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Sample records for play humour learning

  1. Humour in Game-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormann, Claire; Biddle, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the benefits and utilisation of humour in digital game-based learning. Through the activity theory framework, we emphasise the role of humour as a mediating tool which helps resolve contradictions within the activity system from conjoining educational objectives within the computer game. We then discuss the role of humour…

  2. Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Primary School Students' Attitudes on Play, Humour, Learning and Self-Concept: A Comparative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillemyr, Ole Fredrik; Sobstad, Frode; Marder, Kurt; Flowerday, Terri

    2010-01-01

    Based on theory and research, social aspects like friendship and sense of relatedness are fundamental in the development of children's cultural identity and achievement of outcomes. It is argued that this is a motivational aspect often neglected in research studies focusing on students' motivation and learning. Theory and research on motivation…

  3. Humour as EFL Learning-Teaching Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Duleimi, Abbas Deygan Darweesh; Aziz, Rana Naji

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that humour is beneficial in the classroom because it increases social bonding between teachers and students, salience of information, and ultimately recall and retention. The current study attempts to test some assumptions about humour as a pedagogical tool. Results have indicated that using humour to teach material…

  4. Early humour production.

    PubMed

    Hoicka, Elena; Akhtar, Nameera

    2012-11-01

    The current studies explored early humour as a complex socio-cognitive phenomenon by examining 2- and 3-year-olds' humour production with their parents. We examined whether children produced novel humour, whether they cued their humour, and the types of humour produced. Forty-seven parents were interviewed, and videotaped joking with their children. Other parents (N= 113) completed a survey. Parents reported children copy jokes during the first year of life, and produce novel jokes from 2 years. In play sessions, 3-year-olds produced mostly novel humorous acts; 2-year-olds produced novel and copied humorous acts equally frequently. Parents reported children smile, laugh, and look for a reaction when joking. In play sessions, 2- and 3-year-olds produced these behaviours more when producing humorous versus non-humorous acts. In both parent reports and play sessions, they produced novel object-based (e.g., underwear on head) and conceptual humour (e.g., 'pig says moo') and used wrong labels humorously (e.g., calling a cat a dog). Thus, parent report and child behaviour both confirm that young children produce novel humorous acts, and share their humour by smiling, laughing, and looking for a reaction. PMID:23039334

  5. Humour production may enhance observational learning of a new tool-use action in 18-month-old infants.

    PubMed

    Esseily, Rana; Rat-Fischer, Lauriane; Somogyi, Eszter; O'Regan, Kevin John; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have shown that making children laugh enhances certain cognitive capacities such as attention, motivation, perception and/or memory, which in turn enhance learning. However, no study thus far has investigated whether laughing has an effect on learning earlier in infancy. The goal of this study was to see whether using humour with young infants in a demonstration of a complex tool-use task can enhance their learning. Fifty-three 18-month-old infants participated in this study and were included either in a humorous or a control demonstration group. In both groups infants observed an adult using a tool to retrieve an out-of-reach toy. What differed between groups was that in the humorous demonstration group, instead of playing with the toy, the adult threw it on the floor immediately after retrieval. The results show that infants who laughed at the demonstration in the humorous demonstration group reproduced significantly more frequent target actions than infants who did not laugh and those in the control group. This effect is discussed with regard to individual differences in terms of temperament and social capacities as well as positive emotion and dopamine release. PMID:25965997

  6. Early Humour Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoicka, Elena; Akhtar, Nameera

    2012-01-01

    The current studies explored early humour as a complex socio-cognitive phenomenon by examining 2- and 3-year-olds' humour production with their parents. We examined whether children produced novel humour, whether they cued their humour, and the types of humour produced. Forty-seven parents were interviewed, and videotaped joking with their…

  7. Learning, Play, and Your Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Learning, Play, and Your Newborn KidsHealth > For Parents > Learning, ... juega su recién nacido What Is My Newborn Learning? Play is the chief way that infants learn ...

  8. Playful Learning and Montessori Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillard, Angeline S.

    2013-01-01

    Although Montessori education is often considered a form of playful learning, Maria Montessori herself spoke negatively about a major component of playful learning--pretend play, or fantasy--for young children. In this essay, the author discusses this apparent contradiction: how and why Montessori education includes elements of playful learning…

  9. Learning through Role Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Sandra

    2001-01-01

    Explains how role playing can provide enriching experiences that develop children's literacy and numeracy skills. Lists key ingredients of good role playing and suggests ways to plan them and prepare space for them. (SK)

  10. Music Learning and Child's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littleton, Danette

    1998-01-01

    Reviews various studies on childs play and its relation to young childrens development in music learning processes and explores the role that cognitive and social play categories have in studying childrens play with music. Provides strategies for initiating music-play opportunities in a preschool classroom. (CMK)

  11. Intergenerational Learning through Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lindsay; Larkin, Elizabeth; Graves, Stephen B.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that shared play experiences are a good way to build mutually beneficial relationships among older and younger generations. Outlines why intergenerational play is important, focusing on its cognitive, social, physical, and emotional benefits for both older adults and young children. Describes toys, materials, and games conducive to positive…

  12. [The comfort of a pleasant discomfort. Humour as a biological phenomenon I].

    PubMed

    Raab, Thomas

    2008-12-15

    No understanding of the nature of humour can be complete without a description of the emotional reactions and mechanisms accompanying humour. The enjoyment of a good laugh is essential to an explanation of humour and the reason why we seek humorous experiences. Humour is, however, not only coupled with positive emotions, but also triggered by potentially harmful experiences. In this regard, humour can best be described as the experience of something potentially harmful in a safe (social) context. Humour, seen as a biological phenomenon, therefore has its evolutionary roots in the mechanisms underlying the ability to learn to avoid danger. In humans this often takes place in a complex social context, and the final steps in the evolution of humour therefore must be sought in the complex primate society. In this, the first of two articles on humour in a biological context, we examine the role of emotions in experiencing humour. PMID:19128547

  13. Humour in nursing care.

    PubMed

    Astedt-Kurki, P; Liukkonen, A

    1994-07-01

    Humour is an integral part of everyday life and therefore also a component of the care and treatment of patients in the modern health care system. This paper looks at the role of humour in practical nursing in the light of earlier research literature on the subject. It also describes some preliminary results of our studies on the meaning of humour to professional nurses. We opted to use a qualitative approach in this study because the focus of interest was on an issue that has received only little attention in earlier research. Nurses were presented with a set of unstructured, open-ended questions requiring short, essay-type answers. The data obtained were analysed using the qualitative method of content analysis. In the light of our findings here, humour can be described as a joie de vivre which is manifested in human interaction in the form of fun, jocularity and laughter. Humour is a meaningful factor, both with regard to the patient's well-being and to coping, and also with regard to the interaction of nurse and patient. Humour also allows for more job satisfaction and better motivation. Research should be continued and intensified into the role and use of humour in everyday life and particularly in nursing care. PMID:7930119

  14. Creating Outdoor Play & Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Randy; Stoecklin, Vicki L.

    Why typical playgrounds are designed the way they are by adults is discussed, including what the ideal outdoor play/learning environment for children is and how the outdoor space should be considered as an extension of the classroom. The paper emphasizes the importance of nature to children, discusses the criteria playground designers should…

  15. Why did the proton cross the road? Humour and science communication.

    PubMed

    Riesch, Hauke

    2015-10-01

    The use of humour in public discourse about science has grown remarkably over the past few years, and when used in science communication activities is being seen as a great way to bring science to the public through laughter. However, barely any research has been published either on the often-assumed beneficial learning effects of humour in informal science education, or on the wider social functions and effects of humour about science and how humorous public discourse about science can influence the public understanding of science and the science-society relationship. This research note reviews some of the literature on the psychology and sociology of humour and comedy and tries to apply some of its insights to the effects humour might have when used in science communication. Although not intended to be anti-humour, this note attempts at least to start a more critical conversation on the value of humour in the communication of science. PMID:25138269

  16. Understanding Young Children's Learning through Play: Building Playful Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadhead, Pat; Burt, Andy

    2011-01-01

    This timely and accessible text introduces, theorises and practically applies two important concepts which now underpin early years practice: those of "playful learning" and "playful pedagogies". Pat Broadhead and Andy Burt draw upon filmed material, conversations with children, reflection, observation, and parental and staff interviews, in their…

  17. Play, Parachutes, and Experiential Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    Defines and explains key concepts associated with experiential learning and describes practical exercises. Encourages volunteer administrators to investigate and use experiential learning in their work and lives. (Author/JOW)

  18. Designing Learning Environments That Excite Serious Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd

    This paper proposes the phenomenon of play as a legitimate goal for interactive multimedia learning environments. Play offers a means for understanding motivation and learning in a holistic way. Serious play is not easy to achieve, but the reward is an intense and satisfying experience for both students and teachers. Technology offers many routes…

  19. Achieving Learning Goals through Play. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widerstrom, Anne H.

    2004-01-01

    Play is more than just fun; it is a powerful teaching tool that helps young children learn. With this practical, activity-filled guide, teachers will have ready-to-use strategies for weaving individual learning goals into play throughout the school day. Created for use with children ages 2 to 5 who have special needs--but equally effective for…

  20. Learning Through Play and Laughter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth

    Programs for young children should cultivate children's real feelings, both rage and joy, and help children learn to accept and live with their feelings in non-destructive ways. Strong feelings, even negative ones, are sources of energy; rather than suppressing children's negative energy, teachers should recognize its creative aspects and use…

  1. LEARN: Playful Techniques To Accelerate Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Regina G.

    The methods outlined in this guide offer teachers a variety of ways to stimulate interest, enhance concentration, increase understanding, and improve memory in their students. Chapter 1 discusses the LEARN (Learning Efficiently And Remembering Mnemonics) system, a set of strategies that help students use a variety of processing styles to a greater…

  2. Play to Learn, Learn to Play: Language Learning through Gaming Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryu, Dongwan

    2013-01-01

    Many researchers have investigated learning through playing games. However, after playing games, players often go online to establish and participate in the online community where they enrich their game experiences, discuss game-related issues, and create fan-fictions, screenshots, or scenarios. Although these emerging activities are an essential…

  3. Humorous Language Play in a Thai EFL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Ross

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between creativity, play, and language learning has been of increasing interest over the past decade, but the role of humour itself in SLL remains significantly under-explored. The present study examines humorous language play initiated by a bilingual EFL teacher and taken up by his post-beginner students in a Thai university…

  4. The Common Core's First Casualty: Playful Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowdon, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Although the Common Core standards do not prescribe pedagogy or forbid playful learning, kindergarten teachers will find it challenging to maintain a playful classroom under this reform. Kindergarten teachers have to cover a more rigorous and accelerated curriculum now, and they are doing so in a context that rewards procedural teaching.

  5. Outdoor Play and Learning: Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burriss, Kathleen; Burriss, Larry

    2011-01-01

    This study describes national school district policy and practice regarding elementary school children's outdoor learning and play. District representatives from 173 randomly selected school districts completed questionnaires describing policy and practice related to recess, outdoor play, outdoor curricular studies, playground materials, ADA…

  6. Use of humour in patient care.

    PubMed

    Harries, G

    Laughter and humour are an intrinsic part of our daily lives, but do nurses recognise the importance of humour in reducing stress and promoting feelings of wellbeing for patients and fellow staff members? PMID:7580092

  7. The essence of humour and its effects and functions: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Henny; Backe, Harriet; Sörensen, Stefan; Kock, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    Humour is one of the innate abilities that an individual develops whilst growing up and which is affected by his/her experiences in life. The purpose of this study was to describe which categories can be included in the term 'humour' and to describe the effects and functions that humour has on people. The study was exploratory. The data were based on 20 interviews, nine of which were made with women and 11 with men who had no formal connection to health services or nursing. Ages ranged from 17 to 75 years and all the interviewees were from Sweden. The research question was: 'what does humour mean to you?'. The answers given were labelled as: laughter, happiness, unforeseen events/situations, real humour/art form, jokes, plays on words/puns, situation comedy and political satire. The categories were: possibilities/obstacles and weapon/protection. We conclude that the essence of humour can be categorized as possibilities/obstacles and weapon/protection. Humour has effects and functions on individuals. Empathy is a prerequisite for the use of humour in the context of health services and nursing. PMID:11906597

  8. Exploring Play/Playfulness and Learning in the Adult and Higher Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanis, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Play and playfulness and their role in learning are researched extensively in early childhood education. However, as the child matures into an adult, play and playfulness are given less attention in the teaching and learning process. In adult education, there is very little research about play/playfulness and its significance for learning. Despite…

  9. Library Media Learning and Play Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Therese; And Others

    Preschool educators developed a library media learning and play center to enable children to "experience" a library; establish positive attitudes about the library; and encourage respect for self, others, and property. The center had the following areas: check-in and check-out desk, quiet reading section, computer center, listening center, video…

  10. Creative and Playful Learning: Learning through Game Co-Creation and Games in a Playful Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Marjaana

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a pilot study in which children aged 7-12 (N = 68) had an opportunity to study in a novel formal and informal learning setting. The learning activities were extended from the classroom to the playful learning environment (PLE), an innovative playground enriched by technological tools. Curriculum-based learning was intertwined…

  11. Learning, Play, and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Learning, Play, and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Learning, Play, and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Print A A A Text Size What's ... Learning What Your Baby Is Learning By 4 months old, your baby has learned to recognize you ...

  12. The neural basis of humour comprehension and humour appreciation: The roles of the temporoparietal junction and superior frontal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Darren W; Wallace, Marc G; Modirrousta, Mandana; Polimeni, Joseph O; McKeen, Nancy A; Reiss, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    Psychological well-being and social acumen benefit from the recognition of humourous intent and its enjoyment. The enjoyment of humour requires recognition, but humour recognition is not necessarily accompanied by humour enjoyment. Humour recognition is crucial during social interactions, while the associated enjoyment is less critical. Few neuroimaging studies have explicitly differentiated between the neural foundations of humour comprehension and humour appreciation. Among such studies, design limitations have obscured the specification of neural correlates to humour comprehension or appreciation. We implemented a trichotomous response option to address these design limitations. Twenty-four participants rated 120 comics (90 unaltered with humourous intent and 30 caption-altered without humourous intent) as either funny jokes (FJ), not funny jokes but intended to be funny (NFJ), or not intended to be funny or non-jokes (NJ). We defined humour comprehension by NFJ minus NJ and humour appreciation by FJ minus NFJ. We measured localized blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) neural responses with a 3T MRI scanner. We tested for BOLD responses in humour comprehension brain regions of interest (ROIs), humour appreciation ROIs, and across the whole-brain. We found significant NFJ-NJ BOLD responses in our humour comprehension ROIs and significant FJ-NFJ BOLD responses in select humour appreciation ROIs. One key finding is that comprehension accuracy levels correlated with humour-comprehension responses in the left temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). This finding represents a novel and precise neural linkage to humour comprehension. A second key finding is that the superior frontal gyrus (SFG) was uniquely associated with humour-appreciation. The SFG response suggests that complex cognitive processing underlies humour appreciation and that current models of humour appreciation be revised. Finally, our research design provides an operational distinction between humour

  13. The "State of Play" in Australia: Early Childhood Educators and Play-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumsion, Jennifer; Grieshaber, Sue; McArdle, Felicity; Shield, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the Education Meets Play study that will investigate early childhood educators' use of play-based learning, now mandatory under the "National Quality Standard". By building on what can be gleaned about educators' approaches to play-based learning prior to the implementation of the…

  14. Nurses’ experiences of humour in clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Shali, Mahboubeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing holistic nursing care when there is a shortage of personnel and equipment exposes nurses to stress and a higher risk of occupational burnout. Humour can promote nurses’ health and influence nursing care. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ experiences of humour in clinical settings and factors affecting it. Methods: This qualitative study investigated nurses’ experiences of humour. Five hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences provided the setting for this study. The participants comprised of 17 nurses with master’s and Baccalaureate degrees (BSN) in nursing. These nurses worked at educational hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences and had minimum work experience of 12 months in various clinical wards. Nurses from all wards were invited to participate in this study. The data were collected through semi structure interviews using guides comprising probing questions. Telephonic interviews were used to further supplement the data. The data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Results: The data were classified into five themes including the dynamics of humour, condition enforcement, Risk making probability, Instrumental use and Change: opportunities and threats. Conclusion: Understanding nurses’ perceptions and experiences of humour helps identify its contributing factors and provides valuable guidelines for enhancing nurses and patients’ mental, emotional and physical health. Spreading a culture of humour through teaching methods can improve workplace cheerfulness and highlights the importance of humour in patient care in nurses and nursing students. PMID:26034735

  15. Playing with Mathematics: Play in Early Childhood as a Context for Mathematical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Play is an essential part of young children's lives. This symposium highlights the integral role of play in young children's mathematics learning and examines the teacher's role in facilitating and extending this. Papers examine key tenets of play, contributing to theoretical understandings and presenting data on teacher's perceptions of play and…

  16. Science Concepts Young Children Learn through Water Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Carol M.

    2012-01-01

    Water is fascinating, fun, and multifaceted. Children can play with it endlessly. But play, for play's sake, is not water's only value (Crosser, 1994, Tovey, 1993). Indeed, water play is a compelling focus of study for young children (Chalufour & Worth, 2005). The concepts that young children learn from water play are essential for early childhood…

  17. The Playing Learning Child: Towards a Pedagogy of Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelsson, Ingrid Pramling; Carlsson, Maj Asplund

    2008-01-01

    From children's own perspective, play and learning are not always separate in practices during early years. The purpose of this article is, first, to scrutinise the background and character of early years education in terms of play and learning. Second, to elaborate the findings of several years of research about children's learning in preschool…

  18. A Multicultural Perspective on Play and Learning in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillemyr, Ole Fredrik; Sobstad, Frode; Marder, Kurt; Flowerday, Terri

    2011-01-01

    In the school's conception of learning, the cultural aspect of children's play has often been lacking. In different countries, it is emphasized that play is important for learning (Dockett and Fleer, Play and pedagogy in early childhood: Bending the rules. Harcourt Brace & Comp, Sydney, "1999"; Lillemyr, Nordisk Pedagogik/Nordic Educational…

  19. More than Just Play: Enhanced Teacher Preparation through Authentic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, H. Nicole; DeCou, Heather L.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the research behind and development of Play Lab, a play-based authentic learning environment for university students learning to teach children with developmental disabilities and the case study analysis from the Play Lab's first year of implementation. Data from (a) pre-development surveys which were triangulated with (b)…

  20. This is funny: on the beneficial role of self-enhancing and affiliative humour in job design.

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Anja; Vander Elst, Tinne; Dikkers, Josje; De Lange, Annet; De Witte, Hans

    2012-02-01

    Building on positive psychology, the present study aims to address the role of humour in the workplace, and particularly in job design, one of the crucial job aspects contributing to employee well-being. Specifically, we examine the main effects of self-enhancing and affiliative types of humour both on burnout and work engagement. Furthermore, we study whether these humour styles serve as personal resources, moderating the associations of job hindrances (i.e., role conflict), job challenges (i.e., workload) and job resources (i.e., social support) with burnout and work engagement, as outlined in the Job Demands-Resources model. Results in a large sample of Belgian employees ( N = 1200) showed that both types of humour related negatively to burnout and positively to work engagement. No interactions between humour and the job characteristics were found in the prediction of burnout. The significant interactions in predicting work engagement showed that self-enhancing and affiliative humour played a positive role, particularly when role conflict and social support were low. No interactions with workload were found. The discussion aims to shed light on the unexpected results and to further the study of the humour-health hypothesis. PMID:22269369

  1. Learning to Play Well with Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searcy, Jeny

    2009-01-01

    This article presents important lessons the author has learned on a leadership journey in the field of Early Childhood Education. The author describes the steps in her journey, along with lessons learned with those steps. Throughout the journey, regardless of its length, the author stresses one essential lesson for leaders in the field: "Find joy…

  2. Cats and Portals: Video Games, Learning, and Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, James Paul

    2008-01-01

    The author builds on arguments he has made elsewhere that good commercial video games foster deep learning and problem solving and that such games in fact promote mastery as a form of play. Here he maintains that some good video games engage players with an important type of play, namely of play as discovery, of play as surmising new possibilities…

  3. Reconceptualising Play and Learning in the Lives of Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yelland, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    A decade ago I wrote an article entitled "Technology as play" in which I called for early childhood educators to rethink the way in which they regard play. This involved not only incorporating the notion of playing with new technologies but also critiqued the essence of what constituted play and the link with learning that was viewed uncritically.…

  4. Learning through Play: Portraits, Photoshop, and Visual Literacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeyford, Michelle A.; Boyd, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Play has a significant role in language and literacy learning. However, even when valued in schools, opportunities for play are limited beyond early childhood education. This study of an after-school program for adolescents looks closely at several forms of play that students engaged in to produce self-portraits. The study suggests that play and…

  5. Mathematical Learning in a Context of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edo, Meque; Planas, Nuria; Badillo, Edelmira

    2009-01-01

    In this article we analyse a didactical situation centred on the creation and use of a symbolic play environment in a class of pupils aged five and six years-old. The main source of data for this paper comes from an experimentation planned in relation to the following research question: does symbolic play in simulated contexts help pupils to…

  6. Endangered Play, Endangered Development: A Constructivist View of the Role of Play in Development and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Diane E.

    Piagetian and Vygotskian theories may be used as starting points to examine the role of play in development and learning from a constructivist perspective, including how children use play to deepen their understanding and skills, encounter new problems, and incorporate newly mastered skills into their play. Contemporary factors such as an emphasis…

  7. Outdoor Play and Learning for Infants and Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Suzanne M.

    Infants and toddlers like to crawl, climb, run, and explore in wide open, outdoor spaces. This publication provides ideas for day care providers on using outdoor play to facilitate learning in infants and toddlers. Section 1 discusses the benefits of daily outdoor play, including learning to interact with others, practicing language skills,…

  8. Learning, Play, and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Learning, Play, and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Learning, Play, and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Print A A A Text Size What's ... start responding even more to you during these months — and will even give you a smile! Babies ...

  9. Helping Children Play and Learn Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Meadan, Hedda

    2010-01-01

    During the early childhood years, children learn to interact with one another in ways that are positive and successful. Researchers stress the importance of positive peer relationships in childhood and later life. The absence of positive social interactions in childhood is linked to negative consequences later in life, such as withdrawal,…

  10. Playing with Computers--and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsa, Trisha

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of establishing computer centers in early childhood classrooms to enhance cognitive learning, develop self-esteem, and stimulate divergent thinking. Outlines steps necessary for setting up a classroom computer center, such as defining procedures and rules and choosing appropriate activities and software. Suggests ways to…

  11. Young Children's Block Play and Mathematical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Boyoung; Chae, Jeong-Lim; Boyd, Barbara Foulks

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated young children's mathematical engagement in play with wooden unit blocks. Two boys, ages 6 and 7, were independently observed completing the task of filling outlined regions with the various sets of blocks. Three major mathematical actions were observed: categorizing geometric shapes, composing a larger shape…

  12. Playing with Liquid Foams: Learning Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritacco, Hernan

    2008-01-01

    Who has never played with soap bubbles? They are so beautiful and amazing, they have a perfect spherical shape and surprising tints. Foams are structures of bubbles of an incredible complexity and they are a perfect system to stimulate students' interest in the chemistry and physics of surface phenomena. In this article I propose a simple…

  13. Conceptualising Play-Based Learning from Kindergarten Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fesseha, Ellen; Pyle, Angela

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to gain insight into how Ontario teachers define play-based learning, and how their perspectives affect its implementation in kindergarten classrooms. Using survey data from kindergarten teachers from around the province of Ontario, two definitions of play were developed: one focused on social development through play and the…

  14. Children's Categorisation of Play and Learning Based on Social Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Justine; Jenvey, Vickii; Hill, Carly

    2006-01-01

    While much time has been spent deliberating about the definition of play, little emphasis has been placed on what children themselves perceive as play. The aim of the present study was to examine social context as a cue for children's perceptions of play and learning. Ninety-two children aged between four and six years (mean four years nine…

  15. Children Learning to Use Technologies through Play: A Digital Play Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Jo; Edwards, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Digital technologies are increasingly acknowledged as an important aspect of early childhood education. A significant problem for early childhood education has been how to understand the pedagogical use of technologies in a sector that values play-based learning. This paper presents a new framework to understand how children learn to use…

  16. The Transfer of Learning from Play Practices to Game Play in Young Adult Soccer Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Josh E.; Ward, Phillip; Wallhead, Tristan L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Physical educators and coaches face an ongoing problem of presenting fun and enjoyable practices that also provide efficient learning of technical and tactical sports skills. Effective instruction also promotes the transfer of learning from practice tasks to the real game. Play Practice (PP) describes a structure for teaching sports…

  17. Achievement Evaluation within a Non-Conventional Framework: Some Experiences in Physics and Humour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worner, C. H.; Romero, A.; Bustamante, G.

    2010-01-01

    An achievement evaluation of a non-conventional physics course for liberal arts students is presented. The theoretical ground for this course focuses on the use of humour as a teaching tool. Preliminary evidence shows that a learning process is accomplished. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  18. Humorous Bodies and Humorous Minds: Humour within the Social Context of an Infant Child Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loizou, Eleni

    2004-01-01

    This study looks at how the environment in an infant child care setting can have an impact on young children's humourous experiences and therefore their learning and development. With the use of multiple qualitative methods, participant and non-participant observations, journal writing, videotaping, interviewing, and document review this study…

  19. Learning, Play, and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... learn to associate them with mom, dad, and bottle. Your baby will begin to use gestures like ... for exploration. Your baby may enjoy playing with egg cartons, blocks, balls, stacking toys, and push-pull ...

  20. Learning To Play, Playing To Learn. Games and Activities To Teach Sharing, Caring, and Compromise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffens, Charlie; Gorin, Spencer

    This book demonstrates that therapeutic play can provide a solution to contemporary socialization problems. It provides a selection of games and activities that teach children about living in the world through the dynamics of play. Section 1, "Introduction," defines "play" and the philosophy and rules behind a healthy play program. Section 2,…

  1. Blended Learning Using Role-Plays, Wikis and Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruyters, Michele; Douglas, Kathy; Law, Siew Fang

    2011-01-01

    Student learning about legal skills in legal education is increasingly seen as important. These legal skills include advocacy and negotiation. These skills are often taught through role-play. This article discusses the combination of role-plays with online tools, including wikis and blogs, to assist students to master legal skills. The article…

  2. Play: Ten Power Boosts for Children's Early Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice

    2007-01-01

    Play is children's work. Alice Honig enumerates from the heart 10 ways in which children learn through play, including building dexterity; social skills; cognitive and language skills; number and time concepts; spatial understanding; reasoning of cause and effect; clarification of pretend versus real; sensory and aesthetic appreciation; extended…

  3. Learning Physics through Play in an Augmented Reality Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enyedy, Noel; Danish, Joshua A.; Delacruz, Girlie; Kumar, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The Learning Physics through Play Project (LPP) engaged 6-8-year old students (n = 43) in a series of scientific investigations of Newtonian force and motion including a series of augmented reality activities. We outline the two design principles behind the LPP curriculum: 1) the use of socio-dramatic, embodied play in the form of participatory…

  4. Learning to Play Games or Playing Games to Learn? A Health Education Case Study with Soweto Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amory, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of an educational computer video game in teaching and learning. Cultural-historical activity theory is used heuristically to explore the social and cultural interactions during game play. It is argued that knowledge construction occurs when video games function as a tool to mediate learning rather…

  5. Development of a Measure of Humour Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chik, Maria P. Y.; Leung, C. S. Benjamin; Molloy, Geoffrey N.

    2005-01-01

    The procedure for the development of a measure of humour appreciation among a convenience sample of 53 primary school children attending a one-week summer program held in Hong Kong is described. Two sets of visual stimuli depicting pictures of local celebrities portrayed either veridically (congruously) or incongruously were established from a…

  6. Block Play: The Complete Guide to Learning and Playing with Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Sharon

    Based on the view that blocks are a tool that preschool teachers can use to teach all the skills and concepts necessary for children to be successful learners, this guide presents over 50 activities to enhance the preschool and kindergarten classroom's block corner. Chapter 1 of the guide illustrates the skills learned through block play in the…

  7. Playing to Learn: A Qualitative Analysis of Bilingual Pupil-Pupil Talk during Board Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Heather

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores what happens when bilingual learners come together to play a board game specially designed to facilitate an interactive context in which the learning of English as a second or additional language is promoted. An example of the interactive behaviour of one group of bilingual learners is then presented in order to illustrate such…

  8. Home Video Games: Children and Parents Learn to Play and Play to Learn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Edna

    Twenty families in the San Francisco Bay area (California) with new Atari home video game sets were studied from February through June 1981 to obtain data on how the game-playing affected family interaction. Records of play were kept for one week each month and each family member was interviewed at the beginning and the end of the study. It was…

  9. Play, attention, and learning: how do play and timing shape the development of attention and influence classroom learning?

    PubMed

    Hedges, James H; Adolph, Karen E; Amso, Dima; Bavelier, Daphne; Fiez, Julie A; Krubitzer, Leah; McAuley, J Devin; Newcombe, Nora S; Fitzpatrick, Susan M; Ghajar, Jamshid

    2013-07-01

    The behavioral and neurobiological connections between play and the development of critical cognitive functions, such as attention, remain largely unknown. We do not yet know how these connections relate to the formation of specific abilities, such as spatial ability, and to learning in formal environments, such as in the classroom. Insights into these issues would be beneficial not only for understanding play, attention, and learning individually, but also for the development of more efficacious systems for learning and for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. Different operational definitions of play can incorporate or exclude varying types of behavior, emphasize varying developmental time points, and motivate different research questions. Relevant questions to be explored in this area include, How do particular kinds of play relate to the development of particular kinds of abilities later in life? How does play vary across societies and species in the context of evolution? Does play facilitate a shift from reactive to predictive timing, and is its connection to timing unique or particularly significant? This report will outline important research steps that need to be taken in order to address these and other questions about play, human activity, and cognitive functions. PMID:23763338

  10. Play, attention, and learning: How do play and timing shape the development of attention and influence classroom learning?

    PubMed Central

    Hedges, James H; Adolph, Karen E; Amso, Dima; Bavelier, Daphne; Fiez, Julie A; Krubitzer, Leah; McAuley, J Devin; Newcombe, Nora S; Fitzpatrick, Susan M; Ghajar, Jamshid

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral and neurobiological connections between play and the development of critical cognitive functions, such as attention, remain largely unknown. We do not yet know how these connections relate to the formation of specific abilities, such as spatial ability, and to learning in formal environments, such as in the classroom. Insights into these issues would be beneficial not only for understanding play, attention, and learning individually, but also for the development of more efficacious systems for learning and for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. Different operational definitions of play can incorporate or exclude varying types of behavior, emphasize varying developmental time points, and motivate different research questions. Relevant questions to be explored in this area include, How do particular kinds of play relate to the development of particular kinds of abilities later in life? How does play vary across societies and species in the context of evolution? Does play facilitate a shift from reactive to predictive timing, and is its connection to timing unique or particularly significant? This report will outline important research steps that need to be taken in order to address these and other questions about play, human activity, and cognitive functions. PMID:23763338

  11. Children's Play and Culture Learning in an Egalitarian Foraging Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyette, Adam H.

    2016-01-01

    Few systematic studies of play in foragers exist despite their significance for understanding the breadth of contexts for human development and the ontogeny of cultural learning. Forager societies lack complex social hierarchies, avenues for prestige or wealth accumulation, and formal educational institutions, and thereby represent a contrast to…

  12. Breathing and the Oboe: Playing, Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaunt, Helena

    2004-01-01

    Breathing and breath control are central to playing the oboe, yet few detailed educational resources are available to support their teaching and learning. This paper presents a review of existing knowledge and expertise in the field. It highlights common ground and points of controversy, and indicates some key areas for consideration. It points to…

  13. Provisions for Outdoor Play and Learning in Slovene Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kos, Marjanca; Jerman, Janez

    2013-01-01

    This study examined play and learning in the natural environment and on the playgrounds of Slovene preschools. It included 140 preschool teachers and 264 parents of children who attended preschools in 21 Slovene towns. Data were collected through questionnaires with questions referring to time spent outdoors, children's outdoor activities,…

  14. Learning to Play in a Goal-Directed Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstedt, Cecilia; Pramling, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    This study concerns the relationship between learning and play. On the basis of sociocultural theory, some ideas are put forward about how this relationship can be conceptualised in the context of goal-directed practice. Empirical data from primary school with children 6-8 years old are used to illustrate and discuss this conceptualisation. It is…

  15. Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Fred; Sharapan, Hedda

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, in childhood, work and play seem to come together. Says that for young children their play is their work, and the more adults encourage children to play, the more they emphasize important lifelong resource. Examines some uses of children's play, making and building, artwork, dramatic play, monsters and superheroes, gun play, and…

  16. Children's Play and Culture Learning in an Egalitarian Foraging Society.

    PubMed

    Boyette, Adam H

    2016-05-01

    Few systematic studies of play in foragers exist despite their significance for understanding the breadth of contexts for human development and the ontogeny of cultural learning. Forager societies lack complex social hierarchies, avenues for prestige or wealth accumulation, and formal educational institutions, and thereby represent a contrast to the contexts of most play research. Analysis of systematic observations of children's play among Aka forest foragers (n = 50, ages 4-16, M = 9.5) and Ngandu subsistence farmers (n = 48, ages 4-16, M = 9.1) collected in 2010 illustrates that while play and work trade off during development in both groups, and consistent patterns in sex-role development are evident, Aka children engage in significantly less rough-and-tumble play and competitive games than children among their socially stratified farming neighbors. PMID:27189403

  17. Strategies Students Adopted when Learning to Play an Improvised Blues in an E-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Frederick; Biasutti, Michele

    2010-01-01

    In this investigative study, the authors sought to reveal the learning strategies adopted by participants as they learned to play a 12-bar improvised blues with both hands together on a musical keyboard in an e-learning environment. There were 3 participants, 2 female and 1 male. Participants' average age was 21 years. They worked individually in…

  18. Learning by playing: how to create the perfect learning game for and with optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haist, Tobias; Burla, Avinash

    2010-08-01

    For children, playing and learning is often one thing. They learn while playing and by playing the right games they learn a lot. It is therefore obvious that we should use (among other things) games in order to fascinate children for optics and to teach them the basic laws of optics. In this contribution we will introduce different optical games for children in preschool and elementary school. The majority of commercial learning games on the market do not achieve the ambitious goal of leading to fun and knowledge since very often there are serious design flaws within these games. We introduce ten design rules for learning games that will enable you to create your own successful learning game for a special topic. Exemplary, we will show games based on and for color mixing and polarization.

  19. Concentration of clobetasone butyrate in aqueous humour.

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, S C; Richards, A B

    1983-01-01

    The concentrations of clobetasone butyrate and betamethasone were measured in aqueous humour of patients undergoing cataract extraction 12.5 to 18.5 hours after application into the lower conjunctival sac of an ointment containing 0.1% of the steroid. Samples were assayed from 10 patients receiving clobetasone butyrate and 13 patients receiving betamethasone phosphate. There were measurable concentrations in only 2 samples in the former group, and both were 0.1 ng/ml. In the betamethasone group measurable concentrations were found in 11 samples, and the concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 20.3 ng/ml, with the highest concentrations between 12.5 and 13.5 hours after application. The concentration of betamethasone in the aqueous humour decreased by about 90% in the 6 hours from 12.5 to 18.5 hours after application. It is speculative as to whether it is these differences in pharmacokinetic behaviour, or other differences in biological or physicochemical properties, which are responsible for the minimal effect on intraocular pressure induced by clobetasone butyrate compared with betamethasone. PMID:6824626

  20. Learning Pre-Played Solos: Self-Regulated Learning Strategies in Jazz/Improvised Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Siw G.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the self-regulated learning strategies of two advanced students in jazz/improvised music education when learning pre-played solos over well-known jazz tunes. The students were enrolled in a well-established performance degree programme in a music conservatoire, and videotaped their own individual practice sessions. In…

  1. Learning with Serious Games: Is Fun Playing the Game a Predictor of Learning Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iten, Nina; Petko, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Serious games are generally considered to induce positive effects in the areas of learning motivation and learning gains. Yet few studies have examined how these factors are related. Therefore, an empirical study was conducted to test the relationship between anticipated enjoyment and willingness to play, as well as between game enjoyment,…

  2. Students' Learning Outcomes and Learning Experiences through Playing a Serious Educational Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Meng-Tzu; Annetta, Len

    2012-01-01

    This study attempted to examine students' learning outcomes and their learning experiences through playing a Serious Educational Game. A mixed-method research design was employed collecting both quantitative and qualitative data. A total of 98 middle-school students ranging from sixth to eighth grades participated through paper-and-pencil…

  3. Learning in Virtual Worlds: Using Communities of Practice to Explain How People Learn from Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Martin; Carr, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Although there is interest in the educational potential of online multiplayer games and virtual worlds, there is still little evidence to explain specifically what and how people learn from these environments. This paper addresses this issue by exploring the experiences of couples that play "World of Warcraft" together. Learning outcomes were…

  4. Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning: Teaching and Learning or Playing and Becoming?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Alison Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This article advocates the use of free play in the provision of the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) programme in schools. It uses case studies to illustrate how children develop and use the five strands of SEAL while playing. The author draws on recent research and literature to support the idea that SEAL skills are caught rather…

  5. Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    Designing a game with a serious purpose involves considering the worlds of Reality and Meaning yet it is undeniably impossible to create a game without a third world, one that is specifically concerned with what makes a game a game: the play elements. This third world, the world of people like designers and artists, and disciplines as computer science and game design, I call the world of Play and this level is devoted to it. The level starts off with some of the misperceptions people have of play. Unlike some may think, we play all the time, even when we grow old—this was also very noticeable in designing the game Levee Patroller as the team exhibited very playful behavior at many occasions. From there, I go into the aspects that characterize this world. The first concerns the goal of the game. This relates to the objectives people have to achieve within the game. This is constituted by the second aspect: the gameplay. Taking actions and facing challenges is subsequently constituted by a gameworld, which concerns the third aspect. And all of it is not possible without the fourth and final aspect, the type of technology that creates and facilitates the game. The four aspects together make up a “game concept” and from this world such a concept can be judged on the basis of three closely interrelated criteria: engagement, immersion, and fun.

  6. Adult Play-Learning: Observing Informal Family Education at a Science Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanhadilok, Peeranut; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the issues surrounding the nature of adult play. More specifically, we explore "family play-learning", where play activities result in forms of added knowledge or insight for the adults involved. Adult play itself is an under-researched area, and play-learning even more so. We discuss related research and, in…

  7. 'What controls aqueous humour outflow resistance?'.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark

    2006-04-01

    The bulk of aqueous humour outflow resistance is generated in or near the inner wall endothelium of Schlemm's canal in normal eyes, and probably also in glaucomatous eyes. Fluid flow through this region is controlled by the location of the giant vacuoles and pores found in cells of the endothelium of Schlemm's canal, but the flow resistance itself is more likely generated either in the extracellular matrix of the juxtacanalicular connective tissue or the basement membrane of Schlemm's canal. Future studies utilizing in vitro perfusion studies of inner wall endothelial cells may give insights into the process by which vacuoles and pores form in this unique endothelium and why inner wall pore density is greatly reduced in glaucoma. PMID:16386733

  8. "Prey Play": Learning about Predators and Prey through an Interactive, Role-Play Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaton, Cynthia C. M.; Dodd, Kristen; Drennon, Katherine; Nagle, Jack

    2012-01-01

    "Prey Play" is an interactive role-play activity that provides fifth-grade students with opportunities to examine predator-prey interactions. This four-part, role-play activity allows students to take on the role of a predator and prey as they reflect on the behaviors animals exhibit as they collect food and interact with one another, as well as…

  9. Inquiry, play, and problem solving in a process learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaits, Anne Y.

    United States. This dissertation presents an account of the history of the institution and the continuing legacy of the early Exploratorium and its founder, Frank Oppenheimer. I argue that the institution is an early example of a constructivist learning museum. I then describe how art encourages learning in the museum. It provides means of presenting information that engage all of the senses and encourage emotional involvement. It reframes familiar sights so that viewers look more closely in search of recognition, and it presents intangible or dematerialized things in a tangible way. It facilitates play, with its many benefits. It brings fresh perspectives and processes to problem solving and the acquisition of new knowledge. This project is the study of an institution where art and science have always coexisted with equal importance, setting it apart from more traditional museums where art was added as a secondary focus to the original disciplinary concentration of the institution. Many of the exhibits were created by artists, but the real value the visual arts bring to the museum is in its contributions to processes such as inquiry, play, problem-solving, and innovation.

  10. What Infants, Toddlers, and Preschoolers Learn from Play: 12 Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the 12 benefits of playing as a reference and guide for teachers in helping young children develop their cognitive skills, motor ability, socio-emotional, and academic development during play time. The following 12 benefits are described: (1) Play Enhances Bodily Gracefulness; (2) Play Promotes Social Skills;…

  11. Watching the Children Watching "Play School": Indicators of Engagement, Play and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Cathie

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of one aspect of a research project to investigate the contribution of the television program "Play School" to the health and wellbeing of young Australian children. The research question for this aspect of the study was: How do young children respond to the various elements and segments of "Play School" when viewed…

  12. Birds of a Feather Laugh Together: An Investigation of Humour Style Similarity in Married Couples

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Christian Martin; Campbell, Lorne John

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigated the degree of similarity in humour styles between spouses as assessed with the Humour Styles Questionnaire (HSQ). Furthermore, self-esteem was investigated as a potential moderator of partner humour style similarity. A sample of 116 heterosexual, married couples independently completed questionnaires assessing self-reported humour styles across the 32 item HSQ, as well as global self-esteem. Results indicated that there is significant positive association between the humour styles of married partners. This association was moderated by individual self-esteem. Specifically, participants with high self-esteem were found to have greater humour style similarity with their partners. Similarity was also greater for positive compared to negative types of humour. Implications for the use of dyadic data in investigating the roles of humour within couples are discussed. PMID:27547257

  13. Birds of a Feather Laugh Together: An Investigation of Humour Style Similarity in Married Couples.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Christian Martin; Campbell, Lorne John

    2016-08-01

    The present research investigated the degree of similarity in humour styles between spouses as assessed with the Humour Styles Questionnaire (HSQ). Furthermore, self-esteem was investigated as a potential moderator of partner humour style similarity. A sample of 116 heterosexual, married couples independently completed questionnaires assessing self-reported humour styles across the 32 item HSQ, as well as global self-esteem. Results indicated that there is significant positive association between the humour styles of married partners. This association was moderated by individual self-esteem. Specifically, participants with high self-esteem were found to have greater humour style similarity with their partners. Similarity was also greater for positive compared to negative types of humour. Implications for the use of dyadic data in investigating the roles of humour within couples are discussed. PMID:27547257

  14. Active Learning by Play Dough Modeling in the Medical Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herur, Anita; Kolagi, Sanjeev; Chinagudi, Surekharani; Manjula, R.; Patil, Shailaja

    2011-01-01

    Active learning produces meaningful learning, improves attitudes toward learning, and increases knowledge and retention, but is still not fully institutionalized in the undergraduate sciences. A few studies have compared the effectiveness of PowerPoint presentations, student seminars, quizzes, and use of CD-ROMs with blackboard teaching and…

  15. Children's Virtual Play Worlds Culture, Learning, and Participation. New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies. Volume 58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Anne, Ed.; Marsh, Jackie, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    As children's digital lives become more relevant to schools and educators, the question of play and learning is being revisited in new and interesting ways. "Children's Virtual Play Worlds: Culture, Learning, and Participation" provides a more reasoned account of children's play engagements in virtual worlds through a number of scholarly…

  16. It's a Kid's Job: Playing Helps Kids Learn and Grow

    MedlinePlus

    ... on rhesus monkeys. While he’s cautious about drawing parallels between monkeys and people, his studies offer some ... enriching play. Let children lead. Monitor screen time (computer, TV, video games). Encourage more active play. Get ...

  17. Let's Play: Learning Games for Infants and Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Phyllis Jack

    2000-01-01

    Recommends play activities in which children look, listen, taste, smell, and touch. Includes appropriate ages for activities and gives directions for several games, including peek and seek, water play, bean bags, and hot potato. (DLH)

  18. Reflections on Play: Learning from Student Teacher Placements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Richard

    Noting that teacher educators should help preservice teachers not just to see play but also to participate in the realm of play, this paper presents three short case-vignettes illustrating the challenges to facilitating deep, differentiated play in typical classroom and school settings. The first vignette illustrates how seldom a first-grade…

  19. Framing Young Children's Humour and Practitioner Responses to It Using a Bakhtinian Carnivalesque Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallant, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article presents findings from a pilot study offering an alternative framing of children's humour and laughter in an early childhood education setting. It employs a Bakhtinian carnivalesque lens to explore the nature of children's humour in an urban nursery and investigate the framing of children's humour and laughter outside the popular…

  20. [Sense of humour in schizophrenia--ability of humour reception and possibilities of its application in therapeutic interventions].

    PubMed

    Parnowska, Dorota; Braniecka, Anna; Radomska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The existing research on sense of humour in schizophrenia is focused on two main areas, mainly, assessment of patients' abilities to understand and appreciate humour and denoting the possibilities of its application in therapeutic programs concentrating on the improvement of patients' functionality and preventing illness relapses. The vast majority of the conclusions from the above mentioned research corroborate the opinion on the usefulness of developing and reinforcing sense of humour in schizophrenia, emphasizing its beneficial effect on the patients' quality of life, above all, in terms of reducing aggression, anxiety and depression as well as improving general life satisfaction and social functioning. At the same time numerous research indicate low reception of humour in schizophrenia which can negatively influence its effective usage in therapeutic interventions. Further constraint with regard to the therapy can constitute an intensified fear for being laughed at, which has been confirmed in numerous empirical reports. Therefore, it seems that addressing humorous therapeutic interventions to the above mentioned group of patients requires especially careful planning taking into consideration its cognitive and affective limitations in the perception of humour and intensified fear for being laughed at. PMID:25011239

  1. Trainee Teachers' e-Learning Experiences of Computer Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Pam

    2009-01-01

    Pam Wright highlights the role of technology in providing situated learning opportunities for preservice teachers to explore the role commercial computer games may have in primary education. In a study designed to assess the effectiveness of an online unit on gaming incorporated into a course on learning technologies, Wright found that thoughtful…

  2. Learning About Life the Playful Way: From Kindergarten to Play Group. Situation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kischke, Martina I.

    This paper describes various types of child care services available for preschool children in West Germany. The paper emphasizes the importance of play in children's cognitive and social development. Preschool experiences guided by a trained staff are considered an important complement to family life. According to the paper, West Germany is…

  3. Word-Play and "Musike": Young Children Learning Literacies while Communicating Playfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcock, Sophie; Cullen, Joy; St George, Alison

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores young children's rhythmic, musical, humorous and playful communication in the context of empowering themselves to create meaningful curriculum during teacher-controlled routine morning-tea times in an early childhood education centre. The data, presented as "events", formed part of an interpretive qualitative study exploring…

  4. Readings from...Play as a Medium for Learning and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Doris, Ed.

    The chapters and essays in this book are drawn from the 1988 edition of "Play as a Medium for Learning and Development." The first chapter, "The Challenge of Educational Play," by Bernard Spodek and Olivia N. Saracho, is followed by two essays: (1) "Play and the Origin of Species," (Michael J. Ellis); and (2) "The Struggle between Sacred Play and…

  5. Reclaiming Play: Helping Children Learn and Thrive in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson-Paige, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Child development theorists, researchers, and educators have long known that play is one of children's most valuable resources, vital to their social, emotional, and cognitive growth. Through play children make sense of the world around them and work through new experiences, ideas, and feelings. But in recent years, a host of social forces and…

  6. Playful Talk: Negotiating Opportunities to Learn in Collaborative Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Florence R.; Wilson, Nicholas C.

    2015-01-01

    This case study examines the role of playful talk in negotiating the "how" of collaborative group work in a 6th-grade science classroom. Here we develop and test a Vygotsky-derived hypothesis that postulates playful talk as a mechanism for identity exploration and group status negotiation. Our findings indicate that students utilized the…

  7. The Power of Play: Learning What Comes Naturally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    2008-01-01

    Although under attack from some goal-oriented politicians and parents and ofen considered superfluous by school administrators and teachers, free play remains vital to human health and creativity. Contrary to the notion that play should serve utilitarian ends or consist primarily of organized sports, the author makes a case for self-initiated…

  8. Learning Through Play: Joslyn Multi-Service Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Sharon Lee

    1974-01-01

    In an old, wood frame school building, a day care facility, based on a modular, movable, and highly flexible series of components, permits active use and almost constant change in a learning situation. (Author)

  9. Passion play: Will Wright and games for science learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Dixie

    2012-12-01

    Researchers and instructional designers are exploring the possibilities of using video games to support STEM education in the U.S., not only because they are a popular media form among youth, but also because well-designed games often leverage the best features of inquiry learning. Those interested in using games in an educational capacity may benefit from an examination of the work of video game designer Will Wright. Wright designs through a constructivist lens and his open-ended, sandbox games ( SimCity, The Sims, Spore) present wide "possibility spaces" that allow players to exercise their critical thinking and problem solving skills. His games invoke a delight in discovery that inspire creative acts and interest-driven learning both during and outside of the game. Finally, he reminds us that failure-based learning is a viable strategy for building expertise and understanding.

  10. It All Adds Up: Learning Early Math through Play and Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramani, Geetha B.; Eason, Sarah H.

    2015-01-01

    Playing and learning mathematics do not have to be mutually exclusive activities, especially in kindergarten. Play and games can give young children opportunities to learn and develop foundational math skills that are aligned with Common Core standards for mathematics through age-appropriate, fun, and engaging activities.

  11. What Can Chinese and German Children Tell Us about Their Learning and Play in Kindergarten?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Shu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated Hong Kong and German children's perceptions of play and learning and their relationships. Forty-eight children (24 German and 24 Chinese) playing and learning in the classroom were observed and videotaped for five consecutive days. They were interviewed 3 times about their kindergarten experiences by using free- and…

  12. Will Undergraduate Students Play Games to Learn How to Conduct Library Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markey, Karen; Swanson, Fritz; Jenkins, Andrea; Jennings, Brian; St. Jean, Beth; Rosenberg, Victor; Yao, Xingxing; Frost, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study examines whether undergraduate students will play games to learn how to conduct library research. Results indicate that students will play games that are an integral component of the course curriculum and enable them to accomplish overall course goals at the same time they learn about library research. (Contains 1 table.)

  13. Social Play of Young Children At-Risk of Learning Difficulties: A Situated Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Aalsvoort, Geerdina M.; Van Tol, Annemarie M.; Karemaker, Arjette M.

    2004-01-01

    The question asked by this study was whether information on play behaviour of young children at-risk of learning difficulties could act as a diagnostic means of investigating emerging learning difficulties. A sociocultural perspective was taken to examine the role of interaction during the play of students in a regular primary school and in a…

  14. The Swedish National Curriculum: Play and Learning with Fundamental Values in Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Anette; Arlemalm-Hagser, Eva

    2011-01-01

    In Sweden, early childhood education is unique in its combination of learning and play, care and fostering fundamental values. The aim of this article is to discuss and problematise current Swedish research from the early childhood education field with a focus on play and learning in relation to three fundamental values affirmed in the Swedish…

  15. Humour processing in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: A behavioural and neuroanatomical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Camilla N.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Henley, Susie M.D.; Downey, Laura E.; Woollacott, Ione O.; Golden, Hannah L.; Fletcher, Phillip D.; Mummery, Catherine J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Humour is a complex cognitive and emotional construct that is vulnerable in neurodegenerative diseases, notably the frontotemporal lobar degenerations. However, humour processing in these diseases has been little studied. Here we assessed humour processing in patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 22, mean age 67 years, four female) and semantic dementia (n = 11, mean age 67 years, five female) relative to healthy individuals (n = 21, mean age 66 years, 11 female), using a joint cognitive and neuroanatomical approach. We created a novel neuropsychological test requiring a decision about the humorous intent of nonverbal cartoons, in which we manipulated orthogonally humour content and familiarity of depicted scenarios. Structural neuroanatomical correlates of humour detection were assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Assessing performance in a signal detection framework and after adjusting for standard measures of cognitive function, both patient groups showed impaired accuracy of humour detection in familiar and novel scenarios relative to healthy older controls (p < .001). Patient groups showed similar overall performance profiles; however the behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia group alone showed a significant advantage for detection of humour in familiar relative to novel scenarios (p = .045), suggesting that the behavioural variant syndrome may lead to particular difficulty decoding novel situations for humour, while semantic dementia produces a more general deficit of humour detection that extends to stock comedic situations. Humour detection accuracy was associated with grey matter volume in a distributed network including temporo-parietal junctional and anterior superior temporal cortices, with predominantly left-sided correlates of processing humour in familiar scenarios and right-sided correlates of processing novel humour. The findings quantify deficits of core cognitive operations underpinning humour

  16. Language Play, a Collaborative Resource in Children's L2 learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cekaite, Asta; Aronsson, Karin

    2005-01-01

    Within '"communicative language teaching," "natural" language has had a privileged position, and a focus on form has been seen as something inauthentic or as something that is inconsequential for learning (for a critique, see Kramsch and Sullivan 1996; Cook 1997). Yet in the present study of an immersion classroom, it was found that children with…

  17. Relationships Play Primary Role in Boys' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichert. Michael; Hawley. Richard

    2013-01-01

    There is a pantheon of literature and popular panic pointing toward the academic ascent of girls and the decline of boys. On the contrary, the reality is different: Boys are learning and succeeding in many places. Two studies find that the places where boys excel have several common characteristics, including teachers who relate to the boys…

  18. Pedagogical Dramas and Transformational Play: Narratively Rich Games for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barab, Sasha A.; Dodge, Tyler; Ingram-Goble, Adam; Pettyjohn, Patrick; Peppler, Kylie; Volk, Charlene; Solomou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Although every era is met with the introduction of powerful technologies for entertainment and learning, videogames represent a new contribution binding the two and bearing the potential to create sustained engagement in a curricular drama where the player's knowledgeable actions shape an unfolding fiction within a designed world. Although…

  19. Play School: Where Children and Families Learn and Grow Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Lori Berger

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of national research confirms that significant levels of learning and growth occur during early childhood, and that it is important, from a public policy perspective, to increase access to quality programs and services that support the development of skills and attitudes children need to succeed. Clearly, no one-size-fits-all…

  20. Children at Play: Learning Gender in the Early Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This captivating book illuminates our understanding of how young children develop gender identities. A two year longitudinal research project on children's own understandings of gender casts new light on how 3 and 4 year old newcomers in early years classes learn rules for gendered behaviour from older children, in their imaginative and…

  1. The Role Distance Learning Has to Play in Offender Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seelig, Caroline; Rate, Leanne

    2014-01-01

    This article looks into the uses of digital and online tools in distance learning to improve literacy and numeracy of offenders in New Zealand prisons. Looking at the benefits and restrictions of digital education within the prison environment, this article discusses the solutions that Open Polytechnic, in partnership with the the New Zealand…

  2. Passion Play: Will Wright and Games for Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Dixie

    2012-01-01

    Researchers and instructional designers are exploring the possibilities of using video games to support STEM education in the U.S., not only because they are a popular media form among youth, but also because well-designed games often leverage the best features of inquiry learning. Those interested in using games in an educational capacity may…

  3. Outdoor Learning: Supervision Is More than Watching Children Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Heather; Thompson, Donna; Hudson, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood programs strive to provide good-quality care and education as young children develop their physical, emotional, social, and intellectual skills. In order to provide children with positive, developmentally appropriate learning opportunities, educators ensure the safety and security of children, indoors and outdoors. The outdoor…

  4. A Clean and Healthy Place to Play and Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Bobbie

    2012-01-01

    Asking parents about their top priority when choosing a child care program, most will say their child's health and safety. Children thrive in safe, healthy, and loving environments that help them learn about themselves and the world around them; a place where they can exercise their curiosity and explore without being exposed to danger or health…

  5. Brain changes after learning to read and play music.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lauren; Henson, Rik; Kampe, Knut; Walsh, Vincent; Turner, Robert; Frith, Uta

    2003-09-01

    Musically naive participants were scanned before and after a period of 15 weeks during which they were taught to read music and play the keyboard. When participants played melodies from musical notation after training, activation was seen in a cluster of voxels within the bilateral superior parietal cortex. A subset of these voxels were activated in a second experiment in which musical notation was present, but irrelevant for task performance. These activations suggest that music reading involves the automatic sensorimotor translation of a spatial code (written music) into a series of motor responses (keypresses). PMID:14527571

  6. Linking Play to Early Learning and Development Guidelines: Possibility or Polemic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Scott-Little, Catherine; Frelow, Victoria Stebbins

    2009-01-01

    Early learning and development guidelines have often been regarded as a deterrent to an emphasis on play within early learning settings for infants and toddlers. In examining the context for, and the evolution of, early learning guidelines, the article delineates the need to scrutinize and help reverse this mindset. To that end, the authors…

  7. Learning by Thinking during Play: The Power of Reflection to Aid Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Angela K.

    2016-01-01

    Coupled with reflection, play leads to the development of thinking dispositions and promotes deep learning and understanding. The twenty-first century world demands that children learn how to learn by becoming reflective, self-regulating inquirers capable of metacognition (thinking about thinking). This manuscript aims to analyse how young minds…

  8. Role Play Simulations: The Assessment of an Active Learning Technique and Comparisons with Traditional Lectures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeNeve, Kristina; Heppner, Mary J.

    1997-01-01

    Use of active learning techniques of role-playing and simulation in an industrial psychology course (n=29 students) is described and assessed. Subjective reports and objective assessments of knowledge retention indicate the approach was effective. The differential importance of active learning and passive learning (lecture) in the college…

  9. Distance Learning and Role Play: A Web-Bard Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolloff, Mary Ann; Rahimzadeh, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    As most any high school or college English teacher can verify, it is the rare group of students that approaches the study of Shakespeare with anything other than a mixture of anxiety over the difficulty of making sense of the plays' language and annoyance that, once again, they will be forced to engage in an activity they find both unjustifiably…

  10. What Do Students Learn by Playing an Online Simulation Game?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franciosi, Stephan J.; Mehring, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest that simulations and games not only improve target language skills, but they can also support knowledge creation regarding a broader variety of topics. Thus, we wanted to explore how playing an online simulation game affected knowledge of energy supply and its relationship to environmental and economic factors among learners of…

  11. Structured Play and Student Learning in Kindergarten: An Outcome Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Moira Smith

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative research study was an outcome evaluation of an alternative kindergarten curriculum to those currently used in most public schools. Tools of the Mind, a Vygotskian, play-based curriculum was implemented during the 2010-2011 school year in four kindergarten classrooms, involving data from approximately 50 students, within a public…

  12. Participant Approaches to and Reflections on Learning to Play a 12-Bar Blues in an Asynchronous E-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Frederick; Biasutti, Michele

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the viability of learning to play an improvised 12-bar blues on keyboard with both hands together in an asynchronous e-learning environment. The study also sought to reveal participant approaches to and reflections on this learning experience. Participants were video-taped as they engaged with six "Blues Activities",…

  13. The Play's the Thing: The Use of Theatre in Language Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederer, Herbert

    1981-01-01

    Play-acting is a natural human instinct; role-playing, disguising, game-playing are all favorite activities for people of all ages. In a foreign language course, dramatization is especially appropriate and can be used in many ways both in class and as an extra-curricular or supplementary activity. Much language learning occurs during the…

  14. Value of Play as An Early Learning Instrument in Bangladesh Context: A Socio-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chowdhury, Nurun Nahar; Rivalland, Corine

    2012-01-01

    In early childhood education the dominant discourse of play-based pedagogy is greatly influenced by a western play approach. This paper examines how play is valued as early learning in Bangladesh. It reports on a qualitative study that explored the understandings of four parents and four early childhood educators in semi-rural Bangladesh. Findings…

  15. The Relationship of Teacher-Child Play Interactions to Mathematics Learning in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trawick-Smith, Jeffrey; Swaminathan, Sudha; Liu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Teacher-child interactions in preschool children's play may enhance mathematics learning in several ways. As teachers interact with children, they may promote more complex, independent, and symbolic play. Resulting increases in play abilities, in turn, can enhance intellectual growth, including mathematical thinking. Teachers may also facilitate…

  16. When Playing Meets Learning: Methodological Framework for Designing Educational Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linek, Stephanie B.; Schwarz, Daniel; Bopp, Matthias; Albert, Dietrich

    Game-based learning builds upon the idea of using the motivational potential of video games in the educational context. Thus, the design of educational games has to address optimizing enjoyment as well as optimizing learning. Within the EC-project ELEKTRA a methodological framework for the conceptual design of educational games was developed. Thereby state-of-the-art psycho-pedagogical approaches were combined with insights of media-psychology as well as with best-practice game design. This science-based interdisciplinary approach was enriched by enclosed empirical research to answer open questions on educational game-design. Additionally, several evaluation-cycles were implemented to achieve further improvements. The psycho-pedagogical core of the methodology can be summarized by the ELEKTRA's 4Ms: Macroadaptivity, Microadaptivity, Metacognition, and Motivation. The conceptual framework is structured in eight phases which have several interconnections and feedback-cycles that enable a close interdisciplinary collaboration between game design, pedagogy, cognitive science and media psychology.

  17. Regiomontanus or learning how to play with science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, Anca-Catalina

    2016-04-01

    Although at the international school competitions, Romanian students are in the top, but few students decide to learn science in school. The major problem is "how to motivate students to study science?" In cooperation with Meridian Zero Astroclub, Oradea, we provide students non-formal space where non-formal activities can approach them to the work of a researcher. Five days in September, ten to fifteen students are invited in a journey through the science world. • Formation of the Moon's craters • Solar radiation • Solar cycles • Constellations • Solar System • Eratosthenes experiment These topics are examples from our activities. Working with students from 4 years old to 18 years old, all activities are developed in the form of games, combining mathematical skills with physics or astronomy. Older students are put in the position of teachers for younger students. Results: A better understanding of physical processes, a higher interest in science, a better application of mathematical concepts in class.

  18. Science Teachers' Perceptions of the Relationship Between Game Play and Inquiry Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezei, Jessica M.

    The implementation of inquiry learning in American science classrooms remains a challenge. Teachers' perceptions of inquiry learning are predicated on their past educational experiences, which means outdated methods of learning may influence teachers' instructional approaches. In order to enhance their understanding and ultimately their implementation of inquiry learning, teachers need new and more relevant models. This study takes a preliminary step exploring the potential of game play as a valuable experience for science teachers. It has been proposed that game play and inquiry experiences can embody constructivist processes of learning, however there has been little work done with science teachers to systematically explore the relationship between the two. Game play may be an effective new model for teacher education and it is important to understand if and how teachers relate game playing experience and knowledge to inquiry. This study examined science teachers' game playing experiences and their perceptions of inquiry experiences and evaluated teacher's recognition of learning in both contexts. Data was collected through an online survey (N=246) and a series of follow-up interviews (N=29). Research questions guiding the study were: (1) What is the nature of the relationship between science teachers' game experience and their perceptions of inquiry? (2) How do teachers describe learning in and from game playing as compared with inquiry science learning? and (3) What is the range of similarities and differences teachers articulate between game play and inquiry experiences?. Results showed weak quantitative links between science teachers' game experiences and their perceptions of inquiry, but identified promising game variables such as belief in games as learning tools, game experiences, and playing a diverse set of games for future study. The qualitative data suggests that teachers made broad linkages in terms of parallels of both teaching and learning. Teachers

  19. [The pharmacology of humour -- a primer to quantum humourdynamics].

    PubMed

    Györfi, András

    2014-08-10

    A good word put in for someone during a medical consultation can alleviate the stress generated by the contact with the clinic. The superlative of "good word" in these situations could be a humorous phrase of the physician during the consultation, which can cause a cognitive shift in the patient's perception of her/his situation. This change of perspective will diminish the anxiety generated by the disease, can rebuild optimism and establish a good doctor-patient relationship, based on hope and collaboration. This paper analyzes the elements of humour and the neurological mechanisms involved in the emergence of mirth. The dosage of this genuine alternative medication is discussed based on a primer to quantum humor dynamics, observing the similarity between the behaviour of quantum mechanic's elementary particles with the quanta of humour called hilarion. Finally, laughter's psychological and physiological benefits are discussed, obtained through changes in circulation, respiration, muscular tonus and endorphin release. PMID:25087216

  20. Transfer of humoural immunity over two generations in urban pigeons.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A; Jacquin, L; Haussy, C; Perret, S; Gasparini, J

    2015-11-01

    Maternal antibodies (MatAb) are known to provide passive protection early in life for young vertebrates but their effects on the development of offspring immune response across generations are still unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of antigen exposure (keyhole limpet haemocyanin, KLH) experienced by urban pigeon (Columba livia) females on the amount of antigen-specific antibodies (Abs) transferred into the egg yolk of their daughters and on the humoural immune response towards this same antigen in their grandchildren. We found that chicks from KLH-injected maternal grandmothers had a higher humoural response than chicks from sham-injected grandmothers. However, we did not detect a significant effect of female KLH exposure on the ability of their daughters to transmit anti-KLH Abs into their eggs. These results suggest that antigen exposure at one generation may shape the immune profile of offspring over two next generations, although the underlying mechanisms remain to be investigated. PMID:26559513

  1. A Description Grid to Support the Design of Learning Role-Play Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariais, Christelle; Michau, Florence; Pernin, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    To strengthen the motivation of learners, the professional training sector is focusing more and more on game-based learning. In this context, the authors have become interested in the design of Learning Role-Play Game (LRPG) scenarios. The aim of this article is to improve the designers' confidence in the validity of the game-based learning…

  2. The Value of ICT from a Learning Game-Playing Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeill, Michael C.; Fry, Joan M.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) case study in physical education teacher education from a student perspective. Action research evaluated the impact of a range of ICT options on student teachers' learning to play as well as learning to teach games in a secondary school context. Although multiple media were…

  3. Our Special World: Parents and Preschoolers Living, Learning and Playing Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Early Childhood Education.

    This booklet describes specific ways that parents can help their preschool children learn during the routines of a typical day. It provides general guidelines on safety, child development, and parental expectations, as well as learning activities that can be used when children are waking up, dressing, getting ready for preschool, playing alone,…

  4. Integration of Play, Learning, and Experience: What Museums Afford Young Visitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tara Zollinger; Atencio, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines important factors in maximizing children's experiential learning in the context of inquiry-based children's museums. Learning is understood as situated in physical, social, and interactive context that is best achieved when children have opportunities to engage in play-based inquiry. Recommendations for maximizing children's…

  5. Student Voices about the Role Feedback Plays in the Enhancement of Their Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plank, Christine; Dixon, Helen; Ward, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    If feedback is to be framed as purposeful dialogue then both students and teachers have significant roles to play. Students must be willing and able to provide feedback to teachers not only about their learning needs but also about the teaching they experience. In turn, teachers must create the conditions that support active student learning and…

  6. To What Extent Might Role Play Be a Useful Tool for Learning Mathematics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Helen

    2012-01-01

    To most children in primary school role-play is just something you do, and something you enjoy. It is part-and-parcel of being at school, part of the normal classroom activity. So, why can it not just be a normal part of learning mathematics? Can we study learners "in role", and make judgments about what they learn, and how they learn? This is the…

  7. A Play Therapy Intervention and Its Relationship to Self-Efficacy and Learning Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fall, Marijane; Balvanz, Jane; Johnson, Lynette; Nelson, Linda

    1999-01-01

    Reports on an experimental study to address the gap in research literature about the effectiveness of school counselors' use of play-therapy intervention as a way for children to communicate conflicts. Findings suggest that children whose coping skills hinder personal learning can be assisted with six sessions of child-centered play therapy.…

  8. The Curriculum Material Center's Vital Link to Play and Learning: What's the Connection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madray, Amrita; Catalano, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Many educational theorists who study child development concur that the importance of play related materials in schools, homes and libraries is vital to the concept of play and learning. As academic librarians responsible for information literacy, and as the education liaison for the management and collection development of the instructional…

  9. The Impact of Individual, Competitive, and Collaborative Mathematics Game Play on Learning, Performance, and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plass, Jan L.; O'Keefe, Paul A.; Homer, Bruce D.; Case, Jennifer; Hayward, Elizabeth O.; Stein, Murphy; Perlin, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The present research examined how mode of play in an educational mathematics video game impacts learning, performance, and motivation. The game was designed for the practice and automation of arithmetic skills to increase fluency and was adapted to allow for individual, competitive, or collaborative game play. Participants (N = 58) from urban…

  10. E-learning Constructive Role Plays for EFL Learners in China's Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Lin; Suwanthep, Jitpanat

    2011-01-01

    Recently, speaking has played an increasingly important role in second/foreign language settings. However, in many Chinese universities, EFL students rarely communicate in English with other people effectively. The existing behavioristic role plays on New Horizon College English (NHCE) e-learning do not function successfully in supplementing EFL…

  11. Lisa Murphy on Play: The Foundation of Children's Learning, Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Discover why school readiness IS children's play. This updated guide includes timely research and new stories that highlight how play is vital to the social, physical, cognitive, and spiritual development of children. Learn the seven things we must do with children every day and why they are so important. Use your daily observations to incorporate…

  12. Children's Active Learning through Unstructured Play in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatai O., Ismail Abdul; Faqih, Asrul; Bustan, Wafa K.

    2014-01-01

    Play is generally identified as a basic tool for effective learning and development in children. This study explores the ways in which amorphous or unstructured play contributes to children's overall development at the pre-primary level, helping to develop cognitive, social, and motor skills. The findings indicate that through unstructured…

  13. Learning to Deflect: Conceptual Change in Physics during Digital Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Pratim; Krinks, Kara D.; Clark, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    How does deep conceptual change occur when students play well-designed educational games? To answer this question, we present a case study in the form of a microgenetic analysis of a student's processes of knowledge construction as he played a conceptually-integrated digital game (SURGE Next) designed to support learning about Newtonian mechanics.…

  14. Development of Young Adults' Fine Motor Skills when Learning to Play Percussion Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gzibovskis, Talis; Marnauza, Mara

    2012-01-01

    When playing percussion instruments, the main activity is done with the help of a motion or motor skills; to perform it, developed fine motor skills are necessary: the speed and precision of fingers, hands and palms. The aim of the research was to study and test the development of young adults' fine motor skills while learning to play percussion…

  15. Kindergartens in Cognitive Times: Imagination as a Dialectical Relation between Play and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, play has been viewed as the guiding pedagogical practice for kindergartens in most industrialised countries. Central to this approach has been a strong belief in free play. As governments are spending more money on early childhood education, many Western countries are demanding greater learning outcomes for preschool aged children.…

  16. Postmorbid learning of saxophone playing in a patient with frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hanna; Chin, Juhee; Suh, Mee Kyung; Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Yeo Jin; Ye, Byoung Seok; Lee, Na Kyung; Kim, Eun Joo; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L

    2015-01-01

    Some patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) show an artistic enhancement of musical abilities. However, no patients with FTD, to date, have been reported to be able to learn how to play a musical instrument after disease onset. Herein we describe a patient (J. K.) who had never played any musical instruments premorbidly, but who learned to play the saxophone after being diagnosed with a behavioral variant of FTD. He mastered a repertoire that consisted of 10 pieces of Korean folk songs over a period of three years. Furthermore, his saxophone skills were high enough to outperform other students in his class. PMID:25587661

  17. Don't Forget, Thursday Is Test[icle] Time! The Use of Humour in Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality and humour share a fraught relationship at school, so that how humour might be productively employed in sexuality education constitutes a "risky" consideration. This paper explores the role of humour in sexuality education as observed in a Year 9 New Zealand health class. Adding to existing literature emphasising students'…

  18. Relationships among Humour, Self-Esteem, and Social Support to Burnout in School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Sammy K.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the total, direct, and indirect effects of humour on burnout among 539 school teachers. As predicted, those with high humour reported significantly lower levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation but higher levels of personal accomplishment. Self-esteem consistently explained parts of the associations between humour…

  19. Pupils' Humour Directed at Teachers: Its Types and Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Šedová, Klára

    2013-01-01

    Based on an analysis of 137 texts written by pupils, this paper examines pupils' humour directed at teachers, its types and social functions. The collected data are divided into three categories that describe different modes of teachers as targets of pupils' humour. The first mode describes teachers as unintentionally comical, the second…

  20. Humour among Chinese and Greek Preschool Children in Relation to Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Juan; Zhang, XiangKui; Wang, Yong; Xeromeritou, Aphrodite

    2011-01-01

    The researchers studied humour among Chinese and Greek preschool children in relation to cognitive development. The sample included 55 Chinese children and 50 Greek children ages 4½ to 5½ years. Results showed that both Chinese and Greek children's humour recognition were significantly and positively correlated to their cognitive development,…

  1. [Humour and the theory of mind in schizophrenia: a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Etienne, E; Braha, S; Januel, D

    2012-04-01

    Humour is a universal phenomenon, a daily fact holding positive aspects valued in society. The sense of humour is subjective, inherent in each and everyone and difficult to assess. We could qualify it as an indefinable sense set by an absence of norms. This intangible notion occupies a primordial social role of communication, confidence, shared by all with both therapeutic and physical benefit. Scientists started researching this theme in schizophrenic patients from 1950. Studies show a net deficit of humour capabilities between healthy subjects and patients. The hypothesis of a deficit of the theory of mind in the evaluation of humour in schizophrenics is currently the object of several experiments. Nowadays, cognitive functions are also taken into account in humour perception studies. However the little or few studies relevant to this subject are a definite obstacle to the understanding of this complex phenomenon. PMID:22516275

  2. Role-play for medical students learning about communication: Guidelines for maximising benefits

    PubMed Central

    Nestel, Debra; Tierney, Tanya

    2007-01-01

    Background Role-play is widely used as an educational method for learning about communication in medical education. Although educational theory provides a sound rationale for using this form of simulation, there is little published evidence for its effectiveness. Students' prior experiences of role-play may influence the way in which they engage in this method. This paper explores students' experiences with the aim of producing guidelines for maximising the benefits of role-play within this learning context. Methods First-year undergraduate medical students participated in a role-play session as part of their communication programme. Before and after the session, students completed questionnaires. In the pre-session questionnaire, students were asked about their experiences of role-play and asked to identify helpful and unhelpful elements. Immediately after the session, students answered similar questions in relation to the role-play activity they had just completed. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse quantitative data and qualitative data was thematically analysed. Results 284 students completed evaluation forms. Although 63 (22.2%) had prior unhelpful experiences, most students (n = 274; 96.5%) found this experience helpful. Summary findings were that students reported the key aspects of helpful role-play were opportunities for observation, rehearsal and discussion, realistic roles and alignment of roles with other aspects of the curriculum. Unhelpful aspects were those that evoked strong negative emotional responses and factors that contributed to a lack of realism. Conclusion Role-play was valued by students in the acquisition of communication skills even though some had prior unhelpful experiences. Guidelines for effective role-play include adequate preparation, alignment of roles and tasks with level of practice, structured feedback guidelines and acknowledgment of the importance of social interactions for learning. PMID:17335561

  3. Read, Play, and Learn! Storybook Activities for Young Children. The Transdisciplinary Play-Based Curriculum. Collection 1: Modules 1-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Toni W.

    Read, Play, and Learn is a play-based curriculum designed to promote growth across all of the areas of development important to a young child. With a school-year's worth of ready-to-use lessons or modules, the curriculum provides story-related activities centered around themes such as enjoying seasonal festivities, sharing emotions, making…

  4. Read, Play, and Learn! Storybook Activities for Young Children. The Transdisciplinary Play-Based Curriculum. Collection 2: Modules 9-16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Toni W.

    Read, Play, and Learn is a play-based curriculum designed to promote growth across all of the areas of development important to a young child. With a school-year's worth of ready-to-use lessons or modules, the curriculum provides story-related activities centered around themes such as enjoying seasonal festivities, sharing emotions, making…

  5. The Play Curricular Activity Reflection Discussion Model for Game-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Aroutis; Shah, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates the process of game-based learning in classrooms through the use of the Play Curricular activity Reflection Discussion (PCaRD) model. A mixed-methods study was conducted at a high school to implement three games with the PCaRD model in a year-long elective course. Data sources included interviews and observations for…

  6. In the Sandbox: Individuals and Collectives in Organizational Learning as Sense-Making through Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popova-Nowak, Irina V.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop a grounded theory of connections between individual and collective (group and organizational) levels of analysis through the examination of play and sense-making as integral parts of organizational learning (OL) by relying on the meta-paradigm theoretical framework. The study employed grounded theory as its…

  7. "You're It!": Thoughts on Play and Learning in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Laura

    2008-01-01

    It is paradoxical that many educators and parents still differentiate between a time for learning and a time for play without seeing the vital connection between them. Educators are very serious about education in CES schools. However, in their earnest attempts to engage students in meaningful and thought-provoking work or dialogue, is it possible…

  8. What Do Students Learn from a Role-Play Simulation of an International Negotiation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnurr, Matthew A.; De Santo, Elizabeth M.; Green, Amanda D.

    2014-01-01

    This article uses pre- and post-surveys to assess learning outcomes associated with a role-play simulation set within a fictionalized extension of the Convention on Biological Diversity. Quantitative and qualitative data suggest that the simulation increased student appreciation of the complexity of international negotiation, but decreased student…

  9. Perceived Playfulness, Gender Differences and Technology Acceptance Model in a Blended Learning Scenario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Melendez, Antonio; del Aguila-Obra, Ana Rosa; Garrido-Moreno, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    The importance of technology for education is increasing year-by-year at all educational levels and particularly for Universities. This paper reexamines one important determinant of technology acceptance and use, such as perceived playfulness in the context of a blended learning setting and reveals existing gender differences. After a literature…

  10. Facebook Levels the Playing Field: Dyslexic Students Learning through Digital Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Owen

    2014-01-01

    Dyslexia has an ambivalent relationship with learning technology. Any potential gains may be nullified if the technology is perceived to exacerbate stigma. This paper examines the use of an "everyday" technology, Facebook, by a small group of sixth form students labelled as dyslexic. "Levelling the playing field" is a phrase…

  11. The Education Pacific Islands Children Deserve: The Learn and Play Project in the Solomon Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maebuta, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The Learn and Play Project was initiated by Solomon Islands Football Federation and aimed at educating and providing football skills training for primary school dropouts. The aim of this paper is to report the implementation of the programme in a case study school. Because the project is still being implemented, this paper is not intended to…

  12. Throwing and Catching as Relational Skills in Game Play: Situated Learning in a Modified Game Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhail, Ann; Kirk, David; Griffin, Linda

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we were interested in how young people learn to play games within a tactical games model (TGM) approach (Griffin, Oslin, & Mitchell, 1997) in terms of the physical-perceptual and social-interactive dimensions of situativity. Kirk and MacPhail's (2002) development of the Bunker-Thorpe TGfU model was used to conceptualize the nature…

  13. Learning and Teaching Breathing and Oboe Playing: Action Research in a Conservatoire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaunt, Helena

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents findings from action research in a conservatoire (the Guildhall School of Music & Drama) which focused on teaching and learning effective breathing in playing the oboe. A range of approaches and techniques emerged from a literature review. These were implemented in practice with oboe students at the Guildhall School, and…

  14. Outdoor Play in Preschools in England and South Korea: Learning from Polyvocal Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nah, Kwi-Ok; Waller, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses a cross-cultural and collaborative project, in preschools in England and South Korea. The aim of the project is to investigate the pedagogy of outdoor play and learning in two different cultural contexts, from the perspectives of the practitioners. Although there has been a growing academic interest in the use of outdoor…

  15. Designing After-School Learning Using the Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Digital games have become popular for engaging students in a range of learning goals, both in the classroom and the after-school space. In this article, I discuss a specific genre of video game, the massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMO), which has been identified as a dynamic environment for encountering 21st-century workplace…

  16. Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games as Arenas for Second Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates contemporary research on the use of massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) in language education. The development and key features of these games are explored. This is followed by an examination of the theories proposed as a basis for game-based learning, and the claims made regarding the value of…

  17. Teaching Play Skills to Children with Autism through Video Modeling: Small Group Arrangement and Observational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozen, Arzu; Batu, Sema; Birkan, Binyamin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine if video modeling was an effective way of teaching sociodramatic play skills to individuals with autism in a small group arrangement. Besides maintenance, observational learning and social validation data were collected. Three 9 year old boys with autism participated in the study. Multiple probe…

  18. The Outdoor Environment in Norwegian Kindergartens as Pedagogical Space for Toddlers' Play, Learning and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Thomas; Martinsen, Marianne T.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines some characteristics of the outdoor environment in Norwegian kindergartens. Understood as pedagogical space, outdoor conditions may enhance or restrict the youngest children's possibilities for play, learning and development. In 117 of 133 kindergartens (response rate: 87 %) participating in a longitudinal study, the heads of…

  19. Game-as-Teacher: Modification by Adaptation in Learning through Game-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This paper will explore how game-play in video games as well as game centered approaches in physical education (PE) such as Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) can draw on complexity thinking to inform the learning process in physical education. Using the video game concept of game-as-teacher (Gee, 2007), ideas such as enabling constraints…

  20. Play or Learn: European-American and Chinese Kindergartners' Perceptions about the Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kindergarten is the age at which children's future time perspective emerges. This capacity enables them to form goals based on past and ongoing experiences and project themselves in the future. This development may play an important role in guiding children in self-regulated learning. When faced with the conflict between their need to…

  1. Teaching and Learning about Play, Language, and Literacy with Preschool Educators in Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Linda

    1999-01-01

    Compares preschool/kindergarten education in Malaysia and the United Kingdom, including curriculum and teacher training. Describes the Malaysian national preschool curriculum guidelines as using play as a vehicle for learning while incorporating a more formal reading and writing readiness program. Describes experiences in a teaching course for…

  2. Play as Mediator for Knowledge-Creation in Problem Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorsted, Ann Charlotte; Bing, Rie Grønbeck; Kristensen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article recounts reflections by a small group of students and their supervisor on play utilized at their meetings as part of a Problem Based Learning (PBL) process. The students experienced how a less traditional professor-student relationship arose, which transformed their interaction and relationship into a more holistic, trustful,…

  3. All Rigor and No Play Is No Way to Improve Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohlwend, Karen; Peppler, Kylie

    2015-01-01

    The authors propose and discuss their Playshop curricular model, which they developed with teachers. Their studies suggest a playful approach supports even more rigor than the Common Core State Standards require for preschool and early grade children. Children keep their attention longer when learning comes in the form of something they can play…

  4. Does Web-Based Role-Play Establish a High Quality Learning Environment? Design versus Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludewig, Alexandra; Ludewig-Rohwer, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Online role-plays have been celebrated for providing an environment which allows for high quality learning. Innovative approaches have been embraced in foreign language studies, especially in countries where a great distance to the target country needs to be overcome, not only to expose students to the target language but also to provide them with…

  5. Creative and Playful Learning on Technology-Enriched Playgrounds: An International Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Justus J.; Kangas, Marjaana; Ruokamo, Heli; Hyvönen, Pirkko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine the degree that creative and playful learning (CPL) in a technology-enriched playground influences academic achievement of students and what factors are responsible for successes. The participants were 276 students from 12 elementary classrooms in the Netherlands and Finland. The…

  6. Preschool Interactive Peer Play Mediates Problem Behavior and Learning for Low-Income Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.; Bell, Elizabeth R.; Romero, Sandy L.; Carter, Tracy M.

    2012-01-01

    The study employed a developmental, ecological, and resiliency framework to examine whether interactive peer play competencies mediated associations between teacher reported problem behavior and learning outcomes for a representative sample of urban low-income children (N = 507 across 46 Head Start classrooms). Structural equation models provided…

  7. Using Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games for Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Marcus D.; Braswell, Ray

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the use of a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) to foster communication and interaction and to facilitate cooperative learning in an online course. The authors delineate the definition and history of massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs), and describe current uses of MMORPGs in education, including…

  8. Learning to play like a human: case injected genetic algorithms for strategic computer gaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Sushil J.; Miles, Chris

    2006-05-01

    We use case injected genetic algorithms to learn how to competently play computer strategy games that involve long range planning across complex dynamics. Imperfect knowledge presented to players requires them adapt their strategies in order to anticipate opponent moves. We focus on the problem of acquiring knowledge learned from human players, in particular we learn general routing information from a human player in the context of a strike force planning game. By incorporating case injection into a genetic algorithm, we show methods for incorporating general knowledge elicited from human players into future plans. In effect allowing the GA to take important strategic elements from human play and merging those elements into its own strategic thinking. Results show that with an appropriate representation, case injection is effective at biasing the genetic algorithm toward producing plans that contain important strategic elements used by human players.

  9. The effect of action video game playing on sensorimotor learning: Evidence from a movement tracking task.

    PubMed

    Gozli, Davood G; Bavelier, Daphne; Pratt, Jay

    2014-10-12

    Research on the impact of action video game playing has revealed performance advantages on a wide range of perceptual and cognitive tasks. It is not known, however, if playing such games confers similar advantages in sensorimotor learning. To address this issue, the present study used a manual motion-tracking task that allowed for a sensitive measure of both accuracy and improvement over time. When the target motion pattern was consistent over trials, gamers improved with a faster rate and eventually outperformed non-gamers. Performance between the two groups, however, did not differ initially. When the target motion was inconsistent, changing on every trial, results revealed no difference between gamers and non-gamers. Together, our findings suggest that video game playing confers no reliable benefit in sensorimotor control, but it does enhance sensorimotor learning, enabling superior performance in tasks with consistent and predictable structure. PMID:25318081

  10. Boys' and girls' use of cognitive strategy when learning to play video games.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Fran C; Sokol, Lori M

    2004-04-01

    The authors examined gender differences in the cognitive strategies that children use when they learn how to play a video game. They interviewed 2nd- and 5th-grade boys and girls about how often they played video games and what they did "when learning how to play a video game." The children's responses to the latter question were categorized as either internally or externally oriented (i.e., reading a manual vs. asking for help, respectively). The results indicated that more frequent players and older children were more likely to cite internally based strategies. No main effects of gender were found for the proportions of the internally vs. externally based strategies that were cited. PMID:15088867

  11. Learning More about Those Who Play in Session: The National Play Therapy in Counseling Practices Project (Phase I)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Simone F.; LeBlanc, Michael; Mullen, Jodi Ann; Ray, Dee; Baggerly, Jennifer; White, JoAnna; Kaplan, David

    2007-01-01

    Through a joint research committee sponsored by the Association for Play Therapy (APT) and the American Counseling Association (ACA), The National Play Therapy in Counseling Practices Project conducted the first phase of investigation. Findings offered a snapshot of mental health providers of play therapy, regarding the nature of who they are and…

  12. The power of possibility: causal learning, counterfactual reasoning, and pretend play

    PubMed Central

    Buchsbaum, Daphna; Bridgers, Sophie; Skolnick Weisberg, Deena; Gopnik, Alison

    2012-01-01

    We argue for a theoretical link between the development of an extended period of immaturity in human evolution and the emergence of powerful and wide-ranging causal learning mechanisms, specifically the use of causal models and Bayesian learning. We suggest that exploratory childhood learning, childhood play in particular, and causal cognition are closely connected. We report an empirical study demonstrating one such connection—a link between pretend play and counterfactual causal reasoning. Preschool children given new information about a causal system made very similar inferences both when they considered counterfactuals about the system and when they engaged in pretend play about it. Counterfactual cognition and causally coherent pretence were also significantly correlated even when age, general cognitive development and executive function were controlled for. These findings link a distinctive human form of childhood play and an equally distinctive human form of causal inference. We speculate that, during human evolution, computations that were initially reserved for solving particularly important ecological problems came to be used much more widely and extensively during the long period of protected immaturity. PMID:22734063

  13. Mechatronics Learning Studio: From "Play and Learn" to Industry-Inspired Green Energy Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habash, R. W. Y.; Suurtamm, C.; Necsulescu, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of the teaching of electrical engineering to mechanical engineering students based on motivation and a pedagogical strategy incorporating interdisciplinary mechatronics projects in a learning studio environment. Implementation of student projects within the curriculum has been demonstrated to be highly…

  14. PlayPhysics: An Emotional Games Learning Environment for Teaching Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Karla; Kevitt, Paul Mc; Lunney, Tom; Noguez, Julieta; Neri, Luis

    To ensure learning, game-based learning environments must incorporate assessment mechanisms, e.g. Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs). ITSs are focused on recognising and influencing the learner's emotional or motivational states. This research focuses on designing and implementing an affective student model for intelligent gaming, which reasons about the learner's emotional state from cognitive and motivational variables using observable behaviour. A Probabilistic Relational Models (PRMs) approach is employed to derive Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBNs). The model uses the Control-Value theory of 'achievement emotions' as a basis. A preliminary test was conducted to recognise the students' prospective-outcome emotions with results presented and discussed. PlayPhysics is an emotional games learning environment for teaching Physics. Once the affective student model proves effective it will be incorporated into PlayPhysics' architecture. The design, evaluation and postevaluation of PlayPhysics are also discussed. Future work will focus on evaluating the affective student model with a larger population of students, and on providing affective feedback.

  15. Learning to play the violin: motor control by freezing, not freeing degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Konczak, Jürgen; Vander Velden, Heidi; Jaeger, Lukas

    2009-05-01

    Playing a violin requires precise patterns of limb coordination that are acquired over years of practice. In the present study, the authors investigated how motion at proximal arm joints influenced the precision of bow movements in novice learners and experts. The authors evaluated the performances of 11 children (4-12 years old), 3 beginning-to-advanced level adult players, and 2 adult concert violinists, using a musical work that all had mastered as their first violin piece. The authors found that learning to play the violin was not associated with a release or freeing of joint degrees of freedom. Instead, learning was characterized by an experience-dependent suppression of sagittal shoulder motion, as documented by an observed reduction in joint angular amplitude. This reduction in the amplitude of shoulder flexion-extension correlated highly with a decrease of bow-movement variability. The remaining mechanical degrees of freedom at the elbow and shoulder showed patterns of neither suppression nor freeing. Only violinists with more than 700 practice hr achieved sagittal shoulder range of motion comparable to experts. The findings imply that restricting joint amplitude at selected joint degrees of freedom, while leaving other degrees of freedom unconstrained, constitutes an appropriate strategy for learning complex, high-precision motor patterns in children and adults. The findings also highlight that mastering even seemingly simple bowing movements constitutes a prolonged learning process. PMID:19366657

  16. Humour as experienced by patients and nurses in aged nursing in Finland.

    PubMed

    Isola, A; Astedt-Kurki, P

    1997-03-01

    Humour is an integral part of everyday life and therefore a component of the care and treatment of elderly patients in the modern health care. This article deals with the role of humour in aged nursing from the perspective of the nursing home residents. It also describes some preliminary results of our study on the meaning of humour to professional nurses. The chief motivation for the study is to provide a deeper understanding of humour as a part of aged nursing and as a 'phenomenon', which should also help us in the continuing challenge to improve the quality of nursing care. In this study the qualitative approach was used because the focus of interest was on an issue that has received only little attention in earlier research. The research material consists of data from patients and nurses. The data were collected via interviews and essay-type responses. The data obtained were analysed using the qualitative method of content analysis. In the light of our findings here, humour can be described as a joie de vivre which manifests itself in human interaction in the form of fun, jocularity and laughter. The assumption is supported by earlier research results which indicated that humour is an individual and personal matter and, in aged nursing care it is also very much a context-bound phenomenon. Humour makes it easier for some of the elderly patients to experience a positive, human relationship with the nurse. According to the results it seems to us that research should be continued and intensified into the role and use of humour in elderly people's everyday life and particularly in gerontological nursing care. PMID:9274213

  17. Prosocial Television and Young Children: The Effects of Verbal Labeling and Role Playing on Learning and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrich, Lynette K.; Stein, Aletha H.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a study designed to test (1) the effects of an educational prosocial television program on learning and behavior of kindergarten children; and (2) two types of training, verbal labeling and role playing, designed to help children learn the content of the program. Children were able to generalize learning. (ED)

  18. The Role of Motive Objects in Early Childhood Teacher Development Concerning Children's Digital Play and Play-Based Learning in Early Childhood Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Joce; Edwards, Susan; Mantilla, Ana; Grieshaber, Sue; Wood, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Digital technologies are increasingly accepted as a viable aspect of early childhood curriculum. However, teacher uptake of digital technologies in early childhood education and their use with young children in play-based approaches to learning have not been strong. Traditional approaches to the problem of teacher uptake of digital technologies in…

  19. Understanding Producers' Intentions and Viewers' Learning Outcomes in a Science Museum Theater Play on Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, R.; Baram-Tsabari, A.

    2015-09-01

    Science museums often introduce plays to liven up exhibits, attract visitors to specific exhibitions, and help visitors to "digest" difficult content. Most previous research has concentrated on viewers' learning outcomes. This study uses performance and spectator analyses from the field of theater studies to explore the link between producers' intended aims, the written script, and the learning outcomes. We also use the conflict of didactics and aesthetics, common to the design of both educational plays and science museum exhibits, as a lens for understanding our data. "Darwin's journey," a play about evolution, was produced by a major science museum in Israel. The producers' objectives were collected through in-depth interviews. A structural analysis was conducted on the script. Viewer (n = 103) and nonviewer (n = 90) data were collected via a questionnaire. The results show strong evidence for the encoding of all of the producers' aims in the script. Explicit and cognitive aims were decoded as intended by the viewers. The evidence was weak for the decoding of implicit and affective aims. While the producers were concerned with the conflict of didactics and aesthetics, this conflict was not apparent in the script. The conflict is discussed within the broader context of science education in informal settings.

  20. The Relation between Early Childhood Teachers' Conceptualization of "Play" and Their Practice: Implication for the Process of Learning to Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Doris Pui-Wah

    2012-01-01

    For centuries, educators and psychologists have advocated "play" as the ideal activity for the development of young children. Actually, play has been found currently to be the central pedagogy in the learning of young children in 21 countries in the world. However, the quality of play-based pedagogy is becoming a key concern across countries.…

  1. Exploring the Impact of Role-Playing on Peer Feedback in an Online Case-Based Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Yu-Hui

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the impact of role-playing on the quality of peer feedback and learners' perception of this strategy in a case-based learning activity with VoiceThread in an online course. The findings revealed potential positive impact of role-playing on learners' generation of constructive feedback as role-playing was associated…

  2. Learning effects of piano playing on tactile recognition of sequential stimuli.

    PubMed

    Hatta, T; Ejiri, A

    1989-01-01

    To examine the effect of learning experiences of piano playing on a tactile sequential recognition task, two experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, pianists and control subjects were given sequential tactile stimuli and were asked to report the simulated fingers and the order. The pianists showed a left hand superiority and performed better than the control group. In the second experiment, the skilled pianists and the control subjects were given both sequential tactile stimuli and auditory stimuli (unrelated melodies) simultaneously. The sequential stimuli recognition of the skilled pianists was interfered with by the presentation of the unrelated melody, and this tendency was more prominent in their left hand, while the performance of the control subjects was not affected by the presentation of the melody. These results suggest that pianists employed a special strategy, such as transforming tactile stimuli into something like a melody to improve their performance. Based upon these results, effects of learning experiences on hemisphere function were discussed. PMID:2615935

  3. Giocampus school: a "learning through playing" approach to deliver nutritional education to children.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Alice; Brighenti, Furio; Finistrella, Viviana; Ingrosso, Lisa; Monti, Giorgia; Vanelli, Maurizio; Vitale, Marco; Volta, Elio; Scazzina, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    To improve nutritional knowledge of children, single-group educational interventions with pre/post knowledge assessment were performed in primary schools in Parma, Italy, participating to the Giocampus Program. A total of 8165 children (8-11 years old) of 3rd, 4th and 5th grades of primary school were involved in 3 hours per class nutritional lessons, with specifically designed games and activities for each school grade. To evaluate children learning, a questionnaire was administered before and after three months of educational intervention. A total of 16330 questionnaires were analysed. Children nutritional knowledge significantly increased (p< 0.001) in all school grades. The integrated "learning through playing" approach, including the educational figures, tools and games, was successful in improving children's nutritional knowledge. A stable integration of this method in primary school settings could prepare a new generation of citizens, better educated on health-promotion lifestyles. PMID:26888548

  4. Inverse game theory: learning the nature of a game through play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocco, Gabriel F.; Cybenko, George

    2012-06-01

    Real world adversarial dynamics such as those encountered in Computer and Network security require models which allow for both imperfect and incomplete information. Recently game theoretic models and specically signaling games have been at the forefront of interest for modeling these scenarios. We propose a modication of signaling games, a type of Bayesian game, which we believe can serve as a model for these scenarios. By incorporating real world data into the model, these games could allow interested parties to learn the true nature of the game that they are already playing - though without the rulebook.

  5. Effects of e-learning, lectures, and role playing on nursing students’ knowledge acquisition, retention and satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Pourghaznein, Tayebeh; Sabeghi, Hakimeh; Shariatinejad, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nursing education can maintain its dynamic quality when it moves toward innovation and modern methods of teaching and learning. Therefore, teachers are required to employ up to date methods in their teaching plans. This study evaluated the effects of e-learning, lectures, and role playing on nursing students’ learning, retention, and satisfaction. Methods: Sixty nursing students were selected as an experiment and control groups during two consecutive semesters. The educational content was presented as e-learning and role playing during one semester (experiment group) and as lectures in the next semester (control group). A questionnaire containing three parts was used to assess demographics, learning and satisfaction statuses. The questionnaire also included a final openended question to evaluate the students’ ideas about the whole course. Results: The mean scores of posttest were 16.13 ± 1.37 using role playing, 15.50 ± 1.44 using e-learning and 16.45 ± 1.23 using lectures. The differences between the mean scores of posttest and pretest were 12.84 ± 1.43, 12.56 ± 1.57, and 13.73 ± 1.53 in the mentioned methods, respectively. Lectures resulted in significantly better learning compared to role playing and e-learning. In contrast, retention rates were significantly lower using lectures than using role playing and e-learning. Students’ satisfaction from e-learning was significantly lower than lecturing and role playing. Conclusion: Due to the lower rates of retention following lectures, the teachers are recommended to use student- centered approaches in their lectures. Since students’ satisfaction with e-learning was lower than the other methods, further studies are suggested to explore the problems of e-learning in Iran. PMID:26000257

  6. The effect of vitreous humour on prostaglandin production by cultured rabbit chorioretinal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Martin, C E; Croft, K D; van Bockxmeer, F M; Constable, I J

    1987-12-10

    Factors in vitreous humour which regulate prostaglandin production were investigated using cultured rabbit chorioretinal fibroblasts. These cells produced predominantly prostaglandin E2, 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha, a compound likely to be a metabolite of prostaglandin E2 and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. The synthesis of 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha was nearly completely inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor aspirin and partially inhibited by 10(-6) M dexamethasone (49%) and 10(-5) M forskolin (68%). Addition of 10% rabbit vitreous humour to subconfluent cells maintained in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium plus 1% fetal bovine serum resulted in stimulation of 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha production by as much as 246% as measured by radioimmunoassay. Chorioretinal fibroblasts labelled by [3H]arachidonic acid incorporation into cellular phospholipids synthesised greater amounts of all labelled arachidonic acid metabolites in response to vitreous humour. It was concluded, therefore, that there are factors present in vitreous humour of molecular weight above 10 kDa which are capable of stimulating cellular cyclooxygenase activity. Confluent cells also responded to a factor(s) present in vitreous humour. The fraction of less than 10 kDa inhibited 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha production by 50% when used at a concentration of 10%. Furthermore, 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha production in confluent cells (but not subconfluent cells) was inhibited to 40% of control levels by vitamin C at a concentration of 1 mg/100 ml. The latter result points to an inhibitory role for vitamin C in vitreous humour. We conclude, therefore, that vitreous humour contains factors important for the regulation of prostaglandin metabolism in the eye. PMID:3118960

  7. Learning to Play in a Stylized (Chinos) Game: Some Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Abia, Luis; San-Fabián, Emilio; Louis, Enrique; Vega-Redondo, Fernando

    2003-04-01

    In a previous paper, we studied the rich strategic and information-revelation considerations arising in simple guessing game which is very popular in some European countries: the so-called Chinos game. Here, we complement that analysis with a preliminary study of the learning dynamics induced when players no longer can assume that others play according to fixed (possibly equilibrium) rules but, instead, have to use past evidence to understand or interpret their opponent's behavior. We show that if all players are flexible learners, they will eventually succeed in playing according to the unique Nash equilibrium of the game. This outcome, however, is also found to be rather fragile: if only one player (say, a "noise agent") is unable or unwilling to learn, this wrecks havoc in the overall population dynamics. In that case, this dynamics never settles and a complex cyclical pattern typically ensues. The implications of this conclusion for the study of information-revelation mechanisms in the real world (e.g. asset markets) is quite apparent but yet to be tackled in full detail.

  8. Learning to play a melody: an fMRI study examining the formation of auditory-motor associations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joyce L; Rae, Charlotte; Watkins, Kate E

    2012-01-16

    Interactions between the auditory and motor systems are important for music and speech, and may be especially relevant when one learns to associate sounds with movements such as when learning to play a musical instrument. However, little is known about the neural substrates underlying auditory-motor learning. This study used fMRI to investigate the formation of auditory-motor associations while participants with no musical training learned to play a melody. Listening to melodies before and after training activated the superior temporal gyrus bilaterally, but neural activity in this region was significantly reduced on the right when participants listened to the trained melody. When playing melodies and random sequences, activity in the left dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) was reduced in the late compared to early phase of training; learning to play the melody was also associated with reduced neural activity in the left ventral premotor cortex (PMv). Participants with the highest performance scores for learning the melody showed more reduced neural activity in the left PMd and PMv. Learning to play a melody or random sequence involves acquiring conditional associations between key-presses and their corresponding musical pitches, and is related to activity in the PMd. Learning to play a melody additionally involves acquisition of a learned auditory-motor sequence and is related to activity in the PMv. Together, these findings demonstrate that auditory-motor learning is related to the reduction of neural activity in brain regions of the dorsal auditory action stream, which suggests increased efficiency in neural processing of a learned stimulus. PMID:21871571

  9. Developing Pharmacy Student Communication Skills through Role-Playing and Active Learning

    PubMed Central

    Zeszotarski, Paula; Ma, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact on pharmacy students of a communication course, which used role-playing to develop active-learning skills. Design. Students role-playing pharmacists in patient care scenarios were critiqued by students and pharmacist faculty members. Grading was performed using the rubric inspired by Bruce Berger’s Communication Skills for Pharmacists. Written skills were evaluated using student written critique questionnaires. Students completed precourse and postcourse self-assessment surveys. Preceptor evaluations were analyzed for course impact. Assessment. Students demonstrated improvement in oral skills based on role-play scores (45.87/50) after practice sessions. The average score based on the student questionnaire was 9.31/10. Gain was demonstrated in all defined course objectives. Impact on introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) communication objectives was insignificant. Student evaluations for course and teaching strategy reflected a high average. Conclusion. Study results demonstrated improvement in oral and written communication skills that may help improve interprofessional teamwork between pharmacists and other health care providers. PMID:25995519

  10. Laughing it off? Humour, affect and emotion work in communities living with nuclear risk.

    PubMed

    Parkhill, K A; Henwood, K L; Pidgeon, N F; Simmons, P

    2011-06-01

    Over the past two decades, an increasing number of risk researchers have recognized that risks are not simply objective hazards but that the meanings of risk are discursively negotiated, dynamic and embedded within the wider social relations that constitute everyday life. A growing interest in the complexity and nuances of risk subjectivities has alerted sociocultural researchers not only to what is said in a risk situation, but also to how it is said and to what is unsaid and even, in a particular context, unsayable; to the intangible qualities of discourse that communicate additional meanings. Humour is both an intangible and marks such intangible meanings, yet it has largely been ignored and insufficiently theorized by risk researchers. In this paper, we draw upon insights from the humour literature - suspending the belief that humour is inherently good - to analyse and theorize humour as a way of examining the meanings and functions of risk. We show how humour can both mask and carefully reveal affectively charged states about living with nuclear risk. As such, it helps risk subjects to live with risk by suppressing vulnerabilities, enabling the negotiation of what constitutes a threat, and engendering a sense of empowerment. We conclude that humorous talk can be serious talk which can enrich our understandings of the lived experience of risk and of risk subjectivities. PMID:21631461

  11. Understanding Influences of Play on Second Language Learning: A Microethnographic View in One Head Start Preschool Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piker, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    With dual language learners falling behind their same-age peers at the beginning of kindergarten, understanding how school experiences can enhance language learning is critical. This study demonstrates how play among preschool-aged children can foster English language learning. Using an ethnographic approach, one classroom composed of two teachers…

  12. Humour as a Resource and Strategy for Boys to Gain Status in the Field of Informal School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huuki, Tuija; Manninen, Sari; Sunnari, Vappu

    2010-01-01

    Through a feminist approach this paper illustrates how humour is used as a resource and strategy for status among Finnish school boys and in constructing culturally accepted masculinity in the field of informal school. Based on interview and observation material collected in three schools, the results suggest that although humour is often…

  13. Does Instructional Approach Matter? How Elaboration Plays a Crucial Role in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eysink, Tessa H. S.; de Jong, Ton

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the affordances of 4 multimedia learning environments for specific learning processes. The environments covered the same domain but used different instructional approaches: (a) hypermedia learning, (b) observational learning, (c) self-explanation-based learning, and (d) inquiry learning. Although they all promote an active…

  14. Headspace Theater: An Innovative Method for Experiential Learning of Psychiatric Symptomatology Using Modified Role-Playing and Improvisational Theater Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballon, Bruce C.; Silver, Ivan; Fidler, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Headspace Theater has been developed to allow small group learning of psychiatric conditions by creating role-play situations in which participants are placed in a scenario that simulates the experience of the condition. Method: The authors conducted a literature review of role-playing techniques, interactive teaching, and experiential…

  15. Evolving toward Laughter in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strean, William B.

    2008-01-01

    Lowman (1995) described the relationship between teacher and student and student engagement as the two most important ingredients in learning in higher education. Humour builds teacher-student connection (Berk, 1998) and engages students in the learning process. The bond between student and teacher is essential for learning, satisfaction, and…

  16. Learning Partners: Escribamos! Leamos! Juguemos a las Ciencias! Juguemos a las Matematicas! (Learning Partners: Let's Write! Let's Read! Let's Play Mathematics! Let's Play Science!)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

    This Spanish-language document consists of four single-sheet sets of guidelines developed by the Family Involvement Partnership for Learning to assist parents in facilitating their children's elementary school success. The front part of the sheets describes general ways parents can support their children, including modeling writing, reading aloud,…

  17. Fetch, plug, and play: How secondary science instructors use digital learning objects in their classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looser, Theresa A.

    This mixed methods exploratory research study describes how United States science teachers who used digital learning objects in their secondary classrooms implemented them. The types of digital learning objects and frequency of use in addition to instructional strategies used with digital learning objects and instructors' reasons for using them were explored. An online survey and four interviews were conducted with instructors who used digital learning objects in traditional classrooms, and artifacts that included sample digital learning objects and lesson plans that integrate them in classrooms were collected and analyzed. Data from this exploratory research study indicates that digital learning objects shift the focus of education from the instructor to the learner. Participants talked and wrote about students' active engagement in their learning with instructors as facilitators providing scaffolding and support for student learning. Interactive digital learning objects providing immediate feedback opportunities allowed students to control the learning pace, manipulate and extend learning in new ways that are difficult to find in other learning activities. Models and visualizations extended and enriched learning, making abstract concepts more concrete by providing multiple perspectives that provoke learner reflection and restructuring of their knowledge leading to higher levels of learning. Digital learning objects were used to motivate students by gaining their attention, providing relevant content, encouraging learner confidence, and gaining learner satisfaction. This study may benefit secondary instructors by helping them build upon the experiences described by study participants. Results indicate that digital learning objects promoted learner-centered classrooms and exhibited instructional strategies consistent with constructivist learning theory.

  18. The Effects of Coping Humour and Gender on College Adjustment in Turkish Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguz-Duran, Nagihan; Yuksel, Asuman

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of coping humour and gender in the college adjustment of Turkish freshmen. Considering greater happiness and academic achievement as predictors of initial college adjustment, data were gathered from a sample of 574 students using the Subjective Well-Being Scale (SWS) and the Coping Humour…

  19. The social meaning and function of humour in physiotherapy practice: An ethnography.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Di

    2010-01-01

    An ethnographic study was undertaken over a period of 8 months to explore the social meaning and function of humour in the practice of a team of physiotherapists in a UK National Health Service hospital. Interviews were carried out following the observations to gain the therapists' perspectives in an open critical exploration of assumptions and ideas. The analysis was iterative and followed a systematic recognised ethnographic approach. The findings revealed explicit and implicit meanings of the team's humorous interactions. Explicitly, they appeared light-hearted and enhanced camaraderie but implicitly they demonstrated the team leadership and management skills of the most senior member of the team who had an authoritative influence on the other members, and facilitated this explicit marker of membership. By hiding their concerns in humour, the team members were able to avoid a real confrontation with issues of authority and hierarchy that underscored these activities. Humour, in this instance, was used as a stabilising force to give the team a sense of certainty juxtaposed by the prevailing unpredictability of their daily activities; it was part of their professional culture to allow them to handle stressful situations and to build up a socialisation process. By creating a collective identity, the individual members came to understand the team's underlying philosophy of practice. As a resource, humour was seen to be used as a vehicle of negotiation and a catalyst for change. PMID:20067349

  20. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of aqueous humour samples in necrotising retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, T H C; Rozenberg, F; Cassoux, N; Rao, N A; LeHoang, P; Bodaghi, B

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic value of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed on aqueous humour for the detection of viral DNA in patients with necrotising herpetic retinitis. Methods: The clinical features and laboratory results of 22 patients (29 eyes) presenting with necrotising herpetic retinitis between March 1999 and June 2001 were reviewed retrospectively. Aqueous humour was obtained after anterior chamber paracentesis and PCR was performed in all cases. Results: Viral DNA was detected in the aqueous humour of 19 patients (86.4%). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seroconversion was evidenced in one additional patient. In the acute retinal necrosis (ARN) group (n = 19), varicella zoster virus (VZV) DNA was identified in six patients, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) DNA in two patients, herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) DNA in four patients, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) genome in four patients. In the progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) group (n = 3), VZV DNA was detected in all patients. No sample was positive for more than one virus. Conclusions: PCR analysis of aqueous humour in patients with clinical features of necrotising viral retinitis can provide specific aetiological orientation and the method appears to be safe and highly sensitive. PMID:12488268

  1. Laughing with the Lecturer: The Use of Humour in Shaping University Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tait, Gordon; Lampert, Jo; Bahr, Nan; Bennet, Pepita

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the ways in which humour is used by university academics to shape teaching personas. Based upon the work of Mauss and Foucault, and employing semi-structured, in-depth interviews with a range of university teachers, this research suggests that most tertiary teachers deliberately fashion various kinds of teaching persona, which…

  2. Imaginative, Child-Directed Play: Leading the Way in Development and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodrova, Elena; Leong, Deborah J.; Hensen, Ruth; Henninger, Maddie

    2000-01-01

    Describes Vygotsky' view of play and its contribution to children's development. Presents developmental paths of play, focusing on the development of imaginary situations, explicit roles, and implicit rules. Describes how play leads to literacy and supports self-regulation, and ways early childhood teachers can facilitate play through promoting…

  3. The Role Service-Learning Plays in the Transition from College to Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to understand how college graduates used their service-learning experiences while in college to enhance their work lives after graduation. Service learning in higher education is a community-based, reciprocal approach using experiential education theories. Through service-learning activities associated with…

  4. Designing and Integrating Purposeful Learning in Game Play: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ke, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Via a systematic review of the literature on learning games, this article presents a systematic discussion on the design of intrinsic integration of domain-specific learning in game mechanics and game world design. A total of 69 articles ultimately met the inclusion criteria and were coded for the literature synthesis. Exemplary learning games…

  5. Context-Aware Mobile Role Playing Game for Learning--A Case of Canada and Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Chris; Chang, Maiga; Kinshuk; Huang, Echo; Chen, Ching-Wen

    2014-01-01

    The research presented in this paper is part of a 5-year renewable national research program in Canada, namely the NSERC/iCORE/Xerox/Markin research chair program that aims to explore possibilities of adaptive mobile learning and to provide learners with a learning environment which facilitates personalized learning at any time and any place. One…

  6. The Role of Cultural Artefacts in Play as Tools to Mediate Learning in an Intercultural Preschool Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennig, Kelly; Kirova, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Starting with the research question "What is the role of play as a means of genuine inclusion of home language and cultural traditions in an intercultural early learning programme?", the article focuses on the role of cultural artefacts in a programme in which the majority of the children were refugees from Africa. The sociocultural theory of…

  7. Just Pretending Can Be Really Learning: Children Use Pretend Play as a Source for Acquiring Generic Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Shelbie L.; Friedman, Ori

    2013-01-01

    Children can acquire generic knowledge by sharing in pretend play with more knowledgeable partners. We report 3 experiments in which we investigated how this learning occurs-how children draw generalizations from pretense, and whether they resist doing so for pretense that is unrealistic. In all experiments, preschoolers watched pretend scenarios…

  8. "I'm Just Playing iPad": Comparing Prekindergarteners' and Preservice Teachers' Social Interactions While Using Tablets for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Holly Carrell; Adair, Jennifer Keys

    2015-01-01

    In this article we share descriptive findings from two qualitative, grounded theory (Glaser, 1978, 1992, 1998) studies on how two distinct groups of learners--prekindergarteners and preservice teachers in early childhood education coursework--used touch-screen tablets in their playful, discovery-based learning processes. We found similarities…

  9. Outdoor Settings for Playing and Learning: Designing School Grounds to Meet the Needs of the Whole Child and Whole Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Robin C.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a list of imaginative design options for optimal outdoor learning as well as intimate contact with nature. Focuses on entrances, pathways, signage and displays, barriers and enclosures, manufactured equipment and play structures, multipurpose game settings, groundcovers and safety surfaces, landforms and topography, trees and vegetation,…

  10. "Play to Learn": A Case-Study of Parent/Carer and Child Engagement with a Physical Activity Website Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Helen; Fleming, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, Sport Wales produced guidance for practitioners delivering the new Foundation Phase curriculum for children aged three to seven years. A focus was on physical development and in 2009 a resource entitled "Play to Learn" was developed supported by a website launched in 2011. The present study addresses (non-)engagement with the…

  11. The Gift of Music. A Successful Method for Learning To Read, Play, and More Deeply Enjoy Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geltman, Eve

    This book introduces music reading skills in 21 lessons that focus on the violin but which may be applied to the study of any musical instrument. The lessons are designed for beginning music students and build upon previous lessons in the book. This volume focuses on the violin because of the large number of students presently learning to play it…

  12. Does Linguistic Input Play the Same Role in Language Learning for Children with and without Early Brain Injury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Levine, Susan C.; Fisher, Joan A.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Children with unilateral pre- or perinatal brain injury (BI) show remarkable plasticity for language learning. Previous work highlights the important role that lesion characteristics play in explaining individual variation in plasticity in the language development of children with BI. The current study examines whether the linguistic input that…

  13. Learning in a Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game: The Development of Government Leadership Competencies and Performance Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tammy

    2011-01-01

    The increase of technological capabilities has opened the door to innovations that help people learn. One popular form of training over the past 10 years has been in Serious Game--simulations used for training rather than entertainment. The purpose of the study was to determine whether participants who played a massively multiplayer online role…

  14. Active Learning in the Classroom: The Use of Group Role Plays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitzerow, Phyllis

    1990-01-01

    Describes group role-playing activities that have been used to teach about education, criminology, and sex roles. Suggests that role play helps students to absorb and retain many of the insights about the issues involved. (DB)

  15. Embracing Complexity: Rethinking the Relation between Play and Learning--Comment on Lillard et al. (2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisberg, Deena Skolnick; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick

    2013-01-01

    Lillard et al. (2013) concluded that pretend play is not causally related to child outcomes and charged that the field is subject to a "play ethos", whereby research is tainted by a bias to find positive effects of play on child development. In this commentary, we embrace their call for a more solidly scientific approach to questions in this…

  16. A Space for Academic Play: Student Learning Journals as Transitional Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creme, Phyllis

    2008-01-01

    This article builds on the author's previous research on student learning journals to explore how their use can give students a "space" to engage meaningfully and in their own way with their university work. Drawing on the psychoanalytical concept of transitional space and on notions of narrative, it is argued that the student learning journal can…

  17. PlayIt: Game Based Learning Approach for Teaching Programming Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathrani, Anuradha; Christian, Shelly; Ponder-Sutton, Agate

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates a game-based learning (GBL) approach to engage students in learning and enhance their programming skills. The paper gives a detailed narrative of how an educational game was mapped with the curriculum of a prescribed programming course in a computing diploma study programme. Two separate student cohorts were invited to…

  18. Playing Smart: A Parent's Guide to Enriching, Offbeat Learning Activities for Ages 4-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Susan K.; Espeland, Pamela, Ed.

    Recognizing that children need enrichment at home, this book offers hundreds of unusual ways for kids and parents to spend time together. It also demonstrates the fun people can have while learning, and the learning that goes on while having fun. Using this book as a guide, parents and children can survey new subjects ranging from cultural…

  19. Benefits and Results of Learning 2.0: A Case Study of CityLibrariesLearning--Discover*Play*Connect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Michael; Cheetham, Warren

    2012-01-01

    Replicated across the globe, the Learning 2.0 programme--also known as "23 Things"--has been touted as a means to not only educate staff about emerging social and mobile technologies but as a means of moving the participating library forward as a learning organisation. This paper explores the results of a multi-faceted research project launched in…

  20. Investigating the Roles of Perceived Playfulness, Resistance to Change and Self-Management of Learning in Mobile English Learning Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Rui-Ting; Jang, Syh-Jong; Machtmes, Krisanna; Deggs, David

    2012-01-01

    Although there is a growing interest in mobile learning, there are limited studies that focus on student knowledge acquisition. As applications and usages of mobile technology have become more and more accepted, it is important and meaningful that researchers and practitioners of mobile learning understand the potential factors that could…

  1. Play along: effects of music and social interaction on word learning.

    PubMed

    Verga, Laura; Bigand, Emmanuel; Kotz, Sonja A

    2015-01-01

    Learning new words is an increasingly common necessity in everyday life. External factors, among which music and social interaction are particularly debated, are claimed to facilitate this task. Due to their influence on the learner's temporal behavior, these stimuli are able to drive the learner's attention to the correct referent of new words at the correct point in time. However, do music and social interaction impact learning behavior in the same way? The current study aims to answer this question. Native German speakers (N = 80) were requested to learn new words (pseudo-words) during a contextual learning game. This learning task was performed alone with a computer or with a partner, with or without music. Results showed that music and social interaction had a different impact on the learner's behavior: Participants tended to temporally coordinate their behavior more with a partner than with music, and in both cases more than with a computer. However, when both music and social interaction were present, this temporal coordination was hindered. These results suggest that while music and social interaction do influence participants' learning behavior, they have a different impact. Moreover, impaired behavior when both music and a partner are present suggests that different mechanisms are employed to coordinate with the two types of stimuli. Whether one or the other approach is more efficient for word learning, however, is a question still requiring further investigation, as no differences were observed between conditions in a retrieval phase, which took place immediately after the learning session. This study contributes to the literature on word learning in adults by investigating two possible facilitating factors, and has important implications for situations such as music therapy, in which music and social interaction are present at the same time. PMID:26388818

  2. Play along: effects of music and social interaction on word learning

    PubMed Central

    Verga, Laura; Bigand, Emmanuel; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2015-01-01

    Learning new words is an increasingly common necessity in everyday life. External factors, among which music and social interaction are particularly debated, are claimed to facilitate this task. Due to their influence on the learner’s temporal behavior, these stimuli are able to drive the learner’s attention to the correct referent of new words at the correct point in time. However, do music and social interaction impact learning behavior in the same way? The current study aims to answer this question. Native German speakers (N = 80) were requested to learn new words (pseudo-words) during a contextual learning game. This learning task was performed alone with a computer or with a partner, with or without music. Results showed that music and social interaction had a different impact on the learner’s behavior: Participants tended to temporally coordinate their behavior more with a partner than with music, and in both cases more than with a computer. However, when both music and social interaction were present, this temporal coordination was hindered. These results suggest that while music and social interaction do influence participants’ learning behavior, they have a different impact. Moreover, impaired behavior when both music and a partner are present suggests that different mechanisms are employed to coordinate with the two types of stimuli. Whether one or the other approach is more efficient for word learning, however, is a question still requiring further investigation, as no differences were observed between conditions in a retrieval phase, which took place immediately after the learning session. This study contributes to the literature on word learning in adults by investigating two possible facilitating factors, and has important implications for situations such as music therapy, in which music and social interaction are present at the same time. PMID:26388818

  3. Inclusion, Responsibility, and Fair Play Can Also Be Learned Outside the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallegos, Ken

    1998-01-01

    Appalled at a half-dozen fifth-graders' exclusionary and unsportsmanlike behavior on a new basketball court, a resourceful principal intervened next recess to pick teams and set rules. Everyone was allowed to play. Arguing, teasing, and intimidation resulted in benching. Eventually, about 40 children of both sexes and all sizes were playing in two…

  4. Playing for Identity: Cricket, Social Positioning and Shared Learning in Italian Public Parks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoletto, Davide

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the ways in which a cultural practice such as playing cricket in public might contribute to structuring the identity of young immigrants in Italy, and on the role that the practice of cricket in Italian public parks might play in intercultural educational projects which aim to foster cross-cultural interactions in non-formal…

  5. Learning How to Play Ball: Applying Sabermetric Thinking to Benchmarking in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Gary D.

    2012-01-01

    Although the notion is certainly cliched, baseball often serves as an excellent metaphor for life. Some of the methodologies currently being used to measure, evaluate, manage, and even play baseball may serve as references for ways that higher education may be measured, evaluated, managed, and played. This chapter proposes and presents…

  6. Play and Learning in Summer Camps for Children with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mary Kristen; Nwokah, Evangeline E.

    2010-01-01

    Summer camps provide opportunities for children to experience play, pleasurable activities, and social interaction with other children of similar ages and interests and are an integral part of the modern-day American cultural landscape. The authors discuss the emergence of summer camps for children with special needs, the types of play activities…

  7. When Play Is Learning: A School Designed for Self-Directed Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Peter; Chanoff, David

    1984-01-01

    The school described here operates on the principle that play for the sake of play, without unsolicited adult intervention, entails the acquisition of skills and knowledge. Sudbury Valley School promotes cultural acquisition in a manner harmonious with the child's biological self-education system, without age segregation, grading, or academic…

  8. What Can Students Learn in an Extended Role-Play Simulation on Technology and Society?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loui, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    In a small course on technology and society, students participated in an extended role-play simulation for two weeks. Each student played a different adult character in a fictional community, which faces technological decisions in three scenarios set in the near future. The three scenarios involved stem cell research, nanotechnology, and privacy.…

  9. Friedrich Froebel's Gifts: Connecting the Spiritual and Aesthetic to the Real World of Play and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provenzo, Eugene F., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Friedrich Froebel, the German educator and founder of the Kindergarten Movement, developed a series of play materials including geometric building blocks and pattern activity blocks designed to teach children about forms and relationships found in nature. Froebel's notions about using activity and play in preschool education complement many…

  10. Pedagogical Play Types: What Do They Suggest for Learning about Sustainability in Early Childhood Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Susan; Cutter-Mackenzie, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability education is increasingly understood as necessary for young children. An important aspect of early childhood sustainability education is associated with how best to integrate the conceptual basis of sustainability education with existing play-based pedagogies. Play-based pedagogies can be understood as occurring along a continuum,…