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Sample records for playa magagna chubut

  1. Avulsion at a drift-dominated mesotidal estuary: The Chubut River outlet, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isla, Federico; Espinosa, Marcela; Rubio, Belén; Escandell, Alejandra; Gerpe, Marcela; Miglioranza, Karina; Rey, Daniel; Vilas, Federico

    2015-10-01

    The Chubut River flows from the Andes to the Atlantic Ocean, and is interrupted by a single dam built at the middle valley. The lower valley is dominated by the aggradation of an alluvial plain induced by a complex of spits that enclosed the inlet in the last 5000 years. The river has reduced its flow because the blocking of the upper basin by terminal moraines during the Upper Pleistocene. At least the last two marine transgressions have flooded this estuary, and contributed to the aggradation during regressions. The area is of particular interest in regard to irrigation channels practiced since the XIX century. Today, the mean monthly flow is less than 10 m3/s although peaks of 95 m3/s have been recorded in Gaiman in July 2001. The dynamics of the estuary is dominated by waves (wave-dominated estuary) as tidal effects attenuate in less than 5 km. Three vibracores were collected within this floodplain: (a) at Gaiman, an area without any effect of the sea (35 km from the coast); (b) at Trelew, at the former avulsion plain of the river (18 km from the coast); and (c) at Playa Magagna, a saltmarsh located 0.4 km from the beach. At the Gaiman core (1.54 m long) fresh-water epiphytic diatoms dominate (Epithemia sorex, Cocconeis placentula, Ulnaria ulna) suggesting the aggradation of an alluvial plain. The Trelew core (2.19 m long) was collected from a deltaic plain. It was composed by fine sand with organic matter at the base that evolved into silty layers to the top. Several unconformities and laminae with heavy minerals were detected by their geochemical composition analysed by micro X-ray fluorescence (Itrax XRF core scanner). Fine-sand laminated layers were perfectly detected by their high content in S and Cl. On the other hand, mud layers presented lower content in Mg and Al with increments in Ca and V. The core from the marsh area (1.67 m long) was analysed in terms of the diatom evolution in order to detect Holocene sea-level and salinity effects. The sand flats

  2. Monitoring Playa Hydrology using LANDSAT Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. B.; Pradhananga, A.

    2004-12-01

    Playa lakes are wetland basins found across the Great Plains. These ephemeral lakes serve as habitat for migrating waterfowl and act as concentrated recharge points for groundwater aquifers. Playas are generally small but number in the tens of thousands, making them a significant component of the ecology and hydrology of the Great Plains. The shear number of playas makes this system difficult to study. Satellite remote sensing, however, can be used to monitor playa hydrology over broad space and time scales. This study demonstrates the use of a four-image LANDSAT sequence to study a cluster of playas in Beaver County, Oklahoma. A simple water budget model is developed to predict aggregate playa water surface area for the study area.

  3. Geochemical exploration for uranium in playas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, D.L.; Puchlik, K.P.; Glanzman, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    Although playa sediments at spring discharge areas contain as much as 58 ppm U, evaporation and mobilization processes were found to limit their potential as resources of U. Other metals, however, such as Zn, W, and Au may have a geochemical signature in the playas. There are certain conditions that would make some playas more favorable for the accumulation of U: 1) the presence of precursor carbonate-rich saline lakes; 2) nearby U-rich source rocks; 3) restricted groundwater discharge into the playa; 4) localized precipitation mechanisms or phases in the playa;5) large drainage basins and adequate precipitation; and 6) stability of a hydrologically closed basin for a long period of time.- from Authors

  4. Astronomy at Nabta Playa, Southern Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKim Malville, J.

    Nabta Playa may contain the oldest human-made features with astronomical alignments in Egypt. In the Late and Terminal Neolithic (7,500-5,400 BP), nomadic pastoralists built a ceremonial center on the western shore of Nabta Playa, consisting of some 30 complex megalithic structures, stone circles, and lines of megaliths crossing the playa. The megaliths may once have aligned with Arcturus, the Belt of Orion, Sirius, and α Cen. Reorientations of the northern set of megaliths suggest a response to precession. Elaborate burials at the nearby cemetery at Gebel Ramlah indicate the nomads consisted of Mediterranean and sub-Saharan populations with little social stratification.

  5. Microbial Signatures In Sulfate-Rich Playas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glamoclija, M.; Steele, A.; Starke, V.; Zeidan, M.; Potochniak, S.; Sirisena, K.; Widanagamage, I. H.

    2016-05-01

    Microbes that live in playas represent organisms able to cope with transient environments, ranging from fresh to hyper-saline water settings and from wet to dry. We will try to identify mineral and chemical signatures of their presence.

  6. Evolution of playa basins on the Texas High Plains--Evidence from playa-basin fills

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, S.D. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1993-02-01

    Heterogeneous sediments in playa basins document the evolution of shallow depressions on the Texas High Plains surface through the late Quaternary. The suite of sediments encountered in playa-lake basins differs from the typical lithologies of the Blackwater Draw Formation in upland areas. The upland Blackwater Draw Formation has red-brown clayey silt containing root casts, well-developed soil fabrics, and abundant pedogenic carbonate nodules. Cores drilled in playa basins encountered a repetitive suite of gray clay, well-sorted fine to medium sand, and laminated sand and silt associated with clay drapes and beds of pedogenic calcite pebbles. The gray clay was deposited in ephemeral lakes similar to modern playa lakes. Small clams and drab colors extending downward from these deposits demonstrate ponding. Soil fabrics, soil slickensides, deep clay-filled cracks, and root tubules within the clayey beds indicate desiccation and exposure of the lake floor. Well-sorted sand layers represent episodic migration of sand sheets across the playa. Laminated sand and silt beds are interpreted as delta deposits that formed at the mouths of draws. Minimal soil formation indicates relatively rapid deposition during delta progradation. The suite of playa sediments interfingers with upland Blackwater Draw facies, documenting the temporal equivalence of playa and upland deposition and expansion and contraction of the lake within the playa basin. Complex patterns of oxidation, reduction, and precipitation and dissolution of calcite document the interaction between ground water and sediments.

  7. Dynamics of salt playa polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, L.; Fourrière, A.

    2014-12-01

    In natural salt playa or in evaporation pools for the salt extraction industry, one can sometimes see surprising regular structures formed by ridges of salt. These ridges connect together to form a self-organized network of polygons one to two meters in diameter, which we call salt polygons. Here we propose a mechanism based on porous media convection of salty water in soil to explain the formation and the scaling of the salt polygons. Surface evaporation causes a steady upward flow of salty water, which can cause precipitation near the surface. A vertical salt gradient then builds up in the porous soil, with heavy salt-saturated water lying over the less salty source water. This can drive convection when a threshold is reached, given by a critical Rayleigh number of about 7. We suggest that the salt polygons are the surface expression of the porous medium convection, with salt crystallizing along the positions of the convective downwellings. To study this instability directly, we developed a 2D analogue experiment using a Hele-Shaw cell filled with a porous medium saturated with a salt solution and heated from above. We perform a linear stability analysis of this system, and find that it is unstable to convection, with a most unstable wavelength that is set by a balance between salt diffusion and water evaporation. The Rayleigh number in our experiment is controlled by the particle size of our model soil, and the evaporation rate. We obtain results that scale with the observation of natural salt polygons. Using dye, we observe the convective movement of salty water and find downwelling convective plumes underneath the spots where surface salt ridges form, as shown in the attached figure.

  8. The restless rock of Racetrack Playa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Brian; Lorenz, Ralph; Norris, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Tucked away in California's Death Valley National Park, the flat basin known as Racetrack Playa is littered with stones that seem to migrate across the landscape. But how do they do it? Brian Jackson describes how he and collaborators Ralph Lorenz and Richard Norris solved a long-standing mystery.

  9. Playa basin development, southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavson, T.C. ); Holliday, V.T. )

    1992-01-01

    More than 20,000 playa basins have formed on fine-grained eolian sediments of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw and Tertiary Ogallala Formations on the High Plains of TX and NM. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the development of playa basins: (1) subsidence due to dissolution of underlying Permian bedded salt, (2) dissolution of soil carbonate and piping of clastic sediment into the subsurface, (3) animal activity, and (4) deflation. Evidence of eolian processes includes lee dunes and straightened shorelines on the eastern and southern margins of many playas. Lee dunes, which occur on the eastern side of ca 15% of playa basins and contain sediment deflated from adjacent playas, are cresentic to oval in plain view and typically account for 15--40% of the volume of the playa basin. Quaternary fossil biotas and buried calcic soils indicate that grasslands and semi-arid to aid climatic conditions prevailed as these basins formed. Evidence of fluviolacustrine processes in playa basins includes centripetal drainage leading to fan deltas at playa margins and preserved deltaic and lacustrine sediments. Playa basins expanded as fluvial processes eroded basin slopes and carried sediment to the basin floor where, during periods of minimal vegetation cover, loose sediment was removed by deflation. Other processes that played secondary roles in the development of certain playa basins include subsidence induced by dissolution of deeply buried Permian salt, dissolution of soil carbonate and piping, and animal activity. Two small lake basins in Gray County, TX, occur above strata affected by dissolution-induced subsidence. Dissolution of soil carbonate was observed in exposures and cores of strata underlying playa basins. Cattle, and in the past vast numbers of migrating buffalo, destroy soil crusts in dry playas, making these sediments more susceptible to deflation, and carry sediment out of flooded playas on their hooves.

  10. Salt Playas of the Bolivian Altiplano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In the high plateau of southwestern Bolivia, two large salt deserts, or playas, are located between the eastern and western Andes. The Salar de Uyuni is the largest and highest playa in the world, encompassing an area of more than 9000 square kilometers and situated more than 3600 meters above sea level. It is separated by a range of hills from its smaller neighbor to the north, the Salar de Coipasa. During the Pleistocene the climate of the region was wetter and the entire area was covered by a massive lake. As the waters slowly dried, abundant dissolved minerals were left behind to form the playas. The salt pans are now excellent indicators of rainfall fluctuations within the region and are also important sites for the study of paleoclimatology.

    These two image pairs from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR)depict the playas on January 16, 2002 and January 3, 2003. At this time of year the wet season has already begun, and the Salar de Coipaso is usually at least partially flooded. Data from these two dates were processed identically to preserve relative variations in brightness between them. Varying degrees of surface moisture around the two playas are illustrated by the different display techniques of the right and left-hand panels.

    At left are two false-color views acquired by MISR's nadir camera. Data from the near-infrared, green and blue bands are displayed as red, green and blue. This spectral display causes bright, wet surfaces to appear blue-green because water selectively absorbs longer wavelengths such as near-infrared. Significantly more standing water is present in the Salar de Coipaso in 2002 than in 2003. However, a stronger signal at the near-infrared band on the 2003 date, which causes the overall hue in the 2003 image to be redder than 2002, suggests an increase in photosynthetic activity (plant growth) at the 2003 date compared with one year earlier.

    The right-hand panels were created using only red band data, and are

  11. Grass buffers for playas in agricultural landscapes: A literature synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melcher, Cynthia P.; Skagen, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    Future research should entail multiple-scale approaches at regional, wetland-complex, and individual watershed scales. Information needs include direct measures of buffer effectiveness in ‘real-world’ systems, refinement and field tests of buffer-effectiveness models, how buffers may affect floral and faunal communities of playas, and basic ecological information on playa function and playa wildlife ecology. Understanding how wildlife communities respond to patch size and habitat fragmentation is crucial for addressing questions regarding habitat quality of grass buffers in playa systems.

  12. Tourism, Transnationality and Ethnolinguistic Vitality: The Welsh in the Chubut Province, Argentina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to develop the concept of ethnolinguistic vitality by adopting a qualitative approach to vitality rather than the statistical approach traditionally used. Ten small-size focus group style interviews were held with members of the Welsh-Argentinean community in the Chubut Province in the south of Argentina in order to explore…

  13. Topography, surface features, and flooding of Rogers Lake playa, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, Randal L.; McPherson, Kelly R.

    1998-01-01

    Rogers Lake is a desert playa used as a military airport for Edwards Air Force Base in the Antelope Valley of southern California. Previous measurements of land subsidence and ground-water levels in the study area indicated that ground-water pumping induced tensional stresses in the playa, which were sporadically relieved through the formation of long cracks. Drying of the sediments beneath the playa also may have accelerated the natural formation of giant desiccation polygons. When water flows across the playa, the cracks erode into fissures of sufficient width and depth to endanger traffic on the playa. Topographic surveys of the playa were made to derive a contour map that would allow examination of erosive flow paths. Crack networks were surveyed in selected areas during 1995 and compared with cracks visible in aerial photographs taken in 1990. Crack networks remained visible in their positions following several inundations of the playa. The density of the crack networks increased in all of the selected areas.

  14. Evaporation from groundwater discharge playas, Estancia Basin, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menking, Kirsten M.; Anderson, Roger Y.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Allen, Bruce D.; Ellwein, Amy L.; Loveland, Thomas A.; Hostetler, Steven W.

    2000-01-01

    Bowen ratio meteorological stations have been deployed to measure rates of evaporation from groundwater discharge playas and from an adjacent vegetated bench in the Estancia Basin, in central New Mexico. The playas are remnants of late Pleistocene pluvial Lake Estancia and are discharge areas for groundwater originating as precipitation in the adjacent Manzano Mts. They also accumulate water during local precipitation events. Evaporation is calculated from measured values of net radiation, soil heat flux, atmospheric temperature, and relative humidity. Evaporation rates are strongly dependent on the presence or absence of standing water in the playas, with rates increasing more than 600% after individual rainstorms. Evaporation at site E-12, in the southeastern part of the playa Complex, measured 74 cm over a yearlong period from mid-1997 through mid-1998. This value compares favorably to earlier estimates from northern Estancia playas, but is nearly three times greater than evaporation at a similar playa in western Utah. Differences in geographical position, salt crust composition, and physical properties may explain some of the difference in evaporation rates in these two geographic regions.

  15. Dynamics of playa lakes in the Texas High Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. C., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Three small playa lake basins on the southern High Plains, Texas, have been examined by geologists, pedologists, hydrologists, and botanists to establish ground truth for correlation with ERTS-1 imagery. Although the sites are recognizable, details of the three playa basins are too small, at present resolution, to be accurately determined by the available MSS imagery. However, a fourth study site, consisting of a dual playa complex approximately 5 miles long in a basin of 9 square miles, does resolve available imagery allowing accurate measurement of water fluctuations and water depth. Of the available MSS imagery, Band 5 is the most usable. Definition of Band 4 is less due to reduced tonal contrast. The greatest tonal contrast appears on Band 6 and Band 7 between dry land and water areas. Band 6 is particularly good for defining large water areas, Band 7 being best for small lake basins, and Band 5 for growing fields.

  16. Spatial distribution and morphology of sediments in Texas Southern High Plains playa wetlands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Playas are depressional geomorphic features on the U.S. High Plains. About 20,000 Southern High Plains playa wet¬lands serve as runoff catchment basins, which are thought to be focal points of Ogallala aquifer recharge. Sediments in playas can alter biodiversity services, impede aquifer recharge, an...

  17. Spatial Distribution and Morphology of Sediments in Texas Southern High Plains Playa Wetlands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Playas are depressional geomorphic features on the U.S. High Plains and about 20,000 Southern High Plains playa wetlands serve as runoff catchment basins, which are thought to be focal points of Ogallala aquifer recharge. Sediments in playas can alter biodiversity services, impede aquifer recharge,...

  18. Geomorphic and hydrologic controls of dust emissions during drought from Yellow Lake playa, West Texas, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research on the factors that control dust emissions from playas has revealed a number of complex geomorphic and hydrologic factors, yet there are few measurements of dust emissions from playas during drought or low-emission seasons. Deflation of Yellow Lake, a saline playa in West Texas, produces sa...

  19. Comments on Racetrack playa: Rocks moved by wind alone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Montero, M. E.; Cabestrero, Ó.; Rodríguez-Aranda, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms by which rocks move across the beds of playa lakes leaving tracks continue to be debated (Sanz-Montero and Rodríguez-Aranda, 2013; Norris et al., 2014; Sanz-Montero et al., 2015a,b; Baumgardner and Shaffer, 2015; Jones and Hooke, 2015). In this regard, the article by Jones and Hooke (Aeolian Research 19, 2015) is particularly interesting since it provides a description of these mechanisms by R. Jones who, during a storm event in 1972, was probably the first person to witness movement of rocks. The dominant meteorological conditions described by Jones during the period when the tracks were formed are, significantly, rather similar to those previously described by Clements (1952) at Little Bonnie Claire Playa (Nevada, USA). The storm conditions referred to in the article also coincide with the observations, measurements and deductions made by Sanz-Montero and Rodríguez-Aranda (2013) and Sanz-Montero et al. (2015a,b) at Altillo Chica playa lake, Central Spain. Furthermore, we were able to carry out an on-site analysis of the sedimentary structures at Racetrack playa in June 2015, allowing us to verify the similarity of the features present at both sites. Together with the important role played by gusty winds in the formation of the tracks, all the above mentioned studies point to the presence of a thin veneer of water, just a few millimeters deep, in the area of the playa lake where the rock movements occur. However, Jones and Hooke (2015) disregard the force exerted by moving water and analyze the coefficient of friction assuming that the rocks are moved by wind alone. We offer an alternative explanation for the movement of rocks both at Racetrack and Altillo Chica playa lake which considers not only the wind but also the role played by moving water in conjunction with other parameters which modify the erosion thresholds (rocks acting as obstacles) and reduce friction (benthic microorganisms).

  20. Genetic differentiation among cottontails from isolated playa basins.

    PubMed

    Van den Bussche, R A; Hamilton, M J; Chesser, R K; Scribner, K T

    1987-11-30

    Protein variation in 182 Sylvilagus floridanus from 19 playa basins in Castro Co., Texas was examined using starch-gel electrophoresis. Heterozygote deficiencies were noted for all populations. This heterozygote deficiency may be due to differential selection against heterozygous individuals over the winter months. Results of F-statistics indicated a significant degree of population differentiation at six loci. Nei's genetic distance between populations ranged from 0.20 to 0.388 and a significant association between genetic distance and linear geographic distance among playas was found. These results suggest that genetic exchange and long-distance dispersal may be hindered by expanses of unsuitable habitat. PMID:3504804

  1. Population genetic analyses of the Powerplex(®) Fusion kit in a cosmopolitan sample of Chubut Province (Patagonia Argentina).

    PubMed

    Parolin, María Laura; Real, Luciano E; Martinazzo, Liza B; Basso, Néstor G

    2015-11-01

    Allele frequencies and forensic parameters for 22 autosomal STR loci and DYS391 locus included in the PowerPlex(®) Fusion System kit were estimated in a sample of 770 unrelated individuals from Chubut Province, southern Patagonia. No significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed after Bonferroni's correction. The combined power of discrimination and the combined probability of exclusion were >0.999999 and 0.999984, respectively. Comparisons with other worldwide populations were performed. The MDS obtained show a close biological relation between Chubut and Chile. The estimated interethnic admixture supports a high Native American contribution (46%) in the population sample of Chubut. These results enlarge the Argentine databases of autosomal STR and would provide a valuable contribution for identification tests and population genetic studies. PMID:26275612

  2. Excitation-emission matrices applied to the study of urban effluent discharges in the Chubut River (Patagonia, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Chiarandini Fiore, Jessica Paola; Scapini, María del Carmen; Olivieri, Alejandro César

    2013-08-01

    Natural and contaminated waters of the final reaches of the Chubut River (Patagonia, Argentina) were studied to obtain information about river organic matter and effects of domestic and industrial discharges (fishery effluents and sewages). Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrices (EEMs) were obtained from samples only filtered (0.45 μm) and diluted, if necessary, to avoid the inner filter effect. In addition, physicochemical parameters were measured to know the quality of the water and the effluents. Results show that EEMs allow a rapid and simple control of the effluents from fisheries and domestic sewage in Chubut River estuary, necessary to take management decisions. PMID:23325315

  3. Estimating Recharge through Playa Lakes to the Southern High Plains Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainwater, K.; Ganesan, G.; Gitz, D.; Zartman, R.; Hudnall, W.; Smith, L.

    2009-12-01

    In the Southern High Plains of Texas, it is accepted that focused recharge to the High Plains Aquifer (locally known as the Ogallala) occurs through over 20,000 playa lakes, which are local depressions that collect storm runoff. The amount and rate of recharge is not precisely known, and the impact of the land use surrounding each playa lake on the amount of runoff has not been quantified. Each playa exists within its own watershed, and many of those are cultivated, while others are surrounded by native grassland or conservation reserve program (CRP) lands. The amount of sediments entering most playas following cultivation has been substantial, but whether this erosion has had a harmful influence on recharge is unknown. Changing recharge rates can also impact the playa ecosystems that are pivotal to many types of local wildlife. Improved understanding of playa recharge is necessary for proper management strategies for long-term survivability of the Ogallala aquifer. Over the last four years, the research team selected and instrumented 30 playas (10 counties, one cropland playa, one native grassland playa, one CRP playa in each) for observation of their water budgets. To quantify recharge in each playa, data collection includes sufficient weather instrumentation to determine local precipitation and free water evaporation, as well as water level monitoring in the playa lake. The depth/area/volume relationship for each playa was developed by local GPS surveying. Between rainfall/runoff events, seepage through the playa bottom is calculated as the difference between the change in the volume of water stored in the playa and the calculated free water evaporation. The research team hopes to keep the instrumentation operational for as long as possible, hopefully several years, to observe enough inundation events to characterize a range of behaviors in the different playa basins. In this presentation, initial water budget analyses for several of the initially instrumented

  4. Dust emission from wet and dry playas in the Mojave Desert, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R.L.; Yount, J.C.; Reheis, M.; Goldstein, H.; Chavez, P., Jr.; Fulton, R.; Whitney, J.; Fuller, C.; Forester, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    The interactions between playa hydrology and playa-surface sediments are important factors that control the type and amount of dust emitted from playas as a result of wind erosion. The production of evaporite minerals during evaporative loss of near-surface ground water results in both the creation and maintenance of several centimeters or more of loose sediment on and near the surfaces of wet playas. Observations that characterize the texture, mineralogic composition and hardness of playa surfaces at Franklin Lake, Soda Lake and West Cronese Lake playas in the Mojave Desert (California), along with imaging of dust emission using automated digital photography, indicate that these kinds of surface sediment are highly susceptible to dust emission. The surfaces of wet playas are dynamic - surface texture and sediment availability to wind erosion change rapidly, primarily in response to fluctuations in water-table depth, rainfall and rates of evaporation. In contrast, dry playas are characterized by ground water at depth. Consequently, dry playas commonly have hard surfaces that produce little or no dust if undisturbed except for transient silt and clay deposited on surfaces by wind and water. Although not the dominant type of global dust, salt-rich dusts from wet playas may be important with respect to radiative properties of dust plumes, atmospheric chemistry, windborne nutrients and human health.

  5. Land use and conservation reserve program effects on the persistence of playa wetlands in the High Plains.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Dale W; Smith, Loren M; Haukos, David A; Johnson, Lacrecia A; McMurry, Scott T

    2014-04-15

    Watershed cultivation and subsequent soil erosion remains the greatest threat to the service provisioning of playa wetlands in the High Plains. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) plants perennial vegetation cover on cultivated lands including playa watersheds, and therefore, the program influences sediment deposition and accumulation in playas. Our objective was to measure the effects of the CRP on sediment deposition by comparing sediment depth and present/historic size characteristics in 258 playas among three High-Plains subregions (northern, central, and southern) and the three dominant watershed types: cropland, CRP, and native grassland. Sediment depth and resultant volume loss for CRP playas were 40% and 57% lower than cropland playas, but 68% and 76% greater than playas in native grassland. Playas in CRP had remaining volumes exceeding those of cropland playas. Grassland playas had nearly three times more original playa volume and 122% greater wetland area than CRP playas. Overall, playas were larger in the south than other subregions. Sediment depth was also three times greater in the south than the north, which resulted in southern playas losing twice as much total volume as northern playas. However, the larger southern playas provide more remaining volume per playa than those in other subregions. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of proper watershed management in preserving playa wetland ecosystem service provisioning in the High Plains. Furthermore, we identify regional differences in playas that may influence management decisions and provide valuable insight to conservation practitioners trying to maximize wetland services with limited resources. PMID:24635683

  6. Dynamics of Playa lakes in the Texas High Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Three small playa lake basins on the Texas High Plains were originally selected as ERTS-1 test sites to attempt correlation of ERTS-1 imagery with the water balance ecosystem and geology/morphology of the lake basins. The 5-mile long large Double Lakes playa complex was also instrumented as an alternate test site. Analysis of bands 6 and 7 of ERTS-1 MSS imagery shows that lake basins as small as 200 m in diameter (+ or - 10 acres) can be reliably classified as being wet or dry, thus supplying the methodology for a rapid, periodic census of surface water. A cost/benefit analysis reveals that the use of MSS imagery for such a census results in a 66 to 200-fold cost reduction when compared to the costs of using other conventional methods.

  7. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake Playa, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-01

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the US Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition. 72 refs., 59 figs., 26 tab.

  8. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, J.B.

    1997-12-31

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the U.S. Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition.

  9. Bacterial succession within an ephemeral hypereutrophic mojave desert playa lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Navarro, J.B.; Moser, D.P.; Flores, A.; Ross, C.; Rosen, Michael R.; Dong, H.; Zhang, G.; Hedlund, B.P.

    2009-01-01

    Ephemerally wet playas are conspicuous features of arid landscapes worldwide; however, they have not been well studied as habitats for microorganisms. We tracked the geochemistry and microbial community in Silver Lake playa, California, over one flooding/desiccation cycle following the unusually wet winter of 2004-2005. Over the course of the study, total dissolved solids increased by 10-fold and pH increased by nearly one unit. As the lake contracted and temperatures increased over the summer, a moderately dense planktonic population of 1 ?????106 cells ml-1 of culturable heterotrophs was replaced by a dense population of more than 1????????109 cells ml-1, which appears to be the highest concentration of culturable planktonic heterotrophs reported in any natural aquatic ecosystem. This correlated with a dramatic depletion of nitrate as well as changes in the microbial community, as assessed by small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of bacterial isolates and uncultivated clones. Isolates from the early-phase flooded playa were primarily Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes, yet clone libraries were dominated by Betaproteobacteria and yet uncultivated Actinobacteria. Isolates from the late-flooded phase ecosystem were predominantly Proteobacteria, particularly alkalitolerant isolates of Rhodobaca, Porphyrobacter, Hydrogenophaga, Alishwenella, and relatives of Thauera; however, clone libraries were composed almost entirely of Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria). A sample taken after the playa surface was completely desiccated contained diverse culturable Actinobacteria typically isolated from soils. In total, 205 isolates and 166 clones represented 82 and 44 species-level groups, respectively, including a wide diversity of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Acidobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  10. Clay Minerals in Playas of the Mojave Desert, California.

    PubMed

    Droste, J B

    1959-07-10

    Montmorillonite, illite, chlorite, and kaolinite in the playas of southern California are traceable directly to the source areas surrounding the basins. No evidence found in this investigation suggests that these clay minerals are unstable in the sodic or calcic saline lake environment, but this conclusion may not be directly applied to marine evaporite facies where the minerals are rich in potassium and magnesium. PMID:17738603

  11. Bacterial succession within an ephemeral hypereutrophic Mojave Desert playa Lake.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Jason B; Moser, Duane P; Flores, Andrea; Ross, Christian; Rosen, Michael R; Dong, Hailiang; Zhang, Gengxin; Hedlund, Brian P

    2009-02-01

    Ephemerally wet playas are conspicuous features of arid landscapes worldwide; however, they have not been well studied as habitats for microorganisms. We tracked the geochemistry and microbial community in Silver Lake playa, California, over one flooding/desiccation cycle following the unusually wet winter of 2004-2005. Over the course of the study, total dissolved solids increased by approximately 10-fold and pH increased by nearly one unit. As the lake contracted and temperatures increased over the summer, a moderately dense planktonic population of approximately 1x10(6) cells ml(-1) of culturable heterotrophs was replaced by a dense population of more than 1x10(9) cells ml(-1), which appears to be the highest concentration of culturable planktonic heterotrophs reported in any natural aquatic ecosystem. This correlated with a dramatic depletion of nitrate as well as changes in the microbial community, as assessed by small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of bacterial isolates and uncultivated clones. Isolates from the early-phase flooded playa were primarily Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes, yet clone libraries were dominated by Betaproteobacteria and yet uncultivated Actinobacteria. Isolates from the late-flooded phase ecosystem were predominantly Proteobacteria, particularly alkalitolerant isolates of Rhodobaca, Porphyrobacter, Hydrogenophaga, Alishwenella, and relatives of Thauera; however, clone libraries were composed almost entirely of Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria). A sample taken after the playa surface was completely desiccated contained diverse culturable Actinobacteria typically isolated from soils. In total, 205 isolates and 166 clones represented 82 and 44 species-level groups, respectively, including a wide diversity of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Acidobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. PMID:18758846

  12. A modern subtropical playa complex: Salina de Ambargasta, central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanor, Gabriela A.; Piovano, Eduardo L.; Ariztegui, Daniel; Vallet-Coulomb, Christine

    2012-04-01

    Salina de Ambargasta is a playa located at mid latitudes in central Argentina (29 °S-64 °W). Because of its hydrological behaviour, this playa complex can be subdivided into a closed system "sensu-stricto" and an "open-like system" due to the presence of a seasonal outflow. Geomorphological and sedimentological features enable the separation of the Ambargasta playa into well-defined western, eastern and northern zones, where aeolian processes, groundwater supply and surface inflow, respectively, define distinctive sedimentary environments and typical processes of deposition. The following depositional settings were recognized: (1) alluvial fan; (2) sandflat; (3) springs; (4) dunes and palaeo-dune field; (5) dry mudflat; (6) capillary mudflat; (7) ephemeral saline lake (includes saline mudflat and salt pan). The dry mudflat is present at the highest topographical zone, where the groundwater influence is less important and only intermittent ponds are present. In the capillary mudflat, evaporite sedimentation is limited to the development of efflorescence by evaporative pumping. The ephemeral saline lake, placed in the lowermost topographical region, alternates cycles of lake expansion and contraction responding to inter-annual hydrological variability as well as to seasonal variability. Lake expansion takes place during early austral summer (December-March), while continuous evaporation of brine leads to the growth of halite crystals during late summer. Sodium chloride-type brines result from both chemical fractionation as evaporation increases and salt dissolution. The isotopic compositions of surficial and underground waters (δ18O and δ2H) indicate that lake waters become isotopically enriched during summer when evaporation plays a significant role in the playa complex.

  13. Development rates of Late Quaternary soils, Silver Lake Playa, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.; Harden, J.W.; McFadden, L.D.; Shroba, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Soils formed on alluvial fan deposits that range in age from about 35 000 to 200 yr BP near Silver Lake playa in the Mojave Desert permit study of the rates of soil development in an arid, hyperthermic climate. Field-described properties of soils were quantified and analyzed using a soil development index that combines properties and horizon thicknesses. Pedogenic CaCO3 (as indicated by color), pH increase, and dry consistence appear to change with age at linear rates, whereas rubification appears to change at a logarithmic rate. The linear rates are best attributed to the progressive accumulation of CaCO3- and salt-rich eolian dust derived from the playa and other mnore distant sources. The total-texture values of soils on fans older than 10 000 yr BP are similar, which suggests that playas in this area may have been wet enough to restrict the availability of fines from these sources for many thousands of years prior to 10 000 yr BP. Equations derived from regressions of soil age and properties can be used to estimate ages of undated, lithologically similar deposits in similar climates and geomorphic settings. -from Authors

  14. MTI Thermal Bands Calibration at Ivanpah Playa with a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2001-06-27

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is currently calibrating the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite sponsored by the Department of Energy. The reflective bands of the MTI satellite are calibrated in desert playas such as Ivanpah Playa in the Nevada/California border. The five MTI thermal bands are calibrated with targets of known emissivity and temperature such as power plant heated lakes. In order to accomplish a full calibration at the desert playas, a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer was used to measure soil surface radiance and temperature during the satellite overpass. The results obtained with the mobile FTIR during the ground truth campaign at Ivanpah Playa will be presented.

  15. Two new species of Parasaveljevia Wieser, 1953 (Thoracostomopsidae, Nematoda) from Argentinean coasts (Chubut, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Pastor, Catalina; Lo Russo, Virginia; Villares, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Two new Parasavaljevia species are described, one from Puerto Madryn, and one from El Límite beach, San Jorge Gulf, Chubut Province, Argentina. The two species are characterised by a combination of characters. Parasavaljevia uncinoa n. sp. is characterised by having a long rectangular cirrus, positioned at the level of the inner labial setae, rectangular mandibles with prominent lateral hooks bearing denticles in three lines of nine each, and six cephalic setae of the same length, inserted at the anterior end of a small head capsule. Parasavaljevia limitense n. sp. is characterized by having a cirrus posterior positioned, between the labial and cephalic setae, rectangular-arched mandibles bearing denticles in five lines of ten each in a gradient of sizes; a small buccal cavity, small cephalic capsule and abundant cervical setae (4+10). An emendation of the genus diagnosis and a new key are given and discussed. PMID:26624196

  16. Two new species of Parasaveljevia Wieser, 1953 (Thoracostomopsidae, Nematoda) from Argentinean coasts (Chubut, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Pastor, Catalina; Russo, Virginia Lo; Villares, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Two new Parasavaljevia species are described, one from Puerto Madryn, and one from El Límite beach San Jorge Gulf, Chubut Province, Argentina. The two species are characterised by a combination of characters. Parasavaljevia uncinoa n. sp. is characterised by having a long rectangular cirrus, positioned at the level of the inner labial setae, rectangular mandibles with prominent lateral hooks bearing denticles in three lines of nine each and six cephalic setae of the same length, inserted at the anterior end of a small head capsule. Parasavaljevia limitense n. sp. is characterized by having a cirrus posterior positioned, between labial and cephalic setae, rectangular-arched mandibles bearing denticles in five lines of ten each in a gradient of sizes; small buccal cavity, small cephalic capsule and abundant cervical setae (4+10). An emendation of the genus diagnosis and a new key are given and discussed. PMID:26623591

  17. Dust emissions from undisturbed and disturbed, crusted playa surfaces: cattle trampling effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry playa lake beds can be significant sources of fine dust emission. This study used a portable field wind tunnel to quantify the PM10 emissions from a bare, fine-textured playa surface located in the far northern Chihuahua Desert. The natural, undisturbed crust and its subjection to two levels of ...

  18. Influence of conservation practices on ecosystem services provided by playas in the High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The majority of the High Plains region is comprised of shortgrass prairie. Within this shortgrass prairie region, playas are the dominant wetland type. Playas are shallow depressional recharge wetlands, each existing within their own individual catchments. This is also one of the most intensively...

  19. Dust Emissions from Undisturbed and Disturbed, Crusted Playa Surfaces: Cattle Trampling Effect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry playa lake beds can be a significant source of fine dust emissions during high wind events in arid and semiarid landscapes. The physical and chemical properties of the playa surface control the amount and properties of the dust emitted. In this study, we use a field wind tunnel to quantify the...

  20. Preliminary results of dust emission data from Yellow Lake Playa, West Texas, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the relationship between groundwater and dust emission rates at Yellow Lake, a saline “wet” playa in West Texas with a long history of wind erosion. Deflation of the playa surface has generated lunettes composed of silt-clay aggregates and gypsum. Saltation sensors indicate that most...

  1. Field study of spatial variability in unsaturated flow beneath and adjacent to playas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Goldsmith, Richard S.

    We quantified unsaturated flow beneath playa and adjacent interplaya settings at a site in the Southern High Plains (United States) to resolve issues related to where and how water moves through the unsaturated zone. This is the first study in which the data density (39 boreholes) and the variety of techniques used (physical, chemical, and isotopic) were sufficient to quantify spatial variability in unsaturated flow. Water contents, water potentials, and tritium concentrations were much higher and chloride concentrations were much lower beneath playas than in interplaya settings, which indicated that playas focus recharge. These results refute previous hypotheses that playas act as evaporation pans or that recharge is restricted to the annular region around playas. Water fluxes estimated from environmental tracers ranged from 60 to 120mmyr-1 beneath playas and were <=0.1mmyr-1 during the past 2000-5000 years beneath natural interplaya areas not subjected to ponding. To evaluate the apparent inconsistency between high recharge rates and thick clay layers beneath playas, we applied bromide and FD&C blue dye to evaluate flow processes. These applied tracer experiments showed preferential flow along roots and desiccation cracks through structured clays in the shallow subsurface in playas.

  2. Lithium and strontium isotopic systematics in playas in Nevada, USA: constraints on the origin of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araoka, Daisuke; Kawahata, Hodaka; Takagi, Tetsuichi; Watanabe, Yasushi; Nishimura, Koshi; Nishio, Yoshiro

    2014-03-01

    Lithium-rich brine in playas is a major raw material for lithium production. Recently, lithium isotopic ratios (δ7Li) have been identified as a tool for investigating water-rock interactions. Thus, to constrain the origin of lithium in playas by the use of its isotopes, we conducted leaching experiments on various lacustrine sediment and evaporite deposit samples collected from playas in Nevada, USA. We determined lithium and strontium isotopic ratios and contents and trace element contents of the leachate, estimated the initial δ7Li values in the water flowing into the playas, and examined the origin of lithium in playas by comparison with δ7Li values of the possible sources. In samples from the playas, δ7Li values show some variation, reflecting differences both in isotopic fractionation during mineral formation and in initial δ7Li value in water flowing into each playa. However, all δ7Li values in this study are much lower than those in river water and groundwater samples from around the world, but they are close to those of volcanic rocks. Considering the temperature dependence of lithium isotopic fractionation between solid and fluid, these results indicate that the lithium concentrated in playas in Nevada was supplied mainly through high-temperature water-rock interaction associated with local hydrothermal activity and not directly by low-temperature weathering of surface materials. This study, which is the first to report lithium isotopic compositions in playas, demonstrates that δ7Li may be a useful tracer for determining the origin of lithium and evaluating its accumulation processes in playas.

  3. Macropolygon morphology, development, and classification on North Panamint and Eureka playas, Death Valley National Park CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Paula; Stoffer, Phil; Smith, Ward C.

    2005-12-01

    Panamint and Eureka playas, both located within Death Valley National Park, exhibit a host of surficial features including fissures, pits, mounds, and plant-covered ridges, representing topographic highs and lows that vary up to 2 m of relief from the playa surface. Aerial photographs reveal that these linear strands often converge to form polygons, ranging in length from several meters to nearly a kilometer. These features stand out in generally dark contrast to the brighter intervening expanse of flat, plant-free, desiccated mud of the typical playa surface. Ground-truth mapping of playa features with differential GPS (Global Positioning System) was conducted in 1999 (North Panamint Valley) and 2002 (Eureka Valley). High-resolution digital maps reveal that both playas possess macropolygons of similar scale and geometry, and that fissures may be categorized into one of two genetic groups: (1) shore-parallel or playa-interior desiccation and shrinkage; and (2) tectonic-induced cracks. Early investigations of these features in Eureka Valley concluded that their origin may have been related to agricultural activity by paleo-Indian communities. Although human artifacts are abundant at each locale, there is no evidence to support the inference that surface features reported on Eureka Playa are anthropogenic in origin. Our assumptions into the genesis of polygons on playas is based on our fortuitous experience of witnessing a fissure in the process of formation on Panamint Playa after a flash flood (May 1999); our observations revealed a paradox that saturation of the upper playa crusts contributes to the establishment of some desiccation features. Follow-up visits to the same feature over 2 yrs' time are a foundation for insight into the evolution and possible longevity of these features.

  4. Macropolygon morphology, development, and classification on North Panamint and Eureka playas, Death Valley National Park CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messina, P.; Stoffer, P.; Smith, W.C.

    2005-01-01

    Panamint and Eureka playas, both located within Death Valley National Park, exhibit a host of surficial features including fissures, pits, mounds, and plant-covered ridges, representing topographic highs and lows that vary up to 2 m of relief from the playa surface. Aerial photographs reveal that these linear strands often converge to form polygons, ranging in length from several meters to nearly a kilometer. These features stand out in generally dark contrast to the brighter intervening expanse of flat, plant-free, desiccated mud of the typical playa surface. Ground-truth mapping of playa features with differential GPS (Global Positioning System) was conducted in 1999 (North Panamint Valley) and 2002 (Eureka Valley). High-resolution digital maps reveal that both playas possess macropolygons of similar scale and geometry, and that fissures may be categorized into one of two genetic groups: (1) shore-parallel or playa-interior desiccation and shrinkage; and (2) tectonic-induced cracks. Early investigations of these features in Eureka Valley concluded that their origin may have been related to agricultural activity by paleo-Indian communities. Although human artifacts are abundant at each locale, there is no evidence to support the inference that surface features reported on Eureka Playa are anthropogenic in origin. Our assumptions into the genesis of polygons on playas is based on our fortuitous experience of witnessing a fissure in the process of formation on Panamint Playa after a flash flood (May 1999); our observations revealed a paradox that saturation of the upper playa crusts contributes to the establishment of some desiccation features. Follow-up visits to the same feature over 2 yrs' time are a foundation for insight into the evolution and possible longevity of these features. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A change-detection application on the evolution of Kahak playa (South Khorasan province, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Moghaddam, Mohammad Hossein; Saghafi, Mahdi

    2006-12-01

    Kahak salt playa in South Khorasan province of Iran, have special geomorphological characteristics by the presence of ephemeral saline lakes, wetlands, salt crusts, surface accumulations of salt and zones of patterned ground. Salt crusts in the soil surface are unique in the region and have laminated horizons in the playa soil. Soil-surface salt accumulations are dominated by NaCl and gypsum. It has been found that distribution of chemical soluble is not uniform across the playa landscape, and this result influences on the variety form of patterned ground. In this study, the percent changes in some of the chemical elements such as NaCl, gypsum and also brine extent have been calculated in the playa. Indicating changes in Kahak salt playa is the main aim of this study by using remote sensing and GIS techniques. In this paper, techniques such as spectral un-mixing, maximum likelihood classification, band rationing, fuzzy classification and correlation relationships are discussed. This contribution presents modeling of temporal and spatial changes of salinity and playa developing using combined approaches that incorporate different data-fusion and data-integration techniques for two periods of date. Furthermore, percent changes in the surface-patterned ground of the playa have been calculated using texture and pattern analysis of the PCA1. Results have revealed that, in the playa developing, chemical materials such as sodium, NaCl, gypsum and also brine extent are positively correlated with each other and the most increased changes are related to gypsum and the most decreased changes are related to the NaCl. Also changes in the amount of agricultural area in the playa-lakes margin, show low effects in the desertification process.

  6. Dynamics of Playa Lakes in the Texas High Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. C., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. This project is designed to correlate ERTS-1 satellite imagery signatures with the water balance ecosystem and geology of select playa lake basins in West Texas. The principal work consisted of monitoring the weather instruments, the measurement of water levels and water depths examination of MSS imagery, and measurement of water and mud areas by use of ESIAC (Electronic Satellite Image Analysis Console) at Stanford Research Center, Menlo Park, California. A cost/benefit analysis, comparing the use of ERTS-1 data to more conventionally secured data, revealed that use of ERTS-1 data for such a survey reduces cost from $2.00 to $0.03/square mile.

  7. The origin of Chubutolithes Ihering, ichnofossils from the Eocene and Oligocene of Chubut Province, Argentina.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, T.M.; Ratcliffe, B.C.

    1988-01-01

    The distinctive trace fossil Chubutolithes gaimanensis n. ichnosp. occurs in Casamayoran (early Eocene) and Colhuehaupian (late Oligocene) alluvial rocks of the Sarmiento Formation in eastern Chubut Province, Argentina. Though known for nearly 70 years, its origin has remained obscure. Examination of new specimens and comparisons with modern analogs demonstrate that specimens of Chubutolithes represent the fossil nests of a mud-dauber (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae). Virtually identical nests are constructed today by mud-daubers in areas as disparate as southern Santa Cruz Province, Argentina, and Nebraska, confirming that quite similar trace fossils can be produced by several different taxa in a higher taxonomic clade. No satisfactory ethological term exists for trace fossils that, like Chubutolithes, were constructed by organisms above, rather than within, a substrate or medium. The new term aedificichnia is proposed. Chubutolithes occurs in alluvial paleosols and is associated with a large terrestrial ichnofauna. These trace fossils include the nests of scarab beetles, compound nests of social insects, and burrows of earthworms. -Authors

  8. Grass buffers for playas in agricultural landscapes: An annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melcher, Cynthia P.; Skagen, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    References on best management practices (BMPs) for agricultural lands were included because certain BMPs are crucial for informing decisions about buffer design/ effectiveness and overall playa ecology. We also included various papers that increase the spectrum of time over which buffer theories and practices have evolved. An unannotated section lists references that we did not prioritize for annotation and references that may be helpful but were beyond the scope of this document. Finally, we provide notes on conversations we had with scientists, land managers, and other buffer experts whom we consulted, and their contact information. We conclude the bibliography with appendices of common and scientific names of birds and plants and acronyms used in both the bibliography. In the annotations, italicized text signifies our own editorial remarks. Readers should also note that much of the work on buffers has been designed using English units of measure rather than metrics; in most cases, their results have been converted to metrics for publication, explaining the seemingly odd or irregular buffer widths and other parameters reported.

  9. Playa lake and sheetflood deposits of the Upper Cretaceous Jindong Formation, Korea: Occurrences and palaeoenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, I. S.; Kim, H. J.

    2006-05-01

    Lake model of the Upper Cretaceous Jindong Formation in Korea was established on the basis of sedimentological and palaeobiological records of the playa lake and sheetflood deposits and their palaeoenvironmental implications. The playa lake and sheetflood deposits of the Jindong Formation are characterized by the common presence of traces of vanished evaporites, complicated polygonal desiccation cracks and rainprints, the pedogenic carbonate development, and the preservation of invertebrate traces and dinosaur and bird tracks. The traces of vanished evaporites including halite and sulphate evaporite occur as evaporite pseudopmorphs and moulds. The occurrence of all of the evaporite minerals as traces suggests that flooding stages persisted much longer than evaporation and desiccation stages. Invertebrates, birds, and dinosaurs inhabited the playa lake environment of the Upper Cretaceous Jindong Lake. The Jindong Lake formed by the combination of humid source area and arid depositional site due to an orographic effect in fault-bounded basin. Extensive development of the playa lake and sheetflood deposits with evaporite mineral casts and very limited association of shoreline deposits in the Jindong Formation are characteristic of closed lake, and the Jindong Lake is compared to a lake formed in partly drained closed basin. The aggradation of mudflat deposits indicates continued subsidence of the basin and continuation of an underfilled lake basin. The Jindong Lake expanded and stabilized as a playa lake surrounded by dry to saline mudflats, and palaeoclimate and subsidence rates changed little throughout the period of the Jindong Lake development.

  10. Lithostratigraphy and geochronology of fills in small playa basins on the Southern High Plains, United States

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, V.T.; Hovorka, S.D.; Gustavson, T.C.

    1996-08-01

    Playa basins are small depressions (typically <=1.5 km{sup 2}) on the Southern High Plains of northwestern Texas and eastern New Mexico. There are about 25000 playas in the region; they lie on the Blackwater Draw Formation (Pleistocene), a widespread eolin deposit, and locally on the Ogallala Formation (Miocene-Pliocene). Understanding the lithostratigraphy and chronostratigraphy of the fill in the basins is important because it should (1) provide clues to the origin and evolution of playas, which have been long debated; (2) yield a paleoenvironmental record for the region; and (3) aid in understanding the history and future of the regional aquifer because playas are the principal source of recharge. Data from 19 playa basins, combined with published data from 4 other basins, show that the basin fill is composed of six distinctive facies: (1) lacustrine mud; (2) lacustrine carbonate; (3) lacustrine delta deposits; (4) eolian sand and silt; (5) eolian loam; and (6) accretionary eolian deposits (Blackwater Draw Formation). Dating is based on radiocarbon ages from the fill in 12 basins and from lunettes adjacent to 5 basins. All dated basins were present at the end of the Pleistocene and some were present in some form throughout the Pleistocene. These lithostratigraphic and chronostratigraphic relationships show that some basins have a prolonged history as depressions. 96 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Modeling sediment accumulation in North American playa wetlands in response to climate change, 1940-2100

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burris, Lucy; Skagen, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Playa wetlands on the west-central Great Plains of North America are vulnerable to sediment infilling from upland agriculture, putting at risk several important ecosystem services as well as essential habitats and food resources of diverse wetland-dependent biota. Climate predictions for this semi-arid area indicate reduced precipitation which may alter rates of erosion, runoff, and sedimentation of playas. We forecasted erosion rates, sediment depths, and resultant playa wetland depths across the west-central Great Plains and examined the relative roles of land use context and projected changes in precipitation in the sedimentation process. We estimated erosion with the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) using historic values and downscaled precipitation predictions from three general circulation models and three emissions scenarios. We calibrated RUSLE results using field sediment measurements. RUSLE is appealing for regional scale modeling because it uses climate forecasts with monthly resolution and other widely available values including soil texture, slope and land use. Sediment accumulation rates will continue near historic levels through 2070 and will be sufficient to cause most playas (if not already filled) to fill with sediment within the next 100 years in the absence of mitigation. Land use surrounding the playa, whether grassland or tilled cropland, is more influential in sediment accumulation than climate-driven precipitation change.

  12. A Tenebrionid beetle's dataset (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae) from Peninsula Valdés (Chubut, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Cheli, Germán H; Flores, Gustavo E; Román, Nicolás Martínez; Podestá, Darío; Mazzanti, Renato; Miyashiro, Lidia

    2013-12-18

    The Natural Protected Area Peninsula Valdés, located in Northeastern Patagonia, is one of the largest conservation units of arid lands in Argentina. Although this area has been in the UNESCO World Heritage List since 1999, it has been continually exposed to sheep grazing and cattle farming for more than a century which have had a negative impact on the local environment. Our aim is to describe the first dataset of tenebrionid beetle species living in Peninsula Valdés and their relationship to sheep grazing. The dataset contains 118 records on 11 species and 198 adult individuals collected. Beetles were collected using pitfall traps in the two major environmental units of Peninsula Valdés, taking into account grazing intensities over a three year time frame from 2005-2007. The Data quality was enhanced following the best practices suggested in the literature during the digitalization and geo-referencing processes. Moreover, identification of specimens and current accurate spelling of scientific names were reviewed. Finally, post-validation processes using DarwinTest software were applied. Specimens have been deposited at Entomological Collection of the Centro Nacional Patagónico (CENPAT-CONICET). The dataset is part of the database of this collection and has been published on the internet through GBIF Integrated Publishing Toolkit (IPT) (http://data.gbif.org/datasets/resource/14669/). Furthermore, it is the first dataset for tenebrionid beetles of arid Patagonia available in GBIF database, and it is the first one based on a previously designed and standardized sampling to assess the interaction between these beetles and grazing in the area. The main purposes of this dataset are to ensure accessibility to data associated with Tenebrionidae specimens from Peninsula Valdés (Chubut, Argentina), also to contribute to GBIF with primary data about Patagonian tenebrionids and finally, to promote the Entomological Collection of Centro Nacional Patagónico (CENPAT

  13. Tectonic constraints and hydrological functioning in several playa-lakes from southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Miguel; Moral, Francisco; Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Pérez-Valera, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    We have selected three main wetland systems located in southern Spain to describe the tectonic factors that have given rise to the formation of closed depressions originating playa - lakes in a semi arid climate context. The three wetlands are located in the provinces of Córdoba, Seville and Cádiz (Andalusia). The low-permeability of the materials - often Triassic clays and marls - forming the closed depressions generates a local groundwater flow system that coincides with the surface watershed. The main surface water inputs comes from the watershed (runoff) and the main groundwater inputs comes from a local aquifer placed at the bottom of the closed depression. Water outputs are mainly due to the evaporation from the playa-lake and ET from the vegetation. This hypothesis is coherent with the geological origin and is supported by hydrological observation, numerical modelling and and surface-groundwater daily monitoring of time series in some of the studied playas. The southernmost playa lake studied is Medina playa-lake, hosted in the northern edge of a 1748 ha closed basin (Cádiz). The main structure that has generated the northern edge is an antiform with a core of Triassic and Miocene sediments and an upper part formed by alluvial conglomerates. This antiform acts as a barrier to the natural runoff, flowing to the north, remaining the cause for the genesis of the endorheic basin that leads to the establishment of the playa-lake. The Conde playa-lake (Córdoba province) is also placed in the northern edge of its 1109 ha closed basin. In this case, clay, gypsum-rich matrix tectonic mélange with a NE-SW orientation has been described in this sector. This melange define a non-continuous NE-SW uplift ridge, which acts as a natural barrier to the northwardly directed runoff originating the Conde playa-lake formation Finally, in Seville province, there is a large (251 km2) continental inner depression, formerly a Quaternary inland delta, that has lead to the

  14. Microbial mats in playa lakes and other saline habitats: Early Mars analog?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauld, John

    1989-01-01

    Microbial mats are cohesive benthic microbial communities which inhabit various Terra (Earth-based) environments including the marine littoral and both permanent and ephemeral (playa) saline lakes. Certain geomorphological features of Mars, such as the Margaritifer Sinus, were interpreted as ancient, dried playa lakes, presumably formed before or during the transition to the present Mars climate. Studies of modern Terran examples suggest that microbial mats on early Mars would have had the capacity to survive and propagate under environmental constraints that would have included irregularly fluctuating regimes of water activity and high ultraviolet flux. Assuming that such microbial communities did indeed inhabit early Mars, their detection during the Mars Rover Sample Return (MRSR) mission depends upon the presence of features diagnostic of the prior existence of these communities or their component microbes or, as an aid to choosing suitable landing, local exploration or sampling sites, geomorphological, sedimentological or chemical features characteristic of their playa lake habitats. Examination of modern Terran playas (e.g., the Lake Eyre basin) shows that these features span several orders of magnitude in size. While stromatolites are commonly centimeter-meter scale features, bioherms or fields of individuals may extend to larger scales. Preservation of organic matter (mats and microbes) would be favored in topographic lows such as channels or ponds of high salinity, particularly those receiving silica-rich groundwaters. These areas are likely to be located near former zones of groundwater emergence and/or where flood channels entered the paleo-playa. Fossil playa systems which may aid in assessing the applicability of this particular Mars analog include the Cambrian Observatory Hill Beds of the Officer Basin and the Eocene Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation.

  15. Effectiveness of vegetation buffers surrounding playa wetlands at contaminant and sediment amelioration.

    PubMed

    Haukos, David A; Johnson, Lacrecia A; Smith, Loren M; McMurry, Scott T

    2016-10-01

    Playa wetlands, the dominant hydrological feature of the semi-arid U.S. High Plains providing critical ecosystem services, are being lost and degraded due to anthropogenic alterations of the short-grass prairie landscape. The primary process contributing to the loss of playas is filling of the wetland through accumulation of soil eroded and transported by precipitation from surrounding cultivated watersheds. We evaluated effectiveness of vegetative buffers surrounding playas in removing metals, nutrients, and dissolved/suspended sediments from precipitation runoff. Storm water runoff was collected at 10-m intervals in three buffer types (native grass, fallow cropland, and Conservation Reserve Program). Buffer type differed in plant composition, but not in maximum percent removal of contaminants. Within the initial 60 m from a cultivated field, vegetation buffers of all types removed >50% of all measured contaminants, including 83% of total suspended solids (TSS) and 58% of total dissolved solids (TDS). Buffers removed an average of 70% of P and 78% of N to reduce nutrients entering the playa. Mean maximum percent removal for metals ranged from 56% of Na to 87% of Cr. Maximum removal was typically at 50 m of buffer width. Measures of TSS were correlated with all measures of metals and nutrients except for N, which was correlated with TDS. Any buffer type with >80% vegetation cover and 30-60 m in width would maximize contaminant removal from precipitation runoff while ensuring that playas would continue to function hydrologically to provide ecosystem services. Watershed management to minimize erosion and creations of vegetation buffers could be economical and effective conservation tools for playa wetlands. PMID:27423768

  16. Parasites in rodent coprolites from the historical archaeological site Alero Mazquiarán, Chubut Province, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Haydée Sardella, Norma; Horacio Fugassa, Martín

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the parasitic remains that were found in rodent coprolites collected from the archaeological site Alero Mazquiarán (Chubut Province, 45 degrees 44'15''S, 70 degrees 25'9''W), which is assigned to the interface of the Araucanian and Tehuelche cultures, dated at 212 +/- 35 years B.P. The faecal material from two unidentified rodent species (X-10 and X-11) was collected from one human pelvic cavity found in a multiple burial. The faecal samples were processed and examined using paleoparasitological procedures. The X-10 coprolites were positive for eggs of Monoecocestus sp. (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) and the X-11 faeces were positive for Pterygodermatites sp. (Nematoda: Rictulariidae), Trichosomoides sp. (Nematoda: Trichosomoididae) and Monoecocestus sp. In this study, we discuss parasitic life cycles, the zoonotic importance of parasites and the behaviour of the aboriginal people. PMID:19274374

  17. The utilization of ERTS-1-generated photographs in the evaluation of the Iranian playas as potential locations for economic and engineering development. [hydrology and morphology of playa soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krinsley, D. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Hydrologic inventories, throughout the year, were made in interior basins that have not been measured previously because of their inaccessibility. Interior basins during the last ERTS-1 year (August 1972 to August 1973) had driest ground conditions in late September 1972 and had wettest ground conditions from March through May 1973, depending upon location. Bearing strengths of playa soils can be inferred from the changing hydrologic conditions through the seasons as recorded by ERTS-1, with prior ground control. Slight differences in salt-crust morphology and in moisture contest of playa soils can be greatly enhanced by rationing and stretching techniques. Differences in water area and silt content can be enhanced by using a three-stage photographic masking technique employing bands 4, 5, and 7.

  18. Water-Chemistry Evolution and Modeling of Radionuclide Sorption and Cation Exchange during Inundation of Frenchman Flat Playa

    SciTech Connect

    Hershey, Ronald; Cablk, Mary; LeFebre, Karen; Fenstermaker, Lynn; Decker, David

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric tests and other experiments with nuclear materials were conducted on the Frenchman Flat playa at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada; residual radionuclides are known to exist in Frenchman Flat playa soils. Although the playa is typically dry, extended periods of winter precipitation or large single-event rainstorms can inundate the playa. When Frenchman Flat playa is inundated, residual radionuclides on the typically dry playa surface may become submerged, allowing water-soil interactions that could provide a mechanism for transport of radionuclides away from known areas of contamination. The potential for radionuclide transport by occasional inundation of the Frenchman Flat playa was examined using geographic information systems and satellite imagery to delineate the timing and areal extent of inundation; collecting water samples during inundation and analyzing them for chemical and isotopic content; characterizing suspended/precipitated materials and archived soil samples; modeling water-soil geochemical reactions; and modeling the mobility of select radionuclides under aqueous conditions. The physical transport of radionuclides by water was not evaluated in this study. Frenchman Flat playa was inundated with precipitation during two consecutive winters in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. Inundation allowed for collection of multiple water samples through time as the areal extent of inundation changed and ultimately receded. During these two winters, precipitation records from a weather station in Frenchman Flat (Well 5b) provided information that was used in combination with geographic information systems, Landsat imagery, and image processing techniques to identify and quantify the areal extent of inundation. After inundation, water on the playa disappeared quickly, for example, between January 25, 2011 and February 10, 2011, a period of 16 days, 92 percent of the areal extent of inundation receded (2,062,800 m2). Water sampling provided

  19. Depositional Environments of Late Danian Plant Localities: Chubut Provice, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, E.; Slingerland, R. L.; Wilf, P.

    2010-12-01

    Diverse, well-preserved macroflora are observed within Cretaceous and Paleocene sediments of Chubut Province, Patagonia, Argentina. These macroflora are the most well preserved early Paleocene flora from Gondwana and add new insight into the diversity and environments of that epoch. Two major sites of fossil preservation, Palacio de los Loros and Parque Provincial Ormachea, sit near the top of the Late Danian (65.5-61.7 Ma) Salamanca Formation. Understanding the depositional history of the Salamanca is important in characterizing paleoenvironments in which these flora lived and relating these Patagonian macroflora to concurrent Paleocene flora within the Gondwanan supercontinent. During a two week field season, twenty stratigraphic sections were measured along the outcrop belt at Palacio de los Loros and Ormachea Park as well as two minor sites; Las Flores, and Rancho Grande. Photo mosaics, laser ranger data, and stratigraphic columns were merged with elevated geologic maps and imported into Fledermaus to generate a 3-D visualization of facies relationships. Rock samples were also collected and will be thin sectioned and analyzed for petrography and grain size. The Salamanca Fm. consists of 7 facies, listed here in stratigraphically ascending order: 1)Transgressive sands, 2)Wispy-bedded claystone, 3)Banco Verde, 4)White Cross bedded sandstone, 5)Accretion set siltstone, 6)Transitional silty claystone and 7)Banco Negro. Based on these facies, the Salamanca Fm. is interpreted as a marine-shelf to brackish, tide-dominated, estuarine deposit. The base of the Salamanca Fm. rests on an unconformity representing a marine flooding surface and lower sections of the Salamanca, facies 1 and 2, contain abundant glauconite and fossils indicative of a marine shelf environment. These facies give way upwards to bi-directional trough cross bedded sandstones interspersed with flaser bedded sandy siltstones (facies 3 and 4) indicating a less marine estuary with strong flow regimes

  20. Estimating recharge through Playa Lakes to the Southern High Plains Aquifer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the Southern High Plains of Texas, it is accepted that focused recharge to the High Plains Aquifer (locally known as the Ogallala) occurs through over 20,000 playa lakes, which are local depressions that collect storm runoff. The amount and rate of recharge is not precisely known, and the impact ...

  1. Suitability of Eastern Gamagrass for in situ Precipitation Catchment Forage Production in Playas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freshwater playas, shallow ephemeral lakes whose basins fill after periods of prolonged or intense rainfall preceding runoff events, occupy 3-5% of the land in the Llano Estacado and are considered marginal farmlands. The goals of this work were to determine if a native species, eastern gamagrass, c...

  2. A water resource assessment of the playa lakes of the Texas High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) staff are studying the water-resource potential of playa lakes in the Texas High Plains in partnership with the U. S. Department of Agriculture— Agricultural Research Service and Texas Tech University. Phase 1 of the research seeks to measure the volume of water ...

  3. Monitoring infiltration and recharge of playa lakes in the Texas Southern High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary results from playa lakes monitored by the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) suggest that a small volume of deep infiltration and recharge to the Ogallala aquifer occurs along the margins of the lake beds, while the majority of infiltration associated with a typical inundation remains ...

  4. Biophysical Controls over Carbon and Nitrogen Stocks in Desert Playa Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, O. P.; Sala, O. E.

    2014-12-01

    Playas are ephemeral desert wetlands situated at the bottom of closed catchments. Desert playas in the Southwestern US have not been intensively studied despite their potential importance for the functioning of desert ecosystems. We want to know which geomorphic and ecological variables control of the stock size of soil organic carbon, and soil total nitrogen in playas. We hypothesize that the magnitude of carbon and nitrogen stocks depends on: (a) catchment size, (b) catchment slope, (d) catchment vegetation cover, (e) bare-ground patch size, and (f) catchment soil texture. We chose thirty playas from across the Jornada Basin (Las Cruces, NM) ranging from 0.5-60ha in area and with varying catchment characteristics. We used the available 5m digital elevation map (DEM) to calculate the catchment size and catchment slope for these thirty playas. We measured percent cover, and patch size using the point-intercept method with three 10m transects in each catchment. We used the Bouyoucos-hydrometer soil particle analysis to determine catchment soil texture. Stocks of organic carbon and nitrogen were measured from soil samples at four depths (0-10 cm, 10-30 cm, 30-60 cm, 60-100 cm) using C/N combustion analysis. In terms of nitrogen and organic carbon storage, we found soil nitrogen values in the top 10cm ranging from 41.963-214.365 gN/m2, and soil organic carbon values in the top 10cm ranging from 594.339-2375.326 gC/m2. The results of a multiple regression analysis show a positive relationship between catchment slope and both organic carbon and nitrogen stock size (nitrogen: y= 56.801 +47.053, R2=0.621; organic carbon: y= 683.200 + 499.290x, R2= 0.536). These data support our hypothesis that catchment slope is one of factors controlling carbon and nitrogen stock in desert playas. We also applied our model to the 69 other playas of the Jornada Basin and estimated stock sizes (0-10cm) between 415.07-447.97 Mg for total soil nitrogen and 4627.99-5043.51 Mg for soil organic

  5. Evaporites, surface roughness, and inundation in a playa dust source; implications of surface composition for erodibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollerud, H.; Fantle, M.

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of fundamental controls on dust emission is critical in order to predict and model geochemical fluxes in the Earth system. Crucial parameters for dust emission include surface properties such as roughness, strength, and composition, which affect the erodibility of surface sediments. Accordingly, knowledge of the processes that govern surface properties is vital for predicting geochemical dust fluxes. In this study, we examine the spatial distribution of mineralogy within a playa dust source (Black Rock Desert, NV, USA) and its association with the spatial distribution of annual inundation, and employ a numerical model to assess the importance of transport by inundation for producing the distribution of mineralogy that we observe. Additionally, we experimentally investigate the effect of evaporite mineralogy on the development of surface roughness in a playa analog surface. We hypothesize that evaporite minerals in playa surface crusts reduce erodibility by contributing to sediment aggregation, promoting smoothing of the surface and a decrease in the availability of particles for saltation. Heterogeneity in surface mineralogy will then affect erodibility. Thus, it is useful to identify controls on the distribution of mineralogy (specifically evaporites) across a playa dust source. In particular, a connection between inundation and surface heterogeneity suggests that inundation could influence erodibility. Semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of surface sediments from the Black Rock Desert shows that evaporite content is variable; halite content varies from 0-40 wt%, and calcite from 2-15 wt%, with average sediment compositions of 30% quartz, 45% clay, and 10% plagioclase. Average calcite content is lower (7.6%) for sites within the inundated area of the previous year's playa lake (detected using MODIS satellite imagery; band 6, 1640 nm) than for sites outside this area (average calcite content 9.5%). Sites inundated the previous year are

  6. Using the WRF model to simulate the playa breeze over Dugway Proving Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spade, Daniela Maria

    The aim of this model and observation based study is to investigate the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model's (WRF-ARW, although WRF from hereout) ability to simulate the three-dimensional structure of playa breezes and drainage flows occurring in Dugway Proving Ground, Utah using sub-km nesting in addition to improved land use and terrain datasets (as compared to the default datasets provided with WRF), in addition to studying the diurnal cycle and interactions between the playa breeze and drainage flows. A playa breeze is a thermally forced air circulation system that develops near the edge of playas, which have properties distinct from the surrounding land cover, including a higher thermal conductivity, a higher albedo due to the presence of a thin salt crust at the surface, sparse vegetation cover relative to the surrounding land cover, and a higher latent heat flux. The combination of each of these characteristics produces a thermally direct circulation, with low-level flow away from the playa during the day and toward the playa at night, the result of a cooler playa during the day and a warmer playa at night. Five model runs were performed using the Noah land Surface model, each employing a four telescoping nest strategy. Each model run was given a different set of physical parameterizations, with some using GFS model output and others using NAM model output. The object behind utilizing five model runs was to isolate the impacts made by the differing model parameterization schemes used for each simulation. This was accomplished by comparing the model run output to in situ weather observations, provided courtesy of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observation Program (MATERHORN), an ongoing Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) sponsored by the Office of Naval Research with the University of Notre Dame acting as Project Lead. It was found that each of the five model simulations tended to produce a longer

  7. Ratosa playa lake in southern Spain. Karst pan or compound sink?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Miguel; Martos-Rosillo, Sergio; Pedrera, Antonio; Benavente-Herrera, José

    2015-04-01

    In Andalusia (Spain), there are more than 45 semiarid playa lakes protected as natural reserves and related to karstic outcrops. Some of them are located over regional karstic aquifers and have internal drainage networks with sporadic surface outlets, such as sinkholes (compound sinks), but the majority of such playas have no internal drainage systems, so the only water output is evaporation (karst pans). Karst pans are perched and disconnected from the groundwater system. The fact that the Ratosa playa lake is partially located over a karstic Sierra, as well as other hydromorphological observations, it is suggested that the system could be of a compound type, but a detailed hydrogeological analysis showed that the playa is disconnected from the aquifer, so it is in fact a karst pan. Once the hydrological functioning had been established, a monthly water balance for a 10-year period (1998-2008), enabled us to reproduce the evolution of the water level of the playa lake. Estimations of runoff were carried out by a soil water estimate for a water holding capacity in the soil of 191 mm. Results show a good correlation (>90%) after calibration with the time series of water level in the lake for the same period confirming geological observations. Our results highlight that this water body is extremely vulnerable to hydrological alterations of its watershed caused by human activities, particularly those related to land-use change for agriculture. For this reason, we propose a new protection zone, based on hydrological knowledge, instead of the present Peripheral Area of Protection. PMID:25810083

  8. Surface water hydrology and geomorphic characterization of a playa lake system: Implications for monitoring the effects of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Kenneth D.; Sada, Donald W.

    2014-03-01

    Playa lakes are sensitive recorders of subtle climatic perturbations because these ephemeral water bodies respond to the flux of diffuse and channelized flow from their watersheds as well as from direct precipitation. The Black Rock Playa in northwestern Nevada is one of the largest playas in North America and is noted for its extreme flatness, varying less than one meter across a surface area of 310 km2. Geo-referenced Landsat imagery was used to map surface-area fluctuations of ephemeral lakes on the playa from 1972 to 2013 to provide baseline data on surface water hydrology of this system to compare to future hydrologic conditions caused by climate change. The area measurements were transformed into depth and volumetric estimates using results of detailed topographic global positioning system (GPS) surveys and correlated with available surface hydrological and meteorological monitoring data. Playa lakes reach their maximum size (<350 km2) in spring, fed by melting snows from high mountains on the periphery of the drainage basin, and usually desiccate by early- to mid-summer. The combination of a shallow groundwater table, sediment deposition, and hydro-aeolian planation probably are largely responsible for the flatness of the playa. When lakes do not form for a period of several years, the clay- and silt-rich playa surface transforms from one that is hard and durable into one that is soft and puffy, probably from upward capillary movement of water and resultant evaporation. Subsequent flooding restores the hard and durable surface. The near-global availability of Landsat imagery for the last 41 years should allow the documentation of baseline surface hydrologic characteristics for a large number of widely-distributed playa lake systems that can be used to assess the hydrologic effects of future climate changes.

  9. Sliding stones of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley, USA: The roles of rock thermal conductivity and fluctuating water levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, Gunther; Hooke, Roger LeB.; Ryan, Andrew; Fercana, George; McKinney, Emerald; Schwebler, Kristopher P.

    2013-08-01

    On occasion, Racetrack playa in Death Valley National Park becomes flooded and temperatures then drop appreciably below freezing. The thermal conductivity of rock is greater than that of water, so heat is conducted from a partially-submerged rock faster than from water. Consequently, a collar of thicker ice forms at the water surface, a layer of ice forms on more deeply-submerged parts of the rock, and playa sediment beneath the rock may even become frozen to it. While this occurs, only a surface layer of ice forms on water away from the rock. Once the ice becomes thick enough, perhaps only 5-10 mm, either the buoyancy of the ice or additions of water to the playa by rain, snow-melt, or groundwater seepage then reduce the normal force between the rock and the playa to the point where wind shear can move the ice sheet with its entrained rocks, making trails (Stanley, 1955; Reid et al., 1995). After the ice melts, rocks are left at the ends of the trails, sometimes atop a pedestal of silt. A renewed increase in water level on the playa before the ice melts may lift a rock completely free of the playa surface and whisk it away, leaving a rockless trail. During a movement event, changes in rock orientation or water depth may result in changes in width along the track. Rock speeds are likely tens to hundreds of millimeters per second.

  10. Sliding rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: first observation of rocks in motion.

    PubMed

    Norris, Richard D; Norris, James M; Lorenz, Ralph D; Ray, Jib; Jackson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The engraved trails of rocks on the nearly flat, dry mud surface of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park, have excited speculation about the movement mechanism since the 1940s. Rock movement has been variously attributed to high winds, liquid water, ice, or ice flotation, but has not been previously observed in action. We recorded the first direct scientific observation of rock movements using GPS-instrumented rocks and photography, in conjunction with a weather station and time-lapse cameras. The largest observed rock movement involved > 60 rocks on December 20, 2013 and some instrumented rocks moved up to 224 m between December 2013 and January 2014 in multiple move events. In contrast with previous hypotheses of powerful winds or thick ice floating rocks off the playa surface, the process of rock movement that we have observed occurs when the thin, 3 to 6 mm, "windowpane" ice sheet covering the playa pool begins to melt in late morning sun and breaks up under light winds of -4-5 m/s. Floating ice panels 10 s of meters in size push multiple rocks at low speeds of 2-5 m/min. along trajectories determined by the direction and velocity of the wind as well as that of the water flowing under the ice. PMID:25162535

  11. Filed-Analog Study: Efficiency of microbial fossilization in sulfate-rich playas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glamoclija, M.; Zeidan, M.; Potochniak, S.

    2015-12-01

    The samples with the highest priority for sample return will be samples that contain potential life signatures. Sulfate-rich salts have been identified as important component of Mars sedimentary deposits, illustrating the importance of near-surface hydrological processes during the planet's history. The presence of Noachian/early Hesperian sulfate-rich deposits have been identified by the MER's Opportunity at Meridiani Planum and by MRO mission in sedimentary sequences within Gale crater, the Mars Science Laboratory landing site. White Sands National Monument, which we are using as a terrestrial analog in our study, holds active playas that may contain different sizes of water bodies during the year. Alkali Flat contains also preserved deposits of Pleistocene Lake Otero. The presence of a range of modern playas and equivalent Pleistocene deposits allows for an excellent comparison of these different extreme transitional habitats and potential of preservation of organics in an evaporitic playa setting. We have performed shallow drilling (1m) of the Lake Lucero deposits and of Lake Otero evaporitic sequence. The XRD analysis revealed that samples are mainly composed of gypsum and minor mineral phases as brushite, halite and quartz. SEM/EDS revealed the presence of amorphous phases such as halite, glauberite, magnesium chlorite salt, and diatom shells and biofilm. Biofilm is found in near surface samples, which may be attributed to microbial adaptation to desert environment and considered as one of the characteristics of modern and not fossil microbial communities. The compositional difference of salt precipitates associated with potentially geologically old biofilm and the modern counterpart are still ongoing and our findings will be presented at the conference. Further, comparison of environmental physicochemical conditions and molecular biology will be used to determine the characteristics of modern microbial habitats/deposits and to attempt to distinguish them

  12. Investigating playa surface textures: The impact of chemistry and environment on surface morphology and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollerud, H. J.; Fantle, M. S.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral dust is an important component of geochemical cycles, but its impact on those cycles is not thoroughly understood. For instance, dust inputs to the ocean have been suggested to affect the iron cycle by stimulating natural iron fertilization, which then could modify climate. The influence of dust on geochemical cycles is determined by the chemical and mineralogical composition of dust inputs, which is governed in turn by the composition of dust source regions. A loose, unconsolidated surface texture is more easily ablated by wind, and so a location where composition and environmental characteristics encourage this type of surface is more likely to produce dust and influence geochemical cycles. Also, if evaporation concentrates evaporites such as calcite at the surface of a dust producing region, dust Ca concentrations are likely to be higher. Playas can be regionally significant dust source regions, and they are amenable to study as their surface textures often vary significantly across small areas. This study investigates surface processes experimentally, and compares the results to observations of surface texture in a natural playa system (the Black Rock Desert, Nevada). We dry surfaces with 25% to 75% clay and quartz at 40°C for approximately a day, wet the surface to simulate rain, and then repeat the cycle multiple times. We estimate surface roughness, measure surface strength with a penetrometer, and investigate thermal characteristics with an IR camera (wavelength range 8-12μm). We find that textures similar to those in playas can be reproduced with cycles of wetting and drying, such as might occur in an arid environment with intermittent rain. We investigate the addition of calcite and halite, since their precipitation potentially can disrupt the clay surfaces through the formation and expansion of crystals, thereby linking the chemical composition with the disruption of a strong surface texture and an increased chance of dust production. In the

  13. Effects of landuse and precipitation on pesticides and water quality in playa lakes of the southern high plains.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Todd A; Salice, Christopher J; Erickson, Richard A; McMurry, Scott T; Cox, Stephen B; Smith, Loren M

    2013-06-01

    The 25000 playa wetlands within the Southern High Plains (SHP) of the United States of America (USA) are the dominant hydrogeomorphic feature in the region, providing habitat for numerous plants and wildlife. The SHP are among the most intensively cultivated regions; there are concerns over the degradation and/or loss of playa wetland habitat. We examined water quality in playa wetlands surrounded by both grassland and agriculture and measured water concentrations of pesticides used on cotton (acephate, trifluralin, malathion, pendimethalin, tribufos, bifenthrin, λ-cyhalothrin, acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam), the dominant crop in the SHP. Pesticides used on cotton were detected in water samples collected from all playas. Precipitation events and the amount of cultivation were related to pesticide concentrations in sediment and water. Our results show that pesticide concentrations were related in some circumstances to time, precipitation, and tilled-index for some but not all pesticides. We further compared measured pesticide concentrations in playas to toxicity benchmarks used by the US EPA in pesticide ecological risk assessments to obtain some insight into the potential for ecological effects. For all pesticides in water, the maximum measured concentrations exceeded at least one toxicity benchmark, while median concentrations did not exceed any benchmarks. This analysis indicates that there is a potential for adverse effects of pesticides to aquatic organisms. PMID:23541358

  14. A new species of Pontonema (Oncholaimidae, Nematoda) and a redescription of Pontonema incisum Wieser, 1953 from Santa Cruz and Chubut Provinces, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Villares, Gabriela; Russo, Virginia Lo; Pastor, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Pontonema golfonuevensis sp. nov. from Chubut Province, Argentina is described and a description of the male of Pontonema incisum Wieser, 1953 from Chubut and Santa Cruz Provinces is provided. Pontonema golfonuevensis sp. nov. is characterized by having the slender sub-ventral teeth 25 µm long located at 24 % of stoma length, a short, broad dorsal tooth at 60 % of stoma length, excretory pore opening at level of base of the buccal cavity, and by having a ventral precloacal sensory field with four papillae and a glandular sub-ventral area with seven papilliform sensillae. The male of P. incisum has long slender sub-ventral teeth at 36 % of stoma length, a short broad dorsal tooth at 72 % of stoma length, excretory pore about two buccal cavity lengths from the anterior end, and a ventral precloacal sensory field without papillae and a glandular sub-ventral area with twelve to fourteen papilliform sensillae. A key for identification of males of Pontonema is presented. PMID:26701536

  15. Dust emissions from undisturbed and disturbed, crusted playa surfaces: Cattle trampling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddock, Matthew C.; Zobeck, Ted M.; Van Pelt, R. Scott; Fredrickson, Ed L.

    2011-06-01

    Dry playa lake beds can be significant sources of fine dust emission. This study used a portable field wind tunnel to quantify the PM 10 emissions from a bare, fine-textured playa surface located in the far northern Chihuahua Desert. The natural, undisturbed crust and its subjection to two levels of animal disturbance (one and ten cow passes) were tested. The wind tunnel generated dust emissions under controlled conditions for firstly an initial blow-off of the surface, followed by two longer runs with sand added to the flow as an abrader material. Dust was measured using a GRIMM particle monitor. For the study playa, no significant differences in PM 10 concentration and emission flux were found between the untrampled surface and following a single animal pass. This was the case for both the initial blow-offs and tests on plots under a steady abrader rate. Significantly higher dust loading was only associated with the effect of 10 animal passes. In the blow-offs, the higher PM 10 yield after 10 passes reflected the greater availability of easily entrainable fine particles. Under abrasion, the effect of the heaviest trampling increased the emission flux by a third and abrasion efficiency by around 50% more than values on the untrampled surface. This enhanced abrasion efficiency persisted for a 30 min period under abrasion before the positive effect of the disturbance was no longer evident. The findings highlight the role of a threshold of disturbance that determines if supply-limited surfaces will exhibit enhanced wind erosion or not after undergoing perturbation.

  16. The impact of climate and composition on playa surface roughness: Investigation of atmospheric mineral dust emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollerud, H. J.; Fantle, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust has a wide range of impacts, including the transport of elements in geochemical cycles, health hazards from small particles, and climate forcing via the reflection of sunlight from dust particles. In particular, the mineral dust component of climate forcing is one of the most uncertain elements in the IPCC climate forcing summary. Mineral dust is also an important component of geochemical cycles. For instance, dust inputs to the ocean potentially affect the iron cycle by stimulating natural iron fertilization, which could then modify climate via the biological pump. Also dust can transport nutrients over long distances and fertilize nutrient-poor regions, such as island ecosystems or the Amazon rain forest. However, there are still many uncertainties in quantifying dust emissions from source regions. One factor that influences dust emission is surface roughness and texture, since a weak, unconsolidated surface texture is more easily ablated by wind than a strong, hard crust. We are investigating the impact of processes such as precipitation, groundwater evaporation, and wind on surface roughness in a playa dust source region. We find that water has a significant influence on surface roughness. We utilize ESA's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) instrument to measure roughness in the playa. A map of roughness indicates where the playa surface is smooth (on the scale of centimeters) and potentially very strong, and where it is rough and might be more sensitive to disturbance. We have analyzed approximately 40 ASAR observations of the Black Rock Desert from 2007-2011. In general, the playa is smoother and more variable over time relative to nearby areas. There is also considerable variation within the playa. While the playa roughness maps changed significantly between summers and between observations during the winters, over the course of each summer, the playa surface maintained essentially the same roughness pattern. This suggests that

  17. Briny lakes on early Mars? Terrestrial intracrater playas and Martian candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, salt-rich aqueous solutions have been invoked in the preterrestrial alteration of the Nakhla and Lafayette SNC meteorites. The findings substantiate the long-standing suspicion that salts are abundant on Mars and, more importantly, that brines have played a significant role in Martian hydrogeological history. Adding to the growing body of evidence, I report here on the identification of several unusual intracrater high-albedo features in the ancient cratered highlands of Mars, which I interpret as possible saline playas, or salt pans.

  18. Aeolian responses to climate variability during the past century on Mesquite Lake Playa, Mojave Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, J. W.; Breit, G. N.; Buckingham, S. E.; Reynolds, R. L.; Bogle, R. C.; Luo, L.; Goldstein, H. L.; Vogel, J. M.

    2015-02-01

    The erosion and deposition of sediments by wind from 1901 to 2013 have created large changes in surface features of Mesquite Lake playa in the Mojave Desert. The decadal scale recurrence of sand-sheet development, migration, and merging with older dunes appears related to decadal climatic changes of drought and wetness as recorded in the precipitation history of the Mojave Desert, complemented by modeled soil-moisture index values. Historical aerial photographs, repeat land photographs, and satellite images document the presence and northward migration of a mid-20th century sand sheet that formed during a severe regional drought that coincided with a multi-decadal cool phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The sand sheet slowly eroded during the wetter conditions of the subsequent PDO warm phase (1977-1998) due to a lack of added sediment. Sand cohesion gradually increased in the sand sheet by seasonal additions of salt and clay and by re-precipitation of gypsum, which resulted in the wind-carving of yardangs in the receding sand sheet. Smaller yardangs were aerodynamically shaped from coppice dunes with salt-clay crusts, and larger yardangs were carved along the walls and floor of trough blowouts. Evidence of a 19th century cycle of sand-sheet formation and erosion is indicated by remnants of yardangs, photographed in 1901 and 1916, that were found buried in the mid-20th century sand sheet. Three years of erosion measurements on the playa, yardangs, and sand sheets document relatively rapid wind erosion. The playa has lowered 20 to 40 cm since the mid-20th century and a shallow deflation basin has developed since 1999. Annually, 5-10 cm of surface sediment was removed from yardang flanks by a combination of wind abrasion, deflation, and mass movement. The most effective erosional processes are wind stripping of thin crusts that form on the yardang surfaces after rain events and the slumping of sediment blocks from yardang flanks. These wind

  19. Dust Emissions from Undisturbed and Disturbed, Crusted Playa Surfaces: Cattle Trampling Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobeck, T. M.; Baddock, M. C.; van Pelt, R.; Fredrickson, E. L.

    2009-12-01

    Dry playa lake beds can be a significant source of fine dust emissions during high wind events in arid and semiarid landscapes. The physical and chemical properties of the playa surface control the amount and properties of the dust emitted. In this study, we use a field wind tunnel to quantify the dust emissions from a bare, fine-textured playa surface located in the Chihuahua Desert at the Jornada Experimental Range, near Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA. We tested natural, undisturbed crusted surfaces and surfaces that had been subjected to two levels of domestic animal disturbance. The animal disturbance was provided by trampling produced from one and ten passes along the length of the wind tunnel by a 630 kg Angus-Hereford cross cow. The trampling broke the durable crust and created loose erodible material. Each treatment (natural crust, one pass, and ten passes) was replicated three times. A push-type wind tunnel with a 6 m long, 0.5 m wide, and 1 m high test section was used to generate dust emissions under controlled conditions. Clean medium sand was dropped onto the playa surface to act as an abrader material. The tunnel wind speed was equivalent to 15 m/s at a height of 2 m over a smooth soil surface. The tunnel was initially run for ten minutes, with no abrader added. A second 30 minute run was subsequently sampled as abrader was added to the wind stream. Dust and saltating material were collected using an isokinetic slot sampler at the end of the tunnel. Total airborne dust was collected on two 25 cm x 20 cm glass fiber filters (GFF) and measured using a GRIMM particle monitor every 6 sec throughout each test run. Disturbance by trampling generated increased saltating material and airborne dust. The amount of saltating material measured during the initial (no abrader added) run was approximately 70% greater and 5.8 times the amount of saltating material measured on the one pass and ten pass plots, respectively, compared with that observed on the undisturbed

  20. The application of remote sensing technology to the inventory of playa lakes in the High Plains of Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, A. W.; Ellis, M. L.; Bell, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using LANDSAT digital data to inventory the playa lakes of the High Plains region of Texas was investigated. The project will use the detection and mapping (DAM) package developed at NASA-Johnson Space Center. The economy of the High Plains region is dependent on ground water for irrigation and the Ogallala aquifer is being depleted faster than it is being recharged. The playa lakes represent a potential source of artificial recharge for the aquifer and an inventory is the first step in that direction.

  1. Trail formation by ice-shoved "sailing stones" observed at Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Norris, J. M.; Jackson, B. K.; Norris, R. D.; Chadbourne, J. W.; Ray, J.

    2014-08-01

    Trails in the usually-hard mud of Racetrack Playa in Death Valley National Park attest to the seemingly-improbable movement of massive rocks on an exceptionally flat surface. The movement of these rocks, previously described as "sliding stones", "playa scrapers", "sailing stones" etc., has been the subject of speculation for almost a century but is an exceptionally rare phenomenon and until now has not been directly observed. Here we report documentation of multiple rock movement and trail formation events in the winter of 2013-2014 by in situ observation, video, timelapse cameras, a dedicated meteorological station and GPS tracking of instrumented rocks. Movement involved dozens of rocks, forming fresh trails typically of 10s of meters length at speeds of ~5 cm s-1 and were caused by wind stress on a transient thin layer of floating ice. Fracture and local thinning of the ice decouples some rocks from the ice movement, such that only a subset of rocks move in a given event.

  2. Numerical investigation of coupled density-driven flow and hydrogeochemical processes below playas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Enrico; Post, Vincent; Kohfahl, Claus; Prommer, Henning; Simmons, Craig T.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical modeling approaches with varying complexity were explored to investigate coupled groundwater flow and geochemical processes in saline basins. Long-term model simulations of a playa system gain insights into the complex feedback mechanisms between density-driven flow and the spatiotemporal patterns of precipitating evaporites and evolving brines. Using a reactive multicomponent transport model approach, the simulations reproduced, for the first time in a numerical study, the evaporite precipitation sequences frequently observed in saline basins ("bull's eyes"). Playa-specific flow, evapoconcentration, and chemical divides were found to be the primary controls for the location of evaporites formed, and the resulting brine chemistry. Comparative simulations with the computationally far less demanding surrogate single-species transport models showed that these were still able to replicate the major flow patterns obtained by the more complex reactive transport simulations. However, the simulated degree of salinization was clearly lower than in reactive multicomponent transport simulations. For example, in the late stages of the simulations, when the brine becomes halite-saturated, the nonreactive simulation overestimated the solute mass by almost 20%. The simulations highlight the importance of the consideration of reactive transport processes for understanding and quantifying geochemical patterns, concentrations of individual dissolved solutes, and evaporite evolution.

  3. Strontium isotope geochemistry of soil and playa deposits near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.D.; Mahan, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    The isotopic composition of strontium contained in the carbonate fractions of soils provides an excellent tracer which can be used to test models for their origin. This paper reports data on surface coatings and cements, eolian sediments, playas and alluvial fan soils which help to constrain a model for formation of the extensive calcretes and fault infilling in the Yucca Mountain region. The playas contain carbonate with a wide range of strontium compositions; further work will be required to fully understand their possible contributions to the pedogenic carbonate system. Soils from an alluvial fan to the west of Yucca Mountain show that only small amounts of strontium are derived from weathering of silicate detritus. However, calcretes from a fan draining a carbonate terrane have strontium compositions dominated locally by the limestone strontium component. Although much evidence points to an eolian source for at least some of the strontium in the pedogenic carbonates near Yucca Mountain, an additional component or past variation of strontium composition in the eolian source is required to model the pedogenic carbonate system.

  4. Playa Soil Moisture and Evaporation Dynamics During the MATERHORN Field Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Chaoxun; Nadeau, Daniel F.; Jensen, Derek D.; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Pardyjak, Eric R.

    2016-06-01

    We present an analysis of field data collected over a desert playa in western Utah, USA in May 2013, the most synoptically active month of the year, as part of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) program. The results show that decreasing surface albedo, decreasing Bowen ratio and increasing net radiation with increasing soil moisture sustained a powerful positive feedback mechanism promoting large evaporation rates immediately following rain events. Additionally, it was found that, while nocturnal evaporation was negligible during dry periods, it was quite significant (up to 30 % of the daily cumulative flux) during nights following rain events. Our results further show that the highest spatial variability in surface soil moisture is found under dry conditions. Finally, we report strong spatial heterogeneities in evaporation rates following a rain event. The cumulative evaporation for the different sampling sites over a five-day period varied from ≈ 0.1 to ≈ 6.6 mm. Overall, this study allows us to better understand the mechanisms underlying soil moisture dynamics of desert playas as well as evaporation following occasional rain events.

  5. Multi-temporal water extent analysis of a hypersaline playa lake using Landsat Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Ecenur; Kamil Yilmaz, Koray; Lutfi Suzen, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    Distinguishing inland water bodies from satellite imagery has always been one of the main practices of remote sensing. In some cases this differentiation can directly be obtained by visual interpretation. However, in case of hyper-saline playa lakes, presence of high albedo salt crust in the lake bed hampers visual interpretation and requires further attention. Lake Tuz is a hypersaline playa lake which is ranked as the second largest lake in Turkey. Spatio-temporal changes in lake water extent are important both economically and hydrologically including salt production, lake water balance, drought and over-exploitation issues. This study investigates the spatiotemporal changes in Lake Tuz water extent during the last decade using single-band thresholding and multi-band indices extracted from the multi-temporal Landsat 5 TM and Landsat 7 ETM+ images. The applicability of different satellite-derived indices including Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), Modified NDWI (MNDWI), Automated Water Extraction Index (AWEI) and Tasseled Cap Wetness (TCw) were investigated for the extraction of lake water extent from Landsat imagery. Our analysis indicated that, overall, NDWI is superior to other tested indices in separating wet/dry pixels over the lake bottom covered with salt crust. Using a NDWI thresholding procedure, the annual and seasonal variation in the Lake Tuz water extent were determined and further linked to hydro-meteorological variables such as precipitation.

  6. Hydrology and surface morphology of the Bonneville Salt Flats and Pilot Valley Playa, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lines, Gregory C.

    1979-01-01

    The Bonneville Salt Flats and Pilot Valley are in the western part of the Great Salt Lake Desert in northwest Utah. The areas are separate, though similar, hydrologic basins, and both contain a salt crust. The Bonneville salt crust covered about 40 square miles in the fall of 1976, and the salt crust in Pilot Valley covered 7 square miles. Both areas lack any noticeable surface relief (in 1976, 1.3 feet on the Bonneville salt crust and 0.3 foot on the Pilot Valley salt crust). The salt crust on the Salt Flats has been used for many years for automobile racing, and brines from shallow lacustrine deposits have been used for the production of potash. In recent years, there has been an apparent conflict between these two major uses of the area as the salt crust has diminished in both thickness and extent. Much of the Bonneville Racetrack has become rougher, and there has also been an increase in the amount of sediment on the south end of the racetrack. The Pilot Valley salt crust and surrounding playa have been largely unused. Evaporite minerals on the Salt Flats and the Pilot Valley playa are concentrated in three zones: (1) a carbonate zone composed mainly of authigenic clay-size carbonate minerals, (2) a sulfate zone composed mainly of authigenic gypsum, and (3) a chloride zone composed of crystalline halite (the salt crust). Five major types of salt crust were recognized on the Salt Flats, but only one type was observed in Pilot Valley. Geomorphic differences in the salt crust are caused by differences in their hydrologic environments. The salt crusts are dynamic features that are subject to change because of climatic factors and man's activities. Ground water occurs in three distinct aquifers in much of the western Great Salt Lake Desert: (1) the basin-fill aquifer, which yields water from conglomerate in the lower part of the basin fill, (2) the alluvial-fan aquifer, which yields water from sand and gravel along the western margins of both playas, and (3) the

  7. A Tenebrionid beetle’s dataset (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae) from Peninsula Valdés (Chubut, Argentina)

    PubMed Central

    Cheli, Germán H.; Flores, Gustavo E.; Román, Nicolás Martínez; Podestá, Darío; Mazzanti, Renato; Miyashiro, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Natural Protected Area Peninsula Valdés, located in Northeastern Patagonia, is one of the largest conservation units of arid lands in Argentina. Although this area has been in the UNESCO World Heritage List since 1999, it has been continually exposed to sheep grazing and cattle farming for more than a century which have had a negative impact on the local environment. Our aim is to describe the first dataset of tenebrionid beetle species living in Peninsula Valdés and their relationship to sheep grazing. The dataset contains 118 records on 11 species and 198 adult individuals collected. Beetles were collected using pitfall traps in the two major environmental units of Peninsula Valdés, taking into account grazing intensities over a three year time frame from 2005–2007. The Data quality was enhanced following the best practices suggested in the literature during the digitalization and geo-referencing processes. Moreover, identification of specimens and current accurate spelling of scientific names were reviewed. Finally, post-validation processes using DarwinTest software were applied. Specimens have been deposited at Entomological Collection of the Centro Nacional Patagónico (CENPAT-CONICET). The dataset is part of the database of this collection and has been published on the internet through GBIF Integrated Publishing Toolkit (IPT) (http://data.gbif.org/datasets/resource/14669/). Furthermore, it is the first dataset for tenebrionid beetles of arid Patagonia available in GBIF database, and it is the first one based on a previously designed and standardized sampling to assess the interaction between these beetles and grazing in the area. The main purposes of this dataset are to ensure accessibility to data associated with Tenebrionidae specimens from Peninsula Valdés (Chubut, Argentina), also to contribute to GBIF with primary data about Patagonian tenebrionids and finally, to promote the Entomological Collection of Centro Nacional Patag

  8. Sodium toxicity and pathology associated with exposure of waterfowl to hypersaline playa lakes of southeast New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Dubielzig, R.D.; Dein, F.J.; Baeten, L.A.; Moore, M.K.; Jehl, J.R., Jr.; Wesenberg, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    Cause of mortality was studied in waterfowl in hypersaline playa lakes of southeast New Mexico during spring and fall migration. Mortality was not common in wild ducks resting on the playas during good weather. However, when birds remained on the lakes for prolonged periods of time, such as during experimental trials and stormy weather, a heavy layer of salt precipitated on their feathers. Sodium toxicity was the cause of death for all experimental mallards housed on playa water and for 50% of the wild waterfowl found moribund or dead during the spring of 1995. Gross lesions included heavy salt precipitation on the feathers, ocular lens opacities, deeply congested brains, and dilated, thin-walled, fluid-filled cloacae. Microscopic lesions in the more severely affected birds included liquefaction of ocular lens cortex with lens fiber swelling and multifocal to diffuse ulcerative conjunctivitis with severe granulocytic inflammation, edema, and granulocytic vasculitis resulting in thrombosis. Inflammation similar to that seen in the conjunctiva occasionally involved the mucosa of the mouth, pharynx, nasal turbinates, cloaca, and bursa. Transcorneal movement of water in response to the hypersaline conditions on the playa lakes or direct contact with salt crystals could induce anterior segment dehydration of the aqueous humor and increased osmotic pressure on the lens, leading to cataract formation.

  9. Effects of land-use change and fungicide application on soil respiration in playa wetlands and adjacent uplands of the U.S. High Plains.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Dale W; Smith, Loren M; Belden, Jason B; McMurry, Scott T; Swain, Shella

    2015-05-01

    With the increased use of fungicides in cultivated regions such as the southern High Plains (SHP), U.S., unintentional runoff and drift as well as direct overspray during aerial application lead to environmental exposures that may influence soil microbial communities and related biogeochemical functioning. Our goal was to examine the effects of two popular fungicides Headline (pyraclostrobin) and Quilt (azoxystrobin/propiconazole) on respiration from soil microbial communities in playa wetlands embedded in cropland and native grassland and their adjacent watersheds. We monitored fungicide effects (at levels of 0, .1×, 1× and 10× the label rate) by measuring respiration from plant matter amended soils collected from 6 cropland and 6 grassland playas and uplands. In addition, differences in microbial community structure among land use types were determined by measuring ergosterol levels in cropland and native grassland playas and uplands. Native grassland playas and their associated watersheds had up to 43% higher soil respiration rates than cropland playas and watersheds, indicating higher soil microbial activity. Application of either fungicide had no effect on soil respiration at any concentration in either land use type or habitat type (playa/watershed). Native grassland playas and watersheds had 3 and 1.6 times higher ergosterol content than cropland playas and watersheds. The lack of soil respiration response to fungicide application does not necessarily suggest that fungicides used in this study do not affect non-target soil microbial communities due to potential compensation by other biota. Future studies should further elucidate existing microorganism communities in playas and their watersheds. PMID:25668281

  10. A hydrous Ca-bearing magnesium carbonate from playa lake sediments, Salines Lake, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Queralt, I.; Julia, R.; Plana, F.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Sediments of playa Lake Salines, SE, Spain, contain a carbonate mineral characterized by X-ray diffraction peaks very similar to, but systematically shifted from those of pure magnesite. Analyses (SEM, IR and Raman spectroscopy, DTA, TGA, and ICP) indicate the mineral is a hydrous Ca-bearing magnesium carbonate with the chemical formula (Mg0.92,Ca0.08)CO3??3H2O. Thermal characteristics of the mineral are similar to those of other known hydrated magnesium carbonates. X-ray and electron diffraction data suggests a monoclinic system (P21/n space group) with unit-cell parameters of a = 6.063(6), b = 10.668(5), and c = 6.014(4) A?? and ?? = 107.28??.

  11. Mapping playa evaporite minerals and associated sediments in Death Valley, California, with multispectral thermal infrared images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.; Hook, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Efflorescent salt crusts and associated sediments in Death Valley, California, were studied with remote-sensing data acquired by the NASA thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS). Nine spectral classes that represent a variety of surface materials were distinguished, including several classes that reflect important aspects of the playa groundwater chemistry and hydrology. Evaporite crusts containing abundant thenardite (sodium sulfate) were mapped along the northern and eastern margins of the Cottonball Basin, areas where the inflow waters are rich in sodium. Gypsum (calcium sulfate) crusts were more common in the Badwater Basin, particularly near springs associated with calcic groundwaters along the western basin margin. Evaporite-rich crusts generally marked areas where groundwater is periodically near the surface and thus able to replenish the crusts though capillary evaporation. Detrital silicate minerals were prevalent in other parts of the salt pan where shallow groundwater does not affect the surface composition. The surface features in Death Valley change in response to climatic variations on several different timescales. For example, salt crusts on low-lying mudflats form and redissolve during seasonal-to-interannual cycles of wetting and desiccation. In contrast, recent flooding and erosion of rough-salt surfaces in Death Valley probably reflect increased regional precipitation spanning several decades. Remote-sensing observations of playas can provide a means for monitoring changes in evaporite facies and for better understanding the associated climatic processes. At present, such studies are limited by the availability of suitable airborne scanner data. However, with the launch of the Earth Observing System (EOS) AM-1 Platform in 1998, multispectral visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared remote-sensing data will become globally available. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Temporal Dynamics of Sodic Playa Salt Crust Patterns: Implications for Aeolian Dust Emission Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, J. M.; King, J.; Bryant, R. G.; Wiggs, G.; Eckardt, F. D.; Thomas, D. S.; Washington, R.

    2013-12-01

    Salt pans (or playas) are common in arid environments and can be major sources of windblown mineral dust, but there are uncertainties associated with their dust emission potential. These landforms typically form crusts which modify both their erosivity and erodibility by limiting sediment availability, modifying surface and aerodynamic roughness and limiting evaporation rates and sediment production. Here we show the relationship between seasonal surface moisture change and crust pattern development based on both remote-sensing and field surface and atmospheric measurements. We use high resolution (sub-cm) terrestrial laser scanning (TLS; ground-based lidar) surveys over weekly, monthly and annual timescales to accurately characterise crustal ridge thrusting and collapse. This can be as much as 2 mm/day on fresh pan areas that have recently been reset by flooding. Over a two month period, this ridge growth can change aerodynamic roughness length values by 6.5 mm. At the same time, crack densities across the surface increase and this raises the availability of erodible fluffy, low density dust source sediment stored below the crust layer. Ridge spaces are defined in the early stages of crust development, as identified by Fourier Transform analysis, but wider wavelengths become more pronounced over time. We present a conceptual model accounting for the driving forces (subsurface, surface and atmospheric moisture) and feedbacks between these and surface shape that lead to crust pattern trajectories between highly emissive degraded surfaces and less emissive ridged or continuous crusts. These findings improve our understanding of temporal changes in dust availability and supply from playa source regions.

  13. Dust emission thresholds from sodic playas with varying geochemistry and environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, J. M.; McKenna Neuman, C.; O'Brien, P.

    2014-12-01

    Sodic playa surfaces can be major sources of dust emission but their erodibility depends on the surface salt crust characteristics. Here we determine dust emission thresholds in a wind tunnel for 22 different crusts with varying concentrations of sodium sulphate and sodium chloride. Crusts mimic those on Sua Pan, in the Makgadikgadi Basin, Botswana, which is one of the biggest dust hot spots in the Southern Hemisphere. Crusts were grown by encouraging capillary processes and subjected to several weeks of diurnal temperature variation to enable the development of hydrated and dehydrated salt crystals, along with low density, 'fluffy' sediment beneath the primary (and in some cases, secondary) crust. Spray on crusts and liquefied crusts were also developed for response comparison. Using laser scanning we tracked surface change and crystal growth, which we link to crust type and evaporation rates. We found that under pre-dawn and early morning Sua Pan conditions, crusts were typically non-emissive, but during mid-day temperature and humidity conditions typical of Sua Pan in August and September (dry and peak dust emission season), several crusts became friable and highly emissive above wind velocities of 7 m/s, which agrees with in-situ field observations. Thenardite capillary crusts were the most emissive, in contrast to supply limited, halite liquefied crusts which were relatively stable. Disturbances, or small crust fractures, common on polygonal surface patterns decreased the dust emission threshold values and enabled emission from more stable crusts. Our study confirms the potential of playa surfaces to emit dust without the presence of saltation, and highlights the sensitivity of emission thresholds to crust geochemistry, evaporation rates and temperature and humidity conditions.

  14. Mineralogical Composition and Potential Dust Source of Playas in the Western U.S. and Australia as Remotely Identified Through Imaging Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raming, L. W.; Farrand, W. H.; Bowen, B.

    2015-12-01

    Playas are significant dust sources and as a result are potentially hazardous to human health. The composition of the dust is a function of the mineralogical content of the playa and associated brines. Playas are found in arid climates globally, however they are challenging to map geologically as they are often hard to access, have subtle variations in mineralogy, and are topographically featureless. This study uses remote sensing in the form of imaging spectroscopy to map the mineralogical composition of five playas from different geologic settings: Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada, USA; Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah, USA; White Sands National Monument, New Mexico, USA; Lake Brown, Western Australia, Australia; and Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia.Multiple spectrometers were used for this study; these include the multispectral sensor ASTER, and the hyperspectral sensors AVIRIS, HICO, and HyMap. All scenes were processed in ENVI and corrected to at surface reflectance using FLAASH, QUAC or Empirical Line methods. Minerals were identified through a standard end-member extraction approach and mapped using multi-range spectral feature fitting and other methods. Additionally, remote data are combined with in-situ field-based spectra and sample-based laboratory spectra.Initial results suggest various and differing mineralogy between playas. The most abundant mineralogy includes clay minerals such as illite and montmorillonite and evaporites such as gypsum. Additionally there has been identification of Fe absorption bands in the visible / near infrared at White Sands National Monument, and Lake Brown and Lake Tyrell, suggesting the presence of iron bearing minerals. Further research will provide a more comprehensive list of minerals identified by absorption features as related to specific sensors. Collectively, these analyses will be used characterize overall patterns in playa surface mineralogy and to evaluate the parameters that influence playa dust source composition.

  15. Deflation and Meteorite Exposure on Playa Lakes in the Southwestern United States: Unpaired Meteorites at Lucerne Dry Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verish, Robert S.; Rubin, Alan E.; Moore, Carleton B.; Oriti, Ronald A.

    2000-01-01

    Numerous dry lakes (playas) dot the Mojave Desert in Southern California and adjacent desert regions in Nevada and Arizona. Most have been significantly affected by deflation processes aided by the lack of protective vegetation and occurrence of fine-grained sediments. Meteorites have been found on several playas including Lucerne Dry Lake,Rogers (formerly Muroc) Dry Lake, Rosamond Dry Lake, Roach Dry Lake, Alkali Dry Lake, and an unnamed dry lake near the town of Bonnie Claire in Nye County, Nevada. Unpaired meteorites have been found near one another on the same playa. Since 1963, 17 meteorite specimens (1.2-37.4 g), collectively called Lucerne Valley, have been found on Lucerne Dry Lake. Most appear to be completely covered with fusion crust, suggesting that their small size is due to fragmentation in the atmosphere and not to terrestrial weathering. The collection of meteorites on Lucerne Dry Lake is aided by the paucity of terrestrial rocks coarser than small pebbles; this is unusual for dry lakes in the region. Sixteen of the meteorite specimens from Lucerne Dy Lake were available for analysis.

  16. Visible and near-infrared (0.4-2.5 μm) reflectance spectra of playa evaporite minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, James K.

    1991-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared (VNIR; 0.4–2.4 μm) reflectance spectra were recorded for 35 saline minerals that represent the wide range of mineral and brine chemical compositions found in playa evaporite settings. The spectra show that many of the saline minerals exhibit diagnostic near-infrared absorption bands, chiefly attributable to vibrations of hydrogen-bonded structural water molecules. VNIR reflectance spectra can be used to detect minor hydrate phases present in mixtures dominated by anhydrous halite or thenardite, and therefore will be useful in combination with X ray diffraction data for characterizing natural saline mineral assemblages. In addition, VNIR reflectance spectra are sensitive to differences in sample hydration state and should facilitate in situ studies of minerals that occur as fragile, transitory dehydration products in natural salt crusts. The use of spectral reflectance measurements in playa studies should aid in mapping evaporite mineral distributions and may provide insight into the geochemical and hydrological controls on playa mineral and brine development.

  17. Temporal dynamics of salt crust patterns on a sodic playa: implications for aerodynamic roughness and dust emission potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, Joanna; Bryant, Robert; Wiggs, Giles; King, James; Thomas, David; Eckardt, Frank; Washington, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Salt pans (or playas) are common in arid environments and can be major sources of windblown mineral dust, but there are uncertainties associated with their dust emission potential. These landforms typically form crusts which modify both their erosivity and erodibility by limiting sediment availability, modifying surface and aerodynamic roughness and limiting evaporation rates and sediment production. Here we show the relationship between seasonal surface moisture change and crust pattern development on part of the Makgadikgadi Pans of Botswana (a Southern Hemisphere playa that emits significant dust), based on both remote-sensing and field surface and atmospheric measurements. We use high resolution (sub-cm) terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) surveys over weekly, monthly and annual timescales to accurately characterise crustal ridge thrusting and collapse. Ridge development can change surface topography as much as 30 mm/week on fresh pan areas that have recently been reset by flooding. The corresponding change aerodynamic roughness can be as much as 3 mm/week. At the same time, crack densities across the surface increase and this raises the availability of erodible fluffy, low density dust source sediment stored below the crust layer. We present a conceptual model accounting for the driving forces (subsurface, surface and atmospheric moisture) and feedbacks between these and surface shape that lead to crust pattern trajectories between highly emissive degraded surfaces and less emissive ridged or continuous crusts. These findings improve our understanding of temporal changes in dust availability and supply from playa source regions.

  18. Sedimentary facies and environmental ichnology of a ?Permian playa-lake complex in western Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, G.; Buatois, L.A.; Mangano, M.G.; Acenolaza, F.G.

    1998-01-01

    A moderately diverse arthropod icnofauna occurs in ?Permian ephemeral lacustrine deposits of the Paganzo Basin that crop out at Bordo Atravesado, Cuesta de Miranda, western Argentina. Sedimentary successions are interpreted as having accumulated in a playa-lake complex. Deposits include three sedimentary facies: (A) laminated siltstone and mudstone: (B) current-rippled cross-laminated very fine grained sandstone: and (C) climbing and wave-rippled cross-laminated fine-grained sandstone deposited by sheet floods under wave influence in the playa-lake complex. Analysis of facies sequences suggests that repeated vertical facies associations result from transgressive regressive episodes of variable time spans. The Bordo Atravesado ichnofauna includes Cruziana problematica, Diplocraterion isp., cf. Diplopadichnus biformis, Kouphichnium? isp., Merostomichnites aicunai, Mirandaichnium famatinense, Monomorphichnus lineatus, Palaeophyeus tubularis, Umfolozia sinuosa and Umfolozia ef. U. longula. The assemblage is largely dominated by arthropod trackways and represents an example of the Scoyenia ichnofacies. Trace fossils are mostly preserved as hypichnial ridges on the soles of facies C beds, being comparatively rare in facies A and B. Ichnofossil preservation was linked to rapid influx of sand via sheet floods entering into the lake. Four taphonomic variants (types 1-4) are recognized, each determined by substrate consistency and time averaging. Type 1 is recorded by the presence of low density assemblages consisting of poorly defined trackways, which suggests that arthropods crawled in soft, probably slightly subaqueous substrates. Type 2 is represented by low to moderate density suites that include sharply defined trackways commonly associated with mud cracks, suggesting that the tracemakers inhabited a firm, desiccated lacustrine substrate. Type 3 displays features of types 1 and 2 and represents palimpsestic bedding surfaces, resulting from the overprint of terrestrial

  19. Effects of agricultural tillage and sediment accumulation on emergent plant communities in playa wetlands of the U.S. High Plains.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Jessica L; Johnson, Lacrecia A; Daniel, Dale W; McMurry, Scott T; Smith, Loren M; Haukos, David A

    2013-05-15

    Identifying community assembly filters is a primary ecological aim. The High Plains, a 30 million ha short-grass eco-region, is intensely cultivated. Cultivation disturbance, including plowing and eroded soil deposition down-slope of plowing, influences plant composition in depressional wetlands, such as playas, within croplands. We evaluated influences of wetland cultivation and sediment deposition on plant composition in playas embedded within croplands (46 plowed and 32 unplowed) and native grasslands (79) across 6 High Plains' states. Sediment accumulation ranged from 7 to 78 cm in cropland and 1 to 35 cm in grassland playas. Deeper sediments and plowing each decreased wetland plant richness, 28% and 70% respectively in cropland wetlands. Sediment depth reduced richness 37% in small grasslands playas while it increased richness 22% in larger ones, suggesting moderate disturbance increased richness when there were nearby propagule sources. Sediment depth was unrelated to species richness in plowed wetlands, probably because plowing was a strong disturbance. Plowing removed perennial plants from vegetation communities. Sediment accumulation also influenced species composition in cropland playas, e.g., probability of Eleocharis atropurpurea increased with sediment depth, while probability of Panicum capillare decreased. In grassland playas, observed lighter sediment depths did not influence species composition after accounting for wetland area. Sediment accumulation and plowing shift wetland plant communities toward annual species and decrease habitat connectivity for wetland-dependent organisms in cropland playas over 39,000 and 23,400 ha respectively. Conservation practices lessening sediment accumulation include short-grass buffer strips surrounding wetlands. Further, wetland tillage, allowed under federal agricultural conservation programs, should be eliminated. PMID:23500104

  20. Eolian sand deposition during th Medieval Climatic Anomaly in Playa San Bartolo, Sonora, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, B.; Schaaf, P. E.; Murray, A.; Caballero, M.; Lozano Garcia, S.; Ramirez, A.

    2012-12-01

    Records of past climatic changes in desert environments are scarce due to the poor preservation of biological proxies. To overcome this lack we consider the paleoenvironmental significance and age of a lunette dune in the eastern rim of the Playa San Bartolo (PSB) in Sonoran Desert (Mexico). Rock magnetism, mineralogical, and geochemical analysis (major, trace and REE) allow assessment of sediment provenance and changes in the composition of the PSB dune over time. Thermoluminiscence and optical stimulated luminescence (TL and OSL) provide the chronology of lunette dune development. Dune sediments are composed by intercalated layers of sand beds and sandy silt strata. Variability in composition of dune sediments is attributed to changes in sediment sources. Mineralogical, geochemical and magnetic data show clear differences between the sand and the sandy silt of the PSB dune deposits, which suggest different sediment sources. Sand sized deposits, characterized by coarse magnetite grains, are mainly eroded from granitoids from nearby outcrops. Sandy silt deposits, rich in fine grained magnetite and evaporative minerals, resulted after the erosion of volcanic rocks and their soils from sierras at the NE of PSB during heavy rainfall episodes, the flooding of PSB and later deflation and accumulation in the dune of both detritic and authigenic components. The upper 6 m of dune accumulation occurred largely during AD 500 to 1200, a period that correlates with the Medieval climatic anomaly (AD 300 to 1300). These findings suggest that main dune accretion occurred during regionally extended drought conditions, disrupted by sporadic heavy rainfall.

  1. Vitellogenesis and changes in lipid and protein content of oocytes of Trophon geversianus (Neogastropoda: Muricidae) in Golfo San José (Chubut, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Barra, Paula; Giménez, Juliana; Knack de Almeida, Henrique; Arrighetti, Florencia

    2014-03-01

    The reproductive cycle of Trophon geversianus (Pallas 1774) population from Golfo San José (Chubut, Argentina, 42°33'S, 64°33'W) was studied using histochemical methods and digital image analysis. For such purpose, ovary samples were taken monthly between July 2006 and August 2007 and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Sudan black B (to identify lipids) or Schiff's ninhydrin (to identify proteins). Four different gametogenic stages were described: oogonias, previtellogenic oocytes, early vitellogenic oocytes, and late vitellogenic oocytes. Two spawning events were registered; one between September and October 2006, and a second one between February and March 2007. Oocyte quality was determined by the changes in lipid and protein composition during gametogenesis. Through digital image analysis, a lipid and a protein indexes (LI and PI) were calculated. Significant differences were observed in LI over month sampled, contrarily to what PI showed. A significant and positive correlation was found between lipid and protein content and oocytes areas, indicating that these nutrients accumulate during the entire vitellogenesis. Also, when dividing the oocytes into two size groups, analysis indicates a positive correlation between LI and oocyte area for smaller area oocytes. This demonstrates that while proteins accumulate linearly throughout vitellogenesis process, lipids accumulate in two steps: first at a growing rate, secondly at constant rate. This information is essential to determine the nutritional requirements of brood stock individuals at hatcheries in this potential fishery resource that inhabits patagonian waters.

  2. A spectral reflectance study (0.4-2.5 μm) of selected playa evaporite mineral deposits and related geochemical processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, James K.

    1990-01-01

    Playa evaporite mineral deposits show major compositional variations related to differences in lithology, hydrology, and groundwater geochemistry. The use of visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral reflectance measurements as a technique for investigating the mineralogy of playa efflorescent crusts is examined. Samples of efflorescent crust were collected from 4 playa: Bristol Dry Lake, Saline Valley, Teels Marsh, and Rhodes Marsh--all located in eastern California and western Nevada. Laboratory and field spectral analyses coupled with X-ray diffraction analyses of the crusts yielded the following observations: VNIR spectra of unweathered salt crusts can be used to infer the general chemistry of near-surface brines; VNIR spectra are very sensitive for detecting minor hydrate mineral phases contained in mixtures with anhydrous, spectrally featureless, minerals such as halite (NaCl) and thernardite (Na2So4); borate minerals exhibit particularly strong VNIR spectral features that permit small amounts of borate to be detected in efflorescent salt crusts; remote sensing spectral measurements of playa efflorescent crusts may have applications in global studies of playa brines and minerals.

  3. Final Scientific/ Technical Report. Playas Grid Reliability and Distributed Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Van; Weinkauf, Don; Khan, Mushtaq; Helgeson, Wes; Weedeward, Kevin; LeClerc, Corey; Fuierer, Paul

    2012-06-30

    found that the benefits of net metering (like savings on investments in infrastructure and on meeting state renewables requirements) outweigh the costs (like the lowered revenue to cover utility infrastructure costs). Many are eagerly awaiting a California Public Utilities Commission study due later this year, in the hopes that it will provide a relatively unbiased look at the issue. Meanwhile, some states continue to pursue virtual net metering policies. Under Colorado’s Solar Gardens Act, for example, utility customers can subscribe to power generated somewhere other than their own homes. The program allowed by that bill sold out in 30 minutes, evidence of the pent-up demand for this kind of arrangement. And California solar advocates are hoping for passage of a “shared renewables” bill in that state, which would provide for similar solar are significant in bringing solar power to the estimated 75% (likely a conservative number) of can’t put solar on our own roof. As great a resource as the sun is, when it comes to actually implementing solar or other renewables, technology advances, policy changes, bureaucratic practices, and increased energy consciousness will all have to happen to achieve a 30% by 2050 national goal. This project incorporated research activities focused on addressing each of these challenges. First, the project researchers evaluated several leading edge solar technologies by actually implementing these technologies at Playas, New Mexico, a remote town built in the 1970s by Phelps Dodge Mining Company for the company’s employees. This town was purchased by the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in 2005 and converted to a training and research center. Playas is an all-electric town served by a substation about seven miles away. The town is the last user on a 240 kV utility transmission line owned by the Columbus Electric Cooperative (CEC) making it easy to isolate for experiment purposes. The New Mexico Institute of Mining and

  4. The utilization of ERTS-1-generated photographs in the evaluation of the Iranian playas as potential locations for economic and engineering development. [water-borne sedimentation of playa lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krinsley, D. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. False-color composites made from ratioed and stretched transparencies, generated from CCT's of ERTS-1, have enhanced hydrologic and morphologic differences within the playa surficial sediments. A composite of ratios 4/6, 5/7,15/61 and 4/7 using blue, red, yellow, and green, respectively, was useful in separating wet, water, and dry areas in the salt crust and for delineating smooth and rough salt where relief was less than 20 cm.

  5. Modeling aluminum-silicon chemistries and application to Australian acidic playa lakes as analogues for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, G. M.; Crowley, J. K.; Thomson, B. J.; Kargel, J. S.; Bridges, N. T.; Hook, S. J.; Baldridge, A.; Brown, A. J.; Ribeiro da Luz, B.; de Souza Filho, C. R.

    2009-06-01

    Recent Mars missions have stimulated considerable thinking about the surficial geochemical evolution of Mars. Among the major relevant findings are the presence in Meridiani Planum sediments of the mineral jarosite (a ferric sulfate salt) and related minerals that require formation from an acid-salt brine and oxidizing environment. Similar mineralogies have been observed in acidic saline lake sediments in Western Australia (WA), and these lakes have been proposed as analogues for acidic sedimentary environments on Mars. The prior version of the equilibrium chemical thermodynamic FREZCHEM model lacked Al and Si chemistries that are needed to appropriately model acidic aqueous geochemistries on Earth and Mars. The objectives of this work were to (1) add Al and Si chemistries to the FREZCHEM model, (2) extend these chemistries to low temperatures (<0 °C), if possible, and (3) use the reformulated model to investigate parallels in the mineral precipitation behavior of acidic Australian lakes and hypothetical Martian brines. FREZCHEM is an equilibrium chemical thermodynamic model parameterized for concentrated electrolyte solutions using the Pitzer approach for the temperature range from <-70 to 25 °C and the pressure range from 1 to 1000 bars. Aluminum chloride and sulfate mineral parameterizations were based on experimental data. Aluminum hydroxide and silicon mineral parameterizations were based on Gibbs free energy and enthalpy data. New aluminum and silicon parameterizations added 12 new aluminum/silicon minerals to this Na-K-Mg-Ca-Fe(II)-Fe(III)-Al-H-Cl-Br-SO 4-NO 3-OH-HCO 3-CO 3-CO 2-O 2-CH 4-Si-H 2O system that now contain 95 solid phases. There were similarities, differences, and uncertainties between Australian acidic, saline playa lakes and waters that likely led to the Burns formation salt accumulations on Mars. Both systems are similar in that they are dominated by (1) acidic, saline ground waters and sediments, (2) Ca and/or Mg sulfates, and (3) iron

  6. Modeling aluminum-silicon chemistries and application to Australian acidic playa lakes as analogues for Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, G.M.; Crowley, J.K.; Thomson, B.J.; Kargel, J.S.; Bridges, N.T.; Hook, S.J.; Baldridge, A.; Brown, A.J.; Ribeiro da Luz, B.; de Souza, Filho C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Mars missions have stimulated considerable thinking about the surficial geochemical evolution of Mars. Among the major relevant findings are the presence in Meridiani Planum sediments of the mineral jarosite (a ferric sulfate salt) and related minerals that require formation from an acid-salt brine and oxidizing environment. Similar mineralogies have been observed in acidic saline lake sediments in Western Australia (WA), and these lakes have been proposed as analogues for acidic sedimentary environments on Mars. The prior version of the equilibrium chemical thermodynamic FREZCHEM model lacked Al and Si chemistries that are needed to appropriately model acidic aqueous geochemistries on Earth and Mars. The objectives of this work were to (1) add Al and Si chemistries to the FREZCHEM model, (2) extend these chemistries to low temperatures (<0 ??C), if possible, and (3) use the reformulated model to investigate parallels in the mineral precipitation behavior of acidic Australian lakes and hypothetical Martian brines. FREZCHEM is an equilibrium chemical thermodynamic model parameterized for concentrated electrolyte solutions using the Pitzer approach for the temperature range from <-70 to 25 ??C and the pressure range from 1 to 1000 bars. Aluminum chloride and sulfate mineral parameterizations were based on experimental data. Aluminum hydroxide and silicon mineral parameterizations were based on Gibbs free energy and enthalpy data. New aluminum and silicon parameterizations added 12 new aluminum/silicon minerals to this Na-K-Mg-Ca-Fe(II)-Fe(III)-Al-H-Cl-Br-SO4-NO3-OH-HCO3-CO3-CO2-O2-CH4-Si-H2O system that now contain 95 solid phases. There were similarities, differences, and uncertainties between Australian acidic, saline playa lakes and waters that likely led to the Burns formation salt accumulations on Mars. Both systems are similar in that they are dominated by (1) acidic, saline ground waters and sediments, (2) Ca and/or Mg sulfates, and (3) iron

  7. Mapping Playa Evaporite Minerals, White Sands, New Mexico Using Landsat ETM+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrefat, H. A.; Goodell, P. C.

    2002-12-01

    Evaporite minerals are the main source of several industrial and agricultural minerals important to the U.S. and world economy. Landsat ETM+ data covering the White Sands, New Mexico have been used in this study. The White Sands Dune Field, Lake Lucero, and Alkali Flat have been chosen as target sites. The study aims to determine the number of evaporite mineral endmembers that can be detected and mapped using Landsat ETM+. Furthermore, the study also aims to determine the spatial distribution of fractional abundances of evaporite mineral endmembers assuming a linear mixing model. The Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) transform and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were employed to determine a reduced set of noise-free spectral bands. The Pixel Purity Index (PPI) and n-D Visualization (nDV) were conducted on the reduced set of spectral bands to identify spectrally pure evaporite mineral endmembers in the image. Mineral maps of the spatial distribution and relative abundance of evaporite minerals were performed using two different algorithms: Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) and Linear Spectral Unmixing (LSU). Four evaporite mineral endmembers have been identified using Spectral Angle Mapper. These minerals are gypsum, halite, calcite, and thenardite. The results of Linear Spectral Unmixing showed that the most common and abundant evaporite mineral in the White Sands is gypsum. The results of Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) and Linear Spectral Unmixing (LSU) are validated by collecting field samples from different locations within the White Sands. A good match has been determined between results of Landsat ETM+ data and field and laboratory work. Mapping of playa evaporite minerals is of potential importance for the goal of saline soil characterization, regional groundwater hydrology and quality, and mineral resource development.

  8. [Biology and fishery of the lobster Panulirus gracilis in Playa Lagarto, Guanacaste, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Madrigal, Helven Naranjo

    2011-06-01

    Panulirus gracilis is a high valuable lobster species with considerable captures along the tropical Pacific coast. In this study, I present some biological and fishery parameters described after a sample of 843 lobsters, landed in Playa Lagarto from November 2007 to October 2008. From landing records, a total of 74.9% of lobsters were below the minimum legal catch size (80 mm CL). Carapace lengths were in the range of 42.8 and 143.6 mm for males and 115 and 35.8 mm for females. The size structure showed a wide overlapping of population segments, and a trend to increase with depth, where lung diving and "hooka" diving operations take place. Sex ratio was 1.36 M:H. The relationship between weight and LC revealed that females are heavier than males of the same size, and this difference was significant (p < 0.05). The von Bertalanffy growth parameters for males and females respectively (K = 0.45-0.38, LC(infinity) = 166.9-121.7) showed accelerated growth compared to other species. Males observed a higher growth rate than females. Furthermore, natural mortality (M), total mortality (Z) and fishing mortality (F) was higher in males (0.49-2.34-1.92) than in females (0.47-1.82-1.42). Recruitment was continuous for both sexes during the year, with an elevated intensity of 18.5% in July. Under the current fishing regime the population could be at risk of collapse, as indicated by the high exploitation rate (E) 0.80 PMID:21721230

  9. Saline Playas on Qinghai-Tibet Plateau as Mars Analog for the Formation-Preservation of Hydrous Salts and Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Zheng, M.; Kong, F.; Sobron, P.; Mayer, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    Qinghai-Tibet (QT) Plateau has the highest average elevation on Earth (~ 4500 m, about 50-60% of atmospheric pressure at sea-level). The high elevation induces a tremendous diurnal (and seasonal) temperature swing caused by high level of solar irradiation during the day and low level of atmospheric insulation during the evening. In addition, the Himalaya mountain chain (average height >6100 m) in the south of the QT Plateau largely blocks the pathway of humid air from the Indian Ocean, and produces a Hyperarid region (Aridity Index, AI ~ 0.04), the Qaidam Basin (N32-35, E90-100) at the north edge of the QT Plateau. Climatically, the low P, T, large ΔT, high aridity, and high UV radiation all make the Qaidam basin to be one of the most similar places on Earth to Mars. Qaidam basin has the most ancient playas (up to Eocene) and the lakes with the highest salinity on QT Plateau. More importantly, Mg-sulfates appear in the evaporative salts within the most ancient playas (Da Langtang) at the northwest corner of Qaidam basin, which mark the final stage of the evaporation sequence of brines rich in K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, C, B, S, and Cl. The evaporation minerals in the saline playas of Qaidam basin, their alteration and preservation under hyperarid conditions can be an interesting analog for the study of Martian salts and salty regolith. We conducted a field investigation at Da Langtan playa in Qaidam basin, with combined remote sensing (ASTER on board of NASA’s Terra satellite, 1.656, 2.167, 2.209, 2.62, 2.336, 2.40 µm), in situ sensing of a portable NIR spectrometer (WIR, 1.25-2.5 µm continuous spectral range), and the laboratory analyses of collected samples from the field (ASD spectrometer, 0.4 -2.5 µm, and Laser Raman spectroscopy). The results indicate that the materials contributing the high albedo layers in playa deposits are carbonate-gypsum-bearing surface soils, salt-clay-bearing exhaumed Pleistocene deposits, dehydrated Na-sulfates, hydrous Mg

  10. Potential transport pathways of dust emanating from the playa of Ebinur Lake, Xinjiang, in arid northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yongxiao; Abuduwaili, Jilili; Ma, Long; Wu, Na; Liu, Dongwei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the HYSPLIT model, driven with reanalysis meteorological data from 1978 to 2013, was used to understand the potential transport characteristics of dust and salt dust emanating from the playa of Ebinur Lake in arid northwest China. Daily air parcel trajectories were computed forward for 8 days from an origin centered over Ebinur Lake at 100 m above ground level. Air parcel trajectory density plots were mapped for seven levels: 0-100 m agl., 100-500 m agl., 500-1000 m agl., 1000-1500 m agl., 1500-2000 m agl., 2000-3000 m agl., and 3000-5000 m agl. These show that potential dust transport pathways have clear seasonal differentiation. The potential transport distance of dust and salt dust is greatest in spring and summer. In autumn and winter, the potential transport of the high-density air trajectory is below 1000 m traveling a shorter distance. Potential dust transport pathways showed notifying directivity in different seasons and heights. Southeast in spring and summer, and north to northeast in autumn and winter are the two main potential transport channels of dust and salt dust. Accordingly, dust and salt dust from the playa of Ebinur Lake may influence the atmospheric processes and biogeochemical cycles of a vast region. The main area of influence of dust and salt dust is close to the source area, and will significantly accelerate the melting of snow and ice in the Tianshan Mountains. This highlights the urgent need to combine remote sensing, isotope and other methods to further research the transport characteristics of dust and salt dust from the playa of the Ebinur Lake.

  11. Subsidence beneath a playa basin on the Southern High Plains, U. S. A. Evidence from shallow seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, J.G. )

    1994-02-01

    Shallow seismic data from Sevenmile Basin, a large ephemeral lake (playa) basin in the Texas Panhandle, reveal that subsidence has been an important agent in basin formation. Sevenmile Basin is 5.5 x 3.6 km across and 14 m deep and contains 20 m of lacustrine and eolian sediments that interfinger with the Quaternary Blackwater Draw Formation. Seismic reflection and refraction data were collected from the unlithified and variably saturated clastic sequence beneath Seven-mile Basin to investigate the geological history and hydrogeological framework of playa basins, which recharge the regionally important Ogallala aquifer. Three-layer velocity models provide good solutions for reversed refraction data. Near-surface p-wave velocities (layer 1) range from 349 to 505 m/s, layer 2 velocities range from 806 to 851 m/s, and layer 3 velocities range from 2,037 to 2,161 m/s. Shallow test holes and drillers' logs suggest that layer 1 is composed of playa and upper Blackwater Draw Formation deposits, layer 2 consists of lower Blackwater Draw Formation and upper Ogallala Formation deposits, and layer 3 represents a competent and partly saturated zone near the top of the Ogallala aquifer. Reflection sections show a middle Ogallala reflector, a reflector at the top of Permian or Triassic bedrock, and internal bedrock reflectors that indicate a structural low beneath Sevenmile Basin. Increasing relief with age, from 14 m at the surface to 70 m on the middle Ogallala reflector to 110 m at the base of the Ogallala, is interpreted as evidence of subsidence of underlying Permian evaporite-bearing strata before or during Ogallala deposition. 29 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Mapping compositional and particle size variations across Silver Lake Playa: Relevance to analyses of Mars TIR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petroy, S. B.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Kahle, A. B.

    1991-01-01

    The high spectral and spatial resolution thermal infrared (TIR) data to be acquired from the upcoming Mars Observer-Thermal Emission Spectra (TES) mission will map the composition and texture of the Martian sediments. To prepare for these data, portions of two remote sensing experiments were conducted to test procedures for extracting surface property information from TIR data. Reported here is the continuing analysis of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data, field emission spectra, laboratory Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectra, and field observations with respect to the physical characteristics (composition, emissivity, etc.) of Silver Lake playa in southern California.

  13. Eolian sediments generated by anthropogenic disturbance of playas: human impacts on the geomorphic system and geomorphic impacts on the human system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Thomas E.

    1996-09-01

    In many of the Earth's arid and semiarid lands, saline lakes, playas, and similar landforms are disturbed as a result of human activity. Diversion and/or consumptive use of surface or groundwaters has created the effect of a climate change in numerous drainage basins, resulting in the desiccation of lakes and reactivation of eolian processes at many locations. Playas are natural sites for extensive eolian activity because of the deposition of clastic and chemical sediments in basins by surface water (via fluvial transport) and groundwater (via efflorescence). Wind erosion and deposition of playa sediments has had a major role in the development of landforms and sedimentary units in the present (lunette fields worldwide; Simpson Desert, Australia) and geological past, from the Triassic (Mercia Mudstone, England) to the Quaternary (Lahontan Basin and Cima Volcanic Field, USA). Anthropogenic disturbance or desiccation of playa systems has resulted in the eolian transport of sand (e.g. Lop Nor, China; Konya Basin, Turkey; Rajasthan, India; Kappakoola, Australia; several sites in West Africa) and/or dust (e.g. Aral Sea, Kazakhstan/Uzbekistan; Old Wives Lake, Canada; Kara Bogaz Gol, (ex-)USSR; Lake Texcoco, Mexico; Owens (dry) Lake, Mono Lake and other playas, USA). Typically, this is accomplished by abstraction of water and/or removal of vegetation from terminal lake basins. An extensive review of the literature documents many examples and/or potential examples of such phenomena in numerous nations. The reactivation of eolian processes from closed basins produces air pollution in the form of fugitive dust (naturally occurring compounds released into the atmosphere by human actions), and has significant environmental and economic impacts on human activities in the surrounding areas. Restoration or mitigation of degraded land on or surrounding playas has been accomplished at Lake Texcoco, Kara Bogaz Gol and the Konya Basin, and is being actively implemented at Mono Lake

  14. Building on previous OSL dating techniques for gypsum: a case study from Salt Basin playa, New Mexico and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, Shannon; Kay, John

    2012-01-01

    The long term stability and reliability of the luminescence signal for gypsum has not been well documented or systematically measured until just recently. A review of the current literature for luminescence dating of gypsum is compiled here along with original efforts at dating an intact and in-situ bed of selenite gypsum at Salt Basin Playa, New Mexico and Texas. This effort differs from other documented luminescence dating efforts because the gypsum is not powdery or redistributed from its original growth patterns within the playa basin but is instead of a crystalline form. Sixteen ages from eight cores were ultimately produced with seven of the ages coming from rare detrital quartz encased in or with the gypsum crystals while the remaining ages are from the crystalline gypsum. As far as can be ascertained, the quartz was measured separately from the gypsum and no contaminants were noted in any of the aliquots. Some basic and preliminary tests of signal stability were measured and found to be mitigated by lessening of pre-heat protocols. Ages ranged from 8 ka to 10 ka in the shallow cores and 16 ka to 22 ka in the deeper cores. These ages will be useful in determining rates of gypsum growth within a sequence of evaporates which, in turn, will help to better document historic rates of evaporation and thus estimate, with more precision, the corresponding annual evaporation rates.

  15. A new ranavirus isolated from Pseudacris clarkii tadpoles in playa wetlands in the southern High Plains, Texas.

    PubMed

    Torrence, Shannon M; Green, D Earl; Benson, Catherine J; Ip, Hon S; Smith, Loren M; McMurry, Scott T

    2010-06-01

    Mass die-offs of amphibian populations pose a challenging problem for conservation biologists. Ranaviruses often cause systemic infections in amphibians and, in North America, are especially virulent and lethal to larvae and metamorphs. In this paper we describe a novel ranavirus isolate as well as the first recorded occurrence of ranavirus in the southern High Plains of Texas and in associated populations of the spotted chorus frog Pseudacris clarkii. The breeding sites were playas, that is, wetlands that fill via isolated thunderstorms that can occur infrequently; thus, not every playa has water or breeding amphibians annually. We did not detect ranavirus in sympatric anurans, but other reports document ranaviruses in Pseudacris spp. elsewhere. The occurrence of multiple isolates of ranavirus in a number of Pseudacris species suggests that this genus of frogs is highly susceptible to ranaviruses and may experience exceptionally high mortality rates from infection. Thus, the virus may contribute to substantial seasonal population declines and low seasonal recruitment, with negative impacts on populations of breeding adults in successive years. PMID:20848879

  16. Geologic investigation of Playa Lakes, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada : data report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2004-12-01

    Subsurface geological investigations have been conducted at two large playa lakes at the Tonopah Test Range in central Nevada. These characterization activities were intended to provide basic stratigraphic-framework information regarding the lateral distribution of ''hard'' and ''soft'' sedimentary materials for use in defining suitable target regions for penetration testing. Both downhole geophysical measurements and macroscopic lithilogic descriptions were used as a surrogate for quantitative mechanical-strength properties, although some quantitative laboratory strength measurements were obtained as well. Both rotary (71) and core (19) holes on a systematic grid were drilled in the southern half of the Main Lake; drill hole spacings are 300 ft north-south and 500-ft east-west. The drilled region overlaps a previous cone-penetrometer survey that also addressed the distribution of hard and soft material. Holes were drilled to a depth of 40 ft and logged using both geologic examination and down-hole geophysical surveying. The data identify a large complex of very coarse-grained sediment (clasts up to 8 mm) with interbedded finer-grained sands, silts and clays, underlying a fairly uniform layer of silty clay 6 to 12 ft thick. Geophysical densities of the course-grained materials exceed 2.0 g/cm{sup 2}, and this petrophysical value appears to be a valid discriminator of hard vs. soft sediments in the subsurface. Thirty-four holes, including both core and rotary drilling, were drilled on a portion of the much larger Antelope Lake. A set of pre-drilling geophysical surveys, including time-domain electromagnetic methods, galvanic resistivity soundings, and terrain-conductivity surveying, was used to identify the gross distribution of conductive and resistive facies with respect to the present lake outline. Conductive areas were postulated to represent softer, clay-rich sediments with larger amounts of contained conductive ground water. Initial drilling, consisting of

  17. Microclimate of a desert playa: evaluation of annual radiation, energy, and water budgets components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Esmaiel

    2003-03-01

    We set up two automatic weather stations over a playa (the flat floor of an undrained desert basin that, at times, becomes a shallow lake), approximately 65 km east-west by 130 km north-south, located in Dugway (40° 08N, 113° 27W, 1124 m above mean sea level) in northwestern Utah, USA, in 1999. These stations measured the radiation budget components, namely: incoming Rsi and outgoing Rso solar or shortwave radiation, using two Kipp and Zonen pyranometers (one inverted), the incoming Rli (or atmospheric) and outgoing Rlo (or terrestrial) longwave radiation, using two Kipp and Zonen pyrgeometers (one inverted) during the year 2000. These sensors were ventilated throughout the year to prevent dew and frost formation. Summation of these components yields the net radiation Rn. We also measured the air temperatures and humidity at 1 and 2 m and the soil moisture and temperature (Campbell Sci., Inc., CSI) to evaluate the energy budget components (latent (LE), sensible (H), and the soil (Gsur) heat fluxes). The 10 m wind speed U10 and direction (R.M. Young wind monitor), precipitation (CSI), and the surface temperature (Radiation and Energy Balance Systems, REBS) were also measured during 2000. The measurements were taken every 2 s, averaged into 20 min, continuously, throughout the year 2000. The annual comparison of radiation budget components indicates that about 34% of the annual Rsi (6937.7 MJ m-2 year-1) was reflected back to the sky as Rso, with Rli and Rlo amounting to 9943.4 MJ m-2 year-1 and 12 789.7 MJ m-2 year-1 respectively. This yields about 1634.3 MJ m-2 year-1 as Rn, which is about 24% of the annual Rsi. Of the total 1634.3 MJ m-2 year-1 available energy, about 25% was used for the process of evaporation (LE) and 77% for heating the air (H). The annual heat contribution from the soil to the energy budget amounted to 2% during the experimental period. Our studies showed that the total annual measured precipitation amounted to 108.0 mm year-1 during the

  18. Geologic and paleoseismic study of the Lavic Lake fault at Lavic Lake Playa, Mojave Desert, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rymer, M.J.; Seitz, G.G.; Weaver, K.D.; Orgil, A.; Faneros, G.; Hamilton, J.C.; Goetz, C.

    2002-01-01

    Paleoseismic investigations of the Lavic Lake fault at Lavic Lake playa place constraints on the timing of a possible earlier earthquake along the 1999 Hector Mine rupture trace and reveal evidence of the timing of the penultimate earthquake on a strand of the Lavic Lake fault that did not rupture in 1999. Three of our four trenches, trenches A, B, and C, were excavated across the 1999 Hector Mine rupture; a fourth trench, D, was excavated across a vegetation lineament that had only minor slip at its southern end in 1999. Trenches A-C exposed strata that are broken only by the 1999 rupture; trench D exposed horizontal bedding that is locally warped and offset by faults. Stratigraphic evidence for the timing of an earlier earthquake along the 1999 rupture across Lavic Lake playa was not exposed. Thus, an earlier event, if there was one along that rupture trace, predates the lowest stratigraphic level exposed in our trenches. Radiocarbon dating of strata near the bottom of trenches constrains a possible earlier event to some time earlier than about 4950 B.C. Buried faults revealed in trench D are below a vegetation lineament at the ground surface. A depositional contact about 80 cm below the ground surface acts as the upward termination of fault breaks in trench D. Thus, this contact may be the event horizon for a surface-rupturing earthquake prior to 1999-the penultimate earthquake on the Lavic Lake fault. Radiocarbon ages of detrital charcoal samples from immediately below the event horizon indicate that the earthquake associated with the faulting occurred later than A.D. 260. An approximately 1300-year age difference between two samples at about the same stratigraphic level below the event horizon suggests the potential for a long residence time of detrital charcoal in the area. Coupled with a lack of bioturbation that could introduce young organic material into the stratigraphic section, the charcoal ages provide only a maximum bounding age; thus, the recognized

  19. The utilization of ERTS-1-generated photographs in the evaluation of the Iranian playas as potential locations for economic and engineering development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krinsley, D. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Seasonal monitoring of hydrologic conditions at three playa lakes provides a basis for constructing an annual water inventory for these lakes. Although the extreme variation in the extent of playa lakes must be considered, the principal periods of their fluctuations are generally constant. Playa lakes provide an important water source for arid region needs, and their water can be diverted and stored for use during the long, hot, and dry summer. At their 1973 maxima, approximately 400 million cu m and 794 million cu m of water were available at the lakes at Qom and Neriz playas, respectively. These lakes adjoin areas of moderately dense population that have severe annual water deficits. A preliminary road alignment across the Great Kavir in north-central Iran has been prepared from an analysis of ERTS-1 images of that area from September 2, 1972, through May 12, 1973, a total of 6 scenes. An all-weather road constructed along this alignment could reduce the distance between points north and south of the Great Kavir by as much as 700 km.

  20. Playa-lake basins on the Southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico: Part II. A hydrologic model and mass-balance arguments for their development.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, W.W.; Osterkamp, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrologic, geologic, geomorphic, and mass-balance data suggest that most of the approx. 30 000 playa lake basins on the Southern High Plains have developed by a combination of dissolution of caliche and piping of surface material into the unsaturated zone rather than by eolian processes as has generally been stated.-from Authors

  1. Unravelling aquifer-wetland interaction using CSAMT and gravity methods: the Mollina-Camorra aquifer and the Fuente de Piedra playa-lake, southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrera, A.; Martos-Rosillo, S.; Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, M.; Benavente, J.; Martín-Rodríguez, J. F.; Zúñiga-López, M. I.

    2016-06-01

    The hydrological regime of Fuente de Piedra playa-lake (Málaga, southern Spain) has been significantly affected by the intensive exploitation of groundwater in the area. The playa-lake is situated above clays, marls, and gypsum, and under unaltered conditions received surface-subsurface runoff within the watershed as well as groundwater discharge from two carbonate aquifers. We have analyzed the structure of the main one, the Mollina-Camorra carbonate aquifer, by combining controlled source audio magnetotellurics (CSAMT), gravity prospecting, and time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) soundings. This geophysical information, together with new structural and hydrogeological data, was gathered to develop a new conceptual hydrogeological model. This model allows the hydrological linkage of the carbonate aquifer with the playa-lake system to be established. Moreover, the intensive exploitation in the carbonate aquifer, even outside the watershed of the playa-lake, has affected the hydrological regime of the system. This multidisciplinary work demonstrates the potential of geophysical methods for understanding wetland-aquifer interaction, having important groundwater management implications.

  2. Exploring Variability in Acidic Saline Playa Lakes in WA with HyMAP Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldridge, A. M.; Hook, S. J.; Souza Filho, C. R.; Thomson, B. J.; Bridges, N. T.; Crowley, J. K.

    2009-12-01

    Acid saline lakes in Western Australia have been recognized as useful chemical terrestrial analogs for aqueous mineral formation on Mars [e.g., 1]. In these lake systems, large pH and salinity differences are observed both laterally and vertically over scales of a few tens of meters[2, 3]. The variability in these lakes have been offered as an alternate formation mechanism for some of the phyllosilicates and sulfates on Mars, suggesting that these different mineral types may be separated by chemical gradients rather than by temporal boundaries[4]. To assess the ability to detect this variability remotely and to determine the extent of the surface variability, which may not be easily accessible in the field, spectral mapping for two of the acidic saline playa lakes was performed. HyMAP airborne data were acquired in December, 2008, of Lake Gilmore and Lake Chandler in WA. The HyMAP sensors have 126 bands that cover the wavelength range between 0.45 and 2.5 µm. Hyvista Corporation provided atmospherically corrected surface reflectance data at approximately 3m spatial resolution. Using the methodology described by [5] the HyMAP data were analyzed using ENVI to identify spectrally pure endmembers that can be used to distinguish mineralogy in the scene. Relevant (e.g. not roads, water or vegetation) spectral endmembers derived for each scene were identified visually using spectra from the ASTER spectral library[6]. The processing techniques were applied to all flight lines and ultimately a classification map mosaic was produced for selection of relevant and intriguing field sampling sites. The classification maps will be validated using field spectroscopy and visual inspection of representative samples collected from the field sites in October 2009, and laboratory spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction will be performed for further validation. The classification maps confirm variability in mineralogy across the lakes, validating geochemical modeling. There are also some

  3. Comparison of flood hazard assessments on desert piedmonts and playas: A case study in Ivanpah Valley, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Colin R.; Buck, Brenda J.; Williams, Amanda J.; Morton, Janice L.; House, P. Kyle; Howell, Michael S.; Yonovitz, Maureen L.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate and realistic characterizations of flood hazards on desert piedmonts and playas are increasingly important given the rapid urbanization of arid regions. Flood behavior in arid fluvial systems differs greatly from that of the perennial rivers upon which most conventional flood hazard assessment methods are based. Additionally, hazard assessments may vary widely between studies or even contradict other maps. This study's chief objective was to compare and evaluate landscape interpretation and hazard assessment between types of maps depicting assessments of flood risk in Ivanpah Valley, NV, as a case study. As a secondary goal, we explain likely causes of discrepancy between data sets to ameliorate confusion for map users. Four maps, including three different flood hazard assessments of Ivanpah Valley, NV, were compared: (i) a regulatory map prepared by FEMA, (ii) a soil survey map prepared by NRCS, (iii) a surficial geologic map, and (iv) a flood hazard map derived from the surficial geologic map, both of which were prepared by NBMG. GIS comparisons revealed that only 3.4% (33.9 km 2) of Ivanpah Valley was found to lie within a FEMA floodplain, while the geologic flood hazard map indicated that ~ 44% of Ivanpah Valley runs some risk of flooding (Fig. 2D). Due to differences in mapping methodology and scale, NRCS data could not be quantitatively compared, and other comparisons were complicated by differences in flood hazard class criteria and terminology between maps. Owing to its scale and scope of attribute data, the surficial geologic map provides the most useful information on flood hazards for land-use planning. This research has implications for future soil geomorphic mapping and flood risk mitigation on desert piedmonts and playas. The Ivanpah Valley study area also includes the location of a planned new international airport, thus this study has immediate implications for urban development and land-use planning near Las Vegas, NV.

  4. Impact of Diagenesis on Biosignature Preservation Potential in Playa Lake Evaporites in Verde Formation, Arizona: Implications for Mars Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolyar, S.; Farmer, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Major priorities for Mars science include assessing the preservation potential and impact of diagenesis on biosignature preservation in aqueous sedimentary environments. We address these priorities with field and lab studies of playa evaporites of the Verde Formation (upper Pliocene) in Arizona. Evaporites studied include bottom-nucleated halite and displacive growth gypsum in magnesite-rich mudstone. These lithotypes are potential analogs for ancient lacustrine habitable environments on Mars. This study aimed to understand organic matter preservation potential under different diagenetic histories. Methods combined outcrop-scale field observations and lab analyses, including: (1) thin-section petrography to understand diagenetic processes and paragenesis; (2) X-ray powder diffraction to obtain bulk mineralogy; (3) Raman spectroscopy to identify and place phases (and kerogenous fossil remains) within a microtextural context; (4) Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analyses to estimate weight percentages of preserved organic carbon for each subfacies endmember; and (5) electron microprobe to create 2D kerogen maps semi-quantifying kerogen preservation in each subfacies. Results revealed complex diagenetic histories for each evaporite subfacies and pathways for organic matter preservation. Secondary gypsum grew displacively within primary playa lake mudstones during early diagenesis. Mudstones then experienced cementation by Mg-carbonates. Displacive-growth gypsum was sometimes dissolved, forming crystal molds. These molds were later either infilled by secondary sulfates or recrystallized to gypsum pseudomorphs with minor phases present (i.e., glauberite). These observations helped define taphonomic models for organic matter preservation in each subfacies. This work has the potential to inform in situ target identification, sampling strategies, and data interpretations for future Mars Sample Return missions (e.g., sample caching strategies for NASA's Mars 2020 mission).

  5. Late Holocene evolution of playa lakes in the central Ebro depression based on geophysical surveys and morpho-stratigraphic analysis of lacustrine terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, F.; Valero-Garcés, B.; Desir, G.; González-Sampériz, P.; Gutiérrez, M.; Linares, R.; Zarroca, M.; Moreno, A.; Guerrero, J.; Roqué, C.; Arnold, L. J.; Demuro, M.

    2013-08-01

    The origin and morpho-stratigraphic evolution of the largest playa-lake system (La Playa-El Pueyo) in the Bujaraloz-Sástago endorheic area, located in the semiarid central sector of the Ebro Depression, are analysed. The enclosed depressions are developed on gypsiferous Tertiary bedrock and show a prevalent WNW-ESE orientation parallel to the direction of the prevalent strong local wind (Cierzo). Yardangs have been carved in bedrock and unconsolidated terrace deposits in the leeward sector of the largest lake basins. A sequence of three lacustrine terrace levels has been identified by detailed geomorphological mapping. The treads of the upper, middle and lower terrace levels are situated at + 9 m, + 6 m and + 0.5 m above the playa-lake floors, respectively. Seismic refraction and electrical resistivity profiles acquired in La Playa reveal a thin basin fill (~ 2 m) with a planar base. These data allow ruling out the genetic hypothesis for the depressions involving the collapse of large bedrock cavities and support a mixed genesis of combined widespread dissolution and subsidence by groundwater discharge and eolian deflation during dry periods. The 5 m thick deposit of the middle terrace was investigated in hand-dug and backhoe trenches. Six AMS radiocarbon ages from this terrace indicate an aggradation phase between 3.9 ka and ca. 2 ka. These numerical ages yield a maximum average aggradation rate of 2.6 mm/yr and a minimum excavation rate by wind deflation of 3 mm/yr subsequent to the accumulation of the middle terrace. The latter figure compares well with those calculated in several arid regions of the world using yardangs carved in palaeolake deposits. The aggradation phase between 4 and 2 ka is coherent with other Iberian and Mediterranean records showing relatively more humid conditions after 4 ka, including the Iron Ages and the Iberian-Roman Period.

  6. Evaporite-mineral Dusts From a Dry Saline Playa in the Mojave Desert and Bioaccessibility of Their Trace Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, R. L.; Breit, G. N.; Goldstein, H.; Morman, S.; Reheis, M. C.; Yount, J. C.; Bogle, R.; Vogel, J.; Ballantine, J.; King, J.

    2008-12-01

    Evaporite-rich sediments commonly form on the surfaces of dust-emitting dry saline lakes, including wet playas, where the depth to the saturated zone is less than about 4 m. These sediments may contain high levels of toxic metals and metalloids, but many important aspects about these kinds of settings remain poorly known: Conditions that promote and suppress dust emission; chemical relations among ground water, salt- rich crusts, and salt-rich dust; bioaccessibility of metals and metalloids in dust; and controls of human activity and climatic variability on dust emission and on metal contents of dust. A dust-emitting area in the Mojave Desert provides a setting where these factors can be evaluated. The area encompasses Ash Meadows to the north where dilute waters (0.7 mS/cm) both discharge and evaporate and Franklin Lake playa (FLP) about 20 km south where saline ground water (90 mS/cm) evaporates. These features are linked by north-to-south flow of shallow ground water in a confined aquifer beneath Carson Slough that has intermediate salinity (1.5- 16 mS/cm). In ground water at FLP, maximum dissolved concentrations of arsenic (16 mg/L), molybdenum (12 mg/L), selenium (0.7 mg/L), tungsten (0.3 mg/L), and uranium (4 mg/L) are explained by evaporative concentration. Monitoring of dust emission from FLP between March 2005 and April 2008, mainly using digital cameras triggered automatically by wind speeds greater than 4.5 m/s, reveals that aridity suppressed dust emission, whereas wet periods promoted dust emission by generating loose accumulations of salt minerals or thin salt crusts that are vulnerable to wind erosion. Samples of dust taken by a portable wind tunnel and of salt crusts contain highly variable contents of toxic metals and metalloids that have high levels of bioaccessibility when leached in fluids that simulate human gastric, intestinal, and lung fluids, with respective pHs of 1.5, 5.5, and 7.4. The levels of bioaccessible toxic substances correspond

  7. Groundwater Modeling of Playa-Focused Recharge at the Southwestern Edge of the High Plains Aquifer in West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blainey, J.; Pickens, J. F.; grisak, G. E.; Holt, R. M.; Sigda, J.; Cook, S.; Hughes, E.

    2011-12-01

    Ongoing hydrogeologic investigations at a licensed low-level radioactive waste disposal site in Andrews County, Texas include monitoring of a groundwater system in Ogallala (Neogene), Antlers (Cretaceous), and Gatuna (Neogene/Quaternary) Formation sediments on the southwestern edge of the Southern High Plains physiographic province. The disposal site is underlain by unsaturated sands and gravels of these laterally contiguous sediments, informally termed the OAG. North of the site these sediments develop into the continuously saturated High Plains or Ogallala aquifer. Episodes of focused recharge to the OAG sediments have been observed during the last 9 years of groundwater level monitoring near small playas and topographic depressions that collect water after large precipitation events. During smaller precipitation events water is stored in the unsaturated zone and evapotranspired, predominately by mesquite, creosote and grasses. The climate is semi-arid with average evaporation rates far exceeding the estimated average annual precipitation of 15-16 inches/year. Monitoring at more than 250 wells in the OAG and environmental tracer studies confirm a conceptual model of playa-focused natural recharge to the groundwater system with little or no recharge occurring in inter-playa areas. The thickness of the OAG saturated sediments in the vicinity of the disposal sites ranges from 3 feet to 10 feet, with areas of discontinuous saturation away from areas of focused recharge. Environmental tracer studies show the groundwater in the OAG is poorly mixed and disconnected from regional groundwater flow further to the northeast. The disposal facilities are located over a structural high on the erosional surface of the Dockum Group, which immediately underlies the OAG sediments. This feature, referred to as the red bed ridge, is roughly coincident with the topographic divide between the High Plains and the Pecos Valley physiographic provinces and serves as a divide for

  8. A Br Isotopic Study of Australian Arid Playa Lakes and halophyte vegetation as a monitor of Br transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    Bromine possesses a chemistry broadly comparable to that of Cl and F, however its heavier mass and lower abundance results in slightly different behaviours in geochemical cycling. For example it is disproportionately enriched in sea water with respect to Cl. Br can be considered to be a "hydrophile" element, and hence its behaviour is in governed by that of water. It possesses two isotopes 79Br (50.686%) and 81Br (49.314%). This study has developed new chemical extraction, and most significantly, new mass spectrometric protocols for Br isotopes on silicates, evaporites and waters using N-TIMS methodologies. Existing CF-IRMS methodologies offer internal precision of ~0.3‰ (1SD, [1]), whereas N-TIMS measurements of laboratory HBr and seawater standards produce external reproducibility of <0.07‰ (1SD) over an 18 month period with internal precision typically <0.06‰ (1SD) on single analyses. This study presents the first high precision, N-TIMS isotopic data on playa lake evaporites, recording a >5‰ variation in solar system 81Br/79Br. Also presented is data from the analysis of the halophylic saltbush (sp Atriplex) adjacent to the lakes to constrain biological fractionation of Br isotopes. Variations of ~4‰ are observed between the lakes with a comparable shift for the leaves of the saltbush. [1] Shouaker-Stash et al., Anal. Chem, 77; p4027-4033, 2005.

  9. Specificity of the chemical and mineralogical composition of salts in solonchak playas and lakes of the Kulunda steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva (Verba), M. P.; Lopukhina, O. V.; Kalinina, N. V.

    2008-04-01

    The chemical composition of water in 44 lakes of the Kulunda steppe has been studied. It is shown that solute concentrations in different lakes vary from 1 to 390 g/l. Four chemical types of the water salinity—chloride, sulfate, chloride-sulfate with the presence of sodium bicarbonate, and sodic waters—are distinguished. The nature of the water alkalinity has been studied in 12 lakes. In the lakes with neutral chloride and sulfate salts, the total alkalinity does not exceed 16.56 meq/l. In the lakes with the presence of soda, it reaches 189 meq/l. In sodic waters, the total alkalinity varies from 600 to 1504.6 meq/l. In the latter case, the water alkalinity is conditioned by the presence of soda and borate salts. Salt minerals in the bottom sediments and in the salt crusts of solonchakous playas around the lakes are represented by halite, calcite, dolomite, and thenardite. In two salt crusts, the presence of soda and trona has been diagnosed.

  10. Changes in water level, land use, and hydrological budget in a semi-permanent playa lake, southwest Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, M; Green, A J; López, R; Martos-Rosillo, S

    2012-01-01

    Medina playa lake, a Ramsar site in western Andalusia, is a brackish lowland lake of 120 ha with an average depth of 1 m. Water flows into Medina from its 1,748-ha watershed, but the hydrology of the lake has not previously been studied. This paper describes the application of a water budget model on a monthly scale over a 6-year period, based on a conceptual hydrological model, and considers different future scenarios after calibration to improve the understanding of the lake's hydrological functioning. Climatic variables from a nearby weather station and observational data (water-level evolution) were used to develop the model. Comparison of measured and predicted values demonstrated that each model component provided a reasonable output with a realistic interaction among the components. The model was then used to explore the potential consequences of land-use changes. Irrigation of olive groves would significantly reduce both the hydroperiod (becoming dry 15% of the time) and the average depth of the lake (water level <0.5 m 40% of the time). On the other hand, removal of an artificial overflow would double the average flooded surface area during high-water periods. The simulated water balance demonstrates that the catchment outputs are dominated by lake evaporation and surface outflow from the lake system to a creek. Discrepancies between predicted and observed water levels identify key areas of uncertainty for future empirical research. The study provides an improved basis for future hydrological management of the catchment and demonstrates the wider utility of this methodology in simulating this kind of system. This methodology provides a realistic appraisal of potential land-use management practices on a catchment-wide scale and allows predictions of the consequences of climate change. PMID:21461983

  11. Analysis of polygonal cracking patterns in chloride-bearing terrains on Mars: Indicators of ancient playa settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Maarry, M. R.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-11-01

    ancient southern highlands on Mars (~3.5 Gyr old) contain > 600 regions that display spectral evidence in the infrared for the presence of chloride-bearing materials. Many of these locations were previously reported to display polygonal cracking patterns. We studied more than 80 of the chloride-bearing terrains using high-resolution (0.25-0.5 m/pixel) images, as well as near-infrared spectral data, to characterize the surface textures and the associated cracking patterns and mineralogies. Our study indicates that ~75% of the studied locations display polygonal cracks that resemble desiccation cracks, while some resemble salt expansion/thrust polygons. Furthermore, we detect, spectrally, the presence of smectites in association with ~30% of the studied fractured terrains. We note that smectites are a special class of swelling clay minerals that can induce formation of large desiccation cracks. As such, we suggest that the cracking patterns are indicative of the presence of smectite phyllosilicates even in the absence of spectral confirmation. Our results suggest that many chloride-bearing terrains have a lacustrine origin and a geologic setting similar to playas on Earth. Such locations would have contained ephemeral lakes that may have undergone repeated cycles of desiccation and recharging by a near-surface fluctuating water table in order to account for the salt-phyllosilicates associations. These results have notable implications for the ancient hydrology of Mars. We propose that the morphologies and sizes of the polygonal cracks can be used as paleoenvironmental, as well as lithological, indicators that could be helpful in planning future missions.

  12. Septic tanks as larval habitats for the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus in Playa-Playita, Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Burke, R; Barrera, R; Lewis, M; Kluchinsky, T; Claborn, D

    2010-06-01

    Adult Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Culicidae) were previously recovered from emergence traps on septic tanks in southeastern Puerto Rico. In this study we quantified immature mosquito abundance and its relationship with structural variables of the septic tanks and chemical properties of the water containing raw sewage. A miniaturized floating funnel trap was used to sample 89 septic tanks for larvae in the Puerto Rican community of Playa-Playita. Aedes aegypti larvae were recovered from 18% of the sampled tanks (10.3 larvae per septic tank per day). Larval presence was positively associated with cracking of the septic tank walls and uncovered access ports. Larval abundance was positively associated with cracking of the septic tank walls and larger tank surface areas, and inversely associated with the total dissolved solids (TDS). Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) larvae were also recovered from 74% of the septic tanks (129.6 larvae per septic tank per day). Larval presence was negatively associated with TDS in the water and larval abundance was positively associated with cracking of the septic tank walls. A screened, plastic emergence trap was used to sample 93 septic tanks within the community for Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus adults. Aedes aegypti adults were recovered from 49% of the sampled tanks (8.7 adults per septic tank per day) and Cx. quinquefasciatus adults were recovered from 97% of the sampled tanks (155.5 adults per septic tank per day). Aedes aegypti adult presence was positively associated with cracking, uncapped openings and septic water pH. The Ae. aegypti adult counts were positively associated with cracking and inversely associated with TDS and conductivity. This study marks the first published record of the recovery of Ae. aegypti larvae from holding tanks containing raw sewage in the Caribbean region. Our study indicates that Ae. aegypti larvae are present in sewage water and that septic tanks have at least the potential to maintain

  13. Diagenesis of Paleozoic playa-lake and ephemeral-stream deposits from the Pimenta Bueno Formation, Siluro-Devonian (?) of the Parecis Basin, central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, K.; Morad, S.; Al-Aasm, I. S.; De Ros, L. F.

    2011-07-01

    The Parecis Basin is a large intracratonic rift located in central Brazil and filled with Paleozoic carbonate, evaporite and siliciclastic sediments. The occurrence of gas seeps has recently attracted significant exploration interest by the Brazilian petroleum agency and by Petrobras. The continuously cored PB-01-RO well provided the first opportunity to study the depositional environments, diagenetic evolution and hydrocarbon potential of the largely unknown sedimentary successions of the Parecis Basin. The cored lithologies, belonging to the Siluro-Devonian (?) Pimenta Bueno Formation, are interpreted as deposited in playa-lake and ephemeral-stream environments. The deposits display a strong facies control on the diagenetic mineral assemblages and evolution. Diagenetic minerals in the ephemeral-stream deposits include eogenetic hematite and smectitic clay coats and quartz cement, and the mesogenetic process includes precipitation of sulfates (anhydrite and barite) and carbonates (calcite, dolomite and kutnahorite-ankerite-huntite), followed by partial dissolution of these carbonates and sulfates, and of feldspar grains. Telogenetic processes include the precipitation of hematite and kaolinite within secondary pores, and the replacement of anhydrite by gypsum. A second burial phase and mesodiagenesis is indicated by the precipitation of discrete K-feldspar crystals within moldic pores after dissolved feldspars, and by the illitization of etched, telogenetic kaolinite. The playa-lake deposits show early diagenetic dolomitization of lime mud, precipitation of anhydrite nodules and extensive silicification. The anhydrite nodules were replaced by gypsum and chalcedony during telodiagenesis. Potential source rocks are locally represented by organic shales. The fluvial sandstones show fair reservoir quality and limited compaction, as indicated by their intergranular volume, suggesting that the succession has undergone moderate burial. Potential seals for hydrocarbon

  14. Spatial and temporal variability in atmospheric CO2 and CH4 at Railroad Valley playa, a mid-latitude desert site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, E. L.; Schiro, K. A.; Sheffner, E. J.; Iraci, L. T.; Bebout, B.; Berthold, R.; Bruegge, C. J.; Bui, T.; DeMarines, J.; Detweiler, A. M.; Fladeland, M.; Kelley, C. A.; Kolyer, R.; Loewenstein, M.; McKay, C.; Tadic, J.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon dynamics of desert and semi arid ecosystems, which occupy 30% to 45% of the Earth's terrestrial surface, is poorly understood and understudied. However, these regions are of particular interest due to increasing desertification, as a result of climate and land-use change, and due to recent reports which indicate net CO2 uptake by deserts suggesting deserts may play a larger role in modulating atmospheric CO2 levels than previously thought. In an effort to address these issues we conducted a study at Railroad Valley playa, Nevada, USA during June 2011. The playa is a flat, dry lakebed with virtually no vegetation, approximately 15 km x 15 km in size, 1434 m in elevation and 110 km southwest of the nearest city (Ely, Nevada). Surface and airborne CO2 and CH4 observations were made from the playa and from the SIERRA Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) to assess temporal and spatial variability at the ground and low altitudes. Measurements of soil parameters (temperature and humidity) and determination of soil microbial activity by soil gas analysis (CH4 concentrations and isotopic content) and incubation of soil samples were also carried out. This study focuses on exploring the following questions: 1) What is the magnitude and temporal variability of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 in the surface boundary layer? 2) What is the spatial variability of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 within the boundary layer? 3) What is the relationship between the physical environment of the soil and atmospheric observations of CO2 and CH4?

  15. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California; with a section on estimating evapotranspiration using the energy-budget eddy-correlation technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czarnecki, John B.; Stannard, David I.

    1997-01-01

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the ground-water-flow system associated with Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site of a high-level nuclear-waste repository. By using the energy-budget eddy-correlation technique, measurements made between June 1983 and April 1984 to estimate evapotranspiration were found to range from 0.1 centimeter per day during winter months to about 0.3 centimeter per day during summer months; the annual average was 0.16 centimeter per day. These estimates were compared with evapotranspiration estimates calculated from six other methods.

  16. Simulation of the long term radiometric responses of the Terra MODIS and EO-1 ALI using Hyperion spectral responses over Railroad Valley Playa in Nevada (RVPN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Taeyoung; Xiong, Xiaoxiong J.; Angal, Amit; Chander, Gyanesh

    2010-10-01

    The Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) Hyperion instrument provides 220 spectral bands with wavelengths between 400 and 2500 nm at 30 m spatial resolution, which covers a 7.5 km by 100 km area on the ground. The EO-1 spacecraft has another multispectral sensor called the Advanced Land Imager (ALI), which has 10 spectral bands with wavelengths between 400 and 2350 nm at 30 m spatial resolution. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor onboard the Terra spacecraft was launched in Dec., 1999, and flies approximately 30 minutes behind EO-1. Nearsimultaneous observations from Terra MODIS, EO-1 ALI and Hyperion over a well characterized Railroad Valley Playa in Nevada (RVPN) target are chosen for this study. A uniform region of interest (ROI) within the playa within latitudes and longitudes of 38.48 and -115.71 to 38.53 and -115.66 was chosen for this analysis. A representation of the ground spectra during every near-simultaneous acquisition of MODIS and ALI is obtained using EO-1 Hyperion data. Using the EO-1 Hyperion derived top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance profile along with the ALI and MODIS relative spectral responses (RSR), simulated reflectance for the matching band pairs is calculated. The Hyperion simulated TOA reflectance results are compared to the measured TOA reflectance trends of ALI and MODIS. The long-term measured versus simulated reflectance results are used to examine the relationships and calibration differences between the ALI and MODIS sensors.

  17. The microbiological activity and toxicity of oil-polluted playa solonchaks and filled grounds within the Severnye Buzachi Oil Field (Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynybaeva, T. G.; Kostina, N. V.; Terekhov, A. M.; Kurakov, A. V.

    2008-10-01

    The number of colony-forming units of microorganisms, the viable biomass, and also the intensity of the microbiological processes (respiration, nitrogen fixation, denitrification, and cellulose decomposition) in playa solonchaks and sandy-loamy filled grounds in the territory of the Severnye Buzachi Oilfields (Kazakhstan) were much lower than in other soil types attesting to the limited capability of these substrates for selfpurification. Upon pollution by oil at concentrations of 100 600 mg/kg, the number of copiotrophic bacteria increased, whereas the actinomycetal and fungal populations were reduced and the biomass pool, the rates of CO2 emission, the potential nitrogen fixation, and denitrification became higher. The microbial communities of the playa solonchaks were weakly active and consumed few applied substrates. The biotesting with Artemia salina L. showed that some areas belonged to the lands of the 4th danger class, although the majority of the soil and substrate samples were not toxic. The germination of Lepidium sativum L. seeds was suppressed because of the salt toxicity, which is not related to the oil concentration (30 to 600 mg/kg).

  18. The application of remotely sensed data to pedologic and geomorphic mapping on alluvial fan and playa surfaces in Saline Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. A.; Petersen, G. W.; Kahle, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    Arid and semiarid regions yield excellent opportunities for the study of pedologic and geomorphic processes. The dominance of rock and soil exposure over vegetation not only provides the ground observer with observational possibilities but also affords good opportunities for measurement by aircraft and satellite remote sensor devices. Previous studies conducted in the area of pedologic and geomorphic mapping in arid regions with remotely sensed data have utilized information obtained in the visible to near-infrared portion of the spectrum. Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) and Thematic Mapping (TM) data collected in 1984 are being used in comjunction with maps compiled during a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) soil survey to aid in a detailed mapping of alluvial fan and playa surfaces within the valley. The results from this study may yield valuable information concerning the application of thermal data and thermal/visible data combinations to the problem of dating pedologic and geomorphic features in arid regions.

  19. Quaternary enhancement of westerly jet and central Asian aridification: carbonate and salt fluid inclusion isotope records from deep drilling in the Qaidam salt playa, NE Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, X.; Han, W.; Fang, X.

    2014-12-01

    The vast Asian arid inland under the westerlies exerts great impacts on global climatic change. However, its evolution history and its relation with the westerlies, Tibet uplift and global change are still unknown. Here we present high quality carbonate and salt fluid inclusion isotope records from a near thousand meter deep drilling core in the Qaidam salt playa, NW China. They reveal an evident long-term persistent aridification of Asian inland since ca. 1.2 Ma, followed by an accelerated drying since ca. 0.6 Ma. We propose that the rapid uplift of the Tibetan Plateau in the mid-Pleistocene (called Yellow River Movement) might have contributed to the desiccation of the Asian inland through enhancing and bending the westerly jet and its associated ascending flow and blocking the moisture input from the westerlies and monsoons.

  20. Multisensor and multiscale survey and characterization for radiometric spatial uniformity and temporal stability of Railroad Valley Playa (Nevada) test site used for optical sensor calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannari, Abdou A.; Omari, K.; Teillet, Phillipe M.; Fedosejevs, Gunar

    2004-02-01

    In this study, we analyzed for the first time the potential of Getis statistics compared to the coefficient of variation for the study of the radiometric spatial uniformity and temporal stability of the Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada (RVPN) test site. We evaluated multi-sensor and multi-scale image data acquired for the RVPN, including four SPOT HRV images acquired in 1997 and 1998, five NOAA AVHRR images acquired in 1999, and one Landsat TM image acquired in 1998. The results show the potential and the importance of the synergy generated by these two methods for analyzing the radiometric spatial uniformity and temporal stability of the RVPN site. Getis statistics provide an excellent spatial analysis of the site while the coefficient of variation provides complementary information on the temporal evolution of the site.

  1. Morphological and chemical properties of the meadow-semidesert soil complexes of the Khaki playa (the Caspian Lowland) and the influence of the biogenic factor on them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanova, N. P.; Lebedeva-Verba, M. P.; Bykov, A. V.

    2010-03-01

    The initial stage of the development of the complex soil cover pattern in the Caspian Lowland was studied. The obtained data made it possible to reveal the specific features of the morphological and chemical properties of the soils on terraces of the Khaki playa and the role of burrowing animals in the formation of the microtopography and complex soil cover patterns on the youngest surfaces. The soil cover of the studied area consists of three-component complexes: light-humus quasi-gley solonetzes on relatively flat background surfaces, zooturbated solonetzes on microhighs, and humus quasi-gley soils in microlows. The layered deposits of the Khaki playa terraces and the shallow depth of the saline groundwater are responsible for the specificity of the modern salinization of the studied solonetzes. The distribution of the salts in their profiles has a sawshaped patter, which is related to the nonuniform texture of the deposits. On the microhighs composed of the earth extracted from 5- to 7-year-old suslik burrows, specific zooturbated solonetzes are formed. The known age of these formations makes it possible to determine the rate of the desalinization of the gypsum- and salt-bearing material extracted onto the soil surface and the rate of the salt accumulation in the lower part of the solonetzic horizon and in the subsolonetzic horizons in comparison with the data on the solonetzes of the background flat surfaces. The specific features of the soils in the closed microlows suggest that these soils have a polygenetic origin. The features of the recent hydromorphism predetermine the specificity of their morphology.

  2. Two year (2011-2012) observations of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 and comparison with GOSAT measurements at Railroad Valley playa, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadic, J.; Loewenstein, M.; Frankenberg, C.; Iraci, L. T.; Gore, W.; Yates, E. L.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) play an important role in understanding the global carbon cycle and its contribution to global warming. In recent years methane (CH4) has received increasing attention as the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas because of the high uncertainty of its sources and sinks. Aircraft measurements of greenhouse gases are essential for observations in the free troposphere and lower stratosphere to better understand changes at regional and continental scales. Mixing ratios of methane and carbon dioxide were measured from 27000 ft down to the surface on 22 - 26th of June, 2011 and 25th of June - 2nd of July, 2012, to create vertical profiles of CO2 and CH4 over a playa in Railroad Valley, Nevada, USA. The playa is a flat, dry lakebed with virtually no vegetation, approximately 15 km x 15 km in size, 1434 m in elevation and 110 km southwest of the nearest city (Ely, Nevada). The time and location of flights were selected to coincide with the overpass of Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). Airborne (Alpha Jet) in-situ measurements of CO2 and CH4 were collected to support the vicarious calibration experiment to validate column-averaged dry air mole fractions of CO2 and CH4 (XCO2 and XCH4) retrieved from the GOSAT. The in-situ profiles were collected simultaneously with remote measurements in the same regions of atmosphere. Our results reflected the global trend in CO2 concentration measured worldwide, and corresponded well with the values measured by GOSAT.

  3. Soil-Gas Identification of Environmental Factors Affecting CO2 Concentrations Beneath a Playa Wetland: Implications for Soil-Gas Monitoring at Carbon Storage Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanak, K.; Bennett, P.

    2009-12-01

    Strategies for identifying and interpreting the effects of environmental factors on near-surface CO2 concentrations are essential to developing accurate monitoring protocols at carbon storage sites. Based on the results of a three-year study of a natural analogue we present, 1) a method for using soil-gas to identify near-surface CO2 cycling, and 2) a framework for developing monitoring protocols and site evaluation for near-surface monitoring. Near-surface CO2 production, consumption, and re-distribution was observed in the vadose-zone of a highly CO2-reactive playa wetland in the Texas High Plains. Atmospheric conditions, organic and inorganic soil carbon, subsurface pressure, water flux, and surface and groundwater chemistry were compared to real-time background measurements of CO2, CH4, O2+Ar, and N2 from depths up to 45 feet. Carbon isotopes and spatially and temporally variable concentrations of CO2 ≤ 17%, CH4 ≤ 2%, and O2 from 21-0% indicate CO2 and CH4 are produced by microbes. Molar gas ratios of O2 and CO2 distinguish between oxidation of organic matter (CH2O + O2 → CO2 + H2O), CH4 oxidation (CH4 + 2O2 → CO2 + 2H2O), and potentially acetate fermentation (CH3COOH → CH4 + CO2). O2 consumption and distribution is regulated by water flux that supplies dissolved organics to microbes at depth and regulates oxygen supply by blocking vertical permeability and atmospheric gas exchange. A surface flux experiment indicates that when playa floors are dry, subsurface wetting fronts from rain events or previous ponding periods block vertical permeability resulting in surface flux measurements that do not represent subsurface conditions. Samples with CO2+O2 < 21% and N2 > 78% identify dissolution of CO2 and carbonate minerals into recharging groundwater resulting in loss of pore pressure and chemically-induced advection of atmosphere into pores. Inverse geochemical reaction modeling (PHREEQC) of playa surface water and perched groundwater in high PCO2 zones

  4. Development of a new platform for airborne measurements of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 and comparison with GOSAT measurements at Railroad Valley playa, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadic, J.; Loewenstein, M.; Iraci, L. T.; Gore, W.; Schiro, K. A.; Olson, R. A.; Sheffner, E. J.; Yates, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) play an important role in understanding the global carbon cycle and its contribution to global warming. In recent years methane (CH4) has received increasing attention as the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas because of the high uncertainty of its sources and sinks. Aircraft measurements of greenhouse gases are essential for observations in the free troposphere and lower stratosphere to better understand changes at regional and continental scales. Recently new types of high-accuracy analyzers based on cavity-ring down spectroscopy have become available for use on aircraft. One of them, Picarro 2301-m, was remodeled and adapted for use outside the cabin of an Alpha Jet. In this unique attempt, the instrument was redesigned from a single unit to multiple units that fit inside the Alpha jet wing pod, with special emphasis on internal thermal management. After remodeling, the platform was tested in a laboratory, in a chamber with variable pressure and temperature, and in the field. This newly developed platform exhibits several important characteristics: the modular structure of the platform allows usage of other instruments simultaneously, the platform is capable of measuring both vertical and horizontal profiles of CO2 and CH4, and it is very insensitive to flight maneuvers. The new platform was used on 22-26th of June, 2011, to create spatial and temporal profiles of CO2 and CH4 over a playa in Railroad Valley, Nevada, USA. The playa is a flat, dry lakebed with virtually no vegetation, approximately 15 km x 15 km in size, 1434 m in elevation and 110 km southwest of the nearest city (Ely, Nevada). The time and location of flights were selected to coincide with the overpass of Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). Airborne (Alpha Jet) in-situ measurements of CO2 and CH4 were collected to support the vicarious calibration experiment to validate column-averaged dry air mole fractions of CO2 and CH4 (XCO2 and

  5. First Observation of Rock Motion on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park—Role of a Persistent Pool, Sun, Zephyrs, Windowpane Ice, and Tugboats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, R. D.; Norris, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Trails in the mud-cracked surface of Racetrack Playa have been scored by hundreds of rocks up to 320 kg, but the mechanism of movement is debated. In Winter 2013-2014, we observed rocks in motion associated with a transient pool formed by winter precipitation. The pond was 7 cm deep on the southern edge of the playa, tapering to a mud flat to the north. Freezing during cold winter nights formed floating "windowpane" ice 3-5 mm thick. Rocks repeatedly moved on sunny days under light winds of 3-5 m/second, as the ice broke up near midday and was set into motion by wind stress on melt pools and the ice surface. Ice panels shoved rocks along the mud like a tugboat, sometimes forming moving imbricated ice piles upstream of the rocks and in other cases moving faster than the rocks and forming brash-filled leads downstream. GPS units mounted in experimental rocks recorded a creeping pace of 2-6 m/minute, a speed that made it difficult to observe trail formation visually. The 2013-2014 pond formed on November 20-24 and persisted through early February 2014. During this time rocks were observed moving at least five times, and studies of "stiz marks" formed by rocks at the ends of trail segments show that there were likely 3-5 additional move events. Observed travel times ranged from a few seconds to 16 minutes. In one event, two experimental rocks 153 m apart began moving simultaneously and traveled 64.1 and 65.6 m respectively, ultimately moving 157-162 m in subsequent events. Rock motion depends on the creation of winter pools sufficiently deep to allow the formation of floating ice and exposed to the light winds and sun needed for ice breakup. The combination of these events is extremely rare, leading to highly episodic trail formation. Our observations differ from previous hypotheses in that the rocks were moved by thinner ice, at slower speeds, and by lighter winds than predicted.

  6. [Chemical and nutritional composition in the marine snail Strombus gracilior (Mesogastropoda: Strombidae) of various sizes and sexes in Playa Panamá, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Arce, G

    1993-12-01

    74 individuals of "cambute" (Strombus gracilior), were collected in Playa Panamá (10 degrees 35' 45"N, 85 degrees 40' 09" W), Costa Rica. The sex ratio was 1:1 and the size range 70-80mm (total length). The yield was 80% of edible meat. The average values of the macroconstituents to both sizes were: water 72.6% males and 70.9% females; 19.09g% protein in males and 26.89g% in females; carbohydrates 1.85g% males and 1.35g% females; 0.44g% crude fiber both males and females; within ashes there wre variations (2.30-3.71g%) among size and sex. Fat reached a maximum value of 0.94 and 0.91g% (length 80mm) for males and females respectively. In minerals, maximum values for the Na and K of 1440.88 and 1898.33 micrograms/g respectively were obtained for 80mm males; females of the same size showed values of 1376.97 micrograms/g for the Na and of 2393.09 micrograms/g for K; the other minerals (Cu, Mg, Fe) had lower values in relation to the above but the normal according to the literature. PMID:7701073

  7. Physical, chemical, and mineralogical data from surficial deposits, groundwater levels, and water composition in the area of Franklin Lake playa and Ash Meadows, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, Harland L.; Breit, George N.; Yount, James C.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Reheis, Marith C.; Skipp, Gary L.; Fisher, Eric M.; Lamothe, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents data and describes the methods used to determine the physical attributes, as well as the chemical and mineralogical composition of surficial deposits; groundwater levels; and water composition in the area of Franklin Lake playa and Ash Meadows, California and Nevada. The results support studies that examine (1) the interaction between groundwater and the ground surface, and the transport of solutes through the unsaturated zone; (2) the potential for the accumulation of metals and metalloids in surface crusts; (3) emission of dust from metal-rich salt crust; and (4) the effects of metal-rich dusts on human and ecosystem health. The evaporation of shallow (<3 to 4 m) groundwater in saline, arid environments commonly results in the accumulation of salt in the subsurface and (or) the formation of salt crusts at the ground surface. Ground-surface characteristics such as hardness, electrical conductivity, and mineralogy depend on the types and forms of these salt crusts. In the study area, salt crusts range from hard and bedded to soft and loose (Reynolds and others, 2009). Depending on various factors such as the depth and composition of groundwater and sediment characteristics of the unsaturated zone, salt crusts may accumulate relatively high contents of trace elements. Soft, loose salt crusts are highly vulnerable to wind erosion and transport. These vulnerable crusts, which may contain high contents of potentially toxic trace elements, can travel as atmospheric dust and affect human and ecosystem health at local to regional scales.

  8. Use RUSLE2 model to assess the impact of soil erosion on playa inundation and hydrophyte conditions in the Rainwater Basin, Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenghong; Gu, Yue; Jiang, Weiguo; Xue, Yuan; Bishop, Andy; LaGrange, Ted; Nugent, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Playas in the Rainwater Basin region in Nebraska are globally important wetlands that are continuously threatened by culturally accelerated sedimentation. Using annual habitat survey data and wetland vegetation inventories, inundation and hydrophyte community distributions were evaluated for properties under different types of conservation status. Annual soil erosion rates from surrounding watersheds were calculated to estimate sediment accumulated rates using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2 (RUSLE2). The slope-length component of the RUSLE2 was derived from 2009 light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data after the methods described by Van Remortel (Computers & Geosciences 30:1043-1053, 2004). Wetlands enrolled in conservation programs were inundated more and were dominated to a greater degree by hydrophytes than wetlands not enrolled in these programs. The mean estimated soil erosion rate at the Rainwater Basin landscape level was 4.67 tons/ha/year, and the mean estimated sediment accumulation depth for public watersheds was estimated as 0.19 cm/year. Without appropriate conservation actions, the current inundated acres and wetland acres growing hydrophytes would be further reduced by sediment accumulation. The results illustrated the importance of conservation programs to protect wetlands. PMID:27138004

  9. Avian cholera in waterfowl: the role of lesser snow and Ross's geese as carriers of avian cholera in the Playa Lakes region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Johnson, W.P.

    2005-01-01

    We collected samples from apparently healthy geese in the Playa Lakes Region (USA) during the winters of 2000a??01 and 2001a??02 to determine whether carriers of Pasteurella multocida, the bacterium that causes avian cholera, were present in wild populations. With the use of methods developed in laboratory challenge trials (Samuel et al., 2003a) and a serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction method for identification of P. multocida serotype 1, we found that a small proportion of 322 wild birds (<5%) were carriers of pathogenic P. multocida. On the basis of serology, an additional group of these birds (<10%) were survivors of recent avian cholera infection. Our results confirm the hypothesis that wild waterfowl are carriers of avian cholera and add support for the hypothesis that wild birds are a reservoir for this disease. In concert with other research, this work indicates that enzootic infection with avian cholera occurs in lesser snow goose (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) populations throughout their annual cycle. Although fewer Rossa??s geese (Chen rossii) were sampled, we also found these birds were carriers of P. multocida. Even in the absence of disease outbreaks, serologic evidence indicates that chronic disease transmission and recent infection are apparently occurring year-round in these highly gregarious birds and that a small portion of these populations are potential carriers with active infection.

  10. Braidplain, floodplain and playa lake, alluvial-fan, aeolian and palaeosol facies composing a diversified lithogenetical sequence in the permian and triassic of South Devon (England)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Detlef

    The Permian and Triassic of South Devon (England) are a continental red bed sequence of very diversified lithogenetical composition. Within the thick series, the distribution of the main depositional environments being fluvial braidplain, fluvial floodplain and playa lake, alluvial fan, aeolian dune and calcrete palaeosol changes repeatedly in both horizontal and vertical direction. Significant sedimentary milieus such as aeolian dunes and calcrete palaeosols occur repeatedly within the succession, but are also lacking in several parts of the sequence. Fluvial braidplain deposits comprise conglomerates, sandstones, intraformational reworking horizons and mudstones and originate in channels and overbank plains of a braided river system. Conglomerates and sandstones are formed by migration of bars and spreading out of sheets during infilling of streams and aggradation of flats. Gravel is often enriched as lag pockets or veneers within steeper scour holes and kolk pots or on the plane floor of the watercourse. Finer-grained sandstones and mudstones are laid down by suspension settling in stagnant water bodies such as small lakes in the overbank area and residual pools in interbar depressions during low-stage or waning-flow in active channels or in abandoned streams. Spectacular bioturbation features in some sandstones with both horizontal tubes and vertical burrows testify to the colonization of the sediments at the bottom of the rivers with declining discharge and transport capacity. Intraformational reworking horizons with ghost-like remnants of degraded sandstones, mudstones and pedogenic carbonates document partially severe condensation of the sequence by removal of some facies elements from the depositional record. The occasionally occurring gravel-bearing mudstones or silty-clayey sandstones represent products of high-energy water surges overspilling the channel banks and transporting sandy and gravelly bed-load in limited amounts beyond the levee wall. The

  11. The balance between deposition and subsidence (tectonics) in a rift basin playa and its effect on the climatic record of an area: Evidence from Bristol Dry Lake, California

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Two continuous core intervals drilled in Bristol Dry Lake, a large (150 km{sup 2}) playa in the central Mojave Desert of California, penetrated over 500 m of sediment and did not reach basement. The repetitious nature of the alternating shallow brine pond halite and siliciclastic and the consistency of the carbonate isotopic data from the surface and core indicate a relatively stable brine composition for most of the history of Bristol Dry Lake. All sedimentary structures and primary halite fabrics in the core indicate shallow-water, brine-pond halite alternated with halite-saturated siliciclastic muds in the basin center. A delicate balance of subsidence and mechanical and chemical deposition of evaporite and siliciclastic minerals was necessary to maintain the largely ephemeral lake environment of deposition through over 550 m of basin fill. The alternating brine pond/saline lake setting in Bristol Dry Lake is not directly related to climatic influences, and the sediments do not record major climatic events demonstrated in other closed-basin lakes. The reason for this insensitivity to climatic events is explained by the interior location of the basin, the low relief of the mountains surrounding the catchment, the large surface area of the catchment, and the low average sedimentation rates. All of the above criteria are at least partially controlled by the tectonics of the area, which, in turn, affect the sedimentation rate and supply water to the basin. Therefore, it is important to consider the influence of the above factors in determining global versus local, or regional, climate curves for a particular basin.

  12. End-Pleistocene to Holocene paleoenvironmental record from piston corer samples and the challenge of stratigraphic correlation of playa sediment data with a connected alluvial apron from Damghan Basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büdel, Christian; Hoelzmann, Philipp; Wennrich, Volker; Majid Padashi, Sajed; Baumhauer, Roland

    2015-04-01

    The study yields a first characterization and correlation of the end-Pleistocene to Holocene sediment archive of playa and playa lake deposits in the Damghan Basin, northern Iran. The Basin sediments are deposited since Mio- and Pliocene, which is valid for the connected alluvial fans, too. These are covering the area between the playa and mountains and while prograding from the mountain ranges they deliver gravels and fine-sediments to the basins sink. The processes on the studied alluvial apron are described and dated already and can be explained in seven morphodynamic phases, which are linked to a general lake level high-stand in north-east Iran at about 8000-9000 years ago. If and how these phases are passed on from the alluvial record down to the playa sediment record is aim of this study. Today the salt pans margins are highly affected by salt tectonic drifting and access was suboptimal. Only here drilling could be performed through about 280 centimeters of salt-crust unfrequently intercalated with loamy layers. For yielding undisturbed playa sediment records sampling was performed with inliner-tubes deployed in a piston corer (Kullenberg type). Thus at two different drilling sites in summation seven cores could be taken, down to a maximum depth of 129 cm and 1000 cm. Back in Germany the cores had been opened and initially described, photographed and optically scanned with a core logger. Regarding future studies, the aim was a best possible comprehensive documentation of the cores. Therefore basically grainsize measurements (laser diffraction), multi element analyses (XRF, ICP-OES, titrimetry) and mineralogical measurements (XRD) had been deployed on samples taken from every single previously identified layer. Continuous elemental data was secured by use of a XRF-scanning core logger. The sedimentological description together with laboratory element analyses shows saline conditions in the first three meters coincide with general coarser grain sizes. The next

  13. Linking playa surface dust emission potential to feedbacks between surface moisture and salt crust expansion through high resolution terrestrial laser scanning measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, J. M.; King, J.; Wiggs, G.

    2012-12-01

    The dust emissivity of salt pans (or playas) can be significant but is controlled by interactions between wind erosivity, surface moisture, salt chemistry and crust morphology. These surface properties influence the aeolian transport threshold and can be highly variable over both short temporal and spatial scales. In the past, field studies have been hampered by practical difficulties in accurately measuring properties controlling sediment availability at the surface in high resolution. Studies typically therefore, have investigated large scale monthly or seasonal change using remote sensing and assume a homogeneous surface when predicting dust emissivity. Here we present the first high resolution measurements (sub-cm) of salt crust expansion related to changes in diurnal moisture over daily and weekly time periods using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS, ground-based LiDAR) on Sua Pan, Botswana. The TLS measures both elevation and relative surface moisture change simultaneously, without disturbing the surface. Measurement sequences enable the variability in aeolian sediment availability to be quantified along with temporal feedbacks associated with crust degradation. On crusts with well-developed polygon ridges (high aerodynamic and surface roughness), daily surface expansion was greater than 30mm. The greatest surface change occurred overnight on the upper, exposed sections of the ridges, particularly when surface temperatures dropping below 10°C. These areas also experienced the greatest moisture variation and became increasingly moist overnight in response to an increase in relative humidity. In contrast, during daylight hours, the ridge areas were drier than the lower lying inter-ridge areas. Positive feedbacks between surface topography and moisture reinforced the maximum diurnal moisture variation at ridge peaks, encouraging crust thrusting due to overnight salt hydration, further enhancing the surface, and therefore, aerodynamic roughness. These feedbacks

  14. Cross-calibration of the Terra MODIS, Landsat 7 ETM+ and EO-1 ALI sensors using near-simultaneous surface observation over the Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada, test site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Angal, A.; Choi, T.; Meyer, D.J.; Xiong, X.; Teillet, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    A cross-calibration methodology has been developed using coincident image pairs from the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and the Earth Observing EO-1 Advanced Land Imager (ALI) to verify the absolute radiometric calibration accuracy of these sensors with respect to each other. To quantify the effects due to different spectral responses, the Relative Spectral Responses (RSR) of these sensors were studied and compared by developing a set of "figures-of-merit." Seven cloud-free scenes collected over the Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada (RVPN), test site were used to conduct the cross-calibration study. This cross-calibration approach was based on image statistics from near-simultaneous observations made by different satellite sensors. Homogeneous regions of interest (ROI) were selected in the image pairs, and the mean target statistics were converted to absolute units of at-sensor reflectance. Using these reflectances, a set of cross-calibration equations were developed giving a relative gain and bias between the sensor pair.

  15. Cross-calibration of the Terra MODIS, Landsat 7 ETM+ and EO-1 ALI sensors using near-simultaneous surface observation over the Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada, test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chander, Gyanesh; Angal, Amit; Choi, Taeyoung Jason; Meyer, David J.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong Jack; Teillet, Philippe M.

    2007-09-01

    A cross-calibration methodology has been developed using coincident image pairs from the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and the Earth Observing EO-1 Advanced Land Imager (ALI) to verify the absolute radiometric calibration accuracy of these sensors with respect to each other. To quantify the effects due to different spectral responses, the Relative Spectral Responses (RSR) of these sensors were studied and compared by developing a set of "figures-of-merit." Seven cloud-free scenes collected over the Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada (RVPN), test site were used to conduct the cross-calibration study. This cross-calibration approach was based on image statistics from near-simultaneous observations made by different satellite sensors. Homogeneous regions of interest (ROI) were selected in the image pairs, and the mean target statistics were converted to absolute units of at-sensor reflectance. Using these reflectances, a set of cross-calibration equations were developed giving a relative gain and bias between the sensor pair.

  16. Dynamics of playa lakes in the Texas High Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. C., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Regional viewing of ERTS-1 imagery around the test sites shows that storm paths can be accurately traced and a count made of the number of intermittent lake basins filled by the storm. Therefore, during wet years ERTS-type imagery can be used to conduct a reliable count of the tens of thousands of natural lake basins on the southern High Plains which contain water. This type of regional overview of water filled basins in the normally arid southern High Plains is illustrated by bands 6 and 7, ERTS E-1078-16524.

  17. Herbert Marcuse's Theory of Play--A Social Philosophical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwien, Karin A. E.

    Sport has been widely discussed, by conservatives who argue that sport operates within the realm of freedom, and so lies outside the deterministic nexus of capitalist economics and policies, and leftists who argue that sport reproduces the repressive features of capitalism and serves as an ideological tool of the latter. The purpose of this study…

  18. Dynamics of playa lakes in the Texas High Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. C., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 MSS imagery has been found useful for taking a regional wet census of the tens of thousands of lake basins on the Southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico. Once the ground truth which has been correlated with the MSS imagery, is correlated with CCT data, and reliable computer classifications are determined, a lake census from CCT printouts will be possible. Correlation of satellite imagery products with water fluctuations and water budget is also underway.

  19. Reptiles of Chubut province, Argentina: richness, diversity, conservation status and geographic distribution maps

    PubMed Central

    Minoli, Ignacio; Morando, Mariana; Avila, Luciano Javier

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An accurate estimation of species and population geographic ranges is essential for species-focused studies and conservation and management plans. Knowledge of the geographic distributions of reptiles from Patagonian Argentina is in general limited and dispersed over manuscripts from a wide variety of topics. We completed an extensive review of reptile species of central Patagonia (Argentina) based on information from a wide variety of sources. We compiled and checked geographic distribution records from published literature and museum records, including extensive new data from the LJAMM-CNP (CENPAT-CONICET) herpetological collection. Our results show that there are 52 taxa recorded for this region and the highest species richness was seen in the families Liolaemidae and Dipsadidae with 31 and 10 species, respectively. The Patagónica was the phytogeographic province most diverse in species and Phymaturus was the genus of conservation concern most strongly associated with it. We present a detailed species list with geographical information, richness species, diversity analyses with comparisons across phytogeographical provinces, conservation status, taxonomic comments and distribution maps for all of these taxa. PMID:25931966

  20. Using GIS to study the past and present of a northern Chihuahuan Desert playa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The encroachment of mesquite (Prosopis glandulos Torr.) and other desert shrubs into the desert grasslands of the northern Chihuahuan Desert is commonly associated with increased rates of soil erosion. The processes associated with vegetation shifts are still poorly understood. One such example of v...

  1. Self-Esteem through Play--A Natural for Special Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriver, Eunice Kennedy

    1984-01-01

    Let's Play to Grow, a club for families with handicapped children, helps special children develop social and recreational skills. Special families meet monthly to learn how to enjoy and accept themselves. Parents develop relationships with other families with similiar problems. (DF)

  2. What We Know about Play--A Walk through Selected Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Susan J.; Klugman, Edgar

    2002-01-01

    Describes the "Playing for Keeps" project of maintaining a comprehensive, categorized database summarizing current knowledge on play. Presents selected findings and information about: child development theories, studies about the developmental benefits of play, investigations into why play is useful for children, and documentation of the impact of…

  3. The Sign Told Me how to Play--A Lesson in Risk Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallach, Frances

    1988-01-01

    Two constantly appearing claims in most playground accident suits are improper supervision and lack of warning to the users. This article discusses legal implications of improper signage, explains use of symbols, and presents general sign guidelines to ensure proper safety measures. (MLH)

  4. Play--A Multi-Modal Manifestation in Kindergarten Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vong, Keang-Ieng

    2012-01-01

    Play, as an educational concept, has entered many kindergartens in China; yet it has not become a core idea, or been prioritised in the teaching and learning process. An ongoing trans-provincial study started in 2008, using observation, interviews and document analyses. Based on findings from nine kindergartens in three provinces, this article…

  5. Australian Acid Playa Lake as a Mars Analog: Results from Sediment Lipid Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H.; Baldridge, A. M.; Stern, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The ephemeral saline acidic lakes on the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia have been suggested as geochemical analogues to martian terrains. Both are characterized by interbedded phyllosilicates and hydrated sulfates. On Mars, these areas indicate shifting environmental conditions, from the neutral/alkaline and wet conditions that dominated during the Noachian era to the more familiar dry, acidic conditions that began in the Hesperian. The habitability of such a dynamic environment can be informed by investigation of the Yilgarn Lake system. Previous work has found phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) evidence of microbial communities in sections of sediment cores taken from Lake Gilmore. These communities include both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, Actinomycetes, and even methanotrophs. Given recurring detection of methane on the martian surface, evidence of a methane cycling community in an analogous environment is of particular interest. In this study we analyze the carbon isotope composition of bulk organic material as well as extracted lipids from the Lake Gilmore sediment cores at both a near-shore and mid-lake location. These analyses reveal very low accumulations of organic carbon, concentrated primarily in the gypsum-rich near-shore core. The near-shore sediments show a down-core decrease in abundance of organic carbon as well as depletion in the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) with depth. Bulk carbon did not exhibit the unique, highly depleted, diagnostic signature associated with methanotrophic biomass. Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of carbon in extracted methanotroph PFLAs can confirm the presence of a methane cycling metabolism at depth. Also, additional extractions have isolated lipids associated with lake-edge grasses. These analyses consider both the chain-length distribution and carbon CSIA of these lipids in order to understand the effect of terrestrial detritus on any preserved methanotroph carbon signal, given the very low amounts of microbial biomass found in lake cores. While the mineralogy does not suggest anaerobic conditions, further investigation includes extraction of archaeal lipids in order to identify the presence of any methanogenic community associated with the putative methanotrophic community.

  6. Retrieval of surface albedo over the Railroad Valley playa from AVIRIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, T.; O'Brien, D.; O'Dell, C. W.; kuze, A.

    2011-12-01

    High spatial resolution spectra, measured by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) in the 0.76, 1.6 and 2.0 micron bands, are used to retrieve albedo over a bright desert surface in support of the GOSAT vicarious calibration campaign. The albedo retrieval consists of a simple, linear least squares (LLS) fitting routine, coupled with a radiative transfer model. The retrieved albedos are used as inputs to a separate radiative transfer code used to model top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiances. These TOA radiances are then compared to those measured by GOSAT, thus providing the basis for the vicarious calibration of the GOSAT sensors.

  7. Comparison if seepage rates in playa lakes in grassland and cropland basins, Texas High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two sorghum isolines, a wild type (BTx 623) and an erect leaf mutant line (ERL 20) isolated from the wild type were field grown in rectilinear arrays at low (25 plants m-2) and high (12 plants/m-2) densities with sub-surface drip irrigation in an effort to eliminate confounding drought effects. Cano...

  8. Controls of dust emission fluxes and wind erosion threshold on a wet playa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggs, G.; King, J.; Thomas, D. S.; Washington, R.

    2012-12-01

    The control of dust emissions from crusted surfaces is both highly variable and difficult to measure directly. Seasonal changes in moisture availability, temperature, evaporation, surface roughness, and sediment supply result in a highly complex surface condition that remains to be fully described in the context of wind erosion potential. A highly intensive project on Sua Pan, Botswana using the PI-SWERL (portable wind tunnel) combined with surface measurements of crust and soil properties has led to a new understanding of the controls on wind erosion from these surfaces. The PI-SWERL is a highly portable wind tunnel that applies a wind shear to the surface using a motor-controlled rotating annular blade and measures resulting dust emissions with a DustTrak dust monitor. We undertook a sequence of tests with the PI-SWERL to obtain both the wind erosion threshold (using a slowly increasing shear velocity) and a dust emission flux (using a constant shear velocity) across a 12 km by 12 km grid across the pan surface. A total of just under 1000 wind tunnel tests and 2000 correlated measurements of a variety of surface properties including crust thickness, surface and subsurface soil moisture, shearing strength (shear vane), normal stress resistance (penetrometer), and surface roughness were conducted in August 2011. These results show that wind erosion potential is best described by measurements of normal stress resistance rather than shearing strength at low dust emission fluxes, but despite their frequent use in wind erosion studies of crusted surfaces neither metric provided a good explanation of higher dust emission fluxes. Surface soil moisture explained the most variation in both dust emissions and wind erosion threshold although much variation remains unexplained. Our results suggested that combining measurements of surface roughness, soil moisture, and crust thickness provided a reasonable explanation of wind erosion potential on the salt pan surface. As pan surfaces can exhibit a range of aerodynamic roughness lengths over three orders of magnitude the small-scale partition of wind stress could be considered. Surface soil moisture also had a very large range in which a relatively sharp threshold was found to increase dust emissions when combined with other surface factors. Although the role of surface moisture in dust emissions is understood it remains a very difficult (yet critical) parameter to measure and a call for more precise estimations of this metric is highly encouraged.

  9. Prokaryotic Diversity in Aran-Bidgol Salt Lake, the Largest Hypersaline Playa in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Kazemi, Bahram; Pašić, Lejla; Ventosa, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Prokaryotic diversity in Aran-Bidgol salt lake, a thalasohaline lake in Iran, was studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), cultivation techniques, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified fragments of 16S rRNA genes and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. Viable counts obtained (2.5–4 × 106 cells mL−1) were similar to total cell abundance in the lake determined by DAPI direct count (3–4×107 cells mL−1). The proportion of Bacteria to Archaea in the community detectable by FISH was unexpectedly high and ranged between 1:3 and 1:2. We analyzed 101 archaeal isolates and found that most belonged to the genera Halorubrum (55%) and Haloarcula (18%). Eleven bacterial isolates obtained in pure culture were affiliated with the genera Salinibacter (18.7%), Salicola (18.7%) and Rhodovibrio (35.3%). Analysis of inserts of 100 clones from the eight 16S rRNA clone libraries constructed revealed 37 OTUs. The majority (63%) of these sequences were not related to any previously identified taxa. Within this sampling effort we most frequently retrieved phylotypes related to Halorhabdus (16% of archaeal sequences obtained) and Salinibacter (36% of bacterial sequences obtained). Other prokaryotic groups that were abundant included representatives of Haloquadratum, the anaerobic genera Halanaerobium and Halocella, purple sulfur bacteria of the genus Halorhodospira and Cyanobacteria. PMID:22185719

  10. MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF PATHOGENS IN FEEDYARD PLAYA AIR AND WATER SAMPLES IN THE HIGH PLAINS OF TEXAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) may impact the environment due to nutrient inputs present in the manure, and the sheer volume of manure that must be removed. Consequently, management issues such as odor, presence of pathogens, endotoxins, and dust emissions are introduced. The impact o...

  11. Impact of Diagenesis on Biosignature Preservation Potential in Playa Lake Evaporites of the Verde Formation, Arizona: Implications for Mars Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolyar, S.; Farmer, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    We studied evaporite subfacies in the Verde Fmn., AZ. We identified diagenetic pathways and assessed how diagenesis affected biosignature preservation potential (BPP) in each. Results revealed eight pathways, each with diverse impacts on BPP.

  12. Application of a combined measurement and modeling method to quantify windblown dust emissions from the exposed playa at Mono Lake, California.

    PubMed

    Ono, Duane; Kiddoo, Phill; Howard, Christopher; Davis, Guy; Richmond, Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    Particulate matter < or =10 microm (PM10) emissions due to wind erosion can vary dramatically with changing surface conditions. Crust formation, mechanical disturbance, soil texture, moisture, and chemical content of the soil can affect the amount of dust emitted during a wind event. A refined method of quantifying windblown dust emissions was applied at Mono Lake, CA, to account for changing surface conditions. This method used a combination of real-time sand flux monitoring, ambient PM10 monitoring, and dispersion modeling to estimate dust emissions and their downwind impact. The method identified periods with high emissions and periods when the surface was stable (no sand flux), even though winds may have been high. A network of 25 Cox sand catchers (CSCs) was used to measure the mass of saltating particles to estimate sand flux rates across a 2-km2 area. Two electronic sensors (Sensits) were used to time-resolve the CSC sand mass to estimate hourly sand flux rates, and a perimeter tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) monitor measured hourly PM10 concentrations. Hourly sand flux rates were related by dispersion modeling to hourly PM10 concentrations to back-calculate the ratio of vertical PM10 flux to horizontal sand flux (K-factors). Geometric mean K-factor values (K(f)) were found to change seasonally, ranging from 1.3 x 10(-5) to 5.1 x 10(-5) for sand flux measured at 15 cm above the surface (q15). Hourly PM10 emissions, F, were calculated by applying seasonal K-factors to sand flux measurements (F = K(f) x q15). The maximum hourly PM10 emission rate from the study area was 76 g/m2 x hr (10-m wind speed = 23.5 m/sec). Maximum daily PM10 emissions were estimated at 450 g/m2 x day, and annual emissions at 1095 g/m2 x yr. Hourly PM10 emissions were used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guideline AERMOD dispersion model to estimate downwind ambient impacts. Model predictions compared well with monitor concentrations, with hourly PM10 ranging from 16 to over 60,000 microg/m3 (slope = 0.89, R2 = 0.77). PMID:22070036

  13. A comparison of in-situ aircraft measurements of carbon dioxide to GOSAT data measured over Railroad Valley playa, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadić, J. M.; Loewenstein, M.; Frankenberg, C.; Iraci, L. T.; Yates, E. L.; Gore, W.; Kuze, A.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we report vertical profiles of CO2 measured with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS, Picarro, Inc., 2301-m) on a research aircraft from near ground level to 8 km above mean sea level (a.m.s.l.). The airborne platform employed in this study is an Alpha Jet aircraft operated from NASA Ames Research Center. Flights were undertaken to Railroad Valley, Nevada, USA, to coincide with overpasses of the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). Ground based CO2 was simultaneously measured using CRDS, also at the time and location of the airborne and satellite measurements. Results of three GOSAT coordinated aircraft profiles and ground based measurements in June 2011 are presented and discussed in this paper. The accuracy of the CO2 measurements has been determined based upon laboratory calibrations (WMO traceable standard) and pressure/temperature flight simulations in a test chamber. The 2-σ error bars for the CO2 data presented here are ± 0.4 ppm. Our column CO2 measurements, which include about 85% of the tropospheric mass, are extrapolated, using two different techniques, to include the remainder of the tropospheric and stratospheric CO2. The data are then analyzed using the ACOS (Atmospheric CO2 observations from space; JPL algorithm used to analyze XCO2 from GOSAT data) averaging kernels. ACOS version 2.9 is used to interpret the GOSAT data in a collaborative effort between JPL and the GOSAT team. Column averaged CO2, XCO2, measured by GOSAT and analyzed from our data ranged from 388.1 to 390.5 ppm. Values of XCO2 determined from our Alpha Jet measurements and from the GOSAT on three overflight days agree within 1 ppm or better (<0.3%).

  14. 33 CFR 334.1480 - Vieques Passage and Atlantic Ocean, off east coast of Puerto Rico and coast of Vieques Island...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the abandoned central at Playa Grande. (3) A strip, 1,500 yards wide, off the south coast of Vieques... areas at any time unless on official business. Fishing vessels are permitted to anchor in Playa...

  15. Let the Music Play!--A Short-Term but No Long-Term Detrimental Effect of Vocal Background Music with Familiar Language Lyrics on Foreign Language Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, Annette M. B.; Smedinga, Hilde E.

    2014-01-01

    Participants learned foreign vocabulary by means of the paired-associates learning procedure in three conditions: (a) in silence, (b) with vocal music with lyrics in a familiar language playing in the background, or (c) with vocal music with lyrics in an unfamiliar language playing in the background. The vocabulary to learn varied in concreteness…

  16. Surface scattering properties estimated from modeling airborne multiple emission angle reflectance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinness, Edward A.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Irons, J. R.; Harding, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Here, researchers apply the Hapke function to airborne bidirectional reflectance data collected over three terrestrial surfaces. The objectives of the study were to test the range of natural surfaces that the Hapke model fits and to evaluate model parameters in terms of known surface properties. The data used are multispectral and multiple emission angle data collected during the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) over a mud-cracked playa, an artificially roughened playa, and a basalt cobble strewn playa at Lunar Lake Playa in Nevada. Airborne remote sensing data and associated field measurements were acquired at the same time. The airborne data were acquired by the Advanced Solid State Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS) instrument, a 29-spectral band imaging system. ASAS reflectance data for a cobble-strewn surface and an artificially rough playa surface on Lunar Lake Playa can be explained with the Hanke model. The cobble and rough playa sites are distinguishable by a single scattering albedo, which is controlled by material composition; by the roughness parameter, which appears to be controlled by the surface texture and particle size; and the symmetry factor of the single particle phase function, which is controlled by particle size and shape. A smooth playa surface consisting of compacted, fine-grained particles has reflectance variations that are also distinct from either the cobble site or rough playa site. The smooth playa appears to behave more like a Lambertian surface that cannot be modeled with the Hapke function.

  17. Estimating High Plains Aquifer Recharge Using Temperature Probes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The magnitude of recharge through playa wetlands in the High Plains Region of the United States has been debated, but rarely quantified. The ephemeral nature of water in playas makes it difficult and expensive to observe filling and drying/draining cycles. Inexpensive tools are needed to quantify ...

  18. Sediments in Semi-arid Wetlands: US Southern High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Playas are ephemeral wetlands on the semi-arid U.S. Southern High Plains that serve as runoff catchment basins and are thought to be focal points of Ogallala aquifer recharge. Sediments in playas alter biodiversity and hydroperiods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of outerbas...

  19. Initial English Language Teacher Education: Processes and Tensions towards a Unifying Curriculum in an Argentinian Province

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banegas, Dario Luis

    2014-01-01

    In this reflective piece I discuss the process of developing a new unifying initial English language teacher education curriculum in the province of Chubut (Argentina). Trainers and trainees from different institutions were called to work on it with the aim of democratising curriculum development and enhancing involvement among agents. In the…

  20. Description of the last instar larva and new contributions to the knowledge of the pupa of Dasyhelea mediomunda Minaya (Diptera, Culicomorpha, Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Florentina; Anjos-Santos, Danielle; Funes, Amparo; Ronderos, María M

    2016-07-11

    The fourth instar larva of Dasyhelea mediomunda Minaya is described for the first time and a complete description of the pupa is provided, through use of phase-contrast microscope and scanning electron microscope. Studied specimens were collected in a pond connected to a small wetland "mallin" on the Patagonian steppe, Chubut province, Argentina. PMID:27411066

  1. Conflicting Evolutionary Patterns Due to Mitochondrial Introgression and Multilocus Phylogeography of the Patagonian Freshwater Crab Aegla neuquensis

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Brian R.; Xu, Jiawu; Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Jara, Carlos G.; Crandall, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Multiple loci and population genetic methods were employed to study the phylogeographic history of the Patagonian freshwater crab Aegla neuquensis (Aeglidae: Decopoda). This taxon occurs in two large river systems in the Patagonian Steppe, from the foothills of the Andes Mountains east to the Atlantic Ocean. Methodology/Principal Findings A nuclear phylogeny and multilocus nested clade phylogeographic analysis detected a fragmentation event between the Negro and Chico-Chubut river systems. This event occurred approximately 137 thousand years ago. An isolation-with-migration analysis and maximum-likelihood estimates of gene flow showed asymmetrical exchange of genetic material between these two river systems exclusively in their headwaters. We used information theory to determine the best-fit demographic history between these two river systems under an isolation-with-migration model. The best-fit model suggests that the Negro and the ancestral populations have the same effective population sizes; whereas the Chico-Chubut population is smaller and shows that gene flow from the Chico-Chubut into the Negro is four times higher than in the reverse direction. Much of the Chico-Chubut system appears to have only been recently colonized while the Negro populations appear to have been in place for most of the evolutionary history of this taxon. Conclusions/Significance Due to mitochondrial introgression, three nuclear loci provided different phylogeographic resolution than the three mitochondrial genes for an ancient fragmentation event observed in the nuclear phylogeny. However, the mitochondrial locus provided greater resolution on more recent evolutionary events. Our study, therefore, demonstrates the need to include both nuclear and mitochondrial loci for a more complete understanding of evolutionary histories and associated phylogeographic events. Our results suggest that gene flow between these systems, before and after fragmentation was through periodic

  2. Numerical dating of a Late Quaternary spit-shoreline complex at the northern end of Silver Lake playa, Mojave Desert, California: A comparison of the applicability of radiocarbon, luminescence, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide, electron spin resonance, U-series and amino acid racemization methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Bright, Jordon; Finkel, R.C.; Jaiswal, M.K.; Kaufman, D.S.; Mahan, S.; Radtke, U.; Schneider, J.S.; Sharp, W.; Singhvi, A.K.; Warren, C.N.

    2007-01-01

    A Late Quaternary spit-shoreline complex on the northern shore of Pleistocene Lake Mojave of southeastern California, USA was studied with the goal of comparing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon, luminescence, electron spin resonance (ESR), terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclide (TCN) surface exposure, amino acid racemization (AAR) and U-series dating methods. The pattern of ages obtained by the different methods illustrates the complexity of processes acting in the lakeshore environment and highlights the utility of a multi-method approach. TCN surface exposure ages (mostly ???20-30 ka) record the initial erosion of shoreline benches, whereas radiocarbon ages on shells (determined in this and previous studies) within the spit, supported by AAR data, record its construction at fluctuating lake levels from ???16 to 10 ka. Luminescence ages on spit sediment (???6-7 ka) and ESR ages on spit shells (???4 ka) are anomalously young relative to radiocarbon ages of shells within the same deposits. The significance of the surprisingly young luminescence ages is not clear. The younger ESR ages could be a consequence of post-mortem enrichment of U in the shells. High concentrations of detrital thorium in tufa coating spit gravels inhibited the use of single-sample U-series dating. Detailed comparisons such as this provide one of the few means of assessing the accuracy of Quaternary dating techniques. More such comparisons are needed. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  3. The Origin of the Meridiani Sediments: the Key for Understanding the Formation of Sulfates and Layered Deposits on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P.B.; Michalski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Following the discoveries made by the Opportunity rover at Meridiani Planum, members of the MER science team proposed that the Meridiani deposits are playa evaporites reworked by eolian processes. Alternate hypotheses have also been proposed to explain the deposits at Meridiani Planum, and these have highlighted serious problems with the provenance of the sedimentary material in the proposed playa hypothesis. These problems include: indications of cation-conservative weathering, the lack of a topographic basin, the intimate commingling of the most soluble and least soluble salts, and the overall scale of the deposit. These observations are important challenges to the playa scenario, and suggest that the sediment was derived from a different source.

  4. Water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    Applications of remote sensing technology to analysis of watersheds, snow cover, snowmelt, water runoff, soil moisture, land use, playa lakes, flooding, and water quality are summarized. Recommendations are given for further utilization of this technology.

  5. 76 FR 81916 - Marine Mammals; File No. 16685

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ..., notice was published in the Federal Register (76 FR 65697) that a request for a permit to conduct... Thomas A. Jefferson, Ph.D., Clymene Enterprises, 5495 Camino Playa Malaga, San Diego, CA 92124 to...

  6. Neurotoxicity of Thyroid Disrupting Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones playa critical role in the normal development ofthe mammalian brain. Thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs) are environmental contaminants that alter the structure or function ofthe thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeost...

  7. 40 CFR 117.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., all terms shall have the meanings stated in 40 CFR part 116. (a) Reportable quantities means.... Wetlands generally included playa lakes, swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas such as sloughs,...

  8. 40 CFR 117.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., all terms shall have the meanings stated in 40 CFR part 116. (a) Reportable quantities means.... Wetlands generally included playa lakes, swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas such as sloughs,...

  9. 40 CFR 117.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., all terms shall have the meanings stated in 40 CFR part 116. (a) Reportable quantities means.... Wetlands generally included playa lakes, swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas such as sloughs,...

  10. 40 CFR 117.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., all terms shall have the meanings stated in 40 CFR part 116. (a) Reportable quantities means.... Wetlands generally included playa lakes, swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas such as sloughs,...

  11. 40 CFR 117.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., all terms shall have the meanings stated in 40 CFR part 116. (a) Reportable quantities means.... Wetlands generally included playa lakes, swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas such as sloughs,...

  12. Threshold velocities for input of soil particles into the air by desert soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, D.A.; Adams, J.; Endo, A.; Smith, D.; Kihl, R.

    1980-10-20

    Desert soils mostly from the Mojave Desert were tested for threshold friction velocity (the friction velocity above which soil erosion takes place) with an open-bottomed portable wind tunnel. Several geomorphological settings were chosen to be representative of much of the surface of the Mojave Desert, for example, playas, alluvial fans, and aeolian features. Variables which increase threshold velocity are decreasing proportion of sand, increasing size of dry aggregates of the soil, and increasing fraction of the soil mass larger than 1 mm. Threshold velocity increases with different types of soil surfaces in the following order: disturbed soils (except disturbed heavy clay soils), sand dunes, alluvial and aeolian sand deposits, disturbed playa soils, skirts of playas, playa centers, and desert pavement (alluvial deposits). 21 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  13. Reply to comments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooke, Roger LeB.; Jones, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Esther Sanz-Montero and her colleagues raise some interesting questions in their comment, and we are pleased to have the opportunity to clarify our analysis, and to note differences that we perceive between Racetrack and Altillo Chica playas.

  14. Investigations of Phyllosilicate and Sulfate Layering in Intraplaya Deposits; Analogs for Martian Layered Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldridge, A. M.; Thomson, B. J.; Johnson, S. S.

    2014-07-01

    Playa basins in WA provide an opportunity to study compositional variability in aqueous geochemistry and formation processes analogous to martian layered sediments and correlate remote sensing with in situ observations.

  15. Additional information for Leptoglossus impictus (Stål 1859) (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Coreidae: Coreinae: Anisoscelini) from Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Diez, Fernando; Espindola, Milton Ruiz; Cornelis, Marcela; Coscarón, María Del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The Patagonian subregion belongs to the Andean region, and is comprised of two provinces: Central Patagonia and Subandean Patagonia. It extends from central Mendoza, widening through Neuquén, Río Negro, Chubut, and Santa Cruz, to northern Tierra del Fuego, and reaches Chile (Morrone 2006). The knowledge of terrestrial Heteroptera in this region is poor and is limited to a few contributions (e.g. Berg 1979, Breddin 1898, Pennington 1920, Faúndez & Carvajal 2011, Faundez 2015). PMID:27395893

  16. Hyperspectral Mapping of Iron-bearing Minerals Associated with Dry and Ephemeral Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Bowen, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    This research project is utilizing data from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) on the International Space Station (ISS) to examine a set of playas and ephemeral lakes in Australia and in the southwestern United States. HICO collects hyperspectral data from 0.35 to 1.08 μm thus excluding the SWIR vibrational overtone region of clays and carbonates. We are assessing the utility of HICO for detecting iron-bearing minerals and materials associated with playas and mapping their fractional abundance outside of the playa boundaries. Sites being investigated include the clastics-dominated Railroad Valley and Lunar Lake playas of Nevada, the evaporite-dominated Bonneville Salt Flats, and the acid-saline Lake Tyrrell of northwest Victoria, Australia. HICO, and supporting airborne hyperspectral datasets (AVIRIS and HyMap), are being converted from at-sensor radiance to surface reflectance using the FLAASH radiance transfer-based atmospheric correction software. Fe-bearing minerals and materials are determined through a standardized endmember detection approach using the commercial ENVI software and mapped using a variety of approaches including linear spectral mixture analysis, constrained energy minimization, and spectral feature fitting. Interpretations of remote data are guided by field-based observations and mapping. We are using the remote sensing data to assess the surface state of the playa (wet vs. dry, soft vs. hard). These factors have bearing in that dusts stripped from playa surfaces can affect nearby human communities and agricultural fields. Playas are also used for recreation and sometimes as transportation corridors and their physical state has important bearing for those functions. Assessing the types of minerals present has relevance for their impact as wind-entrained particulates that could have adverse effects on the health of humans, crops, or livestock.

  17. Nitrate reduction during ground-water recharge, Southern High Plains, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryar, Alan E.; Macko, Stephen A.; Mullican, William F., III; Romanak, Katherine D.; Bennett, Philip C.

    2000-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid environments, artificial recharge or reuse of wastewater may be desirable for water conservation, but NO 3- contamination of underlying aquifers can result. On the semi-arid Southern High Plains (USA), industrial wastewater, sewage, and feedlot runoff have been retained in dozens of playas, depressions that focus recharge to the regionally important High Plains (Ogallala) aquifer. Analyses of ground water, playa-basin core extracts, and soil gas in an 860-km 2 area of Texas suggest that reduction during recharge limits NO 3- loading to ground water. Tritium and Cl - concentrations in ground water corroborate prior findings of focused recharge through playas and ditches. Typical δ15N values in ground water (>12.5‰) and correlations between δ15N and ln CNO -3-N suggest denitrification, but O 2 concentrations ≥3.24 mg l -1 indicate that NO 3- reduction in ground water is unlikely. The presence of denitrifying and NO 3--respiring bacteria in cores, typical soil-gas δ15N values <0‰, and decreases in NO 3--N/Cl - and SO 42-/Cl - ratios with depth in cores suggest that reduction occurs in the upper vadose zone beneath playas. Reduction may occur beneath flooded playas or within anaerobic microsites beneath dry playas. However, NO 3--N concentrations in ground water can still exceed drinking-water standards, as observed in the vicinity of one playa that received wastewater. Therefore, continued ground-water monitoring in the vicinity of other such basins is warranted.

  18. Ground truthing for methane hotspots at Railroad Valley, NV - application to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detweiler, A. M.; Kelley, C. A.; Bebout, B.; McKay, C. P.; DeMarines, J.; Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.

    2011-12-01

    During the 2010 Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT) calibration and validation campaign at Railroad Valley (RRV) playa, NV, unexpected methane and carbon dioxide fluctuations were observed at the dry lakebed. Possible sources included the presence of natural gas (thermogenic methane) from oil deposits in the surrounding playa, and/or methane production from microbial activity (biogenic) in the subsurface of the playa. In the summer of 2011, measurements were undertaken to identify potential methane sources at RRV. The biogenicity of the methane was determined based on δ13C values and methane/ethane ratios. Soil gas samples and sediments were collected at different sites in the playa and surrounding areas. The soils of the playa consist of a surface crust layer (upper ~ 10 cm) grading to a dense clay below about 25 cm. Soil gas from the playa, sampled at about 20 and 80 cm depths, reflected atmospheric methane concentrations, ranging from 2 to 2.4 ppm, suggesting that no methane was produced within the playa. Natural springs on the northeast and western border of the playa, detected as methane hotspots from a flyover by the Sensor Integrated Environmental Remote Research Aircraft (SIERRA), were also sampled. Bubbles in these springs had methane concentrations that ranged from 69 to 84% by volume. In addition, ethane was detected at very low concentrations, giving methane/ethane ratios in excess of 100,000, indicating biogenic methane in the springs. Soils and sediments collected at the playa and spring sites were incubated in vials over a period of ~23 days. Methane production was observed in the spring sites (avg. 228.6 ± 49.1 nmol/g/d at Kate Springs), but was not evident for the playa sites. The incubation data, therefore, corroborated in situ methane concentration measurements. Particulate organic carbon (POC) was low for all sites samples (0.05-0.38%), with the exception of Kate Springs, which had a much higher POC concentration of 3.4 ± 0

  19. Biological studies in the impact zone of the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility in Frenchman Flat, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, R.B.; Saethre, M.B.; Medica, P.A.; Greger, P.D.; Romney, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    Desert shrubs and rodents were monitored downwind of the Department of Energy Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (LGF), which is situated on a dry lake bed (playa). Plants were censused in 1981 and 1986 through 1990; rodent survival was measured from 1986 through 1990. During that time there were no apparent effects of the spill tests on animals or plants off the edge of the playa, which extends more than 2.5 kilometers from the facility. Plant populations increased in volume from 1981 through 1986, then declined precipitously during drought in 1989 and 1990. Rodent populations also declined during the drought. Some effects of spilled hydrogen fluoride gas were seen on plants growing on manmade mounds on the playa surface. Animal and bird species seen in the vicinity of the LGF are also reported. 11 refs., 10 figs., 16 tabs.

  20. Development of Ground and Remotely Based Evaporation Measurements at the Salar de Atacama, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, S. K.; Tyler, S. W.; Menz, S. F.; Muñoz, J. F.; Astete, C. O.

    2001-12-01

    Evaporation represents an important component of the water budget in desert playa lakes, and accurate spatial and temporal assessment of evaporation rates has the potential to greatly improve the accuracy of hydrologic models in such environments. To this end, evaporation at the Salar de Atacama, a large playa in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, has been examined at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Previous investigators have measured evaporation from the Salar using lysimeters and Bowen Ratio stations and have found that actual evaporation rates in much of the playa are extremely low (<10 mm yr-1), in spite of shallow groundwater. Lake-scale evaporation can, however, be difficult to determine based solely on such point measurements, as evaporation rates may vary spatially as a function of water depth, crust type and vegetation. In this study, eddy correlation techniques have been used to validate and expand the database of evaporation rates on the playa surface. These evaporation rates in conjunction with measurements of meteorological parameters and other components of the land surface energy balance allow determination of evaporation rates using remotely sensed images. Thermal and visible near infrared bands from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Radiation radiometer (ASTER) on Terra I are being used to determine ground surface temperature, emissivity and albedo, values which are implemented into a numerical energy balance model to extrapolate evaporation rates over the entire playa surface. Preliminary results of evaporation and energy budget measurements taken during the first field campaign at the Salar are presented along with an assessment of the ability of ASTER imagery to provide accurate measurements of evaporation rates in playa environments.

  1. Giant evaporite belts of the Neogene central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Ricardo N.; Jordan, Teresa E.; Tabbutt, Kenneth T.; Vandervoort, Dirk S.

    1991-04-01

    Large volumes of continental evaporites accumulated within the central Andes during Neogene uplift of the Altiplano-Puna plateau and development of the Andean volcanic arc. Halite and gypsum are dominant minerals, along with local and economically important borates. Playa conditions have existed since ca. 15 Ma; halite and borate deposition has occurred for the past 7 to 8 m.y. Evaporites formed in salar environments (e.g., playa lakes) and are characterized by complex mineral assemblages, occurrence, zonation, and geochemistry. Evaporite deposition was controlled by volcanism, geothermal activity, closed drainage, and climate. These Andean deposits, and their controls, differ from evaporites in other continental and marine environments.

  2. The Education of the Active Televiewer of School Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Patricio Calderon; Torres, Miguel Reyes

    In response to a series of problem symptoms related to the influence of television on students, a team of professors at the Universidad de Playa Ancha de Ciencias de la Educacion in Chile undertook a project designed to train television viewers to become critical viewers of the medium. Specific objectives of the project included: (1) to design a…

  3. Nasal lavage natural killer cell function is suppressed in smokers after live attenuated influenza virus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background Modified function of immune cells in nasal secretions may playa role in the enhanced susceptibility to resp iratory viruses that is seen in smokers. Innate immune cells in nasal secretions have largely been characterized by cellular differentials using morphologic c...

  4. Nrf2 Expression Modifies Influenza A Entry and Replication inNasal Epithelial Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influenza infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially during pandemics outbreaks. Emerging data indicate that phase II antioxidant enzyme pathways could playa role in virus-associated inflammation and immune clearance. While Nrf2-dependent gene exp...

  5. Habitat preferences of migrant and wintering northern harriers in northwestern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Littlefield, C.D.; Johnson, D.H.

    2005-01-01

    We studied habitat preferences of northern harriers ( Circus cyaneus) in four counties of the Southern High Plains of northwestern Texas from October 1989 to May 1995. Harriers generally arrived in late July and departed in April. They hunted over a variety of habitats in the study area but mainly in Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) grasslands and vegetated playa basins. CRP grasslands, playa basins, and shortgrass prairie were used disproportionately to their availability, whereas winter wheat was used less than its availability. Brown harriers (adult females or subadults of either sex) foraged in CRP about as often as adult males but more frequently in playas and prairies, whereas adult males foraged more in winter wheat. As underground water sources for irrigation continue to be depleted, agricultural practices are likely to change. Depending on how the land is used after irrigation ceases, harriers may benefit if CRP grasslands, vegetated playas, and shortgrass prairies persist. If dominant land use reverts to livestock grazing, however, the harrier population will be negatively affected.

  6. The Landscape Documentary: Unveiling the Face of "Wasteland."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Craig L.

    This paper outlines the process of a photographic landscape documentary project which set out to unveil the face of Utah's West Desert (a 42,000 square-mile, sparsely-populated, broad, rugged land of salt bed "playas" and high mountain ranges) comprising one-third of the state and which hoped to make the West Desert, recently under consideration…

  7. 75 FR 68738 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ....; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376... Number 27 Playa Drain..... Just upstream of None +3663 City of El Paso. Vocational Drive. Just...

  8. 78 FR 73563 - Certain Electronic Devices Having Placeshifting or Display Replication Functionality and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ..., California (``Sling'') on March 12, 2013. 78 FR 22899 (April 17, 2013). The complaint alleged violations of..., the Commission determined not to review the ID finding C2 Microsystems in default. 78 FR 52211 (Aug... International, Inc. of Playa Vista, California (``Belkin''), as respondents. The Office of Unfair...

  9. Children's Free Play: What Has Happened to It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partridge, Susan

    This paper addresses the current abandonment of children's free play--a proven, broad-based, indispensable learning experience--in favor of formal learning and instruction. Educational research has found that play is the natural learning medium of children, yet this understanding is not guiding educators' practice. This condition has caused many…

  10. Education as Free Use: Giorgio Agamben on Studious Play, Toys, and the Inoperative Schoolhouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Tyson E.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay, I argue that the work of Giorgio Agamben provides us with a theory of studious play which cuts across many of the categories that polarize educational thought. Rather than either ritualized testing or constructivist playfulness, Agamben provides a model of what he refers to as studious play--a practice which suspends the logic of…

  11. Graphic-Narrative Play: Young Children's Authoring through Drawing and Telling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This arts-based research illustrates how young children engage in "graphic-narrative play"--a personal fantasy-based experience depicted on paper--while representing imaginary worlds centered on the topic, "what the future will be like". The descriptions show how the children not only made representations, but also manipulated these in abstract…

  12. Play Theory: A Personal Journey and New Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Smith, Brian

    2008-01-01

    A preeminent play-theory scholar reviews a lifetime devoted to the study of play in a lively, even playful, recounting of his illustrious career and some of its autobiographical roots. The author covers the development of his three major theories of play--as a viability variable, as culturally relative play forms, and as a co-evolutionary…

  13. Deposition and diagenesis of the Brushy Basin and upper Westwater Canyon members of the Morrison Formation in northwest New Mexico and its relationship to uranium mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    Diagenetic facies in the upper Westwater Canyon and Brushy Basin Members closely parallel the distribution of lithofacies, just as in the smaller closed basins of late Cenozoic age of western North America. Vitric ash in the sediment has altered to montmorillonite in the fluvial facies. Calcite and montmorillonite are the alteration products where the fluvial and outermost playa facies meet. Vitric ash has altered to clinoptilolite and heulandite along the playa margins. In the center of the playa facies, analcime has replaced clinoptilolite, an early zeolite. Diagenetic zonation of this type is a result of pH and salinity gradients which existed across the basin. These early diagenetic minerals were replaced by albite, quartz, and mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite where the upper Westwater Canyon and Brushy Basin Members have been deeply buried in the San Juan basin. Relatively fresh ground water carrying dissolved organic compounds and uranium mixed with the saline alkaline brine from underlying playa mudstones, result in uranium mineralization of the upper Jurassic Morrison Formation near Laguna New Mexico.

  14. TECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE ALKALI LAKE ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT - PHASE I RECONNAISSANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of three field survey trips (June and September 1991, May 1992) taken to investigate the ecological effects associated with the release of over a million gallons of hazardous waste from herbicide production on the Alkali Lake playa. ampling of s...

  15. Play as Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henricks, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The author investigates what he believes one of the more important aspects of play--the experience it generates in its participants. He considers the quality of this experience in relation to five ways of viewing play--as action, interaction, activity, disposition, and within a context. He treats broadly the different forms of affect, including…

  16. Monitoring sediment transfer processes on the desert margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millington, Andrew C.; Arwyn, R. Jones; Quarmby, Neil; Townshend, John R. G.

    1987-01-01

    LANDSAT Thematic Mapper and Multispectral Scanner data have been used to construct change detection images for three playas in south-central Tunisia. Change detection images have been used to analyze changes in surface reflectance and absorption between wet and dry season (intra-annual change) and between different years (inter-annual change). Change detection imagery has been used to examine geomorphological changes on the playas. Changes in geomorphological phenomena are interpreted from changes in soil and foliar moisture levels, differences in reflectances between different salt and sediments and the spatial expression of geomorphological features. Intra-annual change phenomena that can be detected from multidate imagery are changes in surface moisture, texture and chemical composition, vegetation cover and the extent of aeolian activity. Inter-annual change phenomena are divisible into those restricted to marginal playa facies (sedimentation from sheetwash and alluvial fans, erosion from surface runoff and cliff retreat) and these are found in central playa facies which are related to the internal redistribution of water, salt and sediment.

  17. The family Cavognathidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) in Argentina and adjacent countries.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Osvaldo Di; Turienzo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The family Cavognathidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) in Argentina is represented by three species of the genus Taphropiestes Reitter, 1875: T. fusca Reitter, 1875 [Chubut], T. magna Ślipiński & Tomaszewska, 2010 [Río Negro; Chubut], and T. plaumanni Ślipiński & Tomaszewska 2010 [Buenos Aires]. A total of 2565 larvae (multiple instars), 83 pupae, 2028 live adults, and 16 dead adults of T. plaumanni were found in Argentina between 2005 and 2013 in the nests of birds representing the families Columbidae, Emberizidae, Falconidae, Furnariidae, Hirundinidae, Mimidae, Passeridae, Psittacidae, Troglodytidae and Tyrannidae. The adults were most abundant in closed mud nests of Furnarius rufus (Gmelin, 1788) [Furnariidae] and its inquiline birds, but the larvae were most abundant in wood nest boxes. When T. plaumanni was scarcely represented in bird nests from some localities, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer, 1797), an exotic darkling beetle [Col.: Tenebrionidae: Tenebrioninae], and one native species, Phobelius crenatus Blanchard, 1842 [Col.: Tenebrionidae: Lagriinae], were most abundant in stick nests of Furnariidae. In contrast, when A. diaperinus and P. crenatus were absent in one locality from the province of Buenos Aires, T. plaumanni was the most abundant beetle. A complete account of data is provided for these collections of T. plaumanni in Argentina. Known distributional data for all Argentinian species of Taphropiestes are plotted on maps with biogeographical provinces indicated. PMID:27394368

  18. Aquatic Coleoptera Distribution and Environmental Relationships in a Large Patagonian River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miserendino, María Laura; Archangelsky, Miguel

    2006-10-01

    The benthic coleopteran assemblages of the Chubut River basin were studied in order to assess the main factors affecting species composition and distribution along the upper, middle and lower catchments. A total of 13 sampling sites were selected and sampled seasonally. Eight taxa and 1,601 individuals were collected during the study. Richness was higher in the main channel of Chubut River at the upper basin than at the middle basin. Beetles were completely absent at the lower basin. Mean monthly density per sites varied from 0 to 85 ind m-2. Stethelmis kaszabi had a more restricted distribution whereas Hemiosus dejeanii, Austrelmis sp. and Austrolimnius spp. were more frequent and abundant. Austrelmis sp. appears as the most tolerant species, especially to higher TSS, ammonia, and conductivity values. Luchoelmis cekalovici was absent in stations associated with urban areas. A Canonical Correspondence Analysis shows that conductivity, total suspended solids, wet width, water temperature and pH were the most important variables structuring beetle assemblages. Land use related variables such as NH4, TP, and NO3 were less important but still significant. An increase in TSS affected negatively the coleopteran community; this could be related to both hydrogeological characteristics and agricultural activities (including overgrazing).This is the first approach to the knowledge of the ecological range of distribution of the coleopteran species in Patagonian rivers.

  19. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in Ixodes cf. neuquenensis and Ixodes sigelos ticks from the Patagonian region of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Patrick S; Bottero, Maria Noelia Saracho; Carvalho, Luis; Mackenstedt, Ute; Lareschi, Marcela; Venzal, José M; Nava, Santiago

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to detect Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infection in ixodid ticks from the Patagonia region in the south of Argentina. Therefore, ticks were collected on rodents in the provinces of Chubut, Río Negro and Santa Cruz. These ticks were identified as nymphs of Ixodes cf. neuquenensis and Ixodes sigelos. The B. burgdorferi s.l. infection was tested by a battery of PCR methods targeting the gene flagellin (fla) and the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer region (IGS). Three pools of I. sigelos nymphs from Chubut and Santa Cruz provinces as well as one pool of I. cf. neuquenensis nymphs from Río Negro province were tested positive in the fla-PCR. The samples of I. sigelos were also positive for the IGS-PCR. Phylogenetically, the haplotypes found in the positive ticks belong to the B. burgdorferi s.l. complex, and they were closely related to Borrelia chilensis, a genospecies isolated from Ixodes stilesi in Chile. The pathogenic relevance of the Borrelia genospecies detected in both I. neuquenensis and I. sigelos is unknown. PMID:27372197

  20. Fingerprint ridge density in the Argentinean population and its application to sex inference: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Rivaldería, Noemí; Sánchez-Andrés, Ángeles; Alonso-Rodríguez, Concepción; Dipierri, José E; Gutiérrez-Redomero, Esperanza

    2016-02-01

    Fingerprint ridge density (RD) is known to vary according to sex and population, and such variation can be used for forensic purposes. The aim of this study was to analyze the fingerprint RD of two samples of the Argentinean population in order to assess their topological, digital, bilateral, sexual, and population differences for subsequent application in the inference of sex. Data were collected from the fingerprints of 172 individuals from the Buenos Aires province and 163 from the Chubut province. RD was assessed for three different count areas for all 10 fingers of each individual. In both sexes and both samples, significant differences among areas were obtained, so that radial-RD>ulnar-RD>proximal-RD. Females presented greater RD than males in all areas and on all fingers. Regarding population differences, no significant differences were found between the Buenos Aires and Chubut samples (except for proximal RD in males). However, both samples showed RD significantly different from that of the Jujuy province. The application of Bayes' theorem allowed for the identification of an RD threshold for discrimination of sexes in these Argentinean samples. In conclusion females consistently exhibit narrower epidermal ridges than males, which may evidence a universal pattern of sexual dimorphism in this trait that can be useful in forensics in the identification of individuals. PMID:26474825

  1. Late tertiary and quaternary fluvial deposits in the Mesilla and Hueco bolsons, El Paso area, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Charles J.; Willingham, Daniel L.

    1984-03-01

    The late Tertiary to Quaternary Fort Hancock and Camp Rice Formations fill several extensional basins of the southern Rio Grande Rift. Interior drainage and central playa lakes characterize most of these rift basins. However, sedimentation in two basins located in the central part of the southern rift, the Mesilla and Hueco bolsons, was also greatly influenced by a northern segment of the ancestral Rio Grande river system. During the late Pliocene, a large-scale stream system entered the north end of the Mesilla bolson and deposited a south-sloping fluvial plain that overwhelmed playa lake and bolson-margin areas. The fluvial plain subsequently advanced across the eastern or southeastern margins of the Mesilla bolson then inundated a playa lake in the adjacent Hueco bolson. The Fort Hancock Formation was deposited during fluvial inundation of the bolsons. Four lithofacies of the Fort Hancock Formation are recognized: claystone, mudstone and sandstone, channelized sandstone, and conglomerate. The conglomerate and claystone facies were deposited in bolson-margin and playa depositional environments, respectively. The channelized sandstone facies formed the proximal fluvial plain of the ancestral Rio Grande system. The mudstone and sandstone facies formed in both playa-margin and distal fluvial-plain environments. By the middle Pleistocene, a major drainage basin south of the Hueco bolson, which formed the southern segment of the ancestral Rio Grande system, extended northward into the Hueco and Mesilla bolsons. At this time, the Rio Grande system was entirely integrated from southern Colorado to the Gulf of Mexico. Pebbly, coarse sand transported through this channel system formed the middle Pleistocene Camp Rice Formation.

  2. [Community structure of sponges (Porifera) in three reefs at Morrocoy National Park, Venezuela and its correspondence with some environmental variables].

    PubMed

    Romero, Marco A; Villamizar, Estrella; Malaver, Nora

    2013-09-01

    Sponges have an important ecological role in coral reef ecosystems. However, when compared to other benthic Phyla, it has been little researched. This research was focused in the variability of the community structure of sponges in three locations at Morrocoy National Park (Cayo Sombrero, Playa Mero and Punta Brava) exposed to different environmental conditions (transparency and currents intensity) and affected in different degree of severity by a mass mortality event in 1996. A total of 15 transects (10 m long and 1 m wide) were evaluated in three strata (between 3 and 15 m depth) in each site, where all the individuals were counted by species. Relative abundance by species, diversity and evenness were calculated. Locations showed differences respect turbidity, wave and current intensity. 27 species were found in Morrocoy; Cayo Sombrero (23), Playa Mero (18) and Punta Brava (15). Agelas sceptrum, Amphimedon erina and Niphates erecta were the most common in first location; Niphates erecta and Dysidea etheria in Playa Mero and Dysidea etheria, Niphates erecta and Amphimedon erina in Punta Brava. The species composition showed statistical differences between all three locations; Cayo Sombrero resulted the most diverse and even, followed by Playa Mero and Punta Brava. According to Sorensen Similarity Index results, Cayo Sombrero and Playa Mero were more similar, while Punta Brava resulted the most different. The variability in environmental conditions and the differential mass mortality effects of 1996 in all three reefs, were probably the main causes of the differences between their sponge communities. Nevertheless, we cannot conclude about the weight of these factors. PMID:24027920

  3. Evaporation and land surface energy budget at the Salar de Atacama, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Stephanie K.; Tyler, Scott W.; Ortiz, Cristián A.; Muñoz, José F.; Adkins, Paula L.

    2005-08-01

    Playa systems are driven by evaporation processes, yet the mechanisms by which evaporation occurs through playa salt crusts are still poorly understood. In this study we examine playa evaporation as it relates to land surface energy fluxes, salt crust characteristics, groundwater and climate at the Salar de Atacama, a 3000 km 2 playa in northern Chile containing a uniquely broad range of salt crust types. Land surface energy budget measurements were taken at eight representative sites on this playa during winter (August 2001) and summer (January 2002) seasons. Measured values of net all-wave radiation were highest at vegetated and rough halite crust sites and lowest over smooth, highly reflective salt crusts. Over most of the Salar de Atacama, net radiation was dissipated by means of soil and sensible heat fluxes. Dry salt crusts tended to heat and cool very quickly, whereas soil heating and cooling occurred more gradually at wetter vegetated sites. Sensible heating was strongly linked to wind patterns, with highest sensible heat fluxes occurring on summer days with strong afternoon winds. Very little energy available at the land surface was used to evaporate water. Eddy covariance measurements could only constrain evaporation rates to within 0.1 mm d -1, and some measured evaporation rates were less than this margin of uncertainty. Evaporation rates ranged from 0.1 to 1.1 mm d -1 in smooth salt crusts around the margin of the salar and from 0.4 to 2.8 mm d -1 in vegetated areas. No evaporation was detected from the rugged halite salt crust that covers the interior of the salar, though the depth to groundwater is less than 1 m in this area. These crusts therefore represent a previously unrecorded end member condition in which the salt crusts form a practically impermeable barrier to evaporation.

  4. In-flight calibration of the spectral and radiometric characteristics of AVIRIS in 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Conel, James E.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Margolis, Jack S.; Carrere, Veronique; Vane, Gregg; Hoover, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    On 7 Mar. 1991, an in-flight calibration experiment was held at the Ivanpah Playa in southeastern California for the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) imaging spectrometer. Five AVIRIS overflights were acquired of a calibration target designated on the Ivanpah Playa surface. At the time of the overflights, the reflectance of the calibration target was measured with a field spectrometer. In addition, the atmospheric optical depths and water vapor abundance were measured from a radiometer station adjacent to the calibration target. These in-situ measurements were used to constrain the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to model the upwelling spectral radiance incident to the sensor aperture during the overflights. Analyses of this modeled radiance in conjunction with the laboratory-calibrated radiance were used to determine the spectral and radiometric calibration of AVIRIS while in flight.

  5. Pesticide Use Plan (PUP) for Pantex Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenhals, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act and its Worker Protection Standard, EPA authority, state regulations, and Texas Department of Agriculture authority make up a complex set of environment compliance requirements. The Pantex Plant northeast of Amarillo, Texas is currently dedicated to the disassembly of nuclear weapons. Ironically large areas of the Pantex Plant Site have been farmed for over 40 years. Pesticides are an integral part of agronomic production practices once economic thresholds for certain pests are exceeded. Horticulture and industrial operations also use pesticides. Pesticides can migrate to several playa lakes onsite, where they may threaten compliance with the Clean Water Act. Plant personnel are aware of the need to provide a chemically safe work environment, protect the public, and ensure an ecologically healthy environment. Thus a PUP has been developed to coordinate all pesticide use, ensure safety of agricultural and industrial workers, and protect the playa habitat. The PUP provides guidelines for pesticide use, notification, training, and safety.

  6. Multiple dust sources in the Sahara Desert: The importance of sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouvi, Onn; Schepanski, Kerstin; Amit, Rivka; Gillespie, Alan R.; Enzel, Yehouda

    2012-07-01

    We determine the current sources of dust in the Sahara Desert using quantitative correlation between the number of days with dust storms (NDS), derived from remote-sensing data of high temporal resolution, with the distribution of the soil types and geomorphic units. During 2006-8 the source of over 90% of the NDS was found to be sand dunes, leptosols, calcisols, arenosols, and rock debris. In contrast to previous studies, only few dust storms originated from playas and dry lake beds. Land erodibility was estimated by regressing the NDS to the number of days with high-speed wind events, and was found to be high for sand dunes. Clay and fine-silt grains and aggregates are scarce in sand dunes, which most likely produce dust particles through aeolian abrasion of sand grains. Thus, saltating sand grains impacting clay aggregates on playa surfaces cannot be the sole process for generating dust in the Sahara.

  7. Redbeds from the Middle Muschelkalk (Middle Triassic) of the SW Germanic Basin: arid environments from Pangea's interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecsei, A.; Mandau, T.

    2002-01-01

    The facies of a redbed succession from the lower Middle Muschelkalk of the SW Germanic Basin allows reconstruction of the depositional environment and inference with regard to the climate in a little studied part of Pangea's interior. The redbeds are dominated by fine-grained terrigenous deposits, with both intercalated thin sandstone and carbonate beds. The clastics were derived from the nearby hinterland, and their facies suggest episodic deposition on a playa mud flat or flood plain. The occurrence in the lower part of the succession of sand-patch breccias, ooids, and dolomicrite beds suggests an origin in saline pans and playa lakes. These diverse facies, and phreatic dolomites, reflect an arid climate during deposition.

  8. Coda wave attenuation parallel and perpendicular to the Mexican Pacific coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Valdés-González, C.

    2000-10-01

    We calculated the quality factor, Qc, at frequencies from 6 to 24 Hz using coda waves of 97 aftershocks of the Petatlan, Mexico, earthquake (March 14, 1979; MS=7.6). The data were recorded parallel (between Acapulco and Playa Azul) and perpendicular (between Petatlan and Mexico City) to the coast. The results are the following: at 12 and 24 Hz there is no significant difference in the attenuation ( Qc-1) along the two paths; at 6 Hz, Qc-1 has a large scatter in both directions. This observation indicates strong site effects at this frequency; average Qc-1 is slightly higher between Petatlan-Acapulco (toward SE) than between Petatlan-Playa Azul (toward NW); and at high frequencies, Qc-1 remains essentially constant perpendicular to the coast. These results show that the large seismic wave amplifications in Mexico City are caused by shallow site effects.

  9. Selected hydrologic data for the Bonneville Salt Flats and Pilot Valley, western Utah, 1991-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, James L.; Brothers, W.C.; Gerner, L.J.; Muir, P.S.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains hydrologic data collected during 1991-93 in the Bonneville Salt Flats and Pilot Valley study area of western Utah. These data were collected in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, as part of a study to investigate possible salt loss from the Bonneville Salt Flats. The Bonneville Salt Flats and adjacent Pilot Valley are located in the western part of the Great Salt Lake Desert in Utah, near the Nevada border. The Bonneville Salt Flats playa has a thick, perennial salt crust and the Pilot Valley playa has a thin, ephemeral salt crust. Well-completion data, including well depth and screened intervals, are presented in this report for selected shallow and deep monitoring wells. Water-level measurements are reported with corresponding specfic-gravity and temperature measurements. Results of chemical analyses are reported for brine collected from wells and pore fluids extracted from cores.

  10. Spatial characterization of land surface energy fluxes and uncertainty estimation at the Salar de Atacama, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Stephanie K.; Tyler, Scott W.

    2006-02-01

    We use Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER) data to estimate spatial energy flux and evaporation distributions at the Salar de Atacama, a playa in Northern Chile. Our approach incorporates ASTER surface kinetic temperature, emissivity, and reflectance data, ground-based meteorological measurements, and empirical parameters. Energy flux distributions are estimated using either spatially constant or spatially distributed values of model parameters, with spatially distributed parameters assigned separately to each land cover category in an image classification. We test the sensitivity of energy budget calculations to state variable and parameter values by conducting Monte Carlo simulations for regions with ground energy budget measurements. Results show that assigning spatially distributed model parameters via land cover classifications yields significant improvements to ground and sensible heat flux predictions. Latent heat fluxes cannot, however, be predicted with sufficient accuracy to allow estimation of area-integrated evaporative moisture loss at this low-evaporation playa.

  11. Three new species and one new record of Campylaimus (Diplopeltidae, Nematoda) from Argentine coasts (Buenos Aires and Santa Cruz, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Villares, Gabriela; Martelli, Antonela; Russo, Virginia Lo; Pastor, Catalina

    2013-01-01

    Two new Campylaimus species from Arroyo Pareja, Buenos Aires province and one new species and one new record of Campylaimus from Puerto San Julián, Chubut province are described. The three species are characterized by the shape of the copulatory apparatus of the male and the presence of precloacal papillae. Campylaimus bonariensis sp. nov. has slender and arcuate spicules, with well-developed cephalization at the proximal end, tubular gubernaculum and three precloacal papillae; Campylaimus arcuatus sp. nov. has curved spicules, with well-developed cephalization at the proximal end, gubernaculum with dorso-caudally directed apophysis and five precloacal papillae; Campylaimus patagonicus sp. nov. has slender and arcuate spicules without proximal cephalization, gubernaculum with dorso-caudally directed apophysis and two precloacal papillae. An emended diagnosis of the genus Campylaimus and an identification key to species based on male characters are given. PMID:24698903

  12. Circular structures of Bajada del Diablo (Argentina): geophysical signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezzi, C. B.; Orgeira, M. J.; Martinez, O.; Acevedo, R. D.; Ponce, F.; Goldmann, G.; Magneres, I.; Rabassa, J.

    2016-02-01

    Bajada del Diablo is located in the Northern Patagonian Massif, Chubut, Argentina. The study area includes several circular structures found in Miocene olivine basalts of the Quiñelaf Eruptive Complex and in the Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene Pampa Sastre conglomerates. An impact origin has been proposed for these circular structures. With the aim of further investigate the proposed impact origin, topographic, gravimetric, magnetic, resistivity, paleomagnetic and electromagnetic surveys in two circular structures ("8" and "G") located in Pampa Sastre conglomerates and in basalts of the Quiñelaf Eruptive Complex were carried out. The new geophysical results support the hypothesis of an impact origin. However, the confirmation of such an origin through the findings of shock metamorphism evidences and/or the recovery of meteorites remains elusive.

  13. New record of anoplocephalid eggs (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) collected from rodent coprolites from archaeological and paleontological sites of Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, María Ornela; Fugassa, Martín Horacio; Barberena, Ramiro; Sauthier, Daniel Edgardo Udrizar; Sardella, Norma Haydée

    2013-10-01

    Results of paleoparasitological examination of rodent coprolites collected from archaeological and paleontological sites from Patagonia, Argentina, are present. Each coprolite was processed, rehydrated, homogenized, spontaneously sedimented and examined using light microscope. Coprolites and eggs were described, measured and photographed, and were compared with current faeces of Lagidium viscacia. Eggs with morphological features, attributed to an anoplocephalid cestode were found in samples collected from Cueva Huenul 1 (36°56'45″S, 69°47'32″W, Neuquén Province, Holocene) and Los Altares Profile (43º53'35″S, 68º23'21″W, Chubut Province, Late Holocene). These are the first findings of this anoplocephalid from faecal material from patagonic rodents. PMID:23602736

  14. Circular structures of Bajada del Diablo (Argentina): geophysical signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezzi, C. B.; Orgeira, M. J.; Martinez, O.; Acevedo, R. D.; Ponce, F.; Goldmann, G.; Magneres, I.; Rabassa, J.

    2016-05-01

    Bajada del Diablo is located in the Northern Patagonian Massif, Chubut, Argentina. The study area includes several circular structures found in Miocene olivine basalts of the Quiñelaf Eruptive Complex and in the Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene Pampa Sastre conglomerates. An impact origin has been proposed for these circular structures. With the aim of further investigate the proposed impact origin, topographic, gravimetric, magnetic, resistivity, palaeomagnetic and electromagnetic surveys in two circular structures (`8' and `G') located in Pampa Sastre conglomerates and in basalts of the Quiñelaf Eruptive Complex were carried out. The new geophysical results support the hypothesis of an impact origin. However, the confirmation of such an origin through the findings of shock metamorphism evidences and/or the recovery of meteorites remains elusive.

  15. Multiple incidence angle SIR-B experiment over Argentina Mapping of forest units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimino, J.; Casey, D.; Wall, S. D.; Brandani, A.; Rabassa, J.

    1986-01-01

    Multiple incidence angle SIR-B data of the Cordon la Grasa region of the Chubut Province of Argentina are used to discriminate various forest types by their relative brightness versus incidence angle signatures. The region consists of several species of Nothofagas which change in canopy structure with elevation, slope, and exposure. In general, the factors that appear to impact the radar response most are canopy structure, density, and ground cover (presence or absence of dead trunks and branches in particular). The results of this work indicate that (1) different forest species, and structures of a single species, may be discriminated using multiple incidence angle radar imagery and (2) it is essential to consider the variation in backscatter due to incidence angle when analyzing the comparing data collected at varying frequencies and polarizations.

  16. Early Holocene basinal sediments of the Dakhleh Oasis region, south central Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Ian A.

    1989-09-01

    Twenty samples of artifactual ostrich eggshell and hearth charcoal, firmly to loosely associated with basinal lacustrine, playa, and sand sheet sediments in the Dakhleh Oasis region of south-central Egypt, yield radiocarbon ages between ca. 8800 and ca. 4700 yr B.P. The sediments record variable sedimentary responses to an early Holocene pluvial interval in this virtually rainless region. Differences of hydrogeology and morphometry among and within basin types complicate paleoclimatic interpretation.

  17. A 250,000-year record of lunette dune accumulation on the Southern High Plains, USA and implications for past climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Julie

    2013-02-01

    A concentration of lake/playa basins occurs on the Southern High Plains (SHP) of northwest Texas and eastern New Mexico. Associated with these lake/playas are lee-side lunettes positioned on their southeast margins ranging in height from 1.5 to >10 m. An OSL dating program was applied to 30 samples from lunettes associated with large lakes and small playa basins. Samples were extracted from trenched dune sections or from deep cores. Earlier SHP lunette investigations show depositional ages primarily in the late Wisconsin and Holocene. This research extends the timing of lunette accretion to the middle Pleistocene, the earliest recorded deposition for these features. The expanded chronology permitted investigation into dune morphology on nested lunettes built on contracting lake margins. Outer lunettes formed prior to inner dunes, but simultaneous deposition occurred on downwind ridges as younger lee-side dunes were constructed. Large lake lunettes were inactive during discreet SHP pluvial episodes from early Wisconsin to LGM. Conversely, these lunettes accreted when climatic conditions promoted basin desiccation and aeolian deflation. This suggests their mode of formation contrasts with lunette models recognized for other regions. From post LGM to earliest Holocene, active lunette accretion occurred from 16 to 11 ka followed by a significant period of lunette construction during the mid-Holocene. Late Holocene-lunette deposition was interrupted by intervals of landscape stability. Lunette deposition between 1300s and 1700s corresponds with drought intervals recognized in tree-ring records from adjacent regions. Recent lunette activity on the plateau is contemporary with the 1930's 'dust bowl'. Further insight into SHP response to changing climatic conditions was given by comparing lunette depositional events with previous investigations on sedimentation intervals for draws, lake/playa basins, and sand sheets.

  18. Geochemical characterization of groundwater in the vicinity of the Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Fryar, A.E.; Mullican, W.F. III )

    1993-09-01

    Groundwater samples from the perched and Ogallala aquifers in the vicinity of the Pantex Plant have been collected and analyzed for ionic and isotopic constituents. These data are needed to resolve three questions important not only for contaminant remediation on site, but also generally for water use on the southern High Plains. (1) How does the chemistry of groundwater evolve with flow from the land surface to the Ogallala aquifer (2) How rapidly is the Ogallala aquifer recharged and from what sources (3) How extensive are perched aquifers in the region, in particular the contaminated perched aquifer underlying Playa 1 at the Pantex Plant Away from the center of this perched aquifer, solute concentrations decrease and the composition evolves toward a mixed-cation bicarbonate facies observed regionally within the Ogallala aquifer. The evolving water chemistry may reflect reaction with pedogenic carbonates and adsorption of cations on clay minerals. Wells of less than 100m deep contain bomb tritium, indicating water less than 40 yr. old. However, tritiated Ogallala wells also exhibit C[sup 14] levels as low as 20.8% modern carbon (equivalent to an uncorrected age of 13,000 yr), which suggests mixing of recent recharge with older water. Values of O[sup 18] are slightly enriched relative to the meteoric water line, indicating minimal evaporation, consistent with Nativ's finding of focused recharge through playas. Boron and nitrogen isotopes may allow us to quantify the volumetric contribution of playa waters to the Ogallala aquifer and assess the continuity of perched aquifers underlying playas.

  19. Surface processes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and altimetry data were analyzed to determine the nature and extent of surface modification for venusian plains in the Sedna Planitia, Alpha Regio, and western Ovda Regio areas. Specific cross sections derived from the SAR data were also compared to similar data for dry terrestrial basaltic lava flows (Lunar Crater and Cima volcanic fields) and playas (Lunar and Lavic Lakes) for which microtopographic profiles (i.e., quantitative roughness information) were available.

  20. Technical procedures for ecology: Environmental field program, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Final draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This volume contains Technical Procedures pursuant to the Land Use Site Study Plan including walkover surveys for threatened, endangered, or candidate species; vegetation classification and mapping; reclamation planning; wetland and floodplain determination and characterization of playas; wildlife habitat mapping methods; mammal sampling; bird survey methods; reptile and amphibian survey methods; preexisting environmental; stress and disturbance studies methods; voucher specimens for plants; and voucher specimens to wildlife. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Field investigation of dried lakes in western United States as an analogue to desiccation fractures on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Maarry, M. R.; Watters, W. A.; Yoldi, Z.; Pommerol, A.; Fischer, D.; Eggenberger, U.; Thomas, N.

    2015-12-01

    Potential Desiccation Polygons (PDPs), tens to hundreds of meters in size, have been observed in numerous regions on Mars, particularly in ancient (>3 Gyr old) terrains of inferred paleolacustrine/playa geologic setting, and in association with hydrous minerals such as smectites. Therefore, a better understanding of the conditions in which large desiccation polygons form could yield unique insight into the ancient climate on Mars. Many dried lakebeds/playas in western United States display large (>50 m wide) desiccation polygons, which we consider to be analogues for PDPs on Mars. Therefore, we have carried out fieldwork in seven of these dried lakes in San Bernardino and the Death Valley National Park regions complemented with laboratory and spectral analysis of collected samples. Our study shows that the investigated lacustrine/playa sediments have (a) a soil matrix containing ~40-75% clays and fine silt (by volume) where the clay minerals are dominated by illite/muscovite followed by smectite, (b) carbonaceous mineralogy with variable amounts of chloride and sulfate salts, and significantly, (c) roughly similar spectral signatures in the visible-near-infrared (VIS-NIR) range. We conclude that the development of large desiccation fractures is consistent with water table retreat. In addition, the comparison of the mineralogical to the spectral observations further suggests that remote sensing VIS-NIR spectroscopy has its limitations for detailed characterization of lacustrine/playa deposits. Finally, our results imply that the widespread distribution of PDPs on Mars indicates global or regional climatic transitions from wet conditions to more arid ones making them important candidate sites for future in situ missions.

  2. Surface processes on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidson, R. E.

    1992-12-01

    Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and altimetry data were analyzed to determine the nature and extent of surface modification for venusian plains in the Sedna Planitia, Alpha Regio, and western Ovda Regio areas. Specific cross sections derived from the SAR data were also compared to similar data for dry terrestrial basaltic lava flows (Lunar Crater and Cima volcanic fields) and playas (Lunar and Lavic Lakes) for which microtopographic profiles (i.e., quantitative roughness information) were available.

  3. AVIRIS study of Death Valley evaporite deposits using least-squares band-fitting methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J. K.; Clark, R. N.

    1992-01-01

    Minerals found in playa evaporite deposits reflect the chemically diverse origins of ground waters in arid regions. Recently, it was discovered that many playa minerals exhibit diagnostic visible and near-infrared (0.4-2.5 micron) absorption bands that provide a remote sensing basis for observing important compositional details of desert ground water systems. The study of such systems is relevant to understanding solute acquisition, transport, and fractionation processes that are active in the subsurface. Observations of playa evaporites may also be useful for monitoring the hydrologic response of desert basins to changing climatic conditions on regional and global scales. Ongoing work using Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data to map evaporite minerals in the Death Valley salt pan is described. The AVIRIS data point to differences in inflow water chemistry in different parts of the Death Valley playa system and have led to the discovery of at least two new North American mineral occurrences. Seven segments of AVIRIS data were acquired over Death Valley on 31 July 1990, and were calibrated to reflectance by using the spectrum of a uniform area of alluvium near the salt pan. The calibrated data were subsequently analyzed by using least-squares spectral band-fitting methods, first described by Clark and others. In the band-fitting procedure, AVIRIS spectra are fit compared over selected wavelength intervals to a series of library reference spectra. Output images showing the degree of fit, band depth, and fit times the band depth are generated for each reference spectrum. The reference spectra used in the study included laboratory data for 35 pure evaporite spectra extracted from the AVIRIS image cube. Additional details of the band-fitting technique are provided by Clark and others elsewhere in this volume.

  4. Population regulation in Magellanic penguins: what determines changes in colony size?

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Luciana M; García Borboroglu, Pablo; Boersma, P Dee; Pascual, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Seabirds are often studied at individual colonies, but the confounding effects of emigration and mortality processes in open populations may lead to inappropriate conclusions on the mechanisms underlying population changes. Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) colonies of variable population sizes are distributed along the Argentine coastline. In recent decades, several population and distributional changes have occurred, with some colonies declining and others newly established or increasing. We integrated data of eight colonies scattered along ∼600 km in Northern Patagonia (from 41°26´S, 65°01´W to 45°11´S, 66°30´W, Rio Negro and Chubut provinces) and conducted analysis in terms of their growth rates, production of young and of the dependence of those vital rates on colony age, size, and location. We contrasted population trends estimated from abundance data with those derived from population modeling to understand if observed growth rates were attainable under closed population scenarios. Population trends were inversely related to colony size, suggesting a density dependent growth pattern. All colonies located in the north--which were established during the last decades--increased at high rates, with the smallest, recently established colonies growing at the fastest rate. In central-southern Chubut, where colonies are the oldest, the largest breeding aggregations declined, but smaller colonies remained relatively stable. Results provided strong evidence that dispersal played a major role in driving local trends. Breeding success was higher in northern colonies, likely mediated by favorable oceanographic conditions. However, mean foraging distance and body condition of chicks at fledging were influenced by colony size. Recruitment of penguins in the northern area may have been triggered by a combination of density dependence, likely exacerbated by less favorable oceanographic conditions in the southern sector. Our results reaffirm the idea that

  5. Population Regulation in Magellanic Penguins: What Determines Changes in Colony Size?

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Luciana M.; Borboroglu, Pablo García; Boersma, P. Dee; Pascual, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Seabirds are often studied at individual colonies, but the confounding effects of emigration and mortality processes in open populations may lead to inappropriate conclusions on the mechanisms underlying population changes. Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) colonies of variable population sizes are distributed along the Argentine coastline. In recent decades, several population and distributional changes have occurred, with some colonies declining and others newly established or increasing. We integrated data of eight colonies scattered along ∼ 600 km in Northern Patagonia (from 41°26´S, 65°01´W to 45°11´S, 66°30´W, Rio Negro and Chubut provinces) and conducted analysis in terms of their growth rates, production of young and of the dependence of those vital rates on colony age, size, and location. We contrasted population trends estimated from abundance data with those derived from population modeling to understand if observed growth rates were attainable under closed population scenarios. Population trends were inversely related to colony size, suggesting a density dependent growth pattern. All colonies located in the north—which were established during the last decades—increased at high rates, with the smallest, recently established colonies growing at the fastest rate. In central-southern Chubut, where colonies are the oldest, the largest breeding aggregations declined, but smaller colonies remained relatively stable. Results provided strong evidence that dispersal played a major role in driving local trends. Breeding success was higher in northern colonies, likely mediated by favorable oceanographic conditions. However, mean foraging distance and body condition of chicks at fledging were influenced by colony size. Recruitment of penguins in the northern area may have been triggered by a combination of density dependence, likely exacerbated by less favorable oceanographic conditions in the southern sector. Our results reaffirm the idea

  6. Getting water right: A case study in water yield modelling based on precipitation data.

    PubMed

    Pessacg, Natalia; Flaherty, Silvia; Brandizi, Laura; Solman, Silvina; Pascual, Miguel

    2015-12-15

    Water yield is a key ecosystem service in river basins and especially in dry regions around the World. In this study we carry out a modelling analysis of water yields in the Chubut River basin, located in one of the driest districts of Patagonia, Argentina. We focus on the uncertainty around precipitation data, a driver of paramount importance for water yield. The objectives of this study are to: i) explore the spatial and numeric differences among six widely used global precipitation datasets for this region, ii) test them against data from independent ground stations, and iii) explore the effects of precipitation data uncertainty on simulations of water yield. The simulations were performed using the ecosystem services model InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) with each of the six different precipitation datasets as input. Our results show marked differences among datasets for the Chubut watershed region, both in the magnitude of precipitations and their spatial arrangement. Five of the precipitation databases overestimate the precipitation over the basin by 50% or more, particularly over the more humid western range. Meanwhile, the remaining dataset (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission - TRMM), based on satellite measurements, adjusts well to the observed rainfall in different stations throughout the watershed and provides a better representation of the precipitation gradient characteristic of the rain shadow of the Andes. The observed differences among datasets in the representation of the rainfall gradient translate into large differences in water yield simulations. Errors in precipitation of +30% (-30%) amplify to water yield errors ranging from 50 to 150% (-45 to -60%) in some sub-basins. These results highlight the importance of assessing uncertainties in main input data when quantifying and mapping ecosystem services with biophysical models and cautions about the undisputed use of global environmental datasets. PMID:26282756

  7. Megabreccia deposits in an extensional basin: The Miocene-Pliocene Horse Camp Formation, east-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J.G.; Brown, C.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Three varieties of megabreccia deposits are present in alluvial-lacustrine extensional basin fill of the Miocene-Pliocene Horse Camp Formation of east-central Nevada. Coherent debris sheets (150-300 m thick; up to 1,500 m long) consist of Oligocene-Miocene volcanic rock masses which are internally fractured yet retain their stratigraphic integrity. Fracture zones show variable amounts of displacement (up to 5 cm) and brecciation. These debris sheets overlie horizontally stratified sandstone and laminated claystone interpreted as playa deposits and are overlain by lithified grus. Emplacement of these coherent debris sheets was by landslide or block slide. Associated deposits of large boulders within playa facies suggest gliding of blocks broken from the edges of the landslides across wet playa surfaces. Large (1.6 - 2.4 km-long) allochthonous blocks consist of intact Paleozoic and Tertiary volcanic stratigraphic sequences which are brecciated and attenuated. Brecciation is accompanied in places by incorporation of muddy sand matrix. These blocks may be fragments of the upper plate of low-angle detachment faults which broke away as gravity-driven blocks from the nearby Horse Range and slid along the uplifted former detachment surface into the adjacent Horse Camp basin. Megabreccia deposits characterize Teritary extensional basins in western North America. Detailed analysis of their stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and structural relations can provide a better understanding of the complex tectonosedimentary history of these basins.

  8. Geochemical evidence for diversity of dust sources in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.; Budahn, J.R.; Lamothe, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Several potential dust sources, including generic sources of sparsely vegetated alluvium, playa deposits, and anthropogenic emissions, as well as the area around Owens Lake, California, affect the composition of modern dust in the southwestern United States. A comparison of geochemical analyses of modern and old (a few thousand years) dust with samples of potential local sources suggests that dusts reflect four primary sources: (1) alluvial sediments (represented by Hf, K, Rb, Zr, and rare-earth elements, (2) playas, most of which produce calcareous dust (Sr, associated with Ca), (3) the area of Owens (dry) Lake, a human-induced playa (As, Ba, Li, Pb, Sb, and Sr), and (4) anthropogenic and/or volcanic emissions (As, Cr, Ni, and Sb). A comparison of dust and source samples with previous analyses shows that Owens (dry) Lake and mining wastes from the adjacent Cerro Gordo mining district are the primary sources of As, Ba, Li, and Pb in dusts from Owens Valley. Decreases in dust contents of As, Ba, and Sb with distance from Owens Valley suggest that dust from southern Owens Valley is being transported at least 400 km to the east. Samples of old dust that accumulated before European settlement are distinctly lower in As, Ba, and Sb abundances relative to modern dust, likely due to modern transport of dust from Owens Valley. Thus, southern Owens Valley appears to be an important, geochemically distinct, point source for regional dust in the southwestern United States. Copyright ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. Geomorphic Aspects of Southern African Dryland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Southern African drylands are host to stable land surfaces with limited denudation rates. The resulting soils manifest long term weathering processes, including leaching, collapse and precipitation of calcium carbonate as is the case in the semi-arid Kalahari. Despite the thickness of some of the Kalahari soils and sands, they are furthermore depicting a range of neotectonic land forms and processes, associated with the contemporary rifting of the southern African continent. This is particularly apparent in satellite imagery and digital elevation data that can be used to examine regional scale surface characteristics. Southern Africa is also home to significant global and regional scale dust sources, which are mostly associated with inland basins and playas. Plumes of dust emitted from playas are able to impact upon downwind soil quality. This can be observed in the both the western Makgadikgadi as well as the Central Namib gravel plain. In the Namib playa dust contributes to the accumulation of gravel plain fines, leaching and massive pedogenic gypsum accumulations. It is apparent that Southern African dryland soils are home to aeolian inputs, host extensive duricrusts and depict neotectonic movement which should be of interest to the wider earth science community.

  10. Comparison of bacterial biodiversity and enzyme production in three hypersaline lakes; urmia, howz-soltan and aran-bidgol.

    PubMed

    Babavalian, Hamid; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Zahraei, Shirin; Rohban, Rokhsareh; Shakeri, Fatemeh; Moghaddam, Mehrdad Moosazadeh

    2014-12-01

    This research is a comparative study on the diversity of halophilic bacteria with hydrolytic activities in three significant hypersaline lakes; Urmia in the northwest and Howz-Soltan and Aran-Bidgol in the central desert in Iran. Isolated strains from these saline lakes were found to be halotolerant, moderately and extremely halophilic bacteria. The bacteria in each saline lake were able to produce different hydrolytic enzymes including amylase, protease, lipase, DNase, inulinase, xylanase, carboxy methyl cellulase, pectinase and pullulanase. 188, 302, 91 halophilic strains were isolated from Urmia Lake, Howz-Soltan and Aran-Bidgol playa, respectively. The numbers of Gram-positive strains were more than Gram-negatives, and among Gram-positive bacteria; spore-forming bacilli were most abundant. Due to the unique physico-chemical conditions of the lake environments, the hydrolytic activities of isolated strains were significantly different. For instance, isolated strains from Howz-Soltan playa did not produce pectinase, DNase, amylase, lipase and inulinase, while the isolates from Aran-Bidgol playa had a great ability to produce pectinase and DNase. The strains from Urmia Lake were also good producers of DNase but failed to show any chitinase activity. The diversity of halophilic bacteria from the mentioned three saline lakes was also determined using PCR-amplified 16S rRNA followed by phylogenetic analysis of the partial 16S rRNA sequences. PMID:25320444

  11. Lithium- and boron-bearing brines in the Central Andes: exploring hydrofacies on the eastern Puna plateau between 23° and 23°30'S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, R. L. López

    2016-04-01

    Internally drained basins of the Andean Plateau are lithium- and boron-bearing systems. The exploration of ionic facies and parental links in a playa lake located in the eastern Puna (23°-23°30'S) was assessed by hydrochemical determinations of residual brines, feed waters and solutions from weathered rocks. Residual brines have been characterized by the Cl- (SO4 =)/Na+ (K+) ratio. Residual brines from the playa lake contain up to 450 mg/l of boron and up to 125 mg/l of lithium, and the Las Burras River supplies the most concentrated boron (20 mg/l) and lithium (3.75 mg/l) inflows of the basin. The hydro-geochemical assessment allowed for the identification of three simultaneous sources of boron: (1) inflow originating from granitic areas of the Aguilar and Tusaquillas ranges; (2) weathering of the Ordovician basement; and (3) boron-rich water from the Las Burras River. Most of the lithium input of the basin is likely generated by present geothermal sources rather than by weathering and leaching of ignimbrites and plutonic rocks. However, XRD analyses of playa lake sediments revealed the presence of lithian micas of clastic origin, including taeniolite and eucriptite. This study is the first to document these rare Li-micas from the Puna basin. Thus, both residual brines and lithian micas contribute to the total Li content in the studied hydrologic system.

  12. Observation of the geology and geomorphology of the 1999 Marsokhod test site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Hon, R. A.; Barlow, N.G.; Reagan, M.K.; Bettis, E. Arthur, III; Foster, C.T., Jr.; Gulick, V.C.; Crumpler, L.S.; Aubele, J.C.; Chapman, M.G.; Tanaka, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    The Marsokhod rover returned data from six stations that were used to decipher the geomorphology and geology of a region not previously visited by members of the geomorphology field team. Satellite images and simulated descent images provided information about the regional setting. The landing zone was on an alluvial apron flanking a mountain block to the west and a playa surface to the east. Rover color images, infrared spectra analysis of the mountains, and the apron surface provided insight into the rock composition of the nearby mountains. From the return data the geomorphology team interpreted the region to consist of compressionally deformed, ancient marine sediments and igneous rocks exposed by more recent extensional tectonics. Unconsolidated alluvial materials blanket the lower flanks of the mountains. An ancient shoreline cut into alluvial material marks a high stand of water during a past, wetter climate period. Playa sediments floor a present-day, seasonally, dry lake. Observations made by the rover using panoramic and close-up (hand specimens-scale) image data and color scene data confirmed the presence of boulders, cobbles, and fines of various provinces. Rover traverses to sites identified as geologically distinct, such as fan, channel, shoreline, and playa, provided useful clues to the geologic interpretations. Analysis of local rocks was given context only through comparison with distant geologic features. These results demonstrated the importance of a multifaceted approach to site interpretation through comparison of interpretations derived by differing geologic techniques. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Assessment of the effects of farming and conservation programs on pesticide deposition in high plains wetlands.

    PubMed

    Belden, Jason B; Hanson, Brittany Rae; McMurry, Scott T; Smith, Loren M; Haukos, David A

    2012-03-20

    We examined pesticide contamination in sediments from depressional playa wetlands embedded in the three dominant land-use types in the western High Plains and Rainwater Basin of the United States including cropland, perennial grassland enrolled in conservation programs (e.g., Conservation Reserve Program [CRP]), and native grassland or reference condition. Two hundred and sixty four playas, selected from the three land-use types, were sampled from Nebraska and Colorado in the north to Texas and New Mexico in the south. Sediments were examined for most of the commonly used agricultural pesticides. Atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor, and trifluralin were the most commonly detected pesticides in the northern High Plains and Rainwater Basin. Atrazine, metolachlor, trifluralin, and pendimethalin were the most commonly detected pesticides in the southern High Plains. The top 5-10% of playas contained herbicide concentrations that are high enough to pose a hazard for plants. However, insecticides and fungicides were rarely detected. Pesticide occurrence and concentrations were higher in wetlands surrounded by cropland as compared to native grassland and CRP perennial grasses. The CRP, which is the largest conservation program in the U.S., was protective and had lower pesticide concentrations compared to cropland. PMID:22356096

  14. Effects of the Conservation Reserve Program on Hydrologic Processes in the Southern High Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacker, E. M.; Smidt, S. J.; Kendall, A. D.; Basso, B.; Hyndman, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern High Plains Aquifer is a rapidly depleting resource that supports agriculture in parts of New Mexico and the Texas Panhandle. The development of the aquifer has changed the landscape and the water cycle of the region. This study illustrates the evolving patterns of land use and the effects of cultivation, from irrigated to dryland farming to the countermanding influence of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Previous research indicates that greater recharge rates occur under cultivated land in the Southern High Plains than under unbroken soil: the transition to cultivation causes increased recharge, under both dryland and irrigated management, though most recharge still occurs through playa lakes. The Conservation Reserve Program takes land out of crop production, replacing the land cover with something more like the natural ecosystem. This may decrease recharge below fields, and reduce runoff that feeds playa lakes; or, CRP may help stabilize playa lakes, increasing recharge. Changes to the water cycle are investigated at the field scale using the System Approach to Land Use Sustainability (SALUS) crop model, and at the regional scale with the Landscape Hydrology Model (LHM), and compared with historical data and water table elevations.

  15. Hydrogeologic framework and occurrence, movement, and chemical characterization of groundwater in Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntington, Jena M.; Garcia, C. Amanda; Rosen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    can be several orders of magnitude more transmissive than surrounding and underlying consolidated rocks and Dixie Valley playa deposits. Transmissivity estimates in the basin fill throughout Dixie Valley ranged from 30 to 45,500 feet squared per day; however, a single transmissivity value of 0.1 foot squared per day was estimated for playa deposits. Groundwater generally flows from the mountain range uplands toward the central valley lowlands and eventually discharges near the playa edge. Potentiometric contours east and west of the playa indicate that groundwater is moving eastward from the Stillwater Range and westward from the Clan Alpine Mountains toward the playa. Similarly, groundwater flows from the southern and northern basin boundaries toward the basin center. Subsurface groundwater flow likely enters Dixie Valley from Fairview and Stingaree Valleys in the south and from Jersey and Pleasant Valleys in the north, but groundwater connections through basin-fill deposits were present only across the Fairview and Jersey Valley divides. Annual subsurface inflow from Fairview and Jersey Valleys ranges from 700 to 1,300 acre-feet per year and from 1,800 to 2,300 acre-feet per year, respectively. Groundwater flow between Dixie, Stingaree, and Pleasant Valleys could occur through less transmissive consolidated rocks, but only flow through basin fill was estimated in this study. Groundwater in the playa is distinct from the freshwater, basin-fill aquifer. Groundwater mixing between basin-fill and playa groundwater systems is physically limited by transmissivity contrasts of about four orders of magnitude. Total dissolved solids in playa deposit groundwater are nearly 440 times greater than total dissolved solids in the basin-fill groundwater. These distinctive physical and chemical flow restrictions indicate that groundwater interaction between the basin fill and playa sediments was minimal during this study period (water years 2009–11). Groundwater in Dixie Valley

  16. Estimated ground-water discharge by evapotranspiration from Death Valley, California, 1997-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeMeo, Guy A.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Boyd, Robert A.; Smith, J. LaRue; Nylund, Walter E.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service and Inyo County, Calif., collected field data from 1997 through 2001 to accurately estimate the amount of annual ground-water discharge by evapotranspiration (ET) from the floor of Death Valley, California. Multispectral satellite-imagery and National Wetlands Inventory data are used to delineate evaporative ground-water discharge areas on the Death Valley floor. These areas are divided into five general units where ground-water discharge from ET is considered to be significant. Based upon similarities in soil type, soil moisture, vegetation type, and vegetation density; the ET units are salt-encrusted playa (21,287 acres), bare-soil playa (75,922 acres), low-density vegetation (6,625 acres), moderate-density vegetation (5,019 acres), and high-density vegetation (1,522 acres). Annual ET was computed for ET units with micrometeorological data which were continuously measured at six instrumented sites. Total ET was determined at sites that were chosen for their soil- and vegetated-surface conditions, which include salt-encrusted playa (extensive salt encrustation) 0.17 feet per year, bare-soil playa (silt and salt encrustation) 0.21 feet per year, pickleweed (pickleweed plants, low-density vegetation) 0.60 feet per year, Eagle Borax (arrowweed plants and salt grass, moderate-density vegetation) 1.99 feet per year, Mesquite Flat (mesquite trees, high-density vegetation) 2.86 feet per year, and Mesquite Flat mixed grasses (mixed meadow grasses, high-density vegetation) 3.90 feet per year. Precipitation, flooding, and ground-water discharge satisfy ET demand in Death Valley. Ground-water discharge is estimated by deducting local precipitation and flooding from cumulative ET estimates. Discharge rates from ET units were not estimated directly because the range of vegetation units far exceeded the five specific vegetation units that were measured. The rate of annual ground-water discharge by ET for

  17. A 16-year record of eolian dust in Southern Nevada and California, USA: Controls on dust generation and accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    An ongoing project monitors modern dust accumulation in the arid southwestern United States to (1) determine the rate and composition of dust inputs to soils and (2) relate dust accumulation to weather patterns to help predict the effects of climate change on dust production and accumulation. The 16-year records of 35 dust-trap sites in the eastern Mojave Desert and southern Great Basin reveal how generation and accumulation of dust, including the silt-clay, carbonate, and soluble-salt fractions, is affected by the amount and seasonal distribution of rainfall and the behavior of different source types (alluvium, dry playas, and wet playas). Accumulation rates (fluxes) of the silt-clay fraction of dust, including carbonates, range from about 2-20 g/m2/yr. Average rates are higher in the southern part of the study area (south of latitude 36.5??N) and annually fluctuate over a larger range than rates in the northern part of the area. Sites throughout the study area show peaks in dust flux in the 1984-1985 sampling period and again in 1997-1999; northern sites also show increased flux in 1987-1988 and southern sites in 1989-1991. These peaks of dust flux correspond with both La Nina (dry) conditions and with strong El Nino (wet) periods. The accumulation rates of different components of mineral dusts fluctuate differently. For example, soluble-salt flux increases in 1987-1988, coincident with a moderate El Nino event, and increases very strongly in 1997-1999, overlapping with a strong El Nino event. Both of these high-rainfall winters were preceded and accompanied by strong summer rains. In contrast, little or no change in soluble-salt flux occurred during other periods of high winter rainfall but little summer rain, e.g. 1992-1995. The differences between northern vs. southern sites and between sites with playa dust sources vs. alluvial dust sources indicate that regional differences in the response of precipitation and vegetation growth to ENSO influence and

  18. Mapping bathymetry and rip channels with WorldView2 multispectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, S. M.; Houser, C.

    2014-12-01

    Rip currents are a worldwide coastal hazard that have claimed 616 lives in Costa Rica since 2001 (~50/yr). Lifeguard staff, warning signs, and flag systems have been shown to reduce deaths at rip-prone beaches but are not a perfect system. At Playa Cocles, a popular beach destination along the Caribbean Coast of Costa Rica near Puerto Viejo, lifeguards post flags at the mouth of the 3 to 6 rip currents present each morning. In July 2014, these dangerous currents were measured with floating GPS drogues at speeds up to 3.1 m/s. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capability of the Digital Globe WorldView2 (WV2) multispectral satellite for identifying rip channels and mapping bathymetry in the surf zone (20m and less), because rips form at topographically low spots in the bathymetry as a result of feedback amongst waves, substrate, and antecedent bathymetry. WV2 was launched in 2009; it has a 1.1 day pass-over rate with 1.84m ground pixel resolution of 8 bands, including 'yellow' (585-625 nm) and 'coastal blue' (400-450 nm). Using one 25km2 image from 23 December 2009, during the "high season" of tourism, a bathymetric map of Playa Cocles is created and measured for accuracy. Results of the study will assist the Comisión Nacional de Emergencias de Costa Rica and the town of Puerto Viejo by creating a rip current hazard evaluation and prediction system for the rip-prone beach of Playa Cocles. This creation methodology may be repeated for any following dates or other locations in Costa Rica (or anywhere on the globe captured by WV2). Future work will build on this research to determine rip current strength, location, and seasonality from a combination of WV2 satellite information and field data.

  19. Geoarchaeological investigations at the Winger site: A Late Paleoindian bison bonebed in Southwestern Kansas, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mandel, R.D.; Hofman, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The Winger site is a deeply buried Late Paleoindian bison bonebed in a playa basin on the High Plains of midcontinental North America. The site is one of few stratified, Late Paleoindian bison kills recorded in the region. The bonebed is exposed in the bank of an intermittent stream that cut into the edge of the playa basin. Avocational archaeologists excavated a small portion of the exposed bonebed in the early 1970s and reported flakes in association with the skeletal remains. Limited reinvestigations of the site were undertaken in 2001, and a monthlong excavation was conducted in 2002 to assess the stratigraphy, geochronology, and archaeology. The bonebed is 35 ni long in a buried soil developed in fine-grained basin fill overlain by early Holocene alluvium (arroyo fill). Recent alluvium overlies a soil developed in the early Holocene alluvium, and modern deposits of eolian sand 2 to to < 35 cm thick mantle the site area. Artifacts found at the site include two Allen points and a flake tool discovered in the bone bed, and a biface and Allen point fragment in disturbed bonebed deposits. Excavation of 9 m2 of the bone bed revealed some fully articulated skeletons, and taphonomic observations suggest some of the bison collapsed while standing in a playa or pond margin setting. The remains of at least six bison are represented in the excavated sample from 2002, but many more animals are represented in the bonebed. A 14C age of ca. 9000 yr B.P. was determined on collagen from bison rib fragments. This age is consistent with the diagnostic artifacts found at Winger. ?? 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Lunette dunes and yardangs of the Carson desert, Nevada: Implications for Holocene eolian activity in the northern Great Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, N. . Quaternary Sciences Center)

    1993-04-01

    A large complex of lunette dunes consisting of two and locally three ridges up to 40 m high occurs on the northeast margin of the Carson Sink playa. The outer, or north-easterly, ridge consists of a core of fine and coarse and partially cemented by saline clay and silt (Unit 1) with avalanche face cross-beds dipping to the north-east at 25--30[degree], as well as planar sets of wind ripple laminae with dips to both the northeast and west at 2--5[degree]. Overlying this unit on the crest and lee side of the ridge is 2--5 m of mobile poorly sorted, very fine and coarse sand that forms an active avalanche face up to 25 m high on the east side of the ridge (Unit 3). At a number of localities, the indurated core of the larger dune ridge is carved into yardanges, or streamlined small hills with a lemniscate shape that result from wind erosion of homogeneous sediments. The dunes overlie, with an erosional contact, Late Pleistocene saline lacustrine clays of paleolake Lahontan. They represent at least two episodes of mid- to late-Holocene deflation of sediments from the Carson Sink playa. Erosion of the dunes and yardang formation suggests: (1) termination of sediment supply from the playa as a result of reduced sediment supply and runoff from the Carson River, (2) cementation of the dunes by clay and silt accumulation, and (3) modern eolian erosion through flow acceleration on dune windward slopes.

  1. Observations of Near-Surface Heat-Flux and Temperature Profiles Through the Early Evening Transition over Contrasting Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Derek D.; Nadeau, Daniel F.; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Pardyjak, Eric R.

    2016-06-01

    Near-surface turbulence data from the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) program are used to study countergradient heat fluxes through the early evening transition. Two sites, subjected to similar large-scale forcing, but with vastly different surface and sub-surface characteristics, are considered. The Playa site is situated at the interior of a large dry lakebed desert with high sub-surface soil moisture, shallow water table, and devoid of vegetation. The Sagebrush site is located in a desert steppe region with sparse vegetation and little soil moisture. Countergradient sensible heat fluxes are observed during the transition at both sites. The transition process is both site and height dependent. At the Sagebrush site, the countergradient flux at 5 m and below occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux precedes the local temperature gradient sign change. For 10 m and above, the countergradient flux occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux follows the local temperature gradient sign change. At the Playa site, the countergradient flux at all tower levels occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux follows the local temperature gradient sign change. The phenomenon is explained in terms of the mean temperature and heat-flux evolution. The temperature gradient sign reversal is a top-down process while the flux reversal occurs nearly simultaneously at all heights. The differing countergradient behaviour is primarily due to the different subsurface thermal characteristics at the two sites. The combined high volumetric heat capacity and high thermal conductivity at the Playa site lead to small vertical temperature gradients that affect the relative magnitude of terms in the heat-flux tendency equation. A critical ratio of the gradient production to buoyant production of sensible heat flux is suggested so as to predict the countergradient behaviour.

  2. Comparisons of aircraft measurements of greenhouse gases with GOSAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Loewenstein, M.; Gore, W.; Tadic, J.; Lopez, J. P.; Shiomi, K.; Kawakami, S.; kuze, A.; Yokota, T.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical profiles of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and ozone were measured using the Alpha Jet research aircraft as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX). Airborne instruments measuring GHGs (Picarro Inc. G2301-m) and ozone (2B Technologies Inc., model 205) are installed in a wing pod and operated from NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, CA (37.415°N, 120.050°W). The in situ measurement instruments mounted on the aircraft yield precise and accurate vertical profiles of atmospheric GHGs and ozone. The purpose of this work is to validate GOSAT data and estimate from Alpha Jet measurements the contribution of GHGs from urban areas. We show the result of comparison of GOSAT and Alpha Jet measurements over Railroad Valley, NV and urban areas in Northern California. The Alpha Jet aircraft performs a measurement over the Railroad Valley (RRV) desert playa, Nevada (38.497°N, 115.691°W, 1437m above mean sea level) once a month for the comparison with Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) measurements from 2011. The GOSAT was developed to measure concentrations of CO2 and CH4 from space and has been in operation from 2009. The instruments onboard GOSAT are the Thermal And Near-infrared Sensor for carbon Observation Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and the TANSO Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI) (Kuze et al., 2009). The RRV playa is a flat, high altitude desert site and an area where local sources and sinks of carbon-species are expected to be minimal. The playa has virtually no vegetation and an overall size of 15 km× 15 km, which includes GOSAT's field of view. Reference Akihiko Kuze, Hiroshi Suto, Masakatsu Nakajima, and Takashi Hamazaki. Thermal and near infrared sensor for carbon observation Fourier-transform spectrometer on the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite for greenhouse gases monitoring. App. Opt., 48, 6716-6733, 2009.

  3. Hydrological indications of aeolian salts in mid-latitude deserts of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bing-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Large sandy deserts in middle latitude of northwestern China were studied on salt variations in modern and ancient aeolian sediments, aiming to explore their hydrological indications at the present and past. Globally, sulphate is rich in arid to semi-arid deserts, including the aeolian loess sediments in China and soils in low-latitude deserts, but is less common in the aeolian sediments from the mid-latitude deserts in this study. The compositional differences between aeolian salts and local natural waters is evident, indicating the chemistry of aeolian salts and the associated parent brines may be significantly different than that predicted for hydrologically closed systems. The formation of aeolian salts in the studied deserts is strongly controlled by earth surface processes in a large scale but not in a local scale. Vertical changes in facies and salinities are abrupt in the studied palaeo-aeolian sediment samples, which were interbedded by lacustrine/fluvial sediments with OSL and 14C ages ranging between 40 and 2 ka BP, reflecting rapid high-amplitude changes in hydrological settings during late Pleistocene to later Holocene in these ancient playa systems. A great difference in salt composition between aeolian and lacustrine sediments suggests that the inorganic salt is a latent geoproxy in revealing local hydrological variations and climate change in the desert areas. But the environmental indications could be amphibolous for the sedimentary sequences with dual/multiple depositional end-members; under this situation an increase in sequence salinity does not always represent an enhanced environmental aridity. Ancient playas are arid or humid at the same time based on several sporadic records is not a valid approach to correlation of salt deposits in adjacent saline playa basin in the studied areas. Effects of earth surface processes including erosion, deposition and other processes on sediment properties will bias the hydrological implications of sediment

  4. A 16,000 14C yr B.P. packrat midden series from the USA-Mexico Borderlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmgren, C.A.; Penalba, M.C.; Rylander, K.A.; Betancourt, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    A new packrat midden chronology from Playas Valley, southwestern New Mexico, is the first installment of an ongoing effort to reconstruct paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the U.S.A.-Mexico Borderlands. Playas Valley and neighboring basins supported pluvial lakes during full and/or late glacial times. Plant macrofossil and pollen assemblages from nine middens in the Playas Valley allow comparisons of two time intervals: 16,000-10,000 and 4000-0 14C yr B.P. Vegetation along pluvial lake margins consisted of open pinyon-juniper communities dominated by Pinus edulis, Juniperus scopulorum, Juniperus cf. coahuilensis, and a rich understory of C4 annuals and grasses. This summer-flowering understory is also characteristic of modern desert grassland in the Borderlands and indicates at least moderate summer precipitation. P. edulis and J. scopulorum disappeared or were rare in the midden record by 10,670 14C yr B.P. The late Holocene is marked by the arrival of Chihuahuan desert scrub elements and few departures as the vegetation gradually became modern in character. Larrea tridentata appears as late as 2190 14C yr B.P. based on macrofossils, but may have been present as early as 4095 14C yr B.P. based on pollen. Fouquieria splendens, one of the dominant desert species present at the site today, makes its first appearance only in the last millennium. The midden pollen assemblages are difficult to interpret; they lack modern analogs in surface pollen assemblages from stock tanks at different elevations in the Borderlands. ?? 2003 University of Washington. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spectral and Geological Characterization of Beach Components in Northern Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraballo Álvarez, I. O.; Torres-Perez, J. L.; Barreto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how changes in beach components may reflect beach processes is essential since variations along beach profiles can shed light on river and ocean processes influencing beach sedimentation and beachrock formation. It is likely these influences are related to beach proximity within the Río Grande de Manatí river mouth. Therefore, this study focuses on characterizing beach components at two sites in Manatí, Puerto Rico. Playa Machuca and Playa Tombolo, which are separated by eolianites, differ greatly in sediment size, mineralogy, and beachrock morphology. Several approaches were taken to geologically and spectrally characterize main beach components at each site. These approaches included field and microscopic laboratory identification, granulometry, and a comparison between remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) obtained with a field spectroradiometer and pre-existing spectral library signatures. Preliminary results indicate a positive correlation between each method. This study may help explore the possibility of using only Rrs to characterize beach and shallow submarine components for detailed image analysis and management of coastal features.This study focuses on characterizing beach components at two sites in Manatí, Puerto Rico. Playa Machuca and Playa Tombolo, two beaches that are separated by eolianites, differ greatly in sediment size and mineralogy, as well as in beachrock morphology. Understanding how changes in beach components may reflect beach processes is essential, since it is likely that differences are mostly related to each beaches' proximity to the Río Grande de Manatí river mouth. Hence, changes in components along beach profiles can shed light on the river's and the ocean's influence on beach sedimentation and beachrock formation. Several approaches were taken to properly geologically and spectrally characterize the main beach components at each site. These approaches included field and microscopic laboratory identification

  6. Analysis of ERTS imagery using special electronic viewing/measuring equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. E.; Serebreny, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    An electronic satellite image analysis console (ESIAC) is being employed to process imagery for use by USGS investigators in several different disciplines studying dynamic hydrologic conditions. The ESIAC provides facilities for storing registered image sequences in a magnetic video disc memory for subsequent recall, enhancement, and animated display in monochrome or color. Quantitative measurements of distances, areas, and brightness profiles can be extracted digitally under operator supervision. Initial results are presented for the display and measurement of snowfield extent, glacier development, sediment plumes from estuary discharge, playa inventory, phreatophyte and other vegetative changes.

  7. Online Resource for Earth-Observing Satellite Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, J.; Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Wenny, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS) at Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada is being developed by the University of Arizona to enable improved accuracy and consistency for airborne and satellite sensor calibration. Primary instrumentation at the site consists of ground-viewing radiometers, a sun photometer, and a meteorological station. Measurements made by these instruments are used to calculate surface reflectance, atmospheric properties and a prediction for top-of-atmosphere reflectance and radiance. This work will leverage research for RadCaTS, and describe the requirements for an online database, associated data formats and quality control, and processing levels.

  8. Description of floodplains and wetlands, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Floodplains and wetlands are important features of the Texas Panhandle landscape, and are found on the Deaf Smith County site and in its vicinity. Use or disturbance of floodplains and wetlands in relation to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is subject to environmental review requirements implementing two Executive Orders. This report provides general information on playa wetlands in the Texas Panhandle, and describes and maps floodplains and wetlands on the Deaf Smith site and in its vicinity. The report is based on the published literature, with information from limited field reconnaissance included.

  9. Directional variations in thermal emission from geologic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jakosky, B.M.; Finiol, G.W.; Henderson, B.G. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors investigated the directional emission properties of geologic surfaces using a ground-based, hand-held infrared radiometer and thermistor probe. Field sites involved surfaces ranging from smooth playa and sand surfaces to a very rough aa lava flow in the Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, NV, as part of the Geological Remote Sensing Field Experiment. Large directional variations in thermal emission were found; they result from the presence of surface roughness--at large scales producing spatial variations in kinetic temperature and at small scales producing emissivity variations. These variations are important in remotely determining surface structure and understanding surface energy balance and emission spectra.

  10. Desert Landforms and Surface Processes in the Mojave National Preserve and Vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffer, Philip W.

    2004-01-01

    Landscape features in the Mojave National Preserve are a product of ongoing processes involving tectonic forces, weathering, and erosion. Long-term climatic cycles (wet and dry periods) have left a decipherable record preserved as landform features and sedimentary deposits. This website provides and introduction to climate-driven desert processes influencing landscape features including stream channels, alluvial fans, playas (dry lakebeds), dunes, and mountain landscapes. Bedrock characteristics, and the geometry of past and ongoing faulting, fracturing, volcanism, and landscape uplift and subsidence influence the character of processes happening at the surface.

  11. Recovery of the Space Shuttle Columbia Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hames, Kevin L.

    2003-01-01

    Lessons Learned: a) Avionics data can playa critical role in the investigation of a "close call" or accident. b) Avionics designers should think about the role their systems might play in an investigation. c) Know your data, down to the bit level. d) Know your spacecraft - follow the data. e) Internal placement of circuit cards can affect their survivability. f) Think about how to reconstruct nonvolatile memory (e.g. serialize IC's, etc.) g) Use of external assets can aid in extracting data from avionics.

  12. The Chilean nitrate deposits.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ericksen, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The nitrate deposits in the arid Atacama desert of northern Chile consist of saline-cemented surficial material, apparently formed in and near a playa lake that formerly covered the area. Many features of their distribution and chemical composition are unique. The author believes the principal sources of the saline constituents were the volcanic rocks of late Tertiary and Quaternary age in the Andes and that the nitrate is of organic origin. Possible sources of the nitrate, iodate, perchlorate and chromate are discussed. -J.J.Robertson

  13. Artificial-Recharge Experiments and Operations on the Southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Richmond F.; Signor, Donald C.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments using highly turbid water from playa lakes for injection into the Ogallala Formation have resulted in greatly decreased yield of the recharge wells, Recharge of ground or surface water of good quality has indicated, however, that injection through wells is an effective method of recharging the aquifer. Water that is slightly turbid can be successfully injected for a period of time, but generally results in constantly declining yields and capacity for recharge. Redevelopment through pumping and surging significantly prolongs the life of recharge wells under some conditions. Surface spreading is little practiced on the High Plains, but locally may be a feasible means of artificial recharge.

  14. Directional variations in thermal emission from geologic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Finiol, Gary W.; Henderson, Bradley G.

    1990-01-01

    The directional emission properties of geologic surfaces were investigated using a ground-based, hand-held infrared radiometer and thermistor probe. Field sites involved surfaces ranging from smooth playa and sand surfaces to a very rough aa lava flow. Large directional variations in thermal emission were found; they result from the presence of surface roughness at large scales producing spatial variations in kinetic temperature and at small scales producing emissivity variations. These variations are important in remotely determining surface structure and understanding surface energy balance and emission spectra.

  15. Sedimentology, geochemistry and rock magnetic properties of beach sands in Galapagos Islands - implications for nesting marine turtles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Cruz, L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Vazquez-Gutierrez, F.; Carranza-Edwards, A.

    2007-12-01

    Marine turtles are well known for their navigation ability in the open ocean and fidelity to nesting beaches. Green turtle adult females migrate from foraging areas to island nesting beaches, traveling hundreds or thousands of kilometers each way. The marine turtle breeding in the Galapagos Islands is the Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas agassisi); fairly common throughout the islands but with nesting sites located at Las Bachas (Santa Cruz), Barahona and Quinta Playa (Isabela), Salinas (Baltra), Gardner Bay (Española) and Bartolomé Islet. In order to characterize and to identify the geochemical signature of nesting marine turtle beaches in Galapagos Islands, sedimentological, geochemical and rock magnetic parameters are used. A total of one hundred and twenty sand samples were collected in four beaches to relate compositional characteristics between equivalent areas, these are: Las Bachas, Salinas, Barahona and Quinta Playa. Grain size is evaluated using laser particle analysis (Model Coulter LS 230). Bulk ICP-MS geochemical analysis is performed, following trace elements are analyzed: Al, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Ba, Pb, Fe, Mn, K, Na, Mg, Sr, Ca and Hg; and low-field magnetic susceptibility is measured in all samples at low and high frequencies. Granulometric analysis showed that Barahona and Quinta Playa are characterized for fine grained sands. In contrast, Salinas and Las Bachas exhibit medium to coarse sands. Trace metals concentrations and magnetic susceptibility show different distribution patterns in the beach sands. Calcium is the most abundant element in the samples. In particular, Co, K, and Na show similar concentrations in the four beaches. Las Bachas beach shows highest concentrations of Pb and Hg (maximum values 101.1 and 118.5 mg/kg, respectively), we suggest that the enrichment corresponds to an anthropogenic signal. Salinas beach samples show high concentrations of Fe, V, Cr, Zn, Mn and the highest values of magnetic susceptibility (maximum

  16. Aeolian Transport of Invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, T. E.; Walsh, E. J.; Wallace, R. L.; Rojo, L.; Rivas, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Playas and other ephemeral desert wetlands are preferential terrestrial landforms for dust emission. These sites also are habitat for a diverse assemblage of minute invertebrates. When wetlands desiccate, these invertebrates survive as resting stages (propagules). Thus, playas serve as isolated, ephemeral, biogeographical islands for aquatic invertebrates, but it is unclear how propagules disperse across distances as far as hundreds of kilometers to colonize hydrologically disconnected basins. Aeolian transport (anemochory) may provide the mechanism, especially since many invertebrate propagules are long-lived, aerodynamically shaped, possess low-density, and their size (30-600 μm) falls within the same texture as aeolian dust and sand grains. We are collecting and culturing wind-transported sediment to document its ability to serve in the dispersal of aridland invertebrate propagules. Deposited aeolian sediment was collected from marble-type traps placed on the roof of the Biological Sciences Building at the University of Texas, El Paso, during 19 individual regional-scale Chihuahuan Desert blowing dust/sand events between April 2010 and May 2012. Known source areas for these dust events include playas and ephemeral streams ~40- 150 km upwind. The mean dry grain size of the deposited sediment for each event ranged from 66 to 141 μm. Clean-water rinses of material from each event or standard rehydrations for culturing invertebrates were monitored microscopically for the appearance of organisms. Invertebrates hatched from the sediment of 13 events. Ciliates were detected in each of those samples: gastrotrichs appeared in three samples, nematodes and bdelloid rotifers in two samples, and clam shrimp in one. We have also rehydrated aeolian sediments, collected in standard dust traps, from many dust-emitting playas in Southwest North America and hatched viable organisms including all those previously mentioned as well as branchiopods, fairy shrimp, copepods

  17. Ecological investigations at the Pantex Plant Site, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.; Mazaika, R.R.; Phillips, R.C.

    1993-09-01

    In 1992, Pantex requested that Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conduct a series of ecological surveys to provide baseline information for designing detailed ecological studies on the various ecosystems present at the Pantex plant site near Amarillo, Texas. To this end, PNL scientist and technicians visited the site at different times to conduct investigations and collect samples: July 6--13: birds, small mammals, general habitat assessment; August 10--14: wetland vegetation, birds, small mammals, Playa invertebrates; and September 7--11: birds, small mammals. This report presents the results of these three surveys.

  18. Ground water discharge by evapotranspiration in wetlands of an arid intermountain basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, John S.; Cooper, David J.

    2008-04-01

    SummaryTo improve basin-scale modeling of ground water discharge by evapotranspiration (ET) in relation to water table depth, daily ET was measured using the Bowen ratio energy balance method during 1999-2005 in five herbaceous plant dominated wetlands in an arid intermountain basin in Colorado, USA. Three wetlands were wet meadows supplied primarily by regional ground water flow and two were playas supplied primarily by local stream flow. In wet meadows, mean daily water table depth (WTD) ranged from 0.00 m (ground surface) to 1.2 m, with low inter-annual variability. In wet meadows, annual actual ET (ET a) was 751-994 mm, and ground water discharge from the shallow aquifer (ET g) was 75-88% of ET a. In playas, mean daily WTD ranged from -0.65 to 1.89 m, with high inter-annual variability. In playas, annual ET a was 352-892 mm, and ET g was 0-77% of ET a. The relationship of annual ET g to WTD was compared to existing ET g-WTD models. For wet meadows, ET g decreased exponentially as WTD increased from 0.13 to 0.95 m ( r2 = 0.83, CV = 5%, p < 0.001). In comparison with our findings, existing models under- and over-estimate ET g by -30% to 47% at WTD of 0.13 m, and they under-estimate ET g by -12% to -42% at WTD of 0.95 m. This study found that as the water table declined from near the soil surface to 0.95 m, ET g decreased only ˜26% versus 39-55% estimated by existing models. The magnitude of ET g decrease was 220 mm, whereas existing models predicted decreases up to 700 mm (218% greater). In playas, there was no clear ET g-WTD relationship. Instead, ET g was strongly dependent on the surface water supply. When sufficient surface water inputs occurred to meet ET demand, ET g was ≈0 mm/yr and independent of WTD. When inputs did not meet ET demand, ET g was positive though highly variable at WTD up to 1.68 m.

  19. Unmixing AVIRIS data to provide a method for vegetation fraction subtraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamudio, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Five flight lines of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data were acquired over the Dolly Varden Mountains in northeastern Nevada on 2 June 1989. Signal-to-noise ratio values are given. The empirical line method was used to convert AVIRIS radiance values to reflectance. This method involves calculating gain and offset values for each band. These values are based upon a comparison of the imaging spectrometer data and field reflectance measurements, both taken over the same ground targets. The targets used were a dark andesite flow and a bright playa.

  20. Artificial-recharge experiments and operations on the Southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Richmond F.; Signor, Donald C.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments using highly turbid water from playa lakes for injection into the Ogallala Formation have resulted in greatly decreased yield of the recharge wells, Recharge of ground or surface water of good quality has indicated, however, that injection through wells is an effective method of recharging the aquifer. Water that is slightly turbid can be successfully injected for a period of time, but generally results in constantly declining yields and capacity for recharge. Redevelopment through pumping and surging significantly prolongs the life of recharge wells under some conditions. Surface spreading is little practiced on the High Plains, but locally may be a feasible means of artificial recharge.

  1. Online resource for Earth-observing satellite sensor calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkel, J.; Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Wenny, B.

    2015-09-01

    The Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS) at Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada is being developed by the University of Arizona to enable improved accuracy and consistency for airborne and satellite sensor calibration. Primary instrumentation at the site consists of ground-viewing radiometers, a sun photometer, and a meteorological station. Measurements made by these instruments are used to calculate surface reflectance, atmospheric properties and a prediction for top-of-atmosphere reflectance and radiance. This work will leverage research for RadCaTS, and describe the requirements for an online database, associated data formats and quality control, and processing levels.

  2. Medium-term shoreline evolution of the mediterranean coast of Andalusia (SW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liguori, Vincenzo; Manno, Giorgio; Messina, Enrica; Anfuso, Giorgio; Suffo, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Coastal environment is a dynamic system in which numerous natural processes are continuously actuating and interacting among them. As a result, geomorphologic, physical and biological characteristics of coastal environments are constantly changing. Such dynamic balance is nowadays seriously threatened by the strong and increasing anthropic pressure that favors erosion processes, and the associated loss of environmental, ecologic and economic aspects. Sandy beaches are the most vulnerable environments in coastal areas. The aim of this work was to reconstruct the historical evolution of the Mediterranean coastline of Andalusia, Spain. The investigated area is about 500 km in length and includes the provinces of Cadiz, Malaga, Granada and Almeria. It is essentially composed by cliffed sectors with sand and gravel pocket beaches constituting independent morphological cells of different dimensions. This study was based on the analysis of aerial photos and satellite images covering a period of 55 years, between 1956 and 2011. Aerial photos were scanned and geo-referenced in order to solve scale and distortion problems. The shoreline was considered and mapped through the identification of the wet / dry sand limit which coincides with the line of maximum run-up; this indicator - representing the shoreline at the moment of the photo - is the most easily identifiable and representative one in microtidal coastal environments. Since shoreline position is linked to beach profile characteristics and to waves, tide and wind conditions at the moment of the photo, such parameters were taken into account in the calculation of shoreline position and changes. Specifically, retreat/accretion changes were reconstructed applying the DSAS method (Digital Shoreline Analysis System) proposed by the US Geological Survey. Significant beach accretion was observed at Playa La Mamola (Granada), with +1 m/y, because the construction of five breakwaters, and at Playa El Cantal (Almeria) and close

  3. Shell shape variation in the Nassariid Buccinanops globulosus in northern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaca, María Soledad; Narvarte, Maite; Martín, Pablo; van der Molen, Silvina

    2013-09-01

    Morphological variation among natural populations is a phenomenon commonly observed in marine invertebrates and well studied, particularly, in shelled gastropods. The nassariid Buccinanops globulosus is interesting to study shell shape variation because it exhibits strong interpopulation differences in life history features, including maximum size, fecundity and growth rate. In this study, we examined the pattern of variation in size and shell shape among populations and between sexes of B. globulosus (Bahía San Antonio 40°29'S 63°01'W, Playa Villarino 40°45'S 64°40'W and Bahía Nueva 42°46'S 65°02'W). In particular, we used geometric morphometric techniques to test: (1) whether the two components of shell morphology (size and shape) are independent and (2) whether shape differences between sexes are consistently found among populations, regardless of their body sizes. Our results show shell shape variation between the populations of B. globulosus of northern Patagonia. Intra-specific shell shape variation is affected by body size, indicating allometry. Regardless of the size differences, individuals from Playa Villarino have high-spired shells, and shorter apertures and wider columellar area than individuals from the other populations. Also, sex-related shape differences were consistently found at each population, thus suggesting a common sexual dimorphism in shell morphology for this species. The functional significance of the variability found is discussed in terms of the flexibility of developmental programmes for morphology as well as the evolution of phenotypic plasticity.

  4. Dust deposits on Mars: The 'parna' analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Williams, Steven H.

    1994-01-01

    Parna is an Autralian aboriginal word meaning 'sandy dust'. It has been applied to deposits of clay, silt, and sand which were initially transported by the wind as aggregates, or pellets, of sand size. Parna is distinguished by its silt and clay content, which in some cases exceeds 85% of the total volume of the deposit. Much of the fine-grained playa silt and clay is incorporated into the parna as sand-sized aggregates, which greatly facilitate their transportation and reworking by the wind. Rain following aggregate emplacement can cause their disintegration, rendering the parna immobile by the wind, yet some pellets can survive several wetting/drying episodes. Parna deposits on Earth occur both as dune forms and as sheet deposits which mantle older terrains. In both cases the deposits are typically derived from lacustrine (lake) beds, such as playas. There is substantial evidence to suggest that bodies of water existed on Mars in the past. Thus, the potential is high for lacustrine deposits and the formation of parna on Mars. Although no parna dunes have been identified, it is suggested that the deposits derived from White Rock (-8 deg, 335 deg W), near Mamers Valles (34 deg, 343 deg W), and elsewhere on Mars may represent sheet parna. Data obtained from Mars-94/96 missions and potential landed spacecraft may provide additional evidence for the existence of parna on Mars.

  5. Seroprevalence of antibodies against the excreted antigen superoxide dismutase by Trypanosoma cruzi in dogs from the Yucatan Peninsula (Mexico).

    PubMed

    López-Cespedes, A; Longoni, S S; Sauri-Arceo, C H; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Villegas, N; Escobedo-Ortegón, J; Barrera-Pérez, M A; Sánchez-Moreno, M; Bolio González, M E; Marín, C

    2013-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown the role of dogs as a reservoir for the American trypanosomiasis, as the bridge connecting sylvatic and peridomestic cycles. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of American trypanosomiasis in the dog population (630 sera) from seven localities in the Yucatan Peninsula (city of Mérida and the towns of Molas, Playa del Carmen, Akumal, Xcalacoop, Xcalac and Xahuachol). These data are key for developing control measures for the disease. The sera were analysed to detect antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi, using Fe-SOD excreted as the antigenic fraction by ELISA and Western blot as confirmation. The total prevalence found in the Yucatan Peninsula was some 14.76%, with 10.74% in the state of Yucatan (city of Mérida, towns of Molas and Xcalacoop) and 21.34% in the state of Quintana Roo (towns of Playa del Carmen, Akumal, Xcalac and Xahuachol). However, a more thorough epidemiological study of the dog population, both wild and urban, in the Yucatan Peninsula will be required to design a control strategy for these diseases, paying particular attention to the population affected and even broadening the study to other Mexican states as well as neighbouring countries. These results again confirm that iron-superoxide dismutase excreted by T. cruzi constitutes a good source of antigen for serodiagnosis in epidemiological studies. PMID:22775973

  6. Geochemistry of Precambrian carbonates: 3-shelf seas and non-marine environments of the Archean

    SciTech Connect

    Veizer, J. Ruhr Universitaet, Bochum ); Clayton, R.N. ); Hinton, R.W. Grant Institute of Geology, Edinburgh ); von Brunn, V. ); Mason, T.R. ); Buck, S.G. ); Hoefs, J. )

    1990-10-01

    A comprehensive whole-rock study of mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic attributes of Archean carbonates suggests that their lithologies and facies have been controlled by tectonic setting. In the first two papers of this series they have shown that the dominant lithology of sedimentary carbonates in greenstone belt settings is limestone. In this paper the authors suggest that the Archean shelf sequences are mostly dolostone, and the contemporaneous lacustrine playa lakes are characterized by limestone facies. The present study is of the shelf environments of the Archean, represented by the Pongola Supergroup of South Africa and the Hamersley Group of Australia. The lacustrine playa examples have been sampled from the Ventersdorp Supergroup of South Africa and the Fortescue Group of Australia. Geological, trace element, and oxygen isotope considerations of the shelf carbonates suggest that their original mineralogy may have been aragonite and that the Pongola dolostones probably represent a direct dolomitization product of this precursor. In contrast, the stabilization of the Hamersley carbonates may have involved an additional step of transformation of a metastable precursor into limestone prior to dolomitization.

  7. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Aeromonas spp. Isolated from Environmental Sources▿

    PubMed Central

    Huddleston, Jennifer R.; Zak, John C.; Jeter, Randall M.

    2006-01-01

    Aeromonas spp. are ubiquitous aquatic bacteria that cause serious infections in both poikilothermic and endothermic animals, including humans. Clinical isolates have shown an increasing incidence of antibiotic and antimicrobial drug resistance since the widespread use of antibiotics began. A total of 282 Aeromonas pure cultures were isolated from both urban and rural playa lakes in the vicinity of Lubbock, Texas, and several rivers in West Texas and New Mexico. Of these, at least 104 were subsequently confirmed to be independent isolates. The 104 isolates were identified by Biolog and belonged to 11 different species. The MICs of six metals, one metalloid, five antibiotics, and two antimicrobial drugs were determined. All aeromonads were sensitive to chromate, cobalt, copper, nickel, zinc, cefuroxime, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, ofloxacin, tetracycline, and sulfamethoxazole. Low incidences of trimethoprim resistance, mercury resistance, and arsenite resistance were found. Dual resistances were found in 5 of the 104 Aeromonas isolates. Greater numbers of resistant isolates were obtained from samples taken in March versus July 2002 and from sediment versus water. Plasmids were isolated from selected strains of the arsenite- and mercury-resistant organisms and were transformed into Escherichia coli XL1-Blue MRF′. Acquisition of the resistance phenotypes by the new host showed that these resistance genes were carried on the plasmids. Mercury resistance was found to be encoded on a conjugative plasmid. Despite the low incidence of resistant isolates, the six playa lakes and three rivers that were sampled in this study can be considered a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes. PMID:16950901

  8. [Analysis of chemical speciation of heavy metals in L07-11 profile sediments of "Big Ear" Region of Lop Nor Lake].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin-ping; Zhang, Liang-hui; Jiang, Ping-an; Jia, Hong-tao; Zheng, Chun-xia; Fan, Shun-hui

    2014-12-01

    As playa is the typical characteristic in "Big Ear" Region of Lop Nor Lake, it is significant for enriching playa heavy metal earth environmental chemical data by analyzing species distribution of heavy metal among this district. In this thesis, heavy metal Cd, Pb, Ni, Cu in L07-11 Profile Sediments of "Big Ears" Region of Lop Nor Lake are considered as research objects. Tessier sequential extraction and Graphite furnace atomic absorption method (GF-990) are used to discuss and analyze five forms of Cd, Pb, Ni, Cu among sediments. The results show that the content of Cd, Pb, Ni and Cu is in the range from 1.10~2.54, 9.18~20.02, 9.88~17.15, 4.43~21.11 mg · kg(-1), respectively. The value of organic matter range from 8.71-54.72 g · kg(-1). The order of the bioavailable state in heavy metals is Cd>Pb>Cu>Ni. Pb and Cd mainly exist in exchangeable form including water-soluble, and that Ni is in residual form, and that Cu is mostly in Fe-Mn oxide bound iron-manganese oxides or in residual form. Among surface sediments, effective content of heavy metal is more than 80%. Except Cu, the content of heavy metal Cd, Pb, Ni in exchangeable form is more than 60%. Heavy metal Cd and Pb has higher secondary release potential. The content of heavy metal and organic material has some correlation. PMID:25881435

  9. Late Holocene marine terraces of the Cartagena region, southern Caribbean: The product of neotectonism or a former high stand in sea-level?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignacio Martínez, J.; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Gomez, Andres; Delgado, Adriana; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Rendon, Esteban

    2010-03-01

    The detailed stratigraphic survey and paleontological study (mollusks, corals, foraminifera and ostracods) of four low-level, ˜3 m, marine terrace sections: Punta Canoas, Manzanillo del Mar, Playa de Oro, and Tierra Bomba Island, from the Cartagena region, southern Caribbean, supplemented with 22 radiocarbon dates, reveals that the northern terraces were deposited as parasequences in a clastic depositional system compared to the Tierra Bomba Island succession that was deposited in a carbonate depositional system between ˜3600 and ˜1700 cal yrs BP. Drier conditions and the southern location of the ITCZ at about 3 ka triggered stronger easterly Trades and more dynamic southwestward sediment drift fed by the Magdalena River mouth, thus promoting the formation of sand spits that ultimately isolated the Cienaga de Tesca coastal lagoon from the Caribbean Sea. Our estimates support the hypothesis that the present position of the terraces is the product of neotectonism rather than a higher 3 ka, sea-level. Upheaval of the terraces varies between ˜3.8 mmyr -1 at Punta Canoas and ˜2.2 mmyr -1 at Tierra Bomba to ˜1.5 mmyr -1 at Manzanillo del Mar and Playa de Oro terraces. Our study corroborates previous contentions on the role of mud diapirism and the dynamics of the Dique Fault as late Holocene upheaval mechanisms.

  10. Assessment and Determination land uses of Qom's Hoze Soltan Lake southern lands by FAO Agenda and It's Rehabilitation Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimpour Reihan, Majid

    2010-05-01

    Increase of playas, decrease of water quality, soil and plant degradation is one of important problems in recent decays. Notwithstanding increase of playa wetlands- 4 million ha in our country- is perform some investigations about this biome and components and this lack of investigation is made degradation of water, soil, plant potentials and at least desertification. Then, management the biome and planning for sustainable development is very important because of sensitive this environments and has requirement to recognize ecological properties and components, so in this study, try to investigate fasting and latent this regions. At last for potentialization of region for rangeland, water and dry culture use, assessment and classification of region was performed with aim of FAO formula. According to this formula, environmental factors studied and performed grading and classifying. Basis on results, the region is not proper for dry farming and view of water farming and rangeland was settled in 5 and 6 classes. Latest result should be conserving the region. For this act, our introduced 13 halophyte plats with view of investigation of 20 factors. May god will, ganged this regions to good rangelands and forests of dry regions. Key words: Assessment of lands, Hoze Soltane of Qom, environmental factors, FAO, Compatible Plants, Reclamation strategies

  11. Geoarchaeology and Geochronology of the Miami (Clovis) Site, Southern High Plains of Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holliday, Vance T.; Haynes, C. Vance; Hofman, Jack L.; Meltzer, David J.

    1994-03-01

    The Miami site, excavated in 1937, is in a small "playa" basin on the High Plains surface. The site is one of the earliest documented co-occurrences of Clovis points and mammoth. Reinvestigation of the site and related collections was undertaken to better understand the stratigraphy, geochronology, and archaeology. The basin, 23 m diameter × 1.6 m deep, filled with (1) dark gray silty clay, and (2) near the top of the section, a lens of well-sorted silt or loess. The basin started to fill ca. 13,700 yr B.P., the loess dates to ca. 11,400 yr B.P., and the bone bed probably dates to ca. 11,400-10,500 yr B.P. The loess may be the local manifestation of a "Clovis drought." The partial remains of five mammoths (three adults and two juveniles) were recovered in 1937; no other animal remains are known. The bone is heavily weathered and there are no clear indications of human modification. Artifacts found at the site include three Clovis points and a scraper found among the bones and two flakes and a scraper found on the surface near the playa. The origins of the bone and stone assemblage are uncertain but four scenarios are offered: a successful mammoth kill, an unsuccessful kill with wounded animals dying at the watering hole, opportunistic scavenging following natural deaths, or a palimpsest of multiple deaths following both natural and human causes.

  12. On the dispersal of leatherback turtle hatchlings from Mesoamerican nesting beaches

    PubMed Central

    Shillinger, George L.; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele; Luo, Hao; Bograd, Steven J.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Bailey, Helen; Spotila, James R.

    2012-01-01

    So little is known about the early life history of leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) from hatchling to adulthood that this period has been termed the ‘lost years’. For critically endangered eastern Pacific leatherback populations, continued and rapid declines underscore the urgent need to develop conservation strategies across all life stages. We investigate leatherback hatchling dispersal from four Mesoamerican nesting beaches using passive tracer experiments within a regional ocean modelling system. The evolution of tracer distribution from each of the nesting beaches showed the strong influence of eddy transport and coastal currents. Modelled hatchlings from Playa Grande, Costa Rica, were most likely to be entrained and transported offshore by large-scale eddies coincident with the peak leatherback nesting and hatchling emergence period. These eddies potentially serve as ‘hatchling highways’, providing a means of rapid offshore transport away from predation and a productive refuge within which newly hatched turtles can develop. We hypothesize that the most important leatherback nesting beach remaining in the eastern Pacific (Playa Grande) has been evolutionarily selected as an optimal nesting site owing to favourable ocean currents that enhance hatchling survival. PMID:22378803

  13. Global analysis of the effect of local climate on the hatchling output of leatherback turtles

    PubMed Central

    Santidrián Tomillo, Pilar; Saba, Vincent S.; Lombard, Claudia D.; Valiulis, Jennifer M.; Robinson, Nathan J.; Paladino, Frank V.; Spotila, James R.; Fernández, Carlos; Rivas, Marga L.; Tucek, Jenny; Nel, Ronel; Oro, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The most recent climate change projections show a global increase in temperatures along with precipitation changes throughout the 21st century. However, regional projections do not always match global projections and species with global distributions may exhibit varying regional susceptibility to climate change. Here we show the effect of local climatic conditions on the hatchling output of leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) at four nesting sites encompassing the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. We found a heterogeneous effect of climate. Hatchling output increased with long-term precipitation in areas with dry climatic conditions (Playa Grande, Pacific Ocean and Sandy Point, Caribbean Sea), but the effect varied in areas where precipitation was high (Pacuare, Caribbean Sea) and was not detected at the temperate site (Maputaland, Indian Ocean). High air temperature reduced hatchling output only at the area experiencing seasonal droughts (Playa Grande). Climatic projections showed a drastic increase in air temperature and a mild decrease in precipitation at all sites by 2100. The most unfavorable conditions were projected for Sandy Point where hatching success has already declined over time along with precipitation levels. The heterogeneous effect of climate may lead to local extinctions of leatherback turtles in some areas but survival in others by 2100. PMID:26572897

  14. Global analysis of the effect of local climate on the hatchling output of leatherback turtles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santidrián Tomillo, Pilar; Saba, Vincent S.; Lombard, Claudia D.; Valiulis, Jennifer M.; Robinson, Nathan J.; Paladino, Frank V.; Spotila, James R.; Fernández, Carlos; Rivas, Marga L.; Tucek, Jenny; Nel, Ronel; Oro, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The most recent climate change projections show a global increase in temperatures along with precipitation changes throughout the 21st century. However, regional projections do not always match global projections and species with global distributions may exhibit varying regional susceptibility to climate change. Here we show the effect of local climatic conditions on the hatchling output of leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) at four nesting sites encompassing the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. We found a heterogeneous effect of climate. Hatchling output increased with long-term precipitation in areas with dry climatic conditions (Playa Grande, Pacific Ocean and Sandy Point, Caribbean Sea), but the effect varied in areas where precipitation was high (Pacuare, Caribbean Sea) and was not detected at the temperate site (Maputaland, Indian Ocean). High air temperature reduced hatchling output only at the area experiencing seasonal droughts (Playa Grande). Climatic projections showed a drastic increase in air temperature and a mild decrease in precipitation at all sites by 2100. The most unfavorable conditions were projected for Sandy Point where hatching success has already declined over time along with precipitation levels. The heterogeneous effect of climate may lead to local extinctions of leatherback turtles in some areas but survival in others by 2100.

  15. Preliminary description of quaternary and late pliocene surficial deposits at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, D.L.

    1989-11-01

    The Yucca Mountain area, in the south-central part of the Great Basin, is in the drainage basin of the Amargosa River. The mountain consists of several fault blocks of volcanic rocks that are typical of the Basin and Range province. Yucca Mountain is dissected by steep-sided valleys of consequent drainage systems that are tributary on the east side to Fortymile Wash and on the west side to an unnamed wash that drains Crater Flat. Most of the major washes near Yucca Mountain are not integrated with the Amargosa River, but have distributary channels on the piedmont above the river. Landforms in the Yucca Mountain area include rock pediments, ballenas, alluvial pediments, alluvial fans, stream terraces, and playas. Early Holocene and older alluvial fan deposits have been smoothed by pedimentation. The semiconical shape of alluvial fans is apparent at the junction of tributaries with major washes and where washes cross fault and terrace scarps. Playas are present in the eastern and southern ends of the Amargosa Desert. 39 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Impact of early diagenesis of Eolian reservoirs, Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Krystinik, L.F.; Andrews, S.; Fryberger, S.G.

    1985-02-01

    Dune and associated alluvial and playa deposits at Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado, provide an excellent opportunity to study early diagenetic development of vertical and horizontal permeability barriers in recent eolian deposits (> 10 ka). Cements observed include calcite, aragonite, protodolomite(.), amorphous silica, iron hydroxide, smectite, trona, and halite. Cementation is controlled by the availability of water, with several hydrologic subenvironments producing different cements. Evaporative cementation in dunes adjacent to playas is commonly dominated by trona and halite, but calcite, aragonite, and amorphous silica also bind the sediment. These cements are generally most concentrated in fine laminations where capillary action has pulled water into dunes. Iron hydroxides, calcite, and amorphous silica precipitate at the interface between ground water and streams or lakes, where the pH gradient may exceed 5 pH units (pH 5.7-11.5). Subsequent movement of the ground-water table can result in cross-cutting cement zones. Early cementation in dunes prevents deflation and provides a mechanism for preservation of the reservoir unit. Intense cementation may permanently occlude porosity, or leaching may reestablish well-interconnected porosity. An understanding of the extent and composition of early cement zones can be used to improve hydrodynamic models for production and enhanced recovery.

  17. Diagenetic contrast of sandstones in hydrocarbon prospective Mesozoic rift basins (Ethiopia, UK, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A.

    2014-11-01

    Diagenetic studied in hydrocarbon-prospective Mesozoic rift basins were carried out in the Blue Nile Basin (Ethiopia), Ulster Basin (United Kingdom) and Hartford Basin (United States of America). Alluvial fan, single and amalgamated multistorey meandering and braided river, deep and shallow perennial lake, shallow ephemeral lake, aeolian and playa mud-flat are the prominent depositional environments. The studied sandstones exhibit red bed diagenesis. Source area geology, depositional environments, pore-water chemistry and circulation, tectonic setting and burial history controlled the diagenetic evolution. The diagenetic minerals include: facies-related minerals (calcrete and dolocrete), grain-coating clay minerals and/or hematite, quartz and feldspar overgrowths, carbonate cements, hematite, kaolinite, illite-smectite, smectite, illite, chlorite, actinolite, laumontite, pyrite and apatite. Diversity of diagenetic minerals and sequence of diagenetic alteration can be directly related to depositional environment and burial history of the basins. Variation in infiltrated clays, carbonate cements and clay minerals observed in the studied sandstones. The alluvial fan and fluviatile sandstones are dominated by kaolinite, illite calcite and ferroan calcite, whereas the playa and lacustrine sandstones are dominated by illite-smectite, smectite-chlorite, smectite, chlorite, dolomite ferroan dolomite and ankerite. Albite, pyrite and apatite are predominantly precipitated in lacustrine sandstones. Basaltic eruption in the basins modified mechanically infiltrated clays to authigenic clays. In all the studied sandstones, secondary porosity predominates over primary porosity. The oil emplacement inhabited clay authigenesis and generation of secondary porosity, whereas authigenesis of quartz, pyrite and apatite continued after oil emplacement.

  18. Landsat radiometric continuity using airborne imaging spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkel, J.; Angal, A.; Thome, K.; Cook, B.

    2015-12-01

    NASA Goddard's Lidar, Hyperspectral and Thermal Imager (G-LiHT) includes a scanning lidar, an imaging spectrometer and a thermal camera. The Visible Near-Infrared (VNIR) Imaging Spectrometer acquires high resolution spectral measurements (1.5 nm resolution) from 0.4 to 1.0 µm. The SIRCUS-based calibration facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center was used to measure the absolute spectral response (ASR) of the G-LiHT's imaging spectrometer. Continuously tunable lasers coupled to an integrating sphere facilitated a radiance-based calibration for the detectors in the reflective solar bands. The transfer of the SIRCUS-based laboratory calibration of G-LiHT's Imaging Spectrometer to the Landsat sensors (Landsat 7 ETM+ and Landsat 8 OLI) is demonstrated using simultaneous overpasses over the Red Lake Playa and McClaw's Playa sites during the commissioning phase of Landsat 8 in March 2013. Solar Lunar Absolute Imaging Spectrometer (SOLARIS) is the calibration demonstration system for the reflected solar instrument of CLARREO. A portable version of SOLARIS, known as Suitcase SOLARIS, also calibrated using a SIRCUS-based setup, was deployed for ground measurements as a part of both the field campaigns. Simultaneous measurements of SOLARIS allow cross-comparison with G-LiHT and Landsat sensors. The transfer of the lab-based calibration of G-LiHT to Landsat sensors show that the sensors agree within 5% with a 1-3% calibration uncertainty of G-LiHT's Imaging Spectrometer.

  19. The volcano-sedimentary evolution of a post-Variscan intramontane basin in the Swiss Alps (Glarus Verrucano) as revealed by zircon U-Pb age dating and Hf isotope geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letsch, Dominik; Winkler, Wilfried; von Quadt, Albrecht; Gallhofer, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The Late Palaeozoic Glarus Verrucano basin (GVB, Glarus Alps, eastern Switzerland) formed as an intramontane graben in the aftermath of the Variscan orogeny. Its fill, the Glarus Verrucano, consists of immature alluvial fan and playa lake deposits with intercalated bimodal volcanics (basalts and rhyolites). Despite its importance for local and regional geology, no modern sedimentologic or stratigraphic studies on the GVB exist. By means of sedimentologic and geochronologic studies, we reconstruct the volcano-sedimentary evolution of the GVB: it developed at the Carboniferous/Permian boundary and experienced a first (bimodal) volcanic phase around 285 Ma. For the same time, indications for temporarily humid climate in the otherwise rather arid Early Permian are demonstrated (e.g. pyrite-bearing sandstones). During the Middle and Early Late Permian, increasing aridity is indicated by playa deposits, fanglomerates and subaerial ignimbrites, which mark a second (silicic) volcanic phase at 268 Ma. The detrital zircon age spectra are dominated by Late Variscan ages and thus demonstrate that older sedimentary and metamorphic rocks once forming the Variscan nappe edifice were already mostly eroded at that time. Finally, some larger-scale speculations are given which could indicate a causal connection between the widespread tectono-magmatic Mid-Permian Episode and the local development of the Glarus Verrucano basin.

  20. Mars' "White Rock" feature lacks evidence of an aqueous origin: Results from Mars Global Surveyor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruff, S.W.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, R.N.; Kieffer, H.H.; Malin, M.C.; Bandfield, J.L.; Jakosky, B.M.; Lane, M.D.; Mellon, M.T.; Presley, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The "White Rock" feature on Mars has long been viewed as a type example for a Martian playa largely because of its apparent high albedo along with its location in a topographic basin (a crater). Data from the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) demonstrate that White Rock is not anomalously bright relative to other Martian bright regions, reducing the significance of its albedo and weakening the analogy to terrestrial playas. Its thermal inertia value indicates that it is not mantled by a layer of loose dust, nor is it bedrock. The thermal infrared spectrum of White Rock shows no obvious features of carbonates or sulfates and is, in fact, spectrally flat. Images from the Mars Orbiter Camera show that the White Rock massifs are consolidated enough to retain slopes and allow the passage of saltating grains over their surfaces. Material appears to be shed from the massifs and is concentrated at the crests of nearby bedforms. One explanation for these observations is that White Rock is an eroded accumulation of compacted or weakly cemented aeolian sediment. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Remotely-Sensed Regional-Scale Evapotranspiration of a Semi-Arid Great Basin Desert and its Relationship to Geomorphology, Soils, and Vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, C.; Quattrochi, D.; Malek, E.; Hipps, L.; Boettinger, J.; McCurdy, G.

    1998-01-01

    Landsat thematic mapper data are used to estimate instantaneous regional-scale surface water and energy fluxes in a semi-arid Great Basin desert of the western United States. Results suggest that it is possible to scale from point measurements of environmental state variables to regional estimates of water and energy exchange. This research characterizes the unifying thread in the classical climate-topography-soil-vegetation relation -the surface water and energy balance-through maps of the partitioning of energy throughout the landscape. The study was conducted in Goshute Valley of northeastern Nevada, which is characteristic of most faulted graben valleys of the Basin and Range Province of the western United States. The valley comprises a central playa and lake plain bordered by alluvial fans emanating from the surrounding mountains. The distribution of evapotranspiration (ET) is lowest in the middle reaches of the fans where the water table is deep and plants are small, resulting in low evaporation and transpiration. Highest ET occurs in the center of the valley, particularly in the playa, where limited to no vegetation occurs, but evaporation is relatively high because of a shallow water table and silty clay soil capable of large capillary movement. Intermediate values of ET are associated with large shrubs and is dominated by transpiration.

  2. Remotely-Sensed Regional-Scale Evapotranspiration of a Semi-Arid Great Basin Desert and its Relationship to Geomorphology, Soils, and Vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, C.; Quattrochi, D.; Malek, E.; Hipps, L.; Boettinger, J.; McCurdy, G.

    1997-01-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper data is used to estimate instantaneous regional-scale surface water and energy fluxes in a semi-arid Great Basin desert of the western United States. Results suggest that it is possible to scale from point measurements of environmental state variables to regional estimates of water and energy exchange. This research characterizes the unifying thread in the classical climate-topography-soil-vegetation relation-the surface water and energy balance-through maps of the partitioning of energy throughout the landscape. The study was conducted in Goshute Valley of northeastern Nevada, which is characteristic of most faulted graben valleys of the Basin and Range Province of the western United States. The valley comprises a central playa and lake plain bordered by alluvial fans emanating from the surrounding mountains. The distribution of evapotranspiration (ET) is lowest in the middle reaches of the fans where the water table is deep and plants are small, resulting in low evaporation and transpiration. Highest ET occurs in the center of the valley, particularly in the playa, where limited to no vegetation occurs, but evaporation is relatively high because of a shallow water table and silty clay soil capable of large capillary movement. Intermediate values of ET are associated with large shrubs and is dominated by transpiration.

  3. A Side-by-side Comparison of Eddy Covariance and Bowen Ratio Evapotranspiration From a Northern Great Basin Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyles, B. F.; Jasoni, R. L.

    2008-12-01

    Development of new ground water resources in rural lands surrounding urban areas of the arid western United States has been identified as a key to maintaining urban growth. The extent and rate at which ground water can be sustainably extracted, while minimizing environmental impacts, depends to a large degree on how much of the existing resource escapes back to the atmosphere via the process of evapotranspiration (ET). ET is the sum of water that evaporates (E) from soil surfaces and is transpired (T) from plant leaves. This study was conducted in a northeast/southwest trending closed basin, bounded by mountains on all sides, with no surface water outflow. The playa which is located in the center of the basin encompasses 59,600 hectares, while phreatophytic plants bordering the playa encompass 20,000 hectares. ET data was collected from a sagebrush/greasewood plant community from October 2004 to August 2008 by the Bowen Ratio technique. Eddy covariance ET monitoring equipment was installed in April of 2007 and a side-by-side comparison was conducted from April to October, 2007. At the end of the study period a 25% difference in ET was calculated between the eddy covariance and Bowen ratio techniques. The major factors for the differences in ET from the two different methods will be presented.

  4. Radiometric calibration of Advanced Land Imager using reflectance-based results between 2001 and 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkel, J.; Thome, K.; Biggar, S.; Kuester, M.

    2006-08-01

    The Landsat series of sensors have supplied the remote sensing community with a continuous data set dating to the early 1970s. An important aspect of retaining the continuity of these data is that a Landsat follow-on as well as current Landsat instruments must be understood radiometrically throughout their mission. The Advanced Land Imager (ALI), for example, was developed as a prototype for the next generation of Landsat Instruments, and as such there was a significant effort to understand its radiometric characteristics as well as how it compares with previous Landsat sensors. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona has been part of this effort since the late 2000 launch of ALI through the use of the reflectance-based method of vicarious calibration. The reflectance-based approach consists of ground-based measurements of atmospheric conditions and surface reflectance at the time of satellite overpass to predict the at-sensor radiance seen by the sensor under study. The work compares results from the reflectance-based approach obtained from well-characterized test sites such as Railroad Valley Playa in Nevada and Ivanpah Playa in California as applied to ALI, Landsat-5 TM, and Landsat-7 EMT+. The results from the comparison use a total of 14 ALI dates spanning in time from 2001 to late 2005 and show that ALI agrees with the current radiometric results from TM and ETM+ to within 5%.

  5. Absolute radiometric calibration of the RapidEye multispectral imager using the reflectance-based vicarious calibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naughton, Denis; Brunn, Andreas; Czapla-Myers, Jeff; Douglass, Scott; Thiele, Michael; Weichelt, Horst; Oxfort, Michael

    2011-01-01

    RapidEye AG is a commercial provider of geospatial information products and customized solutions derived from Earth observation image data. The source of the data is the RapidEye constellation consisting of five low-earth-orbit imaging satellites. We describe the rationale, methods, and results of a reflectance-based vicarious calibration campaign that was conducted between April 2009 and May 2010 at Railroad Valley Playa and Ivanpah Playa to determine the on-orbit radiometric accuracy of the RapidEye sensor. In situ surface spectral reflectance measurements of known ground targets and an assessment of the atmospheric conditions above the sites were taken during spacecraft overpasses. The ground data are used as input to a radiative transfer code to compute a band-specific top-of-atmosphere spectral radiance. A comparison of these predicted values based on absolute physical data to the measured at-sensor spectral radiance provide the absolute calibration of the sensor. Initial assessments show that the RapidEye sensor response is within 8% of the predicted values. Outcomes from this campaign are then used to update the calibration parameters in the ground segment processing system. Subsequent verification events confirmed that the measured RapidEye response improved to within 4% of the predictions based on the vicarious calibration method.

  6. Spectral band difference effects on radiometric cross-calibration between multiple satellite sensors in the Landsat solar-reflective spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillet, Philippe M.; Fedosejevs, Gunar; Thome, Kurtis J.

    2004-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of radiometric calibration errors due to differences in spectral response functions between satellite sensors when attempting cross-calibration based on near-simultaneous imaging of common ground targets in analogous spectral bands. Five Earth observation sensors on three satellite platforms were included on the basis of their overpass times being within 45 minutes of each other on the same day (Landsat-7 ETM+; EO-1 ALI; Terra MODIS; Terra ASTER; Terra MISR). The simulation study encompassed spectral band difference effects (SBDE) on cross-calibration between all combinations of the sensors considered, using the Landsat solar reflective spectral domain as a framework. Scene content was simulated using ground target spectra for the calibration test sites at Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada and Niobrara Grassland, Nebraska. Results were obtained as a function of calibration test site, satellite sensor, and spectral region. Overall, in the absence of corrections for SBDE, the Railroad Valley Playa site is a "good" to "very good" ground target for cross-calibration between most but not all satellite sensors considered in most but not all spectral regions investigated. "Good" and "very good" are defined as SBDEs within +/- 3 % and +/- 1 %, respectively. Without SBDE corrections, the Niobrara test site is only "good" for cross-calibration between certain sensor combinations in some spectral regions. The paper includes recommendations for spectral data and tools that would facilitate cross-calibration between multiple satellite sensors.

  7. Measuring Carbon Dioxide and Methane Concentrations in Railroad Valley, Nevada to Support GOSAT Satellite Validation and Global Flux Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro, K. A.; Iraci, L. T.; Loewenstein, M.; Yates, E.; Sheffner, E.; NASA Arc Railroad Valley 2010 Research Team

    2010-12-01

    Carbon dioxide and methane contribute to global warming and are spatially distributed throughout the atmosphere. Although there is a general understanding of the natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks of both gases, their fluxes must be more thoroughly quantified to better forecast and mitigate global climate change. Quantifying these fluxes from local to global scales requires a network of ground-based, airborne and satellite measurements. Developing high-precision satellite sensors is imperative to global scale research by allowing for a more complete spatial analysis. In the summer of 2010, researchers from NASA Ames Research Center joined a multi-institute team on a playa in Railroad Valley, Nevada to acquire ground-based observations supporting measurements from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). A cavity ring down, near infrared instrument collected data every two seconds for 1.5 hours before and after each GOSAT overpass on four separate days near summer solstice. Observed data show unexpected spikes in carbon dioxide concentration throughout the daily data sets, whereas methane concentrations remain relatively constant. There is no discernible correlation between the instrumental data and the meteorological data that explain these spikes in concentration; nor has any instrumental performance error been detected. The Ames team has since been investigating the relationship between concentration variability and atmospheric dynamics, identifying possible nearby sources, and working to prove or disprove the possibility that carbon dioxide is being emitted from a microbial subsurface of the playa.

  8. Vicarious calibration of Aqua and Terra MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, Kurtis J.; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey S.; Biggar, Stuart F.

    2003-11-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is onboard both the Terra and Aqua platforms. An important aspect of the use of MODIS, and other Earth Science Enterprise sensors, has been the characterization and calibration of the sensors and validation of their data products. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona has been active in this area through the use of ground- based test sites. This paper presents the results from the reflectance-base approach using the Railroad Valley Playa test site in Nevada for both Aqua and Terra MODIS. The key to the approach is the measurement of surface reflectance over a 1-km2 area of the playa and results from this method shows agreement with both MODIS sensors to better than 5%. Early results indicate that while the two sensors both agree with the ground-based measurements to within the uncertainties of the reflectance-based approach, there were significant differences between the Aqua and Terra MODIS for data prior to September 2002. Recent results indicate that this bias, if any, is now within the uncertainties of the reflectance-based method of calibration.

  9. Vicarious calibration of Terra ASTER, MISR, and MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, Kurtis J.; Biggar, Stuart F.; Choi, Hyun J.

    2004-10-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection and Radiometer (ASTER), Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are all onboard the Terra platform. An important aspect of the use of MODIS, and other Earth Science Enterprise sensors, has been the characterization and calibration of the sensors and validation of their data products. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona has been active in this area through the use of ground-based test sites. This paper presents the results from the reflectance-base approach using the Railroad Valley Playa test site in Nevada for ASTER, MISR, and MODIS and thus effectively a cross-calibration between all three sensors. The key to the approach is the measurement of surface reflectance over a 1-km2 area of the playa and results from this method shows agreement with MODIS to better than 5%. The paper examines biases between ASTER and the other two sensors in the VNIR due to uncertainties in the onboard calibrator for ASTER and in the SWIR due to an optical crosstalk effect.

  10. Swords into plowshares: Military geology and national security projects

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    Military geology and national security projects are often comparable, achieving their rai-son d`etre in support of national goals, military operations, and/or systems-all for vital national interests. The application of Geoscience to these ends, especially engineering geology, has occurred from pole to pole and included every conceivable environment and natural condition. In the conduct of such projects, the Geosciences have advanced, and vice versa. Desert trafficability, most notably regarding playa surfaces, is both temporary and variable and not a persistent condition as some early authors believed. Playas in Australia, Iran, and the US show that saline efflorescence is removed following surface water dissolution and subsequent deflation, resulting in very hard crusts. Magadiite, a hydrous sodium silicate and possible precursor of bedded chert, was first discovered in North America at Alkali Lake, OR, during a military project. Pleistocene Lake Trinity, a small and mostly buried evaporate basin in the northern Jornada del Muerto, NM, was discovered during exploratory drilling in support of a military test program.

  11. Classification of the LCVF AVIRIS test site with a Kohonen artificial neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merenyi, Erzsebet; Singer, Robert B.; Farrand, William H.

    1993-01-01

    We present a classification of an AVIRIS spectral image of the Lunar Crater Volcanic Field (LCVF). Geologic mapping from such data is made possible by distinctive mineral signatures: absorption features and the shape of the spectral continuum. The subtle spectral shape differences between some of the geological units in this scene along with the high dimensionality of the spectral presents a challenging pattern recognition task. We found an artificial neural network powerful in separating 13 geological units based on the full spectral resolution. The LCVF, in northern Nye County, Nevada, was the primary focus of the NASA-sponsored Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment in the summer of 1989. It consists of over 100 square miles of Quaternary basaltic pyroclastic and flow deposits. These deposits lie atop ignimbrites and silicic lava flows of Tertiary age and in turn are overlain by Quaternary alluvial and playa deposits. This AVIRIS image was collected on September 29, 1989 at 11:44 at 11:44 PDT. The 256-by-256 pixel subsection in this study contains oxidized basaltic cinder deposits, the southern half of the Lunar Lake playa, and outcrops of the Rhyollite of Big Sand Spring Valley. Vegetation in LCVF is sparse, but locally abundant within washes and near springs.

  12. ERTS-1 evaluation of natural resources management applications in the Great Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, P. T.; Lorain, G.

    1973-01-01

    The relatively cloud free weather in the Great Basin has allowed the accumulation of several dates of excellent ERTS-1 imagery. Mountains, valleys, playas, stream courses, canyons, alluvial fans, and other landforms are readily delineated on ERTS-1 imagery, particularly with MSS-5. Each band is useful for identifying and studying one or more natural resource features. For example, crested wheatgrass seedings were most easily identified and measured on MSS-7. Color enhancements simulating CIR were useful for depicting meadow and phreatophytic vegetation along water bodies and stream courses. Work is underway to inventory and monitor wildfire areas by age and successional status. Inventories have been completed on crested wheatgrass seedings over the entire State of Nevada, and inventories of playa surfaces, water surfaces, phreatophytic vegetation, snow cover, meadows, and other features is continuing. Vegetation ecotones are being delineated for vegetation mapping. The pinyon/juniper-northern desert shrub ecotone has been identified with considerable success. Phenology changes can be used to describe vegetation changes for management.

  13. Small mammals associated with colonies of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) in the Southern High Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pruett, A.L.; Boal, C.W.; Wallace, M.C.; Whitlaw, H.A.; Ray, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    We compared diversity and abundance of small mammals at colonies of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) and paired non-colony sites. Of colonies of black-tailed prairie dogs in our study area, >80 were on slopes of playa lakes; thus, we used sites of colonies and non-colonies that were on slopes of playa lakes. We trapped small mammals on 29 pairs of sites. Overall abundance did not differ between types of sites, but some taxa exhibited associations with colonies (Onychomys leucogaster) or non-colonies (Chaetodipus hispidus, Reithrodontomys, Sigmodon hispidus). Diversity and evenness of small mammals did not differ between colonies and non-colonies in 2002, but were higher on non-colonies in 2003. Although we may not have detected some rare or infrequently occurring species, our data reveal differences in diversity and evenness of more common species among the types of sites. Prairie dogs are touted as a keystone species with their colonies associated with a greater faunal diversity than adjacent lands. Our findings contradict several studies reporting greater diversity and abundance of small mammals at colonies of prairie dogs. We suggest that additional research across a wider landscape and incorporating landscape variables beyond the immediate trapping plot may further elucidate interspecific associations between black-tailed prairie dogs and species of small rodents.

  14. Global analysis of the effect of local climate on the hatchling output of leatherback turtles.

    PubMed

    Santidrián Tomillo, Pilar; Saba, Vincent S; Lombard, Claudia D; Valiulis, Jennifer M; Robinson, Nathan J; Paladino, Frank V; Spotila, James R; Fernández, Carlos; Rivas, Marga L; Tucek, Jenny; Nel, Ronel; Oro, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The most recent climate change projections show a global increase in temperatures along with precipitation changes throughout the 21(st) century. However, regional projections do not always match global projections and species with global distributions may exhibit varying regional susceptibility to climate change. Here we show the effect of local climatic conditions on the hatchling output of leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) at four nesting sites encompassing the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. We found a heterogeneous effect of climate. Hatchling output increased with long-term precipitation in areas with dry climatic conditions (Playa Grande, Pacific Ocean and Sandy Point, Caribbean Sea), but the effect varied in areas where precipitation was high (Pacuare, Caribbean Sea) and was not detected at the temperate site (Maputaland, Indian Ocean). High air temperature reduced hatchling output only at the area experiencing seasonal droughts (Playa Grande). Climatic projections showed a drastic increase in air temperature and a mild decrease in precipitation at all sites by 2100. The most unfavorable conditions were projected for Sandy Point where hatching success has already declined over time along with precipitation levels. The heterogeneous effect of climate may lead to local extinctions of leatherback turtles in some areas but survival in others by 2100. PMID:26572897

  15. Using Dental Enamel Wrinkling to Define Sauropod Tooth Morphotypes from the Cañadón Asfalto Formation, Patagonia, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Holwerda, Femke M.; Pol, Diego; Rauhut, Oliver W. M.

    2015-01-01

    The early Middle Jurassic is regarded as the period when sauropods diversified and became major components of the terrestrial ecosystems. Not many sites yield sauropod material of this time; however, both cranial and postcranial material of eusauropods have been found in the Cañadón Asfalto Formation (latest Early Jurassic–early Middle Jurassic) in Central Patagonia (Argentina), which may help to shed light on the early evolution of eusauropods. These eusauropod remains include teeth associated with cranial and mandibular material as well as isolated teeth found at different localities. In this study, an assemblage of sauropod teeth from the Cañadón Asfalto Formation found in four different localities in the area of Cerro Condor (Chubut, Argentina) is used as a mean of assessing sauropod species diversity at these sites. By using dental enamel wrinkling, primarily based on the shape and orientation of grooves and crests of this wrinkling, we define and describe three different morphotypes. With the exception of one taxon, for which no cranial material is currently known, these morphotypes match the local eusauropod diversity as assessed based on postcranial material. Morphotype I is tentatively assigned to Patagosaurus, whereas morphotypes II and III correspond to new taxa, which are also distinguished by associated postcranial material. This study thus shows that enamel wrinkling can be used as a tool in assessing sauropod diversity. PMID:25692466

  16. A review of genus Nysius Dallas in Argentina (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Orsillidae).

    PubMed

    Pall, José Luis; Kihn, Romina Gisela; Diez, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The orsillid genus Nysius Dallas is a complex and large genus with more than 100 described species worldwide, and includes many species of agricultural importance, one such example is N. simulans (Stål) from Argentina. Three species of Nysius are found in this country: N. simulans (Stål), N. irroratus (Spinola) and N. puberulus Berg. The material available for the present study, consisting of over 610 specimens, was collected by sweep-net, G-Vac and light trap in the provinces of Chubut (42° to 46°S; 63.5° to 72° W), La Pampa (35º to 39º south; 63º to 68º West), Neuquén (36° to 41° S; 68° to 71°W) and Río Negro (37° to 42°S; 62° to 71°W), in the central region of Argentina, during the years 2010-2014. Although the species N. simulans is frequently recorded as a pest of soybean crop, there exist no detailed description but only a brief general diagnosis. In the present contribution, therefore, we provide a detailed redescription as well as an updated distribution of N. simulans and N. irroratus, and a key for species of genus Nysius present in Argentina. PMID:27395663

  17. Using dental enamel wrinkling to define sauropod tooth morphotypes from the Cañadón Asfalto Formation, Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Holwerda, Femke M; Pol, Diego; Rauhut, Oliver W M

    2015-01-01

    The early Middle Jurassic is regarded as the period when sauropods diversified and became major components of the terrestrial ecosystems. Not many sites yield sauropod material of this time; however, both cranial and postcranial material of eusauropods have been found in the Cañadón Asfalto Formation (latest Early Jurassic-early Middle Jurassic) in Central Patagonia (Argentina), which may help to shed light on the early evolution of eusauropods. These eusauropod remains include teeth associated with cranial and mandibular material as well as isolated teeth found at different localities. In this study, an assemblage of sauropod teeth from the Cañadón Asfalto Formation found in four different localities in the area of Cerro Condor (Chubut, Argentina) is used as a mean of assessing sauropod species diversity at these sites. By using dental enamel wrinkling, primarily based on the shape and orientation of grooves and crests of this wrinkling, we define and describe three different morphotypes. With the exception of one taxon, for which no cranial material is currently known, these morphotypes match the local eusauropod diversity as assessed based on postcranial material. Morphotype I is tentatively assigned to Patagosaurus, whereas morphotypes II and III correspond to new taxa, which are also distinguished by associated postcranial material. This study thus shows that enamel wrinkling can be used as a tool in assessing sauropod diversity. PMID:25692466

  18. A Paleocene lowland macroflora from Patagonia reveals significantly greater richness than North American analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Ari; Wilf, Peter; Johnson, Kirk R.; Zamuner, Alba B.; Rubén Cúneo, N.; Matheos, Sergio D.; Singer, Bradley S.

    2007-10-01

    Few South American macrofloras of Paleocene age are known, and this limits our knowledge of diversity and composition between the end-Cretaceous event and the Eocene appearance of high floral diversity. We report new, unbiased collections of 2516 compression specimens from the Paleocene Salamanca Formation (ca. 61.7 Ma) from two localities in the Palacio de los Loros exposures in southern Chubut, Patagonia, Argentina. Our samples reveal considerably greater richness than was previously known from the Paleocene of Patagonia, including 36 species of angiosperm leaves as well as angiosperm fruits, flowers, and seeds; ferns; and conifer leaves, cones, and seeds. The floras, which are from siltstone and sandstone channel-fills deposited on low-relief floodplain landscapes in a humid, warm temperate climate, are climatically and paleoenvironmentally comparable to many quantitatively collected Paleocene floras from the Western Interior of North America. Adjusted for sample size, there are >50% more species at each Palacio de los Loros quarry than in any comparable U.S. Paleocene sample. These results indicate more vibrant terrestrial ecosystems in Patagonian than in North American floodplain environments ˜4 m.y. after the end-Cretaceous extinction, and they push back the time line 10 m.y. for the evolution of high floral diversity in South America. The cause of the dis parity is unknown but could involve reduced impact effects because of greater distance from the Chicxulub site, higher latest Cretaceous diversity, or faster recovery or immigration rates.

  19. Inferring population connectivity across the range of distribution of the stiletto shrimp Artemesia longinaris Spence Bate, 1888 (Decapoda, Penaeidae) from DNA barcoding: implications for fishery management

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Batista, Abner; Negri, Mariana; Pileggi, Leonardo G.; Castilho, Antonio L.; Costa, Rogério C.; Mantelatto, Fernando L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Artemesia longinaris is a marine shrimp endemic to the southwestern Atlantic and distributed from Atafona, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) to Rawson, Chubut (Argentina). In recent years, this species has become an important target of the commercial fishery as a consequence of the decline in the fishery of more traditional and profitable marine shrimps. In addition, phenotypic variations have been documented in populations along its distribution. Therefore, investigations on the genetics of the fishing stocks are necessary for the development of sustainable management strategies and for understanding the possible sources of these variations. The mitochondrial gene Cytochrome Oxidase I (COI) was used to search for evidence of genetic structure among the populations of Artemesia longinaris and to analyze the phylogenetic relationships among them. A total of 60 specimens were collected from seven different localities, covering its geographical range. The final alignment showed 53 haplotypes (48 individuals and 5 shared), with no biogeographical pattern. The low genetic divergence found, with a non-significant FST value, also suggests the absence of population structure for this gene. These findings indicate a continuous gene flow among the populations analyzed, suggesting that the phenotypic variation is a consequence of different environmental conditions among the localities. PMID:25561842

  20. Multiple incidence angle SIR-B experiment over Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimino, Jobea; Casey, Daren; Wall, Stephen; Brandani, Aldo; Domik, Gitta; Leberl, Franz

    1986-01-01

    The Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B), the second synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to fly aboard a shuttle, was launched on October 5, 1984. One of the primary goals of the SIR-B experiment was to use multiple incidence angle radar images to distinguish different terrain types through the use of their characteristic backscatter curves. This goal was accomplished in several locations including the Chubut Province of southern Argentina. Four descending image acquisitions were collected providing a multiple incidence angle image set. The data were first used to assess stereo-radargrammetric techniques. A digital elevation model was produced using the optimum pair of multiple incidence angle images. This model was then used to determine the local incidence angle of each picture element to generate curves of relative brightness vs. incidence angle. Secondary image products were also generated using the multi-angle data. The results of this work indicate that: (1) various forest species and various structures of a single species may be discriminated using multiple incidence angle radar imagery, and (2) it is essential to consider the variation in backscatter due to a variable incidence angle when analyzing and comparing data collected at varying frequencies and polarizations.

  1. Utilizing an Extraterrestrial Analogue to Predict Sediment Migration on Frenchman Flat due to Convective Vortex (Dust Devil) Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, B. W.

    2006-12-01

    A synthesis of terrestrial and Martian data suggests that a convective vortex, or "dust devil," is a significant, non-random terrestrial eolian sediment transport phenomenon, which has implications for sediment-based migration of radionuclides on Frenchman Flat playa, a 20 square-mile mountain-bounded dry lake bed approximately centered in Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Planetary scientists are often forced to rely on terrestrial analogues to begin characterizing extraterrestrial processes. However, as the planetary database matures, an increasing number of well-characterized extraterrestrial analogues for terrestrial processes will become available. Such analogues may provide a convenient means to investigate poorly understood or otherwise inaccessible terrestrial phenomena. Historical atmospheric nuclear experiments conducted from 1951 to 1962 deposited radionuclides into surface sediments across parts of Frenchman Flat playa, where dust devils are known to commonly occur, especially during the summer months. Recent information from both terrestrial and Martian studies yields that dust devils can be significant contributors to both the local eolian sediment transport regime and the regional climate system. Additionally, the use of terrestrial desert environments as Martian analogues, as well as the recent, unique discovery of Mars-like dust devil tracks in Africa, has established a working correlation between Earth, Mars, and the dust devil phenomenon. However, while the difficulty in tracking dust devil paths on Earth has hindered the determination of any net sediment transport due to dust devils, the dramatic albedo contrast in disturbed sediment on Mars lends to the formation of persistent, curvilinear dust devil tracks. These tracks illustrate that in zones of preferential formation, dust devils possess non-random orientations over seasonal timescales with respect to prevailing wind. By calibrating these Martian orientations with meteorological

  2. Sedimentology of the saline lakes of the Cariboo Plateau, Interior British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaut, Robin W.; Long, Peter R.

    1989-10-01

    There are several hundred saline lakes in Interior British Columbia, including muddy siliciclastic playas, saline playas, perennial lakes (including meromictic sulphate lakes), and ephemeral lakes, some with permanent salts. The lake waters have highly variable compositions, with Na-CO 3-Cl, Na-CO 3-(SO 4)-Cl, Mg-Na-SO 4 and Na-Mg-SO 4, the dominant types of brine. On the Cariboo Plateau, where they are most abundant, the saline lakes are small, shallow, and occupy depressions within glacial and glacio-fluvial deposits. Most are groundwater-fed. The region is characterized by extremely cold winters and short hot summers. Dense coniferous forest mantles much of the plateau and surrounds most of the lakes. Most basins comprise three main subenvironments—hillslope, mudflat (saline and dry) and lake (ephemeral or perennial). Fluvial sediments are of little significance. Mudflats are primarily a zone of extensive interstitial carbonate precipitation from shallow groundwaters, including abundant magnesite and hydromagnesite. The amount of carbonate formed varies with groundwater composition. Some mudflats are carbonate-dominated; others are predominantly siliciclastic with only highly soluble interstitial salts forming. Sedimentary structures are disrupted by carbonate precipitation and displacive salt crystallization. Springs and ephemeral seepages are locally present. Microbial mats form extensively along many littoral zones and around springs; laminates are preserved in some cores. Efflorescent salt crusts cover saline mudflats around most lakes and playas. Subaqueous salts (including natron, epsomite, bloedite, mirabilite) are precipitated during late summer, autumn and winter in several hypersaline lakes, some by evaporative concentration, others by brine cooling and freeze-out. Several hypersaline, ephemeral lakes have an unusual "spotted" morphology, with hundreds of individual brine pools within carbonate-siliciclastic muds. Most recent sedimentation in the

  3. Soil Moisture Dynamics and Evaporation in Arid Intermountain Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, C.; Pardyjak, E.; Nadeau, D. F.; Jensen, D. D.; Hoch, S.

    2014-12-01

    Mountain flows have been studied for several decades now and it is safe to say that their main features are well understood under steady conditions and over idealized terrain. The Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) program was designed to better understand atmospheric fluid dynamics across all scales over realistic mountainous terrain as well as under transient and steady conditions. As part of MATERHORN, a large field campaign was conducted in May 2013. The main study area, a playa site, covers an area of several hundred square kilometers. It is mostly devoid of vegetation, characterized by a flat surface, shallow water table and a heterogeneous soil moisture spatial distribution even in dry conditions. Recent studies have shown that soil moisture plays a critical role in the dynamics of mountain flows, but a detailed understanding of these has not been sufficiently quantified. The objectives of this study are thus: 1) to quantify the spatial heterogeneity of soil moisture on the playa site; 2) to describe how soil moisture affects the surface energy balance; 3) to identify the key controlling mechanisms on evaporation after a rain event in an arid area; 4) to explore the existence of nocturnal evaporation and investigate its main driving factors. To do this, we applied the gravimetric method to measure volumetric water content in the surface soil layer (0 - 2 cm and 4 - 6 cm) twice per 24-h intensive observation period at 17 sites evenly distributed on a 180 x 240 m grid. Near-surface atmospheric variables as well as ground heat-flux were also measured by a flux tower located close to the soil sampling sites. Preliminary data analysis reveals that the highest spatial variability in surface soil moisture is found under dry conditions. Our results also show that decreasing surface albedo with increasing soil moisture sustained a powerful positive feedback loop promoting large evaporation rates. Finally, it was found that while

  4. Hydrogeologic setting and hydrologic data of the Smoke Creek Desert basin, Washoe County, Nevada, and Lassen County, California, water years 1988-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maurer, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    Smoke Creek Desert is a potential source of water for urban development in Washoe County, Nevada. Hydrogeologic data were collected from 1988 to 1990 to learn more about surface- and ground-water flow in the basin. Impermeable rocks form a boundary to ground-water flow on the east side of the basin and at unknown depths at the base of the flow system. Permeable volcanic rocks on the west and north sides of the basin represent a previously unrecognized aquifer and provide potential avenues for interbasin flow. Geophysical data indicate that basin-fill sediments are about 2,000 feet thick near the center of the basin. The geometry of the aquifers, however, remains largely unknown. Measurements of water levels, pressure head, flow rate, water temperature, and specific conductance at 19 wells show little change from 1988 to 1990. Chemically, ground water begins as a dilute sodium and calcium bicarbonate water in the mountain blocks, changes to a slightly saline sodium bicarbonate solution beneath the alluvial fans, and becomes a briny sodium chloride water near the playa. Concentrations of several inorganic constituents in the briny water near the playa commonly exceed Nevada drinking-water standards. Ground water in the Honey Lake basin and Smoke Creek Desert basin has similar stable-isotope composition, except near Sand Pass. If interbasin flow takes place, it likely occurs at depths greater than 400-600 feet beneath Sand Pass or through volcanic rocks to the north of Sand Pass. Measure- ments of streamflow indicate that about 2,800 acre-feet/year discharged from volcanic rocks to streamflow and a minimum of 7.300 acre-feet/year infiltrated and recharged unconsolidated sediments near Smoke, Buffalo, and Squaw Creeks during the period of study. Also about 1,500 acre-feet per year was lost to evapotranspiration along the channel of Smoke Creek, and about 1,680 acre-feet per year of runoff from Smoke, Buffalo, and Squaw Creeks was probably lost to evaporation from the

  5. Properties of solonetzes on terraces of salt lakes Bulukhta and Khaki in the Caspian Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanova, N. P.; Lebedeva, M. P.

    2016-06-01

    A comparative assessment of pedogenetic processes in solonetzes (Calcic Gypsic Salic Solonetzes (Siltic, Albic, Cutanic, Differentic)) developing on terraces of lake depressions within the Volga-Ural interfluve of the Caspian Lowland has been performed on the basis of data on their macro- and micromorphological features and chemical, physicochemical, and physical properties. The studied soils have number of common characteristics shaped by the humus-accumulative, solonetzic, eluvial-illuvial, calcification, and gypsification processes. However, it is shown that macro- and micromorphological indicators of solonetzic processes (the development of clay-humus coatings and the character of structural units in the solonetzic (B) horizon) do not always agree with the modern physicochemical conditions of the development of this process. This is explained by differences in the degree and chemistry of the soil salinization and the depth and salinity of the groundwater. Solonetzes developing on the second terrace of Playa Khaki are distinguished by the highest water content and maximum thickness of the horizons depleted of soluble salts. They are characterized by the well-pronounced humus-accumulative process leading to the development of the light-humus (AJ) horizon. In other solonetzes, the accumulation of humus is weaker, and their topsoil part can be diagnosed as the solonetzic-eluvial (SEL) horizon. Active solodic process and illuviation of organomineral substances with the development of thick coatings and infillings in the B horizon are also typical of solonetzes on the second terrace of Playa Khaki. Micromorphological data indicate that, at present, layered clayey coatings in these soils are subjected to destruction and in situ humification owing to the active penetration of plant roots into the coatings with their further biogenic processing by the soil microfauna. The process of gleyzation (as judged from the number of Fe-Mn concentrations) is most active in

  6. Application of GIS and remote sensing methods to the paleohydrography of the Paso del Norte region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, John F.

    The purpose of this project is to use geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing methods to investigate the paleohydrology of the Paso del Norte region during the latest pluvial event. During the research I gathered the best available geologic and hydrographic data sets and integrated these data within a GIS in order to create a digital paleohydrologic database for the region. In particular, I used the GIS to reconstruct the hydrography (i.e. streams, lakes, and watershed boundaries) that existed as a results of increased precipitation and a decrease in temperature in the recent geologic past. The existence of the pluvial lakes had an impact on ground-water and surface-water flow systems in this region. The results of my research are presented as two papers ready for peer-review publication submission and a third paper that is a previously published work. (1) Using GIS and Remote Sensing to Reconstruct Late Quaternary and Early Holocene Paleo-Hydrography Using Climate Data and Modern Topography---an Example from the Southwestern US. This paper describes the methods used to create a paleo-hydrography system for the Paso del Norte region, and the development of a water-balance equation that estimates the inputs and outputs of this system. (2) Estimating Water-Balance Equation for Playas in the Tularosa Basin of Southern New Mexico. This paper describes the calibration and testing of the GIS model presented in the first paper. Before it can be applied to paleohydrologic systems, it must be shown to reasonably approximate playa systems in the region under current conditions. Water balances were calculated for several playas and their associated drainages. (3) The Hydrogeologic Framework of Basin-Fill Aquifers and Associated Ground-water flow Systems in Southwestern New Mexico---An Overview. The paper is an overview of work done by many hydrogeologists in the Paso del Norte region; however, the primary source of most of our current knowledge is based on the

  7. Geomorphic and land cover identification of dust sources in the eastern Great Basin of Utah, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahnenberger, Maura; Nicoll, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This study identifies anthropogenically disturbed areas and barren playa surfaces as the two primary dust source types that repeatedly contribute to dust storm events in the eastern Great Basin of western Utah, U.S.A. This semi-arid desert region is an important contributor to dust production in North America, with this study being the first to specifically identify and characterize regional dust sources. From 2004 to 2010, a total of 51 dust event days (DEDs) affected the air quality in Salt Lake City, UT. MODIS satellite imagery during 16 of these DEDs was analyzed to identify dust plumes, and assess the characteristics of dust source areas. A total of 168 plumes were identified, and showed mobilization of dust from Quaternary deposits located within the Bonneville Basin. This analysis identifies 4 major and 5 secondary source areas for dust in this region, which produce dust primarily during the spring and fall months and during moderate or greater drought conditions, with a Palmer Drought Index (PDI) of - 2 or less. The largest number of observed dust plumes (~ 60% of all plumes) originated from playas (ephemeral lakes) and are classified as barren land cover with a silty clay soil sediment surface. Playa surfaces in this region undergo numerous recurrent anthropogenic disturbances, including military operations and anthropogenic water withdrawal. Anthropogenic disturbance is necessary to produce dust from the vegetated landscape in the eastern Great Basin, as evidenced by the new dust source active from 2008 to 2010 in the area burned by the 2007 Milford Flat Fire; this fire was the largest in Utah's history due to extensive cover of invasive cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) along with drought conditions. However, dust mobilization from the Milford Flat Burned Area was limited to regions that had been significantly disturbed by post-fire land management techniques that consisted of seeding, followed by chaining or tilling of the soil. Dust storms in the eastern

  8. Is The Enclosed Qaidam Basin In The Tibetan Plateau Accumulative Or Erosive?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The Qaidam Basin (QB) is an inter-mountane basin in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau (QTP), and various palaeoenvironmental reconstructions have been undertaken assuming that the sediments contain continuous and high-resolution records. The climate is hyper-arid today, and is one of the most arid places in the world. The Chaerhan salt lake is the depo-center for the QB during the Quaternary. The Shell Bar, located in this lake with million of ARTICULATED Corbicula shells living in freshwater, had been previously interpreted to be shorelines representing high lake stand, with 14C ages of 30-40 ka BP. Our new interpretation proposes that it appears to have been formed by an active stream or a small river that flowed into the Chaerhan playa after a lake regressed from the basin floor. The river incised a channel into the lacustrine muds of that former lake, and the accumulation of Corbicula shells and the thin salt crust layer on top provided resistance to the wind erosion that have deflated the surrounding lake sediments, leaving it in topographical relief. At present the channel rises up to 2-3 m above the playa. Our OSL dating results shows that it has an age of about 100 ka. Since the Chaerhan playa is the depositional center of the inland QB during the Quaternary, this implies that the area has experienced considerable deflation since ca. 100 ka. When looking at the chronological data published so far in the basin, we found similar ages of 100 ka for the surface sediments, which indicate that the basin in general has experienced dramatic wind erosion. Different opinions exist towards the dust source of the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) which is located to the east of the QB. It has been argued that the QB contributed little dust to the CLP, as the dust generated in the QB could not reach the CLP. However, some others proposed the opposite. Our geochemistry data show that the similarities of major-element analysis for samples from the QB (both lacustrine and loess

  9. Paleoseismologic evidence for late Holocene earthquakes on the Southern Panamint Valley fault zone: Implications for earthquake clustering in the Eastern California Shear Zone north of the Garlock fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, L. J.; Dolan, J. F.; Kirby, E.; Haravitch, B.; Alm, S.

    2010-12-01

    New paleoseismological data from two trenches excavated across the southern end of the Panamint Valley fault (PVF), the most active of the three major faults in the eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) north of the Garlock fault, reveal the occurrence of at least two, and probably three, surface ruptures during the late Holocene. These trenches were designed to test the hypothesis that the earthquake clusters and intervening seismic lulls observed in the Mojave section of the ECSZ (Rockwell et al. 2000, Ganev et al. 2010) at 8-9.5 ka, 5-6 ka and during the past ~1-1.5 ka, also involved the fault systems of the ECSZ north of the Garlock fault. Well stratified playa sands, silts and clays exposed in the trench allowed precise identification of two event horizons; a likely third event horizon occurred during a period of soil development across the playa. Calibrated radiocarbon dates from 25 charcoal samples constrain the dates of the most recent event (MRE) to ~1450-1500 AD and the ante-penultimate event at 3.2-3.6 ka. The penultimate event occurred during a period of soil development spanning ~350-1400 AD. The presence of large blocks of soil in what appears to be scarp-derived colluvium in a large fissure opened during this event require that it occurred late during soil development, probably only a few hundred years before the MRE. The timing of the three events indicate that the southern PVF has ruptured at least once, and probably twice during the ongoing seismic cluster in the Mojave region. The PVF earthquakes also are similar in age to the 1872 Owens Valley earthquakes and the geomorphically youthful, but undated MRE in central Death Valley. Although we were unable to excavate deeply enough at this site to expose mid-to lower - Holocene playa strata, the timing of the ante-penultimate earthquake at our site shows that the PVF has ruptured at least once during the well-defined 2-5 ka seismic lull in the Mojave section of the ECSZ. Interestingly the 3.2-3.6 ka

  10. Microelements in solonchaks of the western Trans-Baikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosorova, S. B.; Merkusheva, M. G.; Boloneva, L. N.; Baldanova, A. L.; Ubugunov, L. L.

    2016-04-01

    Distribution patterns of microelements (Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Cr, Co, Pb, and Cd) in solonchaks of the western Trans-Baikal region were studied. It was found that their concentrations in typical solonchaks of haloxerophytic steppe differed from those in solonchaks of moistened habitats (playa, gleyed, and dark solonchaks) because of the differences in their landscape positions and ecological conditions. A general rise in the contents of the microelements was observed from the northeast to the southwest in agreement with changes in the parent materials. Different degrees of correlation of the contents of the microelements and their exchangeable forms with the contents of soluble salts, humus, and physical clay in the soils and the soil reaction were found. The average and extreme concentrations of the microelements were determined. The studied typical solonchaks differed from the zonal chestnut soils in the higher contents of Co, Cr, and Cd; whereas solonchaks of moistened habitats were enriched in Mn, Co, and Cd.

  11. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Vermejo Project area and the Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge, Colfax County, northeastern New Mexico, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, J.R.; Garrabrant, L.A.; Wilson, Mark; Lusk, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    invertebrates. Concentrations of other elements were below their respective toxicity levels. Plants, invertebrates, fish, and fish fillets were collected and analyzed. These analyses were compared to diagnostic criteria and to each other to determine the extent of bioaccumulation of trace elements. Plants contained larger dry weight concentrations of aluminum, arsenic, boron, chromium, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, nickel, and vanadium than invertebrates and fish. Adult brine flies, gathered from playas, contained larger geometric mean dry weight concentrations of boron, magnesium, and selenium than other invertebrates. Of all samples collected, the largest mercury concentrations were found in fish fillets, although these concentrations were below levels of concern. Mercury and selenium bioaccumulation was evident in various habitats of the study area. Biological samples from Natural playa, an endemic wetland, and Half playa, a playa that receives additional water through seepage and irrigation delivery canals, generally had elevated concentrations of boron, iron, magnesium, and selenium than samples from reservoir and river sites. Selenium concentrations were lowest in biota from the two reservoir sites, although a wetland immediately downstream from the dam impounding Lake No. 13 (created by seepage from the reservoir) had elevated concentrations of selenium in biota. The geometric mean selenium concentration of whole-fish samples, except those from Lakes No. 13 and No. 14, exceeded the 5-mg/g dry weight selenium concentration that demarcates the approximate lower limit of the threshold range of concentrations that have been associated with adverse effects on piscine reproduction. Biota collected on and in the area around Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge contained concentrations of selenium that are in the low

  12. Mycelial actinobacteria in salt-affected soils of arid territories of Ukraine and Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishko, V. N.; Syshchikova, O. V.; Zenova, G. M.; Kozhevin, P. A.; Dubrova, M. S.; Lubsanova, D. A.; Chernov, I. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    A high population density (up to hundreds of thousands or millions CFU/g soil) of mycelial bacteria (actinomycetes) is determined in salt-affected soils of arid territories of Ukraine, Russia, and Turkmenistan. Of all the studied soils, the lowest amounts of actinomycetes (thousands and tens of thousands CFU/g soil) are isolated from sor (playa) and soda solonchaks developed on the bottoms of drying salt lakes in Buryatia and in the Amu Darya Delta. Actinomycetes of the Streptomyces, Micromonospora, and Nocardiopsis genera were recorded in the studied soils. It is found that conditions of preincubation greatly affect the activity of substrate consumption by the cultures of actinomycetes. This could be attributed to changes in the metabolism of actinomycetes as a mechanism of their adaptation to the increased osmotic pressure of the medium. The alkali tolerance of halotolerant actinomycetes isolated from the salt-affected soils is experimentally proved.

  13. [Embrionary development of Strombus pugilis (Mesogastropoda: Strombidae) in the laboratory].

    PubMed

    Brito Manzano, N; Aldana Aranda, D

    2000-12-01

    Stages from oviposition to veliger hatching are described for Strombus pugilis under laboratory conditions. Two egg masses from Playa Seyba, México, (20 degrees 45' N, 91 degrees 45' W) were used (three sub-samples per mass). Each sub-sample was immersed in a 11 container at 29 +/- 1 degrees C. This description is based on stages known from Strombus gigas, which include number of: fertilized eggs, morulae, gastrulae, trochophore larvae with slow movements, larvae with primordium foot, larvae with eyes, larvae with statocyst and veliger larvae. Eggs with first division appeared five hours after oviposition in the three replicates of each mass, although in greatest number in one of the egg masses. Trochophore larvae with slow movements appear after 50-54 hours and veligers hatch after 90 hours. PMID:15266793

  14. Metaviromics of Namib Desert Salt Pans: A Novel Lineage of Haloarchaeal Salterproviruses and a Rich Source of ssDNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Adriaenssens, Evelien M.; van Zyl, Leonardo Joaquim; Cowan, Don A.; Trindade, Marla I.

    2016-01-01

    Viral communities of two different salt pans located in the Namib Desert, Hosabes and Eisfeld, were investigated using a combination of multiple displacement amplification of metaviromic DNA and deep sequencing, and provided comprehensive sequence data on both ssDNA and dsDNA viral community structures. Read and contig annotations through online pipelines showed that the salt pans harbored largely unknown viral communities. Through network analysis, we were able to assign a large portion of the unknown reads to a diverse group of ssDNA viruses. Contigs belonging to the subfamily Gokushovirinae were common in both environmental datasets. Analysis of haloarchaeal virus contigs revealed the presence of three contigs distantly related with His1, indicating a possible new lineage of salterproviruses in the Hosabes playa. Based on viral richness and read mapping analyses, the salt pan metaviromes were novel and most closely related to each other while showing a low degree of overlap with other environmental viromes. PMID:26761024

  15. Recent Results From the Opportunity Rover's Exploration of Endeavour Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Gellert, R.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is beginning its 11th year of exploration and as of sol 3535 (1/3/14 UTC) has traversed 38,729 m (based on wheel turns) across the plains of Meridiani and the rim of the approx. 22 km wide Noachian Endeavour Crater. Opportunity has investigated ancient sulfate-rich sand-stones (Burns formation) that dominate the plains and formed in ancient playa and dune environments, characterized impact breccias (Shoemaker formation) and their aqueous alteration on Endeavour's Cape York rim segment, and investigated extensive aqueous alteration of rocks on Cape York's Matijevic Hill that stratigraphically underlie Shoemaker formation and predate the Endeavour-forming event. In this abstract results from Opportunity's recent exploration of Endeavour's rim are covered, focusing on comparing what was found on Matijevic Hill with observations acquired on Murray Ridge, where Opportunity will spend its sixth winter at Cook Haven.

  16. Technical report for the alkali lake ecological assessment, phase 1 reconnaissance (FY 91 and FY 92)

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, G.

    1993-03-01

    The report summarizes the results of three field survey trips (June and September 1991, May 1992) taken to investigate the ecological effects associated with the release of over a million gallons of hazardous waste from herbicide production on the Alkali Lake playa. Sampling of soil, sediment, groundwater, soil-dwelling invertebrates and vegetation confirmed that hazardous materials from the waste disposal area are migrating westerly within the shallow aquifer to West Alkali Lake. Two areas of dead vegetation were identified and permanently marked to determine if these areas are changing in size and location. Preliminary calculations using a linear food-chain model suggested that small mammalian herbivores would probably not display adverse effects due to dietary exposures to the contaminants. However, nestling shorebirds may be exposed to concentrations potentially associated with adverse biological effects.

  17. A quantitative model of ground-water flow during formation of tabular sandstone uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a quantitative simulation of regional groundwater flow during uranium deposition in the Westwater Canyon Member and Jackpile Sandstone Member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the San Juan basin. Topographic slope, shoreline position, and density contrasts in the lake and pore fluids controlled the directions of flow and recharge-discharge areas. The most important results for uranium ore deposit formation are that regional groundwater discharged throughout the basin, regional discharge was concentrated along the shore line or playa margin, flow was dominantly gravity driven, and compaction dewatering was negligible. A strong association is found between the tabular sandstone uranium deposits and major inferred zones of mixed local and regional groundwater discharge. -from Author

  18. Mojave remote sensing field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.; Petroy, S. B.; Plaut, J. J.; Shepard, Michael K.; Evans, D.; Farr, T.; Greeley, Ronald; Gaddis, L.; Lancaster, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Mojave Remote Sensing Field Experiment (MFE), conducted in June 1988, involved acquisition of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS); C, L, and P-band polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data; and simultaneous field observations at the Pisgah and Cima volcanic fields, and Lavic and Silver Lake Playas, Mojave Desert, California. A LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) scene is also included in the MFE archive. TM-based reflectance and TIMS-based emissivity surface spectra were extracted for selected surfaces. Radiative transfer procedures were used to model the atmosphere and surface simultaneously, with the constraint that the spectra must be consistent with field-based spectral observations. AIRSAR data were calibrated to backscatter cross sections using corner reflectors deployed at target sites. Analyses of MFE data focus on extraction of reflectance, emissivity, and cross section for lava flows of various ages and degradation states. Results have relevance for the evolution of volcanic plains on Venus and Mars.

  19. The Impact of Horizontal and Temporal Resolution on Convection and Precipitation with High-Resolution GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putman, William P.

    2012-01-01

    Using a high-resolution non-hydrostatic version of GEOS-5 with the cubed-sphere finite-volume dynamical core, the impact of spatial and temporal resolution on cloud properties will be evaluated. There are indications from examining convective cluster development in high resolution GEOS-5 forecasts that the temporal resolution within the model may playas significant a role as horizontal resolution. Comparing modeled convective cloud clusters versus satellite observations of brightness temperature, we have found that improved. temporal resolution in GEOS-S accounts for a significant portion of the improvements in the statistical distribution of convective cloud clusters. Using satellite simulators in GEOS-S we will compare the cloud optical properties of GEOS-S at various spatial and temporal resolutions with those observed from MODIS. The potential impact of these results on tropical cyclone formation and intensity will be examined as well.

  20. Optical dating of geoarchaeologically significant sites from the Southern High Plains and South Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, J.; Stokes, S.

    2001-12-01

    The Southern High Plains of the United States is a key region for the investigation of early human occupation of North America. This area, including selected archaeological sites located in southern Texas, contains a range of aeolian, fluvial and playa deposits. Such deposits may be suited to luminescence-based methods of age assessment. In this paper we describe a combination of multiple and single-aliquot optical dating results for a selection of sites with some independent age control. We find generally good agreement between multiple- and single-aliquot equivalent dose ( De) estimates for the 20 samples compared, but note that the single-aliquot approach results in errors in mean De's to be less by an order of magnitude. Our results suggest that at least some of the single-aliquot methods are of great utility for low-latitude geoarchaeological sites.

  1. Active sand dunes are largest dust source in the Sahara Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-09-01

    Dried up lakebeds and playas in the Sahara Desert of North Africa are large sources of dust in the atmosphere. The Bodélé Depression at the southern edge of the Sahara Desert, for example, is the single largest source of dust in the world; on average, 100 dust storms a year originate from the Bodélé Depression. A new study by Crouvi et al., however, finds that active sand dunes could be even bigger sources of desert dust in the atmosphere. Atmospheric dust plays active roles in climate and biological processes in the ocean: It regulates heating at the surface of the Earth; modifies cloud properties that affect rainfall; and acts as the only source of iron, a critical nutrient for microorganisms in the ocean. Little is known about types of dust sources in the Sahara Desert, which alone accounts for more than 50% of the dust in the atmosphere.

  2. A Marine Origin for the Meridiani Planum Landing Site?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. J.; Haldemann, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    The Opportunity instruments have provided compelling evidence that the sulfate-rich chemical and siliciclastic sediments at the Meridiani Planum landing site were deposited in shallow water. The local paleo-environment is most often characterized as a broad, shallow sea or large playa, with surface conditions cycling between wet and dry episodes, interbedding evaporates with eolian fine sediments [e.g., 1,2]. This particular working hypothesis is reasonable, considering the area characterized by the rover s mobility. An alternative, marine origin will be considered here, a working hypothesis that we feel provides a better fit to the local-scale results identified by Opportunity, and the regional-scale characteristics of Meridiani Planum provided by data from orbiting spacecraft, when considered together.

  3. Some examples of the utility of HCMM data in geologic remote sensing. [Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Schieldge, J. P.; Abrams, M. J.; Alley, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Examples of HCMM (Heat Capacity Mapping Mission) data in geologic remote sensing are presented, and the data set is composed of HCMM and aircraft digital scanner data and ground truth data from four western U.S. test sites. Data are used in the thermal model to test thermal data effectiveness, and changes in temperature with depth and time for dry soils are described by the model. It is found that the HCMM thermal inertia image is useful in the separability of bedrock and alluvium in Death Valley, and aa and pahoehoe flows in the Pisgah basalt flow. In a color composite of HCMM day temperature, night temperature, and day visible images of the Pisgah Crater test site, it is possible to distinguish alluvium, playa, aa and pahoehoe basalt flow, rhyolite intrusives, and other elements. Ground checking of units at a few points will extend capabilities to large areas and assist in creating telegeologic maps.

  4. Constellation Program Electrical Ground Support Equipment Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCoy, Keegan S.

    2010-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, I engaged in the research and development of electrical ground support equipment for NASA's Constellation Program. Timing characteristics playa crucial role in ground support communications. Latency and jitter are two problems that must be understood so that communications are timely and consistent within the Kennedy Ground Control System (KGCS). I conducted latency and jitter tests using Alien-Bradley programmable logic controllers (PLCs) so that these two intrinsic network properties can be reduced. Time stamping and clock synchronization also play significant roles in launch processing and operations. Using RSLogix 5000 project files and Wireshark network protocol analyzing software, I verified master/slave PLC Ethernet module clock synchronization, master/slave IEEE 1588 communications, and time stamping capabilities. All of the timing and synchronization test results are useful in assessing the current KGCS operational level and determining improvements for the future.

  5. Quaternary Stratigraphy, Drainage-Basin Development, and Geomorphology of the Lake Manix Basin, Mojave Desert: Guidebook for Fall Field Trip, Friends of the Pleistocene, Pacific Cell, October 4-7, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, Marith C.; Miller, David M.; Redwine, Joanna L.

    2007-01-01

    The 2007 field trip of the Pacific Cell, Friends of the Pleistocene, visited features of the Quaternary geology and geomorphology of the Lake Manix basin in the Mojave Desert. This report is the guidebook for this trip and includes some discussion of relations observable along the road and at various field trip stops. The Mojave River originates in the San Bernardino Mountains and in high-water years flows north and east to its terminus in Silver Lake playa north of Baker, Calif. Along this course, the river passes through or near several basins that were internally drained prior to integration by the Mojave River, including the Victorville, Harper, Manix, and Soda Lake basins. Sediments in the Lake Manix basin record Mojave River discharge and lake fluctuations that began during the middle Pleistocene and continued through most of the late Pleistocene.

  6. Quantitative analysis of surface characteristics and morphology in Death Valley, California using AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, K. S.; Kruse, F. A.; Lefkoff, A. B.

    1992-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (JPL-AIRSAR) is used to collect full polarimetric measurements at P-, L-, and C-bands. These data are analyzed using the radar analysis and visualization environment (RAVEN). The AIRSAR data are calibrated using in-scene corner reflectors to allow for quantitative analysis of the radar backscatter. RAVEN is used to extract surface characteristics. Inversion models are used to calculate quantitative surface roughness values and fractal dimensions. These values are used to generate synthetic surface plots that represent the small-scale surface structure of areas in Death Valley. These procedures are applied to a playa, smooth salt-pan, and alluvial fan surfaces in Death Valley. Field measurements of surface roughness are used to verify the accuracy.

  7. Does localized recharge occur at a discharge area within the ground-water flow system of Yucca Mountain, Nevada?

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, J.B.; Kroitoru, L.; Ronen, D. |; Magaritz, M.

    1992-10-01

    Studies done in 1984, at a central site on Franklin Lake playa (also known as Alkali Flat, a major discharge area of the ground-water flow system that includes Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site of a high-level nuclear-waste repository) yield limited hydraulic-head and hydrochemical data from a 3-piezometer nest which indicated a slightly downward hydraulic gradient ({minus}0.02) and decreasing concentration of dissolved solids with increasing depth. Hydraulic-head measurements in June, 1989 made at the piezometer nest showed a substantially larger downward gradient ({minus}0.10) and a 0. 83{minus}meter higher water level in the shallowest piezometer (3.29 meters deep), indicating the possibility of localized recharge. during the period of September-November, 1989, a multilevel sampler was used to obtain detailed hydrochemical profiles of the uppermost 1. 5 m of the saturated zone.

  8. The SEMATECH Berkeley microfield exposure tool: learning a the 22-nm node and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher; Baclea-an, Lorie-Mae; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Goldstein, Michael; Hoef, Brian; Hudyma, Russ; Jones, Gideon; Koh, Chawon; La Fontaine, Bruno; McClinton, Brittany; Miyakawa, Ryan; Montgomery, Warren; Roller, John; Wallow, Tom; Wurm, Stefan

    2009-02-16

    Microfield exposure tools (METs) continue to playa dominant role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists. One of these tools is the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA MET operating as a SEMATECH resist and mask test center. Here we present an update summarizing the latest resist test and characterization results. The relatively small numerical aperture and limited illumination settings expected from 1st generation EUV production tools make resist resolution a critical issue even at the 32-nm node. In this presentation, sub 22 nm half pitch imaging results of EUV resists are reported. We also present contact hole printing at the 30-nm level. Although resist development has progressed relatively well in the areas of resolution and sensitivity, line-edge-roughness (LER) remains a significant concern. Here we present a summary of recent LER performance results and consider the effect of system-level contributors to the LER observed from the SEMA TECH Berkeley microfield tool.

  9. Fluvial sedimentary styles and associated depositional environments in the buntsandstein west of river rhine in saar area and pfalz (F.R. Germany) and vosges (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachroth, Wolfgang

    The Buntsandstein west of river Rhine in Saar area, Pfalz and Vosges consists of three fluvial magnacycles which are characterized by different associated non-alluvial environments. The stratigraphic sequence is divided by several unconformities reflecting tectonic movements which were connected with periods of extension of the depositional area. Two major phases and two minor events are recognized by the evaluation of the Pfalz unconformity and the Lothringen unconformity, and the Leuter unconformity and the Saar unconformity, respectively. The Lower Buntsandstein (including Zechstein) compries the first magnacycle and is built up of alluvial-fan deposits, fluvial braidplain sediments and marine to lagoonal deposits. Some aeolian sands as well as several palaeosols are also present. The palaeolandscape consists of alluvial fans seaming the margin of the basin and fluvial braidplains reaching from the toes of the fan belt to the centre of the depositional area which is occupied by a lagoonal sea that partially evolves into a playa-lake with progressive refreshment. The Middle Buntsandstein comprises the second magnacycle and is composed of an alternation of aeolian Dünnschichten and fluvial Felsbänke. The third facies are alluvial-fan deposits of palaeogeographically restricted distribution along the margins of the basin. The aeolian Dünnschichten originate in the marginal parts of chott-type depressions (in comparison with the recent Chott Djerid in Tunesia) where rising ground water moistens the dry sediments that are laid down on the playa floor and thus allows their enhanced preservation. In dry periods, wind-blown sand is spread out as plane sheets or as migrating wind ripple trains, or accumulates to barchanoid-type dunes that advance across the flat. Depending on supply of sand, all stages of transition between dune fields with only narrow interdune corridors between the ridges and interdune playas with isolated widely-spaced dunes are developed. The

  10. Thermal Targets for Satellite Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2001-01-10

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is currently calibrating the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite sponsored by the Department of Energy. The MTI imager is a research and development project with 15 wavebands in the visible, near-infrared, short-wave infrared, mid-wave infrared and long-wave infrared spectral regions. A plethora of targets with known temperatures such as power plant heated lakes, volcano lava vents, desert playas and aluminized Mylar tarps are being used in the validation of the five thermal bands of the MTI satellite. SRTC efforts in the production of ''cold targets'' with aluminized Mylar tarps will be described. Visible and thermal imagery and wavelength dependent radiance measurements of the calibration targets will be presented.

  11. Advances in water resources monitoring from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V.

    1974-01-01

    Nimbus-5 observations indicate that over the oceans the total precipitable water in a column of atmosphere can be estimated to within + or - 10%, the liquid water content of clouds can be estimated to within + or - 25%, areas of precipitation can be delineated, and broad estimates of the precipitation rate obtained. ERTS-1 observations permit the measurement of snow covered area to within a few percent of drainage basin area and snowline altitudes can be estimated to within 60 meters. Surface water areas as small as 1 hectare can be inventoried over large regions such as playa lakes region of West Texas and Eastern New Mexico. In addition, changes in land use on water-sheds occurring as a result of forest fires, urban development, clear cutting, or strip mining can be rapidly obtained.

  12. Metaviromics of Namib Desert Salt Pans: A Novel Lineage of Haloarchaeal Salterproviruses and a Rich Source of ssDNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Adriaenssens, Evelien M; van Zyl, Leonardo Joaquim; Cowan, Don A; Trindade, Marla I

    2016-01-01

    Viral communities of two different salt pans located in the Namib Desert, Hosabes and Eisfeld, were investigated using a combination of multiple displacement amplification of metaviromic DNA and deep sequencing, and provided comprehensive sequence data on both ssDNA and dsDNA viral community structures. Read and contig annotations through online pipelines showed that the salt pans harbored largely unknown viral communities. Through network analysis, we were able to assign a large portion of the unknown reads to a diverse group of ssDNA viruses. Contigs belonging to the subfamily Gokushovirinae were common in both environmental datasets. Analysis of haloarchaeal virus contigs revealed the presence of three contigs distantly related with His1, indicating a possible new lineage of salterproviruses in the Hosabes playa. Based on viral richness and read mapping analyses, the salt pan metaviromes were novel and most closely related to each other while showing a low degree of overlap with other environmental viromes. PMID:26761024

  13. An exploitation of coregistered SIR-A, Seasat and Landsat images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebillard, P.; Nguyen, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    Multispectral registration and classification of SIR-A, Seasat SAR, and Landsat MSS data is presented over two playas located in the northeastern Algerian Sahara. A supervised classification was made over six classes: salt, palm trees, dunes, limestones, gypsum and sand. The best classification is obtained by using all of the data. The images using radar only misclassify trees and salt, limestone and dunes, gypsum and dunes. Landsat only gives a good map but lacks the roughness information contained in the radar data. The Landsat/SIR-A combination gives a better classification than the Landsat/Seasat combination. Density number histograms computed within several classes on the Seasat and SIR-A data show the misclassification is mainly due to the Seasat data.

  14. Number of oil-killed birds and fate of bird carcasses at crude oil pits in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flickinger, Edward L.; Bunck, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey was taken of bird losses in crude oil pits near the central Texas Gulf Coast and in northwestern Texas. At one pit near the Texas Coast, 297 bird carcasses (largely ducks) were counted. Duck losses from oil pollution in northwestern Texas occurred largely in playa basins of the Permian Basin south of the Panhandle. To determine the fate of birds that die in oil pits, 40 carcasses of nine bird species were placed in two crude oil pits near the central Texas Coast in October (19) 1981 and December (15) 1981 and April (6) 1982 and studied for 5 months. Rate of sinking and disappearance of carcasses were positively related to carcass size. In a comparison of three seasons, the time required for a carcass to disappear was longer in winter when oil temperatures were lowest and shorter in spring and fall when oil temperatures were highest.

  15. Equation of state for shock compression of distended solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Dennis; Fenton, Gregg; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-05-01

    Shock Hugoniot data for full-density and porous compounds of boron carbide, silicon dioxide, tantalum pentoxide, uranium dioxide and playa alluvium are investigated for the purpose of equation-of-state representation of intense shock compression. Complications of multivalued Hugoniot behavior characteristic of highly distended solids are addressed through the application of enthalpy-based equations of state of the form originally proposed by Rice and Walsh in the late 1950's. Additive measures of cold and thermal pressure intrinsic to the Mie-Gruneisen EOS framework is replaced by isobaric additive functions of the cold and thermal specific volume components in the enthalpy-based formulation. Additionally, experimental evidence reveals enhancement of shock-induced phase transformation on the Hugoniot with increasing levels of initial distension for silicon dioxide, uranium dioxide and possibly boron carbide. Methods for addressing this experimentally observed feature of the shock compression are incorporated into the EOS model.

  16. Landsat radiometric cross-calibration: extended analysis of tandem image data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillet, P. M.; Markham, Brian L.; Irish, Richard R.

    2005-10-01

    The paper presents the results of an extended analysis of image data sets acquired during the tandem-orbit configuration in 1999 for the purposes of radiometric cross-calibration of the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) sensors. Earlier work focused on the tandem pair for the Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada (RVPN) site to tie down the Landsat-5 TM calibration based on the more accurate Landsat-7 ETM+ calibration. This paper describes new results based on as many as eight tandem image pairs. The additional tandem images are of vegetated areas for which little or no ground reference data were available. Increasing the number of tandem pairs yielded results for the Landsat 5 TM gain coefficients within approximately +/- 1 % of the RVPN-based results in spectral bands 1, 2, 3 and 7, and within -2 % and -4 % of the RVPN-based results for spectral bands 4 and 5, respectively.

  17. Using remote sensing and GIS techniques to estimate discharge and recharge. fluxes for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Agnese, F. A.; Faunt, C.C.; Keith, Turner A.

    1996-01-01

    The recharge and discharge components of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system were defined by remote sensing and GIS techniques that integrated disparate data types to develop a spatially complex representation of near-surface hydrological processes. Image classification methods were applied to multispectral satellite data to produce a vegetation map. This map provided a basis for subsequent evapotranspiration and infiltration estimations. The vegetation map was combined with ancillary data in a GIS to delineate different types of wetlands, phreatophytes and wet playa areas. Existing evapotranspiration-rate estimates were then used to calculate discharge volumes for these areas. A previously used empirical method of groundwater recharge estimation was modified by GIS methods to incorporate data describing soil-moisture conditions, and a recharge potential map was produced. These discharge and recharge maps were readily converted to data arrays for numerical modelling codes. Inverse parameter estimation techniques also used these data to evaluate the reliability and sensitivity of estimated values.

  18. Geochemistry of Precambrian carbonates. V - Late Paleoproterozoic seawater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veizer, Jan; Plumb, K. A.; Clayton, R. N.; Hinton, R. W.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    A study of mineralogy, chemistry, and isotopic composition of the Coronation Supergroup (about 1.9 Ga, NWT), Canada, and the McArthur Group (about 1.65 NT), Australia, is reported in order to obtain better constrained data for the first- and second-order variations in the isotopic composition of late Paleoproterozoic (1.9 +/- 0.2 Ga) seawater. Petrologically, both carbonate sequences are mostly dolostones. The McArthur population contains more abundant textural features that attest to the former presence of sulfates and halite, and the facies investigated represent ancient equivalents of modern evaporitic sabkhas and lacustrine playa lakes. It is suggested that dolomitization was an early diagenetic event and that the O-18 depletion of the Archean to late Paleoproterozoic carbonates is not an artifact of postdepositional alteration.

  19. Lithium Resources for the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, S.; Gruber, P.; Medina, P.; Keolian, G.; Everson, M. P.; Wallington, T.

    2011-12-01

    Lithium is an important industrial compound and the principal component of high energy-density batteries. Because it is the lightest solid element, these batteries are widely used in consumer electronics and are expected to be the basis for battery electric vehicles (BEVs), hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) for the 21st century. In view of the large incremental demand for lithium that will result from expanded use of various types of EVs, long-term estimates of lithium demand and supply are advisable. For GDP growth rates of 2 to 3% and battery recycling rates of 90 to 100%, total demand for lithium for all markets is expected to be a maximum of 19.6 million tonnes through 2100. This includes 3.2 million tonnes for industrial compounds, 3.6 million tonnes for consumer electronics, and 12.8 million tonnes for EVs. Lithium-bearing mineral deposits that might supply this demand contain an estimated resource of approximately 39 million tonnes, although many of these deposits have not been adequately evaluated. These lithium-bearing mineral deposits are of two main types, non-marine playa-brine deposits and igneous deposits. Playa-brine deposits have the greatest immediate resource potential (estimated at 66% of global resources) and include the Salar de Atacama (Chile), the source of almost half of current world lithium production, as well as Zabuye (China/Tibet) and Hombre Muerto (Argentina). Additional important playa-brine lithium resources include Rincon (Argentina), Qaidam (China), Silver Peak (USA) and Uyuni (Bolivia), which together account for about 35% of the estimated global lithium resource. Information on the size and continuity of brine-bearing aquifers in many of these deposits is limited, and differences in chemical composition of brines from deposit to deposit require different extraction processes and yield different product mixes of lithium, boron, potassium and other elements. Numerous other brines in playas

  20. Investigación del USGS sobre el ecosistema de arrecifes de coral en el Atlántico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Yates, Kimberly K.; Zawada, David G.; Richey, Julie N.; Kellogg, Christina A.; Toth, Lauren T.; Torres-Garcia, Legna M.

    2015-01-01

    Los arrecifes de coral son estructuras sólidas, biomineralizadas que protegen comunidades costeras actuando como barreras protectoras de peligros tales como los huracanes y los tsunamis. Estos proveen arena a las playas a través de procesos naturales de erosión, fomentan la industria del turismo, las actividades recreacionales y proveen hábitats pesqueros esenciales. La conti-nua degradación mundial de ecosistemas de arrecifes de coral está bien documentada. Existe la necesidad de enfoque y organización de la ciencia para entender los procesos complejos físicos y biológicos e interacciones que están afectando el estado de los arrecifes coralinos y su capacidad para responder a un entorno cambiante.

  1. Ecological and Taxonomic Features of Actinomycetal Complexes in Soils of the Lake Elton Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenova, G. M.; Dubrova, M. S.; Kuznetsova, A. I.; Gracheva, T. A.; Manucharova, N. A.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2016-02-01

    In the sor (playa) solonchaks of chloride and sulfate-chloride salinity (the content of readily soluble salts is 0.9-1.0%) in the delta of the Khara River discharging into Lake Elton, the number of mycelial actinobacteria (actinomycetes) is low ((2-3) × 103 CFU/g of soil). At a distance from the water's edge, these soils are substituted for the light chestnut ones, for which an elevated number of actinomycetes (an order of magnitude higher than in the sor solonchaks) and a wider generic spectrum are characteristic. The actinomycetal complex is included the Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera, whereas in the sor solonchaks around the lake, representatives of Micromonospora were not found.

  2. Mesoscopic modeling of liquid water transport in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Partha P; Wang, Chao Yang

    2008-01-01

    A key performance limitation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC), manifested in terms of mass transport loss, originates from liquid water transport and resulting flooding phenomena in the constituent components. Liquid water leads to the coverage of the electrochemically active sites in the catalyst layer (CL) rendering reduced catalytic activity and blockage of the available pore space in the porous CL and fibrous gas diffusion layer (GDL) resulting in hindered oxygen transport to the active reaction sites. The cathode CL and the GDL therefore playa major role in the mass transport loss and hence in the water management of a PEFC. In this article, we present the development of a mesoscopic modeling formalism coupled with realistic microstructural delineation to study the profound influence of the pore structure and surface wettability on liquid water transport and interfacial dynamics in the PEFC catalyst layer and gas diffusion layer.

  3. Hydrology of the Bonneville Salt Flats, northwestern Utah, and simulation of ground-water flow and solute transport in the shallow-brine aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, James L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the hydrologic system of the Bonneville Salt Flats with emphasis on the mechanisms of solute transport. Variable-density, three-dimensional computer simulations of the near-surface part of the ground-water system were done to quantify both the transport of salt dissolved in subsurface brine that leaves the salt-crust area and the salt dissolved and precipitated on the land surface. The study was designed to define the hydrology of the brine ground-water system and the natural and anthropogenic processes causing salt loss, and where feasible, to quantify these processes. Specific areas of study include the transport of salt in solution by ground-water flow and the transport of salt in solution by wind-driven ponds and the subsequent salt precipitation on the surface of the playa upon evaporation or seepage into the subsurface. In addition, hydraulic and chemical changes in the hydrologic system since previous studies were documented.

  4. Extrasolar Planets Observed with JWST and the ELTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, L. Drake

    2010-01-01

    The advent of cryogenic space-borne infrared observatories such as the Spitzer Space Telescope has lead to a revolution in the study of planets and planetary systems orbiting sun-like stars. Already Spitzer has characterized the emergent infrared spectra of close-in giant exoplanets using transit and eclipse techniques. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to extend these studies to superEarth exoplanets orbiting in the habitable zones of M-dwarf stars in the near solar neighborhood. The forthcoming ground-based Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) will playa key role in these studies, being especially valuable for spectroscopy at higher spectral resolving powers where large photon fluxes are needed. The culmination of this work within the next two decades will be the detection and spectral characterization of the major molecular constituents in the atmosphere of a habitable superEarth orbiting a nearby lower main sequence star.

  5. Late Pleistocene woodlands in the Bolson de Mapimi: A refugium for the Chihuahuan Desert Biota?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Devender, Thomas R.; Burgess, Tony L.

    1985-11-01

    Packrat middens radiocarbon dated at 12,280 ± 345 and 12,700 ± 165 yr B.P. record expansions of junipers and papershell pinyon ( Pinus remota) into the desert lowlands of Durango and Coahuila, Mexico (26° N). Extralocal trees and shrubs presently occur 24-580 km in nearly all directions including more subtropical areas to the northeast and southeast. An equable Late Wisconsin climate marked by mild winters with increased precipitation and by cool summers with reduced summer monsoons is proposed. The extensive playas of the Bolson de Mapimi probably held water at that time. The Bolson de Mapimi was not a geographical refugium unaffected by glacial climates, although many Chihuahuan Desert plants and animals probably remain in situ as members of equable woodlands. Equable climates, low extinction rates, and repeated, rapid glacial/interglacial climatic fluctuations may have been important in the evolution and accumulation of species at lower latitudes.

  6. Avian cholera in the central and Mississippi flyways 1979-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    Waterfowl mortality from avian cholera during July 1979-May 1980 was widespread in the Central and Mississippi flyways, occurring in a wide variety of species and locations from nesting grounds of snow geese (Chen caerulescens) on Hudson Bay south to waterfowl wintering areas on the Texas coast and playa lakes region. Mortality estimates at the various sites ranged from several birds to over 72,000. The chronological and geographic occurrence of outbreaks corresponded closely to waterfowl migrations from infected sites, suggesting that waterfowl served to distribute avian cholera along migration routes. Recurrent outbreaks at several locations suggest that these sites have become enzootic for this disease. The magnitude of avian cholera mortality and its geographic spread during 1979-80 underscores the need to address management of this disease on an intra- and inter-flyway basis.

  7. Poisoning of Canada geese in Texas by parathion sprayed for control of Russian wheat aphid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flickinger, Edward L.; Juenger, Gary; Roffe, Thomas J.; Smith, Milton R.; Irwin, Roy J.

    1991-01-01

    Approximately 200 Canada geese (Branta canadensis) died at a playa lake in the Texas Panhandle shortly after a winter wheat field in the basin adjacent to the lake was treated with parathion to control newly invading Russian wheat aphids (Diuraphis noxia). No evidence of infectious disease was diagnosed during necropsies of geese. Brain ChE activities were depressed up to 77% below normal. Parathion residues in GI tract contents of geese ranged from 4 to 34 ppm. Based on this evidence, parathion was responsible for the goose mortalities. Parathion applications to winter wheat will undoubtedly increase if parathion is applied for control of both Russian wheat aphids and greenbugs (Schizaphis graminum). Geese may potentially be exposed to widespread applications of parathion from fall to spring, essentially their entire wintering period.

  8. Molecular identification and larval morphological description of Contracaecum pelagicum (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from the anchovy Engraulis anchoita (Engraulidae) and fish-eating birds from the Argentine North Patagonian Sea.

    PubMed

    Garbin, Lucas E; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Paoletti, Michela; Diaz, Julia I; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Navone, Graciela T

    2013-06-01

    Anisakids use invertebrates as paratenic and/or intermediate hosts as a basic feature of larval transmission. The third-stage larva usually develops in invertebrates which are prey items of finfish paratenic hosts. Contracaecum larvae molt twice inside the egg and hatch as free third-stage larvae ensheathed in the second-stage larval cuticle. Copepods act as paratenic or obligatory hosts, usually ingesting these free L3 larvae, and fish act as intermediate/paratenic or metaparatenic hosts preying on infected copepods. Fish-eating birds acquire L3 larvae by ingesting infected fish where they develop into the fourth-stage larvae and adults. Objectives of this work were to establish the specific correspondence between Contracaecum pelagicum L3 larvae parasitizing the anchovy Engraulis anchoita, and the adults parasitizing the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus and the Imperial shag Phalacrocorax atriceps through the use of molecular markers; and, to evaluate the anisakid L3 larval recruitment and infection caused by ingestion of anchovy by S. magellanicus. Sixteen specimens of Contracaecum L3 larvae were analyzed from E. anchoita from Bahía Engaño, Chubut, eight adult nematodes from S. magellanicus and six adult specimens from P. atriceps both from the Valdés Peninsula, Chubut. All nematodes were sequenced for three genes: mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 2 (mtDNA cox2), mitochondrial ribosomal RNA (rrnS), and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA region. Phylogenetic analyses were performed by using Maximum Parsimony (MP) analysis by PAUP. In addition, studies under SEM and LM were carried out on L3 larvae. All L3 individuals from E. anchoita, adults from S. magellanicus, and P. atriceps clustered in the same clade, well supported in the MP tree inferred from the mtDNA cox2, and rrnS gene sequences analyses. Further, the sequence alignments of L3 larvae and adults of C. pelagicum here obtained at the ITS-1 and ITS

  9. Groundwater flow near the Shoal Site, Sand Springs Range, Nevada: Impact of density-driven flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, J.; Mihevc, T.; McKay, A.

    1994-09-01

    The nature of flow from a highland recharge area in a mountain range in north-central Nevada to discharge areas on either side of the range is evaluated to refine a conceptual model of contaminant transport from an underground nuclear test conducted beneath the range. The test, known as the Shoal event, was conducted in 1963 in granitic rocks of the Sand Springs Range. Sparse hydraulic head measurements from the early 1960s suggest flow from the shot location to the east to Fairview Valley, while hydrochemistry supports flow to salt pans in Fourmile Flat to the west. Chemical and isotopic data collected from water samples and during well-logging arc best explained by a reflux brine system on the west side of the Sand Springs Range, rather than a typical local flow system where all flow occurs from recharge areas in the highlands to a central discharge area in a playa. Instead, dense saline water from the playa is apparently being driven toward the range by density contrasts. The data collected between the range and Fourmile Flat suggest the groundwater is a mixture of younger, fresher recharge water with older brine. Chemical contrasts between groundwater in the east and west valleys reflect the absence of re-flux water in Fairview Valley because the regional discharge area is distant and thus there is no accumulation of salts. The refluxing hydraulic system probably developed after the end of the last pluvial period and differences between the location of the groundwater divide based on hydraulic and chemical indicators could reflect movement of the divide as the groundwater system adjusts to the new reflux condition.

  10. Geomorphic and Chemical Characteristics of Dust and Soil in the Eastern Great Basin of Utah, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahnenberger, M.; Nicoll, K.; Perry, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    This study identifies anthropogenically disturbed areas and barren playa surfaces as the two primary dust source types that repeatedly contribute to dust storm events in the eastern Great Basin of western Utah, U.S.A. Further, dust samples were found to be distinctally different elementally compared to soil samples in this region. This analysis used MODIS and USDA Land cover data to identify 4 major and 5 secondary source areas for dust in this region, which produce dust primarily during the spring and fall months and during moderate or greater drought conditions. The largest number of observed dust plumes (~ 60% of all plumes) originated from playas (ephemeral lakes) and are classified as barren land cover with a silty clay soil sediment surface. Anthropogenic disturbance is necessary to produce dust from the vegetated landscape in the eastern Great Basin, as evidenced by the new dust source active from 2008 to 2010 in the area burned by the 2007 Milford Flat Fire; this fire was the largest in Utah's history due to extensive cover of invasive cheatgrass along with drought conditions. Dust and soil samples contain similar enrichments of major soil elements, however, dust samples were significantly more enriched in Na derived from the surface salts of the Sevier Dry Lake. Trace elements were generally more enriched in dust samples and had larger enrichment values than seen in previous studies. Further, for dust and soil samples, the fine fraction (<2.5 μm) was more enriched in trace elements than the coarse fraction (2.5 to 10 μm). Composition of dust transported has influences on human health, ecosystem functioning, and biogeochemical cycling. Dust storms in the eastern Great Basin negatively impact air quality and transportation in the populated regions of Utah; this study details an improved forecasting protocol for dust storm events that will benefit transportation planning and improve public health.

  11. New interpretation of vertically aligned gypsum fabrics: Implications for gypsum depositional environments and diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.R. ); Warren, J.K. )

    1990-05-01

    Gypsum and anhydrite fabrics in trenches and deep 500-m cores from Bristol Dry Lake, California, exhibit a vertical alignment of crystals similar to the fabric seen in bottom-nucleated brine pond gypsum. However, geochemical and sedimentologic evidence indicates that the gypsum formed in Bristol Dry Lake precipitated as a diagenetic displacive mineral within the sediment where groundwater saturated with respect to gypsum recharges around the playa margin (groundwater seepage gypsum). Evidence for displacive growth of gypsum comes from (1) the geometry of the deposit, (2) stable isotopic data and the water chemistry of the brine, and (3) inclusions of matrix that follow twin planes and completely surround crystals as they grow. Because the fabrics and textures of this diagenetic gypsum formed by groundwater in playa settings are similar to those of primary gypsum formed in a brine pond, it is necessary to refine the criteria for the distinction between subaerial, groundwater, and subaqueous gypsum. When compared to the features observed in a Holocene subaqueous gypsum deposit (Marion Lake, Australia) and a Holocene subaerial deposit (Abu Dhabi sabkha), the following criteria can be used to distinguish between the three different types of gypsum deposits: (1) amount of matrix, (2) geometry of the deposit, (3) gypsum crystal size and orientation, (4) distribution of matrix and fluid inclusions within individual crystals, and (5) fabric of the matrix around the gypsum. Distinguishing between subaqueous and groundwater gypsum may be difficult. However, sufficient mesoscale differences exist such that, in most cases, the different gypsum types can be resolved from core slabs and thin sections. These criteria may be applied in ancient examples even after gypsum has been converted to anhydrite.

  12. The distribution, structure, and composition of freshwater ice deposits in Bolivian salt lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurlbert, S.H.; Chang, Cecily C.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Freshwater ice deposits are described from seven, high elevation (4117-4730 m), shallow (mean depth <30 cm), saline (10-103 g l-1) lakes in the southwestern corner of Bolivia. The ice deposits range to several hundred meters in length and to 7 m in height above the lake or playa surface. They are located near the lake or salar margins; some are completely surrounded by water, others by playa deposits or salt crusts. Upper surfaces and sides of the ice deposits usually are covered by 20-40 cm of white to light brown, dry sedimentary materials. Calcite is the dominant crystalline mineral in these, and amorphous materials such as diatom frustules and volcanic glass are also often abundant. Beneath the dry overburden the ice occurs primarily as horizontal lenses 1-1000 mm thick, irregularly alternating with strata of frozen sedimentary materials. Ice represents from 10 to 87% of the volume of the deposits and yields freshwater (TFR <3 g l-1) when melted. Oxygen isotope ratios for ice are similar to those for regional precipitation and shoreline seeps but much lower than those for the lakewaters. Geothermal flux is high in the region as evidenced by numerous hot springs and deep (3.0-3.5 m) sediment temperatures of 5-10??C. This flux is one cause of the present gradual wasting away of these deposits. Mean annual air temperatures for the different lakes probably are all in the range of -2 to 4??C, and mean midwinter temperatures about 5??C lower. These deposits apparently formed during colder climatic conditions by the freezing of low salinity porewaters and the building up of segregation ice lenses. ?? 1988 Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  13. Occurrence of synthetic musk fragrances in effluent and non-effluent impacted environments.

    PubMed

    Chase, Darcy A; Karnjanapiboonwong, Adcharee; Fang, Yu; Cobb, George P; Morse, Audra N; Anderson, Todd A

    2012-02-01

    Synthetic musk fragrances (SMFs) are considered micropollutants and can be found in various environmental matrices near wastewater discharge areas. These emerging contaminants are often detected in wastewater at low concentrations; they are continuously present and constitute a constant exposure source. Objectives of this study were to investigate the environmental fate, transport, and transformation of SMFs. Occurrence of six polycyclic musk compounds (galaxolide, tonalide, celestolide, phantolide, traseolide, cashmeran) and two nitro musk compounds (musk xylene and musk ketone) was monitored in wastewater, various surface waters and their sediments, as well as groundwater, soil cores, and plants from a treated wastewater land application site. Specifically, samples were collected quarterly from (1) a wastewater treatment plant to determine initial concentrations in wastewater effluent, (2) a storage reservoir at a land application site to determine possible photolysis before land application, (3) soil cores to determine the amount of sorption after land application and groundwater recharge to assess lack thereof, (4) a lake system and its sediment to assess degradation, and (5) non-effluent impacted local playa lakes and sediments to assess potential sources of these compounds. All samples were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Data indicated that occurrence of SMFs in effluent-impacted environments was detectable at ng/L and ng/g concentrations, which decreased during transport throughout wastewater treatment and land application. However, unexpected concentrations, ng/L and ng/g, were also detected in playa lakes not receiving treated effluent. Additionally, soil cores from land application sites had ng/g concentrations, and SMFs were detected in plant samples at trace levels. Galaxolide and tonalide were consistently found in all environments. Information on occurrence is critical to assessing exposure to these potential

  14. High (ground) water levels and dune development in central Australia: TL dates from gypsum and quartz dunes around Lake Lewis (Napperby), Northern Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.; Chappell, J.; Murray, A. S.

    1995-03-01

    An episode of high lake levels prior to the last maximum glaciation has been identified at many localities in wastern Australia. Similar events have been recognized at playa lakes in central Australia, where gypsum dunes along playa margins formed during one or more episodes of high groundwater discharge, with a large influx of calcium sulphate. At Lake Lewis, exposures at two islands show similar sediment sequences: three pedogenic gypcrete layers interbedded with aeolian quartz and gypsum sand horizons form three units within gypsum dunes up to 7 m high. The lowest unit has cliffed edges buried by the upper units, indicating a significant time break. Four TL dates (coarse-grained quartz) show that this lowest unit was deposited at or before 70-80 ka. The middle unit of mixed gypsum and quartz sand capped by gypcrete represents the major phase of gypsum dune formation, and 6 TL dates range from 33 to 46 ka with overlapping error bars. These are slightly younger but statistically similar to TL dates (from 39 to 59 ka) of the shoreline gypsum dune at Lake Amadeus in the same region. The top unit of the two islands, up to 1 m thick, has not yet been well dated. One date is inconsistent with the well dated middle layer below, possibly because of incomplete bleaching, and has been rejected. The other date (17 ± 5 ka) is much younger which possibly indicates a minor and local reactivation of old gypsum sediments. At the lake margin, there are quartz dunes overlying the gypsum dunes, and a buried aeolian quartz sand layer occurs in a lake-margin terrace. These represent reactivation of the regional quartz dune field after the major gypsum dune formation. Two consistent TL dates (21 ± 4 ka and 23 ± 6 ka) indicate that regional dunes were active at about the time of the Last Glacial Maximum.

  15. Radiance validation of the solar reflective bands of MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K.

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a key sensor onboard NASA's Terra platform launched in 1999. An important aspect of the use of MODIS, and other Terra sensors, has been the characterization and calibration of the sensors and validation of their data products. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona has been active in this area through the use of ground-based test sites for the radiance validation of MODIS. This paper presents the results from this work using the Railroad Valley Playa test site in Nevada. The paper describes the test site that is now used in the radiance validation and calibration of at least 10 current airborne and satellite based sensors. Two methods are described for the- radiance validation of MODIS. The first relies on ground-based measurements of atmospheric and surface parameters to predict the at -sensor radiance of MODIS. The key to the approach is the measurement of surface reflectance over a 1 km' area of- the playa and results from this method show agreement with MODIS to better than 7%. The second method is a cross-comparison approach to other sensors with footprint sizes and sensor geometries that differ from MODIS. This calibration takes into account the changes in solar zenith and sensor view angle due to any time separation between the sensors as well as spectral differences between the sensors. Early results show that MODIS and ETM+ agree to better than 5% in the solar reflective for bands not affected by atmospheric absorption. The comparisons have also been used to indicate differences in excess of the calibration uncertainties of several other sensors. The paper concludes with an accuracy assessment of the two approaches indicating that cross-comparisons with precision better than 3% can be achieved.

  16. Persistent Leatherback Turtle Migrations Present Opportunities for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Shillinger, George L; Palacios, Daniel M; Bailey, Helen; Bograd, Steven J; Swithenbank, Alan M; Gaspar, Philippe; Wallace, Bryan P; Spotila, James R; Paladino, Frank V; Piedra, Rotney; Eckert, Scott A; Block, Barbara A

    2008-01-01

    Effective transboundary conservation of highly migratory marine animals requires international management cooperation as well as clear scientific information about habitat use by these species. Populations of leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the eastern Pacific have declined by >90% during the past two decades, primarily due to unsustainable egg harvest and fisheries bycatch mortality. While research and conservation efforts on nesting beaches are ongoing, relatively little is known about this population of leatherbacks' oceanic habitat use and migration pathways. We present the largest multi-year (2004–2005, 2005–2006, and 2007) satellite tracking dataset (12,095 cumulative satellite tracking days) collected for leatherback turtles. Forty-six females were electronically tagged during three field seasons at Playa Grande, Costa Rica, the largest extant nesting colony in the eastern Pacific. After completing nesting, the turtles headed southward, traversing the dynamic equatorial currents with rapid, directed movements. In contrast to the highly varied dispersal patterns seen in many other sea turtle populations, leatherbacks from Playa Grande traveled within a persistent migration corridor from Costa Rica, past the equator, and into the South Pacific Gyre, a vast, low-energy, low-productivity region. We describe the predictable effects of ocean currents on a leatherback migration corridor and characterize long-distance movements by the turtles in the eastern South Pacific. These data from high seas habitats will also elucidate potential areas for mitigating fisheries bycatch interactions. These findings directly inform existing multinational conservation frameworks and provide immediate regions in the migration corridor where conservation can be implemented. We identify high seas locations for focusing future conservation efforts within the leatherback dispersal zone in the South Pacific Gyre. PMID:18630987

  17. Deep burial diagenesis in Rotliegende reservoirs of the NW German Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ramseyer, K. ); Gaupp, R.; Matter, A.

    1990-05-01

    A deeply buried Permian continental sequence forms the major gas reservoir in northwest Germany. Deposits of fluvial, eolian, and playa lake shoreline facies show the most favorable reservoir properties. Burial diagenesis is greatly influenced by primary depositional textures and eogenetic processes. However, growth of authigenic clay minerals (illite, kaolinite/dickite, chlorite) relates to changes in the chemistry and flow rate of formation waters. Three different mesogenetic fluid types can be recognized: (1) Alkaline fluids from basin center red beds: The presence of pore-lining chlorite in porous subarkoses of the playa shoreline facies probably is related to a compaction-driven influx of alkaline waters from the shaly, red bed sequences of the basin center. (2) Acidic fluids from coal-bearing Late Carboniferous sediments: An aureole of dickite/kaolinite, several hundred meters wide, is developed in Rotliegende arkosic sands where they are juxtaposed against Carboniferous horsts. In this zone, almost all feldspars were destroyed and the formation of dickite/kaolinite was followed by illite growth and bitumen impregnation. In an outer aureole with less extensive feldspar destruction, kandite minerals are not present, but a dense meshwork of well-crystallized, platy illite fills the pores. The intensity of illitization diminishes away from the Carboniferous sediments (i.e., with increasing distance of fluid migration). K-Ar ages reveal that this illite precipitated within a period when organic maturation products were expelled from the coal measures into Rotliegende sediments and when Paleozoic faults were reactivated. (3) Brines from overlying Zechstein evaporites: During late mesogenetic uplift local influxes of these brines resulted in the formation of pore-plugging carbonate and sulfate cements.

  18. Simulation of Carbon-14 Migration Through a Thick Unsaturated Alluvial Basin Resulting from an Underground Nuclear Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martian, P.; Larentzos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Yucca Flat is one of several areas on the Nevada Test Site that was used for underground nuclear testing. Extensive testing performed in the unsaturated and saturated zones have resulted in groundwater contamination and surface subsidence craters in the vicinity of the underground test areas. Simulation of multiphase 14C transport through the thick Yucca Flat alluvial basin was performed to estimate the magnitude of radionuclide attenuation occurring within the unsaturated zone. Parameterization of the 14C transport in the multiphase flow and transport simulator (FEHM) was verified with experimental data collected from a large unsaturated soil column experiment. The experimental data included 14C as a radio-labeled bicarbonate solution, SF6 gas, and lithium bromide solution breakthroughs. Two representative simulation cases with working points located at shallow and deep depths relative to the water table were created to investigate the impact of subsidence crater-enhanced recharge, crater-playa areal extent, gas-phase partitioning, solid-phase partitioning, and a reduced permeability/porosity compressed zone created during the explosion on 14C transport. The representative shallow test had a detonation point located 175 m below land surface, and the deep test had a working point 435 m below land surface in a 500 m deep unsaturated zone. Carbon-14 transport is influenced by gas-phase diffusion and sorption within the alluvium. Gas-phase diffusion is an attenuation mechanism that transports 14C gas as 14CO2 throughout the unsaturated zone and exposes it to a large amount of soil moisture, resulting in dilute concentrations. The simulations indicated that the majority of the 14C inventory remains in the unsaturated zone over a 1,000-year time period after detonation because gas-phase diffusion moves the bulk of the 14C away from the higher recharge occurring in crater playas. Retardation also plays a role in slowing advective aqueous phase transport to the water

  19. Ancient sedimentary structures in the <3.7 Ga Gillespie Lake Member, Mars, that resemble macroscopic morphology, spatial associations, and temporal succession in terrestrial microbialites.

    PubMed

    Noffke, Nora

    2015-02-01

    Sandstone beds of the <3.7 Ga Gillespie Lake Member on Mars have been interpreted as evidence of an ancient playa lake environment. On Earth, such environments have been sites of colonization by microbial mats from the early Archean to the present time. Terrestrial microbial mats in playa lake environments form microbialites known as microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS). On Mars, three lithofacies of the Gillespie Lake Member sandstone display centimeter- to meter-scale structures similar in macroscopic morphology to terrestrial MISS that include "erosional remnants and pockets," "mat chips," "roll-ups," "desiccation cracks," and "gas domes." The microbially induced sedimentary-like structures identified in Curiosity rover mission images do not have a random distribution. Rather, they were found to be arranged in spatial associations and temporal successions that indicate they changed over time. On Earth, if such MISS occurred with this type of spatial association and temporal succession, they would be interpreted as having recorded the growth of a microbially dominated ecosystem that thrived in pools that later dried completely: erosional pockets, mat chips, and roll-ups resulted from water eroding an ancient microbial mat-covered sedimentary surface; during the course of subsequent water recess, channels would have cut deep into the microbial mats, leaving erosional remnants behind; desiccation cracks and gas domes would have occurred during a final period of subaerial exposure of the microbial mats. In this paper, the similarities of the macroscopic morphologies, spatial associations, and temporal succession of sedimentary structures on Mars to MISS preserved on Earth has led to the following hypothesis: The sedimentary structures in the <3.7 Ga Gillespie Lake Member on Mars are ancient MISS produced by interactions between microbial mats and their environment. Proposed here is a strategy for detecting, identifying, confirming, and differentiating

  20. Alluvial fan facies in Death Valley: Contrasts with fluvial gravels and implications for the interpretation of ancient fan'' gravels

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, G.V. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Sedimentary environments in Death Valley belong to three major groups: fans, washes, and playas. Fans in Death Valley include both diamicts and bedded gravels. Seven facies may be recognized. The diamicts include: (1) matrix-rich, coarse wackestones; (2) thin, matrix-rich, fine wackestones, that may show grading; (3) matrix-poor, coarse packstones, transitional to wackestones. The bedded facies include: (4) weakly bedded, poorly sorted packstones or grainstones, that show patchy imbrication, and cut-and-fill structures; (5) packed, imbricated cobble lenses, generally interbedded in facies 4; (6) distinctly bedded gravels, that are better bedded, finer and better sorted, and show better imbrication than facies 4, but still do not show clear separation of sand and gravel beds; (7) backfill cross-bedded gravels. Sand beds are not seen in fan deposits. Sand is present in eolian deposits of the playa, as plane-laminated, back-eddy deposits in Death Valley Wash, and as laminated or rippled sand in the Amargosa River, which drains into the south end of Death Valley. The most remarkable features of the fan and wash deposits are the very weak segregation of sand and gravel, and the absence of any lower flow-regime structures produced by ripples or dunes. During floods, the slope of fan and wash surfaces is steep enough to produce upper regime flows. Most fans in Death Valley itself are not strongly dominated by debris flow deposits (diamicts). Within a fan, facies vary little from proximal to distal regions, but may differ strongly from facies seen in adjacent fans.

  1. Fairy, tadpole, and clam shrimps (Branchiopoda) in seasonally inundated clay pans in the western Mojave Desert and effect on primary producers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fairy shrimps (Anostraca), tadpole shrimps (Notostraca), clam shrimps (Spinicaudata), algae (primarily filamentous blue-green algae [cyanobacteria]), and suspended organic particulates are dominant food web components of the seasonally inundated pans and playas of the western Mojave Desert in California. We examined the extent to which these branchiopods controlled algal abundance and species composition in clay pans between Rosamond and Rogers Dry Lakes. We surveyed branchiopods during the wet season to estimate abundances and then conducted a laboratory microcosm experiment, in which dried sediment containing cysts and the overlying algal crust were inundated and cultured. Microcosm trials were run with and without shrimps; each type of trial was run for two lengths of time: 30 and 60 days. We estimated the effect of shrimps on algae by measuring chlorophyll content and the relative abundance of algal species. Results We found two species of fairy shrimps (Branchinecta mackini and B. gigas), one tadpole shrimp (Lepidurus lemmoni), and a clam shrimp (Cyzicus setosa) in our wet-season field survey. We collected Branchinecta lindahli in a pilot study, but not subsequently. The dominant taxa were C. setosa and B. mackini, but abundances and species composition varied greatly among playas. The same species found in field surveys also occurred in the microcosm experiment. There were no significant differences as a function of experimental treatments for either chlorophyll content or algal species composition (Microcoleus vaginatus dominated all treatments). Conclusions The results suggest that there was no direct effect of shrimps on algae. Although the pans harbored an apparently high abundance of branchiopods, these animals had little role in regulating primary producers in this environment. PMID:21143855

  2. The use of GIS and remote sensing for the assessment of waterlogging in the dryland irrigated catchments of Farafra Oasis in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bastawesy, M.; Ramadan Ali, R.

    2011-12-01

    This paper investigates the interplay of the hydrogeological characteristics, soil properties and recent land reclamation projects on the distribution of waterlogging and salinisation within the Farafra Oasis. The multi-temporal remote sensing data and field observations show that new reclaimed areas have been recently cultivated in distant areas from the old agricultural land. These new cultivations have developed widespread water logging, seepage channels and soil salinisation. Analyses of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) showed that both old and new agricultural areas are located within same closed drainage basin. The fluvial channels of these catchments, which were developed during wet climatic pluvial have largely been obliterated by the prevailing aridity and often buried under aeolian deposits. However, the new cultivations have been developed on the fingertips of these fluvial channels, while the old fields occupy the low level playas. The soil of the new cultivated areas are mainly lithic with a high calcium carbonate content, thus limiting the downward percolation of excess irrigation water and therefore develop perched water table and seepage through the paleo-channels. The automatically extract drainage networks from DEM are resembling fluvial patterns and coincide with the seepage channels slowly heading toward old cultivation. The inactive alluvial channels and landforms have to be considered when planning for new cultivation in dryland catchments to better control waterlogging and salinisation hazard. It is highly recommended that newly developed seepage-channels have to be detected and intercepted before reaching old agriculture areas. Therefore, the "dry-drainage" concept can be implemented as the seepage water can be conveyed into a nearby playas reserved for evaporation.

  3. Depositional setting of the Upper Jurassic Hith Anhydrite of the Arabian Gulf: An analog to holocene evaporites of the United Arab Emirates and Lake MacLeod of Western Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Alsharhan, A.S. ); Kendall, C.G.St.C. )

    1994-07-01

    The Upper Jurassic Hith Anhydrite is a major hydrocarbon seal in the Arabian Gulf region. Outcrops, core samples from the subsurface, and the literature indicate that the Hith Formation is composed mainly of anhydrite. In most locations where a section of the Hith Formation has been measured, this unit contains less than 20% carbonate much of which is in the form of thin laminations. This lack of carbonate, locally thick layers of salt, and the predominance of anhydrite favor a playa for the setting in which this sediment was accumulated. In fact, much of the Hith has the sedimentary characteristics of the Holocene Lake MacLeod playa of Western Australia, which is dominated by layers of gypsum and halite (what little carbonate that occurs is found in layers at the base of the section). Locally the Hith appears to have accumulated in a sabkha setting, particularly toward central Abu Dhabi where it pinches out into shallow-water, and peritidal carbonate. This sabkha setting is indicated by the interbedded relationship of the Hith anhydrites with these carbonates and the local predominance of horizontally flattened nodules and enterolithic layers of anhydrite. These latter features match some of the characteristic fabrics found in the Holocene coastal sabkhas of the United Arab Emirates. As with the local occurrences in the Hith, the Holocene sabkhas are dominated by carbonates and are divisible into a series of lateral facies belts. These are also expressed as equivalent vertical layers. Traced from seaward to landward, or from the base of the vertical sequence upward, these facies are characterized by (1) algal mat, (2) a layer of a gypsum crystal mush (3) active anhydrite replacement of gypsum (4) anhydrite with no gypsum mush, and (5) recycled eolianite and storm-washover sediments.

  4. In-Situ Greenhouse Gas Measurement Comparisons in Railroad Valley, NV to Identify Local Point Sources and Quantify their Influences on Observed Background Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro, K. A.; Yates, E. L.; Sheffner, E. J.; Iraci, L. T.; Bebout, B.; Berthold, R. W.; Bruegge, C. J.; Bui, T.; DeMarines, J.; Detweiler, A. M.; Fladeland, M. M.; Kelley, C. A.; Koyler, R.; Loewenstein, M.; McKay, C.; Tadic, J.

    2011-12-01

    In the summer of 2011, researchers from NASA Ames Research Center joined a multi-institute team on a playa in Railroad Valley, Nevada to acquire ground-based and airborne observations supporting measurements from the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). In-situ measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) with 10 Hz temporal resolution were made using a Picarro Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Analyzer at both a ground site (Picarro G2311-f) and onboard the NASA SIERRA (Sensor Integrated Environmental Remote Research Aircraft) Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) (Picarro G2301-f). These measurements have been compared in detail with one another, and the ground-based Picarro shows outstanding agreement with the SIERRA Picarro. This validates the ability of both instruments to measure local and regional emissions within the mixed layer. Potential GHG emission sites were identified by overflights with the SIERRA UAS and confirmed by coincident ground observations. These data comparisons, when factoring in the effects of the ground and airborne meteorological conditions, allow us to identify point sources of CO2 and CH4 within the area. Soil gas samples and sediment analysis were also conducted to help distinguish emission sources. Railroad Valley, NV is an ideal site for measuring and modeling emissions on local scales because of its remote location; resulting in clean ambient air that acts as a steady control for data retrieval and dispersion modeling. Most importantly, quantifying emissions from nearby sources allows us to achieve a greater understanding of the nature of the measurements being made across the playa. Further analysis will employ mathematical dispersion models to explore the local emissions detected with the in-situ measurements.

  5. Intercomparison Calibration Study of Terra ASTER and MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, K.; Thome, K. J.; McCorkel, J.

    2014-12-01

    Calibration and validation play an essential role during the acquisition and processing of satellite data for the Earth Observing System satellites in addition to being an integral part of maintaining scientific values of archived satellite data. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection and Radiometer (ASTER) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are two of five sensors onboard the Terra platform - the Earth Observing System flagship. ASTER has a swath width of 60km with 8 bands in the visible and near infrared (VNIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) spectral range with a spatial resolution of 15m (bands 1-3) and 90m (bands 10-14), respectively while MODIS has a swath width of 2300km with 36 spectral bands from visible to infrared spectral range with a spatial resolution of 250m (bands 1-2), 500m (bands 3-7), and 1km (bands 8-36). ASTER is the 'zoom' lens and MODIS is the 'keystone' instrument for Terra; they provide quantitative measurements of various earth system variables to the scientific and to the broader community. The simultaneous view of the sensors simplifies the intercomparison between them and relies on the use of the Railroad Valley Playa test site to reduce uncertainties caused by spatial heterogeneity and spectral differences in the sensors. The fact that Railroad Valley Playa is a calibration test site for ASTER ensures that ASTER was tasked at a higher rate over this area providing more scenes for the intercomparison. The study compares ASTER L1B data for the three VNIR bands reprocessed with recent calibration updates and MODIS 02 Collection 6 data products for the similar bands. No correction for geometry angle is needed and coincident 3-km by 3-km regions are used to reduce the impact of spatial heterogeneity. A correction for spectral differences between the sensors is applied based on averages of ground measurements of the test site.

  6. Validation of the GOSAT Thermal Infrared (TIR) Band using the University of Wisconsin airborne Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) and ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) at Railroad Valley, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuteson, R.; kuze, A.; Shiomi, K.; Taylor, J. K.; Garms, E.; Roman, J.; Revercomb, H. E.; Tobin, D. C.; Gero, P.; Best, F. A.

    2011-12-01

    We provide a quantitative assessment of the calibration accuracy of the thermal infrared measurements from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), which was launched on January 23, 2009. Results will be presented comparing the observed emission spectra from the TANSO-FTS sensor onboard GOSAT to coincident observations from high altitude aircraft and ground-based spectrometers during the June 2011 Railroad Valley Vicarious Calibration and Validation campaign. The 2011 campaign was the third in a series of joint Japan/U.S. field measurements to assess the calibration of the GOSAT sensors and validate derived products of carbon dioxide and methane. As part of the 2011 campaign, the University of Wisconsin Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) successfully overflew Railroad Valley, Nevada onboard the high-altitude NASA ER-2 along with the Airborne Visible/InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER). The ER-2 overpass of Railroad Valley on June 20, 2011 was timed to coincide with an overpass of the GOSAT satellite at 21:19 UTC. A joint JPL/UWisc team provided coincident upper air observations of pressure, temperature, and water vapor using Vaisala radiosondes released from the center of the Railroad Valley dry lakebed (playa) for six GOSAT daytime overpasses and three nighttime overpasses between 19-26 June 2011. The University of Wisconsin also made ground-based measurements from the center of the playa during each GOSAT overpass with an Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer. The AERI was operated from a research vehicle with the capability to measure the upwelling surface radiance at three view angles and the downwelling atmospheric emission at two angles. The ground-based AERI provided accurate surface emissivity and surface temperature for use in forward model calculations of the satellite observed infrared emission between 6 and 17 microns.

  7. Effects of artificial recharge on the Ogallala aquifer, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Richmond Flint; Keys, W.S.

    1985-01-01

    Four recharge tests were conducted by injecting water from playa lakes through wells into the Ogallala Formation. Injection was by gravity flow and by pumping under pressure. At one site, 34-acre feet of water was injected by gravity and produced a significant increase in yield of the well. At a second site, gravity injection of only 0.58 acre-foot caused a significant decrease in permeability due to plugging by suspended sediment. At two other sites, injection by pumping 6 and 14 acre-feet respectively, resulted in discharge of water at the surface and in perching of water above the water table. Differences in success of recharge were largely due to aquifer lithology and, therefore, the type of permeability; the concentration of suspended solids in the recharge water; and the injection technique. The injection technique can be controlled and the concentration of suspended solids can be minimized by treatment, but the site for well recharge will accept water most rapidly if it is selected on the basis of a favorable geohydrologic environment. Geophysical logs were used to study the effect of aquifer lithology on recharge and to understand the movement of injected water. Temperature logs were particularly useful in tracing the movement of recharged water. Natural-gamma, gamma-gamma, and neutron logs provided important data on lithology and porosity in the aquifer and changes in porosity and water distribution resulting from recharge. Effective recharge of the Ogallala Formation, using water from playa lakes, is possible where geohydrologic conditions are favorable and the recharge system is properly constructed.

  8. Seismometer Detection of Dust Devil Vortices by Ground Tilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Kedar, Sharon; Murdoch, Naomi; Lognonné, Philippe; Kawamura, Taichi; Mimoun, David; Bruce Banerdt, W.

    2015-12-01

    We report seismic signals on a desert playa caused by convective vortices and dust devils. The long-period (10-100s) signatures, with tilts of ~10$^{-7}$ radians, are correlated with the presence of vortices, detected with nearby sensors as sharp temporary pressure drops (0.2-1 mbar) and solar obscuration by dust. We show that the shape and amplitude of the signals, manifesting primarily as horizontal accelerations, can be modeled approximately with a simple quasi-static point-load model of the negative pressure field associated with the vortices acting on the ground as an elastic half space. We suggest the load imposed by a dust devil of diameter D and core pressure {\\Delta}Po is ~({\\pi}/2){\\Delta}PoD$^2$, or for a typical terrestrial devil of 5 m diameter and 2 mbar, about the weight of a small car. The tilt depends on the inverse square of distance, and on the elastic properties of the ground, and the large signals we observe are in part due to the relatively soft playa sediment and the shallow installation of the instrument. Ground tilt may be a particularly sensitive means of detecting dust devils. The simple point-load model fails for large dust devils at short ranges, but more elaborate models incorporating the work of Sorrells (1971) may explain some of the more complex features in such cases, taking the vortex winds and ground velocity into account. We discuss some implications for the InSight mission to Mars.

  9. Drought modulated by North Atlantic sea surface temperatures for the last 3,000 years along the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livsey, Daniel; Simms, Alexander R.; Hangsterfer, Alexandra; Nisbet, Robert A.; DeWitt, Regina

    2016-03-01

    In 2012 the most severe United States drought since the 1930's occurred, highlighting the need for a better understanding of the climate factors driving droughts. Spatial-temporal analysis of United States precipitation data from 1900 to 1999 indicates that the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) primarily modulates drought frequency. Tree rings provide the highest resolution and most spatially distributed drought records beyond secular time-series; however, as most tree-ring records only extend to ca. 1000 years before present (BP), a new broadly distributed, quantitative, multi-millennial, proxy of past drought is needed to determine if the AMO modulated drought across North America through the late Holocene. In this study, we develop a new quantitative drought proxy from a transfer function between X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) derived elemental data from a Texas playa and a tree-ring drought record. Using this transfer function, a 954-year tree-ring drought record was extended to ca. 3000 BP. Changes in the extended drought record correspond with timing of the Roman Climate Optimum, Medieval Warm Period, Little Ice Age, and changes in the AMO as recorded in a proxy record derived from North Atlantic ice-rafted debris. These results indicate that lacustrine-derived XRF element data can be used as a quantitative tool to reconstruct past drought records, and suggest that AMO modulated drought in southern Texas for the last 3000 years. Additional studies using XRF-derived element data as a drought proxy are needed to determine the utility of this proxy in non-playa lacustrine systems.

  10. Rocky 7 prototype Mars rover field geology experiments 1. Lavic Lake and sunshine volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arvidson, R. E.; Acton, C.; Blaney, D.; Bowman, J.; Kim, S.; Klingelhofer, G.; Marshall, J.; Niebur, C.; Plescia, J.; Saunders, R.S.; Ulmer, C.T.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments with the Rocky 7 rover were performed in the Mojave Desert to better understand how to conduct rover-based, long-distance (kilometers) geological traverses on Mars. The rover was equipped with stereo imaging systems for remote sensing science and hazard avoidance and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers for in situ determination of mineralogy of unprepared rock and soil surfaces. Laboratory data were also obtained using the spectrometers and an X ray diffraction (XRD)/XRF instrument for unprepared samples collected from the rover sites. Simulated orbital and descent image data assembled for the test sites were found to be critical for assessing the geologic setting, formulating hypotheses to be tested with rover observations, planning traverses, locating the rover, and providing a regional context for interpretation of rover-based observations. Analyses of remote sensing and in situ observations acquired by the rover confirmed inferences made from orbital and simulated descent images that the Sunshine Volcanic Field is composed of basalt flows. Rover data confirmed the idea that Lavic Lake is a recharge playa and that an alluvial fan composed of sediments with felsic compositions has prograded onto the playa. Rover-based discoveries include the inference that the basalt flows are mantled with aeolian sediment and covered with a dense pavement of varnished basalt cobbles. Results demonstrate that the combination of rover remote sensing and in situ analytical observations will significantly increase our understanding of Mars and provide key connecting links between orbital and descent data and analyses of returned samples. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Using remote sensing and GIS techniques to estimate discharge and recharge fluxes for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Agnese, F. A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    The recharge and discharge components of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system were defined by techniques that integrated disparate data types to develop a spatially complex representation of near-surface hydrological processes. Image classification methods were applied to multispectral satellite data to produce a vegetation map. The vegetation map was combined with ancillary data in a GIS to delineate different types of wetlands, phreatophytes and wet playa areas. Existing evapotranspiration-rate estimates were used to calculate discharge volumes for these area. An empirical method of groundwater recharge estimation was modified to incorporate data describing soil-moisture conditions, and a recharge potential map was produced. These discharge and recharge maps were readily converted to data arrays for numerical modelling codes. Inverse parameter estimation techniques also used these data to evaluate the reliability and sensitivity of estimated values.The recharge and discharge components of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system were defined by remote sensing and GIS techniques that integrated disparate data types to develop a spatially complex representation of near-surface hydrological processes. Image classification methods were applied to multispectral satellite data to produce a vegetation map. This map provided a basis for subsequent evapotranspiration and infiltration estimations. The vegetation map was combined with ancillary data in a GIS to delineate different types of wetlands, phreatophytes and wet playa areas. Existing evapotranspiration-rate estimates were then used to calculate discharge volumes for these areas. A previously used empirical method of groundwater recharge estimation was modified by GIS methods to incorporate data describing soil-moisture conditions, and a recharge potential map was produced. These discharge and recharge maps were readily converted to data arrays for numerical modelling codes. Inverse parameter

  12. Characterization of land surface energy fluxes at the Salar de Atacama, Northern Chile using ASTER image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, S. K.; Tyler, S. W.

    2003-12-01

    Models of land surface energy fluxes often use remotely sensed data to derive surface temperature, albedo, and emissivity, important parameters in energy budget calculations. The ability to determine the spatial distribution of these parameters can lead to improved estimations of the spatial variability of land surface energy fluxes. However, other parameters used in energy flux calculations such as aerodynamic resistance are not directly linked to quantities commonly derived from remotely sensed data. If images can be accurately classified into separate land cover types, empirically determined values of unknown parameters can then be assigned separately to each land cover classification. This study examines several techniques of determining the spatial distribution of land surface energy fluxes at the Salar de Atacama, a large playa in northern Chile. Fluxes are calculated using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER) Level 2 surface kinetic temperature, surface emissivity, and surface reflectance data in conjunction with ground-based meteorological measurements. Energy fluxes are calculated initially by applying a single value of aerodynamic resistance to the entire image area. Subsequently, the ASTER scene is classified into distinct land cover types, and land surface roughness is characterized using the ratio of ASTER band 3N (nadir-viewing) to band 3B (back-viewing). Separate values of aerodynamic resistance are then assigned to each land cover type, and energy fluxes over the entire Salar de Atacama are calculated using these spatially distributed aerodynamic resistance values. Results of both energy flux calculation techniques are evaluated at several sites on the playa using ground-based energy flux measurements.

  13. Entrainment of radio frequency chaff by wind as a function of surface aerodynamic roughness.

    PubMed

    Gillies, John A; Nickling, William G

    2003-02-01

    Radio frequency (RF) chaff (approximately 2-cm x 25-microm diameter aluminum-coated glass silicate cylinders) released by military aircraft during testing and training activities has the potential to become entrained by wind upon settling to the Earth's surface. Once entrained from the surface there is the potential for RF chaff to be abraded and produce PM10 and PM2.5, which are regulated pollutants and pose health concerns. A series of portable wind tunnel tests were carried out to examine the propensity of RF chaff to become entrained by wind by defining the relationship between the threshold friction velocity of RF chaff (u(*t RF chaff)) and aerodynamic roughness (z(o)) of surfaces onto which it may deposit. The test surfaces were of varying roughness including types near the Naval Air Station (NAS), Fallon, NV, where RF chaff is released. The u(*t) of this fibrous material ranged from 0.14 m/sec for a smooth playa to 0.82 m/sec for a rough crusted playa surface with larger cobble-sized (approximately 6-26-cm diameter) rocks rising above the surface. The u(*t RF chaff) is dependent on the z(o) of the surface onto which it falls as well as the physical characteristics of the roughness. The wind regime of Fallon would allow for chaff suspension events to occur should it settle on typical surfaces in the area. However, the wind climatology of this area makes the probability of such events relatively low. PMID:12617294

  14. Analysis of a unique Clostridium botulinum strain from the Southern hemisphere producing a novel type E botulinum neurotoxin subtype

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium botulinum strains that produce botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) are most commonly isolated from botulism cases, marine environments, and animals in regions of high latitude in the Northern hemisphere. A strain of C. botulinum type E (CDC66177) was isolated from soil in Chubut, Argentina. Previous studies showed that the amino acid sequences of BoNT/E produced by various strains differ by < 6% and that the type E neurotoxin gene cluster inserts into the rarA operon. Results Genetic and mass spectral analysis demonstrated that the BoNT/E produced by CDC66177 is a novel toxin subtype (E9). Toxin gene sequencing indicated that BoNT/E9 differed by nearly 11% at the amino acid level compared to BoNT/E1. Mass spectrometric analysis of BoNT/E9 revealed that its endopeptidase substrate cleavage site was identical to other BoNT/E subtypes. Further analysis of this strain demonstrated that its 16S rRNA sequence clustered with other Group II C. botulinum (producing BoNT types B, E, and F) strains. Genomic DNA isolated from strain CDC66177 hybridized with fewer probes using a Group II C. botulinum subtyping microarray compared to other type E strains examined. Whole genome shotgun sequencing of strain CDC66177 revealed that while the toxin gene cluster inserted into the rarA operon similar to other type E strains, its overall genome content shared greater similarity with a Group II C. botulinum type B strain (17B). Conclusions These results expand our understanding of the global distribution of C. botulinum type E strains and suggest that the type E toxin gene cluster may be able to insert into C. botulinum strains with a more diverse genetic background than previously recognized. PMID:23113872

  15. Oldest Known Eucalyptus Macrofossils Are from South America

    PubMed Central

    Zamaloa, María C.; Nixon, Kevin C.; González, Cynthia C.; Wilf, Peter; Cúneo, N. Rubén; Johnson, Kirk R.

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary history of Eucalyptus and the eucalypts, the larger clade of seven genera including Eucalyptus that today have a natural distribution almost exclusively in Australasia, is poorly documented from the fossil record. Little physical evidence exists bearing on the ancient geographical distributions or morphologies of plants within the clade. Herein, we introduce fossil material of Eucalyptus from the early Eocene (ca. 51.9 Ma) Laguna del Hunco paleoflora of Chubut Province, Argentina; specimens include multiple leaves, infructescences, and dispersed capsules, several flower buds, and a single flower. Morphological similarities that relate the fossils to extant eucalypts include leaf shape, venation, and epidermal oil glands; infructescence structure; valvate capsulate fruits; and operculate flower buds. The presence of a staminophore scar on the fruits links them to Eucalyptus, and the presence of a transverse scar on the flower buds indicates a relationship to Eucalyptus subgenus Symphyomyrtus. Phylogenetic analyses of morphological data alone and combined with aligned sequence data from a prior study including 16 extant eucalypts, one outgroup, and a terminal representing the fossils indicate that the fossils are nested within Eucalyptus. These are the only illustrated Eucalyptus fossils that are definitively Eocene in age, and the only conclusively identified extant or fossil eucalypts naturally occurring outside of Australasia and adjacent Mindanao. Thus, these fossils indicate that the evolution of the eucalypt group is not constrained to a single region. Moreover, they strengthen the taxonomic connections between the Laguna del Hunco paleoflora and extant subtropical and tropical Australasia, one of the three major ecologic-geographic elements of the Laguna del Hunco paleoflora. The age and affinities of the fossils also indicate that Eucalyptus subgenus Symphyomyrtus is older than previously supposed. Paleoecological data indicate that the

  16. Basis for a Waste Management Public Communication Policy: Actual Situation Analysis and Implementation of Corrective Actions

    SciTech Connect

    Jolivet, L. A.; Maset, E. R.

    2002-02-28

    Argentina will require new sites for the location of radioactive waste final disposal systems. It is currently mandatory to have social and political consensus to obtain the corresponding agreements. The experience obtained with the cancellation of the project ''Feasibility Study and Engineering Project--Repository for High Level Radioactive Waste'', reinforces even more the necessity to count with the acceptance of the public to carry out projects of this kind. The first phase of the former was developed in the 80's: geological, geophysical and hydrogeological studies were performed in a compact granitic rock located in Sierra del Medio, Chubut province. This project had to be called off in the early 90's due to strong social rejection. This decision was closely related to the poor attention given to social communication issues. The governmental decision-makers in charge underwent a lot of pressure from social groups claiming for the cancellation of the project due to the lack of information and the fear it triggered. Thus, the lesson learnt: ''social communication activities must be carefully undertaken in order to achieve the appropriate management of the radioactive waste produced in our country.'' The same as in other countries, the specific National Law demands the formulation of a Strategic Plan which will not only include the research into radioactive waste, but the design of a Social Communication Programme as well. The latter will be in charge of informing the population clearly and objectively about the latest scientific and technological advances in the issue. A tentative perception-attitude pattern of the Argentine society about the overall nuclear issue is outlined in this paper. It is meant to contribute to the understanding of the public's adverse reaction to this kind of project. A communication programme is also presented. Its objective is to install the waste management topic in the public's opinion with a positive real outlook.

  17. Estimating Hantavirus Risk in Southern Argentina: A GIS-Based Approach Combining Human Cases and Host Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Andreo, Veronica; Neteler, Markus; Rocchini, Duccio; Provensal, Cecilia; Levis, Silvana; Porcasi, Ximena; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Lanfri, Mario; Scavuzzo, Marcelo; Pini, Noemi; Enria, Delia; Polop, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    We use a Species Distribution Modeling (SDM) approach along with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques to examine the potential distribution of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) caused by Andes virus (ANDV) in southern Argentina and, more precisely, define and estimate the area with the highest infection probability for humans, through the combination with the distribution map for the competent rodent host (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus). Sites with confirmed cases of HPS in the period 1995–2009 were mostly concentrated in a narrow strip (~90 km × 900 km) along the Andes range from northern Neuquén to central Chubut province. This area is characterized by high mean annual precipitation (~1,000 mm on average), but dry summers (less than 100 mm), very low percentages of bare soil (~10% on average) and low temperatures in the coldest month (minimum average temperature −1.5 °C), as compared to the HPS-free areas, features that coincide with sub-Antarctic forests and shrublands (especially those dominated by the invasive plant Rosa rubiginosa), where rodent host abundances and ANDV prevalences are known to be the highest. Through the combination of predictive distribution maps of the reservoir host and disease cases, we found that the area with the highest probability for HPS to occur overlaps only 28% with the most suitable habitat for O. longicaudatus. With this approach, we made a step forward in the understanding of the risk factors that need to be considered in the forecasting and mapping of risk at the regional/national scale. We propose the implementation and use of thematic maps, such as the one built here, as a basic tool allowing public health authorities to focus surveillance efforts and normally scarce resources for prevention and control actions in vast areas like southern Argentina. PMID:24424500

  18. Phylogeography and palaeodistribution modelling of Nassauvia subgenus Strongyloma (Asteraceae): exploring phylogeographical scenarios in the Patagonian steppe

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Marcela V; Sede, Silvana M; Pozner, Raúl; Johnson, Leigh A

    2014-01-01

    The Patagonian steppe is an immense, cold, arid region, yet phylogeographically understudied. Nassauvia subgen. Strongyloma is a characteristic element of the steppe, exhibiting a continuum of morphological variation. This taxon provides a relevant phylogeographical model not only to understand how past environmental changes shaped the genetic structure of its populations, but also to explore phylogeographical scenarios at the large geographical scale of the Patagonian steppe. Here, we (1) assess demographic processes and historical events that shaped current geographic patterns of haplotypic diversity; (2) analyze hypotheses of isolation in refugia, fragmentation of populations, and/or colonization of available areas during Pleistocene glaciations; and (3) model extant and palaeoclimatic distributions to support inferred phylogeographical patterns. Chloroplast intergenic spacers, rpl32–trnL and trnQ–5′rps16, were sequenced for 372 individuals from 63 populations. Nested clade analysis, analyses of molecular variance, and neutrality tests were performed to assess genetic structure and range expansion. The present potential distribution was modelled and projected onto a last glacial maximum (LGM) model. Of 41 haplotypes observed, ten were shared among populations associated with different morphological variants. Populations with highest haplotype diversity and private haplotypes were found in central-western and south-eastern Patagonia, consistent with long-term persistence in refugia during Pleistocene. Palaeomodelling suggested a shift toward the palaeoseashore during LGM; new available areas over the exposed Atlantic submarine platform were colonized during glaciations with postglacial retraction of populations. A scenario of fragmentation and posterior range expansion may explain the observed patterns in the center of the steppe, which is supported by palaeomodelling. Northern Patagonian populations were isolated from southern populations by the Chubut and

  19. The anatomy of Dolichocebus gaimanensis, a stem platyrrhine monkey from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Kay, Richard F; Fleagle, J G; Mitchell, T R T; Colbert, Matthew; Bown, Tom; Powers, Dennis W

    2008-03-01

    Dolichocebus is known from the type skull encased in a concretion, numerous isolated teeth, parts of two mandibles, and a talus. The specimens come from the Trelew Member (early Miocene, Colhuehuapian South American Land Mammal Age) of the Sarmiento Formation near the village of Gaiman, Chubut Province, Argentina, dated to about 20Ma. We describe all Dolichocebus fossil material using conventional surface anatomy and micro-CT data from the cranium. The new material and newly imaged internal anatomy of the skull demonstrate that anatomical characters hitherto supposed to support a phyletic link between Dolichocebus and either callitrichines (marmosets, tamarins, and Callimico) or Saimiri (squirrel monkeys) are either indeterminate or absent. To more fully explore the phyletic position of Dolichocebus, we undertook a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis. We examined 268 characters of the cranium and dentition of 16 living platyrrhine genera, some late Oligocene and early Miocene platyrrhines, Tarsius, some Eocene and Oligocene stem anthropoids, and several extant catarrhines. These analyses consistently indicate that Dolichocebus is a stem platyrrhine, as are late Oligocene Branisella and early Miocene Tremacebus, Soriacebus, and Carlocebus. Platyrrhine evolution often is conceived of as a single ancient adaptive radiation. Review of all available phyolgenetic data suggests a more layered evolutionary pattern, with several independent extinct clades filling modern platyrrhine niche space, and modern platyrrhine families and subfamilies appearing over a nine-million-year interval in the Miocene. The outcome of these analyses highlights the pervasiveness of homoplasy in dental and cranial characters. Homoplasy is a real evolutionary phenomenon that is present at all levels of biological analysis, from amino-acid sequences to aspects of adult bony morphology, behavior, and adaptation. PMID:18001820

  20. Estimating hantavirus risk in southern Argentina: a GIS-based approach combining human cases and host distribution.

    PubMed

    Andreo, Veronica; Neteler, Markus; Rocchini, Duccio; Provensal, Cecilia; Levis, Silvana; Porcasi, Ximena; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Lanfri, Mario; Scavuzzo, Marcelo; Pini, Noemi; Enria, Delia; Polop, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    We use a Species Distribution Modeling (SDM) approach along with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques to examine the potential distribution of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) caused by Andes virus (ANDV) in southern Argentina and, more precisely, define and estimate the area with the highest infection probability for humans, through the combination with the distribution map for the competent rodent host (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus). Sites with confirmed cases of HPS in the period 1995-2009 were mostly concentrated in a narrow strip (~90 km × 900 km) along the Andes range from northern Neuquén to central Chubut province. This area is characterized by high mean annual precipitation (~1,000 mm on average), but dry summers (less than 100 mm), very low percentages of bare soil (~10% on average) and low temperatures in the coldest month (minimum average temperature -1.5 °C), as compared to the HPS-free areas, features that coincide with sub-Antarctic forests and shrublands (especially those dominated by the invasive plant Rosa rubiginosa), where rodent host abundances and ANDV prevalences are known to be the highest. Through the combination of predictive distribution maps of the reservoir host and disease cases, we found that the area with the highest probability for HPS to occur overlaps only 28% with the most suitable habitat for O. longicaudatus. With this approach, we made a step forward in the understanding of the risk factors that need to be considered in the forecasting and mapping of risk at the regional/national scale. We propose the implementation and use of thematic maps, such as the one built here, as a basic tool allowing public health authorities to focus surveillance efforts and normally scarce resources for prevention and control actions in vast areas like southern Argentina. PMID:24424500

  1. Description of a New Temnocephala Species (Platyhelminthes) from the Southern Neotropical Region.

    PubMed

    de León, Rodrigo Ponce; Vera, Bárbara Berón; Volonterio, Odile

    2015-08-01

    The genus Temnocephala is endemic to the Neotropical region. Temnocephala mexicana and Temnocephala chilensis are the only 2 temnocephalans whose known distribution ranges extend to the south beyond Parallel 40°S. No Temnocephala species has ever been recorded from the extensive area between Parallel 43°S and the southern end of the South American continent, which makes the study of the southern limit of the distribution of the genus a topic of great interest. The southernmost report corresponds to T. chilensis from the Telsen River, Chubut Province, Argentina. In March 2000, several temnocephalans were found on the freshwater anomuran crustacean Aegla neuquensis from the same locality; the specimens were identified as belonging to a new species, which is described here. This species is characterized by possessing an unusually thin-walled, narrow zone that has the appearance of a deep groove connecting the introvert to the shaft of the penial stylet; an introvert with 36 longitudinal rows of spines, each bearing 6-8 spines that are progressively smaller towards the distal end; a distal end of the introvert with a very thin, sclerotized wall without spines; a seminal vesicle that opens sub-polarly into the contractile vesicle; a pair of paranephrocytes at the level of the pharynx and a second pair at the level of the anterior portion of the anterior testes, and eggs with very long stalks. On the basis of their overall morphology, host preference, and geographical distribution, T. chilensis and the new species are closely related, so a diagnostic key for the southern species of Temnocephala is also included. The type locality of the new species is in the southern limit of the known distribution area of T. chilensis, so after this work there are 2 known species marking the southern limit of the distribution of the genus. PMID:25871978

  2. Geohydrology and water utilization in the Willcox Basin, Graham and Cochise Counties, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, S.G.; Schumann, Herbert H.

    1969-01-01

    The Willcox basin is an area of interior drainage in the northern part of Sulphur Springs Valley, Cochise and Graham Counties, Ariz. The basin comprises about 1,500 square miles, of which the valley floor occupies about 950 square miles. The basin probably formed during middle and late Tertiary time, when the area was subjected to large-scale faulting accompanied by the uplift of the mountain ranges that presently border it. During and after faulting, large quantities of alluvium were deposited in the closed basin. The rocks in the basin are divided into two broad groups--the rocks of the mountain blocks, of Precambrian through Tertiary age, and the rocks of the basin, of Tertiary and Quaternary age. The mountain blocks consist of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks; the water-bearing characteristics of these rocks depend primarily on their degree of weathering and fracturing. Even in areas where these rocks are fractured and jointed, only small amounts of water have been developed. The rocks of the basin consist of moderately consolidated alluvium, poorly consolidated alluvium, and unconsolidated alluvium. The water-bearing characteristics of the moderately and poorly consolidated alluvium are not well known. The unconsolidated alluvium underlies most of the valley floor and consists of two facies, stream deposits and lake beds associated with the old playa. The lenticular sand and gravel layers interbedded in silt- and clay-size material of the unconsolidated alluvium constitute the principal aquifer in the basin. The other aquifers, which yield less water, consist of beds of poorly to moderately consolidated sand- and gravel-size material; these beds occur in both the poorly consolidated and moderately consolidated alluvium. In the Stewart area the median specific capacity of wells per 100 feet of saturated unconsolidated alluvium was 20 gallons per minute, and in the Kansas Settlement area the specific capacity of wells penetrating the poorly and

  3. Mutiple Isotope Forensics on Nitrate in the Poisoning of Wild Horses in 2007.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, G.; Dahman, C.; Earman, S.; Hershey, R.

    2008-12-01

    Multiple isotopes ratios in nitrate can be used as powerful tracers of biogeochemical ýprocesses and used in natural forensics. In June of 2007, 71 wild horses were found dead ýnear the Main Lake depression in the Cactus Flat playa at the U.S. Air Force's Nevada ýTest and Training Range in southern Nevada. Toxicology reports showed that the horses ýdied from acute nitrate poisoning and subsequent testing of the Main Lake depression ýwater showed that it contained nitrate concentrations as high as 10 times the ýrecommended limits for livestock. Concerns among land managers and the community ýled to extensive news coverage of the event, which fueled speculation that the high levels ýof nitrate were caused by dumping of deicing urea onto the playa. We conducted a ýmultiple isotope forensics study on nitrate obtained from the water, sediment, and soils ýfrom surrounding stream inlets to the playa. This included δ 15N, δ ýý18O, and Δ 17O analysis. Our δ 18O values were ýenriched (relative to SMOW) ~ 15‰ to 31‰ suggesting atmospheric ýdeposition, known to accumulate in arid soils, may be important. However, Δ ýý17O values of ~2‰ discounted atmospheric deposition as a significant ýsource of nitrate; we estimate only 10 % of the total load. The ýnitrate δ 15N values were extremely positive, ranging from 38‰ to ýý7.5‰, effectively ruling out the oxidation of urea (δ 15N -ýý1.0‰). The most probable scenario that would explain the high δ ýý15N and δ 18O low Δ 17O, and high [NO3-] is ýnitrogen in manure/urine with enriched δ 15N was deposited around the rim ýof the Main Lake depression during the dry summer and then partially volatilized, further ýenriching the δ 15N. During the winter, this N was dissolved by ýprecipitation and mixed with atmospheric nitrate. As the water in the Main Lake ýdepression evaporated over the next spring and summer, this N mixture slowly ýconcentrated. At some point, nitrification of NH4

  4. Stereo Pair: Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This view of northern Patagonia, near El Cain, Argentina shows complexly eroded volcanic terrain, with basalt mesas, sinkholes, landslide debris, playas, and relatively few integrated drainage channels. Surrounding this site (but also extending far to the east) is a broad plateau capped by basalt, the Meseta de Somuncura. Here, near the western edge of the plateau, erosion has broken through the basalt cap in a variety of ways. On the mesas, water-filled sinkholes (lower left) are most likely the result of the collapse of old lava tubes. Along the edges of the mesas (several locations) the basalt seems to be sliding away from the plateau in a series of slices. Water erosion by overland flow is also evident, particularly in canyons where vegetation blankets the drainage channels (green patterns, bottom of image). However, overland water flow does not extend very far at any location. This entire site drains to local playas, some of which are seen here (blue). While the water can reach the playas and then evaporate, what becomes of the eroded rock debris? Wind might excavate some of the finer eroded debris, but the fate of much of the missing bedrock remains mysterious.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7 satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The

  5. Anaglyph: Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This view of northern Patagonia, near El Cain, Argentina shows complexly eroded volcanic terrain, with basalt mesas, sinkholes, landslide debris, playas, and relatively few integrated drainage channels. Surrounding this site (but also extending far to the east) is a broad plateau capped by basalt, the Meseta de Somuncura. Here, near the western edge of the plateau, erosion has broken through the basalt cap in a variety of ways. On the mesas, water-filled sinkholes (lower left) are most likely the result of the collapse of old lava tubes. Along the edges of the mesas (several locations) the basalt seems to be sliding away from the plateau in a series of slices. Water erosion by overland flow is also evident, particularly in canyons where vegetation blankets the drainage channels (bright patterns, bottom of image). However, overland water flow does not extend very far at any location. This entire site drains to local playas, some of which are seen here (dark lakes with bright shores). While the water can reach the playas and then evaporate, what becomes of the eroded rock debris? Wind might excavate some of the finer eroded debris, but the fate of much of the missing bedrock remains mysterious.

    This anaglyph was generated by first draping a Landsat Thematic Mapper image over a topographic map from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, then producing the two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was

  6. Effects of the West Desert Pumping Project on Near-Surface Brine Resources in the Newfoundland Basin, Tooele and Box Elder Counties, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, W. W.; Jones, B. F.; Kohler, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    The Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Geological Survey have identified changes in Newfoundland Basin shallow-brine aquifer chemistry that resulted from pumping Great Salt Lake brine into the Newfoundland Evaporation Basin during the West Desert pumping project. The pumping project was operated by the State of Utah from April 1987, to June 1989 in an attempt to lower the historically high level of Great Salt Lake (pond elevation was 4,211.85 feet in 1986). Effects of the pumping on the Newfoundland Basin included altering the chemical character of the shallow brine aquifer by mixing two chemically different brines, and depositing a halite salt crust where none was previously reported on the lacustrine sediments of the Newfoundland Basin playa. The halite salt crust resulted from evaporation of the brine pond generated by the pumping project. Changes in the shallow-brine aquifer chemistry were determined by comparing pre-pumping brine chemistry with that of post pumping brine, and examining variation with borehole depth and location (i.e., playa periphery vs central basin topographic low) of specific analyte concentration profiles and solid-phase mineral assemblages obtained from analyses of core sample pore water and mineralogy. Brine sample analyses from 72 exploratory boreholes drilled in the Newfoundland Basin by Reynolds Metals Company during the mid 1960's provided pre-pumping brine chemistry. Post pumping chemistry was obtained from analyses of brine samples from 24 boreholes hand-augured between 1998 and 2001 in the central and peripheral portions of the Newfoundland Basin. TEQUIL, a brine equilibrium model, was used to better understand how the Great Salt Lake brines introduced into the Newfoundland Basin may have interacted with fluids contained within the Basin's shallow-brine aquifer. TEQUIL identified the sequence of mineral precipitation from evaporation of pre and post-pumping Newfoundland Basin shallow-aquifer fluids and Great Salt Lake brine. The

  7. Petrophysical properties and 3D block model of Buntsandstein Sandstones reservoir (Upper Rhine Graben)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sébastien, Haffen; Yves, Géraud; Marc, Diraison; Chrystel, Dezayes

    2013-04-01

    Buntsandstein sandstones (upper Permian to middle Triassic), located in the Upper Rhine Graben, appear as an easy target for geothermal exploitation: this reservoir links more or less permeable argillaceous sandstones, intersected by many major faults, to the regional thermal anomaly. In this context, we propose a conceptual geological 3-D block model of the Buntsandstein reservoir which could be used as a guide for future regional geothermal exploration or exploitation. This block presents the Buntsandstein sandstones reservoir at depth with different sedimentary facies (braided rivers, playa lake and fluvio-aeolian), above the Palaeozoic Granit and below the Muschelkalk limestones, intersecting by faults oriented according regional major azimuths: (1) ≈N020°E, corresponding to Rhenish faults and (2) ≈N060°E (or ≈N130°E) corresponding to Hercynian reactivated faults. Petrophysical properties of the reservoir are both controlled by matrix and faults/fractures characteristics. (1) Matrix properties (porosity, permeability, thermal conductivity, Pwaves velocity) have been determined from petrophysical measurements performed on cores of 15 borehole, mainly on borehole EPS1 (Soultz-sous-Forêts, France), continuously cored through Buntsandstein; (2) from thermal gradient analyses based on thermal conductivity measurements on core samples and also from borehole temperature logs run in the same borehole. This last approach allows locating fluid flow and thus permeability at reservoir scale. The flow paths appear as a composite network controlled by 'sedimentary' permeability on one hand and by 'fracture' permeability on the other. Fracturing associated with major fault zones provide pathways for the upward flowing fluids to connect with stratigraphic levels characterized by high matrix permeability and no impermeable macroscopic layers. This is why the Playa Lake and Fluvio-aeolian marginal erg facies provide a reservoir connected to a deep hot fluid source

  8. Earthquake behavior along the Levant fault from paleoseismology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Y.; Le Beon, M.; Wechsler, N.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Levant fault is a major continental structure 1200 km-long that bounds the Arabian plate to the west. The finite offset of this left-lateral strike-slip fault is estimated to be 105 km for the section located south of the restraining bend corresponding roughly to Lebanon. Along this southern section the slip-rate has been estimated over a large range of time scales, from few years to few hundreds thousands of years. Over these different time scales, studies agree for the slip-rate to be 5mm/yr × 2 mm/yr. The southern section of the Levant fault is particularly attractive to study earthquake behavior through time for several reasons: 1/ The fault geometry is simple and well constrained. 2/ The fault system is isolated and does not interact with obvious neighbor fault systems. 3/ The Middle-East, where the Levant fault is located, is the region in the world where one finds the longest and most complete historical record of past earthquakes. About 30 km north of the city of Aqaba, we opened a trench in the southern part of the Yotvata playa, along the Wadi Araba fault segment. The stratigraphy presents silty sand playa units alternating with coarser sand sediments from alluvial fans flowing westwards from the Jordan plateau. Two fault zones can be recognized in the trench and a minimum of 8 earthquakes can be identified, based on upward terminations of ground ruptures. Dense 14C dating through the entire exposure allows matching the 4 most recent events with historical events in AD1458, AD1212, AD1068 and AD748. Size of the ground rupture suggests a bi-modal distribution of earthquakes with earthquakes rupturing the entire Wadi Araba segment and earthquakes ending in the extensional jog forming the playa. Timing of earthquakes shows that no earthquakes occurred at this site since about 600 years, suggesting earthquake clustering along this section of the fault and potential for a large earthquake in the near future. 3D paleoseismological trenches at the Beteiha

  9. Equatorial Layered Deposits in Arabia Terra, Mars: Facies and Process Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pondrelli, M.; Rossi, A.; van Gasselt, S.; Le Deit, L.; Glamoclija, M.; Cavalazzi, B.; Franchi, F.; Fueten, F.; Hauber, E.; Zegers, T.

    2012-12-01

    Genetic mechanisms proposed to explain Equatorial Layered Deposits (ELDs) formation include subglacial volcanism, aeolian/airfall, lacustrine, lacustrine/volcanic and spring-fed deposition. ELDs have been frequently shown to consist of sulfates (e.g. Gendrin et al., 2005) that might form as a response to evaporation in a playa environment (Hoefen et al., 2003) or during spring precipitation (e.g. Allen and Oehler, 2008; Rossi et al., 2008). The importance of groundwater-dominated hydrological systems was proposed to explain the formation of light-toned deposits in Meridiani Planum and Arabia Terra (e.g. Andrews-Hanna et al. 2007). Additionally, fluid expulsion processes have been invoked to explain the formation of mounds within the light-toned deposits in Arabia Terra (Allen and Oehler, 2008; Rossi et al., 2008; Pondrelli et al., 2011). Potential for habitable conditions of both playa and spring-related settings (Cavalazzi et al., 2007; Glamoclija et al., 2011) coupled with the high preservation potential within sulfates (Panieri et al., 2010), make these deposits a good candidate to understand the potential past habitability of the planet. In order to investigate ELDs genesis, an area in the vicinity of Firsoff crater, where ELDs are present within and outside the craters, was selected for geological mapping and analysis of the landforms and their association using the available dataset, including CRISM in order to infer ELDs composition. Within Firsoff crater, ELDs form a bulge that can be estimated to be at least a few hundred meters thick, while, outside the craters, ELDs form flat-lying deposits. Although heavily eroded by wind and carved by yardangs, several morphologies within the ELDs in the craters seem to be depositional, which would exclude that the entire Firsoff basin had been originally filled by ELDs. Within craters, ELDs consist of roughly meter thick layers draping and onlapping the substratum. They appear affected by polygonal patterns with no

  10. A combined U-series, radiocarbon and stable isotope approach for constructing a Pleistocene lake hydrograph: an example from Surprise Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, D. E.; Weaver, K. L.; Harris, C.; Maher, K.

    2013-12-01

    Lake records and lake hydrographs provide an integrated record of the hydrologic conditions across a watershed. To provide useful constraints on past changes in climate, robust hydrographs require concordance among multiple geochronologic approaches as well as supporting geochemical and hydrologic evidence. Dating shoreline or near-shore lacustrine carbonates using U-series and radiocarbon methods is one approach for developing the age-elevation constraints to construct lake hydrographs. Geochemical analyses (e.g., stable isotopes, elemental ratios, U-series measurements) of modern waters and sediments, as well as the primary carbonate samples, can be used to assess the potential influence of open-system behavior, detrital Th corrections, or pedogenic overprinting on the calculated ages. Additionally, topographic analyses (e.g., basin pour point, shoreline elevations and sample locations) further constrain the spatial relevance and relationships between sample localities. To evaluate the timing and magnitude of the most recent late Pleistocene lake cycle in Surprise Valley, California, we analyzed 111 sub-samples from 22 laminated shoreline tufa samples using U-series disequilibrium geochronology, and pair these analyses with 15 radiocarbon ages. To further assess the radiocarbon and U-series ages, we measured the stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C) and elemental (Sr/Ca) signatures of the tufa samples, and characterized the range of (234U/238U) observed in the modern waters and playas within the watershed. Topographic analysis verified that Lake Surprise is a closed, inward draining basin, and demonstrated lateral correspondence between samples from the four targeted shoreline sets. Multiple lines of evidence revealed that samples from the highest shorelines are likely from older, higher lake cycles and were influenced by variable amounts of open-system exchange or pedogenic overprinting. The measured U concentrations of ~300 to 1200 ng/g, with (238U/232Th) from ~3 to

  11. Mulitple Origins of Sand Dune-Topography Interactions on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goggin, H.; Ewing, R. C.; Hayes, A.; Cisneros, J.; Epps, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between sand dune patterns and topographic obstacles is a primary signal of sand transport direction in the equatorial region of Saturn's moon, Titan. The streamlined, tear drop appearance of the sand-dune patterns as they wrap around obstacles and a dune-free zone on the east side of many obstacles gives the impression that sand transport is from the west to east at equatorial latitudes. However, the physical mechanism behind the dune-obstacle interaction is not well explained, leaving a gap in our understanding of the equatorial sand transport and implied wind directions and magnitudes on Titan. In order to better understand this interaction and evaluate wind and sand transport direction, we use morphometric analysis of optical images on Earth and Cassini SAR images on Titan combined with analog wind tunnel experiments to study dune-topography interactions. Image analysis is performed in a GIS environment to map spatial variations in dune crestline orientations proximal to obstacles. We also use digital elevation models to and analyze the three-dimensional geometry - height, length, width and slope of the dune-topography relationships on Earth. Preliminary results show that dune patterns are deflected similarly around positive, neutral, or negative topography, where positive topography is greater than the surrounding dune height, neutral topography is at dune height and negative topography is lower than dune heights. In the latter case these are typically intra-dune field playas. The obstacle height, width, slope and wind variability appear to play a primary role in determining if a lee-dune, rather than a dune-free lee-zone, develops. In many cases a dune-free playa with evaporite and mud desiccation polygons forms lee-ward of the obstacle. To support and elaborate on the mapping and spatial characterization of dune-topography interactions, a series of experiments using a wind tunnel were conducted. Wind tunnel experiments examine the formation

  12. Long-term comparison of the fish community in a Costa Rican rocky shore marine reserve.

    PubMed

    Myers, Mark C; Wagner, Jonathan; Vaughan, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    Despite their role in supporting diverse marine fish communities, tropical rocky shores and reefs have attracted less research and fewer targeted conservation efforts compared to coral reefs. We studied fish community composition in Playa Blanca Marine Reserve (9 degrees 40' N - 84 degrees 40' W), a rocky shore site on the central Pacific coast of Costa Rica. We conducted visual surveys of fishes along six strip transects soon after the area was designated a marine reserve in 1995, then again in 2006 following an eleven-year period of complete protection. We recorded a total of 31 406 sightings of 72 species from 30 families. Pomacentrids (42.5%), labrids (16.6%) and haemulids (14.8%) dominated the community, accounting for > 70% of total fish abundance. In comparison to other sites in the region, the fish community was more similar to one reported from Bahia Honda, Panama (7 degrees 50' N - 81 degrees 35 W) than from the geographically more proximate Culebra Bay, Costa Rica (10 degrees 45' N - 85 degrees 43 W). Sixty-one species from 26 families were recorded in 1995; sixty-nine species from 28 families in 2006. Our results suggest that the Playa Blanca Marine Reserve is fulfilling its conservation role. Average fish abundance, species richness and Shannon's index of community diversity were greater in 2006 than 1995, and fish community composition varied significantly within each transect among years. Much of the change in community composition among years resulted from spatial and temporal variation in the abundance of a few dominant species, including Abudefduf troschelli, Thalassoma lucasanum, Chromis atrilobata, and Stegastes flavilatus/acapulcoensis. Of the 48 species/species groups recorded in both years, 37 (77%) were more abundant in 2006 than 1995, and several species recorded as uncommon or rare in 1995 were more frequent and abundant in 2006. Fish community composition and the abundance of some species changed in the reserve over time, but further

  13. Detection and Preliminary Assessment of Source Areas of the 15 December 2003 Dust Storm in the Chihuahuan Desert, Southwestern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Rivera, N. I.; Gill, T. E.; Bleiweiss, M. P.; Hand, J. L.; Dominguez A., M.; Ruiz, A.; Perez, A. E.; Emmert, S. P.; Lee, J. A.; Mulligan, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    Dust storms can disperse large quantities of fine aeolian sediment regionally and even globally. These extreme aerosol events frequently originate with multiple dust plumes developing simultaneously over a large region. Dust outbreaks originating in the southwestern USA and northern Mexico seasonally transport aerosols long distances across continental North America. However, dust sources in this region are not well characterized. Remote sensing data can be used to assess the frequency and magnitude of these dust events for potential impacts on climate, visibility and health-related air quality issues. We applied a technique that consists of examining visible spectral bands, as well as difference "split-window" images for far-infrared (far-IR) channels using a variety of satellite imagery (NOAA/GOES/GVAR/Imager, NOAA/POES/AVHRR and NASA/TERRA/MODIS). This technique was used to locate the origin of multiple dust plumes in the Chihuahuan Desert region of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico during a significant dust event that occurred on December 15, 2003. After dust sources were identified, we superimposed their locations on Landsat-7 images to assess surface features of these aeolian "hotspots," and visited many of these sites to determine the geomorphology, soil/sediment properties, and land use associated with these dust sources. Dust plumes in the Chihuahuan Desert on 15 December 2003 emanated from several land types, including saline playas, bare desert soils, disturbed/abandoned lands, and agricultural areas. In Mexico, sources included several sites along the edges of pluvial Lake Palomas near the contacts between sand sheets and lacustrine sediments, small dry lake beds (lagunas secas) and several sites in the Casas Grandes river basin in Chihuahua. In the United States, dust emission hotspots included dry, unvegetated saline playas (the White Sands near the E and SE edges of Lake Lucero, New Mexico, and the northern Salt Basin west of the

  14. Dust emission from different sol types and geomorphic units in the Sahara - implications for modeling dust emission and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouvi, Onn; Schepanski, Kerstin; Amit, Rivka; Gillespie, Alan; Enzel, Yehouda

    2014-05-01

    Mineral dust plays multiple roles in mediating physical and biogeochemical exchanges among the atmosphere, land and ocean, and thus is an active component of the global climate system. To estimate the past, current, and future impacts of dust on climate, sources of dust and their erodibility should be identified. The Sahara is the major source of dust on Earth. Based on qualitative analysis of remotely sensed data with low temporal resolution, the main sources of dust that have been identified are topographic depressions comprised of dry lake and playa deposits in hyprarid regions. Yet, recent studies cast doubts on these as the major sources and call for a search for others. Moreover, the susceptibility of soils to aeolian erosion (wind land erodibility) in the Sahara is still poorly known. In this study we identify and determine the soil types and geomorphic units most important as Saharan dust sources by correlating between the number of days with dust storms (NDS), derived from remote-sensing data of high temporal resolution, with the distribution of the soil types/geomorphic units. During 2006-8 the source of over 90% of the NDS was sand dunes, leptosols, calcisols, arenosols, and rock debris. Few dust storms originated from dry lake beds and playas. Land erodibility by wind for each soil type/geomorphic unit was estimated by a regression of the NDS and the number of days with high-speed wind events; the regression is relatively high for sand dunes and gypsisols. We use these regressions to differentiate between sources of dust that are supply-limited to those that are transport-limited. We propose that the fracturing of saltating sand and the removal of clay coatings from sand grains through eolian abrasion is the dominant dust-emission mechanism for the sand-rich areas covering large portion of the Sahara. Our results also explain the increased dustiness during the last glacial period, when sand dunes activity has been more common than during the Holocene

  15. Recurrent large-scale landsliding on the west flank of La Palma, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urgeles, Roger; Masson, Douglas G.; Canals, Miquel; Watts, Anthony B.; Le Bas, Tim

    1999-11-01

    A large area of debris avalanche deposits has been discovered on the western submarine flanks of the island of La Palma. Multibeam bathymetry and its derivative backscatter data, Towed Ocean Bottom Instrument (TOBI) sidescan sonar images, and 3.5 kHz and airgun seismic reflection data have been used to identify at least two, and possibly as many as four, major landslide events. The youngest of the events, the Cumbre Nueva Debris Avalanche, extends onshore into the valleys bounded by the Caldera de Taburiente and Cumbre Nueva Ridge, which mark the degraded collapse scars. Radiometric dating of the volcanic flows in the headwall indicate an age of between 536 and 125 ka for this landslide. The debris avalanche covers an area of 780 km2, has a maximum thickness of 500 m, and has an estimated volume of 95 km3. Older deposits, collectively referred to as the Playa de la Veta Debris Avalanche Complex, are probably, as the name indicates, an amalgamation of at least two or three events rather than the result of a single catastrophic failure. The Playa de la Veta Debris Avalanche Complex is associated onshore with an unconformity dated as late Matuyama (1 Ma to 800 ka). It covers an area of 1200 km2, has a maximum thickness of 1300 m, and may represent a total volume of up to 650 km3. The greater thicknesses and limited areas occupied by debris avalanches on the western flank of La Palma, compared to other landslides in the Canary Archipelago, suggest that the La Palma landslide masses have relatively low mobility. The different debris avalanche lobes formed by each landslide event are separated by channels 2-2.5 km wide. The clear relationship between channel position and the boundaries of each debris avalanche lobe indicates that debris avalanches control later channel formation and pathways. The relief of the submarine flanks of the La Palma volcanoes, in the areas of island slope unaffected by landslides, is mainly the result of constructional volcanic processes

  16. Integrated hydrogeochemical, isotopic and geomorphological depiction of the groundwater salinization in the aquifer system of Delhi, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manish; Rao, M. Someshwar; Deka, Jyoti Prakash; Ramanathan, AL.; Kumar, Bhishm

    2015-11-01

    exploitation of groundwater, and enhanced evaporation have together resulted in saline playa condition in some part of the region. The scenario was further verified by matching the required condition for the formation of salt pan or playa with the existing geo-morphological conditions of the area. Isotopic results indicate that salinity flushing is possible and proceeds in the areas of freshwater recharge.

  17. An AEM-TEM study of weathering and diagenesis, Abert Lake, Oregon: II. Diagenetic modification of the sedimentary assemblage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banfield, J.F.; Jones, B.F.; Veblen, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper compares the mineralogy and chemistry of clay minerals in sediments from various depths and positions in Abert Lake and surrounding playa with those of the weathered materials entering the lake in order to reveal the nature and extent of post-depositional mineralogical modification. Analytical electron microscope (AEM) data from individual clay particles reveal that each sample is comprised of a highly inhomogeneous smectite assemblage. The thin clay flakes (commonly less than 10 nm wide) display a complete range in octahedral sheet compositions from nearly dioctahedral to nearly trioctahedral. The very abundant Mg-rich lake smectites with an estimated composition K0.29(Al0.23-Mg2.16Fe0.30)Si3.80Al0.20O10(OH)2 are not formed by weathering. This confirms the importance of diagenetic Mg uptake. Lattice-fringe imaging failed to reveal distinct brucite-like or vermiculite-like layers, suggesting that interstratifications of this type are rare or absent. Siliceous coatings on clay particles (identified by silica excess in smectite analyses) seem to favor topotactic overgrowth of stevensite rather than addition of brucite-like layers to the dioctahedral nuclei. The growth of K-stevensite dilutes the Al content of the crystal, and thus the increasing diagenetic modification reduces rather than supplements its illite component. Smectite compositions within individual samples were highly variable, yet source-related characteristics such as the abundance of Fe-rich smectite were apparent. Little evidence for systematic K or Mg enrichment with depth was identified in samples from depths of down to 16 feet below the sediment-water interface. The most magnesian assemblages are associated both with weathering sources of Mg-rich smectite and playa environments subjected to repeated wetting and drying cycles. Thus, the observations suggest that clay compositions primarily reflect changes in lake levels, brine composition, and source characteristics, rather than time and

  18. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  19. An AEM-TEM study of weathering and diagenesis, Abert Lake, Oregon: II. Diagenetic modification of the sedimentary assemblage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, Jillian F.; Jones, Blair F.; Veblen, David R.

    1991-10-01

    This paper compares the mineralogy and chemistry of clay minerals in sediments from various depths and positions in Abert Lake and surrounding playa with those of the weathered materials entering the lake in order to reveal the nature and extent of post-depositional mineralogical modification. Analytical electron microscope (AEM) data from individual clay particles reveal that each sample is comprised of a highly inhomogeneous smectite assemblage. The thin clay flakes (commonly less than 10 nm wide) display a complete range in octahedral sheet compositions from nearly dioctahedral to nearly trioctahedral. The very abundant Mg-rich lake smectites with an estimated composition K 0.29(Al 0.23-Mg 2.16Fe 0.30)Si 3.80Al 0.20O 10(OH) 2 are not formed by weathering. This confirms the importance of diagenetic Mg uptake. Lattice-fringe imaging failed to reveal distinct brucite-like or vermiculite-like layers, suggesting that interstratifications of this type are rare or absent. Siliceous coatings on clay particles (identified by silica excess in smectite analyses) seem to favor topotactic overgrowth of stevensite rather than addition of brucite-like layers to the dioctahedral nuclei. The growth of K-stevensite dilutes the Al content of the crystal, and thus the increasing diagenetic modification reduces rather than supplements its illite component. Smectite compositions within individual samples were highly variable, yet source-related characteristics such as the abundance of Fe-rich smectite were apparent. Little evidence for systematic K or Mg enrichment with depth was identified in samples from depths of down to 16 feet below the sediment-water interface. The most magnesian assemblages are associated both with weathering sources of Mg-rich smectite and playa environments subjected to repeated wetting and drying cycles. Thus, the observations suggest that clay compositions primarily reflect changes in lake levels, brine composition, and source characteristics, rather than

  20. Biologically induced mineralization of dypingite by cyanobacteria from an alkaline wetland near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Power, Ian M; Wilson, Siobhan A; Thom, James M; Dipple, Gregory M; Southam, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Background This study provides experimental evidence for biologically induced precipitation of magnesium carbonates, specifically dypingite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·5H2O), by cyanobacteria from an alkaline wetland near Atlin, British Columbia. This wetland is part of a larger hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O) playa. Abiotic and biotic processes for magnesium carbonate precipitation in this environment are compared. Results Field observations show that evaporation of wetland water produces carbonate films of nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O) on the water surface and crusts on exposed surfaces. In contrast, benthic microbial mats possessing filamentous cyanobacteria (Lyngbya sp.) contain platy dypingite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·5H2O) and aragonite. Bulk carbonates in the benthic mats (δ13C avg. = 6.7‰, δ18O avg. = 17.2‰) were isotopically distinguishable from abiotically formed nesquehonite (δ13C avg. = 9.3‰, δ18O avg. = 24.9‰). Field and laboratory experiments, which emulated natural conditions, were conducted to provide insight into the processes for magnesium carbonate precipitation in this environment. Field microcosm experiments included an abiotic control and two microbial systems, one containing ambient wetland water and one amended with nutrients to simulate eutrophic conditions. The abiotic control developed an extensive crust of nesquehonite on its bottom surface during which [Mg2+] decreased by 16.7% relative to the starting concentration. In the microbial systems, precipitation occurred within the mats and was not simply due to the capturing of mineral grains settling out of the water column. Magnesium concentrations decreased by 22.2% and 38.7% in the microbial systems, respectively. Laboratory experiments using natural waters from the Atlin site produced rosettes and flakey globular aggregates of dypingite precipitated in association with filamentous cyanobacteria dominated biofilms cultured from the site, whereas the abiotic control again precipitated

  1. Monitoring Changes in Moisture Load Using Elastic Displacements in the Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrash, C. J.; Murdoch, L. C.; Germanovich, L. N.; Weinberg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring changes in mass over scales of several meters to hundreds of meters or more has many applications to characterization of the Critical Zone, including assessing changes in soil moisture, erosion or deposition of sediment, and melting or accumulation of snow or ice. A technique has been developed to monitor average changes in mass on those scales using continuous high-resolution measurements of displacement made with a vertical extensometer (called a DELTA extensometer). An increase of mass above the extensometer causes the soil to contract, which causes the extensometer to function similar to a weighing lysimeter. DELTA extensometers have been deployed at field sites near Clemson, South Carolina, and in northern Texas. The extensometers in South Carolina are in saprolite derived from biotite gneiss, whereas the ones in Texas are in clayey silt underlying playas. The instruments are in the vadose zone at depths of 3m to 6m. Signals from co-located extensometers are remarkably similar, demonstrating reproducibility of the technique. The extensometers respond to loading from a person or vehicle, and this load is used to estimate the Young's modulus of soil enveloping the extensometer. Displacement during small to moderate rainfalls is typically linear with the accumulated rain (~0.2 micron/mm of rain, for example). The displacement levels out during large rainfalls, potentially due to the onset of overland flow that would limit the water load during precipitation. This suggests that the onset of overland flow could be evaluated using this technique. Seasonal temperature fluctuations at the soil surface can penetrate to the depths of the extensometers causing displacement from thermal expansion and contraction. Thermal effects account for approximately 100 μm of displacement over an annual cycle at one instrument. It appears that much of the thermal signal can be removed by data analysis. Pore pressure changes in the vicinity of the extensometer can also

  2. Fault kinematics and depocenter evolution of oil-bearing, continental successions of the Mina del Carmen Formation (Albian) in the Golfo San Jorge basin, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, José Matildo; Plazibat, Silvana; Crovetto, Carolina; Stein, Julián; Cayo, Eric; Schiuma, Ariel

    2013-10-01

    normal faults (mean Az = 98°) formed during the "third rifting phase", which occurs coeval with the deposition of the Upper Member of the Bajo Barreal Formation. The fault characteristics indicate a counterclockwise rotation of the stress field during the deposition of the Chubut Group of the Golfo San Jorge basin, likely associated to the rotation of Southern South America during the fragmentation of the Gondwana paleocontinent. Understanding the evolution of fault-controlled topography in continental basins allow to infer location and orientation of coeval fluvial systems, providing a more reliable scenario for location of producing oil wells.

  3. Sedimentology and paleoenvironments of the Las Chacritas carbonate paleolake, Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Jurassic), Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaleri, Nora G.; Benavente, Cecilia A.

    2013-02-01

    The Las Chacritas Member is the lower part of the Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Jurassic). The unit is a completely continental limestone succession with volcanic contributions that were deposited during the development of the Cañadón Asfalto Rift Basin (Chubut province, Patagonia, Argentina). A detailed sedimentological analysis was performed in the Fossati depocenter to determine the paleoenvironments that developed in the context of this rift. The Las Chacritas Member represents a carbonate paleolake system with ramp-shaped margins associated with wetlands that were eventually affected by subaerial exposure and pedogenesis. This process is represented by three main subenvironments: a) a lacustrine setting sensu stricto (lacustrine limestone facies association), represented by Mudstones/Wackestones containing porifera spicules (F1), Intraclastic packstones (F6) and Tabular stromatolites (F10) in which deposition and diagenesis were entirely subaqueous; b) a palustrine setting (palustrine limestone facies association) containing Microbial Mudstones (F2), Intraclastic sandy packstone with ostracode remains (F3), Oncolitic packstone (F5), Brecciated limestone (F7) and Nodular-Mottled limestone (F8) representing shallow marginal areas affected by groundwater fluctuations and minor subaerial exposure; and c) a pedogenic paleoenvironment (pedogenic limestone facies association) including Intraclastic limestone (F4) and Packstones containing Microcodium (F9) facies displaying the major features of subaerial exposure, pedogenic diagenesis and the development of paleosols. The fluvial-palustrine-lacustrine succession shows a general shallow upward trend in which contraction-expansion cycles are represented (delimited by exposure and surface erosion). The variations in the successive formations reflect the responses to fluctuations in a combination of two major controls, the tectonic and local climatic variables. The predominance of the palustrine facies associations was

  4. A Basal Lithostrotian Titanosaur (Dinosauria: Sauropoda) with a Complete Skull: Implications for the Evolution and Paleobiology of Titanosauria.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Rubén D F; Lamanna, Matthew C; Novas, Fernando E; Ridgely, Ryan C; Casal, Gabriel A; Martínez, Javier E; Vita, Javier R; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-01-01

    We describe Sarmientosaurus musacchioi gen. et sp. nov., a titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian-Turonian) Lower Member of the Bajo Barreal Formation of southern Chubut Province in central Patagonia, Argentina. The holotypic and only known specimen consists of an articulated, virtually complete skull and part of the cranial and middle cervical series. Sarmientosaurus exhibits the following distinctive features that we interpret as autapomorphies: (1) maximum diameter of orbit nearly 40% rostrocaudal length of cranium; (2) complex maxilla-lacrimal articulation, in which the lacrimal clasps the ascending ramus of the maxilla; (3) medial edge of caudal sector of maxillary ascending ramus bordering bony nasal aperture with low but distinct ridge; (4) 'tongue-like' ventral process of quadratojugal that overlaps quadrate caudally; (5) separate foramina for all three branches of the trigeminal nerve; (6) absence of median venous canal connecting infundibular region to ventral part of brainstem; (7) subvertical premaxillary, procumbent maxillary, and recumbent dentary teeth; (8) cervical vertebrae with 'strut-like' centroprezygapophyseal laminae; (9) extremely elongate and slender ossified tendon positioned ventrolateral to cervical vertebrae and ribs. The cranial endocast of Sarmientosaurus preserves some of the most complete information obtained to date regarding the brain and sensory systems of sauropods. Phylogenetic analysis recovers the new taxon as a basal member of Lithostrotia, as the most plesiomorphic titanosaurian to be preserved with a complete skull. Sarmientosaurus provides a wealth of new cranial evidence that reaffirms the close relationship of titanosaurs to Brachiosauridae. Moreover, the presence of the relatively derived lithostrotian Tapuiasaurus in Aptian deposits indicates that the new Patagonian genus represents a 'ghost lineage' with a comparatively plesiomorphic craniodental form, the evolutionary history of which

  5. A Basal Lithostrotian Titanosaur (Dinosauria: Sauropoda) with a Complete Skull: Implications for the Evolution and Paleobiology of Titanosauria

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Rubén D. F.; Lamanna, Matthew C.; Novas, Fernando E.; Ridgely, Ryan C.; Casal, Gabriel A.; Martínez, Javier E.; Vita, Javier R.; Witmer, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    We describe Sarmientosaurus musacchioi gen. et sp. nov., a titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian—Turonian) Lower Member of the Bajo Barreal Formation of southern Chubut Province in central Patagonia, Argentina. The holotypic and only known specimen consists of an articulated, virtually complete skull and part of the cranial and middle cervical series. Sarmientosaurus exhibits the following distinctive features that we interpret as autapomorphies: (1) maximum diameter of orbit nearly 40% rostrocaudal length of cranium; (2) complex maxilla—lacrimal articulation, in which the lacrimal clasps the ascending ramus of the maxilla; (3) medial edge of caudal sector of maxillary ascending ramus bordering bony nasal aperture with low but distinct ridge; (4) ‘tongue-like’ ventral process of quadratojugal that overlaps quadrate caudally; (5) separate foramina for all three branches of the trigeminal nerve; (6) absence of median venous canal connecting infundibular region to ventral part of brainstem; (7) subvertical premaxillary, procumbent maxillary, and recumbent dentary teeth; (8) cervical vertebrae with ‘strut-like’ centroprezygapophyseal laminae; (9) extremely elongate and slender ossified tendon positioned ventrolateral to cervical vertebrae and ribs. The cranial endocast of Sarmientosaurus preserves some of the most complete information obtained to date regarding the brain and sensory systems of sauropods. Phylogenetic analysis recovers the new taxon as a basal member of Lithostrotia, as the most plesiomorphic titanosaurian to be preserved with a complete skull. Sarmientosaurus provides a wealth of new cranial evidence that reaffirms the close relationship of titanosaurs to Brachiosauridae. Moreover, the presence of the relatively derived lithostrotian Tapuiasaurus in Aptian deposits indicates that the new Patagonian genus represents a ‘ghost lineage’ with a comparatively plesiomorphic craniodental form, the evolutionary

  6. [The prevalence of risk factors for coronary arteriosclerosis in the urban areas of the Argentine Patagonia. A multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Coniglio, R I; Dahinten, E; Vidal, E J; Salgueiro, A M; Otero, J C; Vásquez, L A; Marcheselli, C; Zavaley, S

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know the prevalence of risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis in the urban south area of Argentina in order to implement the prevention of this disease. In 330 males and 322 females of Viedma and Cipolletti (Province of Rio Negro), and Comodoro Rivadavia (Province of Chubut), we determined total cholesterol (CT), triglycerides (TG), HDL cholesterol (CHDL), LDL cholesterol (CLDL), uric acid (AcU), systolic pressure (PS), diastolic pressure (PD), cigarette smokers (Cig), and body mass index (BMI). Laboratories were coordinated as to methodology and quality control. Between 30 and 50 years of age, the prevalence of risk factors was greater in males than females; 27.3% of males vs 16.0 of females had CT > or = 240 mg/dl (p < 0.05), 30.5% vs 19.7%, had CLDL > or = 160 mg/dl (p < 0.05), 10.3% vs 5.9%, had CHDL < 35 mg/dl, 8.9% vs 4.2% had PS > 145 mmHg, 9.0% vs 5.9%, had PD > 90 mm Hg, 33.6% vs 23.4%, had Cig > or = 10/d (p < 0.05), 26.0% vs 13.8% had TG > 170 mg/dl (p < 0.05), 30.5% vs 22.4%, had BMI > 27 Kg/m2 (p < 0.05) (Figs. 2-3). This difference between sexes was not significant over 50 years of age, when the prevalence of factors increased in both sexes. In Figure 4, 41.5% of males and 34.5% of females had one primary risk factor, 13.0% of males and 9.9% of females had two factors and 1.5% of males had three. The following main combinations of two primary risk factors was observed: between 30 and 50 years of age, 10.3% of males and 3.7% of females had CLDL > or = 160 mg/dl and Cig > or = 10/d (p < 0.01); over 50 years, 19.5% of females and 11.8% of males had CLDL > or = 160 mg/dl and PS > 145 mm Hg (NS). We suggest that operatives of education for the prevention of high cholesterol, no smoking and control of high blood pressure, are needed specially in young men. PMID:1340881

  7. Uncertainty quantification for turbulent mixing simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, David Howland; Glimm, James G; Kaman, Tulin

    2011-01-20

    We have achieved validation in the form of simulation-experiment agreement for Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing rates (known as {alpha}) over the past decade. The problem was first posed sixty years ago. Recent improvements in our simulation technology allow sufficient precision to distinguish between mixing rates for different experiments. We explain the sensitivity and non-universality of the mixing rate. These playa role in the difficulties experienced by many others in efforts to compare experiment with simulation. We analyze the role of initial conditions, which were not recorded for the classical experiments of Youngs et al. Reconstructed initial conditions with error bars are given. The time evolution of the long and short wave length portions of the instability are analyzed. We show that long wave length perturbations are strong at t = 0, but are quickly overcome by the rapidly growing short wave length perturbations. These conclusions, based solely on experimental data analysis, are in agreement with results from theoretical bubble merger models and numerical simulation studies but disagree with models based on superposition of modes.

  8. Mineralogy of Saudi Arabian soils: eastern region

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Dixon, J.B.; Aba-Husayn, M.M.

    1983-03-01

    Mineralogical properties of soils along a 500 km east-west transect of an eastern province of Saudi Arabia were examined. Mineralogical composition of soils along the eastern coastal playa near Al Qatif is mostly gypsum or calcite in the whole soil, and smectite among layer silicate minerals in the clay fraction (<2mm). In soils of the Harad area palygorskite and smectite are the major layer silicate minerals. In the Al Kharj area kaolinite and smectite are the major clay minerals. Small amounts of chlorite occur in all soils studied although it varies in thermal stability and the amount is very small in Al Kharj 11 and Al Kharj Mountain surface soils. In the entire eastern region mica and vermiculite are present in the soil clays. The results of transmission electron microscpoy and x-ray diffraction analyses show that acicular palygorskite is widely distributed in the eastern-region soils. Palygorskite is believed to originate from the underlying Mio-Pliocene limestone in the basin, and to be redistributed by alluvial and eolian processes.

  9. The boron isotope geochemistry of the Kirka borate deposit, western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, M. R.; Helvaci, C.

    1995-09-01

    We have measured the boron isotope composition of seventeen samples of borate minerals (colemanite, ulexite, and borax) and the 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio in thirteen borate samples from the Kirka borate deposit in western Anatolia, Turkey. These Neogene deposits were formed by evaporation of playa lakes fed by geothermal springs. The δ 11B values range from -14.9% o in colemanite to -1.6% o in borax. To a first approximation the relative differences in the δ 11B values of the borate minerals are consistent with their basic boron atomic configuration, but the magnitude of the boron isotope fractionation between the three minerals precludes their simultaneous precipitation from a brine with the same boron isotope composition and pH. Rather the data are consistent with precipitation of colemanite from a brine with lower pH than that required for ulexite precipitation, which in turn requires a lower pH than is needed for borax precipitation. The boron isotope data also suggest that the borate minerals did not maintain boron isotopic equilibrium with the brine after they precipitated. Rayleigh fractionation models indicate that during borax precipitation the δ 11B value of the brine was slightly heavier than during precipitation of ulexite and colemanite.

  10. The ecology of stream and riparian habitats of the Great Basin region: A community profile

    SciTech Connect

    Minshall, G.W. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Jensen, S.E. ); Platts, W.S. . Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station)

    1989-09-01

    Surface waters of the Great Basin include perennial, intermittent, and ephemeral streams; freshwater and saline lakes; playa lakes; freshwater and saline wetlands and thermal springs associated with faulting and volcanic activity. All of these aquatic habitats generally have associated riparian habitats. However, riparian habitats of the Great Basin may be more mesic than the riparian habitats of the eastern United States. The Great Basin comprises the northern half of the Basin and Range Physiographic Province and covers most of Nevada and western Utah and portions of California, Oregon, and Idaho. The entire basin actually consists of numerous subbasins and mountain ranges which present an extremely diverse physical setting. Typical mountains range from about 2100--3000 m in elevation while subbasin floors are typically 1500--1800 m in elevation. The entire Great Basin lies in the rain shadow of the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the regions is semi-arid to arid. Riparian and stream habitats within the Great Basin have received less attention from ecologists than similar habitats elsewhere in the United States. As a consequence, little is known about biotic communities or about certain aspects of structure and functioning of these ecosystems.

  11. Boundary Layer Circulations Driven by Land Surface Contrasts within an Arid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rife, D.

    2006-12-01

    This talk will illustrate the variety of locally forced PBL circulations that are driven by heterogeneities in the land surface within an arid environment. The presenter will use observations and MM5 model data from a study done within the Great Basin Desert (or Great Salt Lake Desert), located to the southwest o Salt Lake City, Utah. This region is characteristic of the arid "basin and range" province of North America in that it contains complex terrain, varied vegetation and substrates, and salt-encrusted basin flats (playas). The study area is especially well instrumented with surface meteorological stations operated by the U.S. Army's West Desert Test Center and a collection of cooperating mesonets in northeastern Utah. To an observer on the ground in the center of this desert study area, the landscape looks flat, barren, and generally unremarkable, except for mountains in the distance. Nevertheless, the presenter will show that the local boundary layer wind field exhibits a complex spatial and temporal structure that results from contrasts in the land surface characteristics, which belies the traditional notion of benignly uniform conditions within arid areas. He will also demonstrate that the adequacy with which these contrasts are represented in atmospheric models has a potentially strong impact on the accuracy of simulated mesoscale weather and climate.

  12. Contemporaneous deposition of phyllosilicates and sulfates: Using Australian acidic saline lake deposits to describe geochemical variability on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldridge, A.M.; Hook, S.J.; Crowley, J.K.; Marion, G.M.; Kargel, J.S.; Michalski, J.L.; Thomson, B.J.; de Souza, Filho C.R.; Bridges, N.T.; Brown, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the origin of the Martian sulfate and phyllosilicate deposits have led to the hypothesis that there was a marked, global-scale change in the Mars environment from circum-neutral pH aqueous alteration in the Noachian to an acidic evaporitic system in the late Noachian to Hesperian. However, terrestrial studies suggest that two different geochemical systems need not be invoked to explain such geochemical variation.Western Australian acidic playa lakes have large pH differences separated vertically and laterally by only a few tens of meters, demonstrating how highly variable chemistries can coexist over short distances in natural environments. We suggest diverse and variable Martian aqueous environments where the coetaneous formation of phyllosilicates and sulfates at the Australian sites are analogs for regions where phyllosilicates and sulfates coexist on Mars. In these systems, Fe and alkali earth phyllosilicates represent deep facies associated with upwelling neutral to alkaline groundwater, whereas aluminous phyllosilicates and sulfates represent near-surface evaporitic facies formed from more acidic brines. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Potential Effects of Climate Change on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Great Plains of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covich, A. P.; Fritz, S. C.; Lamb, P. J.; Marzolf, R. D.; Matthews, W. J.; Poiani, K. A.; Prepas, E. E.; Richman, M. B.; Winter, T. C.

    1997-06-01

    The Great Plains landscape is less topographically complex than most other regions within North America, but diverse aquatic ecosystems, such as playas, pothole lakes, ox-bow lakes, springs, groundwater aquifers, intermittent and ephemeral streams, as well as large rivers and wetlands, are highly dynamic and responsive to extreme climatic fluctuations. We review the evidence for climatic change that demonstrates the historical importance of extremes in north-south differences in summer temperatures and east-west differences in aridity across four large subregions. These physical driving forces alter density stratification, deoxygenation, decomposition and salinity. Biotic community composition and associated ecosystem processes of productivity and nutrient cycling respond rapidly to these climatically driven dynamics. Ecosystem processes also respond to cultural effects such as dams and diversions of water for irrigation, waste dilution and urban demands for drinking water and industrial uses. Distinguishing climatic from cultural effects in future models of aquatic ecosystem functioning will require more refinement in both climatic and economic forecasting. There is a need, for example, to predict how long-term climatic forecasts (based on both ENSO and global warming simulations) relate to the permanence and productivity of shallow water ecosystems. Aquatic ecologists, hydrologists, climatologists and geographers have much to discuss regarding the synthesis of available data and the design of future interdisciplinary research.

  14. Geologic Characterization of Young Alluvial Basin-Fill Deposits from Drill Hole Data in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Drake II, Ronald M.

    2007-01-01

    Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada, that has been the site of numerous underground nuclear tests; many of these tests occurred within the young alluvial basin-fill deposits. The migration of radionuclides to the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through this thick, heterogeneous section of Tertiary and Quaternary rock. An understanding of the lateral and vertical changes in the material properties of young alluvial basin-fill deposits will aid in the further development of the hydrogeologic framework and the delineation of hydrostratigraphic units and hydraulic properties required for simulating ground-water flow in the Yucca Flat area. This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, presents data and interpretation regarding the three-dimensional variability of the shallow alluvial aquifers in areas of testing at Yucca Flat, data that are potentially useful in the understanding of the subsurface flow system. This report includes a summary and interpretation of alluvial basin-fill stratigraphy in the Yucca Flat area based on drill hole data from 285 selected drill holes. Spatial variations in lithology and grain size of the Neogene basin-fill sediments can be established when data from numerous drill holes are considered together. Lithologic variations are related to different depositional environments within the basin including alluvial fan, channel, basin axis, and playa deposits.

  15. Geologic Characterization of Young Alluvial Basin-Fill Deposits from Drill-Hole Data in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Drake II, Ronald M.

    2007-01-01

    Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada, that has been the site of numerous underground nuclear tests; many of these tests occurred within the young alluvial basin-fill deposits. The migration of radionuclides to the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through this thick, heterogeneous section of Tertiary and Quaternary rock. An understanding of the lateral and vertical changes in the material properties of young alluvial basin-fill deposits will aid in the further development of the hydrogeologic framework and the delineation of hydrostratigraphic units and hydraulic properties required for simulating ground-water flow in the Yucca Flat area. This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, presents data and interpretation regarding the three-dimensional variability of the shallow alluvial aquifers in areas of testing at Yucca Flat, data that are potentially useful in the understanding of the subsurface flow system. This report includes a summary and interpretation of alluvial basin-fill stratigraphy in the Yucca Flat area based on drill-hole data from 285 selected drill holes. Spatial variations in lithology and grain size of the Neogene basin-fill sediments can be established when data from numerous drill holes are considered together. Lithologic variations are related to different depositional environments within the basin such as alluvial fan, channel, basin axis, and playa deposits.

  16. Depositional history and neotectonics in Great Salt Lake, Utah, from high-resolution seismic stratigraphy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; Kelts, K.R.; Dinter, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection data from Great Salt Lake show that the basinal sediment sequence is cut by numerous faults with N-S and NE-SW orientations. This faulting shows evidence of varied timing and relative offsets, but includes at least three events totaling about 12 m following the Bonneville phase of the lake (since about 13.5 ka). Several faults displace the uppermost sediments and the lake floor. Bioherm structures are present above some faults, which suggests that the faults served as conduits for sublacustrine discharge of fresh water. A shallow, fault-controlled ridge between Carrington Island and Promontory Point, underlain by a well-cemented pavement, separates the main lake into two basins. The pavement appears to be early Holocene in age and younger sediments lap onto it. Onlap-offlap relationships, reflection truncations, and morphology of the lake floor indicate a low lake, well below the present level, during the early Holocene, during which most of the basin was probably a playa. This low stand is represented by irregular reflections in seismic profiles from the deepest part of the basin. Other prominent reflectors in the profiles are correlated with lithologic changes in sediment cores related to the end of the Bonneville stage of the lake, a thick mirabilite layer in the northern basin, and the Mazama tephra. Reflections below those penetrated by sediment cores document earlier lacustrine cycles. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sand injectites at the base of the Coconino Sandstone, Grand Canyon, Arizona (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, John H.; Strom, Ray

    2010-10-01

    In the Grand Canyon, large tabular and wedge shaped sand-filled cracks commonly occur at the base of the Coconino Sandstone, penetrating downward into the coarse siltstones of the Hermit Formation. All previous workers have casually identified the vertical sand-filled cracks as desiccation cracks. Until now, they have never been studied. Cracks and their associated features were found and examined at thirty locations; and it was found that they have characteristics difficult to explain using desiccation mud cracks or large playa cracks as a model. Instead, it was found the cracks have features commonly found in clastic dikes and sand injectites. Some lateral sand bodies associated with the cracks have clastic sill-like characteristics. Liquefaction and injection of the basal Coconino into the Hermit is indicated by 1) macroscopic and microscopic banding (flow structures) within the cracks, 2) bedded sandstone clast breccias in structureless sandstone lenses at the base of the Coconino, 3) lateral sand bodies which are connected to the vertical cracks, 4) a zoned depth distribution of cracks about the Bright Angel Fault zone, 5) insufficient clay mineralogy and particle size for the Hermit to crack by desiccation, 6) preferred orientation of the cracks roughly perpendicular to the Bright Angel Fault zone and several other features. Caution should be exercised when interpreting sand-filled cracks as desiccation features (i.e., "mud cracks"), even if the interpretation fits well with accepted paleoenvironmental models.

  18. Thermal-infrared remote sensing and Kirchhoff's Law. 1: Laboratory measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; Wald, Andrew; D'Aria, Dana M.

    1994-01-01

    By the end of this century the Earth Observing System (EOS) will provide worldwide, thermal infrared, multispectral images of the Earth, presenting geologists with a new kind of remote sensing data for interpretation. Thus it has become essential to understand the spectral emittance behavior of terrestrial surface materials. Perhaps the most fundamental question to be answereed is the extent to which such materials follow Kirchhoff's law (epsilon = 1 -R) under laboratory and field conditions, especially when a sample displays a thermal gradient. We present the first rigorous quantitative comparison of directional and hemispherical reflectance and directional emittance of rock and soil samples in the laboratory, with thermal gradients induced by heating them from below and allowing them to radiate to a colder background. The results show that only an extemeley low density sample composed of fine particles sifted into a 'fairy castle' structure displays a thermal gradient steep enough within the infrared skin depth to cause significant (6%) departure from Kirchhoff's law. There is no detectable effect on the more normal terrestrial samples, such as soils and rocks measured in the laboratory, even when semitransparent coatings are involved. Thus both emittance and reflectance measurements can be used to calculate sample emissivity for most terrestrial surface materieals. However, the effect on Kirchhoffian behavior of different field environments, which may induce a steeper thermal gradient in particulate samples, has yet to be determined, and some low-density surface materials like newly fallen snow, frost, and efflorescent salts on playas have yet to be measured in emittance.

  19. Comparison of inversion models using AIRSAR data for Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.

    1993-01-01

    Polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data were collected for the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) over Death Valley, California, USA, in September 1989. AIRSAR is a four-look, quid-polarizaiton, three frequency instrument. It collects measurements at C-band (5.66 cm), L-band (23.98 cm), and P-band (68.13 cm), and has a GIFOV of 10 meters and a swath width of 12 kilometers. Because the radar measures at three wavelengths, different scales of surface roughness are measured. Also, dielectric constants can be calculated from the data. The scene used in this study is in Death Valley, California and is located over Trail Canyon alluvial fan, the valley floor, and Artists Drive alluvial fan. The fans are very different in mineralogic makeup, size, and surface roughness. Trail Canyon fan is located on the west side of the valley at the base of the Panamint Range and is a large fan with older areas of desert pavement and younger active channels. The source for the material on southern part of the fan is mostly quartzites and there is an area of carbonate source on the northern part of the fan. Artists Drive fan is located at the base of the Black Mountains on the east side of the valley and is a smaller, young fan with its source mostly from volcanic rocks. The valley floor contains playa and salt deposits that range from smooth to Devil's Golf course type salt pinnacles.

  20. A seismic search for the paleoshorelines of Lake Otero beneath White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, P. F.; Reece, R.; Ewing, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Tularosa Basin, which now houses White Sands Dune Field, was once occupied by Pleistocene Lake Otero. Several paleoshorelines of Lake Otero have been identified throughout the basin by field surveys and remote sensing using digital elevation models. Up to four shorelines may be buried beneath White Sands Dune Field and it has been posited that the current upwind margin of White Sands coincides with a one of these shorelines. Here we employ a novel geophysical instrument and method to image the subsurface: the seismic land streamer. The land streamer utilizes weighted base plates and one-component vertical geophones in a towed array. With a seisgun acoustic source, we imaged in the Alkali Flats area near the upwind margin, one potential location of paleoshorelines, as well as the Film Lot closer to the center of the dune field. Surfaces in both locations are indurated gypsum playa, which made seismic imaging possible and successful. We collected one SW-NE trending seismic line at each location, which matches the dominant wind and dune migration directions. Based on initial data analysis we find some subsurface structure that may coincide with the paleo lake bed of Lake Otero. The successful demonstration of this new method provides the foundation for an expanded regional subsurface study to image the strata and structure of the Tularosa Basin.

  1. Evaporites and strata-bound tungsten mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Ririe, G.T. )

    1989-02-01

    Discoidal gypsum crystal cavities occur in quartzites that host varying amounts of strata-bound scheelite mineralization near Halls Creek in Western Australia. The host quartzites have been regionally metamorphosed to greenschist facies and are contained within a Middle Proterozoic sequence that includes pelites, mafic and felsic volcanics, and volcaniclastic rocks. Textural, fluid inclusion, and oxygen isotope data indicate that scheelite was present in the host quartzites prior to regional metamorphism. The presence of crystal cavities after gypsum in the quartzites implies an evaporitic origin for this sequence. The continental-sabkha playa basins of the Mojave Desert, California, are suggested to be possible modern analogs-e.g., Searles Lake, where the tungsten content is up to 70 ppm WO{sub 3} in brines and 118 ppm in muds, and exceeds the amount of tungsten in all known deposits in the United States. Metamorphism of a continental evaporitic sequence containing tungsten could produce an assemblage of rocks very similar to those reported from several stratabound tungsten deposits. Some of these, such as at Halls Creek, may be related to original accumulations of tungsten in nonmarine evaporitic environments.

  2. Estimates of deep drainage rates at the U.S. Department of Energy Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Richmond, M.C.; Wigmosta, M.S.; Kelley, M.E.

    1998-04-01

    In FY 1996, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provided technical assistance to Battelle Columbus Operations (BCO) in their ongoing assessment of contaminant migration at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. The objective of this report is to calculate deep drainage rates at the Pantex Plant. These deep drainage rates may eventually be used to predict contaminant loading to the underlying unconfined aquifer for the Pantex Plant Baseline Risk Assessment. These rates will also be used to support analyses of remedial activities involving surface alterations or the subsurface injection withdrawal of liquids or gases. The scope of this report is to estimate deep drainage rates for the major surface features at the Pantex Plant, including ditches and playas, natural grassland, dryland crop rotation, unvegetated soil, and graveled surfaces. Areas such as Pantex Lake that are outside the main plant boundaries were not included in the analysis. All estimates were derived using existing data or best estimates; no new data were collected. The modeling framework used to estimate the rates is described to enable future correlations, improvements, and enhancements. The scope of this report includes only data gathered during FY 1996. However, a current review of the data gathered on weather, soil, plants, and other information in the time period since did not reveal anything that would significantly alter the results presented in this report.

  3. Helping nuclear power help us

    SciTech Connect

    Schecker, Jay A

    2009-01-01

    After a prolonged absence, the word 'nuclear' has returned to the lexicon of sustainable domestic energy resources. Due in no small part to its demonstrated reliability, nuclear power is poised to playa greater role in the nation's energy future, producing clean, carbon-neutral electricity and contributing even more to our energy security. To nuclear scientists, the resurgence presents an opportunity to inject new technologies into the industry to maximize the benefits that nuclear energy can provide. 'By developing new options for waste management and exploiting new materials to make key technological advances, we can significantly impact the use of nuclear energy in our future energy mix,' says Chris Stanek, a materials scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stanek approaches the big technology challenges by thinking way small, all the way down to the atoms. He and his colleagues are using cutting edge atomic-scale simulations to address a difficult aspect of nuclear waste -- predicting its behavior far into the future. Their research is part of a broader, coordinated effort on the part of the Laboratory to use its considerable experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities to explore advanced materials central to not only waste issues, but to nuclear fuels as well.

  4. Climate change impacts on leatherback turtle pelagic habitat in the Southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis-Norton, Ellen; Hazen, Elliott L.; Fossette, Sabrina; Shillinger, George; Rykaczewski, Ryan R.; Foley, David G.; Dunne, John P.; Bograd, Steven J.

    2015-03-01

    Eastern Pacific populations of the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) have declined by over 90% during the past three decades. The decline is primarily attributed to human pressures, including unsustainable egg harvest, development on nesting beaches, and by-catch mortality. In particular, the effects of climate change may impose additional stresses upon already threatened leatherback populations. This study analyzes how the pelagic habitat of Eastern Pacific leatherbacks may be affected by climate change over the next century. This population adheres to a persistent migration pattern; following nesting at Playa Grande, Costa Rica, individuals move rapidly through equatorial currents and into foraging habitat within the oligotrophic South Pacific Gyre. Forty-six nesting females were fitted with satellite tags. Based on the turtle positions, ten environmental variables were sampled along the tracks. Presence/absence habitat models were created to determine the oceanographic characteristics of the preferred turtle habitat. Core pelagic habitat was characterized by relatively low sea surface temperatures and chlorophyll-a. Based on these habitat models, we predicted habitat change using output from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory prototype Earth System Model under the Special Report on Emissions Scenario A2 (business-as-usual). Although the model predicted both habitat losses and gains throughout the region, we estimated that overall the core pelagic habitat of the Eastern Pacific leatherback population will decline by approximately 15% within the next century. This habitat modification might increase pressure on a critically endangered population, possibly forcing distributional shifts, behavioral changes, or even extinction.

  5. Dark and Bright Albedo Changes in the Wake of a Titan Rainstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Buratti, B. J.; Turtle, E. P.; Bow, J.; Dalba, P. A.; Perry, J.; Rodriguez, S.; LeMouelic, S.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Lorenz, R. D.; Malaska, M. J.; McCord, T. B.; Clark, R. N.; Jaumann, R.; Hayne, P. O.; Nicholson, P. D.; Soderblom, J. M.; Soderblom, L. A.

    2012-10-01

    Turtle et al. (2011) previously announced large-scale surface changes in Titan's tropics following a 2010 September cloudburst event. Those changes were areas that had darkened, and the darkening was attributed to surface wetting by rain. Here we will discuss the results of continued monitoring of the darkened areas by Cassini VIMS and ISS. These new observations show that instead of reverting to their previous state, the rain-darkened areas instead brightened beyond their original albedos starting a few months after the cloudburst event. The brightening was unexpected, and spectra show that it occurs in each of Titan's atmospheric wavelength windows. The brightened spectra show some similarity to he heretofore unique signature of Xanadu. The areas slowly revert to their original spectra over a period of a year. The two hypotheses that we have not eliminated involve (1) volatile frosts resulting from evaporative cooling of rain-derived surface methane that later sublime, (2) deposition of a thin surface layer of very-fine-grained particles (similar to terrestrial playa lakes) that degrade due to aeolean erosion. Future calculations and observations will serve to constrain the mechanism that drives the brightening.

  6. X-Ray Fingerprinting Techniques for Recognizing A Hydrological Role in the Formation of Minerals on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Ellen P.; John, R.

    1999-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the ability of a miniaturized XRD-XRF instrument to perform in-situ analyses without sample preparation or acquisition. Deployment of this instrument on a Martian rover will allow a large number of rapid qualitative analyses, which will maximize the diversity of samples studied and selected for possible return. As a first step in designing a decision tree for recognizing minerals in complex mixtures, d spacings were plotted against intensity for several mineral groups comprising rock and soil types inferred for the surface of Mars (weathered basalt, playa and hydrothermal deposits, clay-rich soils). In all groups, d spacings cluster in a range from about 1-4 angstroms, which can under certain circumstances obscure patterns for individual phases. However, within the silicate family, minerals containing either bound OH- or molecules of H20 (clays, micas, amphiboles, zeolites) are characterized by a shift of peaks to higher d spacings. Large d spacings (greater than about 7 angstroms) thus act as a first-order filter for distinguishing hydrous from anhydrous silicates. The ability to quickly verify the presence of silicates that have interacted with water has important implications for using mineral chemistry and structure to help decipher the hydrologic and atmospheric history of Mars. This represents a beginning for developing more sophisticated methods of pattern recognition. These will combine XRD and XRF analyses with optical data to rapidly7 discern environmentally diagnostic assemblages without the necessity of identifying every peak individual mineral phase.

  7. Advanced reservoir characterization for improved oil recovery in a New Mexico Delaware basin project

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.D.; Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County, New Mexico is a field demonstration site in the Department of Energy Class III program. The basic problem at the Nash Draw Pool is the low recovery typically observed in similar Delaware fields. By comparing a control area using standard infill drilling techniques to a pilot area developed using advanced reservoir characterization methods, the goal of the project is to demonstrate that advanced technology can significantly improve oil recovery. During the first year of the project, four new producing wells were drilled, serving as data acquisition wells. Vertical seismic profiles and a 3-D seismic survey were acquired to assist in interwell correlations and facies prediction. Limited surface access at the Nash Draw Pool, caused by proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes, limits development with conventional drilling. Combinations of vertical and horizontal wells combined with selective completions are being evaluated to optimize production performance. Based on the production response of similar Delaware fields, pressure maintenance is a likely requirement at the Nash Draw Pool. A detailed reservoir model of pilot area was developed, and enhanced recovery options, including waterflooding, lean gas, and carbon dioxide injection, are being evaluated.

  8. High-resolution topography along surface rupture of the 16 October 1999 Hector Mine, California (Mw 7.1) from airborne laser swath mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudnutt, K.W.; Borsa, A.; Glennie, C.; Minster, J.-B.

    2002-01-01

    In order to document surface rupture associated with the Hector Mine earthquake, in particular, the area of maximum slip and the deformed surface of Lavic Lake playa, we acquired high-resolution data using relatively new topographic-mapping methods. We performed a raster-laser scan of the main surface breaks along the entire rupture zone, as well as along an unruptured portion of the Bullion fault. The image of the ground surface produced by this method is highly detailed, comparable to that obtained when geologists make particularly detailed site maps for geomorphic or paleoseismic studies. In this case, however, for the first time after a surface-rupturing earthquake, the detailed mapping is along the entire fault zone rather than being confined to selected sites. These data are geodetically referenced, using the Global Positioning System, thus enabling more accurate mapping of the rupture traces. In addition, digital photographs taken along the same flight lines can be overlaid onto the precise topographic data, improving terrain visualization. We demonstrate the potential of these techniques for measuring fault-slip vectors.

  9. Calcic, gypsic, and siliceous soil chronosequences in arid and semiarid environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, J.W.; Taylor, E.M.; Reheis, M.C.; McFadden, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    We studied three soil chronosequences in the western USA to compare the development of calcic, gypsic, and siliceous soils through time. We compared calcic soils from the Silver Lake playa, southeastern California, gypsic-calcic soils from the Kane Fans in Big Horn County, Wyoming, and siliceous-calcic soils from Forty-mile Wash in southwestern Nevada. In these areas, carbonate, gypsum, and opaline silica appear to be derived primarily from eolian additions and, in advanced stages typical of old soils, are dissolved and precipitated as diagnostic calcic or petrocalcic, gypsic or petrogypsic, and duripan soil horizons. These three precipitates produce somewhat similar morphologic characteristics through time. Morphological stages progress from discrete coatings under clasts, to matrix and around clasts, to significant coatings of clasts and cementation of matrix, to laminar caps above plugged horizons in cases of carbonate and silica. Significant differences among the three soil types include development of color, change of pH, and the depth to which the precipitates begin to accumulate. The tops of gypsic horizons occur below the tops of calcic horizons in simple leaching regimes; the depth to the tops of siliceous horizons is more closely related to the presence and development of argillic horizons.

  10. Springtime Dust Aerosols at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, C. F.; Yee, Y.; Gill, T. E.; Ruiz, A.; Emmert, S. P.; Cahill, T. A.; Wilson, F.; Ellison, E.

    2005-12-01

    Windblown dust can reduce visibility and create a health hazard. Current dust models, such as CARMA, are used to predict the atmospheric dust aerosol loading during dust storms. However, size-fractionated aerosol measurements are needed to improve and validate the aerosol generation portions of the models. Therefore, from April 19 through May 23, 2005, two size-fractionated (8 size bins between 10 and 0.07 microns in aerodynamic diameter) drum aerosol impactors were deployed on and downwind of a playa at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico to collect aerosol samples to help determine the size and amount of dust particles generated as a function of wind speed. The aerosol samplers were co-located with meteorological sensors and passive blowing dust/sand collectors. The meteorological data for the sampling period, including wind speed and direction, were provided by the Meteorological Division of the White Sands Missile Range. The mass, elemental composition and optical absorption of the aerosols collected during the study are correlated with wind speed and other meteorological parameters to determine the emission, as a function of size, of dust aerosols at different wind speeds. This data will be used to initialize and/or validate dust models, calculate the visibility degradation associated with a given aerosol loading, and help predict the effects of dust aerosols on humans.

  11. Reynolds Number Effects on Boundary Layer Streamwise Velocity Statistics and Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, M.; Atzet, I.; Klewicki, J.

    2003-11-01

    Well-resolved streamwise velocity data were recently obtained in a turbulent boundary layer at R_θ ≈ 5 × 10^6. Hot-wire anemometry experiments were performed on the salt playa of Utah's western desert under conditions of near-neutral thermal stability, as verified by the Monin-Obukhov length. A distinction of the present data is the use of 20 simultaneously sampled hot-wires to cover a wall normal distance (inner normalized) spanning 5≤ y^+ ≤ 10^4. Because of inherent temporal variations in the atmosphere, simultaneous data are needed to clarify trends in the statistical profiles. The present atmospheric results are compared with wind tunnel data acquired in the range 2500 ≤ R_θ ≤ 1.5×10^4. In all cases, the inner normalized wire length is less than 10. The inner normalized mean profile at high R_θ exhibit a logarithmic region with an inverse slope less than the typical value of κ=0.41, observed at lower R_θ. Evidence for a secondary peak in the inner normalized rms profile is observed near y^+=550 at R_θ ≈ 5 × 10^6. The variation of intermediate length and time scales (Taylor microscales) as a function of Reynolds number and distance from the wall is also presented.

  12. Deuterium content of water from wells and perennial springs, southeastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleason, J.D.; Veronda, Guida; Smith, G.I.; Friedman, Irving; Martin, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The areal distribution of the concentrations of the stable isotopes deuterium and oxygen-18 in ground water in southeastern California is depicted and evaluated in this report. The deuterium content of about 300 ground-water samples and the oxygen-18 content of 101 of these samples are presented. Thirty-two of the samples were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1977–78 as part of a study to determine the mineral and brine potential of playa lakes in selected basins in southeastern California. Most of the remaining samples were collected during the winters and springs of 1981 and 1982 as part of the Climate Change Program of the Geological Survey. Selected additional samples were collected through 1986. Stable-isotope data from three previous studies also have been included. These data are for 19 samples from the Coso thermal area east of the southern Sierra Nevada (Fournier and Thompson, 1980, tables 1,2), 5 samples from areas in Nevada just east of Death Valley (Winograd and Friedman, 1972, table 1), and 9 samples from the Imperial Valley (Coplen, 1971, table 1). Also presented for comparison are weighted averages of deuterium content of recent precipitation collected for this report at 32 stations over the 7-year period from April 1982 to April 1989 (Irving Friedman and G.I. Smith, U.S. Geological Survey, written commun., 1989).

  13. Paleogeographic and paleotectonic development of Laramide basins of SW Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstrand, P.M. )

    1993-04-01

    Initial Laramide-style deformation in SW Utah began in latest Cretaceous (late Campanian or Maastrichtian) time during deposition of the conglomeratic Canaan Peak Formation (TKcp) which thins onto a broad arch located on the northern Paunsaugunt Plateau (Paunsaugunt upwarp). This NNE-SSW trending upward affected sediment dispersal patterns during the early Paleocene and was the southern basin margin for braided fluvial sediments of the Grand Castle Formation (Tgc). These sediments were shed SE, from the inactive Sevier highlands, as far east as the Table Cliff Plateau. Laramide deformation increased during the late( ) Paleocene, after deposition of the Tgc, with the formation of at least two closed basins. During the late( ) Paleocene, the Johns Valley and Upper Valley anticlines, and Circle Cliff Uplift developed with sediment being shed to the SE, E, and SW into the Pine Hollow basin. During initial development of the Pine Hollow basin, the underlying TKcp and Tgc were reworked into the basal Pine Hollow Formation. Small alluvial fans bounded the basin, grading laterally into low-energy fluvial, playa mudflat, and ephemeral lacustrine environments. The basal Claron Formation represents a broad, closed basin that initially developed during the later Paleocene to the SW of the Pine Hollow basin. The Claron basin was bordered by low relief uplands, fluvial floodplains, and calcrete paleosols to the north and moderate relief uplands to the west and east. Shallow lacustrine deposition occurred to the south. Lacustrine onlap of Laramide structures by middle Eocene suggests cessation of Laramide deformation by this time.

  14. Detecting surface roughness effects on the atmospheric boundary layer via AIRSAR data: A field experiment in Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumberg, Dan G.; Greeley, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    The part of the troposphere influenced by the surface of the earth is termed the atmospheric boundary layer. Flow within this layer is influenced by the roughness of the surface; rougher surfaces induce more turbulence than smoother surfaces and, hence, higher atmospheric transfer rates across the surface. Roughness elements also shield erodible particles, thus decreasing the transport of windblown particles. Therefore, the aerodynamic roughness length (z(sub 0)) is an important parameter in aeolian and atmospheric boundary layer processes as it describes the aerodynamic properties of the underlying surface. z(sub 0) is assumed to be independent of wind velocity or height, and dependent only on the surface topography. It is determined using in situ measurements of the wind speed distribution as a function of height. For dry, unvegetated soils the intensity of the radar backscatter (sigma(sup 0)) is affected primarily by surface roughness at a scale comparable with the radar wavelength. Thus, both wind and radar respond to surface roughness variations on a scale of a few meters or less. Greeley showed the existence of a correlation between z(sub 0) and sigma(sup 0). This correlation was based on measurements over lava flows, alluvial fans, and playas in the southwest deserts of the United States. It is shown that the two parameters behave similarly also when there are small changes over a relatively homogeneous surface.

  15. Use of radar to assess aeolian processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Lancaster, N.; Gaddis, L.; Blumberg, D.; Debrovolskis, A.; Saunders, R. S.; Wall, S.; Iversen, J. D.; White, B.; Rasmussen, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction between wind and desert surfaces has important implications for sediment transport on Earth, Mars, and Venus, and for understanding the relationship between radar backscatter and aerodynamic roughness. Here, researchers report results from measurements of atmospheric boundary layer profiles, assessment of radar backscatter at P, L, and C wavelengths, and surface roughness in Death Valley, the Mojave Desert, and Lunar Lake, NV, and discuss the implications for aeolian process. The sites include playas, gravel and sand regs, alluvial fans, and lava flows. Boundary layer wind profiles were measured using anemometers at heights of 0.75, 1.25, 2.07, 3.44, 5.72, and 9.5 m; temperature sensors at heights of 1.3 and 9.6 m; and wind vanes at 9.7 and 1.5 m. Microtopographic measurements were made using a template and a laser-photo device to obtain RMS height. This study demonstrates that radar backscatter coefficients obtained from airborne and perhaps orbiting instruments could permit the derivation of aerodynamic roughness values for large areas. Such values, when combined with wind frequency data, could enable assessment of aeolian processes on a regional scale.

  16. First occurrence of tetrapod footprints from the continental Triassic of the Sidi Said Maachou area (Western Meseta, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hminna, Abdelkbir; Voigt, Sebastian; Klein, Hendrik; Saber, Hafid; Schneider, Jörg W.; Hmich, Driss

    2013-04-01

    The Sidi Said Maachou area in the Moroccan western Meseta preserves a succession, up to 400 m thick, of hitherto poorly studied continental Triassic deposits. Recent detailed geological mapping proposes a lithostratigraphic subdivision of the predominantly red-coloured siliciclastic deposits into three formations. Laminated mudstones and fine-grained sandstones in the upper part of the Oued Oum Er Rbiaa Formation have the most interesting fossil content including plant impressions, rhizoliths, fish scales, and invertebrate and vertebrate traces. These biogenic remains are partially associated with tool marks, microbially induced sedimentary structures, oscillation ripples, desiccation cracks, and halite pseudomorphs, suggesting sedimentation in a playa-like, fluvio-lacustrine system under semiarid conditions. All tetrapod footprints from these beds are assigned to Brachychirotherium parvum and indistinguishable from other occurrences of the ichnogenus in Central Europe and North America. Supposed trackmakers are archosaurs of the crocodile stem-group (Crurotarsi) that were widely spread over Triassic Pangaea. Because Brachychirotherium is only known from Late Triassic (Carnian-Rhaetian) deposits, the same age is attributed to the footprint horizon of the Oued Oum Er Rbiaa Formation. This is the first record of Brachychirotherium on the African continent and the first record of Triassic tetrapod footprints in Morocco outside of the High Atlas.

  17. Comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer data for the Cuprite mining district, Esmeralda, and Nye counties, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1989-01-01

    Landsat TM images and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data were analyzed for the Cuprite mining district and compared to available geologic and alteration maps of the area. The TM data, with 30 m resolution and 6 broadbands, allowed discrimination of general mineral groups. Clay minerals, playa deposits, and unaltered rocks were mapped as discrete spectral units using the TM data, but specific minerals were not determined, and definition of the individual alteration zones was not possible. The GERIS, with 15 m spatial resolution and 63 spectral bands, permitted construction of complete spectra and identification of specific minerals. Detailed spectra extracted from the images provided the ability to identify the minerals alunite, kaolinite, hematite, and buddingtonite by their spectral characteristics. The GERIS data show a roughly concentrically zoned hydrothermal system. The mineralogy mapped with the aircraft system conforms to previous field and multispectral image mapping. However, identification of individual minerals and spatial display of the dominant mineralogy add information that can be used to help determine the morphology and genetic origin of the hydrothermal system.

  18. Great Salt Lake, and precursors, Utah: The last 30,000 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, R.J.; Baedecker, M.J.; Eugster, H.P.; Forester, R.M.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Jones, B.F.; Kelts, K.; McKenzie, J.; Madsen, D.B.; Rettig, S.L.; Rubin, M.; Bowser, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    Sediment cores up to 6.5 m in length from the South Arm of Great Salt Lake, Utah, have been correlated. Radiocarbon ages and volcanic tephra layers indicate a record of greater than 30,000 years. A variety of approaches have been employed to collect data used in stratigraphic correlation and lake elevation interpretation; these include acoustic stratigraphy, sedimentologic analyses, mineralogy, geochemistry (major element, C, O and S isotopes, and organics), paleontology and pollen. The results indicate that prior to 32,000 year B.P. an ephemeral saline lake-playa system was present in the basin. The perennial lake, which has occupied the basin since this time, rose in a series of three major steps; the freshest water conditions and presumably highest altitude was reached at about 17,000 year B.P. The lake remained fresh for a brief period, followed by a rapid increase in salinity and sharp lowering in elevation to levels below that of the present Great Salt Lake. The lake remained at low elevations, and divided at times into a north and south Basin, until about 8,000 year B.P. Since that time, with the exception of two short rises to about 1290 m, the lake level has remained near the present elevation of 1280 m. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Oxychlorine Detections on Mars: Implications for Cl Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Jackson, W. A.; Ming, D. W.; Archer, P. D.; Stern, J. C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Gellert, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument has detected evolved O2 and HCl indicating the presence of perchlorate and/or chlorate (oxychlorine) in all 11 sediments analyzed to date. The hyperarid martian climate is believed to have allowed accumulation of oxychlorine and assumed chloride contents similar to those in hyperarid terrestrial settings. The linear correlation of oxychlorine and chloride of Gale Crater sediments is low (r (sup 2) equals 0.64). Correlations present in hyperarid Antarctica and the Atacama Desert are attributed to unaltered atmospheric source coupled with minimal redox cycling by biological activity. Terrestrial semi-arid to arid settings have low correlations similar to Gale Crater and are attributed to additional inputs of Cl minus from sea salt, dust, and/or proximal playa settings, and possible reduction of oxychlorine phases during wetter periods. While microbiological processes could contribute to low oxychlorine/chloride correlations on Mars, several abiotic mechanisms are more likely, such as changing oxychlorine production rates with time and/or post-depositional geochemical redox processes that altered the Gale Crater oxychlorine and chloride contents.

  20. Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. Part I. Geology and geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, D.H.; Welch, A.H.; Maurer, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to the low thermal diffusivity of upland areas caused by low moisture content. Surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Towards quantifying fuzzy stream power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanghart, W.; Korup, O.

    2012-04-01

    Deterministic flow direction algorithms such as the D8 have wide application in numerical models of landscape evolution. These simple algorithms play a central role in quantifying drainage basin area, and hence approximating—via empirically derived relationships from regional flood frequency and hydraulic geometry—stream power or fluvial erosion potential. Here we explore how alternative algorithms that employ a probabilistic choice of flow direction affect quantitative estimates of stream power. We test a probabilistic multi-flow direction algorithm within the MATLAB TopoToolbox in model and real landscapes of low topographic relief and minute gradients, where potentially fuzzy drainage divides are dictated by, among others, alluvial fan dynamics, playa infill, and groundwater fluxes and seepage. We employ a simplistic numerical landscape evolution model that simulates fluvial incision and hillslope diffusion and explicitly models the existence and capture of endorheic basins that prevail in (semi-)arid, low-relief landscapes. We discuss how using this probabilistic multi-flow direction algorithm helps represent and quantify uncertainty about spatio-temporal drainage divide locations and how this bears on quantitative estimates of downstream stream power and fluvial erosion potential as well as their temporal dynamics.

  2. Methodology for the quantitative exploration for sites for salinity-gradient solar ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, J.A.; Goodell, P.C.; Swift, A.

    1996-12-31

    Salinity-gradient solar pond (SGSP) energy production is one of the proven solar energy technologies, however only in several instances have these ponds yet proven to be economically competitive. Electricity generation, water desalination, medium grade industrial heat production, and hydrometallurgy have been successfully demonstrated, however, on the whole the technology is seeking a niche within which to thrive and develop. The present study provides a rational basis for the selection of new SGSP sites, and a methodology has been developed to consider the multitudinous variables necessary in such a decision. Twenty physical criteria are considered in SGSP site selection. Four value and seven cost criteria have been considered in the present study. Large values of F correlate with the more favorable SGSP sites. This methodology has been applied to over 100 sites in west Texas and eastern New Mexico. Sites tested include playa lakes, salt lakes, artificial lakes, and empty ground, located both near and distal from active industrial sites in the region. Distance to potential energy user is of great importance. Hydrometallurgical processes may benefit from a SGSP during sodium sulfate production. Salt is also such an important driver in the favorability index that certain industries result with high values. Notable are the nuclear waste storage facility at the WIPP site and the potash mining industry in the Potash Enclave, where salt is a waste product of their activities.

  3. Vernal pool hydroperiod: simulations of long-term dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyke, C. R.; Chadwick, O.

    2001-12-01

    Vernal pools are shallow, seasonal wetlands formed by the accumulation of seasonal rains on impermeable substrates. Vernal pools are part of a large set of ephemeral wetlands including prairie potholes, karst sinks, playa lakes, and savanna rain-pools. Research has shown the ecological importance of hydroperiod in the species richness of crustacean communities, the persistence and spatial distribution of amphibians, and plant community composition. Despite the well-known ecological importance of vernal pool hydroperiod, existing observational records are very short (typically < 5 years), unreplicated, and frequently lost in the informal gray literature. These issues suggest the need for a process-based model of vernal pool hydroperiod that can be applied to hind-cast historical patterns of hydroperiod variability based on meteorological records. This research developed a water balanced-based model for the simulation of vernal pool hydrology based on historical meteorological records for coastal vernal pools in Santa Barbara, California. Stochastic weather generation was also applied to evaluate the potential statistical distribution of vernal pool hydroperiod over long periods of time. The model suggests that hydroperiod is particularly sensitive to maximum pool depth, soil thickness, and soil water holding capacity. Results suggest that combinations of these factors can change flooding duration and return interval by more than 50% under identical weather conditions. These findings have significant implications for wetland restoration and management.

  4. Predicting the roughness length of turbulent flows over landscapes with multi-scale microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Field, Jason P.

    2016-05-01

    The fully rough form of the law of the wall is commonly used to quantify velocity profiles and associated bed shear stresses in fluvial, aeolian, and coastal environments. A key parameter in this law is the roughness length, z0. Here we propose a predictive formula for z0 that uses the amplitude and slope of each wavelength of microtopography within a discrete-Fourier-transform-based approach. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is used to quantify the effective z0 value of sinusoidal microtopography as a function of the amplitude and slope. The effective z0 value of landscapes with multi-scale roughness is then given by the sum of contributions from each Fourier mode of the microtopography. Predictions of the equation are tested against z0 values measured in ˜ 105 wind-velocity profiles from southwestern US playa surfaces. Our equation is capable of predicting z0 values to 50 % accuracy, on average, across a 4 order of magnitude range. We also use our results to provide an alternative formula that, while somewhat less accurate than the one obtained from a full multi-scale analysis, has an advantage of being simpler and easier to apply.

  5. Facies analysis of Tertiary basin-filling rocks of the Death Valley regional ground-water system and surrounding areas, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Fridrich, Christopher J.; Taylor, Emily

    2001-01-01

    Existing hydrologic models of the Death Valley region typically have defined the Cenozoic basins as those areas that are covered by recent surficial deposits, and have treated the basin-fill deposits that are concealed under alluvium as a single unit with uniform hydrologic properties throughout the region, and with depth. Although this latter generalization was known to be flawed, it evidently was made because available geologic syntheses did not provide the basis for a more detailed characterization. As an initial attempt to address this problem, this report presents a compilation and synthesis of existing and new surface and subsurface data on the lithologic variations between and within the Cenozoic basin fills of this region. The most permeable lithologies in the Cenozoic basin fills are freshwater limestones, unaltered densely welded tuffs, and little-consolidated coarse alluvium. The least permeable lithologies are playa claystones, altered nonwelded tuffs, and tuffaceous and clay-matrix sediments of several types. In all but the youngest of the basin fills, permeability probably decreases strongly with depth owing to a typically increasing abundance of volcanic ash or clay in the matrices of the clastic sediments with increasing age (and therefore with increasing depth in general), and to increasing consolidation and alteration (both hydrothermal and diagenetic) with increasing depth and age. This report concludes with a categorization of the Cenozoic basins of the Death Valley region according to the predominant lithologies in the different basin fills and presents qualitative constraints on the hydrologic properties of these major lithologic categories.

  6. Meridiani Planum and the global hydrology of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C.; Phillips, Roger J.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2007-03-01

    The Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover found evidence for groundwater activity in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars in the form of aeolian and fluvial sediments composed of sulphate-rich grains. These sediments appear to have experienced diagenetic modification in the presence of a fluctuating water table. In addition to the extensive secondary aqueous alteration, the primary grains themselves probably derive from earlier playa evaporites. Little is known, however, about the hydrologic processes responsible for this environmental history-particularly how such extensive evaporite deposits formed in the absence of a topographic basin. Here we investigate the origin of these deposits, in the context of the global hydrology of early Mars, using numerical simulations, and demonstrate that Meridiani is one of the few regions of currently exposed ancient crust predicted to have experienced significant groundwater upwelling and evaporation. The global groundwater flow would have been driven primarily by precipitation-induced recharge and evaporative loss, with the formation of the Tharsis volcanic rise possibly playing a role through the burial of aquifers and induced global deformation. These results suggest that the deposits formed as a result of sustained groundwater upwelling and evaporation, rather than ponding within an enclosed basin. The evaporite formation coincided with a transition to more arid conditions that increased the relative impact of a deep-seated, global-scale hydrology on the surface evolution.

  7. Groundwater evaporation from salt pans: Examples from the eastern Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Stephan; Horovitz, Marcel; Rausch, Randolf; Michelsen, Nils; Mallast, Ulf; Köhne, Maximilian; Siebert, Christian; Schüth, Christoph; Al-Saud, Mohammed; Merz, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    The major groundwater resources of the Arabian Peninsula are stored in the large sedimentary basins in its eastern part. Evaporation from continental salt pans (playas) is an important process in water resources assessments of its upper principal aquifers - the Upper Mega Aquifer system - as it constitutes a significant sink. However, literature values on evaporation rates vary widely and usually report about coastal salt pans where seawater evaporation is assumed. The present study applies different methods to provide a comprehensive picture of groundwater evaporation from salt pans of the Upper Mega Aquifer system. A remote sensing approach provided the spatial distribution and total salt pan area of about 36,500 km2. Hydrochemical and isotopic investigations revealed that from about 10% (3600 km2 ± 1600 km2) of the mapped salt pan area seawater evaporates. To estimate the groundwater evaporation rate from continental salt pans a laboratory column experiment was set up, implying a mean annual evaporation rate of about 42 mm ± 13 mm. In-situ analysis of water table fluctuations in the field suggested about 3 mm a-1 originate from recently infiltrated rainwater leading to an annual net groundwater evaporation of 39 mm ± 13 mm. Relating this number to the mapped salt pan area, from which groundwater evaporates, provides a total annual groundwater loss of 1.3 km3 ± 0.5 km3 for the Upper Mega Aquifer system.

  8. Population structure of the snail Buccinanops globulosum (Prosobranchia, Nassariidae) in San Matías Gulf, Patagonia Argentina: Isolated enclaves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narvarte, Maite; Willers, Valeria; Avaca, María Soledad; Echave, María Eugenia

    2008-10-01

    In San Matías Gulf (Patagonia, Argentina), Buccinanops globulosum is typically distributed in two different areas: the intertidal-subtidal zone of Playa Villarino, where conch length reaches up to 60 mm, and the inner channel of San Antonio Bay, where individuals are not larger than 30 mm. It is suggested that both populations of B. globulosum constitute independent enclaves adapted to the local conditions and with a different population structure. This comparative study focuses on the population structure, sex ratios, growth, and size at maturity at the two sites. The data collected reveal that the individuals in San Antonio ranged from 5 to 29 mm whereas those in Villarino ranged from 4 to 61 mm. It was also observed that in San Antonio Bay, generally males outnumbered females whereas exactly the opposite occurred in Villarino. In addition, females were larger and showed a faster growth than males in both study areas. The number of egg capsules on each female ranged from 8 to 25 in San Antonio Bay and from 5 to 66 in Villarino. Size at maturity of females in San Antonio Bay was estimated at 14.47 mm and maximum estimated length at 6 years old was 33 mm. The same parameters in the individuals from Villarino were 45 and 65 mm, respectively. The comparative analysis of the above-mentioned features poses the question of whether these two populations represent either different species or different forms of the same species.

  9. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and luminescence geochronology of the northeastern Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, S.A.; Miller, D.M.; Menges, C.M.; Yount, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The chronology of the Holocene and late Pleistocene deposits of the northeastern Mojave Desert have been largely obtained using radiocarbon ages. Our study refines and extends this framework using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to date deposits from Valjean Valley, Silurian Lake Playa, Red Pass, and California Valley. Of particular interest are eolian fine silts incorporated in ground-water discharge (GWD) deposits bracketed at 185-140 and 20-50 ka. Alluvial fan deposits proved amenable for OSL by dating both eolian sand lenses and reworked eolian sand in a matrix of gravel that occurs within the fan stratigraphy. Lacustrine sand in spits and bars also yielded acceptable OSL ages. These OSL ages fill gaps in the geochronology of desert deposits, which can provide data relevant to understanding the responses of several depositional systems to regional changes in climate. This study identifies the most promising deposits for future luminescence dating and suggests that for several regions of the Mojave Desert, sediments from previously undated landforms can be more accurately placed within correct geologic map units.

  10. Airborne Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD) luminescence imaging systems and its application to exploration problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Robert D.; Theisen, Arnold F.; Hemphill, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments with an imaging airborne Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD) are being conducted to establish the feasibility of delineating the areal extent of luminescent materials on the earth's surface from aircraft and spacecraft. All luminescence measurements are related to a standard set of conditions with rhodamine wt dye used as a reference standard. The FLD has a minimum detectable rhodamine wt concentration of 0.1 parts per billion (ppb) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 5.0. Luminescence, when expressed in a signal-to-noise ratio (R) is related to equivalent ppb rhodamine wt through the relationship ppb=(0.1R-0.4). Luminescent materials imaged from an aircraft altitude of approximately 2400 m above terrain include fluorite in association with molybdenum, Pinenut Mountains, Nevada (R=62.0); mineralized playas, Claunch, New Mexico (R=960.0); uranium and vanadium-bearing outcrops, Big Indian Valley, Utah (R=105.0); uranophane sandstones, Sandia Mountains, New Mexico (R=60.0); phosphate outcrops, Pine Mountain, California (R=76.0); and marine oil slicks, Santa Barbara Channel, California (R=24.0). Correlation between the amount of fluorite in the rocks and soils of the Pinenut Mountains and luminescence, measured by the FLD, is as high as 0.88 at the 95 percent confidence level.

  11. Age, palaeoenvironments, and climatic significance of late Pleistocene Konya lake, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Neil

    1983-03-01

    The Konya Basin, a closed depression at the southern margin of the Anatolian Plateau, contained a shallow but extensive lake during the late Quaternary. Nearshore sands and gravels containing Dreissena shells form prominent depositional terraces around the basin edges at elevations between 1005 and 1020 m, and the highest has been dated at more than 30,000 yr B.P. The last major phase of limnic sedimentation occurred between 23,000 and 17,000 yr B.P., after which the lake fragmented into a number of subbasins or secondary depressions which evolved to become either marshes or playas. A final expansion of these residual lakes has been dated to ca. 11,000 yr B.P. in one secondary depression. Archaeological and other evidence indicate that only minor lake-level fluctuations occurred during the Holocene. The dominant sedimentary process over the last 10,000 years has been alluviation at the basin margin. The Konya sequence confirms that the most recent period of high-lake levels in the northern Near East was of the last glacial age. The palaeolakes of Anatolia and Iran were, however, more a product of reduced evaporation brought about by temperature depression than of changes in precipitation, and thus belie their often-used description as an indicator of "pluvial" climatic conditions.

  12. Groundwater dynamic, temperature and salinity response to the tide in Patagonian marshes: Observations on a coastal wetland in San José Gulf, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, María del Pilar; Carol, Eleonora; Hernández, Mario A.; Bouza, Pablo J.

    2015-10-01

    The processes regulating the relationship between tidal flows and shallow groundwater dynamics, temperature and salinity in a coastal wetland in an arid climate are analysed in a detailed field study carried out in the marsh located at Playa Fracasso (Argentina). The continuous records of groundwater level, temperature and electrical conductivity from a transect perpendicular to the coastline were studied during a period ranging from summer to winter, together with the information obtained in hydrogeomorphological field surveys and soil profiles. An assessment of the processes conditioning marsh hydrology was carried out contemplating seasonal (summer-winter) and periodical variations caused by tidal flows. The study showed that the dynamics of groundwater in relation to tidal flows depends almost exclusively on the infiltration of tidal water when the marsh is flooded during spring tides (syzygy), with an increase in the groundwater discharge level at the onset of syzygy. The differences in temperature between sea and continental water were very useful in defining the origin of the different contributions. Groundwater salinity is mainly associated with the leaching of the soil salts that enter with the sea water infiltrating during flood events. The presence of saline soils in the marsh is regulated by the evapotranspiration predominating in arid zones. The conceptual hydrological model suggested may help in the understanding of the hydrological processes in other similar marshes of Patagonia, as well as in coastal wetlands of arid zones worldwide.

  13. Giant desiccation fissures filled with calcareous eolian sand, Hermosa Formation (Pennsylvanian), southeastern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, David B.; Haverland, Zsolt E.

    1988-04-01

    At two stratigraphic intervals within the upper member of the Upper Pennsylvanian Hermosa Formation, calcareous eolian sand fills downward-tapering fissures that are as much as 18 cm wide and 5.7 m deep. Fissure fillings define orthogonal polygons 10 m or more in diameter. One of the host beds is primarily composed of subtidally deposited limestone, the other is a thinly laminated, nonmarine red siltstone. Both systems of fissure fillings are directly overlain and underlain by large-scale cross-stratified, calcareous eolianites. The limestone host bed contains chert pseudomorphs after gypsum. Compaction of host rocks contorted fissure fillings and caused doming of eolian strata over each fissure. Platy mineral grains in fissure fillings are aligned subparallel to bedding in the host rocks, supporting the view that the fissures were passively filled rather than forcefully injected. These ancient fissure systems are similar in scale and pattern to those that define giant desiccation polygons in numerous Great Basin playas. The Pennsylvanian fissures, like their Holocene counterparts, probably formed when groundwater tables dropped from shallow levels within fine-grained, impermeable deposits into underlying aquifers, greatly decreasing the extent of the capillary fringe. Our study of the fissures and host rocks supports the hypothesis that carbonate grains within the eolianites were deflated from uncemented marine sediments that were broadly exposed during regressive intervals.

  14. On the Causes of and Long Term Changes in Eurasian Heat Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried; Wang, Hailan; Koster, Randal; Suarez, Max

    2012-01-01

    The MERRA reanalysis, other observations, and the GEOS-S model have been used to diagnose the causes of Eurasian heat waves including the recent extreme events that occurred in Europe during 2003 and in Russia during 2010. The results show that such extreme events are an amplification of natural patterns of atmospheric variability (in this case a particular large-scale atmospheric planetary wave) that develop over the Eurasian continent as a result of internal atmospheric forcing. The amplification occurs when the wave occasionally becomes locked in place for several weeks to months resulting in extreme heat and drying with the location depending on the phase of the upper atmospheric wave. Model experiments suggest that forcing from both the ocean (SST) and land playa role phase-locking the waves. An ensemble of very long GEOS-S model simulations (spanning the 20th century) forced with observed SST and greenhouse gases show that the model is capable of generating very similar heat waves, and that they have become more extreme in the last thirty years as a result of the overall warming of the Asian continent.

  15. [Fishery and biology of Rhinobatospercellens (Rajiformes: Rhinobatidae) caught by the artisanal fishery at La Pared beach, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Tagliafico, Alejandro; Rago, Néstor; Rangel, Maria Salomé

    2013-03-01

    R. percellens is incidentally caught in Venezuela by the artisanal fishery using bottom gillnets. This species was classified by the IUCN as being "near threatened", and there is poor knowledge about its biology and fishery in Venezuela. For this reason, we analyzed the specimens caught by the artisanal fleet in playa La Pared, once a week, from January to December 2007. We determined total length, sex and maturity for each captured specimen. A total of 210 specimens were analyzed, 159 females and 51 males. The 81% of all specimens caught were adults, but within this group 27% were pregnant. The average size of sexual maturity was found between 51 and 52cm for females and males, respectively. Adult females were found all year round, and pregnant females in seven of the months sampled; highest numbers were found between February-March and September. The analyzed females had a total of 96 embryos with a size range between 2 and 19cm, with a maximum fertility of four embryos per litter. February and June-July showed the maximum breeding time, and considering the broad range of embryos sizes and the frequency of pregnant females along the different months, allow us to believe that they reproduce throughout the year. Fishing regulation including minimum catch size in relation to maturity length and release of pregnant females in water is recommended. PMID:23894969

  16. High-precision provenance determination using detrital-zircon ages and petrography of Quaternary sands on the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, J.K.; Link, P.K.; Fanning, C.M.

    1999-04-01

    The Big Lost trough is an upper Pliocene to Holocene sedimentary basin containing volcanic sills in the northeastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The basin receives sediment primarily from Basin and Range fluvial systems of the Big Lost River, Little Lost River, and Birch Creek. The Big Lost trough contains a >200-m-thick succession of lacustrine, fluvial, eolian, and playa sediments, recording high-frequency Quaternary climatic fluctuations interbedded with basalt flows. Alternating deposition of clay-rich lacustrine sediments and sandy fluvial and eolian sediments in the central part of the basin was in response to the interaction of fluvial and eolian systems with Pleistocene Lake Terreton. The source areas for modern sands from the fluvial systems can be differentiated by using both petrography and U/Pb age spectra from detrital-zircon populations. Provenance data from subsurface sands indicate that the Big Lost trough was supplied with sand largely deposited by the Big Lost River, with local redeposition by eolian processes, similar to the modern depositional system. Provenance and stratigraphic data suggest that during Pleistocene wet climate cycles, the center of the basin was dominated by lacustrine sedimentation; during dry climate cycles, the base level dropped, the Big Lost River prograded across the basin, and the eolian system became active. At least seven climate oscillations are recorded in strata deposited between {approximately}140 and {approximately}1250 ka.

  17. Determination of in-flight AVIRIS spectral, radiometric, spatial and signal-to-noise characteristics using atmospheric and surface measurements from the vicinity of the rare-earth-bearing carbonatite at Mountain Pass, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Vane, Gregg; Conel, James E.

    1988-01-01

    An assessment of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) performance was made for a flight over Mountain Pass, California, July 30, 1987. The flight data were reduced to reflectance using an empirical algorithm which compensates for solar, atmospheric and instrument factors. AVIRIS data in conjunction with surface and atmospheric measurements acquired concurrently were used to develop an improved spectral calibration. An accurate in-flight radiometric calibration was also performed using the LOWTRAN 7 radiative transfer code together with measured surface reflectance and atmospheric optical depths. A direct comparison with coincident Thematic Mapper imagery of Mountain Pass was used to demonstrate the high spatial resolution and good geometric performance of AVIRIS. The in-flight instrument noise was independently determined with two methods which showed good agreement. A signal-to-noise ratio was calculated using data from a uniform playa. This ratio was scaled to the AVIRIS reference radiance model, which provided a basis for comparison with laboratory and other in-flight signal-to-noise determinations.

  18. Late Quaternary stratigraphy, sedimentology, and geochemistry of an underfilled lake basin in the Puna (north-west Argentina)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGlue, Michael M.; Cohen, Andrew S.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Kowler, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Depositional models of ancient lakes in thin-skinned retroarc foreland basins rarely benefit from appropriate Quaternary analogues. To address this, we present new stratigraphic, sedimentological and geochemical analyses of four radiocarbon-dated sediment cores from the Pozuelos Basin (PB; northwest Argentina) that capture the evolution of this low-accommodation Puna basin over the past ca. 43 cal kyr. Strata from the PB are interpreted as accumulations of a highly variable, underfilled lake system represented by lake-plain/littoral, profundal, palustrine, saline lake and playa facies associations. The vertical stacking of facies is asymmetric, with transgressive and thin organic-rich highstand deposits underlying thicker, organic-poor regressive deposits. The major controls on depositional architecture and basin palaeogeography are tectonics and climate. Accommodation space was derived from piggyback basin-forming flexural subsidence and Miocene-Quaternary normal faulting associated with incorporation of the basin into the Andean hinterland. Sediment and water supply was modulated by variability in the South American summer monsoon, and perennial lake deposits correlate in time with several well-known late Pleistocene wet periods on the Altiplano/Puna plateau. Our results shed new light on lake expansion–contraction dynamics in the PB in particular and provide a deeper understanding of Puna basin lakes in general.

  19. A diatom record of climate and hydrology for the past 200 KA from Owens Lake, California with comparison to other Breat Basin records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradbury, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Diatoms from lake sediments beneath Owens Lake playa, Inyo County, California, document a nearly continuous paleolimnological record of climate and hydrologic change since the penultimate glacial-interglacial cycle based on a chronology established by radiocarbon, tephrochronology, and paleomagnetic control. Freshwater planktic diatoms (especially species of Stephanodiscus), plagioclase feldspar-rich sediments with high magnetic susceptibility, and Juniperus-type pollen characterized the penultimate glaciation at Owens Lake. Saline diatoms dominated in the following interglacial period, and there are several episodes during which freshwater planktic diatoms became abundant between 100 and 50 ka that may represent interstadial climatic conditions. Saline diatoms fell to low values after 50 ka, but warm-season Aulacoseira species indicate episodes of significant summer precipitation in the hydrologic balance of Owens Lake prior to the last glacial maximum. By 25 ka, glacial environments were again characterized by abundant Juniperus, plagioclase feldspar, and Stephanodiscus species. Generally and Holocene climates were recorded in Owens Lake by short-term fluctuations of saline and freshwater diatoms, desiccation, and oolitic sediments barren of diatoms. Comparison to paleoclimate records both north and south of Owens Lake suggest a southerly displacement of storm tracks originating from the Aleutian Low during glacial episodes.

  20. A groundwater flow and transport model of long-term radionuclide migration in central Frenchman flat, Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect

    Kwicklis, Edward Michael; Becker, Naomi M; Ruskauff, Gregory; De Novio, Nicole; Wilborn, Bill

    2010-11-10

    A set of groundwater flow and transport models were created for the Central Testing Area of Frenchman Flat at the former Nevada Test Site to investigate the long-term consequences of a radionuclide migration experiment that was done between 1975 and 1990. In this experiment, radionuclide migration was induced from a small nuclear test conducted below the water table by pumping a well 91 m away. After radionuclides arrived at the pumping well, the contaminated effluent was discharged to an unlined ditch leading to a playa where it was expected to evaporate. However, recent data from a well near the ditch and results from detailed models of the experiment by LLNL personnel have convincingly demonstrated that radionuclides from the ditch eventually reached the water table some 220 m below land surface. The models presented in this paper combine aspects of these detailed models with concepts of basin-scale flow to estimate the likely extent of contamination resulting from this experiment over the next 1,000 years. The models demonstrate that because regulatory limits for radionuclide concentrations are exceeded only by tritium and the half-life of tritium is relatively short (12.3 years), the maximum extent of contaminated groundwater has or will soon be reached, after which time the contaminated plume will begin to shrink because of radioactive decay. The models also show that past and future groundwater pumping from water supply wells within Frenchman Flat basin will have negligible effects on the extent of the plume.

  1. STS-55 Earth observation of agricultural development in northern Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Earth observation taken aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, is of agricultural development in northern Argentina. This photograph is from a mapping strip of photographs acquired by the STS-55 crew. This mapping strip runs from the 'eyelash forests' of the Bolivian Andes, southeast across the Chaco Plains, and into the upper Parana River Basin of north-central Argentina. The formerly densely forested areas between the upper Rio Pilcomayo and the Rio Teuco of NW Argentina rest on deep, rich alluvial and loess deposits. These modern soils were carried into the region by rivers from the Andes and by dust storms from large playa areas of the Altiplano (high plains) of Peru and Boliva. In this scene, representative of the long mapping strip, the process of converting forests to agriculture is far advanced. The original road network, a series of grids laid out in the forest, has nearly coalesced into a farm and ranch landscape. Some few relict forests are still visible as distin

  2. Geologic Characterization of Young Alluvial Basin-Fill Deposits from Drill Hole Data in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect

    Donald S. Sweetkind; Ronald M. Drake II

    2007-01-22

    Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada, that has been the site of numerous underground nuclear tests; many of these tests occurred within the young alluvial basin-fill deposits. The migration of radionuclides to the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through this thick, heterogeneous section of Tertiary and Quaternary rock. An understanding of the lateral and vertical changes in the material properties of young alluvial basin-fill deposits will aid in the further development of the hydrogeologic framework and the delineation of hydrostratigraphic units and hydraulic properties required for simulating ground-water flow in the Yucca Flat area. This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, presents data and interpretation regarding the three-dimensional variability of the shallow alluvial aquifers in areas of testing at Yucca Flat, data that are potentially useful in the understanding of the subsurface flow system. This report includes a summary and interpretation of alluvial basin-fill stratigraphy in the Yucca Flat area based on drill hole data from 285 selected drill holes. Spatial variations in lithology and grain size of the Neogene basin-fill sediments can be established when data from numerous drill holes are considered together. Lithologic variations are related to different depositional environments within the basin including alluvial fan, channel, basin axis, and playa deposits.

  3. Secondary island formation in collisional and collisionless kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Dayton, William S; Roytershteyn, Vadim; Gary, Peter; Yin, L; Albright, B J; Bowers, K J; Karimabadi, H

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of magnetic reconnection in large-scale systems often gives rise to extended current layers that are unstable to the formation of secondary magnetic islands. The role of these islands in the reconnection process and the conditions under which they form remains a subject of debate. In this work, we benchmark two different kinetic particle-in-cell codes to address the formation of secondary islands for several types of global boundary conditions. The influence on reconnection is examined for a range of conditions and collisionality limits. Although secondary islands are observed in all cases, their influence on reconnection may be different depending on the regime. In the collisional limit, the secondary islands playa key role in breaking away from the Sweet-Parker scaling and enabling faster reconnection. In the collisionless limit, their formation is one mechanism for controlling the length of the diffusion region. In both limits, the onset of secondary islands leads to a time dependent behavior in the reconnection rate. In all cases considered, the number of secondary islands increases for larger systems.

  4. Regional transport of a chemically distinctive dust: Gypsum from White Sands, New Mexico (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Warren H.; Hyslop, Nicole P.; Trzepla, Krystyna; Yatkin, Sinan; Rarig, Randy S.; Gill, Thomas E.; Jin, Lixin

    2015-03-01

    The White Sands complex, a National Monument and adjoining Missile Range in southern New Mexico, occupies the dry bed of an ice-age lake where an active gypsum dunefield abuts erodible playa sediments. Aerosols entrained from White Sands are sometimes visible on satellite images as distinct, light-colored plumes crossing the Sacramento Mountains to the east and northeast. The IMPROVE network (Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments) operates long-term aerosol samplers at two sites east of the Sacramento range. In recent years a spring pulse of sulfate aerosol has appeared at these sites, eclipsing the regional summer peak resulting from atmospheric reactions of sulfur dioxide emissions. A significant fraction of this spring sulfate is contributed by gypsum and other salts from White Sands, with much of the sulfur in coarse particles and concentrations of calcium and strontium above regional levels. The increase in these gypsiferous species coincides with a drought following a period of above-average precipitation. White Sands and the IMPROVE samplers together provide a natural laboratory: a climatically sensitive dust source that is both well characterized and chemically distinct from its surroundings, with a signature that remains identifiable at long-term observatories 100-200 km downwind.

  5. Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Inyo County

    2006-07-26

    Inyo County has participated in oversight activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository since 1987. The overall goal of these studies are the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, or radionuclides into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Our oversight and completed Cooperative Agreement research, and a number of other investigators research indicate that there is groundwater flow between the alluvial and carbonate aquifers both at Yucca Mountain and in Inyo County. In addition to the potential of radionuclide transport through the LCA, Czarnecki (1997), with the US Geological Survey, research indicate potential radionuclide transport through the shallower Tertiary-age aquifer materials with ultimate discharge into the Franklin Lake Playa in Inyo County. The specific purpose of this Cooperative Agreement drilling program was to acquire geological, subsurface geology, and hydrologic data to: (1) establish the existence of inter-basin flow between the Amargosa Basin and Death Valley Basin; (2) characterize groundwater flow paths in the LCA through Southern Funeral Mountain Range, and (3) Evaluation the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and the major springs in Death Valley through the LCA.

  6. Lungfish burrows in the Upper Triassic Chinle and Dolores Formations, Colorado Plateau ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dubiel, R.F.; Blodgett, R.H.; Bown, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    Vertical-to-inclined, cylindrical trace fossils that occur in the Upper Triassic Chinle and Dolores Formations on the Colorado Plateau are interpreted to be the casts of lungfish burrows based on their morphologic similarity to previously identified lungfish burrows. The casts were formed by passive siliciclastic and carbonate sedimentation into apparently abandoned lungfish burrows. Locally, the burrow fillings are overwhelmingly abundant, and many intersect and have destroyed former burrow fillings. Bioturbation has contributed to the mottled coloration and the knobby-weathering texture of the rocks. The burrow-fillings occur ubiquitously in three lithofacies, deposited in a continental environment that included fluvial channels and floodplains, sand sheets and playa mudflats, and lacustrine basins, marshes, and deltas. The widespread occurrence of the lungfish burrows in the Chinle and Dolores Formations attests to the extensive habitat that supported lungfish in the Late Triassic. Analogy with the environments that support modern lungfish populations suggests that the Late Triassic climate in the study area provided sufficient moisture to support large populations of lungfish and that this climate was probably punctuated by seasonally dry periods. -from Authors

  7. A Variational Method to Retrieve the Extinction Profile in Liquid Clouds Using Multiple Field-of-View Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pounder, Nicola L.; Hogan, Robin J.; Varnai, Tamas; Battaglia, Alessandro; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    While liquid clouds playa very important role in the global radiation budget, it's been very difficult to remotely determine their internal cloud structure. Ordinary lidar instruments (similar to radars but using visible light pulses) receive strong signals from such clouds, but the information is limited to a thin layer near the cloud boundary. Multiple field-of-view (FOV) lidars offer some new hope as they are able to isolate photons that were scattered many times by cloud droplets and penetrated deep into a cloud before returning to the instrument. Their data contains new information on cloud structure, although the lack of fast simulation methods made it challenging to interpret the observations. This paper describes a fast new technique that can simulate multiple-FOV lidar signals and can even estimate the way the signals would change in response to changes in cloud properties-an ability that allows quick refinements in our initial guesses of cloud structure. Results for a hypothetical airborne three-FOV lidar suggest that this approach can help determine cloud structure for a deeper layer in clouds, and can reliably determine the optical thickness of even fairly thick liquid clouds. The algorithm is also applied to stratocumulus observations by the 8-FOV airborne "THOR" lidar. These tests demonstrate that the new method can determine the depth to which a lidar provides useful information on vertical cloud structure. This work opens the way to exploit data from spaceborne lidar and radar more rigorously than has been possible up to now.

  8. Late Quaternary Pollen Record from Cheyenne Bottoms, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredlund, Glen G.

    1995-01-01

    A sediment and pollen record from Cheyenne Bottoms, a large (166 km 2) enclosed basin in central Kansas, provides evidence for local and regional vegetation and climate change during the late Quaternary (ca. 30,000 yr.). Although radiocarbon dating of the carbonate-rich lacustrine sediments remains problematic, a basic chronological framework for the section is established. Two major litho- and biostratigraphic units, a Farmdalian zone (ca. 30,000 to 24,000 yr B.P.) and a Holocene zone (ca. 11,000 yr B.P. to present), are separated by a major unconformity spanning the Woodfordian (ca. 24,000 to 11,000 yr B.P.). Pollen and sedimentary data indicate a period of basin-wide drying preceding this unconformity. The sustained absence of sediment accumulation within this playa-like basin suggests that early Woodfordian conditions were increasingly arid with strengthened surface winds. Before this, persistent shallow water marshland dominated the local basin-bottom vegetation. Regional upland vegetation was an open grassland-sage steppe throughout the Farmdalian with limited populations of spruce, juniper, aspen, birch, and boxelder in riparian settings and escarpments. Throughout the Holocene, water levels within the basin fluctuated. Changes in wetland vegetation resulting from water level fluctuation have increased during the last 3,000 yr indicating that periodic episodes of wetland loss and rebound are not unique to postsettlement conditions but are an ongoing phenomenon at Cheyenne Bottoms.

  9. Potential effects of climate change on aquatic ecosystems of the Great Plains of North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Covich, A.P.; Fritz, S.C.; Lamb, P.J.; Marzolf, R.D.; Matthews, W.J.; Poiani, K.A.; Prepas, E.E.; Richman, M.B.; Winter, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Great Plains landscape is less topographically complex than most other regions within North America, but diverse aquatic ecosystems, such as playas, pothole lakes, ox-bow lakes, springs, groundwater aquifers, intermittent and ephemeral streams, as well as large rivers and wetlands, are highly dynamic and responsive to extreme climatic fluctuations. We review the evidence for climatic change that demonstrates the historical importance of extremes in north-south differences in summer temperatures and east-west differences in aridity across four large subregions. These physical driving forces alter density stratification, deoxygenation, decomposition and salinity. Biotic community composition and associated ecosystem processes of productivity and nutrient cycling respond rapidly to these climatically driven dynamics. Ecosystem processes also respond to cultural effects such as dams and diversions of water for irrigation, waste dilution and urban demands for drinking water and industrial uses. Distinguishing climatic from cultural effects in future models of aquatic ecosystem functioning will require more refinement in both climatic and economic forecasting. There is a need, for example, to predict how long-term climatic forecasts (based on both ENSO and global warming simulations) relate to the permanence and productivity of shallow water ecosystems. Aquatic ecologists, hydrologists, climatologists and geographers have much to discuss regarding the synthesis of available data and the design of future interdisciplinary research. ?? 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. In-Flight Calibration and Validation of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green Robert O.; Conel, James E.; Margolis, Jack; Chovit, Chris; Faust, Jessica

    1996-01-01

    Calibrated spectra acquired remotely as images allow determination of surface and atmospheric properties based on absorption and scattering expressed in the spectra. AVIRIS measures spectra as images in the solar reflected portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. To use these spectra for scientific research and applications, the calibration of the spectra must be known at the time of measurement in flight. To validate the calibration of AVIRIS in flight, an in-flight calibration experiment was performed for an over-flight on May 9, 1995 at Ivanpah Playa, California. In-situ measurements of the atmosphere and surface at a calibration target were measured. These measurements were used to constrain a radiative transfer code and predict the total upwelling spectral radiance incident at AVIRIS. This prediction was compared to the radiance measured by AVIRIS for the calibration target. An agreement of 96.5% was determined. The in-flight signal-to-noise was determined and shown to have more than doubled over the previous year.

  11. [Diversity, abundance and distribution of benthic macrofauna on rocky shores from North Sucre State, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Johanna; Jiménez, Mayré; Allen, Thays

    2014-09-01

    The rocky intertidal zone is among the most extreme physical environments on Earth. Organisms living in this area are constantly stricken by physico-chemical and biological factors. Due to the ecological importance of these areas, we studied the diversity, abundance and distribution of the rocky coastline benthic macrofauna, from the North coast of Sucre State, Venezuela. We performed bimonthly samplings from November 2008 to September 2009. The collection of biological material in the littoral zone (supra, mid and infralittoral) was done manually with a grid of 0.25m2. Organisms were preserved in 10% formalin for later identification and analysis (ecological parameters and Kruskal-Wallis test to the abundance and diversity). We found a total 19,020 organisms (86 spp.), in 8 phyla, 45 families and 47 genera. Mollusks were the most abundant and diverse (58 spp.), followed by arthropods (12 spp.), annelids (7 spp.), echinoderms (5 spp.), and the less represented cnidarians, sipunculids, nemertinids and urochordates (1 sp.). The zonation found coincided with the universal scheme of zonation. The towns of Rio Boca and Rio Caribe presented the highest values of ecological parameters, and the lowest were found in Playa Grande. Statistical significant differences were found in the abundance and diversity of macrofauna among the three zones. The little information on the composition and distribution of macrobenthic rocky coastline, prevents a better comparison, however the results contribute to the knowledge of the marine biodiversity in this region. PMID:25412527

  12. Constraints on the composition and particle size of chloride salt-bearing deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotch, Timothy D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Wolff, Michael J.; Arnold, Jessica A.; Che, Congcong

    2016-03-01

    Chloride salt-bearing deposits on Mars were discovered using the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) and have been characterized by both mid-infrared (MIR) and visible-to-near-infrared (VNIR) remote sensing instruments. The chloride salt-bearing deposits exhibit a blue slope at MIR wavelengths and a featureless red slope at VNIR wavelengths. These deposits also lack strong 3 µm bands in VNIR spectra, indicating that they are desiccated compared to the surrounding regolith. The lack of VNIR spectral features suggests that an anhydrous chloride salt, the most likely of which is halite, is responsible for the observed spectral slope. In this work, we use laboratory spectra and a hybrid T-matrix/Hapke light scattering model to constrain the particle sizes and salt abundances of the Martian chloride salt-bearing deposits. Our work shows that the two broad spectral classes of these deposits observed by THEMIS can be explained by a difference in the particle size of the admixed silicate regolith. In all cases, chloride salt abundances of 10-25% are required to match the THEMIS data. The chloride salt abundances determined in this work suggest deposition in a lacustrine/playa setting or in association with late-stage groundwater upwelling.

  13. Model for deposition of bedded halite in a shallow shelf setting, San Andres Formation, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    Existing depositional models for evaporites do not adequately describe facies relationships, halite fabrics, and trace element geochemistry of halite from the Permian San Andres Formation. Interbedding of anhydritic halite and mudstone with disrupted bedding records alternation between marine-dominated brine pool and subaerial environments. Chevron structures and hopper crystal cumulates in the halite indicate subaqueous deposition. Abundant anhydrite partings within halite, which thicken and become interbedded with marine shelf carbonates to the south, demonstrate the facies equivalence and physical connection of evaporite and marine environments. Maintenance of marine character in trace element profiles through halite sequences documents the episodic influx of marine water. Haloturbated structure in mudstone interbeds within the halite is produced by displacive growth of halite within mudstone and dissolution and collapse of this halite as ground-water chemistry fluctuates in response to conditions of alternating desiccation and wetting. Karst features cutting the halite also imply subaerial exposure. Mapping of the fine-scale sedimentary structures, geochemical signature, and insoluble component mineralogy of halite sequences indicates that the brine pool environment extended over areas in excess of 100 km/sup 2/. Sabkha, salina, playa, and deep water basin models of halite-precipitating environments do not satisfactorily describe the shallow marine shelf depositional environment of the San Andres halite.

  14. Reevaluation of upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Western Interior

    SciTech Connect

    Mantzios, C.

    1989-03-01

    Comparison of the Brushy Basin member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the Colorado Plateau with the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Morrison-Cloverly sequence in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, shows great similarities in their depositional environments and stratigraphy. The lower Brushy Basin member is a fluvial deposit composed of channel sandstones and overbank mudstones which display a great number of pedogenic features. Similar depositional setting has been observed in the Morrison Formation in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, where pedogenic features suggest a distal floodplain setting with low-sinuosity channels cutting through. In both localities the dominant clay mineral is illite. The upper Brushy Basin member in the Colorado Plateau is composed mostly of gray and purpose mudstones rich in montmorillonite. Devitrified tuff beds and bentonite occur in certain levels throughout the unit. Pedogenic features are not conspicuously developed. The Lower Cretaceous Clovery Formation in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, is strikingly similar in terms of lithological aspects. The depositional environment is interpreted in both localities as a playa deposit. A great variety of nodules is present such as silcretes, septaria, and silica-carbonate nodules. Radiometric dating of bentonites in central Utah revealed that the upper Brushy Basin member is Early Cretaceous in age. Field and geochemical data support these conclusions and aid the understanding of the exact nature of the depositional basin, environments, stratigraphy, and paleotectonics of the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous interval in the Western Interior.

  15. Bidirectional measurements of surface reflectance for view angle corrections of oblique imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Teillet, P. M.; Slater, P. N.; Fedosejevs, G.; Jasinski, Michael F.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring bidirectional reflectance-factor data was constructed and used over four surface types. Data sets were obtained over a headed wheat canopy, bare soil having several different roughness conditions, playa (dry lake bed), and gypsum sand. Results are presented in terms of relative bidirectional reflectance factors (BRFs) as a function of view angle at a number of solar zenith angles, nadir BRFs as a function of solar zenith angles, and, for wheat, vegetation indices as related to view and solar zenith angles. The wheat canopy exhibited the largest BRF changes with view angle. BRFs for the red and the NIR bands measured over wheat did not have the same relationship with view angle. NIR/Red ratios calculated from nadir BRFs changed by nearly a factor of 2 when the solar zenith angle changed from 20 to 50 degs. BRF versus view angle relationships were similar for soils having smooth and intermediate rough surfaces but were considerably different for the roughest surface. Nadir BRF versus solar-zenith angle relationships were distinctly different for the three soil roughness levels. Of the various surfaces, BRFs for gypsum sand changed the least with view angle (10 percent at 30 degs).

  16. Ecological Processes of Isolated Wetlands: Ecosystem Services and the Significant Nexus (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengler, U.; De Lucia, M.; Kuehn, M.

    2011-12-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands occur throughout the US and are characterized by a wetland system completely surrounded by uplands. Examples include prairie potholes, woodland seasonal (i.e., vernal) pools, cypress domes, playas, and other such systems. Decisions by the US Supreme Court in 2001 and 2006 have affected the jurisdictional status of geographically isolated wetlands such that those failing to have a demonstrable 'significant nexus' to navigable waters may have no federal protection under the Clean Water Act. These systems are typically small and, as such, may be under-counted in assessments of area and abundance. Areal extent is a portion of the information required to characterize the functions associated with geographically isolated wetlands and understanding both site-specific and larger-scale processes are also required to better quantify those functions. In addition, quantifying anthropogenic effects on system processing informs our understanding of the contributions and the connectivity of geographically isolated wetlands to other waters. This presentation focuses on both efforts to quantify the contribution of geographically isolated wetlands to system-scale processes, focusing on nutrient assimilation and hydrologic storage, as well as concurrent research to identify their locations at multiple scales. Findings from this research may help elucidate the link between geographically isolated wetlands and other systems, and may inform discussions on ecosystem services provided by geographically isolated wetlands.

  17. Ecological Processes of Isolated Wetlands: Ecosystem Services and the Significant Nexus (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, C.; Autrey, B.; D'Amico, E.

    2013-12-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands occur throughout the US and are characterized by a wetland system completely surrounded by uplands. Examples include prairie potholes, woodland seasonal (i.e., vernal) pools, cypress domes, playas, and other such systems. Decisions by the US Supreme Court in 2001 and 2006 have affected the jurisdictional status of geographically isolated wetlands such that those failing to have a demonstrable 'significant nexus' to navigable waters may have no federal protection under the Clean Water Act. These systems are typically small and, as such, may be under-counted in assessments of area and abundance. Areal extent is a portion of the information required to characterize the functions associated with geographically isolated wetlands and understanding both site-specific and larger-scale processes are also required to better quantify those functions. In addition, quantifying anthropogenic effects on system processing informs our understanding of the contributions and the connectivity of geographically isolated wetlands to other waters. This presentation focuses on both efforts to quantify the contribution of geographically isolated wetlands to system-scale processes, focusing on nutrient assimilation and hydrologic storage, as well as concurrent research to identify their locations at multiple scales. Findings from this research may help elucidate the link between geographically isolated wetlands and other systems, and may inform discussions on ecosystem services provided by geographically isolated wetlands.

  18. Low Frequency Turbulence as the Source of High Frequency Waves in Multi-Component Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Krivorutsky, Emmanuel N.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2011-01-01

    Space plasmas support a wide variety of waves, and wave-particle interactions as well as wavewave interactions are of crucial importance to magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma behavior. High frequency wave turbulence generation by the low frequency (LF) turbulence is restricted by two interconnected requirements: the turbulence should be strong enough and/or the coherent wave trains should have the appropriate length. These requirements are strongly relaxed in the multi-component plasmas, due to the heavy ions large drift velocity in the field of LF wave. The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs), in particular, is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. It is demonstrated that large-amplitude Alfven waves, in particular those associated with LF turbulence, may generate LHW s in the auroral zone and ring current region and in some cases (particularly in the inner magnetosphere) this serves as the Alfven wave saturation mechanism. We also argue that the described scenario can playa vital role in various parts of the outer magnetosphere featuring strong LF turbulence accompanied by LHW activity. Using the data from THEMIS spacecraft, we validate the conditions for such cross-scale coupling in the near-Earth "flow-braking" magnetotail region during the passage of sharp injection/dipolarization fronts, as well as in the turbulent outflow region of the midtail reconnection site.

  19. Meteorites at Meridiani Planum provide evidence for significant amounts of surface and near-surface water on early Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairen, Alberto G.; Dohm, James M.; Baker, Victor R.; Thompson, Shane D.; Mahaney, William C.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Rodriguez, J. Alexis P.; Davila, Alfonso F.; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; El Maarry, M. Ramy; Uceda, Esther R.; Amils, Ricardo; Miyamoto, Hirdy; Kim, Kyeong J.; Anderson, Robert C.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Six large iron meteorites have been discovered in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in a nearly 25 km-long traverse. Herein, we review and synthesize the available data to propose that the discovery and characteristics of the six meteorites could be explained as the result of their impact into a soft and wet surface, sometime during the Noachian or the Hesperian, subsequently to be exposed at the Martian surface through differential erosion. As recorded by its sediments and chemical deposits, Meridiani has been interpreted to have undergone a watery past, including a shallow sea, a playa, an environment of fluctuating ground water, and/or an icy landscape. Meteorites could have been encased upon impact and/or subsequently buried, and kept underground for a long time, shielded from the atmosphere. The meteorites apparently underwent significant chemical weathering due to aqueous alteration, as indicated by cavernous features that suggest differential acidic corrosion removing less resistant material and softer inclusions. During the Amazonian, the almost complete disappearance of surface water and desiccation of the landscape, followed by induration of the sediments and subsequent differential erosion and degradation of Meridiani sediments, including at least 10–80 m of deflation in the last 3–3.5 Gy, would have exposed the buried meteorites. We conclude that the iron meteorites support the hypothesis that Mars once had a denser atmosphere and considerable amounts of water and/or water ice at and/or near the surface.

  20. Plio-Quaternary Stepwise Aridification of the Asian Inland: Multi-Proxy Records from a 938.5m Drill Core in the Western Qaidam Basin, NE Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Xi, X.; Li, M.; Appel, E.

    2014-12-01

    The Qaidam Basin is a largest closed basin in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau which is now under hyperarid climate. A 938.5 m-long core was drilled in the Qahansilatu depression in the western Qaidam Basin with an average core recovery rate of 95%. It consists of lacustrine grayish mudstone and siltstones with upperward increasing interbedded salt layers. High resolution paleomagnetic and OSL-U/Th dating of the core determine the core formed between 2.77 Na and 0.1 Ma. Detailed examinations of lithofacies, evaporative minerals, carbon and oxygen isotopes, grain size, bioproductivity and redox conditions collectively reveal that the climate was dry since 2.77Ma and became intensively dried at about 2.5 Ma, 2.2 Ma, 1.6 Ma, 1.2 Ma, 0.9 Ma, 0.6 Ma and 0.1 Ma. Accompanying this stepwise aridifications is the phased shrinkage of the paleo-Qaidam lake from the semi-deep brackish lake in early stage via shallow brackish lake and perennial saline lake to playa saline lake in late stage and completely dried out at the end. Episodic global cooling and tectonic uplift of the NE Tibetan Plateau are possible forcing.