Science.gov

Sample records for platinum gallium compounds

  1. Gallium-containing anticancer compounds

    PubMed Central

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    There is an ever pressing need to develop new drugs for the treatment of cancer. Gallium nitrate, a group IIIa metal salt, inhibits the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo and has shown activity against non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and bladder cancer in clinical trials. Gallium can function as an iron mimetic and perturb iron-dependent proliferation and other iron-related processes in tumor cells. Gallium nitrate lacks cross resistance with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and is not myelosuppressive; it can be used when other drugs have failed or when the blood count is low. Given the therapeutic potential of gallium, newer generations of gallium compounds are now in various phases of preclinical and clinical development. These compounds hold the promise of greater anti-tumor activity against a broader spectrum of cancers. The development of gallium compounds for cancer treatment and their mechanisms of action will be discussed. PMID:22800370

  2. Laser photochemistry of gallium-containing compounds. [Trimethylgallium

    SciTech Connect

    Baughcum, S.L.; Oldenborg, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The production of gas-phase gallium atoms in the photolysis of trimethylgallium has been investigated at 193 nm and at other laser wavelengths. Ground state (4 /sup 2/P/sup 0//sub 1/2) and metastable (4 /sup 2/P/sup 0//sub 3/2/) gallium atoms are detected using laser-induced fluorescence techniques. Our results indicate that gallium atoms continue to be produced at long times after the laser pulse. The observed dependence on photolysis laser fluence, trimethylgallium pressure, and buffer gas pressure are consistent with a mechanism in which highly excited gallium methyl radicals undergo unimolecular decomposition to produce gallium atoms. Since this process is observed to happen on the time scale of hundreds of microseconds, these results have important implications for studies of metal deposition and direct laser writing by laser photolysis of organometallic compounds. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  3. The effect of copper and gallium compounds on ribonucleotide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, J.

    1992-01-01

    The mode of action of copper complexes (CuL and CuKTS) and gallium compounds (gallium nitrate and citrate) in cytotoxicity was studied. The effects of these agents on the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase was investigated by monitoring the tyrosyl free radical present in the active site of the enzyme through electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Ribonucleotide reductase, a key enzyme in cellular proliferation, consists of two subunits. M1, a dimer of molecular weight 170,000 contains the substrate and effector binding sites. M2, a dimer of molecular weight 88,000, contains non-heme iron and tyrosyl free radical essential for the activity of the enzyme. In studies using copper complexes, the cellular oxidative chemistry was examined by ESR studies on adduct formation with membranes, and oxidation of thiols. Membrane thiols were oxidized through the reduction of the ESR signal of the thiol adduct and the analysis of sulfhydryl content. Using the radiolabel [sup 59]Fe, the inhibitory action of copper thiosemicarbazones on cellular iron uptake was shown. The inhibitory action of CuL on ribonucleotide reductase was shown by the quenching of the tyrosyl free radical on the M2 subunit. The hypothesis that gallium directly interacts with the M2 subunit of the enzyme and displaces the iron from it was proven. The tyrosyl free radical signal from cell lysates was inhibited by the direct addition of gallium compounds. Gallium content in the cells was measured by a fluorimetric method, to ensure the presence of sufficient amounts of gallium to compete with the iron in the M2 subunit. The enzyme activity, measured by the conversion of [sup 14]C-CDP to the labeled deoxy CDP, was inhibited by the addition of gallium nitrate in a cell free assay system. The immunoprecipitation studies of the [sup 59]Fe labeled M2 protein using the monoclonal antibody directed against this subunit suggested that gallium releases iron from the M2 subunit.

  4. Luminescent Platinum Compounds: From Molecules to OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Lisa; Williams, J. A. Gareth

    Around 30 years ago, much of the research into platinum coordination chemistry was being driven either by research into one-dimensional, electrically conducting molecular materials exploiting the stacking interactions of planar complexes, or by the unprecedented success of cis-Pt(NH3)2Cl2 (cisplatin) as an anticancer agent. At that time, a number of simple platinum(II) compounds were known to be photoluminescent at low temperature or in the solid state, but almost none in fluid solution at room temperature. Since that time, several families of complexes have been discovered that are brightly luminescent, and a number of investigations have shed light on the factors that govern the luminescence efficiencies of Pt(II) complexes. Over the past decade, such studies have been spurred on by the potential application of triplet-emitting metal complexes as phosphors in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs), where their ability to trap otherwise wasted triplet states can lead to large gains in efficiency. In this contribution, we take a chemist's perspective of the field, overviewing in the first instance the factors that need to be taken into account in the rational design of highly luminescent platinum(II) complexes, and the background to their use in OLEDs. We then consider in more detail the properties of some individual classes, highlighting work from the past 3 years, and including selected examples of their utility in OLEDs and other applications.

  5. Bilateral Comparison of Mercury and Gallium Fixed-Point Cells Using Standard Platinum Resistance Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojkovski, J.; Veliki, T.; Zvizdić, D.; Drnovšek, J.

    2011-08-01

    The objective of project EURAMET 1127 (Bilateral comparison of triple point of mercury and melting point of gallium) in the field of thermometry is to compare realization of a triple point of mercury (-38.8344 °C) and melting point of gallium (29.7646 °C) between the Slovenian national laboratory MIRS/UL-FE/LMK and the Croatian national laboratory HMI/FSB-LPM using a long-stem 25 Ω standard platinum resistance thermometer (SPRT). MIRS/UL/FE-LMK participated in a number of intercomparisons on the level of EURAMET. On the other hand, the HMI/LPM-FSB laboratory recently acquired new fixed-point cells which had to be evaluated in the process of intercomparisons. A quartz-sheathed SPRT has been selected and calibrated at HMI/LPM-FSB at the triple point of mercury, the melting point of gallium, and the water triple point. A second set of measurements was made at MIRS/UL/FE-LMK. After its return, the SPRT was again recalibrated at HMI/LPM-FSB. In the comparison, the W value of the SPRT has been used. Results of the bilateral intercomparison confirmed that the new gallium cell of the HMI/LPM-FSB has a value that is within uncertainty limits of both laboratories that participated in the exercise, while the mercury cell experienced problems. After further research, a small leakage in the mercury fixed-point cell has been found.

  6. The Preparation and Structural Characterization of Three Structural Types of Gallium Compounds Derived from Gallium (II) Chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Edward M.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Duraj. Stan A.; Habash, Tuhfeh S.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Schupp, John D.; Eckles, William E.; Long, Shawn

    1997-01-01

    The three compounds Ga2Cl4(4-mepy)2 (1),[GaCl2(4-mepy)4]GaCl4x1/2(4-mepy); (2) and GaCl2(4-mepy)2(S2CNEt2); (3) (4-mepy= 4-methylpyridine) have been prepared from reactions of gallium (II) chloride in 4-methylpyridine and characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Small variations in the reaction conditions for gallium(II) chloride can produce crystals with substantially different structural properties. The three compounds described here encompass a neutral gallium(II) dimer in which each gallium is four-coordinate, an ionic compound containing both anionic and cationic gallium complex ions with different coordination numbers and a neutral six-coordinate heteroleptic

  7. Platinum compounds in children with cancer: toxicity and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Antonio; Trombatore, Giovanna; Triarico, Silvia; Arena, Roberta; Ferrara, Pietro; Scalzone, Maria; Pierri, Filomena; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2013-11-01

    Platinum compounds are widely used in the treatment of pediatric tumors such as neuroblastoma, germ-cell tumors, osteosarcoma, retinoblastoma, hepatoblastoma, brain tumors (low-grade gliomas and medulloblastoma/PNET), and relapsed and refractory lymphomas. The three major platinum compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin) have a similar pharmacokinetics profile and mechanism of action, but the differences in their chemical structure are responsible for their different antitumor activity and toxicity. In this review, we have described the main characteristics of cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, focusing on their toxic effects and possible strategies to prevent them to improve the clinical outcomes in pediatric cancer patients. The underlying mechanism of each platinum-related toxicity is shown together with the clinical manifestations. Furthermore, possible preventive strategies are suggested to reduce the negative impact of platinum compounds on the quality of life of children with cancer. Cisplatin seems to be mostly ototoxic and nephrotoxic, carboplatin mainly produces myelosuppression, whereas oxaliplatin induces predominantly peripheral sensory neurotoxicity. In contrast, nausea and vomiting can be linked to all platinum compounds, although cisplatin exerts the strongest emetic effect. A correct knowledge of pharmacokinetics and toxicological profile of platinum compounds may aid physicians prevent their toxicity on auditory, nervous, renal, and bone marrow function, improving the quality of life of pediatric cancer patients. PMID:23962902

  8. Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Discovered in 1875 through a study of its spectral properties, gallium was the first element to be uncovered following the publication of Mendeleev`s Periodic Table. French chemist, P.E. Lecoq de Boisbaudran, named his element discovery in honor of his native country; gallium is derived from the Latin word for France-{open_quotes}Gallia.{close_quotes}. This paper describes the properties, sources, and market for gallium.

  9. Platinum nanoparticles on gallium nitride surfaces: effect of semiconductor doping on nanoparticle reactivity.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Susanne; Wyrzgol, Sonja A; Caterino, Roberta; Jentys, Andreas; Schoell, Sebastian J; Hävecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Lercher, Johannes A; Sharp, Ian D; Stutzmann, Martin

    2012-08-01

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on n- and p-type gallium nitride (GaN) are investigated as novel hybrid systems for the electronic control of catalytic activity via electronic interactions with the semiconductor support. In situ oxidation and reduction were studied with high pressure photoemission spectroscopy. The experiments revealed that the underlying wide-band-gap semiconductor has a large influence on the chemical composition and oxygen affinity of supported nanoparticles under X-ray irradiation. For as-deposited Pt cuboctahedra supported on n-type GaN, a higher fraction of oxidized surface atoms was observed compared to cuboctahedral particles supported on p-type GaN. Under an oxygen atmosphere, immediate oxidation was recorded for nanoparticles on n-type GaN, whereas little oxidation was observed for nanoparticles on p-type GaN. Together, these results indicate that changes in the Pt chemical state under X-ray irradiation depend on the type of GaN doping. The strong interaction between the nanoparticles and the support is consistent with charge transfer of X-ray photogenerated free carriers at the semiconductor-nanoparticle interface and suggests that GaN is a promising wide-band-gap support material for photocatalysis and electronic control of catalysis. PMID:22738117

  10. Gallium a unique anti-resorptive agent in bone: Preclinical studies on its mechanisms of action

    SciTech Connect

    Bockman, R.; Adelman, R.; Donnelly, R.; Brody, L.; Warrell, R. ); Jones, K.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of gallium as a new and unique agent for the treatment of metabolic bone disorders was in part fortuitous. Gallium is an exciting new therapeutic agent for the treatment of pathologic states characterized by accelerated bone resorption. Compared to other therapeutic metal compounds containing platinum or germanium, gallium affects its antiresorptive action without any evidence of a cytotoxic effect on bone cells. Gallium is unique amongst all therapeutically available antiresorptive agents in that it favors bone formation. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Gallium compounds in solar cells. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of gallium compounds in solar cells to increase solar cell efficiency. Computer models, theories, and performance tests are included. Gallium compounds used in thin film cells, cascade solar cells, large area solar cells, cells designed for industrial and space applications, and as antireflection coatings are discussed. Resistance to radiation damage, cooling to improve efficiency, grain boundary behavior, and economic considerations are also covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. [Platinum compounds in cancer therapy--past, present, and future].

    PubMed

    Akaza, H; Saijo, N; Aiba, K; Isonishi, S; Ohashi, Y; Kawai, K; Konishi, T; Saeki, T; Sone, S; Tsukagoshi, S; Tsuruo, T; Noguchi, S; Miki, T; Mikami, O; Smith, M; Hoctin-Boes, G; Stribling, D

    2001-05-01

    Platinum cytotoxics play an important role globally in the management of solid tumours. Cisplatin sets the standard for efficacy in both regions with careful administration to reduce nephrotoxicity. Carboplatin is associated with neurotoxicity, but has become the leading product in the US due largely to the easier to manage toxicity profile. Both agents have been widely used in both registered and non registered indications and are frequently combined with other cytotoxics. In Japan, cisplatin has been used successfully at low doses in combination with 5-FU based regimens and appears to achieve a synergistic effect, but controlled data are not yet available. More recently oxaliplatin (Europe) and nedaplatin (in Japan) have been introduced, but their clinical roles in therapy have yet to be established. One of the limiting features of the first generation of platinum compounds is that a significant proportion of tumours develop cross resistance to platins due to either changes in uptake or excretion, intracellular detoxification or accelerated DNA repair. The forum discussed the possibility for the development of better new platinum compounds, A new platin agent which had lower toxicity and higher efficacy across a wide range of cancers without the development of resistance would be a significant step forward. If the tolerability profile was suitable, an oral formulation may improve the quality of life for patients but this must not be at the expense of efficacy. Even after the introduction of new target based drugs, platinum cytotoxics are likely to be used to reduce the tumour mass and in some cases can be expected to potentiate the effects of the new agents. In preclinical studies, ZD0473 has been shown to by-pass some major mechanisms of resistance and has the potential to achieve these objectives and is now being evaluated in clinical studies in both Japan and the West. PMID:11383210

  13. Iron-Targeting Antitumor Activity of Gallium Compounds and Novel Insights Into Triapine®-Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Antholine, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Despite advances made in the treatment of cancer, a significant number of patients succumb to this disease every year. Hence, there is a great need to develop new anticancer agents. Recent Advances: Emerging data show that malignant cells have a greater requirement for iron than normal cells do and that proteins involved in iron import, export, and storage may be altered in cancer cells. Therefore, strategies to perturb these iron-dependent steps in malignant cells hold promise for the treatment of cancer. Recent studies show that gallium compounds and metal-thiosemicarbazone complexes inhibit tumor cell growth by targeting iron homeostasis, including iron-dependent ribonucleotide reductase. Chemical similarities of gallium(III) with iron(III) enable the former to mimic the latter and interpose itself in critical iron-dependent steps in cellular proliferation. Newer gallium compounds have emerged with additional mechanisms of action. In clinical trials, the first-generation-compound gallium nitrate has exhibited activity against bladder cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, while the thiosemicarbazone Triapine® has demonstrated activity against other tumors. Critical Issues: Novel gallium compounds with greater cytotoxicity and a broader spectrum of antineoplastic activity than gallium nitrate should continue to be developed. Future Directions: The antineoplastic activity and toxicity of the existing novel gallium compounds and thiosemicarbazone-metal complexes should be tested in animal tumor models and advanced to Phase I and II clinical trials. Future research should identify biologic markers that predict tumor sensitivity to gallium compounds. This will help direct gallium-based therapy to cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from it. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000–000. PMID:22900955

  14. Platinum-containing compound platinum pyrithione is stronger and safer than cisplatin in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chong; Chen, Xin; Zang, Dan; Lan, Xiaoying; Liao, Siyan; Yang, Changshan; Zhang, Peiquan; Wu, Jinjie; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Ningning; Liao, Yuning; Huang, Hongbiao; Shi, Xianping; Jiang, Lili; Liu, Xiuhua; He, Zhimin; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2016-09-15

    DNA is the well-known molecular target of current platinum-based anticancer drugs; consequently, their clinical use is severely restricted by their systemic toxicities and drug resistance originating from non-selective DNA damage. Various strategies have been developed to circumvent the shortcomings of platinum-based chemotherapy but the inherent problem remains unsolved. Here we report that platinum pyrithione (PtPT), a chemically well-characterized synthetic complex of platinum, inhibits proteasome function and thereby exhibits greater and more selective cytotoxicity to multiple cancer cells than cisplatin, without showing discernible DNA damage both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, unlike the classical proteasome inhibitor bortezomib/Velcade which inhibits the proteasome via blocking the peptidase activity of 20S proteasomes, PtPT primarily deactivates 26S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases USP14 and UCHL5. Furthermore, PtPT can selectively induce cytotoxicity and proteasome inhibition in cancer cells from leukemia patients but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy humans. In nude mice, PtPT also remarkably inhibited tumor xenograft growth, without showing the adverse effects that were induced by cisplatin. Hence, we have discovered a new platinum-based anti-tumor agent PtPT which targets 26S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases rather than DNA in the cell and thereby exerts safer and more potent anti-tumor effects, identifying a highly translatable new platinum-based anti-cancer strategy. PMID:27381943

  15. Innovative use of platinum compounds to selectively detect live microorganisms by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Takashi; Minami, Jun-Ichi; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Abe, Fumiaki

    2016-02-01

    PCR cannot distinguish live microorganisms from dead ones. To circumvent this disadvantage, ethidium/propidium-monoazide (EMA/PMA) and psoralen to discriminate live from dead bacteria have been used for 2 decades. These methods require the use of numerous laborious procedures. We introduce an innovative method that uses platinum compounds, which are primarily used as catalysts in organic chemistry and partly used as anti-cancer drugs. Microorganisms are briefly exposed to platinum compounds in vivo, and these compounds penetrate dead (compromised) microorganisms but not live ones and are chelated by chromosomal DNA. The use of platinum compounds permits clear discrimination between live and dead microorganisms in water and milk (including Cronobacter sakazakii and Escherichia coli) via PCR compared with typically used PMA. This platinum-PCR method could enable the specific detection of viable coliforms in milk at a concentration of 5-10 CFU mL(-1) specified by EU/USA regulations after a 4-h process. For sample components, environmental water contains lower levels of PCR inhibitors than milk does, and milk is similar to infant formula, skim milk and blood; thus, the use of the platinum-PCR method could also prevent food poisoning due to the presence of C. sakazakii in dairy products. This method could provide outstanding rapidity for use in environmental/food/clinical tests. Platinum-PCR could also be a substitute for the typical culture-based methods currently used. PMID:26192088

  16. Gallium Compounds: A Possible Problem for the G2 Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Melius, Carl F.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The G2 atomization energies of fluorine and oxygen containing Ga compounds are greatly in error. This arises from an inversion of the Ga 3d core orbital and the F 2s or O 2s valence orbitals. Adding the Ga 3d orbital to the correlation treatment or removing the F 2s orbitals from the correlation treatment are shown to eliminate the problem. Removing the O 2s orbital from the correlation treatment reduces the error, but it can still be more than 6 kcal/mol. It is concluded that the experimental atomization energy of GaF2 is too large.

  17. Radio- and photosensitization of DNA with compounds containing platinum and bromine atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmiałek, Małgorzata A.; Ptasińska, Sylwia; Gow, Jason; Vrønning Hoffmann, Søren; Mason, Nigel J.

    2015-05-01

    Irradiations of plasmid DNA by both X-rays and UV light in the presence and absence of compounds containing platinum and bromine atoms were performed in order to asses the sensitization potential of these compounds. Plasmid DNA pBR322 was incubated with platinum (II) bromide, hydrogen hexabromoplatinate (IV), hydrogen hexahydroxyplatinate (IV) and sodium hexahydroxyplatinate (IV). Incubation was followed by X-ray or UV irradiations. It was found that amongst the sensitizers tested, during irradiations carried out in the presence of platinum (II) bromide, the highest levels of double strand breaks formation upon X-ray treatment were recorded. In contrast much less damage was induced by UV light. Data presented here suggests that this compound may be a promising radiosensitizer for cancer treatment. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene Surdutovich.

  18. [Clinical pharmacology of anticancer agents. (Part 1) Introduction, alkylating agents and platinum compounds].

    PubMed

    Fujita, H

    1991-11-01

    Pharmacokinetic concepts as to absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of anticancer agents, and how drugs reach to the site of action were reviewed. Then, roles of the liver and kidney to the excretion and metabolism, intracellular pharmacokinetics, and relationships between drug response and cell proliferation kinetics or cell cycle phase were explained. Drug development, mode of action and pharmacokinetics of alkylating agents and platinum compounds were reviewed. This includes: alkylating agents: nitrogen mustard, phenylalanine mustard, estracyte, cyclophosphamide, carboquone, busulfan, nitrosourea, etc., and platinum compounds: cisplatin, carboplatin, 254-S, DWA-2114 R, NK-121. PMID:1952967

  19. Stepwise degradation of trifluoromethyl platinum(II) compounds.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Salvador, Sonia; Forniés, Juan; Martín, Antonio; Menjón, Babil; Usón, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The action of moisture on the homoleptic organoplatinum(II) compound [NBu(4)](2)[Pt(CF(3))(4)] (1) gives rise to the carbonyl derivative [NBu(4)][Pt(CF(3))(3)(CO)] (2), which is itself moisture stable. However, treatment of compound 2 with HCl(aq) results in the formation of [NBu(4)][cis-Pt(CF(3))(2)Cl(CO)] (3), which undergoes degradation of an additional CF(3) group by further treatment with HCl(aq) in large excess, affording [NBu(4)][cis-Pt(CF(3))Cl(2)(CO)] (4). The carbonyl derivatives 2-4 are fairly stable species, in which the CO ligand, however, can be readily extruded by reaction with trimethylamine N-oxide (ONMe(3)). Thus, compound 2 reacts with ONMe(3) in the presence of a number of neutral or anionic ligands affording a series of singly or doubly charged derivatives with the general formulae [NBu(4)][Pt(CF(3))(3)(L)] [L = CNtBu (5), PPh(3) (6), P(o-tolyl)(3) (7), tht (8; tht = tetrahydrothiophene)] and [NBu(4)](2)[Pt(CF(3))(3)X] [X = Cl (9), Br (10), I (11)], respectively. Compound 2 also reacts with ONMe(3) and pyridin-2-thiol (C(5)H(5)NS) giving rise to the five-membered metallacyclic derivative [NBu(4)][Pt(CF(3))(2)(CF(2)NC(5)H(4)S-κC,κS)] (12), which can be viewed as a difluorocarbene species stabilized by intramolecular base coordination. On the other hand, treatment of compound 3 with ONMe(3) in the presence of C(5)H(5)NS yields the four-membered metallacyclic compound [NBu(4)][Pt(CF(3))(2)(NC(5)H(4)S-κN,κS)] (13). The geometries of the metallacycles in compounds 12 and 13 are compared. In the absence of any additional ligand, compound 3 undergoes dimerization producing the dinuclear species [NBu(4)](2)[{Pt(CF(3))(2)}(2)(μ-Cl)(2)] (14). Halide abstraction in the latter compound with AgClO(4) in THF yields the solvento compound cis-[Pt(CF(3))(2)(thf)(2)] (15). The highly labile character of the THF ligands in compound 15 makes this species a convenient synthon of the "cis-Pt(CF(3))(2)" unit. PMID:23165756

  20. Can gallium-68 compounds partly replace (18)F-FDG in PET molecular imaging?

    PubMed

    Pagou, Margarita; Zerizer, Imene; Al-Nahhas, Adil

    2009-01-01

    The development of gallium-68 -1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclodecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid ((68)Ga-DOTA) compounds was made possible due to the chemistry of (68)Ga, which matches the pharmacokinetics of many peptides, specially the chelators DOTA and DOTAderivatives with the formation of stable (68)Ga (3+) complexes. The availability of this tracer from a germanium-68-gallium-68 generator with a relatively long half-life makes it attractive to use in busy nuclear medicine departments, particularly those with limited access to cyclotrons. The recent clinical experience with (68)Ga-peptides includes imaging neuroendocrine tumours particularly carcinoid, as well as neuroectodermal tumours such as phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma. In vitro and animal testing are still progressing alongside clinical studies, with promising results in the use of (68)Ga-DOTA-rhenium-cyclized alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) and (68)Ga-DOTA-napamide (NAP) in melanoma, (68)Ga-DOTA-PEG(4)-BN(7-14) (PESIN) for the imaging of bombesin receptor- positive tumours and (68)Ga-ethylene dicysteine-metronidazole (EC-MN) for imaging tumour hypoxia. In addition to tumours, (68)Ga- DOTA peptide inhibitor of vascular peptide protein 1(VAP-P1) is being assessed for imaging inflammatory reaction. An additional value following a positive scan is the use of beta emitters labelled to the same peptides for radionuclide treatment. In conclusion, the recent introduction of (68)Ga-peptides, made available by a convenient (68)Ga/(68)Ge generator, could greatly contribute to the management of a wide range of clinical conditions including tumours and inflammation. PMID:19675859

  1. Ionic interactions in platinum chloride linear-chain compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Batistic, I. ); Huang, X.Z.; Bishop, A.R.; Saxena, A. )

    1993-09-01

    Halogen-bridged transition-metal chain compounds have recently emerged as an important class of low-dimensional electronic materials with strong electron-lattice and electron-electron interactions. We introduce a many-body model for such materials which is quantitatively successful for highly valence-localized (strong charge-density-wave) members of the class, e.g., PtCl with various ligand structures. The model introduces nearest-neighbor Coulomb attraction [ital and] metal ion-ion electrostatic repulsion directly rather than through a linear Peierls-Hubbard Hamiltonian. These interactions have the effects of (i) modifying the on-site orbital energies, (ii) generating an effective [ital anharmonic] [ital intra]site electron-lattice coupling (leading to the formation of a charge-density wave even if the intersite electron-lattice coupling is weak), and (iii) acting as an effective [ital anharmonic] elastic force between neighboring metal and halogen atoms. The stoichiometric ground state and various defect states (polaron, bipolaron, kink, exciton) are studied within this framework by computing their optical absorption, Raman, and infrared spectra: The results agree well with available experimental data. Buckling of Cl atoms out of the chain axis in certain PtCl compounds is predicted to be important in order to obtain the observed Raman frequencies for [ital electron] polarons and bipolarons. Finally, a strong template'' effect is discussed by comparing two PtCl materials with different ligands and counterions.

  2. Molten gallium flux synthesis of known thermoelectric and novel magnetic inorganic clathrate compounds: Improving thermoelectric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, John Daniel

    Molten gallium metal has been used as a solvent to grow large single crystals of known inorganic thermoelectric clathrates Sr8Ga 16Ge30, Ba8Ga16Ge30, and Ba8Ga16Si30. X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, electron microprobe, Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry, temperature dependent electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements characterized the single crystals. The Thermoelectric performance was shown to be heavily dependent on the synthetic conditions including container choice, thermal history and impurity concentration. Inorganic Clathrates have attracted intense interest in last several years as potential new materials for thermoelectric devices. If a small to moderate increase in thermoelectric performance over the currently used materials is realized, substantial environmental and technological gains could be achieved. Since thermoelectric refrigeration modules require no moving parts or heat exchange gas (freon) they offer significant advantages over conventional refrigeration technology that tends to fail due to the finite lifetime of the pumping equipment. High temperature devices are also extremely useful for power generation in harsh unforgiving environments where excess heat is available. The thermoelectric performance, primarily at room temperature, of these compounds was found to be heavily dependent on the synthetic procedures used to obtain them. A flux growth procedure was developed to overcome the problems of the traditional melt-quench-anneal solid-state chemical approach. This procedure yielded large single crystals of the Sr8Ga16Ge 30, Ba8Ga16Ge30 and Ba8Ga 16Si30 compounds which ready facilitated their chemical and electronic study. Finally, an outlook on the application of these compounds as thermoelectric devices is given. Application of the flux method to other systems was also successful in the discovery of two new inorganic clathrate compounds: type IV Eu4Ga 8Ge16 and type V Yb8Ga16Ge14. The Eu4Ga8Ge16 compound was found to

  3. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of two novel isomerism anticancer platinum compounds.

    PubMed

    He, Donglin; Yin, Shuhui; Han, Fuguo; Zhu, Jingjie; Shi, Yun; Tong, Zhiyuan; Liu, Qingfei

    2016-11-01

    LLC-0601(S,S) and LLC-0601(R,R) are two novel synthesized isomerism platinum compounds both with encouraging anticancer activity. However, the previous study showed that toxicity of LLC-0601(R,R) was much higher than that of LLC-0601(S,S) with higher body weight loss and mortality rate of tested rats. This paper is focused on the comparison of the two compounds with their pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles in rats and tissue distribution in mice after intravenous administration. The atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) method was successfully developed and applied for the determination of platinum in plasma and tissues. The results showed that main PK parameters such as half-life, AUC and MRT of the two compounds had no significant difference after intravenous administration to rats (p  > 0.05). The tissue distribution after intravenous administration to mice showed that the concentration of LLC-0601(R,R) in heart at 0.083 h was higher than that of LLC-0601(S,S) (p  < 0.05) and it was the same case for AUC5min-4 h (p  < 0.05). Different distribution of the two compounds in heart was possibly the main reason of different toxicity and more in-depth research on the metabolites and other mechanism are needed to investigate the toxicity. PMID:27042965

  4. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    Liver gallium scan; Bony gallium scan ... You will get a radioactive material called gallium injected into your vein. The gallium travels through the bloodstream and collects in the bones and certain organs. Your health care provider will ...

  5. Electrodeposition of gallium for photovoltaics

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2016-08-09

    An electroplating solution and method for producing an electroplating solution containing a gallium salt, an ionic compound and a solvent that results in a gallium thin film that can be deposited on a substrate.

  6. The role of macrocyclic compounds in the extraction and possible separation of platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar; Lee, Jin-Young

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclic compounds (crown ethers), specifically 18-crown-6 (18-C-6), benzo-15-crown-5 (B-15-C-5), di-benzo-18-crown-6 (DB-18-C-6) and di-cyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC-18C-6), are used as extractants as well as synergists with amine-group extractants. Platinum and rhodium belong to platinum-group metals (PGMs) and have very similar ionic radii and similar properties. The separation of PGMs is most useful for the preparation of functional materials. Macrocyclic compounds are tested for platinum and rhodium separation and are found to achieve marginal separation. Amines (used as extractants) are paired with macrocyclic compounds (used as synergists), and the separation factor between platinum and rhodium is increased with synergistic enhancement from a chloride solution. The present study discusses extraction chemistry, separation factors and the synergy between platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions. To ensure accurate data, the aqueous samples in this study are analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). PMID:27283394

  7. The role of macrocyclic compounds in the extraction and possible separation of platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions

    PubMed Central

    Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar; Lee, Jin-Young

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclic compounds (crown ethers), specifically 18-crown-6 (18-C-6), benzo-15-crown-5 (B-15-C-5), di-benzo-18-crown-6 (DB-18-C-6) and di-cyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC-18C-6), are used as extractants as well as synergists with amine-group extractants. Platinum and rhodium belong to platinum-group metals (PGMs) and have very similar ionic radii and similar properties. The separation of PGMs is most useful for the preparation of functional materials. Macrocyclic compounds are tested for platinum and rhodium separation and are found to achieve marginal separation. Amines (used as extractants) are paired with macrocyclic compounds (used as synergists), and the separation factor between platinum and rhodium is increased with synergistic enhancement from a chloride solution. The present study discusses extraction chemistry, separation factors and the synergy between platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions. To ensure accurate data, the aqueous samples in this study are analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). PMID:27283394

  8. The role of macrocyclic compounds in the extraction and possible separation of platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar; Lee, Jin-Young

    2016-06-01

    Macrocyclic compounds (crown ethers), specifically 18-crown-6 (18-C-6), benzo-15-crown-5 (B-15-C-5), di-benzo-18-crown-6 (DB-18-C-6) and di-cyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC-18C-6), are used as extractants as well as synergists with amine-group extractants. Platinum and rhodium belong to platinum-group metals (PGMs) and have very similar ionic radii and similar properties. The separation of PGMs is most useful for the preparation of functional materials. Macrocyclic compounds are tested for platinum and rhodium separation and are found to achieve marginal separation. Amines (used as extractants) are paired with macrocyclic compounds (used as synergists), and the separation factor between platinum and rhodium is increased with synergistic enhancement from a chloride solution. The present study discusses extraction chemistry, separation factors and the synergy between platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions. To ensure accurate data, the aqueous samples in this study are analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES).

  9. HEPARAN SULFATE PROTEOGLYCAN-MEDIATED ENTRY PATHWAY FOR CHARGED TRI-PLATINUM COMPOUNDS. DIFFERENTIAL CELLULAR ACCUMULATION MECHANISMS FOR PLATINUM

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Heveline; Frézard, Frédéric; Peterson, Erica J.; Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Ryan, John J.; Farrell, Nicholas P.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of accumulation of charged polynuclear platinum complexes (PPCs), based on analogy of polyarginine interactions with the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) family of protein-linked glycosoaminoglycan polysaccharides (GAGs). GAGS such as heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) mediate the cellular entry of many charged molecules. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that PPCs, but not the neutral cisplatin or oxaliplatin, blocked the cellular entry of TAMRA-R9 (a nonarginine peptide, R9) coupled to the TAMRA fluorescent label 5-(and 6-)carboxytetramethylrhodamine) in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO), human colon carcinoma (HCT116), and osteosarcoma (SAOS-2) cells. Furthermore, detection of platinum accumulation in wt CHO, mutant CHO-pgsD-677 (lacking HS), and CHO-pgsA (lacking HS/CS) cells confirms that HSPG-mediated interactions are an important mechanism for PPC internalization, but not so for uncharged cisplatin and oxaliplatin. Endocytosis inhibitor studies show that macropinocytosis, a mechanism of cell entry for heparan sulfate GAGs and arginine-rich peptides, is important in the cellular accumulation of “non-covalent” TriplatinNC, and to a lesser degree, the covalently-binding BBR3464. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis, however, was not involved in either case. Overall the results suggest a new proteoglycan-mediated mechanism for cellular accumulation of PPCs not shared by cisplatin or oxaliplatin. The results have significant implications for rational design of platinum antitumor drugs with distinct biological profiles in comparison to the clinically-used agents as well as expanding the chemotypes for HS proteoglycan-dependent receptors. PMID:22494465

  10. Preparation and study of binary compounds of actinides and lanthanides. X. Separation of the TPE and platinum (palladium) by extraction chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedeva, L.S.; Nezgovorov, N.Yu.; Radchenko, V.M.; Vasil'ev, V.Ya.

    1988-03-01

    The possibility of separation of TPE from compounds bearing platinum or palladium by extraction chromatography using D2EHPA has been explored. It has been found that TPE loss is practically nil. The coefficient of TPE isolation from platinum metals is above 10/sup 3/. It has been shown that macroamounts of platinum can be removed preliminarily by its precipitation as the sparingly soluble salt (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/PtCl/sub 6/ without a significant loss of TPE. The technique can also be applied for regeneration of platinum group elements from compounds with TPE. The purity of regenerated platinum (palladium) is enough for repeated use as components of compounds with TPE.

  11. A Capped Octahedral MHC6 Compound of a Platinum Group Metal.

    PubMed

    Eguillor, Beatriz; Esteruelas, Miguel A; Lezáun, Virginia; Oliván, Montserrat; Oñate, Enrique; Tsai, Jui-Yi; Xia, Chuanjun

    2016-06-27

    A MHC6 complex of a platinum group metal with a capped octahedral arrangement of donor atoms around the metal center has been characterized. This osmium compound OsH{κ(2) -C,C-(PhBIm-C6 H4 )}3 , which reacts with HBF4 to afford the 14 e(-) species [Os{κ(2) -C,C-(PhBIm-C6 H4 )}(Ph2 BIm)2 ]BF4 stabilized by two agostic interactions, has been obtained by reaction of OsH6 (PiPr3 )2 with N,N'-diphenylbenzimidazolium chloride ([Ph2 BImH]Cl) in the presence of NEt3 . Its formation takes place through the C,C,C-pincer compound OsH2 {κ(3) -C,C,C-(C6 H4 -BIm-C6 H4 )}(PiPr3 )2 , the dihydrogen derivative OsCl{κ(2) -C,C-(PhBIm-C6 H4 )}(η(2) -H2 )(PiPr3 )2 , and the five-coordinate osmium(II) species OsCl{κ(2) -C,C-(PhBIm-C6 H4 )}(PiPr3 )2 . PMID:27123555

  12. Cyclometalated Iminophosphorane Gold(III) and Platinum(II) Complexes. A Highly Permeable Cationic Platinum(II) Compound with Promising Anticancer Properties.

    PubMed

    Frik, Malgorzata; Fernández-Gallardo, Jacob; Gonzalo, Oscar; Mangas-Sanjuan, Víctor; González-Alvarez, Marta; Serrano del Valle, Alfonso; Hu, Chunhua; González-Alvarez, Isabel; Bermejo, Marival; Marzo, Isabel; Contel, María

    2015-08-13

    New organometallic gold(III) and platinum(II) complexes containing iminophosphorane ligands are described. Most of them are more cytotoxic to a number of human cancer cell lines than cisplatin. Cationic Pt(II) derivatives 4 and 5, which differ only in the anion, Hg2Cl6(2-) or PF6(-) respectively, display almost identical IC50 values in the sub-micromolar range (25-335-fold more active than cisplatin on these cell lines). The gold compounds induced mainly caspase-independent cell death, as previously reported for related cycloaurated compounds containing IM ligands. Cycloplatinated compounds 3, 4, and 5 can also activate alternative caspase-independent mechanisms of death. However, at short incubation times cell death seems to be mainly caspase dependent, suggesting that the main mechanism of cell death for these compounds is apoptosis. Mercury-free compound 5 does not interact with plasmid (pBR322) DNA or with calf thymus DNA. Permeability studies of 5 by two different assays, in vitro Caco-2 monolayers and a rat perfusion model, have revealed a high permeability profile for this compound (comparable to that of metoprolol or caffeine) and an estimated oral fraction absorbed of 100%, which potentially makes it a good candidate for oral administration. PMID:26147404

  13. Cyclometalated Iminophosphorane Gold(III) and Platinum(II) Complexes. A Highly Permeable Cationic Platinum(II) Compound with Promising Anticancer Properties

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New organometallic gold(III) and platinum(II) complexes containing iminophosphorane ligands are described. Most of them are more cytotoxic to a number of human cancer cell lines than cisplatin. Cationic Pt(II) derivatives 4 and 5, which differ only in the anion, Hg2Cl62– or PF6– respectively, display almost identical IC50 values in the sub-micromolar range (25–335-fold more active than cisplatin on these cell lines). The gold compounds induced mainly caspase-independent cell death, as previously reported for related cycloaurated compounds containing IM ligands. Cycloplatinated compounds 3, 4, and 5 can also activate alternative caspase-independent mechanisms of death. However, at short incubation times cell death seems to be mainly caspase dependent, suggesting that the main mechanism of cell death for these compounds is apoptosis. Mercury-free compound 5 does not interact with plasmid (pBR322) DNA or with calf thymus DNA. Permeability studies of 5 by two different assays, in vitro Caco-2 monolayers and a rat perfusion model, have revealed a high permeability profile for this compound (comparable to that of metoprolol or caffeine) and an estimated oral fraction absorbed of 100%, which potentially makes it a good candidate for oral administration. PMID:26147404

  14. Crystal structure and chemotherapeutic efficacy of the novel compound, gallium tetrachloride betaine, against breast cancer using nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed; Noaman, Eman; Kandil, Eman; Badawi, Abdelfattah; Mostafa, Nihal

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antitumor efficacy of a novel synthesized compound, betaine gallium-tetrachloride (BTG), alone or combined with ZnO-nanoparticles (BTG + ZnO-NPs) on the incidence of 7, 12-dimethylbenz-anthrathene-induced mammary tumor in female rats. Crystal and molecular structure of the prepared BTG were identified using X-ray crystallography. In vitro study revealed BTG more cytotoxic than BTG + ZnO-NPs on human breast cancer (MCF-7) cell line. In vivo study demonstrated that the blood antioxidant status of tumor-bearing rats (DMBA group) was significantly lower than normal noticeable by a significant decrease in GSH content, GPx, SOD, and CAT activities associated with a significantly high MDA content. Both treatments have significantly elevated SOD and CAT activities with a concomitant decrease of MDA level compared to DMBA group. However, BTG + ZnO-NPs accentuated the decrease of GSH regarding DMBA group. The results showed also that both treatments significantly activate caspase-3 enzyme and apoptosis in mammary glands. Their administration to tumor-bearing rats was found to significantly reduce plasma iron and iron-binding capacity (TIBC) compared to DMBA group. Regarding liver function, both treatments significantly reduced the increase of ALT and AST activities compared to DMBA group. However, BTG + ZnO-NPs decreased albumin below normal level. Histopathological studies showed that normalization of tissue structures was higher in BTG than BTG + ZnO-NPs treatment. According to the results obtained, it is observed that the antitumor effect of BTG alone was as strong as BTG + ZnO-NPs and even more efficient in some aspects accordingly, a combination is not needed. Thus, the novel synthetic gallium derivatives may potentially present a new hope for the development of breast cancer therapeutics, which should attract further scientific and pharmaceutical interest. PMID:26894603

  15. Derived reference doses for three compounds used in the photovoltaics industry: Copper indium diselenide, copper gallium diselenide, and cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Bernholc, N.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.

    1995-07-06

    Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic modules made from copper indium diselenide (CIS), copper gallium diselenide (CGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) arc nearing commercial development. A wide range of issues are being examined as these materials move from the laboratory to large-scale production facilities to ensure their commercial success. Issues of traditional interest include module efficiency, stability and cost. More recently, there is increased focus given to environmental, health and safety issues surrounding the commercialization of these same devices. An examination of the toxicological properties of these materials, and their chemical parents is fundamental to this discussion. Chemicals that can present large hazards to human health or the environment are regulated often more strictly than those that are less hazardous. Stricter control over how these materials are handled and disposed can increase the costs associated with the production and use of these modules dramatically. Similarly, public perception can be strongly influenced by the inherent biological hazard that these materials possess. Thus, this report: presents a brief background tutorial on how toxicological data are developed and used; overviews the toxicological data available for CIS, CGS and CdTe; develops ``reference doses`` for each of these compounds; compares the reference doses for these compounds with those of their parents; discusses the implications of these findings to photovoltaics industry.

  16. Glioblastoma Treatment: Bypassing the Toxicity of Platinum Compounds by Using Liposomal Formulation and Increasing Treatment Efficiency With Concomitant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Charest, Gabriel; Sanche, Leon; Fortin, David; Mathieu, David; Paquette, Benoit

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Treatments of glioblastoma with cisplatin or oxaliplatin only marginally improve the overall survival of patients and cause important side effects. To prevent adverse effects, improve delivery, and optimize the tumor response to treatment in combination with radiotherapy, a potential approach consists of incorporating the platinum agent in a liposome. Methods and Materials: In this study, cisplatin, oxaliplatin, carboplatin, Lipoplatin (the liposomal formulation of cisplatin), and Lipoxal (the liposomal formulation of oxaliplatin) were tested on F98 glioma orthotopically implanted in Fischer rats. The platinum compounds were administered by intracarotid infusion and were assessed for the ability to reduce toxicity, improve cancer cell uptake, and increase survival of animals when combined or not combined with radiotherapy. Results: The tumor uptake was 2.4-fold more important for Lipoxal than the liposome-free oxaliplatin. Lipoxal also improved the specificity of oxaliplatin as shown by a higher ratio of tumor to right hemisphere uptake. Surprisingly, Lipoplatin led to lower tumor uptake compared with cisplatin. However, Lipoplatin had the advantage of largely reducing the toxicity of cisplatin and allowed us to capitalize on the anticancer activity of this agent. Conclusion: Among the five platinum compounds tested, carboplatin showed the best increase in survival when combined with radiation for treatment of glioma implanted in Fischer rats.

  17. Role of phosphate-containing compounds in the transfer of indium-111 and gallium-67 from transferrin to ferritin.

    PubMed

    Weiner, R E

    1989-01-01

    Physiologic concentrations of ATP stimulate the translocation of gallium-67 (67Ga) from human transferrin (TF) to horse ferritin (HoFE). The mechanism of this translocation was examined. One millimolar ATP did not speed the binding of 67Ga or indium-111 (111In) to HoFE. ATP and pyrophosphate (PPi) at 1 mM, did not form high affinity complexes with 67Ga or 111In. ATP and PPi interacted directly with the [67Ga]TF complex and could within minutes increase the amount of nonprotein-bound 67Ga. Serum HCO3- concentration, 30 mM, prevented the ATP-induced dissociation of 67Ga from TF, whereas intracellular concentrations (0.4 and 5 mM) did not. Using a dialysis technique, ATP also stimulated the translocation of 111In from TF to HoFE; however, this process was much slower than with 67Ga. ATP caused an increase in the nonprotein-bound 111In compared to the control. These results suggest the formation of nonprotein-bound nuclide by these phosphate-containing compounds in a kinetically labile form is important to the translocation mechanism. PMID:2536083

  18. Multi-platinum anti-cancer agents. Substitution-inert compounds for tumor selectivity and new targets.

    PubMed

    Farrell, N P

    2015-12-21

    This tutorial review summarizes chemical, biophysical and cellular biological properties of formally substitution-inert "non-covalent" polynuclear platinum complexes (PPCs). We demonstrate how modulation of the pharmacological factors affecting platinum compound cytotoxicity such as cellular accumulation, reactivity toward extracellular and intracellular sulfur-ligand nucleophiles and consequences of DNA binding is achieved to afford a profile of biological activity distinct from that of covalently-binding agents. The DNA binding of substitution-inert complexes is achieved by molecular recognition through minor groove spanning and backbone tracking of the phosphate clamp. In this situation, the square-planar tetra-am(m)ine Pt(ii) coordination units hydrogen bond to phosphate oxygen OP atoms to form bidentate N-O-N motifs. The modular nature of the polynuclear compounds results in high-affinity binding to DNA and very efficient nuclear condensation. These combined effects distinguish the phosphate clamp as a third mode of ligand-DNA binding, discrete from intercalation and minor-groove binding. The cellular consequences mirror those of the biophysical studies and a significant portion of nuclear DNA is compacted, a unique effect different from mitosis, senescence or apoptosis. Substitution-inert PPCs display cytotoxicity similar to cisplatin in a wide range of cell lines, and sensitivity is indifferent to p53 status. Cellular accumulation is mediated through binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) allowing for possibilities of tumor selectivity as well as disruption of HSPG function, opening new targets for platinum antitumor agents. The combined properties show that covalently-binding chemotypes are not the unique arbiters of cytotoxicity and antitumor activity and meaningful antitumor profiles can be achieved even in the absence of Pt-DNA bond formation. These dual properties make the substitution-inert compounds a unique class of inherently dual

  19. Ligand modulation of a dinuclear platinum compound leads to mechanistic differences in cell cycle progression and arrest

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Vijay R.; Peterson, Erica J.; Valerie, Kristoffer; Farrell, Nicholas P.; Povirk, Lawrence F.

    2013-01-01

    Despite similar structures and DNA binding profiles, two recently synthesized dinuclear platinum compounds are shown to elicit highly divergent effects on cell cycle progression. In colorectal HCT116 cells, BBR3610 shows a classical G2/M arrest with initial accumulation in S phase, but the derivative compound BBR3610-DACH, formed by introduction of the 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (DACH) as carrier ligand, results in severe G1/S as well as G2/M phase arrest, with nearly complete S phase depletion. The origin of this unique effect was studied. Cellular interstrand crosslinking as assayed by comet analysis was similar for both compounds, confirming previous in vitro results obtained on plasmid DNA. Immunoblotting revealed a stabilization of p53 and concomitant transient increases in p21 and p27 proteins after treatment with BBR3610-DACH. Cell viability assays and cytometric analysis of p53 and p21 null cells indicated that BBR3610-DACH-induced cell cycle arrest was p21-dependent and partially p53-dependent. However, an increase in the levels of cyclin E was observed with steady state levels of CDK2 and Cdc25A, suggesting that the G1 block occurs downstream of CDK/cyclin complex formation. The G2/M block was corroborated with decreased levels of cyclin A and cyclin B1. Surprisingly, BBR3610-DACH-induced G1 block was independent of ATM and ATR. Finally, both compounds induced apoptosis, with BBR3610-DACH showing a robust PARP-1 cleavage that was not associated with caspase-3/7 cleavage. In summary, BBR3610-DACH is a DNA binding platinum agent with unique inhibitory effects on cell cycle progression that could be further developed as a chemotherapeutic agent complementary to cisplatin and oxaliplatin. PMID:24161784

  20. Surface reconstructions and morphology of indium gallium arsenide compound semiconductor alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riposan, Alexandru

    Lattice-matched In0.53Ga0.47As/InP(001) and compressively strained In0.27Ga0.73As/GaAs(001) and In0.81Ga 0.19As/InP(001) compound semiconductor layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and analyzed by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and ex-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Regular (4x3) and irregular (nx3) alloy reconstructions were observed at all compositions. In addition, the strained surfaces contain alpha2(2x4) and beta2(2x4) reconstructions at the lower and higher In compositions, respectively. New models were proposed for the (4x3) reconstruction, which are consistent with the experimental results and obey the electron counting rule. In these models, the (4x3) reconstruction is As-rich, but contains As-metal heterodimers, in addition to As dimers and metal dimers. These models can also be used to compose disordered (nx3) surfaces while still obeying the electron counting rule. The experiments suggest that the (2x4) reconstructions are favored by compressive misfit strain and are enriched in In compared with the (4x3)/(nx3) reconstructions. At moderate misfit strains and temperatures, the critical film thickness for three-dimensional (3D) growth is increased by increasing the As overpressure during film deposition. This effect provides an additional method to control the transition to 3D growth and has applications in device fabrication. Large 3D islands form during the annealing of planar pseudomorphic In 0.27Ga0.73As/GaAs films, and later disappear with continuing annealing. These islands are different from those formed during film deposition. The formation of these features is strain-driven, while their dissolution is triggered by In desorption. A step instability was also observed during annealing at this composition, consisting in the cusping of step edges and the formation of surface pits and step bunches. The driving force for this instability is likely the creation of new step line due to the compressive strain, through step

  1. Identification of cisplatin-binding proteins using agarose conjugates of platinum compounds.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M; Steyger, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as an antineoplastic drug, but its ototoxic and nephrotoxic side-effects, as well as the inherent or acquired resistance of some cancers to cisplatin, remain significant clinical problems. Cisplatin's selectivity in killing rapidly proliferating cancer cells is largely dependent on covalent binding to DNA via cisplatin's chloride sites that had been aquated. We hypothesized that cisplatin's toxicity in slowly proliferating or terminally differentiated cells is primarily due to drug-protein interactions, instead of drug-DNA binding. To identify proteins that bind to cisplatin, we synthesized two different platinum-agarose conjugates, one with two amino groups and another with two chlorides attached to platinum that are available for protein binding, and conducted pull-down assays using cochlear and kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis on protein bands after gel electrophoresis and Coomassie blue staining identified several proteins, including myosin IIA, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), calreticulin, valosin containing protein (VCP), and ribosomal protein L5, as cisplatin-binding proteins. Future studies on the interaction of these proteins with cisplatin will elucidate whether these drug-protein interactions are involved in ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, or contribute to tumor sensitivity or resistance to cisplatin treatment. PMID:23755301

  2. Identification of Cisplatin-Binding Proteins Using Agarose Conjugates of Platinum Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M.; Steyger, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as an antineoplastic drug, but its ototoxic and nephrotoxic side-effects, as well as the inherent or acquired resistance of some cancers to cisplatin, remain significant clinical problems. Cisplatin's selectivity in killing rapidly proliferating cancer cells is largely dependent on covalent binding to DNA via cisplatin's chloride sites that had been aquated. We hypothesized that cisplatin's toxicity in slowly proliferating or terminally differentiated cells is primarily due to drug-protein interactions, instead of drug-DNA binding. To identify proteins that bind to cisplatin, we synthesized two different platinum-agarose conjugates, one with two amino groups and another with two chlorides attached to platinum that are available for protein binding, and conducted pull-down assays using cochlear and kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis on protein bands after gel electrophoresis and Coomassie blue staining identified several proteins, including myosin IIA, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), calreticulin, valosin containing protein (VCP), and ribosomal protein L5, as cisplatin-binding proteins. Future studies on the interaction of these proteins with cisplatin will elucidate whether these drug-protein interactions are involved in ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, or contribute to tumor sensitivity or resistance to cisplatin treatment. PMID:23755301

  3. Synthesis of a monofunctional platinum compound and its activity alone and in combination with phytochemicals in ovarian tumor models.

    PubMed

    Arzuman, Laila; Beale, Philip; Yu, Jun Qing; Proschogo, Nick; Huq, Fazlul

    2014-12-01

    Currently used platinum drugs fail to provide long-term cure for ovarian cancer mainly because of acquired drug resistance. In this study, a new monofunctional planaramineplatinum(II) complex, namely tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)monochloroplatinum(II) chloride (coded as LH3), was synthesised and investigated for its activity against human ovarian A2780, cisplatin-resistant A2780 (A2780(cisR)) and ZD0473-resistant A2780 (A2780(ZD0473R)) cancer cell lines, alone and in combination with the phytochemicals curcumin, genistein and resveratrol. Cellular levels of glutathione in A2780 and A2780(cisR) cell lines before and after treatment with LH3 and its combinations with genistein and curcumin were also determined. Interaction of the compounds with salmon sperm DNA, pBR322 plasmid DNA and damage to DNA in A2780 and A2780(cisR) cells due to interaction with LH3-alone and in combination with phytochemicals were also investigated. LH3 was found to be much more active than cisplatin against the resistant tumor models and greatest synergism in activity was observed when combinations of LH3 with genistein and curcumin were administered as a bolus. For combinations of LH3 with the phytochemicals, platinum accumulation and the level of Pt-DNA binding were found to be greater in the resistant A2780(cisR) cell line than in the parental A2780 cell line. Greater activity of LH3 than cisplatin against the resistant ovarian cell lines indicates that it may have the potential for development as a novel anticancer drug and that its combination with phytochemicals can serve to further enhance drug efficacy. PMID:25503135

  4. Gallium and its competing roles with iron in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2016-08-01

    Gallium, a group IIIa metal, shares chemical properties with iron. Studies have shown that gallium-based compounds have potential therapeutic activity against certain cancers and infectious microorganisms. By functioning as an iron mimetic, gallium perturbs iron-dependent proliferation processes in tumor cells. Gallium's action on iron homeostasis leads to disruption of ribonucleotide reductase, mitochondrial function, and the regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin. In addition, gallium nitrate stimulates an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in cells which triggers downstream upregulation of metallothionein and hemoxygenase-1. Gallium's anti-infective activity against bacteria and fungi results from disruption of microbial iron utilization through mechanisms which include gallium binding to siderophores and downregulation of bacterial iron uptake. Gallium compounds lack cross-resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and antibiotics thus making them attractive agents for drug development. This review will focus on the mechanisms of action of gallium with emphasis on its interaction with iron and iron proteins. PMID:27150508

  5. Optical Properties and Electronic Structures of d- and F-Electron Metals and Alloys, Silver-Indium Nickel - GOLD-GALLIUM(2), PLATINUM-GALLIUM(2), - - Cobalt-Aluminum CERIUM-TIN(3), and LANTHANUM-TIN(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang Joo

    1990-01-01

    Optical properties and electronic structures of disordered Ag_{1-x}In_ {x} (x = 0.0, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12) and Ni_{1-x}Cu_{x }(x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.4) alloys and ordered AuGa_2, PtGa _2, beta^' -NiAl, beta^' -CoAl, CeSn_3, and LaSn_3 have been studied. The complex dielectric functions have been determined for Ag_{1-x}In _{x},Ni_{1-x}Cu_ {x},AuGa_2, and PtGa_2 in the 1.2-5.5 eV region and for CeSn_3 and LaSn_3 in the 1.5-4.5 eV region using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Self-consistent relativistic band calculations using the linearized-augmented -plane-wave method have been performed for AuGa _2, PtGa_2,beta^' -CoAl, CeSn_3, and LaSn_3 to interpret the experimental optical spectra. In Ag_{1-x}In_{x} , the intraband scattering rate increases with increasing In concentration in the low-energy region (<3.5 eV). As the In concentration increases, the onset energy of the L_3to L_sp{2}{'}( E_{F}) transitions, 4.03 eV for pure Ag, shifts to higher energies, while that of the L_sp{2}{'}(E _{F}) to L_1 transitions, 3.87 eV for pure Ag, shifts to lower energies. This is only partly attributable to the rise of the Fermi level E_{F} caused by an increase in the average number of electrons per atom due to the In solute and to the narrowing of the Ag 4d-bands. The L_1-band may also lower as In is added. In Ni_{1-x}Cu_ {x}, the 4.7-eV edge (from transitions between the s-d-hybridized bands well below E_ {F} and the s-p-like bands above E _{F}, e.g., X_1 to X_sp{4}{'} ) shifts to higher energies, while the 1.5-eV edge (from transitions between a p-like band below E _{F} and a d-band above E _{F}, e.g., L_sp {2}{'} to L_3) remains at the same energy as the Cu concentration increases. A structure grows in the (2-3)-eV region as Cu is added, and it is interpreted as being due to transitions between the localized Cu subbands. For AuGa_2 and PtGa _2, both compounds show interband absorption at low photon energies (<1.3 eV). The interband absorption for AuGa_2 is strong at about 2 eV while

  6. Vertical Bridgman growth of calcium lithium niobium gallium garnet crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xuewu; Chong, Tow-Chong; Zhang, Guangyu; Li, Minghua; Soo, Lay Hiok; Xu, Wei; Freeman, Bill

    2003-03-01

    The growth of calcium lithium niobium gallium garnet (CLNGG) crystal has been carried out using platinum crucibles in a vertical Bridgman (VB) furnace with three resistance-heating zones. Transparent CLNGG crystals grown from the congruent melts with and without weight loss compensation are different in color and are 25 mm in diameter and about 70 mm in length. The phase identification of the sintered raw materials, grown crystals and white compound formed on the side surface of the grown crystal has been done using the powder X-ray diffraction method. The formation of the white compound is related to the {1 0 0} facet growth near the side surface. The naturally selected growth direction of the CLNGG crystal grown without a seed is near <1 1 1> , which is in good agreement with the morphological importance analysis according to the BFDH law. The VB-grown CLNGG also shows a cleavable feature parallel to {1 1 0} face and no absorption peaks in the wavelength range of 1100-1600 nm. The linear thermal-expansion coefficient of the CLNGG crystal along <1 1 1> direction is also reported and compared with that of CNGG, GGG and platinum crucible.

  7. Gallium interactions with Zircaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, A.L.; West, M.K.

    1999-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of gallium ion implantation into zircaloy cladding material to investigate the effects that gallium may have in a reactor. High fluence ion implantation of Ga ions was conducted on heated Zircaloy-4 in the range of 10{sup 16}--10{sup 18} Ga ions/cm2. Surface effects were studied using SEM and electron microprobe analysis. The depth profile of Ga in the Zircaloy was characterized with Rutherford backscattering and SIMS techniques. Results indicate that the Zirc-4 is little affected up to a fluence of 10{sup 17} Ga ions/cm{sup 2}. After implantation of 10{sup 18} Ga ions/cm{sup 2}, sub-grain features on the order of 2 {micro}m were observed which may be due to intermetallic compound formation between Ga and Zr. For the highest fluence implant, Ga content in the Zirc-4 reached a saturation value of between 30 and 40 atomic %; significant enhanced diffusion was observed but gallium was not seen to concentrate at grain boundaries.

  8. Boron, bismuth co-doping of gallium arsenide and other compounds for photonic and heterojunction bipolar transistor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-07-07

    Isoelectronic co-doping of semiconductor compounds and alloys with acceptors and deep donors is sued to decrease bandgap, to increase concentration of the dopant constituents in the resulting alloys, and to increase carrier mobilities lifetimes. For example, Group III-V compounds and alloys, such as GaAs and GaP, are isoelectronically co-doped with, for example, B and Bi, to customize solar cells, and other semiconductor devices. Isoelectronically co-doped Group II-VI compounds and alloys are also included.

  9. Aquated cisplatin and heparin-pluronic nanocomplexes exhibiting sustainable release of active platinum compound and NCI-H460 lung cancer cell antiproliferation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Nhat-Anh N; Nguyen, Thi Phuong; Cuu Khoa, Nguyen; Tran, Ngoc Quyen

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, platinum compounds have been many contributions in medicine. Development of new drugs from the active platinum compounds as well as nanocarriers for targeted delivery and reducing side effects of the drugs has paid much attention. In the study, nanocomplexes were prepared from aquated species of cisplatin and pluronic-conjugated heparin which distributed in the range of 80-100 nm by Transmission Electron Microscopy and 134 nm by Dynamic light scattering (DLS). Formation of the complex was confirmed by FTIR and DLS. The nanocomplexes exhibited high drug-loading capacity (approximately 42.5% wt/wt at 37 °C and 37.5% wt/wt at 25 °C). In vitro, drug-loaded nanogels showed much slower release profiles of cisplatin CDDP in pH 7.4 (physiological pH) compared with pH 5.5 condition at 37 °C. Moreover, the cytotoxicity assay results also indicated that Hep-F127 was cytocompatible; meanwhile, CDDP-loaded nanocomplex was able to reduce the cytotoxic ability of free CDDP (IC50 = 5.68 ± 0.73 μg/ml), which still maintain a significantly antiproliferative activity on NCI-H460 lung cancer cell. The in vitro preliminarily obtained results indicate that the nanocomplex is a candidate for CDDP delivery which can be studied further in cancer therapy. PMID:26886825

  10. Gallium fluoroarsenates.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kayleigh L; Armstrong, Jennifer A; Weller, Mark T

    2015-07-28

    Six new phases in the gallium-fluoride-arsenate system have been synthesised hydrofluorothermally using a fluoride-rich medium and "HAsF6" (HF : AsF5) as a reactant. RbGaF3(H2AsO4), KGaF(H2AsO4) and [piperazine-H2]2[Ga2F8(HAsO4)]·H2O have one dimensional structures, [DABCO-H2]2[Ga4F7O2H(AsO4)2]·4H2O consists of two dimensionally connected polyhedral layers, while GaF(AsO3[OH,F])2 and (NH4)3Ga4F9(AsO4)2 both have three-dimensionally connected polyhedral frameworks. PMID:26095086

  11. The surface tension of liquid gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tension of liquid gallium has been measured using the sessile drop technique in an Auger spectrometer. The experimental method is described. The surface tension in mJ/sq m is found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature and may be represented as 708-0.66(T-29.8), where T is the temperature in centigrade. This result is of interest because gallium has been suggested as a model fluid for Marangoni flow experiments. In addition, the surface tension is of technological significance in the processing of compound semiconductors involving gallium.

  12. Structure, solution chemistry, antiproliferative actions and protein binding properties of non-conventional platinum(II) compounds with sulfur and phosphorus donors.

    PubMed

    Mügge, Carolin; Rothenburger, Claudia; Beyer, Antje; Görls, Helmar; Gabbiani, Chiara; Casini, Angela; Michelucci, Elena; Landini, Ida; Nobili, Stefania; Mini, Enrico; Messori, Luigi; Weigand, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    Twelve Pt(II) complexes with cis-PtP(2)S(2) pharmacophores (where P(2) refers to two monodentate or one bidentate phosphane ligand and S(2) is a dithiolato ligand) were prepared, characterized and evaluated as potential antiproliferative agents. The various compounds were first studied from the structural point of view; afterward, their solubility properties as well as their solution behaviour were analyzed in detail. Antiproliferative properties were specifically evaluated against A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells, either resistant or sensitive to cisplatin. For comparison purposes similar studies were carried out on four parent cis-dichloro bisphosphane Pt(II)complexes. On the whole, the cis-PtP(2)S(2) compounds displayed significant antiproliferative properties while the cis-PtP(2)Cl(2) (cis-dichloro bisphosphane Pt(II)) compounds revealed quite poor biological performances. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms of these bisphosphane Pt(II) compounds, the reactions of selected complexes against the model protein cytochrome c were investigated by ESI-MS and their adduct formation explored. A relevant reactivity with cyt c was obtained only for cis-PtP(2)Cl(2) compounds, whereas cis-PtP(2)S(2) compounds turned out to be nearly unreactive. The obtained results are interpreted and discussed in the frame of the current knowledge of anticancer platinum compounds and their structure-activity-relationships. The observation of appreciable antiproliferative effects for the relatively inert cis-PtP(2)S(2) compounds strongly suggests that these compounds will undergo specific activation within the cellular environment. PMID:21212880

  13. Compound semiconductor native oxide-based technologies for optical and electrical devices grown on gallium arsenide substrates using MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Adrian Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    The beginning of the modern microelectronics industry can be traced back to an invention made in 1947 when Bardeen and Brattain created the first semiconductor switch, called a transistor. Several other important discoveries followed; however, two of the more significant were (i) the development of the first planar process using silicon dioxide (SiO2) as a mask for diffusions into silicon by Frosch in 1955, and (ii) the subsequent integration of several transistors in tiny circuits by Kilby in 1958. Due to the superior quality of the SiO2-silicon interface, Si-based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistors have primarily been used in integrated circuits. Until recently, compound semiconductors did not have a native oxide of sufficient quality to create similar MOS transistors. In 1990, research performed by Professor Holonyak and his group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has led to a high-quality, stable, and insulating native oxide created from aluminum-containing compound semiconductor alloys. This study investigates native oxide films that are formed by the thermal oxidation of AlAs and InAlP epitaxial layers grown lattice-matched on GaAs substrates using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The primary goal is to evaluate how these native oxides can help form novel device structures and transistors. To qualify the material properties of these native oxide films, we have used several characterization techniques including photoluminescence, cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, we have performed leakage current and capacitance-voltage measurements to evaluate the electrical characteristics of the native oxide-semiconductor interface. The kinetics of the thermal oxidation process for both the surface oxidation of InAlP and lateral oxidation of AlAs are studied and contrasted. Aided by this knowledge, we have created a sealed

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Non-Platinum-Based Halogenated Compounds as Potent Antitumor Agents for Natural Targeted Chemotherapy of Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Zhang, Qin-Rong; Ou, Ning; Wang, Chun-Rong; Warrington, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Based on a molecular-mechanism-based anticancer drug discovery program enabled by an innovative femtomedicine approach, we have found a previously unknown class of non-platinum-based halogenated molecules (called FMD compounds) as potent antitumor agents for effective treatment of cancers. Here, we present in vitro and in vivo studies of the compounds for targeted chemotherapy of cervical, breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. Our results show that these FMD agents led to DNA damage, cell cycle arrest in the S phase, and apoptosis in cancer cells. We also observed that such a FMD compound caused an increase of reduced glutathione (GSH, an endogenous antioxidant) levels in human normal cells, while it largely depleted GSH in cancer cells. We correspondingly found that these FMD agents exhibited no or little toxicity toward normal cells/tissues, while causing significant cytotoxicity against cancer cells, as well as suppression and delay in tumor growth in mouse xenograft models of cervical, ovarian, breast and lung cancers. These compounds are therefore a previously undiscovered class of potent antitumor agents that can be translated into clinical trials for natural targeted chemotherapy of multiple cancers. PMID:26351651

  15. Nanocarriers for delivery of platinum anticancer drugs☆

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Nukolova, Natalia V.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2014-01-01

    Platinum based anticancer drugs have revolutionized cancer chemotherapy, and continue to be in widespread clinical use especially for management of tumors of the ovary, testes, and the head and neck. However, several dose limiting toxicities associated with platinum drug use, partial anti-tumor response in most patients, development of drug resistance, tumor relapse, and many other challenges have severely limited the patient quality of life. These limitations have motivated an extensive research effort towards development of new strategies for improving platinum therapy. Nanocarrier-based delivery of platinum compounds is one such area of intense research effort beginning to provide encouraging preclinical and clinical results and may allow the development of the next generation of platinum chemotherapy. This review highlights current understanding on the pharmacology and limitations of platinum compounds in clinical use, and provides a comprehensive analysis of various platinum–polymer complexes, micelles, dendrimers, liposomes and other nanoparticles currently under investigation for delivery of platinum drugs. PMID:24113520

  16. [Platinum antitumor complexes].

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Andrea; Giuliani, Jacopo; Muggia, Franco

    2015-12-01

    In the last 50 years the oncology has experienced remarkable changes resulting in transforming malignant germ-cell testicular tumors from highly fatal to nearly uniformly cured neoplasms. This clinical landmark was justly attributed to the identification of cisplatin by Barnett Rosenberg in his experiments dating to 1965. On this 50th anniversary of this discovery, one is reminded of the following key aspects in cancer therapeutics: 1) the life-story of Barnett Rosenberg and his legacy that included organizing nearly quadrennial "platinum" meetings incorporating advances in cancer biology into evolving therapeutic strategies; 2) the search for less toxic analogs of cisplatin leading to the development of carboplatin; 3) clinical research into attenuation of cisplatin toxicities; 4) oxaliplatin and the expansion of the therapeutic spectrum of platinum compounds; and 5) the ongoing multifaceted investigations into the problem of "platinum resistance". PMID:26780071

  17. Efficient water reduction with gallium phosphide nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Standing, Anthony; Assali, Simone; Gao, Lu; Verheijen, Marcel A.; van Dam, Dick; Cui, Yingchao; Notten, Peter H. L.; Haverkort, Jos E. M.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from solar energy and water offers a clean and sustainable fuel option for the future. Planar III/V material systems have shown the highest efficiencies, but are expensive. By moving to the nanowire regime the demand on material quantity is reduced, and new materials can be uncovered, such as wurtzite gallium phosphide, featuring a direct bandgap. This is one of the few materials combining large solar light absorption and (close to) ideal band-edge positions for full water splitting. Here we report the photoelectrochemical reduction of water, on a p-type wurtzite gallium phosphide nanowire photocathode. By modifying geometry to reduce electrical resistance and enhance optical absorption, and modifying the surface with a multistep platinum deposition, high current densities and open circuit potentials were achieved. Our results demonstrate the capabilities of this material, even when used in such low quantities, as in nanowires. PMID:26183949

  18. Efficient water reduction with gallium phosphide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standing, Anthony; Assali, Simone; Gao, Lu; Verheijen, Marcel A.; van Dam, Dick; Cui, Yingchao; Notten, Peter H. L.; Haverkort, Jos E. M.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from solar energy and water offers a clean and sustainable fuel option for the future. Planar III/V material systems have shown the highest efficiencies, but are expensive. By moving to the nanowire regime the demand on material quantity is reduced, and new materials can be uncovered, such as wurtzite gallium phosphide, featuring a direct bandgap. This is one of the few materials combining large solar light absorption and (close to) ideal band-edge positions for full water splitting. Here we report the photoelectrochemical reduction of water, on a p-type wurtzite gallium phosphide nanowire photocathode. By modifying geometry to reduce electrical resistance and enhance optical absorption, and modifying the surface with a multistep platinum deposition, high current densities and open circuit potentials were achieved. Our results demonstrate the capabilities of this material, even when used in such low quantities, as in nanowires.

  19. Investigations in gallium removal

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, C.V.; Pitt, W.W.; Beard, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    Gallium present in weapons plutonium must be removed before it can be used for the production of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear reactor fuel. The main goal of the preliminary studies conducted at Texas A and M University was to assist in the development of a thermal process to remove gallium from a gallium oxide/plutonium oxide matrix. This effort is being conducted in close consultation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel involved in the development of this process for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Simple experiments were performed on gallium oxide, and cerium-oxide/gallium-oxide mixtures, heated to temperatures ranging from 700--900 C in a reducing environment, and a method for collecting the gallium vapors under these conditions was demonstrated.

  20. Gallium nitride optoelectronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of bulk gallium nitride crystals was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride. Gallium nitride single crystals up to 2.5 x 0.5 cm in size were produced. The crystals are suitable as substrates for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride. The epitaxial growth of gallium nitride on sapphire substrates with main faces of (0001) and (1T02) orientations was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride in a gas flow system. The grown layers had electron concentrations in the range of 1 to 3 x 10 to the 19th power/cu cm and Hall mobilities in the range of 50 to 100 sq cm/v/sec at room temperature.

  1. Electrothermal atomisation atomic absorption conditions and matrix modifications for determining antimony, arsenic, bismuth, cadmium, gallium, gold, indium, lead, molybdenum, palladium, platinum, selenium, silver, tellurium, thallium and tin following back-extraction of organic aminohalide extracts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    A multi-element organic-extraction and back-extraction procedure, that had been developed previously to eliminate matrix interferences in the determination of a large number of trace elements in complex materials such as geological samples, produced organic and aqueous solutions that were complex. Electrothermal atomisation atomic absorption conditions and matrix modifications have been developed for 13 of the extracted elements (Ag, As, Au, Bi, Cd, Ga, In, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Te and Tl) that enhance sensitivity, alleviate problems resulting from the complex solutions and produce acceptable precision. Platinum, Pd and Mo can be determined without matrix modification directly on the original unstripped extracts.

  2. Iron(III)-Salophene: An Organometallic Compound with Selective Cytotoxic and Anti-Proliferative Properties in Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh K.; Strongin, Robert M.; McCourt, Carolyn K.; Brard, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Background In this pioneer study to the biological activity of organometallic compound Iron(III)-salophene (Fe-SP) the specific effects of Fe-SP on viability, morphology, proliferation, and cell-cycle progression on platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines were investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Fe-SP displayed selective cytotoxicity against SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 (ovarian epithelial adenocarcinoma) cell lines at concentrations between 100 nM and 1 µM, while the viability of HeLa cells (epithelial cervix adenocarcinoma) or primary lung or skin fibroblasts was not affected. SKOV-3 cells in contrast to fibroblasts after treatment with Fe-SP revealed apparent hallmarks of apoptosis including densely stained nuclear granular bodies within fragmented nuclei, highly condensed chromatin and chromatin fragmentation. Fe-SP treatment led to the activation of markers of the extrinsic (Caspase-8) and intrinsic (Caspase-9) pathway of apoptosis as well as of executioner Caspase-3 while PARP-1 was deactivated. Fe-SP exerted effects as an anti-proliferative agent with an IC50 value of 300 nM and caused delayed progression of cells through S-phase phase of the cell cycle resulting in a complete S-phase arrest. When intra-peritoneally applied to rats Fe-SP did not show any systemic toxicity at concentrations that in preliminary trials were determined to be chemotherapeutic relevant doses in a rat ovarian cancer cell model. Conclusion/Significance The present report suggests that Fe-SP is a potent growth-suppressing agent in vitro for cell lines derived from ovarian cancer and a potential therapeutic drug to treat such tumors in vivo. PMID:18509533

  3. Lung gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation in the lungs, most often due to sarcoidosis or a certain type of pneumonia. Normal Results ... up very little gallium. What Abnormal Results Mean Sarcoidosis Other respiratory infections, most often pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia ...

  4. Preventing Supercooling Of Gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massucco, Arthur A.; Wenghoefer, Hans M.; Wilkins, Ronnie

    1994-01-01

    Principle of heterogeneous nucleation exploited to prevent gallium from supercooling, enabling its use as heat-storage material that crystallizes reproducibly at its freezing or melting temperature of 29 to 30 degrees C. In original intended application, gallium used as heat-storage material in gloves of space suits. Terrestrial application lies in preparation of freezing-temperature reference samples for laboratories. Principle of heterogeneous nucleation also exploited similarly in heat pipes filled with sodium.

  5. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-12-01

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400{degrees}C, corrosion rates are {approx}4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400{degrees}C are {ge}88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400{degrees}C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized.

  6. Studies of glutathione transferase P1-1 bound to a platinum(IV)-based anticancer compound reveal the molecular basis of its activation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lorien J; Italiano, Louis C; Morton, Craig J; Hancock, Nancy C; Ascher, David B; Aitken, Jade B; Harris, Hugh H; Campomanes, Pablo; Rothlisberger, Ursula; De Luca, Anastasia; Lo Bello, Mario; Ang, Wee Han; Dyson, Paul J; Parker, Michael W

    2011-07-01

    Platinum-based cancer drugs, such as cisplatin, are highly effective chemotherapeutic agents used extensively for the treatment of solid tumors. However, their effectiveness is limited by drug resistance, which, in some cancers, has been associated with an overexpression of pi class glutathione S-transferase (GST P1-1), an important enzyme in the mercapturic acid detoxification pathway. Ethacraplatin (EA-CPT), a trans-Pt(IV) carboxylate complex containing ethacrynate ligands, was designed as a platinum cancer metallodrug that could also target cytosolic GST enzymes. We previously reported that EA-CPT was an excellent inhibitor of GST activity in live mammalian cells compared to either cisplatin or ethacrynic acid. In order to understand the nature of the drug-protein interactions between EA-CPT and GST P1-1, and to obtain mechanistic insights at a molecular level, structural and biochemical investigations were carried out, supported by molecular modeling analysis using quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical methods. The results suggest that EA-CPT preferentially docks at the dimer interface at GST P1-1 and subsequent interaction with the enzyme resulted in docking of the ethacrynate ligands at both active sites (in the H-sites), with the Pt moiety remaining bound at the dimer interface. The activation of the inhibitor by its target enzyme and covalent binding accounts for the strong and irreversible inhibition of enzymatic activity by the platinum complex. PMID:21681839

  7. Platinum-based drugs: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Dilruba, Shahana; Kalayda, Ganna V

    2016-06-01

    Platinum-based drugs cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin are widely used in the therapy of human neoplasms. Their clinical success is, however, limited due to severe side effects and intrinsic or acquired resistance to the treatment. Much effort has been put into the development of new platinum anticancer complexes, but none of them has reached worldwide clinical application so far. Nedaplatin, lobaplatin and heptaplatin received only regional approval. Some new platinum complexes and platinum drug formulations are undergoing clinical trials. Here, we review the main classes of new platinum drug candidates, such as sterically hindered complexes, monofunctional platinum drugs, complexes with biologically active ligands, trans-configured and polynuclear platinum complexes, platinum(IV) prodrugs and platinum-based drug delivery systems. For each class of compounds, a detailed overview of the mechanism of action is given, the cytotoxicity is compared to that of the clinically used platinum drugs, and the clinical perspectives are discussed. A critical analysis of lessons to be learned is presented. Finally, a general outlook regarding future directions in the field of new platinum drugs is given. PMID:26886018

  8. PLATINUM AND FUEL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Platinum requirements for fuel cell vehicles (FCVS) have been identified as a concern and possible problem with FCV market penetration. Platinum is a necessary component of the electrodes of fuel cell engines that power the vehicles. The platinum is deposited on porous electrodes...

  9. Percolation of gallium dominates the electrical resistance of focused ion beam deposited metals

    SciTech Connect

    Faraby, H.; DiBattista, M.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2014-04-28

    Metal deposition through focused ion beam (FIB) based systems is thought to result in material composed of the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor in addition to carbon, oxygen, and gallium. We determined, through electrical resistance and chemical composition measurements on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum and tungsten lines, that the gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) concentration in the metal lines plays the dominant role in controlling the electrical resistivity. Effective medium theory, based on McLachlan's formalisms, was used to describe the relationship between the Ga{sup +} concentration and the corresponding resistivity.

  10. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Gallium arsenide in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Greenspan, B.J.; Dill, J.A.; Stoney, K.H.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1990-12-01

    Gallium arsenide is a crystalline compound used extensively in the semiconductor industry. Workers preparing solar cells and gallium arsenide ingots and wafers are potentially at risk from the inhalation of gallium arsenide dust. The potential for gallium arsenide to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague- Dawley rats and CD-1 (Swiss) mice exposed to 0, 10, 37, or 75 mg/m{sup 3} gallium arsenide, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and {approx}30 positively mated rats or {approx}24 positively mated mice. Mice were exposed on 4--17 days of gestation (dg), and rats on 4--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Gallium and arsenic concentrations were determined in the maternal blood and uterine contents of the rats (3/group) at 7, 14, and 20 dg. 37 refs., 11 figs., 30 tabs.

  11. Platinum(IV) coordination compounds containing 5-methyl-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5- a]pyrimidin-7(4 H)-one as nonleaving ligand. Molecular and cytotoxicity in vitro characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łakomska, Iwona; Fandzloch, Marzena; Wojtczak, Andrzej; Szłyk, Edward

    2011-08-01

    Novel platinum(IV) coordination compounds with 5-methyl-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5- a]pyrimidin-7(4 H)-one (HmtpO): cis- trans-[PtCl 2(OH) 2(NH 3)(HmtpO)] ( 1), cis- trans-[PtCl 5(HmtpO)][(CH 3) 2NH 2] ( 2) have been prepared and structurally characterized by spectroscopic methods ( 1H, IR and X-ray crystallography ( 2)). The X-ray results indicate that the local geometry around the platinum(IV) centre approximates a typical octahedral arrangement with nitrogen atom N3 of the HmtpO and three chloride atoms in equatorial positions. The remaining two axial positions are occupied by two chlorides. The preliminary assessment of antitumor properties of ( 1) was performed as an in vitro antiproliferative activity against HL-60 human acute promyelocytic leukemia and HCV29T bladder cancer. The cis- trans-[PtCl 2(OH) 2(NH 3)(HmtpO)] ( 1) exhibits higher cytotoxic activity against HL-60 (IC 50 = 6.4 μM) than cisplatin.

  12. Interaction of sodium with tellurium in gallium melts

    SciTech Connect

    Dergacheva, M.B.; Sarsekeeva, R.Zh.; Kozin, L.F.

    1988-09-20

    The purpose of this work was to study interaction of sodium with admixtures of tellurium and to determine the composition and phase state of the intermetallic compounds formed. The investigations were carried out by a potentiometric method with measurement of emf of the concentration cells. Sodium was introduced into the original gallium-tellurium binary alloy by electrolysis. The results of measurements of the emf of the cell were used for plotting potentiometric curves. The emf values found on the horizontal region of the potentiometric were subjected to mathematical analysis for determination of deviations from the regression line of the results of three parallel series of measurement. The emf of concentration cells with a solid electrolyte, based on melts of the gallium-sodium-tellurium ternary system, deviate from the theoretical values at 855 K; this is attributed to formation of the intermetallic compound, sparingly soluble in gallium, the free energy of formation of which is -266 +/- 15 kJ/mole.

  13. The effects of platinum on nickel electrodes in the nickel hydrogen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Albert H.

    1991-01-01

    Interactions of platinum and platinum compounds with the nickel electrode that are possible in the nickel hydrogen cell, where both the nickel electrode and a platinum catalyst hydrogen electrode are in intimate contact with the alkaline electrolyte, are examined. Additionally, a mechanism of nickel cobalt oxyhydroxide formation in NiH2 cells is presented.

  14. Gallium--A smart metal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Nora; Jaskula, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Gallium is a soft, silvery metallic element with an atomic number of 31 and the chemical symbol Ga. The French chemist Paul-Emile Lecoq de Boisbaudran discovered gallium in sphalerite (a zinc-sulfide mineral) in 1875 using spectroscopy. He named the element "gallia" after his native land of France (formerly Gaul; in Latin, Gallia). The existence of gallium had been predicted in 1871 by Dmitri Mendeleev, the Russian chemist who published the first periodic table of the elements. Mendeleev noted a gap in his table and named the missing element "eka-aluminum" because he determined that its location was one place away from aluminum in the table. Mendeleev thought that the missing element (gallium) would be very much like aluminum in its chemical properties, and he was right. Solid gallium has a low melting temperature (~29 degrees Celsius, or °C) and an unusually high boiling point (~2,204 °C). Because of these properties, the earliest uses of gallium were in high-temperature thermometers and in designing metal alloys that melt easily. The development of a gallium-based direct band-gap semiconductor in the 1960s led to what is now one of the most well-known applications for gallium-based products--the manufacture of smartphones and data-centric networks.

  15. Gallium phosphide energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, P. E.; DiNetta, Louis C.; DuganCavanagh, K.; Goetz, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Betavoltaic power supplies based on gallium phosphide can supply long term low-level power with high reliability. Results are presented for GaP devices powered by Ni-63 and tritiarated phosphors. Leakage currents as low as 1.2 x 10(exp -17) A/cm(exp 2) have been measured and the temperature dependence of the reverse saturation current is found to have ideal behavior. A small demonstration system has been assembled that generates and stores enough electricity to light up an LED.

  16. Gallium Arsenide Domino Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Long; Long, Stephen I.

    1990-01-01

    Advantages include reduced power and high speed. Experimental gallium arsenide field-effect-transistor (FET) domino circuit replicated in large numbers for use in dynamic-logic systems. Name of circuit denotes mode of operation, which logic signals propagate from each stage to next when successive stages operated at slightly staggered clock cycles, in manner reminiscent of dominoes falling in a row. Building block of domino circuit includes input, inverter, and level-shifting substages. Combinational logic executed in input substage. During low half of clock cycle, result of logic operation transmitted to following stage.

  17. Gallium nitride nanotube lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Hurtado, Antonio; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Xu, Huiwen; Luk, Ting Shan; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-01-01

    Lasing is demonstrated from gallium nitride nanotubes fabricated using a two-step top-down technique. By optically pumping, we observed characteristics of lasing: a clear threshold, a narrow spectral, and guided emission from the nanotubes. In addition, annular lasing emission from the GaN nanotube is also observed, indicating that cross-sectional shape control can be employed to manipulate the properties of nanolasers. The nanotube lasers could be of interest for optical nanofluidic applications or application benefitting from a hollow beam shape.

  18. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-04-19

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH{sub 3} flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  19. PLATINUM-GROUP METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document assembles, organizes, and evaluates all pertinent information (up to April 1976) about the effects on man and his environment that result either directly or indirectly from pollution by platinum-group metals: iridium (Ir), osmium (Os), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), ...

  20. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2003-05-07

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  1. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2003-06-01

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  2. Dioxime kinetic enhancer for solvent extraction of gallium from basic aqueous solutions thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Gefvert, D.L.

    1989-08-08

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for recovering gallium values contained in a basic aqueous solution by liquid/liquid extraction thereof comprising contacting the basic aqueous solution with a water-immiscible, organic phase comprising a substituted hydroxy-quinoline dissolved in an organic solvent therefor, whereby gallium is extracted into the organic phase; separating the organic phase from the basic aqueous phase; and recovering gallium from the separated organic phase. The improvement comprises: the organic phase further comprising dissolved therein an organic dioxime compound.

  3. Compatibility of ITER candidate materials with static gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Luebbers, P.R.; Chopra, O.K.

    1995-09-01

    Corrosion tests have been conducted to determine the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) first wall/blanket systems, e.g., Type 316 stainless steel (SS), Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr. The results indicate that Type 316 SS is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400 C, corrosion rates for Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy are {approx} 4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr, respectively. Iron, nickel, and chromium react rapidly with gallium. Iron shows greater corrosion than nickel at 400 C ({ge} 88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively). The present study indicates that at temperatures up to 400 C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The growth of intermetallic compounds may control the overall rate of corrosion.

  4. Monofunctional and Higher-Valent Platinum Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Wilson, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    Platinum compounds represent one of the great success stories of metals in medicine. Following the serendipitous discovery of the anticancer activity of cisplatin by Rosenberg, a large number of cisplatin variants have been prepared and tested for their ability to kill cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. These efforts continue today with increased realization that new strategies are needed to overcome issues of toxicity and resistance inherent to treatment by the approved platinum anticancer agents. One approach has been the use of so-called “non-traditional” platinum(II) and platinum(IV) compounds that violate the structure-activity relationships that governed platinum drug-development research for many years. Another is the use of specialized drug delivery strategies. Here we describe recent developments from our laboratory involving monofunctional platinum(II) complexes together with an historical account of the manner by which we came to investigate these compounds and their relationship to previously studied molecules. We also discuss work carried out using platinum(IV) prodrugs and the development of nanoconstructs designed to deliver them in vivo. PMID:23738524

  5. Improving Platinum Efficiency:. Nanoformulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, Rolando; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-09-01

    Platinum-based drugs continue being the support of therapy for many different kinds of cancer. Cancer patients often present irreversible resistance to platinum after repeated treatment in clinic. Despite of the great efforts, chemoresistance (intrinsic or acquired) already is a major limitation in the management of this disease. In this review, the last current research on cancer characteristic and cancer chemical resistance is summarized, the major and novel strategies to reverse resistance to platinum- based drugs are discussed and this article mainly emphasizes the contribution of nanotechnology and combination therapies to target sites and reduce the cancer chemoresistance.

  6. Solar abundance of platinum

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Harry; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1975-01-01

    Three lines of neutral platinum, located at λ 2997.98 Å, λ 3064.71 Å, and λ 3301.86 Å have been used to determine the solar platinum abundance by the method of spectral synthesis. On the scale, log A(H) = 12.00, the thus-derived solar platinum abundance is 1.75 ± 0.10, in fair accord with Cameron's value of log A(Pt) = 1.69 derived by Mason from carbonaceous chondrites and calculated on the assumption that log A(Si) = 7.55 in the sun. PMID:16592278

  7. Synthesis, Reactivity Investigation, and X-ray Diffraction Structures of New Platinum(II) Compounds Containing Redox-Active Diphosphine Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoping; Richmond, Michael G.; Hunt, Sean W

    2009-01-01

    Substitution of the 1,5-cyclooctadiene (cod) ligand in PtCl2(cod) (1) by the diphosphine ligand 4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (bpcd) yields PtCl2(bpcd) (2). Knoevenagel condensation of 2 with 9-anthracenecarboxaldehyde leads to the functionalization of the bpcd ligand and formation of the corresponding 2-(9-anthracenylidene)-4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (abpcd) substituted compound PtCl2(abpcd) (3), which is also obtained from the direct reaction of 1 with the abpcd ligand in near quantitative yield. The reaction of 3 with disodium maleonitriledithiolate (Na2mnt) affords the chelating dithiolate compound Pt(mnt)(abpcd) (4). Compounds 2 C4 have been fully characterized in solution by IR and NMR spectroscopies (1H and 31P), and their molecular structures established by X-ray crystallography. The electrochemical properties of 2 C4 have examined by cyclic voltammetry, and the nature of the HOMO and LUMO levels in these systems has been established by MO calculations at the extended H ckel level, the results of which are discussed with respect to electrochemical data and related diphosphine derivatives.

  8. Determination of platinum in blood by adsorptive voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Nygren, O; Vaughan, G T; Florence, T M; Morrison, G M; Warner, I M; Dale, L S

    1990-08-01

    This work describes a sensitive method for the determination of platinum in blood, which can be used for determining the natural levels of platinum in human blood, for monitoring patients treated with platinum cytotoxic drugs, and for monitoring occupational exposure to these drugs and other platinum compounds. The method involves dry ashing of blood samples in a muffle furnace and determination of platinum by adsorptive voltammetric (AV) measurement of the catalytic reduction of protons by the platinum-formazone complex. The detection limit for a 100-microL sample of blood is 0.017 micrograms/L, with a recovery of 94% and a relative standard deviation of 7% at a platinum level of 1 microgram/L. By using this method, the natural levels of platinum in human blood were found to be in the range 0.1-2.8 micrograms/L (median = 0.6 micrograms/L). These results were verified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with blood prepared by wet ashing and using gold as an internal standard. PMID:2400106

  9. Gallium phosphide energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, P. E.; Dinetta, L. C.; Goetz, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) energy converters may be successfully deployed to provide new mission capabilities for spacecraft. Betavoltaic power supplies based on the conversion of tritium beta decay to electricity using GaP energy converters can supply long term low-level power with high reliability. High temperature solar cells, also based on GaP, can be used in inward-bound missions greatly reducing the need for thermal dissipation. Results are presented for GaP direct conversion devices powered by Ni-63 and compared to the conversion of light emitted by tritiarated phosphors. Leakage currents as low as 1.2 x 10(exp -17) A/sq cm have been measured and the temperature dependence of the reverse saturation current is found to have ideal behavior. Temperature dependent IV, QE, R(sub sh), and V(sub oc) results are also presented. These data are used to predict the high-temperature solar cell and betacell performance of GaP devices and suggest appropriate applications for the deployment of this technology.

  10. 49 CFR 173.162 - Gallium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gallium. 173.162 Section 173.162 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.162 Gallium. (a) Except when packaged in cylinders or steel flasks, gallium must be packaged in packagings which meet...

  11. 49 CFR 173.162 - Gallium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gallium. 173.162 Section 173.162 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.162 Gallium. (a) Except when packaged in cylinders or steel flasks, gallium must be packaged in packagings which meet...

  12. 49 CFR 173.162 - Gallium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gallium. 173.162 Section 173.162 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.162 Gallium. (a) Except when packaged in cylinders or steel flasks, gallium must be packaged in packagings which meet...

  13. 49 CFR 173.162 - Gallium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gallium. 173.162 Section 173.162 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.162 Gallium. (a) Except when packaged in cylinders or steel flasks, gallium must be packaged in packagings which meet...

  14. 49 CFR 173.162 - Gallium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gallium. 173.162 Section 173.162 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.162 Gallium. (a) Except when packaged in cylinders or steel flasks, gallium must be packaged in packagings which meet...

  15. Thermodynamic properties of uranium in gallium-aluminium based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovich, V. A.; Maltsev, D. S.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Chukin, A. V.; Smolenski, V. V.; Novoselova, A. V.; Osipenko, A. G.

    2015-10-01

    Activity, activity coefficients and solubility of uranium was determined in gallium-aluminium alloys containing 1.6 (eutectic), 5 and 20 wt.% aluminium. Additionally, activity of uranium was determined in aluminium and Ga-Al alloys containing 0.014-20 wt.% Al. Experiments were performed up to 1073 K. Intermetallic compounds formed in the alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Partial and excess thermodynamic functions of U in the studied alloys were calculated.

  16. Thermodynamic properties of uranium in gallium-aluminium based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovich, V. A.; Maltsev, D. S.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Chukin, A. V.; Smolenski, V. V.; Novoselova, A. V.; Osipenko, A. G.

    2015-10-01

    Activity, activity coefficients and solubility of uranium was determined in gallium-aluminium alloys containing 1.6 (eutectic), 5 and 20 wt.% aluminium. Additionally, activity of uranium was determined in aluminium and Ga-Al alloys containing 0.014-20 wt.% Al. Experiments were performed up to 1073 K. Intermetallic compounds formed in the alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Partial and excess thermodynamic functions of U in the studied alloys were calculated.

  17. Mineral resource of the month: gallium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaskula, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The metal element gallium occurs in very small concentrations in rocks and ores of other metals — native gallium is not known. As society gets more and more high-tech, gallium becomes more useful. Gallium is one of only five metals that are liquid at or close to room temperature. It has one of the longest liquid ranges of any metal (29.8 degrees Celsius to 2204 degrees Celsius) and has a low vapor pressure even at high temperatures. Ultra-pure gallium has a brilliant silvery appearance, and the solid metal exhibits conchoidal fracture similar to glass.

  18. Effect of barrier height on friction behavior of the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishina, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction experiments were conducted for the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals. Polycrystalline titanium, tantalum, nickel, palladium, and platinum were made to contact a single crystal silicon (111) surface. Indium, nickel, copper, and silver were made to contact a single crystal gallium arsenide (100) surface. Sliding was conducted both in room air and in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 9th power torr. The friction of semiconductors in contact with metals depended on a Schottky barrier height formed at the metal semiconductor interface. Metals with a higher barrier height on semiconductors gave lower friction. The effect of the barrier height on friction behavior for argon sputtered cleaned surfaces in vacuum was more specific than that for the surfaces containing films in room air. With a silicon surface sliding on titanium, many silicon particles back transferred. In contrast, a large quantity of indium transferred to the gallium arsenide surface.

  19. Preliminary survey report: control technology for gallium arsenide processing at Hewlett Packard, San Jose, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lenihan, K.L.

    1987-04-01

    A walk-through survey of the Hewlett Packard Company facility in San Jose, California, was prompted by an interest in the use of gallium arsenide as an alternative to silicon for the semiconductor industry. This facility produced gallium-arsenide and gallium phosphide Potential hazards existed from solvents, acids, and gases employed in wafer production. Some of the solvents included fluorocarbon compounds, xylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane Arsine, phosphine, hydrogen, and silane gases were used in the production processes. Worker exposures to gallium arsenide or arsenic dust were lower during the cleaning operation than they had been in other similar facilities, perhaps due to the small size of the crystal pullers used at this particular facility. According to the author, this facility is a possible candidate for an in-depth industry survey, but may not be representative of the entire industry.

  20. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

  1. Liquid gallium rotary electric contract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przybyszewski, J. S.

    1969-01-01

    Due to its low vapor pressure, gallium, when substituted for mercury in a liquid slip ring system, transmits substantial amounts of electrical current to rotating components in an ultrahigh vacuum. It features low electrical loss, little or no wear, and long maintenance-free life.

  2. Gallium scan in intracerebral sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Makhija, M.C.; Anayiotos, C.P.

    1981-07-01

    Sarcoidosis involving the nervous system probably occurs in about 4% of patients. The usefulness of brain scintigraphy in these cases has been suggested. In this case of cerebral sarcoid granuloma, gallium imaging demonstrated the lesion before treatment and showed disappearance of the lesion after corticosteroid treatment, which correlated with the patient's clinical improvement.

  3. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  4. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan; Fu, Tracy; Ross, Jennifer; Chan, James

    1997-01-01

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  5. Gallium nitride electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Siddharth; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-07-01

    In the past two decades, there has been increasing research and industrial activity in the area of gallium nitride (GaN) electronics, stimulated first by the successful demonstration of GaN LEDs. While the promise of wide band gap semiconductors for power electronics was recognized many years before this by one of the contributors to this issue (J Baliga), the success in the area of LEDs acted as a catalyst. It set the field of GaN electronics in motion, and today the technology is improving the performance of several applications including RF cell phone base stations and military radar. GaN could also play a very important role in reducing worldwide energy consumption by enabling high efficiency compact power converters operating at high voltages and lower frequencies. While GaN electronics is a rapidly evolving area with active research worldwide, this special issue provides an opportunity to capture some of the great advances that have been made in the last 15 years. The issue begins with a section on epitaxy and processing, followed by an overview of high-frequency HEMTs, which have been the most commercially successful application of III-nitride electronics to date. This is followed by review and research articles on power-switching transistors, which are currently of great interest to the III-nitride community. A section of this issue is devoted to the reliability of III-nitride devices, an area that is of increasing significance as the research focus has moved from not just high performance but also production-worthiness and long-term usage of these devices. Finally, a group of papers on new and relatively less studied ideas for III-nitride electronics, such as interband tunneling, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and high-temperature electronics is included. These areas point to new areas of research and technological innovation going beyond the state of the art into the future. We hope that the breadth and quality of articles in this issue will make it

  6. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts. PMID:26808458

  7. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  8. Vapor-Phase Synthesis of Gallium Phosphide Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Dr Zhanjun; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Pan, Zhengwei

    2009-01-01

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) nanowires were synthesized in a high yield by vapor-phase reaction of gallium vapor and phosphorus vapor at 1150 C in a tube furnace system. The nanowires have diameters in the range of 25-100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers. Twinning growth occurs in GaP nanowires, and as a result most nanowires contain a high density of twinning faults. Novel necklacelike GaP nanostructures that were formed by stringing tens of amorphous Ga-P-O microbeads upon one crystalline GaP nanowires were also found in some synthesis runs. This simple vapor-phase approach may be applied to synthesize other important group III-V compound nanowires.

  9. Platinum Neurotoxicity Pharmacogenetics

    PubMed Central

    McWhinney, Sarah R.; Goldberg, Richard M.; McLeod, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    Cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin anticancer drugs are commonly used to treat lung, colorectal, ovarian, breast, head/neck, and genitourinary cancers. However, the efficacy of platinum-based drugs is often compromised because of the substantial risk for severe toxicities, including neurotoxicity. Neurotoxicity can result in both acute and chronic debilitation. Moreover, colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin more often discontinue therapy due to peripheral neuropathy than for tumor progression, potentially compromising patient benefit. Numerous methods to prevent neurotoxicity have so far proven unsuccessful. In order to circumvent this life-altering side effect, while taking advantage of the antitumor activities of the platinum agents, efforts to identify mechanism-based biomarkers are underway. In this review, we detail findings from the current literature for genetic markers associated with neurotoxicity induced by single agent and combination platinum chemotherapy. These data have the potential for broad clinical implications if mechanistic associations lead to the development of toxicity modulators to minimize the noxious sequelae of platinum chemotherapy. PMID:19139108

  10. Epitaxial Deposition Of Germanium Doped With Gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Epitaxial layers of germanium doped with gallium made by chemical vapor deposition. Method involves combination of techniques and materials used in chemical vapor deposition with GeH4 or GeCl4 as source of germanium and GaCl3 as source of gallium. Resulting epitaxial layers of germanium doped with gallium expected to be highly pure, with high crystalline quality. High-quality material useful in infrared sensors.

  11. Tuberculosis peritonitis: gallium-67 scintigraphic appearance.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Y; Ozaki, Y; Hasegawa, H; Shindoh, N; Katayama, H; Tamamoto, F

    1999-06-01

    Tuberculosis peritonitis is a rare manifestation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The results of gallium-67 scintigraphy of three patients with tuberculosis peritonitis were reviewed to assess its usefulness in the diagnosis of this condition. Tuberculosis peritonitis was associated with diffuse or focal abdominal localization and decreased hepatic accumulation of gallium-67. These gallium-67 scan features of tuberculosis peritonitis may help to optimize the diagnosis and management of this disease. PMID:10435380

  12. Thermal oxidation of gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, O.R.; Evans, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Here we present some results of transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy of thermally oxidized gallium arsenide with different types of dopants. At temperatures below 400 /sup 0/C an amorphous oxide is formed. Oxidation at temperatures between 500 and 600 /sup 0/C initially produces an epitaxial film of ..gamma..-Ga/sub 2/O/sub 3/. As the reaction proceeds, this film becomes polycrystalline and then transforms to ..beta..-Ga/sub 2/O/sub 3/. This film contains small crystallites of As/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and As/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in the case of the chromium doped samples, whereas only the former was detected in the case of silicon and tellurium doped samples. Elemental arsenic was always found at the interface between the oxide and GaAs. Chromium doped gallium also exhibited a slower oxidation kinetics than the other materials.

  13. Recovering gallium from residual bayer process liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso de Magalhães, Maria Elizabeth; Tubino, Matthieu

    1991-06-01

    Gallium is normally obtained by direct electrolysis as a by-product from Bayer process residual liquor at an aluminum processing plant. However, to permit any net accumulation of the metal, the gallium concentration must be at least about 0.3 g/l in the liquor. This article describes a continuous process of extraction with organic solvents and rhodamine-B, followed by a re-extraction step into aqueous media. The final product is a solid containing up to 18 wt.% Ga in a solid mixture of hydroxides and oxides of gallium and aluminum. This final product can then be electrolyzed to recover the gallium more efficiently.

  14. New platinum compounds containing the diphosphine ligand 2-(ferrocenylidene)-4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (fbpcd): Synthesis, redox behavior, and X-ray diffraction structures Of PtCl2(fbpcd) and Pt(mnt)(fbpcd)

    SciTech Connect

    Poola, Bhaskar; Hunt, Sean W; Wang, Xiaoping; Richmond, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    The reaction of the redox-active diphosphine ligand 2-(ferrocenylidene)-4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (fbpcd) with PtCl2(1,5-cod) furnishes the platinum(II) compound PtCl2(fbpcd) (2). Treatment of 2 with disodium maleonitriledithiolate (Na(2)mnt) yields the chelating thiolate compound Pt(mnt)(fbpcd) (3). Both 2 and 3 have been fully characterized in solution by IR, UV-Vis, and NMR spectroscopies, and their molecular structures established by X-ray crystallography. The redox properties of the fbpcd ligand and compounds 2 and 3 have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry, and the composition of the HOMO and LUMO levels in these systems have been determined by extended Huckel MO calculations, the results of which are discussed with respect to electrochemical data.

  15. Near-UV phosphorescent emitters: N-heterocyclic platinum(ii) tetracarbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Unger, Yvonne; Zeller, Alexander; Taige, Maria A; Strassner, Thomas

    2009-06-28

    Although examples of nickel(ii), palladium(ii) and platinum(ii) N-heterocyclic tetracarbene complexes are known in the literature, particularly platinum(ii) tetracarbene complexes are rare. We developed a new synthetic route via biscarbene acetate complexes, which make homoleptic as well as heteroleptic platinum(ii) tetracarbene complexes accessible. The reported photoluminescence data show that these complexes have good quantum yields and photostability and are a promising class of emitters for PhOLEDs. Characterization of the compounds includes a solid-state structure of the homoleptic complex bis(1,1'-diisopropyl-3,3'-methylenediimidazoline-2,2'-diylidene)platinum(ii) dibromide. PMID:19513490

  16. Rapid biological synthesis of platinum nanoparticles using Ocimum sanctum for water electrolysis applications.

    PubMed

    Soundarrajan, C; Sankari, A; Dhandapani, P; Maruthamuthu, S; Ravichandran, S; Sozhan, G; Palaniswamy, N

    2012-06-01

    The leaf extract of Ocimum sanctum was used as a reducing agent for the synthesis of platinum nanoparticles from an aqueous chloroplatinic acid (H(2)PtCl(6)·6H(2)O). A greater conversion of platinum ions to nanoparticles was achieved by employing a tulsi leaf broth with a reaction temperature of 100 °C. Energy-dispersive absorption X-ray spectroscopy confirmed the platinum particles as major constituent in the reduction process. It is evident from scanning electron microscopy that the reduced platinum particles were found as aggregates with irregular shape. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that the compounds such as ascorbic acid, gallic acid, terpenoids, certain proteins and amino acids act as reducing agents for platinum ions reduction. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy suggested the associated forms of platinum with other molecules and the average particle size of platinum nanoparticle was 23 nm, calculated using Scherer equation. The reduced platinum showed similar hydrogen evolution potential and catalytic activity like pure platinum using linear scan voltammetry. This environmentally friendly method of biological platinum nanoparticles production increases the rates of synthesis faster which can potentially be used in water electrolysis applications. PMID:22167464

  17. Zintl cluster chemistry in the alkali-metal-gallium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, R.

    1998-03-27

    Previous research into the alkali-metal-gallium systems has revealed a large variety of networked gallium deltahedra. The clusters are analogues to borane clusters and follow the same electronic requirements of 2n+2 skeletal electrons for closo-deltahedra. This work has focused on compounds that do not follow the typical electron counting rules. The first isolated gallium cluster was found in Cs{sub 8}Ga{sub 11}. The geometry of the Ga{sub 11}{sup 7{minus}} unit is not deltahedral but can be described as a penta-capped trigonal prism. The reduction of the charge from a closo-Ga{sub 11}{sup 13{minus}} to Ga{sub 11}{sup 7{minus}} is believed to be the driving force of the distortion. The compound is paramagnetic because of an extra electron but incorporation of a halide atom into the structure captures the unpaired electron and forms a diamagnetic compound. A second isolated cluster has been found in Na{sub 10}Ga{sub 10}Ni where the tetra-capped trigonal prismatic gallium is centered by nickel. Stabilization of the cluster occurs through Ni-Ga bonding. A simple two-dimensional network occurs in the binary K{sub 2}Ga{sub 3} Octahedra are connected through four waist atoms to form a layered structure with the potassium atoms sitting between the layers. Na{sub 30.5}Ga{sub 60{minus}x}Ag{sub x} is nonstoichiometric and needs only a small amount of silver to form (x {approximately} 2--6). The structure is composed of three different clusters which are interconnected to form a three-dimensional structure. The RbGa{sub 3{minus}x}Au{sub x} system is also nonstoichiometric with a three-dimensional structure composed of Ga{sub 8} dodecahedra and four-bonded gallium atoms. Unlike Na{sub 30.5}Ga{sub 60{minus}x}Ag{sub x}, the RbGa{sub 3} binary is also stable. The binary is formally a Zintl phase but the ternary is not. Some chemistry in the alkali-metal-indium system also has been explored. A new potassium-indium binary is discussed but the structure has not been completely

  18. Growth of platinum nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Movie showing the growth of platinum nanocrystals in a liquid cell observed in situ using the JEOL 3010 TEM at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. This is the first ever-real time movie showing nucleation and growth by monomer attachment or by smaller nanocrystals coalescing to form larger nanocrystals. All the nanocrystals end up being roughly the same shape and size. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/08/04/growth-spurts/

  19. Decreased gallium uptake in acute hematogenous osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.G.; Gelfand, M.J.

    1983-07-01

    Decreased radiopharmaceutical uptake was noted on both bone and gallium scans in the case of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis of the right ilium (acetabular roof). This combination of findings is probably rare. The mechanism of decreased gallium uptake is unknown, but may be related to decreased blood flow.

  20. Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thrustor Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the design of a new type of two-stage pulsed electromagnetic accelerator, the gallium electromagnetic (GEM) thruster. A schematic illustration of the GEM thruster concept is given in Fig. 1. In this concept, liquid gallium propellant is pumped into the first stage through a porous metal electrode using an electromagneticpump[l]. At a designated time, a pulsed discharge (approx.10-50 J) is initiated in the first stage, ablating the liquid gallium from the porous electrode surface and ejecting a dense thermal gallium plasma into the second state. The presence of the gallium plasma in the second stage serves to trigger the high-energy (approx.500 I), send-stage puke which provides the primary electromagnetic (j x B) acceleration.

  1. Myocardial gallium-67 imaging in dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, John B.; Henkin, Robert E.

    1985-01-01

    The use of gallium-67, an isotope that is avid for areas of inflammation in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, is described and compared with endomyocardial biopsy in 68 consecutive patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Myocarditis was diagnosed in 8% on biopsy and the likelihood of a positive biopsy when the gallium scan was positive for inflammation, rose to 36%. It is concluded that gallium scanning is a useful adjunct to biopsy in detecting myocarditis in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and in following patients with evidence of myocarditis on biopsy. Disadvantages of gallium-67 imaging include the radiation dose accumulated with multiple scans and 72h delay from initial injection of the isotope to imaging. It is suggested that definitive conclusions regarding the technique should await the results of a large multicentre trial evaluating gallium in comparison with endomyocardial biopsy in the diagnosis of myocarditis. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

  2. Processing to obtain high-purity gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Renato G.

    2003-03-01

    Gallium has become increasingly popular as a substrate material for electronic devices. Aside from ore, gallium can be obtained from such industrial sources as the Bayer process caustic liquor that is a byproduct of bauxite processing, flue dust removed from the fume-collection system in plants that produce aluminum by the electrolytic process, zinc refinery residues, gallium scrap materials, and coal fly ash. The purification process for gallium can start with solvent-extraction processes where the concentrations of impurities, especially metals, are reduced to the ppm range. This article describes how ultra-purification techniques can be employed to reduce the undesirable impurities to the low ppb range. The various procedures described give an idea as to the extent of work needed to obtain and prepare high-purity gallium for electronic application.

  3. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-04-01

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  4. Isoelectronic Traps in Gallium Phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Theresa; Alberi, Kirstin; Beaton, Daniel; Fluegel, Brian; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-03-01

    Isoelectronic substitutional dopants can result in strongly localized exciton traps within a host bandstructure such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium phosphide (GaP). These traps have received great attention for their role in the anomalous bandgap bowing of nitrogen or bismuth-doped GaAs, creating the dramatic bandgap tunability of these unusual dilute alloys. In the wider, indirect-bandgap host material GaP, these same isoelectronic dopants create bound states within the gap that can have very high radiative efficiency and a wealth of discrete spectral transitions illuminating the symmetry of the localized excitonic trap state. We will present a comparative study of nitrogen and bismuth isoelectronic traps in GaP. Research was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division under contract DE-AC36-08GO28308 and by the Department of Energy Office of Science Graduate Fellowship Program (DOE SCGF), made possible in part by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, administered by ORISE-ORAU under contract no. DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  5. Thermodynamic properties of uranium in liquid gallium, indium and their alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovich, V. A.; Maltsev, D. S.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Osipenko, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    Activity, activity coefficients and solubility of uranium was determined in gallium, indium and gallium-indium alloys containing 21.8 (eutectic), 40 and 70 wt.% In. Activity was measured at 573-1073 K employing the electromotive force method, and solubility between room temperature (or the alloy melting point) and 1073 K employing direct physical measurements. Activity coefficients were obtained from the difference of experimentally determined temperature dependencies of uranium activity and solubility. Intermetallic compounds formed in the respective alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction. Partial and excess thermodynamic functions of uranium in the studied alloys were calculated. Liquidus lines in U-Ga and U-In phase diagrams from the side rich in gallium or indium are proposed.

  6. (Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2001-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  7. (Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2002-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  8. Silicon Nitride For Gallium Arsenide Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagle, J.; Morgan, David V.

    1987-04-01

    Gallium Arsenide, unlike silicon does not have a natural oxide with the dielectric and interface qualities of SiO2. As a consequence alternative techniques have to be developed for device and IC processing applications. Plasma deposited silicon nitride films are currently being investigated in many laboratories. This paper will deal with the characterization of such films deposited under a range of gas and plasma deposition conditions. The techniques of Infra Red Spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering have been used for characterization of both "as deposited layers" and layers which have been annealed up to temperatures of 800 °C, after deposition. The use of RBS for silicon nitride on GaAs is limited since the relatively small nitride spectrum is superimposed on much larger GaAs spectrum. The problem can be removed by placing carbon test substrates alongside the GaAs wafers. This separates the silicon and nitrogen spectra from the substrate enabling enhanced accuracy to be obtained. In this paper the range of results obtained will be discussed in the context of the deposition condition in order to identify the optimum conditions for obtaining a stoichiometric compound and a high quality interface.

  9. Status of gallium-67 in tumor detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, P.

    1980-04-01

    The efficacy of gallium-67 citrate in detecting specific tumors is discussed. Tumors in which gallium-67 imaging is useful as a diagnostic tool include Hodgkin's disease, histiocystic lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, hepatoma melanoma, and leukemia. It has not been found to be effective in diagnosing head and neck tumors, gastrointestinal tumors, genitourinary tract tumors, breast tumors, and pediatric tumors. Gallium may be useful in the evaluation of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, testicular carcinoma, mesothelioma, and carcinoma of the lung. It may also be useful for determining response to treatment and prognosis in some neoplasms.

  10. One-dimensional Magnus-type platinum double salts

    PubMed Central

    Hendon, Christopher H.; Walsh, Aron; Akiyama, Norinobu; Konno, Yosuke; Kajiwara, Takashi; Ito, Tasuku; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Sakai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Interest in platinum-chain complexes arose from their unusual oxidation states and physical properties. Despite their compositional diversity, isolation of crystalline chains has remained challenging. Here we report a simple crystallization technique that yields a series of dimer-based 1D platinum chains. The colour of the Pt2+ compounds can be switched between yellow, orange and blue. Spontaneous oxidation in air is used to form black Pt2.33+ needles. The loss of one electron per double salt results in a metallic state, as supported by quantum chemical calculations, and displays conductivity of 11 S cm−1 at room temperature. This behaviour may open up a new avenue for controllable platinum chemistry. PMID:27320502

  11. One-dimensional Magnus-type platinum double salts.

    PubMed

    Hendon, Christopher H; Walsh, Aron; Akiyama, Norinobu; Konno, Yosuke; Kajiwara, Takashi; Ito, Tasuku; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Sakai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Interest in platinum-chain complexes arose from their unusual oxidation states and physical properties. Despite their compositional diversity, isolation of crystalline chains has remained challenging. Here we report a simple crystallization technique that yields a series of dimer-based 1D platinum chains. The colour of the Pt(2+) compounds can be switched between yellow, orange and blue. Spontaneous oxidation in air is used to form black Pt(2.33+) needles. The loss of one electron per double salt results in a metallic state, as supported by quantum chemical calculations, and displays conductivity of 11 S cm(-1) at room temperature. This behaviour may open up a new avenue for controllable platinum chemistry. PMID:27320502

  12. Gallium-67 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Trauth, H.A.; Heimes, K.; Schubotz, R.; von Wichert, P.

    1986-01-01

    Roentgenograms and gallium-67 scans and gallium-67 counts of BAL fluid samples, together with differential cell counts, have proved to be useful in assessing activity and lung involvement in sarcoidosis. In active pulmonary sarcoidosis gallium-67 scans are usually positive. Quantitation of gallium-67 uptake in lung scans, however, may be difficult. Because gallium-67 uptake and cell counts in BAL fluid may be correlated, we set out to investigate gallium-67 activity in BAL fluid recovered from patient of different groups. Sixteen patients with recently diagnosed and untreated sarcoidosis, nine patients with healthy lungs, and five patients with CFA were studied. Gallium-67 uptake of the lung, gallium-67 activity in the lavage fluid, SACE and LACE levels, and alpha 1-AT activity were measured. Significantly more gallium-67 activity was found in BAL fluid from sarcoidosis patients than in that from CFA patients (alpha = .001) or patients with healthy lungs (alpha = .001). Gallium-67 activity in BAL fluid could be well correlated with the number of lymphocytes in BAL fluid, but poorly with the number of macrophages. Subjects with increased levels of SACE or serum alpha 1-AT showed higher lavage gallium-67 activity than did normals, but no correlation could be established. High gallium-67 activity in lavage fluid may be correlated with acute sarcoidosis or physiological deterioration; low activity denotes change for the better. The results show that gallium-67 counts in BAL fluid reflects the intensity of gallium-67 uptake and thus of activity of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  13. Radiochemical separation of gallium by amalgam exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.

    1969-01-01

    An amalgam-exchange separation of radioactive gallium from a number of interfering radioisotopes has been developed. A dilute (ca. 0.3%) gallium amalgam is agitated with a slightly acidic solution of 72Ga3+ containing concentrations of sodium thiocyanate and either perchlorate or chloride. The amalgam is then removed and the radioactive gallium stripped by agitation with dilute nitric acid. The combined exchange yield of the perchlorate-thiocyanate system is 90??4% and that of the chloride-thiocyanate system is 75??4%. Decontamination yields of most of the 11 interfering isotopes studied were less than 0.02%. The technique is applicable for use with activation analysis for the determination of trace amounts of gallium. ?? 1969.

  14. NIM Realization of the Gallium Triple Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoke, Yan; Ping, Qiu; Yuning, Duan; Yongmei, Qu

    2003-09-01

    In the last three years (1999 to 2001), the gallium triple-point cell has been successfully developed, and much corresponding research has been carried out at the National Institute of Metrology (NIM), Beijing, China. This paper presents the cell design, apparatus and procedure for realizing the gallium triple point, and presents studies on the different freezing methods. The reproducibility is 0.03 mK, and the expanded uncertainty of realization of the gallium triple point is evaluated to be 0.17 mK (p=0.99, k=2.9). Also, the reproducibility of the gallium triple point was compared with that of the triple point of water.

  15. Recovery of gallium from aluminum industry residues

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, M.S.; Neto, K.C.M.; Nobrega, A.W.; Medeiros, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    A procedure is proposed to recover gallium from flue dust aluminum residues produced in plants by using solid-phase extraction with a commercial polyether-type polyurethane foam (PUF). Gallium can be separated from high concentrations of aluminum, iron, nickel, titanium, vanadium, copper, zinc, sulfate, fluoride, and chloride by extraction with PUF from 3 M sulfuric acid and 3 M sodium chloride concentration medium with at least a 92% efficiency. Gallium backextraction was fast and quantitative with ethanol solution. In all recovery steps commercial-grade reagents could be used, including tap water. The recovered gallium was precipitated with sodium hydroxide solution, purified by dissolution and precipitation, calcinated, and the final oxide was 98.6% pure.

  16. Radiosensitization of EMT6 cells by four platinum complexes.

    PubMed

    Teicher, B A; Rockwell, S; Lee, J B

    1985-05-01

    The greatest research effort in producing radiation sensitizers has been directed toward organic compounds. However, platinum complexes also have radiosensitizing capabilities, perhaps because they bind to DNA. The compound described here are dichloro complexes of bivalent platinum with one or two potentially radiosensitizing ligands. The radiosensitization of oxygenated and hypoxic exponentially growing EMT6 cells in vitro was measured. The dose modifying factors obtained with 200 microM and 400 microM trans-bis(2-nitroimidazole)dichloroplatinum II (NIPt) in hypoxic cells were 1.5 and 2.1, respectively. For trans-bis(2-amino-5-nitrothiazole)dichloroplatinum II (Plant) under the same conditions, the dose modifying factor was 1.5 at 200 microM and 1.8 at 400 microM. Neither compound sensitized oxygenated cells when tested similar protocols. Unlike the trans complexes, (1,2-diamino-4-nitrobenzene)dichloroplatinum II (Plato) was cytotoxic toward the hypoxic cells in the absence of X rays. The time course of cytotoxicity for 100 microM Plato in exponentially growing cells showed rapid killing of hypoxic cells, and much less toxicity toward oxygenated cells. In radiosensitization studies, dose modifying factors of 1.6 and 2.0 were found with 200 microM and 400 microM Plato in hypoxic cells. The compound did not sensitize aerobic cells. The well-known platinum complex cis-dipyridinedichloroplatinum II (PyPt) represents a cis-platinum heterocyclic aromatic complex that does not have a nitro-functionality. The dose modifying factor obtained with 400 microM PyPt in hypoxic cells was 1.7. On a molar basis, the nitro-functional platinum complexes appear to be more effective as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers than the corresponding free ligands. PMID:4039304

  17. Water-soluble platinum phthalocyanines as potential antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Giuseppina; Lanuti, Paola; D'Ambrosio, Primiano; Tonucci, Lucia; Pierdomenico, Laura; D'Emilio, Carlo; Celli, Nicola; Marchisio, Marco; d'Alessandro, Nicola; Santavenere, Eugenio; Bressan, Mario; Miscia, Sebastiano

    2014-06-01

    Breast cancer represents the second cause of death in the European female population. The lack of specific therapies together with its high invasive potential are the major problems associated to such a tumor. In the last three decades platinum-based drugs have been considered essential constituents of many therapeutic strategies, even though with side effects and frequent generation of drug resistance. These drugs have been the guide for the research, in last years, of novel platinum and ruthenium based compounds, able to overcome these limitations. In this work, ruthenium and platinum based phthalocyanines were synthesized through conventional techniques and their antiproliferative and/or cytotoxic actions were tested. Normal mammary gland (MCF10A) and several models of mammarian carcinoma at different degrees of invasiveness (BT474, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) were used. Cells were treated with different concentrations (5-100 μM) of the above reported compounds, to evaluate toxic concentration and to underline possible dose-response effects. The study included growth curves made by trypan blue exclusion test and scratch assay to study cellular motility and its possible negative modulation by phthalocyanine. Moreover, we investigated cell cycle and apoptosis through flow cytometry and AMNIS Image Stream cytometer. Among all the tested drugs, tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine of platinum resulted to be the molecule with the best cytostatic action on neoplastic cell lines at the concentration of 30 μM. Interestingly, platinum tetrasulfophtalocyanine, at low doses, had no antiproliferative effects on normal cells. Therefore, such platinum complex, appears to be a promising drug for mammarian carcinoma treatment. PMID:24699848

  18. Development of gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The potential of ion implantation as a means of developing gallium arsenide solar cells with high efficiency performance was investigated. Computer calculations on gallium arsenide cell characteristics are presented to show the effects of surface recombination, junction space-charge recombination, and built-in fields produced by nonuniform doping of the surface region. The fabrication technology is summarized. Electrical and optical measurements on samples of solar cells are included.

  19. Silicone breast implants and platinum.

    PubMed

    Wixtrom, Roger N

    2007-12-01

    Platinum, in a specific form, is used as a catalyst in the cross-linking reactions of the silicone gel and elastomer in breast implants. After manufacture, it remains in the devices at low-parts-per-million levels. Potential concerns have been raised as to whether this platinum might diffuse from silicone breast implants into the body and result in adverse health effects. The weight of evidence indicates that the platinum present is in its most biocompatible (zero valence) form, and the very minute levels (<0.1 percent) that might diffuse from the implants do not represent a significant health risk to patients. PMID:18090821

  20. Generator for gallium-68 and compositions obtained therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Neirinckx, Rudi D.; Davis, Michael A.

    1981-01-01

    A generator for obtaining radioactive gallium-68 from germanium-68 bound in a resin containing unsubstituted phenolic hydroxyl groups. The germanium-68 is loaded into the resin from an aqueous solution of the germanium-68. A physiologically acceptable solution of gallium-68 having an activity of 0.1 to 50 millicuries per milliliter of gallium-68 solution is obtained. The solution is obtained from the bound germanium-68 which forms gallium-68 in situ by eluting the column with a hydrochloric acid solution to form an acidic solution of gallium-68. The acidic solution of gallium-68 can be neutralized.

  1. Beam-deposited platinum as versatile catalyst for bottom-up silicon nanowire synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hibst, N.; Strehle, S.; Knittel, P.; Kranz, C.; Mizaikoff, B.

    2014-10-13

    The controlled localized bottom-up synthesis of silicon nanowires on arbitrarily shaped surfaces is still a persisting challenge for functional device assembly. In order to address this issue, electron beam and focused ion beam-assisted catalyst deposition have been investigated with respect to platinum expected to form a PtSi alloy catalyst for a subsequent bottom-up nanowire synthesis. The effective implementation of pure platinum nanoparticles or thin films for silicon nanowire growth has been demonstrated recently. Beam-deposited platinum contains significant quantities of amorphous carbon due to the organic precursor and gallium ions for a focused ion beam-based deposition process. Nevertheless, silicon nanowires could be grown on various substrates regardless of the platinum purity. Additionally, p-type doping could be realized with diborane whereas n-type doping suppressed a nanowire growth. The rational utilization of this beam-assisted approach enables us to control the localized synthesis of single silicon nanowires at planar surfaces but succeeded also in single nanowire growth at the three-dimensional apex of an atomic force microscopy tip. Therefore, this catalyst deposition method appears to be a unique extension of current technologies to assemble complex nanowire-based devices.

  2. Platinum availability for future automotive technologies.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Elisa; Field, Frank R; Kirchain, Randolph E

    2012-12-01

    Platinum is an excellent catalyst, can be used at high temperatures, and is stable in many aggressive chemical environments. Consequently, platinum is used in many current industrial applications, notably automotive catalytic converters, and prospective vehicle fuel cells are expected to rely upon it. Between 2005 and 2010, the automotive industry used approximately 40% of mined platinum. Future automotive industry growth and automotive sales shifts toward new technologies could significantly alter platinum demand. The potential risks for decreased platinum availability are evaluated, using an analysis of platinum market characteristics that describes platinum's geophysical constraints, institutional efficiency, and dynamic responsiveness. Results show that platinum demand for an automotive fleet that meets 450 ppm greenhouse gas stabilization goals would require within 10% of historical growth rates of platinum supply before 2025. However, such a fleet, due largely to sales growth in fuel cell vehicles, will more strongly constrain platinum supply in the 2050 time period. While current platinum reserves are sufficient to satisfy this increased demand, decreasing platinum ore grade and continued concentration of platinum supply in a single geographic area are availability risk factors to platinum end-users. PMID:23088692

  3. The Next Generation of Platinum Drugs: Targeted Pt(II) Agents, Nanoparticle Delivery, and Pt(IV) Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The platinum drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, prevail in the treatment of cancer,, but new platinum agents have been very slow to enter the clinic. Recently, however, there has been a surge of activity, based on a great deal of mechanistic information, aimed at developing non-classical platinum complexes that operate via mechanisms of action distinct from those of the approved drugs. The use of nanodelivery devices has also grown and many different strategies have been explored to incorporate platinum warheads into nanomedicine constructs. In this review, we discuss these efforts to create the next generation of platinum anticancer drugs. The introduction provides the reader with a brief overview of the use, development, and mechanism of action of the approved platinum drugs to provide the context in which more recent research has flourished. We then describe approaches that explore non-classical platinum(II) complexes with trans geometry and with a monofunctional coordination mode, polynuclear platinum(II) compounds, platinum(IV) prodrugs, dual-treat agents, and photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes. Nanodelivery particles designed to deliver platinum(IV) complexes will also be discussed, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and polymeric micelles. Additional nanoformulations including supramolecular self-assembled structures, proteins, peptides, metal-organic frameworks, and coordination polymers will then be described. Finally, the significant clinical progress made by nanoparticle formulations of platinum(II) agents will be reviewed. We anticipate that such a synthesis of disparate research efforts will not only help to generate new drug development ideas and strategies, but also reflect our optimism that the next generation of platinum cancer drugs is about to arrive. PMID:26865551

  4. The Next Generation of Platinum Drugs: Targeted Pt(II) Agents, Nanoparticle Delivery, and Pt(IV) Prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lippard, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    The platinum drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, prevail in the treatment of cancer, but new platinum agents have been very slow to enter the clinic. Recently, however, there has been a surge of activity, based on a great deal of mechanistic information, aimed at developing nonclassical platinum complexes that operate via mechanisms of action distinct from those of the approved drugs. The use of nanodelivery devices has also grown, and many different strategies have been explored to incorporate platinum warheads into nanomedicine constructs. In this Review, we discuss these efforts to create the next generation of platinum anticancer drugs. The introduction provides the reader with a brief overview of the use, development, and mechanism of action of the approved platinum drugs to provide the context in which more recent research has flourished. We then describe approaches that explore nonclassical platinum(II) complexes with trans geometry or with a monofunctional coordination mode, polynuclear platinum(II) compounds, platinum(IV) prodrugs, dual-threat agents, and photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes. Nanoparticles designed to deliver platinum(IV) complexes will also be discussed, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and polymeric micelles. Additional nanoformulations, including supramolecular self-assembled structures, proteins, peptides, metal-organic frameworks, and coordination polymers, will then be described. Finally, the significant clinical progress made by nanoparticle formulations of platinum(II) agents will be reviewed. We anticipate that such a synthesis of disparate research efforts will not only help to generate new drug development ideas and strategies, but also will reflect our optimism that the next generation of approved platinum cancer drugs is about to arrive. PMID:26865551

  5. Window structure for passivating solar cells based on gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Allen M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Passivated gallium arsenide solar photovoltaic cells with high resistance to moisture and oxygen are provided by means of a gallium arsenide phosphide window graded through its thickness from arsenic rich to phosphorus rich.

  6. Controlled Electrochemical Deformation of Liquid-Phase Gallium.

    PubMed

    Chrimes, Adam F; Berean, Kyle J; Mitchell, Arnan; Rosengarten, Gary; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-02-17

    Pure gallium is a soft metal with a low temperature melting point of 29.8 °C. This low melting temperature can potentially be employed for creating optical components with changeable configurations on demand by manipulating gallium in its liquid state. Gallium is a smooth and highly reflective metal that can be readily maneuvered using electric fields. These features allow gallium to be used as a reconfigurable optical reflector. This work demonstrates the use of gallium for creating reconfigurable optical reflectors manipulated through the use of electric fields when gallium is in a liquid state. The use of gallium allows the formed structures to be frozen and preserved as long as the temperature of the metal remains below its melting temperature. The lens can be readily reshaped by raising the temperature above the melting point and reapplying an electric field to produce a different curvature of the gallium reflector. PMID:26820807

  7. Thermochromic platinum complexes

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, Nenad M.; Zhou, Xia-Ying

    1990-05-29

    Thermochromic compounds containing the [Pt(dipic)Cl].sup.- anion. These compounds are yellow and monomeric at high temperatures or in low concentrations and abruptly change to red and polymeric at low temperatures or higher solution concentrations. This unusual property allows them to be used as temperature sensors.

  8. Thermochromic platinum complexes

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, Nenad M.; Zhou, Xia-Ying

    1989-08-15

    Thermochromic compounds containing the [Pt(dipic)Cl].sup.- anion. These compounds are yellow and monomeric at high temperatures or in low concentrations and abruptly change to red and polymeric at low temperatures or higher solution concentrations. This unusual property allows them to be used as temperature sensors.

  9. Platinum(iv) N-heterocyclic carbene complexes: their synthesis, characterisation and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Bouché, M; Dahm, G; Wantz, M; Fournel, S; Achard, T; Bellemin-Laponnaz, S

    2016-07-28

    Platinum(ii) N-heterocyclic carbene complexes have been oxidized by bromine or iodobenzene dichloride to provide the fully characterised corresponding platinum(iv) NHC complexes. Antiproliferative activities of Pt(iv) NHC complexes were assayed against several cancer cell lines and the results were correlated with respect to their stability. Mechanistic investigations revealed that mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS production were associated with the cytotoxic process induced by these compounds. PMID:27331604

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic convection in liquid gallium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juel, Anne; Mullin, Tom

    1996-11-01

    Results are presented from a study of convective flow of liquid gallium confined in a rectangular cavity of length/depth ratio 4, subject to a horizontal temperature gradient. The origin of the problem lies in the area of crystal growth, where it is known that the dynamics of the fluid flow in semiconductor geometries are of vital importance in determining the quality of the crystal. Application of a magnetic field, for instance, damps out the time-dependent convection in the liquid phase that creates striations in the crystal and reduces its quality. Prior to the study of dynamical phenomena, the nature of the steady flow is investigated. In the absence of a magnetic field, a direct comparison between experimental results, the Hadley cell model and two and three-dimensional numerical simulations clearly shows that the flow is three-dimensional in nature. The effect of a uniform transverse magnetic field is then examined. Direct comparison between experimental results and three dimensional simulations shows identical damping of the convective circulation. Numerically, it is found that the magnetic field restricts the flow to 2d motion. Experimentally, this is confirmed from the measurement of isotherms. Hence, the detailed knowledge of the steady flow provides us with a robust basis for studies of time dependent behaviour.

  11. Single gallium nitride nanowire lasers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Justin C; Choi, Heon-Jin; Knutsen, Kelly P; Schaller, Richard D; Yang, Peidong; Saykally, Richard J

    2002-10-01

    There is much current interest in the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires, because the cylindrical geometry and strong two-dimensional confinement of electrons, holes and photons make them particularly attractive as potential building blocks for nanoscale electronics and optoelectronic devices, including lasersand nonlinear optical frequency converters. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor of much practical interest, because it is widely used in electrically pumped ultraviolet-blue light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors. Recent progress in microfabrication techniques has allowed stimulated emission to be observed from a variety of GaN microstructures and films. Here we report the observation of ultraviolet-blue laser action in single monocrystalline GaN nanowires, using both near-field and far-field optical microscopy to characterize the waveguide mode structure and spectral properties of the radiation at room temperature. The optical microscope images reveal radiation patterns that correlate with axial Fabry-Perot modes (Q approximately 10(3)) observed in the laser spectrum, which result from the cylindrical cavity geometry of the monocrystalline nanowires. A redshift that is strongly dependent on pump power (45 meV microJ x cm(-2)) supports the idea that the electron-hole plasma mechanism is primarily responsible for the gain at room temperature. This study is a considerable advance towards the realization of electron-injected, nanowire-based ultraviolet-blue coherent light sources. PMID:12618824

  12. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  15. Phase Change of Gallium Enables Highly Reversible and Switchable Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhou; Lum, Guo Zhan; Song, Sukho; Rich, Steven; Sitti, Metin

    2016-07-01

    Gallium exhibits highly reversible and switchable adhesion when it undergoes a solid-liquid phase transition. The robustness of gallium is notable as it exhibits strong performance on a wide range of smooth and rough surfaces, under both dry and wet conditions. Gallium may therefore find numerous applications in transfer printing, robotics, electronic packaging, and biomedicine. PMID:27146217

  16. METHOD OF REDUCING PLUTONIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Johns, I.B.

    1958-06-01

    A method is described for reducing plutonium compounds in aqueous solution from a higher to a lower valence state. This reduction of valence is achieved by treating the aqueous solution of higher valence plutonium compounds with hydrogen in contact with an activated platinum catalyst.

  17. Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sujoy; Sampath, S

    2016-05-11

    A ternary, ionically conducting, deep eutectic solvent based on acetamide, urea and gallium nitrate is reported for the electrodeposition of gallium nitride/gallium indium nitride under ambient conditions; blue and white light emitting photoluminescent deposits are obtained under potential control. PMID:27074315

  18. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Joslin, D.; Garlick, J.; Lillington, D.; Gillanders, M.; Cavicchi, B.; Scott-Monck, J.; Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B.

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) gallium arsenide cells were irradiated with 1 Mev electrons up to fluences of 1 times 10 to the 16th power cm-2. Measurements of spectral response and dark and illuminated I-V data were made at each fluence and then, using computer codes, the experimental data was fitted to gallium arsenide cell models. In this way it was possible to determine the extent of the damage, and hence damage coefficients in both the emitter and base of the cell.

  19. /sup 67/Gallium lung scans in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M.; Feiglin, D.; Hyland, R.; Urowitz, M.B.; Shiff, B.

    1983-08-01

    /sup 67/Gallium lung scans were performed in 19 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). Results were expressed quantitatively as the /sup 67/Gallium Uptake Index. The mean total pulmonary /sup 67/Gallium Uptake Index in patients was significantly higher than that in controls (41 versus 25), and 4 patients (21%) fell outside the normal range. There were no clinical or laboratory variables that correlated with the /sup 56/Gallium uptake. Increased pulmonary /sup 67/Gallium uptake in scleroderma may prove useful as an index of pulmonary disease activity.

  20. Four Terminal Gallium Nitride MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veety, Matthew Thomas

    All reported gallium nitride (GaN) transistors to date have been three-terminal devices with source, drain, and gate electrodes. In the case of GaN MOSFETs, this leaves the bulk of the device at a floating potential which can impact device threshold voltage. In more traditional silicon-based MOSFET fabrication a bulk contact can be made on the back side of the silicon wafer. For GaN grown on sapphire substrates, however, this is not possible and an alternate, front-side bulk contact must be investigated. GaN is a III-V, wide band gap semiconductor that as promising material parameters for use in high frequency and high power applications. Possible applications are in the 1 to 10 GHz frequency band and power inverters for next generation grid solid state transformers and inverters. GaN has seen significant academic and commercial research for use in Heterojunction Field Effect Transistors (HFETs). These devices however are depletion-mode, meaning the device is considered "on" at zero gate bias. A MOSFET structure allows for enhancement mode operation, which is normally off. This mode is preferrable in high power applications as the device has lower off-state power consumption and is easier to implement in circuits. Proper surface passivation of seminconductor surface interface states is an important processing step for any device. Preliminary research on surface treatments using GaN wet etches and depletion-mode GaN devices utilizing this process are discussed. Devices pretreated with potassium pursulfate prior to gate dielectric deposition show significant device improvements. This process can be applied to any current GaN FET. Enhancement-mode GaN MOSFETs were fabricated on magnesium doped p-type Wurtzite gallium nitride grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane sapphire substrates. Devices utilized ion implant source and drain which was activated under NH3 overpressure in MOCVD. Also, devices were fabricated with a SiO2 gate dielectric

  1. Coating Carbon Fibers With Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Duncan, Peter; Coupland, Duncan; Rigali, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A process for coating carbon fibers with platinum has been developed. The process may also be adaptable to coating carbon fibers with other noble and refractory metals, including rhenium and iridium. The coated carbon fibers would be used as ingredients of matrix/fiber composite materials that would resist oxidation at high temperatures. The metal coats would contribute to oxidation resistance by keeping atmospheric oxygen away from fibers when cracks form in the matrices. Other processes that have been used to coat carbon fibers with metals have significant disadvantages: Metal-vapor deposition processes yield coats that are nonuniform along both the lengths and the circumferences of the fibers. The electrical resistivities of carbon fibers are too high to be compatible with electrolytic processes. Metal/organic vapor deposition entails the use of expensive starting materials, it may be necessary to use a furnace, and the starting materials and/or materials generated in the process may be hazardous. The present process does not have these disadvantages. It yields uniform, nonporous coats and is relatively inexpensive. The process can be summarized as one of pretreatment followed by electroless deposition. The process consists of the following steps: The surfaces of the fiber are activated by deposition of palladium crystallites from a solution. The surface-activated fibers are immersed in a solution that contains platinum. A reducing agent is used to supply electrons to effect a chemical reduction in situ. The chemical reduction displaces the platinum from the solution. The displaced platinum becomes deposited on the fibers. Each platinum atom that has been deposited acts as a catalytic site for the deposition of another platinum atom. Hence, the deposition process can also be characterized as autocatalytic. The thickness of the deposited metal can be tailored via the duration of immersion and the chemical activity of the solution.

  2. Thermodynamic ground states of platinum metal nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aberg, D; Sadigh, B; Crowhurst, J; Goncharov, A

    2007-10-09

    We have systematically studied the thermodynamic stabilities of various phases of the nitrides of the platinum metal elements using density functional theory. We show that for the nitrides of Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt two new crystal structures, in which the metal ions occupy simple tetragonal lattice sites, have lower formation enthalpies at ambient conditions than any previously proposed structures. The region of stability can extend up to 17 GPa for PtN{sub 2}. Furthermore, we show that according to calculations using the local density approximation, these new compounds are also thermodynamically stable at ambient pressure and thus may be the ground state phases for these materials. We further discuss the fact that the local density and generalized gradient approximations predict different values of the absolute formation enthalpies as well different relative stabilities between simple tetragonal and the pyrite or marcasite structures.

  3. Polymorphic transporters and platinum pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sprowl, Jason A.; Ness, Rachel A.; Sparreboom, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Summary Several solute carriers and ATP-binding cassette transporters have been implicated in the influx or efflux of platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin. Given that many of these proteins are highly polymorphic, the genetic status of these proteins could be an important contributor to the extensive interindividual pharmacokinetic variability associated with the clinical use of these agents. In this review article, we provide an updated overview of the various transporters that have shown promise in animal models or patient populations in facilitating the movement of platinum-based agents across cell membranes, and how their function is associated with drug disposition or pharmacodynamic effects. PMID:22986709

  4. Long-chain amine-templated synthesis of gallium sulfide and gallium selenide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seral-Ascaso, A.; Metel, S.; Pokle, A.; Backes, C.; Zhang, C. J.; Nerl, H. C.; Rode, K.; Berner, N. C.; Downing, C.; McEvoy, N.; Muñoz, E.; Harvey, A.; Gholamvand, Z.; Duesberg, G. S.; Coleman, J. N.; Nicolosi, V.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the soft chemistry synthesis of amine-templated gallium chalcogenide nanotubes through the reaction of gallium(iii) acetylacetonate and the chalcogen (sulfur, selenium) using a mixture of long-chain amines (hexadecylamine and dodecylamine) as a solvent. Beyond their role as solvent, the amines also act as a template, directing the growth of discrete units with a one-dimensional multilayer tubular nanostructure. These new materials, which broaden the family of amine-stabilized gallium chalcogenides, can be tentatively classified as direct large band gap semiconductors. Their preliminary performance as active material for electrodes in lithium ion batteries has also been tested, demonstrating great potential in energy storage field even without optimization.We describe the soft chemistry synthesis of amine-templated gallium chalcogenide nanotubes through the reaction of gallium(iii) acetylacetonate and the chalcogen (sulfur, selenium) using a mixture of long-chain amines (hexadecylamine and dodecylamine) as a solvent. Beyond their role as solvent, the amines also act as a template, directing the growth of discrete units with a one-dimensional multilayer tubular nanostructure. These new materials, which broaden the family of amine-stabilized gallium chalcogenides, can be tentatively classified as direct large band gap semiconductors. Their preliminary performance as active material for electrodes in lithium ion batteries has also been tested, demonstrating great potential in energy storage field even without optimization. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01663d

  5. Spin-phonon coupling in scandium doped gallium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Keka R. E-mail: smyusuf@barc.gov.in; Mukadam, M. D.; Basu, S.; Yusuf, S. M. E-mail: smyusuf@barc.gov.in; Paul, Barnita; Roy, Anushree; Grover, Vinita; Tyagi, A. K.

    2015-03-28

    We embarked on a study of Scandium (Sc) doped (onto Ga site) gallium ferrite (GaFeO{sub 3}) and found remarkable magnetic properties. In both doped as well as parent compounds, there were three types of Fe{sup 3+} ions (depending on the symmetry) with the structure conforming to space group Pna2{sub 1} (Sp. Grp. No. 33) below room temperature down to 5 K. We also found that all Fe{sup 3+} ions occupy octahedral sites, and carry high spin moment. For the higher Sc substituted sample (Ga{sub 1−x}Sc{sub x}FeO{sub 3}: x = 0.3), a canted magnetic ordered state is found. Spin-phonon coupling below Néel temperature was observed in doped compounds. Our results indicated that Sc doping in octahedral site modifies spin-phonon interactions of the parent compound. The spin-phonon coupling strength was estimated for the first time in these Sc substituted compounds.

  6. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2001-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interefere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  7. In-situ Observation of Surface Graphitization of Gallium Droplet and Concentration of Carbon in Liquid Gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, Ryuichi; Nishijima, Takuya; Hikata, Takeshi; Ookubo, Soichiro; Utsunomiya, Risa; Matsuba, Teruaki; Fujita, Jun-ichi

    2012-06-01

    Although carbon has been recognized to be insoluble in gallium, we found that the outermost surface of gallium has unexpectedly high carbon solubility, particularly the limited region of about a few nanometers in depth. Our in-situ transmission electron microscope observations revealed that a graphene layer was precipitated at the surface of a gallium droplet simultaneously with gallium evaporation, and some of the droplets created an internal graphitic layer. On the basis of these experimental data, we evaluated a substantial carbon solubility that seemed to exceed about 50 at. %, but was realized in a very thin surface region of about 4 nm in depth. We believe that this high carbon solubility at the gallium surface is the key mechanism for the catalytic ability of gallium that was observed at the interface between liquid gallium and solid amorphous carbon.

  8. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage. PMID:27007502

  9. Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Polzin, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Discharge current, terminal voltage, and mass bit measurements are performed on a coaxial gallium electromagnetic thruster at discharge currents in the range of 7-23 kA. It is found that the mass bit varies quadratically with the discharge current which yields a constant exhaust velocity of 20 km/s. Increasing the electrode radius ratio of the thruster from to 2.6 to 3.4 increases the thruster efficiency from 21% to 30%. When operating with a central gallium anode, macroparticles are ejected at all energy levels tested. A central gallium cathode ejects macroparticles when the current density exceeds 3.7 10(exp 8) A/square m . A spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range is used to determine which species are present in the plasma. The spectra show that neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium species are present in the discharge, as well as annular electrode species at higher energy levels. Axial Langmuir triple probe measurements yield electron temperatures in the range of 0.8-3.8 eV and electron densities in the range of 8 x 10(exp )20 to 1.6 x 10(exp 21) m(exp -3) . Triple probe measurements suggest an exhaust plume with a divergence angle of 9 , and a completely doubly ionized plasma at the ablating thruster cathode.

  10. Extrapulmonary localization of gallium in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.; Singh, R.; Vieras, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the spectrum of extrapulmonary localization of gallium in patients with sarcoidosis. The usefulness of Ga-67 scintiscans in detecting clinically occult lesions, in directing clinicians to accessible sites for biopsy, and in following the course of extrapulmonary sites of involvement with therapy is emphasized.

  11. Solar cell with a gallium nitride electrode

    DOEpatents

    Pankove, Jacques I.

    1979-01-01

    A solar cell which comprises a body of silicon having a P-N junction therein with a transparent conducting N-type gallium nitride layer as an ohmic contact on the N-type side of the semiconductor exposed to solar radiation.

  12. Gallium-positive Lyme disease myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, L.I.; Welch, P.; Fisher, N.

    1985-09-01

    In the course of a work-up for fever of unknown origin associated with intermittent arrhythmias, a gallium scan was performed which revealed diffuse myocardial uptake. The diagnosis of Lyme disease myocarditis subsequently was confirmed by serologic titers. One month following recovery from the acute illness, the abnormal myocardial uptake completely resolved.

  13. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  14. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  15. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankey, T., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  16. Thermodynamic binding constants for gallium transferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W.R.; Pecoraro, V.L.

    1983-01-18

    Gallium-67 is widely used as an imaging agent for tumors and inflammatory abscesses. It is well stablished that Ga/sup 3 +/ travels through the circulatory system bound to the serum iron transport protein transferrin and that this protein binding is an essential step in tumor localization. However, there have been conflicting reports on the magnitude of the gallium-transferrin binding constants. Therefore, thermodynamic binding constants for gallium complexation at the two specific metal binding sites of human serum transferrin at pH 7.4 and 5 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ have been determined by UV difference spectroscopy. The conditional constants calculated for 27 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ are log K/sub 1/* = 20.3 and log K/sub 2/* = 19.3. These results are discussed in relation to the thermodynamics of transferrin binding of Fe/sup 3 +/ and to previous reports on gallium binding. The strength of transferrin complexation is also compared to that of a series of low molecular weight ligands by using calculated pM values (pM = -log (Ga(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6/)) to express the effective binding strength at pH 7.4.

  17. Development of gallium aluminum phosphide electroluminescent diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicotka, R. J.; Lorenz, M. R.; Nethercot, A. H.; Pettit, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Work done on the development of gallium aluminum phosphide alloys for electroluminescent light sources is described. The preparation of this wide band gap semiconductor alloy, its physical properties (particularly the band structure, the electrical characteristics, and the light emitting properties) and work done on the fabrication of diode structures from these alloys are broadly covered.

  18. Radiosensitization of EMT6 cells by four platinum complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Teicher, B.A.; Rockwell, S.; Lee, J.B.

    1985-05-01

    The compounds described here are dichloro complexes of bivalent platinum with one or two potentially radiosensitizing ligands. The radiosensitization of oxygenated and hypoxic exponentially growing EMT6 cells in vitro was measured. The dose modifying factors obtained with 200 ..mu..M and 400 ..mu..M trans-bis(2-nitroimidazole)dichloroplatinum II (NIPt) in hypoxic cells were 1.5 and 2.1, respectively. For trans-bis(2-amino-5-nitrothiazole)dichloroplatinum II (Plant) under the same conditions, the dose modifying factor was 1.5 at 200 ..mu..M and 1.8 at 400 ..mu..M. Neither compound sensitized oxygenated cells when tested similar protocols. Unlike the trans complexes (1,2-diamino-4-nitrobenzene)dichloroplatinum II (Plato) was cytotoxic toward the hypoxic cells in the absence of X rays. The time course of cytotoxicity for 100 ..mu..M Plato in exponentially growing cells showed rapid killing of hypoxic cells, and much less toxicity toward oxygenated cells. In radiosensitization studies, dose modifying factors of 1.6 and 2.0 were found with 200 ..mu..M and 400 ..mu..M Plato in hypoxic cells. The compound did not sensitize aerobic cells. The well-known platinum complex cis-dipyridinedichloroplatinum II (PyPt) represents a cis-platinum heterocyclic aromatic complex that does not have a nitro-functionality. The dose modifying factor obtained with 400 ..mu..M PyPt in hypoxic cells was 1.7. On a molar basis, the nitro-functional platinum complexes appear to be more effective as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers than the corresponding free ligands.

  19. Ammonothermal Growth of Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimputkar, Siddha

    Bulk, single crystal Gallium Nitride (GaN) crystals are essential for enabling high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices by providing arbitrarily oriented, high quality, large, single crystal GaN substrates. Methods of producing single crystals of sufficient size and quality at a rate that would enable successful commercialization has been a major focus for research groups and companies worldwide. Recent advances have demonstrated remarkable improvements, though high cost and lack of high volume production remain key challenges. Major investments in bulk GaN growth were made at UCSB with particular focus on the ammonothermal method. The existing lab was upgraded and a new facility was designed and built with improved experimental setups for ammonothermal growth of GaN. The facilities can simultaneously operate up to 15 reactors of differing designs and capabilities with the ability to grow crystals up to 2 inches in diameter. A novel in-situ technique was devised to investigate the growth chemistry which occurs at typical operating conditions of 3,000 atm and 600 °C. Improvements in ammonothermal GaN include improved growth rates for c-plane by a factor of four to 344 μm/day with an overall record growth rate of 544 μm/day achieved for the (112¯2) plane. Crystal qualities comparable to that of the seed crystal were achieved. Impurity concentrations for transition metals were consistently reduced by a factor of 100 to concentrations below 1017 atoms/cm3. Optical transparency was improved by significantly reducing the yellow coloration typically seen for ammonothermal GaN. Single crystal GaN was successfully grown on large seeds and a 1 inch x ½ inch x ½ inch GaN crystal was demonstrated. To better understand the growth chemistry, models were created for the decomposition of ammonia under growth conditions, with initial experiments performed using the designed in-situ setup to verify the model's accuracy. To investigate the surface morphology and

  20. Bioavailability of platinum emitted from automobile exhaust.

    PubMed

    Artelt, S; Kock, H; Nachtigall, D; Heinrich, U

    1998-08-01

    A model substance was used which is similar in respect to platinum content of exhaust particles emitted from a three-way-catalytic converter equipped engine. The bioavailability of platinum from such exhaust particles and the kind of platinum species formed in vivo were assessed. An in vitro solubility test showed a solubility of approximately 10 percent of platinum content of the model substance in physiological sodium chloride solution. Two short-term animal studies (8 days) were performed. In all examined rat tissues and body fluids platinum could be detected. In addition, the contribution of the overall bioavailability caused by swallowing a certain amount of the intratracheally applied platinum was evaluated by oral application. It was very low. An analytical method was developed to determine platinum species. Synthetic samples (matrix with a platinum standard solution) were analysed. In rat bronchoalveolar lavage spiked with a platinum standard solution only low molecular complexed platinum was found whereas in rat blood plasma all platinum was bound to proteins. In ongoing studies, the model substance is being tested in a three month rat inhalation study. PMID:9820662

  1. Method for forming porous platinum films

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Leon

    2000-01-01

    A method for forming a platinum film includes providing a substrate, sputtering a crystalline platinum oxide layer over at least a portion of the substrate, and reducing the crystalline platinum oxide layer to form the platinum film. A device includes a non-conductive substrate and a platinum layer having a density of between about 2 and 5 g/cm.sup.3 formed over at least a portion of the non-conductive substrate. The platinum films produced in accordance with the present invention provide porous films suitable for use as electrodes, yet require few processing steps. Thus, such films are less costly. Such films may be formed on both conductive and non-conductive substrates. While the invention has been illustrated with platinum, other metals, such as noble metals, that form a low density oxide when reactively sputtered may also be used.

  2. Self- and zinc diffusion in gallium antimonide

    SciTech Connect

    Nicols, Samuel Piers

    2002-03-26

    The technological age has in large part been driven by the applications of semiconductors, and most notably by silicon. Our lives have been thoroughly changed by devices using the broad range of semiconductor technology developed over the past forty years. Much of the technological development has its foundation in research carried out on the different semiconductors whose properties can be exploited to make transistors, lasers, and many other devices. While the technological focus has largely been on silicon, many other semiconductor systems have applications in industry and offer formidable academic challenges. Diffusion studies belong to the most basic studies in semiconductors, important from both an application as well as research standpoint. Diffusion processes govern the junctions formed for device applications. As the device dimensions are decreased and the dopant concentrations increased, keeping pace with Moore's Law, a deeper understanding of diffusion is necessary to establish and maintain the sharp dopant profiles engineered for optimal device performance. From an academic viewpoint, diffusion in semiconductors allows for the study of point defects. Very few techniques exist which allow for the extraction of as much information of their properties. This study focuses on diffusion in the semiconductor gallium antimonide (GaSb). As will become clear, this compound semiconductor proves to be a powerful one for investigating both self- and foreign atom diffusion. While the results have direct applications for work on GaSb devices, the results should also be taken in the broader context of III-V semiconductors. Results here can be compared and contrasted to results in systems such as GaAs and even GaN, indicating trends within this common group of semiconductors. The results also have direct importance for ternary and quaternary semiconductor systems used in devices such as high speed InP/GaAsSb/InP double heterojunction bipolar transistors (DHBT) [Dvorak

  3. Metal Insulator Semiconductor Structures on Gallium Arsenide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Sean Denis

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The compound semiconductor gallium arsenide and its associated aluminium alloys have been the subject of intensive research in recent years. These materials offer the advantage of high electron mobilities coupled with the ability to be 'barrier engineered' leading to high injection efficiencies in bipolar devices. From a technological viewpoint however these materials are difficult to work with and device realisation is a major problem. Both thermal and anodic oxidation of these materials fail to produce a dielectric of sufficient quality for device applications and as a result devices tend to be complex non planar, mesa structures. A technique is proposed whereby the electrical interface is separated from the dielectric by means of a thin layer of AlGaAs, carrier confinement in the active GaAs region being maintained by the potential barriers to holes and electrons formed by the GaAs-AlGaAs junction. The integrity of these barriers is maintained by the provision of a suitable 'capping' dielectric. The electrical characteristics of various dielectric systems on GaAs have been investigated by means of current -voltage, capacitance-voltage and electronic breakdown measurements. Transport mechanisms for leakage current through these systems are identified and the interface properties (viz Fermi level pinning etc.) assessed by means of a direct comparison between experimental capacitance-voltage curves and theoretical data obtained from classical theory. As a technique for producing a convenient, in house 'capping' dielectric with good electrical and mechanical properties, the plasma anodisation of deposited aluminium films has been investigated. The anodisation parameters have been optimised for oxidation of these films in a microwave sustained oxygen plasma to give alumina films of around 500 A. A qualitative model for the anodisation process, involving linear and parabolic growth kinetics is proposed and

  4. Gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Levy, P.S.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1988-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease, 45 patients with various glomerulopathies, excluding lupus nephritis and renal vasculitis, were studied. Persistent renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive scintigram, was graded as + (less than), ++ (equal to), and +++ (greater than) the hepatic uptake. Positive scintigrams were seen in ten of 16 cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, six of 11 cases of proliferative glomerulonephritis, and one case of minimal change, and one of two cases of membranous nephropathy; also in three of six cases of sickle glomerulopathy, two cases of diabetic neuropathy, one of two cases of amyloidosis, and one case of mild chronic allograft rejection. The 25 patients with positive scans were younger than the 20 with negative scans (31 +/- 12 v 42 +/- 17 years; P less than 0.01), and exhibited greater proteinuria (8.19 +/- 7.96 v 2.9 +/- 2.3 S/d; P less than 0.01) and lower serum creatinine values (2 +/- 2 v 4.1 +/- 2.8 mg/dL; P less than 0.01). The amount of proteinuria correlated directly with the intensity grade of the gallium image (P less than 0.02), but there was no correlation between the biopsy diagnosis and the outcome of the gallium scan. It was concluded that gallium scintigraphy is not useful in the differential diagnosis of the glomerular diseases under discussion. Younger patients with good renal function and heavy proteinuria are likely to have a positive renal scintigram regardless of the underlying glomerulopathy.

  5. (Pt1-xCux)3Cu2B and Pt9Cu3B5, the first examples of copper platinum borides. Observation of superconductivity in a novel boron filled β-Mn-type compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamakha, Leonid P.; Sologub, Oksana; Stöger, Berthold; Michor, Herwig; Bauer, Ernst; Rogl, Peter F.

    2015-09-01

    New ternary copper platinum borides have been synthesized by arc melting of pure elements followed by annealing at 600 °C. The structures have been studied by X-ray single crystal and powder diffraction. (Pt1-xCux)3Cu2B (x=0.33) forms a B-filled β-Mn-type structure (space group P4132; a=0.6671(1) nm). Cu atoms are distributed preferentially on the 8c atom sites, whereas the 12d site is randomly occupied by Pt and Cu atoms (0.670(4) Pt±0.330(4) Cu). Boron is located in octahedral voids of the parent β-Mn-type structure. Pt9Cu3B5 (space group P-62m; a=0.9048(3) nm, c=0.2908(1) nm) adopts the Pt9Zn3B5-δ-type structure. It has a columnar architecture along the short translation vector exhibiting three kinds of [Pt6] trigonal prism columns (boron filled, boron semi-filled and empty) and Pt channels with a pentagonal cross section filled with Cu atoms. The striking structural feature is a [Pt6] cluster in form of an empty trigonal prism at the origin of the unit cell, which is surrounded by coupled [BPt6] and [Pt6] trigonal prisms, rotated perpendicularly to the central one. There is no B-B contact as well as Cu-B contact in the structure. The relationships of Pt9Cu3B5 structure with the structure of Ti1+xOs2-xRuB2 as well as with the structure families of metal sulfides and aluminides have been elucidated. (Pt1-xCux)3Cu2B (x=0.3) (B-filled β-Mn-type structure) is a bulk superconductor with a transition temperature of about 2.06 K and an upper critical field μ0HC2(0)WHH of 1.2 T, whereas no superconducting transition has been observed up to 0.3 K in Pt9Cu3B5 (Pt9Zn3B5-δ-type structure) from electrical resistivity measurements.

  6. Indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride quantum wells grown on polar and nonpolar gallium nitride substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Kun-Yu

    Nonpolar (m-plane or a-plane) gallium nitride (GaN) is predicted to be a potential substrate material to improve luminous efficiencies of nitride-based quantum wells (QWs). Numerical calculations indicated that the spontaneous emission rate in a single In0.15Ga0.85N/GaN QW could be improved by ˜2.2 times if the polarization-induced internal field was avoided by epitaxial deposition on nonpolar substrates. A challenge for nonpolar GaN is the limited size (less than 10x10 mm2) of substrates, which was addressed by expansion during the regrowth by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE). Subsurface damage in GaN substrates were reduced by annealing with NH3 and N2 at 950°C for 60 minutes. It was additionally found that the variation of m-plane QWs' emission properties was significantly increased when the substrate miscut toward a-axis was increased from 0° to 0.1°. InGaN/GaN QWs were grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane and m-plane GaN substrates. The QWs were studied by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with different incident electron beam probe currents (0.1 nA ˜ 1000 nA). Lower emission intensities and longer peak wavelengths from c-plane QWs were attributed to the Quantum-confined Stark Effect (QCSE). The emission intensity ratios of m-plane QWs to c-plane QWs decreased from 3.04 at 1 nA to 1.53 at 1000 nA. This was identified as the stronger screening effects of QCSE at higher current densities in c-plane QWs. To further investigate these effects in a fabricated structure, biased photoluminescence measurements were performed on m-plane InGaN/GaN QWs. The purpose was to detect the possible internal fields induced by the dot-like structure in the InGaN layer through the response of these internal fields under externally applied fields. No energy shifts of the QWs were observed, which was attributed to strong surface leakage currents.

  7. Bone tissue incorporates in vitro gallium with a local structure similar to gallium-doped brushite.

    PubMed

    Korbas, M; Rokita, E; Meyer-Klaucke, W; Ryczek, J

    2004-01-01

    During mineral growth in rat bone-marrow stromal cell cultures, gallium follows calcium pathways. The dominant phase of the cell culture mineral constitutes the poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP). This model system mimics bone mineralization in vivo. The structural characterization of the Ga environment was performed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ga K-edge. These data were compared with Ga-doped synthetic compounds (poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite, amorphous calcium phosphate and brushite) and with strontium-treated bone tissue, obtained from the same culture model. It was found that Sr(2+) substitutes for Ca(2+) in the HAP crystal lattice. In contrast, the replacement by Ga(3+) yielded a much more disordered local environment of the probe atom in all investigated cell culture samples. The coordination of Ga ions in the cell culture minerals was similar to that of Ga(3+), substituted for Ca(2+), in the Ga-doped synthetic brushite (Ga-DCPD). The Ga atoms in the Ga-DCPD were coordinated by four oxygen atoms (1.90 A) of the four phosphate groups and two oxygen atoms at 2.02 A. Interestingly, the local environment of Ga in the cell culture minerals was not dependent on the onset of Ga treatment, the Ga concentration in the medium or the age of the mineral. Thus, it was concluded that Ga ions were incorporated into the precursor phase to the HAP mineral. Substitution for Ca(2+ )with Ga(3+) distorted locally this brushite-like environment, which prevented the transformation of the initially deposited phase into the poorly crystalline HAP. PMID:14648284

  8. Low valent and hydride complexes of NHC coordinated gallium and indium.

    PubMed

    Ball, Graham E; Cole, Marcus L; McKay, Alasdair I

    2012-01-21

    The reactions of the N-heterocyclic carbene 1,3-dimesitylimidazol-2-ylidene (IMes) with Ga[GaCl(4)], "GaI", InCl(2) and GaBr(3) have been examined. All reactions using a low valent gallium or indium starting material led to species of the form [{MX(2)(IMes)}(2)], where M = Ga, X = Cl (1), I (2); M = In, X = Cl (3), with disproportionation and loss of gallium metal in the case of 2. Reaction of IMes with gallium tribromide yields the air and moisture stable complex [GaBr(3)(IMes)] (4), which has been used as a precursor to the mixed bromohydrides [GaBrH(2)(IMes)] (5) and [GaBr(2)H(IMes)] (6) by (i) ligand redistribution with [GaH(3)(IMes)], (ii) hydride-bromide exchange with triethylsilane, and (iii) alkylation with (n)butyllithium followed by β-hydride elimination (6 only). Attempts to prepare 1, or monovalent analogues such as [{GaCl(IMes)}(n)], by thermally induced reductive elimination of dihydrogen from the chlorohydride congeners of 5 and 6 resulted in isolation of the known compounds [IMesCl][Cl] (IMesCl = 1,3-dimesityl-2-chloroimidazolium), and/or 1,3-dimesityl-2-dihydroimidazole, and gallium metal. Preliminary photochemical NMR spectroscopy and catalytic studies of 5 and 6 aimed at reductive dehydrogenation under milder conditions are reported. Compounds 1 and 4 have been characterised by single crystal X-ray structure determination. PMID:22080333

  9. Light Elements in the Core: Constraints from Gallium Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, I.; Badro, J.; Siebert, J.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of Earth's core has left a compositional imprint on the mantle, depleting and fractionating most of its siderophile (iron-loving) elements. Gallium is a moderately siderophile, hence it should be strongly depleted in the mantle. However, gallium concentration in the mantle matches that of lithophile (silicate-loving) elements having the same volatility. That is to say that either gallium behaves as a lithophile element during core formation, or a large influx of gallium was brought to the Earth after the core had formed. Geochemical evidence does not support the latter hypothesis, as it would require all other lithophile elements with similar volatility to be enriched in the mantle, or for late accretion to be composed of anomalously gallium-rich objects. In order to mitigate this issue, experimental studies have tried to understand how gallium behaves during core segregation by gauging the effects of pressure, temperature and oxygen fugacity on the partitioning of gallium between metal and silicate. None of these parameters provided the first-order change required to match the observation. We investigated the influence of core composition on gallium partitioning. The core in known to contain light-elements (oxygen, silicon sulfur and carbon), and those can change the activity of gallium in the metal, and strongly affect the behavior of gallium during core formation. We performed a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments (2 GPa, 1673-2073 K) in a piston-cylinder press. We varied the light-element composition of the metal and observed that Si and O have a very strong influence on the activity of gallium, making it more lithophile. We then modeled terrestrial accretion as a continuous process and tested different accretion histories; we can reproduce the mantle concentration of gallium if the core segregates in a deep magma ocean (>40 GPa) and contains large amounts of silicon or oxygen.

  10. Inflammatory pseudotumor: A gallium-avid mobile mesenteric mass

    SciTech Connect

    Auringer, S.T.; Scott, M.D.; Sumner, T.E. )

    1991-08-01

    An 8-yr-old boy with a 1-mo history of culture-negative fever and anemia underwent gallium, ultrasound, and computed tomography studies as part of the evaluation of a fever of unknown origin. These studies revealed a mobile gallium-avid solid abdominal mass subsequently proven to be an inflammatory pseudotumor of the mesentery, a rare benign mass. This report documents the gallium-avid nature of this rare lesion and discusses associated characteristic clinical, pathologic, and radiographic features.

  11. Survey of the market, supply and availability of gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Rosi, F.D.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the present consumption and supply of gallium, its potential availability in the satellite power system (SPS) implementation time frame, and commercial and new processing methods for increasing the production of gallium. Findings are reported in detail. The findings strongly suggest that with proper long range planning adequate gallium would be available from free-enterprise world supplies of bauxite for SPS implementation.

  12. Gallium-68: a systematic review of its nononcological applications.

    PubMed

    Vorster, Mariza; Maes, Alex; Van deWiele, Christophe; Sathekge, Mike

    2013-09-01

    The increased availability of PET facilities worldwide has sparked renewed interest in the use of generator-produced tracers such as gallium-68 (Ga). Imaging with Ga provides exciting opportunities in terms of new ligand-labelling possibilities and the exploration of novel clinical applications. The aim of the study was to summarize and appraise what has been published on the clinical applications of Ga outside oncology practice. This systematic review was based on the PRISMA guidelines. Databases searched include PubMed, Medline, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar. The following search strategy was used: 'Ga' OR 'Gallium' (all fields) NOT the following (title and abstract): Oncology/NET/neuroendocrine tumour/tumor/DOTATOC, DOTATATE, DOTANOC. These results were further limited to English publications, which resulted in 205 publications on PubMed. After duplicates and irrelevant articles were removed, 72 publications remained for inclusion. Only those studies in which compounds were labelled with Ga for applications other than in oncology-related indications were included. Publications in which the focus was on oncology-related applications of Ga imaging or in which the emphasis was on aspects relating to generators, radiochemistry or physics were excluded. Although a multitude of tracers have been labelled with Ga over several decades, it has not been established in routine clinical practice yet. In addition, neuroendocrine and other oncological applications have dominated the field until relatively recently following reports of applications in infection and inflammation. The majority of publications to date involve small numbers of subjects in mainly preclinical settings. Differences in methodology preclude grouping of studies to reach a clear conclusion. There is wide scope for Ga tracer application outside oncological practice, which remains greatly underutilized. Larger clinical trials are needed to validate these applications. PMID:23812409

  13. Surface characterization of platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Solla-Gullón, José; Rodríguez, Paramaconi; Herrero, Enrique; Aldaz, Antonio; Feliu, Juan M

    2008-03-14

    The quantitative analysis of the different surface sites on platinum samples is attempted from pure voltammetric data. This analysis requires independent knowledge of the fraction of two-dimensional (111) and (100) domains. Specific site-probe reactions are employed to achieve this goal. Irreversibly-adsorbed bismuth and tellurium have been revealed to be sensitive to the presence of (111) terrace domains of different width whereas almost all sites involved in (100) ordered domains have been characterized through germanium adatoms. The experimental protocol follows that used with well-defined single-crystal electrodes and, therefore, requires careful control of the surface cleanliness. Platinum basal planes and their vicinal stepped surfaces have been employed to obtain calibration plots between the charge density measured under the adatom redox peak, specific for the type of surface site, and the corresponding terrace size. The evaluation of the (100) bidimensional domains can also be achieved using the voltammetric profiles, once the fraction of (111) ordered domains present in the polyoriented platinum has been determined and their featureless contribution has been subtracted from the whole voltammetric response. Using that curve, it is possible to perform a deconvolution of the adsorption states of the polycrystalline sample different from those related to (111) domains. The fraction of (100)-related states in the deconvoluted voltammogram can then be compared to that expected from the independent estimation coming from the charge involved in the redox process undergone by the irreversibly-adsorbed germanium and thus check the result of the deconvolution. The information about the surface-site distribution can also be applied to analyze the voltammetric profile of nanocrystalline platinum electrodes. PMID:18309392

  14. Gallium-67 imaging in muscular sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Edan, G.; Bourguet, P.; Delaval, P.; Herry, J.Y.

    1984-07-01

    A case is presented of sarcoid myopathy in which radiogallium was seen to accumulate in the sites of muscle involvement. Uptake of the radiotracer disappeared following institution of corticosteroid therapy. The exceptional nature of this case contrasts with the high frequency of biopsy evidence of sarcoid granulomas in muscle. Gallium-67 imaging can be used to determine the extent of muscle involvement and, through evaluation of uptake intensity, the degree of disease activity before and after treatment.

  15. A Gallium multiphase equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Scott D; Greeff, Carl

    2009-01-01

    A new SESAME multiphase Gallium equation of state (EOS) has been developed. The equation of state includes three of the solid phases (Ga I, Ga II, Ga III) and a fluid phase (liquid/gas). The EOS includes consistent latent heat between the phases. We compare the results to the liquid Hugoniol data. We also explore the possibility of re-freezing via dynamic means such as isentropic and shock compression.

  16. Salvage chemotherapy with amrubicin and platinum for relapsed thymic carcinoma: experience in six cases.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Tomonobu; Agatsuma, Toshihiko; Ichiyama, Takashi; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Ushiki, Atsuhito; Komatsu, Yoshimichi; Tanabe, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yasuo, Masanori; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kubo, Keishi; Hachiya, Tsutomu

    2010-06-01

    It has been reported that cisplatin-based chemotherapy shows beneficial effects in certain patients with advanced thymic carcinoma. However, the usefulness of salvage therapy has not been reported. We focused on a new anthracycline agent, amrubicin, combined with platinum compounds as salvage chemotherapy in patients with thymic carcinoma. Six cases of unresectable and locally advanced thymic carcinoma relapsed from prior cisplatin-containing chemotherapy were treated with amrubicin (30-40 mg/m(2) day 1-3) plus platinum compounds (cisplatin 60 mg/m(2) day 1 or nedaplatin 70 mg/m(2) day 1) chemotherapy as salvage chemotherapy. Two patients showed a partial response. However, Grade 3/4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in all and two of the patients, respectively. We conclude that thymic carcinoma is sensitive to platinum-based chemotherapy and that amrubicin appears to have significant activity against thymic carcinoma. The major toxicity is hematological toxicities. PMID:19415537

  17. Production of Platinum Atom Nanoclusters at One End of Helical Plant Viruses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Platinum atom clusters (Pt nanoparticles, Pt-NPs) were produced selectively at one end of helical plant viruses, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and potato virus X (PVX), when platinum coordinate compounds were reduced chemically by borohydrides. Size of the platinum NPs depends on conditions of the electroless deposition of platinum atoms on the virus. Results suggest that the Pt-NPs are bound concurrently to the terminal protein subunits and the 5′ end of encapsidated TMV RNA. Thus, a special structure of tobacco mosaic virus and potato X virus particles with nanoparticles of platinum, which looks like a push-pin with platinum head and virus needle, was obtained. Similar results were obtained with ultrasonically fragmented TMV particles. By contrast, the Pt-NPs fully filled the central axial hole of in vitro assembled RNA-free TMV-like particles. We believe that the results presented here will be valuable in the fundamental understanding of interaction of viral platforms with ionic metals and in a mechanism of nanoparticles formation. PMID:24187551

  18. Long-chain amine-templated synthesis of gallium sulfide and gallium selenide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Seral-Ascaso, A; Metel, S; Pokle, A; Backes, C; Zhang, C J; Nerl, H C; Rode, K; Berner, N C; Downing, C; McEvoy, N; Muñoz, E; Harvey, A; Gholamvand, Z; Duesberg, G S; Coleman, J N; Nicolosi, V

    2016-06-01

    We describe the soft chemistry synthesis of amine-templated gallium chalcogenide nanotubes through the reaction of gallium(iii) acetylacetonate and the chalcogen (sulfur, selenium) using a mixture of long-chain amines (hexadecylamine and dodecylamine) as a solvent. Beyond their role as solvent, the amines also act as a template, directing the growth of discrete units with a one-dimensional multilayer tubular nanostructure. These new materials, which broaden the family of amine-stabilized gallium chalcogenides, can be tentatively classified as direct large band gap semiconductors. Their preliminary performance as active material for electrodes in lithium ion batteries has also been tested, demonstrating great potential in energy storage field even without optimization. PMID:27221399

  19. GaN growth using gallium hydride generated by hydrogenation of liquid gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayoshi, H.; Nishimura, S.; Takeuchi, T.; Hirai, M.; Terashima, K.

    2005-02-01

    The novel growth method of GaN using hydrogen radicals has been investigated. This paper is the first report of gallium hydrogenation reaction and deposition of GaN using hydrogenated gallium. We found that gallium (Ga) could be volatilized at low temperature by hydrogenation reaction with hydrogen radicals. In this reaction, Ga assumed to be volatilized as GaH 3. The GaN deposition was attempted by using gas phase reaction of NH 3 and GaH 3 generated by the reaction between liquid Ga and hydrogen radicals. Hydrogen radicals were generated by hot tungsten filament, which works as a catalyst during hydrogen cracking, whose temperature was 1600 °C. Surface morphology, deposition rate, and film structure were investigated. It was confirmed that GaN could be deposited by this method. The source materials of this method are safe and of low cost compared to the conventional methods.

  20. High-dose gallium imaging in lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.C.; Leonard, R.C.; Canellos, G.P.; Skarin, A.T.; Kaplan, W.D.

    1983-08-01

    The role of gallium-67 imaging in the management of patients with lymphoma, traditionally assessed using low tracer doses and the rectilinear scanner, was assessed when using larger doses (7 to 10 mCi) and a triple-peak Anger camera. Gallium scan results in 51 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 21 patients with Hodgkin's disease were compared with simultaneous radiologic, clinical, and histopathologic reports. Subsequent disease course was also evaluated in light of radionuclide findings. Sensitivity and specificity of the scans were 0.90 or greater for both non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease, and overall accuracy by site was 96 percent. Although there are insufficient numbers of pretreatment scans to allow any conclusions, our data suggest that newer approaches to gallium scanning in treated patients are (1) highly specific in all lymphomas and most sensitive in high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease; (2) valuable in assessing the mediastinum in both non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease; and (3) helpful adjuncts to computed tomographic scanning and ultrasonography in assessing abdominal node disease.

  1. Phosphoric acid fuel cell platinum use study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundblad, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is promoting the private development of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plants for terrestrial applications. Current PAFC technology utilizes platinum as catalysts in the power electrodes. The possible repercussions that the platinum demand of PAFC power plant commercialization will have on the worldwide supply and price of platinum from the outset of commercialization to the year 2000 are investigated. The platinum demand of PAFC commercialization is estimated by developing forecasts of platinum use per unit of generating capacity and penetration of PAFC power plants into the electric generation market. The ability of the platinum supply market to meet future demands is gauged by assessing the size of platinum reserves and the capability of platinum producers to extract, refine and market sufficient quantities of these reserves. The size and timing of platinum price shifts induced by the added demand of PAFC commercialization are investigated by several analytical methods. Estimates of these price shifts are then used to calculate the subsequent effects on PAFC power plant capital costs.

  2. Platinum-induced structural collapse in layered oxide polycrystalline films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianlin; Liu, Changhui; Huang, Haoliang; Fu, Zhengping; Peng, Ranran E-mail: yllu@ustc.edu.cn; Zhai, Xiaofang; Lu, Yalin E-mail: yllu@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-03-30

    Effect of a platinum bottom electrode on the SrBi{sub 5}Fe{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 18} layered oxide polycrystalline films was systematically studied. The doped cobalt ions react with the platinum to form a secondary phase of PtCoO{sub 2}, which has a typical Delafossite structure with a weak antiferromagnetism and an exceptionally high in-plane electrical conductivity. Formation of PtCoO{sub 2} at the interface partially consumes the cobalt dopant and leads to the structural collapsing from 5 to 4 layers, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements. Considering the weak magnetic contribution from PtCoO{sub 2}, the observed ferromagnetism should be intrinsic of the Aurivillius compounds. Ferroelectric properties were also indicated by the piezoresponse force microscopy. In this work, the platinum induced secondary phase at the interface was observed, which has a strong impact on Aurivillius structural configuration and thus the ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties.

  3. Platinum-induced structural collapse in layered oxide polycrystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianlin; Huang, Haoliang; Liu, Changhui; Fu, Zhengping; Zhai, Xiaofang; Peng, Ranran; Lu, Yalin

    2015-03-01

    Effect of a platinum bottom electrode on the SrBi5Fe1-xCoxTi4O18 layered oxide polycrystalline films was systematically studied. The doped cobalt ions react with the platinum to form a secondary phase of PtCoO2, which has a typical Delafossite structure with a weak antiferromagnetism and an exceptionally high in-plane electrical conductivity. Formation of PtCoO2 at the interface partially consumes the cobalt dopant and leads to the structural collapsing from 5 to 4 layers, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements. Considering the weak magnetic contribution from PtCoO2, the observed ferromagnetism should be intrinsic of the Aurivillius compounds. Ferroelectric properties were also indicated by the piezoresponse force microscopy. In this work, the platinum induced secondary phase at the interface was observed, which has a strong impact on Aurivillius structural configuration and thus the ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties.

  4. Gallium maltolate inhibits human cutaneous T-cell lymphoma tumor development in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuesong; Wang, Timothy W; Lessmann, George M; Saleh, Jamal; Liu, Xiping; Chitambar, Christopher R; Hwang, Sam T

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) represent a heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by an accumulation of malignant CD4 T cells in the skin. The group IIIa metal salt, gallium nitrate, is known to have antineoplastic activity against B-cell lymphoma in humans, but its activity in CTCLs has not been elaborated in detail. Herein, we examined the antineoplastic efficacy of a gallium compound, gallium maltolate (GaM), in vitro and in vivo with murine models of CTCLs. GaM inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis of cultured CTCL cells. In human CTCL xenograft models, peritumoral injection of GaM limited the growth of CTCL cells, shown by fewer tumor formations, smaller tumor sizes, and decreased neovascularization in tumor microenvironment. To identify key signaling pathways that have a role in GaM-mediated reduction of tumor growth, we analyzed inflammatory cytokines, as well as signal transduction pathways in CTCL cells treated by GaM. IFN-γ-induced chemokines and IL-13 were found to be notably increased in GaM-treated CTCL cells. However, immunosuppressive cytokines, such as IL-10, were decreased with GaM treatment. Interestingly, both oxidative stress and p53 pathways were involved in GaM-induced cytotoxicity. These results warrant further investigation of GaM as a therapeutic agent for CTCLs. PMID:25371972

  5. C-H Oxidation by Platinum Group Metal Oxo or Peroxo Species

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Meng; Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    While C–H oxidation by ruthenium oxo compounds has been broadly applied in organic synthesis, examples of C–H oxidation by metal oxo complexes from the rest of the platinum group are still rare. We survey the preparation and reactivity of these late-transition metal oxo and peroxo complexes in this tutorial review.

  6. P-n junctions formed in gallium antimonide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, R.; Richman, D.; Tietjen, J.

    1970-01-01

    Vapor phase deposition process forms a heavily doped n-region on a melt-grown p-type gallium antimonide substrate. HCl transports gallium to the reaction zone, where it combines with antimony hydride and the dopant carrier, hydrogen telluride. Temperatures as low as 400 degrees C are required.

  7. Gallium scintigraphy in bone infarction. Correlation with bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Armas, R.R.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The appearance of gallium-67 images in bone infarction was studied in nine patients with sickle cell disease and correlated with the bone scan findings. Gallium uptake in acute infarction was decreased or absent with a variable bone scan uptake, and normal in healing infarcts, which showed increased uptake on bone scan. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  8. INDUCTION OF TRISOMICS BY PLATINUM DIAMINODINITRODICHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trisomics were produced in the pollen mother cells of Pennisetum americanum (L) K. Schum plants resulting from seeds treated with M to the minus 6th power platinum diaminodinitrodichloride. On the basis of the preliminary study the relative potency of cis-Platinum diaminodinitrod...

  9. Failure mechanism characterization of platinum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.; Mcfarlen, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    This article describes procedures and results of testing performed on a platinum/10-percent rhodium, thin-wall tubular product. The purpose of the testing was to develop exemplar SEM fractographs to be used to characterize failures under various environmental conditions. Conditions evaluated for the platinum alloys included high temperature, hydrogen environment, braze metal contamination, and cyclic loading.

  10. Platinum electrodes for electrochemical detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Bacteria is detected electro-chemically by measuring evolution of hydrogen in test system with platinum and reference electrode. Using system, electrodes of platinum are used to detect and enumerate varieties of gram-positive and gram-negative organisms compared in different media.

  11. Platinum metallization for MEMS application

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Vittorio; Biazi, Leonardo; Marchiori, Roberto; Lago, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The adherence of Platinum thin film on Si/SiO2 wafer was studies using Chromium, Titanium or Alumina (Cr, Ti, Al2O3) as interlayer. The adhesion of Pt is a fundamental property in different areas, for example in MEMS devices, which operate at high temperature conditions, as well as in biomedical applications, where the problem of adhesion of a Pt film to the substrate is known as a major challenge in several industrial applications health and in biomedical devices, such as for example in the stents.1-4 We investigated the properties of Chromium, Titanium, and Alumina (Cr, Ti, and Al2O3) used as adhesion layers of Platinum (Pt) electrode. Thin films of Chromium, Titanium and Alumina were deposited on Silicon/Silicon dioxide (Si/SiO2) wafer by electron beam. We introduced Al2O3 as a new adhesion layer to test the behavior of the Pt film at higher temperature using a ceramic adhesion thin film. Electric behaviors were measured for different annealing temperatures to know the performance for Cr/Pt, Ti/Pt, and Al2O3/Pt metallic film in the gas sensor application. All these metal layers showed a good adhesion onto Si/SiO2 and also good Au wire bondability at room temperature, but for higher temperature than 400 °C the thin Cr/Pt and Ti/Pt films showed poor adhesion due to the atomic inter-diffusion between Platinum and the metal adhesion layers.5 The proposed Al2O3/Pt ceramic-metal layers confirmed a better adherence for the higher temperatures tested. PMID:24743057

  12. Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S.; Nekuda, Jennifer A.

    2011-11-15

    Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

  13. Extended Platinum Nanotubes as Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, S.; Pivovar, B. S.; Yan, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Energy consumption has relied principally on fossil fuels as an energy source; fuel cells, however, can provide a clean and sustainable alternative, an answer to the depletion and climate change concerns of fossil fuels. Within proton exchange membrane fuel cells, high catalyst cost and poor durability limit the commercial viability of the device. Recently, platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) were studied as durable, active catalysts, providing a platform to meet US Department of Energy vehicular activity targets.[1] Porous PtNTs were developed to increase nanotube surface area, improving mass activity for oxygen reduction without sacrificing durability.[2] Subsurface platinum was then replaced with palladium, forming platinum-coated palladium nanotubes.[3] By forming a core shell structure, platinum utilization was increased, reducing catalyst cost. Alternative substrates have also been examined, modifying platinum surface facets and increasing oxygen reduction specific activity. Through modification of the PtNT platform, catalyst limitations can be reduced, ensuring a commercially viable device.

  14. Gallium scintigraphic pattern in lung CMV infections

    SciTech Connect

    Ganz, W.I.; Cohen, D.; Mallin, W.

    1994-05-01

    Due to extensive use of prophylactic therapy for Pneumonitis Carinii Pneumonia (PCP), Cytomegalic Viral (CMV) infection may now be the most common lung infection in AIDS patients. This study was performed to determine Gallium-67 patterns in AIDS patients with CMV. Pathology reports were reviewed in AIDS patients who had a dose of 5 to 10 mCi of Gallium-67 citrate. Analysis of images were obtained 48-72 hours later of the entire body was performed. Gallium-67 scans in 14 AIDS patients with biopsy proven CMV, were evaluated for eye, colon, adrenal, lung and renal uptake. These were compared to 40 AIDS patients without CMV. These controls had infections including PCP, Mycobacterial infections, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis. 100% of CMV patients had bowel uptake greater than or equal to liver. Similar bowel activity was seen in 50% of AIDS patients without CMV. 71% had intense eye uptake which was seen in only 10% of patients without CMV. 50% of CMV patients had renal uptake compared to 5% of non-CMV cases. Adrenal uptake was suggested in 50%, however, SPECT imaging is needed for confirmation. 85% had low grade lung uptake. The low grade lung had perihilar prominence. The remaining 15% had high grade lung uptake (greater than sternum) due to superimposed PCP infection. Colon uptake is very sensitive indicator for CMV infection. However, observing eye, renal, and or adrenal uptake improved the diagnostic specificity. SPECT imaging is needed to confirm renal or adrenal abnormalities due to intense bowel activity present in 100% of cases. When high grade lung uptake is seen superimposed PCP is suggested.

  15. Gallium-67 imaging in muscular sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Edan, G.; Bourguet, P.; Delaval, P.; Herry, J.Y.

    1984-07-01

    A case is presented of sarcoid myopathy in which radiogallium was seen to accumulate in the sites of muscle involvement. Uptake of the radiotracer disappeared following institution of corticosteroid therapy. The exceptional nature of this case contrasts with the high frequency of biopsy evidence of sarcoid muscle disease but is consistent with the rarity of clinical evidence of sarcoid granulomas in muscle. Gallium-67 imaging can be used to determine the extent of muscle involvement and, through evaluation of uptake intensity, the degree of disease activity before and after treatment.

  16. Resonant cavity modes in gallium oxide microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Iñaki; Nogales, Emilio; Méndez, Bianchi; Piqueras, Javier

    2012-06-01

    Fabry Perot resonant modes in the optical range 660-770 nm have been detected from single and coupled Cr doped gallium oxide microwires at room temperature. The luminescence is due to chromium ions and dominated by the broad band involving the 4T2-4A2 transition, strongly coupled to phonons, which could be of interest in tunable lasers. The confinement of the emitted photons leads to resonant modes detected at both ends of the wires. The separation wavelength between maxima follows the Fabry-Perot dependence on the wire length and the group refractive index for the Ga2O3 microwires.

  17. Effects of relativistic motion of electrons on the chemistry of gold and platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Martin

    2005-12-01

    Experimental evidence proving the unique stabilization of the 6s orbital in platinum and gold is presented. The conclusions are drawn from the chemical reactivities, of both elements, as well as from structural and spectroscopic features of selected compounds. In particular, the opening of a band gap in transparent CsAu and Cs2Pt, backed by band structure calculations, are regarded conclusive indications of Au- and Pt2- to exist as closed shell species in these compounds.

  18. Proof-of-Concept Experiments on a Gallium-Based Ignitron for Pulsed Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, H. K.; Hanson, V. S.; Polzin, K. A.; Pearson, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    ignitron designs have used mercury as the liquid metal cathode, owing to its presence as a liquid at room temperatures and a vapor pressure of 10 Pa (75 mtorr) at room temperature. While these are favorable properties, there are obvious environmental and personal safety concerns with the storage, handling, and use of mercury and its compounds. The purpose of the present work was to fabricate and test an ignitron that used as its cathode an alternate liquid metal that was safe to handle and store. To that end, an ignitron test article that used liquid gallium as the cathode material was developed and tested. Gallium is a metal that has a melting temperature of 29.76 C, which is slightly above room temperature, and a boiling point of over 2,300 C at atmospheric pressure. This property makes gallium the element with the largest relative difference between melting and boiling points. Gallium has a limited role in biology, and when ingested, it will be subsequently processed by the body and expelled rather than accumulating to toxic levels. The next section of this Technical Memorandum (TM) provides background information on the development of mercury-based ignitrons, which serves as the starting point for the development of the gallium-based variant. Afterwards, the experimental hardware and setup used in proof-of-concept testing of a basic gallium ignitron are presented. Experimental data, consisting of discharge voltage and current waveforms as well as high-speed imaging of the gallium arc discharge in the gallium ignitron test article, are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the concept. Discussion of the data and suggestions on improvements for future iterations of the design are presented in the final two sections of this TM.

  19. Comparison of the effects of the oral anticancer platinum(IV) complexes oxoplatin and metabolite cis-diammine-tetrachlorido-platinum(IV) on global gene expression of NCI-H526 cells

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, Ulrike; Ulsperger, Ernst; Geissler, Klaus; Hamilton, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Platinum(IV) coordination complexes like oxoplatin (cis,cis,trans-diammine-dichlorido-dihydroxido-platinum[IV]) show high stability and therefore can be utilized orally for outpatient care. Although oxoplatin is capable of binding directly to DNA after prolonged incubation, platinum(IV) agents are considered to be largely inert prodrugs that are converted to highly cytotoxic platinum(II) compounds by reducing substances, enzymes, or microenviron-mental conditions. Reaction of oxoplatin with 0.1 M hydrogen chloride mimicking gastric acid yields cis-diammine-tetrachlorido-platinum(IV) (DATCP[IV]), which exhibits two-fold increased activity. The presence of chlorides as ligands in the axial position results in a high reduction potential that favors transformation to platinum(II) complexes. In this study, the intracellular effect of the highly reactive tetrachlorido derivative was investigated in comparison with an equipotent dose of cisplatin. Genome-wide expression profiling of NCI-H526 small cell lung cancer cells treated with these platinum species revealed clear differences in the expression pattern of affected genes and concerned cellular pathways between DATCP(IV) and cisplatin. Application of DATCP(IV) resulted in extensive downregulation of protein and ATP synthesis, cell cycle regulation, and glycolysis, in contrast to cisplatin, which preferentially targeted glutathione conjugation, pyruvate metabolism, citric acid cycle, and the metabolism of amino acids and a range of carbohydrates. Thus, the oxoplatin metabolite DATCP(IV) constitutes a potent cytotoxic derivative that may be produced by gastric acid or acidic areas prevailing in larger solid tumors, depending on the respective pharmaceutical formulation of oxoplatin. Furthermore, DATCP(IV) exhibits intracellular effects that are clearly different from the expected reduced product cisplatin(II). In conclusion, activation of the platinum(IV) complex oxoplatin seems to involve the generation of a cytotoxic

  20. Unsaturated platinum-rhenium cluster complexes. Synthesis, structures and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Captain, Burjor; Smith, Mark D; Beddie, Chad; Hall, Michael B

    2007-05-01

    Two new compounds PtRe3(CO)12(PBut3)(micro-H)3, 9, and PtRe2(CO)9(PBut3)(micro-H)2, 10, were obtained from the reaction of Pt(PBut3)2 with Re3(CO)12(micro-H3), 8, at room temperature. Compound 9 contains a butterfly cluster of four metals formed by the insertion of the platinum atom from a Pt(PBut3) group into one of the hydride-bridged metal-metal bonds of 8. The three hydrido ligands are bridging ligands across each of three new Pt-Re bonds. Compound 10 contains a triangular PtRe2 cluster with two hydrido ligands; one bridges a Pt-Re bond, and the other bridges the Re-Re bond. The new compound Pt2Re2(CO)7(PBut3)2(micro-H)2, 11, was obtained from the reaction of 8 with Pt(PBut3)2 in hexane at reflux. Compound 11 was also obtained from 10 by reaction with an additional quantity of Pt(PBut3)2. Compound 11 contains a tetrahedral cluster of four metal atoms with two dynamically active hydrido ligands. A CO ligand on one of the two platinum atoms also exchanges between the two platinum atoms rapidly on the NMR time scale. Compound 11 is electronically unsaturated and was found to add hydrogen at room temperature to form the tetrahydrido cluster complex, Pt2Re2(CO)7(PBut3)2(micro-H)4, 12. Compound 12 has a structure similar to 11 but contains one triply bridging hydrido ligand, two edge bridging hydrido ligands, and one terminal hydrido ligand on one of the two platinum atoms. A kinetic isotope effect D/H of 1.5(1) was determined for the addition of H2 to 11. Hydrogen can be eliminated from 12 by heating to 97 degrees C or by the application of UV-vis irradiation at room temperature. Compound 12 adds CO at room temperature to yield the complex Pt2Re2(CO)8(PBut3)2(micro-H)4, 13, which contains a planar cluster of four metal atoms with a Pt-Pt bond and four edge bridging hydrido ligands. Compounds 11 and 12 react with Pt(PBut3)2 to yield the known five metal cluster complexes Pt3Re2(CO)6(PBut3)3(micro-H)2, 14, and Pt3Re2(CO)6(PBut3)3(micro-H)4, 15, respectively. Density

  1. Characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, L.C.; Ishida, Takanobu.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces has been accomplished through the use of four major electrochemical techniques. These were chronoamperometry, chronopotentiommetry, cyclic voltammetry, and linear sweep voltammetry. A systematic study on the under-potential deposition of several transition metals has been performed. The most interesting of these were: Ag, Cu, Cd, and Pb. It was determined, by subjecting the platinum electrode surface to a single potential scan between {minus}0.24 and +1.25 V{sub SCE} while stirring the solution, that the electrocatalytic activity would be regenerated. As a consequence of this study, a much simpler method for producing ultra high purity water from acidic permanganate has been developed. This method results in water that surpasses the water produced by pyrocatalytic distillation. It has also been seen that the wettability of polycrystalline platinum surfaces is greatly dependent on the quantity of oxide present. Oxide-free platinum is hydrophobic and gives a contact angle in the range of 55 to 62 degrees. We have also modified polycrystalline platinum surface with the electrically conducting polymer poly-{rho}-phenylene. This polymer is very stable in dilute sulfuric acid solutions, even under applied oxidative potentials. It is also highly resistant to electrochemical hydrogenation. The wettability of the polymer modified platinum surface is severely dependent on the choice of supporting electrolyte chosen for the electrochemical polymerization. Tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate produces a film that is as hydrophobic as Teflon, whereas tetraethylammonium perchlorate produces a film that is more hydrophilic than oxide-free platinum.

  2. Assessment of gallium-67 scanning in pulmonary and extrapulmonary sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, H.L.; Gushue, G.F.; Park, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Gallium-67 scans have been widely employed in patients with sarcoidosis as a means of indicating alveolitis and the need for corticosteroid therapy. Observation of 32 patients followed 3 or more years after gallium scans showed no correlation between findings and later course: of 10 patients with pulmonary uptake, 7 recovered with minor residuals; of 18 patients with mediastinal of extrathoracic uptake, 10 had persistent or progressive disease; of 4 patients with negative initial scans, 2 had later progression. The value of gallium-67 scans as an aid to diagnosis was studied in 40 patients with extrapulmonary sarcoidosis. In 12 patients, abnormal lacrimal, nodal, or pulmonary uptake aided in selection of biopsy sites. Gallium-67 scans and serum ACE levels were compared in 97 patients as indices of clinical activity. Abnormal gallium-67 uptake was observed in 96.3% of the tests in active disease, and ACE level elevation occurred in 56.3%. In 24 patients with inactive or recovered disease, abnormal gallium-67 uptake occurred in 62.5% and ACE level elevation in 37.5%. Gallium-67 scans have a limited but valuable role in the diagnosis and management of sarcoidosis.

  3. Dispersion of submicron Ni particles into liquid gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L. F.; Park, H. S.; Dodbiba, G.; Fujita, T.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper a liquid gallium with a low melting temperature and good thermal conductivity was used as a carrier to develop a new magnetorheological (MR) fluid that can be employed in energy convection devices. Submicron nickel particles, coated with silica, were chosen to be dispersed in the liquid gallium. The silica coating was used to improve the dispersion and prepare the composite particles with a density similar to that of the carrier liquid, i.e., liquid gallium. The supercooling phenomenon of liquid gallium was analyzed to better understand the dispersion of particles. The magnetization behaviours of both the silica-coated nickel particles and the synthesized MR fluids were measured. The results showed that the silica-coated nickel particles exhibited a shell-type structure, and the composite particle with a density same as the one of liquid gallium can be obtained by controlling the thickness of the coating layer to approximately 22 nm. The submicron nickel particles with the help of silica coating can be easily dispersed into liquid gallium. It was found that the supercooling of liquid gallium varied from 13.5 K to 19.3 K depending on the thickness of the coating layer of the dispersed particles. The saturation magnetization of the composite particles was reduced due to the occurrence of a non-magnetic silica layer. Figs 5, Refs 14.

  4. Gallium increases bone calcium and crystallite perfection of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Bockman, R S; Boskey, A L; Blumenthal, N C; Alcock, N W; Warrell, R P

    1986-12-01

    Gallium, a group IIIa metal, is known to interact with hydroxyapatite as well as the cellular components of bone. In recent studies we have found gallium to be a potent inhibitor of bone resorption that is clinically effective in controlling cancer-related hypercalcemia as well as the accelerated bone resorption associated with bone metastases. To begin to elucidate gallium's mechanism of action we have examined its effects on bone mineral properties. After short-term (14 days) administration to rats, gallium nitrate produced measurable changes in bone mineral properties. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy, low levels of gallium were noted to preferentially accumulate in regions of active bone formation, 0.54 +/- .07 microgram/mg bone in the metaphyses versus 0.21 +/- .03 microgram/mg bone in the diaphyses, P less than 0.001. The bones of treated animals had increased calcium content measured spectrophotometrically. Rats injected with radiolabeled calcium during gallium treatment had greater 45-calcium content compared to control animals. By wide-angle X-ray analyses, larger and/or more perfect hydroxyapatite was observed. The combined effects of gallium on bone cell function and bone mineral may explain its clinical efficacy in blocking accelerated bone resorption. PMID:3026592

  5. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:24151196

  6. Design, Synthesis of Novel Platinum(II) Glycoconjugates, and Evaluation of Their Antitumor Effects.

    PubMed

    Han, Jianbin; Gao, Xiangqian; Liu, Ran; Yang, Jinna; Zhang, Menghua; Mi, Yi; Shi, Ying; Gao, Qingzhi

    2016-06-01

    A new series of sugar-conjugated (trans-R, R-cyclohexane-1, 2-diamine)-2-halo-malonato-platinum(II) complexes were designed and synthesized to target tumor-specific glucose transporters (GLUTs). The water solubility of the sugar-conjugated platinum (II) complexes was greatly improved by average of 570-fold, 33-fold, and 94-fold, respectively, compared to cisplatin (1.0 mg/mL), carboplatin (17.1 mg/mL), and the newest generation of clinical drug oxaliplatin (6.0 mg/mL). Despite the high water solubility, the platinum(II) glycoconjugates exhibited a notable increase in cytotoxicity by a margin of 1.5- to 6.0-fold in six different human cancer cell lines with respect to oxaliplatin. The potential GLUT1 transportability of the complexes was investigated through a molecular docking study and was confirmed with GLUT1 inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity dependency evaluation. The results showed that the sugar-conjugated platinum(II) complexes can be recognized by the glucose recognition binding site of GLUT1 and their cell killing effect depends highly on the GLUT1 inhibitor, quercetin. The research presenting a prospective concept for targeted therapy anticancer drug design, and with the analysis of the synthesis, water solubility, antitumor activity, and the transportability of the platinum(II) glycoconjugates, this study provides fundamental data supporting the inherent potential of these designed conjugates as lead compounds for GLUT-mediated tumor targeting. PMID:26706102

  7. [Mechanism of Platinum Derivatives Induced Kidney Injury].

    PubMed

    Yan, Feifei; Duan, Jianchun; Wang, Jie

    2015-09-20

    Platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors, lung cancer, and colorectal cancer. Two major problems exist, however, in the clinic use of platinum derivatives. One is the development of tumor resistance to the drug during therapy, leading to treatment failure. The other is the drug's toxicity such as the cisplatin's nephrotoxicity, which limits the dose that can be administered. This paper describes the mechanism of platinum derivatives induced kidney injury. PMID:26383983

  8. Antitumor effect of arabinogalactan and platinum complex.

    PubMed

    Starkov, A K; Zamay, T N; Savchenko, A A; Ingevatkin, E V; Titova, N M; Kolovskaya, O S; Luzan, N A; Silkin, P P; Kuznetsova, S A

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the results of investigation of antitumor properties of platinum-arabinogalactan complex. We showed the ability of the complex to inhibit the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. It is found that the distribution of the platinum-arabinogalactan complex is not specific only for tumor cells in mice. The complex was found in all tissues and organs examined (ascites cells, embryonic cells, kidney, and liver). The mechanism of action of the arabinogalactan-platinum complex may be similar to cisplatin as the complex is able to accumulate in tumor cells. PMID:27193706

  9. Gallium scanning in lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis of children with AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, R.G.; Kabat, L.; Kamani, N.

    1987-12-01

    Lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) is a frequent pulmonary complication in the child with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We report the gallium scan findings in two children with AIDS and LIP. Gallium scintigraphy in both children demonstrated increased radionuclide concentration throughout the lungs, a pattern indistinguishable scintigraphically from that of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). This should alert nuclear medicine practitioners and referring physicians to another cause of diffusely increased gallium uptake in the lungs of patients with AIDS.

  10. Limiting pump intensity for sulfur-doped gallium selenide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Li, D.-J.; Xie, J.-J.; Zhang, L.-M.; Feng, Z.-S.; Andreev, Yu M.; Kokh, K. A.; Lanskii, G. V.; Potekaev, A. I.; Shaiduko, A. V.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.

    2014-05-01

    High optical quality undoped and sulfur-doped gallium selenide crystals were grown from melts by the modified vertical Bridgman method. Detailed study of the damage produced under femtosecond pulse exposure has shown that evaluation of the damage threshold by visual control is unfounded. Black matter spots produced on crystal surfaces do not noticeably decrease either its transparency or its frequency conversion efficiency as opposed to real damage identified as caked well-cohesive gallium structures. For the first time it was demonstrated that optimally sulfur-doped gallium selenide crystal possesses the highest resistivity to optical emission (about four times higher in comparison with undoped gallium selenide).

  11. Platinum group elements in the environment and their health risk.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Khaiwal; Bencs, László; Van Grieken, René

    2004-01-01

    Accumulation of platinum group elements (PGEs) in the environment has been increased over the time. Catalytic converters of modern vehicles are considered to be the main sources of PGE pollution, since the correlation is between the Pt:Rh ratios in various environmental compartments and in converter units. The present literature survey shows that the concentration of these metals has increased significantly in the last decades in diverse environmental matrices; like airborne particulate matter, soil, roadside dust and vegetation, river, coastal and oceanic environment. Generally, PGEs are referred to behave in an inert manner and to be immobile. However, there is an evidence of spread and bioaccumulation of these elements in the environment. Platinum content of road dusts can be soluble, consequently, it enters the waters, sediments, soil and finally, the food chain. The effect of chronic occupational exposure to Pt compounds is well-documented, and certain Pt species are known to exhibit allergenic potential. However, the toxicity of biologically available anthropogenic Pt is not clear. Hence, there is a need to study the effect on human health of long-term chronic exposure to low levels of Pt compounds. PMID:14654273

  12. IRIS Toxicological Review of Halogenated Platinum Salts and Platinum Compounds (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA released the draft toxicological review for public comment under the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program. The original draft assessment (January 2009) has been archived but is available on this web page for the sake of transparency.

  13. Thin Films of Gallium Arsenide and Gallium Aluminum Arsenide by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Look, Edward Gene Lun

    Low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LPMOCVD) of thin films of gallium arsenide (GaAs) and gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) was performed in a horizontal cold wall chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor. The organometallic (group III) sources were triethylgallium (TEGa) and triethylaluminum (TEAl), used in conjunction with arsine (AsH_3) as the group V source. It was found that growth parameters such as growth temperature, pressure, source flow rates and temperatures have a profound effect on the film quality and composition. Depending on the particular combination of conditions, both the surface and overall morphologies may be affected. The films were nondestructively analyzed by Raman and photoreflectance spectroscopies, x-ray diffraction and rocking curve studies, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Hall measurements and film thicknesses were determined with a step profilometer.

  14. Teaching the Chemistry of Platinum.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert G W

    2015-01-01

    Following colonisation of South America by the Spanish, many new naturally occurring substances were sent to Europe. One of these was the silvery, unreactive metal, platinum, discovered in New Grenada in the mid-eighteenth century. It was often found in granular form, associated with gold, and the challenge to chemists was to refine it, produce it as wire or sheet, and determine its chemical properties. This interested the professor of chemistry at the University of Edinburgh, Joseph Black, who was able to obtain samples from London-based Spanish contacts, particularly Ignacio Luzuriaga. This paper examines how Black transmitted his knowledge of the metal to large numbers of students attending his annual course. PMID:26924332

  15. Calibration of platinum resistance thermometers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, D. H.; Terbeek, H. G.; Malone, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results of five years experience in calibrating about 1000 commercial platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) are reported. These PRT were relatively small and rugged, with ice-point resistances from 200 to 5000 ohms. Calibrations normalized in terms of resistance-difference ratios (Cragoe Z function) were found to be remarkably uniform for five of six different types of PRT tested, and to agree very closely with normalized calibrations of the primary reference standard type PRT. The Z function normalization cancels residual resistances which are not temperature dependent and simplifies interpolation between calibration points when the quality of a given type of PRT has been established in terms of uniform values of the Z function. Measurements at five or six well spaced base-point temperatures with Z interpolation will suffice to calibrate a PRT accurately from 4 to 900 K.

  16. Evaluation of platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation procedure for the characterization of industrial platinum resistance thermometers (PRTs) for use in the temperature range -120 to 160 C was investigated. This evaluation procedure consisted of calibration, thermal stability and hysteresis testing of four surface measuring PRTs. Five different calibration schemes were investigated for these sensors. The IPTS-68 formulation produced the most accurate result, yielding average sensor systematic error of 0.02 C and random error of 0.1 C. The sensors were checked for thermal stability by successive and thermal cycling between room temperature, 160 C, and boiling point of nitrogen. All the PRTs suffered from instability and hysteresis. The applicability of the self-heating technique as an in situ method for checking the calibration of PRTs located inside wind tunnels was investigated.

  17. Novel ethylenediamine-gallium phosphate containing 6-fold coordinated gallium atoms with unusual four equatorial Ga-N bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torre-Fernández, Laura; Espina, Aránzazu; Khainakov, Sergei A.; Amghouz, Zakariae; García, José R.; García-Granda, Santiago

    2014-07-01

    A novel ethylenediamine-gallium phosphate, formulated as Ga(H2NCH2CH2NH2)2PO4·2H2O, was synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The crystal structure, including hydrogen positions, was determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (monoclinic, a=9.4886(3) Å, b=6.0374(2) Å, c=10.2874(3) Å, and β=104.226(3)°, space group Pc) and the bulk was characterized by chemical (Ga-P-C-H-N) and thermal analysis (TG-MS and DSC), including activation energy data of its thermo-oxidative degradation, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) measurements, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, SAED/NBD, and STEM BF-EDX). The crystal structure is built up of infinite zig-zag chains running along the c-axis, formed by vertex-shared {PO4} and {GaO2N4} polyhedra. The new compound is characterized by unusual four equatorial Ga-N bonds coming from two nonequivalent ethylenediamine molecules and exhibits strong blue emission at 430 nm (λex=350 nm) in the solid state at room temperature.

  18. Fabrication of Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride MESFET And It's Applications in Biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alur, Siddharth

    Gallium Nitride has been researched extensively for the past three decades for its application in Light Emitting Diodes (LED's), power devices and UV photodetectors. With the recent developments in crystal growth technology and the ability to control the doping there has been an increased interest in heterostructures formed between Gallium nitride and it's alloy Aluminium Gallium Nitride. These heterostructures due to the combined effect of spontaneous and piezoelectric effect can form a high density and a high mobility electron gas channel without any intentional doping. This high density electron gas makes these heterostructures ideal to be used as sensors. Gallium Nitride is also chemically very stable. Detection of biomolecules in a fast and reliable manner is very important in the areas of food safety and medical research. For biomolecular detection it is paramount to have a robust binding of the probes on the sensor surface. Therefore, in this dissertation, the fabrication and application of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors for the detection of DNA and Organophosphate hydrolase enzyme is discussed. In order to use these AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors capable of working in a liquid environment photodefinable polydimethyl-siloxane is used as an encapsulant. The immobilization conditions for a robust binding of thiolated DNA and the catalytic receptor enzyme organophosphate hydrolase on gold surfaces is developed with the help of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. DNA and OPH are detected by measuring the change in the drain current of the device as a function of time.

  19. Mitochondria-Localized Fluorescent BODIPY-Platinum Conjugate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A convenient synthesis of a BODIPY (1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-8-(4-pyridyl)-4,4′-difluoroboradiazaindacene) labeled platinum compound (BODIPY-Pt) was developed by direct conjugation of cisplatin with the pyridine group of BODIPY. The membrane permeability and selective uptake of BODIPY-Pt in the mitochondria was studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The fluorescent BODIPY-Pt conjugate showed high cellular proliferation inhibition against human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) and human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 27.37 and 12.14 μM, respectively. This work highlights the potential of using BODIPY labeled Pt compounds to realize the visualization of Pt distribution in living cells. PMID:25941554

  20. Platinum-ruthenium-palladium fuel cell electrocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2006-02-07

    A catalyst suitable for use in a fuel cell, especially as an anode catalyst, that contains platinum at a concentration that is between about 20 and about 60 atomic percent, ruthenium at a concentration that is between about 20 and about 60 atomic percent, palladium at a concentration that is between about 5 and about 45 atomic percent, and having an atomic ratio of platinum to ruthenium that is between about 0.7 and about 1.2. Alternatively, the catalyst may contain platinum at a concentration that is between about 25 and about 50 atomic percent, ruthenium at a concentration that is between about 25 and about 55 atomic percent, palladium at a concentration that is between about 5 and about 45 atomic percent, and having a difference between the concentrations of ruthenium and platinum that is no greater than about 20 atomic percent.

  1. Platinum-ruthenium-nickel fuel cell electrocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2005-07-26

    A catalyst suitable for use in a fuel cell, especially as an anode catalyst, that contains platinum, ruthenium, and nickel, wherein the nickel is at a concentration that is less than about 10 atomic percent.

  2. Platinum-Resistor Differential Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.; Britcliffe, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Platinum resistance elements used in bridge circuit for measuring temperature difference between two flowing liquids. Temperature errors with circuit are less than 0.01 degrees C over range of 100 degrees C.

  3. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cathode of the phosphoric acid fuel cell uses a high surface area platinum catalyst supported on a carbon substrate. During operation, the small platinum crystallites sinter, causing loss in cell performance. A support was developed that stabilizes platinum in the high surface area condition by retarding or preventing the sintering process. The approach is to form etch pits in the carbon by oxidizing the carbon in the presence of a metal oxide catalyst, remove the metal oxide by an acid wash, and then deposit platinum in these pits. Results confirm the formation of etch pits in each of the three supports chosen for investigation: Vulcan XC-72R, Vulcan XC-72 that was graphized at 2500 C, and Shawinigan Acetylene Black.

  4. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Platinum sintering on phosphoric acid fuel cell cathodes is discussed. The cathode of the phosphoric acid fuel cell uses a high surface area platinum catalyst dispersed on a conductive carbon support to minimize both cathode polarization and fabrication costs. During operation, however, the active surface area of these electrodes decreases, which in turn leads to decreased cell performance. This loss of active surface area is a major factor in the degradation of fuel cell performance over time.

  5. Preliminary Experimental Measurements for a Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Glumac, Nick G.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    A low-energy gallium plasma source is used to perform a spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range. Neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium are present in a 20 J, 1.8 kA (peak) arc discharge operating with a central cathode. When the polarity of the inner electrode is reversed the discharge current and arc voltage waveforms remain similar. Utilizing a central anode configuration, multiple Ga lines are absent in the 270-340 nm range. In addition, neutral and singly ionized Fe spectral lines are present, indicating erosion of the outer electrode. With graphite present on the insulator to facilitate breakdown, line emission from the gallium species is further reduced and while emissions from singly and doubly ionized carbon atoms and molecular carbon (C2) radicals are observed. These data indicate that a significant fraction of energy is shifted from the gallium and deposited into the various carbon species.

  6. Usefulness of gallium-67 citrate scanning in testicular seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Willan, B.D.; Penney, H.; Castor, W.R.; McGowan, D.G.

    1987-10-01

    An analysis of 77 consecutive patients with a histologic diagnosis of seminoma testis, assessed and treated at the Cross Cancer Institute between 1977 and 1982, is presented. Ga-67 citrate was first used in the assessment of patients with malignant testicular tumors in 1973. Following three years of study that supported the observation of the gallium-avid nature of seminoma, gallium scans became routine in the initial staging assessment and were used also when recurrence was suspected. From 1977 through 1982, 72 patients with biopsy-proven seminoma testis were assessed initially for extent of disease by Ga-67 scanning. Comparison with intravenous pyelography and bipedal lymphography was possible for accuracy of tumor assessment. The scan sensitivity was 83%, and the specificity was 95%. During the same period, gallium was studied in nonseminomatous testicular tumors but the results were disappointing and its use was discontinued. The gallium-avid nature of seminoma testis may be useful in determining the extent of disease.

  7. Reversible expansion of gallium-stabilized delta-plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W; Oudot, B; Baclet, N

    2006-01-26

    The transient expansion of plutonium-gallium alloys observed both in the lattice parameter as well as in the dimension of a sample held at ambient temperature is explained by assuming incipient precipitation of Pu{sub 3}Ga. However, this ordered {zeta}{prime}-phase is also subject to radiation-induced disordering. As a result, the gallium-stabilized {delta}-phase, being metastable at ambient temperature, is both driven towards thermodynamic equilibrium by radiation-enhanced diffusion of gallium and at the same time pushed back to its metastable state by radiation-induced disordering. A steady state is reached in which only a modest fraction of the gallium present is tied up in the {zeta}{prime}-phase.

  8. Reversible expansion of gallium-stabilized (delta)-plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W G; Oudot, B; Baclet, N

    2006-02-27

    It is shown that the transient expansion of plutonium-gallium alloys observed both in the lattice parameter as well as in the dimension of a sample held at ambient temperature can be explained by assuming incipient precipitation of Pu{sub 3}Ga. However, this ordered {zeta}-phase is also subject to radiation-induced disordering. As a result, the gallium-stabilized {delta}-phase, being metastable at ambient temperature, is driven towards thermodynamic equilibrium by radiation-enhanced diffusion of gallium and at the same time reverted back to its metastable state by radiation-induced disordering. A steady state is reached in which only a modest fraction of the gallium present is arranged in ordered {zeta}-phase regions.

  9. Computer simulation of radiation damage in gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stith, John J.; Davenport, James C.; Copeland, Randolph L.

    1989-01-01

    A version of the binary-collision simulation code MARLOWE was used to study the spatial characteristics of radiation damage in proton and electron irradiated gallium arsenide. Comparisons made with the experimental results proved to be encouraging.

  10. Gallium arsenide solar array subsystem study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, F. Q.

    1982-01-01

    The effects on life cycle costs of a number of technology areas are examined for a gallium arsenide space solar array. Four specific configurations were addressed: (1) a 250 KWe LEO mission - planer array; (2) a 250 KWe LEO mission - with concentration; (3) a 50 KWe GEO mission planer array; (4) a 50 KWe GEO mission - with concentration. For each configuration, a baseline system conceptual design was developed and the life cycle costs estimated in detail. The baseline system requirements and design technologies were then varied and their relationships to life cycle costs quantified. For example, the thermal characteristics of the baseline design are determined by the array materials and masses. The thermal characteristics in turn determine configuration, performance, and hence life cycle costs.

  11. Cavity optomechanics in gallium phosphide microdisks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Matthew; Hryciw, Aaron C.; Barclay, Paul E.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate gallium phosphide (GaP) microdisk optical cavities with intrinsic quality factors >2.8 × 105 and mode volumes <10(λ/n)3, and study their nonlinear and optomechanical properties. For optical intensities up to 8.0 × 104 intracavity photons, we observe optical loss in the microcavity to decrease with increasing intensity, indicating that saturable absorption sites are present in the GaP material, and that two-photon absorption is not significant. We observe optomechanical coupling between optical modes of the microdisk around 1.5 μm and several mechanical resonances, and measure an optical spring effect consistent with a theoretically predicted optomechanical coupling rate g0/2π˜30 kHz for the fundamental mechanical radial breathing mode at 488 MHz.

  12. The interaction of gold with gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar-cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments designed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions have yielded several interesting results. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are also explained by invoking this mechanism.

  13. Cavity optomechanics in gallium phosphide microdisks

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Matthew; Barclay, Paul E.; Hryciw, Aaron C.

    2014-04-07

    We demonstrate gallium phosphide (GaP) microdisk optical cavities with intrinsic quality factors >2.8 × 10{sup 5} and mode volumes <10(λ/n){sup 3}, and study their nonlinear and optomechanical properties. For optical intensities up to 8.0 × 10{sup 4} intracavity photons, we observe optical loss in the microcavity to decrease with increasing intensity, indicating that saturable absorption sites are present in the GaP material, and that two-photon absorption is not significant. We observe optomechanical coupling between optical modes of the microdisk around 1.5 μm and several mechanical resonances, and measure an optical spring effect consistent with a theoretically predicted optomechanical coupling rate g{sub 0}/2π∼30 kHz for the fundamental mechanical radial breathing mode at 488 MHz.

  14. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.

  15. Contact formation in gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments were performed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are explained by invoking this mechanism.

  16. Producing gallium arsenide crystals in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randolph, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The production of high quality crystals in space is a promising near-term application of microgravity processing. Gallium arsenide is the selected material for initial commercial production because of its inherent superior electronic properties, wide range of market applications, and broad base of on-going device development effort. Plausible product prices can absorb the high cost of space transportation for the initial flights provided by the Space Transportation System. The next step for bulk crystal growth, beyond the STS, is planned to come later with the use of free flyers or a space station, where real benefits are foreseen. The use of these vehicles, together with refinement and increasing automation of space-based crystal growth factories, will bring down costs and will support growing demands for high quality GaAs and other specialty electronic and electro-optical crystals grown in space.

  17. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Garlick, G. F. J.

    1987-01-01

    High-efficiency gallium arsenide cells, made by the liquid epitaxy method (LPE), have been irradiated with 1-MeV electrons up to fluences of 10 to the 16th e/sq cm. Measurements have been made of cell spectral response and dark and light-excited current-voltage characteristics and analyzed using computer-based models to determine underlying parameters such as damage coefficients. It is possible to use spectral response to sort out damage effects in the different cell component layers. Damage coefficients are similar to other reported in the literature for the emitter and buffer (base). However, there is also a damage effect in the window layer and possibly at the window emitter interface similar to that found for proton-irradiated liquid-phase epitaxy-grown cells. Depletion layer recombination is found to be less than theoretically expected at high fluence.

  18. Direct Band Gap Wurtzite Gallium Phosphide Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The main challenge for light-emitting diodes is to increase the efficiency in the green part of the spectrum. Gallium phosphide (GaP) with the normal cubic crystal structure has an indirect band gap, which severely limits the green emission efficiency. Band structure calculations have predicted a direct band gap for wurtzite GaP. Here, we report the fabrication of GaP nanowires with pure hexagonal crystal structure and demonstrate the direct nature of the band gap. We observe strong photoluminescence at a wavelength of 594 nm with short lifetime, typical for a direct band gap. Furthermore, by incorporation of aluminum or arsenic in the GaP nanowires, the emitted wavelength is tuned across an important range of the visible light spectrum (555–690 nm). This approach of crystal structure engineering enables new pathways to tailor materials properties enhancing the functionality. PMID:23464761

  19. The Soviet-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE)

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, G.T.

    1989-01-01

    It is a great pleasure for me to have been asked by Louis Rosen to tell you about the Soviet-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE). This undertaking is a multi-institutional collaboration among scientists from the Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (INR), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and several US universities. Its purpose is to measure the number of low-energy electron neutrinos emitted from the Sun that arrive at this planet. As such, it is an extremely important experiment, touching on fundamental physics issues as well as solar dynamics. In contrast to the strategic overviews, plans, and hopes for international collaboration presented earlier today, SAGE is an ongoing working effort with high hopes of producing the first measurement of the Sun's low-energy neutrino flux. This paper reviews this experiment. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Complexometric determination of gallium with calcein blue as indicator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsheimer, H.N.

    1967-01-01

    A metalfluorechromic indicator, Calcein Blue, has been used for the back-titration of milligram amounts of EDTA in presence of gallium complexes. The indicator was used in conjunction with an ultraviolet titration assembly equipped with a cadmium sulphide detector cell and a microammeter for enhanced end-point detection. The result is a convenient and rapid method with an accuracy approaching 0.1 % and a relative standard deviation of about 0.4% for 10 mg of gallium. ?? 1967.

  1. Generator for ionic gallium-68 based on column chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Neirinckx, Rudi D.; Davis, Michael A.

    1981-01-01

    A physiologically acceptable solution of gallium-68 fluorides, having an activity of 0.1 to 50 millicuries per milliliter of solution is provided. The solution is obtained from a generator comprising germanium-68 hexafluoride bound to a column of an anion exchange resin which forms gallium-68 in situ by eluting the column with an acid solution to form a solution containing .sup.68 Ga-fluorides. The solution then is neutralized prior to administration.

  2. Gallium lung scintigraphy in amiodarone pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.Y.; Botvinick, E.; Dae, M.; Golden, J.; Hattner, R.; Scheinman, M.

    1988-06-01

    We sought to assess the role of gallium-67 lung scintigrams in the evaluation of amiodarone pulmonary toxicity. Images and laboratory studies were evaluated in 54 patients who had chest radiographs and scintigraphic studies during amiodarone treatment of more than one month's duration among 561 patients receiving the medication for refractory arrhythmias. There were 22 patients with pulmonary symptoms and clinical evidence of amiodarone pulmonary toxicity (group 1); 19 patients had other causes for pulmonary symptoms (group 2); and 21 patients were without symptoms or other clinical evidence of pulmonary toxicity (group 3). There was no difference among groups in treatment duration or total amiodarone dose. Symptomatic presentation could not differentiate between group 1 and group 2 patients. However, radiographic findings of isolated pulmonary congestion or a normal radiograph in the presence of symptoms made amiodarone toxicity unlikely, while the appearance of new, dense radiographic infiltrates--often in a nodular distribution--were more frequent among group 1 patients (p less than 0.01). During symptomatic periods, 18 of 22 group 1 patients had abnormal gallium lung uptake, while four revealed more subtle serial changes but there was only one abnormal scintigram among symptomatic group 2 patients. Nonspecific radiographic abnormalities in patients with pulmonary symptoms on amiodarone therapy were rarely attributed to toxicity in the presence of a normal scintigram. One group 3 patient developed scintigraphic abnormalities early during amiodarone treatment, suggesting toxicity in the presence of a normal chest x-ray examination. Comparison of radiographic and scintigraphic studies performed during symptoms with those performed prior to symptom development best indicated the diagnosis, while comparison with later images assessed the efficacy of treatment.

  3. From crystalline to glassy gallium fluoride materials: an NMR study of 69Ga and 71Ga quadrupolar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bureau, B; Silly, G; Buzaré, J Y; Legein, C; Massiot, D

    1999-11-01

    Owing to the implementation of acquisition techniques specific for nuclei with very large quadrupolar interaction (full shifted echo and variable offset cumulative spectra (VOCS)), NMR spectra of 69Ga and 71Ga are obtained in crystallised (PbGaF5, Pb3Ga2F12, Pb9Ga2F24 and CsZnGaF6) and glassy (PbF2-ZnF2-GaF3) gallium fluorides. Simulations of both static (full echo or VOCS) and 15 kHz MAS spectra allow to obtain consistent determinations of isotropic chemical shifts and very large quadrupolar parameters (nuQ up to 14 MHz). In the crystalline compounds whose structures are unknown, the number and the local symmetry of the different gallium sites are tentatively worked out. For the glassy systems, a continuous Czjzek's distribution of the NMR quadrupolar parameters accounts for the particular shape of the NMR spectrum. PMID:10670905

  4. From crystalline to glassy gallium fluoride materials: an NMR study of 69Ga and 71Ga quadrupolar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bureau, B; Silly, G; Buzaré, J Y; Legein, C; Massiot, D

    1999-09-01

    Owing to the implementation of acquisition techniques specific for nuclei with very large quadrupolar interaction (full shifted echo and variable offset cumulative spectra (VOCS)), NMR spectra of 69Ga and 71Ga are obtained in crystallised (PbGaF5, Pb3Ga2F12, Pb9Ga2F24 and CsZnGaF6) and glassy (PbF2-ZnF2-GaF3) gallium fluorides. Simulations of both static (full echo or VOCS) and 15 kHz MAS spectra allow to obtain consistent determinations of isotropic chemical shifts and very large quadrupolar parameters (nu(Q) up to 14 MHz). In the crystalline compounds whose structures are unknown, the number and the local symmetry of the different gallium sites are tentatively worked out. For the glassy systems, a continuous Czjzek's distribution of the NMR quadrupolar parameters accounts for the particular shape of the NMR spectrum. PMID:10499664

  5. On the system cerium-platinum-silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Gribanov, Alexander Grytsiv, Andriy; Royanian, Esmaeil; Rogl, Peter; Bauer, Ernst; Giester, Gerald; Seropegin, Yurii

    2008-11-15

    Phase relations in the ternary system Ce-Pt-Si have been established for the isothermal section at 800 deg. C based on X-ray powder diffraction, metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques on about 120 alloys, which were prepared by various methods employing arc-melting under argon or powder reaction sintering. Nineteen ternary compounds were observed. Atom order in the crystal structures of {tau}{sub 18}-Ce{sub 5}(Pt,Si){sub 4} (Pnma; a=0.77223(3) nm, b=1.53279(8) nm c=0.80054(5) nm), {tau}{sub 3}-Ce{sub 2}Pt{sub 7}Si{sub 4} (Pnma; a=1.96335(8) nm, b=0.40361(4) nm, c=1.12240(6) nm) and {tau}{sub 10}-CePtSi{sub 2} (Cmcm; a=0.42943(2) nm, b=1.67357(5) nm, c=0.42372(2) nm) was determined by direct methods from X-ray single-crystal CCD data and found to be isotypic with the Sm{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type, the Ce{sub 2}Pt{sub 7}Ge{sub 4}-type and the CeNiSi{sub 2}-type, respectively. Rietveld refinements established the atom arrangement in the structures of Pt{sub 3}Si (Pt{sub 3}Ge-type, C2/m, a=0.7724(2) nm, b=0.7767(2) nm, c=0.5390(2) nm, {beta}=133.86(2){sup o}), {tau}{sub 16}-Ce{sub 3}Pt{sub 5}Si (Ce{sub 3}Pd{sub 5}Si-type, Imma, a=0.74025(8) nm, b=1.2951(2) nm, c=0.7508(1) nm) and {tau}{sub 17}-Ce{sub 3}PtSi{sub 3} (Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}-type, Immm, a=0.41065(5) nm, b=0.43221(5) nm, c=1.8375(3) nm). Phase equilibria in Ce-Pt-Si are characterised by the absence of cerium solubility in platinum silicides. Cerium silicides and cerium platinides, however, dissolve significant amounts of the third component, whereby random substitution of the almost equally sized atom species platinum and silicon is reflected in extended homogeneous regions at constant Ce content such as for {tau}{sub 13}-Ce(Pt{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}){sub 2}, {tau}{sub 6}-Ce{sub 2}Pt{sub 3+x}Si{sub 5-x} or {tau}{sub 7}-CePt{sub 2-x}Si{sub 2+x}. - Graphical abstract: Phase relations in the ternary system Ce-Pt-Si have been established for the isothermal

  6. Method of fabricating germanium and gallium arsenide devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzban (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of semiconductor diode fabrication is disclosed which relies on the epitaxial growth of a precisely doped thickness layer of gallium arsenide or germanium on a semi-insulating or intrinsic substrate, respectively, of gallium arsenide or germanium by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The method involves: depositing a layer of doped or undoped silicon dioxide on a germanium or gallium arsenide wafer or substrate, selectively removing the silicon dioxide layer to define one or more surface regions for a device to be fabricated thereon, growing a matched epitaxial layer of doped germanium or gallium arsenide of an appropriate thickness using MBE or MOCVD techniques on both the silicon dioxide layer and the defined one or more regions; and etching the silicon dioxide and the epitaxial material on top of the silicon dioxide to leave a matched epitaxial layer of germanium or gallium arsenide on the germanium or gallium arsenide substrate, respectively, and upon which a field effect device can thereafter be formed.

  7. THERMALLY-INDUCED GALLIUM REMOVAL FROM PLUTONIUM DIOXIDE FOR MOX FUEL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    D. KOLMAN; M. GRIEGO; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    A process for the separation of gallium oxide from plutonium dioxide using a ''dry'' process has been developed. The process uses a reducing gas to generate a volatile gallium specie which is collected downstream. The effects of temperature, duration, flow rate, and sample size have been examined. Results indicate that temperature plays a strong role in the efficacy of gallium removal. Other variables have a much smaller effect on gallium removal efficiency. Gallium removal to approximately 1 ppm (atomic) has been observed. Gallium removal to sub-ppm levels appears feasible based on results-to-date.

  8. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stanley M.

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  9. Allergic reaction to platinum in silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Arepalli, Sambasiva R; Bezabeh, Shewit; Brown, S Lori

    2002-01-01

    Platinum is used as a catalyst in the manufacture of silicone breast implants. Because platinum is recognized as a potent sensitizer in certain circumstances, some have expressed concern that women with silicone breast implants are exposed to platinum, which is causing allergic reactions. We searched the literature for information on the level of platinum in breast implants and reports of sensitization that clearly related to platinum in women with breast implants. We found no published report with convincing evidence that platinum causes allergic reactions in women with breast implants or that women with breast implants are any more likely to have allergic reactions than women without breast implants. PMID:12627791

  10. Gallium Adhesion: Phase Change of Gallium Enables Highly Reversible and Switchable Adhesion (Adv. Mater. 25/2016).

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhou; Lum, Guo Zhan; Song, Sukho; Rich, Steven; Sitti, Metin

    2016-07-01

    M. Sitti and co-workers find that gallium exhibits highly reversible and switchable adhesive characteristics during the liquid-solid phase change. As described on page 5088, this reversible adhesive allows miniature capsule-like robots, which are able to easily pick-and-place objects with irregular geometries and rough surfaces, and thus assemble such objects into a complex structure. The contact interface between gallium and the rough object is illustrated in the magnified image. PMID:27372722

  11. Platinum in Earth surface environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reith, F.; Campbell, S. G.; Ball, A. S.; Pring, A.; Southam, G.

    2014-04-01

    Platinum (Pt) is a rare precious metal that is a strategic commodity for industries in many countries. The demand for Pt has more than doubled in the last 30 years due to its role in the catalytic conversion of CO, hydrocarbons and NOx in modern automobiles. To explore for new Pt deposits, process ores and deal with ecotoxicological effects of Pt mining and usage, the fundamental processes and pathways of Pt dispersion and re-concentration in surface environments need to be understood. Hence, the aim of this review is to develop a synergistic model for the cycling of Pt in Earth surface environments. This is achieved by integrating the geological/(biogeo)chemical literature, which focuses on naturally occurring Pt mobility around ore deposits, with the environmental/ecotoxicological literature dealing with anthropogenic Pt dispersion. In Pt deposits, Pt occurs as sulfide-, telluride- and arsenide, native metal and alloyed to other PGEs and iron (Fe). Increased mining and utilization of Pt combined with the burning of fossil fuels have led to the dispersion of Pt-containing nano- and micro-particles. Hence, soils and sediments in industrialized areas, urban environments and along major roads are now commonly Pt enriched. Platinum minerals, nuggets and anthropogenic particles are transformed by physical and (bio)geochemical processes. Complexation of Pt ions with chloride, thiosulfate, ammonium, cyanide, low- and high molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs and HMWOAs) and siderophores can facilitate Pt mobilization. Iron-oxides, clays, organic matter and (micro)biota are known to sequester Pt-complexes and -particles. Microbes and plants are capable of bioaccumulating and reductively precipitating mobile Pt complexes. Bioaccumulation can lead to toxic effects on plants and animals, including humans. (Bio)mineralization in organic matter-rich sediments can lead to the formation of secondary Pt particles and -grains. Ultimately, Pt is enriched in oceanic sediments

  12. Pre-association of polynuclear platinum anticancer agents on a protein, human serum albumin. Implications for drug design†

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Eva I.; Benedetti, Brad T.; Mangrum, John B.; Oehlsen, Michael J.; Qu, Yun; Farrell, Nicholas P.

    2009-01-01

    The interactions of polynuclear platinum complexes with human serum albumin were studied. The compounds examined were the “non-covalent” analogs of the trinuclear BBR3464 as well as the dinuclear spermidine-bridged compounds differing in only the presence or absence of a central -NH2-+ (BBR3571 and analogs). Thus, closely-related compounds could be compared. Evidence for pre-association, presumably through electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding, was obtained from fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS). In the case of those compounds containing Pt-Cl bonds, further reaction took place presumably through displacement by sulfur nucleophiles. The implications for protein pre-association and plasma stability of polynuclear platinum compounds are discussed. PMID:17992278

  13. Studies of n-butane conversion over silica-supported platinum, platinum-silver and platinum-copper catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Junhua

    1992-06-09

    The present work was undertaken to elucidate effect of adding silver and copper to silica-supported platinum catalyst on the activity and selectivity in the n-butane reactions. At the conditions of this study n-butane underwent both hydrogenolysis and structural isomerization. The catalytic activity and selectivities between hydrogenolysis and isomerization and within hydrogenolysis were measured at temperature varying from 330 C to 370 C. For platinum-silver catalysts, at lower temperatures studied the catalytic activity per surface platinum atom (turnover frequency) remained constant at lower silver content (between 0 at. % and 30 at. %) and decreased with further increased silver loading, suggesting that low- index planes could be dominant in the hydrogenolysis of n-butane. Moreover, increasing silver content resulted in an enhancement of the selectivity of isomerization products relative to hydrogenolysis products. At the higher temperature studied, no suppression in catalytic activity was observed. It is postulated that surface structure could change due to the mobility of surface silver atoms, leading to surface silver atoms forming islands or going to the bulk, and leaving large portions of basal planes exposed with active platinum atoms. It is also suggested that the presence of inert silver atoms results in weakening of the H-surface bond. This results in increased mobility of hydrogen atoms on the surface and hence, higher reactivity with other adsorbed species. For platinum copper catalysts, the mixed ensembles could play an active role in the hydrogenolysis of n-butane.

  14. Biologically Inspired Phosphino Platinum Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Avijita; Helm, Monte L.; Linehan, John C.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-08-01

    Platinum complexes containing phosphino amino acid and amino acid ester ligands, built upon the PPhNR’2 platform, have been synthesized and characterized (PPhNR’2= [1,3-diaza]-5-phenyl phosphacyclohexane, R’=glycine or glycine ester). These complexes were characterized by 31P, 13C, 1H, 195Pt NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The X-ray crystal structure of one of the complexes, [PtCl2(PPhNGlyester 2)2], is also reported. These biologically inspired ligands have potential use in homogeneous catalysis, with special applications in chiral chemistry and water soluble chemistry. These complexes also provide a foundation upon which larger peptides can be attached, to allow the introduction of enzyme-like features onto small molecule catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  15. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. PMID:17796685

  16. Metalloid aluminum and gallium clusters: element modifications on the molecular scale?

    PubMed

    Schnepf, Andreas; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg

    2002-10-01

    As members of the same group in the periodic table, the industrially significant elements aluminum and gallium exhibit strong similarities in the majority of their compounds. In contrast there are significant differences in the structures of the two elemental forms: Aluminum forms a typical closest-packed metallic structure whereas gallium demonstrates a diversity of molecular bonding principles in its seven structural modifications. It can therefore be expected that differences between Al and Ga compounds will arise when, as for the elemental forms, many metal-metal bonds are formed. To synthesize such cluster compounds, we have developed the following synthesis procedure: Starting from gaseous monohalides at around 1000 degrees C, metastable solutions are generated from which the elements ultimately precipitate by means of a disproportionation reaction at room temperature. On the way to the elemental forms, molecular Al and Ga cluster compounds can be obtained by selection of suitable ligands (protecting groups), in which a core of Al or Ga atoms are protected from the formation of the solid element by a ligand shell. Since the arrangement of atoms in such clusters corresponds to that in the elements, we have designated these clusters as metalloid or elementoid. In accordance with the Greek word [see text] (ideal, prototype), the atomic arrangement in metalloid clusters represents the prototypic or ideal atomic arrangement in the elements at the molecular level. The largest clusters of this type contain 77 Al or 84 Ga atoms and have diameters of up to two nanometers. They hold the world record with respect to the naked metal-atom core for structurally characterized metalloid clusters. PMID:12370894

  17. Epirubicin, Cisplatin, and Capecitabine for Primary Platinum-Resistant or Platinum-Refractory Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sayal, Karen; Gounaris, Ioannis; Basu, Bristi; Freeman, Sue; Moyle, Penny; Hosking, Karen; Iddawela, Mahesh; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Abraham, Jean; Brenton, James; Hatcher, Helen; Earl, Helena; Parkinson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Objective Primary platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is an area of unmet medical need. There is limited evidence from small studies that platinum-based combinations can overcome “resistance” in a proportion of patients. We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of platinum-based combination chemotherapy in the platinum-resistant and platinum-refractory setting. Methods Epirubicin, cisplatin, and capecitabine (ECX) combination chemotherapy was used at our institution for the treatment of relapsed EOC. From the institutional database, we identified all patients with primary platinum-refractory or platinum-resistant relapse treated with ECX as second-line therapy between 2001 and 2012. We extracted demographic, clinical, treatment, and toxicity data and outcomes. We used logistic and Cox regression models to identify predictors of response and survival respectively. Results Thirty-four 34 patients (8 refractory, 26 resistant) were treated with ECX. Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) response rate was 45%, median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.4 months, and overall survival (OS) was 10.6 months. Platinum-resistant patients had better outcomes than did platinum-refractory patients (response rate, 54% vs 0%, P = 0.047; PFS 7.2 vs 1.8 months, P < 0.0001; OS 14.4 vs 3 months, P < 0.001). In regression models, time to progression after first-line treatment and platinum-refractory status were the strongest predictors of response and PFS or OS, respectively. Patients with time to progression after first-line treatment longer than 3 months showed PFS and OS of 7.9 and 14.7 months, respectively. Toxicity was manageable, with only 13% of cycles administered at reduced doses. Conclusions Epirubicin, cisplatin, and capecitabine seems to be active in platinum-resistant relapsed EOC with manageable toxicity. Further prospective investigation of platinum-anthracycline combinations is warranted in patients who relapse 3 to 6 months after

  18. Gallium Potentiates the Antibacterial Effect of Gentamicin against Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The reasons why aminoglycosides are bactericidal have not been not fully elucidated, and evidence indicates that the cidal effects are at least partly dependent on iron. We demonstrate that availability of iron markedly affects the susceptibility of the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis strain SCHU S4 to the aminoglycoside gentamicin. Specifically, the intracellular depots of iron were inversely correlated to gentamicin susceptibility, whereas the extracellular iron concentrations were directly correlated to the susceptibility. Further proof of the intimate link between iron availability and antibiotic susceptibility were the findings that a ΔfslA mutant, which is defective for siderophore-dependent uptake of ferric iron, showed enhanced gentamicin susceptibility and that a ΔfeoB mutant, which is defective for uptake of ferrous iron, displayed complete growth arrest in the presence of gentamicin. Based on the aforementioned findings, it was hypothesized that gallium could potentiate the effect of gentamicin, since gallium is sequestered by iron uptake systems. The ferrozine assay demonstrated that the presence of gallium inhibited >70% of the iron uptake. Addition of gentamicin and/or gallium to infected bone marrow-derived macrophages showed that both 100 μM gallium and 10 μg/ml of gentamicin inhibited intracellular growth of SCHU S4 and that the combined treatment acted synergistically. Moreover, treatment of F. tularensis-infected mice with gentamicin and gallium showed an additive effect. Collectively, the data demonstrate that SCHU S4 is dependent on iron to minimize the effects of gentamicin and that gallium, by inhibiting the iron uptake, potentiates the bactericidal effect of gentamicin in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26503658

  19. Application of ultrasound in solvent extraction of nickel and gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Pesic, B.

    1996-07-01

    The effects of ultrasound on the rate of solvent extraction of nickel with Lix 65N and Lix 70, and gallium with Kelex 100 were investigated. These solvent extraction systems are noted by their sluggish nature. Low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound increased the rates of extraction of nickel by factors of four to seven. The ultrasound had no effect on the final chemical equilibrium. Gallium extraction rates were enhanced with the use of ultrasound by as much as a factor of 15. Again, the ultrasound had no effect on extraction equilibrium. For both nickel and gallium, the enhanced rates were attributed to increased interfacial surface area associated with ultrasonically induced cavitation and microdroplet formation. The stability of the microdroplets permitted intermittent application of ultrasound with corresponding decreases in ultrasonic energy requirements. The lowest energy consumption was observed with short (0.25 to 5 s) bursts of high power (41 to 61 W) ultrasonic inputs. The study also provided insight into the factors that affect the complex extraction of gallium from sodium aluminate solutions. The rate controlling step was found to be the dehydration of the gallate ion, Ga(OH)4, and the first complex formation between gallium and Kelex 100. Sodium was found to enhance the extraction rate up to a point, beyond which increased concentration was detrimental. Increasing aluminum concentration was found to slow extraction rates. Modifiers and diluents were shown to markedly affect extraction rates even without ultrasound. Ketone modifiers, particularly 2-undecanone, when used with Kermac 470B or Escaid 200 diluents enhanced extraction rates of gallium to the point that the use of ultrasound provided no additional benefits. The positive effects of ketone modifiers for the solvent extraction of gallium had not been previously reported.

  20. Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activity of Steroidal Thiosemicarbazone Platinum (Pt(II)) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanmin; Kong, Erbin; Gan, Chunfang; Liu, Zhiping; Lin, Qifu; Cui, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Steroidal compounds exhibit particular physiological activities. In this paper, some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes were synthesized by the condensation of steroidal ketones with thiosemicarbazide using estrone, chenodeoxycholic acid, and 7-deoxycholic acid as starting materials and complexation of steroidal thiosesemicarbazones with Pt(II). The complexes were characterized by IR, NMR, and MS, and their antiproliferative activities were evaluated. The results showed that some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes displayed moderate cytotoxicity to HeLa and Bel-7404 cells. Thereinto, complex 6 showed an excellent inhibited selectivity to HeLa cells with an IC50 value of 9.2 μM and SI value of 21.7. At the same time, all compounds were almost inactive to HEK293T (normal kidney epithelial cells). The information obtained from the studies may be useful for the design of novel chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26635511

  1. Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activity of Steroidal Thiosemicarbazone Platinum (Pt(II)) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanmin; Kong, Erbin; Gan, Chunfang; Liu, Zhiping; Lin, Qifu; Cui, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Steroidal compounds exhibit particular physiological activities. In this paper, some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes were synthesized by the condensation of steroidal ketones with thiosemicarbazide using estrone, chenodeoxycholic acid, and 7-deoxycholic acid as starting materials and complexation of steroidal thiosesemicarbazones with Pt(II). The complexes were characterized by IR, NMR, and MS, and their antiproliferative activities were evaluated. The results showed that some steroidal thiosemicarbazones platinum (Pt(II)) complexes displayed moderate cytotoxicity to HeLa and Bel-7404 cells. Thereinto, complex 6 showed an excellent inhibited selectivity to HeLa cells with an IC50 value of 9.2 μM and SI value of 21.7. At the same time, all compounds were almost inactive to HEK293T (normal kidney epithelial cells). The information obtained from the studies may be useful for the design of novel chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26635511

  2. Cytotoxic properties of a new organometallic platinum(II) complex and its gold(I) heterobimetallic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Serratrice, Maria; Maiore, Laura; Zucca, Antonio; Stoccoro, Sergio; Landini, Ida; Mini, Enrico; Massai, Lara; Ferraro, Giarita; Merlino, Antonello; Messori, Luigi; Cinellu, Maria Agostina

    2016-01-14

    A novel platinum(ii) organometallic complex, [Pt(pbi)(Me)(DMSO)], bearing the 2-(2'-pyridyl)-benzimidazole (pbiH) ligand, was synthesized and fully characterized. Interestingly, the reaction of this organometallic platinum(ii) complex with two distinct gold(i) phosphane compounds afforded the corresponding heterobimetallic derivatives with the pbi ligand bridging the two metal centers. The antiproliferative properties in vitro of [Pt(pbi)(Me)(DMSO)] and its gold(i) derivatives as well as those of the known coordination platinum(ii) and palladium(ii) complexes with the same ligand, of the general formula [MCl2(pbiH)], were comparatively evaluated against A2780 cancer cells, either sensitive or resistant to cisplatin. A superior biological activity of the organometallic compound clearly emerged compared to the corresponding platinum(ii) complex; the antiproliferative effects are further enhanced upon attaching the gold(i) triphenylphosphine moiety to the organometallic Pt compound. Remarkably, these novel metal species are able to overcome nearly complete resistance to cisplatin. Significant mechanistic insight into the study compounds was gained after investigating their reactions with a few representative biomolecules by electrospray mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. The obtained results are comprehensively discussed. PMID:26609781

  3. Insights into the structure-activity relationships of chiral 1,2-diaminophenylalkane platinum(II) anticancer derivatives.

    PubMed

    Berger, Gilles; Fusaro, Luca; Luhmer, Michel; Czapla-Masztafiak, Joanna; Lipiec, Ewelina; Szlachetko, Jakub; Kayser, Yves; Fernandes, Daniel L A; Sá, Jacinto; Dufrasne, François; Bombard, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    The structure-activity relationships of chiral 1,2-diaminophenylalkane platinum(II) anticancer derivatives are studied, including interactions with telomeric- and genomic-like DNA sequences, the pKa of their diaqua species, structural properties obtained from DFT calculations and resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy. The binding modes of the compounds to telomeric sequences were elucidated, showing no major differences with conventional cis-platinum(II) complexes like cisplatin, supporting that the cis-square planar geometry governs the binding of small Pt(II) complexes to G4 structures. Double-stranded DNA platination kinetics and acid-base constants of the diaqua species of the compounds were measured and compared, highlighting a strong steric dependence of the DNA-binding kinetics, but independent to stereoisomerism. Structural features of the compounds are discussed on the basis of dispersion-corrected DFT, showing that the most active series presents conformers for which the platinum atom is well devoid of steric hindrance. If reactivity indices derived from conceptual DFT do not show evidences for different reactivity between the compounds, RXES experiments provide new insight into the availability of platinum orbitals for binding to nucleophiles. PMID:25982100

  4. Gallium based low-interaction anions

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne A.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides: a composition of the formula M.sup.+x (Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.-).sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; a composition of the formula (R).sub.x Q.sup.+ Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.- where Q is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus and oxygen, each R is a ligand selected from the group consisting of alkyl, aryl, and hydrogen, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 3 and 4 depending upon Q, and each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; an ionic polymerization catalyst composition including an active cationic portion and a gallium based weakly coordinating anion; and bridged anion species of the formula M.sup.+x.sub.y [X(Ga(Y.sub.3).sub.z ].sup.-y.sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, X is a bridging group between two gallium atoms, y is an integer selected from the group consisting 1 and 2, z is an integer of at least 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide.

  5. Surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Longoni, Giuliano; Zacchini, Stefano; Zarra, Salvatore

    2012-06-01

    Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters.Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters. CCDC 867747 and 867748. For crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30400g

  6. Autonomous movement of platinum-loaded stomatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Daniela A; Nolte, Roeland J M; van Hest, Jan C M

    2012-04-01

    Polymer stomatocytes are bowl-shaped structures of nanosize dimensions formed by the controlled deformation of polymer vesicles. The stable nanocavity and strict control of the opening are ideal for the physical entrapment of nanoparticles which, when catalytically active, can turn the stomatocyte morphology into a nanoreactor. Herein we report an approach to generate autonomous movement of the polymer stomatocytes by selectively entrapping catalytically active platinum nanoparticles within their nanocavities and subsequently using catalysis as a driving force for movement. Hydrogen peroxide is free to access the inner stomatocyte cavity, where it is decomposed by the active catalyst (the entrapped platinum nanoparticles) into oxygen and water. This generates a rapid discharge, which induces thrust and directional movement. The design of the platinum-loaded stomatocytes resembles a miniature monopropellant rocket engine, in which the controlled opening of the stomatocytes directs the expulsion of the decomposition products away from the reaction chamber (inner stomatocyte cavity). PMID:22437710

  7. Further studies on the synthesis of finely divided platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Turkevich, J.; Miner, R.S. Jr.; Babenkova, L.

    1986-09-25

    An investigation was made of the effect of pH and of starting platinum complexes on the synthesis of monodisperse platinum particles by citrate reduction. The antitumor drug cis-platin does not readily produce colloidal particles, and these lack activity for hydrogen peroxide decomposition. The growth of platinum particles by both citrate reduction and hydrogen gas treatment was also studied.

  8. Platinum Publications, January 1–March 31, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  9. Platinum Publications, October 1–29, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  10. Platinum Publications, July 31–September 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  11. Platinum Publications, June 26–July 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  12. Platinum Publications, October 30–December 31, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  13. Platinum Publications, November 27, 2014 – February 26, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  14. Platinum Publications, October 30 – November 26, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  15. Platinum Publications, February 27 – March 26, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  16. Platinum Publications as of May 29, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  17. Platinum Publications as of June 25, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  18. Platinum Publications as of March 6, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  19. Platinum Publications as of September 25, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  20. Platinum Publications, March 27 – April 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  1. Platinum Publications, February 27 – March 26, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  2. Platinum Publications, October 30 – November 26, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  3. Platinum Publications, July 31–September 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  4. Platinum Publications, June 26–July 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  5. Platinum Publications, July 1–July 28, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  6. Platinum Publications, September 26 – October 29, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  7. Platinum Publications as of April 30, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  8. Platinum Publications, October 30–December 31, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  9. Platinum Publications, September 26 – October 29, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  10. Platinum Publications, April 1–May 27, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  11. Platinum Publications, January 1–March 31, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  12. Platinum Publications as of December 3, 2013 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  13. Mineral resource of the month: platinum-group metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hilliard, Henry

    2003-01-01

    The precious metals commonly referred to as platinum-group metals (PGM) include iridium, osmium, palladium, platinum, rhodium and ruthenium. PGM are among the rarest of elements, and their market values — particularly for palladium, platinum and rhodium — are the highest of all precious metals.

  14. Platinum Publications, June 1–June 30, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  15. Platinum Publications, May 1 – June 25, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  16. Preliminary Spectroscopic Measurements for a Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Glumac, Nick G.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    As a propellant option for electromagnetic thrusters, liquid ,gallium appears to have several advantages relative to other propellants. The merits of using gallium in an electromagnetic thruster (EMT) are discussed and estimates of discharge current levels and mass flow rates yielding efficient operation are given. The gallium atomic weight of 70 predicts high efficiency in the 1500-2000 s specific impulse range, making it ideal for higher-thrust, near-Earth missions. A spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range is used to determine which species are present in the plasma and estimate electron temperature. The spectra show that neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium species are present in a 20 J, 1.8 kA (peak) are discharge. With graphite present on the insulator to facilitate breakdown, singly and doubly ionized carbon atoms are also present, and emission is observed from molecular carbon (CZ) radicals. A determination of the electron temperature was attempted using relative emission line data, and while the spatially and temporally averaged, spectra don't fit well to single temperatures, the data and presence of doubly ionized gallium are consistent with distributions in the 1-3 eV range.

  17. Gallium-68 PSMA uptake in adrenal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Law, W Phillip; Fiumara, Frank; Fong, William; Miles, Kenneth A

    2016-08-01

    Gallium-68 (Ga-68) labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged as a promising tool for staging of prostate cancer and restaging of disease in recurrence or biochemical failure after definitive treatment of prostate cancer. Ga-68 PSMA PET produces high target-to-background images of prostate cancer and its metastases which are reflective of the significant overexpression of PSMA in these cells and greatly facilitates tumour detection. However, relatively little is known about the PSMA expression of benign neoplasms and non-prostate epithelial malignancies. This is a case report of PSMA uptake in an adrenal adenoma incidentally discovered on PET performed for restaging of biochemically suspected prostate cancer recurrence. With the increasing use of PSMA PET in the management of prostate cancer - and the not infrequent occurrence of adrenal adenomas - the appearance of low- to moderate-grade PSMA uptake in adrenal adenomas should be one with which reporting clinicians are familiar. PMID:26394552

  18. Investigation on gallium ions impacting monolayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xin; Zhao, Haiyan Yan, Dong; Pei, Jiayun

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, the physical phenomena of gallium (Ga{sup +}) ion impacting monolayer graphene in the nanosculpting process are investigated experimentally, and the mechanisms are explained by using Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Firstly, the MC method is employed to clarify the phenomena happened to the monolayer graphene target under Ga{sup +} ion irradiation. It is found that substrate has strong influence on the damage mode of graphene. The mean sputtering yield of graphene under 30 keV Ga{sup +} ion irradiation is 1.77 and the least ion dose to completely remove carbon atoms in graphene is 21.6 ion/nm{sup 2}. Afterwards, the focused ion beam over 21.6 ion/nm{sup 2} is used for the irradiation on a monolayer graphene supported by SiO2 experimentally, resulting in the nanostructures, i.e., nanodot and nanowire array on the graphene. The performances of the nanostructures are characterized by atomic force microscopy and Raman spectrum. A plasma plume shielding model is put forward to explain the nanosculpting results of graphene under different irradiation parameters. In addition, two damage mechanisms are found existing in the fabrication process of the nanostructures by using empirical MD simulations. The results can help us open the possibilities for better control of nanocarbon devices.

  19. Gallium-based avalanche photodiode optical crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazej, Josef; Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel; Sopko, Bruno; Chren, Dominik

    2006-11-01

    Solid-state single photon detectors based on avalanche photodiode are getting more attention in various areas of applied physics: optical sensors, quantum key distribution, optical ranging and Lidar, time-resolved spectroscopy, X-ray laser diagnostics, and turbid media imaging. Avalanche photodiodes specifically designed for single photon counting semiconductor avalanche structures have been developed on the basis of various materials: Si, Ge, GaP, GaAsP, and InGaP/InGaAs at the Czech Technical University in Prague during the last 20 years. They have been tailored for numerous applications. Trends in demand are focused on detection array construction recently. Even extremely small arrays containing a few cells are of great importance for users. Electrical crosstalk between individual gating and quenching circuits and optical crosstalk between individual detecting cells are serious limitation for array design and performance. Optical crosstalk is caused by the parasitic light emission of the avalanche which accompanies the photon detection process. We have studied in detail the optical emission of the avalanche photon counting structure in the silicon- and gallium-based photodiodes. The timing properties and spectral distribution of the emitted light have been measured for different operating conditions to quantify optical crosstalk. We conclude that optical crosstalk is an inherent property of avalanche photodiode operated in Geiger mode. The only way to minimize optical crosstalk in avalanche photodiode array is to build active quenching circuit with minimum response time.

  20. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  1. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  2. Pure silver ohmic contacts to N- and P- type gallium arsenide materials

    DOEpatents

    Hogan, Stephen J.

    1986-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved process for manufacturing gallium arsenide semiconductor devices having as its components an n-type gallium arsenide substrate layer and a p-type gallium arsenide diffused layer. The improved process comprises forming a pure silver ohmic contact to both the diffused layer and the substrate layer, wherein the n-type layer comprises a substantially low doping carrier concentration.

  3. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  4. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  5. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  6. Process for forming pure silver ohmic contacts to N- and P-type gallium arsenide materials

    DOEpatents

    Hogan, S.J.

    1983-03-13

    Disclosed is an improved process for manufacturing gallium arsenide semiconductor devices having as its components a n-type gallium arsenide substrate layer and a p-type gallium arsenide diffused layer. The improved process comprises forming a pure silver ohmic contact to both the diffuse layer and the substrate layer wherein the n-type layer comprises a substantially low doping carrier concentration.

  7. Simulation studies on the evolution of gallium nitride on a liquid gallium surface under plasma bombardment.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, M R; Flauta, R E; Wada, M

    2008-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to study the formation of gallium-nitride (GaN) layer on liquid gallium (Ga) sputtering target immersed in nitrogen (N(2)) plasma. In the simulation model, N ions were assumed to possess energy equal to the bias voltage applied to the sputtering target with respect to the plasma. The results showed the surface morphology of GaN changed from a relatively smooth GaN on Ga surface at 50 eV N ion energy to a rough surface with GaN dendrites on liquid Ga at 500 eV ion energy. Further increase in N ion energy up to 1 keV resulted in smaller density of GaN dendrites on surface. Increasing surface coverage of Ga by GaN substantially reduced the sputtering yield of Ga from the target. These simulation results were correlated with previously reported experimental observations on liquid Ga surface immersed in the nitrogen plasma of a plasma-sputter-type ion source. PMID:18315225

  8. Short channel effects on gallium nitride/gallium oxide nanowire transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.-W.; Yeh, P.-C.; Wang, S.-L.; Wu, Y.-R.; Mao, M.-H.; Lin, H.-H.; Peng, L.-H.

    2012-10-01

    Gallium nitride/gallium oxide GaN/Ga2O3 nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors are shown to operate at an average electron velocity of ˜1.24 × 107 cm/s and threshold-voltage roll-off of -0.2 V as the transistor gate length Lg reduced from 500 to 50 nm. Improvement of saturation current to 120 μA and unity current/power-gain cut-off frequency to 150/180 GHz is observed on Lg = 50 nm devices. Our study reveals the advantages of using (i) polarization-induced positive charges and high-k dielectric at the {11¯01¯}GaN/{002}Ga2O3 interface to provide carrier confinement and to shield the drain field, and (ii) polarization-induced negative charges at the (0001)GaN/sapphire interface to form a back-barrier to suppress leakage and improve the short-channel transport properties.

  9. Measuring Nanoscale Heat Transfer for Gold-(Gallium Oxide)-Gallium Nitride Interfaces as a Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwejkowski, Chester; Sun, Kai; Constantin, Costel; Giri, Ashutosh; Saltonstall, Christopher; Hopkins, Patrick; NanoSynCh Team; Exsite Team

    2014-03-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is considered the most important semiconductor after the discovery of Silicon. Understanding the properties of GaN is imperative in determining the utility and applicability of this class of materials to devices. We present results of time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) measurements as a function of surface root mean square (RMS) roughness. We used commercially available 5mm x 5mm, single-side polished GaN (3-7 μm)/Sapphire (430 μm) substrates that have a Wurtzite crystal structure and are slightly n-type doped. The GaN substrates were annealed in the open atmosphere for 10 minutes (900-1000 °C). This high-temperature treatment produced RMS values from 1-60 nm and growth of gallium oxide (GaO) as measured with an atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy respectively. A gold film (80nm) was deposited on the GaN surface using electron beam physical vapor deposition which was verified using ellipsometry and profilometry. The TDTR measurements suggest that the thermal conductivity decays exponentially with RMS roughness and that there is a minimum value for thermal boundary conductance at a roughness of 15nm.

  10. Combination of Genistein and Cisplatin with Two Designed Monofunctional Platinum Agents in Human Ovarian Tumour Models.

    PubMed

    Arzuman, Laila; Beale, Philip; Proschogo, Nick; Yu, Jun Q; Huq, Fazlul

    2015-11-01

    A great amount of research effort has been directed at platinum compounds that bind with DNA differently from cisplatin with the idea that the difference may translate into an altered spectrum of activity. Recently research has also been directed at applying combinations of platinum agents with tumour-active phytochemicals with the aim of providing a means of overcoming platinum resistance in ovarian cancer. Herein we report the synthesis of monofunctional platinum tris(3-hydroxypyridine)chloroplatinum(II) chloride (coded as LH1) and tris(imidazole)chloroplatinum(II) chloride (coded as LH2), and their activity alone and in combination with genistein and cisplatin against human ovarian A2780, cisplatin-resistant A2780(cisR) and picoplatin-resistant A2780(ZD0473R) cancer cell lines. Although both LH1 and LH2 were found to be less active than cisplatin against the tumour models, they produced synergistic outcomes in combination with genistein. Both the level of cellular accumulation of Pt and of Pt-DNA binding resulting from the combination were greater in the A2780(cisR) cell line than in the parental A2780 cell line, irrespective of the sequence of administration. Absence of association between activity of LH1 and LH2 and the level of Pt-DNA binding indicates that the cell death induced by LH1 and LH2 may not be limited to the effect of their binding with DNA. PMID:26504026

  11. Cell membrane penetration and mitochondrial targeting by platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Torrano, Adriano A; Herrmann, Rudolf; Strobel, Claudia; Rennhak, Markus; Engelke, Hanna; Reller, Armin; Hilger, Ingrid; Wixforth, Achim; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    In this work we investigate the interaction between endothelial cells and nanoparticles emitted by catalytic converters. Although catalyst-derived particles are recognized as growing burden added to environmental pollution, very little is known about their health impact. We use platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles as model compounds for the actual emitted particles and focus on their fast uptake and association with mitochondria, the cell's powerhouse. Using live-cell imaging and electron microscopy we clearly show that 46 nm platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles can rapidly penetrate cell membranes and reach the cytosol. Moreover, if suitably targeted, these particles are able to selectively attach to mitochondria. These results are complemented by cytotoxicity assays, thus providing insights into the biological effects of these particles on cells. Interestingly, no permanent membrane disruption or any other significant adverse effects on cells were observed. The unusual uptake behavior observed for 46 nm nanoparticles was not observed for equivalent but larger 143 nm and 285 nm platinum-decorated particles. Our results demonstrate a remarkable particle size effect in which particles smaller than ∼50-100 nm escape the usual endocytic pathway and translocate directly into the cytosol, while particles larger than ∼150 nm are internalized by conventional endocytosis. Since the small particles are able to bypass endocytosis they could be explored as drug and gene delivery vehicles. Platinum-decorated nanoparticles are therefore highly interesting in the fields of nanotoxicology and nanomedicine. PMID:27341699

  12. In vitro toxicity of gallium arsenide in alveolar macrophages evaluated by magnetometry, cytochemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Okada, M; Karube, H; Niitsuya, M; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1999-12-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a chemical compound of gallium and arsenic, causes various toxic effects including pulmonary diseases in animals. Since the toxicity is not completely investigated, GaAs has been used in workplaces as the material of various semiconductor products. The present study was conducted to clarify the toxicity of GaAs particles in the alveolar macrophages of hamsters using magnetometry, enzyme release assays and morphological examinations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from hamsters by tracheobronchial lavage and adhered to the disks in the bottom of wells were exposed to ferrosoferric oxide and GaAs particles. Ferrosoferric oxide particles were magnetized externally and the remanent magnetic field was measured. Relaxation, a fast decline of the remanent magnetic fields radiated from the alveolar macrophages, was delayed and decay constants were decreased dose-dependently due to exposure to GaAs. Because the relaxation is thought to be associated with cytoskeleton, the exposure of GaAs may have impaired the motor function of them. Enzyme release assay and morphological findings indicated the damage to the macrophages. Thus the cytotoxicity causes cytostructural changes and cell death. According to DNA electrophoresis and the TUNEL method, necrotic changes occur more frequently than apoptotic changes. PMID:10739163

  13. Nonenzymatic glucose detection using mesoporous platinum.

    PubMed

    Park, Sejin; Chung, Taek Dong; Kim, Hee Chan

    2003-07-01

    Roughness of nanoscopic dimensions can be used to selectively enhance the faradaic current of a sluggish reaction. Using this principle, we constructed mesoporous structures on the surfaces of pure platinum electrodes responding even more sensitively to glucose than to common interfering species, such as L-ascorbic acid and 4-acetamidophenol. Good sensitivities, as high as 9.6 microA cm(-2) mM(-1), were reproducibly observed in the presence of high concentration of chloride ion. The selectivities, sensitivities, and stabilities determined experimentally have demonstrated the potential of mesoporous platinum as a novel candidate for nonenzymatic glucose sensors. PMID:12964749

  14. Antibacterial effect of gallium and silver on Pseudomonas aeruginosa treated with gallium-silver-phosphate-based glasses.

    PubMed

    Valappil, Sabeel P; Higham, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Gallium and silver incorporated phosphate-based glasses were evaluated for antibacterial effect on the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a leading cause of opportunistic infections. The glasses were produced by conventional melt quenching methods at 1100°C for 1 h. Glass degradation studies were conducted by weight loss method. Disc diffusion assay and cell viability assay displayed statistically significant (p ≤ 0.0005) effect on P. aeruginosa growth which increased with decreasing calcium content in the glasses. The gallium ion release rates (1.83, 0.69 and 0.48 ppm·h(-1)) and silver ion release rates (2.97, 2.84 and 2.47 ppm·h(-1)) were found to account for this variation. Constant depth film fermentor was used to evaluate the anti-biofilm properties of the glasses. Both gallium and silver in the glass contributed to biofilm growth inhibitory effect on P. aeruginosa (up to 2.68 reduction in log 10 values of the viable counts compared with controls). The glasses were found to deliver gallium and silver in a controlled way and exerted cumulative antibacterial action on planktonic and biofilm growth of P. aeruginosa. The antibacterial, especially anti-biofilm, properties of the gallium and silver incorporated phosphate-based glasses make them a potential candidate to combat infections caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:24840197

  15. Effect of bronchoscopy on localization of gallium-67 citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, B.A.; Cooper, K.R.; Fratkin, M.J.

    1983-03-01

    Bronchoscopy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and 67Ga lung scans are frequently performed for diagnosis or follow-up of patients with sarcoidosis, interstitial pneumonitis, lymphoma, infections, and bronchogenic carcinoma. Because many patients undergo all 3 of these procedures, it is important to determine what effects bronchoscopy and/or BAL may have on gallium imaging. Because 67Ga accumulates in neutrophils at the site of an inflammatory lesion as well as in those circulating in the vascular compartment, it seems reasonable to postulate that bronchoscopy could cause migration of labeled neutrophils into the lung, resulting in false positive gallium scans. To test this hypothesis, we studied 5 patients with varying chronologic relationships of 67Ga injection, gallium scanning, and bronchoscopy with BAL. In all patients, the repeat 67Ga lung scans remained normal or showed no change after bronchoscopy and BAL. We conclude that bronchoscopy with or without BAL does not cause increased 67Ga uptake by the lung.

  16. The Soviet-American gallium experiment at Baksan

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, A. I.; Abdurashitov, D. N.; Anosov, O. L.; Danshin, S. N.; Eroshkina, L. A.; Faizov, E. L.; Gavrin, V. N.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Knodel, T. V.; Knyshenko, I. I.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Mezentseva, S. A.; Mirmov, I. N.; Ostrinsky, A. I.; Petukhov, V. V; Pshukov, A. M.; Revzin, N. Ye; Shikhin, A. A.; Slyusareva, Ye. D.; Timofeyev, P. V.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Vermul, V. M.; Yantz, V. E.; Zakharov, Yu.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Zhandarov, V. I.

    1990-01-01

    A gallium solar neutrino detector is sensitive to the full range of the solar neutrino spectrum, including the low-energy neutrinos from the fundamental proton-proton fusion reaction. If neutrino oscillations in the solar interior are responsible for the suppressed {sup 8}B flux measured by the Homestake {sup 37}Cl experiment and the Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector, then a comparison of the gallium, chlorine, and water results may make possible a determination of the neutrino mass difference and mixing angle. A 30-ton gallium detector is currently operating in the Baksan laboratory in the Soviet Union, with a ratio of expected solar signal to measured background (during the first one to two {sup 71}Ge half lives) of approximately one. 28 refs.

  17. Liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction studies in ISTTOK tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, R. B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.; Alekseyv, A.

    2009-06-01

    Liquid metals have been pointed out as a suitable solution to solve problems related to the use of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing, simultaneously, an efficient heat exhaustion process from fusion devices. The most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state temperature range when compared with gallium. To explore further this property, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying liquid gallium jet with the plasma. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with this jet without noticeable discharge degradation and no severe effect on the main plasma parameters or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. Additionally the response of an infrared sensor, intended to measure the jet surface temperature increase during its interaction with the plasma, has been studied. The jet power extraction capability is extrapolated from the heat flux profiles measured in ISTTOK plasmas.

  18. Platinum particle size and support effects in NO(x) mediated carbon oxidation over platinum catalysts.

    PubMed

    Villani, Kenneth; Vermandel, Walter; Smets, Koen; Liang, Duoduo; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Martens, Johan A

    2006-04-15

    Platinum metal was dispersed on microporous, mesoporous, and nonporous support materials including the zeolites Na-Y, Ba-Y, Ferrierite, ZSM-22, ETS-10, and AIPO-11, alumina, and titania. The oxidation of carbon black loosely mixed with catalyst powder was monitored gravimetrically in a gas stream containing nitric oxide, oxygen, and water. The carbon oxidation activity of the catalysts was found to be uniquely related to the Pt dispersion and little influenced by support type. The optimum dispersion is around 3-4% corresponding to relatively large Pt particle sizes of 20-40 nm. The carbon oxidation activity reflects the NO oxidation activity of the platinum catalyst, which reaches an optimum in the 20-40 nm Pt particle size range. The lowest carbon oxidation temperatures were achieved with platinum loaded ZSM-22 and AIPO-11 zeolite crystallites bearing platinum of optimum dispersion on their external surfaces. PMID:16683615

  19. Platinum recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hilliard, Henry E.

    2001-01-01

    In the United States, catalytic converters are the major source of secondary platinum for recycling. Other sources of platinum scrap include reforming and chemical process catalysts. The glass industry is a small but significant source of platinum scrap. In North America, it has been estimated that in 1998 more than 20,000 kilograms per year of platinum-group metals from automobile catalysts were available for recycling. In 1998, an estimated 7,690 kilograms of platinum were recycled in the United States. U.S. recycling efficiency was calculated to have been 76 percent in 1998; the recycling rate was estimated at 16 percent.

  20. Chronology of platinum accumulation in an urban lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, S.; Hermond, H. F.; Ravizza, G.; Morrison, G. M.

    2003-05-01

    Concern has recently emerged over the release of platinum from automobile catalysts and increasing environmental concentrations. The history of platinum deposition is followed through the natural incorporation of pollutants into the sediment record of the Upper Mystic Lake. Platinum was determined by ICP-MS in dated sediments. Platinum concentration remained relatively constant until the mid-1970s when Pt-containing catalysts were introduced in the US. After the introduction of catalysts, platinum concentration increased significantly, with an average deposition rate of 5.4 μg m^{-2} year^{-1} after 1990.

  1. Use of platinum electrodes for the electrochemical detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Platinum electrodes with surface area ratios of four to one were used to detect and enumerate a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. Linear relationships were established between inoculum size and detection time. End points for platinum electrodes were similar to those obtained with a platinum-reference electrode combination. Shape of the overall response curves and length of detection times for gram-positive organisms were markedly different than those for the majority of gram-negative species. Platinum electrodes are better than the platinum-reference electrode combination because of cost, ease of handling, and clearer definition of the end point.

  2. Interaction of a Liquid Gallium Jet with ISTTOK Edge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, R. B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.

    2008-04-01

    The use of liquid metals as plasma facing components in tokamaks has recently experienced a renewed interest stimulated by their advantages in the development of a fusion reactor. Liquid metals have been proposed to solve problems related to the erosion and neutronic activation of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing an efficient heat exhaust from fusion devices. Presently the most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state range when compared, for example, with gallium that has essentially better thermal properties and lower vapor pressure. To explore further these properties, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying, fully formed liquid gallium jet with the plasma. The interacting, 2.3 mm diameter, jet is generated by hydrostatic pressure and has a 2.5 m/s flow velocity. The liquid metal injector has been build to allow the positioning of the jet inside the tokamak chamber, within a 13 mm range. This paper presents the first obtained experimental results concerning the liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction. A stable jet has been obtained, which was not noticeably affected by the magnetic field transients. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with the gallium jet without degradation of the discharge or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. This observation is supported by spectroscopic measurements showing that gallium radiation is limited to the region around the jet. Furthermore, the power deposited on the jet has been evaluated at different radial locations and the surface temperature increase estimated.

  3. Novel platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes of thiosemicarbazones derived from 5-substitutedthiophene-2-carboxaldehydes and their antiviral and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Karaküçük-İyidoğan, Ayşegül; Taşdemir, Demet; Oruç-Emre, Emine Elçin; Balzarini, Jan

    2011-11-01

    A series of thiosemicarbazones and their platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes have been synthesized. The chemical structures of ligands and their complexes were characterized by UV-Vis, IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, MS spectra, elemental analysis and TGA. The antiviral and cytotoxic activities of all compounds have been tested. Results of broad antiviral evaluation showed that none of the compounds evaluated endowed with anti-DNA or -RNA virus activity at subtoxic concentrations except for the palladium complex 1b. This compound exhibited slightly selective inhibition against cytomegalovirus. The platinum complex 4a exhibited the best cytostatic activities against human cervix carcinoma. Ligands 2, 4 and 5 showed cytostatic potential. The palladium complexes were in general less cytostatic than the corresponding platinum complexes or unliganded congeners. PMID:21993152

  4. On-chip superconductivity via gallium overdoping of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Skrotzki, R.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Heera, V.; Voelskow, M.; Muecklich, A.; Schmidt, B.; Skorupa, W.; Helm, M.; Wosnitza, J.; Fiedler, J.; Gobsch, G.

    2010-11-08

    We report on superconducting properties of gallium-enriched silicon layers in commercial (100) oriented silicon wafers. Ion implantation and subsequent rapid thermal annealing have been applied for realizing gallium precipitation beneath a silicon-dioxide cover layer. Depending on the preparation parameters, we observe a sharp drop to zero resistance at 7 K. The critical-field anisotropy proofs the thin-film character of superconductivity. In addition, out-of-plane critical fields of above 9 T and critical current densities exceeding 2 kA/cm{sup 2} promote these structures to be possible playgrounds for future microelectronic technology.

  5. Absence of gallium-67 avidity in diffuse pulmonary calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Foster, R.W.

    1985-09-01

    Diffuse pulmonary uptake by bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals has been reported previously but, in the same patient, would pulmonary uptake of Ga-67 citrate yield clinically meaningful results. A patient with hypercalcemia and renal failure in whom bone scintigraphy demonstrated striking diffuse bilateral pulmonary uptake, but subsequent gallium imaging demonstrated no evidence of pulmonary uptake greater than body background, is discussed. We conclude that pulmonary uptake of gallium cannot be attributed to calcium deposition and should carry the same clinical significance in regard to inflammatory and malignant lesions as would be assigned to patients without pulmonary calcific deposits.

  6. Pade spectroscopy of structural correlation functions: Application to liquid gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Klumov, B. A.; Ryltsev, R. E.; Khusnutdinoff, R. M.; Mokshin, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    We propose the new method of fluid structure investigation based on numerical analytic continuation of structural correlation functions with Pade approximants. The method particularly allows extracting hidden structural features of disordered condensed matter systems from experimental diffraction data. The method has been applied to investigate the local order of liquid gallium, which has a non-trivial structure in both the liquid and solid states. Processing the correlation functions obtained from molecular dynamic simulations, we show the method proposed reveals non-trivial structural features of liquid gallium such as the spectrum of length-scales and the existence of different types of local clusters in the liquid.

  7. Multiplane gallium tomography in assessment of occupational chest diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Cordasco, E.M.; O'Donnell, J.; MacIntyre, W.; Demeter, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Eren, M.; McMahon, W.; Burns, D.; Feiglin, D.H. )

    1990-01-01

    Gallium-67 scintigraphy is helpful in the evaluation of inflammatory, respiratory diseases. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of radioisotope distribution in the body. The addition of SPECT to gallium-67 scanning in 27 patients demonstrated an improvement in the sensitivity for detecting the presence and extent of interstitial occupational lung disease. This technique may provide earlier detection of parenchymal lung changes than can the chest x-ray and planar scanning in some patients with asbestosis. Findings in six patients with asbestosis are reported.

  8. First results from the Soviet-American Gallium Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, A.I.; Abdurashitov, D.N.; Anosov, O.L.; Eroshkina, L.A.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Knodel, T.V.; Knyshenko, I.I.; Kornoukhov, V.N.; Mezentseva, S.A.; Mirmov, I.N.; Ostrinsky, A.I.; Petukhov, V.V.; Pshukov, A.M.; Revzin, N.Y.; Shikhin, A.A.; Timofeyev, P.V.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Vermul, V.M.; Zakharov, Y.; Zatsepin, G.T.; Zhandarov, V.I. . Inst. Yadernykh Issledovanij); Bowl

    1990-01-01

    The Soviet-American Gallium Experiment is the first experiment able to measure the dominant flux of low energy p-p solar neutrinos. Four extractions made during January to May 1990 from 30 tons of gallium have been counted and indicate that the flux is consistent with 0 SNU and is less than 72 SNU (68% CL) and less than 138 SNU (95% CL). This is to be compared with the flux of 132 SNU predicted by the Standard Solar Model. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Extremely-efficient, miniaturized, long-lived alpha-voltaic power source using liquid gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source converts .alpha.-particle energy to electricity for use in electrical systems. Liquid gallium or other liquid medium is subjected to .alpha.-particle emissions. Electrons are freed by collision from neutral gallium atoms to provide gallium ions. The electrons migrate to a cathode while the gallium ions migrate to an anode. A current and/or voltage difference then arises between the cathode and anode because of the work function difference of the cathode and anode. Gallium atoms are regenerated by the receiving of electrons from the anode enabling the generation of additional electrons from additional .alpha.-particle collisions.

  10. Gallium arsenide processing for gate array logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Eric D.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a reliable and reproducible GaAs process was initiated for applications in gate array logic. Gallium Arsenide is an extremely important material for high speed electronic applications in both digital and analog circuits since its electron mobility is 3 to 5 times that of silicon, this allows for faster switching times for devices fabricated with it. Unfortunately GaAs is an extremely difficult material to process with respect to silicon and since it includes the arsenic component GaAs can be quite dangerous (toxic) especially during some heating steps. The first stage of the research was directed at developing a simple process to produce GaAs MESFETs. The MESFET (MEtal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) is the most useful, practical and simple active device which can be fabricated in GaAs. It utilizes an ohmic source and drain contact separated by a Schottky gate. The gate width is typically a few microns. Several process steps were required to produce a good working device including ion implantation, photolithography, thermal annealing, and metal deposition. A process was designed to reduce the total number of steps to a minimum so as to reduce possible errors. The first run produced no good devices. The problem occurred during an aluminum etch step while defining the gate contacts. It was found that the chemical etchant attacked the GaAs causing trenching and subsequent severing of the active gate region from the rest of the device. Thus all devices appeared as open circuits. This problem is being corrected and since it was the last step in the process correction should be successful. The second planned stage involves the circuit assembly of the discrete MESFETs into logic gates for test and analysis. Finally the third stage is to incorporate the designed process with the tested circuit in a layout that would produce the gate array as a GaAs integrated circuit.

  11. Fraction of platinum surface covered with carbonaceous species following hydrogenolysis of hexane on platinum alumina catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera Latas, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    Catalytic naphtha reforming plays a major role in satisfying the demand for unleaded, high octane gasoline. Hydrogen containing carbonaceous deposits (coke) accumulation on the surface of the catalysts during reforming operation. This study investigated the following question: what is the fraction of the platinum surface covered with the deposits following a typical reforming reaction. These observations prompted us to prepare a platinum-alumina catalyst with a high metal content (5%) to enhance the sensitivity of experiments designed to examine the platinum surface following hexane hydrogenolysis. The reaction was selected because it is a good model reaction for catalytic reforming and it was also studied by the Somorjai group in the higher temperature range of their work. Hydrogenolysis of hexane was carried out in a flow system for 3 h at 713 K, at atmospheric pressure, and around 0.1 total conversion. The catalyst was cooled down to room temperature in the reactant mixture, and the fraction of surface platinum atoms exposed was measured in situ by four independent methods: titration of adsorbed oxygen by dihydrogen, chemisorption of carbon monoxide, infra-red spectroscopy of carbon monoxide bonded to platinum, and rate of ethylene hydrogenation. Independent gravimetric studies showed that coke deposits of around 1% by weight were formed on the same catalyst during hydrogenolysis of hexane under similar conditions. Each of the four methods indicate that approximately 50% of the platinum surface remains exposed under the conditions.

  12. Skin Sensitizing Potency of Halogenated Platinum Salts.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between occupational exposure to halogenated platinum (Pt) salts and Pt-specific allergic sensitization is well-established. Although human case reports and clinical studies demonstrate that Pt salts are potent skin sensitizers, no studies have been published tha...

  13. Nanoscale platinum printing on insulating substrates.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, C D; Higgins, M J; Sullivan, R P; Jamali, S S; Moulton, S E; Wallace, G G

    2013-12-20

    The deposition of noble metals on soft and/or flexible substrates is vital for several emerging applications including flexible electronics and the fabrication of soft bionic implants. In this paper, we describe a new strategy for the deposition of platinum electrodes on a range of materials, including insulators and flexible polymers. The strategy is enabled by two principle advances: (1) the introduction of a novel, low temperature strategy for reducing chloroplatinic acid to platinum using nitrogen plasma; (2) the development of a chloroplatinic acid based liquid ink formulation, utilizing ethylene glycol as both ink carrier and reducing agent, for versatile printing at nanoscale resolution using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The ink formulation has been printed and reduced upon Si, glass, ITO, Ge, PDMS, and Parylene C. The plasma treatment effects reduction of the precursor patterns in situ without subjecting the substrate to destructively high temperatures. Feature size is controlled via dwell time and degree of ink loading, and platinum features with 60 nm dimensions could be routinely achieved on Si. Reduction of the ink to platinum was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Feature morphology was characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and AFM. The high electrochemical activity of individually printed Pt features was characterized using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). PMID:24270681

  14. Nanoscale platinum printing on insulating substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, C. D.; Higgins, M. J.; Sullivan, R. P.; Jamali, S. S.; Moulton, S. E.; Wallace, G. G.

    2013-12-01

    The deposition of noble metals on soft and/or flexible substrates is vital for several emerging applications including flexible electronics and the fabrication of soft bionic implants. In this paper, we describe a new strategy for the deposition of platinum electrodes on a range of materials, including insulators and flexible polymers. The strategy is enabled by two principle advances: (1) the introduction of a novel, low temperature strategy for reducing chloroplatinic acid to platinum using nitrogen plasma; (2) the development of a chloroplatinic acid based liquid ink formulation, utilizing ethylene glycol as both ink carrier and reducing agent, for versatile printing at nanoscale resolution using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The ink formulation has been printed and reduced upon Si, glass, ITO, Ge, PDMS, and Parylene C. The plasma treatment effects reduction of the precursor patterns in situ without subjecting the substrate to destructively high temperatures. Feature size is controlled via dwell time and degree of ink loading, and platinum features with 60 nm dimensions could be routinely achieved on Si. Reduction of the ink to platinum was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Feature morphology was characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and AFM. The high electrochemical activity of individually printed Pt features was characterized using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

  15. Evaluation of industrial platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Dillontownes, Lawrence A.; Alderfer, David W.

    1987-01-01

    The calibration and stability of four surface temperature measuring industrial platinum resistance thermometers for use in the temperature range -120 C to 160 C was investigated. It was found that the calibration formulation of the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1968 provided the most accurate calibration. It was also found that all the resistance thermometers suffered from varying degrees of instability and hysteresis.

  16. Gallium-67 uptake by the thyroid associated with progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoberg, R.J.; Blue, P.W.; Kidd, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Although thyroidal uptake of gallium-67 has been described in several thyroid disorders, gallium-67 scanning is not commonly used in the evaluation of thyroid disease. Thyroidal gallium-67 uptake has been reported to occur frequently with subacute thyroiditis, anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, and thyroid lymphoma, and occasionally with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and follicular thyroid carcinoma. A patient is described with progressive systemic sclerosis who, while being scanned for possible active pulmonary involvement, was found incidentally to have abnormal gallium-67 uptake only in the thyroid gland. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the thyroid revealed Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Although Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs with increased frequency in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis, thyroidal uptake of gallium-67 associated with progressive systemic sclerosis has not, to our knowledge, been previously described. Since aggressive thyroid malignancies frequently are imaged by gallium-67 scintigraphy, fine needle aspiration cytology of the thyroid often is essential in the evaluation of thyroidal gallium-67 uptake.

  17. Nucleation mechanism of gallium-assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth of gallium arsenide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Colombo, C.; Abstreiter, G.; Arbiol, J.; Morante, J. R.

    2008-02-11

    Molecular beam epitaxy Ga-assisted synthesis of GaAs nanowires is demonstrated. The nucleation and growth are seen to be related to the presence of a SiO{sub 2} layer previously deposited on the GaAs wafer. The interaction of the reactive gallium with the SiO{sub 2} pinholes induces the formation of nanocraters, found to be the key for the nucleation of the nanowires. With SiO{sub 2} thicknesses up to 30 nm, nanocraters reach the underlying substrate, resulting into a preferential growth orientation of the nanowires. Possibly related to the formation of nanocraters, we observe an incubation period of 258 s before the nanowires growth is initiated.

  18. Optoelectronic and low temperature thermoelectric studies on nanostructured thin films of silver gallium selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rajani Philip, Rachel Reena Nazer, Sheeba Abraham, Anitha Nair, Sinitha B.; Pradeep, B.; Urmila, K. S.; Okram, G. S.

    2014-01-28

    Polycrystalline thin films of silver gallium selenide were deposited on ultrasonically cleaned soda lime glass substrates by multi-source vacuum co-evaporation technique. The structural analysis done by X-ray diffraction ascertained the formation of nano structured tetragonal chalcopyrite thin films. The compound formation was confirmed by X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic technique has been used for surface morphological analysis. Direct allowed band gap ∼1.78eV with high absorption coefficient ∼10{sup 6}/m was estimated from absorbance spectra. Low temperature thermoelectric effects has been investigated in the temperature range 80–330K which manifested an unusual increase in Seebeck coefficient with negligible phonon drag toward the very low and room temperature regime. The electrical resistivity of these n-type films was assessed to be ∼2.6Ωm and the films showed good photo response.

  19. Optoelectronic and low temperature thermoelectric studies on nanostructured thin films of silver gallium selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Rajani; Philip, Rachel Reena; Nazer, Sheeba; Abraham, Anitha; Nair, Sinitha B.; Pradeep, B.; Urmila, K. S.; Okram, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    Polycrystalline thin films of silver gallium selenide were deposited on ultrasonically cleaned soda lime glass substrates by multi-source vacuum co-evaporation technique. The structural analysis done by X-ray diffraction ascertained the formation of nano structured tetragonal chalcopyrite thin films. The compound formation was confirmed by X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic technique has been used for surface morphological analysis. Direct allowed band gap ˜1.78eV with high absorption coefficient ˜106/m was estimated from absorbance spectra. Low temperature thermoelectric effects has been investigated in the temperature range 80-330K which manifested an unusual increase in Seebeck coefficient with negligible phonon drag toward the very low and room temperature regime. The electrical resistivity of these n-type films was assessed to be ˜2.6Ωm and the films showed good photo response.

  20. Relationship between gallium pyramidalization in L·GaCl3 complexes and the electronic ligand properties.

    PubMed

    El-Hellani, Ahmad; Monot, Julien; Tang, Shun; Guillot, Régis; Bour, Christophe; Gandon, Vincent

    2013-10-01

    Six new molecular GaCl3 adducts of electron rich compounds of the carbone (carbodiphosphorane, tetraaminoallene) and cyclic alkyl amino carbene (CAAC) families have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The sum of their Cl-Ga-Cl angles has been compared to those of 20 other complexes exhibiting various oxygen-, nitrogen-, phosphorus-, and carbon-donor ligands for which good quality X-ray analyses have been reported. The pyramidalization of the GaCl3 moiety in L·GaCl3 complexes has been checked against the computed antisymmetric stretching of the Ga-Cl bonds. It has also been compared to the symmetric stretching of the C-O bonds of the corresponding L·Ni(CO)3 complexes (Tolman Electronic Parameter). On this basis, a relationship between the pyramidalization observed in the gallium complexes and the electronic ligand properties has been established. PMID:24070393

  1. Cataloging antineoplastic agents according to their effectiveness against platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive ovarian carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Kimiko; Zhu, Yong-Lian; Lin, Z. Ping; Penketh, Philip G.; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Zhu, Rui; Baumann, Raymond P.; Sartorelli, Alan C.; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Ratner, Elena S.

    2016-01-01

    Although epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) are initially treated with platinum-based chemotherapy, EOCs vary in platinum responsiveness. Cataloging antineoplastic agents according to their effectiveness against platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive EOC cell lines is valuable for development of therapeutic strategies to avoid platinum inefficacy and to exploit platinum sensitivity. TOV-21G devoid of FANCF expression, OV-90 and SKOV-3 were employed as examples of platinum-sensitive, platinum-intermediate and platinum-resistant cell lines, respectively. Antineoplastic agents examined included mitomycin C, doxorubicin, etoposide, gemcitabine, chlorambucil, paclitaxel, triapine and X-rays. Their effectiveness against cell lines was analyzed by clonogenic assays. Cytotoxic profiles of mitomycin C and carboplatin were similar, with mitomycin C exhibiting greater potency and selectivity against TOV-21G than carboplatin. Cytotoxic profiles of doxorubicin, etoposide and X-rays overlapped with that of carboplatin, while OV-90 overexpressing Rad51 was more resistant to chlorambucil than SKOV-3. The efficacy of paclitaxel and triapine was independent of platinum sensitivity or resistance. Consistent with these cytotoxic profiles, cisplatin/mitomycin C, triapine, and paclitaxel differed in the capacity to induce phosphorylation of H2AX, and produced unique inhibitory patterns of DNA/RNA syntheses in HL-60 human leukemia cells. Paclitaxel and triapine in combination produced additive antitumor effects in M109 murine lung carcinoma. In conclusion, mitomycin C is potentially more effective against Fanconi anemia pathway-deficient EOCs than carboplatin. Doxorubicin and etoposide, because of their overlapping cytotoxic properties with carboplatin, are unlikely to be efficacious against platinum-refractory EOCs. Paclitaxel and triapine are effective regardless of platinum sensitivity status, and promising in combination for both platinum-sensitive and platinum-refractory EOCs

  2. Abnormal gallium scintigraphy in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.D.; White, D.A.; Stover-Pepe, D.E.; Caravelli, J.F.; Van Uitert, C.; Benua, R.S.

    1987-04-01

    A patient with medulloblastoma of the cerebellum developed dyspnea and hypoxemia. Pulmonary function tests showed decreased lung volume and diffusing capacity, while the chest radiographs initially showed only mild interstitial infiltrates. Repeated gallium scans showed diffuse lung uptake and diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis was made by open lung biopsy.

  3. Discovery of gallium, germanium, lutetium, and hafnium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, J.L.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-09-15

    Currently, twenty-eight gallium, thirty-one germanium, thirty-five lutetium, and thirty-six hafnium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  4. Mechanical retention versus bonding of amalgam and gallium alloy restorations.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Staninec, M; Yip, R L; Chavez, M A

    1994-10-01

    The retention of amalgam and gallium alloy restorations in proximal box forms was measured in vitro, and three different adhesives to conventional undercuts were compared. For control, restorations were placed without undercuts or adhesives. No significant difference was found between amalgam and gallium alloys with each of the five methods of retention used. Alloys placed without retention or adhesives were significantly less retentive than all other groups. When Tytin alloy was used, no difference was found in retention among the restorations retained with Panavia or All-Bond adhesive or an occlusal dovetail and retention grooves, but Amalgambond adhesive was less retentive than all three of these methods. When gallium alloy was used, both Panavia and All-Bond adhesive were more retentive than undercuts, but the effect of Amalgambond adhesive was more retentive than undercuts, but the effect of Amalgambond adhesive was comparable to that of undercuts. The results of this study indicate that adhesives could be used in place of traditional undercuts to retain amalgam and gallium alloys, thus saving a considerable amount of tooth structure. PMID:7990038

  5. Cellular uptake and anticancer activity of carboxylated gallium corroles.

    PubMed

    Pribisko, Melanie; Palmer, Joshua; Grubbs, Robert H; Gray, Harry B; Termini, John; Lim, Punnajit

    2016-04-19

    We report derivatives of gallium(III) tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole, 1 [Ga(tpfc)], with either sulfonic (2) or carboxylic acids (3, 4) as macrocyclic ring substituents: the aminocaproate derivative, 3 [Ga(ACtpfc)], demonstrated high cytotoxic activity against all NCI60 cell lines derived from nine tumor types and confirmed very high toxicity against melanoma cells, specifically the LOX IMVI and SK-MEL-28 cell lines. The toxicities of 1, 2, 3, and 4 [Ga(3-ctpfc)] toward prostate (DU-145), melanoma (SK-MEL-28), breast (MDA-MB-231), and ovarian (OVCAR-3) cancer cells revealed a dependence on the ring substituent: IC50values ranged from 4.8 to >200 µM; and they correlated with the rates of uptake, extent of intracellular accumulation, and lipophilicity. Carboxylated corroles 3 and 4, which exhibited about 10-fold lower IC50values (<20 µM) relative to previous analogs against all four cancer cell lines, displayed high efficacy (Emax= 0). Confocal fluorescence imaging revealed facile uptake of functionalized gallium corroles by all human cancer cells that followed the order: 4 > 3 > 2 > 1 (intracellular accumulation of gallium corroles was fastest in melanoma cells). We conclude that carboxylated gallium corroles are promising chemotherapeutics with the advantage that they also can be used for tumor imaging. PMID:27044076

  6. The 100 micron detector development program. [gallium doped germanium photoconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    An effort to optimize gallium-doped germanium photoconductors (Ge:Ga) for use in space for sensitive detection of far infrared radiation in the 100 micron region is described as well as the development of cryogenic apparatus capable of calibrating detectors under low background conditions.

  7. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy activity of gallium tetra-(4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin when conjugated to differently shaped platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managa, Muthumuni; Nyokong, Tebello

    2015-11-01

    This work reports on the conjugation of differently shaped Pt nanoparticles (PtNPs) with ClGa(III) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin (ClGaTCPP). The resulting conjugates were used for photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy against Staphylococcus aureus. The degree of photo-inactivation is dependent on concentration of the conjugates, light dose (fluence) and illumination time. The log reduction obtained for ClGaTCPP when conjugated to cubic PtNPs was 4.64 log (which indicate 99.99% of the bacteria have been killed), which is much higher than 3.94 log unit for ClGaTCPP-Hexagonal PtNPs and 3.31 log units for ClGaTCPP-Unshaped PtNPs. ClGaTCPP alone gave a log unit reduction of less than 3, showing the importance of conjugation to PtNPs.

  8. Vibrational properties of the gallium monohydrides SrGaGeH, BaGaSiH, BaGaGeH, and BaGaSnH

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Michael J.; Lee, Myeong H.; Holland, Gregory P.; Daemen, Luke L.; Sankey, Otto F.; Haeussermann, Ulrich

    2009-08-15

    Vibrational properties of the gallium monohydrides SrGaGeH, BaGaSiH, BaGaGeH, and BaGaSnH (AeGaTtH) have been investigated by means of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and first principles calculations. The compounds contain separated Ga-H units being part of a two dimensional polyanionic layer, [TtGaH]{sup 2-} (Tt=Si, Ge, Sn). The INS spectra show internal Ga-H bending and stretching modes at frequencies around 900 and 1200 cm{sup -1}, respectively. While the stretching mode is virtually invariant with respect to the variable chemical environment of the Ga-H unit, the bending mode frequency varies and is highest for BaGaSiH and lowest for BaGaSnH. The stretching mode is a direct measure of the Ga-H bond strength, whereas the bending mode reflects indirectly the strength of alkaline earth metal-hydrogen interaction. Accordingly, the terminal Ga-H bond in solid state AeGaTtH is distinct, but-compared to molecular gallium hydrides-very weak. - Graphical abstract: Vibrational properties of the gallium monohydrides SrGaGeH, BaGaSiH, BaGaGeH, and BaGaSnH have been investigated and revealed Ga-H stretching mode frequencies around 1200 cm{sup -1}. This implies that the terminal Ga-H bond in solid state polyanionic gallium hydrides is very weak compared to molecular gallium hydride species.

  9. Gallium Oxide Nanostructures for High Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Chintalapalle, Ramana V.

    2015-04-30

    Gallium oxide (Ga2O3) thin films were produced by sputter deposition by varying the substrate temperature (Ts) in a wide range (Ts=25-800 °C). The structural characteristics and electronic properties of Ga2O3 films were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and spectrophotometric measurements. The effect of growth temperature is significant on the chemistry, crystal structure and morphology of Ga2O3 films. XRD and SEM analyses indicate that the Ga2O3 films grown at lower temperatures were amorphous while those grown at Ts≥500 oC were nanocrystalline. RBS measurements indicate the well-maintained stoichiometry of Ga2O3 films at Ts=300-800 °C. The electronic structure determination indicated that the nanocrystalline Ga2O3films exhibit a band gap of ~5 eV. Tungsten (W) incorporated Ga2O3 films were produced by co-sputter deposition. W-concentration was varied by the applied sputtering-power. No secondary phase formation was observed in W-incorporated Ga2O3 films. W-induced effects were significant on the structure and electronic properties of Ga2O3 films. The band gap of Ga2O3 films without W-incorporation was ~5 eV. Oxygen sensor characteristics evaluated using optical and electrical methods indicate a faster response in W-doped Ga2O3 films compared to intrinsic Ga2O3 films. The results demonstrate the applicability of both intrinsic and W-doped Ga-oxide films for oxygen sensor application at temperatures ≥700 °C.

  10. Synthesis and reactivity of dichloroboryl complexes of platinum(II).

    PubMed

    Charmant, Jonathan P H; Fan, Cheng; Norman, Nicholas C; Pringle, Paul G

    2007-01-01

    The reaction between [Pt(nbe)3] (nbe=norbornene), two equivalents of the phosphines PPh3, PMePh2 or PMe2Ph and 1 equivalent of BCl3 affords the platinum dichloroboryl species [PtCl(BCl2)(PPh3)2], [PtCl(BCl2)(PMePh2)2] and [PtCl(BCl2)(PMe2Ph)2]. All three complexes were characterised by X-ray crystallography and reveal that the boryl group lies trans to the chloride. With PMe3 as the phosphine, the complex [PtCl(BCl2)(PMe3)2] is isolated in high yield as a white crystalline powder although crystals suitable for X-ray crystallography were not obtained. Crystals were obtained of a product shown by X-ray crystallography to be the unusual dinuclear species [Pt2(BCl2)2(PMe3)4(micro-Cl)][BCl4] which reveals an arrangement in which two square planar platinum(II) centres are linked by a single bridging chloride which is trans to a BCl2 group on each platinum centre. The reaction of [PtCl(BCl2)(PMe3)2] with NEt3 or pyridine (py) affords the adducts [PtCl{BCl2(NEt3)}(PMe3)2] and [PtCl{BCl2(py)}(PMe3)2], respectively, both characterised spectroscopically. The reaction between [PtCl(BCl2)(PMe3)2] and either 4 equivalents of NHEt2 or piperidine (pipH) results in the mono-substituted boryl species [PtCl{BCl(NEt2)}(PMe3)2] and [PtCl{BCl(pip)}(PMe3)2], respectively, the former characterised by X-ray crystallography. Treatment of either [PtCl(BCl2)(PMe3)2] (in the presence of excess NEt3) or [PtCl{BCl(NEt2)}(PMe3)2] with catechol affords the B(cat) (cat=catecholate) derivative [PtCl{B(cat)}(PMe3)2] which is also formed in the reaction between [Pt(PMe3)4] and ClB(cat) and also from the slow decomposition of [Pt{B(cat)}2(PMe3)2] in dichloromethane over a period of months. The compound [Pt{B(cat)}2(PMe3)2] was prepared from the reaction between [Pt(PMe3)4] and B2(cat)2. PMID:17160181

  11. Platinum stable isotopes in ferromanganese crust and nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Loretta; Seward, Terry; Handler, Monica R.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crust and nodules are slow-growing chemical sediments that form by direct precipitation from seawater, resulting in a record of changing seawater chemistry. These sediments are the primary sink for platinum in the modern oxic marine environment, hosting well-documented enrichments over other platinum-group elements (PGEs): the Pt anomaly [1]. Platinum is a non-bio-essential, highly siderophile, transition metal with six stable isotopes (190Pt, 192Pt, 194Pt, 195Pt, 196Pt, and 198Pt) with several oxidation states (Pt0, Pt2+ and Pt4+). Platinum is generally considered to exist in the hydrosphere as Pt2+ although its behaviour in the marine environment is poorly constrained, and Pt4+may also be present. Variations in ocean redox state, together with changes in source fluxes to the oceans, may therefore lead to small variations (< ±1) in the stable isotopic composition of marine platinum, raising the potential of adding platinum to the growing arsenal of paleoceanographic tracers. A method has been developed to measure the platinum isotopic composition using double spike MC-ICPMS analysis [2]and applied to a global suite of modern Fe-Mn crust and nodules. Combining synchrotron XAFS analyses of platinum adsorbed onto Fe-Mn oxide and oxyhydroxide surfaces to determine oxidation state and bonding environment, with platinum stable isotopic measurements allowing us to evaluate both platinum incorporation onto these sediments and the associated degree of platinum isotopic fractionation. Leaching experiments conducted on platinum rich terrestrial materials underwent platinum stable isotopic measurement as an analogue for the Pt isotopic fractionation associated with continental weathering. [1] Hodge, V.F. et al. (1985) Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 72, 158-162. [2] Creech, J. et al. (2013) Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 28. 853-865.

  12. Pair distribution function study on compression of liquid gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shengnian; Yu, Tony; Chen, Jiuhua; Ehm, Lars; Guo, Quanzhong; Parise, John

    2008-01-01

    Integrating a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) and focused high energy x-ray beam from the superconductor wiggler X17 beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we have successfully collected high quality total x-ray scattering data of liquid gallium. The experiments were conducted at a pressure range from 0.1GPa up to 2GPa at ambient temperature. For the first time, pair distribution functions (PDF) for liquid gallium at high pressure were derived up to 10 {angstrom}. Liquid gallium structure has been studied by x-ray absorption (Di Cicco & Filipponi, 1993; Wei et al., 2000; Comez et al., 2001), x-ray diffraction studies (Waseda & Suzuki, 1972), and molecular dynamics simulation (Tsay, 1993; Hui et al., 2002). These previous reports have focused on the 1st nearest neighbor structure, which tells us little about the atomic arrangement outside the first shell in non- crystalline materials. This study focuses on the structure of liquid gallium and the atomic structure change due to compression. The PDF results show that the observed atomic distance of the first nearest neighbor at 2.78 {angstrom} (first G(r) peak and its shoulder at the higher Q position) is consistent with previous studies by x-ray absorption (2.76 {angstrom}, Comez et al., 2001). We have also observed that the first nearest neighbor peak position did not change with pressure increasing, while the farther peaks positions in the intermediate distance range decreased with pressure increasing. This leads to a conclusion of the possible existence of 'locally rigid units' in the liquid. With the addition of reverse Monte Carlo modeling, we have observed that the coordination number in the local rigit unit increases with pressure. The bulk modulus of liquid gallium derived from the volume compression curve at ambient temperature (300K) is 12.1(6) GPa.

  13. Sputtering of tin and gallium-tin clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lill, T.; Calaway, W.F.; Ma, Z.; Pellin, M.J.

    1994-08-01

    Tin and gallium-tin clusters have been produced by 4 keV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment of polycrystalline tin and the gallium-tin eutectic alloy and analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The sputtered neutral species were photoionized with 193 nm (6.4 eV) excimer laser light. Neutral tin clusters containing up to 10 atoms and mixed gallium-tin clusters Ga{sub (n-m)}Sn{sub m} with n {<=} 4 for the neutrals and N {<=} 3 for the sputtered ionic species have been detected. Laser power density dependent intensity measurements, relative yields, and kinetic energy distributions have been measured. The abundance distributions of the mixed clusters have been found to be nonstatistical due to significant differences in the ionization efficiencies for clusters with equal nuclearity but different number of tin atoms. The results indicate that Ga{sub 2}Sn and Ga{sub 3}Sn like the all-gallium clusters have ionization potentials below 6.4 eV. In the case of Sn{sub 5}, Sn{sub 6}, GaSn and Ga{sub (n-m)}Sn{sub m} clusters with n=2 to 4 and m>1, the authors detect species that have sufficient internal energy to be one photon ionized despite ionization potentials that are higher 6.4 eV. The tin atom signal that is detected can be attributed to photofragmentation of dimers for both sputtering from polycrystalline tin and from the gallium-tin eutectic alloy.

  14. Gallium vacancies and gallium antisites as acceptors in electron-irradiated semi-insulating GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Corbel, C.; Pierre, F. ); Saarinen, K.; Hautojaervi, P. ); Moser, P. )

    1992-02-15

    Positron-lifetime measurements show that acceptors are produced in semi-insulating GaAs by 1.5-MeV electron irradiation at 20 K. Two types of acceptors can be separated. The first ones are negative vacancy-type defects which anneal out over a very broad range of temperature between 77 and 500 K. The second ones are negative ion-type defects which are stable still at 450 K. The data show that these two types of defects are independent and do not form close pairs. We attribute both to gallium-related defects. We identify the ion-type acceptors as isolated gallium antisites. The vacancy-type acceptors are identified as gallium vacancies which are isolated or involved in negatively charged complexes. The introduction rate of the gallium antisite is estimated to be 1.8{plus minus}0.3 cm{sup {minus}1} in the fluence range 10{sup 17}--10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}2} for 1.5-MeV electron irradiation at 20 K.

  15. Platinum-based drugs disrupt STAT6-mediated suppression of immune responses against cancer in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Lesterhuis, W. Joost; Punt, Cornelis J.A.; Hato, Stanleyson V.; Eleveld-Trancikova, Dagmar; Jansen, Bastiaan J.H.; Nierkens, Stefan; Schreibelt, Gerty; de Boer, Annemiek; Van Herpen, Carla M.L.; Kaanders, Johannes H.; van Krieken, Johan H.J.M.; Adema, Gosse J.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments feature immune inhibitory mechanisms that prevent T cells from generating effective antitumor immune responses. Therapeutic interventions aimed at disrupting these inhibitory mechanisms have been shown to enhance antitumor immunity, but they lack direct cytotoxic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of cytotoxic cancer chemotherapeutics on immune inhibitory pathways. We observed that exposure to platinum-based chemotherapeutics markedly reduced expression of the T cell inhibitory molecule programmed death receptor-ligand 2 (PD-L2) on both human DCs and human tumor cells. Downregulation of PD-L2 resulted in enhanced antigen-specific proliferation and Th1 cytokine secretion as well as enhanced recognition of tumor cells by T cells. Further analysis revealed that STAT6 controlled downregulation of PD-L2. Consistent with these data, patients with STAT6-expressing head and neck cancer displayed enhanced recurrence-free survival upon treatment with cisplatin-based chemoradiation compared with patients with STAT6-negative tumors, demonstrating the clinical relevance of platinum-induced STAT6 modulation. We therefore conclude that platinum-based anticancer drugs can enhance the immunostimulatory potential of DCs and decrease the immunosuppressive capability of tumor cells. This dual action of platinum compounds may extend their therapeutic application in cancer patients and provides a rationale for their use in combination with immunostimulatory compounds. PMID:21765211

  16. Synthesis of Bimetallic Platinum Nanoparticles for Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Leteba, Gerard M.; Lang, Candace I.

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnetic nanomaterials in biosensing applications is growing as a consequence of their remarkable properties; but controlling the composition and shape of metallic nanoalloys is problematic when more than one precursor is required for wet chemistry synthesis. We have developed a successful simultaneous reduction method for preparation of near-spherical platinum-based nanoalloys containing magnetic solutes. We avoided particular difficulties in preparing platinum nanoalloys containing Ni, Co and Fe by the identification of appropriate synthesis temperatures and chemistry. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to show that our particles have a narrow size distribution, uniform size and morphology, and good crystallinity in the as-synthesized condition. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms the coexistence of Pt with the magnetic solute in a face-centered cubic (FCC) solid solution. PMID:23941910

  17. Raman characterization of platinum diselenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O’Brien, Maria; McEvoy, Niall; Motta, Carlo; Zheng, Jian-Yao; Berner, Nina C.; Kotakoski, Jani; Elibol, Kenan; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Meyer, Jannik C.; Yim, Chanyoung; Abid, Mohamed; Hallam, Toby; Donegan, John F.; Sanvito, Stefano; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2016-06-01

    Platinum diselenide (PtSe2) is a newly discovered 2D material which is of great interest for applications in electronics and catalysis. PtSe2 films were synthesized by thermally assisted selenization of predeposited platinum films and scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed the crystal structure of these films to be 1T. Raman scattering of these films was studied as a function of film thickness, laser wavelength and laser polarization. E g and A 1g Raman active modes were identified using polarization measurements in the Raman setup. These modes were found to display a clear position and intensity dependence with film thickness, for multiple excitation wavelengths, and their peak positions agree with simulated phonon dispersion curves for PtSe2. These results highlight the practicality of using Raman spectroscopy as a prime characterization technique for newly synthesized 2D materials.

  18. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Stocks, G. M.; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie

    2014-11-28

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-alumina-supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3-supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms are as active as fully formed platinum particles. The overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms.

  19. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Stocks, G. M.; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie

    2014-11-28

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-alumina-supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3-supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms aremore » as active as fully formed platinum particles. The overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms.« less

  20. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms

    PubMed Central

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Stocks, G. M.; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms are as active as fully formed platinum particles. Thus, the overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms. PMID:25429995

  1. Synthesis, structure and characterization of two new open-framework gallium phosphite-oxalates of varying dimensionality

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Caixia; Huang, Liangliang; Zhou, Mingdong; Xia, Jing; Ma, Hongwei; Zang, Shuliang; Wang, Li

    2013-12-15

    Using N, N-dimethyl-piperazine as structure directing agent, two new gallium phosphite-oxalates [Ga{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})](C{sub 6}N{sub 2}H{sub 16}) (I) and [Ga{sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}PO{sub 3})(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})](C{sub 6}N{sub 2}H{sub 16}){sub 0.5} (II) have been synthesized under solvothermal and hydrothermal conditions, respectively and further characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, TGA, ICP-AES and elemental analyses. Single crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that the striking feature of I and II is that they possess the same second building unit (SBU) Ga{sub 2}P{sub 2} constructed from two GaO{sub 6} octahedra and two [HPO{sub 3}{sup 2−}] pseudo-pyramids sharing oxygen atoms. However, due to the different connecting fashions of SBUs, [C{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2−}] groups and [H{sub 2}PO{sub 3}{sup −}] pseudo-pyramids, the final frameworks of them are distinctly different. Compound I shows 2D layered structures with 8-membered ring (8-MR) windows in the ab plane while compound II presents a 3D open-framework with 8-MR channels along the b axis. - Graphical abstract: Using N, N-dimethyl-piperazine as structure directing agent, two new gallium phosphite-oxalates I showing 2D layered structure and II presenting 3D open-framework have been synthesized under solvothermal and hydrothermal conditions, respectively. - Highlights: • Using N, N-dimethyl-piperazine as structure directing agent, two new gallium phosphite-oxalates have been synthesized under solvothermal and hydrothermal conditions, respectively. • The same second building unit (SBU) is displayed in both compounds. • Compound I shows 2D layered structure with 8-MR windows while compound II presents 3D open-framework with 8-MR channels. • The solvent plays an important role on the formation of microporous compounds.

  2. A common polymorphism in the 5' UTR of ERCC5 creates an upstream ORF that confers resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Somers, Joanna; Wilson, Lindsay A; Kilday, John-Paul; Horvilleur, Emilie; Cannell, Ian G; Pöyry, Tuija A A; Cobbold, Laura C; Kondrashov, Alexander; Knight, John R P; Puget, Stéphanie; Grill, Jacques; Grundy, Richard G; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E

    2015-09-15

    We show that a common polymorphic variant in the ERCC5 5' untranslated region (UTR) generates an upstream ORF (uORF) that affects both the background expression of this protein and its ability to be synthesized following exposure to agents that cause bulky adduct DNA damage. Individuals that harbor uORF1 have a marked resistance to platinum-based agents, illustrated by the significantly reduced progression-free survival of pediatric ependymoma patients treated with such compounds. Importantly, inhibition of DNA-PKcs restores sensitivity to platinum-based compounds by preventing uORF1-dependent ERCC5 expression. Our data support a model in which a heritable 5' noncoding mRNA element influences individuals' responses to platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:26338418

  3. A common polymorphism in the 5′ UTR of ERCC5 creates an upstream ORF that confers resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Joanna; Wilson, Lindsay A.; Kilday, John-Paul; Horvilleur, Emilie; Cannell, Ian G.; Pöyry, Tuija A.A.; Cobbold, Laura C.; Kondrashov, Alexander; Knight, John R.P.; Puget, Stéphanie; Grill, Jacques; Grundy, Richard G.; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    We show that a common polymorphic variant in the ERCC5 5′ untranslated region (UTR) generates an upstream ORF (uORF) that affects both the background expression of this protein and its ability to be synthesized following exposure to agents that cause bulky adduct DNA damage. Individuals that harbor uORF1 have a marked resistance to platinum-based agents, illustrated by the significantly reduced progression-free survival of pediatric ependymoma patients treated with such compounds. Importantly, inhibition of DNA-PKcs restores sensitivity to platinum-based compounds by preventing uORF1-dependent ERCC5 expression. Our data support a model in which a heritable 5′ noncoding mRNA element influences individuals’ responses to platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:26338418

  4. Nuclear microprobe determination of platinum quantitative distribution in rat brain tumors after cisplatin or carboplatin injection for PAT treatment of glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.; Biston, M.-C.; Devès, G.; Bohic, S.; Carmona, A.

    2005-04-01

    Conventional radiotherapy of high-grade glioma is unsuccessful since less than 50% of patients survive at 6 months, therefore glioma treatment is still challenging. A new radiotherapy procedure has been recently proposed, the photoactivation therapy (PAT), associating synchrotron radiation with a chemotherapy agent, such as cisplatin. PAT aims at using the monochromaticity and the very high brilliance of the synchrotron radiation for selective excitation of a high-Z compound introduced in tumor cell DNA to maximize the photoelectric effect probability, thus increasing local toxicity. Synchrotron irradiation of cisplatin at the platinum absorption K-edge resulted in a dramatic increase in life span relative to median survival time in the F98 glioma model in Fisher rat. In the purpose to optimize the platinum concentration into the tumor, the platinum content of irradiated target needs to be quantified. These results will enable to correlate injected dose to cellular platinum content in the tumor at the time of irradiation, and to study the spatial diffusion and distribution of the platinum into the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissues from the point of injection. Male Fisher 344 rats were inoculated with 103 F98 glioma cells. Thirteen days after stereotactic inoculation, intracerebral injection at the tumor site of 40 μg of carboplatin and 3 or 5 μg of cisplatin was performed. Platinum quantitative distribution in tumors and adjacent brain tissues was determined using μ-PIXE and μ-RBS analysis.

  5. Far-Infrared and Optical Studies of Gallium Arsenide and Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Semiconductor Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanaway, Mark Brian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis reports far-infrared (FIR) and photoluminescence studies, performed at low temperatures (4.2K) and at magnetic fields up to 25T, of selectively and inadvertently doped bulk and low dimensional gallium arsenide (GaAs) and aluminium gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) semiconductor structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution FIR magnetospectroscopy of ultra -high mobility n-GaAs reveals a variety of shallow donor intra-impurity transitions plus spin-split higher Landau level transitions in the photoconductive response. The first observation of polarons bound to D^ - ions in bulk n-GaAs is reported. The excited state spectrum of the confined silicon donor in GaAs/AlGaAs multi-quantum wells (MQWs) has been examined. Narrower linewidths and more higher excited state donor transitions are noted in the present photoconductive investigation compared with previous reports. The electron recombination dynamics has been examined in silicon-doped GaAs/AlGaAs MQWs and homogeneous and sheet -doped bulk n-GaAs samples using time-resolved FIR photoconductivity. The extrinsic response of doped MQW structures suggests a potential use as a fast, sensitive detectors of FIR. FIR transmission measurements are reported for GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (QWs) of various widths in magnetic fields of up to 20T, tilted away from the normal to the QW plane by angles up to theta = 50^circ. Deviation of the cyclotron resonance field from a costheta law are interpreted using theoretical models describing Landau level/electric subband coupling. The in-plane magnetic field and excitation power dependence of the photoluminescence intensity of a GaAs/AlGaAs QW spectral feature is interpreted in terms of charge transfer in the QW, using a coupled oscillator model, and the efficiency of nonradiative electronic traps. In-plane magnetic field studies of the photoluminescence from a superlattice structure

  6. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm2 using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si. PMID:25593562

  7. Synthesis of Two New Group 13 Benzoato-Chloro Complexes: A Structural Study of Gallium and Indium Chelating Carboxylates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duraj, Stan A.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Woloszynek, Robert; Protasiewicz, John D.; Dequeant, Michael; Ren, Tong

    2010-01-01

    Two new heteroleptic chelated-benzoato gallium (III) and indium (III) complexes have been prepared and structurally characterized. The molecular structures of [GaCl2(4-Mepy)2(O2CPh)]4-Mepy (1) and [InCl(4-Mepy)2(O2CPh)2]4-Mepy (2) have been determined by single-crystal x-ray diffraction. The gallium compound (1) is a distorted octahedron with cis-chloride ligands co-planar with the chelating benzoate and the 4-methylpyridines trans to each other. This is the first example of a Ga(III) structure with a chelating benzoate. The indium compound (2) is a distorted pentagonal bipyramid with two chelating benzoates, one 4-methylpyridine in the plane and a chloride trans to the other 4-methylpyridine. The indium bis-benzoate is an unusual example of a seven-coordinate structure with classical ligands. Both complexes, which due to the chelates, could also be described as pseudo-trigonal bipyramidal, include a three-bladed motif with three roughly parallel aromatic rings that along with a solvent of crystallization and electron-withdrawing chloride ligand(s) stabilize the solid-state structures.

  8. Synthesis and structure of new compounds with Zn-Ga bonds: insertion of the gallium(I) bisimidinate Ga(DDP) into Zn-X (X = CH3, Cl) and the homoleptic complex cation [Zn(GaCp*)4]2+.

    PubMed

    Kempter, Andreas; Gemel, Christian; Cadenbach, Thomas; Fischer, Roland A

    2007-10-29

    Insertion reactions of the low-valent group 13 bisimidinate ligand Ga(DDP) {DDP = 2-[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)amino]-4-[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]-2-pentene} into Zn-Me and Zn-Cl bonds are reported. The reaction of ZnMe2 with 2 equiv of Ga(DDP) yields the double-insertion product [{(DDP)GaMe}2Zn] (1), whereas the insertion of Ga(DDP) into the Zn-Cl bond of ZnCl2 in tetrahydrofuran (THF) leads to the monoinsertion product [{(DDP)GaCl}ZnCl(THF)2] (2). Treatment of 2 with Na[BArF] results in the salt [{THF.Ga(DDP)}Zn(THF)(mu-Cl)]2[BArF]2 (3), with two Cl atoms bridging the Zn centers. The structural features of the Zn-Ga-bonded compounds 1-3 were compared with related complexes and in particular with the compound [Zn(GaCp*)4][BArF]2 (4), which was synthesized by the reaction of ZnMe2, [H(OEt2)2][BArF], and GaCp* in fluorobenzene. The complex cation [Zn(GaCp*)4]2+ of 4 relates to previously reported d10 analogues [M(GaCp*)4] (M = Ni, Pd, Pt). All new compounds were fully characterized by elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. PMID:17918829

  9. Controlled synthesis of porous platinum nanostructures for catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanqin; Zhang, Junwei; Yang, Yong; Huang, Zhengren; Long, Nguyen Viet; Nogami, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    Porous platinum, that has outstanding catalytic and electrical properties and superior resistant characteristics to corrosion, has been widely applied in chemical, petrochemical, pharmaceutical, electronic, and automotive industries. As the catalytic activity and selectivity depend on the size, shape and structure of nanomaterials, the strategies for controlling these factors of platinum nanomaterials to get excellent catalytic properties are discussed. Here, recent advances in the design and preparation of various porous platinum nanostructures are reviewed, including wet-chemical synthesis, electro-deposition, galvanic replacement reaction and de-alloying technology. The applications of various platinum nanostructures are also discussed, especially in fuel cells. PMID:24749422

  10. Synthesis of the donor acceptor ligand 2-(4-dimethylaminobenzylidene)-4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (dbpcd) and X-ray diffraction structure of the platinum(II) compound PtCl2(dbpcd) 1.5CH2Cl2

    SciTech Connect

    Atim, Silvia; Wang, Xiaoping; Richmond, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of the donor acceptor ligand 2-(4-dimethylaminobenzylidene)-4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (dbpcd) from the Knoevenagel condensation of 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde with 4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (bpcd) is reported. This new ligand reacts with PtCl2(cod) to afford the platinum(II) complex PtCl2(dbpcd) in high yield. The dbpcd ligand and PtCl2(dbpcd) have been isolated and characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, MO calculations at the extended H ckel level, and X-ray diffraction analysis in the case of PtCl2(dbpcd).

  11. Vapor-phase epitaxy of gallium nitride by gallium arc discharge evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikman, S.; Keller, S.; Mishra, U. K.

    2006-08-01

    Vapor-phase epitaxy of GaN was performed by combining ammonia with gallium evaporated into an inert gas stream by a DC arc discharge, and letting the mixture pass through a pair of heated graphite susceptors. Growth rates as high as 30 μm/h were achieved. The growth on the top sample was specular in a large area, and was of high quality as characterized by atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The bottom sample had a high density of macroscopic defects, presumably caused by Ga droplets in the gas phase resulting from the arc evaporation process. The experimental growth rate was found to be less than {1}/{3} of values predicted in a computer flow dynamic model of the growth system, and Ga-NH 3 pre-reactions were implicated as the likely cause of the discrepancy. The growth efficiency, calculated to 2%, could arguably be improved by reducing the reactor growth pressure, and by changing the reactor geometry to avoid Ga condensation on walls. Potential advantages of the described growth technique are cheap source materials of high purity and low equipment costs. Furthermore, since no corrosive gasses were used, hardware corrosion and gas-phase impurities can be reduced.

  12. Gallium uptake in the thyroid gland in amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, M.C.; Dake, M.D.; Okerlund, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Amiodarone is an iodinated antiarrhythmic agent that is effective in the treatment of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. A number of side effects are seen, including pulmonary toxicity and thyroid dysfunction. A patient with both amiodarone-induced pneumonitis and hyperthyroidism who exhibited abnormal gallium activity in the lungs, as well as diffuse gallium uptake in the thyroid gland is presented. The latter has not been previously reported and supports the concept of iodide-induced thyroiditis with gallium uptake reflecting the inflammatory response.

  13. Structure and Chemistry of Nickel Oxide-Nickel Platinum-Platinum Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Judith Chun-Hsu

    Recent investigations have demonstrated that interfacial reactions can be used to modify the mechanical strength of metal-ceramic interfaces. To better understand this phenomena, the structure and chemistry of model metal-ceramic interfaces, formed by diffusion bonding single crystals of NiO and Pt together, were studied using electron microscopy techniques. Lattice imaging shows that the interface structure between NiO and Pt may facet depending on the relative twist geometry between them. As suggested by Ni-Pt phase diagrams and previous work, suitable choice of annealing temperature, time and oxygen partial pressure allows the formation of the intermetallic compound NiPt. Conventional transmission electron microscope (CTEM) studies reveal the presence of a 0-20 nm thick NiPt interlayer after heat treatment at low oxygen activities. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) investigations showed that the nickel diffuses into the platinum for 100nm. Some thermodynamic and kinetic information of the NiPt formation at the NiO -Pt interface, based on the CTEM and EELS studies, is presented. The influence of crystallography, impurities and oxygen activity on the interfacial reactions were investigated. In the (100)_{NiO}//(100)_ {Pt} system, a NiPt layer forms along the interface. Whereas in the (100)_{NiO }//(111)_{Pt} system, NiPt particles appear within the Pt matrix. The growth of the intermetallic interlayer is also sensitive to impurities. The presence of silicon impurities in the heat treatment furnace reduces the thickness of the NiPt interlayer by nearly a factor of ten. The NiPt interlayer may or may not form due to slight changes in the oxygen activity of the heat treatment. A simple bonding model was previously proposed to explain why NiPt improves the interfacial shear strength. That is, the NiPt layer prevents the formation of weak Pt-O bonds. In order to experimentally check this model, NiPt -NiO interface planes, produced by internal oxidation in order

  14. Platinum(II) Metallomesogens: New External-Stimuli-Responsive Photoluminescence Materials.

    PubMed

    Cuerva, Cristián; Campo, José A; Cano, Mercedes; Lodeiro, Carlos

    2016-07-11

    New dicatenar isoquinoline-functionalized pyrazoles, [Hpz(R(n,n)iq) ] (R(n,n)=C6 H3 (OCn H2n+1 )2 ; n=4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18), have been strategically designed and synthesized to induce mesomorphic and luminescence properties into the corresponding bis(isoquinolinylpyrazolate)platinum(II) complexes [Pt(pz(R(n,n)iq) )2 ]. Thermal studies reveal that all platinum(II) compounds exhibit columnar mesophases over an exceptionally wide temperature range, above 300 °C in most cases. The photophysical behavior was also investigated in solution and in the solid state. As a consequence of the formation of Pt⋅⋅⋅Pt interactions, the weak greenish emission of the platinum derivatives turns bright orange in the mesophase. Additionally, the complexes are sensitive to a great variety of external inputs, such as temperature, mechanical grinding, pressure, solvents, and vapors. On this basis, they are used as dopant agents of a polyvinylpyrrolidone or poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer matrix to achieve stimuli-responsive thin films. PMID:27273696

  15. Evidence for growth inhibition by platinum electrodes at low current levels.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, B T; Bojsen, J

    1982-04-01

    Platinum is considered to be a noble metal and is often used for electrodes in biological investigations. However, platinum electrodes can form inhibitory compounds, as pointed out by Rosenberg et al. 1965. The aim of this study was to investigate whether platinum electrodes are inert in the extremely low frequency (ELF) range of currents. Human bone marrow cells cultured in agar were used as target cells and were grown under various electrical conditions. A 50% reduction in growth compared with controls was obtained by average currents of 2300 microA at 8 Hz and 110 microA at 80 Hz, the current being derived from a square bipolar voltage waveform. D.c. currents were also inhibitory, with a value of 50% at the 1.4 microA level. The cells were probably not affected directly by the current, since inhibitory properties could be stored in agar and saline and because titanium electrodes at equal current levels did not produce the same effect. PMID:7070062

  16. Platinum carboxylato-pendant-arm macrocycles: structure, redox properties and anti-cancer potential.

    PubMed

    Haines, R I; Hutchings, D R; McCormack, T M

    2001-05-01

    In an attempt to generate new platinum compounds that may be effective in the treatment of cancer, as well as having a lower toxicity than traditional platins and being orally viable, we are studing the synthesis and reactivity of platinum complexes of tetraazamacrocycles bearing carboxylato pendant arms. We have synthesized adducts of meso- and rac-5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1,7-diacetic acid (L(1)H(2)). The meso-Pt(II)L(1) complex is unstable with respect to disproportionation, forming platinum metal and [meso-Pt(IV)L(1)](2+). The rac-isomer shows less tendency to disproportionate. Cyclic voltammetry suggests that the rac-Pt(II)L(1) complex undergoes two one-electron oxidations. Using bis-triazacyclononanenickel(III), [Ni(III)(tacn)(2)](3+) as an outer-sphere oxidant, the self-exchange rate for the [Pt(II/III)L](0/+) couple has been estimated at 0.034 M(-1) s(-1). PMID:11377689

  17. Gallium arsenide pilot line for high performance components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vehse, Robert C.; Lapham, E. F.

    1991-08-01

    The Gallium Arsenide Pilot Line for High Performance Components (Pilot Line III) is to develop a facility for the fabrication of GaAs logic and memory chips. Physical and electrical analysis conclusively demonstrated that the EFET problem was caused by residual AlGaAs remaining in the EFET tubs. For our Self Aligned Refractory Gate Integrated Circuit (SARGIC) process to perform as designed, the FET gates must be placed directly on Gallium Arsenide. Residual AlGaAs increases the FET thresholds and thereby substantially changes device characteristics. We solved the problem by developing a new etch process using a PP etchant (H3PO4 and H2O2). AlGaAs is now completely removed from EFET tubs and EFET threshold control has been restored. With wafer starts suspended and other program work minimized to conserve resources, there was little primary circuit testing. A new result is that the 32-Bit Multiplier is functional at 60 MHz.

  18. Neutron detection using boron gallium nitride semiconductor material

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, Katsuhiro; Inoue, Yoku; Nakano, Takayuki; Mimura, Hidenori; Aoki, Toru

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we developed a new neutron-detection device using a boron gallium nitride (BGaN) semiconductor in which the B atom acts as a neutron converter. BGaN and gallium nitride (GaN) samples were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, and their radiation detection properties were evaluated. GaN exhibited good sensitivity to α-rays but poor sensitivity to γ-rays. Moreover, we confirmed that electrons were generated in the depletion layer under neutron irradiation. This resulted in a neutron-detection signal after α-rays were generated by the capture of neutrons by the B atoms. These results prove that BGaN is useful as a neutron-detecting semiconductor material.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of gallium polyaminothiols (PAT).

    PubMed

    John, C S; Kinuya, S; Minear, G; Keast, R K; Paik, C H

    1993-02-01

    Two polyaminothiol ligands, one hexadentate, N,N',N"-tris[2-methyl(2-propanethiol)]-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (TACN), and another potentially heptadentate, tris[2-methyl(2-propanethiol)]aminoethylamine (TMAE), were synthesized and characterized using spectroscopic and analytical methods. Both ligands were labeled with gallium-67 at pH 3.0-3.5 in high yields. The resulting gallium chelates were lipophilic. The biodistribution studies for both the chelates showed hepatic uptake and biliary clearance. The total % ID activity for [67Ga]TACN in liver and intestine at 5 min was 33.86 increasing gradually to 61.4% at 30 min. The chelates were in vivo stable to plasma-transferrin transchelation as confirmed by scintigraphic images obtained by [67Ga]TACN in rats and by plasma incubation of the chelates. These results indicate that Ga-TACN is a potentially useful tracer for hepatobiliary imaging using PET. No brain uptake was found. PMID:8448576

  20. Ultra-low threshold gallium nitride photonic crystal nanobeam laser

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Nan Woolf, Alexander; Wang, Danqing; Hu, Evelyn L.; Zhu, Tongtong; Oliver, Rachel A.; Quan, Qimin

    2015-06-08

    We report exceptionally low thresholds (9.1 μJ/cm{sup 2}) for room temperature lasing at ∼450 nm in optically pumped Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanobeam cavity structures. The nanobeam cavity geometry provides high theoretical Q (>100 000) with small modal volume, leading to a high spontaneous emission factor, β = 0.94. The active layer materials are Indium Gallium Nitride (InGaN) fragmented quantum wells (fQWs), a critical factor in achieving the low thresholds, which are an order-of-magnitude lower than obtainable with continuous QW active layers. We suggest that the extra confinement of photo-generated carriers for fQWs (compared to QWs) is responsible for the excellent performance.

  1. Preparation Of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Films For Solar Cells

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Keane, James; Tennant, Andrew L. , Tuttle, John R.; Ramanathan, Kannan; Noufi, Rommel

    1998-08-08

    High quality thin films of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide useful in the production of solar cells are prepared by electrodepositing at least one of the constituent metals onto a glass/Mo substrate, followed by physical vapor deposition of copper and selenium or indium and selenium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2. Using an AC voltage of 1-100 KHz in combination with a DC voltage for electrodeposition improves the morphology and growth rate of the deposited thin film. An electrodeposition solution comprising at least in part an organic solvent may be used in conjunction with an increased cathodic potential to increase the gallium content of the electrodeposited thin film.

  2. Cutaneous gallium uptake in patients with AIDS with mycobacterium avium-intracellulare septicemia

    SciTech Connect

    Allwright, S.J.; Chapman, P.R.; Antico, V.F.; Gruenewald, S.M.

    1988-07-01

    Gallium imaging is increasingly being used for the early detection of complications in patients with AIDS. A 26-year-old homosexual man who was HIV antibody positive underwent gallium imaging for investigation of possible Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Widespread cutaneous focal uptake was seen, which was subsequently shown to be due to mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) septicemia. This case demonstrates the importance of whole body imaging rather than imaging target areas only, the utility of gallium imaging in aiding the early detection of clinically unsuspected disease, and shows a new pattern of gallium uptake in disseminated MAI infection.

  3. Cell membrane penetration and mitochondrial targeting by platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrano, Adriano A.; Herrmann, Rudolf; Strobel, Claudia; Rennhak, Markus; Engelke, Hanna; Reller, Armin; Hilger, Ingrid; Wixforth, Achim; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    In this work we investigate the interaction between endothelial cells and nanoparticles emitted by catalytic converters. Although catalyst-derived particles are recognized as growing burden added to environmental pollution, very little is known about their health impact. We use platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles as model compounds for the actual emitted particles and focus on their fast uptake and association with mitochondria, the cell's powerhouse. Using live-cell imaging and electron microscopy we clearly show that 46 nm platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles can rapidly penetrate cell membranes and reach the cytosol. Moreover, if suitably targeted, these particles are able to selectively attach to mitochondria. These results are complemented by cytotoxicity assays, thus providing insights into the biological effects of these particles on cells. Interestingly, no permanent membrane disruption or any other significant adverse effects on cells were observed. The unusual uptake behavior observed for 46 nm nanoparticles was not observed for equivalent but larger 143 nm and 285 nm platinum-decorated particles. Our results demonstrate a remarkable particle size effect in which particles smaller than ~50-100 nm escape the usual endocytic pathway and translocate directly into the cytosol, while particles larger than ~150 nm are internalized by conventional endocytosis. Since the small particles are able to bypass endocytosis they could be explored as drug and gene delivery vehicles. Platinum-decorated nanoparticles are therefore highly interesting in the fields of nanotoxicology and nanomedicine.In this work we investigate the interaction between endothelial cells and nanoparticles emitted by catalytic converters. Although catalyst-derived particles are recognized as growing burden added to environmental pollution, very little is known about their health impact. We use platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles as model compounds for the actual emitted particles and

  4. Gallium(III) Tetraphenylporphyrinates Containing Hydrosulfide and Thiolate Ligands: Structural Models for Sulfur-Bound Iron(III) Hemes.

    PubMed

    Meininger, Daniel J; Chee-Garza, Max; Arman, Hadi D; Tonzetich, Zachary J

    2016-03-01

    Gallium(III) tetraphenylporphyrinates (TPP) containing anionic sulfur ligands have been prepared and characterized in the solid state and solution. The complexes serve as structural models for iron(III) heme sites containing sulfur coordination that otherwise prove challenging to synthesize due to the propensity for reduction to iron(II). The compounds prepared include the first well-characterized example of a trivalent metalloporphyrinate containing a terminal hydrosulfide ligand, [Ga(SH)(TPP)], as well as [Ga(SEt)(TPP)], [Ga(SPh)(TPP)], and [Ga(SSi(i)Pr3)(TPP)]. The stability of these compounds toward reduction has permitted an investigation of their solid-state structures and electrochemistry. The structural features and reaction chemistry of the complexes in relation to their iron(III) analogs is discussed. PMID:26872092

  5. Diagnosis of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm using 67-gallium citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Blumoff, R.L.; McCartney, W.; Jaques, P.; Johnson, G. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    Mycotic aneurysms of the abdominal aorta are uncommon, but potentially lethal problems. Clinical subtleties may suggest their presence, but in the past, definitive diagnosis has been dependent on surgical exploration or autopsy findings. A case is presented in which 67-gallium citrate abdominal scanning localized the site of sepsis in an abdominal aortic aneurysm and allowed for prompt and successful surgical therapy. This noninvasive technique is recommended as a adjunct in the diagnosis of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  6. Two-photon photovoltaic effect in gallium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jichi; Chiles, Jeff; Sharma, Yagya D; Krishna, Sanjay; Fathpour, Sasan

    2014-09-15

    The two-photon photovoltaic effect is demonstrated in gallium arsenide at 976 and 1550 nm wavelengths. A waveguide-photodiode biased in its fourth quadrant harvests electrical power from the optical energy lost to two-photon absorption. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulations based on nonlinear wave propagation in waveguides and the drift-diffusion model of carrier transport in semiconductors. Power efficiency of up to 8% is theoretically predicted in optimized devices. PMID:26466255

  7. Pyochelin potentiates the inhibitory activity of gallium on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Minandri, Fabrizia; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Gallium (Ga) is an iron mimetic that has successfully been repurposed for antibacterial chemotherapy. To improve the antibacterial potency of Ga on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the effect of complexation with a variety of siderophores and synthetic chelators was tested. Ga complexed with the pyochelin siderophore (at a 1:2 ratio) was more efficient than Ga(NO3)3 in inhibiting P. aeruginosa growth, and its activity was dependent on increased Ga entrance into the cell through the pyochelin translocon. PMID:24957826

  8. Use of Gallium-67 in the diagnosis of occult infections

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1981-05-01

    The mechanism of Ga-67 citrates in the diagnosis of infection involves the rapid binding of gallium by transferrin. The Ga-67-transferrin complex gains access into inflammatory tissue to some extent through the leaky endothelium of vessels at sites of inflammation. In addition, Ga-67 binds to a limited extent to circulating neutrophils. Advances in imaging techniques using Ga-67 citrates are discussed. The clinical applications include the diagnosis of bone and joint infections, pulmonary lesions, and infections of the urinary tract.

  9. Appraisal of lupus nephritis by renal imaging with gallium-67

    SciTech Connect

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Hryhorczuk, D.O.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1985-08-01

    To assess the activity of lupus nephritis, 43 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were studied by gallium imaging. Delayed renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive result, was noted in 25 of 48 scans. Active renal disease was defined by the presence of hematuria, pyuria (10 or more red blood cells or white blood cells per high-power field), proteinuria (1 g or more per 24 hours), a rising serum creatinine level, or a recent biopsy specimen showing proliferative and/or necrotizing lesions involving more than 20 percent of glomeruli. Renal disease was active in 18 instances, inactive in 23, and undetermined in seven (a total of 48 scans). Sixteen of the 18 scans (89 percent) in patients with active renal disease showed positive findings, as compared with only four of 23 scans (17 percent) in patients with inactive renal disease (p less than 0.001). Patients with positive scanning results had a higher rate of hypertension (p = 0.02), nephrotic proteinuria (p = 0.01), and progressive renal failure (p = 0.02). Mild mesangial nephritis (World Health Organization classes I and II) was noted only in the patients with negative scanning results (p = 0.02) who, however, showed a higher incidence of severe extrarenal SLE (p = 0.04). It is concluded that gallium imaging is a useful tool in evaluating the activity of lupus nephritis.

  10. Incidental diagnosis of pregnancy on bone and gallium scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Malat, J.; Collica, C.J.; Richman, A.H.

    1986-03-01

    Bone and gallium scintigraphy were performed as part of the diagnostic workup of a 21-yr-old woman who presented at our institution with a history of progressively worsening low back pain over a 1-wk period of time. The angiographic phase of the bone scan demonstrated a well-defined radionuclide blush within the pelvis just cephalad to the urinary bladder with persistent hyperemia noted in the blood-pool image. We attribute these findings to a uterine blush secondary to the pronounced uterine muscular hyperplasia, hyperemia, and edema that accompany pregnancy. Gallium scintigraphy demonstrated intense bilateral breast accumulation of the imaging agent in a typical doughnut pattern which is commonly found in the prelactating and lactating breast. Also demonstrated was apparent gallium accumulation in the placenta. This case is presented to emphasize the radionuclide findings that occur during pregnancy, particularly the incidental finding of radionuclide blush during the angiographic phase of a radionuclide scintigraphy which should alert the nuclear physician to the possibility of pregnancy in a woman of childbearing age.

  11. Defects in gallium nitride nanowires: first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Li, Jingbo; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2010-08-15

    Atomic configurations and formation energies of native defects in an unsaturated GaN nanowire grown along the [001] direction and with (100) lateral facets are studied using large-scale ab initio calculation. Cation and anion vacancies, antisites and interstitials in the neutral charge state are all considered. The nitrogen related defects are more stable than the gallium related defects under nitrogen-rich conditions. The configurations of these defects in the core region of the nanowire are same as those in the bulk GaN. The relaxation of vacancies is generally small, but the relaxation around antisite defects is large. The nitrogen interstitial relaxes into a split interstitial configuration. The configurations of the defects in the outermost free surface region are different than those in the core. A Ga atom on the outmost surface is replaced by a Ga interstital, and is ejected on to the surface to become an adsorbed atom. A gallium atom at the outermost surface can also be ejected out to become an adsorbed atom. Nitrogen interstitials form a split-interstitial configuration with one of the nearest-neighbor nitrogens. For a Ga vacancy at the edge of the side plane of the nanowire, nitrogen atom at a gallium site and nitrogen interstitial often induced the formation of N2 molecules with low formation energy, which agrees well with experiment findings [Nano Letters 9, 1844 (2009)].

  12. Structure and Properties of Epitaxial Dielectrics on gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Virginia Danielle

    GaN is recognized as a possible material for metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) used in high temperature, high power and high speed electronic applications. However, high gate leakage and low device breakdown voltages limit their use in these applications. The use of high-kappa dielectrics, which have both a high permittivity (ε) and high band gap energy (Eg), can reduce the leakage current density that adversely affects MOS devices. La2O3 and Sc2O 3 are rare earth oxides with a large Eg (6.18 eV and 6.3 eV respectively) and a relatively high ε (27 and 14.1 respectively), which make them good candidates for enhancing MOSFET performance. Epitaxial growth of oxides is a possible approach to reducing leakage current and Fermi level pinning related to a high density of interface states for dielectrics on compound semiconductors. In this work, La2O3 and Sc2O 3 were characterized structurally and electronically as potential epitaxial gate dielectrics for use in GaN based MOSFETs. GaN surface treatments were examined as a means for additional interface passivation and influencing subsequent oxide formation. Potassium persulfate (K2(SO4)2) and potassium hydroxide (KOH) were explored as a way to achieve improved passivation and desired surface termination for GaN films deposited on sapphire substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that KOH left a nitrogen-rich interface, while K2(SO 4)2 left a gallium-rich interface, which provides a way to control surface oxide formation. K2(SO4)2 exhibited a shift in the O1s peak indicating the formation of a gallium-rich GaOx at the surface with decreased carbon contaminants. GaO x acts as a passivating layer prior to dielectric deposition, which resulted in an order of magnitude reduction in leakage current, a reduced hysteresis window, and an overall improvement in device performance. Furthermore, K2(SO4)2 resulted in an additional 0.4 eV of

  13. Comparison of the antimicrobial activities of gallium nitrate and gallium maltolate against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fecteau, Marie-Eve; Aceto, Helen W; Bernstein, Lawrence R; Sweeney, Raymond W

    2014-10-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is an enteric infection of cattle and other ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). This study compared the antimicrobial activities of gallium nitrate (GaN) and gallium maltolate (GaM) against two field MAP isolates by use of broth culture. The concentrations that resulted in 99% growth inhibition of isolates 1 and 2 were, respectively, 636 µM and 183 µM for GaN, and 251 µM and 142 µM for GaM. For both isolates, time to detection was significantly higher for GaM than GaN. These results suggest that GaM is more efficient than GaN in inhibiting MAP growth in vitro. PMID:25155307

  14. Exhaust system having a gold-platinum group metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ragle, Christie Susan; Silver, Ronald G.; Zemskova, Svetlana Mikhailovna; Eckstein, Colleen J.

    2011-12-06

    A method of providing an exhaust treatment device is disclosed. The method includes applying a catalyst including gold and a platinum group metal to a particulate filter. The concentration of the gold and the platinum group metal is sufficient to enable oxidation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

  15. Exhaust system having a gold-platinum group metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ragle, Christie Susan; Silver, Ronald G.; Zemskova, Svetlana Mikhailovna; Eckstein, Colleen J.

    2012-08-07

    A method of providing an exhaust treatment device is disclosed. The method includes applying a catalyst including gold and a platinum group metal to a particulate filter. The concentration of the gold and the platinum group metal is sufficient to enable oxidation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

  16. Catalytic activities of platinum nanotubes: a density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prajna; Gupta, Bikash C.; Jena, Puru

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate the catalytic properties of platinum nanotubes using density functional theory based calculations. In particular, we study the dissociation of hydrogen and oxygen molecules as well as oxidation of CO molecules. The results indicate that platinum nanotubes have good catalytic properties and can be effectively used in converting CO molecule to CO2.

  17. Bimetallic alloy electrocatalysts with multilayered platinum-skin surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.; Wang, Chao; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2016-01-26

    Compositions and methods of preparing a bimetallic alloy having enhanced electrocatalytic properties are provided. The composition comprises a PtNi substrate having a surface layer, a near-surface layer, and an inner layer, where the surface layer comprises a nickel-depleted composition, such that the surface layer comprises a platinum skin having at least one atomic layer of platinum.

  18. 76 FR 8627 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Platinum, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... Class E airspace at Platinum AK (75 FR 77572). Interested parties were invited to participate in this... U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revision of Class E Airspace; Platinum, AK AGENCY:...

  19. Vapor-deposited platinum as a fuel-cell catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asher, W. J.; Batzold, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Electrodes are prepared by vacuum deposition of platinum on nickel substrate with conventional vapor-deposition apparatus. Amount of platinum loaded on substrate can be veried by changing exposure time during deposition. These electrodes are significantly more effective than conventional oxygen electrodes.

  20. Radiosensitization of DNA in presence of Pt(II)-based compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmiałek, Małgorzata A.; Ptasińska, Sylwia; Gow, Jason; Pieve, Chiara Da; Mason, Nigel J.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray irradiation of plasmid DNA in presence of platinum (II)-based compounds was carried out in order to assess the radiosensitization capabilities of these drugs. In present investigations pBR322 plasmid DNA was used to monitor the effectiveness of chosen compounds in inducing strand breaks. Samples were incubated in the presence of potential radiosensitisers: platinum (II) bromide and cis-diamminedibromoplatinum (II). The results were examined against a common cancer chemotherapy drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II). It was found that platinum (II) bromide can greatly increase the levels of single- and double-strand break formation observed in the irradiated samples with respect to the samples containing platinum as a radiosensitizer only, possessing very little chemotherapeutic activity. The suggested drugs exhibit much higher level of radiosensitivity than widely used cisplatin and thus may be good candidates for cancer treatment.

  1. Role of cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, platinum, selenium, and titanium in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kazantzis, G

    1981-01-01

    The possible carcinogenicity of cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, platinum, selenium, and titanium is reviewed, taking into account epidemiological data, the results of animal experimental studies, data on mutagenic effects and on other in vitro test systems. Of the great variety of occupations where exposure to one of these metals may occur, only haematite mining has been clearly shown to involve an increased human cancer risk. While the possibility that haematite might in some way act as a carcinogen has to be taken into consideration it is more likely that other carcinogens are responsible. Certain platinum coordination complexes are used in cancer chemotherapy, are mutagenic, and likely to be carcinogenic. Cobalt, its oxide and sulfide, certain lead salts, one organomanganese, and one organotitanium compound have been shown to have a limited carcinogenic effect in experimental animal studies, and except for titanium appear to be mutagenic. Certain mercury compounds are mutagenic but none have been shown to be carcinogenic. The presently available data are inadequate to assess the possible carcinogenicity of selenium compounds, but a few observations suggest that selenium may suppress the effect of other carcinogens administered to experimental animals and may even be associated with lower cancer mortality rates in man. Epidemiological observations are essential for the assessment of a human cancer risk, but the difficulty in collecting past exposure data in occupational groups and the complexity of multiple occupational exposures with changes over time, limits the usefulness of retrospective epidemiological studies. PMID:7023929

  2. Platinum trans-Bis(borirene) complexes displaying coplanarity and communication across a platinum metal center.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Holger; Damme, Alexander; Dewhurst, Rian D; Kelch, Hauke; Macha, Bret B; Radacki, Krzysztof; Vargas, Alfredo; Ye, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Ambient-temperature photolysis of the aminoborylene complex [(OC)5 Cr=B=N(SiMe3 )2 ] in the presence of a series of trans-bis(alkynyl)platinum(II) precursors of the type trans-[Pt(CCAr)2 (PEt3 )2 ] (Ar=Ph, p-C6 H4 OMe, and p-C6 H4 CF3 ) successfully leads to twofold transfer of the borylene moiety [:B=N(SiMe3 )2 ] onto the alkyne functionalities. The alkynyl precursors and resultant bis(borirene)platinum(II) complexes formed are of the type trans-[Pt(B{=N(SiMe3 )2 }C=CAr)2 (PEt3 )2 ] (Ar=Ph, p-C6 H4 OMe, and p-C6 H4 CF3 ). These species have all been successfully characterized by NMR, IR, and UV/Vis spectroscopy as well as by elemental analysis. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction has verified that these trans-bis(borirene)platinum(II) complexes display coplanarity between the twin three-membered rings across the platinum core in the solid state and stand as the first examples of coplanar conformations of twin borirene systems. These complexes were modeled using density functional theory (DFT), providing information helpful in determining the ability of the transition metal core to interact with each individual borirene ring system and allowing for the observed coplanarity of these rings in the solid state. This proposed transition metal interaction with the twin borirene systems is manifested in the electronic characterization of these borirene species, which display divergent photophysical UV/Vis spectroscopic profiles compared to a previously published mono(borirene)platinum(II) complex. PMID:25430871

  3. Picazoplatin, an Azide-Containing Platinum(II) Derivative for Target Analysis by Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    White, Jonathan D.; Osborn, Maire F.; Moghaddam, Alan D.; Guzman, Lindsay E.; Haley, Michael M.; DeRose, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the broad use of platinum-based chemotherapeutics, identification of their full range of cellular targets remains a significant challenge. In order to identify, visualize, and isolate cellular targets of Pt(II) complexes, we have modified the chemotherapeutic drug picoplatin with an azide moiety for subsequent click reactivity. The new compound picazoplatin readily binds DNA and RNA oligonucleo-tides and undergoes facile post-labeling click reactions to alkyne-fluorophore conjugates. Pt-fluorophore click reactions in ribosomal RNA purified from drug-treated S. cerevisiae demonstrate its potential for future in vivo efforts. PMID:23879391

  4. Induction of protein crystallization by platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoshihiro; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated effects of platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) on protein crystal nucleation. The presence of PtNPs increased the number of crystals in a crystallization solution, indicating that the PtNPs have the ability to promote the crystal nucleation. Dynamic light scattering measurements revealed that the PtNP gathers more than 10 lysozyme molecules around it to form an embryonic complex of PtNP and lysozyme. Zeta potential measurements revealed that the charges of the lysozyme molecules were reduced by delocalization of their charges in the complex. As a result, the energy barrier of association between the complexes is reduced, followed by the nucleation.

  5. Impedance spectra of polypyrrole coated platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Onnela, Niina; Savolainen, Virpi; Hiltunen, Maiju; Kellomäki, Minna; Hyttinen, Jari

    2013-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) coated electrodes may provide new solutions to increase the charge injection capacity and biocompatibility of metal electrodes in e.g., neural stimulus applications. In this study, electrical impedance spectra of PPy coated platinum (Pt) electrodes having three different coating thicknesses were measured and modeled. A suitable equivalent electrical circuit providing the material characteristics was chosen and the impedance data was analyzed using the model and data fitting. The modeled parameter values of different coating thicknesses were compared and our results demonstrated the changes in charge transfer properties and mechanisms of thin and thick PPy film coatings. PMID:24109743

  6. Computational Study of Platinum Group Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popoola, A. I.; Lowther, J. E.

    2014-02-01

    Various properties of substitutional alloys formed from aluminium and the platinum group metals (PGMs) are examined using density functional (D-F) theory and show strong variations depending on metal type. A similar pattern for the binary alloys is observed using molecular dynamics modeling employing Sutton Chen potentials. All results suggest that several of the PGMs could have superior properties to the presently used Ni3Al alloy for high temperature applications. Some phases are predicted to be stable with extremely high melting temperatures (MTs).

  7. Response time correlations for platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.; Ash, R. L.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    The 'plunge method' recommended by ASTM has been used to determine the time constant of 100-ohm platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) considered for use in the National Transonic Facility. It is shown that the response time of ventilated PRT can be correlated with the reciprocal of the heat transfer coefficient in a given field. Universal correlations are established for the 100- and 1000-ohm PRT with uncertainties of 20 and 30 percent, respectively. The correlations are found to be consistent with the uncertainty involved in heat transfer correlations available in the literature and are recommended for use in flowing liquids and gases.

  8. POLLUTION PREVENTION IN THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY THROUGH RECOVERY AND RECYCLING OF GALLIUM AND ARSENIC FROM GAAS POLISHING WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A process was developed for the recovery of both arsenic and gallium from gallium arsenide polishing wastes. The economics associated with the current disposal techniques utilizing ferric hydroxide precipitation dictate that sequential recovery of toxic arsenic and valuble galliu...

  9. Platinum adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles, method for preparing, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Tong, YuYe; Du, Bingchen

    2015-08-11

    A superior, industrially scalable one-pot ethylene glycol-based wet chemistry method to prepare platinum-adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles has been developed that offers an exquisite control of the platinum packing density of the adlayers and effectively prevents sintering of the nanoparticles during the deposition process. The wet chemistry based method for the controlled deposition of submonolayer platinum is advantageous in terms of processing and maximizing the use of platinum and can, in principle, be scaled up straightforwardly to an industrial level. The reactivity of the Pt(31)-Ru sample was about 150% higher than that of the industrial benchmark PtRu (1:1) alloy sample but with 3.5 times less platinum loading. Using the Pt(31)-Ru nanoparticles would lower the electrode material cost compared to using the industrial benchmark alloy nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  10. EPM Fine-Disperse Platinum Coating on Powder Carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serga, V.; Kulikova, L.; Cvetkov, A.; Krumina, A.

    2012-08-01

    In the reported investigation the extractive-pyrolytic method of fine-disperse platinum coating on powder carriers was applied. Nanopowders of Al2O3, γ- AlO(OH), Y2O3, CeO2, SiO2 were used as carriers. Investigations on the effect of synthesis parameters on the mean size of platinum crystallites in the produced composites (metal content 4.8 wt%) have revealed that the increase of the pyrolysis temperature, annealing period, metal concentration in the precursor [(C8H17)3NH]2PtCI6 in toluene as well as the decrease of the specific surface area result in growth of the mean size of platinum crystallites. Microscopic studies show the formation of platinum spherical particles sized 5 to 35 nm as a results of the pyrolysis of the platinum-containing precursor in a water-soluble carrier (fine-disperse NaCl).

  11. A copper-based intrauterine device with gold or platinum core: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Gonen, R; Gal-Or, L; Zilberman, A; Scharf, M

    1981-12-01

    The use of copper intrauterine contraceptive devices is currently limited to 2-3 years, mainly due to wire fragmentation, which was observed as early as after 8 months of use. In the resulting search for a long-lasting device, two new systems of duplex wire, with gold and platinum cores electrolytically coated with copper, were devised and studied. Initially, duplex wires and controls were exposed to physiological solution. Copper dissolution rate, and corrosion morphology were studied by weight-loss measurements and optical metallography. Similar systems were then surgically implanted in rat uteri for varying periods up to 26 weeks. Electron microanalysis of corrosion products in addition to weight-loss measurements and metallography was performed. The results showed that a uniform and ductile copper coating is obtainable by electroplating on gold and platinum wires. The rate of copper dissolution is similar to that of solid copper wire. No dissolution of gold and platinum in the controls or coated wires was detected by weight loss, metallography or atomic absorption measurements. Microanalysis of the deposits and corrosion products on the wires in the uterine environment showed the presence of compounds containing sulphur, chlorine, calcium and copper. The results of this study suggest that supplementing IUDs with copper-coated gold or platinum wires may result in significant prolongation of the life-span of the device by preventing uncontrolled loss of copper caused by wire fragmentation. PMID:7326937

  12. Antiviral activity of platinum (II) and palladium (II) complexes of pyridine-2-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone.

    PubMed

    Varadinova, T; Kovala-Demertzi, D; Rupelieva, M; Demertzis, M; Genova, P

    2001-04-01

    A heterocyclic compound, pyridine-2-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (HFoTsc), and its six metal coordinated bound complexes, three with platinum (II) and three with palladium (II), were studied for their activity against herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection in cultured cells. According to their cytotoxicity the compounds were divided into two groups. Group I (cytotoxic compounds) included all three palladium complexes and [Pt(HFoTsc)2] Cl2, with maximum non-toxic concentration (MNC) of 1-10 micromol/l and a 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of 20-100 micromol/l. Group 2 (low cytotoxic compounds) with MNC of 100 micromol/l and CC50 of 548-5820 micromol/l included compounds in the following order: [Pt(HFoTsc)2] Cl2platinum complexes as well as [Pd(HFoTsc)2]Cl2 and [Pd(FoTsc)2] inhibited HSV- I infection following a structure-activity relationship but only [Pt(HFoTsc)2]Cl2 expressed a significant selectivity comparable to that of HFoTsc. However, [PdCl(FoTsc)] acting 48 hrs gave a higher infectious HSV-1 titer (170%) compared to control (100%, no compound). PMID:11719987

  13. Synthesis of substituted β-diketiminate gallium hydrides via oxidative addition of H-O bonds.

    PubMed

    Herappe-Mejía, Eduardo; Trujillo-Hernández, Karla; Carlos Garduño-Jiménez, Juan; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Martínez-Otero, Diego; Jancik, Vojtech

    2015-10-14

    Oxidative addition of LGa into the OH bonds from HCCCH2OH, Ph2Si(OH)2, (nBuO)2P(O)(OH) and 4-MeC6H4S(O)2(OH) results in the formation of four compounds of the general formula LGa(H)(O-X). The correlation of the Ga-O bond length and the strength of the Ga-H bond depending on the acidity of the OH group in the starting materials has been demonstrated. The molecular structures of all four compounds have been determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. DFT calculations were performed on the reacting complex of LGa with propargyl alcohol and show an OHGa hydrogen bond as the first interaction between the reagents. This reacting complex changes into a D-A complex where the oxygen atom of the propargyl alcohol coordinates to the gallium atom and in a concerted reaction the oxidative addition product is formed. PMID:26351779

  14. Therapeutic gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Miko; Foote, Matthew; Prow, Tarl W

    2015-01-01

    There are an abundance of nanoparticle technologies being developed for use as part of therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on a narrow class of metal nanoparticles that have therapeutic potential that is a consequence of elemental composition and size. The most widely known of these are gold nanoshells that have been developed over the last two decades for photothermal ablation in superficial cancers. The therapeutic effect is the outcome of the thickness and diameter of the gold shell that enables fine tuning of the plasmon resonance. When these metal nanoparticles are exposed to the relevant wavelength of light, their temperature rapidly increases. This in turn induces a localized photothermal ablation that kills the surrounding tumor tissue. Similarly, gold nanoparticles have been developed to enhance radiotherapy. The high-Z nature of gold dramatically increases the photoelectric cross-section. Thus, the photoelectric effects are significantly increased. The outcome of these interactions is enhanced tumor killing with lower doses of radiation, all while sparing tissue without gold nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles have been used for their wound healing properties in addition to enhancing the tumor-killing effects of anticancer drugs. Finally, platinum nanoparticles are thought to serve as a reservoir for platinum ions that can induce DNA damage in cancer cells. The future is bright with the path to clinical trials is largely cleared for some of the less complex therapeutic metal nanoparticle systems. PMID:25521618

  15. Core-Protected Platinum Monolayer Shell High-Stability Electrocatalysts for Fuel-Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; H Naohara; Y Cai; Y Choi; P Liu; M Vukmirovic; J Wang; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    Platinum monolayers can act as shells for palladium nanoparticles to lead to electrocatalysts with high activities and an ultralow platinum content, but high platinum utilization. The stability derives from the core protecting the shell from dissolution. In fuel-cell tests, no loss of platinum was observed in 200,000 potential cycles, whereas loss of palladium was significant.

  16. Core-Protected Platinum Monolayer Shell High-Stability Electrocatalysts for Fuel-Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, R.R.; Sasaki, K.; Naohara, H.; Cai, Y.; Choi, Y.M.; Liu, P.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Wang, J.X.

    2010-11-08

    More than skin deep: Platinum monolayers can act as shells for palladium nanoparticles to lead to electrocatalysts with high activities and an ultralow platinum content, but high platinum utilization. The stability derives from the core protecting the shell from dissolution. In fuel-cell tests, no loss of platinum was observed in 200?000 potential cycles, whereas loss of palladium was significant.

  17. Failure of Gallium-67 scintigraphy to identify reliably noninfectious interstitial nephritis: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G.D.; Lundy, M.M.; Moreno, A.J.

    1983-07-01

    Gallium-67 scintigraphy has been reported to be useful in the diagnosis of noninfectious interstitial nephritis. We studied 12 patients with Ga-67 citrate that were diagnosed as having noninfectious interstitial nephritis on renal biopsy. Only seven of the twelve patients with interstitial nephritis on biopsy were scan-positive. Gallium-67 scintigraphy may not reliably identify noninfectious interstitial nephritis.

  18. Low temperature recombination and trapping analysis in high purity gallium arsenide by microwave photodielectric techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khambaty, M. B.; Hartwig, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Some physical theories pertinent to the measurement properties of gallium arsenide are presented and experimental data are analyzed. A model for explaining recombination and trapping high purity gallium arsenide, valid below 77 K is assembled from points made at various places and an appraisal is given of photodielectric techniques for material property studies.

  19. Synthesis and use of (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium and indium

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2000-01-01

    Salts of (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are described. The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions have the formula [ER'R"R'"F].sup..crclbar. wherein E is aluminum, gallium, or indium, wherein F is fluorine, and wherein R', R", and R'" is each a fluorinated phenyl, fluorinated biphenyl, or fluorinated polycyclic group.

  20. X-ray microscopy studies on the pharmaco-dynamics of therapeutic gallium in rat bones

    SciTech Connect

    Bockman, R.; Repo, M.; Warrell, R.; Pounds, J.G.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Long, G.J.; Schidlovksy, G.; Jones, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    We describe here our preliminary results on gallium and calcium quantitation and localization using x-ray microscopy techniques at the X-26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at 50 to 100 ..mu..m resolution and 10/sup )minus/6) gg detection levels. Since the original observation of exogenous gallium accumulation in bones, several studies have demonstrated that gallium nitrate is extremely effective in preserving boen mienral content both in vivo and in vitro. Gallium nitrate therapy normalized serum calcium levels in a study of patients with caner-related hypercalcemia, resistant to standard hydration and diuretic therapy. Recently, gallium nitrate treatment has been shown to halt the accelerated bone resorption that is frequently associated with cancers metastatic to bone. Several lines of evidence from vitro studies recently led to the demonstration of increased bone calcium and improvement in hydroxyapatite crystallinity in adult gallium-treated rats. Evidence is rapidly accumulating that gallium nitrate is an effective, new therapeutic agent for inhibition of accelerated bone resorption associated with cancer-related hypercalcemia. It has also been suggested that gallium could have wide clinical applications in disorders characterized by accelerated calcium loss from bone. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Crystal growth, structure, infrared spectroscopy, and luminescent properties of rare-earth gallium borates RGa3(BO3)4, R = Nd, Sm-Er, Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikova, Elena Yu.; Boldyrev, Kirill N.; Aksenov, Sergey M.; Dobretsova, Elena A.; Kurazhkovskaya, Victoria S.; Leonyuk, Nikolay I.; Savon, Alexander E.; Deyneko, Dina V.; Ksenofontov, Dmitry A.

    2015-11-01

    Crystals of the rare-earth gallium borates RGa3(BO3)4, where R = Nd, Sm-Er, or Y, were grown by the flux method. The crystal structures of RGa3(BO3)4 (R = Eu, Ho) were studied on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. The hexagonal unit-cell parameters are a = 9.4657(1) Å, c = 7.4667(1) Å and a = 9.4394(2) Å, c = 7.4322(1) Å for EuGa3(BO3)4 and HoGa3(BO3)4, respectively, space group R32. Structure model was determined by "charge flipping" method and refined to R = 1.93% [EuGa3(BO3)4] and R = 1.89% [HoGa3(BO3)4] in anisotropic approximation. All grown gallium borates were investigated by infrared (IR) spectroscopy technique in a middle and far IR region. IR spectra of rare-earth gallium borates correspond to a pure rhombohedral (R32) polytype structure. Small inclusions of a monoclinic phase were detected only in Eu and Nd compounds. Luminescence of Eu and Ho gallium borates was studied at room temperature. The measured decay times for the most intensive emission lines of EuGa3(BO3)4 (∼614 nm) and HoGa3(BO3)4 (434 nm) are 940 μs and 140 μs, respectively. The scheme of crystal-field energy levels of Eu3+ in EuGa3(BO3)4 was built on the basis of the temperature-dependent optical transmission measurements combined with the luminescence data. The measured UV absorption edge for RGa3(BO3)4 is at about 300 nm.

  2. T-shaped platinum boryl complexes: synthesis and structure.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Holger; Radacki, Krzysztof; Uttinger, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    A series of cationic T-shaped 14-electron boryl complexes of the type trans-[(Cy3P)2Pt(B(X)X')]+ (X=Br; X'=ortho-tolyl, tBu, NMe2, piperidyl, Br; XX'=(NMe2)2, catecholato) were synthesized by halide abstraction from trans-[(Cy3P)2Pt(Br)(B(X)X')] (Cy=cyclohexyl) with Na[BArf 4] (Arf=3,5-(CF3)2C6H3), K[B(C6F5)4], or Na[BPh4]. X-ray diffraction studies were performed on all compounds, revealing a subtle correlation between the trans-influence of the boryl moiety and the Pt-H and Pt-C separations. However, no notable agostic C-H interaction with the platinum center was detected. trans-[(Cy3P)2Pt(BCat)]+ (Cat=catecholato), the complex with the shortest Pt-H and Pt-C distances, was treated with Lewis bases (L), forming compounds of the type trans-[(Cy3P)2Pt(L)(BCat)]+, thus proving a decisive influence of the degree of trans-influence exerted by the boryl ligands on the chemical reactivity of the title complexes. Another point that was investigated and clarified is the different behavior of trans-[(Cy3P)2Pt(Br)(B(Br)Mes)] (Mes=mesityl) towards K[B(C6F5)4] with formation of the borylene species trans-[(Cy3P)2Pt(Br)(BMes)]+. PMID:18663715

  3. Investigation of the variations in the crystallization front shape during growth of gadolinium gallium and terbium gallium crystals by the Czochralski method

    SciTech Connect

    Budenkova, O. N. Vasiliev, M. G.; Yuferev, V. S.; Ivanov, I. A.; Bul'kanov, A. M.; Kalaev, V. V.

    2008-12-15

    Numerical investigation of the variations in the crystallization front shape during growth of gadolinium gallium and terbium gallium garnet crystals in the same thermal zone and comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data have been performed. It is shown that the difference in the behavior of the crystallization front during growth of the crystals is related to their different transparency in the IR region. In gadolinium gallium garnet crystals, which are transparent to thermal radiation, a crystallization front, strongly convex toward the melt, is formed in the growth stage, which extremely rapidly melts under forced convection. Numerical analysis of this process has been performed within the quasistationary and nonstationary models. At the same time, in terbium gallium garnet crystals, which are characterized by strong absorption of thermal radiation, the phase boundary shape changes fairly smoothly and with a small amplitude. In this case, as the crystal is pulled, the crystallization front tends to become convex toward the crystal bulk.

  4. Alternative substrates for gallium nitride epitaxy and devices: Laterally overgrown gallium nitride and silicon(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Hugues

    Gallium nitride films grown on sapphire or silicon carbide using the conventional 'two-step' technique typically exhibit threading dislocations on the order of ˜109 cm-2, which are detrimental to device performance. In addition, sapphire and silicon carbide substrates are expensive and available only in limited size (2-3 inch diameter). This work addresses both issues by evaluating the properties of GaN films synthesized by lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) and conventional growth on sapphire and Si(111) substrates. LEO consists of partially masking a previously-grown seed layer and performing a subsequent regrowth such that the regrown features extend over the masked areas. Under favorable conditions the threading dislocations originating from the seed material are blocked by the mask material or redirected by the growing facets. In this work dislocation densities as low as ˜106 cm-2 were observed in the laterally-overgrown areas. The overgrown features exhibited well-defined facets ((0001), {11¯01}, {112¯0}, {112¯1}, {112¯2}), the persistence of which depended on the orientation of the mask as well as on the growth conditions. The relationship between the morphology of the LEO stripes and the growth conditions (temperature, pressure, ammonia and trimethylgallium partial pressures) was characterized for LEO on GaN/sapphire substrates. A qualitative model of the growth mechanisms was presented based on the microscopic structure of the growing surfaces. Microstructural characterization revealed a crystallographic tilt between the seed and the LEO region, which resulted in the formation of dislocations above the mask edge and at the junction plane of adjacent stripes. GaN stripes laterally overgrown on AlN/Si(111) exhibited similar properties. However, chemical interactions between the substrate and the precursors caused morphological degradation, which could be avoided by using a thick (≥180 nm) AlN buffer layer. In addition, thermal expansion mismatch

  5. Pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma in patients with AIDS: Scintigraphic diagnosis with sequential thallium and gallium scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Fuller, J.D.; O'Brien, M.J.; Parker, D.R.; Cooley, T.P.; Liebman, H.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is difficult to diagnose because the clinical presentations and radiographic findings are nonspecific. The authors report three proved cases of AIDS-associated pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed with sequential thallium and gallium scans. These scans demonstrated abnormal increase of pulmonary thallium uptake, whereas the gallium uptake was negative. In the authors' experience and in reports in the radiology literature, infected areas of the chest are generally thallium-negative on the delayed (3-hour) scans but are gallium-avid, whereas lymphomas are both thallium- and gallium-avid. The authors conclude that sequential thallium and gallium scans can be used to help diagnose pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma and distinguish it from other common AIDS-associated chest complications such as lymphoma and infections.

  6. Electrochemical platinum coatings for improving performance of implantable microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    de Haro, C; Mas, R; Abadal, G; Muñoz, J; Perez-Murano, F; Dominguez, C

    2002-12-01

    The formation and properties of electrochemical platinum films grown on platinum contacts contained in implantable flexible microelectrodes were investigated. The resulting platinum deposits were obtained by applying cyclic voltammetry to baths containing concentrations around 70 mM of chloroplatinic acid. A pre-activation step was necessary before the platinum-electroplating step in order to achieve good adhesive properties. The benefits of this process were ascribed to higher corrosion resistance, lower impedance and improved adhesion to the sputtered platinum. These improvements can make the application of this electrochemical technique highly useful for increasing the lifetime of implantable microelectrode arrays, such as cuff structures (IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 40 (1993) 640). These medical devices, obtained by semiconductor technology could be used for selective stimulation of nerve fascicles, although, poor long-term performance has been achieved with them. The dissolution rate for platinum thin-film microelectrodes under fixed corrosion test conditions was 38.8 ng/C. Lower rates were observed for electroplated microelectrodes, obtaining a dissolution rate of 7.8 ng/C under analogous experimental ageing conditions. The corrosion behaviour of the electroplated platinum during stimulation experimental conditions was estimated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. PMID:12322971

  7. Electron Beam Welder Used to Braze Sapphire to Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsgren, Roger C.; Vannuyen, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    A new use for electron beam brazing was recently developed by NASA Lewis Research Center's Manufacturing Engineering Division. This work was done to fabricate a fiberoptic probe (developed by Sentec Corporation) that could measure high temperatures less than 600 deg C of vibrating machinery, such as in jet engine combustion research. Under normal circumstances, a sapphire fiber would be attached to platinum by a ceramic epoxy. However, no epoxies can adhere ceramic fibers to platinum under such high temperatures and vibration. Also, since sapphire and platinum have different thermal properties, the epoxy bond is subjected to creep over time. Therefore, a new method had to be developed that would permanently and reliably attach a sapphire fiber to platinum. Brazing a sapphire fiber to a platinum shell. The fiber-optic probe assembly consists of a 0.015-in.-diameter sapphire fiber attached to a 0.25-in.-long, 0.059-in.-diameter platinum shell. Because of the small size of this assembly, electron beam brazing was chosen instead of conventional vacuum brazing. The advantage of the electron beam is that it can generate a localized heat source in a vacuum. Gold reactive braze was used to join the sapphire fiber and the platinum. Consequently, the sapphire fiber was not affected by the total heat needed to braze the components together.

  8. Surface Analysis of 4-Aminothiophenol Adsorption at Polycrystalline Platinum Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Fachini, Estevao R.; Contes, Enid J.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2008-01-01

    Formation of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on polycrystalline platinum electrodes has been studied by surface analysis and electrochemistry techniques. The 4-ATP monolayer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), Raman spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments give an idea about the packing quality of the monolayer. RAIR and Raman spectra for 4-ATP modified platinum electrodes showed the characteristic adsorption bands for neat 4-ATP indicating the adsorption of 4-ATP molecules on platinum surface. The adsorption on platinum was also evidenced by the presence of sulfur and nitrogen peaks by XPS survey spectra of the modified platinum electrodes. High resolution XPS studies and RAIR spectrum for platinum electrodes modified with 4-ATP indicate that molecules are sulfur-bonded to the platinum surface. The formation of S-Pt bond suggests that ATP adsorption gives up an amino terminated SAM. Thickness of the monolayer was evaluated via angle-resolved XPS (AR-XPS) analyses. Derivatization of 4-ATP SAM was performed using 16-Br hexadecanoic acid.

  9. Preparation of low-sulfur platinum and platinum aluminide layers in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Walston, William S. (Inventor); Schaeffer, Jon C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for preparing a coated nickel-base superalloy article reduces the sulfur content of the surface region of the metallic coating layers to low levels, thereby improving the adhesion of the coating layers to the article. The method includes depositing a first layer of platinum overlying the surface of a substrate, depositing a second layer of aluminum over the platinum, and final desulfurizing the article by heating the article to elevated temperature, preferably in hydrogen, and removing a small amount of material from the surface that was exposed during the step of heating. A ceramic layer may be deposited over the desulfurized article. The article may also be similarly desulfurized at other points in the fabrication procedure.

  10. Measurement of achievable plutonium decontamination from gallium by means of PUREX solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.D.; Campbell, D.O.; Felker, L.K.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the work described herein was to measure, experimentally, the achievable decontamination of plutonium from gallium by means of the PUREX solvent extraction process. Gallium is present in surplus weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) at a concentration of approximately 1 wt%. Plans are to dispose of surplus WG-Pu by converting it to UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. However, the presence of high concentrations of gallium in plutonium is a potential corrosion problem during the process of MOX fuel irradiation. The batch experiments performed in this study were designed to measure the capability of the PUREX solvent extraction process to separate gallium from plutonium under idealized conditions. Radioactive tracing of the gallium with {sup 72}Ga enabled the accurate measurement of low concentrations of extractable gallium. The experiments approximated the proposed flowsheet for WG-Pu purification, except that only one stage was used for each process: extraction, scrubbing, and stripping. With realistic multistage countercurrent systems, much more efficient separations are generally obtained. The gallium decontamination factor (DF) obtained after one extraction stage was about 3 x 10{sup 6}. After one scrub stage, all gallium measurements were less than the detection limit, which corresponded to DFs >5 x 10{sup 6}. All these values exceed a 10{sup 6} DF needed to meet a hypothetical 10-ppb gallium impurity limit in MOX fuel. The results of this study showed no inherent or fundamental problem with regard to removing gallium from plutonium.

  11. The role of the equatorial ligands for the redox behavior, mode of cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of platinum(IV) prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Göschl, Simone; Varbanov, Hristo P; Theiner, Sarah; Jakupec, Michael A; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2016-07-01

    The current study aims to elucidate the possible reasons for the significantly different pharmacological behavior of platinum(IV) complexes with cisplatin-, carboplatin- or nedaplatin-like cores and how this difference can be related to their main physicochemical properties. Chlorido-containing complexes are reduced fast (within hours) by ascorbate and are able to unwind plasmid DNA in the presence of ascorbate, while their tri- and tetracarboxylato analogs are generally inert under the same conditions. Comparison of the lipophilicity, cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of the investigated platinum compounds revealed the necessity to define new structure-property/activity relationships (SPRs and SARs). The higher activity and improved accumulation of platinum(IV) complexes bearing Cl(-) in equatorial position cannot only be attributed to passive diffusion facilitated by their lipophilicity. Therefore, further platinum accumulation experiments under conditions where active/facilitated transport mechanisms are suppressed were performed. Under hypothermic conditions (4°C), accumulation of dichloridoplatinum(IV) complexes is reduced down to 10% of the amount determined at 37°C. These findings suggest the involvement of active and/or facilitated transport in cellular uptake of platinum(IV) complexes with a cisplatin-like core. Studies with ATP depletion mediated by oligomycin and low glucose partially confirmed these observations, but their feasibility was severely limited in the adherent cell culture setting. PMID:27055943

  12. Synthesis and Properties of [7]Helicene-like Compounds Fused with a Fluorene Unit.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hiromi; Akiyama, Midori; Nakano, Koji; Naito, Masanobu; Nobusawa, Kazuyuki; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2016-08-01

    [7]Helicene-like compounds with a fluorene unit were successfully synthesized using a platinum-catalyzed double cyclization reaction. Crystal structures and photophysical properties of these compounds were also studied. In particular, they were found to exhibit a high fluorescence quantum yield and a relatively large g value (dissymmetric factor) of circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) for small molecules. PMID:27400646

  13. Aluminum additions in polycrystalline iron-gallium (Galfenol) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, M. D.; Summers, E.; Meloy, R.; Mosley, J.

    2008-03-01

    Galfenol alloys show promise as a new magnetically activated smart material based on their unique combination of relatively high magnetostrictive performance and good mechanical robustness. Investigations of aluminum additions to single crystal iron-gallium alloys have been done previously, and the magnetostrictive response seems to follow the rule of mixtures with decreasing saturation magnetostriction with increasing aluminum content. Aluminum is assumed to substitute for Ga directly in the alloy. Directionally solidified polycrystalline Galfenol alloys with aluminum additions were produced to determine the effects on the magnetic properties. Iron-gallium-aluminum alloys were investigated for two primary reasons: (1) Fe-Al alloys are well established and are typically manufactured using conventional thermo-mechanical processing techniques such as rolling; it is anticipated that aluminum additions will aid in the development of Galfenol alloy rolled sheets (2) Gallium prices continue to rise and a cost effective alternative needs to be investigated. Several Fe-Ga-Al alloy compositions were prepared using the Free Stand Zone Melting (FSZM) directional solidification technique. Alloy composition ranges investigated include: Fe 80.5Ga xAl 19.5-x (4.9<=x<=13), Fe 81.6Ga yAl 18.4-y (4.6<=y<=13.8), and Fe 85Ga zAl 15-z (3.75<=z<=11.25). Alloys were studied using EDS (chemistry verification), EBSD (crystallite orientation), and magnetic characterization techniques to determine the effect of aluminum addition on the polycrystalline binary Fe-Ga system. Magnetic properties such as saturation magnetostriction (λ sat), piezomagnetic constant (d 33), and relative magnetic permeability (μ r) of directionally solidified Fe-Ga-Al polycrystalline alloys will be compared to binary Fe-Ga alloys including investigations into the crystal orientation effects on these properties. Results suggest that up to 50% aluminum can be substituted in the alloy while maintaining considerable

  14. Survival of rabbit platelets labeled with gallium 67

    SciTech Connect

    Mazoyer, E.; Carpenter, D.; Ebbe, S.; Yano, Y.; Dalal, K.; Singh, M.; Mazoyer, B.

    1988-02-01

    The viability of rabbit platelets labeled with radioactive gallium was determined to analyze the feasibility of using platelets labeled with gallium 67 as an imaging reagent for positron emission tomography. Platelets were labeled with a complex of the longer lived gallium 67 and mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (MPO) or with sodium chromate Cr 51. Their survival after transfusion was measured. Labelling efficiency of /sup 67/Ga-MPO was 6.5% to 45.8% (26.8% +/- 2.8%) when platelets were suspended in saline solution, but was much lower (1.6% +/- 0.8%) in plasma. Platelets labeled with either radioisotope in a saline medium survived as well as platelets labeled with 51Cr in plasma. Recovery values 1 hour after transfusion and mean platelet survivals were 68.6% +/- 4.9% and 3.4 +/- 0.2 days for /sup 67/Ga in saline solution, 76.5% +/- 6.8% and 3.8 +/- 0.5 days for /sup 51/Cr in saline solution, and 73.7% +/- 7.4% and 3.6 +/- 0.5 days for /sup 51/Cr in plasma. Labeled platelet concentrates always contained extra radioactivity not firmly bound to viable platelets. A postlabeling wash in saline solution did not reduce this contamination and resulted in reduction of the number of viable platelets. The results showed that rabbit platelets labeled with /sup 67/Ga-MPO survived in the circulation as well as those labeled by a standard protocol with sodium chromate Cr 51.

  15. Gallium-68 chemistry for labeling platelets, proteins and lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Y.; Budinger, T.F.; Ebbe, S.N.; Mathis, C.A.; Moore, D.H.; Singh, M.; Brennan, K.; Moyer, B.R.; Nichols, A.

    1984-07-01

    Generator produced gallium-68 is a convenient useful radionuclide for positron emission tomography (PET) investigations. Gallium-68 labeled platelets and low density lipoproteins would be useful agents for PET studies of thrombosis and atherosclerosis in cardiovascular disease. To label these agents with Ga-68, we have studied the effects of trace metal contaminants in 1 N HCl elutions of Ga-68 from germanium-68 absorbed on a stannic oxide column. Studies were conducted on the formation and characteristics of Ga-68 complexes with the ligands 8-hydroxyquinoline, tropolone, and mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (MPO). Various parameters such as pH, buffers, concentration of ligand, and incubation or stability with time were investigated. High performance liquid chromatography and instant thin layer chromatography were used to analyze the Ga-68 ligand preparations. Platelets separated from human, dog, and rabbit plasma were incubated with the Ga-68 complexes and the labeling yields and in vivo survival were determined. The accumulation of the platelets in the ballon catheter scraped aorta of the rabbit was determined by PET imaging studies, tissue counting in a gamma well counter, and en-face autoradiography of the arterial wall. The Ga-68 complexes of MPO gave 40 to 60% labeling efficiency of rabbit platelets which accumulated about fourfold more in the damaged aorta compared to the normal. Gallium-68 was attached to low density lipoproteins (LDL) with the bifunctional chelate of DTPA. Low pressure gel column chromatography and HPLC were used to preparatively separate and analyze the Ga-68 LDL for uptake studies in the healing endothelium of the scraped aorta rabbit model. The Ga-68 LDL labeling yield was 80 to 85% with a radiochemical purity 90 to 95%. 22 references, 10 figures, 4 tables.

  16. (Pt{sub 1–x}Cu{sub x}){sub 3}Cu{sub 2}B and Pt{sub 9}Cu{sub 3}B{sub 5}, the first examples of copper platinum borides. Observation of superconductivity in a novel boron filled β-Mn-type compound

    SciTech Connect

    Salamakha, Leonid P.; Sologub, Oksana; Stöger, Berthold; Michor, Herwig; Bauer, Ernst; Rogl, Peter F.

    2015-09-15

    New ternary copper platinum borides have been synthesized by arc melting of pure elements followed by annealing at 600 °C. The structures have been studied by X-ray single crystal and powder diffraction. (Pt{sub 1−x}Cu{sub x}){sub 3}Cu{sub 2}B (x=0.33) forms a B-filled β-Mn-type structure (space group P4{sub 1}32; a=0.6671(1) nm). Cu atoms are distributed preferentially on the 8c atom sites, whereas the 12d site is randomly occupied by Pt and Cu atoms (0.670(4) Pt±0.330(4) Cu). Boron is located in octahedral voids of the parent β-Mn-type structure. Pt{sub 9}Cu{sub 3}B{sub 5} (space group P-62m; a=0.9048(3) nm, c=0.2908(1) nm) adopts the Pt{sub 9}Zn{sub 3}B{sub 5–δ}-type structure. It has a columnar architecture along the short translation vector exhibiting three kinds of [Pt{sub 6}] trigonal prism columns (boron filled, boron semi-filled and empty) and Pt channels with a pentagonal cross section filled with Cu atoms. The striking structural feature is a [Pt{sub 6}] cluster in form of an empty trigonal prism at the origin of the unit cell, which is surrounded by coupled [BPt{sub 6}] and [Pt{sub 6}] trigonal prisms, rotated perpendicularly to the central one. There is no B–B contact as well as Cu–B contact in the structure. The relationships of Pt{sub 9}Cu{sub 3}B{sub 5} structure with the structure of Ti{sub 1+x}Os{sub 2−x}RuB{sub 2} as well as with the structure families of metal sulfides and aluminides have been elucidated. (Pt{sub 1–x}Cu{sub x}){sub 3}Cu{sub 2}B (x=0.3) (B-filled β-Mn-type structure) is a bulk superconductor with a transition temperature of about 2.06 K and an upper critical field μ{sub 0}H{sub C2}(0){sup WHH} of 1.2 T, whereas no superconducting transition has been observed up to 0.3 K in Pt{sub 9}Cu{sub 3}B{sub 5} (Pt{sub 9}Zn{sub 3}B{sub 5–δ}-type structure) from electrical resistivity measurements. - Highlights: • First two copper platinum borides, (Pt{sub 0.67}Cu{sub 0.33}){sub 3}Cu{sub 2}B and Pt{sub 9}Cu{sub 3}B

  17. Platinum coat color locus in the deer mouse.

    PubMed

    Dodson, K M; Dawson, W D; Van Ooteghem, S O; Cushing, B S; Haigh, G R

    1987-01-01

    Platinum coat color in the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, is an autosomal recessive trait marking a locus, pt, distinct from silver (si), albino (c), blonde (bl), brown (b), and agouti (a). Platinum deer mice are conspicuously pale, with light ears and tail stripe. The pewter trait is allelic with and phenotypically identical to platinum, and represents an independent recurrence of this mutant. The rate of recoveries of coat color mutations from wild deer mice is consistent with available data for recurring mutation rates balanced by strong selection against the recessive phenotype. PMID:3611714

  18. Bio-inspired routes for synthesizing efficient nanoscale platinum electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jennifer N.; Wang, Joseph

    2014-08-31

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to use fundamental advances in bionanotechnology to design powerful platinum nanocrystal electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. The new economically-viable, environmentally-friendly, bottom-up biochemical synthetic strategy will produce platinum nanocrystals with tailored size, shape and crystal orientation, hence leading to a maximum electrochemical reactivity. There are five specific aims to the proposed bio-inspired strategy for synthesizing efficient electrocatalytic platinum nanocrystals: (1) isolate peptides that both selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum and promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies, (2) pattern nanoscale 2-dimensional arrays of platinum nucleating peptides from DNA scaffolds, (3) investigate the combined use of substrate patterned peptides and soluble peptides on nanocrystal morphology and growth (4) synthesize platinum crystals on planar and large-area carbon electrode supports, and (5) perform detailed characterization of the electrocatalytic behavior as a function of catalyst size, shape and morphology. Project Description and Impact: This bio-inspired collaborative research effort will address key challenges in designing powerful electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications by employing nucleic acid scaffolds in combination with peptides to perform specific, environmentally-friendly, simultaneous bottom-up biochemical synthesis and patterned assembly of highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts. Bulk synthesis of nanoparticles usually produces a range of sizes, accessible catalytic sites, crystal morphologies, and orientations, all of which lead to inconsistent catalytic activities. In contrast, biological systems routinely demonstrate exquisite control over inorganic syntheses at neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressures. Because the orientation and arrangement of the templating biomolecules can be precisely

  19. Oxidation performance of platinum-clad Mo-47Re alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald K.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    1994-01-01

    The alloy Mo-47Re has favorable mechanical properties at temperatures above 1400 C, but it undergoes severe oxidation when used in air with no protective coating. To shield the alloy from oxidation, platinum cladding has been evaluated. The unprotected alloy undergoes catastrophic oxidation under static and dynamic oxidation conditions. The platinum cladding provides good protection from static and dynamic oxidation for moderate times at 1260 C. Samples tested for longer times under static oxidation conditions experienced severe oxidation. The data suggest that oxidation results from the transport of oxygen through the grain boundaries and through the pinhole defects of the platinum cladding.

  20. Low Temperature Calorimetric Investigation of the Spin Glasses: MERCURY(1-X)MANGANESE(X)TELLURIDE and COBALT(X)GALLIUM(1-X); and of the Compounds: Mercury-Telluride Alpha - Mercury Sulfide, Beta - Mercury Sulfide, THALLIUM(3)ARSENIC SELENIDE(3), THALLIUM(3)ANTIMONY SULFIDE(3), Silver-Thallium - and Silver-Thallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarzadeh, Hadi

    A systematic study of the low-dc-field magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat has been carried out on mixes Hg(,1-x)Mn(,x)Te crystals, in the composition range 0 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 0.35. The alloy with x = 0.35 showed spin-glass behavior below T = 10.9 K. The observed spin-glass phase is ascribed to the frustration of the antiferromagnetic interactions. For x (LESSTHEQ) 0.25, the Hg(,1-x)Mn(,x)Te samples remain paramagnetic down to 1 K. Experimental results for the specific heat and the susceptibility for x < 0.1 are discussed in terms of a cluster model which leads to an estimated value of the antiferromagnetic exchange constant J/k (DBLTURN) -0.7 (+OR-) 0.3 K. When a random distribution of Mn ions over the fcc sublattice is assumed, calculated values for the specific heat and the susceptibility differ substantially from the experimental results for the low Mn concentration, leading to the conclusion that the magnetic ions prefer to cluster rather than to remain isolated in Hg(,1-x)Mn(,x)Te. Low temperature specific heat of the spin glass compounds Co(,x)Ga(,1-x). with x between 0.49 and 0.58 are presented. For all samples the excess specific heat in zero magnetic field initially contains a term linear in temperature, and for x > 0.52 it also has contributions by the cobalt nuclei, proportional to T('-2), and a spin wave contribution proportional to T('3/2). This last term indicates the coexistence of spin glass and ferromagnetic properties. A simple two level system model fits the spin glass specific heat very well. The agreement between experimental and calculated specific heat shows that individual AS defects are responsible for the thermal properties. To explain hysteresis and remanence objects containing thousands of AS defects have been proposed. On increasing the temperature some objects become unfrozen. We speculate that the individual AS defects in the unfrozen objects can adjust themselves over their own two levels and so contribute to the

  1. The electrooxidation mechanism of formic acid on platinum and on lead ad-atoms modified platinum studied with the kinetic isotope effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bełtowska-Brzezinska, M.; Łuczak, T.; Stelmach, J.; Holze, R.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of formic acid (FA) oxidation on platinum and upd-lead ad-atoms modified platinum electrodes have been studied using unlabelled and deuterated compounds. Poisoning of the electrode surface by CO-like species was prevented by suppression of dissociative chemisorption of FA due to a fast competitive underpotential deposition of lead ad-atoms on the Pt surface from an acidic solution containing Pb2+ cations. Modification of the Pt electrode with upd lead induced a catalytic effect in the direct electrooxidation of physisorbed FA to CO2. With increasing degree of H/D substitution, the rate of this reaction decreased in the order: HCOOH > DCOOH ≥ HCOOD > DCOOD. HCOOH was oxidized 8.5-times faster on a Pt/Pb electrode than DCOOD. This primary kinetic isotope effect proves that the C-H- and O-H-bonds are simultaneously cleaved in the rate determining step. A secondary kinetic isotope effect was found in the dissociative chemisorption of FA in the hydrogen adsorption-desorption range on a bare Pt electrode after H/D exchange in the C-H bond, wherein the influence of deuterium substitution in the O-H group was negligibly small. Thus the C-H bond cleavage is accompanied by the C-OH and not the O-H bond split in the FA decomposition, producing CO-like species on the Pt surface sites.

  2. A gallium phosphide high-temperature bipolar junction transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipperian, T. E.; Dawson, L. R.; Chaffin, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported on the development of a high temperature (350 C) gallium phosphide bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for geothermal and other energy applications. This four-layer p(+)n(-)pp(+) structure was formed by liquid phase epitaxy using a supercooling technique to insure uniform nucleation of the thin layers. Magnesium was used as the p-type dopant to avoid excessive out-diffusion into the lightly doped base. By appropriate choice of electrodes, the device may also be driven as an n-channel junction field-effect transistor. The initial design suffers from a series resistance problem which limits the transistor's usefulness at high temperatures.

  3. High growth speed of gallium nitride using ENABLE-MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. J.; Fischer, A. M.; Williamson, T. L.; Gangam, S.; Faleev, N. N.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Honsberg, C. B.

    2015-09-01

    Films of gallium nitride were grown at varying growth speeds, while all other major variables were held constant. Films grown determine the material impact of the high flux capabilities of the unique nitrogen plasma source ENABLE. Growth rates ranged from 13 to near 60 nm/min. X-ray ω scans of GaN (0002) have FWHM in all samples less than 300 arc sec. Cathodoluminescence shows radiative recombination for all samples at the band edge. In general material quality overall is high with slight degradation as growth speeds increase to higher rates.

  4. Gallium uptake in tryptophan-related pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Patel, R. )

    1991-02-01

    We describe a patient who developed fever, fatigue, muscle weakness, dyspnea, skin rash, and eosinophilia after taking high doses of tryptophan for insomnia for two years. A gallium-67 scan revealed diffuse increased uptake in the lung and no abnormal uptake in the muscular distribution. Bronchoscopy and biopsy confirmed inflammatory reactions with infiltration by eosinophils, mast cells, and lymphocytes. CT scan showed an interstitial alveolar pattern without fibrosis. EMG demonstrated diffuse myopathy. Muscle biopsy from the right thigh showed an inflammatory myositis with eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltrations.

  5. Microwave dielectric constants of silicon, gallium arsenide, and quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, K.

    1988-06-01

    For a determination of the dielectric constants epsilon of semiconductors, a microwave transmission interference method has been applied. For the first time, a calculation is presented which yields the full interference spectrum, not only the position of the extremal points. A comparison of the theoretical and experimental spectra results in a higher precision than previously obtained. A metal evaporation of the sample faces which are in contact with the waveguide walls turns out to be very important. Relative dielectric constants of 11.6 for silicon, 12.8 for gallium arsenide, and 4.6 for crystalline quartz, all +- 0.05, have been obtained.

  6. Improved performance design of gallium arsenide solar cells for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parekh, R. H.; Barnett, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    An improved design, shallow junction heteroface, n-p, gallium arsenide solar cell for space applications is reported, with a predicted AM0 efficiency in the 21.9 to 23.0 percent range. The optimized n-p structure, while slightly more efficient, has the added advantage of being less susceptible to radiation-induced degradation by virtue of this thin top junction layer. Detailed spectral response curves and an analysis of the loss mechanisms are reported. The details of the design are readily measurable. The optimized designs were reached by quantifying the dominant loss mechanisms and then minimizing them by using computer simulations.

  7. Testing of gallium arsenide solar cells on the CRRES vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumble, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    A flight experiment was designed to determine the optimum design for gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cell panels in a radiation environment. Elements of the experiment design include, different coverglass material and thicknesses, welded and soldered interconnects, different solar cell efficiencies, different solar cell types, and measurement of annealing properties. This experiment is scheduled to fly on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). This satellite will simultaneously measure the radiation environment and provide engineering data on solar cell degradation that can be directly related to radiation damage.

  8. Visible light metasurfaces based on gallium nitride high contrast gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenhai; He, Shumin; Liu, Qifa; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    We propose visible-light metasurfaces (VLMs) capable of serving as lens and beam deflecting element based on gallium nitride (GaN) high contrast gratings (HCGs). By precisely manipulating the wavefront of the transmitted light, we theoretically demonstrate an HCG focusing lens with transmissivity of 86.3%, and a VLM with beam deflection angle of 6.09° and transmissivity as high as 91.4%. The proposed all-dielectric metasurfaces are promising for GaN-based visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which would be robust and versatile for controlling the output light propagation and polarization, as well as enhancing the extraction efficiency of the LEDs.

  9. Electronic structure and properties of layered gallium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, U. Sandhya; Gupta, Uttam; Narang, Deepa S.; Late, Dattatray J.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2016-05-01

    Layer-dependent electronic structure and properties of gallium monochalcogenides, GaX where X = S, Se, Te, have been investigated using first-principles calculations based on various functionals, with a motivation to assess their use in photocatalytic water splitting. Since hydrogen evolution by water splitting using visible light provides a promising way for solar energy conversion, both theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out on the photochemical hydrogen evolution by GaTe. We also present the Raman spectra of GaTe examined by both theory and experiment.

  10. Frequency conversion in free-standing periodically oriented gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher G.; Bowman, Steven R.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Freitas, Jaime A.; Kub, Francis J.; Eddy, Charles R.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R.; Leach, Jacob H.; Udwary, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Gallium nitride's (GaN) material properties of broadband transparency, high thermal conductivity, and wide-band gap make it a promising candidate for high-power frequency conversion devices. The strong internal polarization of GaN leads to large second-order nonlinearity, but conventional phase matching is prevented due to weak birefringence. To obtain efficient nonlinear optic frequency conversion, patterned inversion growth has been developed to induce quasiphase matching (QPM). We have fabricated and tested periodically oriented GaN (PO-GaN) devices to obtain QPM frequency conversion. This report discusses our recent measurements of second harmonic generation resonances for these devices.

  11. Gallium-doped germanium, evaluation of photoconductors, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Gallium-doped germanium far infrared detectors were evaluated at low temperatures and low background simulating the space environment. Signal and noise characteristics were determined for detector temperatures in the 2K to 4K range. Optimum performance occurs at about 2.5K for all devices tested. The minimum average NEP in the 40-130 micron region was found to be approximately 4 x 10 to the minus 17th power watt Hz(-1/2) at a frequency of 1 Hz.

  12. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activity 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.

  13. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenxian; Sun, Ziqi; Tian, Dongliang; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ˜4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  14. Superconductivity observed in platinum-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Pai-Chia; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lee, Ku-Pin; Shiue, Jessie

    2014-05-26

    We report the discovery of superconductivity with an onset temperature of ∼0.6 K in a platinum-silicon interface. The interface was formed by using a unique focused ion beam sputtering micro-deposition method in which the energies of most sputtered Pt atoms are ∼2.5 eV. Structural and elemental analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveal a ∼ 7 nm interface layer with abundant Pt, which is the layer likely responsible for the superconducting transport behavior. Similar transport behavior was also observed in a gold-silicon interface prepared by the same technique, indicating the possible generality of this phenomenon.

  15. Role of copper transporters in platinum resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kilari, Deepak; Guancial, Elizabeth; Kim, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Platinum (Pt)-based antitumor agents are effective in the treatment of many solid malignancies. However, their efficacy is limited by toxicity and drug resistance. Reduced intracellular Pt accumulation has been consistently shown to correlate with resistance in tumors. Proteins involved in copper homeostasis have been identified as Pt transporters. In particular, copper transporter receptor 1 (CTR1), the major copper influx transporter, has been shown to play a significant role in Pt resistance. Clinical studies demonstrated that expression of CTR1 correlated with intratumoral Pt concentration and outcomes following Pt-based therapy. Other CTRs such as CTR2, ATP7A and ATP7B, may also play a role in Pt resistance. Recent clinical studies attempting to modulate CTR1 to overcome Pt resistance may provide novel strategies. This review discusses the role of CTR1 as a potential predictive biomarker of Pt sensitivity and a therapeutic target for overcoming Pt resistance. PMID:26862494

  16. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenxian; Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue; Tian, Dongliang

    2014-07-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  17. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activitymore » 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.« less

  18. Thermodynamic ground states of platinum metal nitrides.

    PubMed

    Aberg, Daniel; Sadigh, Babak; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2008-03-01

    The thermodynamic stabilities of various phases of the nitrides of the platinum-metal elements are systematically studied using density functional theory. It is shown that for the nitrides of Rh, Pd, Ir, and Pt two new crystal structures, in which the metal ions occupy simple tetragonal lattice sites, have lower formation enthalpies at ambient conditions than any previously proposed structures. The region of stability with respect to those structures extends to 17 GPa for PtN2. Calculations show that the PtN2 simple tetragonal structures at this pressure are thermodynamically stable also with respect to phase separation. The fact that the local density and generalized gradient approximations predict different values of the absolute formation enthalpies as well different relative stabilities between simple tetragonal and the pyrite or marcasite structures are further discussed. PMID:18352720

  19. Thermodynamic Ground States of Platinum Metal Nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åberg, Daniel; Sadigh, Babak; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2008-03-01

    The thermodynamic stabilities of various phases of the nitrides of the platinum-metal elements are systematically studied using density functional theory. It is shown that for the nitrides of Rh, Pd, Ir, and Pt two new crystal structures, in which the metal ions occupy simple tetragonal lattice sites, have lower formation enthalpies at ambient conditions than any previously proposed structures. The region of stability with respect to those structures extends to 17 GPa for PtN2. Calculations show that the PtN2 simple tetragonal structures at this pressure are thermodynamically stable also with respect to phase separation. The fact that the local density and generalized gradient approximations predict different values of the absolute formation enthalpies as well different relative stabilities between simple tetragonal and the pyrite or marcasite structures are further discussed.

  20. Platinum group nuggets in deep sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Bates, B. A.; Wheelock, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of iron meteor oblation spheres in deep sea sediments was known for over a century. These spheres generally were believed to be composed of either pure magnetite and wustite or an oxide shell surrounding a NiFe metal core. A large number of 300 micron to 600 micron spheres found were pure oxide spheres, usually containing a solitary 10 micron platinum group nugget (pgn) composed almost entirely of group VIII metals. Twelve PGN's were analyzed and most had chondritic abundances with some depletions that correlate with element volatility. PGN formation by oxidation of a molten metal sphere entering the atmosphere cannot occur if the oxygen abundance in the atmosphere is less than half of its present value. The first appearance of PGN's in the geological record should mark when, in the Earth's history, oxygen rose to this level.

  1. On the kinetics of platinum silicide formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Erik J.; Wolters, Rob A. M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-02-01

    In this work, the kinetics of platinum silicide formation for thin Pt films (50 nm) on monocrystalline ⟨100⟩ silicon is investigated via in situ resistance measurements under isothermal (197-275 °C) conditions. For Pt2Si diffusion limited growth was observed. For PtSi formation, however, no linear relation between silicide thickness and √t was found. PtSi growth over time could be described using the Avrami relation rendering Avrami exponent n =1.4±0.1. Additionally, an effective activation energy EA=1.7±0.1 eV was derived using the Avrami k values. The findings are important for obtaining well defined silicide films and silicide-to-silicon contacts.

  2. Effects of monofunctional platinum agents on bacterial growth: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Alexander, Sarah M; Lin, Wei; Lippard, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the novel and potent monofunctional platinum(II) agent phenanthriplatin on Escherichia coli and bacteriophage λ lysogens is reported. E. coli filamentation was observed by light microscopy when cells were grown in the presence of phenanthriplatin, cis-[Pt(NH3)2(Am)Cl](+) where Am is phenanthridine. Treatment of lysogenic bacteria with this compound resulted in lysis and the production of viral particles, as indicated by plaque formation in a bacterial lawn. The results obtained with phenanthriplatin are contextualized by comparison with those obtained using cisplatin as well as other, less active, monofunctional compounds such as [Pt(NH3)3Cl](+) and cis-[Pt(NH3)2(py)Cl](+), where py is pyridine. The ability of phenanthriplatin to induce bacterial filamentation and initiate lysis in lysogenic bacteria corroborates the hypothesis that the biological activity of this complex is mediated by its interaction with DNA. PMID:24364388

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and molecular modeling of a tetranuclear platinum(II) complex with thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbi, Pedro P.; Formiga, André L. B.; Bonk, Fábio A.; Quintão, Frederico A.; Ferraresi, Diego K. D.; Lustri, Wilton R.; Massabni, Antonio C.

    2012-07-01

    The synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and molecular modeling of a novel tetranuclear platinum(II) complex with thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (THC) are described. Elemental analysis is consistent with the composition PtCl2C4H7NO2S·H2O. Infrared (IR) spectroscopic results and solid-state 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data indicate coordination of the ligand to Pt(II) through the nitrogen and sulfur atoms. The square planar geometry of the platinum(II) complex is completed by chlorine atoms. Density functional theory (DFT) suggests the formation of a tetrameric cluster as the most probable structure, where each THC molecule bridges between two metal centers. The compound is insoluble in water.

  4. Theoretical Investigations and Density Functional Theory Based Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationships Model for Novel Cytotoxic Platinum(IV) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Octahedral platinum(IV) complexes are promising candidates in the fight against cancer. In order to rationalize the further development of this class of compounds, detailed studies on their mechanisms of action, toxicity, and resistance must be provided and structure–activity relationships must be drawn. Herein, we report on theoretical and QSAR investigations of a series of 53 novel bis-, tris-, and tetrakis(carboxylato)platinum(IV) complexes, synthesized and tested for cytotoxicity in our laboratories. The hybrid DFT functional wb97x was used for optimization of the structure geometry and calculation of the descriptors. Reliable and robust QSAR models with good explanatory and predictive properties were obtained for both the cisplatin sensitive cell line CH1 and the intrinsically cisplatin resistant cell line SW480, with a set of four descriptors. PMID:23214999

  5. Gallium and indium complexes containing the bis(imino)phenoxide ligand: synthesis, structural characterization and polymerization studies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Swarup; Gowda, Ravikumar R; Jagan, Rajamony; Chakraborty, Debashis

    2015-06-14

    A series of gallium and indium complexes containing a bis(imino)phenolate ligand framework were synthesized and completely characterized with different spectroscopic techniques. The molecular structures of a few complexes were determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These compounds were found to be extremely active towards the bulk ring opening polymerization (ROP) of lactides yielding polymers with high number average molecular weight (Mn) and controlled molecular weight distributions (MWDs). The neutral complexes produce isotactic enriched poly(lactic acid) (PLA) from rac-lactide (rac-LA) under melt conditions, whereas the ionic complex produces atactic PLA. The polymerizations are controlled, as evidenced by the narrow molecular distribution (MWDs) of the isolated polymers in addition to the linear nature of number average molecular weight (Mn) versus conversion plots with variations in monomer to catalyst ratios. The kinetic and mechanistic studies associated with these polymerizations have been performed. PMID:25977999

  6. Characterization of the Absolute Crystal Polarity across Twin Boundaries in Gallium Phosphide Using Convergent-Beam Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cohen; McKernan; Carter

    1999-05-01

    : The measurement of absolute crystal polarity is crucial to understanding the structural properties of many planar defects in compound semiconductors. Grain boundaries, including twin boundaries, in the sphalerite lattice are uniquely characterized by the crystallographic misorientation of individual grains and the direction of the crystal polarity in domains adjoining the grain boundary. To evaluate crystal polarity in gallium phosphide (GaP), asymmetrical interference contrast in convergent-beam electron-diffraction (CBED) patterns was used to ascertain the nature and direction of polar bonds. The direction of the asymmetry in the electron diffraction reflections was correlated with the crystal polarity of a sample with known polarity. The CBED technique was applied to determine the polar orientation of grains adjoining Sigma = 3 coherent and lateral twin boundaries in polycrystalline GaP. PMID:10383990

  7. Physical Character and Morphology of Platinum Nanocrystals on Strontium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gild, Joshua; Pierce, Michael; Komanicky, Vladimir; Barbour, Andi; You, Hoydoo

    2015-03-01

    The physical characteristics of platinum nanocrystals on single crystal strontium titanate, SrTiO3 , can effect the chemical properties of this important model catalyst. The morphology, epitaxy, distribution, and size of the Pt nano-crystals can all be controlled through different growth and processing mechanisms. Nanometer scale platinum thin films are deposited on strontium titanate at ambient temperatures then annealed at range of temperatures and in various oxidizing environments. The process of how these conditions influence the formation of uniformly epitaxial platinum crystals on the sample surface has been investigated using basic materials characterization techniques. Single crystal x-ray diffraction is the primary tool for these experiments, coupled with atomic force microscopy for morphology and x-ray and electron spectroscopy to determine chemical bonding between the particles and gases introduced into the system. These substrate supported nanoparticle samples will then be utilized in experiments to test their catalytic activity compared to an amorphous platinum film.

  8. Defining Therapy for Recurrent Platinum-sensitive Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, women with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer will be randomly assigned to undergo secondary cytoreductive surgery, if they are candidates for such surgery, and

  9. MEIOTIC BEHAVIOR OF PLATINUM-INDUCED ANEUPLOIDS IN PEARL MILLET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytotoxicity, measured by seed germination and seedling survival, and the clastogenic potential of platinum diaminodinitrodichloride were evaluated in pear millet (Pennisetum americanum (k) Schum). The study was conducted under controlled climatic conditions. Presoaked seed of pe...

  10. Water dissociation on silica in the presence of atomic platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klett, Joachim; Elger, Benjamin; Krähling, Stephan; Kaiser, Bernhard; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Schäfer, Rolf

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of water on well-defined silica and silica/Pt interfaces by synchrotron X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (SXPS). For that purpose silica surfaces grown on Si have been covered with atomic platinum in order to facilitate water dissociation. Water was adsorbed from the gas phase at cryogenic temperatures and its dissociation was observed on clean and platinum coated surfaces. After desorption the adsorbed hydroxides decompose on the blank surface, whereas the hydroxides remain stable if the surface was modified with platinum. The principal reversibility of the hydroxylation process implies the necessity of point defects in order to stabilize hydroxides on well-ordered silica surfaces. Deposited platinum atoms are able to stabilize hydroxides in their proximity and act as an acceptor state on the silica surface.

  11. Platinum Publications, April 1–May 27, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed.

  12. Docetaxel in combination with irinotecan (CPT-11) in platinum-resistant paclitaxel-pretreated ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Polyzos, Aristides; Kosmas, Christos; Toufexi, Helen; Malamos, Nicholas; Lagadas, Antonios; Kosmidis, Christos; Ginopoulos, Panagiotis; Ziras, Nicholas; Kandilis, Kostas; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2005-01-01

    The role of combination chemotherapy regimens in the management of ovarian cancer patients with tumors resistant to platinum compounds has not yet been defined. This multicenter prospective phase II study evaluated the activity and toxicity of the docetaxel-plus-irinotecan combination in ovarian cancer patients whose tumors were resistant to platinum compounds and who had been exposed to paclitaxel. Treatment consisted of docetaxel 60 mg/m2 i.v. followed by irinotecan 200 mg/m2 i.v. both on day 1 followed by prophylactic recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) support from days 2 to 6, every 3 weeks. Thirty-one patients were enrolled in the study. The median age was 60 years, and the median performance status (ECOG) was 1. Eight (26%) patients had primary tumors resistant to platinum, while the rest of the population had tumor recurrence within 6 months from the last cisplatin treatment. Four chemotherapy cycles per patient were administered, with the delivered dose intensity at 75% of the planned dose for both agents. Among 30 patients evaluable for response, there were 2 (7%) complete and 4 (14%) partial responses (overall response rate 20%; (95% confidence interval, CI, 11%-33%). Stable disease was recorded in 8 (28%) patients and progressive disease in 15 (51%). The median response duration was 4.5 months (range, 3-12), the median time to progression 5 months (range, 2-17) and the median survival 11 months (range, 1-40); the 1-year survival was almost 50%. Myelotoxicity was moderate, with grade 3 and 4 neutropenia occurring in 23% of the patients, grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia in 6% and febrile neutropenia in 13%. Grade 3 diarrhea was observed in 2% of the patients. There was one treatment-related death due to sepsis. In conclusion, the combination of docetaxel plus irinotecan with rhG-CSF support, appears to be a moderately effective regimen with acceptable toxicity for platinum-resistant, paclitaxel-pretreated ovarian cancer patients

  13. Gallium-67 citrate imaging in underground coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, R.E.; Barkman, H.W. Jr.; Rom, W.N.; Taylor, A.T. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-two underground coal workers with 27 or more years of coal dust exposure were studied with gallium-67 citrate (Ga-67) imaging. Radiographic evidence of coal workers indicates that pneumoconiosis (CWP) was present in 12 subjects. The Ga-67 scan was abnormal in 11 of 12 with, and 9 of 10 without, CWP. The Ga-67 uptake index was significantly correlated with total dust exposure (p less than 0.01) and approached significant correlation with the radiographic profusion of the nodules (0.10 greater than p greater than 0.05). There was no correlation between Ga-67 uptake and spirometric function, which was normal in this group of patients; furthermore, increased lung uptake of gallium did not indicate a poor prognosis in subjects no longer exposed to coal dust. While coal dust exposure may be associated with positive Ga-67 lung scan in coal miners with many years of coal dust exposure, the scan provided no information not already available from a careful exposure history and a chest radiograph. Since Ga-67 scanning is a relatively expensive procedure the authors would recommend that its use in subjects with asymptomatic CWP be limited to an investigative role and not be made part of a routine evaluation.

  14. Multiscale modelling of gallium induced embrittlement in aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhogireddy, Venkata Sai Pavan Kumar; Todorova, Mira; Spatschek, Robert; Neugebauer, Jörg

    Liquid metal embrittlement is a degradation phenomenon in which a solid metal undergoes brittle failure when it is stressed while in contact with a liquid metal. The transition from ductile to brittle metal failure manifests itself by rapid crack propagations which reduces the elongation to failure ratio. Combining density functional theory calculations with continuum methods, we study the liquid metal embrittlement of aluminium in contact with gallium. Comparing ab initio calculated energies for a Σ 3 and a Σ 5 Al grain boundary and their corresponding surface energies in the presence and absence of Ga, we identify critical Ga concentrations which result in a weakening of the mechanical strength of aluminium. Parametrising the DFT results in continuum model we obtain the concentration as a function of the strain in the system. In a final step we extend this approach and compute the stress field induced by cracks in bulk and at grain boundaries. The stress field explains the large segregation of gallium atoms at the crack tip and the crack tip's subsequent propagation.

  15. Investigation of Structural Phase Transitions on Wurtzite Gallium Nitride Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianjiao; Chinchore, Abhijit; Liu, Yinghao; Wang, Kangkang; Lin, Wenzhi; Smith, Arthur

    2009-03-01

    Surface structures of wurtzite gallium nitride (w-GaN) have been investigated previously,[1][2] and it is well known that above 300K there exist order-disorder phase transitions. For N-polar w-GaN (000-1) at 300K, a family of surface reconstructions occurs, including 1x1, 3x3, 6x6, and c(6x12). Not much is known, however, about what happens to these structures as they are cooled below 300K. We have recently developed a new epitaxy/analysis system, including a sample stage which can be both heated and cooled. The N-polar w-GaN surfaces are prepared using rf N-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, and monitored in-situ using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The approach is to monitor the [11-20] and [10-10] RHEED diffractions during cryogenic cooling, starting with the 1x1 or 3x3 structures. A critical issue to explore is the interrelationship between surface gallium concentration and structural deformation. This study may provide the missing link to new reconstructions of w-GaN recently observed using LT scanning tunneling microscopy.[3] This work is supported by NSF (Grant No. 0730257). [1] A. R. Smith et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3934 (1997). [2] A. R. Smith et al., Surface Science 423, 70 (1999). [3] D. Acharya, S.-W. Hla et al., unpublished.

  16. Gold and Gallium Nanoparticle Growth on Silicon (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Rees; Brown, Hunter L.; Ames, Sadie; Rasmussen, J. Leland; Tobler, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticles are used for various applications in today's research. Some researcher's interests involve using the nanoparticles to grow silicon nanowires on a silicon substrate. Before growing nanowires can be accomplished a study must be made of the formation of nanoparticles. Most often the metal used to make the nanoparticles is gold. In this study both gold and gallium were used to make the nanoparticles, by thermal evaporation. The gold and gallium nanoparticles were grown on silicon (100). Between one to three monolayers of material was added to the substrate, with the particle sizes ranging from 0.5 microns to 3 microns in diameter. Densities of nanoparticles varied based on the time of growth and on the intensity of the source. The variable sizes were seen with sample temperatures between 700 C and 900 C measured using a disappearing filament optical pyrometer. The growth process occurred at pressures below 3e-7 Torr. This presentation will summarize the growth process and show the similarities and differences between the two metals.

  17. Low temperature solid-state synthesis of nanocrystalline gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liangbiao; Shi, Liang; Li, Qianwen; Si, Lulu; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► GaN nanocrystalline was prepared via a solid-state reacion at relatively low temperature. ► The sizes and crystallinities of the GaN samples obtained at the different temperatures are investigated. ► The GaN sample has oxidation resistance and good thermal stability below 1000 °C. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline gallium nitride was synthesized by a solid-state reaction of metallic magnesium powder, gallium sesquioxide and sodium amide in a stainless steel autoclave at a relatively low temperature (400–550 °C). The structures and morphologies of the obtained products were derived from X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD patterns indicated that the products were hexagonal GaN (JCPDS card no. 76-0703). The influence of reaction temperature on size of the products was studied by XRD and TEM. Furthermore, the thermal stability and oxidation resistance of the nanocrystalline GaN were also investigated. It had good thermal stability and oxidation resistance below 800 °C in air.

  18. Experimental investigation of electron transport properties of gallium nitride nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motayed, Abhishek; Davydov, Albert V.; Mohammad, S. N.; Melngailis, John

    2008-07-01

    We report transport properties of gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires grown using direct reaction of ammonia and gallium vapor. Reliable devices, such as four-terminal resistivity measuring structures and field-effect transistors, were realized by dielectrophoretically aligning the nanowires on an oxidized silicon substrate and subsequently applying standard microfabrication techniques. Room-temperature resistivity in the range of (1.0-6.2)×10-2 Ω cm was obtained for the nanowires with diameters ranging from 200 to 90 nm. Temperature-dependent resistivity and mobility measurements indicated the possible sources for the n-type conductivity and high background charge carrier concentration in these nanowires. Specific contact resistance in the range of 5.0×10-5 Ω cm2 was extracted for Ti/Al/Ti/Au metal contacts to GaN nanowires. Significant reduction in the activation energy of the dopants at low temperatures (<200 K) was observed in the temperature-dependent resistivity measurement of these nanowires, which is linked to the onset of degeneracy. Temperature-dependent field-effect mobility measurements indicated that the ionized impurity scattering is the dominant mechanism in these nanowires at all temperatures.

  19. Exciton pumping across type-I gallium chalcogenide heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hui; Kang, Jun; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Peeters, Francois; Meng, Xiuqing; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-02-01

    Quasi-two-dimensional gallium chalcogenide heterostructures are created by transferring exfoliated few-layer GaSe onto bulk GaTe sheets. Luminescence spectroscopy measurements reveal that the light emission from underlying GaTe layers drastically increases on heterojunction regions where GaSe layers make contact with the GaTe. Density functional theory (DFT) and band offset calculations show that conduction band minimum (CBM) (valance band maximum (VBM)) values of GaSe are higher (lower) in energy compared to GaTe, forming type-I band alignment at the interface. Consequently, GaSe layers provide photo-excited electrons and holes to GaTe sheets through relatively large built-in potential at the interface, increasing overall exciton population and light emission from GaTe. Observed results are not specific to the GaSe/GaTe system but observed on GaS/GaSe heterolayers with type-I band alignment. Observed experimental findings and theoretical studies provide unique insights into interface effects across dissimilar gallium chalcogenides and offer new ways to boost optical performance by simple epitaxial coating.

  20. Study on natural convection capability of liquid gallium for passive decay heat removal system (PDHRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Ha, K. S.; Lee, S. W.; Park, S. D.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Kim, J. H.; Bang, I. C.

    2012-07-01

    The safety issues of the SFRs are important due to the fact that it uses sodium as a nuclear coolant, reacting vigorously with water and air. For that reason, there are efforts to seek for alternative candidates of liquid metal coolants having excellent heat transfer property and to adopt improved safety features to the SFR concepts. This study considers gallium as alternative liquid metal coolant applicable to safety features in terms of chemical activity issue of the sodium and aims to experimentally investigate the natural convection capability of gallium as a feasibility study for the development of gallium-based passive safety features in SFRs. In this paper, the design and construction of the liquid gallium natural convection loop were carried out. The experimental results of heat transfer coefficient of liquid gallium resulting in heat removal {approx}2.53 kW were compared with existing correlations and they were much lower than the correlations. To comparison of the experimental data with computer code analysis, gallium property code was developed for employing MARS-LMR (Korea version of RELAP) based on liquid gallium as working fluid. (authors)