating a potential source for the development of an antibody against platelets.

  7. Nonoperative biological treatment approach for partial Achilles tendon lesion.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Presti, Mirco Lo; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2010-02-01

    Tendon injuries, especially those of the Achilles tendon, are major concerns in sports medicine. The clinical presentation can be acute or chronic and the pathologic findings can range from peritendonitis to full-thickness tendon rupture. Nonsurgical treatment is not always successful; in particular, significant partial ruptures seem to respond poorly to conservative measures and do not improve with time. Surgery is most often considered the favored treatment option for this kind of lesion to obtain pain relief and full functionality with long-standing effects.This article describes a case of a partial tear of the Achilles tendon in a 34-year-old competitive athlete where surgical treatment was avoided in favor of a new biological approach. We applied autologous platelet growth factors through multiple platelet-rich plasma injections; approximately 6.5 billion platelets were injected into the lesion 3 times, 7 days apart. The treatment with platelet-rich plasma and a progressive rehabilitation program allowed the patient to play for 20 minutes in a basketball game 64 days after the trauma and in a full game 75 days after the trauma. To date, 18 months later, he has participated regularly in all the season's games and received no further treatment for his tendon.The fast tissue repair, confirmed by magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, allowed a swift return to full functionality and competitive sports activity, suggesting a possible role of platelet growth factors in promoting rapid tendon healing with high-quality tissue. This biological approach may represent a less-invasive therapeutic option even in cases where severe tendon lesions are candidates for surgical treatment. PMID:20192152

  8. Membrane Changes Associated with Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    George, James N.; Lyons, Roger M.; Morgan, Rebecca K.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of aggregation and secretion on membrane proteins was studied in washed human platelets. Reversible aggregation without secretion was stimulated by ADP and secretion without aggregation was stimulated by thrombin in the presence of EDTA. No loss of platelet surface glycoproteins occurred during reversible ADP-induced platelet aggregation, as measured by quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of platelets that were labeled with 125I-diazotized diiodosulfanilic acid (DD125ISA) before ADP stimulation. Also, no new proteins became exposed on the platelet surface after ADP aggregation, as determined by DD125ISA labeling after stimulation. Thrombin-induced platelet secretion also caused no loss of platelet surface glycoproteins. However, after platelet secretion two new proteins were labeled by DD125ISA: (a) actin and (b) the 149,000-mol wt glycoprotein (termed GP-G), which is contained in platelet granules and secreted in response to thrombin. The identity of DD125ISA-labeled actin was confirmed by four criteria: (a) comigration with actin in three different sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems, (b) elution from a particulate fraction in low ionic strength buffer, (c) co-migration with actin in isoelectric focusing, and (d) binding to DNase I. The identity of actin and its appearance on the platelet surface after thrombin-induced secretion was also demonstrated by the greater binding of an anti-actin antibody to thrombin-treated platelets, measured with 125I-staphylococcal protein A. Therefore, major platelet membrane changes occur after secretion but not after reversible aggregation. The platelet surface changes occurring with secretion may be important in the formation of irreversible platelet aggregates and in the final retraction of the blood clot. Images PMID:6772667

  9. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  10. Platelet collagen receptors and coagulation. A characteristic platelet response as possible target for antithrombotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Johan W M; Kuijpers, Marijke J E; Munnix, Imke C A; Siljander, Pia R M

    2005-04-01

    Collagen is a unique agonist of platelets, because it acts as an immobilized ligand that only causes platelet activation after stable adhesion. This review addresses the present understanding of how platelet interaction with collagen supports the process of thrombin generation and coagulation. Only some of the collagen-adhered platelets, that is, those showing profound changes in shape and shedding microparticles (resembling apoptotic cells), appear to contribute to the procoagulant activity of platelets. The main signaling receptor for collagen, glycoprotein VI, plays a key role in the platelet procoagulant response during thrombus formation; this is a reason why new anti-glycoprotein-VI antibodies are promising antithrombotic tools. PMID:16039967

  11. Characteristics of platelet gels combined with silk.

    PubMed

    Pallotta, Isabella; Kluge, Jonathan A; Moreau, Jodie; Calabrese, Rossella; Kaplan, David L; Balduini, Alessandra

    2014-04-01

    Platelet gel, a fibrin network containing activated platelets, is widely used in regenerative medicine due the capacity of platelet-derived growth factors to accelerate and direct healing processes. However, limitations to this approach include poor mechanical properties, relatively rapid degradation, and the lack of control of release of growth factors at the site of injection. These issues compromise the ability of platelet gels for sustained function in regenerative medicine. In the present study, a combination of platelet gels with silk fibroin gel was studied to address the above limitations. Mixing sonicated silk gels with platelet gels extended the release of growth factors without inhibiting gel-forming ability. The released growth factors were biologically active and their delivery was modified further by manipulation of the charge of the silk protein. Moreover, the silk gel augmented both the rheological properties and compressive stiffness of the platelet gel, tuned by the silk concentration and/or silk/platelet gel ratio. Silk-platelet gel injections in nude rats supported enhanced cell infiltration and blood vessel formation representing a step towards new platelet gel formulations with enhanced therapeutic impact. PMID:24480538

  12. Thrombospondin-induced adhesion of human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, G P; Kowalska, M A

    1991-01-01

    Washed human unactivated platelets attached and spread on thrombospondin (TSP)-coated microtiter plates. Platelet adhesion was promoted by divalent cations Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ as compared to buffer having all divalent cations complexed with EDTA. TSP-dependent adhesion was inhibited by anti-TSP fab fragments, an anti-TSP monoclonal antibody, an RGD-containing peptide, complex-specific anti-glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa monoclonal antibodies (A2A9 or AP-2) and anti-VLA-2 monoclonal antibodies (6F1 and Gi9), but not by rabbit preimmune fab fragments, mouse IgG, an anti-GPIIIa monoclonal antibody, or monoclonal antibodies against either the human vitronectin receptor, glycocalicin, or GPIV. At saturating concentrations, anti-GPIIb-IIIa inhibited adhesion by 40-60%. Glanzman's thrombasthenic platelets, which lack GPIIb-IIIa, adhered to TSP to the same extent as anti-GPIIb-IIIa-treated normal platelets or 40-60% as well as untreated normal platelets. Antibody 6F1 (5-10 micrograms/ml) inhibited platelet adhesion of both normal and thrombasthenic platelets by 84-100%. Both VLA-2 antibodies also inhibited collagen-induced platelet adhesion, but had no effect on fibronectin-induced adhesion of normal platelets. These data indicate that platelets specifically adhere to TSP and that this adhesion is mediated through GPIIb-IIIa and/or VLA-2. Images PMID:2010551

  13. Function of human platelets during extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, V L; Hicks, R E; Niewiarowski, S; Edmunds, L H; Colman, R W

    1977-06-01

    The interaction between human platelets and nonbiologic surfaces was studied during in vitro recirculation of 500 ml of fresh, heparinized human blood in four different perfusion circuits. Circuits differed in surface area (0.1 m2 or 0.9 m2) and in surface composition. No important differences were observed between standard silicone-rubber and filler-free, silicone-rubber surfaces. Platelet counts decreased to 85% of control in 0.1- m2 circuits, but retained normal sensitivity to aggregating agents and released only small amounts of platelet factor 4 (PF4). In contrast, platelet counts in 0.9-m2 circuits decreased to 20% of control within 2 min and platelet sensitivity was depressed out of proportion to the fall in platelet count. Plasma PF4 progressively increased and platelet PF4 content progressively decreased during 6 h of recirculation. The results indicate that human platelets may exist in three conditions during extracorporeal circulation. Some platelets are unaltered, some are less sensitive to aggregating agents, and others have undergone extensive release. The ratio of blood volume to surface area appears to be an important determinant of platelet-surface interaction. PMID:18017

  14. Characteristics of platelet gels combined with silk

    PubMed Central

    Pallotta, Isabella; Kluge, Jonathan A.; Moreau, Jodie; Calabrese, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Platelet gel, a fibrin network containing activated platelets, is widely used in regenerative medicine due the capacity of platelet-derived growth factors to accelerate and direct healing processes. However, limitations to this approach include poor mechanical properties, relatively rapid degradation, and the lack of control of release of growth factors at the site of injection. These issues compromise the ability of platelet gels for sustained function in regenerative medicine. In the present study, a combination of platelet gels with silk fibroin gel was studied to address the above limitations. Mixing sonicated silk gels with platelet gels extended the release of growth factors without inhibiting gel forming ability. The released growth factors were biologically active and their delivery was modified further by manipulation of the charge of the silk protein. Moreover, the silk gel augmented both the rheological properties and compressive stiffness of the platelet gel, tuned by the silk concentration and/or silk/platelet gel ratio. Silk-platelet gel injections in nude rats supported enhanced cell infiltration and blood vessel formation representing a step towards new platelet gel formulations with enhanced therapeutic impact. PMID:24480538

  15. Influence of irradiation on stored platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Moroff, G.; George, V.M.; Siegl, A.M.; Luban, N.L.

    1986-09-01

    Platelet concentrates intended for transfusion to immunosuppressed patients are irradiated to minimize transfusion-induced graft-versus-host disease. Because few reports describe how irradiation influences stored platelets, the authors studied whether 5000 rad of gamma irradiation, the maximum dose currently used clinically, altered platelets in vitro. Platelet concentrates were stored for either 1 day or 5 days in plastic (PL 732) containers before gamma irradiation. One unit of a pair of identical platelet concentrates was irradiated; the second unit served as a control. Irradiation did not alter platelet morphology, mean platelet volume, expression of platelet-factor-3 activity, response to hypotonic stress, extent of discharge of lactate dehydrogenase, release of beta-thromboglobulin, formation of thromboxane B2, nor the ability to undergo synergistic aggregation. The lack of any substantial change was observed whether the platelet concentrates were stored initially for either 1 day or 5 days. These results suggest that stored platelets are not altered deleteriously by irradiation with 5000 rad.

  16. Platelet destruction in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura: kinetics and clearance of indium-111-labeled autologous platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J.R.; Ballem, P.J.; Gernsheimer, T.; Cerqueira, M.; Slichter, S.J.

    1989-05-01

    Using autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets, platelet kinetics and the sites of platelet destruction were assessed in 16 normal subjects (13 with and three without spleens), in 17 studies of patients with primary autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP), in six studies of patients with secondary AITP, in ten studies of patients with AITP following splenectomy, and in five thrombocytopenic patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In normal subjects, the spleen accounted for 24 +/- 4% of platelet destruction and the liver for 15 +/- 2%. Untreated patients with primary AITP had increased splenic destruction (40 +/- 14%, p less than 0.001) but not hepatic destruction (13 +/- 5%). Compared with untreated patients, prednisone treated patients did not have significantly different spleen and liver platelet sequestration. Patients with secondary AITP had similar platelet counts, platelet survivals, and increases in splenic destruction of platelets as did patients with primary AITP. In contrast, patients with myelodysplastic syndromes had a normal pattern of platelet destruction. In AITP patients following splenectomy, the five nonresponders all had a marked increase (greater than 45%) in liver destruction compared to five responders (all less than 40%). Among all patients with primary or secondary AITP, there was an inverse relationship between the percent of platelets destroyed in the liver plus spleen and both the platelet count (r = 0.75, p less than 0.001) and the platelet survival (r = 0.86, p less than 0.001). In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, total liver plus spleen platelet destruction, the platelet survival and the platelet turnover were all significant independent predictors of the platelet count. Thus platelet destruction is shifted to the spleen in primary and secondary AITP. Failure of splenectomy is associated with a marked elevation in liver destruction.

  17. Indium-111 platelet imaging for detection of platelet deposition in abdominal aneurysms and prosthetic arterial grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.L.; Stratton, J.R.; Thiele, B.; Haminton, G.W.; Warrick, L.N.; Huang, T.W.; Harker, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    Thirty-four platelet imaging studies were performed in 23 patients to determine whether platelet deposition could be detected in patients with vascular aneurysms (18 patients) or in patients in whom Dacron prosthetic grafts had been placed (5 patients). In patients in whom abnormal platelet deposition was detected, the effect of administration of platelet-active drugs on platelet deposition was examined. Of the 18 patients with an aneurysm, 12 had equivocally positive studies on initial imaging and 2 had equivocally positive images. Of five patients with Dacron arterial grafts in place, four had diffuse platelet deposition in the grafts; the fifth patient had a platelet deposition only in a pseudoaneurysm. Eight patients with an abdominal aneurysm and positive or equivocally positive baseline images were restudied during platelet-active drug therapy either with aspirin plus dipyridamole (seven patients) or with sulfinpyrazone (four patients). No patient studied during treatment with aspirin plus dipyridamole had detectably decreased platelet deposition compared with baseline determinations. In contrast, two of four patients studied while receiving sulfinpyrazone showed decreased platelet deposition. Thus, platelet imaging may be of value for studying platelet physiology in vivo and for assessing platelet-active drugs and the thrombogenicity of prosthetic graft materials in human beings.

  18. Systemic effects of locally injected platelet rich plasma in a rat model: an analysis on muscle and bloodstream.

    PubMed

    Borrione, P; Grasso, L; Racca, S; Abbadessa, G; Carriero, V; Fagnani, F; Quaranta, F; Pigozzi, F

    2015-01-01

    Abundant evidence suggests that growth factors, contained in platelets alpha granules, may play a key role in the early stages of the muscle healing process with particular regard to the inflammatory phase. Although the contents of the platelet-rich plasma preparations have been extensively studied, the biological mechanisms involved as well as the systemic effects and the related potential doping implications of this approach are still largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether local platelet-rich plasma administration may modify the levels of specific cytokines and growth factors both in treated muscle and bloodstream in rats. An additional aim was to investigate more deeply whether the local platelet-rich plasma administration may exert systemic effects by analyzing contralateral lesioned but untreated muscles. The results showed that platelet-rich plasma treatment induced a modification of certain cytokines and growth factor levels in muscle but not in the bloodstream, suggesting that local platelet-rich plasma treatment influenced directly or, more plausibly, indirectly the synthesis or recruitment of cytokines and growth factors at the site of injury. Moreover, the observed modifications of cytokine and growth factor levels in contralateral injured but not treated muscles, strongly suggested a systemic effect of locally injected platelet-rich plasma. PMID:25864767

  19. [Diagnosis of inherited diseases of platelet function. Interdisciplinary S2K guideline of the Permanent Paediatric Committee of the Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Research (GTH e. V.)].

    PubMed

    Knöfler, R; Eberl, W; Schulze, H; Bakchoul, T; Bergmann, F; Gehrisch, S; Geisen, C; Gottstein, S; Halimeh, S; Harbrecht, U; Kappert, G; Kirchmaier, C; Kehrel, B; Lösche, W; Krause, M; Mahnel, R; Meyer, O; Pilgrimm, A K; Pillitteri, D; Rott, H; Santoso, S; Siegemund, A; Schambeck, C; Scheer, M; Schmugge, M; Scholl, T; Strauss, G; Zieger, B; Zotz, R; Hermann, M; Streif, W

    2014-01-01

    Congenital disorders of platelet function are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are often not detected until bleeding occurs. In clinical settings only a few methods have proven to be useful for identification and classification of inherited platelet disorders. For a rational diagnostic approach, a stepwise algorithm is recommended. Patient history and clinical investigation are mandatory. Von Willebrand disease and other coagulation disorders should always be ruled out prior to specific platelet testing. Platelet count, size, volume (MPV) and morphology may guide further investigations. The PFA-100® CT is suited for screening for severe platelet defects. Platelet aggregometry allows assessment of multiple aspects of platelet function. Flow cytometry enables diagnosis of thrombasthenia Glanzmann, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and storage pool defects. Molecular genetics may confirm a putative diagnosis or pave the way for identifying new defects. We present an unabridged version of the interdisciplinary guideline. PMID:24903476

  20. A prospective microbiologic surveillance program to detect and prevent the transfusion of bacterially contaminated platelets.

    PubMed

    Yomtovian, R; Lazarus, H M; Goodnough, L T; Hirschler, N V; Morrissey, A M; Jacobs, M R

    1993-01-01

    After two patients received bacterially contaminated platelet transfusions, a prospective surveillance program was instituted to perform Gram staining and microbiologic culturing of platelets at the time of transfusion. In 12 months, 3141 random-donor platelet pools (prepared from 14,481 units) and 2476 single-donor apheresis units were cultured. All single-donor apheresis units were sterile, but 6 (0.19%) of the random-donor pools were found to be bacterially contaminated, with 1 unit of 5 in the pool being the source in each case. Contaminants were Staphylococcus epidermidis (4 cases), Bacillus cereus (1), and Staphylococcus aureus (1) at counts of 0.5 x 10(2) to 10(11) colony-forming units per mL in platelet pools and 10(3) to 10(13) colony-forming units per mL in source units. The contamination rate for units transfused at < or = 4 days (1.8/10,000) was significantly lower than that at 5 days (11.9/10,000; p < 0.05), as was the magnitude of contamination (p < 0.05). Use of the pretransfusion Gram stain on 4- and 5-day-old platelet pools was 100 percent sensitive (4/4 true positives) and 99.93 percent specific (1 false positive) in detecting contaminated pools. These data define the extent and magnitude of platelet bacterial contamination and demonstrate the efficacy of the pretransfusion Gram stain on platelet units stored for 4 and 5 days in preventing the transfusion of heavily contaminated units. It is concluded that the risk of platelet contamination is related to the duration of component storage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8259595

  1. Targeting Phosphodiesterases in Anti-platelet Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rondina, Matthew T.; Weyrich, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    There are two primary modes of platelet inhibition: blockade of membrane receptors or neutralization of intracellular pathways. Both means of inhibition have proven benefits in the prevention and resolution of atherothrombotic events. With regard to intracellular inhibition, phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are fundamental for platelet function. Platelets possess several PDEs (PDE2, PDE3 and PDE5) that catalyze the hydrolysis of cyclic adenosine 3′-5′-monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine 3′-5′-monophosphate (cGMP), thereby limiting the levels of intracellular nucleotides. PDE inhibitors, such as cilostazol and dipyridamole, dampen platelet function by increasing cAMP and cGMP levels. This review focuses on the roles of PDE inhibitors in modulating platelet function, with particular attention paid to drugs that have anti-platelet clinical indications. PMID:22918733

  2. The Role of Platelets in Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Schindewolf, Marc; Stanford, Sophia; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Thiele, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Multiple factors contribute to the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Platelets have attracted much interest in arterial cardiovascular disease, whereas their role in VTE has received much less attention. Recent evidence suggests that platelets may play a more important role in VTE than previously anticipated. This review discusses the mechanisms that link platelets with venous thrombotic disease and their potential applications as novel risk factors for VTE. In addition, animal studies and randomized clinical trials that highlight the potential effect of antiplatelet therapy in venous thrombosis are evaluated to assess the role of platelets in VTE. The clinical significance of platelets for VTE risk assessment in specific patient cohorts and their role as a suitable therapeutic target for VTE prevention is acknowledged. The role of platelets in VTE is a promising field for future research. PMID:26926584

  3. Evaluation of platelet cross-matching in the management of patients refractory to platelet transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Osama S.; Aladl, Doaa A.; El Ghannam, Doaa M.; Elderiny, Wesam E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-match-compatible platelets are used to support thrombocytopenic patients who are refractory to randomly selected platelets. However, few studies have addressed the efficacy of using this strategy for patients requiring intensive platelet transfusion therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of cross-match-compatible platelets in an unselected group of patients refractory to platelets from random donors. Materials and methods A total of 406 cross-match-compatible platelet components were administered to 40 evaluable patients who were refractory to random-donor platelets. A solid-phase red cell adherence method was used for platelet cross-matching. The corrected count increment was used to monitor the effectiveness of each platelet transfusion. Multivariate analysis was performed to detect whether any variables could predict the response to transfusion. Results Statistically significant improvements were found in the mean corrected count increment when comparing cross-match-compatible platelets with randomly selected and incompatible platelets (p<0.001 for each). Compatible platelet transfusions were associated with a good response in 72.9% of cases while incompatible platelets were associated with a poor response in 66.7% of transfusion events (p<0.001). In the presence of clinical factors or alloimmunisation, compatible platelets were associated with good responses in 67.9% and 28.0% respectively vs 100% and 93.3% in their absence (p=0.009, p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that cross-matching and alloimmunisation were the strongest predictors of transfusion response at 1 hour, while ABO compatibility, type of units received, followed by alloimmunisation then clinical factors were predictors at 24 hours. Discussion Platelet cross-matching using the solid-phase red cell adherence technique is an effective and rapid first-line approach for the management of patients refractory to platelet transfusions. PMID:24931840

  4. Extending The Shelf Life Of Blood Platelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas M.

    1988-01-01

    New method of storing human blood platelets extends vitality for transfusions. Packaged as suspension in sterile liquid in plastic blood bags. Each bag placed between pair of plastic grids, and rubberbands placed around sandwich thus formed to hold together. Stored upright in open air or in container through which air pumped at rate of at least 45 L/min. Ensures that platelets receive ample oxygen and expiratory carbon dioxide form platelets removed before pH drops to harmful levels.

  5. [Improvement in cryopreservation of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Zhiburt, E B; Vil'ianinov, V N; Kaleko, S P; Sidorkevich, S V; Petrenko, G I; Bagautdinov, Sh M; Kuz'min, N S

    2000-01-01

    The first Russian solution Krimolit designed for cryopreservation of platelet concentrates down -196 degrees C was clinically tested. The therapeutical efficacy of the cryopreserved platelets was evaluated on the basis of clinical and laboratory monitoring of transfusions in 20 cancer hematological patients. They were found to have the same therapeutical action as fresh cells. The introduction of cryopreserved platelets into clinical practice allows one to form stores and to transfuse autological cells. Krimolit is recommended for clinical application. PMID:10740789

  6. Platelet mimicry: The emperor's new clothes?

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Hunter, Alan Christy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Here we critically examine whether coating of nanoparticles with platelet membranes can truly disguise them against recognition by elements of the innate immune system. We further assess whether the "cloaking technology" can sufficiently equip nanoparticles with platelet-mimicking functionalities to include in vivo targeting of damaged blood vessels and binding to platelet-adhering opportunistic pathogens. We present views for improved, and pharmaceutically viable nanoparticle design strategies. PMID:26409192

  7. Platelet C1- inhibitor. A secreted alpha-granule protein.

    PubMed Central

    Schmaier, A H; Smith, P M; Colman, R W

    1985-01-01

    In order to characterize which proteins of the contact phase of coagulation interact with platelets, human platelets were studied immunochemically and functionally to determine if they contain C1- inhibitor. By means of monospecific antibody to C1- inhibitor, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CELISA) was developed to measure directly platelet C1- inhibitor. With the CELISA, from 33 to 115 ng of C1- inhibitor antigen per 10(8) platelets from 15 normal donors was quantified in lysates of washed human platelets solubilized in nonionic detergent. The mean concentration in 10(8) platelets was 62 +/- 33 ng (SD). Plasma C1- inhibitor either in the platelet suspension medium or on the surface of the platelets could account for only from 6.5 to 16% of the total antigen measured in the solubilized platelets. Upon functional studies, platelets contained 84 +/- 36 ng (SD) of C1- inhibitor activity in 10(8) platelets. As assessed by the CELISA, platelet C1- inhibitor antigen was immunochemically identical to plasma and purified C1- inhibitor. In contrast, the mean concentration of platelet C1- inhibitor antigen in platelets from four patients with classical hereditary angioedema was 8.3 ng/10(8) platelets (range, 5.3 to 11.3 ng/10(8) platelets). 25 and 31% of the total platelet C1- inhibitor was secreted without cell lysis from normal platelets after exposure to collagen (20 micrograms/ml) and thrombin (1 U/ml), respectively, and this secretion was blocked by metabolic inhibitors. Platelet subcellular fractionation showed that platelet C1- inhibitor resided mostly in alpha-granules, similar to the location of platelet fibrinogen. Thus, human platelets contained C1- inhibitor, which became available by platelet secretion. The identification of platelet C1- inhibitor suggests that platelets may modulate the activation of the proteins of early blood coagulation and the classical complement pathways. Images PMID:3965505

  8. Freezing of Apheresis Platelet Concentrates in 6% Dimethyl Sulfoxide: The First Preliminary Study in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Soner; Çetinkaya, Rıza Aytaç; Eker, İbrahim; Ünlü, Aytekin; Uyanık, Metin; Tapan, Serkan; Pekoğlu, Ahmet; Pekel, Aysel; Erkmen, Birgül; Muşabak, Uğur; Yılmaz, Sebahattin; Avcı, İsmail Yaşar; Avcu, Ferit; Kürekçi, Emin; Eyigün, Can Polat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Transfusion of platelet suspensions is an essential part of patient care for certain clinical indications. In this pioneering study in Turkey, we aimed to assess the in vitro hemostatic functions of platelets after cryopreservation. Materials and Methods: Seven units of platelet concentrates were obtained by apheresis. Each apheresis platelet concentrate (APC) was divided into 2 equal volumes and frozen with 6% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The 14 frozen units of APCs were kept at -80 °C for 1 day. APCs were thawed at 37 °C and diluted either with autologous plasma or 0.9% NaCl. The volume and residual numbers of leukocytes and platelets were tested in both before-freezing and post-thawing periods. Aggregation and thrombin generation tests were used to analyze the in vitro hemostatic functions of platelets. Flow-cytometric analysis was used to assess the presence of frozen treated platelets and their viability. Results: The residual number of leukocytes in both dilution groups was <1x106. The mean platelet recovery rate in the plasma-diluted group (88.1±9.5%) was higher than that in the 0.9% NaCl-diluted group (63±10%). These results were compatible with the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines quality criteria. Expectedly, there was no aggregation response to platelet aggregation test. The mean thrombin generation potential of post-thaw APCs was higher in the plasma-diluted group (2411 nmol/L per minute) when compared to both the 0.9% NaCl-diluted group (1913 nmol/L per minute) and the before-freezing period (1681 nmol/L per minute). The flow-cytometric analysis results for the viability of APCs after cryopreservation were 94.9% and 96.6% in the plasma and 0.9% NaCl groups, respectively. Conclusion: Cryopreservation of platelets with 6% DMSO and storage at -80 °C increases their shelf life from 7 days to 2 years. Besides the increase in hemostatic functions of platelets, the cryopreservation process also does not affect their viability

  9. Inactivation of viruses in platelet suspensions that retain their in vitro characteristics: Comparison of psoralen-ultraviolet A and merocyanine 540-visible light methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, R.Y.; Moroff, G.; Wagner, S.; Dabay, M.H.; Dorfman, E.; George, V.; Ribeiro, A.; Shumaker, J.; Benade, L.E. )

    1991-07-01

    The ability of two fundamentally different photochemical procedures to inactivate model viruses in platelet suspensions was compared. Merocyanine 540 (MC 540) with visible light was used as an example of an oxygen-dependent chemical-directed at the viral membrane, and aminomethyl trimethyl psoralen (AMT) with ultraviolet A light (UVA) was used as an example of a nucleic acid-directed system. Antiviral conditions in petri dishes were identified and the effects of these procedures on platelet suspensions in plastic storage containers were studied. Concentrations of photochemicals in the 10 to 150 mumol range with 30 to 60 minutes of visible light (MC 540) or 1 to 2 minutes of UVA (AMT) readily inactivated 5 to 6 log10 of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and other model viruses in platelet suspensions, provided the plasma concentration was reduced to about 15 percent by the use of a synthetic platelet storage medium. Extracellular pH, morphology scores, and aggregation response dropped markedly when platelets were treated with MC 540 and visible light. However, treatment with 136 mumol per L of AMT and 1 to 3 minutes of UVA could inactivate 5 log10 of VSV in platelet suspensions with retention of platelet characteristics for 4 days, particularly if oxygen levels were reduced during treatment. These studies demonstrate that AMT-UVA treatment meets the initial requirements for virus inactivation in platelet suspensions.

  10. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.