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Sample records for pleiotropic regulatory locus

  1. Complementation of a pleiotropic Nif-Gln regulatory mutant of Rhodospirillum rubrum by a previously unrecognized Azotobacter vinelandii regulatory locus.

    PubMed

    Hu, C Z; Yoch, D C

    1990-01-01

    A spontaneous pleiotropic Nif- mutation in Rhodospirillum rubrum has been partially characterized biochemically and by complementation analysis with recombinant plasmids carrying Azotobacter vinelandii DNA in the vicinity of ORF12 [Jacobson et al. (1989) J. Bacteriol 171: 1017-1027]. In addition to being unable to grow on N2 as a nitrogen source the phenotypic characterization of this and other metronidazole enriched spontaneous mutants showed (a) no nitrogenase activity, (b) the absence of NifHDK polypeptides, (c) a slower growth rate on NH4+, (d) approximately 50% higher glutamine synthetase (GS) activity than the wild-type, which was repressible, (e) an inability to switch-off GS activity in response to an NH4+ up-shift, and (f) an inability to modify (32P-label) the GS polypeptide. The apparent relationship between the absence of nifHDK expression and the absence of GS adenylylation cannot be explained in terms of the current model for nif gene regulation. However, R. rubrum transconjugants receiving A. vinelandii DNA which originated immediately upstream from nifH, restored all aspects of the wild-type phenotype. These data suggest a here-to-fore unrecognized relationship between nif expression and GS switch-off (adenylylation) activity, and the existence of a previously unidentified regulatory locus in Azotobacter that complements this mutation. PMID:1980582

  2. Pleiotropic locus for emotion recognition and amygdala volume identified using univariate and bivariate linkage

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Emma E. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Kent, Jack W.; Sprooten, Emma; Carless, Melanie A.; Curran, Joanne E.; de Almeida, Marcio A. A.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Olvera, Rene; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Glahn, David. C.

    2014-01-01

    The role of the amygdala in emotion recognition is well established and separately each trait has been shown to be highly heritable, but the potential role of common genetic influences on both traits has not been explored. Here we present an investigation of the pleiotropic influences of amygdala and emotion recognition in a sample of randomly selected, extended pedigrees (N = 858). Using a combination of univariate and bivariate linkage we found a pleiotropic region for amygdala and emotion recognition on 4q26 (LOD = 4.34). Association analysis conducted in the region underlying the bivariate linkage peak revealed a variant meeting the corrected significance level (pBonferroni = 5.01×10−05) within an intron of PDE5A (rs2622497, Χ2 =16.67, p = 4.4×10−05) as being jointly influential on both traits. PDE5A has been implicated previously in recognition-memory deficits and is expressed in subcortical structures that are thought to underlie memory ability including the amygdala. The present paper extends our understanding of the shared etiology between amygdala and emotion recognition by showing that the overlap between the two traits is due, at least in part, to common genetic influences. Moreover, the present paper identifies a pleiotropic locus for the two traits and an associated variant, which localizes the genetic signal even more precisely. These results, when taken in the context of previous research, highlight the potential utility of PDE5-inhibitors for ameliorating emotion-recognition deficits in populations including, but not exclusively, those individuals suffering from mental or neurodegenerative illness. PMID:25322361

  3. A Spectrum of Pleiotropic Consequences in Development Due to Changes in a Regulatory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, Ana E.; Inouye, Sumiko; Travisano, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory evolution has frequently been proposed as the primary mechanism driving morphological evolution. This is because regulatory changes may be less likely to cause deleterious pleiotropic effects than changes in protein structure, and consequently have a higher likelihood to be beneficial. We examined the potential for mutations in trans acting regulatory elements to drive phenotypic change, and the predictability of such change. We approach these questions by the study of the phenotypic scope and size of controlled alteration in the developmental network of the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. We perturbed the expression of a key regulatory gene (fruA) by constructing independent in-frame deletions of four trans acting regulatory loci that modify its expression. While mutants retained developmental capability, the deletions caused changes in the expression of fruA and a dramatic shortening of time required for completion of development. We found phenotypic changes in the majority of traits measured, indicating pleiotropic effects of changes in regulation. The magnitude of the change for different traits was variable but the extent of differences between the mutants and parental type were consistent with changes in fruA expression. We conclude that changes in the expression of essential regulatory regions of developmental networks may simultaneously lead to modest as well as dramatic morphological changes upon which selection may subsequently act. PMID:22937047

  4. Pleiotropic effects of the 11p13 locus on developmental verbal dyspraxia and EEG centrotemporal sharp waves.

    PubMed

    Pal, D K; Li, W; Clarke, T; Lieberman, P; Strug, L J

    2010-11-01

    We recently showed genomewide linkage of centrotemporal sharp waves (CTS) in classic Rolandic epilepsy (RE) families to chromosome 11p13, and fine-mapped this locus to variants in the ELP4 gene. Speech sound disorder (SSD) is a common comorbidity in RE subjects, of unknown etiology, which co-aggregates in family members in a manner that could hypothetically be explained by shared underlying genetic risk with CTS. Furthermore, the neural mechanism of SSD is unknown, although individuals with rare, Mendelian forms of RE are described with severe verbal and oromotor apraxia. We therefore first performed genomewide linkage analysis for SSD, operationally defined as clinical history consistent with ICD-10 speech articulation disorder, in 38 families singly ascertained through a proband with RE. We tested the hypothesis of shared genetic risk with CTS at the 11p13 locus. In the second part of the study we used computerized acoustic analysis of recorded speech to test the hypothesis of dyspraxia as a mechanism for SSD in a smaller subset of RE probands and relatives. In two-point and multipoint LOD score analysis, we found that evidence for linkage to the 11p13 locus increased substantially when the phenotype was broadened from CTS to CTS/SSD. In multipoint analysis, the LOD score rose by 3.2 to HLOD 7.54 at D11S914 for CTS/SSD, the same marker at which multipoint linkage maximized for CTS alone. Non-parametric, affected-only methods in a sub-set of the data provide further confirmatory evidence for pleiotropy. In acoustic analysis there were voice-onset time abnormalities in 10/18 RE probands, 8/16 siblings and 5/15 parents, providing evidence of breakdown in the spatial/temporal properties of speech articulation consistent with a dyspraxic mechanism. The results from genetic and physiological studies suggest a pleiotropic role for the 11p13 locus in the development of both SSD and CTS, and also indicate a dyspraxic mechanism for the SSD linked to 11p13. Taken together

  5. Cloning of the pleiotropic T locus in soybean and two recessive alleles that differentially affect structure and expression of the encoded flavonoid 3' hydroxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Zabala, Gracia; Vodkin, Lila

    2003-01-01

    Three loci (I, R, and T) control pigmentation of the seed coats in Glycine max and are genetically distinct from those controlling flower color. The T locus also controls color of the trichome hairs. We report the identification and isolation of a flavonoid 3' hydroxylase gene from G. max (GmF3'H) and the linkage of this gene to the T locus. This GmF3'H gene was highly expressed in early stages of seed coat development and was expressed at very low levels or not at all in other tissues. Evidence that the GmF3'H gene is linked to the T locus came from the occurrence of multiple RFLPs in lines with varying alleles of the T locus, as well as in a population of plants segregating at that locus. GmF3'H genomic and cDNA sequence analysis of color mutant lines with varying t alleles revealed a frameshift mutation in one of the alleles. In another line derived from a mutable genetic stock, the abundance of the mRNAs for GmF3'H was dramatically reduced. Isolation of the GmF3'H gene and its identification as the T locus will enable investigation of the pleiotropic effects of the T locus on cell wall integrity and its involvement in the regulation of the multiple branches of the flavonoid pathway in soybean. PMID:12586717

  6. A Phenomic Scan of the Norfolk Island Genetic Isolate Identifies a Major Pleiotropic Effect Locus Associated with Metabolic and Renal Disorder Markers

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Miles C.; Lea, Rodney A.; Macartney-Coxson, Donia; Hanna, Michelle; Eccles, David A.; Carless, Melanie A.; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Bellis, Claire; Goring, Harald H.; Curran, Joanne E.; Harper, Jacquie L.; Gibson, Gregory; Blangero, John; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2015-01-01

    Multiphenotype genome-wide association studies (GWAS) may reveal pleiotropic genes, which would remain undetected using single phenotype analyses. Analysis of large pedigrees offers the added advantage of more accurately assessing trait heritability, which can help prioritise genetically influenced phenotypes for GWAS analysis. In this study we performed a principal component analysis (PCA), heritability (h2) estimation and pedigree-based GWAS of 37 cardiovascular disease -related phenotypes in 330 related individuals forming a large pedigree from the Norfolk Island genetic isolate. PCA revealed 13 components explaining >75% of the total variance. Nine components yielded statistically significant h2 values ranging from 0.22 to 0.54 (P<0.05). The most heritable component was loaded with 7 phenotypic measures reflecting metabolic and renal dysfunction. A GWAS of this composite phenotype revealed statistically significant associations for 3 adjacent SNPs on chromosome 1p22.2 (P<1x10-8). These SNPs form a 42kb haplotype block and explain 11% of the genetic variance for this renal function phenotype. Replication analysis of the tagging SNP (rs1396315) in an independent US cohort supports the association (P = 0.000011). Blood transcript analysis showed 35 genes were associated with rs1396315 (P<0.05). Gene set enrichment analysis of these genes revealed the most enriched pathway was purine metabolism (P = 0.0015). Overall, our findings provide convincing evidence for a major pleiotropic effect locus on chromosome 1p22.2 influencing risk of renal dysfunction via purine metabolism pathways in the Norfolk Island population. Further studies are now warranted to interrogate the functional relevance of this locus in terms of renal pathology and cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26474483

  7. Pleiotropic Effect of Common Variants at ABO Glycosyltranferase Locus in 9q32 on Plasma Levels of Pancreatic Lipase and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For forty-three clinical test values presumably associated to common complex human diseases, we carried out a genome-wide association study using 600K SNPs in a general Japanese population of 1,639 individuals (1,252 after quality control procedures) drawn from a regional cohort, followed by a replication study for statistically significant SNPs (p = 1.95×10−9–8.34×10−39) using an independent population of 1,671 from another cohort. In this single two-stage study, we newly found strong and robust associations of common variants at the ABO histo-blood glycosyltransferase locus in 9q32 with the plasma levels of pancreatic lipase (P-LIP), in addition to successful confirmation of the known ABO association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) independent of the ACE1 gene in 17q23.2 with the ACE level. Our results are compatible with the previously reported association between the ABO gene and pancreatic cancer, and show that the effect of these common variants at the ABO locus on the P-LIP and ACE levels is largely opposing and pleiotropic. PMID:24586218

  8. Regulatory Mutants at the his1 Locus of Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lax, Carol; Fogel, Seymour; Cramer, Carole

    1979-01-01

    The his1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for phosphoribosyl transferase, an allosteric enzyme that catalyzes the initial step in histidine biosynthesis. Mutants that specifically alter the feedback regulatory function were isolated by selecting his1 prototrophic revertants that overproduce and excrete histidine. The prototrophs were obtained from diploids homoallelic for his1–7 and heterozygous for the flanking markers thr3 and arg6. Among six independently derived mutant isolates, three distinct levels of histidine excretion were detected. The mutants were shown to be second-site alterations mapping at the his1 locus by recovery of the original auoxtrophic parental alleles. The double mutants, HIS1–7e, are dominant with respect to catalytic function but recessive in regulatory function. When removed from this his1–7 background, the mutant regulatory site (HIS1–e) still confers prototrophy but not histidine excretion. To yield the excretion phenotype, the primary and altered secondary sites are required in cis array. Differences in histidine excretion levels correlate with resistance to the histidine analogue, triazoalanine. PMID:385447

  9. Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility locus.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Kar, Siddhartha; McCue, Karen; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Beesley, Jonathan; Ramus, Susan J; Li, Qiyuan; Delgado, Melissa K; Lee, Janet M; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Bandera, Elisa V; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Berchuck, Andrew; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bruinsma, Fiona; Brunet, Joan; Buhari, Shaik Ahmad; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butzow, Ralf; Buys, Saundra S; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldes, Trinidad; Campbell, Ian; Canniotto, Rikki; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cook, Linda S; Cox, Angela; Cramer, Daniel W; Cross, Simon S; Cybulski, Cezary; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Doherty, Jennifer A; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Engel, Christoph; Lee, Eunjung; Evans, D Gareth; Fasching, Peter A; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fridley, Brooke L; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gambino, Gaetana; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; García-Closas, Montserrat; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Harrington, Patricia A; Hartman, Mikael; Hassan, Norhashimah; Healey, Sue; Heitz, Florian; Herzog, Josef; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L; Hulick, Peter J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Allan; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Kapuscinski, Miroslav; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Knight, Julia A; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Kwong, Ava; de la Hoya, Miguel; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Le, Nhu; De Leeneer, Kim; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Loud, Jennifer T; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Le Marchand, Loic; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; McLean, Catriona; McNeish, Iain; Meindl, Alfons; Menon, Usha; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Milne, Roger L; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Ness, Roberta B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Nussbaum, Robert L; Odunsi, Kunle; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Olswold, Curtis; O'Malley, David; Orlow, Irene; Orr, Nick; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Poole, Elizabeth M; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rennert, Gad; Rhenius, Valerie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Risch, Harvey A; Rodriguez, Gus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Salvesen, Helga B; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sellers, Thomas A; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sieh, Weiva; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Slager, Susan; Song, Honglin; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa C; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sutter, Christian; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo H; Terry, Kathryn L; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Tung, Nadine; Tworoger, Shelley S; Vachon, Celine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Doorn, Helena C; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Van't Veer, Laura J; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Vergote, Ignace; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Qin; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Khanna, Kum Kum; Simard, Jacques; Monteiro, Alvaro N; French, Juliet D; Couch, Fergus J; Freedman, Matthew L; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D; Edwards, Stacey L; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Gayther, Simon A

    2016-01-01

    A locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 × 10(-20)), ER-negative BC (P=1.1 × 10(-13)), BRCA1-associated BC (P=7.7 × 10(-16)) and triple negative BC (P-diff=2 × 10(-5)). Genotype-gene expression associations are identified for candidate target genes ANKLE1 (P=2 × 10(-3)) and ABHD8 (P<2 × 10(-3)). Chromosome conformation capture identifies interactions between four candidate SNPs and ABHD8, and luciferase assays indicate six risk alleles increased transactivation of the ADHD8 promoter. Targeted deletion of a region containing risk SNP rs56069439 in a putative enhancer induces ANKLE1 downregulation; and mRNA stability assays indicate functional effects for an ANKLE1 3'-UTR SNP. Altogether, these data suggest that multiple SNPs at 19p13 regulate ABHD8 and perhaps ANKLE1 expression, and indicate common mechanisms underlying breast and ovarian cancer risk. PMID:27601076

  10. Paramutation alters regulatory control of the maize pl locus.

    PubMed Central

    Hollick, J B; Patterson, G I; Asmundsson, I M; Chandler, V L

    2000-01-01

    The maize purple plant (pl) locus encodes a transcription factor required for anthocyanin pigment synthesis in vegetative and floral tissues. The strongly expressed Pl-Rhoades (Pl-Rh) allele is unstable, spontaneously changing to weaker expression states (Pl') at low frequencies and exclusively changing to Pl' in Pl'/Pl-Rh heterozygotes. The weakly expressed Pl' state is mitotically and meiotically stable, yet reversible. This type of allele-dependent, heritable alteration of gene control is called paramutation. Expression studies herein demonstrate that visible differences in anthocyanin pigment levels mirror pl RNA abundance and that pl paramutation is associated with reduced transcription of the pl gene. This transcriptional alteration is accompanied by acquisition of light-dependent regulation. Restriction endonuclease mapping indicates that these changes in pl gene regulation are not associated with detectable DNA alterations or with extensive changes in cytosine methylation patterns. Genetic tests show that Pl-Blotched (Pl-Bh), a structurally similar pl allele encoding an identical pl RNA and PL protein, does not participate in pl paramutation. This result suggests that if cis-acting sequences are required for pl paramutation they are distinct from the protein coding and immediately adjacent regions. A model is discussed in which pl paramutation results in heritable changes of chromatin structure that fundamentally alter regulatory interactions occurring during plant development. PMID:10747073

  11. Molecular analysis of the maize anthocyanin regulatory locus C1.

    PubMed Central

    Cone, K C; Burr, F A; Burr, B

    1986-01-01

    The C1 gene of maize plays a regulatory role in the production of anthocyanin pigments in the aleurone layer of the endosperm. As an initial step toward understanding the molecular details of how C1 controls pigment biosynthesis, we cloned the C1 gene. This was accomplished by first cloning a mutable allele of C1, c1-m5, which contains the transposable element Spm. A combination of molecular and genetic analysis was used to identify the Spm at the C1 locus. Individual genomic DNAs from a population in which the c1-mutable phenotype was segregating with the recessive c1 phenotype were digested with methyl-sensitive restriction enzymes and probed with a small DNA fragment derived from a defective Spm. One Sal I restriction fragment complementary to the Spm probe was shown to be present in the DNA of individuals with the c1-m5 phenotype but absent from DNA of individuals with a recessive c1 phenotype. Subsequent cloning and restriction analysis of this fragment revealed sequences flanking the Spm that proved to be C1-specific. A DNA fragment derived from the flanking sequences was then used as a probe to clone the wild-type C1 gene and several additional alleles of C1, including one stable recessive, two mutations caused by Ds insertions, one mutation induced by insertion of a defective Spm, and two dominant mutations, C1-S and C1-I. RNA blot hybridization analysis of three C1 alleles indicates that C1 regulation of the Bz1 and A1 structural genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway is at the transcriptional level. Images PMID:3025847

  12. Pleiotropic regulatory genes bldA, adpA and absB are implicated in production of phosphoglycolipid antibiotic moenomycin.

    PubMed

    Makitrynskyy, Roman; Ostash, Bohdan; Tsypik, Olga; Rebets, Yuriy; Doud, Emma; Meredith, Timothy; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Bechthold, Andreas; Walker, Suzanne; Fedorenko, Victor

    2013-10-01

    Unlike the majority of actinomycete secondary metabolic pathways, the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase inhibitor moenomycin in Streptomyces ghanaensis does not involve any cluster-situated regulators (CSRs). This raises questions about the regulatory signals that initiate and sustain moenomycin production. We now show that three pleiotropic regulatory genes for Streptomyces morphogenesis and antibiotic production-bldA, adpA and absB-exert multi-layered control over moenomycin biosynthesis in native and heterologous producers. The bldA gene for tRNA(Leu)UAA is required for the translation of rare UUA codons within two key moenomycin biosynthetic genes (moe), moeO5 and moeE5. It also indirectly influences moenomycin production by controlling the translation of the UUA-containing adpA and, probably, other as-yet-unknown repressor gene(s). AdpA binds key moe promoters and activates them. Furthermore, AdpA interacts with the bldA promoter, thus impacting translation of bldA-dependent mRNAs-that of adpA and several moe genes. Both adpA expression and moenomycin production are increased in an absB-deficient background, most probably because AbsB normally limits adpA mRNA abundance through ribonucleolytic cleavage. Our work highlights an underappreciated strategy for secondary metabolism regulation, in which the interaction between structural genes and pleiotropic regulators is not mediated by CSRs. This strategy might be relevant for a growing number of CSR-free gene clusters unearthed during actinomycete genome mining. PMID:24153004

  13. Scrutinizing the FTO locus: compelling evidence for a complex, long-range regulatory context.

    PubMed

    Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Almén, Markus Sällman; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a genetic region including the first two introns of the gene encoding FTO have consistently been shown to be the strongest genetic factors influencing body mass index (BMI). However, this same also contains several regulatory DNA elements that affect the expression of IRX3 and IRX5, which respectively, are located approximately 500 kb and 1.2 Mbp downstream from the BMI-associated FTO locus. Through these affected regulatory elements, genetic variation at the FTO locus influences adipocyte development leading to decreased thermogenesis and increased lipid storage. These findings provide a genomic model for the functional implications of genetic variations at this locus, and also demonstrate the importance of accounting for chromatin-chromatin interactions when constructing hypotheses for the mechanisms of trait and disease-associated common genetic variants. Several consortia have generated genome-wide datasets describing different aspects of chromatin biology which can be utilized to predict functionality and propose biologically relevant descriptions of specific DNA regions. Here, we review some of the publically available data resources on genome function and organization that can be used to gain an overview of genetic regions of interest and to generate testable hypotheses for future studies. We use the BMI- and obesity-associated FTO locus as a subject as it poses an illustrative example on the value of these resources. We find that public databases strongly support long-range interactions between regulatory elements in the FTO locus with the IRXB cluster genes IRX3 and IRX5. Chromatin configuration capture data also support interactions across a large region stretching across from the RPGRIP1L gene, FTO and the IRXB gene cluster. PMID:26340902

  14. Epigenetic Regulation of Individual Modules of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus 3' Regulatory Region.

    PubMed

    Birshtein, Barbara K

    2014-01-01

    The Igh locus undergoes an amazing array of DNA rearrangements and modifications during B cell development. During early stages, the variable region gene is constructed from constituent variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments (VDJ joining). B cells that successfully express an antibody can be activated, leading to somatic hypermutation (SHM) focused on the variable region, and class switch recombination (CSR), which substitutes downstream constant region genes for the originally used Cμ constant region gene. Many investigators, ourselves included, have sought to understand how these processes specifically target the Igh locus and avoid other loci and potential deleterious consequences of malignant transformation. Our laboratory has concentrated on a complex regulatory region (RR) that is located downstream of Cα, the most 3' of the Igh constant region genes. The ~40 kb 3' RR, which is predicted to serve as a downstream major regulator of the Igh locus, contains two distinct segments: an ~28 kb region comprising four enhancers, and an adjacent ~12 kb region containing multiple CTCF and Pax5 binding sites. Analysis of targeted mutations in mice by a number of investigators has concluded that the entire 3' RR enhancer region is essential for SHM and CSR (but not for VDJ joining) and for high levels of expression of multiple isotypes. The CTCF/Pax5 binding region is a candidate for influencing VDJ joining early in B cell development and serving as a potential insulator of the Igh locus. Components of the 3' RR are subject to a variety of epigenetic changes during B cell development, i.e., DNAse I hypersensitivity, histone modifications, and DNA methylation, in association with transcription factor binding. I propose that these changes provide a foundation by which regulatory elements in modules of the 3' RR function by interacting with each other and with target sequences of the Igh locus. PMID:24795714

  15. Molecular basis of the pleiotropic phenotype of mice carrying the hypervariable yellow (A{sup hvy}) mutation at the agouti locus

    SciTech Connect

    Argeson, A.C.; Nelson, K.K.; Siracusa, L.D.

    1996-02-01

    The murine agouti locus regulates a switch in pigment synthesis between eumelanin (black/brown pigment) and phaeomelanin (yellow/red pigment) by hair bulb melanocytes. We recently described a spontaneous mutation, hypervariable yellow (A{sup hvy}) and demonstrated that A{sup hvy} is responsible for the largest range of phenotypes yet identified at the agouti locus, producing mice that are obese with yellow coats to mice that are of normal weight with black coats. Here, we show that agouti expression is altered both temporally and spatially in A{sup hvy} mutants. Agouti expression levels are positively correlated with the degree of yellow pigmentation in individual A{sup hvy} mice, consistent with results from other dominant yellow agouti mutations. Sequencing of 5{prime} RACE and genomic PCR products revealed that A{sup hvy} resulted from the integration of an intracisternal A particle (IAP) in an antisense orientation within the 5{prime} untranslated agouti exon 1C. This retrovirus-like element is responsible for deregulating agouti expression in A{sup hvy} mice; agouti expression is correlated with the methylation state of CpG residues in the IAP long terminal repeat as well as in host genomic DNA. In addition, the data suggest that the variable phenotype of A{sup hvy} offspring is influenced in part by the phenotype of their A{sup hvy} female parent. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Fine-mapping analysis revealed complex pleiotropic effect and tissue-specific regulatory mechanism of TNFSF15 in primary biliary cholangitis, Crohn's disease and leprosy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yonghu; Irwanto, Astrid; Toyo-Oka, Licht; Hong, Myunghee; Liu, Hong; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Choi, Hyunchul; Hitomi, Yuki; Yu, Gongqi; Yu, Yongxiang; Bao, Fangfang; Wang, Chuan; Fu, Xian; Yue, Zhenhua; Wang, Honglei; Zhang, Huimin; Kawashima, Minae; Kojima, Kaname; Nagasaki, Masao; Nakamura, Minoru; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Denise, Yosua; Rotzschke, Olaf; Song, Kyuyoung; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Zhang, Furen; Liu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphism within the 9q32 locus is linked with increased risk of several diseases, including Crohn's disease (CD), primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and leprosy. The most likely disease-causing gene within 9q32 is TNFSF15, which encodes the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF super-family member 15, but it was unknown whether these disparate diseases were associated with the same genetic variance in 9q32, and how variance within this locus might contribute to pathology. Using genetic data from published studies on CD, PBC and leprosy we revealed that bearing a T allele at rs6478108/rs6478109 (r(2) = 1) or rs4979462 was significantly associated with increased risk of CD and decreased risk of leprosy, while the T allele at rs4979462 was associated with significantly increased risk of PBC. In vitro analyses showed that the rs6478109 genotype significantly affected TNFSF15 expression in cells from whole blood of controls, while functional annotation using publicly-available data revealed the broad cell type/tissue-specific regulatory potential of variance at rs6478109 or rs4979462. In summary, we provide evidence that variance within TNFSF15 has the potential to affect cytokine expression across a range of tissues and thereby contribute to protection from infectious diseases such as leprosy, while increasing the risk of immune-mediated diseases including CD and PBC. PMID:27507062

  17. Fine-mapping analysis revealed complex pleiotropic effect and tissue-specific regulatory mechanism of TNFSF15 in primary biliary cholangitis, Crohn’s disease and leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yonghu; Irwanto, Astrid; Toyo-oka, Licht; Hong, Myunghee; Liu, Hong; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Choi, Hyunchul; Hitomi, Yuki; Yu, Gongqi; Yu, Yongxiang; Bao, Fangfang; Wang, Chuan; Fu, Xian; Yue, Zhenhua; Wang, Honglei; Zhang, Huimin; Kawashima, Minae; Kojima, Kaname; Nagasaki, Masao; Nakamura, Minoru; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Denise, Yosua; Rotzschke, Olaf; Song, Kyuyoung; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Zhang, Furen; Liu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphism within the 9q32 locus is linked with increased risk of several diseases, including Crohn’s disease (CD), primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and leprosy. The most likely disease-causing gene within 9q32 is TNFSF15, which encodes the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF super-family member 15, but it was unknown whether these disparate diseases were associated with the same genetic variance in 9q32, and how variance within this locus might contribute to pathology. Using genetic data from published studies on CD, PBC and leprosy we revealed that bearing a T allele at rs6478108/rs6478109 (r2 = 1) or rs4979462 was significantly associated with increased risk of CD and decreased risk of leprosy, while the T allele at rs4979462 was associated with significantly increased risk of PBC. In vitro analyses showed that the rs6478109 genotype significantly affected TNFSF15 expression in cells from whole blood of controls, while functional annotation using publicly-available data revealed the broad cell type/tissue-specific regulatory potential of variance at rs6478109 or rs4979462. In summary, we provide evidence that variance within TNFSF15 has the potential to affect cytokine expression across a range of tissues and thereby contribute to protection from infectious diseases such as leprosy, while increasing the risk of immune-mediated diseases including CD and PBC. PMID:27507062

  18. Identification of the genetic locus for the structural gene and a new regulatory gene for the synthesis of repressible alkaline phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Y.; Toh-e, A.; Oshima, Y.

    1982-02-01

    Two lines of evidence showed that the PHO8 gene encodes the structure of repressible, nonspecific alkaline phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: (I) the enzyme produced by a temperature-sensitive pho8 mutant at the permissive temperature (25/sup 0/C) was more thermolabile than that of the wild-type strain, and (II) the PHO8 gene showed a gene dosage effect on the enzyme activity. The pho8 locus has been mapped on chromosome IV, 8 centimorgans distal to rna3. A new mutant carrying the pho9 gene was isolated which lacks repressible alkaline phosphatase, but has the normal phenotype for the synthesis of repressible acid phosphatase. The pho9 gene segregated independently of all known pho-regulatory genes and did not show the gene dosage effect on repressible alkaline phosphatase activity. The pho9/pho9 diploid hardly sporulated and showed no commitment to intragenic recombination when it was inoculated on sporulation medium. Hence the pho9 mutant has a phenotype similar to the pep4 mutant, which was isolated as a pleiotropic mutant with reduced levels of proteinases A and B carboxypeptidase Y. An allelism test indicated that pho9 and pep4 are allelic.

  19. Retroviral vectors encoding ADA regulatory locus control region provide enhanced T-cell-specific transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Murine retroviral vectors have been used in several hundred gene therapy clinical trials, but have fallen out of favor for a number of reasons. One issue is that gene expression from viral or internal promoters is highly variable and essentially unregulated. Moreover, with retroviral vectors, gene expression is usually silenced over time. Mammalian genes, in contrast, are characterized by highly regulated, precise levels of expression in both a temporal and a cell-specific manner. To ascertain if recapitulation of endogenous adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression can be achieved in a vector construct we created a new series of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) based retroviral vector that carry human regulatory elements including combinations of the ADA promoter, the ADA locus control region (LCR), ADA introns and human polyadenylation sequences in a self-inactivating vector backbone. Methods A MuLV-based retroviral vector with a self-inactivating (SIN) backbone, the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter (PGK) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), as a reporter gene, was generated. Subsequent vectors were constructed from this basic vector by deletion or addition of certain elements. The added elements that were assessed are the human ADA promoter, human ADA locus control region (LCR), introns 7, 8, and 11 from the human ADA gene, and human growth hormone polyadenylation signal. Retroviral vector particles were produced by transient three-plasmid transfection of 293T cells. Retroviral vectors encoding eGFP were titered by transducing 293A cells, and then the proportion of GFP-positive cells was determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Non T-cell and T-cell lines were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1 and the yield of eGFP transgene expression was evaluated by FACS analysis using mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) detection. Results Vectors that contained the ADA LCR were preferentially expressed in T

  20. Evaluation of potential regulatory function of breast cancer risk locus at 6q25.1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yaqiong; Ye, Chuanzhong; Guo, Xingyi; Wen, Wanqing; Long, Jirong; Gao, Yu-Tang; Shu, Xiao Ou; Zheng, Wei; Cai, Qiuyin

    2016-02-01

    In a genome-wide association study conducted among Chinese women, we identified the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2046210 at 6q25.1 for breast cancer risk. To explore a potential regulatory role for this risk locus, we measured expression levels of nine genes at the locus in breast cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue samples obtained from 67 patients recruited in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. We found that rs2046210 had a statistically significant association with the expression levels of the AKAP12 and ESR1 genes in adjacent normal breast tissues. Women who carry the AA/AG risk genotypes had higher expressions of these two genes compared to those who carry G/G genotypes (P = 0.02 and 0.04 for the AKAP12 and ESR1, respectively). However, no significant differences of SNP rs2046210 with gene expression levels were found in tumor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas samples, the AA/AG risk genotypes of SNP rs2046210 were associated with a significantly higher expression level of the AKAP12 gene and a lower level of the ESR1 gene in tumor tissue. Functional analysis using ENCODE data revealed that SNP rs7763637, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with SNP rs2046210, is likely a potential functional variant, regulating the AKAP12 gene. Taken together, these results from our study suggest that the association between the 6q25.1 locus and breast cancer risk may be mediated through SNPs that regulate expressions of the AKAP12 gene. PMID:26645718

  1. Early enhancer establishment and regulatory locus complexity shape transcriptional programs in hematopoietic differentiation.

    PubMed

    González, Alvaro J; Setty, Manu; Leslie, Christina S

    2015-11-01

    We carried out an integrative analysis of enhancer landscape and gene expression dynamics during hematopoietic differentiation using DNase-seq, histone mark ChIP-seq and RNA sequencing to model how the early establishment of enhancers and regulatory locus complexity govern gene expression changes at cell state transitions. We found that high-complexity genes-those with a large total number of DNase-mapped enhancers across the lineage-differ architecturally and functionally from low-complexity genes, achieve larger expression changes and are enriched for both cell type-specific and transition enhancers, which are established in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and maintained in one differentiated cell fate but lost in others. We then developed a quantitative model to accurately predict gene expression changes from the DNA sequence content and lineage history of active enhancers. Our method suggests a new mechanistic role for PU.1 at transition peaks during B cell specification and can be used to correct assignments of enhancers to genes. PMID:26390058

  2. Donor Locus Selection during Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Mating Type Interconversion Responds to Distant Regulatory Signals

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, K. S.; Broach, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Mating type interconversion in homothallic strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results from directed transposition of a mating type allele from one of the two silent donor loci, HML and HMR, to the expressing locus, MAT. Cell type regulates the selection of the particular donor locus to be utilized during mating type interconversion: MATa cells preferentially select HMLα and MATα cells preferentially select HMRa. Such preferential selection indicates that the cell is able to distinguish between HML and HMR during mating type interconversion. Accordingly, we designed experiments to identify those features perceived by the cell to discriminate HML and HMR. We demonstrate that discrimination does not derive from the different structures of the HML and HMR loci, from the unique sequences flanking each donor locus nor from any of the DNA distal to the HM loci on chromosome III. Moreover, we find that the sequences flanking the MAT locus do not function in the preferential selection of one donor locus over the other. We propose that the positions of the donor loci on the left and right arms of chromosome III is the characteristic utilized by the cell to distinguish HML and HMR. This positional information is not generated by either CEN3 or the MAT locus, but probably derives from differences in the chromatin structure, chromosome folding or intranuclear localization of the two ends of chromosome III. PMID:1459444

  3. Multiple Hepatic Regulatory Variants at the GALNT2 GWAS Locus Associated with High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Roman, Tamara S; Marvelle, Amanda F; Fogarty, Marie P; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Gonzalez, Arlene J; Buchkovich, Martin L; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Fuchsberger, Christian; Jackson, Anne U; Wu, Ying; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons J; Gaulton, Kyle J; Sethupathy, Praveen; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kuusisto, Johanna; Collins, Francis S; Laakso, Markku; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 150 loci associated with blood lipid and cholesterol levels; however, the functional and molecular mechanisms for many associations are unknown. We examined the functional regulatory effects of candidate variants at the GALNT2 locus associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Fine-mapping and conditional analyses in the METSIM study identified a single locus harboring 25 noncoding variants (r(2) > 0.7 with the lead GWAS variants) strongly associated with total cholesterol in medium-sized HDL (e.g., rs17315646, p = 3.5 × 10(-12)). We used luciferase reporter assays in HepG2 cells to test all 25 variants for allelic differences in regulatory enhancer activity. rs2281721 showed allelic differences in transcriptional activity (75-fold [T] versus 27-fold [C] more than the empty-vector control), as did a separate 780-bp segment containing rs4846913, rs2144300, and rs6143660 (49-fold [AT(-) haplotype] versus 16-fold [CC(+) haplotype] more). Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we observed differential CEBPB binding to rs4846913, and we confirmed this binding in a native chromatin context by performing chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays in HepG2 and Huh-7 cell lines of differing genotypes. Additionally, sequence reads in HepG2 DNase-I-hypersensitivity and CEBPB ChIP-seq signals spanning rs4846913 showed significant allelic imbalance. Allelic-expression-imbalance assays performed with RNA from primary human hepatocyte samples and expression-quantitative-trait-locus (eQTL) data in human subcutaneous adipose tissue samples confirmed that alleles associated with increased HDL-C are associated with a modest increase in GALNT2 expression. Together, these data suggest that at least rs4846913 and rs2281721 play key roles in influencing GALNT2 expression at this HDL-C locus. PMID:26637976

  4. Multiple Hepatic Regulatory Variants at the GALNT2 GWAS Locus Associated with High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Tamara S.; Marvelle, Amanda F.; Fogarty, Marie P.; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Gonzalez, Arlene J.; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Jackson, Anne U.; Wu, Ying; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons J.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Sethupathy, Praveen; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kuusisto, Johanna; Collins, Francis S.; Laakso, Markku; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 150 loci associated with blood lipid and cholesterol levels; however, the functional and molecular mechanisms for many associations are unknown. We examined the functional regulatory effects of candidate variants at the GALNT2 locus associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Fine-mapping and conditional analyses in the METSIM study identified a single locus harboring 25 noncoding variants (r2 > 0.7 with the lead GWAS variants) strongly associated with total cholesterol in medium-sized HDL (e.g., rs17315646, p = 3.5 × 10−12). We used luciferase reporter assays in HepG2 cells to test all 25 variants for allelic differences in regulatory enhancer activity. rs2281721 showed allelic differences in transcriptional activity (75-fold [T] versus 27-fold [C] more than the empty-vector control), as did a separate 780-bp segment containing rs4846913, rs2144300, and rs6143660 (49-fold [AT– haplotype] versus 16-fold [CC+ haplotype] more). Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we observed differential CEBPB binding to rs4846913, and we confirmed this binding in a native chromatin context by performing chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays in HepG2 and Huh-7 cell lines of differing genotypes. Additionally, sequence reads in HepG2 DNase-I-hypersensitivity and CEBPB ChIP-seq signals spanning rs4846913 showed significant allelic imbalance. Allelic-expression-imbalance assays performed with RNA from primary human hepatocyte samples and expression-quantitative-trait-locus (eQTL) data in human subcutaneous adipose tissue samples confirmed that alleles associated with increased HDL-C are associated with a modest increase in GALNT2 expression. Together, these data suggest that at least rs4846913 and rs2281721 play key roles in influencing GALNT2 expression at this HDL-C locus. PMID:26637976

  5. PLEIOTROPIC EFFECTS OF STATINS

    PubMed Central

    Liao, James K.; Laufs, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. In clinical trials, statins are beneficial in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. However, the overall benefits observed with statins appear to be greater than what might be expected from changes in lipid levels alone, suggesting effects beyond cholesterol lowering. Indeed, recent studies indicate that some of the cholesterol-independent or “pleiotropic” effects of statins involve improving endothelial function, enhancing the stability of atherosclerotic plaques, decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation, and inhibiting the thrombogenic response. Furthermore, statins have beneficial extrahepatic effects on the immune system, CNS, and bone. Many of these pleiotropic effects are mediated by inhibition of isoprenoids, which serve as lipid attachments for intracellular signaling molecules. In particular, inhibition of small GTP-binding proteins, Rho, Ras, and Rac, whose proper membrane localization and function are dependent on isoprenylation, may play an important role in mediating the pleiotropic effects of statins. PMID:15822172

  6. New cis-regulatory elements in the Rht-D1b locus region of wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifteen gene-containing BACs with accumulated length of 1.82-Mb from the Rht-D1b locus region weresequenced and compared in detail with the orthologous regions of rice, sorghum, and maize. Our results show that Rht-D1b represents a conserved genomic region as implied by high gene sequence identity...

  7. Differential contribution of cis-regulatory elements to higher order chromatin structure and expression of the CFTR locus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L; Gosalia, Nehal; Neems, Daniel; Gorsic, Lidija K; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E; Kosak, Steven T; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2016-04-20

    Higher order chromatin structure establishes domains that organize the genome and coordinate gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling transcription of individual loci within a topological domain (TAD) are not fully understood. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene provides a paradigm for investigating these mechanisms.CFTR occupies a TAD bordered by CTCF/cohesin binding sites within which are cell-type-selective cis-regulatory elements for the locus. We showed previously that intronic and extragenic enhancers, when occupied by specific transcription factors, are recruited to the CFTR promoter by a looping mechanism to drive gene expression. Here we use a combination of CRISPR/Cas9 editing of cis-regulatory elements and siRNA-mediated depletion of architectural proteins to determine the relative contribution of structural elements and enhancers to the higher order structure and expression of the CFTR locus. We found the boundaries of the CFTRTAD are conserved among diverse cell types and are dependent on CTCF and cohesin complex. Removal of an upstream CTCF-binding insulator alters the interaction profile, but has little effect on CFTR expression. Within the TAD, intronic enhancers recruit cell-type selective transcription factors and deletion of a pivotal enhancer element dramatically decreases CFTR expression, but has minor effect on its 3D structure. PMID:26673704

  8. Pleiotropic effects of statins.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J A

    2000-05-01

    The advent of statin therapy has revolutionized the ability of the clinician to manage patients at risk for the development of an ischemic event due to dyslipidemia. Large-scale clinical trials involving thousands of patients in both primary and secondary prevention have clearly demonstrated that statin therapy will reduce cardiovascular mortality across a broad spectrum of patient subgroups. Additionally, in adequately powered trials, total mortality has been successfully decreased by the use of statin therapy. However, the precise mechanism underlying the benefit of statin therapy has been controversial due to the multiplicity of potential benefits that statins have demonstrated in addition to pure lipid lowering. The causal theory of pharmacologic benefit reiterates the lipid hypothesis, which states that dyslipidemia is central to the process of atherosclerosis and the clinical benefit which accrues from statin therapy is a function of the degree of lipid lowering. The noncausal theory supports the premise that clinical benefits are related primarily to pleiotropic effects of statins (endothelial function, inflammation, coagulation and plaque vulnerability) as being the major modulators of clinical benefit. This review will focus on the potential beneficial effects of statin therapy on a number of the pleiotropic effects of statins and the potential role that these activities play in the reduction of risk for ischemic events. PMID:11122746

  9. Prostate cancer risk locus at 8q24 as a regulatory hub by physical interactions with multiple genomic loci across the genome

    PubMed Central

    Du, Meijun; Yuan, Tiezheng; Schilter, Kala F.; Dittmar, Rachel L.; Mackinnon, Alexander; Huang, Xiaoyi; Tschannen, Michael; Worthey, Elizabeth; Jacob, Howard; Xia, Shu; Gao, Jianzhong; Tillmans, Lori; Lu, Yan; Liu, Pengyuan; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Wang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 8q24 locus contains regulatory variants that modulate genetic risk to various cancers including prostate cancer (PC). However, the biological mechanism underlying this regulation is not well understood. Here, we developed a chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based multi-target sequencing technology and systematically examined three PC risk regions at the 8q24 locus and their potential regulatory targets across human genome in six cell lines. We observed frequent physical contacts of this risk locus with multiple genomic regions, in particular, inter-chromosomal interaction with CD96 at 3q13 and intra-chromosomal interaction with MYC at 8q24. We identified at least five interaction hot spots within the predicted functional regulatory elements at the 8q24 risk locus. We also found intra-chromosomal interaction genes PVT1, FAM84B and GSDMC and inter-chromosomal interaction gene CXorf36 in most of the six cell lines. Other gene regions appeared to be cell line-specific, such as RRP12 in LNCaP, USP14 in DU-145 and SMIN3 in lymphoblastoid cell line. We further found that the 8q24 functional domains more likely interacted with genomic regions containing genes enriched in critical pathways such as Wnt signaling and promoter motifs such as E2F1 and TCF3. This result suggests that the risk locus may function as a regulatory hub by physical interactions with multiple genes important for prostate carcinogenesis. Further understanding genetic effect and biological mechanism of these chromatin interactions will shed light on the newly discovered regulatory role of the risk locus in PC etiology and progression. PMID:25149474

  10. Fine mapping of the pleiotropic locus B for black spine and orange mature fruit color in cucumber identifies a 50 kb region containing a R2R3-MYB transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhong; Wen, Changlong; Weng, Yiqun

    2013-08-01

    In cucumber, Cucumis sativus L., the spine and skin colors are two important fruit quality traits for variety improvement. In this study, we investigated the inheritance of spine and mature fruit skin colors in F2 and F3 populations derived from a cross between two inbred lines WI7200 (black spine and orange fruit skin colors) and WI7201 (white spine and creamy fruit skin colors). We confirmed that a single, dominant gene, B, controlled both black spine color and orange mature fruit color. Initial framework mapping with microsatellite markers located the B locus in the distal region of the short arm of cucumber chromosome 4. Fine mapping was conducted with draft genome scaffold-assisted chromosome walking and stepwise increase of mapping population sizes, which allowed for the assignment of the B locus to a 50 kb genomic DNA region with two flanking markers that were 0.06 and 0.09 cM, respectively, from the B locus in a mapping population of 2,001 F2 plants. Gene annotation of this 50 kb region identified six genes including one encoding for a R2R3-MYB transcription factor. Sequence alignment of the R2R3-MYB homologs between the two parent inbreds identified a 1 bp deletion in the third intron of this gene in WI 7201. A molecular marker based on this indel was co-segregating with the spine and fruit colors. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed higher level of expression of this R2R3-MYB gene in WI7200 than in WI7201 in both immature and mature fruits. This R2R3-MYB gene seems to be the best candidate gene for the B locus conditioning black spine and orange mature fruit colors of cultivated cucumber. PMID:23689749

  11. Evolutionarily Assembled cis-Regulatory Module at a Human Ciliopathy Locus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Silhavy, Jennifer L.; Lee, Ji Eun; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Thomas, Sophie; Davis, Erica E.; Bielas, Stephanie L.; Hill, Kiley J.; Iannicelli, Miriam; Brancati, Francesco; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Russ, Carsten; Logan, Clare V.; Sharif, Saghira Malik; Bennett, Christopher P.; Abe, Masumi; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Diplas, Bill H.; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Katsanis, Nicholas; Rajab, Anna; Koul, Roshan; Sztriha, Laszlo; Waters, Elizabeth R.; Ferro-Novick, Susan; Woods, C. Geoffrey; Johnson, Colin A.; Valente, Enza Maria; Zaki, Maha S.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Neighboring genes are often coordinately expressed within cis-regulatory modules, but evidence that nonparalogous genes share functions in mammals is lacking. Here, we report that mutation of either TMEM138 or TMEM216 causes a phenotypically indistinguishable human ciliopathy, Joubert syndrome. Despite a lack of sequence homology, the genes are aligned in a head-to-tail configuration and joined by chromosomal rearrangement at the amphibian-to-reptile evolutionary transition. Expression of the two genes is mediated by a conserved regulatory element in the noncoding intergenic region. Coordinated expression is important for their interdependent cellular role in vesicular transport to primary cilia. Hence, during vertebrate evolution of genes involved in ciliogenesis, nonparalogous genes were arranged to a functional gene cluster with shared regulatory elements. PMID:22282472

  12. New Amino Acid Regulatory Locus Having Unusual Properties in Heterozygous Merodiploids

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Ellis L.

    1972-01-01

    Spontaneous mutants of Escherichia coli B/r resistant to 5′,5′,5′,-trifluoro-dl-leucine contain defects in a gene which maps to the left of the threonine region. Low-level constitutive expression of the isoleucine-valine and leucine operons is caused by this mutation in haploid strains. This is in contrast to extremely high levels of gene expression in the heterozygous merodiploids (F' wild type/mutant allele). The properties of these mutants define a new locus and suggest that it encodes a subunit protein which is involved in the repression of the structural genes for the branched-chain amino acid pathways. Images PMID:4555405

  13. Nucleotide sequence of the regulatory locus controlling expression of bacterial genes for bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1987-01-01

    Production of light by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and by recombinant hosts containing cloned lux genes is controlled by the density of the culture. Density-dependent regulation of lux gene expression has been shown to require a locus consisting of the luxR and luxI genes and two closely linked divergent promoters. As part of a genetic analysis to understand the regulation of bioluminescence, we have sequenced the region of DNA containing this control circuit. Open reading frames corresponding to luxR and luxI were identified; transcription start sites were defined by S1 nuclease mapping and sequences resembling promoter elements were located. Images PMID:3697093

  14. Maternal Depression, Locus of Control, and Emotion Regulatory Strategy as Predictors of Preschoolers' Internalizing Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Lisa W.; Thompson, Alysha D.

    2011-01-01

    Childhood internalizing problems may occur as early as preschool, tend to be stable over time, and undermine social and academic functioning. Parent emotion regulatory behaviors may contribute to child internalizing problems and may be especially important during the preschool years when parents model emotion coping and regulation for their…

  15. Regulatory elements necessary for termination of transcription within the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.B.

    1992-01-01

    Previous experimentation demonstrated that regulation of the IgM only phenotype in both pre-B and immature B cells was primarily at the transcriptional level. Expression of IgD mRNA involves transcription of the entire 29 kilobase rearranged [mu]-[delta] locus. Mature B cells transcribe the [beta] exons at approximately half the level that they transcribe the [delta] gene. Early B cells however, transcribe the [mu] gene with approximately 90% more efficiency than they do the [delta] gene. Specifically, early B cells show a transcription termination event occurring within a 1 kilobase region of the [mu]-[delta] intron. This dissertation analyzes the sequence elements necessary to encode the transcription termination event within the [mu]-[delta] intron. This work shows that the termination motif consists of specific sequences within the [mu]m poly(A) site as well as a region of the [mu]-[delta] intron contained within a 1200 base pair fragment. The 1200 base pair fragment extends from the Pst I site within the intron and ends just prior to the C[delta]1 exon. This fragment contains a 162 base pair unique sequence inverted repeat (USIR). Furthermore, the [mu]m site is specifically required because the [mu]s site was unable to substitute, despite extensive usage. In addition, the USIR-containing intron functions in an orientation-dependent manner. Analysis of this termination motif in a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells suggests that this motif is an intrinsic polymerase II termination motif. This implies that transcription termination in early B cells is by a default model and that active regulation of this motif involves an anti-termination event in mature B cells.

  16. Cis-regulatory Changes at FLOWERING LOCUS T Mediate Natural Variation in Flowering Responses of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar; Warthmann, Norman; Michael, Todd P.; Lempe, Janne; Sureshkumar, Sridevi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Maloof, Julin N.; Borevitz, Justin O.; Chory, Joanne; Weigel, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    Flowering time, a critical adaptive trait, is modulated by several environmental cues. These external signals converge on a small set of genes that in turn mediate the flowering response. Mutant analysis and subsequent molecular studies have revealed that one of these integrator genes, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), responds to photoperiod and temperature cues, two environmental parameters that greatly influence flowering time. As the central player in the transition to flowering, the protein coding sequence of FT and its function are highly conserved across species. Using QTL mapping with a new advanced intercross-recombinant inbred line (AI-RIL) population, we show that a QTL tightly linked to FT contributes to natural variation in the flowering response to the combined effects of photoperiod and ambient temperature. Using heterogeneous inbred families (HIF) and introgression lines, we fine map the QTL to a 6.7 kb fragment in the FT promoter. We confirm by quantitative complementation that FT has differential activity in the two parental strains. Further support for FT underlying the QTL comes from a new approach, quantitative knockdown with artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs). Consistent with the causal sequence polymorphism being in the promoter, we find that the QTL affects FT expression. Taken together, these results indicate that allelic variation at pathway integrator genes such as FT can underlie phenotypic variability and that this may be achieved through cis-regulatory changes. PMID:19652183

  17. Identification of the Staphylococcus aureus vfrAB Operon, a Novel Virulence Factor Regulatory Locus

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Seth M.; Hall, Pamela R.; Bayles, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    During a screen of the Nebraska Transposon Mutant Library, we identified 71 mutations in the Staphylococcus aureus genome that altered hemolysis on blood agar medium. Although many of these mutations disrupted genes known to affect the production of alpha-hemolysin, two of them were associated with an apparent operon, designated vfrAB, that had not been characterized previously. Interestingly, a ΔvfrB mutant exhibited only minor effects on the transcription of the hla gene, encoding alpha-hemolysin, when grown in broth, as well as on RNAIII, a posttranscriptional regulatory RNA important for alpha-hemolysin translation, suggesting that VfrB may function at the posttranscriptional level. Indeed, a ΔvfrB mutant had increased aur and sspAB protease expression under these conditions. However, disruption of the known secreted proteases in the ΔvfrB mutant did not restore hemolytic activity in the ΔvfrB mutant on blood agar. Further analysis revealed that, in contrast to the minor effects of VfrB on hla transcription when strains were cultured in liquid media, the level of hla transcription was decreased 50-fold in the absence of VfrB on solid media. These results demonstrate that while VfrB represses protease expression when strains are grown in broth, hla regulation is highly responsive to factors associated with growth on solid media. Intriguingly, the ΔvfrB mutant displayed increased pathogenesis in a model of S. aureus dermonecrosis, further highlighting the complexity of VfrB-dependent virulence regulation. The results of this study describe a phenotype associated with a class of highly conserved yet uncharacterized proteins found in Gram-positive bacteria, and they shed new light on the regulation of virulence factors necessary for S. aureus pathogenesis. PMID:24549328

  18. Evidence for regulatory diversity and auto-regulation at the TAC1 locus in sensory neurones

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance-P (SP) is expressed from the TAC1 gene in sensory neurones where it acts as a key modulator of neurogenic inflammation. The promoter of TAC1 (TAC1prom) plays a central role in the regulation of the TAC1 gene but requires the presence of a second regulatory element; ECR2, to support TAC1 expression in sensory neurones and to respond appropriately to signalling pathways such as MAPkinases and noxious induction by capsaicin. We examined whether the effect of capsaicin on ECR2-TAC1prom activity in larger diameter neurones was cell autonomous or non- cell autonomous. We demonstrate that TRPV1 is not expressed in all the same cells as SP following capsaicin induction suggesting the presence of a non-cell autonomous mechanism for TAC1 up-regulation following capsaicin induction. In addition, we demonstrate that induction of SP and ECR1-TAC1prom activity in these larger diameter neurones can be induced by potassium depolarisation suggesting that, in addition to capsaicin induction, transgene activity may be modulated by voltage gated calcium channels. Furthermore, we show that NK1 is expressed in all SP- expressing cells after capsaicin induction and that an agonist of NK1 can activate both SP and the transgene in larger diameter neurones. These observations suggest the presence of an autocrine loop that controls the expression of the TAC1 promoter in sensory neurones. In contrast, induction of the TAC1 promoter by LPS was not dependent on ECR2 and did not occur in large diameter neurones. These studies demonstrate the diversity of mechanisms modulating the activity of the TAC1 promoter and provide novel directions for the development of new anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:21294877

  19. Functional genomics, proteomics, and regulatory DNA analysis in isogenic settings using zinc finger nuclease-driven transgenesis into a safe harbor locus in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    DeKelver, Russell C.; Choi, Vivian M.; Moehle, Erica A.; Paschon, David E.; Hockemeyer, Dirk; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.; Sancak, Yasemin; Cui, Xiaoxia; Steine, Eveline J.; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Tam, Phillip; Bartsevich, Victor V.; Meng, Xiangdong; Rupniewski, Igor; Gopalan, Sunita M.; Sun, Helena C.; Pitz, Kathleen J.; Rock, Jeremy M.; Zhang, Lei; Davis, Gregory D.; Rebar, Edward J.; Cheeseman, Iain M.; Yamamoto, Keith R.; Sabatini, David M.; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.

    2010-01-01

    Isogenic settings are routine in model organisms, yet remain elusive for genetic experiments on human cells. We describe the use of designed zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) for efficient transgenesis without drug selection into the PPP1R12C gene, a “safe harbor” locus known as AAVS1. ZFNs enable targeted transgenesis at a frequency of up to 15% following transient transfection of both transformed and primary human cells, including fibroblasts and hES cells. When added to this locus, transgenes such as expression cassettes for shRNAs, small-molecule-responsive cDNA expression cassettes, and reporter constructs, exhibit consistent expression and sustained function over 50 cell generations. By avoiding random integration and drug selection, this method allows bona fide isogenic settings for high-throughput functional genomics, proteomics, and regulatory DNA analysis in essentially any transformed human cell type and in primary cells. PMID:20508142

  20. Distribution, evolution, and diversity of retrotransposons at the flamenco locus reflect the regulatory properties of piRNA clusters.

    PubMed

    Zanni, Vanessa; Eymery, Angéline; Coiffet, Michael; Zytnicki, Matthias; Luyten, Isabelle; Quesneville, Hadi; Vaury, Chantal; Jensen, Silke

    2013-12-01

    Most of our understanding of Drosophila heterochromatin structure and evolution has come from the annotation of heterochromatin from the isogenic y; cn bw sp strain. However, almost nothing is known about the heterochromatin's structural dynamics and evolution. Here, we focus on a 180-kb heterochromatic locus producing Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNA cluster), the flamenco (flam) locus, known to be responsible for the control of at least three transposable elements (TEs). We report its detailed structure in three different Drosophila lines chosen according to their capacity to repress or not to repress the expression of two retrotransposons named ZAM and Idefix, and we show that they display high structural diversity. Numerous rearrangements due to homologous and nonhomologous recombination, deletions and segmental duplications, and loss and gain of TEs are diverse sources of active genomic variation at this locus. Notably, we evidence a correlation between the presence of ZAM and Idefix in this piRNA cluster and their silencing. They are absent from flam in the strain where they are derepressed. We show that, unexpectedly, more than half of the flam locus results from recent TE insertions and that most of the elements concerned are prone to horizontal transfer between species of the melanogaster subgroup. We build a model showing how such high and constant dynamics of a piRNA master locus open the way to continual emergence of new patterns of piRNA biogenesis leading to changes in the level of transposition control. PMID:24248389

  1. A cloned regulatory gene of Streptomyces lividans can suppress the pigment deficiency phenotype of different developmental mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, D; Cohen, S N

    1989-01-01

    We report here the cloning of a Streptomyces lividans gene that when introduced on a multicopy plasmid vector reversed the pigment deficiency phenotype of several distinct mutants blocked in development, pigment production, or both. Although this gene was shown by restriction enzyme analysis to be similar to a previously cloned afsB-complementing gene of Streptomyces coelicolor, we show that it does not correspond to the S. coelicolor chromosomal locus designated afsB. Thus, the cloned locus, which we propose to rename afsR, appears to complement the AfsB- phenotype by pleiotropic regulatory effects. Images PMID:2703474

  2. Major recent and independent changes in levels and patterns of expression have occurred at the b gene, a regulatory locus in maize

    PubMed Central

    Selinger, David A.; Chandler, Vicki L.

    1999-01-01

    The b locus encodes a transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes that produce purple anthocyanin pigment. Different b alleles are expressed in distinct tissues, causing tissue-specific anthocyanin production. Understanding how phenotypic diversity is produced and maintained at the b locus should provide models for how other regulatory genes, including those that influence morphological traits and development, evolve. We have investigated how different levels and patterns of pigmentation have evolved by determining the phenotypic and evolutionary relationships between 18 alleles that represent the diversity of b alleles in Zea mays. Although most of these alleles have few phenotypic differences, five alleles have very distinct tissue-specific patterns of pigmentation. Superimposing the phenotypes on the molecular phylogeny reveals that the alleles with strong and distinctive patterns of expression are closely related to alleles with weak expression, implying that the distinctive patterns have arisen recently. We have identified apparent insertions in three of the five phenotypically distinct alleles, and the fourth has unique upstream restriction fragment length polymorphisms relative to closely related alleles. The insertion in B-Peru has been shown to be responsible for its unique expression and, in the other two alleles, the presence of the insertion correlates with the phenotype. These results suggest that major changes in gene expression are probably the result of large-scale changes in DNA sequence and/or structure most likely mediated by transposable elements. PMID:10611328

  3. Inactivation, sequence, and lacZ fusion analysis of a regulatory locus required for repression of nitrogen fixation genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, R G; Pace, V M; Caldicott, I M

    1990-01-01

    Transcription of the genes that code for proteins involved in nitrogen fixation in free-living diazotrophs is typically repressed by high internal oxygen concentrations or exogenous fixed nitrogen. The DNA sequence of a regulatory locus required for repression of Rhodobacter capsulatus nitrogen fixation genes was determined. It was shown that this locus, defined by Tn5 insertions and by ethyl methanesulfonate-derived mutations, is homologous to the glnB gene of other organisms. The R. capsulatus glnB gene was upstream of glnA, the gene for glutamine synthetase, in a glnBA operon. beta-Galactosidase expression from an R. capsulatus glnBA-lacZ translational fusion was increased twofold in cells induced by nitrogen limitation relative to that in cells under nitrogen-sufficient conditions. R. capsulatus nifR1, a gene that was previously shown to be homologous to ntrC and that is required for transcription of nitrogen fixation genes, was responsible for approximately 50% of the transcriptional activation of this glnBA fusion in cells induced under nitrogen-limiting conditions. R. capsulatus GLNB, NIFR1, and NIFR2 (a protein homologous to NTRB) were proposed to transduce the nitrogen status in the cell into repression or activation of other R. capsulatus nif genes. Repression of nif genes in response to oxygen was still present in R. capsulatus glnB mutants and must have occurred at a different level of control in the regulatory circuit. Images FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:2152916

  4. Univariate and Bivariate Linkage Analysis Identifies Pleiotropic Loci Underlying Lipids and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hasstedt, Sandra J; Hanis, Craig L; Elbein, Steven C

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dyslipidemia frequently co-occurs with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and with obesity. To investigate whether the co-occurrence is due to pleiotropic genes, we performed univariate linkage analysis of lipid levels and bivariate linkage analysis of pairs of lipid levels and of lipid levels paired with T2D, body mass index (BMI), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) in the African American subset of the Genetics of NIDDM (GENNID) sample. We obtained significant evidence for a pleiotropic low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)–T2D locus on chromosome 1 at 16–19 megabases (MB) (bivariate lod = 4.41), as well as a non-pleiotropic triglyceride (TG) locus on chromosome 20 at 28–34 MB (univariate lod = 3.57). In addition, near-significant evidence supported TG–T2D loci on chromosome 2 at 81–101 MB (bivariate lod = 4.23) and 232–239 MB (bivariate lod = 4.27) and on chromosome 7 at 147–151 MB (univariate lod = 3.08 for TG with P = 0.041 supporting pleiotropy with T2D), as well as an LDL-C–BMI locus on chromosome 3 at 137–147 MB (bivariate lod score = 4.25). These finding provide evidence that at least some of the co-occurrence of dyslipidemia with T2D and obesity is due to common underlying genes. PMID:20597901

  5. Pleiotropic Analysis of Lung Cancer and Blood Triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Verena; Marconett, Crystal N; Shi, Jianxin; Hua, Xing; Wheeler, William; Yang, Chenchen; Song, Lei; Dale, Anders M; Laplana, Marina; Risch, Angela; Witoelar, Aree; Thompson, Wesley K; Schork, Andrew J; Bettella, Francesco; Wang, Yunpeng; Djurovic, Srdjan; Zhou, Beiyun; Borok, Zea; van der Heijden, Henricus F M; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Swinkels, Dorine; Aben, Katja K; McKay, James; Hung, Rayjean J; Bikeböller, Heike; Stevens, Victoria L; Albanes, Demetrius; Caporaso, Neil E; Han, Younghun; Wei, Yongyue; Panadero, Maria Angeles; Mayordomo, Jose I; Christiani, David C; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Andreassen, Ole A; Houlston, Richard; Amos, Christopher I; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Laird-Offringa, Ite A; Mills, Ian G; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2016-12-01

    Epidemiologically related traits may share genetic risk factors, and pleiotropic analysis could identify individual loci associated with these traits. Because of their shared epidemiological associations, we conducted pleiotropic analysis of genome-wide association studies of lung cancer (12 160 lung cancer case patients and 16 838 control subjects) and cardiovascular disease risk factors (blood lipids from 188 577 subjects, type 2 diabetes from 148 821 subjects, body mass index from 123 865 subjects, and smoking phenotypes from 74 053 subjects). We found that 6p22.1 (rs6904596, ZNF184) was associated with both lung cancer (P = 5.50x10(-6)) and blood triglycerides (P = 1.39x10(-5)). We replicated the association in 6097 lung cancer case patients and 204 657 control subjects (P = 2.40 × 10(-4)) and in 71 113 subjects with triglycerides data (P = .01). rs6904596 reached genome-wide significance in lung cancer meta-analysis (odds ratio = 1.15, 95% confidence interval = 1.10 to 1.21 ,: Pcombined = 5.20x10(-9)). The large sample size provided by the lipid GWAS data and the shared genetic risk factors between the two traits contributed to the uncovering of a hitherto unidentified genetic locus for lung cancer. PMID:27565901

  6. Germline deletion of Igh 3′ regulatory region elements hs5-7 affects B cell specific regulation, rearrangement and insulation of the Igh locus1

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Sabrina A.; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Hassan, Rabih; Ju, Zhongliang; Roa, Sergio; Chatterjee, Sanjukta; Werling, Uwe; Hou, Harry; Will, Britta; Steidl, Ulrich; Scharff, Matthew; Edelman, Winfried; Feeney, Ann J.; Birshtein, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory elements located within a ~28 kb region 3′ of the Igh gene cluster (3′ regulatory region, 3′ RR) are required for class switch recombination and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. We previously defined novel DNase I hypersensitive (hs) sites, i.e. hs5-7, immediately downstream of this region. Hs5-7 contains a high density of binding sites for CTCF, a zinc finger protein associated with mammalian insulator activity and is an anchor for interactions with CTCF sites flanking the DH region. To test the function of hs5-7, we have generated mice with an 8 kb deletion encompassing all three hs elements. B cells from hs5-7 KO mice showed a modest increase in expression of the nearest downstream gene. In addition, Igh alleles in hs5-7 KO mice were in a less contracted configuration compared to WT Igh alleles and showed a two-fold increase in the usage of proximal VH7183 gene families. Hs5-7 KO mice were essentially indistinguishable from wild type mice in B cell development, allelic regulation, class switch recombination, and chromosomal looping. We conclude that hs5-7--a high-density CTCF binding region at the 3′ end of the Igh locus--impacts usage of VH regions as far as 500 kb away. PMID:22345664

  7. NF-κB and BRG1 bind a distal regulatory element in the IL-3/GM-CSF locus

    PubMed Central

    Wurster, Andrea L.; Precht, Patricia; Pazin, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated gene regulation at the IL-3/GM-CSF gene cluster. We found BRG1, a SWI/SNF remodeling ATPase, bound a distal element, CNSa. BRG1 binding was strongest in differentiated, stimulated T helper cells, paralleling IL-3 and GM-CSF expression. Depletion of BRG1 reduced IL-3 and GM-CSF transcription. BAF-specific SWI/SNF subunits bound to this locus and regulated IL-3 expression. CNSa was in closed chromatin in fibroblasts, open chromatin in differentiated T helper cells, and moderately open chromatin in naïve (undifferentiated) T helper cells; BRG1 was required for the most open state. CNSa increased transcription of a reporter in an episomal expression system, in a BRG1-dependent manner. The NF-κB subunit RelA/p65 bound CNSa in activated T helper cells. Inhibition of NF-κB blocked BRG1 binding to CNSa, chromatin opening at CNSa, and activation of IL-3 and GM-CSF. Together, these findings suggest CNSa is a distal enhancer that binds BRG1 and NF-κB. PMID:21831442

  8. Quantitative Trait Locus Based Virulence Determinant Mapping of the HSV-1 Genome in Murine Ocular Infection: Genes Involved in Viral Regulatory and Innate Immune Networks Contribute to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Inna; Craven, Mark; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 causes mucocutaneous lesions, and is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the United States. Animal studies have shown that the severity of HSV-1 ocular disease is influenced by three main factors; innate immunity, host immune response and viral strain. We previously showed that mixed infection with two avirulent HSV-1 strains (OD4 and CJ994) resulted in recombinants that exhibit a range of disease phenotypes from severe to avirulent, suggesting epistatic interactions were involved. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of HSV-1 ocular virulence determinants and to identify virulence associated SNPs. Blepharitis and stromal keratitis quantitative scores were characterized for 40 OD4:CJ994 recombinants. Viral titers in the eye were also measured. Virulence quantitative trait locus mapping (vQTLmap) was performed using the Lasso, Random Forest, and Ridge regression methods to identify significant phenotypically meaningful regions for each ocular disease parameter. The most predictive Ridge regression model identified several phenotypically meaningful SNPs for blepharitis and stromal keratitis. Notably, phenotypically meaningful nonsynonymous variations were detected in the UL24, UL29 (ICP8), UL41 (VHS), UL53 (gK), UL54 (ICP27), UL56, ICP4, US1 (ICP22), US3 and gG genes. Network analysis revealed that many of these variations were in HSV-1 regulatory networks and viral genes that affect innate immunity. Several genes previously implicated in virulence were identified, validating this approach, while other genes were novel. Several novel polymorphisms were also identified in these genes. This approach provides a framework that will be useful for identifying virulence genes in other pathogenic viruses, as well as epistatic effects that affect HSV-1 ocular virulence. PMID:26962864

  9. Quantitative Trait Locus Based Virulence Determinant Mapping of the HSV-1 Genome in Murine Ocular Infection: Genes Involved in Viral Regulatory and Innate Immune Networks Contribute to Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Aaron W; Lee, Kyubin; Larsen, Inna; Craven, Mark; Brandt, Curtis R

    2016-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 causes mucocutaneous lesions, and is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the United States. Animal studies have shown that the severity of HSV-1 ocular disease is influenced by three main factors; innate immunity, host immune response and viral strain. We previously showed that mixed infection with two avirulent HSV-1 strains (OD4 and CJ994) resulted in recombinants that exhibit a range of disease phenotypes from severe to avirulent, suggesting epistatic interactions were involved. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of HSV-1 ocular virulence determinants and to identify virulence associated SNPs. Blepharitis and stromal keratitis quantitative scores were characterized for 40 OD4:CJ994 recombinants. Viral titers in the eye were also measured. Virulence quantitative trait locus mapping (vQTLmap) was performed using the Lasso, Random Forest, and Ridge regression methods to identify significant phenotypically meaningful regions for each ocular disease parameter. The most predictive Ridge regression model identified several phenotypically meaningful SNPs for blepharitis and stromal keratitis. Notably, phenotypically meaningful nonsynonymous variations were detected in the UL24, UL29 (ICP8), UL41 (VHS), UL53 (gK), UL54 (ICP27), UL56, ICP4, US1 (ICP22), US3 and gG genes. Network analysis revealed that many of these variations were in HSV-1 regulatory networks and viral genes that affect innate immunity. Several genes previously implicated in virulence were identified, validating this approach, while other genes were novel. Several novel polymorphisms were also identified in these genes. This approach provides a framework that will be useful for identifying virulence genes in other pathogenic viruses, as well as epistatic effects that affect HSV-1 ocular virulence. PMID:26962864

  10. Population genetic and phylogenetic evidence for positive selection on regulatory mutations at the factor VII locus in humans.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Matthew W; Rockman, Matthew V; Soranzo, Nicole; Goldstein, David B; Wray, Gregory A

    2004-06-01

    The abundance of cis-regulatory polymorphisms in humans suggests that many may have been important in human evolution, but evidence for their role is relatively rare. Four common polymorphisms in the 5' promoter region of factor VII (F7), a coagulation factor, have been shown to affect its transcription and protein abundance both in vitro and in vivo. Three of these polymorphisms have low-frequency alleles that decrease expression of F7 and may provide protection against myocardial infarction (heart attacks). The fourth polymorphism has a minor allele that increases the level of transcription. To look for evidence of natural selection on the cis-regulatory variants flanking F7, we genotyped three of the polymorphisms in six Old World populations for which we also have data from a group of putatively neutral SNPs. Our population genetic analysis shows evidence for selection within humans; surprisingly, the strongest evidence is due to a large increase in frequency of the high-expression variant in Singaporean Chinese. Further characterization of a Japanese population shows that at least part of the increase in frequency of the high-expression allele is found in other East Asian populations. In addition, to examine interspecific patterns of selection we sequenced the homologous 5' noncoding region in chimpanzees, bonobos, a gorilla, an orangutan, and a baboon. Analysis of these data reveals an excess of fixed differences within transcription factor binding sites along the human lineage. Our results thus further support the hypothesis that regulatory mutations have been important in human evolution. PMID:15238535

  11. A role for HOX13 proteins in the regulatory switch between TADs at the HoxD locus

    PubMed Central

    Beccari, Leonardo; Yakushiji-Kaminatsui, Nayuta; Woltering, Joost M.; Necsulea, Anamaria; Lonfat, Nicolas; Rodríguez-Carballo, Eddie; Mascrez, Benedicte; Yamamoto, Shiori; Kuroiwa, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate limb development, Hoxd genes are regulated following a bimodal strategy involving two topologically associating domains (TADs) located on either side of the gene cluster. These regulatory landscapes alternatively control different subsets of Hoxd targets, first into the arm and subsequently into the digits. We studied the transition between these two global regulations, a switch that correlates with the positioning of the wrist, which articulates these two main limb segments. We show that the HOX13 proteins themselves help switch off the telomeric TAD, likely through a global repressive mechanism. At the same time, they directly interact with distal enhancers to sustain the activity of the centromeric TAD, thus explaining both the sequential and exclusive operating processes of these two regulatory domains. We propose a model in which the activation of Hox13 gene expression in distal limb cells both interrupts the proximal Hox gene regulation and re-enforces the distal regulation. In the absence of HOX13 proteins, a proximal limb structure grows without any sign of wrist articulation, likely related to an ancestral fish-like condition. PMID:27198226

  12. A role for HOX13 proteins in the regulatory switch between TADs at the HoxD locus.

    PubMed

    Beccari, Leonardo; Yakushiji-Kaminatsui, Nayuta; Woltering, Joost M; Necsulea, Anamaria; Lonfat, Nicolas; Rodríguez-Carballo, Eddie; Mascrez, Benedicte; Yamamoto, Shiori; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Duboule, Denis

    2016-05-15

    During vertebrate limb development, Hoxd genes are regulated following a bimodal strategy involving two topologically associating domains (TADs) located on either side of the gene cluster. These regulatory landscapes alternatively control different subsets of Hoxd targets, first into the arm and subsequently into the digits. We studied the transition between these two global regulations, a switch that correlates with the positioning of the wrist, which articulates these two main limb segments. We show that the HOX13 proteins themselves help switch off the telomeric TAD, likely through a global repressive mechanism. At the same time, they directly interact with distal enhancers to sustain the activity of the centromeric TAD, thus explaining both the sequential and exclusive operating processes of these two regulatory domains. We propose a model in which the activation of Hox13 gene expression in distal limb cells both interrupts the proximal Hox gene regulation and re-enforces the distal regulation. In the absence of HOX13 proteins, a proximal limb structure grows without any sign of wrist articulation, likely related to an ancestral fish-like condition. PMID:27198226

  13. Crosstalk between bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells through a glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper/developmental endothelial locus-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nianlan; Baban, Babak; Isales, Carlos M; Shi, Xing-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Bone marrow is a reservoir for regulatory T (T(reg)) cells, but how T(reg) cells are regulated in that environment remains poorly understood. We show that expression of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in bone marrow mesenchymal lineage cells or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) increases the production of T(reg) cells via a mechanism involving the up-regulation of developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1), an endogenous leukocyte-endothelial adhesion inhibitor. We found that the expression of Del-1 is increased ∼4-fold in the bone tissues of GILZ transgenic (Tg) mice, and this increase is coupled with a significant increase in the production of IL-10 (2.80 vs. 0.83) and decrease in the production of IL-6 (0.80 vs. 2.33) and IL-12 (0.25 vs. 1.67). We also show that GILZ-expressing BMSCs present antigen in a way that favors T(reg) cells. These results indicate that GILZ plays a critical role mediating the crosstalk between BMSCs and T(reg) in the bone marrow microenvironment. These data, together with our previous findings that overexpression of GILZ in BMSCs antagonizes TNF-α-elicited inflammatory responses, suggest that GILZ plays important roles in bone-immune cell communication and BMSC immune suppressive functions. PMID:26038125

  14. Distinct gene expression patterns in skeletal and cardiac muscle are dependent on common regulatory sequences in the MLC1/3 locus.

    PubMed Central

    McGrew, M J; Bogdanova, N; Hasegawa, K; Hughes, S H; Kitsis, R N; Rosenthal, N

    1996-01-01

    The myosin light-chain 1/3 locus (MLC1/3) is regulated by two promoters and a downstream enhancer element which produce two protein isoforms in fast skeletal muscle at distinct stages of mouse embryogenesis. We have analyzed the expression of transcripts from the internal MLC3 promoter and determined that it is also expressed in the atria of the heart. Expression from the MLC3 promoter in these striated muscle lineages is differentially regulated during development. In transgenic mice, the MLC3 promoter is responsible for cardiac-specific reporter gene expression while the downstream enhancer augments expression in skeletal muscle. Examination of the methylation status of endogenous and transgenic promoter and enhancer elements indicates that the internal promoter is not regulated in a manner similar to that of the MLC1 promoter or the downstream enhancer. A GATA protein consensus sequence in the proximal MLC3 promoter but not the MLC1 promoter binds with high affinity to GATA-4, a cardiac muscle- and gut-specific transcription factor. Mutation of either the MEF2 or GATA motifs in the MLC3 promoter attenuates its activity in both heart and skeletal muscles, demonstrating that MLC3 expression in these two diverse muscle types is dependent on common regulatory elements. PMID:8754853

  15. Mutations in the SUP-PF-1 locus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identify a regulatory domain in the beta-dynein heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Porter, M E; Knott, J A; Gardner, L C; Mitchell, D R; Dutcher, S K

    1994-09-01

    We have characterized a group of regulatory mutations that alter the activity of the outer dynein arms. Three mutations were obtained as suppressors of the paralyzed central pair mutant pf6 (Luck, D.J.L., and G. Piperno. 1989. Cell Movement. pp. 49-60), whereas two others were obtained as suppressors of the central pair mutant pfl6. Recombination analysis and complementation tests indicate that all five mutations are alleles at the SUP-PF-1/ODA4 locus and that each allele can restore motility to radial spoke and central pair defective strains. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis with a genomic probe for the beta-dynein heavy chain (DHC) gene confirms that this locus is tightly linked to the beta-DHC gene. Although all five mutant sup-pf-1 alleles alter the activity of the outer dynein arm as assayed by measurements of flagellar motility, only two alleles have a discernable polypeptide defect by SDS-PAGE. We have used photolytic and proteolytic cleavage procedures to localize the polypeptide defect to an approximately 100-kD domain downstream from the last putative nucleotide binding site. This region is encoded by approximately 5 kb of genomic DNA (Mitchell, D.R., and K. Brown. 1994. J. Cell Sci. 107:653-644). PCR amplification of wild-type and mutant DNA across this region identified one PCR product that was consistently smaller in the sup-pf-1 DNA. Direct DNA sequencing of the PCR products revealed that two of the sup-pf-1 mutations are distinct, in-frame deletions. These deletions occur within a region that is predicted to encode a small alpha-helical coiled-coil domain of the beta-DHC. This domain may play a role in protein-protein interactions within the outer dynein arm. Since both the size and location of this domain have been conserved in all axonemal and cytoplasmic DHCs sequenced to date, it presumably performs a common function in all dynein isoforms. PMID:8089181

  16. Determining which phenotypes underlie a pleiotropic signal

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Haldar, Tanushree; Witte, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Discovering pleiotropic loci is important to understand the biological basis of seemingly distinct phenotypes. Most methods for assessing pleiotropy only test for the overall association between genetic variants and multiple phenotypes. To determine which specific traits are pleiotropic, we evaluate via simulation and application three different strategies. The first is model selection techniques based on the inverse regression of genotype on phenotypes. The second is a subset-based meta-analysis ASSET [Bhattacharjee et al., 2012], which provides an optimal subset of non-null traits. And the third is a modified Benjamini-Hochberg (B-H) procedure of controlling the expected false discovery rate [Benjamini and Hochberg, 1995] in the framework of phenome-wide association study. From our simulations we see that an inverse regression based approach MultiPhen [O’Reilly et al., 2012] is more powerful than ASSET for detecting overall pleiotropic association, except for when all the phenotypes are associated and have genetic effects in the same direction. For determining which specific traits are pleiotropic, the modified B-H procedure performs consistently better than the other two methods. The inverse regression based selection methods perform competitively with the modified B-H procedure only when the phenotypes are weakly correlated. The efficiency of ASSET is observed to lie below and in between the efficiency of the other two methods when the traits are weakly and strongly correlated, respectively. In our application to a large GWAS, we find that the modified B-H procedure also performs well, indicating that this may be an optimal approach for determining the traits underlying a pleiotropic signal. PMID:27238845

  17. Determining Which Phenotypes Underlie a Pleiotropic Signal.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Haldar, Tanushree; Witte, John S

    2016-07-01

    Discovering pleiotropic loci is important to understand the biological basis of seemingly distinct phenotypes. Most methods for assessing pleiotropy only test for the overall association between genetic variants and multiple phenotypes. To determine which specific traits are pleiotropic, we evaluate via simulation and application three different strategies. The first is model selection techniques based on the inverse regression of genotype on phenotypes. The second is a subset-based meta analysis ASSET [Bhattacharjee et al., ], which provides an optimal subset of nonnull traits. And the third is a modified Benjamini-Hochberg (B-H) procedure of controlling the expected false discovery rate [Benjamini and Hochberg, ] in the framework of phenome-wide association study. From our simulations we see that an inverse regression-based approach MultiPhen [O'Reilly et al., ] is more powerful than ASSET for detecting overall pleiotropic association, except for when all the phenotypes are associated and have genetic effects in the same direction. For determining which specific traits are pleiotropic, the modified B-H procedure performs consistently better than the other two methods. The inverse regression-based selection methods perform competitively with the modified B-H procedure only when the phenotypes are weakly correlated. The efficiency of ASSET is observed to lie below and in between the efficiency of the other two methods when the traits are weakly and strongly correlated, respectively. In our application to a large GWAS, we find that the modified B-H procedure also performs well, indicating that this may be an optimal approach for determining the traits underlying a pleiotropic signal. PMID:27238845

  18. Cross-Cancer Genome-Wide Analysis of Lung, Ovary, Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Reveals Novel Pleiotropic Associations.

    PubMed

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D; Eeles, Rosalind A; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward L; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J; Stevens, Victoria L; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C; Goode, Ellen L; Permuth, Jennifer B; Risch, Harvey A; Reid, Brett M; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J; Kocarnik, Jonathan K; Newcomb, Polly A; Schoen, Robert E; Slattery, Martha L; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Southey, Melissa C; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S; Yang, Xiaohong R; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V; Edlund, Christopher K; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Jenkins, Mark; Le Marchand, Loïc; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Schmit, Stephanie L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Woods, Michael O; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Easton, Douglas F; Hunter, David J; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Hung, Rayjean J

    2016-09-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer, and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5103-14. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197191

  19. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease. PMID:27494228

  20. The pleiotropic effects of the seed germination inhibitor germostatin.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yajin; Zhao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Seed dormancy and germination are the most important adaptive traits of seed plants, which control the germination in a proper space and time. Internal genetic factors together with environmental cues govern seed dormancy and germination. Abscisic acid (ABA), a key phytohormone induces seed dormancy and inhibits seed germination through its molecular genetic signaling network responding the seed inherent physiological and environmental factors. Recently, auxin has been shown to be another phytohormone that induces seed dormancy. We have recently shown that germonstatin (GS), a small synthetic molecule identified by high through-put chemical genetic screenings, inhibits seed germination through up-regulating auxin signaling and inducing auxin biosynthesis. GERMOSTATIN RESISTANCE LOCUS 1 (GSR1) encodes a plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein and is responsible for GS seed germination inhibition. Its knockdown mutant gsr1 displays decreased dormancy. In this report, we show that GS is not an ABA analog and provided 2 other GS-resistant mutants related to the chemical's function in seed germination inhibition other than gsr1, suggesting that GS may have pleiotropic effects through targeting different pathway governing seed germination. PMID:26918467

  1. Pleiotropic and retinoprotective functions of PACAP.

    PubMed

    Shioda, Seiji; Takenoya, Fumiko; Wada, Nobuhiro; Hirabayashi, Takahiro; Seki, Tamotsu; Nakamachi, Tomoya

    2016-09-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a 27- or 38-amino acid neuropeptide, which belongs to the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide/glucagon/secretin family. PACAP and its three receptor subtypes are expressed in neural tissues of the eye, including the retina, cornea and lacrimal gland, and PACAP is known to exert pleiotropic effects throughout the central nervous system. This review provides an overview of current knowledge regarding the cell protective effects, mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential of PACAP in response to several types of eye injury. PMID:27324639

  2. Homologous Elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3′ Regulatory Region of the Murine Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain (Igh) Locus Are Both Dispensable for Class-switch Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R.; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K.; Eckhardt, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3′ regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established “pairs” of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3′ regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR. PMID:21673112

  3. Pleiotropic Effects of a Schweinfurthin on Isoprenoid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Sarah A.; Kuder, Craig H.; Tong, Huaxiang

    2013-01-01

    The schweinfurthins, a family of natural products derived from the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP), have marked growth inhibitory activity. However, the biochemical basis for the schweinfurthins cellular effects has remained ill-defined. Here, the effects of the synthetic schweinfurthin, 3-deoxyschweinfurthin (3dSB) on multiple aspects of isoprenoid homeostasis are explored. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrate a synergistic interaction between 3dSB and the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor lovastatin but not with other IBP inhibitors in a variety of human cancer cell lines. The cytotoxic effects of 3dSB were enhanced in cells incubated in lipid-depleted serum. 3dSB was found to enhance the lovastatin-induced decrease in protein prenylation. In addition, 3dSB decreases intracellular farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate levels in both established cell lines and primary cells. To determine whether 3dSB alters the regulation of expression of genes involved in isoprenoid homeostasis, real-time PCR studies were performed in human cell lines cultured in either lipid-replete or -deplete conditions. These studies demonstrate that 3dSB abrogates lovastatin-induced upregulation of sterol regulatory element-containing genes and lovastatin-induced downregulation of ABCA1. In aggregate, these studies are the first to demonstrate that a schweinfurthin exerts pleiotropic effects on isoprenoid homeostasis. PMID:21633866

  4. Pleiotropic genes for metabolic syndrome and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kraja, Aldi T.; Chasman, Daniel I.; North, Kari E.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josée; Johnson, Andrew D.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Chu, Audrey Y.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Dastani, Zari; Morris, Andrew; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Sun, Yan V.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Vaez, Ahmad; Lin, Honghuang; Ligthart, Symen; Marullo, Letizia; Rohde, Rebecca; Shao, Yaming; Ziegler, Mark A.; Im, Hae Kyung; Schnabel, Renate B.; Jørgensen, Torben; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Stolk, Ronald P.; Snieder, Harold; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Franco, Oscar H.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Richards, J. Brent; Rotimi, Charles; Wilson, James G.; Lange, Leslie; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Nalls, Mike; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Pankow, James S.; Coresh, Josef; Tang, Weihong; Kao, W.H. Linda; Boerwinkle, Eric; Morrison, Alanna C.; Ridker, Paul M.; Becker, Diane M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Larson, Martin G.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Province, Michael A.; Tracy, Russell; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vaidya, Dhananjay; O’Donnell, Christopher; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Prokopenko, Inga; Meigs, James B.; Borecki, Ingrid B.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has become a health and financial burden worldwide. The MetS definition captures clustering of risk factors that predict higher risk for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Our study hypothesis is that additional to genes influencing individual MetS risk factors, genetic variants exist that influence MetS and inflammatory markers forming a predisposing MetS genetic network. To test this hypothesis a staged approach was undertaken. (a) We analyzed 17 metabolic and inflammatory traits in more than 85,500 participants from 14 large epidemiological studies within the Cross Consortia Pleiotropy Group. Individuals classified with MetS (NCEP definition), versus those without, showed on average significantly different levels for most inflammatory markers studied. (b) Paired average correlations between 8 metabolic traits and 9 inflammatory markers from the same studies as above, estimated with two methods, and factor analyses on large simulated data, helped in identifying 8 combinations of traits for follow-up in meta-analyses, out of 130,305 possible combinations between metabolic traits and inflammatory markers studied. (c) We performed correlated meta-analyses for 8 metabolic traits and 6 inflammatory markers by using existing GWAS published genetic summary results, with about 2.5 million SNPs from twelve predominantly largest GWAS consortia. These analyses yielded 130 unique SNPs/genes with pleiotropic associations (a SNP/gene associating at least one metabolic trait and one inflammatory marker). Of them twenty-five variants (seven loci newly reported) are proposed as MetS candidates. They map to genes MACF1, KIAA0754, GCKR, GRB14, COBLL1, LOC646736-IRS1, SLC39A8, NELFE, SKIV2L, STK19, TFAP2B, BAZ1B, BCL7B, TBL2, MLXIPL, LPL, TRIB1, ATXN2, HECTD4, PTPN11, ZNF664, PDXDC1, FTO, MC4R and TOMM40. Based on large data evidence, we conclude that inflammation is a feature of MetS and several gene variants show pleiotropic genetic

  5. Deletions of exons with regulatory activity at the DYNC1I1 locus are associated with split-hand/split-foot malformation: array CGH screening of 134 unrelated families

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A growing number of non-coding regulatory mutations are being identified in congenital disease. Very recently also some exons of protein coding genes have been identified to act as tissue specific enhancer elements and were therefore termed exonic enhancers or “eExons”. Methods We screened a cohort of 134 unrelated families with split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM) with high resolution array CGH for CNVs with regulatory potential. Results In three families with an autosomal dominant non-syndromic SHFM phenotype we detected microdeletions encompassing the exonic enhancer (eExons) 15 and 17 of DYNC1I1. In a fourth family, who had hearing loss in addition to SHFM, we found a larger deletion of 510 kb including the eExons of DYNC1I1 and, in addition, the human brain enhancer hs1642. Exons 15 and 17 of DYNC1I1 are known to act as tissue specific limb enhancers of DLX5/6, two genes that have been shown to be associated with SHFM in mice. In our cohort of 134 unrelated families with SHFM, deletions of the eExons of DYNC1I1 account for approximately 3% of the cases, while 17p13.3 duplications were identified in 13% of the families, 10q24 duplications in 12%, and TP63 mutations were detected in 4%. Conclusions We reduce the minimal critical region for SHFM1 to 78 kb. Hearing loss, however, appears to be associated with deletions of a more telomeric region encompassing the brain enhancer element hs1642. Thus, SHFM1 as well as hearing loss at the same locus are caused by deletion of regulatory elements. Deletions of the exons with regulatory potential of DYNC1I1 are an example of the emerging role of exonic enhancer elements and their implications in congenital malformation syndromes. PMID:25231166

  6. Quercetin: a pleiotropic kinase inhibitor against cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Gian Luigi; Russo, Maria; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Tedesco, Idolo; Bilotto, Stefania; Iannitti, Roberta; Palumbo, Rosanna

    2014-01-01

    Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables can represent an easy strategy to significantly reduce the incidence of cancer. From this observation, derived mostly from epidemiological data, the new field of chemoprevention has emerged in the primary and secondary prevention of cancer. Chemoprevention is defined as the use of natural or synthetic compounds able to stop, reverse, or delay the process of tumorigenesis in its early stages. A large number of phytochemicals are potentially capable of simultaneously inhibiting and modulating several key factors regulating cell proliferation in cancer cells. Quercetin is a flavonoid possessing potential chemopreventive properties. It is a functionally pleiotropic molecule, possessing multiple intracellular targets, affecting different cell signaling processes usually altered in cancer cells, with limited toxicity on normal cells. Simultaneously targeting multiple pathways may help to kill malignant cells and slow down the onset of drug resistance. Among the different substrates triggered by quercetin, we have reviewed the ability of the molecule to inhibit protein kinases involved in deregulated cell growth in cancer cells. PMID:24114481

  7. Interleukin (IL)-25: Pleiotropic roles in asthma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiujuan; Sun, Yongchang; Wang, Wei; Sun, Ying

    2016-05-01

    IL-25, also named IL-17E, is a distinct member of the IL-17 cytokine family, which can promote and augment T helper type 2 (Th2) responses locally or systemically. Growing evidence from experimental and clinical studies indicates that the expression of IL-25 and its cognate receptor, IL-17RB/RA, is markedly upregulated in asthmatic conditions. It has also been found that IL-25 induces not only typical eosinophilic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), but also airway remodelling, manifested by goblet cell hyperplasia, subepithelial collagen deposition and angiogenesis. This review will focus on the discovery, cellular origins and targets of IL-25, and try to update current animal and human studies elucidating the roles of IL-25 in asthma. We conclude that although IL-25 is a pleiotropic cytokine, it may only play its dominant role in a certain specific asthmatic endotype, named 'IL-25 high' phenotype. Thus, targeting IL-25 or its receptor might selectively benefit some subgroups with asthma. Furthermore, the major IL-25 producing as well as responsive cells in the changeable milieu of asthma should be assessed in the future. PMID:26699081

  8. Distinct cis-Regulatory Elements from the Dlx1/Dlx2 Locus Mark Different Progenitor Cell Populations in the Ganglionic Eminences and Different Subtypes of Adult Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Noël; Yu, Man; Long, Jason; Hatch, Gary; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Ekker, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Distinct subtypes of cortical GABAergic interneurons provide inhibitory signals that are indispensable for neural network function. The Dlx homeobox genes have a central role in regulating their development and function. We have characterized the activity of three cis-regulatory sequences involved in forebrain expression of vertebrate Dlx genes: upstream regulatory element 2 (URE2), I12b, and I56i. The three regulatory elements display regional and temporal differences in their activities within the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE), medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), and caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) and label distinct populations of tangentially migrating neurons at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and E13.5. We provide evidence that the dorsomedial and ventral MGE are distinct sources of tangentially migrating neurons during midgestation. In the adult cortex, URE2 and I12b/I56i are differentially expressed in parvalbumin-, calretinin-, neuropeptide Y-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive interneurons; I12b and I56i were specifically active in somatostatin-, vasoactive intestinal peptide-, and calbindin-positive interneurons. These data suggest that interneuron subtypes use distinct combinations of Dlx1/Dlx2 enhancers from the time they are specified through adulthood. PMID:17494687

  9. The regulatory c1 locus of Zea mays encodes a protein with homology to myb proto-oncogene products and with structural similarities to transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Ares, J; Ghosal, D; Wienand, U; Peterson, P A; Saedler, H

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the wild-type c1 locus of Zea mays was determined by sequence analysis of one genomic and two cDNA clones. The coding region is composed of three exons (150 bp, 129 bp and one, at least 720 bp) and two small introns (88 bp and 145 bp). Transcription of the mRNAs corresponding to the two cDNA clones cLC6 (1.1 kb) and cLC28 (2.1 kb) starts from the same promoter. Both cDNAs are identical except that cLC28 extends further at its 3' end. A putative protein, 273 amino acids in length was deduced from the sequence of both transcripts. It contains two domains, one basic and the other acidic and might function as a transcriptional activator. The basic domain of this c1-encoded protein shows 40% sequence homology to the protein products of animal myb proto-oncogenes. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3428265

  10. Genetic relatedness of Clostridium difficile isolates from various origins determined by triple-locus sequence analysis based on toxin regulatory genes tcdC, tcdR, and cdtR.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Philippe J M; Popoff, Michel R

    2008-11-01

    A triple-locus nucleotide sequence analysis based on toxin regulatory genes tcdC, tcdR and cdtR was initiated to assess the sequence variability of these genes among Clostridium difficile isolates and to study the genetic relatedness between isolates. A preliminary investigation of the variability of the tcdC gene was done with 57 clinical and veterinary isolates. Twenty-three isolates representing nine main clusters were selected for tcdC, tcdR, and cdtR analysis. The numbers of alleles found for tcdC, tcdR and cdtR were nine, six, and five, respectively. All strains possessed the cdtR gene except toxin A-negative toxin B-positive variants. All but one binary toxin CDT-positive isolate harbored a deletion (>1 bp) in the tcdC gene. The combined analyses of the three genes allowed us to distinguish five lineages correlated with the different types of deletion in tcdC, i.e., 18 bp (associated or not with a deletion at position 117), 36 bp, 39 bp, and 54 bp, and with the wild-type tcdC (no deletion). The tcdR and tcdC genes, though located within the same pathogenicity locus, were found to have evolved separately. Coevolution of the three genes was noted only with strains harboring a 39-bp or a 54-bp deletion in tcdC that formed two homogeneous, separate divergent clusters. Our study supported the existence of the known clones (PCR ribotype 027 isolates and toxin A-negative toxin B-positive C. difficile variants) and evidence for clonality of isolates with a 39-bp deletion (toxinotype V, PCR ribotype 078) that are frequently isolated worldwide from human infections and from food animals. PMID:18832125

  11. High-resolution mapping of the wheat Lr46 pleiotropic rust resistance locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rust diseases are the most important diseases of wheat globally, and genetic resistance is the most effective method for controlling all three rusts. Numerous resistance genes have been characterized and reported. For typical resistance genes, the mechanism of resistance and the basis of race specif...

  12. Association Between Seed Dormancy and Pericarp Color Is Controlled by a Pleiotropic Gene That Regulates Abscisic Acid and Flavonoid Synthesis in Weedy Red Rice

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xing-You; Foley, Michael E.; Horvath, David P.; Anderson, James V.; Feng, Jiuhuan; Zhang, Lihua; Mowry, Chase R.; Ye, Heng; Suttle, Jeffrey C.; Kadowaki, Koh-ichi; Chen, Zongxiang

    2011-01-01

    Seed dormancy has been associated with red grain color in cereal crops for a century. The association was linked to qSD7-1/qPC7, a cluster of quantitative trait loci for seed dormancy/pericarp color in weedy red rice. This research delimited qSD7-1/qPC7 to the Os07g11020 or Rc locus encoding a basic helix-loop-helix family transcription factor by intragenic recombinants and provided unambiguous evidence that the association arises from pleiotropy. The pleiotropic gene expressed in early developing seeds promoted expression of key genes for biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), resulting in an increase in accumulation of the dormancy-inducing hormone; activated a conserved network of eight genes for flavonoid biosynthesis to produce the pigments in the lower epidermal cells of the pericarp tissue; and enhanced seed weight. Thus, the pleiotropic locus most likely controls the dormancy and pigment traits by regulating ABA and flavonoid biosynthetic pathways, respectively. The dormancy effect could be eliminated by a heat treatment, but could not be completely overcome by gibberellic acid or physical removal of the seed maternal tissues. The dormancy-enhancing alleles differentiated into two groups basically associated with tropical and temperate ecotypes of weedy rice. Of the pleiotropic effects, seed dormancy could contribute most to the weed adaptation. Pleiotropy prevents the use of the dormancy gene to improve resistance of white pericarp cultivars against pre-harvest sprouting through conventional breeding approaches. PMID:21954164

  13. Pleiotropic Properties of a Yeast Mutant Insensitive to Catabolite Repression

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Helene Cherrick; Fugit, Donna; Mowshowitz, Deborah Bernhardt

    1980-01-01

    The flk1 mutation, which was originally isolated in the yeast Saccharomyces carlsbergenesis, causes insensitivity to catabolite repression. This mutation has been further characterized and mapped. The gene flk1 is located on chromosome III between thr4 and MAL2, 14 centimorgans from MAL2. flk1 is shown to be allelic to the pleiotropic mutants tup1, cyc9, and umr7; and flk1 is shown to exhibit an array of pleiotropic properties common to tup1, cyc9 and umr7; These results suggest that the flk1 mutation is not a specific lesion affecting catabolite repression. PMID:17249023

  14. Pleiotropic role of the RNA chaperone protein Hfq in the human pathogen Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Boudry, P; Gracia, C; Monot, M; Caillet, J; Saujet, L; Hajnsdorf, E; Dupuy, B; Martin-Verstraete, I; Soutourina, O

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emergent human pathogen and the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Our recent data strongly suggest the importance of RNA-based mechanisms for the control of gene expression in C. difficile. In an effort to understand the function of the RNA chaperone protein Hfq, we constructed and characterized an Hfq-depleted strain in C. difficile. Hfq depletion led to a growth defect, morphological changes, an increased sensitivity to stresses, and a better ability to sporulate and to form biofilms. The transcriptome analysis revealed pleiotropic effects of Hfq depletion on gene expression in C. difficile, including genes encoding proteins involved in sporulation, stress response, metabolic pathways, cell wall-associated proteins, transporters, and transcriptional regulators and genes of unknown function. Remarkably, a great number of genes of the regulon dependent on sporulation-specific sigma factor, SigK, were upregulated in the Hfq-depleted strain. The altered accumulation of several sRNAs and interaction of Hfq with selected sRNAs suggest potential involvement of Hfq in these regulatory RNA functions. Altogether, these results suggest the pleiotropic role of Hfq protein in C. difficile physiology, including processes important for the C. difficile infection cycle, and expand our knowledge of Hfq-dependent regulation in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:24982306

  15. Pleiotropic Role of the RNA Chaperone Protein Hfq in the Human Pathogen Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Boudry, P.; Gracia, C.; Monot, M.; Caillet, J.; Saujet, L.; Hajnsdorf, E.; Dupuy, B.; Martin-Verstraete, I.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emergent human pathogen and the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Our recent data strongly suggest the importance of RNA-based mechanisms for the control of gene expression in C. difficile. In an effort to understand the function of the RNA chaperone protein Hfq, we constructed and characterized an Hfq-depleted strain in C. difficile. Hfq depletion led to a growth defect, morphological changes, an increased sensitivity to stresses, and a better ability to sporulate and to form biofilms. The transcriptome analysis revealed pleiotropic effects of Hfq depletion on gene expression in C. difficile, including genes encoding proteins involved in sporulation, stress response, metabolic pathways, cell wall-associated proteins, transporters, and transcriptional regulators and genes of unknown function. Remarkably, a great number of genes of the regulon dependent on sporulation-specific sigma factor, SigK, were upregulated in the Hfq-depleted strain. The altered accumulation of several sRNAs and interaction of Hfq with selected sRNAs suggest potential involvement of Hfq in these regulatory RNA functions. Altogether, these results suggest the pleiotropic role of Hfq protein in C. difficile physiology, including processes important for the C. difficile infection cycle, and expand our knowledge of Hfq-dependent regulation in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:24982306

  16. Cross-cancer pleiotropic analysis of endometrial cancer: PAGE and E2C2 consortia

    PubMed Central

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Schumacher, Fredrick; Prescott, Jennifer; Haessler, Jeffrey; Malinowski, Jennifer; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Yang, Hannah; Chanock, Stephen; Brinton, Louise; Hartge, Patricia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Park, S.Lani; Cheng, Iona; Bush, William S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Ursin, Giske; Horn-Ross, Pamela; Bernstein, Leslie; Lu, Lingeng; Risch, Harvey; Yu, Herbert; Sakoda, Lori C.; Doherty, Jennifer; Chen, Chu; Jackson, Rebecca; Yasmeen, Shagufta; Cote, Michele; Kocarnik, Jonathan M.; Peters, Ulrike; Kraft, Peter; De Vivo, Immaculata; Haiman, Christopher A.; Kooperberg, Charles; Le Marchand, Loic

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a large number of cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), several of which have been associated with multiple cancer sites suggesting pleiotropic effects and shared biological mechanisms across some cancers. We hypothesized that SNPs associated with other cancers may be additionally associated with endometrial cancer. We examined 213 SNPs previously associated with 14 other cancers for their associations with endometrial cancer in 3758 endometrial cancer cases and 5966 controls of European ancestry from two consortia: Population Architecture Using Genomics and Epidemiology and the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium. Study-specific logistic regression estimates adjusted for age, body mass index and the most significant principal components of genetic ancestry were combined using fixed-effect meta-analysis to evaluate the association between each SNP and endometrial cancer risk. A Bonferroni-corrected P value of 2.35×10−4 was used to determine statistical significance of the associations. SNP rs7679673, ~6.3kb upstream of TET2 and previously reported to be associated with prostate cancer risk, was associated with endometrial cancer risk in the direction opposite to that for prostate cancer [meta-analysis odds ratio = 0.87 (per copy of the C allele), 95% confidence interval = 0.81, 0.93; P = 7.37×10−5] with no evidence of heterogeneity across studies (P heterogeneity = 0.66). This pleiotropic analysis is the first to suggest TET2 as a susceptibility locus for endometrial cancer. PMID:24832084

  17. Pleiotropic effects of statins: new therapeutic targets in drug design.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Onkar; Dhawan, Veena; Sharma, P L; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-07-01

    The HMG Co-enzyme inhibitors and new lipid-modifying agents expand their new therapeutic target options in the field of medical profession. Statins have been described as the most effective class of drugs to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Since the discovery of the first statin nearly 30 years ago, these drugs have become the main therapeutic approach to lower cholesterol levels. The present scientific research demonstrates numerous non-lipid modifiable effects of statins termed as pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be beneficial for the treatment of various devastating disorders. The most important positive effects of statins are anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, anti-diabetes, and antithrombotic, improving endothelial dysfunction and attenuating vascular remodeling besides many others which are discussed under the scope of this review. In particular, inhibition of Rho and its downstream target, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), and their agonistic action on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) can be viewed as the principle mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic effects of statins. With gradually increasing knowledge of new therapeutic targets of statins, their use has also been advocated in chronic inflammatory disorders for example rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the scope of review, we highlight statins and their pleiotropic effects with reference to their harmful and beneficial effects as a novel approach for their use in the treatment of devastating disorders. Graphical abstract Pleiotropic effect of statins. PMID:27146293

  18. Tumor Progression Locus 2 (Tpl2) Activates the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Pathway, Inhibits Forkhead Box P3 (FoxP3) Expression, and Limits Regulatory T Cell (Treg) Immunosuppressive Functions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Acuff, Nicole V; Peeks, Angela R; Kirkland, Rebecca; Wyatt, Kara D; Nagy, Tamas; Watford, Wendy T

    2016-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2, also known as Map3k8/Cot) is a potent inflammatory mediator that drives the production of TNFα, IL-1β, and IFNγ. We previously demonstrated that Tpl2 regulates T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and modulates T helper cell differentiation. However, very little is known about how Tpl2 modulates the development of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs are a specialized subset of T cells that express FoxP3 and possess immunosuppressive properties to limit excess inflammation. Because of the documented role of Tpl2 in promoting inflammation, we hypothesized that Tpl2 antagonizes Treg development and immunosuppressive function. Here we demonstrate that Tpl2 constrains the development of inducible Tregs. Tpl2(-/-) naïve CD4(+) T cells preferentially develop into FoxP3(+) inducible Tregs in vitro as well as in vivo in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced systemic tolerance. Treg biasing of Tpl2(-/-) T cells depended on TCR signal strength and corresponded with reduced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Importantly, Tpl2(-/-) Tregs have basally increased expression of FoxP3 and immunosuppressive molecules, IL-10 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4). Furthermore, they were more immunosuppressive in vivo in a T cell transfer model of colitis, as evidenced by reduced effector T cell accumulation, systemic production of inflammatory cytokines, and colonic inflammation. These results demonstrate that Tpl2 promotes inflammation in part by constraining FoxP3 expression and Treg immunosuppressive functions. Overall, these findings suggest that Tpl2 inhibition could be used to preferentially drive Treg induction and thereby limit inflammation in a variety of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27261457

  19. Pleiotropic functions of catabolite control protein CcpA in Butanol-producing Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used to produce butanol in industry. Catabolite control protein A (CcpA), known to mediate carbon catabolite repression (CCR) in low GC gram-positive bacteria, has been identified and characterized in C. acetobutylicum by our previous work (Ren, C. et al. 2010, Metab Eng 12:446–54). To further dissect its regulatory function in C. acetobutylicum, CcpA was investigated using DNA microarray followed by phenotypic, genetic and biochemical validation. Results CcpA controls not only genes in carbon metabolism, but also those genes in solvent production and sporulation of the life cycle in C. acetobutylicum: i) CcpA directly repressed transcription of genes related to transport and metabolism of non-preferred carbon sources such as d-xylose and l-arabinose, and activated expression of genes responsible for d-glucose PTS system; ii) CcpA is involved in positive regulation of the key solventogenic operon sol (adhE1-ctfA-ctfB) and negative regulation of acidogenic gene bukII; and iii) transcriptional alterations were observed for several sporulation-related genes upon ccpA inactivation, which may account for the lower sporulation efficiency in the mutant, suggesting CcpA may be necessary for efficient sporulation of C. acetobutylicum, an important trait adversely affecting the solvent productivity. Conclusions This study provided insights to the pleiotropic functions that CcpA displayed in butanol-producing C. acetobutylicum. The information could be valuable for further dissecting its pleiotropic regulatory mechanism in C. acetobutylicum, and for genetic modification in order to obtain more effective butanol-producing Clostridium strains. PMID:22846451

  20. Chinese hamster pleiotropic multidrug-resistant cells are not radioresistant

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.B.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, N.; DeGraff, W.; Carmichael, J.; Glatstein, E.

    1988-01-01

    The inherent cellular radiosensitivity of a Chinese hamster ovary pleiotropic cell line that is multidrug resistant (CHRC5) was compared to that of its parental cell line (AuxB1). Radiation survival curve parameters n and D0 were 4.5 and 1.1 Gy, respectively, for the CHRC5 line and 5.0 and 1.2 Gy, respectively, for the parental line. Thus, the inherent radiosensitivity of the two lines was similar even though key intracellular free radical scavenging and detoxifying systems employing glutathione, glutathione transferase, and catalase produced enzyme levels that were 2.0-, 1.9-, and 1.9-fold higher, respectively, in the drug-resistant cell line. Glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine resulted in the same extent of aerobic radiosensitization in both lines (approximately 10%). Incorporation of iododeoxyuridine into cellular DNA sensitized both cell lines to radiation. These studies indicate that pleiotropic drug resistance does not necessarily confer radiation resistance.

  1. An ancient yet flexible cis-regulatory architecture allows localized Hedgehog tuning by patched/Ptch1

    PubMed Central

    Lorberbaum, David S; Ramos, Andrea I; Peterson, Kevin A; Carpenter, Brandon S; Parker, David S; De, Sandip; Hillers, Lauren E; Blake, Victoria M; Nishi, Yuichi; McFarlane, Matthew R; Chiang, Ason CY; Kassis, Judith A; Allen, Benjamin L; McMahon, Andrew P; Barolo, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway is part of the ancient developmental-evolutionary animal toolkit. Frequently co-opted to pattern new structures, the pathway is conserved among eumetazoans yet flexible and pleiotropic in its effects. The Hedgehog receptor, Patched, is transcriptionally activated by Hedgehog, providing essential negative feedback in all tissues. Our locus-wide dissections of the cis-regulatory landscapes of fly patched and mouse Ptch1 reveal abundant, diverse enhancers with stage- and tissue-specific expression patterns. The seemingly simple, constitutive Hedgehog response of patched/Ptch1 is driven by a complex regulatory architecture, with batteries of context-specific enhancers engaged in promoter-specific interactions to tune signaling individually in each tissue, without disturbing patterning elsewhere. This structure—one of the oldest cis-regulatory features discovered in animal genomes—explains how patched/Ptch1 can drive dramatic adaptations in animal morphology while maintaining its essential core function. It may also suggest a general model for the evolutionary flexibility of conserved regulators and pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13550.001 PMID:27146892

  2. [Ghd7, a pleiotropic gene controlling flag leaf area in rice].

    PubMed

    Tan, Cong; Weng, Xiao-Yu; Yan, Wen-Hao; Bai, Xu-Feng; Xing, Yong-Zhong

    2012-07-01

    Photosynthesis is the unique source of energy for plant. Flag leaf contributed the majority of photosynthate after rice flowering. Ghd7 is a pleiotropic gene, which can significantly increase rice production. In order to study the genetic effects of Ghd7 on the flag leaf morphology, we made quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis for flag leaf length (FLL), flag leaf width (FLW), and flag leaf area (FLA) using a Ghd7-BC2F2 population of 190 plants. In the BC2F2 population, the frequency distribution of FLL, FLW, and FLA were bimodal and in agreement with single Mendelian segregation ratio (3:1). FLL, FLW, and FLA were positively correlated with grains per panicle in the population. One QTL was mapped to the in-terval between markers RM3859 and C39 on chromosome 7, which explained 73.3%, 62.3%, and 71.8% of the variations for FLL, FLW, and FLA, and co-segregated with Ghd7. Two near-isogenic lines of NIL (mh7) and NIL (tq7) were devel-oped using Zhenshan 97 as the recurrent parent and Minghui 63 and Teqing as the donor parent, respectively. Both NILs significantly increased the phenotypic values of FLL, FLW, and FLA as compared with Zhenshan 97. FLL, The values of FLW and FLA for Ghd7 over-expression transgenic plants were 8.9 cm, 0.5 cm, and 17.8 cm2 larger than its recipient Heji-ang 19. These results demonstrated that Ghd7 plays an important role in controlling the flag leaf area in rice. PMID:22805217

  3. The pleiotropic effects of paricalcitol: Beyond bone-mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Egido, Jesús; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Bover, Jordi; Praga, Manuel; Torregrosa, José Vicente; Fernández-Giráldez, Elvira; Solozábal, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a common complication in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) that is characterised by elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and a series of bone-mineral metabolism anomalies. In patients with SHPT, treatment with paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, has been shown to reduce PTH levels with minimal serum calcium and phosphorus variations. The classic effect of paricalcitol is that of a mediator in mineral and bone homeostasis. However, recent studies have suggested that the benefits of treatment with paricalcitol go beyond PTH reduction and, for instance, it has a positive effect on cardiovascular disease and survival. The objective of this study is to review the most significant studies on the so-called pleiotropic effects of paricalcitol treatment in patients with CKD. PMID:26705959

  4. Targeting pleiotropic signaling pathways to control adult cardiac stem cell fate and function

    PubMed Central

    Pagliari, Stefania; Jelinek, Jakub; Grassi, Gabriele; Forte, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The identification of different pools of cardiac progenitor cells resident in the adult mammalian heart opened a new era in heart regeneration as a means to restore the loss of functional cardiac tissue and overcome the limited availability of donor organs. Indeed, resident stem cells are believed to participate to tissue homeostasis and renewal in healthy and damaged myocardium although their actual contribution to these processes remain unclear. The poor outcome in terms of cardiac regeneration following tissue damage point out at the need for a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling CPC behavior and fate determination before new therapeutic strategies can be developed. The regulation of cardiac resident stem cell fate and function is likely to result from the interplay between pleiotropic signaling pathways as well as tissue- and cell-specific regulators. Such a modular interaction—which has already been described in the nucleus of a number of different cells where transcriptional complexes form to activate specific gene programs—would account for the unique responses of cardiac progenitors to general and tissue-specific stimuli. The study of the molecular determinants involved in cardiac stem/progenitor cell regulatory mechanisms may shed light on the processes of cardiac homeostasis in health and disease and thus provide clues on the actual feasibility of cardiac cell therapy through tissue-specific progenitors. PMID:25071583

  5. Pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on intestinal mucosa: not just trefoil peptides.

    PubMed

    Assimakopoulos, Stelios-F; Scopa, Chrisoula-D; Nikolopoulou, Vassiliki-N; Vagianos, Constantine-E

    2008-06-14

    Bombesin and neurotensin are neuropeptides which exert a wide spectrum of biological actions on gastrointestinal tissues influencing intestinal growth and adaptation, intestinal motility, blood flow, secretion, nutrient absorption and immune response. Based mainly on their well-established potent enterotrophic effect, numerous experimental studies investigated their potential positive effect on the atrophic or injured intestinal mucosa. These peptides proved to be effective mucosa-healing factors, but the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms for this action remained unresolved. In a recently published study (World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14(8): 1222-1230), it was shown that their protective effect on the intestine in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease was related to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiapoptotic actions. These results are in close agreement with our previous studies on jaundiced and hepatectomized rats that showed a regulatory effect of bombesin and neurotensin on critical cellular processes such as enterocyte' proliferation and death, oxidative stress and redox equilibrium, tight junctions' formation and function, and inflammatory response. The pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on diverse types of intestinal injury may justify their consideration for clinical trials. PMID:18567096

  6. Mutations in Barley Row Type Genes Have Pleiotropic Effects on Shoot Branching

    PubMed Central

    Liller, Corinna Brit; Neuhaus, René; von Korff, Maria; Koornneef, Maarten; van Esse, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Cereal crop yield is determined by different yield components such as seed weight, seed number per spike and the tiller number and spikes. Negative correlations between these traits are often attributed to resource limitation. However, recent evidence suggests that the same genes or regulatory modules can regulate both inflorescence branching and tillering. It is therefore important to explore the role of genetic correlations between different yield components in small grain cereals. In this work, we studied pleiotropic effects of row type genes on seed size, seed number per spike, thousand grain weight, and tillering in barley to better understand the genetic correlations between individual yield components. Allelic mutants of nine different row type loci (36 mutants), in the original spring barley varieties Barke, Bonus and Foma and introgressed in the spring barley cultivar Bowman, were phenotyped under greenhouse and outdoor conditions. We identified two main mutant groups characterized by their relationships between seed and tillering parameters. The first group comprises all mutants with an increased number of seeds and significant change in tiller number at early development (group 1a) or reduced tillering only at full maturity (group 1b). Mutants in the second group are characterized by a reduction in seeds per spike and tiller number, thus exhibiting positive correlations between seed and tiller number. Reduced tillering at full maturity (group 1b) is likely due to resource limitations. In contrast, altered tillering at early development (groups 1a and 2) suggests that the same genes or regulatory modules affect inflorescence and shoot branching. Understanding the genetic bases of the trade-offs between these traits is important for the genetic manipulation of individual yield components. PMID:26465604

  7. The IGF2 Locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone regulating various cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis. IGF2 is vital to embryo development. The IGF2 locus covers approximately 150-kb genomic region on human chromosome 11, containing two imprinted genes, IGF2 and H19, sha...

  8. Gastrin exerts pleiotropic effects on human melanoma cell biology.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Véronique; Mijatovic, Tatjana; van Damme, Marc; Kiss, Robert

    2005-10-01

    The effects of gastrin (G17) on the growth and migration factors of four human melanoma cell lines (HT-144, C32, G-361, and SKMEL-28) were investigated. The expression patterns of cholecystokinin (CCK)(A), CCK(B), and CCK(C) gastrin receptors were investigated in these cells and in seven clinical samples by means of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Melanoma cells appear to express mRNA for CCK(C) receptors, but not for CCK(A) or CCK(B) receptors. Although gastrin does not significantly modify the growth characteristics of the cell lines under study, it significantly modifies their cell migration characteristics. These modifications occur at adhesion level by modifying the expression levels of alpha(v) and beta3 integrins, at motility level by modifying the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, and at invasion level by modifying the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase 14. We recently demonstrated the presence of CCK(B) receptors in mouse endothelial cells involved in glioblastoma neoangiogenesis. Chronic in vivo administration of a selective CCK(B) receptor antagonist to mice bearing xenografts of human C32 melanoma cells significantly decreased levels of neoangiogenesis, resulting in considerable delays in the growth of these C32 xenografts. In conclusion, our study identifies the pleiotropic effects of gastrin on melanoma cell biology. PMID:16242076

  9. Synthesis and Pharmacochemistry of New Pleiotropic Pyrrolyl Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidou, Markella; Gkermani, Alice; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of our attempts to synthesize pleiotropic anti-inflammatory agents, we have synthesized some chalcones and their corresponding 3,4-pyrrolyl derivatives. Chalcones constitute a class of compounds with high biological impact. They are known for a number of biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging activities. They inhibit several enzymes implicated in the inflammatory process, such as lipoxygenase, cyclooxygenase (COX) and lysozymes. The synthesized pyrroles have been studied for: (1) their in vitro inhibition of lipoxygenase; (2) their in vitro inhibition of COX; (3) their in vitro inhibition of lipid peroxidation; (4) their interaction with the stable, N-centered, free radical, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH); (5) their inhibition on interleukin-6 (IL-6); (6) their anti-proteolytic activity; and (7) their in vivo anti-inflammatory activity using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. Their physicochemical properties were determined to explain the biological results. Lipophilicity was experimentally determined. 2i and 2v were found to be promising multifunctional molecules with high antiproteolytic and anti-inflammatory activities in combination with anti-interleukin-6 activity. PMID:26378503

  10. Mosaic hoxb4a Neuronal Pleiotropism in Zebrafish Caudal Hindbrain

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Leung-Hang; Punnamoottil, Beena; Rinkwitz, Silke; Baker, Robert

    2009-01-01

    To better understand how individual genes and experience influence behavior, the role of a single homeotic unit, hoxb4a, was comprehensively analyzed in vivo by clonal and retrograde fluorescent labeling of caudal hindbrain neurons in a zebrafish enhancer-trap YFP line. A quantitative spatiotemporal neuronal atlas showed hoxb4a activity to be highly variable and mosaic in rhombomere 7–8 reticular, motoneuronal and precerebellar nuclei with expression decreasing differentially in all subgroups through juvenile stages. The extensive Hox mosaicism and widespread pleiotropism demonstrate that the same transcriptional protein plays a role in the development of circuits that drive behaviors from autonomic through motor function including cerebellar regulation. We propose that the continuous presence of hoxb4a positive neurons may provide a developmental plasticity for behavior-specific circuits to accommodate experience- and growth-related changes. Hence, the ubiquitous hoxb4a pleitropism and modularity likely offer an adaptable transcriptional element for circuit modification during both growth and evolution. PMID:19536294

  11. Congenic Strains Confirm the Pleiotropic Effect of Chromosome 4 QTL on Mouse Femoral Geometry and Biomechanical Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kristianto, Jasmin; Litscher, Suzanne J.; Johnson, Michael G.; Patel, Forum; Patel, Mital; Fisher, Jacqueline; Zastrow, Ryley K.; Radcliff, Abigail B.; Blank, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    A pleiotropic quantitative trait locus (QTL) for bone geometry and mechanical performance in mice was mapped to distal chromosome 4 via an intercross of recombinant congenic mice HcB-8 and HcB-23. To study the QTL in isolation, we have generated C3H.B10-(rs6355453-rs13478087) (C.B.4.3) and C3H.B10-(rs6369860-D4Mit170) (C.B.4.2) congenic strains that harbor ~20 Mb and ~3 Mb, respectively, of chromosome 4 overlapping segments from C57BL/10ScSnA (B10) within the locus on a C3H/DiSnA (C3H) background. Using 3-point bend testing and standard beam equations, we phenotyped these mice for femoral mid-diaphyseal geometry and biomechanical performance. We analyzed the results via 2-way ANOVA, using sex and genotype as factors. In the C.B.4.3 strain, we found that homozygous B10/B10 male mice had smaller cross sectional area (CSA) and reduced total displacement than homozygous C3H/C3H mice. Sex by genotype interaction was also observed for maximum load and stiffness for C3H/C3H and B10/B10 mice, respectively. In C.B.4.2 strain, we found that homozygous B10/B10 mice had lower total displacement, post-yield displacement (PYD), stiffness, yield load and maximum load than mice harboring C3H allele. Sex by genotype interaction was observed in B10/B10 mice for perimeter, outer minor axis (OMA) and CSA. There were no significant differences in tissue level mechanical performance, which suggest that the QTL acts primarily on circumferential bone size. These data confirm the prior QTL mapping data and support other work demonstrating the importance of chromosome 4 QTL on bone modeling and bone responses to mechanical loading. PMID:26849124

  12. The Cnes2 Locus on Mouse Chromosome 17 Regulates Host Defense against Cryptococcal Infection through Pleiotropic Effects on Host Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Shourian, Mitra; Flaczyk, Adam; Angers, Isabelle; Mindt, Barbara C.; Fritz, Jörg H.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of natural susceptibility to progressive Cryptococcus neoformans infection is not well understood. Using C57BL/6 and CBA/J inbred mice, we previously identified three chromosomal regions associated with C. neoformans susceptibility (Cnes1, Cnes2, and Cnes3). To validate and characterize the role of Cnes2 during the host response, we constructed a congenic strain on the C57BL/6 background (B6.CBA-Cnes2). Phenotypic analysis of B6.CBA-Cnes2 mice 35 days after C. neoformans infection showed a significant reduction of fungal burden in the lungs and spleen with higher pulmonary expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12), lower expression of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and an absence of airway epithelial mucus production compared to that in C57BL/6 mice. Multiparameter flow cytometry of infected lungs also showed a significantly higher number of neutrophils, exudate macrophages, CD11b+ dendritic cells, and CD4+ cells in B6.CBA-Cnes2 than in C57BL/6 mice. The activation state of recruited macrophages and dendritic cells was also significantly increased in B6.CBA-Cnes2 mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the Cnes2 interval is a potent regulator of host defense, immune responsiveness, and differential Th1/Th2 polarization following C. neoformans infection. PMID:26371125

  13. Lack of a type-2 glycosyltransferase in the fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum determines pleiotropic changes and loss of virulence.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pascual, David; Gómez, Esther; Guijarro, José A

    2015-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen, responsible for Cold Water Disease, with a significant economic impact on salmonid farms worldwide. In spite of this, little is known about the bacterial physiology and pathogenesis mechanisms, maybe because it is difficult to manipulate, being considered a fastidious microorganism. Mutants obtained using a Tn4351 transposon were screened in order to identify those with alteration in colony morphology, colony spreading and extracellular proteolytic activity, amongst other phenotypes. A F. psychrophilum mutant lacking gliding motility showed interruption of the FP1638 locus that encodes a putative type-2 glycosyltransferase (from here on referred to as fpgA gene, Flavobacterium psychrophilum glycosyltransferase). Additionally, the mutant also showed a decrease in the extracellular proteolytic activity as a consequence of down regulation in the fpgA mutant background of the fpp2-fpp1 operon promoter, responsible for the major extracellular proteolytic activity of the bacterium. The protein glycosylation profile of the parental strain showed the presence of a 22 kDa glycosylated protein which is lost in the mutant. Complementation with the fpgA gene led to the recovery of the wild-type phenotype. LD50 experiments in the rainbow trout infection model show that the mutant was highly attenuated. The pleiotropic phenotype of the mutant demonstrated the importance of this glycosyltranferase in the physiology and virulence of the bacterium. Moreover, the fpgA mutant strain could be considered a good candidate for the design of an attenuated vaccine. PMID:25582708

  14. [Mechanisms of action of statins and their pleiotropic effects].

    PubMed

    Davignon, J; Mabile, L

    2001-02-01

    This brief review and update considers a few aspects of the mechanisms of action of statins, especially those related to some of the pleiotropic effects that have clinical relevance. The beneficial effect on endothelial dysfunction is a class effect that is related not only to the lowering of plasma LDL-cholesterol but also to a direct effect on nitric oxide (NO) production. It is an early and sustained effect, linked to oxidative processes, that deserves particular attention since endothelial dysfunction is intimately linked to atherogenesis. Awareness of the anti-inflammatory effect came about following the observation that statin administration in humans reduces markers of inflammation in the circulation. The importance of these observations is ascribable to the fact that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, that the inflammatory process in a coronary artery is now measurable in vivo in humans, that it contributes to the progression and the destabilization of the plaque, and also, because statins exert a number of effects that tend to stabilize it. Statins, and particularly lipophilic statins, in general inhibit cell proliferation, seemingly by multifaceted mechanisms. These include inhibition of cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis, reduction of cyclooxygenase-2 activity and an enhancement of angiogenesis. At the center of these mechanisms stands the ability to inhibit G protein prenylation through a reduction of farnesylation and geranylgeranylation. This effect has been used to show that statins are anticarcinogenic in vitro and in animals. The clinical relevance of such a property remains to be proven but is supported by promising observations in animals and in humans which are detailed in this review. Finally, the ability of lipophilic statins to increase the production of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and to enhance osteogenesis in animals combined with the results of several clinical studies should stimulate physicians to

  15. Flavopiridol: pleiotropic biological effects enhance its anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Elizabeth W

    2004-06-01

    Flavopiridol has potent anti-proliferative properties due to its direct action of binding to the ATP-binding pocket of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks), and due to its indirect action reducing levels of other cyclins and cdk inhibitors, contributing to its pleiotropic effects. Flavopiridol is a potent apoptotic agent due to its ability to cause cell death in cycling as well as non-cycling tumor cells; to down-regulate important cell survival proteins, such as survivin, through inhibition of the phosphorylation of Thr34; to increase sensitivity for S phase cells to drug treatment by modulating E2F-1 transcription factor activity in tumor cells; to induce both caspase-dependent and -independent mitochondrial cell death pathways; and to inhibit the activation of p-Akt which in turn inhibits activation of NF-kappaB. Flavopiridol possesses several important anti-angiogenic activities including induction of apoptosis of endothelial cells; inhibition of the hypoxic induction of vascular endothelial growth factor and/or its production under hypoxic conditions through inhibition of HIF-1alpha transcription; and decreased secretion of matrix metalloproteinases that is linked with significant inhibition of invasive potential in Matrigel assays. Taken together, the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic properties of flavopiridol may contribute to its anti-tumor activities observed in several preclinical animal models of human cancers including prostate, lymphoid, head and neck, colon, and glioma. These promising preclinical observations opened the way for phase I and II clinical trials. Given the low toxicity profile of flavopiridol used as a single agent in patients, combination therapy now offers numerous opportunities in the near future to improve the efficacy of flavopiridol in the treatment of refractory cancers. PMID:15166614

  16. The pleiotropic effects of erythropoietin in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Buemi, M; Cavallaro, E; Floccari, F; Sturiale, A; Aloisi, C; Trimarchi, M; Corica, F; Frisina, N

    2003-03-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is a hydrophobic sialoglycoproteic hormone produced by the kidney and responsible for the proliferation, maturation, and differentiation of the precursors of the erythroid cell line. Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEpo) is used to treat different types of anemia, not only in uremic patients but also in newborns with anemia of prematurity, in patients with cancer-related anemia or myeloproliferative disease, thalassemias, bone marrow transplants, or those with chronic infectious diseases. The pleiotropic functions of Epo are well known. It has been shown that this hormone can modulate the inflammatory and immune response, has direct hemodynamic and vasoactive effects, could be considered a proangiogenic factor because of its interaction with vascular endothelial growth factor, and its ability to stimulate mitosis and motility of endothelial cells. The multifunctional role of Epo has further been confirmed by the discovery in the central nervous system of a specific Epo/Epo receptor (EpoR) system. Both Epo and EpoR are expressed by astrocytes and neurons and Epo is present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Therefore, novel functions of Epo, tissue-specific regulation, and the mechanisms of action have been investigated. In this review we have tried to summarize the current data on the role of Epo on brain function. We discuss the different sites of cerebral expression and mechanisms of regulation of Epo and its receptor and its role in the development and maturation of the brain. Second, we discuss the neurotrophic and neuroprotective function of Epo in different conditions of neuronal damage, such as hypoxia, cerebral ischemia, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, and the consequent possibility that rHuEpo therapy could soon be used in clinical practice to limit neuronal damage induced by these diseases. PMID:12638727

  17. Pleiotropic actions of iron balance in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhui; Fang, Xuexian; Wang, Fudi

    2015-03-01

    As an essential element, iron plays a central role in many physiological processes, including redox balance, inflammation, energy metabolism, and environment sensing. Perturbations in iron homeostasis are associated with several conditions, including hyperglycemia and diabetes, both of which have been studied in patients and animal models. To clarify the pleiotropic role of iron homeostasis in diabetes development, the early studies on diseases with iron-overload, studies on clinical iron depletion therapies, associations between iron-related genetic polymorphisms and diabetes, and etiological mechanisms underlying iron perturbations-impaired insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity were carefully reviewed and discussed. Hereditary hemochromatosis, transfusion-dependent thalassemia, and excess heme iron intake can increase the risk of developing diabetes. Genetically modified mice and mice fed a high-iron diet present with discrepant phenotypes due to differences in tissue iron distribution. Moreover, several genetic polymorphisms related to iron homeostasis have been associated with the risk of developing diabetes. Tightly controlled iron metabolism is essential for insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, and iron overload in pancreatic islets alters reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, as well as hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stability and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, thereby impairing the function and viability of β-cells. Decreased levels of adiponectin, macrophage-mediated inflammation, and ROS-mediated liver kinase B1 (LKB1)/adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation can contribute to iron overload-induced insulin resistance, whereas iron deficiency could also participate in obesity-related inflammation, hypoxia, and insulin resistance. Because iron homeostasis is closely correlated with many metabolic processes, future studies are needed in order to elucidate the finely tuned network among iron

  18. The pleiotropic effects of metformin: time for prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Bromage, Daniel I; Yellon, Derek M

    2015-01-01

    The global prevalence of diabetes has risen to epidemic proportions and the trend is predicted to continue. The consequent burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is a major public health concern and new treatments are required to mitigate the deleterious effects of cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury is well known to exacerbate the harmful effects of acute myocardial infarction and subsequent therapeutic reperfusion, and several mechanical and pharmacological approaches to mitigating this injury have been investigated. Metformin, which is cheap, relatively safe and widely used in type 2 diabetes, is one such pharmacotherapy with considerable pre-clinical evidence for cardioprotective utility beyond its glucose-lowering effect. However, despite convincing basic evidence its translation to clinical application has largely been limited to studies of cardiovascular risk. There are several barriers to prospective randomized assessment in the context of acute myocardial infarction, not least the accessibility and already widespread use of metformin among patients with type 2 diabetes at high risk of cardiovascular events. In the place of class 1 evidence, well-designed prospective cohort studies of the potential pleiotropic utility of metformin in cardiovascular disease, and particularly its benefit in ischaemia-reperfusion injury, are needed. Given the availability of metformin worldwide, this is particularly true in low- and middle-income countries where the optimal therapy for acute myocardial infarction, primary percutaneous coronary intervention, may not be available, and instead patients are managed with thrombolysis. As this is less effective, metformin as an adjunct to thrombolysis (or PPCI) could represent an effective, cheap means of cardioprotection with global relevance. PMID:26271457

  19. Pleiotropic neuroprotective and metabolic effects of Actovegin's mode of action.

    PubMed

    Machicao, Fausto; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Hundsberger, Harald; Pflüger, Maren; Guekht, Alla

    2012-11-15

    This article reviews the mechanisms of action of Actovegin in the context of its preclinical effects and new concepts in the pharmacological treatment of neurological disorders. Actovegin is an ultrafiltrate of calf blood, composed of more than 200 biological substances. The drug is used for a broad spectrum of diseases, including disturbances of peripheral and cerebral blood circulation, burns, impaired wound healing, radiation-induced damage and diabetic polyneuropathy. Actovegin is composed of small molecules present under normal physiological conditions, therefore pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies to determine its active substance are not feasible. Preclinical data have revealed that it improves metabolic balance by increasing glucose uptake and improving oxygen uptake under conditions of ischemia. Actovegin also resists the effects of gamma-irradiation and stimulates wound healing. More recent preclinical studies have suggested that anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic mechanisms of action specifically underlie the neuroprotective properties of Actovegin. The drug has been found to exert these beneficial effects experimentally, in primary rat hippocampal neurons and in an STZ-rat model of diabetic polyneuropathy, while also providing evidence that it positively affects the functional recovery of neurons. Latest data suggest that Actovegin also has a positive influence on the NF-κB pathway, but many molecular and cellular pathways remain unexplored. In particular, Actovegin's influence on neuroplasticity, neurogenesis and neurotrophicity are questions that ideally should be answered by future research. Nevertheless, it is clear that the multifactorial and complex nature of Actovegin underlies its pleiotropic neuroprotective mechanisms of action and positive effect on clinical outcomes. PMID:22910148

  20. Pleiotropic mechanisms facilitated by resveratrol and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Calamini, Barbara; Ratia, Kiira; Malkowski, Michael G.; Cuendet, Muriel; Pezzuto, John M.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2010-07-01

    Resveratrol has demonstrated cancer chemopreventive activity in animal models and some clinical trials are underway. In addition, resveratrol was shown to promote cell survival, increase lifespan and mimic caloric restriction, thereby improving health and survival of mice on high-calorie diet. All of these effects are potentially mediated by the pleiotropic interactions of resveratrol with different enzyme targets including COX-1 (cyclo-oxygenase-1) and COX-2, NAD{sup +}-dependent histone deacetylase SIRT1 (sirtuin 1) and QR2 (quinone reductase 2). Nonetheless, the health benefits elicited by resveratrol as a direct result of these interactions with molecular targets have been questioned, since it is rapidly and extensively metabolized to sulfate and glucuronide conjugates, resulting in low plasma concentrations. To help resolve these issues, we tested the ability of resveratrol and its metabolites to modulate the function of some known targets in vitro. In the present study, we have shown that COX-1, COX-2 and QR2 are potently inhibited by resveratrol, and that COX-1 and COX-2 are also inhibited by the resveratrol 4{prime}-O-sulfate metabolite. We determined the X-ray structure of resveratrol bound to COX-1 and demonstrate that it occupies the COX active site similar to other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Finally, we have observed that resveratrol 3- and 4?-O-sulfate metabolites activate SIRT1 equipotently to resveratrol, but that activation is probably a substrate-dependent phenomenon with little in vivo relevance. Overall, the results of this study suggest that in vivo an interplay between resveratrol and its metabolites with different molecular targets may be responsible for the overall beneficial health effects previously attributed only to resveratrol itself.

  1. Fine mapping of the nail-patella syndrome locus at 9q34.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, I; Clough, M V; Schäffer, A A; Puffenberger, E G; Horton, V K; Peters, K; Abbott, M H; Roig, C M; Cutone, S; Ozelius, L; Kwiatkowski, D J; Pyeritz, R E; Brown, L J; Pauli, R M; McCormick, M K; Francomano, C A

    1997-01-01

    Nail-patella syndrome (NPS), or onychoosteodysplasia, is an autosomal dominant, pleiotropic disorder characterized by nail dysplasia, absent or hypoplastic patellae, iliac horns, and nephropathy. Previous studies have demonstrated linkage of the nail-patella locus to the ABO and adenylate kinase loci on human chromosome 9q34. As a first step toward isolating the NPS gene, we present linkage analysis with 13 polymorphic markers in five families with a total of 69 affected persons. Two-point linkage analysis with the program MLINK showed tight linkage of NPS and the anonymous markers D9S112 (LOD = 27.0; theta = .00) and D9S315 (LOD = 22.0; theta = .00). Informative recombination events place the NPS locus within a 1-2-cM interval between D9S60 and the adenylate kinase gene (AK1). PMID:8981956

  2. A Novel Regulatory Locus of Phosphorylation in the C Terminus of the Potassium Chloride Cotransporter KCC2 That Interferes with N-Ethylmaleimide or Staurosporine-mediated Activation*♦

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Maren; Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Beyer, Timo; Ripperger, Anne; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2014-01-01

    The neuron-specific cation chloride cotransporter KCC2 plays a crucial role in hyperpolarizing synaptic inhibition. Transporter dysfunction is associated with various neurological disorders, raising interest in regulatory mechanisms. Phosphorylation has been identified as a key regulatory process. Here, we retrieved experimentally observed phosphorylation sites of KCC2 from public databases and report on the systematic analysis of six phosphorylated serines, Ser25, Ser26, Ser937, Ser1022, Ser1025, and Ser1026. Alanine or aspartate substitutions of these residues were analyzed in HEK-293 cells. All mutants were expressed in a pattern similar to wild-type KCC2 (KCC2WT). Tl+ flux measurements demonstrated unchanged transport activity for Ser25, Ser26, Ser1022, Ser1025, and Ser1026 mutants. In contrast, KCC2S937D, mimicking phosphorylation, resulted in a significant up-regulation of transport activity. Aspartate substitution of Thr934, a neighboring putative phosphorylation site, resulted in a comparable increase in KCC2 transport activity. Both KCC2T934D and KCC2S937D mutants were inhibited by the kinase inhibitor staurosporine and by N-ethylmaleimide, whereas KCC2WT, KCC2T934A, and KCC2S937A were activated. The inverse staurosporine effect on aspartate versus alanine substitutions reveals a cross-talk between different phosphorylation sites of KCC2. Immunoblot and cell surface labeling experiments detected no alterations in total abundance or surface expression of KCC2T934D and KCC2S937D compared with KCC2WT. These data reveal kinetic regulation of transport activity by these residues. In summary, our data identify a novel key regulatory phosphorylation site of KCC2 and a functional interaction between different conformation-changing post-translational modifications. The action of pharmacological agents aimed to modulate KCC2 activity for therapeutic benefit might therefore be highly context-specific. PMID:24849604

  3. Global Rebalancing of Cellular Resources by Pleiotropic Point Mutations Illustrates a Multi-scale Mechanism of Adaptive Evolution.

    PubMed

    Utrilla, Jose; O'Brien, Edward J; Chen, Ke; McCloskey, Douglas; Cheung, Jacky; Wang, Harris; Armenta-Medina, Dagoberto; Feist, Adam M; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2016-04-27

    Pleiotropic regulatory mutations affect diverse cellular processes, posing a challenge to our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships across multiple biological scales. Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) allows for such mutations to be found and characterized in the context of clear selection pressures. Here, several ALE-selected single-mutation variants in RNA polymerase (RNAP) of Escherichia coli are detailed using an integrated multi-scale experimental and computational approach. While these mutations increase cellular growth rates in steady environments, they reduce tolerance to stress and environmental fluctuations. We detail structural changes in the RNAP that rewire the transcriptional machinery to rebalance proteome and energy allocation toward growth and away from several hedging and stress functions. We find that while these mutations occur in diverse locations in the RNAP, they share a common adaptive mechanism. In turn, these findings highlight the resource allocation trade-offs organisms face and suggest how the structure of the regulatory network enhances evolvability. PMID:27135538

  4. A Pleiotropic Nonadditive Model of Variation in Quantitative Traits

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, A.; Keightley, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    A model of mutation-selection-drift balance incorporating pleiotropic and dominance effects of new mutations on quantitative traits and fitness is investigated and used to predict the amount and nature of genetic variation maintained in segregating populations. The model is based on recent information on the joint distribution of mutant effects on bristle traits and fitness in Drosophila melanogaster from experiments on the accumulation of spontaneous and P element-induced mutations. These experiments suggest a leptokurtic distribution of effects with an intermediate correlation between effects on the trait and fitness. Mutants of large effect tend to be partially recessive while those with smaller effect are on average additive, but apparently with very variable gene action. The model is parameterized with two different sets of information derived from P element insertion and spontaneous mutation data, though the latter are not fully known. They differ in the number of mutations per generation which is assumed to affect the trait. Predictions of the variance maintained for bristle number assuming parameters derived from effects of P element insertions, in which the proportion of mutations with an effect on the trait is small, fit reasonably well with experimental observations. The equilibrium genetic variance is nearly independent of the degree of dominance of new mutations. Heritabilities of between 0.4 and 0.6 are predicted with population sizes from 10(4) to 10(6), and most of the variance for the metric trait in segregating populations is due to a small proportion of mutations (about 1% of the total number) with neutral or nearly neutral effects on fitness and intermediate effects on the trait (0.1-0.5σ(P)). Much of the genetic variance is contributed by recessive or partially recessive mutants, but only a small proportion (about 10%) of the genetic variance is dominance variance. The amount of apparent selection on the trait itself generated by the model is

  5. Genetic analysis of a pleiotropic deletion mutation (delta igf) in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Y; Fujita, T

    1983-01-01

    A delta igf mutation of Bacillus subtilis (formerly called fdpAl) is a large deletion causing pleiotropic defects. The mapping of the delta igf deletion by phage PBS1 transduction revealed the following map order: sacA, thiC, hsrE, delta igf, ts199, purA. To analyze the pleiotropic nature of the delta igf mutation, mutants affected in each property of the pleiotropic mutation were isolated, and the mutations were mapped. iol and gnt mutants could not grow on inositol and gluconate, respectively, and fdp mutants were affected only in fructose-bisphosphatase. The map order from sacA to purA was as follows: sacA, thiC, hsrE, iol-6, gnt-4, fdp-74, hsrB, ts199, purA. The delta igf deletion covered loci from iol-6 to hsrB. PMID:6302085

  6. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Coline, Goriaux; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets. PMID:25136352

  7. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Goriaux, Coline; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets. PMID:25136352

  8. Diazaborine resistance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals a link between YAP1 and the pleiotropic drug resistance genes PDR1 and PDR3.

    PubMed

    Wendler, F; Bergler, H; Prutej, K; Jungwirth, H; Zisser, G; Kuchler, K; Högenauer, G

    1997-10-24

    We have investigated the mechanisms underlying resistance to the drug diazaborine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We used UV mutagenesis to generate resistant mutants, which were divided into three different complementation groups. The resistant phenotype in these groups was found to be caused by allelic forms of the genes AFG2, PDR1, and PDR3. The AFG2 gene encodes an AAA (ATPases associated to a variety of cellular activities) protein of unknown function, while PDR1 and PDR3 encode two transcriptional regulatory proteins involved in pleiotropic drug resistance development. The isolated PDR1-12 and PDR3-33 alleles carry mutations that lead to a L1044Q and a Y276H exchange, respectively. In addition, we report that overexpression of Yap1p, the yeast homologue of the transcription factor AP1, results in a diazaborine-resistant phenotype. The YAP1-mediated diazaborine resistance is dependent on the presence of functional PDR1 and PDR3 genes, although PDR3 had a more pronounced effect. These results provide the first evidence for a functional link between the Yap1p-dependent stress response pathway and Pdr1p/Pdr3p-dependent development of pleiotropic drug resistance. PMID:9341149

  9. Transcriptional Analysis of the Streptococcus pyogenes Salivaricin Locus

    PubMed Central

    Namprachan-Frantz, Phanramphoei; Rowe, Hannah M.; Runft, Donna L.

    2014-01-01

    The sal lantibiotic locus plays an important role in the virulence of Streptococcus pyogenes. Our transcriptional analysis of the sal locus provides new information on the complex regulation of this operon. Transcription of the operon is regulated by a promoter upstream of the operon and by a second internal promoter upstream of the salKRZ genes. Here we identify the location of the internal promoter and provide information on how this promoter is autoregulated by proteins within the locus. We determined by primer extension that the salKR promoter is located within the salY gene and identified several regulatory regions important for expression. The higher activity of the promoter in a salKR deletion strain indicates a role in repression by the SalR response regulator. Further, this promoter had higher activity in a salA deletion strain, implicating corepression or a signaling role for the SalA peptide. Finally, we demonstrate that this promoter can be controlled by host factors. Analysis of transcriptional regulation of this locus provides a better understanding of the function of the sal locus in S. pyogenes pathogenesis. PMID:24244008

  10. Genetic Variation Within a Metabolic Motif in the Chromogranin A Promoter: Pleiotropic Influence on Cardiometabolic Risk Traits in Twins

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Fangwen; Chiron, Stephane; Wei, Zhiyun; Fung, Maple M.; Chen, Yuqing; Wen, Gen; Khandrika, Srikrishna; Ziegler, Michael G.; Benyamin, Beben; Montgomery, Grant; Whitfield, John B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Waalen, Jill; Hamilton, Bruce A.; Mahata, Sushil K.; O’Connor, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    thus under joint (pleiotropic) genetic determination, with CHGA as one such contributory locus: a common polymorphism in the promoter (G-462A) of CHGA predicts such heritable metabolic traits as BMI and leptin. CHGA promoter variant G-462A was not only associated with such metabolic traits but also disrupted a PPARγ/RXRα motif and responded differentially to characteristic trans-activators of that motif. The results suggest novel links between the catecholaminergic system and risk for the metabolic syndrome as well as systemic hypertension. PMID:21918574

  11. Propagation of genetic variation in gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plahte, Erik; Gjuvsland, Arne B.; Omholt, Stig W.

    2013-08-01

    A future quantitative genetics theory should link genetic variation to phenotypic variation in a causally cohesive way based on how genes actually work and interact. We provide a theoretical framework for predicting and understanding the manifestation of genetic variation in haploid and diploid regulatory networks with arbitrary feedback structures and intra-locus and inter-locus functional dependencies. Using results from network and graph theory, we define propagation functions describing how genetic variation in a locus is propagated through the network, and show how their derivatives are related to the network’s feedback structure. Similarly, feedback functions describe the effect of genotypic variation of a locus on itself, either directly or mediated by the network. A simple sign rule relates the sign of the derivative of the feedback function of any locus to the feedback loops involving that particular locus. We show that the sign of the phenotypically manifested interaction between alleles at a diploid locus is equal to the sign of the dominant feedback loop involving that particular locus, in accordance with recent results for a single locus system. Our results provide tools by which one can use observable equilibrium concentrations of gene products to disclose structural properties of the network architecture. Our work is a step towards a theory capable of explaining the pleiotropy and epistasis features of genetic variation in complex regulatory networks as functions of regulatory anatomy and functional location of the genetic variation.

  12. Altered calmodulin activity in fluphenazine-resistant mutant strains. Pleiotropic effect on development and cellular organization in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Kurn, N; Sela, B A

    1981-12-01

    Genetically altered calmodulin activity in spontaneously derived mutant strains, which were selected for resistance to the toxic effect of a specific inhibitor, the phenothiazine drug fluphenazine, is demonstrated. Partially purified calmodulin preparations from wild-type and fluphenazine-resistant strains of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, were tested for the ability to activate Ca2+-ATPase of the erythrocyte membranes, and the inhibition of this stimulatory activity by fluphenazine. Unlike the preparation obtained from wild-type cells, mutant calmodulin is shown to be insensitive to fluphenazine inhibition, in one case, and calmodulin from another strain was found to be inactive in vitro, i.e. it did not activate Ca2+-ATPase. The pleiotropic phenotype of the spontaneously derived mutant strains involved aberrant multicellular organization and hormone-independent commitment of the multipotent asexual reproductive cells, gonodia, to sexual development. These results clearly implicate calmodulin in the control of development and morphogenesis in this simple multicellular eukaryote. In addition, intracellular inhibition of calmodulin in wild-type cells is shown to block the morphogenic process of embryo inversion and to arrest motility. The availability of mutant calmodulin will facilitate further investigation of the role of this ubiquitous regulatory protein in the control of development and differentiation in multicellular eukarytes, as well as the fine structure/function relationship with regard to calmodulin modulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. PMID:6459931

  13. Aconitase Functions as a Pleiotropic Posttranscriptional Regulator in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Crystal M.; Wang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Posttranscriptional regulation in bacteria has increasingly become recognized as playing a major role in response to environmental stimuli. Aconitase is a bifunctional protein that not only acts enzymatically but also can be a posttranscriptional regulator. To investigate protein expression regulated by Helicobacter pylori AcnB in response to oxidative stress, a global proteomics study was conducted wherein the ΔacnB strain was compared to the parent strain when both strains were O2 stressed. Many proteins, including some involved in urease activity, in combating oxidative stress, and in motility, were expressed at a significantly lower level in the ΔacnB strain. A bioinformatics prediction tool was used to identify putative targets for aconitase-mediated regulation, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that apo-AcnB is able to bind to RNA transcripts of hpn (encoding a nickel-sequestering protein), ahpC (encoding alkyl hydroperoxide reductase), and flgR (encoding flagellum response regulator). Compared to the wild type (WT), the ΔacnB strain had decreased activities of the nickel-containing enzymes urease and hydrogenase, and this could be correlated with lower total nickel levels within ΔacnB cells. Binding of apo-AcnB to the hpn 5′ untranslated region (UTR) may inhibit the expression of Hpn. In agreement with the finding that AcnB regulates the expression of antioxidant proteins such as AhpC, ΔacnB cells displayed oxidative-stress-sensitive phenotypes. The ΔacnB strain has a lesser motility ability than the WT strain, which can likely be explained by the functions of AcnB on the FlgRS-RpoN-FlgE regulatory cascade. Collectively, our results suggest a global role for aconitase as a posttranscriptional regulator in this gastric pathogen. IMPORTANCE Bacterial survival depends on the ability of the cell to sense and respond to a variety of environmental changes. For Helicobacter pylori, responding to environmental stimuli within the

  14. Pleiotropic effect of thyroid hormones on gene expression in fish as exemplified from the blue bream Ballerus ballerus (Cyprinidae): Results of transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rastorguev, S M; Nedoluzhko, A V; Levina, M A; Prokhorchuk, E B; Skryabin, K G; Levin, B A

    2016-03-01

    A pronounced pleiotropic effect of thyroid hormones on the regulation of gene expression in fish in postembryogenesis was demonstrated for the first time using larvae and juveniles of the blue bream Ballerus ballerus as an example. Genome-wide transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) identified 1212 differentially expressed genes in the brain and liver of fish kept in triiodothyronine solution (0.25 ng/mL). Our data show that the regulation of gene expression by thyroid hormones is widespread in nature: it involves not only the structural genes but also the regulatory genes. A significant number of genes under the control of thyroid hormones are involved in the determination of morphological traits. PMID:27193715

  15. Vitamin D: Metabolism, Molecular Mechanism of Action, and Pleiotropic Effects.

    PubMed

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Verlinden, Lieve; Carmeliet, Geert

    2016-01-01

    1,25-Dihydroxvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] is the hormonally active form of vitamin D. The genomic mechanism of 1,25(OH)2D3 action involves the direct binding of the 1,25(OH)2D3 activated vitamin D receptor/retinoic X receptor (VDR/RXR) heterodimeric complex to specific DNA sequences. Numerous VDR co-regulatory proteins have been identified, and genome-wide studies have shown that the actions of 1,25(OH)2D3 involve regulation of gene activity at a range of locations many kilobases from the transcription start site. The structure of the liganded VDR/RXR complex was recently characterized using cryoelectron microscopy, X-ray scattering, and hydrogen deuterium exchange. These recent technological advances will result in a more complete understanding of VDR coactivator interactions, thus facilitating cell and gene specific clinical applications. Although the identification of mechanisms mediating VDR-regulated transcription has been one focus of recent research in the field, other topics of fundamental importance include the identification and functional significance of proteins involved in the metabolism of vitamin D. CYP2R1 has been identified as the most important 25-hydroxylase, and a critical role for CYP24A1 in humans was noted in studies showing that inactivating mutations in CYP24A1 are a probable cause of idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia. In addition, studies using knockout and transgenic mice have provided new insight on the physiological role of vitamin D in classical target tissues as well as evidence of extraskeletal effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 including inhibition of cancer progression, effects on the cardiovascular system, and immunomodulatory effects in certain autoimmune diseases. Some of the mechanistic findings in mouse models have also been observed in humans. The identification of similar pathways in humans could lead to the development of new therapies to prevent and treat disease. PMID:26681795

  16. A Quantitative Trait Locus Influencing Anxiety in the Laboratory Rat

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Escorihuela, Rosa M.; Gray, Jeffrey A.; Aguilar, Raúl; Gil, Luis; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Tobeña, Adolf; Bhomra, Amarjit; Nicod, Alison; Mott, Richard; Driscoll, Peter; Dawson, Gerard R.; Flint, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    A critical test for a gene that influences susceptibility to fear in animals is that it should have a consistent pattern of effects across a broad range of conditioned and unconditioned models of anxiety. Despite many years of research, definitive evidence that genetic effects operate in this way is lacking. The limited behavioral test regimes so far used in genetic mapping experiments and the lack of suitable multivariate methodologies have made it impossible to determine whether the quantitative trait loci (QTL) detected to date specifically influence fear-related traits. Here we report the first multivariate analysis to explore the genetic architecture of rodent behavior in a battery of animal models of anxiety. We have mapped QTLs in an F2 intercross of two rat strains, the Roman high and low avoidance rats, that have been selectively bred for differential response to fear. Multivariate analyses show that one locus, on rat chromosome 5, influences behavior in different models of anxiety. The QTL influences two-way active avoidance, conditioned fear, elevated plus maze, and open field activity but not acoustic startle response or defecation in a novel environment. The direction of effects of the QTL alleles and a coincidence between the behavioral profiles of anxiolytic drug and genetic action are consistent with the QTL containing at least one gene with a pleiotropic action on fear responses. As the neural basis of fear is conserved across species, we suggest that the QTL may have relevance to trait anxiety in humans. PMID:11932246

  17. Detecting Functional Groups of Arabidopsis Mutants by Metabolic Profiling and Evaluation of Pleiotropic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jörg; Börnke, Frederik; Schmiedl, Alfred; Kleine, Tatjana; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic profiles and fingerprints of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with various defects in plastidic sugar metabolism or photosynthesis were analyzed to elucidate if the genetic mutations can be traced by comparing their metabolic status. Using a platform of chromatographic and spectrometric tools data from untargeted full MS scans as well as from selected metabolites including major carbohydrates, phosphorylated intermediates, carboxylates, free amino acids, major antioxidants, and plastidic pigments were evaluated. Our key observations are that by multivariate statistical analysis each mutant can be separated by a unique metabolic signature. Closely related mutants come close. Thus metabolic profiles of sugar mutants are different but more similar than those of photosynthesis mutants. All mutants show pleiotropic responses mirrored in their metabolic status. These pleiotropic responses are typical and can be used for separating and grouping of the mutants. Our findings show that metabolite fingerprints can be taken to classify mutants and hence may be used to sort genes into functional groups. PMID:22639613

  18. Malaria Parasite-Infected Erythrocytes Secrete PfCK1, the Plasmodium Homologue of the Pleiotropic Protein Kinase Casein Kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Dorin-Semblat, Dominique; Demarta-Gatsi, Claudia; Hamelin, Romain; Armand, Florence; Carvalho, Teresa Gil; Moniatte, Marc; Doerig, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Casein kinase 1 (CK1) is a pleiotropic protein kinase implicated in several fundamental processes of eukaryotic cell biology. Plasmodium falciparum encodes a single CK1 isoform, PfCK1, that is expressed at all stages of the parasite's life cycle. We have previously shown that the pfck1 gene cannot be disrupted, but that the locus can be modified if no loss-of-function is incurred, suggesting an important role for this kinase in intra-erythrocytic asexual proliferation. Here, we report on the use of parasite lines expressing GFP- or His-tagged PfCK1 from the endogenous locus to investigate (i) the dynamics of PfCK1 localisation during the asexual cycle in red blood cells, and (ii) potential interactors of PfCK1, so as to gain insight into the involvement of the enzyme in specific cellular processes. Immunofluorescence analysis reveals a dynamic localisation of PfCK1, with evidence for a pool of the enzyme being directed to the membrane of the host erythrocyte in the early stages of infection, followed by a predominantly intra-parasite localisation in trophozoites and schizonts and association with micronemes in merozoites. Furthermore, we present strong evidence that a pool of enzymatically active PfCK1 is secreted into the culture supernatant, demonstrating that PfCK1 is an ectokinase. Our interactome experiments and ensuing kinase assays using recombinant PfCK1 to phosphorylate putative interactors in vitro suggest an involvement of PfCK1 in many cellular processes such as mRNA splicing, protein trafficking, ribosomal, and host cell invasion. PMID:26629826

  19. Malaria Parasite-Infected Erythrocytes Secrete PfCK1, the Plasmodium Homologue of the Pleiotropic Protein Kinase Casein Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Dorin-Semblat, Dominique; Demarta-Gatsi, Claudia; Hamelin, Romain; Armand, Florence; Carvalho, Teresa Gil; Moniatte, Marc; Doerig, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Casein kinase 1 (CK1) is a pleiotropic protein kinase implicated in several fundamental processes of eukaryotic cell biology. Plasmodium falciparum encodes a single CK1 isoform, PfCK1, that is expressed at all stages of the parasite’s life cycle. We have previously shown that the pfck1 gene cannot be disrupted, but that the locus can be modified if no loss-of-function is incurred, suggesting an important role for this kinase in intra-erythrocytic asexual proliferation. Here, we report on the use of parasite lines expressing GFP- or His-tagged PfCK1 from the endogenous locus to investigate (i) the dynamics of PfCK1 localisation during the asexual cycle in red blood cells, and (ii) potential interactors of PfCK1, so as to gain insight into the involvement of the enzyme in specific cellular processes. Immunofluorescence analysis reveals a dynamic localisation of PfCK1, with evidence for a pool of the enzyme being directed to the membrane of the host erythrocyte in the early stages of infection, followed by a predominantly intra-parasite localisation in trophozoites and schizonts and association with micronemes in merozoites. Furthermore, we present strong evidence that a pool of enzymatically active PfCK1 is secreted into the culture supernatant, demonstrating that PfCK1 is an ectokinase. Our interactome experiments and ensuing kinase assays using recombinant PfCK1 to phosphorylate putative interactors in vitro suggest an involvement of PfCK1 in many cellular processes such as mRNA splicing, protein trafficking, ribosomal, and host cell invasion. PMID:26629826

  20. Pleiotropic effects of coat colour-associated mutations in humans, mice and other mammals.

    PubMed

    Reissmann, Monika; Ludwig, Arne

    2013-01-01

    The characterisation of the pleiotropic effects of coat colour-associated mutations in mammals illustrates that sensory organs and nerves are particularly affected by disorders because of the shared origin of melanocytes and neurocytes in the neural crest; e.g. the eye-colour is a valuable indicator of disorders in pigment production and eye dysfunctions. Disorders related to coat colour-associated alleles also occur in the skin (melanoma), reproductive tract and immune system. Additionally, the coat colour phenotype of an individual influences its general behaviour and fitness. Mutations in the same genes often produce similar coat colours and pleiotropic effects in different species (e.g., KIT [reproductive disorders, lethality], EDNRB [megacolon] and LYST [CHS]). Whereas similar disorders and similar-looking coat colour phenotypes sometimes have a different genetic background (e.g., deafness [EDN3/EDNRB, MITF, PAX and SNAI2] and visual diseases [OCA2, RAB38, SLC24A5, SLC45A2, TRPM1 and TYR]). The human predilection for fancy phenotypes that ignore disorders and genetic defects is a major driving force for the increase of pleiotropic effects in domestic species and laboratory subjects since domestication has commenced approximately 18,000 years ago. PMID:23583561

  1. Pleiotropic effects of herbicide-resistance genes on crop yield: a review.

    PubMed

    Darmency, Henri

    2013-08-01

    The rapid adoption of genetically engineered herbicide-resistant crop varieties (HRCVs)-encompassing 83% of all GM crops and nearly 8% of the worldwide arable area-is due to technical efficiency and higher returns. Other herbicide-resistant varieties obtained from genetic resources and mutagenesis have also been successfully released. Although the benefit for weed control is the main criteria for choosing HRCVs, the pleiotropic costs of genes endowing resistance have rarely been investigated in crops. Here the available data of comparisons between isogenic resistant and susceptible varieties are reviewed. Pleiotropic harmful effects on yield are reported in half of the cases, mostly with resistance mechanisms that originate from genetic resources and mutagenesis (atrazine in oilseed rape and millet, trifluralin in millet, imazamox in cotton) rather than genetic engineering (chlorsulfuron and glufosinate in some oilseed rape varieties, glyphosate in soybean). No effect was found for sethoxydim and bromoxynil resistance. Variable minor effects were found for imazamox, chlorsulfuron, glufosinate and glyphosate resistance. The importance of the breeding plan and the genetic background on the emergence of these effects is pointed out. Breeders' efforts to produce better varieties could compensate for the yield loss, which eliminates any possibility of formulating generic conclusions on pleiotropic effects that can be applied to all resistant crops. PMID:23457026

  2. Pleiotropic Roles of the Msi1-Like Protein Msl1 in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong-Hoon; Maeng, Shinae; Strain, Anna K.; Floyd, Anna; Nielsen, Kirsten; Heitman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Msi1-like (MSIL) proteins contain WD40 motifs and have a pleiotropic cellular function as negative regulators of the Ras/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway and components of chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1), yet they have not been studied in fungal pathogens. Here we identified and characterized an MSIL protein, Msl1, in Cryptococcus neoformans, which causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis in humans. Notably, Msl1 plays pleiotropic roles in C. neoformans in both cAMP-dependent and -independent manners largely independent of Ras. Msl1 negatively controls antioxidant melanin production and sexual differentiation, and this was repressed by the inhibition of the cAMP-signaling pathway. In contrast, Msl1 controls thermotolerance, diverse stress responses, and antifungal drug resistance in a Ras/cAMP-independent manner. Cac2, which is the second CAF-1 component, appears to play both redundant and distinct functions compared to the functions of Msl1. Msl1 is required for the full virulence of C. neoformans. Transcriptome analysis identified a group of Msl1-regulated genes, which include stress-related genes such as HSP12 and HSP78. In conclusion, this study demonstrates pleiotropic roles of Msl1 in the human fungal pathogen C. neoformans, providing insight into a potential novel antifungal therapeutic target. PMID:23042129

  3. Derivation of a Bayes factor to distinguish between linked or pleiotropic quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed Central

    Varona, L; Gómez-Raya, L; Rauw, W M; Clop, A; Ovilo, C; Noguera, J L

    2004-01-01

    A simple procedure to calculate the Bayes factor between linked and pleiotropic QTL models is presented. The Bayes factor is calculated from the marginal prior and posterior densities of the locations of the QTL under a linkage and a pleiotropy model. The procedure is computed with a Gibbs sampler, and it can be easily applied to any model including the location of the QTL as a variable. The procedure was compared with a multivariate least-squares method. The proposed procedure showed better results in terms of power of detection of linkage when low information is available. As information increases, the performance of both procedures becomes similar. An example using data provided by an Iberian by Landrace pig intercross is presented. The results showed that three different QTL segregate in SSC6: a pleiotropic QTL affects myristic, palmitic, and eicosadienoic fatty acids; another pleiotropic QTL affects palmitoleic, stearic, and vaccenic fatty acids; and a third QTL affects the percentage of linoleic acid. In the example, the Bayes factor approach was more powerful than the multivariate least-squares approach. PMID:15020485

  4. Pleiotropic effects of hemagglutinin amino acid substitutions of H5 influenza escape mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Rudneva, Irina A.; Timofeeva, Tatiana A.; Ignatieva, Anna V.; Shilov, Aleksandr A.; Krylov, Petr S.; Ilyushina, Natalia A.; Kaverin, Nikolai V.

    2013-12-15

    In the present study we assessed pleiotropic characteristics of the antibody-selected mutations. We examined pH optimum of fusion, temperatures of HA heat inactivation, and in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics of the previously obtained influenza H5 escape mutants. Our results showed that HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. Mutations of the escape mutants located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability (P<0.05). HA changes at positions 131, 144, 145, and 156 and substitutions at positions 131, 142, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 escape mutants in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Overall, a co-variation between antigenic specificity and different HA phenotypic properties has been demonstrated. We believe that the monitoring of pleiotropic effects of the HA mutations found in H5 escape mutants is essential for accurate prediction of mutants with pandemic potential. - Highlights: • HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. • Mutations located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability. • HA changes at positions 131, 142, 144, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 mutants. • Acquisition of glycosylation site could lead to the emergence of multiple pleiotropic effects.

  5. Pleiotropic Genes Affecting Carcass Traits in Bos indicus (Nellore) Cattle Are Modulators of Growth.

    PubMed

    G T Pereira, Anirene; Utsunomiya, Yuri T; Milanesi, Marco; Torrecilha, Rafaela B P; Carmo, Adriana S; Neves, Haroldo H R; Carvalheiro, Roberto; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Sonstegard, Tad S; Sölkner, Johann; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J; Garcia, José F

    2016-01-01

    Two complementary methods, namely Multi-Trait Meta-Analysis and Versatile Gene-Based Test for Genome-wide Association Studies (VEGAS), were used to identify putative pleiotropic genes affecting carcass traits in Bos indicus (Nellore) cattle. The genotypic data comprised over 777,000 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers scored in 995 bulls, and the phenotypic data included deregressed breeding values (dEBV) for weight measurements at birth, weaning and yearling, as well visual scores taken at weaning and yearling for carcass finishing precocity, conformation and muscling. Both analyses pointed to the pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) as a major pleiotropic gene. VEGAS analysis revealed 224 additional candidates. From these, 57 participated, together with PLAG1, in a network involved in the modulation of the function and expression of IGF1 (insulin like growth factor 1), IGF2 (insulin like growth factor 2), GH1 (growth hormone 1), IGF1R (insulin like growth factor 1 receptor) and GHR (growth hormone receptor), suggesting that those pleiotropic genes operate as satellite regulators of the growth pathway. PMID:27410030

  6. Assessment of pleiotropic transcriptome perturbations in Arabidopsis engineered for indirect insect defence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular characterization is an essential step of risk/safety assessment of genetically modified (GM) crops. Holistic approaches for molecular characterization using omics platforms can be used to confirm the intended impact of the genetic engineering, but can also reveal the unintended changes at the omics level as a first assessment of potential risks. The potential of omics platforms for risk assessment of GM crops has rarely been used for this purpose because of the lack of a consensus reference and statistical methods to judge the significance or importance of the pleiotropic changes in GM plants. Here we propose a meta data analysis approach to the analysis of GM plants, by measuring the transcriptome distance to untransformed wild-types. Results In the statistical analysis of the transcriptome distance between GM and wild-type plants, values are compared with naturally occurring transcriptome distances in non-GM counterparts obtained from a database. Using this approach we show that the pleiotropic effect of genes involved in indirect insect defence traits is substantially equivalent to the variation in gene expression occurring naturally in Arabidopsis. Conclusion Transcriptome distance is a useful screening method to obtain insight in the pleiotropic effects of genetic modification. PMID:24947327

  7. Pleiotropic Genes Affecting Carcass Traits in Bos indicus (Nellore) Cattle Are Modulators of Growth

    PubMed Central

    Milanesi, Marco; Torrecilha, Rafaela B. P.; Carmo, Adriana S.; Neves, Haroldo H. R.; Carvalheiro, Roberto; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Sölkner, Johann; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J.; Garcia, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Two complementary methods, namely Multi-Trait Meta-Analysis and Versatile Gene-Based Test for Genome-wide Association Studies (VEGAS), were used to identify putative pleiotropic genes affecting carcass traits in Bos indicus (Nellore) cattle. The genotypic data comprised over 777,000 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers scored in 995 bulls, and the phenotypic data included deregressed breeding values (dEBV) for weight measurements at birth, weaning and yearling, as well visual scores taken at weaning and yearling for carcass finishing precocity, conformation and muscling. Both analyses pointed to the pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) as a major pleiotropic gene. VEGAS analysis revealed 224 additional candidates. From these, 57 participated, together with PLAG1, in a network involved in the modulation of the function and expression of IGF1 (insulin like growth factor 1), IGF2 (insulin like growth factor 2), GH1 (growth hormone 1), IGF1R (insulin like growth factor 1 receptor) and GHR (growth hormone receptor), suggesting that those pleiotropic genes operate as satellite regulators of the growth pathway. PMID:27410030

  8. Locus of Control and Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, M. Michael

    1980-01-01

    The role of locus of control in interpersonal attraction was examined by administering 1) the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale and 2) a sociometric test of friendship to 200 eighth graders. (CM)

  9. Suppressors of a genetic regulatory mutation affecting isoleucine-valine biosynthesis in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, J E; Calhoun, D H

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 mutant PS187 carries a mutation, ilvA538, in the structural gene for the biosynthetic L-threonine deaminase that leads to a leucine-sensitive growth phenotype, an isoleucine- and leucine-hypersensitive L-threonine deaminase, and pleiotropic effects resulting in abnormally low and invariant expression of some of the isoleucine-valine biosynthetic enzymes. Fifty-eight derivatives of strain PS187 were isolated as resistant to growth inhibition by leucine, by valine, or by valine plus glycly-valine and were biochemically, genetically, and physiologically characterized. All of these derivatives produced the feedback-hypersensitive L-threonine deaminase, and thus presumably possess the ilvA538 allele of the parent strain. Elevated synthesis of L-threonine deaminase was observed in 41 of the 58 isolates. Among 18 strains analyzed genetically, only those with mutations linked to the ilv gene clusters at 83 min produced elevated levels of L-threonine deaminase. One of the strains, MSR91, isolated as resistant to valine plus glycyl-valine, was chosen for more detailed study. The locus in strain MSR91 conferring resistance was located in four factor crosses between ilvE and rbs, and is in or near the ilvO gene postulated to be a site controlling the expression of the ilvEDA genes. Synthesis of the ilvEDA gene products in strain MSR91 is constitutive and derepressed approximately 200-fold relative to the parent strain, indicating that the genetic regulatory effects of the ilvA538 allele have been suppressed. Strain MSR91 should be suitable for use in purification of the ilvA538 gene product, since enzyme synthesis is fully derepressed and the suppressor mutation is clearly not located within the ilvA gene. PMID:361682

  10. Locus of Control and Status Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensman, Miriam Roza; Haller, Archibald O.

    Utilizing data derived from 277 rural, male respondents initially enrolled in Lenawee County, Michigan high schools, the Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale was employed to test the hypothesis that locus of control will have interactive rather than additive effects on the process of status attainment. Locus of control was defined as…

  11. Caveolin Contributes to the Modulation of Basal and β-Adrenoceptor Stimulated Function of the Adult Rat Ventricular Myocyte by Simvastatin: A Novel Pleiotropic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shailesh R.; Harvey, Robert D.; Porter, Karen E.; Calaghan, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The number of people taking statins is increasing across the globe, highlighting the importance of fully understanding statins' effects on the cardiovascular system. The beneficial impact of statins extends well beyond regression of atherosclerosis to include direct effects on tissues of the cardiovascular system (‘pleiotropic effects’). Pleiotropic effects on the cardiac myocyte are often overlooked. Here we consider the contribution of the caveolin protein, whose expression and cellular distribution is dependent on cholesterol, to statin effects on the cardiac myocyte. Caveolin is a structural and regulatory component of caveolae, and is a key regulator of cardiac contractile function and adrenergic responsiveness. We employed an experimental model in which inhibition of myocyte HMG CoA reductase could be studied in the absence of paracrine influences from non-myocyte cells. Adult rat ventricular myocytes were treated with 10 µM simvastatin for 2 days. Simvastatin treatment reduced myocyte cholesterol, caveolin 3 and caveolar density. Negative inotropic and positive lusitropic effects (with corresponding changes in [Ca2+]i) were seen in statin-treated cells. Simvastatin significantly potentiated the inotropic response to β2-, but not β1-, adrenoceptor stimulation. Under conditions of β2-adrenoceptor stimulation, phosphorylation of phospholamban at Ser16 and troponin I at Ser23/24 was enhanced with statin treatment. Simvastatin increased NO production without significant effects on eNOS expression or phosphorylation (Ser1177), consistent with the reduced expression of caveolin 3, its constitutive inhibitor. In conclusion, statin treatment can reduce caveolin 3 expression, with functional consequences consistent with the known role of caveolae in the cardiac cell. These data are likely to be of significance, particularly during the early phases of statin treatment, and in patients with heart failure who have altered β-adrenoceptor signalling. In addition

  12. EDARV370A associated facial characteristics in Uyghur population revealing further pleiotropic effects.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qianqian; Li, Jinxi; Tan, Jingze; Yang, Yajun; Zhang, Manfei; Wu, Sijie; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Juan; Qin, Pengfei; Guan, Yaqun; Jiao, Yi; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Sabeti, Pardis C; Tang, Kun; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li; Wang, Sijia

    2016-01-01

    An adaptive variant of human Ectodysplasin receptor, EDARV370A, had undergone strong positive selection in East Asia. In mice and humans, EDARV370A was found to affect ectodermal-derived characteristics, including hair thickness, hair shape, active sweat gland density and teeth formation. Facial characteristics are also largely ectodermal derived. In this study, taking advantage of an admixed population of East Asian and European ancestry-the Uyghur, we aim to test whether EDARV370A is affecting facial characteristics and to investigate its pleiotropic nature and genetic model. In a sample of 1027 Uyghurs, we discover that EDARV370A is significantly associated with several facial characteristics, in particular shape of earlobe (P = 3.64 × 10 (-6) ) and type of chin (P = 9.23 × 10 (-5) ), with successful replication in other East Asian populations. Additionally, in this Uyghur population, we replicate previous association findings of incisors shoveling (P = 1.02 × 10 (-7) ), double incisors shoveling (P = 1.86 × 10 (-12) ) and hair straightness (P = 3.99 × 10 (-16) ), providing strong evidence supporting an additive model for the EDARV370A associations. Partial least square path model confirms EDARV370A systematically affect these weakly related ectodermal-derived characteristics, suggesting the pleiotropic effect of EDARV370A mainly plays roles in early embryo development. This study extends our knowledge about the pleiotropic nature of EDARV370A and provides potential clues to its adaptation fitness in human evolution. PMID:26603699

  13. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus.

    PubMed

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  14. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus

    PubMed Central

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K.; Nederbragt, Alexander J.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  15. Heritability of floral volatiles and pleiotropic responses to artificial selection in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Zu, Pengjuan; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Schiestl, Florian P

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of the vast diversity of floral volatiles is little understood, although they serve fundamental functions, such as pollinator attraction and herbivore deterrence. Floral volatiles are often species specific, yet highly variable and sensitive to environmental factors. To date, nothing is known about the heritability of floral volatiles, and whether individual compounds can evolve independently or solely in concert with the whole volatile bouquet. We conducted bi-directional artificial selection on four target floral volatiles to estimate heritability and correlated pleiotropic responses in the wild turnip (Brassica rapa). The realized heritability of the four target volatiles ranged from 20% to 45%. The average narrow-sense heritability of all 13 analyzed floral volatiles was 18% based on parent-offspring regressions. There were pleiotropic effects of the selected floral volatile compounds on other constituents of the floral scent bouquet, on flowering time and on some morphological traits. We found that the whole floral scent bouquet changed, even when there was selection only on single compounds, with the overall phenotypic covariance being unaffected. Our study demonstrates that floral scent can evolve rapidly under phenotypic selection, but with additional correlated responses in traits that are not direct targets of selection. PMID:26391626

  16. Azilsartan as a Potent Antihypertensive Drug with Possible Pleiotropic Cardiometabolic Effects: A Review Study

    PubMed Central

    Georgiopoulos, Georgios; Katsi, Vasiliki; Oikonomou, Dimitrios; Vamvakou, Georgia; Koutli, Evangelia; Laina, Aggeliki; Tsioufis, Constantinos; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertension related cardiovascular (CV) complications could be amplified by the presence of metabolic co-morbidities. Azilsartan medoxomil (AZL-M) is the eighth approved member of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), a drug class of high priority in the management of hypertensive subjects with diabetes mellitus type II (DMII). Methods: Under this prism, we performed a systematic review of the literature for all relevant articles in order to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and possible clinical role of AZL-M in hypertensive diabetic patients. Results: AZL-M was found to be more effective in terms of reducing indices of blood pressure over alternative ARBs or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors with minimal side effects. Preclinical studies have established pleiotropic effects for AZL-M beyond its primary antihypertensive role through differential gene expression, up-regulation of membrane receptors and favorable effect on selective intracellular biochemical and pro-atherosclerotic pathways. Conclusion: Indirect but accumulating evidence from recent literature supports the efficacy and safety of AZL-M among diabetic patients. However, no clinical data exist to date that evince a beneficial role of AZL-M in patients with metabolic disorders on top of its antihypertensive effect. Further clinical studies are warranted to assess the pleiotropic cardiometabolic benefits of AZL-M that are derived from preclinical research. PMID:27536242

  17. Pleiotropic effects of a single gene on skeletal development and sensory system patterning in sticklebacks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adaptation to a new environment can be facilitated by co-inheritance of a suite of phenotypes that are all advantageous in the new habitat. Although experimental evidence demonstrates that multiple phenotypes often map to the same genomic regions, it is challenging to determine whether phenotypes are associated due to pleiotropic effects of a single gene or to multiple tightly linked genes. In the threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus), multiple phenotypes are associated with a genomic region around the gene Ectodysplasin (Eda), but only the presence of bony lateral plates has been conclusively shown to be caused by Eda. Results Here, we ask whether pleiotropy or linkage is responsible for the association between lateral plates and the distribution of the neuromasts of the lateral line. We first identify a strong correlation between plate appearance and changes in the spatial distribution of neuromasts through development. We then use an Eda transgene to induce the formation of ectopic plates in low plated fish, which also results in alterations to neuromast distribution. Our results also show that other loci may modify the effects of Eda on plate formation and neuromast distribution. Conclusions Together, these results demonstrate that Eda has pleiotropic effects on at least two phenotypes, highlighting the role of pleiotropy in the genetic basis of adaptation. PMID:24499504

  18. Functional Phylogenetics Reveals Contributions of Pleiotropic Peptide Action to Ligand-Receptor Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongbo; Wei, Zhaojun; Nachman, Ronald J.; Adams, Michael E.; Park, Yoonseong

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of peptidergic signaling has been accompanied by a significant degree of ligand-receptor coevolution. Closely related clusters of peptide signaling molecules are observed to activate related groups of receptors, implying that genes encoding these ligands may orchestrate an array of functions, a phenomenon known as pleiotropy. Here we examine whether pleiotropic actions of peptide genes might influence ligand-receptor coevolution. Four test groups of neuropeptides characterized by conserved C-terminal amino acid sequence motifs and their cognate receptors were examined in the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum): 1) cardioacceleratory peptide 2b (CAPA); CAPAr, 2) pyrokinin/diapause hormone (PK1/DH); PKr-A, -B, 3) pyrokinin/pheromone biosynthesis activating hormone (PK2/PBAN); PKr-C, and 4) ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH); ETHr-b. Ligand-receptor specificities were established through heterologous expression of receptors in cell-based assays for 9 endogenous ligands. Based on ligand-receptor specificity analysis, we found positive pleiotropism exhibited by ETH on ETHR-b and CAPAr, whereas PK1/DH and CAPA are more highly selective for their respective authentic receptors than would be predicted by phylogenetic analysis. Disparities between evolutionary trees deduced from receptor sequences vs. functional ligand-receptor specificities lead to the conclusion that pleiotropy exhibited by peptide genes influences ligand-receptor coevolution. PMID:25348027

  19. Pleiotropic Effects of Immune Responses Explain Variation in the Prevalence of Fibroproliferative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Shirley B.; Smith, Joan C.; Huang, Minjun; Trupin, Joel S.; Williams, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases are differentially distributed among human populations. Differential selection on genetic variants in ancestral environments that coincidentally predispose to disease can be an underlying cause of these unequal prevalence patterns. Selected genes may be pleiotropic, affecting multiple phenotypes and resulting in more than one disease or trait. Patterns of pleiotropy may be helpful in understanding the underlying causes of an array of conditions in a population. For example, several fibroproliferative diseases are more prevalent and severe in populations of sub-Saharan ancestry. We propose that this disparity is due to selection for an enhanced Th2 response that confers resistance to helminthic infections, and concurrently increases susceptibility to fibrosis due to the profibrotic action of Th2 cytokines. Many studies on selection of Th2-related genes for host resistance to helminths have been reported, but the pleiotropic impact of this selection on the distribution of fibrotic disorders has not been explicitly investigated. We discuss the disproportionate occurrence of fibroproliferative diseases in individuals of African ancestry and provide evidence that adaptation of the immune system has shaped the genetic structure of these human populations in ways that alter the distribution of multiple fibroproliferative diseases. PMID:26540410

  20. Identification of pleiotropic genes and gene sets underlying growth and immunity traits: a case study on Meishan pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Wang, Z; Yang, Y; Zhao, J; Chen, Q; Liao, R; Chen, Z; Zhang, X; Xue, M; Yang, H; Zheng, Y; Wang, Q; Pan, Y

    2016-04-01

    Both growth and immune capacity are important traits in animal breeding. The animal quantitative trait loci (QTL) database is a valuable resource and can be used for interpreting the genetic mechanisms that underlie growth and immune traits. However, QTL intervals often involve too many candidate genes to find the true causal genes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide an effective annotation pipeline that can make full use of the information of Gene Ontology terms annotation, linkage gene blocks and pathways to further identify pleiotropic genes and gene sets in the overlapping intervals of growth-related and immunity-related QTLs. In total, 55 non-redundant QTL overlapping intervals were identified, 1893 growth-related genes and 713 immunity-related genes were further classified into overlapping intervals and 405 pleiotropic genes shared by the two gene sets were determined. In addition, 19 pleiotropic gene linkage blocks and 67 pathways related to immunity and growth traits were discovered. A total of 343 growth-related genes and 144 immunity-related genes involved in pleiotropic pathways were also identified, respectively. We also sequenced and genotyped 284 individuals from Chinese Meishan pigs and European pigs and mapped the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to the pleiotropic genes and gene sets that we identified. A total of 971 high-confidence SNPs were mapped to the pleiotropic genes and gene sets that we identified, and among them 743 SNPs were statistically significant in allele frequency between Meishan and European pigs. This study explores the relationship between growth and immunity traits from the view of QTL overlapping intervals and can be generalized to explore the relationships between other traits. PMID:26689779

  1. Characterization of a Multipeptide Lantibiotic Locus in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Maricic, Natalie; Anderson, Erica S.; Opipari, AnneMarie E.; Yu, Emily A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial communities are established through a combination of cooperative and antagonistic interactions between the inhabitants. Competitive interactions often involve the production of antimicrobial substances, including bacteriocins, which are small antimicrobial peptides that target other community members. Despite the nearly ubiquitous presence of bacteriocin-encoding loci, inhibitory activity has been attributed to only a small fraction of gene clusters. In this study, we characterized a novel locus (the pld locus) in the pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae that drives the production of a bacteriocin called pneumolancidin, which has broad antimicrobial activity. The locus encodes an unusual tandem array of four inhibitory peptides, three of which are absolutely required for antibacterial activity. The three peptide sequences are similar but appear to play distinct roles in regulation and inhibition. A modification enzyme typically found in loci encoding a class of highly modified bacteriocins called lantibiotics was required for inhibitory activity. The production of pneumolancidin is controlled by a two-component regulatory system that is activated by the accumulation of modified peptides. The locus is located on a mobile element that has been found in many pneumococcal lineages, although not all elements carry the pld genes. Intriguingly, a minimal region containing only the genes required for pneumolancidin immunity was found in several Streptococcus mitis strains. The pneumolancidin-producing strain can inhibit nearly all pneumococci tested to date and provided a competitive advantage in vivo. These peptides not only represent a unique strategy for bacterial competition but also are an important resource to guide the development of new antimicrobials. PMID:26814178

  2. TYK2 protein-coding variants protect against rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmunity, with no evidence of major pleiotropic effects on non-autoimmune complex traits.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Dorothée; Bastarache, Lisa; Liao, Katherine P; Graham, Robert R; Fulton, Robert S; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Cui, Jing; Lee, Annette; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Kremer, Joel M; Barton, Anne; Coenen, Marieke J H; Franke, Barbara; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Mariette, Xavier; Richard-Miceli, Corrine; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João E; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P; Crusius, J Bart A; Nurmohamed, Michael T; Kurreeman, Fina; Mikuls, Ted R; Okada, Yukinori; Stahl, Eli A; Larson, David E; Deluca, Tracie L; O'Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina C; Fulton, Lucinda L; Kosoy, Roman; Ransom, Michael; Bhangale, Tushar R; Ortmann, Ward; Cagan, Andrew; Gainer, Vivian; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Kohane, Isaac; Murphy, Shawn N; Martin, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Worthington, Jane; Mardis, Elaine R; Seldin, Michael F; Gregersen, Peter K; Behrens, Timothy; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Denny, Joshua C; Plenge, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in detecting a large number of loci for complex phenotypes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility, the lack of information on the causal genes leaves important challenges to interpret GWAS results in the context of the disease biology. Here, we genetically fine-map the RA risk locus at 19p13 to define causal variants, and explore the pleiotropic effects of these same variants in other complex traits. First, we combined Immunochip dense genotyping (n = 23,092 case/control samples), Exomechip genotyping (n = 18,409 case/control samples) and targeted exon-sequencing (n = 2,236 case/controls samples) to demonstrate that three protein-coding variants in TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2) independently protect against RA: P1104A (rs34536443, OR = 0.66, P = 2.3 x 10(-21)), A928V (rs35018800, OR = 0.53, P = 1.2 x 10(-9)), and I684S (rs12720356, OR = 0.86, P = 4.6 x 10(-7)). Second, we show that the same three TYK2 variants protect against systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, Pomnibus = 6 x 10(-18)), and provide suggestive evidence that two of the TYK2 variants (P1104A and A928V) may also protect against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; P(omnibus) = 0.005). Finally, in a phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) assessing >500 phenotypes using electronic medical records (EMR) in >29,000 subjects, we found no convincing evidence for association of P1104A and A928V with complex phenotypes other than autoimmune diseases such as RA, SLE and IBD. Together, our results demonstrate the role of TYK2 in the pathogenesis of RA, SLE and IBD, and provide supporting evidence for TYK2 as a promising drug target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:25849893

  3. TYK2 Protein-Coding Variants Protect against Rheumatoid Arthritis and Autoimmunity, with No Evidence of Major Pleiotropic Effects on Non-Autoimmune Complex Traits

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Dorothée; Bastarache, Lisa; Liao, Katherine P.; Graham, Robert R.; Fulton, Robert S.; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Cui, Jing; Lee, Annette; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Kremer, Joel M.; Barton, Anne; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Franke, Barbara; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Mariette, Xavier; Richard-Miceli, Corrine; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João E.; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; Nurmohamed, Michael T.; Kurreeman, Fina; Mikuls, Ted R.; Okada, Yukinori; Stahl, Eli A.; Larson, David E.; Deluca, Tracie L.; O'Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina C.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Kosoy, Roman; Ransom, Michael; Bhangale, Tushar R.; Ortmann, Ward; Cagan, Andrew; Gainer, Vivian; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Kohane, Isaac; Murphy, Shawn N.; Martin, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Worthington, Jane; Mardis, Elaine R.; Seldin, Michael F.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Behrens, Timothy; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Denny, Joshua C.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in detecting a large number of loci for complex phenotypes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility, the lack of information on the causal genes leaves important challenges to interpret GWAS results in the context of the disease biology. Here, we genetically fine-map the RA risk locus at 19p13 to define causal variants, and explore the pleiotropic effects of these same variants in other complex traits. First, we combined Immunochip dense genotyping (n = 23,092 case/control samples), Exomechip genotyping (n = 18,409 case/control samples) and targeted exon-sequencing (n = 2,236 case/controls samples) to demonstrate that three protein-coding variants in TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2) independently protect against RA: P1104A (rs34536443, OR = 0.66, P = 2.3x10-21), A928V (rs35018800, OR = 0.53, P = 1.2x10-9), and I684S (rs12720356, OR = 0.86, P = 4.6x10-7). Second, we show that the same three TYK2 variants protect against systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, Pomnibus = 6x10-18), and provide suggestive evidence that two of the TYK2 variants (P1104A and A928V) may also protect against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Pomnibus = 0.005). Finally, in a phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) assessing >500 phenotypes using electronic medical records (EMR) in >29,000 subjects, we found no convincing evidence for association of P1104A and A928V with complex phenotypes other than autoimmune diseases such as RA, SLE and IBD. Together, our results demonstrate the role of TYK2 in the pathogenesis of RA, SLE and IBD, and provide supporting evidence for TYK2 as a promising drug target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:25849893

  4. Coadjuvants in the Diabetic Complications: Nutraceuticals and Drugs with Pleiotropic Effects.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Thiago Melo Costa; Pimenta, Fabio Silva; Porto, Marcella Lima; Baldo, Marcelo Perim; Campagnaro, Bianca Prandi; Gava, Agata Lages; Meyrelles, Silvana Santos; Vasquez, Elisardo Corral

    2016-01-01

    Because diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifactorial metabolic disease, its prevention and treatment has been a constant challenge for basic and clinical investigators focused on translating their discoveries into clinical treatment of this complex disorder. In this review, we highlight recent experimental and clinical evidences of potential coadjuvants in the management of DM, such as polyphenols (quercetin, resveratrol and silymarin), cultured probiotic microorganisms and drugs acting through direct/indirect or pleiotropic effects on glycemic control in DM. Among several options, we highlight new promising therapeutic coadjuvants, including chemical scavengers, the probiotic kefir and the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, which besides the reduction of hyperglycemia and ameliorate insulin resistance, they reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial dysfunction in the systemic vascular circulation. In the near future, experimental studies are expected to clear the intracellular pathways involving coadjuvants. The design of clinical trials may also contribute to new strategies with coadjuvants against the harmful effects of diabetic complications. PMID:27527163

  5. Discovery of six new susceptibility loci and analysis of pleiotropic effects in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Irwanto, Astrid; Fu, Xi'an; Yu, Gongqi; Yu, Yongxiang; Sun, Yonghu; Wang, Chuan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Okada, Yukinori; Low, Huiqi; Li, Yi; Liany, Herty; Chen, Mingfei; Bao, Fangfang; Li, Jinghui; You, Jiabao; Zhang, Qilin; Liu, Jian; Chu, Tongsheng; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Wang, Na; Niu, Guiye; Liu, Dianchang; Yu, Xiulu; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Hongqing; Zhou, Guizhi; Rotzschke, Olaf; Chen, Shumin; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Furen

    2015-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have led to the discovery of several susceptibility loci for leprosy with robust evidence, providing biological insight into the role of host genetic factors in mycobacterial infection. However, the identified loci only partially explain disease heritability, and additional genetic risk factors remain to be discovered. We performed a 3-stage GWAS of leprosy in the Chinese population using 8,313 cases and 16,017 controls. Besides confirming all previously published loci, we discovered six new susceptibility loci, and further gene prioritization analysis of these loci implicated BATF3, CCDC88B and CIITA-SOCS1 as new susceptibility genes for leprosy. A systematic evaluation of pleiotropic effects demonstrated a high tendency for leprosy susceptibility loci to show association with autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. Further analysis suggests that molecular sensing of infection might have a similar pathogenic role across these diseases, whereas immune responses have discordant roles in infectious and inflammatory diseases. PMID:25642632

  6. Coadjuvants in the Diabetic Complications: Nutraceuticals and Drugs with Pleiotropic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Thiago Melo Costa; Pimenta, Fabio Silva; Porto, Marcella Lima; Baldo, Marcelo Perim; Campagnaro, Bianca Prandi; Gava, Agata Lages; Meyrelles, Silvana Santos; Vasquez, Elisardo Corral

    2016-01-01

    Because diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifactorial metabolic disease, its prevention and treatment has been a constant challenge for basic and clinical investigators focused on translating their discoveries into clinical treatment of this complex disorder. In this review, we highlight recent experimental and clinical evidences of potential coadjuvants in the management of DM, such as polyphenols (quercetin, resveratrol and silymarin), cultured probiotic microorganisms and drugs acting through direct/indirect or pleiotropic effects on glycemic control in DM. Among several options, we highlight new promising therapeutic coadjuvants, including chemical scavengers, the probiotic kefir and the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, which besides the reduction of hyperglycemia and ameliorate insulin resistance, they reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial dysfunction in the systemic vascular circulation. In the near future, experimental studies are expected to clear the intracellular pathways involving coadjuvants. The design of clinical trials may also contribute to new strategies with coadjuvants against the harmful effects of diabetic complications. PMID:27527163

  7. Epigenetic Genome Mining of an Endophytic Fungus Leads to Pleiotropic Biosynthesis of Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xu-Ming; Xu, Wei; Li, Dehai; Yin, Wen-Bing; Chooi, Yit-Heng; Li, Yong-Quan

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule biosynthetic potential of most filamentous fungi remains largely unexplored and represents an attractive source for new compound discovery. Genome sequencing of Calcarisporium arbuscula, a mushroom endophytic fungus, revealed 68 core genes that are involved in natural products biosynthesis. This is in sharp contrast to predominant production of the ATPase inhibitors aurovertin B (1) and D (2). Inactivation of a histone H3 deacetylase HdaA led to pleiotropic activation and overexpression of more than 75% of the biosynthetic genes. Sampling of the overproduced compounds led to isolation of ten compounds of which four contain new structures, including the cyclic peptides arbumycin (3) and arbumelin (4); the diterpenoid arbuscullic acid A (11); and a meroterpenoid arbuscullic acid B (12). Such epigenetic modification therefore provides a rapid and global approach to mine the chemical diversity of endophytic fungi. PMID:26013262

  8. Resveratrol induces ordered domains formation in biomembranes: Implication for its pleiotropic action.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana Rute; Nunes, Cláudia; Reis, Salette

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol compound with great value in cancer therapy, cardiovascular protection, and neurodegenerative disorders. The mechanism by which resveratrol exerts such pleiotropic effects is not yet clear and there is a huge need to understand the influence of this compound on the regulation of lipid domains formation on membrane structure. The aim of the present study was to reveal potential molecular interactions between resveratrol and lipid rafts found in cell membranes by means of Förster resonance energy transfer, DPH fluorescence quenching, and triton X-100 detergent resistance assay. Liposomes composed of egg phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and sphingomyelin were used as model membranes. The results revealed that resveratrol induces phase separation and formation of liquid-ordered domains in bilayer structures. The formation of such tightly packed lipid rafts is important for different signal transduction pathways, through the regulation of membrane-associating proteins, that can justify several pharmacological activities of this compound. PMID:26456556

  9. Leveraging electronic health records to study pleiotropic effects on bipolar disorder and medical comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Prieto, M L; Ryu, E; Jenkins, G D; Batzler, A; Nassan, M M; Cuellar-Barboza, A B; Pathak, J; McElroy, S L; Frye, M A; Biernacka, J M

    2016-01-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have a high prevalence of comorbid medical illness. However, the mechanisms underlying these comorbidities with BD are not well known. Certain genetic variants may have pleiotropic effects, increasing the risk of BD and other medical illnesses simultaneously. In this study, we evaluated the association of BD-susceptibility genetic variants with various medical conditions that tend to co-exist with BD, using electronic health records (EHR) data linked to genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. Data from 7316 Caucasian subjects were used to test the association of 19 EHR-derived phenotypes with 34 SNPs that were previously reported to be associated with BD. After Bonferroni multiple testing correction, P<7.7 × 10(-5) was considered statistically significant. The top association findings suggested that the BD risk alleles at SNP rs4765913 in CACNA1C gene and rs7042161 in SVEP1 may be associated with increased risk of 'cardiac dysrhythmias' (odds ratio (OR)=1.1, P=3.4 × 10(-3)) and 'essential hypertension' (OR=1.1, P=3.5 × 10(-3)), respectively. Although these associations are not statistically significant after multiple testing correction, both genes have been previously implicated with cardiovascular phenotypes. Moreover, we present additional evidence supporting these associations, particularly the association of the SVEP1 SNP with hypertension. This study shows the potential for EHR-based analyses of large cohorts to discover pleiotropic effects contributing to complex psychiatric traits and commonly co-occurring medical conditions. PMID:27529678

  10. [Tibetan formulas as pleiotropic signatures--application of network medicines in multimorbidity].

    PubMed

    Schwabl, Herbert; Vennos, Cécile; Saller, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the network model of the organism, multimorbid states (≥ 2 chronic diseases at the same time) can be considered as a complex disease pattern which can be mapped as characteristic signatures. From the perspective of system theory, living systems such as the human body are viewed as networks of interacting parts. These in turn can themselves be subnetworks assigned to different complexity levels. They range, e.g., from the gene to the transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and epigenome up to the network of the entire molecular interactions, the so-called interactome. In multimorbidity, the disease signature affects different networks at all levels, e.g., cell systems, organs, and functional systems. Based on this semiotics, certain signatures of effectiveness and profiles of action can be assigned to each drug. A drug signature represents the physicochemical stimuli that cause a reaction by the system, as well as the cross-links by which the entire connected system is affected at all levels. Phytotherapeutics, which chemically represent multi-component mixtures, have especially complex signatures. As multi-target medicines with a pleiotropic effect profile, they therapeutically affect different levels of the network, which is why they are also referred to as network medicines. Herbal formulas from traditional medicine systems such as Tibetan Medicine are an example for phytotherapeutics with a particularly complex pleiotropic signature. Also from the traditional point of view, a disease signature is set in relation with a corresponding drug signature. However, in this case, it is based on the traditional energetic understanding of diseases. Modern research results clearly indicate a widely diversified signature range of Tibetan Medicines and thus provide a rationale for their use in integrative treatment approaches for diseases with complex signatures, e.g. in multimorbidity. The system-theoretical approach discussed here represents a method to

  11. Factors Determining Adolescent Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopera-Frye, Karen F.; And Others

    Previous research has demonstrated an association between locus of control in adolescence and a successful transition to adulthood. Having an external locus of control has been implicated as an important factor in adolescent behaviors such as teenage pregnancy and delinquency, and has been found to be negatively related to school achievement. This…

  12. Two Novel AP2/EREBP Transcription Factor Genes TaPARG Have Pleiotropic Functions on Plant Architecture and Yield-Related Traits in Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Li, Qiaoru; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Wang, Jingyi; Chang, Xiaoping; Hao, Chenyang; Zhang, Xueyong; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    AP2/EREBPs play significant roles in plant growth and development. A novel, pleiotropic TaPARG (PLANT ARCHITECTURE-RELATED GENE), a member of the AP2/EREBP transcription factor gene family, and its flanking sequences were isolated in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Two TaPARG genes were identified and named as TaPARG-2A and TaPARG-2D. Their amino acid sequences were highly similar especially in the functional domains. TaPARG-2A on chromosome 2A was flanked by markers Xwmc63 and Xgwm372. TaPARG-2D was mapped to chromosome 2D. Subcellular localization revealed that TaPARG-2D was localized in the nucleus. The results of tissue expression pattern, overexpression in rice, association analysis and distinct population verification jointly revealed that TaPARG functions during the entire growth cycle of wheat. Its functions include regulation of plant architecture-related and yield-related traits. Association analysis, geographic distribution and allelic frequencies suggested that favored haplotypes Hap-2A-2 and Hap-2A-3 were selected in Chinese wheat breeding programs. Both favored haplotypes might be caused by a single amino acid substitution (His/Tyr). These results suggest that TaPARG is a regulatory factor in plant growth and development, and that the favored alleles might be useful for improving plant architecture and grain yield of wheat. PMID:27555860

  13. Two Novel AP2/EREBP Transcription Factor Genes TaPARG Have Pleiotropic Functions on Plant Architecture and Yield-Related Traits in Common Wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Qiaoru; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Wang, Jingyi; Chang, Xiaoping; Hao, Chenyang; Zhang, Xueyong; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    AP2/EREBPs play significant roles in plant growth and development. A novel, pleiotropic TaPARG (PLANT ARCHITECTURE-RELATED GENE), a member of the AP2/EREBP transcription factor gene family, and its flanking sequences were isolated in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Two TaPARG genes were identified and named as TaPARG-2A and TaPARG-2D. Their amino acid sequences were highly similar especially in the functional domains. TaPARG-2A on chromosome 2A was flanked by markers Xwmc63 and Xgwm372. TaPARG-2D was mapped to chromosome 2D. Subcellular localization revealed that TaPARG-2D was localized in the nucleus. The results of tissue expression pattern, overexpression in rice, association analysis and distinct population verification jointly revealed that TaPARG functions during the entire growth cycle of wheat. Its functions include regulation of plant architecture-related and yield-related traits. Association analysis, geographic distribution and allelic frequencies suggested that favored haplotypes Hap-2A-2 and Hap-2A-3 were selected in Chinese wheat breeding programs. Both favored haplotypes might be caused by a single amino acid substitution (His/Tyr). These results suggest that TaPARG is a regulatory factor in plant growth and development, and that the favored alleles might be useful for improving plant architecture and grain yield of wheat. PMID:27555860

  14. A Flucytosine-Responsive Mbp1/Swi4-Like Protein, Mbs1, Plays Pleiotropic Roles in Antifungal Drug Resistance, Stress Response, and Virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Hee; Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Min Su; Yoon, Ja-Kyung; White, Theodore C.; Floyd, Anna; Heitman, Joseph; Strain, Anna K.; Nielsen, Judith N.; Nielsen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcosis, caused by the basidiomycetous fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, is responsible for more than 600,000 deaths annually in AIDS patients. Flucytosine is one of the most commonly used antifungal drugs for its treatment, but its resistance and regulatory mechanisms have never been investigated at the genome scale in C. neoformans. In the present study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis by employing two-component system mutants (tco1Δ and tco2Δ) exhibiting opposing flucytosine susceptibility. As a result, a total of 177 flucytosine-responsive genes were identified, and many of them were found to be regulated by Tco1 or Tco2. Among these, we discovered an APSES-like transcription factor, Mbs1 (Mbp1- and Swi4-like protein 1). Expression analysis revealed that MBS1 was regulated in response to flucytosine in a Tco2/Hog1-dependent manner. Supporting this, C. neoformans with the deletion of MBS1 exhibited increased susceptibility to flucytosine. Intriguingly, Mbs1 played pleiotropic roles in diverse cellular processes of C. neoformans. Mbs1 positively regulated ergosterol biosynthesis and thereby affected polyene and azole drug susceptibility. Mbs1 was also involved in genotoxic and oxidative stress responses. Furthermore, Mbs1 promoted production of melanin and capsule and thereby was required for full virulence of C. neoformans. In conclusion, Mbs1 is considered to be a novel antifungal therapeutic target for treatment of cryptococcosis. PMID:22080454

  15. The Rhizobium meliloti rhizopine mos locus is a mosaic structure facilitating its symbiotic regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, P J; Trenz, S P; Grzemski, W; De Bruijn, F J; Schell, J

    1993-01-01

    The Rhizobium meliloti L5-30 mos locus, encoding biosynthesis of the rhizopine 3-O-methyl-scyllo-inosamine, is shown to be a mosaic structure. The mos locus consists of four open reading frames (ORFs) (ORF1 and mosABC) arranged in an operon structure. Within this locus, several domains of homology with other prokaryotic symbiotic genes (nifH, fixA, fixU, and nifT) are present, suggesting that this locus may represent a hot spot for rearrangement of symbiotic genes. Unusually, these domains are present in the coding as well as noncoding regions of the mos locus. Proteins corresponding to those encoded by mosABC, but not ORF1, have been detected in nodule extracts by using antibodies. As ORF1 shows extensive homology with the 5' region of the nifH gene (P.J. Murphy, N. Heycke, S.P. Trenz, P. Ratet, F.J. de Bruijn, and J. Schell, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:9133-9137, 1988) and a frameshift mutation indicates that expression of this ORF is not required for mos activity, we propose that the mos locus has acquired a duplicated copy of nifH, including the promoter region, in order to become symbiotically regulated. Surprisingly, since the functions are likely different, MosA has an amino acid sequence similar to that of the DapA protein of Escherichia coli. The central domain of MosB has extensive homology with a range of diverse proteins involved with carbohydrate metabolism in either antibiotic or outer-cell-wall biosynthesis. This region is also common to the regulatory proteins DegT and DnrJ, suggesting a regulatory role for MosB. The structure of MosC is consistent with its being a membrane transport protein. Images PMID:8349559

  16. Determining the bistability parameter ranges of artificially induced lac operon using the root locus method.

    PubMed

    Avcu, N; Alyürük, H; Demir, G K; Pekergin, F; Cavas, L; Güzeliş, C

    2015-06-01

    This paper employs the root locus method to conduct a detailed investigation of the parameter regions that ensure bistability in a well-studied gene regulatory network namely, lac operon of Escherichia coli (E. coli). In contrast to previous works, the parametric bistability conditions observed in this study constitute a complete set of necessary and sufficient conditions. These conditions were derived by applying the root locus method to the polynomial equilibrium equation of the lac operon model to determine the parameter values yielding the multiple real roots necessary for bistability. The lac operon model used was defined as an ordinary differential equation system in a state equation form with a rational right hand side, and it was compatible with the Hill and Michaelis-Menten approaches of enzyme kinetics used to describe biochemical reactions that govern lactose metabolism. The developed root locus method can be used to study the steady-state behavior of any type of convergent biological system model based on mass action kinetics. This method provides a solution to the problem of analyzing gene regulatory networks under parameter uncertainties because the root locus method considers the model parameters as variable, rather than fixed. The obtained bistability ranges for the lac operon model parameters have the potential to elucidate the appearance of bistability for E. coli cells in in vivo experiments, and they could also be used to design robust hysteretic switches in synthetic biology. PMID:25864166

  17. Structure of the MHC A and B locus promoters in hominoids

    SciTech Connect

    Vallejo, A.N.; Pease, L.R.

    1995-04-15

    The expansion and contraction of mammalian class I multigene families raises the issue as to what determines the loss or retention of family members. We propose that accumulating changes in regulatory regions result in the loss of expression of the gene products during times critical to selection, leading to the extinction of misregulated genes. The structures of promoter regions of MHC class I genes in nonhuman primates support this view. The B promoters are more homogeneous and contain regulatory elements also found in the promoters of the homologous class I genes of more distant mammals, whereas the A locus promoters were significantly more heterogeneous, have fewer sequence motifs related to known transcription factor-binding sites and have accumulated nucleotide substitutions within one of the widely conserved class I promoter elements. These findings are consistent with the view that the more polymorphic B locus is the principal MHC locus encoding functional class I Ag-presenting molecules whereas the less polymorphic A locus is assuming a secondary role as a consequence of promoter defects. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. KLF1 stabilizes GATA-1 and TAL1 occupancy in the human β-globin locus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yujin; Kim, Yea Woon; Yun, Jangmi; Shin, Jongo; Kim, AeRi

    2015-03-01

    KLF1 is an erythroid specific transcription factor that binds to regulatory regions of erythroid genes. Binding sites of KLF1 are often found near binding sites of GATA-1 and TAL1. In the β-globin locus, KLF1 is required for forming active chromatin structure, although its role is unclear. To explore the role of KLF1 in transcribing the human γ-globin genes, we stably reduced the expression of KLF1 in erythroid K562 cells, compromising its association in the β-globin locus. The γ-globin transcription was reduced with disappearance of active chromatin structure of the locus in the KLF1 knockdown cells. Interestingly, GATA-1 and TAL1 binding was reduced in the β-globin locus, even though their expressions were not affected by KLF1 knockdown. The KLF1-dependent GATA-1 and TAL1 binding was observed in the adult locus transcribing the β-globin gene and in several erythroid genes, where GATA-1 occupancy is independent from TAL1. These results indicate that KLF1 plays a role in facilitating and/or stabilizing GATA-1 and TAL1 occupancy in the erythroid genes, contributing to the generation of active chromatin structure such as histone acetylation and chromatin looping. PMID:25528728

  19. Pleiotropic Effects of CEP290 (NPHP6) Mutations Extend to Meckel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baala, Lekbir ; Audollent, Sophie ; Martinovic, Jéléna ; Ozilou, Catherine ; Babron, Marie-Claude ; Sivanandamoorthy, Sivanthiny ; Saunier, Sophie ; Salomon, Rémi ; Gonzales, Marie ; Rattenberry, Eleanor ; Esculpavit, Chantal ; Toutain, Annick ; Moraine, Claude ; Parent, Philippe ; Marcorelles, Pascale ; Dauge, Marie-Christine ; Roume, Joëlle ; Merrer, Martine Le ; Meiner, Vardiella ; Meir, Karen ; Menez, Françoise ; Beaufrère, Anne-Marie ; Francannet, Christine ; Tantau, Julia ; Sinico, Martine ; Dumez, Yves ; MacDonald, Fiona ; Munnich, Arnold ; Lyonnet, Stanislas ; Gubler, Marie-Claire ; Génin, Emmanuelle ; Johnson, Colin A. ; Vekemans, Michel ; Encha-Razavi, Férechté ; Attié-Bitach, Tania 

    2007-01-01

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a rare autosomal recessive lethal condition characterized by central nervous system malformations, polydactyly, multicystic kidney dysplasia, and ductal changes of the liver. Three loci have been mapped (MKS1–MKS3), and two genes have been identified (MKS1/FLJ20345 and MKS3/TMEM67), whereas the gene at the MKS2 locus remains unknown. To identify new MKS loci, a genomewide linkage scan was performed using 10-cM–resolution microsatellite markers in eight families. The highest heterogeneity LOD score was obtained for chromosome 12, in an interval containing CEP290, a gene recently identified as causative of Joubert syndrome (JS) and isolated Leber congenital amaurosis. In view of our recent findings of allelism, at the MKS3 locus, between these two disorders, CEP290 was considered a candidate, and homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations were identified in four families. Sequencing of additional cases identified CEP290 mutations in two fetuses with MKS and in four families presenting a cerebro-reno-digital syndrome, with a phenotype overlapping MKS and JS, further demonstrating that MKS and JS can be variable expressions of the same ciliopathy. These data identify a fourth locus for MKS (MKS4) and the CEP290 gene as responsible for MKS. PMID:17564974

  20. Disclosing Pleiotropic Effects during Genetic Risk Assessment for Alzheimer’s Disease: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Kurt D.; Roberts, J. Scott; Whitehouse, Peter J.; Royal, Charmaine D. M.; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Vernarelli, Jacqueline A.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Linnenbringer, Erin; Butson, Melissa B.; Fasaye, Grace-Ann; Uhlmann, Wendy R.; Hiraki, Susan; Wang, Na; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Green, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing use of genetic testing raises questions about disclosing secondary findings, including pleiotropic information. Objective To determine the safety and behavioral impact of disclosing modest associations between APOE genotype and coronary artery disease (CAD) risk during APOE-based genetic risk assessments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Design Randomized, multicenter equivalence clinical trial Setting Four teaching hospitals Participants 257 asymptomatic adults enrolled, 69% with one AD-affected first degree relative Intervention Disclosing AD and CAD genetic risk information (AD+CAD) versus disclosing only AD genetic risk (AD-only) Measurements Co-primary outcomes were Beck Anxiety Index (BAI) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) scores at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included test-related distress at 12 months, all measures at 6 weeks and 6 months, and health behavior changes at 12 months. Results 12 months after disclosure, mean BAI scores were 3.5 and 3.5 in AD-only and AD+CAD arms (Δ=0.0, 95%CI: −1.0 to 1.0), and mean CES-D scores were 6.4 and 7.1 in AD-only and AD+CAD arms (Δ=0.7, 95%CI: −1.0 to 2.4). Both confidence bounds fell within the equivalence margin of +/−5 points. Among ε4-positive participants, distress was lower in AD+CAD arms than AD-only arms (Δ=−4.8, 95%CI: −8.6 to −1.0) (p=0.031 for disclosure arm x APOE genotype). AD+CAD participants also reported more health behavior changes, regardless of APOE genotype. Limitations Outcomes were self-reported from volunteers without severe anxiety, severe depression, or cognitive problems. Analyses omitted 33 randomized participants. Conclusion Disclosing pleiotropic information did not increase anxiety or depression, and may have decreased distress among those at increased risk for two conditions. Providing risk modification information regarding CAD improved health behaviors. Findings highlight potential benefits of secondary genetic findings

  1. A comprehensive analysis of the chorion locus in silkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nohata, Junko; Guo, Huizhen; Li, Shenglong; Liu, Jianqiu; Guo, Youbing; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Liu, Chun; Arunkumar, Kallare P.; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shiping; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Swevers, Luc; Tsitoura, Panagiota; Iatrou, Kostas; Gopinathan, Karumathil P.; Goldsmith, Marian R.; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than 40 years of intense study, essential features of the silkmoth chorion (eggshell) are still not fully understood. To determine the precise structure of the chorion locus, we performed extensive EST analysis, constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig, and obtained a continuous genomic sequence of 871,711 base pairs. We annotated 127 chorion genes in two segments interrupted by a 164 kb region with 5 non-chorion genes, orthologs of which were on chorion bearing scaffolds in 4 ditrysian families. Detailed transcriptome analysis revealed expression throughout choriogenesis of most chorion genes originally categorized as “middle”, and evidence for diverse regulatory mechanisms including cis-elements, alternative splicing and promoter utilization, and antisense RNA. Phylogenetic analysis revealed multigene family associations and faster evolution of early chorion genes and transcriptionally active pseudogenes. Proteomics analysis identified 99 chorion proteins in the eggshell and micropyle localization of 1 early and 6 Hc chorion proteins. PMID:26553298

  2. A comprehensive analysis of the chorion locus in silkmoth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nohata, Junko; Guo, Huizhen; Li, Shenglong; Liu, Jianqiu; Guo, Youbing; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Liu, Chun; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shiping; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Swevers, Luc; Tsitoura, Panagiota; Iatrou, Kostas; Gopinathan, Karumathil P; Goldsmith, Marian R; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than 40 years of intense study, essential features of the silkmoth chorion (eggshell) are still not fully understood. To determine the precise structure of the chorion locus, we performed extensive EST analysis, constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig, and obtained a continuous genomic sequence of 871,711 base pairs. We annotated 127 chorion genes in two segments interrupted by a 164 kb region with 5 non-chorion genes, orthologs of which were on chorion bearing scaffolds in 4 ditrysian families. Detailed transcriptome analysis revealed expression throughout choriogenesis of most chorion genes originally categorized as "middle", and evidence for diverse regulatory mechanisms including cis-elements, alternative splicing and promoter utilization, and antisense RNA. Phylogenetic analysis revealed multigene family associations and faster evolution of early chorion genes and transcriptionally active pseudogenes. Proteomics analysis identified 99 chorion proteins in the eggshell and micropyle localization of 1 early and 6 Hc chorion proteins. PMID:26553298

  3. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and cohesin influence the genomic architecture of the Igh locus and antisense transcription in pro-B cells.

    PubMed

    Degner, Stephanie C; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Wong, Timothy P; Bossen, Claudia; Iverson, G Michael; Torkamani, Ali; Vettermann, Christian; Lin, Yin C; Ju, Zhongliang; Schulz, Danae; Murre, Caroline S; Birshtein, Barbara K; Schork, Nicholas J; Schlissel, Mark S; Riblet, Roy; Murre, Cornelis; Feeney, Ann J

    2011-06-01

    Compaction and looping of the ~2.5-Mb Igh locus during V(D)J rearrangement is essential to allow all V(H) genes to be brought in proximity with D(H)-J(H) segments to create a diverse antibody repertoire, but the proteins directly responsible for this are unknown. Because CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) has been demonstrated to be involved in long-range chromosomal interactions, we hypothesized that CTCF may promote the contraction of the Igh locus. ChIP sequencing was performed on pro-B cells, revealing colocalization of CTCF and Rad21 binding at ~60 sites throughout the V(H) region and 2 other sites within the Igh locus. These numerous CTCF/cohesin sites potentially form the bases of the multiloop rosette structures at the Igh locus that compact during Ig heavy chain rearrangement. To test whether CTCF was involved in locus compaction, we used 3D-FISH to measure compaction in pro-B cells transduced with CTCF shRNA retroviruses. Reduction of CTCF binding resulted in a decrease in Igh locus compaction. Long-range interactions within the Igh locus were measured with the chromosomal conformation capture assay, revealing direct interactions between CTCF sites 5' of DFL16 and the 3' regulatory region, and also the intronic enhancer (Eμ), creating a D(H)-J(H)-Eμ-C(H) domain. Knockdown of CTCF also resulted in the increase of antisense transcription throughout the D(H) region and parts of the V(H) locus, suggesting a widespread regulatory role for CTCF. Together, our findings demonstrate that CTCF plays an important role in the 3D structure of the Igh locus and in the regulation of antisense germline transcription and that it contributes to the compaction of the Igh locus. PMID:21606361

  4. Exploiting the Pleiotropic Antioxidant Effects of Established Drugs in Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Steven, Sebastian; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death and reduced quality of life worldwide. Arterial vessels are a primary target for endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, which is accompanied or even driven by increased oxidative stress. Recent research in this field identified different sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species contributing to the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. According to lessons from the past, improvement of endothelial function and prevention of cardiovascular disease by systemic, unspecific, oral antioxidant therapy are obviously too simplistic an approach. Source- and cell organelle-specific antioxidants as well as activators of intrinsic antioxidant defense systems might be more promising. Since basic research demonstrated the contribution of different inflammatory cells to vascular oxidative stress and clinical trials identified chronic inflammatory disorders as risk factors for cardiovascular events, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease are closely associated with inflammation. Therefore, modulation of the inflammatory response is a new and promising approach in the therapy of cardiovascular disease. Classical anti-inflammatory therapeutic compounds, but also established drugs with pleiotropic immunomodulatory abilities, demonstrated protective effects in various models of cardiovascular disease. However, results from ongoing clinical trials are needed to further evaluate the value of immunomodulation for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26251902

  5. Multivariable Mendelian randomization: the use of pleiotropic genetic variants to estimate causal effects.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Stephen; Thompson, Simon G

    2015-02-15

    A conventional Mendelian randomization analysis assesses the causal effect of a risk factor on an outcome by using genetic variants that are solely associated with the risk factor of interest as instrumental variables. However, in some cases, such as the case of triglyceride level as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, it may be difficult to find a relevant genetic variant that is not also associated with related risk factors, such as other lipid fractions. Such a variant is known as pleiotropic. In this paper, we propose an extension of Mendelian randomization that uses multiple genetic variants associated with several measured risk factors to simultaneously estimate the causal effect of each of the risk factors on the outcome. This "multivariable Mendelian randomization" approach is similar to the simultaneous assessment of several treatments in a factorial randomized trial. In this paper, methods for estimating the causal effects are presented and compared using real and simulated data, and the assumptions necessary for a valid multivariable Mendelian randomization analysis are discussed. Subject to these assumptions, we demonstrate that triglyceride-related pathways have a causal effect on the risk of coronary heart disease independent of the effects of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:25632051

  6. Cytoplasmic male sterility in Mimulus hybrids has pleiotropic effects on corolla and pistil traits

    PubMed Central

    Barr, C M; Fishman, L

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying genetic associations have important consequences for evolutionary outcomes, but distinguishing linkage from pleiotropy is often difficult. Here, we use a fine mapping approach to determine the genetic basis of association between cytonuclear male sterility and other floral traits in Mimulus hybrids. Previous work has shown that male sterility in hybrids between Mimulus guttatus and Mimulus nasutus is due to interactions between a mitochondrial gene from M. guttatus and two tightly linked nuclear restorer alleles on Linkage Group 7, and that male sterility is associated with reduced corolla size. In the present study, we generated a set of nearly isogenic lines segregating for the restorer region and male sterility, but with unique flanking introgressions. Male-sterile flowers had significantly smaller corollas, longer styles and greater stigmatic exsertion than fertile flowers. Because these effects were significant regardless of the genotypic composition of introgressions flanking the restorer region, they suggest that these floral differences are a direct byproduct of the genetic incompatibility causing anther abortion. In addition, we found a non-significant but intriguing trend for male-sterile plants to produce more seeds per flower than fertile siblings after supplemental pollination. Such pleiotropic effects may underlie the corolla dimorphism frequently observed in gynodioecious taxa and may affect selection on cytoplasmic male sterility genes when they initially arise. PMID:21245895

  7. RNases J1 and J2 are critical pleiotropic regulators in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Liu, Nan; Khajotia, Sharukh; Qi, Fengxia

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that post-transcriptional control mechanisms are the principal source of gene regulation for a large number of prokaryotic genetic pathways, particularly those involved in virulence and environmental adaptation. Post-transcriptional regulation is largely governed by RNA stability, which itself is determined by target accessibility to RNase degradation. In most Firmicutes species, mRNA stability is strongly impacted by the activity of two recently discovered RNases referred to as RNase J1 and RNase J2. Little is known about RNase J1 function in bacteria and even less is known about RNase J2. In the current study, we mutated both RNase J orthologues in Streptococcus mutans to determine their functional roles in the cell. Single and double RNase J mutants were viable, but grew very slowly on agar plates. All of the mutants shared substantial defects in growth, morphology, acid tolerance, natural competence and biofilm formation. However, most of these defects were more severe in the RNase J2 mutant. Phenotypic suppression results also implicate a role for RNase J2 as a regulator of RNase J1 function. Unlike Bacillus subtilis, RNase J2 is a major pleiotropic regulator in S. mutans, which indicates some fundamental differences from B. subtilis in global gene regulation. Key conserved residues among the RNase J2 orthologues of lactic acid bacteria may hint at a greater role for RNase J2 in these species. PMID:25635274

  8. [Pleiotropic effect of the hooded mutation of the rat on male fertility].

    PubMed

    Prasolova, L A; Trut, L N; Os'kina, I N; Pliusnina, I Z

    2003-04-01

    Several reproductive parameters were studied in males homozygous (hh) or heterozygous (Hh) for the hooded mutation as compared with completely pigmented wild-type males (HH). Histological analysis of the testes was carried out in males of the three genotypes. The proportion of sterile males in homogeneous matings of homozygotes hh was twice as high as in matings of heterozygotes. The proportion of sterile males in matings yielding no progeny was also twice higher in homozygotes hh as compared with heterozygotes. No sterile males were detected in matings of completely pigmented wild-type animals. Unilateral cryptorchidism, a hypoplastic testis combined with a hyperplastic one, or hypoplasia of both testes were observed in some males homozygous for the hooded mutation. Morphologically, these defects were associated with underdevelopment or the complete absence of spermatogenic epithelium or with the presence of gaps and cells with large nondivided nuclei in the epithelium. The results showed that the hooded coat-color mutation exerts a pleiotropic effect on male fertility in rat. PMID:12760249

  9. Heterologous carotenoid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae induces the pleiotropic drug resistance stress response.

    PubMed

    Verwaal, René; Jiang, Yang; Wang, Jing; Daran, Jean-Marc; Sandmann, Gerhard; van den Berg, Johan A; van Ooyen, Albert J J

    2010-12-01

    To obtain insight into the genome-wide transcriptional response of heterologous carotenoid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcriptome of two different S. cerevisiae strains overexpressing carotenogenic genes from the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous grown in carbon-limited chemostat cultures was analysed. The strains exhibited different absolute carotenoid levels as well as different intermediate profiles. These discrepancies were further sustained by the difference of the transcriptional response exhibited by the two strains. Transcriptome analysis of the strain producing high carotenoid levels resulted in specific induction of genes involved in pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR). These genes encode ABC-type and major facilitator transporters which are reported to be involved in secretion of toxic compounds out of cells. β-Carotene was found to be secreted when sunflower oil was added to the medium of S. cerevisiae cells producing high levels of carotenoids, which was not observed when added to X. dendrorhous cells. Deletion of pdr10, one of the induced ABC transporters, decreased the transformation efficiency of a plasmid containing carotenogenic genes. The few transformants that were obtained had decreased growth rates and lower carotenoid production levels compared to a pdr5 deletion and a reference strain transformed with the same genes. Our results suggest that production of high amounts of carotenoids in S. cerevisiae leads to membrane stress, in which Pdr10 might play an important role, and a cellular response to secrete carotenoids out of the cell. PMID:20632327

  10. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Min; Jhan, Yun-Lian; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2016-01-01

    (1) BACKGROUND: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); (2) METHODS: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis; (3) RESULTS: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid-treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4) CONCLUSION: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research. PMID:27399657

  11. Pleiotropic Control by Testosterone of a Learned Vocal Behavior and Its Underlying Neuroplasticity123

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Farrah N.; Parker, Shannon E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Steroid hormones coordinate multiple aspects of behavior and physiology. The same hormone often regulates different aspects of a single behavior and its underlying neuroplasticity. This pleiotropic regulation of behavior and physiology is not well understood. Here, we investigated the orchestration by testosterone (T) of birdsong and its neural substrate, the song control system. Male canaries were castrated and received stereotaxic implants filled with T in select brain areas. Implanting T solely in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) increased the motivation to sing, but did not enhance aspects of song quality such as acoustic structure and stereotypy. In birds implanted with T solely in HVC (proper name), a key sensorimotor region of the song control system, little or no song was observed, similar to castrates that received no T implants of any sort. However, implanting T in HVC and POM simultaneously rescued all measures of song quality. Song amplitude, though, was still lower than what was observed in birds receiving peripheral T treatment. T in POM enhanced HVC volume bilaterally, likely due to activity-dependent changes resulting from an enhanced song rate. T directly in HVC, without increasing song rate, enhanced HVC volume on the ipsilateral side only. T in HVC enhanced the incorporation and recruitment of new neurons into this nucleus, while singing activity can independently influence the incorporation of new neurons into HVC. These results have broad implications for how steroid hormones integrate across different brain regions to coordinate complex social behaviors. PMID:26835510

  12. The rice FISH BONE gene encodes a tryptophan aminotransferase, which affects pleiotropic auxin-related processes.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takanori; Ito, Momoyo; Sumikura, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Akira; Nishimura, Takeshi; Kitano, Hidemi; Yamaguchi, Isomaro; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Hibara, Ken-Ichiro; Nagato, Yasuo; Itoh, Jun-Ichi

    2014-06-01

    Auxin is a fundamental plant hormone and its localization within organs plays pivotal roles in plant growth and development. Analysis of many Arabidopsis mutants that were defective in auxin biosynthesis revealed that the indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) pathway, catalyzed by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) and YUCCA (YUC) families, is the major biosynthetic pathway of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). In contrast, little information is known about the molecular mechanisms of auxin biosynthesis in rice. In this study, we identified a auxin-related rice mutant, fish bone (fib). FIB encodes an orthologue of TAA genes and loss of FIB function resulted in pleiotropic abnormal phenotypes, such as small leaves with large lamina joint angles, abnormal vascular development, small panicles, abnormal organ identity and defects in root development, together with a reduction in internal IAA levels. Moreover, we found that auxin sensitivity and polar transport activity were altered in the fib mutant. From these results, we suggest that FIB plays a pivotal role in IAA biosynthesis in rice and that auxin biosynthesis, transport and sensitivity are closely interrelated. PMID:24654985

  13. Multivariable Mendelian Randomization: The Use of Pleiotropic Genetic Variants to Estimate Causal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Stephen; Thompson, Simon G.

    2015-01-01

    A conventional Mendelian randomization analysis assesses the causal effect of a risk factor on an outcome by using genetic variants that are solely associated with the risk factor of interest as instrumental variables. However, in some cases, such as the case of triglyceride level as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, it may be difficult to find a relevant genetic variant that is not also associated with related risk factors, such as other lipid fractions. Such a variant is known as pleiotropic. In this paper, we propose an extension of Mendelian randomization that uses multiple genetic variants associated with several measured risk factors to simultaneously estimate the causal effect of each of the risk factors on the outcome. This “multivariable Mendelian randomization” approach is similar to the simultaneous assessment of several treatments in a factorial randomized trial. In this paper, methods for estimating the causal effects are presented and compared using real and simulated data, and the assumptions necessary for a valid multivariable Mendelian randomization analysis are discussed. Subject to these assumptions, we demonstrate that triglyceride-related pathways have a causal effect on the risk of coronary heart disease independent of the effects of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:25632051

  14. Metformin Beyond Diabetes: Pleiotropic Benefits of Metformin in Attenuation of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Forouzandeh, Farshad; Salazar, Gloria; Patrushev, Nikolay; Xiong, Shiqin; Hilenski, Lula; Fei, Baowei; Alexander, R. Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical studies show that metformin attenuates all‐cause mortality and myocardial infarction compared with other medications for type 2 diabetes, even at similar glycemic levels. However, there is paucity of data in the euglycemic state on the vasculoprotective effects of metformin. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effects of metformin on ameliorating atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Using ApoE−/− C57BL/6J mice, we found that metformin attenuates atherosclerosis and vascular senescence in mice fed a high‐fat diet and prevents the upregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor by a high‐fat diet in the aortas of mice. Thus, considering the known deleterious effects of angiotensin II mediated by angiotensin II type 1 receptor, the vascular benefits of metformin may be mediated, at least in part, by angiotensin II type 1 receptor downregulation. Moreover, we found that metformin can cause weight loss without hypoglycemia. We also found that metformin increases the antioxidant superoxide dismutase‐1. Conclusion Pleiotropic effects of metformin ameliorate atherosclerosis and vascular senescence. PMID:25527624

  15. Sphingosine kinase A is a pleiotropic and essential enzyme forLeishmania survival and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ou; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Xu, Wei; Pawlowic, Mattie; Zhang, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Summary Sphingosine kinase is a key enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism, catalysing the conversion of sphingosine or dihydrosphingosine into sphingosine-1-phosphate or dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate respectively. In mammals, sphingosine-1-phosphate is a powerful signalling molecule regulating cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and immunity. Functions of sphingosine kinase or sphingosine-1-phosphate in pathogenic protozoans are virtually unknown. While most organisms possess two closely related sphingosine kinases, only one sphingosine kinase homologue (SKa) can be identified in Leishmania, which are vector-borne protozoan parasites responsible for leishmaniasis. Leishmania SKa is a large, cytoplasmic enzyme capable of phosphorylating both sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine. Remarkably, deletion of SKa leads to catastrophic defects in both the insect stage and mammalian stage of Leishmania parasites. Genetic and biochemical analyses demonstrate that proper expression of SKa is essential for Leishmania parasites to remove toxic metabolites, to survive stressful conditions, and to cause disease in mice. Therefore, SKa is a pleiotropic enzyme with vital roles throughout the life cycle of Leishmania. The essentiality of SKa and its apparent divergence from mammalian counterparts suggests that this enzyme can be selectively targeted to reduce Leishmania infection. PMID:23980754

  16. Characterization of broadly pleiotropic phenotypes caused by an hfq insertion mutation in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Tsui, H C; Leung, H C; Winkler, M E

    1994-07-01

    The region immediately downstream from the miaA tRNA modification gene at 94.8 min contains the hfq gene and the hflA region, which are important in the bacteriophage Q beta and lambda life cycles. The roles of these genes in bacteria remain largely unknown. We report here the characterization of two chromosomal hfq insertion mutations. An omega (omega) cassette insertion near the end of hfq resulted in phenotypes only slightly different from the parent, although transcript mapping demonstrated that the insertion was completely polar on hflX expression. In contrast, an equally polar omega cassette insertion near the beginning of hfq caused pronounced pleiotropic phenotypes, including decreased growth rates and yields, decreased negative supercoiling of plasmids in stationary phase, increased cell size, osmosensitivity, increased oxidation of carbon sources, increased sensitivity to ultraviolet light, and suppression of bgl activation by hns mutations. hfq::omega mutant phenotypes were distinct from those caused by omega insertions early in the miaA tRNA modification gene. On the other hand, both hfq insertions interfered with lambda phage plaque formation, probably by means of polarity at the hflA region. Together, these results show that hfq function plays a fundamental role in Escherichia coli physiology and that hfq and the hflA-region are in the amiB-mutL-miaA-hfq-hflX superoperon. PMID:7984093

  17. The influence of the pleiotropic action of erythropoietin and its derivatives on nephroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Bartnicki, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Mariusz; Rysz, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is traditionally described as a hematopoietic cytokine or growth hormone regulating proliferation, differentiation, and survival of erythroid progenitors. The use of EPO in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) was a milestone achievement in the treatment of anemia. However, EPO involves some degree of risk, which increases with increasing hemoglobin levels. A growing number of studies have assessed the renoprotective effects of EPO in acute kidney injury (AKI) or CKD. Analysis of the biological effects of erythropoietin and pathophysiology of CKD in these studies suggests that treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) may exert renoprotection by pleiotropic actions on several targets and directly or indirectly slow the progression of CKD. By reducing ischemia and oxidative stress or strengthening anti-apoptotic processes, EPO may prevent the development of interstitial fibrosis and the destruction of tubular cells. Furthermore, it could have a direct protective impact on the integrity of the interstitial capillary network through its effects on endothelial cells and promotion of vascular repair, or modulate inflammation response. Thus, it is biologically plausible to suggest that correcting anemia with ESAs could slow the progression of CKD. The aim of this article is to discuss these possible renoprotection mechanisms and provide a comprehensive overview of erythropoietin and its derivatives. PMID:23872600

  18. Exploiting the Pleiotropic Antioxidant Effects of Established Drugs in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steven, Sebastian; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death and reduced quality of life worldwide. Arterial vessels are a primary target for endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, which is accompanied or even driven by increased oxidative stress. Recent research in this field identified different sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species contributing to the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. According to lessons from the past, improvement of endothelial function and prevention of cardiovascular disease by systemic, unspecific, oral antioxidant therapy are obviously too simplistic an approach. Source- and cell organelle-specific antioxidants as well as activators of intrinsic antioxidant defense systems might be more promising. Since basic research demonstrated the contribution of different inflammatory cells to vascular oxidative stress and clinical trials identified chronic inflammatory disorders as risk factors for cardiovascular events, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease are closely associated with inflammation. Therefore, modulation of the inflammatory response is a new and promising approach in the therapy of cardiovascular disease. Classical anti-inflammatory therapeutic compounds, but also established drugs with pleiotropic immunomodulatory abilities, demonstrated protective effects in various models of cardiovascular disease. However, results from ongoing clinical trials are needed to further evaluate the value of immunomodulation for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26251902

  19. CSF1 over-expression has pleiotropic effects on microglia in vivo

    PubMed Central

    De, Ishani; Nikodemova, Maria; Steffen, Megan D.; Sokn, Emily; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Watters, Jyoti J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (CSF1) is a cytokine that is upregulated in several diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). To examine the effects of CSF1 over-expression on microglia, transgenic mice that over-express CSF1 in the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) compartment were generated. CSF1 over-expressing mice have increased microglial proliferation and increased microglial numbers compared to controls. Treatment with PLX3397, a small molecule inhibitor of the CSF1 receptor CSF1R and related kinases, decreases microglial numbers by promoting microglial apoptosis in both CSF1 over-expressing and control mice. Microglia in CSF1 over-expressing mice exhibit gene expression profiles indicating that they are not basally M1 or M2 polarized, but they do have defects in inducing expression of certain genes in response to the inflammatory stimulus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These results indicate that the CSF1 over-expression observed in CNS pathologies likely has pleiotropic influences on microglia. Furthermore, small molecule inhibition of CSF1R has the potential to reverse CSF1-driven microglial accumulation that is frequently observed in CNS pathologies, but can also promote apoptosis of normal microglia. PMID:25042473

  20. A trans-acting locus regulates an anti-viral expression network and type 1 diabetes risk

    PubMed Central

    Heinig, Matthias; Petretto, Enrico; Wallace, Chris; Bottolo, Leonardo; Rotival, Maxime; Lu, Han; Li, Yoyo; Sarwar, Rizwan; Langley, Sarah R.; Bauerfeind, Anja; Hummel, Oliver; Lee, Young-Ae; Paskas, Svetlana; Rintisch, Carola; Saar, Kathrin; Cooper, Jason; Buchan, Rachel; Gray, Elizabeth E.; Cyster, Jason G.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Hengstenberg, Christian; Maouche, Seraya; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Rice, Catherine M.; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Goodall, Alison H; Schulz, Herbert; Roider, Helge; Vingron, Martin; Blankenberg, Stefan; Münzel, Thomas; Zeller, Tanja; Szymczak, Silke; Ziegler, Andreas; Tiret, Laurence; Smyth, Deborah J.; Pravenec, Michal; Aitman, Timothy J.; Cambien, Francois; Clayton, David; Todd, John A.; Hubner, Norbert; Cook, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Combined analyses of gene networks and DNA sequence variation can provide new insights into the aetiology of common diseases. Here, we used integrated genome-wide approaches across seven rat tissues to identify gene networks and the loci underlying their regulation. We defined an interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7)1-driven inflammatory network (iDIN) enriched for viral response genes, which represents a molecular biomarker for macrophages and was regulated in multiple tissues by a locus on rat chromosome 15q25. At this locus, Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (Ebi2 or Gpr183), which we localised to macrophages and is known to control B lymphocyte migration2,3, regulated the iDIN. The human chromosome 13q32 locus, orthologous to rat 15q25, controlled the human equivalent of iDIN, which was conserved in monocytes. For the macrophage-associated autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes (T1D) iDIN genes were more likely to associate with T1D susceptibility than randomly selected immune response genes (P = 8.85 × 10−6). The human locus controlling the iDIN, was associated with the risk of T1D at SNP rs9585056 (P = 7.0 × 10−10, odds ratio = 1.15), which was one of five SNPs in this region associated with EBI2 expression. These data implicate IRF7 network genes and their regulatory locus in the pathogenesis of T1D. PMID:20827270

  1. Pleiotropic Effect of a High Resolution Mapped Blood Pressure QTL on Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xi; Waghulde, Harshal; Mell, Blair; Smedlund, Kathryn; Vazquez, Guillermo; Joe, Bina

    2016-01-01

    This study is focused on a translationally significant, genome-wide-association-study (GWAS) locus for cardiovascular disease (QT-interval) on human chromosome 17. We have previously validated and high resolution mapped the homologous genomic segment of this human locus to <42.5 kb on rat chromosome 10. This <42.5 kb segment in rats regulates both QT-interval and blood pressure and contains a single protein-coding gene, rififylin (Rffl). The expression of Rffl in the hearts and kidneys is differential between Dahl S and S.LEW congenic rats, which are the strains used for mapping this locus. Our previous study points to altered rate of endocytic recycling as the underlying mechanism, through which Rffl operates to control both QT-interval and blood pressure. Interestingly, Rffl also contributes to tumorigenesis by repressing caspases and tumor suppressor genes. Moreover, the expression of Methyl-CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 (Mbd2) in the hearts and kidneys is also higher in the S.LEW congenic strain than the background (control) Dahl S strain. Mbd2 can repress methylated tumor suppressor genes. These data suggest that the S.LEW congenic strain could be more susceptible to tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, the S and S.LEW strains were compared for susceptibility to azoxymethane-induced colon tumors. The number of colon tumors was significantly higher in the S.LEW congenic strain compared with the S rat. Transcriptomic analysis confirmed that the chemical carcinogenesis pathway was significantly up-regulated in the congenic strain. These studies provide evidence for a GWAS-validated genomic segment on rat chromosome 10 as being important for the regulation of cardiovascular function and tumorigenesis. PMID:27073989

  2. Saturation germ line mutagenesis of the murine t region including a lethal allele at the quaking locus.

    PubMed Central

    Shedlovsky, A; King, T R; Dove, W F

    1988-01-01

    The proximal region of mouse chromosome 17 contains many genes affecting embryonic development, germ cell differentiation, and the immune system. Although the study of natural variation, including t haplotypes, has yielded some information about the function of these genes, spontaneous variants often exhibit manifold genetic effects and are generally not carried on inbred backgrounds. To clearly connect phenotypes with the actions of individual genes, mutants in which genes are altered singly are needed. Therefore, we used a highly efficient point mutagen, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, in combination with classical breeding schemes to induce and identify recessive lethal mutations in the t region. Of 350 mutagenized gametes examined, at least 10 independent recessive embryonic lethal mutations have been identified; an additional two are perinatal lethals. A spontaneous brachyury mutation, TWis, arose on a genetic background that permits high-resolution mapping of the induced recessive mutations against cloned DNA sequences from the t region. One lethal mutation is an allele at the quaking locus. The multiple alleles of quaking and the feasibility of high-resolution mapping permit investigation of the pleiotropic action of this locus in mammalian development. Images PMID:3422415

  3. Erythropoietin in heart failure and other cardiovascular diseases: hematopoietic and pleiotropic effects.

    PubMed

    Manolis, Antonis S; Tzeis, Stylianos; Triantafyllou, Kostas; Michaelidis, John; Pyrros, Ioannis; Sakellaris, Nikolaos; Kranidis, Athanasios; Melita, Helen

    2005-10-01

    Erythropoietin is a hypoxia-induced hormone that is a major regulator of normal erythropoiesis. Over the last decade, the production of recombinant human erythropoietin has revolutionized the treatment of anemia associated with chronic renal failure, and has led to a greater understanding of anemia pathophysiology and to the elucidation of the interactions of erythropoietin, iron, and erythropoiesis. Anemia has been shown to be independently associated with increased mortality and disease progression. Potential survival benefits associated with correction of anemia have expanded considerably the indications of erythropoietin use in various patient populations and are leading to consideration of earlier, more aggressive treatment of mild to moderate anemia. The results of such treatment are promising in a variety of new clinical settings, including anemia associated with congestive heart failure. Furthermore, the erythropoietin receptor is widely distributed in the cardiovascular system, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes and preclinical studies have established erythropoietin to be a pleiotropic cytokine with anti-apoptotic activity and tissue-protective actions in the cardiovascular system, beyond correction of hemoglobin levels. Despite some potential adverse effects, such as hypertension, and the occurrence of erythropoietin resistance, early studies in heart failure patients with anemia suggest that erythropoietin therapy is safe and effective in reducing left ventricular hypertrophy, enhancing exercise performance and increasing ejection fraction. Anemia is found in about one-third of all cases of congestive heart failure (CHF). The most likely common cause is chronic renal insufficiency, which is present in about half of all CHF cases. However, anemia can occur in CHF without renal insufficiency and is likely to be due to excessive cytokine production. The anemia itself can worsen cardiac function, both because it causes

  4. Deficiency of huntingtin has pleiotropic effects in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; Lumsden, Amanda L; Thompson, Morgan N; Wasco, Wilma; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F

    2011-04-01

    Huntingtin is a large HEAT repeat protein first identified in humans, where a polyglutamine tract expansion near the amino terminus causes a gain-of-function mechanism that leads to selective neuronal loss in Huntington's disease (HD). Genetic evidence in humans and knock-in mouse models suggests that this gain-of-function involves an increase or deregulation of some aspect of huntingtin's normal function(s), which remains poorly understood. As huntingtin shows evolutionary conservation, a powerful approach to discovering its normal biochemical role(s) is to study the effects caused by its deficiency in a model organism with a short life-cycle that comprises both cellular and multicellular developmental stages. To facilitate studies aimed at detailed knowledge of huntingtin's normal function(s), we generated a null mutant of hd, the HD ortholog in Dictyostelium discoideum. Dictyostelium cells lacking endogenous huntingtin were viable but during development did not exhibit the typical polarized morphology of Dictyostelium cells, streamed poorly to form aggregates by accretion rather than chemotaxis, showed disorganized F-actin staining, exhibited extreme sensitivity to hypoosmotic stress, and failed to form EDTA-resistant cell-cell contacts. Surprisingly, chemotactic streaming could be rescued in the presence of the bivalent cations Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) but not pulses of cAMP. Although hd(-) cells completed development, it was delayed and proceeded asynchronously, producing small fruiting bodies with round, defective spores that germinated spontaneously within a glassy sorus. When developed as chimeras with wild-type cells, hd(-) cells failed to populate the pre-spore region of the slug. In Dictyostelium, huntingtin deficiency is compatible with survival of the organism but renders cells sensitive to low osmolarity, which produces pleiotropic cell autonomous defects that affect cAMP signaling and as a consequence development. Thus, Dictyostelium provides a novel haploid

  5. Deficiency of Huntingtin Has Pleiotropic Effects in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Myre, Michael A.; Lumsden, Amanda L.; Thompson, Morgan N.; Wasco, Wilma; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Huntingtin is a large HEAT repeat protein first identified in humans, where a polyglutamine tract expansion near the amino terminus causes a gain-of-function mechanism that leads to selective neuronal loss in Huntington's disease (HD). Genetic evidence in humans and knock-in mouse models suggests that this gain-of-function involves an increase or deregulation of some aspect of huntingtin's normal function(s), which remains poorly understood. As huntingtin shows evolutionary conservation, a powerful approach to discovering its normal biochemical role(s) is to study the effects caused by its deficiency in a model organism with a short life-cycle that comprises both cellular and multicellular developmental stages. To facilitate studies aimed at detailed knowledge of huntingtin's normal function(s), we generated a null mutant of hd, the HD ortholog in Dictyostelium discoideum. Dictyostelium cells lacking endogenous huntingtin were viable but during development did not exhibit the typical polarized morphology of Dictyostelium cells, streamed poorly to form aggregates by accretion rather than chemotaxis, showed disorganized F-actin staining, exhibited extreme sensitivity to hypoosmotic stress, and failed to form EDTA-resistant cell–cell contacts. Surprisingly, chemotactic streaming could be rescued in the presence of the bivalent cations Ca2+ or Mg2+ but not pulses of cAMP. Although hd− cells completed development, it was delayed and proceeded asynchronously, producing small fruiting bodies with round, defective spores that germinated spontaneously within a glassy sorus. When developed as chimeras with wild-type cells, hd− cells failed to populate the pre-spore region of the slug. In Dictyostelium, huntingtin deficiency is compatible with survival of the organism but renders cells sensitive to low osmolarity, which produces pleiotropic cell autonomous defects that affect cAMP signaling and as a consequence development. Thus, Dictyostelium provides a novel haploid

  6. Pleiotropic Effects and Compensation Mechanisms Determine Tissue Specificity in Mitochondrial Myopathy and Sideroblastic Anemia (MLASA)

    PubMed Central

    Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Mengesha, Emebet; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    The tissue specificity of mitochondrial diseases is poorly understood. Recently, tissue-specific quantitative differences of the components of the mitochondrial translation system have been found to correlate with disease presentation in fatal hepatopathy caused by mutations in mitochondrial translation factor EFG1. MLASA is an autosomal recessive inherited progressive oxidative phosphorylation disorder that affects muscle and erythroid cells. The disease is caused by the homozygous point mutation C656T (R116W) in the catalytic domain of the pseudouridylate synthase 1 (PUS1) gene, which leads to a complete lack of pseudouridylation at the expected sites in mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNAs. Despite the presence of these altered tRNAs, most tissues are unaffected, and even in muscle and erythroid cells the disease phenotype only slowly emerges over the course of years. In order to elucidate intracellular pathways through which the homozygous mutation leads to tissue-restricted phenotype, we performed microarray expression analysis of EBV-transformed lymphoblasts from MLASA patients, heterozygous parents, and controls using human Beadchip microarray with 47,296 transcripts. Genes coding for proteins involved in DNA transcription and its regulation, and metal binding proteins, demonstrated major differences in expression between patients and all other individuals with normal phenotype. Genes coding for ribosomal proteins differed significantly between individual with at least one copy of the mutated PUS1 gene and controls. These findings indicate that the lack of tRNA pseudouridylation can be overcome by compensatory changes in levels of ribosomal proteins, and that the disease phenotype in affected tissues is likely due to pleiotropic effects of PUS1p on non-tRNA molecules involved in DNA transcription and iron metabolism. Similar combinations of mechanisms may play a role in the tissue specificity of other mitochondrial disorders. PMID:17374500

  7. Functional variant in methionine synthase reductase intron-1 is associated with pleiotropic congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Haiqin; Li, Huili; Bu, Zhaoli; Zhang, Qin; Bai, Baoling; Zhao, Hong; Li, Ren-Ke; Zhang, Ting; Xie, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Congenital malformations, such as neural tube defects (NTDs) and congenital heart disease (CHD), cause significant fetal mortality and childhood morbidity. NTDs are a common congenital anomaly, and are typically induced by higher maternal homocysteine (Hcy) levels and abnormal folate metabolism. The gene encoding methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) is essential for adequate remethylation of Hcy. Previous studies have focused on the coding region of genes involved in one-carbon metabolism, but recent research demonstrates that an allelic change in a non-coding region of MTRR (rs326119) increases the risk of CHD. We hypothesized that this variant might contribute to the etiology of NTDs as well, based on a common role during early embryogenesis. In the present study, 244 neural tube defect cases and 407 controls from northern China were analyzed to determine any association (by χ (2) test) between rs326119 and disease phenotypes. Significant increased risk of anencephaly was seen in MTRR variant rs326119 heterozygote (het) and homozygote (hom) individuals [odds ratios (OR)het = 1.81; ORhom = 2.05)]. Furthermore, this variant was also a risk factor for congenital malformations of the adrenal gland (OR = 1.85), likely due to multiple systemic malformations in the NTDs case population. Our present data indicate that the rs326119 non-coding variant of MTRR has a pleiotropic effect on the development of multiple tissues, especially during early stages in utero. This suggests the allelic state of MTRR is a significant clinical factor affecting Hcy levels and optimal folic supplementation. PMID:26045171

  8. A Pleiotropic Regulator, Frp, Affects Exopolysaccharide Synthesis, Biofilm Formation, and Competence Development in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Kuramitsu, Howard K.

    2006-01-01

    Exopolysaccharide synthesis, biofilm formation, and competence are important physiologic functions and virulence factors for Streptococcus mutans. In this study, we report the role of Frp, a transcriptional regulator, on the regulation of these traits crucial to pathogenesis. An Frp-deficient mutant showed decreased transcription of several genes important in virulence, including those encoding fructosyltransferase (Ftf), glucosyltransferase B (GtfB), and GtfC, by reverse transcription and quantitative real-time PCR. Expression of Ftf was decreased in the frp mutant, as assessed by Western blotting as well as by the activity assays. Frp deficiency also inhibited the production of GtfB in the presence of glucose and sucrose as well as the production of GtfC in the presence of glucose. As a consequence of the effects on GtfB and -C, sucrose-induced biofilm formation was decreased in the frp mutant. The expression of competence mediated by the competence-signaling peptide (CSP) system, as assessed by comC gene transcription, was attenuated in the frp mutant. As a result, the transformation efficiency was decreased in the frp mutant but was partially restored by adding synthetic CSP. Transcription of the frp gene was significantly increased in the frp mutant under all conditions tested, indicating that frp transcription is autoregulated. Furthermore, complementation of the frp gene in the frp mutant restored transcription of the affected genes to levels similar to those in the wild-type strain. These results suggest that Frp is a novel pleiotropic effector of multiple cellular functions and is involved in the modulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis, sucrose-dependent biofilm formation, and competence development. PMID:16861645

  9. Breaking evolutionary and pleiotropic constraints in mammals: On sloths, manatees and homeotic mutations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mammals as a rule have seven cervical vertebrae, except for sloths and manatees. Bateson proposed that the change in the number of cervical vertebrae in sloths is due to homeotic transformations. A recent hypothesis proposes that the number of cervical vertebrae in sloths is unchanged and that instead the derived pattern is due to abnormal primaxial/abaxial patterning. Results We test the detailed predictions derived from both hypotheses for the skeletal patterns in sloths and manatees for both hypotheses. We find strong support for Bateson's homeosis hypothesis. The observed vertebral and rib patterns cannot be explained by changes in primaxial/abaxial patterning. Vertebral patterns in sloths and manatees are similar to those in mice and humans with abnormal numbers of cervical vertebrae: incomplete and asymmetric homeotic transformations are common and associated with skeletal abnormalities. In sloths the homeotic vertebral shift involves a large part of the vertebral column. As such, similarity is greatest with mice mutant for genes upstream of Hox. Conclusions We found no skeletal abnormalities in specimens of sister taxa with a normal number of cervical vertebrae. However, we always found such abnormalities in conspecifics with an abnormal number, as in many of the investigated dugongs. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that the evolutionary constraints on changes of the number of cervical vertebrae in mammals is due to deleterious pleitropic effects. We hypothesize that in sloths and manatees low metabolic and activity rates severely reduce the usual stabilizing selection, allowing the breaking of the pleiotropic constraints. This probably also applies to dugongs, although to a lesser extent. PMID:21548920

  10. Inter-locus antagonistic coevolution as an engine of speciation: Assessment with hemiclonal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rice, William R.; Linder, Jodell E.; Friberg, Urban; Lew, Timothy A.; Morrow, Edward H.; Stewart, Andrew D.

    2005-01-01

    One of Ernst Mayr's legacies is the consensus that the allopatry model is the predominant mode of speciation in most sexually reproducing lineages. In this model, reproductive isolation develops as a pleiotropic byproduct of the genetic divergence that develops among physically isolated populations. Presently, there is no consensus concerning which, if any, evolutionary process is primarily responsible for driving the specific genetic divergence that leads to reproductive isolation. Here, we focus on the hypothesis that inter-locus antagonistic coevolution drives rapid genetic divergence among allopatric populations and thereby acts as an important “engine” of speciation. We assert that only data from studies of experimental evolution, rather than descriptive patterns of molecular evolution, can provide definitive evidence for this hypothesis. We describe and use an experimental approach, called hemiclonal analysis, that can be used in the Drosophila melanogaster laboratory model system to simultaneously screen nearly the entire genome for both standing genetic variation within a population and the net-selection gradient acting on the variation. Hemiclonal analysis has four stages: (i) creation of a laboratory “island population”; (ii) cytogenetic cloning of nearly genome-wide haplotypes to construct hemiclones; (iii) measurement of additive genetic variation among hemiclones; and (iv) measurement of the selection gradient acting on phenotypic variation among hemiclones. We apply hemiclonal analysis to test the hypothesis that there is ongoing antagonistic coevolution between the sexes in the D. melanogaster laboratory model system and then discuss the relevance of this analysis to natural systems. PMID:15851669

  11. Total body fat and abdominal visceral fat response to exercise training in the HERITAGE Family Study: evidence for major locus but no multifactorial effects.

    PubMed

    Rice, T; Hong, Y; Pérusse, L; Després, J P; Gagnon, J; Leon, A S; Skinner, J S; Wilmore, J H; Bouchard, C; Rao, D C

    1999-10-01

    The familial etiology of the response in total fat mass (FM) and abdominal visceral fat (AVF) to 20 weeks of exercise training was investigated in families participating in the HERITAGE Family Study. AVF (measured by computed tomographic scanning) and FM (measured by underwater weighing techniques) were assessed at baseline (in a sedentary state) and after 20 weeks of exercise training. The response AVF (AVFdelta) and response FM (FMdelta) were computed as the simple delta values (posttraining - baseline) and adjusted for the effects of sex, generation, and a polynomial in age using multiple regression analysis. To index the AVF response independently of the response in FM and the initial level of visceral fat, the AVFdelta was also adjusted for age and baseline AVF (AVFB) and FMdelta. Familial correlation analysis was used to investigate the multifactorial familial effects (polygenic and/or familial environmental), and segregation analysis was used to search for major gene effects. For the age-adjusted AVFdelta, a putative recessive locus accounting for 18% of the variance (q2 = 1%) was detected. Adjusting AVFdelta for AVFB and FMdelta slightly increased the percentage of variance accounted for (to 26%, q2 = 3%) but did not radically alter the pattern of the parameter estimates. For FMdelta, a putative dominant locus accounting for 31% of the variance (q2 = 49%) was noted. In conclusion, the results were consistent across methods in suggesting that there is little evidence of a multifactorial heritability for either AVFdelta or FMdelta. Rather, the familial etiology of the response to exercise training appears to be primarily due to putative major genes (a recessive locus for AVFdelta and a dominant locus for FMdelta). In addition, a pleiotropic/oligogenic system underlying these variables was inferred. That is, the putative loci for FMdelta and/or AVFB also may impact the AVFdelta, with an additional independent major locus effect on AVFdelta after the former

  12. Enhancer scanning to locate regulatory regions in genomic loci.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Melissa; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Mendoza-Fandiño, Gustavo; Baskin, Rebekah; Carvalho, Renato S; Carvalho, Marcelo A; Woods, Nicholas T; Monteiro, Alvaro N A

    2016-01-01

    This protocol provides a rapid, streamlined and scalable strategy to systematically scan genomic regions for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions that are active in a specific cell type. It creates genomic tiles spanning a region of interest that are subsequently cloned by recombination into a luciferase reporter vector containing the simian virus 40 promoter. Tiling clones are transfected into specific cell types to test for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions. The protocol includes testing of different single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles to determine their effect on regulatory activity. This procedure provides a systematic framework for identifying candidate functional SNPs within a locus during functional analysis of genome-wide association studies. This protocol adapts and combines previous well-established molecular biology methods to provide a streamlined strategy, based on automated primer design and recombinational cloning, allowing one to rapidly go from a genomic locus to a set of candidate functional SNPs in 8 weeks. PMID:26658467

  13. Enhancer scanning to locate regulatory regions in genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Melissa; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Mendoza-Fandiño, Gustavo; Baskin, Rebekah; Carvalho, Renato S.; Carvalho, Marcelo A.; Woods, Nicholas T.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol provides a rapid, streamlined and scalable strategy to systematically scan genomic regions for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions active in a specific cell type. It creates genomic tiles spanning a region of interest that are subsequently cloned by recombination into a luciferase reporter vector containing the Simian Virus 40 promoter. Tiling clones are transfected into specific cell types to test for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions. The protocol includes testing of different SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) alleles to determine their effect on regulatory activity. This procedure provides a systematic framework to identify candidate functional SNPs within a locus during functional analysis of genome-wide association studies. This protocol adapts and combines previous well-established molecular biology methods to provide a streamlined strategy, based on automated primer design and recombinational cloning to rapidly go from a genomic locus to a set of candidate functional SNPs in eight weeks. PMID:26658467

  14. Reversion at the HIS1 Locus of Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Seymour; Lax, Carol; Hurst, Donald D.

    1978-01-01

    The his1 gene (chromosome V) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae specifies phosphoribosyl transferase (E.C.2.4.2.17), the first enzyme of histidine biosynthesis. This hexameric enzyme has both catalytic and regulatory functions.—The spontaneous reversion rates of seven his1 mutations were studied. The reversion rates of the alleles at the proximal end of the locus (relative to the centromere) were about 50-fold higher than distal alleles.—Spontaneous reversion to prototrophy was studied in diploids homoallelic for each of the seven his1 mutations. Based on tetrad analysis, the prototrophy revertants could be assigned to three classes: (1) revertant tetrads that carried a prototrophic allele indistinguishable from wild type; (2) revertant tetrads that carried a prototrophic allele characterized by histidine excretion and feedback resistance; and (3) revertant tetrads that did not contain a prototrophic spore, but rather a newly derived allele that complemented the original allele intragenically. Four of the seven his1 mutations produced the excretor revertant class, and two mutations produced the complementer revertant class. The significance of these findings to our understanding of gene organization and the catalytic and regulatory functions of gene products are discussed. PMID:365679

  15. Positional cloning of the nude locus: Genetic, physical, and transcription maps of the region and mutations in the mouse and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, J.A.; Lander, E.S. |; Taylor, B.A.

    1995-08-10

    Mutations in the nude locus in mice and rats produce the pleiotropic phenotype of hairlessness and athymia, resulting in severely compromised immune system. To identify the causative gene, we utilized modern tools and techniques of positional cloning. Specifically, spanning the region in which the nude locus resides, we constructed a genetic map of polymorphic markers, a physical map of yeast artificial chromosomes and bacteriophage P1 clones, and a transcription map of genes obtained by direct cDNA selection and exon trapping. We identified seven novel transcripts with similarity to genes from Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat or human and three previously identified mouse genes. Based on our transcription mapping results, we present a novel approach to estimate that the nude locus resides in a region approximately threefold enriched for genes. We confirm a recently published report that the nude phenotype is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a novel winged helix or fork head domain transcription factor, whn. We report as well as the mutations in the rat rnu allele and the complete coding sequence of the rat whn mRNA. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Convergent evolution of complex regulatory landscapes and pleiotropy at Hox loci.

    PubMed

    Lonfat, Nicolas; Montavon, Thomas; Darbellay, Fabrice; Gitto, Sandra; Duboule, Denis

    2014-11-21

    Hox genes are required during the morphogenesis of both vertebrate digits and external genitals. We investigated whether transcription in such distinct contexts involves a shared enhancer-containing landscape. We show that the same regulatory topology is used, yet with some tissue-specific enhancer-promoter interactions, suggesting the hijacking of a regulatory backbone from one context to the other. In addition, comparable organizations are observed at both HoxA and HoxD clusters, which separated through genome duplication in an ancestral invertebrate animal. We propose that this convergent regulatory evolution was triggered by the preexistence of some chromatin architecture, thus facilitating the subsequent recruitment of the appropriate transcription factors. Such regulatory topologies may have both favored and constrained the evolution of pleiotropic developmental loci in vertebrates. PMID:25414315

  17. The Pleiotropic Effects of Simvastatin on Retinal Microvascular Endothelium Has Important Implications for Ischaemic Retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Reinhold J.; O'Neill, Christina L.; Devine, Adrian B.; Gardiner, Tom A.; Stitt, Alan W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Current guidelines encourage the use of statins to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients; however the impact of these drugs on diabetic retinopathy is not well defined. Moreover, pleiotropic effects of statins on the highly specialised retinal microvascular endothelium remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of simvastatin on retinal endothelium in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Findings Retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs) were treated with 0.01–10 µM simvastatin and a biphasic dose-related response was observed. Low concentrations enhanced microvascular repair with 0.1 µM simvastatin significantly increasing proliferation (p<0.05), and 0.01 µM simvastatin significantly promoting migration (p<0.05), sprouting (p<0.001), and tubulogenesis (p<0.001). High concentration of simvastatin (10 µM) had the opposite effect, significantly inhibiting proliferation (p<0.01), migration (p<0.01), sprouting (p<0.001), and tubulogenesis (p<0.05). Furthermore, simvastatin concentrations higher than 1 µM induced cell death. The mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy was used to investigate the possible effects of simvastatin treatment on ischaemic retinopathy. Low dose simvastatin(0.2 mg/Kg) promoted retinal microvascular repair in response to ischaemia by promoting intra-retinal re-vascularisation (p<0.01). By contrast, high dose simvastatin(20 mg/Kg) significantly prevented re-vascularisation (p<0.01) and concomitantly increased pathological neovascularisation (p<0.01). We also demonstrated that the pro-vascular repair mechanism of simvastatin involves VEGF stimulation, Akt phosphorylation, and nitric oxide production; and the anti-vascular repair mechanism is driven by marked intracellular cholesterol depletion and related disorganisation of key intracellular structures. Conclusions A beneficial effect of low-dose simvastatin on ischaemic

  18. Neuroprotective and consequent neurorehabilitative clinical outcomes, in patients treated with the pleiotropic drug cerebrolysin

    PubMed Central

    Mureşanu, DF; Ciurea, AV; Chendreanu, CD; Mihaescu, AS; Mardare, DC; Andone, I; SpȦnu, A; Popescu, C; Dumitrescu, A; Popescu, M; Grigorean, V; Ungur, B; Marinescu, F; Colibaşeanu, I; Onose, L; Haras, M; Sandu, A; Spircu, T

    2009-01-01

    Background: Discovery of neurotrophic factors–emblematic: the nerve growth factor (NGF)–resulted in better approaching central nervous system (CNS) lesions. Recently, another crucial property has been unveiled: their rather unique pleiotropic effect. Cerebrolysin is a peptide mixture that penetrates the blood–brain barrier in significant amounts and mimics the effects of NGF. Methods: Comparative analysis: Cerebrolysin treated (10 ml x 2/ day, i.v. x 3 weeks) vs. non–treated, in patients (all received aside, a rather equivalent complementary, pharmacological and physical, therapy). Two lots of patients, admitted in our Physical and Rehabilitation (neural–muscular) Medical–PR(n–m)M–Clinic Division, during 2007–2009: 69 treated with Cerebrolysin (22 F, 47 M; Average: 59.333; Mean of age: 61.0 Years old; Standard deviation 16.583) and 70 controls (41 F, 29 M; A: 70.014; M.o.a.: 70.5 Y.o.; S.d.: 6.270) were studied. The total number of assessed items was 13: most contributive in relation with the score of Functional Independence Measure at discharge (d FIM), were: admission (a FIM), number of physical therapy days (PT), number of hospitalization days (H), age (A) and–relatively–days until the first knee functional extension (KE). Concomitantly, the main/ key, focused on neuro–motor rehabilitative outcomes, functional/analytical parameters, have been assessed regarding the speed in achieving their functional recovery. Results: Concerning d FIM, there have not been objectified significant differences between the two lots (p=0.2453) but regarding key, focused on neuro–motor rehabilitative outcomes, functional/analytical parameters: KE (p=0.0007) and days until the first time recovery of the ability to walk between parallel bars (WPB–p=0.0000)–highly significant differences in favor of Cerebrolysin lot resulted. Conclusion: Cerebrolysin administration, as neurorehabilitative outcomes, proved to hasten, statistically significant, especially the

  19. Role of CTCF protein in regulating FMR1 locus transcription.

    PubMed

    Lanni, Stella; Goracci, Martina; Borrelli, Loredana; Mancano, Giorgia; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Moscato, Umberto; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Tabolacci, Elisabetta; Neri, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 gene, through expansion and methylation of a CGG triplet repeat (methylated full mutation). An antisense transcript (FMR1-AS1), starting from both promoter and intron 2 of the FMR1 gene, was demonstrated in transcriptionally active alleles, but not in silent FXS alleles. Moreover, a DNA methylation boundary, which is lost in FXS, was recently identified upstream of the FMR1 gene. Several nuclear proteins bind to this region, like the insulator protein CTCF. Here we demonstrate for the first time that rare unmethylated full mutation (UFM) alleles present the same boundary described in wild type (WT) alleles and that CTCF binds to this region, as well as to the FMR1 gene promoter, exon 1 and intron 2 binding sites. Contrariwise, DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding to FXS alleles. Drug-induced CpGs demethylation does not restore this binding. CTCF knock-down experiments clearly established that CTCF does not act as insulator at the active FMR1 locus, despite the presence of a CGG expansion. CTCF depletion induces heterochromatinic histone configuration of the FMR1 locus and results in reduction of FMR1 transcription, which however is not accompanied by spreading of DNA methylation towards the FMR1 promoter. CTCF depletion is also associated with FMR1-AS1 mRNA reduction. Antisense RNA, like sense transcript, is upregulated in UFM and absent in FXS cells and its splicing is correlated to that of the FMR1-mRNA. We conclude that CTCF has a complex role in regulating FMR1 expression, probably through the organization of chromatin loops between sense/antisense transcriptional regulatory regions, as suggested by bioinformatics analysis. PMID:23874213

  20. Exercise Adherence and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geshuri, Yosef; Glahn, Ronald

    In 1990, a study was conducted to investigate the relationship between students' locus of control and the extent to which they participated in a voluntary exercise program. First-time participants in the "Shape Up" program offered at the Porterville College Fitness Center during the summer and fall semesters of 1990 were identified through the…

  1. Locus of Control Differences and Marital Dissatisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, William J.

    1981-01-01

    Studied the relationship between spouses' individual expectancies for internal versus external control of reinforcements (locus of control), and their level of marital dissatisfaction. Results indicated that only a marital pattern in which the wife was more external and the husband more internal was associated with marital dissatisfaction. (Author)

  2. The Measurement of Parenting Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralj, M. M.; And Others

    The present study describes the construction of a scale for reliably measuring the extent to which parents form generalized expectancies of the degree to which their children's behaviors are contingent on their own actions as parents. The original 72 statements included in the Parenting Locus of Control (PLOC) scale ascribed cause to one of four…

  3. Regulatory RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Anderson, Jorge; Contreras, Lydia M

    2013-01-01

    RNAs have many important functional properties, including that they are independently controllable and highly tunable. As a result of these advantageous properties, their use in a myriad of sophisticated devices has been widely explored. Yet, the exploitation of RNAs for synthetic applications is highly dependent on the ability to characterize the many new molecules that continue to be discovered by large-scale sequencing and high-throughput screening techniques. In this review, we present an exhaustive survey of the most recent synthetic bacterial riboswitches and small RNAs while emphasizing their virtues in gene expression management. We also explore the use of these RNA components as building blocks in the RNA synthetic biology toolbox and discuss examples of synthetic RNA components used to rewire bacterial regulatory circuitry. We anticipate that this field will expand its catalog of smart devices by mimicking and manipulating natural RNA mechanisms and functions. PMID:24356572

  4. Regulatory Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  5. Regulatory Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced through these logics as well as to consider the sometimes unintended consequences of such safety work. In fact, the EU rules have been giving rise to complaints from practitioners finding the directives problematic and inadequate. In this article, I explore the problems practitioners face and why they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape. PMID:26139952

  6. The Effect of Locus of Control and Locus of Reinforcement on Academic Task Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Susan; Messer, Stanley B.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the differential effectiveness of using external reinforcement versus self reinforcement to increase the task persistence of children characterized by internal or external locus of control. Subjects were 153 fourth and fifth grade boys. (BD)

  7. IlvHI locus of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Squires, C H; De Felice, M; Lago, C T; Calvo, J M

    1983-06-01

    In Escherichia coli K-12, the ilvHI locus codes for one of two acetohydroxy acid synthase isoenzymes. A region of the Salmonella typhimurium genome adjacent to the leucine operon was cloned on plasmid pBR322, yielding plasmids pCV47 and pCV49 (a shortened version of pCV47). This region contains DNA homologous to the E. coli ilvHI locus, as judged by hybridization experiments. Plasmid pCV47 did not confer isoleucine-valine prototrophy upon either E. coli or S. typhimurium strains lacking acetohydroxy acid synthase activity, suggesting that S. typhimurium lacks a functional ilvHI locus. However, isoleucine-valine prototrophs were readily isolated from such strains after mutagenesis with nitrosoguanidine. In one case we found that the Ilv+ phenotype resulted from an alteration in bacterial DNA on the plasmid (new plasmid designated pCV50). Furthermore, a new acetohydroxy acid synthase activity was observed in Ilv+ revertants; this enzyme was similar to E. coli acetohydroxy acid synthase III in its lack of activity at low pH. This new activity was correlated with the appearance in minicells of a new polypeptide having an approximate molecular weight of 61,000. Strains carrying either pCV49 or pCV50 produced a substantial amount of ilvHI-specific mRNA. These results, together with results from other laboratories, suggest that S. typhimurium has functional ilvB and ilvG genes and a cryptic ilvHI locus. E. coli K-12, on the other hand, has functional ilvB and ilvHI genes and a cryptic ilvG locus. PMID:6189818

  8. Locus of Control: The Effect on Reading and Instructional Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Richard I; Dyer, Barbara

    1978-01-01

    One hundred seventy-five college students were tested to determine the relationship among locus of control, student preference, and teaching procedures. Results showed that external locus of control students preferred hardware as instructional devices and that such devices improved their reading rates, while internal locus of control students…

  9. Self-Esteem, Locus of Control, and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterbin, Allan; Rakow, Ernest

    The direct effects of locus of control and self-esteem on standardized test scores were studied. The relationships among the standardized test scores and measures of locus of control and self-esteem for 12,260 students from the National Education Longitudinal Study 1994 database were examined, using the same definition of locus of control and…

  10. Locus of Control and Psychological Distress among the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, W. Daniel; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined relationship between locus of control and self-reported psychopathology in 139 residents of retirement complex. Correlation coefficients computed for locus of control and each of nine symptom dimensions of the Brief Symptom Inventory indicated that locus of control was correlated with self-reported psychopatholgoy for older women but not…

  11. The Impact of Locus of Control on Language Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani

    2012-01-01

    This study hypothesized that students' loci of control affected their language achievement. 198 (N = 198) EFL students took the Rotter's (1966) locus of control test and were classified as locus-internal (ni = 78), and locus-external (ne = 120). They then took their ordinary courses and at the end of the semester, they were given their exams.…

  12. Toward an Abbreviated Internal-External Locus of Control Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert M., Jr.; Salomone, Paul R.

    1981-01-01

    Integrates a review of Rotter's theory with an analysis of the design and development of locus of control scales, and tests the reliability and validity of an abbreviated version of Rotter's Locus of Control Scale which provides practitioners with an instrument less confusing than other locus of control scales. (Author)

  13. Interaction of the Stubble-Stubbloid Locus and the Broad-Complex of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Beaton, A. H.; Kiss, I.; Fristrom, D.; Fristrom, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The 2B5 region on the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster forms an early ecdysone puff at the end of the third instar. The region is coextensive with a complex genetic locus, the Broad-Complex (BR-C). The BR-C is a regulatory gene that contains two major functional domains, the br domain and the l(1)2Bc domain. BR-C mutants prevent metamorphosis, including morphogenesis of imaginal discs; br mutants prevent elongation and eversion of appendages and l(1)2Bc mutants prevent fusion of the discs. The Stubble-stubbloid (Sb-sbd) locus at 89B9-10 is best known for the effects of its mutants on bristle structure. Mutants of the BR-C and the Sb-sbd locus interact to produce severe malformation of appendages. Viable heteroallelic and homoallelic combinations of Sb-sbd mutants, including loss-of-function mutants, affect the elongation of imaginal disc appendages. Thus, the Sb-sbd(+) product is essential for normal appendage elongation. Sb-sbd mutants, however, do not affect eversion or fusion of discs. Correspondingly, only BR-C mutants deficient in br function interact with Sb-sbd mutants. The interaction occurs in deficiency heterozygotes using single, wild-type doses of the BR-C, of the Sb-sbd locus, or of both loci. These last results are formally consistent with the possibility that the BR-C acts as a positive regulator of the Sb-sbd locus. The data do not exclude other possible nonregulatory interactions between the two loci, e.g., interactions between the products of both genes. PMID:3143619

  14. Activation of the pleiotropic drug resistance pathway can promote mitochondrial DNA retention by fusion-defective mitochondria in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Nebibe; Garipler, Görkem; Akdoğan, Emel; Dunn, Cory D

    2014-07-01

    Genetic and microscopic approaches using Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified many proteins that play a role in mitochondrial dynamics, but it is possible that other proteins and pathways that play a role in mitochondrial division and fusion remain to be discovered. Mutants lacking mitochondrial fusion are characterized by rapid loss of mitochondrial DNA. We took advantage of a petite-negative mutant that is unable to survive mitochondrial DNA loss to select for mutations that allow cells with fusion-deficient mitochondria to maintain the mitochondrial genome on fermentable medium. Next-generation sequencing revealed that all identified suppressor mutations not associated with known mitochondrial division components were localized to PDR1 or PDR3, which encode transcription factors promoting drug resistance. Further studies revealed that at least one, if not all, of these suppressor mutations dominantly increases resistance to known substrates of the pleiotropic drug resistance pathway. Interestingly, hyperactivation of this pathway did not significantly affect mitochondrial shape, suggesting that mitochondrial division was not greatly affected. Our results reveal an intriguing genetic connection between pleiotropic drug resistance and mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:24807265

  15. Neuroanatomical correlates of the sense of control: Gray and white matter volumes associated with an internal locus of control.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-10-01

    A belief that effort is rewarded can develop incentive, achievement motivation, and self-efficacy. Individuals with such a belief attribute causes of events to themselves, not to external, uncontrollable factors, and are thus said to have an internal locus of control. An internal locus of control is a positive personality trait and has been thoroughly studied in applied psychology, but has not been widely examined in neuroscience. In the present study, correlations between locus of control assessment scores and brain volumes were examined in 777 healthy young adults using magnetic resonance imaging. A whole-brain multiple regression analysis with corrections for the effects of age, gender, and intelligence was conducted. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that gray matter volumes in the anterior cingulate cortex, striatum, and anterior insula positively correlated with higher scores, which indicate an internal LOC. In addition, white matter volumes in the striatum showed significant correlations with an internal locus of control. These results suggest that cognitive, socioemotional, self-regulatory, and reward systems might be associated with internal control orientation. The finding of greater volumes in several brain regions in individuals with a stronger internal locus of control indicates that there is a neuroanatomical basis for the belief that one's efforts are rewarded. PMID:26123375

  16. Finemapping of the arthritis QTL Pia7 reveals co-localization with Oia2 and the APLEC locus.

    PubMed

    Rintisch, C; Kelkka, T; Norin, U; Lorentzen, J C; Olofsson, P; Holmdahl, R

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we sought to determine the effect of the quantitative trait locus Pia7 on arthritis severity. The regulatory locus derived from the arthritis-resistant E3 rat strain was introgressed into the arthritis-susceptibility DA strain through continuous backcrossing. Congenic rats were studied for their susceptibility to experimental arthritis using pristane and adjuvant oil. In addition, cell number and function of various leukocyte populations were analyzed either under naive or stimulated conditions. We found that the minimal congenic fragment of DA.E3-Pia7 rats overlapped with the minimal fragment in DA.PVG-Oia2 congenic rats, which has been positionally cloned to the antigen-presenting lectin-like receptor complex (APLEC) genes. DA.E3-Pia7 congenic rats were protected from both PIA and OIA, but the protection was more pronounced in OIA. In adoptive transfer experiments we observed that the Pia7 locus controlled the priming of arthritogenic T cells and not the effector phase. In addition, Pia7 congenic rats had a significant higher frequency of B cells and granulocytes as well as TNFalpha production after stimulation, indicating a higher activation state of cells of the innate immune system. In conclusion, this study shows that the APLEC locus is a major locus regulating the severity of experimentally induced arthritis in rats. PMID:20200546

  17. Mota1552, a Mutation of Dictyostelium Discoideum Having Pleiotropic Effects on Motility and Discoidin I Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kayman, S. C.; Birchman, R.; Clarke, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Dictyostelium discoideum mutant MC2 exhibits temperature-sensitive growth, temperature-sensitive motility, and temperature induction of discoidin I synthesis. These three phenotypes of MC2 were not separated in the genetic experiments reported here. They were therefore assigned to the mutation motA1552, which was mapped to linkage group II by segregation analysis and by analysis of mitotic recombinant diploids. In one motA1552 strain, loss of motility preceded accumulation of discoidin I by 3 hr, indicating that discoidin I is not involved in generation of the motility defect. Expression of motA1552 phenotypes varied both among strains carrying the mutation, and among different clones of a particular strain. MC2 and its derivatives displayed elevated levels of recombination between whiA and acrA on linkage group II, and yielded highly unstable mutations at the acrA locus. Accumulation of large amounts of discoidin I during axenic growth of strain AX3 was found to depend on the presence of a second linkage group II mutation, daxA1551. This mutation was already present in the strain mutagenized to isolate motA1552, complicating explication of motA1552 action. PMID:3366362

  18. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of human longevity identifies a novel locus conferring survival beyond 90 years of age.

    PubMed

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won; Broer, Linda; Ayers, Kristin L; Tan, Qihua; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Bennet, Anna M; Tamm, Riin; Trompet, Stella; Guðbjartsson, Daníel F; Flachsbart, Friederike; Rose, Giuseppina; Viktorin, Alexander; Fischer, Krista; Nygaard, Marianne; Cordell, Heather J; Crocco, Paolina; van den Akker, Erik B; Böhringer, Stefan; Helmer, Quinta; Nelson, Christopher P; Saunders, Gary I; Alver, Maris; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen; Breen, Marie E; van der Breggen, Ruud; Caliebe, Amke; Capri, Miriam; Cevenini, Elisa; Collerton, Joanna C; Dato, Serena; Davies, Karen; Ford, Ian; Gampe, Jutta; Garagnani, Paolo; de Geus, Eco J C; Harrow, Jennifer; van Heemst, Diana; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Heinsen, Femke-Anouska; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hofman, Albert; Jeune, Bernard; Jonsson, Palmi V; Lathrop, Mark; Lechner, Doris; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen; Mcnerlan, Susan E; Mihailov, Evelin; Montesanto, Alberto; Mooijaart, Simon P; Murphy, Anne; Nohr, Ellen A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Postmus, Iris; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ross, Owen A; Salvioli, Stefano; Sattar, Naveed; Schreiber, Stefan; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stott, David J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Samani, Nilesh J; Galan, Pilar; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Jukema, J Wouter; Rea, Irene Maeve; Passarino, Giuseppe; de Craen, Anton J M; Christensen, Kaare; Nebel, Almut; Stefánsson, Kári; Metspalu, Andres; Magnusson, Patrik; Blanché, Hélène; Christiansen, Lene; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franceschi, Claudio; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Slagboom, P Eline

    2014-08-15

    The genetic contribution to the variation in human lifespan is ∼ 25%. Despite the large number of identified disease-susceptibility loci, it is not known which loci influence population mortality. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 7729 long-lived individuals of European descent (≥ 85 years) and 16 121 younger controls (<65 years) followed by replication in an additional set of 13 060 long-lived individuals and 61 156 controls. In addition, we performed a subset analysis in cases aged ≥ 90 years. We observed genome-wide significant association with longevity, as reflected by survival to ages beyond 90 years, at a novel locus, rs2149954, on chromosome 5q33.3 (OR = 1.10, P = 1.74 × 10(-8)). We also confirmed association of rs4420638 on chromosome 19q13.32 (OR = 0.72, P = 3.40 × 10(-36)), representing the TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 locus. In a prospective meta-analysis (n = 34 103), the minor allele of rs2149954 (T) on chromosome 5q33.3 associates with increased survival (HR = 0.95, P = 0.003). This allele has previously been reported to associate with low blood pressure in middle age. Interestingly, the minor allele (T) associates with decreased cardiovascular mortality risk, independent of blood pressure. We report on the first GWAS-identified longevity locus on chromosome 5q33.3 influencing survival in the general European population. The minor allele of this locus associates with low blood pressure in middle age, although the contribution of this allele to survival may be less dependent on blood pressure. Hence, the pleiotropic mechanisms by which this intragenic variation contributes to lifespan regulation have to be elucidated. PMID:24688116

  19. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of human longevity identifies a novel locus conferring survival beyond 90 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won; Broer, Linda; Ayers, Kristin L.; Tan, Qihua; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Bennet, Anna M.; Tamm, Riin; Trompet, Stella; Guðbjartsson, Daníel F.; Flachsbart, Friederike; Rose, Giuseppina; Viktorin, Alexander; Fischer, Krista; Nygaard, Marianne; Cordell, Heather J.; Crocco, Paolina; van den Akker, Erik B.; Böhringer, Stefan; Helmer, Quinta; Nelson, Christopher P.; Saunders, Gary I.; Alver, Maris; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen; Breen, Marie E.; van der Breggen, Ruud; Caliebe, Amke; Capri, Miriam; Cevenini, Elisa; Collerton, Joanna C.; Dato, Serena; Davies, Karen; Ford, Ian; Gampe, Jutta; Garagnani, Paolo; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Harrow, Jennifer; van Heemst, Diana; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Heinsen, Femke-Anouska; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hofman, Albert; Jeune, Bernard; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Lathrop, Mark; Lechner, Doris; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen; Mcnerlan, Susan E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Montesanto, Alberto; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Murphy, Anne; Nohr, Ellen A.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Postmus, Iris; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ross, Owen A.; Salvioli, Stefano; Sattar, Naveed; Schreiber, Stefan; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stott, David J.; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Samani, Nilesh J.; Galan, Pilar; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Rea, Irene Maeve; Passarino, Giuseppe; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Christensen, Kaare; Nebel, Almut; Stefánsson, Kári; Metspalu, Andres; Magnusson, Patrik; Blanché, Hélène; Christiansen, Lene; Kirkwood, Thomas B.L.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Franceschi, Claudio; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Slagboom, P. Eline

    2014-01-01

    The genetic contribution to the variation in human lifespan is ∼25%. Despite the large number of identified disease-susceptibility loci, it is not known which loci influence population mortality. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 7729 long-lived individuals of European descent (≥85 years) and 16 121 younger controls (<65 years) followed by replication in an additional set of 13 060 long-lived individuals and 61 156 controls. In addition, we performed a subset analysis in cases aged ≥90 years. We observed genome-wide significant association with longevity, as reflected by survival to ages beyond 90 years, at a novel locus, rs2149954, on chromosome 5q33.3 (OR = 1.10, P = 1.74 × 10−8). We also confirmed association of rs4420638 on chromosome 19q13.32 (OR = 0.72, P = 3.40 × 10−36), representing the TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 locus. In a prospective meta-analysis (n = 34 103), the minor allele of rs2149954 (T) on chromosome 5q33.3 associates with increased survival (HR = 0.95, P = 0.003). This allele has previously been reported to associate with low blood pressure in middle age. Interestingly, the minor allele (T) associates with decreased cardiovascular mortality risk, independent of blood pressure. We report on the first GWAS-identified longevity locus on chromosome 5q33.3 influencing survival in the general European population. The minor allele of this locus associates with low blood pressure in middle age, although the contribution of this allele to survival may be less dependent on blood pressure. Hence, the pleiotropic mechanisms by which this intragenic variation contributes to lifespan regulation have to be elucidated. PMID:24688116

  20. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cooke, N.E.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Monks, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes research involving the five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster and its expression in the placenta. The results indicate that interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression in the mouse genome. In addition, the results suggest a role for shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. 67 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Bipolar disorder: Evidence for a major locus

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, M.A.; Flodman, P.L.; Sadovnick, A.D.; Ameli, H.

    1995-10-09

    Complex segregation analyses were conducted on families of bipolar I and bipolar II probands to delineate the mode of inheritance. The probands were ascertained from consecutive referrals to the Mood Disorder Service, University Hospital, University of British Columbia and diagnosed by DSM-III-R and Research Diagnostic Criteria. Data were available on over 1,500 first-degree relatives of the 186 Caucasian probands. The purpose of the analyses was to determine if, after correcting for age and birth cohort, there was evidence for a single major locus. Five models were fit to the data using the statistical package SAGE: (1) dominant, (2) recessive, (3) arbitrary mendelian inheritance, (4) environmental, and (5) no major effects. A single dominant, mendelian major locus was the best fitting of these models for the sample of bipolar I and II probands when only bipolar relatives were defined as affected (polygenic inheritance could not be tested). Adding recurrent major depression to the diagnosis {open_quotes}affected{close_quotes} for relatives reduced the evidence for a major locus effect. Our findings support the undertaking of linkage studies and are consistent with the analyses of the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) Collaborative Study data by Rice et al. and Blangero and Elston. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. A model for antagonistic pleiotropic gene action for mortality and advanced age.

    PubMed

    Toupance, B; Godelle, B; Gouyon, P H; Schächter, F

    1998-06-01

    Association or linkage studies involving control and long-lived populations provide information on genes that influence longevity. However, the relationship between allele-specific differences in survival and the genetic structure of aging cohorts remains unclear. We model a heterogeneous cohort comprising several genotypes differing in age-specific mortality. In its most general form, without any specific assumption regarding the shape of mortality curves, the model permits derivation of a fundamental property underlying abrupt age-related changes in the composition of a cohort. The model is applied to sex-specific survival curves taken from period life tables, and Gompertz-Makeham mortality coefficients are calculated for the French population. Then, adjustments are performed under Gompertz-Makeham mortality functions for three genotypes composing a heterogeneous cohort, under the constraint of fitting the resultant mortality to the real French population mortality obtained from life tables. Multimodal curves and divergence after the 8th decade appear as recurrent features of the frequency trajectories. Finally, a fit to data previously obtained at the angiotensin-converting-enzyme locus is realized, explaining what had seemed to be paradoxical results-namely, that the frequency of a genotype known as a cardiovascular risk factor was increased in centenarians. Our results help explain the well-documented departure from Gompertz-Makeham mortality kinetics at older ages. The implications of our model are discussed in the context of known genetic effects on human longevity and age-related pathologies. Since antagonistic pleiotropy between early and late survival emerges as a general rule, extrapolating the effects measured for a gene in a particular age class to other ages could be misleading. PMID:9585593

  3. A gene locus for targeted ectopic gene integration in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Kilaru, S; Schuster, M; Latz, M; Das Gupta, S; Steinberg, N; Fones, H; Gurr, S J; Talbot, N J; Steinberg, G

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the cellular organization and biology of fungal pathogens requires accurate methods for genomic integration of mutant alleles or fluorescent fusion-protein constructs. In Zymoseptoria tritici, this can be achieved by integrating of plasmid DNA randomly into the genome of this wheat pathogen. However, untargeted ectopic integration carries the risk of unwanted side effects, such as altered gene expression, due to targeting regulatory elements, or gene disruption following integration into protein-coding regions of the genome. Here, we establish the succinate dehydrogenase (sdi1) locus as a single "soft-landing" site for targeted ectopic integration of genetic constructs by using a carboxin-resistant sdi1(R) allele, carrying the point-mutation H267L. We use various green and red fluorescent fusion constructs and show that 97% of all transformants integrate correctly into the sdi1 locus as single copies. We also demonstrate that such integration does not affect the pathogenicity of Z. tritici, and thus the sdi1 locus is a useful tool for virulence analysis in genetically modified Z. tritici strains. Furthermore, we have developed a vector which facilitates yeast recombination cloning and thus allows assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments in a single cloning step for high throughput vector and strain generation. PMID:26092798

  4. The A alpha mating locus of Schizophyllum commune encodes two dissimilar multiallelic homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stankis, M M; Specht, C A; Yang, H; Giasson, L; Ullrich, R C; Novotny, C P

    1992-01-01

    The A alpha mating locus is one of four multiallelic loci that govern sexual development in the basidiomycete fungus Schizophyllum commune. We have determined the nucleotide sequence encoding three A alpha mating types, A alpha 1, A alpha 3, and A alpha 4. We have found that the locus for A alpha 3 and A alpha 4 consists of two genes: Y and Z. The locus for A alpha 1 encodes only one gene, Y. The Z polypeptides encoded by different alleles exhibit 42% identity. The Y polypeptides exhibit 49-54% identity. The finding that the deduced Z and Y polypeptides have homeodomain motifs suggests that these polypeptides may be DNA-binding regulatory proteins that control the expression of developmental genes. The deduced Z polypeptide also has acidic regions that might be functionally analogous to the acidic regions in yeast GAL4 and GCN4 that activate transcription. The Y polypeptide has a serine-rich region and a basic region that shows some identity to the lysine-rich region of H1 histones. PMID:1353886

  5. AINTEGUMENTA, an APETALA2-like gene of Arabidopsis with pleiotropic roles in ovule development and floral organ growth.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, R C; Betzner, A S; Huttner, E; Oakes, M P; Tucker, W Q; Gerentes, D; Perez, P; Smyth, D R

    1996-01-01

    To understand better the role of genes in controlling ovule development, a female-sterile mutant, aintegumenta (ant), was isolated from Arabidopsis. In ovules of this mutant, integuments do not develop and megasporogenesis is blocked at the tetrad stage. As a pleiotropic effect, narrower floral organs arise in reduced numbers. More complete loss of floral organs occurs when the ant mutant is combined with the floral homeotic mutant apetala2, suggesting that the two genes share functions in initiating floral organ development. The ANT gene was cloned by transposon tagging, and sequence analysis showed that it is a member of the APETALA2-like family of transcription factor genes. The expression pattern of ANT in floral and vegetative tissues indicates that it is involved not only in the initiation of integuments but also in the initiation and early growth of all primorida except roots. PMID:8742707

  6. Stromal control of oncogenic traits expressed in response to the overexpression of GLI2, a pleiotropic oncogene.

    PubMed

    Snijders, A M; Huey, B; Connelly, S T; Roy, R; Jordan, R C K; Schmidt, B L; Albertson, D G

    2009-02-01

    Hedgehog signaling is often activated in tumors, yet it remains unclear how GLI2, a transcription factor activated by this pathway, acts as an oncogene. We show that GLI2 is a pleiotropic oncogene. The overexpression induces genomic instability and blocks differentiation, likely mediated in part by enhanced expression of the stem cell gene SOX2. GLI2 also induces transforming growth factor (TGF)B1-dependent transdifferentiation of foreskin and tongue, but not gingival fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, creating an environment permissive for invasion by keratinocytes, which are in various stages of differentiation having downregulated GLI2. Thus, upregulated GLI2 expression is sufficient to induce a number of the acquired characteristics of tumor cells; however, the stroma, in a tissue-specific manner, determines whether certain GLI2 oncogenic traits are expressed. PMID:19015636

  7. Addiction Genetics and Pleiotropic Effects of Common Haplotypes that Make Polygenic Contributions to Vulnerability to Substance Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, George R.; Drgon, Tomas; Johnson, Catherine; Liu, Qing-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Abundant evidence from family, adoption, and twin studies point to large genetic contributions to individual differences in vulnerability to develop dependence on one or more addictive substances. Twin data suggest that most of this genetic vulnerability is shared by individuals who are dependent on a variety of addictive substances. Molecular genetic studies, especially genomewide and candidate gene association studies, have elucidated common haplotypes in dozens of genes that appear to make polygenic contributions to vulnerability to developing dependence. Most genes that harbor currently identified addiction-associated haplotypes are expressed in the brain. Haplotypes in many of the same genes are identified in genomewide association studies that compare allele frequencies in substance dependent vs. control individuals from European, African, and Asian racial/ethnic backgrounds. Many of these addiction-associated haplotypes display pleiotropic influences on a variety of related brain-based phenotypes that display 1) substantial heritability and 2) clinical cooccurence with substance dependence. PMID:19152208

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide in the locus coeruleus and its possible role in the regulation of arterial blood pressure, fluid and electrolyte homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, H.; Sterzel, R.B. ); Bahner, U.; Heidland, A. ); Palkovits, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANP) is present in neuronal cells of the locus coeruleus and its vicinity in the pontine tegmentum and moderate amount of ANP is detectable in this area by radioimmunoassay. The ANP is known as a neuropeptide which may influence the body salt and water homeostasis and blood pressure by targeting both central and peripheral regulatory mechanisms. Whether this pontine ANP cell group is involved in any of these regulatory mechanisms, the effect of various types of hypertension and experimental alterations in the salt and water balance on ANP levels was measured by radioimmunoassay in the locus coeruleus of rats. Adrenalectomy, as well as aldosterone and dexamethasone treatments failed to alter ANP levels in the locus coeruleus. Reduced ANP levels were measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and in diabetes insipidus rats with vasopressin replacement. In contrast to these situations, elevated ANP levels were found in rats with DOCA-salt or 1-Kidney-1-clip hypertension. These data suggest a link between ANP levels in the locus coeruleus and fluid volume homeostasis. Whether this link is causal and connected with the major activity of locus coeruleus neurons needs further information.

  9. A Multi-Trait, Meta-analysis for Detecting Pleiotropic Polymorphisms for Stature, Fatness and Reproduction in Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bolormaa, Sunduimijid; Pryce, Jennie E.; Reverter, Antonio; Zhang, Yuandan; Barendse, William; Kemper, Kathryn; Tier, Bruce; Savin, Keith; Hayes, Ben J.; Goddard, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms that affect complex traits or quantitative trait loci (QTL) often affect multiple traits. We describe two novel methods (1) for finding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with one or more traits using a multi-trait, meta-analysis, and (2) for distinguishing between a single pleiotropic QTL and multiple linked QTL. The meta-analysis uses the effect of each SNP on each of n traits, estimated in single trait genome wide association studies (GWAS). These effects are expressed as a vector of signed t-values (t) and the error covariance matrix of these t values is approximated by the correlation matrix of t-values among the traits calculated across the SNP (V). Consequently, t'V−1t is approximately distributed as a chi-squared with n degrees of freedom. An attractive feature of the meta-analysis is that it uses estimated effects of SNPs from single trait GWAS, so it can be applied to published data where individual records are not available. We demonstrate that the multi-trait method can be used to increase the power (numbers of SNPs validated in an independent population) of GWAS in a beef cattle data set including 10,191 animals genotyped for 729,068 SNPs with 32 traits recorded, including growth and reproduction traits. We can distinguish between a single pleiotropic QTL and multiple linked QTL because multiple SNPs tagging the same QTL show the same pattern of effects across traits. We confirm this finding by demonstrating that when one SNP is included in the statistical model the other SNPs have a non-significant effect. In the beef cattle data set, cluster analysis yielded four groups of QTL with similar patterns of effects across traits within a group. A linear index was used to validate SNPs having effects on multiple traits and to identify additional SNPs belonging to these four groups. PMID:24675618

  10. Pleiotropic effects of the beta-adrenoceptor blocker carvedilol on calcium regulation during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruijuan; Miura, Toshiro; Harada, Nozomu; Kametani, Ryosuke; Shibuya, Masaki; Fukagawa, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Shuji; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Hara, Masayuki; Matsuzaki, Masunori

    2006-07-01

    Carvedilol is a nonselective beta-adrenoceptor blocker with multiple pleiotropic actions. A recent clinical study suggested that carvedilol may be superior to other beta-adrenoceptor blockers in the treatment of heart failure. Despite numerous investigations, the underlying mechanisms of carvedilol on improving heart failure are yet to be fully established. The purpose of this study is to clarify the pleiotropic effect of carvedilol on cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium regulation during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Carvedilol (10 microM), but not metoprolol (10 microM), reduced H2O2 (100 microM)-induced apoptosis in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. During the process, changes in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and mitochondrial calcium concentration ([Ca2+]m) and mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) were measured by fluorescent probes [Fluo-3/acetoxymethyl ester (AM), Rhod-2/AM, and tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester, respectively] and imaged by laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that H2O2 caused [Ca2]m overload first, followed by [Ca2+]i overload, leading to DeltaPsim dissipation and the induction of apoptosis. Carvedilol (10 microM) significantly delayed these processes and reduced apoptosis. These effects were not observed with other beta-adrenoceptor blockers (metoprolol, atenolol, and propranolol) or with a combination of the alpha (phentolamine)- and the beta-adrenoceptor blocker. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, 5 mM) and the combination of NAC and propranolol (10 microM) showed an effect similar to that of carvedilol. Therefore, the effect of carvedilol on H2O2-induced changes in [Ca2+]m, [Ca2+]i, and DeltaPsi(m) is independent of alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors but is probably dependent on the antioxidant effect. PMID:16611853

  11. Regulatory polymorphisms underlying complex disease traits.

    PubMed

    Knight, Julian C

    2005-02-01

    There is growing evidence that genetic variation plays an important role in the determination of individual susceptibility to complex disease traits. In contrast to coding sequence polymorphisms, where the consequences of non-synonymous variation may be resolved at the level of the protein phenotype, defining specific functional regulatory polymorphisms has proved problematic. This has arisen for a number of reasons, including difficulties with fine mapping due to linkage disequilibrium, together with a paucity of experimental tools to resolve the effects of non-coding sequence variation on gene expression. Recent studies have shown that variation in gene expression is heritable and can be mapped as a quantitative trait. Allele-specific effects on gene expression appear relatively common, typically of modest magnitude and context specific. The role of regulatory polymorphisms in determining susceptibility to a number of complex disease traits is discussed, including variation at the VNTR of INS, encoding insulin, in type 1 diabetes and polymorphism of CTLA4, encoding cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen, in autoimmune disease. Examples where regulatory polymorphisms have been found to play a role in mongenic traits such as factor VII deficiency are discussed, and contrasted with those polymorphisms associated with ischaemic heart disease at the same gene locus. Molecular mechanisms operating in an allele-specific manner at the level of transcription are illustrated, with examples including the role of Duffy binding protein in malaria. The difficulty of resolving specific functional regulatory variants arising from linkage disequilibrium is demonstrated using a number of examples including polymorphism of CCR5, encoding CC chemokine receptor 5, and HIV-1 infection. The importance of understanding haplotypic structure to the design and interpretation of functional assays of putative regulatory variation is highlighted, together with discussion of the strategic use of

  12. Evolving New Skeletal Traits by cis-Regulatory Changes in Bone Morphogenetic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Indjeian, Vahan B; Kingman, Garrett A; Jones, Felicity C; Guenther, Catherine A; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Myers, Richard M; Kingsley, David M

    2016-01-14

    Changes in bone size and shape are defining features of many vertebrates. Here we use genetic crosses and comparative genomics to identify specific regulatory DNA alterations controlling skeletal evolution. Armor bone-size differences in sticklebacks map to a major effect locus overlapping BMP family member GDF6. Freshwater fish express more GDF6 due in part to a transposon insertion, and transgenic overexpression of GDF6 phenocopies evolutionary changes in armor-plate size. The human GDF6 locus also has undergone distinctive regulatory evolution, including complete loss of an enhancer that is otherwise highly conserved between chimps and other mammals. Functional tests show that the ancestral enhancer drives expression in hindlimbs but not forelimbs, in locations that have been specifically modified during the human transition to bipedalism. Both gain and loss of regulatory elements can localize BMP changes to specific anatomical locations, providing a flexible regulatory basis for evolving species-specific changes in skeletal form. PMID:26774823

  13. Human locus coeruleus neurons express the GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunit gene and produce benzodiazepine binding.

    PubMed

    Hellsten, Kati S; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E; Särkioja, Terttu; Maksimow, Anu; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Korpi, Esa R

    2010-06-21

    Noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus project throughout the cerebral cortex and multiple subcortical structures. Alterations in the locus coeruleus firing are associated with vigilance states and with fear and anxiety disorders. Brain ionotropic type A receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) serve as targets for anxiolytic and sedative drugs, and play an essential regulatory role in the locus coeruleus. GABA(A) receptors are composed of a variable array of subunits forming heteropentameric chloride channels with different pharmacological properties. The gamma2 subunit is essential for the formation of the binding site for benzodiazepines, allosteric modulators of GABA(A) receptors that are clinically often used as sedatives/hypnotics and anxiolytics. There are contradictory reports in regard to the gamma2 subunit's expression and participation in the functional GABA(A) receptors in the mammalian locus coeruleus. We report here that the gamma2 subunit is transcribed and participates in the assembly of functional GABA(A) receptors in the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neuromelanin-containing neurons within postmortem human locus coeruleus as demonstrated by in situ hybridization with specific gamma2 subunit oligonucleotides and autoradiographic assay for flumazenil-sensitive [(3)H]Ro 15-4513 binding to benzodiazepine sites. These sites were also sensitive to the alpha1 subunit-preferring agonist zolpidem. Our data suggest a species difference in the expression profiles of the alpha1 and gamma2 subunits in the locus coeruleus, with the sedation-related benzodiazepine sites being more important in man than rodents. This may explain the repeated failures in the transition of novel drugs with a promising neuropharmacological profile in rodents to human clinical usage, due to intolerable sedative effects. PMID:20417252

  14. The developmental activation of the chicken lysozyme locus in transgenic mice requires the interaction of a subset of enhancer elements with the promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, M C; Jägle, U; Krüger, G; Bonifer, C

    1997-01-01

    The complete chicken lysozyme locus is expressed in a position independent fashion in macrophages of transgenic mice and forms the identical chromatin structure as observed with the endogenous gene in chicken cells. Individual lysozyme cis -regulatory elements reorganize their chromatin structure at different developmental stages. Accordingly, their activities are developmentally regulated, indicating a differential role of these elements in locus activation. We have shown previously that a subset of enhancer elements and the promoter are sufficient to activate transcription of the chicken lysozyme gene at the correct developmental stage. Here, we analyzed to which grade the developmentally controlled chromatin reorganizing capacity of cis -regulatory elements in the 5'-region of the chicken lysozyme locus is dependent on promoter elements, and we examined whether the lysozyme locus carries a dominant chromatin reorganizing element. To this end we generated transgenic mouse lines carrying constructs with a deletion of the lysozyme promoter. Expression of the transgene in macrophages is abolished, however, the chromatin reorganizing ability of the cis -regulatory elements is differentially impaired. Some cis -elements require the interaction with the promoter to stabilize transcription factor complexes detectable as DNase I hypersensitive sites in chromatin, whereas other elements reorganize their chromatin structure autonomously. PMID:9224598

  15. Murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah) gene is disrupted by a neonatally lethal albino deletion that defines the hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation 1 (hsdr-1) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Klebig, M.L. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN ); Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M. )

    1992-02-15

    Homozygous deletion of the hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation 1 (hsdr-1) locus in mouse chromosome 7 results in perinatal death and a pleiotropic syndrome characterized by ultrastructural abnormalities of the liver and kidney, failure of induction of a number of specific transcription units in the liver and kidney during late gestation, and marked overexpression of an enzyme that defends against oxidative stress. Previously, the breakpoints of two albino (c) deletions (c{sup 14CoS} and c{sup IFAFyh}) that genetically define hsdr-1 were localized, on a long-range map, in the vicinity of the distal breakpoint of a viable albino deletion (c{sup 24R75M}) that breaks proximally within the c locus. Here the authors report the use of a probe derived from a deletion breakpoint fusion fragment cloned from c{sup 24R75M}/c{sup 24R75M} DNA to clone a breakpoint fusion fragment caused by the c{sup 14CoS} deletion. The proximal breakpoint of the c{sup 14CoS} deletion was discovered to disrupt a gene (Fah) encoding fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the last enzyme in the tyrosine degradation pathway. These mouse mutants may also provide models for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia, which is associated with fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency and liver and kidney dysfunction.

  16. Multigeneic QTL: the laccase encoded within the soybean Rfs2/rhg1 locus inferred to underlie part of the dual resistance to cyst nematode and sudden death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M J; Ahsan, R; Afzal, A J; Jamai, A; Meksem, K; El-Shemy, H A; Lightfoot, D A

    2009-01-01

    Multigeneic QTL present significant problems to analysis. Resistance to soybean (Glycine max (L) Merr.) sudden death syndrome (SDS) caused by Fusarium virguliforme was partly underlain by QRfs2 that was clustered with, or pleiotropic to, the multigeneic rhg1 locus providing resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines). A group of five genes were found between the two markers that delimited the Rfs2/rhg1 locus. One of the five genes was predicted to encode an unusual diphenol oxidase (laccase; EC 1.10.3.2). The aim of this study was to characterize this member of the soybean laccase gene-family and explore its involvement in SDS resistance. A genomic clone and a full length cDNA was isolated from resistant cultivar 'Forrest' that were different among susceptible cultivars 'Asgrow 3244' and 'Williams 82' at four residues R/H168, I/M271, R/H330, E/K470. Additional differences were found in six of the seven introns and the promoter region. Transcript abundance (TA) among genotypes that varied for resistance to SDS or SCN did not differ significantly. Therefore the protein activity was inferred to underlie resistance. Protein expressed in yeast pYES2/NTB had weak enzyme activity with common substrates but good activity with root phenolics. The Forrest isoform may underlie both QRfs2 and rhg1. PMID:19193960

  17. Developmental characterization and chromosomal mapping of the 5-azacytidine-sensitive fluF locus of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Tamame, M; Antequera, F; Santos, E

    1988-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, a fungus that possesses negligible, if any, levels of methylation in its genome, low concentrations of 5-azacytidine (5-AC) convert a high percentage of the cell population to fluffy phenotypic variants through a heritable modification of a single nuclear gene (M. Tamame, F. Antequera, J. R. Villanueva, and T. Santos, Mol. Cell. Biol. 3:2287-2297, 1983). This new 5-AC-altered locus, designated here fluF1, was mapped as the closest marker to the centromere that has been identified so far on the right arm of chromosome VIII. Of all mutagens tested, only 5-AC induced the fluffy phenotype with a significant frequency. Furthermore, we determined that the wild-type, dominant allele of the fluF gene was primarily accessible to modification by 5-AC at the initial stages of fungal vegetative growth. These results indicated that 5-AC does not act through random mutagenic action but, rather, that fluF constitutes a specific target for this drug during a well-defined period of fungal development. Alteration of fluF by 5-AC resulted in a dramatic modification of the developmental program of A. nidulans. The resulting fluffy clones were characterized by massive, uncontrolled proliferation of undifferentiated hyphae, a drastic delay in the onset of asexual differentiation (conidiation), and colonies with an invasive nature. These features are reminiscent of the malignant properties of tumor cells. We propose that the locus fluF plays a primary role in the control of cell proliferation in A. nidulans and that its alteration by 5-AC produces pleiotropic modifications of the developmental program of this fungus. Images PMID:2463470

  18. Gene regulatory mechanisms underpinning prostate cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Whitington, Thomas; Gao, Ping; Song, Wei; Ross-Adams, Helen; Lamb, Alastair D; Yang, Yuehong; Svezia, Ilaria; Klevebring, Daniel; Mills, Ian G; Karlsson, Robert; Halim, Silvia; Dunning, Mark J; Egevad, Lars; Warren, Anne Y; Neal, David E; Grönberg, Henrik; Lindberg, Johan; Wei, Gong-Hong; Wiklund, Fredrik

    2016-04-01

    Molecular characterization of genome-wide association study (GWAS) loci can uncover key genes and biological mechanisms underpinning complex traits and diseases. Here we present deep, high-throughput characterization of gene regulatory mechanisms underlying prostate cancer risk loci. Our methodology integrates data from 295 prostate cancer chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing experiments with genotype and gene expression data from 602 prostate tumor samples. The analysis identifies new gene regulatory mechanisms affected by risk locus SNPs, including widespread disruption of ternary androgen receptor (AR)-FOXA1 and AR-HOXB13 complexes and competitive binding mechanisms. We identify 57 expression quantitative trait loci at 35 risk loci, which we validate through analysis of allele-specific expression. We further validate predicted regulatory SNPs and target genes in prostate cancer cell line models. Finally, our integrated analysis can be accessed through an interactive visualization tool. This analysis elucidates how genome sequence variation affects disease predisposition via gene regulatory mechanisms and identifies relevant genes for downstream biomarker and drug development. PMID:26950096

  19. Root Locus Algorithms for Programmable Pocket Calculators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wechsler, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Two algorithms are described which allow the plotting of individual points on a root locus diagram with or without time delay. The development was performed during the design of a continuous phase shifter used in the Baseband Antenna Combiner for the Deep Space Network (DSN). The algorithms, which are expected to be useful in similar DSN efforts, are simple enough to be implemented on a programmable pocket calculator. The coordinates of the open-loop zeros and poles, the gain constant K, and the time delay T are the data inputs.

  20. Direct and indirect relationship between locus of control and depression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; Fan, Guanhua

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the mediating effect of self-esteem on the relationship between locus of control and depression among Chinese university students. In all, 457 students (232 men and 225 women) completed measures of locus of control, self-esteem, and depression. Correlational analyses indicated that external locus of control was related to self-esteem and depression, and self-esteem was related to depression. Structural equation modeling analysis showed that self-esteem partially mediated the influence of locus of control on depression. The significance of the results is discussed. PMID:25305190

  1. Clutter locus equation for more general linear array orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Douglas L.

    2011-06-01

    The clutter locus is an important concept in space-time adaptive processing (STAP) for ground moving target indicator (GMTI) radar systems. The clutter locus defines the expected ground clutter location in the angle-Doppler domain. Typically in literature, the clutter locus is presented as a line, or even a set of ellipsoids, under certain assumptions about the geometry of the array. Most often, the array is assumed to be in the horizontal plane containing the velocity vector. This paper will give a more general 3-dimensional interpretation of the clutter locus for a general linear array orientation.

  2. Molecular cloning of the c locus of Zea mays: a locus regulating the anthocyanin pathway.

    PubMed

    Paz-Ares, J; Wienand, U; Peterson, P A; Saedler, H

    1986-05-01

    The c locus of Zea mays, involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis, has been cloned by transposon tagging. A clone (# 18En) containing a full size En1 element was initially isolated from the En element-induced mutable allele c-m668655. Sequences of clone # 18En flanking the En1 element were used to clone other c mutants, whose structure was predicted genetically. Clone #23En (isolated from c-m668613) contained a full size En1 element, clone #3Ds (isolated from c-m2) a Ds element and clone # 5 (isolated from c+) had no element on the cloned fragment. From these data we conclude that the clones obtained contain at least part of the c locus. Preliminary data on transcript analysis using a 1-kb DNA fragment from wild-type clone # 5 showed that at least three transcripts are encoded by that part of the locus, indicating that c is a complex locus. PMID:15957214

  3. Engineering the AAVS1 locus for consistent and scalable transgene expression in human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Oceguera-Yanez, Fabian; Kim, Shin-Il; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Tan, Ghee Wan; Xiang, Long; Hatani, Takeshi; Kondo, Takayuki; Ikeya, Makoto; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Inoue, Haruhisa; Woltjen, Knut

    2016-05-15

    The potential use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in personalized regenerative medicine applications may be augmented by transgenics, including the expression of constitutive cell labels, differentiation reporters, or modulators of disease phenotypes. Thus, there is precedence for reproducible transgene expression amongst iPSC sub-clones with isogenic or diverse genetic backgrounds. Using virus or transposon vectors, transgene integration sites and copy numbers are difficult to control, and nearly impossible to reproduce across multiple cell lines. Moreover, randomly integrated transgenes are often subject to pleiotropic position effects as a consequence of epigenetic changes inherent in differentiation, undermining applications in iPSCs. To address this, we have adapted popular TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease technologies in order to introduce transgenes into pre-defined loci and overcome random position effects. AAVS1 is an exemplary locus within the PPP1R12C gene that permits robust expression of CAG promoter-driven transgenes. Gene targeting controls transgene copy number such that reporter expression patterns are reproducible and scalable by ∼2-fold. Furthermore, gene expression is maintained during long-term human iPSC culture and in vitro differentiation along multiple lineages. Here, we outline our AAVS1 targeting protocol using standardized donor vectors and construction methods, as well as provide practical considerations for iPSC culture, drug selection, and genotyping. PMID:26707206

  4. A new regulatory principle for in vivo biochemistry: pleiotropic low affinity regulation by the adenine nucleotides--illustrated for the glycolytic enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mensonides, Femke I C; Bakker, Barbara M; Cremazy, Frederic; Messiha, Hanan L; Mendes, Pedro; Boogerd, Fred C; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2013-09-01

    Enzymology tends to focus on highly specific effects of substrates, allosteric modifiers, and products occurring at low concentrations, because these are most informative about the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. We hypothesized that at relatively high in vivo concentrations, important molecular monitors of the state of living cells, such as ATP, affect multiple enzymes of the former and that these interactions have gone unnoticed in enzymology. We test this hypothesis in terms of the effect that ATP, ADP, and AMP might have on the major free-energy delivering pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Assaying cell-free extracts, we collected a comprehensive set of quantitative kinetic data concerning the enzymes of the glycolytic and the ethanol fermentation pathways. We determined systematically the extent to which the enzyme activities depend on the concentrations of the adenine nucleotides. We found that the effects of the adenine nucleotides on enzymes catalysing reactions in which they are not directly involved as substrate or product, are substantial. This includes effects on the Michaelis-Menten constants, adding new perspective on these, 100 years after their introduction. PMID:23856461

  5. Probing the regulatory effects of specific mutations in three major binding domains of the pleiotropic regulator CcpA of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Detert Oude Weme, Ruud; Seidel, Gerald; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon catabolite control is required for efficient use of available carbon sources to ensure rapid growth of bacteria. CcpA is a global regulator of carbon metabolism in Gram-positive bacteria like Bacillus subtilis. In this study the genome-wide gene regulation of a CcpA knockout and three specific CcpA mutants were studied by transcriptome analysis, to further elucidate the function of specific binding sites in CcpA. The following three amino acids were mutated to characterize their function: M17(R) which is involved in DNA binding, T62(H) which is important for the allosteric switch in CcpA upon HPr-Ser46-P binding, and R304(W) which is important for binding of the coeffectors HPr-Ser46-P and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. The results confirm that CcpA was also involved in gene regulation in the absence of glucose. CcpA-M17R showed a small relief of Carbon Catabolite Control; the CcpA-M17R mutant regulates fewer genes than the CcpA-wt and the palindromicity of the cre site is less important for CcpA-M17R. CcpA-T62H was a stronger repressor than CcpA-wt and also acted as a strong repressor in the absence of glucose. CcpA-R304W was shown here to be less dependent on HPr-Ser46-P for its carbon catabolite control activities. The results presented here provide detailed information on alterations in gene regulation for each CcpA-mutant. PMID:26483775

  6. Pleiotropic Effects of IL-2 on Cancer: Its Role in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valle-Mendiola, Arturo; Gutiérrez-Hoya, Adriana; Lagunas-Cruz, María del Carmen; Weiss-Steider, Benny; Soto-Cruz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signalling is critical for normal lymphocyte proliferation, but its role in cervical cancer is not fully understood. The receptor is composed of three chains: IL-2α, IL-2β, and IL-2γ. Intracellular signalling is initiated by ligand-induced heterodimerization of the IL-2β and IL-2γ chains, resulting in the activation of multiple intracellular kinases. Recently, IL-2R was shown to be expressed on nonhaematopoietic cells, especially on several types of tumour cells. However, the function of this receptor on malignant cells has not been clearly defined. The expression of IL-2R and the production of IL-2 in cervical cancer cells have been documented as well as expression of molecules of the JAK-STAT pathway. In the current review we have highlighted the differences in the responses of molecules downstream from the IL-2R in normal lymphocytes and tumour cells that could explain the presence of tumour cells in an environment in which cytotoxic lymphocytes also exist and compete and also the effect of different concentrations of IL-2 that could activate effector cells of the immune system cells, which favour the elimination of tumour cells, or concentrations that may promote a regulatory microenvironment in which tumour cells can easily grow. PMID:27293315

  7. Alterations of the IKBKG locus and diseases: an update and a report of 13 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Francesca; Pescatore, Alessandra; Bal, Elodie; Ghoul, Aida; Paciolla, Mariateresa; Lioi, Maria Brigida; D'Urso, Michele; Rabia, Smail Hadj; Bodemer, Christine; Bonnefont, Jean Paul; Munnich, Arnold; Miano, Maria Giuseppina; Smahi, Asma; Ursini, Matilde Valeria

    2008-05-01

    Mutations in the inhibitor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells, kinase gamma (IKBKG), also called nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kB) essential modulator (NEMO), gene are the most common single cause of incontinentia pigmenti (IP) in females and anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency (EDA-ID) in males. The IKBKG gene, located in the Xq28 chromosomal region, encodes for the regulatory subunit of the inhibitor of kappaB (IkB) kinase (IKK) complex required for the activation of the NF-kB pathway. Therefore, the remarkably heterogeneous and often severe clinical presentation reported in IP is due to the pleiotropic role of this signaling transcription pathway. A recurrent exon 4_10 genomic rearrangement in the IKBKG gene accounts for 60 to 80% of IP-causing mutations. Besides the IKBKG rearrangement found in IP females (which is lethal in males), a total of 69 different small mutations (missense, frameshift, nonsense, and splice-site mutations) have been reported, including 13 novel ones in this work. The updated distribution of all the IP- and EDA-ID-causing mutations along the IKBKG gene highlights a secondary hotspot mutation in exon 10, which contains only 11% of the protein. Furthermore, familial inheritance analysis revealed an unexpectedly high incidence of sporadic cases (>65%). The sum of the observations can aid both in determining the molecular basis of IP and EDA-ID allelic diseases, and in genetic counseling in affected families. PMID:18350553

  8. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Takeomi; Haga, Hisashi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]). To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article “Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85” [1]. PMID:26937449

  9. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Takeomi; Haga, Hisashi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2016-03-01

    This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]). To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article "Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85" [1]. PMID:26937449

  10. Analysis of Mice Lacking DNaseI Hypersensitive Sites at the 5′ End of the IgH Locus

    PubMed Central

    Manis, John P.; Zarrin, Ali A.; Brodeur, Peter H.; Alt, Frederick W.

    2010-01-01

    The 5′ end of the IgH locus contains a cluster of DNaseI hypersensitive sites, one of which (HS1) was shown to be pro-B cell specific and to contain binding sites for the transcription factors PU.1, E2A, and Pax5. These data as well as the location of the hypersensitive sites at the 5′ border of the IgH locus suggested a possible regulatory function for these elements with respect to the IgH locus. To test this notion, we generated mice carrying targeted deletions of either the pro-B cell specific site HS1 or the whole cluster of DNaseI hypersensitive sites. Lymphocytes carrying these deletions appear to undergo normal development, and mutant B cells do not exhibit any obvious defects in V(D)J recombination, allelic exclusion, or class switch recombination. We conclude that deletion of these DNaseI hypersensitive sites does not have an obvious impact on the IgH locus or B cell development. PMID:21085586

  11. Associations between a Polymorphism in the Pleiotropic GCKR and Age-Related Phenotypes: The HALCyon Programme

    PubMed Central

    Alfred, Tamuno; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Cooper, Rachel; Hardy, Rebecca; Deary, Ian J.; Elliott, Jane; Harris, Sarah E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Power, Chris; Starr, John M.; Kuh, Diana; Day, Ian N. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The glucokinase regulatory protein encoded by GCKR plays an important role in glucose metabolism and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1260326 (P446L) in the gene has been associated with several age-related biomarkers, including triglycerides, glucose, insulin and apolipoproteins. However, associations between SNPs in the gene and other ageing phenotypes such as cognitive and physical capability have not been reported. Methods As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research programme, men and women from five UK cohorts aged between 44 and 90+ years were genotyped for rs1260326. Meta-analysis was used to pool within-study genotypic associations between the SNP and several age-related phenotypes, including body mass index (BMI), blood lipid levels, lung function, and cognitive and physical capability. Results We confirm the associations between the minor allele of the SNP and higher triglycerides and lower glucose levels. We also observed a triglyceride-independent association between the minor allele and lower BMI (pooled beta on z-score = −0.04, p-value = 0.0001, n = 16,251). Furthermore, there was some evidence for gene-environment interactions, including physical activity attenuating the effects on triglycerides. However, no associations were observed with measures of cognitive and physical capability. Conclusion Findings from middle-aged to older adults confirm associations between rs1260326 GCKR and triglycerides and glucose, suggest possible gene-environment interactions, but do not provide evidence that its relevance extends to cognitive and physical capability. PMID:23894584

  12. Changing Locus of Control: Steelworkers Adjusting to Forced Unemployment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legerski, Elizabeth Miklya; Cornwall, Marie; O'Neil, Brock

    2006-01-01

    Using an abbreviated version of Levenson's (1981) locus of control scale, we examine change over time in the locus of control of displaced steelworkers. The first data collection occurred approximately six months after plant shutdown, the second occurred a year later. Utilizing a multidimensional measurement model, we test the major assumption…

  13. Itpr3 Is responsible for the mouse tufted (tf) locus.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Hillary T; Tordoff, Michael G; Parker, M Rockwell

    2013-03-01

    The tf (tufted) locus is responsible for a classic phenotype of hair loss and regrowth in mice. It is a characteristic of the BTBR strain. Here, we use a combination of positional cloning methods and complementation mapping to identify Itpr3, the inositol triphosphate receptor type 3, as the gene responsible for the tf locus. PMID:23100490

  14. Locus of Control, and Expectational Set, on Two Aptitude Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildstein, Arlene B.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are differences between males and females on locus of control, if experimental instructions differentially affect the performance of internals as opposed to externals, and if locus of control differentially influences performance on distinct types of aptitude tests. The Children's…

  15. Anxiety, locus of control and appraisal of air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, P.L.; Simpson-Housley, P.; de Man, A.F.

    1987-06-01

    100 residents of Santiago de Chile took part in a study of the relationship among locus of control, trait-anxiety, and perception of air pollution. Concern over the problem of atmospheric pollution and number of antipollution measures taken was related to trait-anxiety. Locus of control was associated with variation in awareness of pollution hazard.

  16. Physical structure of an endopolygalacturonase locus in peach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The melting flesh trait and the freestone trait are genetically linked to the same single locus in peach. Several studies have associated an endopolygalacturonase gene with this locus, either a deletion of endopolygalacturonase associated with the non-melting/clingstone phenotype or changes in the ...

  17. Personality and Locus of Control among School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Archana A.; Jogsan, Yogesh A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the sex differences in personality traits and locus of control among school children. A total 60 children (30 boys and 30 girls) were taken as a sample. The research tool for personality, children personality questionnaire was used, which was made by Cattell and Porter. Locus of control was…

  18. Locus of Control and the Effectiveness of Social Reinforcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawlicki, Robert E.

    1974-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the developmental change in the effectiveness of social reinforcement was related to changes in locus of control. A total of 145 subjects in grades 3, 4, 6, and 7 responded to the Children's Locus of Control Scale and to a simple game of measuring the effectiveness of either praise connoting or information…

  19. ABI3 controls embryo degreening through Mendel's I locus

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, Frédéric; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Deb, Srijani; Widdup, Ellen; Bournonville, Céline; Bollier, Norbert; Northey, Julian G. B.; McCourt, Peter; Samuel, Marcus A.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyll (chl) is essential for light capture and is the starting point that provides the energy for photosynthesis and thus plant growth. Obviously, for this reason, retention of the green chlorophyll pigment is considered a desirable crop trait. However, the presence of chlorophyll in mature seeds can be an undesirable trait that can affect seed maturation, seed oil quality, and meal quality. Occurrence of mature green seeds in oil crops such as canola and soybean due to unfavorable weather conditions during seed maturity is known to cause severe losses in revenue. One recently identified candidate that controls the chlorophyll degradation machinery is the stay-green gene, SGR1 that was mapped to Mendel’s I locus responsible for cotyledon color (yellow versus green) in peas. A defect in SGR1 leads to leaf stay-green phenotypes in Arabidopsis and rice, but the role of SGR1 in seed degreening and the signaling machinery that converges on SGR1 have remained elusive. To decipher the gene regulatory network that controls degreening in Arabidopsis, we have used an embryo stay-green mutant to demonstrate that embryo degreening is achieved by the SGR family and that this whole process is regulated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) through ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 3 (ABI3); a B3 domain transcription factor that has a highly conserved and essential role in seed maturation, conferring desiccation tolerance. Misexpression of ABI3 was sufficient to rescue cold-induced green seed phenotype in Arabidopsis. This finding reveals a mechanistic role for ABI3 during seed degreening and thus targeting of this pathway could provide a solution to the green seed problem in various oil-seed crops. PMID:24043799

  20. ABI3 controls embryo degreening through Mendel's I locus.

    PubMed

    Delmas, Frédéric; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Deb, Srijani; Widdup, Ellen; Bournonville, Céline; Bollier, Norbert; Northey, Julian G B; McCourt, Peter; Samuel, Marcus A

    2013-10-01

    Chlorophyll (chl) is essential for light capture and is the starting point that provides the energy for photosynthesis and thus plant growth. Obviously, for this reason, retention of the green chlorophyll pigment is considered a desirable crop trait. However, the presence of chlorophyll in mature seeds can be an undesirable trait that can affect seed maturation, seed oil quality, and meal quality. Occurrence of mature green seeds in oil crops such as canola and soybean due to unfavorable weather conditions during seed maturity is known to cause severe losses in revenue. One recently identified candidate that controls the chlorophyll degradation machinery is the stay-green gene, SGR1 that was mapped to Mendel's I locus responsible for cotyledon color (yellow versus green) in peas. A defect in SGR1 leads to leaf stay-green phenotypes in Arabidopsis and rice, but the role of SGR1 in seed degreening and the signaling machinery that converges on SGR1 have remained elusive. To decipher the gene regulatory network that controls degreening in Arabidopsis, we have used an embryo stay-green mutant to demonstrate that embryo degreening is achieved by the SGR family and that this whole process is regulated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) through ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 3 (ABI3); a B3 domain transcription factor that has a highly conserved and essential role in seed maturation, conferring desiccation tolerance. Misexpression of ABI3 was sufficient to rescue cold-induced green seed phenotype in Arabidopsis. This finding reveals a mechanistic role for ABI3 during seed degreening and thus targeting of this pathway could provide a solution to the green seed problem in various oil-seed crops. PMID:24043799

  1. 3 CFR - Regulatory Review

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulatory Review Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of January 30, 2009 Regulatory Review Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies For well over two decades, the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) at the Office of Management...

  2. Identifying a novel locus for psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Budu-Aggrey, Ashley; Bowes, John; Barton, Anne

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have identified genetic risk loci for PsA, the majority of which also confer risk for psoriasis. The stronger heritability of PsA in comparison with psoriasis suggests that there should be risk loci that are specific for PsA. Identifying such loci could potentially inform therapy development to provide more effective treatments for PsA patients, especially with a considerable proportion being non-responsive to current therapies. Evidence of a PsA-specific locus has been previously found at HLA-B27 within the MHC region. A recent study has provided evidence of non-HLA risk loci that are specific for PsA at IL23R, PTPN22 and on chromosome 5q31. Functional characterization of these loci will provide further understanding of the pathways underlying PsA, and enable us to apply genetic findings for patient benefit. PMID:26255310

  3. Dental outpatients: health locus of control correlates.

    PubMed

    Ludenia, K; Donham, G W

    1983-11-01

    Examined relationships between the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) Scales, Beck Depression Inventory, Trait subscales of the State-Trait Personality Inventory, and dental ratings of oral hygiene and presence of periodontal disease with dental outpatients (N = 101) at a Veterans Administration Medical Center Dental Clinic. Results indicated that this sample of outpatients scored comparably on MHLC Health Internality and Health Externality to a sample reported by Wallston and Wallston. Older dental patients, in the present sample, scored significantly higher on Powerful Others Externality in contrast to younger Ss, which suggests greater reliance on health professionals for dental health. Confirmatory evidence is presented on the negative correlations of depression, anger, and anxiety with Health Internality. Differential approaches to dental treatment are discussed. PMID:6662936

  4. The Cajal Body and Histone Locus Body

    PubMed Central

    Nizami, Zehra; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G.

    2010-01-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear organelle present in all eukaryotes that have been carefully studied. It is identified by the signature protein coilin and by CB-specific RNAs (scaRNAs). CBs contain high concentrations of splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and other RNA processing factors, suggesting that they are sites for assembly and/or posttranscriptional modification of the splicing machinery of the nucleus. The histone locus body (HLB) contains factors required for processing histone pre-mRNAs. As its name implies, the HLB is associated with the genes that code for histones, suggesting that it may function to concentrate processing factors at their site of action. CBs and HLBs are present throughout the interphase of the cell cycle, but disappear during mitosis. The biogenesis of CBs shows the features of a self-organizing structure. PMID:20504965

  5. Identifying a novel locus for psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Budu-Aggrey, Ashley; Bowes, John

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have identified genetic risk loci for PsA, the majority of which also confer risk for psoriasis. The stronger heritability of PsA in comparison with psoriasis suggests that there should be risk loci that are specific for PsA. Identifying such loci could potentially inform therapy development to provide more effective treatments for PsA patients, especially with a considerable proportion being non-responsive to current therapies. Evidence of a PsA-specific locus has been previously found at HLA-B27 within the MHC region. A recent study has provided evidence of non-HLA risk loci that are specific for PsA at IL23R, PTPN22 and on chromosome 5q31. Functional characterization of these loci will provide further understanding of the pathways underlying PsA, and enable us to apply genetic findings for patient benefit. PMID:26255310

  6. Locus of Control Orientation: Parents, Peers, and Place.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, Eileen M; Lobo Antunes, Maria João

    2015-09-01

    An internal locus of control contributes to positive youth outcomes such as a general well-being and academic success, while also serving as a protective factor against exposure to community violence and reducing negative behaviors like violence. Despite these benefits, very little is known about antecedents of an internal locus of control orientation. Without an understanding of what factors contribute to the development of an internal locus of control, it is not clear how to best encourage its formation. This study uses data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to examine whether various mesosystem variables (family management strategies, peer interactions, neighborhood context, and individual-level characteristics) are associated with an internal locus of control orientation among 1,076 youth ages 9-19 living in 78 Chicago neighborhoods. Study participants were Hispanic (46 %), African American (34 %), and White (15 %), and 50 % were female. The findings suggest that, while most levels of the mesosystem influence locus of control orientation, family management strategies are more prominent determinants of an internal locus of control than peers, neighborhood context, or individual characteristics. Parental supervision over the time a youth spends at home and family socioeconomic status are consistent predictors of an internal locus of control, while harsh discipline is associated with an external locus of control. The discussion examines the import of various parenting techniques in shaping an internal locus of control and considers future avenues for research to further unpack how antecedents of locus of control can vary across youth. PMID:25617000

  7. Novel alleles of the transforming growth factor β-1 regulatory region and exon 1.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Bolaños, E; Madrigal, J A; Shaw, B E

    2015-06-01

    Transforming growth factor β-1, encoded by the TGFB1 gene, is a cytokine that plays a central role in many physiologic and pathogenic processes with pleiotropic effects. Regulatory activity for this gene has been shown for 3.0 kb between positions -2665 and +423 from its translational start site. At least 17 TGFB1 regulatory region and exon 1 alleles have been defined on the basis of 18 polymorphic sites. Polymorphisms in TGFB1's regulatory region have been associated with differential levels of expression of this cytokine and to genetic risk in cancer and transplantation. In this report, we present 19 novel TGFB1 regulatory region and exon 1 alleles: p018-p036. Amplification of TGFB1's regulatory region was performed with an in-house protocol, and novel alleles were defined by either allele-specific amplification and/or molecular cloning of the amplicons, followed by sequencing in isolation. Three of these novel alleles (p018, p019, and p020) are shown to be formed by novel combinations of the aforementioned known polymorphic positions. Another 16 novel alleles are shown to carry additional known and unknown single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Polymorphism in TGFB1's regulatory region could have an impact on important processes, including embryogenesis, hematopoiesis, carcinogenesis, angiogenesis, fibrosis, immune responses, and transplantation, making its characterization necessary. PMID:25808355

  8. Regulatory affairs administration as regulatory policy determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Forcier, J.R.

    1984-05-10

    It is the thesis of this article that the processing of a utility company's regulation-related work, the supporting tasks and the manner in which they are completed, can and does have a significant impact on the final results or work product of the regulatory affairs function, including even, potentially, the action of the regulatory agency. The article is therefore full of practical pointers on how the interface with the regulatory authority can best be organized, managed, and carried through to the attainment of optimum results for the utility. 2 references.

  9. An increase in melatonin in transgenic rice causes pleiotropic phenotypes, including enhanced seedling growth, delayed flowering, and low grain yield.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-05-01

    No previous reports have described the effects of an increase in endogenous melatonin levels on plant yield and reproduction. Here, the phenotypes of melatonin-rich transgenic rice plants overexpressing sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase were investigated under field conditions. Early seedling growth of melatonin-rich transgenic rice was greatly accelerated, with enhanced biomass relative to the wild type (WT). However, flowering was delayed by 1 wk in the transgenic lines compared with the WT. Grain yields of the melatonin-rich transgenic lines were reduced by 33% on average. Other phenotypes also varied among the transgenic lines. For example, the transgenic line S1 exhibited greater height and biomass than the WT, while the S10 transgenic line showed diminished height and an increase in panicle numbers per plant. The expression levels of Oryza sativa homeobox1 (OSH1) and TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 (TB1) genes, two key regulators of meristem initiation and maintenance, were not altered in the transgenic lines. These data demonstrate that an alteration of endogenous melatonin levels leads to pleiotropic effects such as height, biomass, panicle number, flowering time, and grain yield, indicating that melatonin behaves as a signaling molecule in plant growth and reproduction. PMID:24571270

  10. Pleiotropic Quantitative Trait Loci Contribute to Population Divergence in Traits Associated With Life-History Variation in Mimulus guttatus

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Megan C.; Basten, Christopher J.; Willis, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists seek to understand the genetic basis for multivariate phenotypic divergence. We constructed an F2 mapping population (N = 539) between two distinct populations of Mimulus guttatus. We measured 20 floral, vegetative, and life-history characters on parents and F1 and F2 hybrids in a common garden experiment. We employed multitrait composite interval mapping to determine the number, effect, and degree of pleiotropy in quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting divergence in floral, vegetative, and life-history characters. We detected 16 QTL affecting floral traits; 7 affecting vegetative traits; and 5 affecting selected floral, vegetative, and life-history traits. Floral and vegetative traits are clearly polygenic. We detected a few major QTL, with all remaining QTL of small effect. Most detected QTL are pleiotropic, implying that the evolutionary shift between these annual and perennial populations is constrained. We also compared the genetic architecture controlling floral trait divergence both within (our intraspecific study) and between species, on the basis of a previously published analysis of M. guttatus and M. nasutus. Eleven of our 16 floral QTL map to approximately the same location in the interspecific map based on shared, collinear markers, implying that there may be a shared genetic basis for floral divergence within and among species of Mimulus. PMID:16361232

  11. Alkylrhodamines enhance the toxicity of clotrimazole and benzalkonium chloride by interfering with yeast pleiotropic ABC-transporters.

    PubMed

    Knorre, Dmitry A; Besedina, Elizaveta; Karavaeva, Iuliia E; Smirnova, Ekaterina A; Markova, Olga V; Severin, Fedor F

    2016-06-01

    ABC-transporters with broad substrate specificity are responsible for pathogenic yeast resistance to antifungal compounds. Here we asked whether highly hydrophobic chemicals with delocalized positive charge can be used to overcome the resistance. Such molecules efficiently penetrate the plasma membrane and accumulate inside the cells. We reasoned that these properties can convert an active efflux of the compounds into a futile cycle thus interfering with the extrusion of the antibiotics. To test this, we studied the effects of several alkylated rhodamines on the drug resistance of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We found that octylrhodamine synergetically increases toxicity of Pdr5p substrate-clotrimazole, while the others were less effective. Next, we compared the contributions of three major pleiotropic ABC-transporters (Pdr5p, Yor1p, Snq2p) on the accumulation of the alkylated rhodamines. While all of the tested compounds were extruded by Pdr5p, Yor1p and Snq2p showed narrower substrate specificity. Interestingly, among the tested alkylated rhodamines, inactivation of Pdr5p had the strongest effect on the accumulation of octylrhodamine inside the cells, which is consistent with the fact that clotrimazole is a substrate of Pdr5p. As alkylated rhodamines were shown to be non-toxic on mice, our study makes them potential components of pharmacological antifungal compositions. PMID:27044313

  12. Pleiotropic defects caused by loss of the proteasome-interacting factors Rad23 and Rpn10 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Lambertson, D; Chen, L; Madura, K

    1999-01-01

    Rad23 is a member of a novel class of proteins that contain unprocessed ubiquitin-like (UbL) domains. We showed recently that a small fraction of Rad23 can form an interaction with the 26S proteasome. Similarly, a small fraction of Rpn10 is a component of the proteasome. Rpn10 can bind multiubiquitin chains in vitro, but genetic studies have not clarified its role in vivo. We report here that the loss of both Rad23 and Rpn10 results in pleiotropic defects that are not observed in either single mutant. rad23Delta rpn10Delta displays slow growth, cold sensitivity, and a pronounced G2/M phase delay, implicating overlapping roles for Rad23 and Rpn10. Although rad23Delta rpn10Delta displays similar sensitivity to DNA damage as a rad23Delta single mutant, deletion of RAD23 in rpn10Delta significantly increased sensitivity to canavanine, a phenotype associated with an rpn10Delta single mutant. A mutant Rad23 that is unable to bind the proteasome ((DeltaUbL)rad23) does not suppress the canavanine or cold-sensitive defects of rad23Delta rpn10Delta, demonstrating that Rad23/proteasome interaction is related to these effects. Finally, the accumulation of multiubiquitinated proteins and the stabilization of a specific proteolytic substrate in rad23Delta rpn10Delta suggest that proteasome function is altered. PMID:10471701

  13. Gene Networks Underlying Convergent and Pleiotropic Phenotypes in a Large and Systematically-Phenotyped Cohort with Heterogeneous Developmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke; Taylor, Avigail; Steinberg, Julia; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne; Pfundt, Rolph; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Webber, Caleb

    2015-01-01

    Readily-accessible and standardised capture of genotypic variation has revolutionised our understanding of the genetic contribution to disease. Unfortunately, the corresponding systematic capture of patient phenotypic variation needed to fully interpret the impact of genetic variation has lagged far behind. Exploiting deep and systematic phenotyping of a cohort of 197 patients presenting with heterogeneous developmental disorders and whose genomes harbour de novo CNVs, we systematically applied a range of commonly-used functional genomics approaches to identify the underlying molecular perturbations and their phenotypic impact. Grouping patients into 408 non-exclusive patient-phenotype groups, we identified a functional association amongst the genes disrupted in 209 (51%) groups. We find evidence for a significant number of molecular interactions amongst the association-contributing genes, including a single highly-interconnected network disrupted in 20% of patients with intellectual disability, and show using microcephaly how these molecular networks can be used as baits to identify additional members whose genes are variant in other patients with the same phenotype. Exploiting the systematic phenotyping of this cohort, we observe phenotypic concordance amongst patients whose variant genes contribute to the same functional association but note that (i) this relationship shows significant variation across the different approaches used to infer a commonly perturbed molecular pathway, and (ii) that the phenotypic similarities detected amongst patients who share the same inferred pathway perturbation result from these patients sharing many distinct phenotypes, rather than sharing a more specific phenotype, inferring that these pathways are best characterized by their pleiotropic effects. PMID:25781962

  14. RahU: An inducible and functionally pleiotropic protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates innate immunity and inflammation in host cells

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Jayasimha; Elliott, Michael R.; Leitinger, Norbert; Jensen, Roderick V.; Goldberg, Joanna B.; Amin, Ashok R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the functional role of a recently identified RahU protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in macrophages and its role in bacterial defense. Recombinant (r)-RahU had no significant effect on cell apoptosis or cell viability in human monocytic THP-1 cells. Gene expression array of murine macrophage cells (RAW 264.7) stimulated with LPS showed modulation of common transcripts involved in inflammation. Functional cellular analysis showed RAW cells incubated with r-RahU at 1.0–10 µg/ml (0.06–0.6 µM) inhibited accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) in the presence of LPS by 10 to 50%. The IC50 of r-RahU (0.6 µM) was distinct from the known inhibitors of NO production: prednisone (50 µM) and L-NMMA (100 µM). rRahU also significantly inhibited chemotactic activity of THP-1 cells toward CCL2 or chemotactic supernatants from apoptotic T-cells. These reports show previously unknown pleiotropic properties of RahU in modulating both microbial physiology and host innate immunity. PMID:21704311

  15. The Pleiotropic CymR Regulator of Staphylococcus aureus Plays an Important Role in Virulence and Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Soutourina, Olga; Dubrac, Sarah; Poupel, Olivier; Msadek, Tarek; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    We have characterized a novel pleiotropic role for CymR, the master regulator of cysteine metabolism. We show here that CymR plays an important role both in stress response and virulence of Staphylococcus aureus. Genes involved in detoxification processes, including oxidative stress response and metal ion homeostasis, were differentially expressed in a ΔcymR mutant. Deletion of cymR resulted in increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-, disulfide-, tellurite- and copper-induced stresses. Estimation of metabolite pools suggests that this heightened sensitivity could be the result of profound metabolic changes in the ΔcymR mutant, with an increase in the intracellular cysteine pool and hydrogen sulfide formation. Since resistance to oxidative stress within the host organism is important for pathogen survival, we investigated the role of CymR during the infectious process. Our results indicate that the deletion of cymR promotes survival of S. aureus inside macrophages, whereas virulence of the ΔcymR mutant is highly impaired in mice. These data indicate that CymR plays a major role in virulence and adaptation of S. aureus for survival within the host. PMID:20485570

  16. The pleiotropic flavonoid quercetin: from its metabolism to the inhibition of protein kinases in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Russo, Gian Luigi; Russo, Maria; Spagnuolo, Carmela

    2014-10-01

    Quercetin is a flavonoid, of the subclass flavonols, possessing potential anticancer properties. It has often been defined as a functionally pleiotropic molecule because it can simultaneously target multiple pathways bypassing or ameliorating the onset of drug resistance in malignant cells. In this context, we reviewed the sometimes paradoxical antioxidant properties of quercetin and the functional role of its glucuronide and/or sulfate conjugates to discuss the low bioavailability of the molecule measured in vivo. We recently demonstrated that quercetin is able to sensitize several leukemia cell lines as well as B cells isolated from patients affected by chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) to death ligand agonists (anti-CD95 and rTRAIL). The flavonol also potentiates the effect of canonical and innovative chemotherapeutic drugs (fludarabine and ABT-737) against CLL. The apoptosis-enhancing activity of quercetin in cell lines and B-CLL cells depends upon the modulated expression and activity of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic protein belonging to the Bcl-2 family. Herein, we suggest that the pleotropic activity of quercetin in CLL is obtained by the direct inhibition of key protein kinases, which positively regulate Mcl-1 activity and by indirect downregulation of Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels acting on its mRNA stability and proteasome-mediated degradation. Finally, we highlighted the pros and cons of quercetin supplementation in cancer therapy and in prevention. PMID:25096193

  17. Mutation of an Arabidopsis NatB N-Alpha-Terminal Acetylation Complex Component Causes Pleiotropic Developmental Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ferrández-Ayela, Almudena; Alonso-Peral, María Magdalena; Micol, José Luis; Ponce, María Rosa

    2013-01-01

    N-α-terminal acetylation is one of the most common, but least understood modifications of eukaryotic proteins. Although a high degree of conservation exists between the N-α-terminal acetylomes of plants and animals, very little information is available on this modification in plants. In yeast and humans, N-α-acetyltransferase complexes include a single catalytic subunit and one or two auxiliary subunits. Here, we report the positional cloning of TRANSCURVATA2 (TCU2), which encodes the auxiliary subunit of the NatB N-α-acetyltransferase complex in Arabidopsis. The phenotypes of loss-of-function tcu2 alleles indicate that NatB complex activity is required for flowering time regulation and for leaf, inflorescence, flower, fruit and embryonic development. In double mutants, tcu2 alleles synergistically interact with alleles of ARGONAUTE10, which encodes a component of the microRNA machinery. In summary, NatB-mediated N-α-terminal acetylation of proteins is pleiotropically required for Arabidopsis development and seems to be functionally related to the microRNA pathway. PMID:24244708

  18. Dynamic chromatin: the regulatory domain organization of eukaryotic gene loci.

    PubMed

    Bonifer, C; Hecht, A; Saueressig, H; Winter, D M; Sippel, A E

    1991-10-01

    It is hypothesized that nuclear DNA is organized in topologically constrained loop domains defining basic units of higher order chromatin structure. Our studies are performed in order to investigate the functional relevance of this structural subdivision of eukaryotic chromatin for the control of gene expression. We used the chicken lysozyme gene locus as a model to examine the relation between chromatin structure and gene function. Several structural features of the lysozyme locus are known: the extension of the region of general DNAasel sensitivity of the active gene, the location of DNA-sequences with high affinity for the nuclear matrix in vitro, and the position of DNAasel hypersensitive chromatin sites (DHSs). The pattern of DHSs changes depending on the transcriptional status of the gene. Functional studies demonstrated that DHSs mark the position of cis-acting regulatory elements. Additionally, we discovered a novel cis-activity of the border regions of the DNAasel sensitive domain (A-elements). By eliminating the position effect on gene expression usually observed when genes are randomly integrated into the genome after transfection, A-elements possibly serve as punctuation marks for a regulatory chromatin domain. Experiments using transgenic mice confirmed that the complete structurally defined lysozyme gene domain behaves as an independent regulatory unit, expressing the gene in a tissue specific and position independent manner. These expression features were lost in transgenic mice carrying a construct, in which the A-elements as well as an upstream enhancer region were deleted, indicating the lack of a locus activation function on this construct. Experiments are designed in order to uncover possible hierarchical relationships between the different cis-acting regulatory elements for stepwise gene activation during cell differentiation. We are aiming at the definition of the basic structural and functional requirements for position independent and high

  19. HMGB1 binds to the rs7903146 locus in TCF7L2 in human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuedan; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Shcherbina, Liliya; Ratti, Joyce; Kock, Kian-Hong; Su, Jing; Martin, Brian; Oskolkova, Malin Zackrisson; Göransson, Olga; Bacon, Julie; Li, Weimin; Bucciarelli, Saskia; Cilio, Corrado; Brazma, Alvis; Thatcher, Bradley; Rung, Johan; Wierup, Nils; Renström, Erik; Groop, Leif; Hansson, Ola

    2016-07-15

    The intronic SNP rs7903146 in the T-cell factor 7-like 2 gene (TCF7L2) is the common genetic variant most highly associated with Type 2 diabetes known to date. The risk T-allele is located in an open chromatin region specific to human pancreatic islets of Langerhans, thereby accessible for binding of regulatory proteins. The risk T-allele locus exhibits stronger enhancer activity compared to the non-risk C-allele. The aim of this study was to identify transcriptional regulators that bind the open chromatin region in the rs7903146 locus and thereby potentially regulate TCF7L2 expression and activity. Using affinity chromatography followed by Edman sequencing, we identified one candidate regulatory protein, i.e. high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). The binding of HMGB1 to the rs7903146 locus was confirmed in pancreatic islets from human deceased donors, in HCT116 and in HEK293 cell lines using: (i) protein purification on affinity columns followed by Western blot, (ii) chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by qPCR and (iii) electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The results also suggested that HMGB1 might have higher binding affinity to the C-allele of rs7903146 compared to the T-allele, which was supported in vitro using Dynamic Light Scattering, possibly in a tissue-specific manner. The functional consequence of HMGB1 depletion in HCT116 and INS1 cells was reduced insulin and TCF7L2 mRNA expression, TCF7L2 transcriptional activity and glucose stimulated insulin secretion. These findings suggest that the rs7903146 locus might exert its enhancer function by interacting with HMGB1 in an allele dependent manner. PMID:26845344

  20. Detecting purely epistatic multi-locus interactions by an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wongseree, Waranyu; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Piroonratana, Theera; Sinsomros, Saravudh; Limwongse, Chanin; Chaiyaratana, Nachol

    2009-01-01

    Background Purely epistatic multi-locus interactions cannot generally be detected via single-locus analysis in case-control studies of complex diseases. Recently, many two-locus and multi-locus analysis techniques have been shown to be promising for the epistasis detection. However, exhaustive multi-locus analysis requires prohibitively large computational efforts when problems involve large-scale or genome-wide data. Furthermore, there is no explicit proof that a combination of multiple two-locus analyses can lead to the correct identification of multi-locus interactions. Results The proposed 2LOmb algorithm performs an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses. The algorithm consists of four main steps: two-locus analysis, a permutation test, global p-value determination and a progressive search for the best ensemble. 2LOmb is benchmarked against an exhaustive two-locus analysis technique, a set association approach, a correlation-based feature selection (CFS) technique and a tuned ReliefF (TuRF) technique. The simulation results indicate that 2LOmb produces a low false-positive error. Moreover, 2LOmb has the best performance in terms of an ability to identify all causative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a low number of output SNPs in purely epistatic two-, three- and four-locus interaction problems. The interaction models constructed from the 2LOmb outputs via a multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method are also included for the confirmation of epistasis detection. 2LOmb is subsequently applied to a type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) data set, which is obtained as a part of the UK genome-wide genetic epidemiology study by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). After primarily screening for SNPs that locate within or near 372 candidate genes and exhibit no marginal single-locus effects, the T2D data set is reduced to 7,065 SNPs from 370 genes. The 2LOmb search in the reduced T2D data reveals that four intronic SNPs

  1. flrB, a Regulatory Locus Controlling Branched-Chain Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Devorah; Mikulka, Thomas W.; Jones, Judith; Calvo, Joseph M.

    1974-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium strain CV123 (ara-9 gal-205 flrB1), isolated as a mutant resistant to trifluoroleucine, has derepressed and constitutive levels of enzymes forming branched-chain amino acids. This strain grows more slowly than the parent at several temperatures, both in minimal medium and nutrient broth. It overproduces and excretes sizeable amounts of leucine, valine, and isoleucine in comparison with the parental strain. Both leuS (coding for leucyl-transfer ribonucleic acid [tRNA]synthetase) and flrB are linked to lip (min 20 to 25) by P1 transduction, whereas only leuS is linked to lip by P22 transduction. Strain CV123 containing an F′ lip+ episome from Escherichia coli has repressed levels of leucine-forming enzymes, indicating that flrB+ is dominant to flrB. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase from strain CV123 appears to be identical to the leucyl-tRNA synthetase in the parent. No differences were detected between strain CV123 and the parent with respect to tRNA acceptor activity for a number of amino acids. Furthermore, there was no large difference between the two strains in the patterns of leucine tRNA isoaccepting species after fractionation on several different columns. Several other flrB strains exhibited temperature-sensitive excretion of leucine, i.e., they excreted leucine at 37 C but not 25 C. In one such strain, excretion at 37 C was correlated with derepression of some enzymes specified by ilv and leu. These latter results suggest that flrB codes for a protein. PMID:4598011

  2. flrB, a regulatory locus controlling branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, D; Mikulka, T W; Jones, J; Calvo, J M

    1974-06-01

    Salmonella typhimurium strain CV123 (ara-9 gal-205 flrB1), isolated as a mutant resistant to trifluoroleucine, has derepressed and constitutive levels of enzymes forming branched-chain amino acids. This strain grows more slowly than the parent at several temperatures, both in minimal medium and nutrient broth. It overproduces and excretes sizeable amounts of leucine, valine, and isoleucine in comparison with the parental strain. Both leuS (coding for leucyl-transfer ribonucleic acid [tRNA]synthetase) and flrB are linked to lip (min 20 to 25) by P1 transduction, whereas only leuS is linked to lip by P22 transduction. Strain CV123 containing an F' lip(+) episome from Escherichia coli has repressed levels of leucine-forming enzymes, indicating that flrB(+) is dominant to flrB. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase from strain CV123 appears to be identical to the leucyl-tRNA synthetase in the parent. No differences were detected between strain CV123 and the parent with respect to tRNA acceptor activity for a number of amino acids. Furthermore, there was no large difference between the two strains in the patterns of leucine tRNA isoaccepting species after fractionation on several different columns. Several other flrB strains exhibited temperature-sensitive excretion of leucine, i.e., they excreted leucine at 37 C but not 25 C. In one such strain, excretion at 37 C was correlated with derepression of some enzymes specified by ilv and leu. These latter results suggest that flrB codes for a protein. PMID:4598011

  3. Low Cost Upper Atmosphere Sounder (LOCUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Daniel; Swinyard, Bruce M.; Ellison, Brian N.; Aylward, Alan D.; Aruliah, Anasuya; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Saunders, Christopher; Friend, Jonathan; Bird, Rachel; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Parkes, Steve

    2014-05-01

    near future. We describe the current instrument configuration of LOCUS, and give a first preview of the expected science return such a mission would yield. The LOCUS instrument concept calls for four spectral bands, a first band at 4.7 THz to target atomic oxygen (O), a second band at 3.5 THz to target hydroxyl (OH), a third band at 1.1 THz to cover several diatomic species (NO, CO, O3, H2O) and finally a fourth band at 0.8 THz to retrieve pointing information from molecular oxygen (O2). LOCUS would be the first satellite instrument to measure atomic oxygen on a global scale with a precision that will allow the retrieval of the global O distribution. It would also be the first time that annual and diurnal changes in O are measured. This will be a significant step forward in understanding the chemistry and dynamics of the MLT. Current indications (derived from CRISTA measurement) lead us to believe that current models only give a poor representation of upper atmospheric O. The secondary target species can help us to address additional scientific questions related to both Climate (distribution of climate relevant gases, highly geared cooling of the MLT in response to Climate change, increased occurrence of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC), etc) and Space Weather (precipitation of electrically charged particles and impact on NOx chemistry, fluctuations of solar Lyman-alpha flux through shown in the the distribution of photochemically active species, etc).

  4. Relation of organizational citizenship behavior and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Turnipseed, David L; Bacon, Calvin M

    2009-12-01

    The relation of organizational citizenship behavior and locus of control was assessed in a sample of 286 college students (52% men; M age = 24 yr.) who worked an average of 26 hr. per week. Measures were Spector's Work Locus of Control Scale and Podsakoff, et al.'s Organization Citizenship Behavior scale. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated positive association of scores on work locus of control with scores on each of the four tested dimensions of organizational citizenship, as well as total organizational citizenship behavior. PMID:20099548

  5. Fine mapping of the celiac disease-associated LPP locus reveals a potential functional variant

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rodrigo; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Kumar, Vinod; Deelen, Patrick; Szperl, Agata; Trynka, Gosia; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Swertz, Morris A.; Platteel, Mathieu; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Barisani, Donatella; Greco, Luigi; Mearin, Luisa; Wolters, Victorien M.; Mulder, Chris; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Sood, Ajit; Cukrowska, Bozena; Núñez, Concepción; Pratesi, Riccardo; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Using the Immunochip for genotyping, we identified 39 non-human leukocyte antigen (non-HLA) loci associated to celiac disease (CeD), an immune-mediated disease with a worldwide frequency of ∼1%. The most significant non-HLA signal mapped to the intronic region of 70 kb in the LPP gene. Our aim was to fine map and identify possible functional variants in the LPP locus. We performed a meta-analysis in a cohort of 25 169 individuals from six different populations previously genotyped using Immunochip. Imputation using data from the Genome of the Netherlands and 1000 Genomes projects, followed by meta-analysis, confirmed the strong association signal on the LPP locus (rs2030519, P = 1.79 × 10−49), without any novel associations. The conditional analysis on this top SNP-indicated association to a single common haplotype. By performing haplotype analyses in each population separately, as well as in a combined group of the four populations that reach the significant threshold after correction (P < 0.008), we narrowed down the CeD-associated region from 70 to 2.8 kb (P = 1.35 × 10−44). By intersecting regulatory data from the ENCODE project, we found a functional SNP, rs4686484 (P = 3.12 × 10−49), that maps to several B-cell enhancer elements and a highly conserved region. This SNP was also predicted to change the binding motif of the transcription factors IRF4, IRF11, Nkx2.7 and Nkx2.9, suggesting its role in transcriptional regulation. We later found significantly low levels of LPP mRNA in CeD biopsies compared with controls, thus our results suggest that rs4686484 is the functional variant in this locus, while LPP expression is decreased in CeD. PMID:24334606

  6. The handedness-associated PCSK6 locus spans an intronic promoter regulating novel transcripts.

    PubMed

    Shore, Robert; Covill, Laura; Pettigrew, Kerry A; Brandler, William M; Diaz, Rebeca; Xu, Yiwang; Tello, Javier A; Talcott, Joel B; Newbury, Dianne F; Stein, John; Monaco, Anthony P; Paracchini, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    We recently reported the association of the PCSK6 gene with handedness through a quantitative genome-wide association study (GWAS; P < 0.5 × 10(-8)) for a relative hand skill measure in individuals with dyslexia. PCSK6 activates Nodal, a morphogen involved in regulating left-right body axis determination. Therefore, the GWAS data suggest that the biology underlying the patterning of structural asymmetries may also contribute to behavioural laterality, e.g. handedness. The association is further supported by an independent study reporting a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) within the same PCSK6 locus to be associated with degree of handedness in a general population cohort. Here, we have conducted a functional analysis of the PCSK6 locus combining further genetic analysis, in silico predictions and molecular assays. We have shown that the previous GWAS signal was not tagging a VNTR effect, suggesting that the two markers have independent effects. We demonstrated experimentally that one of the top GWAS-associated markers, rs11855145, directly alters the binding site for a nuclear factor. Furthermore, we have shown that the predicted regulatory region adjacent to rs11855415 acts as a bidirectional promoter controlling the expression of novel RNA transcripts. These include both an antisense long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and a short PCSK6 isoform predicted to be coding. This is the first molecular characterization of a handedness-associated locus that supports the role of common variants in non-coding sequences in influencing complex phenotypes through gene expression regulation. PMID:26908617

  7. Principles of regulatory information conservation between mouse and human

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, Yong; Ma, Zhihai; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Wu, Weisheng; Cayting, Philip; Boyle, Alan P.; Sundaram, Vasavi; Xing, Xiaoyun; Dogan, Nergiz; Li, Jingjing; et al

    2014-11-19

    To broaden our understanding of the evolution of gene regulation mechanisms, we generated occupancy profiles for 34 orthologous transcription factors (TFs) in human–mouse erythroid progenitor, lymphoblast and embryonic stem-cell lines. By combining the genome-wide transcription factor occupancy repertoires, associated epigenetic signals, and co-association patterns, here we deduce several evolutionary principles of gene regulatory features operating since the mouse and human lineages diverged. The genomic distribution profiles, primary binding motifs, chromatin states, and DNA methylation preferences are well conserved for TF-occupied sequences. However, the extent to which orthologous DNA segments are bound by orthologous TFs varies both among TFs and withmore » genomic location: binding at promoters is more highly conserved than binding at distal elements. Notably, occupancy-conserved TF-occupied sequences tend to be pleiotropic; they function in several tissues and also co-associate with many TFs. Lastly, single nucleotide variants at sites with potential regulatory functions are enriched in occupancy-conserved TF-occupied sequences.« less

  8. Principles of regulatory information conservation between mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yong; Ma, Zhihai; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Wu, Weisheng; Cayting, Philip; Boyle, Alan P.; Sundaram, Vasavi; Xing, Xiaoyun; Dogan, Nergiz; Li, Jingjing; Euskirchen, Ghia; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Visel, Axel; Kawli, Trupti; Yang, Xinqiong; Patacsil, Dorrelyn; Keller, Cheryl A.; Giardine, Belinda; Kundaje, Anshul; Wang, Ting; Pennacchio, Len A.; Weng, Zhiping; Hardison, Ross C.; Snyder, Michael P.

    2014-11-19

    To broaden our understanding of the evolution of gene regulation mechanisms, we generated occupancy profiles for 34 orthologous transcription factors (TFs) in human–mouse erythroid progenitor, lymphoblast and embryonic stem-cell lines. By combining the genome-wide transcription factor occupancy repertoires, associated epigenetic signals, and co-association patterns, here we deduce several evolutionary principles of gene regulatory features operating since the mouse and human lineages diverged. The genomic distribution profiles, primary binding motifs, chromatin states, and DNA methylation preferences are well conserved for TF-occupied sequences. However, the extent to which orthologous DNA segments are bound by orthologous TFs varies both among TFs and with genomic location: binding at promoters is more highly conserved than binding at distal elements. Notably, occupancy-conserved TF-occupied sequences tend to be pleiotropic; they function in several tissues and also co-associate with many TFs. Lastly, single nucleotide variants at sites with potential regulatory functions are enriched in occupancy-conserved TF-occupied sequences.

  9. Principles of regulatory information conservation between mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yong; Ma, Zhihai; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Wu, Weisheng; Cayting, Philip; Boyle, Alan P; Sundaram, Vasavi; Xing, Xiaoyun; Dogan, Nergiz; Li, Jingjing; Euskirchen, Ghia; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Visel, Axel; Kawli, Trupti; Yang, Xinqiong; Patacsil, Dorrelyn; Keller, Cheryl A; Giardine, Belinda; Kundaje, Anshul; Wang, Ting; Pennacchio, Len A; Weng, Zhiping; Hardison, Ross C; Snyder, Michael P

    2014-11-20

    To broaden our understanding of the evolution of gene regulation mechanisms, we generated occupancy profiles for 34 orthologous transcription factors (TFs) in human-mouse erythroid progenitor, lymphoblast and embryonic stem-cell lines. By combining the genome-wide transcription factor occupancy repertoires, associated epigenetic signals, and co-association patterns, here we deduce several evolutionary principles of gene regulatory features operating since the mouse and human lineages diverged. The genomic distribution profiles, primary binding motifs, chromatin states, and DNA methylation preferences are well conserved for TF-occupied sequences. However, the extent to which orthologous DNA segments are bound by orthologous TFs varies both among TFs and with genomic location: binding at promoters is more highly conserved than binding at distal elements. Notably, occupancy-conserved TF-occupied sequences tend to be pleiotropic; they function in several tissues and also co-associate with many TFs. Single nucleotide variants at sites with potential regulatory functions are enriched in occupancy-conserved TF-occupied sequences. PMID:25409826

  10. Cytosine hypomethylation at CHG and CHH sites in the pleiotropic mutants of Mendelian inheritance in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Renu; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sharma, Vishakha; Sharma, Vinay; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-12-01

    The 5S and 18S rDNA sequences of Catharanthus roseus cv 'Nirmal' (wild type) and its leafless inflorescence (lli), evergreen dwarf (egd) and irregular leaf lamina (ill) single mutants and lli egd, lli ill and egd ill double mutants were characterized. The lli, egd and ill mutants of Mendelian inheritance bore the names after their most conspicuous morphological feature(s). They had been chemically induced and isolated for their salt tolerance. The double mutants were isolated as morphological segregants from crosses between single mutants. The morphological features of the two parents accompanied salt tolerance in the double mutants. All the six mutants were hypomethylated at repeat sequences, upregulated and downregulated for many genes and carried pleiotropic alterations for several traits. Here the 5S and 18S rDNAs of C. roseus were found to be relatively low in cytosine content. Cytosines were preponderantly in CG context (53%) and almost all of them were methylated (97%). The cytosines in CHH and CHG (where H = A, T or C) contexts were largely demethylated (92%) in mutants. The demethylation was attributable to reduced expression of RDR2 and DRM2 led RNA dependant DNA methylation and CMT3 led maintenance methylation pathways. Mutants had gained some cytosines by substitution of C at T sites. These perhaps arose on account of errors in DNA replication, mediated by widespread cytosine demethylation at CHG and CHH sites. It was concluded that the regulation of cytosine ethylation mechanisms was disturbed in the mutants. ILL, EGD and LLI genes were identified as the positive regulators of other genes mediating the RdDM and CMT3 pathways, for establishment and maintenance of cytosine methylation in C. roseus. PMID:24371171

  11. Overexpression of the pleiotropic regulator CodY decreases sporulation, attachment and pellicle formation in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Gopalani, Monisha; Dhiman, Alisha; Rahi, Amit; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2016-01-15

    CodY, a global transcriptional regulator, primarily functions as a nutrient and energy sensor. It is activated by metabolic effectors like BCAA and GTP. In low G + C Gram positive bacteria, it facilitates coupling of changes in the cellular metabolite pool with those required in the transcriptome of the cell. This pleiotropic regulator controls the expression of a vast number of genes as the cell transits from exponential to the stationary phase. Earlier studies have shown that CodY is required for the virulence of Bacillus anthracis. We sought to investigate the effect of its overexpression on the physiology of B. anthracis. In our study, we found that cellular CodY levels were unchanged during this phase-transition. Expression of endogenous CodY remained the same in different nutrient limiting conditions. Immunoblotting studies revealed CodY presence in the whole spore lysate of B. anthracis indicating it to be a component of the spore proteome. We could also detect CodY in the secretome of B. anthracis. Further, CodY was overexpressed in B. anthracis Sterne strain and this led to a 100-fold decrease in the sporulation titer and a 2.5-fold decrease in the in vitro attachment ability of the bacteria. We also observed a decrease in the pellicle formation by CodY overexpressed strain when compared to wildtype bacilli. The CodY overexpressed strain showed chaining phenotype during growth in liquid media and pellicle. PMID:26686421

  12. Pleiotropic effect of lovastatin, with and without cholestyramine, in the post coronary artery bypass graft (Post CABG) trial.

    PubMed

    Domanski, Michael; Tian, Xin; Fleg, Jerome; Coady, Sean; Gosen, Christine; Kirby, Ruth; Sachdev, Vandana; Knatterud, Genell; Braunwald, Eugene

    2008-10-15

    This study evaluated patients in the Post Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (Post CABG) trial for evidence of statin pleiotropic effects in preventing atherosclerotic progression in saphenous vein grafts (SVGs). We studied 1,116 of the 1,351 patients in the Post CABG trial who were randomized to aggressive (low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol target <85 mg/dl) or moderate (target LDL cholesterol <140 mg/dl) lovastatin treatment and who had sufficient data available. The generalized estimating equation models, adjusting for important covariates, were applied to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and probability of substantial atherosclerotic SVG progression (decrease in lumen diameter >or=0.6 mm) and the difference in minimum lumen diameter change between treatment groups. Aggressive lovastatin treatment compared with moderate treatment was associated with a significant decrease in risk of significant SVG atherosclerotic progression after adjustment for baseline cholesterol level, LDL cholesterol on treatment, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride changes on treatment and other independent predictors (OR 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.49 to 0.94, p = 0.019). Results were similar when the change or percent change from baseline of LDL cholesterol level on treatment was adjusted for rather than on-treatment LDL cholesterol and in the subset achieving a year-1 LDL cholesterol level from 90 to 135 mg/dl (OR 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.42 to 0.98, p = 0.042). Mean decrease in minimum lumen diameter was also significantly smaller in the aggressive than the moderate treatment arm (-0.256 vs -0.343 mm, p = 0.042). In conclusion, aggressive versus moderate lovastatin treatment appeared therapeutic in slowing the atherosclerotic process in SVGs from Post CABG patients, independent of its greater LDL cholesterol-lowering effect. PMID:18929703

  13. Pleiotropic effects of Chr15q25 nicotinic gene cluster and the relationship between smoking, cognition and ADHD.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Jaqueline B; Polina, Evelise R; Rovaris, Diego L; Kappel, Djenifer B; Mota, Nina R; Cupertino, Renata B; Silva, Katiane L; Guimarães-da-Silva, Paula O; Karam, Rafael G; Salgado, Carlos A I; White, Melanie J; Rohde, Luis A; Grevet, Eugenio H; Bau, Claiton H D

    2016-09-01

    Polymorphisms in the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster (Chr15q25) have been robustly associated with nicotine dependence, including genome-wide studies, as well as with cognitive and neuropsychological measures. In addition, cognitive processes can be influenced by nicotine use through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we evaluated the effect of polymorphisms in CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster and their interaction with tobacco smoking status on cognition in patients with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Eight SNPs from the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster were evaluated on a clinical sample of 403 adults with ADHD. Cognitive performance was assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R). Analyses of covariance were used to assess the influence of single markers and their interaction with smoking status in the Vocabulary and Block Design subtests of WAIS-R. Correction for multiple comparisons was applied. Lifetime smoking was associated to Vocabulary subtest. The TT genotypes of CHRNA5 SNPs rs588765 and rs514743 showed a trend towards association with, respectively, higher and lower scores on the Vocabulary subtest. There was a significant interaction between intergenic SNP rs8023462 and smoking on Vocabulary scores. Our results are consistent with an influence of variants in the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster on cognitive measures. The overall scenario suggests a pleiotropic role of Chr15q25 nicotinic gene cluster with complex influences in ADHD, tobacco smoking and cognitive performance, characteristics that can be partially interdependent and may share underlying genetic factors. PMID:27302872

  14. Estimates of epistatic and pleiotropic effects of () and () genetic markers on beef heifer performance traits enhanced by selection.

    PubMed

    Tait, R G; Cushman, R A; McNeel, A K; Casas, E; Smith, T P L; Freetly, H C; Bennett, G L

    2016-03-01

    Genetic marker effects and type of inheritance are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. A stable composite population (MARC II) was subjected to marker assisted selection for 2 yr to equalize and genetic marker frequencies to evaluate the epistatic and pleiotropic effects of these markers on BW, reproduction, and first calf performance traits in replacement beef females ( = 171) managed under 2 postweaning development protocols. Traits evaluated on the heifers were birth BW, weaning BW, 11-mo BW, 12-mo BW, 13-mo BW, first breeding season pregnancy evaluation BW, first calving season BW, 11-mo puberty, 12-mo puberty, 13-mo puberty, first breeding season pregnancy, and first calf weaning rate. Additionally, heifer's first calf performance traits of ordinal calving date, first calf birth BW, and first calf weaning BW (with and without age adjustment) were analyzed. Selection to increase minor allele frequencies and balanced sampling across genotype classes enhanced the ability to detect all genetic effects except dominance × dominance epistasis. The × genotype effect was significant ( < 0.05) for 11-mo BW and 12-mo BW and tended to be significant ( = 0.08) for 13-mo BW. Consistently, for all 3 traits, the most significant effect among epistatic × genotype effects was the additive effect, with the G allele decreasing BW. There were no associations between × genotype and fertility related traits ( ≥ 0.46) in this study. Additionally, there were no × genotype associations with first progeny performance traits ( ≥ 0.14). The large effect of the additive × additive interaction on first calf weaning BW was imprecisely estimated, which may warrant further investigation. PMID:27065254

  15. Sevelamer revisited: pleiotropic effects on endothelial and cardiovascular risk factors in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    of sevelamer versus calcium-based binders. This review discusses recent exploratory evidence for pleiotropic effects of sevelamer on endothelial function in CKD or ESRD. Endothelial effects of sevelamer may contribute mechanistically to the improved survival observed in some studies of CKD and ESRD patients. PMID:24327730

  16. Guidelines for establishing locus specific databases.

    PubMed

    Vihinen, Mauno; den Dunnen, Johan T; Dalgleish, Raymond; Cotton, Richard G H

    2012-02-01

    Information about genetic variation has been collected for some 20 years into registries, known as locus specific databases (LSDBs), which nowadays often contain information in addition to the actual genetic variation. Several issues have to be taken into account when considering establishing and maintaining LSDBs and these have been discussed previously in a number of articles describing guidelines and recommendations. This information is widely scattered and, for a newcomer, it would be difficult to obtain the latest information and guidance. Here, a sequence of steps essential for establishing an LSDB is discussed together with guidelines for each step. Curators need to collect information from various sources, code it in systematic way, and distribute to the research and clinical communities. In doing this, ethical issues have to be taken into account. To facilitate integration of information to, for example, analyze genotype-phenotype correlations, systematic data representation using established nomenclatures, data models, and ontologies is essential. LSDB curation and maintenance comprises a number of tasks that can be managed by following logical steps. These resources are becoming ever more important and new curators are essential to ensure that we will have expertly curated databases for all disease-related genes in the near future. PMID:22052659

  17. Chromosomal locus for staphylococcal enterotoxin B.

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, W M; Iandolo, J J

    1978-01-01

    The genetic locus of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) was investigated in the Staphylococcus aureus food-poisoning isolates, strains S6 and 277. Direct neutral sucrose gradient centrifugation analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-sodium chloride-mediated cleared lysates demonstrated that strain S6 contained a single 37S plasmid. Transductional analysis revealed that the 37S plasmid in S6 encoded for cadmium resistance (Cad) but not SEB. Additionally, elimination of cadmium resistance in S6 provided a plasmid-negative derivative that produced SEB at the same level as the parent. Examination of strain 277 showed two plasmids, a 37S species encoding for penicillin resistance (Penr) and a 21S species containing the gene(s) responsible for tetracycline resistance (Tetr). Elimination of the 37S, penr plasmid in 277 had no effect on SEB production, whereas introduction of the 21S tetr plasmid via transformation into strain 8325 (SEB--) did not confer enterotoxigenesis upon the transformants. The data obtained in this investigation suggest that the SEB gene(s) in these food-poisoning isolates of S. aureus is chromosomal. Images PMID:669796

  18. Dynamic Estrogen Receptor Interactomes Control Estrogen-Responsive Trefoil Factor (TFF) Locus Cell-Specific Activities

    PubMed Central

    Quintin, Justine; Le Péron, Christine; Palierne, Gaëlle; Bizot, Maud; Cunha, Stéphanie; Sérandour, Aurélien A.; Avner, Stéphane; Henry, Catherine; Percevault, Frédéric; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Huet, Sébastien; Watrin, Erwan; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Legagneux, Vincent; Salbert, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol signaling is ideally suited for analyzing the molecular and functional linkages between the different layers of information directing transcriptional regulations: the DNA sequence, chromatin modifications, and the spatial organization of the genome. Hence, the estrogen receptor (ER) can bind at a distance from its target genes and engages timely and spatially coordinated processes to regulate their expression. In the context of the coordinated regulation of colinear genes, identifying which ER binding sites (ERBSs) regulate a given gene still remains a challenge. Here, we investigated the coordination of such regulatory events at a 2-Mb genomic locus containing the estrogen-sensitive trefoil factor (TFF) cluster of genes in breast cancer cells. We demonstrate that this locus exhibits a hormone- and cohesin-dependent reduction in the plasticity of its three-dimensional organization that allows multiple ERBSs to be dynamically brought to the vicinity of estrogen-sensitive genes. Additionally, by using triplex-forming oligonucleotides, we could precisely document the functional links between ER engagement at given ERBSs and the regulation of particular genes. Hence, our data provide evidence of a formerly suggested cooperation of enhancers toward gene regulation and also show that redundancy between ERBSs can occur. PMID:24752895

  19. Phenotypic subregions within the split-hand/foot malformation 1 locus.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Malene B; Kreiborg, Sven; Jensen, Per; Bak, Mads; Mang, Yuan; Lodahl, Marianne; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Tommerup, Niels; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rendtorff, Nanna D

    2016-03-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation 1 (SHFM1) is caused by chromosomal aberrations involving the region 7q21.3, DLX5 mutation, and dysregulation of DLX5/DLX6 expression by long-range position effects. SHFM1 can be isolated or syndromic with incomplete penetrance and a highly variable clinical expression, possibly influenced by sex and imprinting. We report on a new family with five affected individuals with syndromic SHFM1 that includes split-hand/foot malformations, hearing loss, and craniofacial anomalies, and an inv(7)(q21.3q35) present both in the proband and her affected son. The proximal inversion breakpoint, identified by next generation mate-pair sequencing, truncates the SHFM1 locus within the regulatory region of DLX5/6 expression. Through genotype-phenotype correlations of 100 patients with molecularly characterized chromosomal aberrations from 32 SHFM1 families, our findings suggest three phenotypic subregions within the SHFM1 locus associated with (1) isolated SHFM, (2) SHFM and hearing loss, and (3) SHFM, hearing loss, and craniofacial anomalies, respectively (ranked for increasing proximity to DLX5/6), and encompassing previously reported tissue-specific enhancers for DLX5/6. This uniquely well-characterized cohort of SHFM1 patients allowed us to systematically analyze the recently suggested hypothesis of skewed transmission and to confirm a higher penetrance in males vs. females in a subgroup of patients with isolated SHFM. PMID:26839112

  20. Changing Expectancies: A Counseling Model Based on Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Sean G.

    1980-01-01

    Presents counseling and communication techniques for giving external expectancies the internal direction necessary to facilitate behavior change. Locus of control expectancies provide a useful concept for assessing and influencing the behavior of unmotivated clients. (Author)

  1. Two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tienari, P.J. Univ. of Helsinki ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. ); Palo, J. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-01-15

    One of the major challenges in genetic linkage analyses is the study of complex diseases. The authors demonstrate here the use of two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS), a multifactorial disease with a complex mode of inheritance. In a set of Finnish multiplex families, they have previously found evidence for linkage between MS susceptibility and two independent loci, the myelin basic protein gene (MBP) on chromosome 18 and the HLA complex on chromosome 6. This set of families provides a unique opportunity to perform linkage analysis conditional on two loci contributing to the disease. In the two-trait-locus/two-marker-locus analysis, the presence of another disease locus is parametrized and the analysis more appropriately treats information from the unaffected family member than single-disease-locus analysis. As exemplified here in MS, the two-locus analysis can be a powerful method for investigating susceptibility loci in complex traits, best suited for analysis of specific candidate genes, or for situations in which preliminary evidence for linkage already exists or is suggested. 41 refs., 6 tabs.

  2. Fixation probability in a two-locus intersexual selection model.

    PubMed

    Durand, Guillermo; Lessard, Sabin

    2016-06-01

    We study a two-locus model of intersexual selection in a finite haploid population reproducing according to a discrete-time Moran model with a trait locus expressed in males and a preference locus expressed in females. We show that the probability of ultimate fixation of a single mutant allele for a male ornament introduced at random at the trait locus given any initial frequency state at the preference locus is increased by weak intersexual selection and recombination, weak or strong. Moreover, this probability exceeds the initial frequency of the mutant allele even in the case of a costly male ornament if intersexual selection is not too weak. On the other hand, the probability of ultimate fixation of a single mutant allele for a female preference towards a male ornament introduced at random at the preference locus is increased by weak intersexual selection and weak recombination if the female preference is not costly, and is strong enough in the case of a costly male ornament. The analysis relies on an extension of the ancestral recombination-selection graph for samples of haplotypes to take into account events of intersexual selection, while the symbolic calculation of the fixation probabilities is made possible in a reasonable time by an optimizing algorithm. PMID:27059474

  3. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    PubMed

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation. PMID:22864845

  4. Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Konefal, J; Duncan, R C; Reese, M A

    1992-06-01

    Training in the neurolinguistic programming techniques of shifting perceptual position, visual-kinesthetic dissociation, timelines, and change-history, all based on experiential cognitive processing of remembered events, leads to an increased awareness of behavioral contingencies and a more sensitive recognition of environmental cues which could serve to lower trait anxiety and increase the sense of internal control. This study reports on within-person and between-group changes in trait anxiety and locus of control as measured on the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Wallston, Wallston, and DeVallis' Multiple Health Locus of Control immediately following a 21-day residential training in neurolinguistic programming. Significant with-in-person decreases in trait-anxiety scores and increases in internal locus of control scores were observed as predicted. Chance and powerful other locus of control scores were unchanged. Significant differences were noted on trait anxiety and locus of control scores between European and U.S. participants, although change scores were similar for the two groups. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that this training may lower trait-anxiety scores and increase internal locus of control scores. A matched control group was not available, and follow-up was unfortunately not possible. PMID:1620774

  5. Fine mapping of the pleiotropic locus B for black spine and orange mature fruit color in cucumber identifies a 50 kb region containing a R2R3-MYB transcription factor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spine and skin colors on fruits are two important fruit quality traits in cucumber for variety improvement. In this study, we investigated the inheritance of spine and mature fruit colors with segregation populations developed from the cross between two inbred lines WI7200 (black spine and orang...

  6. Developmental cis-regulatory analysis of the cyclin D gene in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin D genes regulate the cell cycle, growth and differentiation in response to intercellular signaling. While the promoters of vertebrate cyclin D genes have been analyzed, the cis-regulatory sequences across an entire cyclin D locus have not. Doing so would increase understanding of how cyclin D genes respond to the regulatory states established by developmental gene regulatory networks, linking cell cycle and growth control to the ontogenetic program. Therefore, we conducted a cis-regulatory analysis on the cyclin D gene, SpcycD, of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, during embryogenesis, identifying upstream and intronic sequences, located within six defined regions bearing one or more cis-regulatory modules each. PMID:24090975

  7. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...) 2010, less the amounts appropriated from the Nuclear Waste Fund, amounts appropriated for Waste... agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). For this edition of the NRC's regulatory agenda, the most... publication of the last NRC semiannual agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). Within each group, the...

  8. Genomic analysis reveals extensive gene duplication within the bovine TRB locus

    PubMed Central

    Connelley, Timothy; Aerts, Jan; Law, Andy; Morrison, W Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Background Diverse TR and IG repertoires are generated by V(D)J somatic recombination. Genomic studies have been pivotal in cataloguing the V, D, J and C genes present in the various TR/IG loci and describing how duplication events have expanded the number of these genes. Such studies have also provided insights into the evolution of these loci and the complex mechanisms that regulate TR/IG expression. In this study we analyze the sequence of the third bovine genome assembly to characterize the germline repertoire of bovine TRB genes and compare the organization, evolution and regulatory structure of the bovine TRB locus with that of humans and mice. Results The TRB locus in the third bovine genome assembly is distributed over 5 scaffolds, extending to ~730 Kb. The available sequence contains 134 TRBV genes, assigned to 24 subgroups, and 3 clusters of DJC genes, each comprising a single TRBD gene, 5–7 TRBJ genes and a single TRBC gene. Seventy-nine of the TRBV genes are predicted to be functional. Comparison with the human and murine TRB loci shows that the gene order, as well as the sequences of non-coding elements that regulate TRB expression, are highly conserved in the bovine. Dot-plot analyses demonstrate that expansion of the genomic TRBV repertoire has occurred via a complex and extensive series of duplications, predominantly involving DNA blocks containing multiple genes. These duplication events have resulted in massive expansion of several TRBV subgroups, most notably TRBV6, 9 and 21 which contain 40, 35 and 16 members respectively. Similarly, duplication has lead to the generation of a third DJC cluster. Analyses of cDNA data confirms the diversity of the TRBV genes and, in addition, identifies a substantial number of TRBV genes, predominantly from the larger subgroups, which are still absent from the genome assembly. The observed gene duplication within the bovine TRB locus has created a repertoire of phylogenetically diverse functional TRBV genes

  9. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  10. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  11. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  12. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  13. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  14. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  15. Plant Regulatory Organizations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chapter on Plant Regulatory Organizations is part of a book titled Pest Management and Phytosanitary Trade Barriers authored by Neil Heather (Australia) and Guy Hallman. It covers the role of plant regulatory organizations from the international to state level in protecting plant health. At on...

  16. Pleiotropic effects of incretins

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal

    2012-01-01

    Drugs that augment the incretin system [glucagon like peptide (GLP) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors] represent a novel class of anti-hyperglycemic agents that have shown to improve the health and survival of beta-cells (improvement in postprandial hyperglycemia) and suppress glucagon (improvement in fasting hyperglycemia). The incretins represent a large family of molecules referred to as the “glucagon superfamily of peptide hormones” of which more than 90% of the physiological effects of incretins are accomplished by GLP-17-37 and GLP17-36 amide and gastric insulinotropic peptide (GIP). GLP-1 mediates its effects via the GLP-1 receptor, which has a wide tissue distribution [pancreas, lung, heart, vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, macrophages and monocytes, kidney, gastrointestinal tract (stomach and intestine), central nervous system (neoortex, cerebellum, hypothalamus, hippocampus, brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius) and peripheral nervous system]. This would imply that the incretin system has effects outside the pancreas. Over time data has accumulated to suggest that therapies that augment the incretin system has beneficial pleiotrophic effects. The incretins have shown to possess a cardiac-friendly profile, preserve neuronal cells and safeguard from neuronal degeneration, improve hepatic inflammation and hepatosteatosis, improve insulin resistance, promote weight loss and induce satiety. There is growing evidence that they may also be renoprotective promoting wound healing and bone health. PMID:22701844

  17. Pleiotropic effects of statins

    PubMed Central

    Kavalipati, Narasaraju; Shah, Jay; Ramakrishan, Ananthraman; Vasnawala, Hardik

    2015-01-01

    Statins or 3-hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors not only prevents the synthesis of cholesterol biosynthesis but also inhibits the synthesis of essential isoprenoid intermediates such as farnesyl pyrophosphate, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, isopentanyl adenosine, dolichols and polyisoprenoid side chains of ubiquinone, heme A, and nuclear lamins. These isoprenoid intermediates are required for activation of various intracellular/signaling proteins- small guanosine triphosphate bound protein Ras and Ras-like proteins like Rho, Rab, Rac, Ral, or Rap which plays an indispensible role in multiple cellular processes. Reduction of circulating isoprenoids intermediates as a result of HMG CoA reductase inhibition by statins prevents activation of these signalling proteins. Hence, the multiple effects of statins such as antiinflammatory effects, antioxidant effects, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects, plaque stability, normalization of sympathetic outflow, and prevention of platelet aggregation are due to reduction of circulating isoprenoids and hence inactivation of signalling proteins. These multiple lipid-independent effects of statins termed as statin pleiotropy would potentially open floodgates for research in multiple treatment domains catching attentions of researchers and clinician across the globe. PMID:26425463

  18. Genome-wide characterization of cis-acting DNA targets reveals the transcriptional regulatory framework of opaque2 in maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaobin; Qiao, Zhenyi; Qi, Weiwei; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Yue; Yang, Xi; Tang, Yuanping; Mei, Bing; Lv, Yuanda; Zhao, Han; Xiao, Han; Song, Rentao

    2015-03-01

    Opaque2 (O2) is a transcription factor that plays important roles during maize endosperm development. Mutation of the O2 gene improves the nutritional value of maize seeds but also confers pleiotropic effects that result in reduced agronomic quality. To reveal the transcriptional regulatory framework of O2, we studied the transcriptome of o2 mutants using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and determined O2 DNA binding targets using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq). The RNA-Seq analysis revealed 1605 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 383 differentially expressed long, noncoding RNAs. The DEGs cover a wide range of functions related to nutrient reservoir activity, nitrogen metabolism, stress resistance, etc. ChIP-Seq analysis detected 1686 O2 DNA binding sites distributed over 1143 genes. Overlay of the RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq results revealed 35 O2-modulated target genes. We identified four O2 binding motifs; among them, TGACGTGG appears to be the most conserved and strongest. We confirmed that, except for the 16- and 18-kD zeins, O2 directly regulates expression of all other zeins. O2 directly regulates two transcription factors, genes linked to carbon and amino acid metabolism and abiotic stress resistance. We built a hierarchical regulatory model for O2 that provides an understanding of its pleiotropic biological effects. PMID:25691733

  19. Tether mutations that restore function and suppress pleiotropic phenotypes of the C. elegans isp-1(qm150) Rieske iron-sulfur protein.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Gholamali; Wasko, Brian M; Tonge, Ashley; Schurman, Nathan; Dong, Cindy; Li, Zhongyu; Peters, Rebecca; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Pitt, Jason N; Morgan, Phil G; Sedensky, Margaret M; Crofts, Antony R; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2015-11-10

    Mitochondria play an important role in numerous diseases as well as normative aging. Severe reduction in mitochondrial function contributes to childhood disorders such as Leigh Syndrome, whereas mild disruption can extend the lifespan of model organisms. The Caenorhabditis elegans isp-1 gene encodes the Rieske iron-sulfur protein subunit of cytochrome c oxidoreductase (complex III of the electron transport chain). The partial loss of function allele, isp-1(qm150), leads to several pleiotropic phenotypes. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of ISP-1 function, we sought to identify genetic suppressors of the delayed development of isp-1(qm150) animals. Here we report a series of intragenic suppressors, all located within a highly conserved six amino acid tether region of ISP-1. These intragenic mutations suppress all of the evaluated isp-1(qm150) phenotypes, including developmental rate, pharyngeal pumping rate, brood size, body movement, activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response reporter, CO2 production, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and lifespan extension. Furthermore, analogous mutations show a similar effect when engineered into the budding yeast Rieske iron-sulfur protein Rip1, revealing remarkable conservation of the structure-function relationship of these residues across highly divergent species. The focus on a single subunit as causal both in generation and in suppression of diverse pleiotropic phenotypes points to a common underlying molecular mechanism, for which we propose a "spring-loaded" model. These observations provide insights into how gating and control processes influence the function of ISP-1 in mediating pleiotropic phenotypes including developmental rate, movement, sensitivity to stress, and longevity. PMID:26504246

  20. Tether mutations that restore function and suppress pleiotropic phenotypes of the C. elegans isp-1(qm150) Rieske iron–sulfur protein

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Gholamali; Wasko, Brian M.; Tonge, Ashley; Schurman, Nathan; Dong, Cindy; Li, Zhongyu; Peters, Rebecca; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Pitt, Jason N.; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Crofts, Antony R.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in numerous diseases as well as normative aging. Severe reduction in mitochondrial function contributes to childhood disorders such as Leigh Syndrome, whereas mild disruption can extend the lifespan of model organisms. The Caenorhabditis elegans isp-1 gene encodes the Rieske iron–sulfur protein subunit of cytochrome c oxidoreductase (complex III of the electron transport chain). The partial loss of function allele, isp-1(qm150), leads to several pleiotropic phenotypes. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of ISP-1 function, we sought to identify genetic suppressors of the delayed development of isp-1(qm150) animals. Here we report a series of intragenic suppressors, all located within a highly conserved six amino acid tether region of ISP-1. These intragenic mutations suppress all of the evaluated isp-1(qm150) phenotypes, including developmental rate, pharyngeal pumping rate, brood size, body movement, activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response reporter, CO2 production, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and lifespan extension. Furthermore, analogous mutations show a similar effect when engineered into the budding yeast Rieske iron–sulfur protein Rip1, revealing remarkable conservation of the structure–function relationship of these residues across highly divergent species. The focus on a single subunit as causal both in generation and in suppression of diverse pleiotropic phenotypes points to a common underlying molecular mechanism, for which we propose a “spring-loaded” model. These observations provide insights into how gating and control processes influence the function of ISP-1 in mediating pleiotropic phenotypes including developmental rate, movement, sensitivity to stress, and longevity. PMID:26504246

  1. Pleiotropic and Epistatic Behavior of a Ring-Hydroxylating Oxygenase System in the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Metabolic Network from Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Ohgew; Kim, Seong-Jae; Kim, Dae-Wi; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Kim, Hyun-lee; Ahn, Youngbeom; Sutherland, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the considerable knowledge of bacterial high-molecular-weight (HMW) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolism, the key enzyme(s) and its pleiotropic and epistatic behavior(s) responsible for low-molecular-weight (LMW) PAHs in HMW PAH-metabolic networks remain poorly understood. In this study, a phenotype-based strategy, coupled with a spray plate method, selected a Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 mutant (6G11) that degrades HMW PAHs but not LMW PAHs. Sequence analysis determined that the mutant was defective in pdoA2, encoding an aromatic ring-hydroxylating oxygenase (RHO). A series of metabolic comparisons using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis revealed that the mutant had a lower rate of degradation of fluorene, anthracene, and pyrene. Unlike the wild type, the mutant did not produce a color change in culture media containing fluorene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene. An Escherichia coli expression experiment confirmed the ability of the Pdo system to oxidize biphenyl, the LMW PAHs naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and fluorene, and the HMW PAHs pyrene, fluoranthene, and benzo[a]pyrene, with the highest enzymatic activity directed toward three-ring PAHs. Structure analysis and PAH substrate docking simulations of the Pdo substrate-binding pocket rationalized the experimentally observed metabolic versatility on a molecular scale. Using information obtained in this study and from previous work, we constructed an RHO-centric functional map, allowing pleiotropic and epistatic enzymatic explanation of PAH metabolism. Taking the findings together, the Pdo system is an RHO system with the pleiotropic responsibility of LMW PAH-centric hydroxylation, and its epistatic functional contribution is also crucial for the metabolic quality and quantity of the PAH-MN. PMID:25070740

  2. The Orphan Gene ybjN Conveys Pleiotropic Effects on Multicellular Behavior and Survival of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongping; Calla, Bernarda; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Wu, Xia; Korban, Schuyler S.; Huber, Steven C.; Clough, Steven J.; Zhao, Youfu

    2011-01-01

    YbjN, encoding an enterobacteria-specific protein, is a multicopy suppressor of temperature sensitivity in the ts9 mutant strain of Escherichia coli. In this study, we further explored the role(s) of ybjN. First, we demonstrated that the ybjN transcript was about 10-fold lower in the ts9 strain compared to that of E. coli strain BW25113 (BW). Introduction of multiple copies of ybjN in the ts9 strain resulted in over-expression of ybjN by about 10-fold as compared to that of BW. These results suggested that temperature sensitivity of the ts9 mutant of E. coli may be related to expression levels of ybjN. Characterization of E. coli ybjN mutant revealed that ybjN mutation resulted in pleiotropic phenotypes, including increased motility, fimbriation (auto-aggregation), exopolysaccharide production, and biofilm formation. In contrast, over-expression of ybjN (in terms of multiple copies) resulted in reduced motility, fimbriation, exopolysaccharide production, biofilm formation and acid resistance. In addition, our results indicate that a ybjN-homolog gene from Erwinia amylovora, a plant enterobacterial pathogen, is functionally conserved with that of E. coli, suggesting similar evolution of the YbjN family proteins in enterobacteria. A microarray study revealed that the expression level of ybjN was inversely correlated with the expression of flagellar, fimbrial and acid resistance genes. Over-expression of ybjN significantly down-regulated genes involved in citric acid cycle, glycolysis, the glyoxylate shunt, oxidative phosphorylation, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. Furthermore, over-expression of ybjN up-regulated toxin-antitoxin modules, the SOS response pathway, cold shock and starvation induced transporter genes. Collectively, these results suggest that YbjN may play important roles in regulating bacterial multicellular behavior, metabolism, and survival under stress conditions in E. coli. These results also suggest that ybjN over

  3. The pleiotropic role of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (EPAC1) in cancer: implications for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Almahariq, Muayad; Mei, Fang C; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The pleiotropic second messenger adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) regulates a myriad of biological processes under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (EPAC1) mediates the intracellular functions of cAMP by acting as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like Rap small GTPases. Recent studies suggest that EPAC1 plays important roles in immunomodulation, cancer cell migration/metastasis, and metabolism. These results, coupled with the successful development of EPAC-specific small molecule inhibitors, identify EPAC1 as a promising therapeutic target for cancer treatments. PMID:26525949

  4. lcrR, a low-Ca2(+)-response locus with dual Ca2(+)-dependent functions in Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed Central

    Barve, S S; Straley, S C

    1990-01-01

    The low-Ca2+ response (Lcr) of Yersinia includes a regulatory cascade and a set of virulence-related proteins, one of which is the V antigen. The regulatory genes modulate both bacterial growth and expression of the virulence-related proteins in response to temperature and the presence of Ca2+ and nucleotides. In this study we defined a new Lcr locus, lcrR, in Yersinia pestis KIM. An lcrR mutant, obtained by insertion mutagenesis, failed to grow at 37 degrees C whether Ca2+ was present or not. However, it grew normally in the presence of ATP, showing that the Ca2(+)- and nucleotide-responsive mechanisms are separate in Y. pestis. The lcrR mutant was avirulent in mice, probably due to its compromised growth at 37 degrees C. beta-Galactosidase measurements and Northern (RNA blot) analysis revealed that lcrR transcription was regulated primarily by temperature. The DNA sequence of the lcrR locus contained a single open reading frame of 441 bases that could encode a protein with a molecular weight of 16,470 and a pI of 10.73. Expression of an lcrR-containing clone in Escherichia coli yielded a 16,000-molecular-weight protein. At 37 degrees C, the lcrR mutant strongly expressed V antigen and initiated lcrGVH transcription whether Ca2+ was present or not, indicating that this mutant had lost the transcriptional downregulation of lcrGVH shown by the parent in the presence of Ca2+. In the absence of Ca2+, the mutant failed to express LcrG, even though lcrGVH mRNA initiated upstream of lcrG at the normal sites. These data suggest that the lcrR locus is necessary for the regulation of LcrG expression in the absence of Ca2+. Therefore, this locus has a dual regulatory role in the low-Ca2+ response. Images PMID:1695896

  5. Exonic Re-Sequencing of the Chromosome 2q24.3 Parkinson’s Disease Locus

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Catherine; Ogaki, Kotaro; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Heckman, Michael G.; McCarthy, Allan; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Walton, Ronald L.; Lynch, Timothy; Siuda, Joanna; Opala, Grzegorz; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Barcikowska, Maria; Czyzewski, Krzysztof; Dickson, Dennis W.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Ross, Owen A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) have identified over 20 genomic regions associated with disease risk. Many of these loci include several candidate genes making it difficult to pinpoint the causal gene. The locus on chromosome 2q24.3 encompasses three genes: B3GALT1, STK39, and CERS6. In order to identify if the causal variants are simple missense changes, we sequenced all 31 exons of these three genes in 187 patients with PD. We identified 13 exonic variants including four non-synonymous and three insertion/deletion variants (indels). These non-synonymous variants and rs2102808, the GWAS tag SNP, were genotyped in three independent series consisting of a total of 1976 patients and 1596 controls. Our results show that the seven identified 2q24.3 coding variants are not independently responsible for the GWAS association signal at the locus; however, there is a haplotype, which contains both rs2102808 and a STK39 exon 1 6bp indel variant, that is significantly associated with PD risk (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.11–1.64, P = 0.003). This haplotype is more associated than each of the two variants independently (OR = 1.23, P = 0.005 and 1.10, P = 0.10, respectively). Our findings suggest that the risk variant is likely located in a non-coding region. Additional sequencing of the locus including promoter and regulatory regions will be needed to pinpoint the association at this locus that leads to an increased risk to PD. PMID:26090850

  6. Regulatory guidance document

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

  7. 78 FR 44279 - Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ...The Department of Justice is publishing its spring 2013 regulatory agenda pursuant to Executive Order 12866, ``Regulatory Planning and Review,'' 58 FR 51735, and the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. sections 601 to 612...

  8. Promoter–enhancer looping at the PPARγ2 locus during adipogenic differentiation requires the Prmt5 methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Scott E.; Wu, Qiong; Lamba, Pallavi; Sif, Saïd; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    PPARγ2 is a critical lineage-determining transcription factor that is essential for adipogenic differentiation. Here we report characterization of the three-dimensional structure of the PPARγ2 locus after the onset of adipogenic differentiation and the mechanisms by which it forms. We identified a differentiation-dependent loop between the PPARγ2 promoter and an enhancer sequence 10 kb upstream that forms at the onset of PPARγ2 expression. The arginine methyltransferase Prmt5 was required for loop formation, and overexpression of Prmt5 resulted in premature loop formation and earlier onset of PPARγ2 expression. Kinetic studies of regulatory factor interactions at the PPARγ2 promoter and enhancer revealed enhanced interaction of Prmt5 with the promoter that preceded stable association of Prmt5 with enhancer sequences. Prmt5 knockdown prevented binding of both MED1, a subunit of Mediator complex that facilitates enhancer–promoter interactions, and Brg1, the ATPase of the mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzyme required for PPARγ2 activation and adipogenic differentiation. The data indicate a dynamic association of Prmt5 with the regulatory sequences of the PPARγ2 gene that facilitates differentiation-dependent, three-dimensional organization of the locus. In addition, other differentiation-specific, long-range chromatin interactions showed Prmt5-dependence, indicating a more general role for Prmt5 in mediating higher-order chromatin connections in differentiating adipocytes. PMID:26935580

  9. Promoter-enhancer looping at the PPARγ2 locus during adipogenic differentiation requires the Prmt5 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Scott E; Wu, Qiong; Lamba, Pallavi; Sif, Saïd; Imbalzano, Anthony N

    2016-06-20

    PPARγ2 is a critical lineage-determining transcription factor that is essential for adipogenic differentiation. Here we report characterization of the three-dimensional structure of the PPARγ2 locus after the onset of adipogenic differentiation and the mechanisms by which it forms. We identified a differentiation-dependent loop between the PPARγ2 promoter and an enhancer sequence 10 kb upstream that forms at the onset of PPARγ2 expression. The arginine methyltransferase Prmt5 was required for loop formation, and overexpression of Prmt5 resulted in premature loop formation and earlier onset of PPARγ2 expression. Kinetic studies of regulatory factor interactions at the PPARγ2 promoter and enhancer revealed enhanced interaction of Prmt5 with the promoter that preceded stable association of Prmt5 with enhancer sequences. Prmt5 knockdown prevented binding of both MED1, a subunit of Mediator complex that facilitates enhancer-promoter interactions, and Brg1, the ATPase of the mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzyme required for PPARγ2 activation and adipogenic differentiation. The data indicate a dynamic association of Prmt5 with the regulatory sequences of the PPARγ2 gene that facilitates differentiation-dependent, three-dimensional organization of the locus. In addition, other differentiation-specific, long-range chromatin interactions showed Prmt5-dependence, indicating a more general role for Prmt5 in mediating higher-order chromatin connections in differentiating adipocytes. PMID:26935580

  10. Identification of an imprinted master trans regulator at the KLF14 locus related to multiple metabolic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Small, Kerrin S; Hedman, Asa K; Grundberg, Elin; Nica, Alexandra C; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Kong, Augustine; Thorsteindottir, Unnur; Shin, So-Youn; Richards, Hannah B; Soranzo, Nicole; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Stefansson, Kari; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Deloukas, Panos; Spector, Timothy D; McCarthy, Mark I

    2011-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified many genetic variants associated with complex traits. However, at only a minority of loci have the molecular mechanisms mediating these associations been characterized. In parallel, whereas cis regulatory patterns of gene expression have been extensively explored, the identification of trans regulatory effects in humans has attracted less attention. Here we show that the type 2 diabetes and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-associated cis-acting expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) of the maternally expressed transcription factor KLF14 acts as a master trans regulator of adipose gene expression. Expression levels of genes regulated by this trans-eQTL are highly correlated with concurrently measured metabolic traits, and a subset of the trans-regulated genes harbor variants directly associated with metabolic phenotypes. This trans-eQTL network provides a mechanistic understanding of the effect of the KLF14 locus on metabolic disease risk and offers a potential model for other complex traits. PMID:21572415

  11. The ensembl regulatory build.

    PubMed

    Zerbino, Daniel R; Wilder, Steven P; Johnson, Nathan; Juettemann, Thomas; Flicek, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Most genomic variants associated with phenotypic traits or disease do not fall within gene coding regions, but in regulatory regions, rendering their interpretation difficult. We collected public data on epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding in human cell types and used it to construct an intuitive summary of regulatory regions in the human genome. We verified it against independent assays for sensitivity. The Ensembl Regulatory Build will be progressively enriched when more data is made available. It is freely available on the Ensembl browser, from the Ensembl Regulation MySQL database server and in a dedicated track hub. PMID:25887522

  12. Locus equations are an acoustic expression of articulator synergy

    PubMed Central

    Iskarous, Khalil; Fowler, Carol A.; Whalen, D. H.

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated the articulatory basis of locus equations, regression lines relating F2 at the start of a Consonant-Vowel (CV) transition to F2 at the middle of the vowel, with C fixed and V varying. Several studies have shown that consonants of different places of articulation have locus equation slopes that descend from labial to velar to alveolar, and intercept magnitudes that increase in the opposite order. Using formulas from the theory of bivariate regression that express regression slopes and intercepts in terms of standard deviations and averages of the variables, it is shown that the slope directly encodes a well-established measure of coarticulation resistance. It is also shown that intercepts are directly related to the degree to which the tongue body assists the formation of the constriction for the consonant. Moreover, it is shown that the linearity of locus equations and the linear relation between locus equation slopes and intercepts originates in linearity in articulation between the horizontal position of the tongue dorsum in the consonant and to that in the vowel. It is concluded that slopes and intercepts of acoustic locus equations are measures of articulator synergy. PMID:20968373

  13. Quantitative trait locus mapping of yield-related components and oligogenic control of the cap color of the button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Rodier, Anne; Rousseau, Thierry; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2012-04-01

    As in other crops, yield is an important trait to be selected for in edible mushrooms, but its inheritance is poorly understood. Therefore, we have investigated the complex genetic architecture of yield-related traits in Agaricus bisporus through the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), using second-generation hybrid progeny derived from a cross between a wild strain and a commercial cultivar. Yield, average weight per mushroom, number of fruiting bodies per m(2), earliness, and cap color were evaluated in two independent experiments. A total of 23 QTL were detected for 7 yield-related traits. These QTL together explained between 21% (two-flushes yield) and 59% (earliness) of the phenotypic variation. Fifteen QTL (65%) were consistent between the two experiments. Four regions underlying significant QTL controlling yield, average weight, and number were detected on linkage groups II, III, IV, and X, suggesting a pleiotropic effect or tight linkage. Up to six QTL were identified for earliness. The PPC1 locus, together with two additional genomic regions, explained up to 90% of the phenotypic variation of the cap color. Alleles from the wild parent showed beneficial effects for some yield traits, suggesting that the wild germ plasm is a valuable source of variation for several agronomic traits. Our results constitute a key step toward marker-assisted selection and provide a solid foundation to go further into the biological mechanisms controlling productive traits in the button mushroom. PMID:22267676

  14. Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping of Yield-Related Components and Oligogenic Control of the Cap Color of the Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Anne; Rousseau, Thierry; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    As in other crops, yield is an important trait to be selected for in edible mushrooms, but its inheritance is poorly understood. Therefore, we have investigated the complex genetic architecture of yield-related traits in Agaricus bisporus through the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), using second-generation hybrid progeny derived from a cross between a wild strain and a commercial cultivar. Yield, average weight per mushroom, number of fruiting bodies per m2, earliness, and cap color were evaluated in two independent experiments. A total of 23 QTL were detected for 7 yield-related traits. These QTL together explained between 21% (two-flushes yield) and 59% (earliness) of the phenotypic variation. Fifteen QTL (65%) were consistent between the two experiments. Four regions underlying significant QTL controlling yield, average weight, and number were detected on linkage groups II, III, IV, and X, suggesting a pleiotropic effect or tight linkage. Up to six QTL were identified for earliness. The PPC1 locus, together with two additional genomic regions, explained up to 90% of the phenotypic variation of the cap color. Alleles from the wild parent showed beneficial effects for some yield traits, suggesting that the wild germ plasm is a valuable source of variation for several agronomic traits. Our results constitute a key step toward marker-assisted selection and provide a solid foundation to go further into the biological mechanisms controlling productive traits in the button mushroom. PMID:22267676

  15. Reorganisation of Hoxd regulatory landscapes during the evolution of a snake-like body plan.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Isabel; Gitto, Sandra; Novoa, Ana; Codourey, Julien; Nguyen Huynh, Thi Hanh; Gonzalez, Federico; Milinkovitch, Michel C; Mallo, Moises; Duboule, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Within land vertebrate species, snakes display extreme variations in their body plan, characterized by the absence of limbs and an elongated morphology. Such a particular interpretation of the basic vertebrate body architecture has often been associated with changes in the function or regulation of Hox genes. Here, we use an interspecies comparative approach to investigate different regulatory aspects at the snake HoxD locus. We report that, unlike in other vertebrates, snake mesoderm-specific enhancers are mostly located within the HoxD cluster itself rather than outside. In addition, despite both the absence of limbs and an altered Hoxd gene regulation in external genitalia, the limb-associated bimodal HoxD chromatin structure is maintained at the snake locus. Finally, we show that snake and mouse orthologous enhancer sequences can display distinct expression specificities. These results show that vertebrate morphological evolution likely involved extensive reorganisation at Hox loci, yet within a generally conserved regulatory framework. PMID:27476854

  16. Endogenous retroviral long terminal repeats within the HLA-DQ locus.

    PubMed Central

    Kambhu, S; Falldorf, P; Lee, J S

    1990-01-01

    Two endogenous retroviral long terminal repeats (LTRs) were found in the human major histocompatibility complex locus HLA-DQ. The solo LTRs, unlinked to retrovirus structural genes, are located approximately 5 kilobases apart from each other and in the same transcriptional orientation, which is opposite to that for the HLA-DQB1 gene. These elements exhibit greater than 90% homology to the LTRs of the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K10. The conservation of putative regulatory elements found within the LTRs and their position relative to the HLA-DQB1 gene suggest that these elements may confer distinct regulatory properties on genes in the HLA-DQ region. Polymorphic variation between different HLA haplotypes for the presence of the LTRs at this location and of the molecular architecture within this subregion is supported by polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis. Comparisons of chromosomes with and without the LTRs in this region will provide a unique opportunity in the human genome to analyze transposition or integration of retroviral sequences. Images PMID:2114643

  17. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition.

  18. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition.

  19. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition.

  20. Function and evolution of local repeats in the Firre locus

    PubMed Central

    Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Shukla, Chinmay J.; Weiner, Catherine L.; Rinn, John L.

    2016-01-01

    More than half the human and mouse genomes are comprised of repetitive sequences, such as transposable elements (TEs), which have been implicated in many biological processes. In contrast, much less is known about other repeats, such as local repeats that occur in multiple instances within a given locus in the genome but not elsewhere. Here, we systematically characterize local repeats in the genomic locus of the Firre long noncoding RNA (lncRNA). We find a conserved function for the RRD repeat as a ribonucleic nuclear retention signal that is sufficient to retain an otherwise cytoplasmic mRNA in the nucleus. We also identified a repeat, termed R0, that can function as a DNA enhancer element within the intronic sequences of Firre. Collectively, our data suggest that local repeats can have diverse functionalities and molecular modalities in the Firre locus and perhaps more globally in other lncRNAs. PMID:27009974

  1. Locus coeruleus syndrome as a complication of tectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Kronenburg, Annick; Spliet, Wim G; Broekman, Marike; Robe, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a 48-year-old woman who underwent a resection of a tectal pilocytic astrocytoma complicated by a sequence of fluctuating consciousness, psychosis with complex hallucinations and lasting sleeping disturbances in which she vividly acts out her dreams. Based on the clinical and anatomical evidence of this case, we propose the term locus coeruleus syndrome to describe this association of iatrogenic symptoms. Along with those of the locus coeruleus, lesions of the dorsal raphe nucleus, ventral tegmentum, substantia nigra pars compacta, the superior colliculus and other peduncular lesions (such as peduncular hallucinosis) are involved in the regulation of sleep-wake/arousal, behaviour, sleeping disorders and rapid eye movement atonia. However, iatrogenic lesion of the locus coeruleus could explain the complications on all levels in our patient. PMID:25903199

  2. Canadian drug regulatory framework.

    PubMed

    Kelly, L; Lazzaro, M; Petersen, C

    2007-03-01

    The role of regulatory drug submission evaluators in Canada is to critically assess both the data submitted and the sponsor's interpretation of the data in order to reach an evidence-, and context-based recommendation as to the potential benefits and potential harms (i.e., risks) associated with taking the drug under the proposed conditions of use. The purpose of this document is to outline the regulatory framework in which this assessment occurs, including: defining what "authorization to market a drug in Canada" means, in terms of the role of the sponsor, the responsibility of Health Canada in applying the Food and Drugs Act prior to and after marketing authorization, and the distinction between regulatory authorization versus physician authorization; highlighting organizational, process and legal factors within Health Canada related to authorization of clinical trials and authorization to market a drug; considerations during the review process, such as regulatory and scientific issues related to the drug, patient populations and trial designs; application of international guidelines, and decisions from other jurisdictions; regulatory realities regarding drug authorization, including the requirement for wording in the Product Monograph to accurately reflect the information currently available on the safe and effective use of a drug, and that hypothesis-confirming studies are essential to regulatory endorsement; current issues related to the review of therapies for dementia, such as assessing preventative treatments, and therapies that have symptomatic versus disease-modifying effects, statistical issues regarding missing data, and trial design issues. PMID:17469674

  3. Current status of IL-10 and regulatory T-cells in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Kristen L.; Blatner, Nichole R.; Gounari, Fotini; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Tumor growth elicits antigen-specific cytotoxic as well as immune suppressive responses. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a key immune-suppressive cytokine produced by regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and by helper T-cells (TH). Here we review pleiotropic functions of IL-10 that impact the immune pathology of cancer. Recent findings The role of IL-10 in cancer has become less certain with knowledge of its immune stimulatory functions. IL-10 is needed for T-helper cell functions, T-cell immune surveillance, and suppression of cancer-associated inflammation. By promoting tumor specific immune surveillance and hindering pathogenic inflammation IL-10 is emerging as a key cytokine in the battle of the host against cancer. Summary IL-10 functions at the cross roads of immune stimulation and immune suppression in cancer. Immunological mechanisms of action of IL-10 can be ultimately exploited to develop novel and effective cancer therapies. PMID:24076584

  4. Lessons from Domestication: Targeting Cis-Regulatory Elements for Crop Improvement.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Gwen; Goossens, Alain; Pauwels, Laurens

    2016-06-01

    Domestication of wild plant species has provided us with crops that serve our human nutritional needs. Advanced DNA sequencing has propelled the unveiling of underlying genetic changes associated with domestication. Interestingly, many changes reside in cis-regulatory elements (CREs) that control the expression of an unmodified coding sequence. Sequence variation in CREs can impact gene expression levels, but also developmental timing and tissue specificity of expression. When genes are involved in multiple pathways or active in several organs and developmental stages CRE modifications are favored in contrast to mutations in coding regions, due to the lack of detrimental pleiotropic effects. Therefore, learning from domestication, we propose that CREs are interesting targets for genome editing to create new alleles for plant breeding. PMID:26876195

  5. Bipartite Structure of the ade3 Locus of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Elizabeth W.

    1977-01-01

    Forty ade3 mutants were examined with respect to their growth requirements, levels of the tetrahydrofolate interconversion enzymes, and/or map positions. Four deletions were detected. Mutations that result in a requirement for adenine and histidine map in one region of the locus; those which result in a requirement for adenine only map in a quite separate region of the locus, a region not disclosed in previous studies. No correlation was observed between growth properties of the strains and enzyme levels. PMID:324867

  6. Neighborhood Vigilance, Health Locus of Control, and Smoking Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Reitzel, Lorraine R.; Lahoti, Sejal; Li, Yisheng; Cao, Yumei; Wetter, David W.; Waters, Andrew J.; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether health locus of control mediated relations of self-reported neighborhood vigilance and biochemically verified, continuous short-term smoking abstinence among 200 smokers enrolled in a cohort study. Methods A nonparametric bootstrapping procedure was used to assess mediation. Results Health locus of control-chance mediated relations between neighborhood vigilance and smoking abstinence in analyses adjusted for sociodemographics and tobacco dependence (p < .05). Greater vigilance was associated with greater attributions that health was affected by chance, which was associated with a lower likelihood of smoking abstinence. Conclusions Results suggest that neighborhood perceptions influence residents’ attributions for health outcomes, which can affect smoking abstinence. PMID:23985180

  7. Sequence-based Association Analysis Reveals an MGST1 eQTL with Pleiotropic Effects on Bovine Milk Composition

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohn, Mathew D.; Tiplady, Kathryn; Fink, Tania A.; Lehnert, Klaus; Lopdell, Thomas; Johnson, Thomas; Couldrey, Christine; Keehan, Mike; Sherlock, Richard G.; Harland, Chad; Scott, Andrew; Snell, Russell G.; Davis, Stephen R.; Spelman, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland is a prolific lipogenic organ, synthesising copious amounts of triglycerides for secretion into milk. The fat content of milk varies widely both between and within species, and recent independent genome-wide association studies have highlighted a milk fat percentage quantitative trait locus (QTL) of large effect on bovine chromosome 5. Although both EPS8 and MGST1 have been proposed to underlie these signals, the causative status of these genes has not been functionally confirmed. To investigate this QTL in detail, we report genome sequence-based imputation and association mapping in a population of 64,244 taurine cattle. This analysis reveals a cluster of 17 non-coding variants spanning MGST1 that are highly associated with milk fat percentage, and a range of other milk composition traits. Further, we exploit a high-depth mammary RNA sequence dataset to conduct expression QTL (eQTL) mapping in 375 lactating cows, revealing a strong MGST1 eQTL underpinning these effects. These data demonstrate the utility of DNA and RNA sequence-based association mapping, and implicate MGST1, a gene with no obvious mechanistic relationship to milk composition regulation, as causally involved in these processes. PMID:27146958

  8. An insight into pleiotropic regulators Agr and Sar: molecular probes paving the new way for antivirulent therapy.

    PubMed

    Arya, Rekha; Princy, S Adline

    2013-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is an intricate process involving a diverse array of extracellular proteins, biofilm and cell wall components that are coordinately expressed in different stages of infection. The expression of two divergent loci, agr and sar, is increasingly recognized as a key regulator of virulence in S. aureus, and there is mounting evidence for the role of these loci in staphylococcal infections. The functional agr regulon is critical for the production of virulence factors, including α, β and δ hemolysins. The sar locus encodes SarA protein, which regulates the expression of cell wall-associated and certain extracellular proteins in agr-dependent and agr-independent pathways. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world and its management, especially in community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections, has evolved comparatively little. In particular, no novel targets have been incorporated into its treatment to date. Hence, these loci appear to be the most significant and are currently at the attention of intense investigation regarding their therapeutic prospects. PMID:24059923

  9. Sequence-based Association Analysis Reveals an MGST1 eQTL with Pleiotropic Effects on Bovine Milk Composition.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Mathew D; Tiplady, Kathryn; Fink, Tania A; Lehnert, Klaus; Lopdell, Thomas; Johnson, Thomas; Couldrey, Christine; Keehan, Mike; Sherlock, Richard G; Harland, Chad; Scott, Andrew; Snell, Russell G; Davis, Stephen R; Spelman, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland is a prolific lipogenic organ, synthesising copious amounts of triglycerides for secretion into milk. The fat content of milk varies widely both between and within species, and recent independent genome-wide association studies have highlighted a milk fat percentage quantitative trait locus (QTL) of large effect on bovine chromosome 5. Although both EPS8 and MGST1 have been proposed to underlie these signals, the causative status of these genes has not been functionally confirmed. To investigate this QTL in detail, we report genome sequence-based imputation and association mapping in a population of 64,244 taurine cattle. This analysis reveals a cluster of 17 non-coding variants spanning MGST1 that are highly associated with milk fat percentage, and a range of other milk composition traits. Further, we exploit a high-depth mammary RNA sequence dataset to conduct expression QTL (eQTL) mapping in 375 lactating cows, revealing a strong MGST1 eQTL underpinning these effects. These data demonstrate the utility of DNA and RNA sequence-based association mapping, and implicate MGST1, a gene with no obvious mechanistic relationship to milk composition regulation, as causally involved in these processes. PMID:27146958

  10. A highly pleiotropic amino acid polymorphism in the Drosophila insulin receptor contributes to life-history adaptation.

    PubMed

    Paaby, Annalise B; Bergland, Alan O; Behrman, Emily L; Schmidt, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    Finding the specific nucleotides that underlie adaptive variation is a major goal in evolutionary biology, but polygenic traits pose a challenge because the complex genotype-phenotype relationship can obscure the effects of individual alleles. However, natural selection working in large wild populations can shift allele frequencies and indicate functional regions of the genome. Previously, we showed that the two most common alleles of a complex amino acid insertion-deletion polymorphism in the Drosophila insulin receptor show independent, parallel clines in frequency across the North American and Australian continents. Here, we report that the cline is stable over at least a five-year period and that the polymorphism also demonstrates temporal shifts in allele frequency concurrent with seasonal change. We tested the alleles for effects on levels of insulin signaling, fecundity, development time, body size, stress tolerance, and life span. We find that the alleles are associated with predictable differences in these traits, consistent with patterns of Drosophila life-history variation across geography that likely reflect adaptation to the heterogeneous climatic environment. These results implicate insulin signaling as a major mediator of life-history adaptation in Drosophila, and suggest that life-history trade-offs can be explained by extensive pleiotropy at a single locus. PMID:25319083

  11. On the Concept of Cis-regulatory Information: From Sequence Motifs to Logic Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpine, Ryan; Istrail, Sorin

    The regulatory genome is about the “system level organization of the core genomic regulatory apparatus, and how this is the locus of causality underlying the twin phenomena of animal development and animal evolution” (E.H. Davidson. The Regulatory Genome: Gene Regulatory Networks in Development and Evolution, Academic Press, 2006). Information processing in the regulatory genome is done through regulatory states, defined as sets of transcription factors (sequence-specific DNA binding proteins which determine gene expression) that are expressed and active at the same time. The core information processing machinery consists of modular DNA sequence elements, called cis-modules, that interact with transcription factors. The cis-modules “read” the information contained in the regulatory state of the cell through transcription factor binding, “process” it, and directly or indirectly communicate with the basal transcription apparatus to determine gene expression. This endowment of each gene with the information-receiving capacity through their cis-regulatory modules is essential for the response to every possible regulatory state to which it might be exposed during all phases of the life cycle and in all cell types. We present here a set of challenges addressed by our CYRENE research project aimed at studying the cis-regulatory code of the regulatory genome. The CYRENE Project is devoted to (1) the construction of a database, the cis-Lexicon, containing comprehensive information across species about experimentally validated cis-regulatory modules; and (2) the software development of a next-generation genome browser, the cis-Browser, specialized for the regulatory genome. The presentation is anchored on three main computational challenges: the Gene Naming Problem, the Consensus Sequence Bottleneck Problem, and the Logic Function Inference Problem.

  12. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Heterotic Trait Locus (HTL) Mapping Identifies Intra-Locus Interactions That Underlie Reproductive Hybrid Vigor in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Israel, Imri; Kilian, Benjamin; Nida, Habte; Fridman, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Identifying intra-locus interactions underlying heterotic variation among whole-genome hybrids is a key to understanding mechanisms of heterosis and exploiting it for crop and livestock improvement. In this study, we present the development and first use of the heterotic trait locus (HTL) mapping approach to associate specific intra-locus interactions with an overdominant heterotic mode of inheritance in a diallel population using Sorghum bicolor as the model. This method combines the advantages of ample genetic diversity and the possibility of studying non-additive inheritance. Furthermore, this design enables dissecting the latter to identify specific intra-locus interactions. We identified three HTLs (3.5% of loci tested) with synergistic intra-locus effects on overdominant grain yield heterosis in 2 years of field trials. These loci account for 19.0% of the heterotic variation, including a significant interaction found between two of them. Moreover, analysis of one of these loci (hDPW4.1) in a consecutive F2 population confirmed a significant 21% increase in grain yield of heterozygous vs. homozygous plants in this locus. Notably, two of the three HTLs for grain yield are in synteny with previously reported overdominant quantitative trait loci for grain yield in maize. A mechanism for the reproductive heterosis found in this study is suggested, in which grain yield increase is achieved by releasing the compensatory tradeoffs between biomass and reproductive output, and between seed number and weight. These results highlight the power of analyzing a diverse set of inbreds and their hybrids for unraveling hitherto unknown allelic interactions mediating heterosis. PMID:22761720

  14. Receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus

    DOEpatents

    Nasrallah, June B.; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Stein, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Described herein is a S receptor kinase gene (SRK), derived from the S locus in Brassica oleracea, having a extracellular domain highly similar to the secreted product of the S-locus glycoprotein gene.

  15. Coordinated forms of noradrenergic plasticity in the locus coeruleus and primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana Raquel O.; Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is plastic and represents the world according to the significance of sensory stimuli. However, cortical networks are embodied within complex circuits including neuromodulatory systems such as the noradrenergic locus coeruleus, providing information about internal state and behavioral relevance. While norepinephrine is important for cortical plasticity, it is unknown how modulatory neurons themselves respond to changes of sensory input. Here we examine how locus coeruleus neurons are modified by experience, and the consequences of locus coeruleus plasticity on cortical representations and sensory perception. We made whole-cell recordings from rat locus coeruleus and primary auditory cortex (AI), pairing sounds with locus coeruleus activation. Although initially unresponsive, locus coeruleus neurons developed and maintained auditory responses afterwards. Locus coeruleus plasticity induced changes in AI responses lasting at least hours and improved auditory perception for days to weeks. Our results demonstrate that locus coeruleus is highly plastic, leading to substantial changes in regulation of brain state by norepinephrine. PMID:26301326

  16. Seven novel mutations at the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase locus

    SciTech Connect

    Goyette, P.; Frosst, P.; Rosenblatt, D.S.; Rozen, R.

    1994-09-01

    5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a flavoprotein, catalyzes the conversion of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, a cofactor for methionine synthase in the methylation of homocysteine to methionine. Severe MTHFR deficiency, which causes homocysteinemia, is an autosomal recessive disorder with variable clinical features; developmental delay, perinatal death, mental retardation and asymptomatic individuals have been observed. A milder deficiency has been reported in patients with cardiovascular disease. We have recently described the isolation of a cDNA for MTHFR and the identification of 2 mutations in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. We report here the characterization of 7 additional mutations at this locus: 5 missense mutations and 2 splicing mutations. Mutation analysis was performed by SSCP on PCR products generated either from reverse transcription-PCR of patients` total fibroblast RNA or from PCR of patients` genomic DNA. The 5 missense mutations are as follows: 1 Arg to Cys substitution in a hydrophilic segment proposed to be the hinge region that connects the catalytic and regulatory domains, 2 different Arg to Cys substitutions in 2 patients whose enzymatic thermolability is responsive to FAD, 1 Thr to Met substitution affecting an evolutionarily-conserved residue and a Pro to Leu substitution. The 2 splicing mutations affect the 5{prime} splice site and the 3{prime} splice site of 2 introns, respectively. The 5{prime} splice site mutation generates a 57 bp in-frame deletion of the RNA through the utilization of a cryptic 5{prime} splice site within the coding sequence. The identification of 9 mutations at this locus has allowed us to make preliminary correlations between genotype and phenotype and to contribute to a structure:function analysis of the enzyme.

  17. Ink4-Arf locus in cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Sherr, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    Three tumor suppressor genes at the small (<50 kb) INK4-ARF (CDKN2A/B) locus on human chromosome 9p21 coordinate a signaling network that depends on the activities of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein and the p53 transcription factor. Disruption of this circuitry, frequently by codeletion of INK4-ARF, is a hallmark of cancer, begging the question of why the intimate genetic linkage of these tumor suppressor genes has been maintained in mammals despite the risk of their coinactivation. The INK4-ARF locus is not highly expressed under normal physiologic conditions in young mammals, but its induction becomes more pronounced as animals age. Notably, INK4-ARF is actively silenced en bloc in embryonic, fetal, and adult stem cells but becomes poised to respond to oncogenic stress signals as stem cells lose their self-renewal capacity and differentiate, thereby providing a potent barrier to tumor formation. Epigenetic remodeling of the locus as a whole provides a mechanism for coordinating the activities of RB and p53. A hypothesis is that the INK4-ARF locus may have evolved to physiologically restrict the self-renewal capacities and numbers of stem and progenitor cells with the attendant consequence of limiting tissue regenerative capacity, particularly as animals age. Deletion of INK4-ARF contributes to the aberrant self-renewal capacity of tumor cells and occurs frequently in many forms of human cancer. PMID:22960768

  18. Locus of Control and Human Capital Investment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cebi, Merve

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of teenagers' outlooks--specified as their locus of control--on educational attainment and labor market outcomes. I replicate the study of Coleman and DeLeire (2003) and test the predictions of their theoretical model using a different data set--National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The findings fail to…

  19. Relationship between Locus of Control and Health-Related Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graffeo, Lisa Cotlar; Silvestri, Lynette

    2006-01-01

    Locus of Control (LOC) deals with an individual's personal attribution of successful or failure. Those with internal LOC believe that events in their lives are under their personal control while individuals with external LOC feel that their lives are dominated by the environment. The theory has been applied to achievement and health-related issues…

  20. Should Farmers' Locus of Control Be Used in Extension?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuthall, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    To explore whether Farmers' Locus of Control (LOC) could be useful in agricultural extension programmes to improve managerial ability. This test records a farmer's belief in her/his control over production outcomes. A mail survey of 2300 New Zealand farmers was used to obtain a range of variables, and to measure their LOC using a question set…

  1. Changes in Perceived Locus of Control during Basic Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, Ross R., Jr.; Conway, Terry L.

    Basic Training (BT) is designed to prepare recruits for their new role as members of the military. The psychological effects of this experience can have important implications for recruits' later effectiveness in the military. Locus of control is one psychological construct which can be important for overall psychological and behavioral adaptation…

  2. Attitudes toward Nutrition, Locus of Control and Smoking Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfield, V. Kilian; And Others

    Research has shown that many behaviors previously thought to be purely psychological in origin do, in fact, have a physiological basis. To examine the relationship of smoking behavior to locus of control, and to attitudes toward, knowledge about, and behavior with respect to nutrition, 116 Canadian undergraduate students completed the Nutrition…

  3. Fetal Health Locus of Control Scale: Development and Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labs, Sharon M.; Wurtele, Sandy K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes development of the Fetal Health Locus of Control scale, the scale's utility in predicting maternal health-related behavior during pregnancy, normative data, and information on factor structure and internal consistency. Reports that cigarette and caffeine consumption during pregnancy, and women's intentions to participate in prepared…

  4. Comparison of Locus of Control with Levels of Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneipp, Karen B.; Gadzella, Bernadette M.

    This study was undertaken to determine whether external locus of control orientation was significantly negatively correlated with levels of creativity. Subjects were 13 male and 13 female undergraduate students enrolled in psychology classes at a southwestern university. Mean age of the subjects was 28.6. Instruments used were Levenson's (1972) I…

  5. Locus of Control of Reinforcement and Responsiveness to Social Influence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doctor, Ronald M.; Marziani, A. William

    Rotter's (1966) "control of reinforcement" construct is a dimension of belief or expectancy about the locus of reinforcing consequences for behavior. A generalized disposition is represented which ascribes reinforcement contingencies to either "external" (and, hence, uncontrollable) factors or to "internal" sources in which case the individual…

  6. Dimensions of Locus of Control: Impact of Early Educational Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Mark W.

    A study was conducted to: (1) assess the equivalence of the Nowicki Strickland Locus of Control Scale for Children, the Stephens-Delys Reinforcement Contingency Interview, and the Gruen-Korte-Stephens test and the construct validity of each; and (2) investigate the impact on IE of the open classroom Follow Through program sponsored by the…

  7. Locus of Control and Helplessness: Gender Differences among Bereaved Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinstein, Gidi

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated locus of control (LC) and hopelessness (H) among 25 pairs of bereaved parents, who lost their children in the Arab--Israeli conflict, and 25 pairs of demographically matched non-bereaved parents (mean age 53). Four of the 5 hypotheses were supported by results. LC was significantly more external and H was significantly…

  8. Children's Locus of Control and Intrinsically Motivated Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Patricia

    A study investigated the relationship between locus of control and intrinsically motivated reading for children. The entire sixth grade, totalling 53 students, of a parochial school in San Francisco was administered the Children's Nowicki-Strickland Internal-External Control Scale. A free-choice paperback reading rack provided the measure for…

  9. Inferring relationships between pairs of individuals from locus heterozygosities

    PubMed Central

    Presciuttini, Silvano; Toni, Chiara; Tempestini, Elena; Verdiani, Simonetta; Casarino, Lucia; Spinetti, Isabella; Stefano, Francesco De; Domenici, Ranieri; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E

    2002-01-01

    Background The traditional exact method for inferring relationships between individuals from genetic data is not easily applicable in all situations that may be encountered in several fields of applied genetics. This study describes an approach that gives affordable results and is easily applicable; it is based on the probabilities that two individuals share 0, 1 or both alleles at a locus identical by state. Results We show that these probabilities (zi) depend on locus heterozygosity (H), and are scarcely affected by variation of the distribution of allele frequencies. This allows us to obtain empirical curves relating zi's to H for a series of common relationships, so that the likelihood ratio of a pair of relationships between any two individuals, given their genotypes at a locus, is a function of a single parameter, H. Application to large samples of mother-child and full-sib pairs shows that the statistical power of this method to infer the correct relationship is not much lower than the exact method. Analysis of a large database of STR data proves that locus heterozygosity does not vary significantly among Caucasian populations, apart from special cases, so that the likelihood ratio of the more common relationships between pairs of individuals may be obtained by looking at tabulated zi values. Conclusions A simple method is provided, which may be used by any scientist with the help of a calculator or a spreadsheet to compute the likelihood ratios of common alternative relationships between pairs of individuals. PMID:12441003

  10. The Locus of the Focus of a Rolling Parabola

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Anurag; Marengo, James

    2010-01-01

    The catenary is usually introduced as the shape assumed by a hanging flexible cable. This is a "physical" description of a catenary. In this article we give a "geometrical" description of a catenary. Specifically we show that the catenary is the locus of the focus of a certain parabola as it rolls on the x-axis.

  11. The Influence of Locus of Control on Student Financial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, Sonya; Cumbie, Julie A.; Bell, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    Data on psychological influences of financial behaviors has not been well addressed in student populations, which is concerning given the high levels of general and financial stress experienced by college students. The findings of this study indicate that college students with an external locus of control exhibit the worst financial behaviors.…

  12. Relationship Among Locus of Control, Self-concept, and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Dennis M.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to replicate O'Leary, et al.'s previous findings (EJ 100 528) and to test the hypothesis that the correlation between Rotter's Locus of Control scale and the Taylor Manifest Anxiety scale was moderated by neuroticism and negativism toward self. (Author/RK)

  13. Dealing with Malfunction: Locus of Control in Web-Conferencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klebl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers how students deal with malfunctions that occur during the use of web conferencing systems in learning arrangements. In a survey among participants in online courses that make use of a web-conferencing system (N = 129), the relationship between a preference for internal or external locus of control and the perception of…

  14. Relationships among Impulsiveness, Locus of Control, Sex, and Music Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksza, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This study is an investigation of relationships among impulsiveness, locus of control, sex, observed practice behaviors, practice effectiveness, and self-reported practice habits in a sample of 40 college brass players. Practice effectiveness was defined by the amount of change in pretest and posttest performance achievement scores over one…

  15. Molecular genetic analysis of the Phaseolus vulgaris P locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bean market classes are distinguished by their many seed colors, patterns, and size. At least 23 genes, acting independently or in an epistatic manner, affect the seed coat color and pattern. The P locus which is described as the “ground factor” by Emerson, has multiple alleles and controls a...

  16. Marathon Group: Changes in Perceived Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foulds, Melvin L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen college students participated in a 24-hour marathon group and responded to the Internal-External Scale immediately before and after the experience. The results disclosed significant positive change at the .001 level in perceived locus of internal-external control of reinforcement expectancies in the direction of increased internality.…

  17. Exploring Learner Autonomy: Language Learning Locus of Control in Multilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peek, Ron

    2016-01-01

    By using data from an online language learning beliefs survey (n?=?841), defining language learning experience in terms of participants' multilingualism, and using a domain-specific language learning locus of control (LLLOC) instrument, this article examines whether more experienced language learners can also be seen as more autonomous language…

  18. Effect of Color-coding on Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, David M.; Dwyer, Francis M.

    This study examined the effects of color on information processing strategies of internal and external locus of control learners. Specific objectives were to: (1) examine the instructional effectiveness of two types of visualized instruction in facilitating achievement for students with different learning styles; (2) determine whether an…

  19. Job Satisfaction and Locus of Control in an Academic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stachowiak, Bonni J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored any relationships that existed between faculty members' locus of control and job satisfaction at a small, private, faith-based university. Two demographic variables were also analyzed in the findings: number of years teaching in higher education and tenure status. The job satisfaction instrument used was the Job in General…

  20. Affective Relationship, Locus of Control, and Imitative Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, A. J., Jr.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The effects of the affective relationship between a model and observer and locus of control on imitative behavior were investigated using a simple imitative task with 28 boys as subjects. Results indicated the need to control the affective relationship between model and observer and support Bandura's position that imitative behavior is primarily…

  1. Enhancer turnover and conserved regulatory function in vertebrate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Domené, Sabina; Bumaschny, Viviana F.; de Souza, Flávio S. J.; Franchini, Lucía F.; Nasif, Sofía; Low, Malcolm J.; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in regulatory regions including enhancers are an important source of variation and innovation during evolution. Enhancers can evolve by changes in the sequence, arrangement and repertoire of transcription factor binding sites, but whole enhancers can also be lost or gained in certain lineages in a process of turnover. The proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc), which encodes a prohormone, is expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus of all jawed vertebrates. We have previously described that hypothalamic Pomc expression in mammals is controlled by two enhancers—nPE1 and nPE2—that are derived from transposable elements and that presumably replaced the ancestral neuronal Pomc regulatory regions. Here, we show that nPE1 and nPE2, even though they are mammalian novelties with no homologous counterpart in other vertebrates, nevertheless can drive gene expression specifically to POMC neurons in the hypothalamus of larval and adult transgenic zebrafish. This indicates that when neuronal Pomc enhancers originated de novo during early mammalian evolution, the newly created cis- and trans-codes were similar to the ancestral ones. We also identify the neuronal regulatory region of zebrafish pomca and confirm that it is not homologous to the mammalian enhancers. Our work sheds light on the process of gene regulatory evolution by showing how a locus can undergo enhancer turnover and nevertheless maintain the ancestral transcriptional output. PMID:24218639

  2. Long-term pleiotropic effect of statins upon nitric oxide and C-reactive protein levels in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Bleda, S; De Haro, J; Florez, A; Varela, C; Esparza, L; Acin, F

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Peripheral arterial disease can be regarded as a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting the entire vascular system. In the early clinical stages, it is characterised by the deterioration of endothelial function, which does not progress with the development of the disease. This study analyses the pleiotropic effects upon the plasma nitrite and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in claudicating patients after 12 months of treatment with statins. Study design A prospective randomised controlled translational study was made in patients with Fontaine grade II ischaemia, treated with the best medical treatment with or without statins for 12 months from the time of diagnosis for assessing the pleiotropic effects of those statins. Methods Measurements of plasma high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP), lipid profile and nitrites were made at baseline and after 1 month and 1 year of treatment with atorvastatin 40 mg/day. Results A significant reduction in nitrite levels was observed after 1 month of treatment (11.8±7.8 μM vs 5.7±1.8 μM, p=0.0001), but this effect did not persist after 1 year (11.8±7.8 μM vs 9.4±8.9 μM, p=0.27). HsCRP underwent a significant reduction after both 1 month (7 (2.2–12) vs 3.4 (1.6–5.5), p<0.01) and 1 year of treatment with atorvastatin (7 (2.2–12) vs 2.25 (1.67–6.7), p=0.02). Statin treatment reduced hsCRP levels in 9.64 (95% CI (1.60 to 17.68)) after 1 month and in 9.14 (95% CI (0.18 to 18.47)) after 1 year. Conclusions The long-term biological pleiotropic effects of statins provide information on the role of endothelial function and systemic inflammation in the aetiopathogenesis of peripheral arterial disease. Statins slow endothelial degradation at the start of the disease, with no effects over the long term. These drug substances reduce progressive inflammation throughout the treatment period. This supports the novel hypothesis that endothelial dysfunction is only a disease-triggering phenomenon

  3. The Salmonella typhimurium mar locus: molecular and genetic analyses and assessment of its role in virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Sulavik, M C; Dazer, M; Miller, P F

    1997-01-01

    The marRAB operon is a regulatory locus that controls multiple drug resistance in Escherichia coli. marA encodes a positive regulator of the antibiotic resistance response, acting by altering the expression of unlinked genes. marR encodes a repressor of marRAB transcription and controls the production of MarA in response to environmental signals. A molecular and genetic study of the homologous operon in Salmonella typhimurium was undertaken, and the role of marA in virulence in a murine model was assessed. Expression of E. coli marA (marAEC) present on a multicopy plasmid in S. typhimurium resulted in a multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) phenotype, suggesting that a similar regulon exists in this organism. A genomic plasmid library containing S. typhimurium chromosomal sequences was introduced into an E. coli strain that was deleted for the mar locus and contained a single-copy marR'-'lacZ translational fusion. Plasmid clones that contained both S. typhimurium marR (marRSt) and marA (marASt) genes were identified as those that were capable of repressing expression of the fusion and which resulted in a Mar phenotype. The predicted amino acid sequences of MarRSt, MarASt, and MarBSt were 91, 86, and 42% identical, respectively, to the same genes from E. coli, while the operator/promoter region of the operon was 86% identical to the same 98-nucleotide-upstream region in E. coli. The marRAB transcriptional start sites for both organisms were determined by primer extension, and a marRABSt transcript of approximately 1.1 kb was identified by Northern blot analysis. Its accumulation was shown to be inducible by sodium salicylate. Open reading frames flanking the marRAB operon were also conserved. An S. typhimurium marA disruption strain was constructed by an allelic exchange method and compared to the wild-type strain for virulence in a murine BALB/c infection model. No effect on virulence was noted. The endogenous S. typhimurium plasmid that is associated with virulence

  4. Rationales for regulatory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Perhac, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    The author provides an outline which touches on the types of concerns about risk evaluation which are addressed in the process of establishing regulatory guides. Broadly he says regulatory activity serves three broad constituents: (1) Paternalism (private risk); (2) Promotion of social welfare (public risks); (3) Protection of individual rights (public risks). He then discusses some of the major issues encountered in reaching a decision on what is an acceptable level of risk within each of these areas, and how one establishes such a level.

  5. Locus of Control, Field Dependence, and Stress Reactivity in Young Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweibinz, Janet S.

    This study examined the potential relationships between locus of control, field dependence, and stress reactivity in a sample of young adult males (N=40). Locus of control, field dependence, and stress reactivity were measured by the Rotter Locus of Control Scale, the Embedded Figures Test, and the Life Events Survey, respectively. State stress…

  6. On the Locus Formed by the Maximum Heights of Projectile Motion with Air Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Saldana, H.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis on the locus formed by the set of maxima of the trajectories of a projectile launched in a medium with linear drag. Such a place, the locus of apexes, is written in terms of the Lambert "W" function in polar coordinates, confirming the special role played by this function in the problem. To characterize the locus, a study of…

  7. Locus of Control, Television Viewing, and Eating Disorder Symptomatology in Young Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouts, Gregory; Vaughan, Kimberley

    2002-01-01

    Assesses the effects of locus of control and television watching on eating disorder symptomatology in girls between the ages 10-17 years. Girls with an external locus of control had significantly greater eating disorder symptomatology. Girls who watched higher amounts of television and had an external locus of control had significantly greater…

  8. Reframing Student Affairs Leadership: An Analysis of Organizational Frames of Reference and Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tull, Ashley; Freeman, Jerrid P.

    2011-01-01

    Examined in this study were the identified frames of reference and locus of control used by 478 student affairs administrators. Administrator responses were examined to identify frames of reference most commonly used and their preference order. Locus of control most commonly used and the relationship between frames of reference and locus of…

  9. Development and Validation of the Health Locus of Control (HLC) Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallston, Barbara Strudler; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Health Locus of Control (HLC) Scale is an area-specific measure of expectancies regarding locus of control developed for prediction of health-related behavior. Two experiments show discriminant validity of the HLC in contrast with Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale. Normative data on the HLC are provided. (Author)

  10. Locus of Control and Attitude toward Eating in a Female College Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth-Marnat, Gary; Scumaker, Jack F.

    1988-01-01

    Investigated relationship between locus of control and attitude to food intake in 101 female college students. Results indicated that locus of control was unable to predict attitudes toward eating and fear of becoming overweight. Thesis that locus of control would be related to attitude toward food intake was not supported. (Author/NB)

  11. Antecedents and Correlates of Locus of Control in High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Wendy Segal

    This study dealt with the perceived parental attitudes of affection, physical contact, consistency-trust, security and perceived parental locus of control orientation as possible determinants of locus of control orientation in high school seniors. A second phase was concerned with the relationship of perceived parental locus of control orientation…

  12. Rasch Analysis of the Locus-of-Hope Scale. Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadiana, Leny G.; David, Adonis P.

    2015-01-01

    The Locus-of-Hope Scale (LHS) was developed as a measure of the locus-of-hope dimensions (Bernardo, 2010). The present study adds to the emerging literature on locus-of-hope by assessing the psychometric properties of the LHS using Rasch analysis. The results from the Rasch analyses of the four subscales of LHS provided evidence on the…

  13. A Study of Reward Preference in Taiwanese Gifted and Nongifted Students with Differential Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Su Chen; Elliott, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether gifted and nongifted students' preferences for different types of reward were affected by differential locus of control. In total, 181 gifted and 107 nongifted junior high school students in Taiwan participated. The Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale was used as a measure of locus of…

  14. Locus of Control in Offenders and Alleged Offenders with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Wendy; Leggett, Janice; Garrett, Tanya

    2007-01-01

    Locus of control can be a useful measure of treatment outcome in offenders from the general population. However, there is little information regarding locus of control and offenders with learning disabilities. Existing measures of locus of control use complex language and abstract ideas that may not be accessible to individuals in this group. A…

  15. On the Relation of Locus of Control and L2 Reading and Writing Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghonsooly, Behzad; Shirvan, Majid Elahi

    2011-01-01

    Locus of control, a psychological construct, has been the focus of attention in recent decades. Psychologists have discussed the effect of locus of control on achieving life goals in social/psychological interactions. While learning a foreign language involves both social interactions and psychological processes, the role and relation of locus of…

  16. A homologue of the tryptophan-rich sensory protein TspO and FixL regulate a novel nutrient deprivation-induced Sinorhizobium meliloti locus.

    PubMed

    Davey, M E; de Bruijn, F J

    2000-12-01

    A nutrient deprivation-induced locus in Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 1021 was identified by use of a Tn5-luxAB reporter gene transposon. The tagged locus is comprised of two open reading frames (ORFs) designated ndiA and ndiB for nutrient deprivation-induced genes A and B. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of both ndiA and ndiB to the protein databases failed to reveal similarity to any known genes. The expression of the ndi locus was found to be induced by carbon and nitrogen deprivation, osmotic stress, and oxygen limitation and during entry into stationary phase. To identify regulatory components involved in the control of ndi gene expression, a second round of mutagenesis was performed on the primary ndiB::Tn5-luxAB-tagged strain (C22) with transposon Tn1721. A double-mutant strain was obtained that lacked ndi locus transcriptional activity under all of the inducing conditions tested. The Tn1721-tagged gene showed a high degree of similarity to tryptophan-rich sensory protein TspO from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, as well as to mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor pK18 from mammals. Induction of the ndi::Tn5-luxAB reporter gene fusion was restored under all inducing conditions by introducing the tspO coding region, from either S. meliloti or R. sphaeroides, in trans. Furthermore, it was found that, in addition to tspO, fixL, which encodes the sensor protein of an oxygen-sensing two-component system, is required for full expression of the ndi locus, but only under low oxygen tension. PMID:11097914

  17. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes. PMID:27465215

  18. A Common Missense Variant in the Glucokinase Regulatory Protein Gene (GCKR) Is Associated with Increased Plasma Triglyceride and C-Reactive Protein but Lower Fasting Glucose Concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE-Using the genome-wide-association approach, we recently identified the glucokinase regulatory protein gene (GCKR, rs780094) region as a novel quantitative trait locus for plasma triglyceride concentration in Europeans. Here, we sought to study the association of GCKR variants with metaboli...

  19. Pleiotropic effects of the lpxM mutation in Yersinia pestis resulting in modification of the biosynthesis of major immunoreactive antigens.

    PubMed

    Feodorova, V A; Pan'kina, L N; Savostina, E P; Kuznetsov, O S; Konnov, N P; Sayapina, L V; Dentovskaya, S V; Shaikhutdinova, R Z; Ageev, S A; Lindner, B; Kondakova, A N; Bystrova, O V; Kocharova, N A; Senchenkova, S N; Holst, O; Pier, G B; Knirel, Y A; Anisimov, A P; Motin, V L

    2009-04-01

    Deletion mutants in the lpxM gene in two Yersinia pestis strains, the live Russian vaccine strain EV NIIEG and a fully virulent strain, 231, synthesise a less toxic penta-acylated lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Analysis of these mutants revealed they possessed marked reductions in expression and immunoreactivity of numerous major proteins and carbohydrate antigens, including F1, Pla, Ymt, V antigen, LPS, and ECA. Moreover, both mutants demonstrated altered epitope specificities of the antigens as determined in immunodot-ELISAs and immunoblotting analyses using a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The strains also differed in their susceptibility to the diagnostic plague bacteriophage L-413C. These findings indicate that the effects of the lpxM mutation on reduced virulence and enhanced immunity of the Y. pestis EV DeltalpxM is also associated with these pleiotropic changes and not just to changes in the lipid A acylation. PMID:19428838

  20. Pleiotropic effects of the lpxM mutation in Yersinia pestis resulting in modification of the biosynthesis of major immunoreactive antigens

    PubMed Central

    Feodorova, V.A.; Pan'kina, L.N.; Savostina, E.P.; Kuznetsov, O.S.; Konnov, N.P.; Sayapina, L.V.; Dentovskaya, S.V.; Shaikhutdinova, R.Z.; Ageev, S.A.; Lindner, B.; A.N.Kondakova; Bystrova, O.V.; Kocharova, N.A.; Senchenkova, S.N.; Holst, O.; Pier, G.B.; Knirel, Y.A.; Anisimov, A.P.; Motin, V.L.

    2010-01-01

    Deletion mutants in the lpxM gene in two Y. pestis strains, the live Russian vaccine strain EV NIIEG and a fully virulent strain, 231, synthesise a less toxic penta-acylated lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Analysis of these mutants revealed they possessed marked reductions in expression and immunoreactivity of numerous major proteins and carbohydrate antigens, including F1, Pla, Ymt, V antigen, LPS, and ECA. Moreover, both mutants demonstrated altered epitope specificities of the antigens as determined in immunodot-ELISAs and immunoblotting analyses using a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The strains also differed in their susceptibility to the diagnostic plague bacteriophage L-413C. These findings indicate that the effects of the lpxM mutation on reduced virulence and enhanced immunity of the Y. pestis EV ΔlpxM is also associated with these pleiotropic changes and not just to changes in the lipid A acylation. PMID:19428838

  1. The Relative Abundance of Oxygen Alkyl-Related Groups in Aliphatic Domains Is Involved in the Main Pharmacological-Pleiotropic Effects of Humic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Vashishta, Aruna; Fuentes, Marta; Baigorri, Roberto; Garcia-Mina, Jose M.; Yvin, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Despite the rather common presence of humic acid (HA), our full knowledge of its biological effect is still lacking. In this article, we first performed a physicochemical characterization of several HAs, and next, we evaluated their ability to affect interleukin-2 secretion, antibody secretion, wound healing (an in vitro model using HaCaT cells), cancer growth (the Lewis lung carcinoma model), and protection against hepatotoxicity. In all tested reactions, HA showed significant stimulation on immune reactions, including suppression of cancer growth and inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatotoxicity. These effects were dependent on its chemical properties. The pleiotropic effects of HA observed in this article suggest the possible role of these compounds in human nutrition. PMID:23875902

  2. A Burkholderia pseudomallei Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator-Like Protein Has Rapamycin-Inhibitable Peptidylprolyl Isomerase Activity and Pleiotropic Effects on Virulence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Norville, Isobel H.; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Harding, Sarah V.; Fischer, Gunter; Keith, Karen E.; Brown, Katherine A.; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Titball, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage infectivity potentiators (Mips) are a group of virulence factors encoded by pathogenic bacteria such as Legionella, Chlamydia, and Neisseria species. Mips are part of the FK506-binding protein (FKBP) family, whose members typically exhibit peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) activity which is inhibitable by the immunosuppressants FK506 and rapamycin. Here we describe the identification and characterization of BPSS1823, a Mip-like protein in the intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei. Recombinant BPSS1823 protein has rapamycin-inhibitable PPIase activity, indicating that it is a functional FKBP. A mutant strain generated by deletion of BPSS1823 in B. pseudomallei exhibited a reduced ability to survive within cells and significant attenuation in vivo, suggesting that BPSS1823 is important for B. pseudomallei virulence. In addition, pleiotropic effects were observed with a reduction in virulence mechanisms, including resistance to host killing mechanisms, swarming motility, and protease production. PMID:21859853

  3. 4-(1-Ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide – A new pleiotropic HDAC inhibitor targeting cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal organisation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahal, Katharina; Kahlen, Philip; Biersack, Bernhard; Schobert, Rainer

    2015-08-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) which play a crucial role in cancer cell proliferation are promising drug targets. However, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) modelled on natural hydroxamic acids such as trichostatin A frequently lead to resistance or even an increased agressiveness of tumours. As a workaround we developed 4-(1-ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide (etacrox), a hydroxamic acid that combines HDAC inhibition with synergistic effects of the 4,5-diarylimidazole residue. Etacrox proved highly cytotoxic against a panel of metastatic and resistant cancer cell lines while showing greater specificity for cancer over non-malignant cells when compared to the approved HDACi vorinostat. Like the latter, etacrox and the closely related imidazoles bimacroxam and animacroxam acted as pan-HDACi yet showed some specificity for HDAC6. Akt signalling and interference with nuclear beta-catenin localisation were elicited by etacrox at lower concentrations when compared to vorinostat. Moreover, etacrox disrupted the microtubule and focal adhesion dynamics of cancer cells and inhibited the proteolytic activity of prometastatic and proangiogenic matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, etacrox acted strongly antimigratory and antiinvasive against various cancer cell lines in three-dimensional transwell invasion assays and also antiangiogenic in vivo with respect to blood vessel formation in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. These pleiotropic effects and its water-solubility and tolerance by mice render etacrox a promising new HDACi candidate. - Graphical abstract: A novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with pleiotropic anticancer effects. - Highlights: • Etacrox is a new HDACi with cytotoxic, antiangiogenic and antiinvasive activity. • Etacrox causes aberrant cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal reorganisation. • Pro-metastatic and angiogenic matrix metalloproteinases are inhibited by etacrox. • Etacrox impairs blood vessel maturation in vivo and cancer cell

  4. Pleiotropic effects of sitagliptin versus voglibose in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled via diet and/or a single oral antihyperglycemic agent: a multicenter, randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Yukiko; Takeshita, Yumie; Kita, Yuki; Otoda, Toshiki; Kato, Ken-ichiro; Toyama-Wakakuri, Hitomi; Akahori, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Akiko; Hamaguchi, Erika; Nishimura, Yasuyuki; Kanamori, Takehiro; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Toshinari

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A step-up strategy for diet therapy and/or single oral antihyperglycemic agent (OHA) regimens has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a primary end point, and the pleiotropic effects on metabolic and cardiovascular parameters as secondary end points, of sitagliptin versus voglibose in patients with type 2 diabetes with inadequate glycemic control while on diet therapy and/or treatment with a single OHA. Methods In this multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group trial, a total of 260 patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes (HbA1c levels >6.9%) were randomly assigned to receive either sitagliptin (50 mg, once daily) or voglibose (0.6 mg, thrice daily) for 12 weeks. The primary end point was HbA1c levels. Results Patients receiving sitagliptin showed a significantly greater decrease in HbA1c levels (−0.78±0.69%) compared with those receiving voglibose (−0.30±0.78%). Sitagliptin treatment also lowered serum alkaline phosphatase levels and increased serum creatinine, uric acid, cystatin-C and homeostasis model assessment-β values. Voglibose increased low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and altered serum levels of several fatty acids, and increased Δ-5 desaturase activity. Both drugs increased serum adiponectin. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was significantly lower in the sitagliptin group, due to the decreased incidence of gastrointestinal AEs. Conclusions Sitagliptin shows superior antihyperglycemic effects compared with voglibose as a first-line or second-line therapy. However, both agents possess unique pleiotropic effects that lead to reduced cardiovascular risk in Japanese people with type 2 diabetes. Trial registration number UMIN 000003503. PMID:27110370

  5. [PLEIOTROPIC EFFECTS OF GIBBERELLIN-SENSITIVE AND GIBBERELLIN-INSENSITIVE DWARFING GENES IN COMMON WHEAT OF THE SOUTHERN STEP REGION OF BLACK SEA].

    PubMed

    Chebotar, G A; Chebotar, S V; Motsnyy, I I

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of the pleiotropic effects of GA-sensitive (Rht8) and GA-insensitive (Rht-B1, Rht-D1) dwarfing genes and a gene that determines the response of plants to photoperiod--Ppd-D1 were carried out for three years in the southern step region of Black Sea bank on five different genetic backgrounds. It is shown that in addition to direct effects on plant height GA-sensitive and GA-insensitive dwarfing genes have pleiotropic effects on all studied traits except the number of fertile spikelets. Presence of the dwarfing genes in the genotype of tall forms led to the decrease of stem and ear length, and at the same time to the increase of ear density. The number of spikelets per spike decreased due to sterile spikelets, whereas the number of fertile spikelets did not change. There was a significant increase in the number of grains per ear as a result of increasing of spikelets in ears. The number and weight of grains did not decrease, even though the plants were characterized by a smaller number of productive stems. The presence of Rht8x allele on genetic background of variety Stepnyak resulted in a significant decrease of plants productivity. However, in combination with Ppd-D1a allele plants with Rht8x increased the potential productivity, and surpassed the parental form (Rht8a Ppd-D1b). The presence of Rht-B1e allele resulted in reduction of grain mass per spike and 1000-grain weight, increase of l/h, and left the number of grains per spike stable in comparison with Rht8c. PMID:27266182

  6. α-Linolenic Acid, A Nutraceutical with Pleiotropic Properties That Targets Endogenous Neuroprotective Pathways to Protect against Organophosphate Nerve Agent-Induced Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Piermartiri, Tetsade; Pan, Hongna; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Marini, Ann M

    2015-01-01

    α-Linolenic acid (ALA) is a nutraceutical found in vegetable products such as flax and walnuts. The pleiotropic properties of ALA target endogenous neuroprotective and neurorestorative pathways in brain and involve the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a major neuroprotective protein in brain, and downstream signaling pathways likely mediated via activation of TrkB, the cognate receptor of BDNF. In this review, we discuss possible mechanisms of ALA efficacy against the highly toxic OP nerve agent soman. Organophosphate (OP) nerve agents are highly toxic chemical warfare agents and a threat to military and civilian populations. Once considered only for battlefield use, these agents are now used by terrorists to inflict mass casualties. OP nerve agents inhibit the critical enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that rapidly leads to a cholinergic crisis involving multiple organs. Status epilepticus results from the excessive accumulation of synaptic acetylcholine which in turn leads to the overactivation of muscarinic receptors; prolonged seizures cause the neuropathology and long-term consequences in survivors. Current countermeasures mitigate symptoms and signs as well as reduce brain damage, but must be given within minutes after exposure to OP nerve agents supporting interest in newer and more effective therapies. The pleiotropic properties of ALA result in a coordinated molecular and cellular program to restore neuronal networks and improve cognitive function in soman-exposed animals. Collectively, ALA should be brought to the clinic to treat the long-term consequences of nerve agents in survivors. ALA may be an effective therapy for other acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26569216

  7. Overexpression of Ipe protein from the coliphage mEp021 induces pleiotropic effects involving haemolysis by HlyE-containing vesicles and cell death.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Peñafiel, Eva; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Ishida, Cecilia; Reyes-Cortés, Ruth; Sepúlveda-Robles, Omar; Guarneros-Peña, Gabriel; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María; Kameyama, Luis

    2012-06-01

    Lysogenic Escherichia coli K-12 harbouring the prophage mEp021 displays haemolytic activity. From a genomic library of mEp021, we identified an open reading frame (ORF 4) that was responsible for the haemolytic activity. However, the ORF 4 sequence contains four initiation codons in the same frame: ORF 4.1-ORF 4.4, coding for 83-a.a., 82-a.a., 77-a.a. and 72-a.a. products, respectively. The expression of the cloned ORF 4.3, or inducer of pleiotropic effects (ipe), reproduced the haemolytic phenotype in a native strain carrying the gene hlyE(+), but not in the mutant hlyE(-) strain. The overexpression of Ipe induced several pleiotropic effects, such as the inhibition of cell growth and the deregulation of cell division, which resulted in a mixture of normal and desiccated-like cells: normal-filamentous, desiccated-like-filamentous bacilli, minicells etc. Other effects included abnormalities of the cell membrane, the production of vesicles containing HlyE, and finally, cell death. These events were analysed at the molecular level by microarray assays. The global transcription profile of E. coli K-12 strain MC4100, which expressed Ipe after 4 h, revealed differential expression of various genes, most of which were related either to cell membrane and murein biosynthesis or to cell division. The up-regulation of some of these transcripts was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Additional research is needed to determine whether these effects are directly related to Ipe activity or are consequences of the cellular responses to putative structural damage induced by Ipe. PMID:22365985

  8. Toxicogenomics in Regulatory Ecotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential utility of toxicogenomics in toxicological research and regulatory activities has been the subject of scientific discussions, and as with any new technology, there is a wide range of opinion. The purpose of this feature article is to consider roles of toxicogenomic...

  9. The regulatory horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, ED

    1987-01-01

    The author briefly discusses the FAA's position as it relates to cockpit resource management. For example, if Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) is a positive concept, why isn't everyone required to implement it? The regulatory practice of the FAA is discussed and questions and answers are presented.

  10. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  11. REFINE WETLAND REGULATORY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tribes will work toward refining a regulatory program by taking a draft wetland conservation code with permitting incorporated to TEB for review. Progress will then proceed in developing a permit tracking system that will track both Tribal and fee land sites within reservati...

  12. REGULATORY AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appendix W to 40CFR Part 51 (Guideline on Air Quality Models) specifies the models to be used for purposes of permitting, PSD, and SIPs. Through a formal regulatory process this modeling guidance is periodically updated to reflect current science. In the most recent action, thr...

  13. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This document is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considered action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  14. NRC regulatory agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This document provides a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  15. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This document compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rule making which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter.

  16. A meta-analytic examination of work and general locus of control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Bowling, Nathan A; Eschleman, Kevin J

    2010-07-01

    The current meta-analysis examined the hypothesized consequences of work and general locus of control. As expected, work locus of control generally yielded stronger relationships with work-related criteria (e.g., job satisfaction, affective commitment, and burnout) than general locus of control. We also found some evidence that general locus of control yielded relatively stronger relationships with general criteria (e.g., life satisfaction, affective commitment, and burnout). Regression analysis found several unique effects for both work and general locus of control. PMID:20604595

  17. Stress-induced expression of NICOTINE2-locus genes and their homologs encoding Ethylene Response Factor transcription factors in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Tsubasa; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Plants have evolved diverse defense metabolites as adaptations to biotic and abiotic stresses. The defense alkaloid nicotine is produced in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) and its biosynthesis is elicited by jasmonates in the roots. At least seven jasmonate-responsive genes that encode transcription factors of the Ethylene Response Factor (ERF) family are clustered at the nicotine-regulatory locus NICOTINE2 (NIC2) in the tobacco genome. A subset of the NIC2-locus ERFs and their homologs, including ERF189 and ERF199, have been shown to be most effective in controlling nicotine biosynthetic pathway genes. Herein reported is that the ERF genes of this group, other than ERF189 and ERF199, were strongly induced by NaCl in tobacco hairy roots, although salt stress had no effect on expression of nicotine biosynthesis genes. Abscisic acid and osmotic stress also increased expression of a subset of these NaCl-inducible ERF genes. Promoter expression analysis in transgenic tobacco hairy roots confirmed that while methyl jasmonate (MJ) activated the promoters of ERF29, ERF210 and ERF199, salt stress up-regulated the promoters of only ERF29 and ERF210, but not ERF199. The protein biosynthesis inhibitor cycloheximide induced expression of the ERFs, and simultaneous addition of MJ and cycloheximide showed synergistic effects. These results indicate that, after several gene duplication events, the NIC2-locus ERFs and possibly their homologs appear to have diverged in their responses to jasmonates and various environmental inputs, including salt stress, and may have evolved to regulate distinct metabolic processes and cellular responses. PMID:24947337

  18. The Gpr1/Zdbf2 locus provides new paradigms for transient and dynamic genomic imprinting in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Duffié, Rachel; Ajjan, Sophie; Greenberg, Maxim V.; Zamudio, Natasha; Escamilla del Arenal, Martin; Iranzo, Julian; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Barbaux, Sandrine; Fauque, Patricia; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2014-01-01

    Many loci maintain parent-of-origin DNA methylation only briefly after fertilization during mammalian development: Whether this form of transient genomic imprinting can impact the early embryonic transcriptome or even have life-long consequences on genome regulation and possibly phenotypes is currently unknown. Here, we report a maternal germline differentially methylated region (DMR) at the mouse Gpr1/Zdbf2 (DBF-type zinc finger-containing protein 2) locus, which controls the paternal-specific expression of long isoforms of Zdbf2 (Liz) in the early embryo. This DMR loses parental specificity by gain of DNA methylation at implantation in the embryo but is maintained in extraembryonic tissues. As a consequence of this transient, tissue-specific maternal imprinting, Liz expression is restricted to the pluripotent embryo, extraembryonic tissues, and pluripotent male germ cells. We found that Liz potentially functions as both Zdbf2-coding RNA and cis-regulatory RNA. Importantly, Liz-mediated events allow a switch from maternal to paternal imprinted DNA methylation and from Liz to canonical Zdbf2 promoter use during embryonic differentiation, which are stably maintained through somatic life and conserved in humans. The Gpr1/Zdbf2 locus lacks classical imprinting histone modifications, but analysis of mutant embryonic stem cells reveals fine-tuned regulation of Zdbf2 dosage through DNA and H3K27 methylation interplay. Together, our work underlines the developmental and evolutionary need to ensure proper Liz/Zdbf2 dosage as a driving force for dynamic genomic imprinting at the Gpr1/Zdbf2 locus. PMID:24589776

  19. Nonsense mutation in the regulatory gene ETH2 involved in methionine biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cervisiae.

    PubMed

    Masselot, M; Robichon-Szulmajster, H

    1972-08-01

    Ethionine-resistant mutants, mapping at the locus eth2-the product of which is involved in pleiotropic regulation of methionine biosynthesis-have been isolated in a strain carrying five ochre nonsense mutations. Selection for nonsense suppressors in such a strain led to characterization of several allele-specific but gene non-specific suppressors which are active on the recessive heteroallele eth2-2 (resulting in partial recovery of sensitivity toward ethionine) as well as on the five other suppressible alleles. Two of these suppressors are unlinked to the eth2 gene and either dominant or semi-dominant. It is concluded that the mutation eth2-2 resulted in a nonsense codon. Enzyme studies indicate that this mutation results in a complete absence of an active product of gene eth2, in contrast with the effect of a former mutation eth2-1 which was interpreted as leading to a modified product of this gene (Cherest, Surdin-Kerjan and de Robichon-Szulmajster 1971). This conclusion is based on the absence of repressibility of methionine group I enzymes and the observation that in a heteroallelic diploid, eth2-1 expression is not masked by eth2-2. The nonsense suppressors studied lead to at least partial recovery of repressibility of methionine group I enzymes. All these results support the idea that the product of gene ETH2 is an aporepressor protein. PMID:4560067

  20. Toxicogenomics and the Regulatory Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicogenomics presents regulatory agencies with the opportunity to revolutionize their analyses by enabling the collection of information on a broader range of responses than currently considered in traditional regulatory decision making. Analyses of genomic responses are expec...

  1. Refined localization of the Prieto-syndrome locus

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, F.; Prieto, F.; Gal, A.

    1996-07-12

    PRS designates the locus for a syndromal form of X-linked mental retardation (Prieto syndrome) characterized by minor facial anomalies, ear malformation, abnormal growth of teeth, clinodactyly, sacral dimple, patellar luxation, malformation of lower limbs, abnormalities of the fundus of the eye, and subcortical cerebral atrophy. Linkage analysis localized the disease locus between DXS84 (Xp21.1) and DXS255. Here we present additional linkage data that provide further support and refinement of this localization. Individual III-18 gave birth to a male, currently aged 2 7/12 years, who clearly shows delayed psychomotor development. He began to walk at 23 months and his speech is delayed. In addition, he shows the characteristic facial anomalies, {open_quotes}dysplastic{close_quotes} ears, sacral dimple, and clinodactyly, as do all other affected males in this family. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Cross-species identification of Mendel's I locus.

    PubMed

    Armstead, Ian; Donnison, Iain; Aubry, Sylvain; Harper, John; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; James, Caron; Mani, Jan; Moffet, Matt; Ougham, Helen; Roberts, Luned; Thomas, Ann; Weeden, Norman; Thomas, Howard; King, Ian

    2007-01-01

    A key gene involved in plant senescence, mutations of which partially disable chlorophyll catabolism and confer stay-green leaf and cotyledon phenotypes, has been identified in Pisum sativum, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Festuca pratensis by using classical and molecular genetics and comparative genomics. A stay-green locus in F. pratensis is syntenically equivalent to a similar stay-green locus on rice chromosome 9. Functional testing in Arabidopsis of a homolog of the rice candidate gene revealed (i) senescence-associated gene expression and (ii) a stay-green phenotype after RNA interference silencing. Genetic mapping in pea demonstrated cosegregation with the yellow/green cotyledon polymorphism (I/i) first reported by Gregor Mendel in 1866. PMID:17204643

  3. Teacher psychological needs, locus of control and engagement.

    PubMed

    Betoret, Fernando Doménech

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relationships among psychological needs, locus of control and engagement in a sample of 282 Spanish secondary school teachers. Nine teacher needs were identified based on the study of Bess (1977) and on the Self-Determination Theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985, 2000, 2002). Self-report questionnaires were used to measure the construct selected for this study and their interrelationships were examined by conducting hierarchical regression analyses. An analysis of teacher responses using hierarchical regression reveals that psychological needs have significant positive effects on the three engagement dimensions (vigor, dedication and absorption). Furthermore, the results show the moderator role played by locus of control in the relationship between teacher psychological needs and the so-called core of engagement (vigor and dedication). Finally, practical implications are discussed. PMID:23866223

  4. The locus of microRNA-10b

    PubMed Central

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary microRNA research has led to significant advances in our understanding of the process of tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs participate in different events of a cancer cell’s life, through their ability to target hundreds of putative transcripts involved in almost every cellular function, including cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation. The relevance of these small molecules is even more evident in light of the emerging linkage between their expression and both prognosis and clinical outcome of many types of human cancers. This identifies microRNAs as potential therapeutic modifiers of cancer phenotypes. From this perspective, we overview here the miR-10b locus and its involvement in cancer, focusing on its role in the establishment (miR-10b*) and spreading (miR-10b) of breast cancer. We conclude that targeting the locus of microRNA 10b holds great potential for cancer treatment. PMID:23839045

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  6. Functional overlap in the cis-acting regulation of the V(D)J recombination at the TCRβ locus

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Bernard; Mahowald, Grace; Khor, Katrina; Sleckman, Barry P.

    2009-01-01

    The second exon of lymphocyte antigen receptor genes is assembled in developing lymphocytes from component V, J and, in some cases, D gene segments through the process of V(D)J recombination. This process is initiated by an endonuclease comprised of the Rag-1 and Rag-2 proteins, collectively referred to as Rag. Rag binds to recombination signals (RSs) and catalyzes the pair-wise introduction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) at recombining gene segments. DNA cleavage by Rag is restricted both by intrinsic features of RSs, as well as the activity of other cis-acting elements, such as promoters and enhancers that regulate the accessibility of gene segments to Rag. In the TCRβ locus, accessibility of the Dβ1-Jβ1 gene segment cluster relies on the function of an enhancer, Eβ, and a promoter, PDβ1. Here we demonstrate that deletion of a small genomic region containing 5 of the 6 Jβ1 gene segments, but no known transcriptional regulatory elements, leads to a marked decrease in transcription and rearrangements involving the Dβ1 and Jβ1.1 gene segments. Surprisingly, point mutations in the RS of the Jβ1.1 gene segment not only impact Rag cleavage, but also lead to diminished transcription through the Dβ1-Jβ1 gene segment cluster. Our findings demonstrate that cis-acting elements that regulate transcription and accessibility of the TCRβ locus may functionally overlap with RS sequences, which are known primarily to direct Rag-mediated cleavage. PMID:19070901

  7. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait-gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species. PMID:26637433

  8. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B.; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait–gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species. PMID:26637433

  9. Disruption of the Hbs1l-Myb locus causes hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mikiko; Yamazaki, Hiromi; Mukai, Harumi Y; Motohashi, Hozumi; Shi, Lihong; Tanabe, Osamu; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-04-01

    The human β-globin locus is comprised of embryonic, fetal, and adult globin genes, each of which is expressed at distinct stages of pre- and postnatal development. Functional defects in globin proteins or expression results in mild to severe anemia, such as in sickle-cell disease or β-thalassemia, but the clinical symptoms of both disorders are ameliorated by persistent expression of the fetal globin genes. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified the intergenic region between the HBS1L and MYB loci as a candidate modifier of fetal hemoglobin expression in adults. However, it remains to be clarified whether the enhancer activity within the HBS1L-MYB regulatory domain contributes to the production of fetal hemoglobin in adults. Here we report a new mouse model of hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) in which a transgene was randomly inserted into the orthologous murine Hbs1l-Myb locus. This mutant mouse exhibited typically elevated expression of embryonic globins and hematopoietic parameters similar to those observed in human HPFH. These results support the contention that mutation of the HBS1L-MYB genomic domain is responsible for elevated expression of the fetal globin genes, and this model serves as an important means for the analysis of networks that regulate fetal globin gene expression. PMID:23428869

  10. Disruption at the PTCHD1 locus on Xp22.11 in autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Abdul; Whibley, Annabel; Marshall, Christian R.; Gianakopoulos, Peter J.; Piton, Amelie; Carson, Andrew R.; Orlic-Milacic, Marija; Lionel, Anath; Sato, Daisuke; Pinto, Dalila; Drmic, Irene; Noakes, Carolyn; Senman, Lili; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Mo, Rong; Gauthier, Julie; Crosbie, Jennifer; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Munson, Jeffrey; Estes, Annette M.; Fiebig, Andreas; Franke, Andre; Schreiber, Stefan; Stewart, Alexandre F.R.; Roberts, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Guter, Stephen J.; Cook, Edwin H.; Dawson, Geraldine; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Battaglia, Agatino; Maestrini, Elena; Jeng, Linda; Hutchison, Terry; Rajcan-Separovic, Evica; Chudley, Albert E.; Lewis, Suzanne M.E.; Liu, Xudong; Holden, Jeanette; Fernandez, Bridget; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bryson, Susan E.; Roberts, Wendy; Szatmari, Peter; Gallagher, Louise; Stratton, Michael R.; Gecz, Jozef; Brady, Angela F.; Schwartz, Charles E.; Schachar, Russell J.; Monaco, Anthony P.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Hui, Chi-chung; Raymond, F. Lucy; Scherer, Stephen W.; Vincent, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a common neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex mode of inheritance. It is one of the most highly heritable of the complex disorders, however, the underlying genetic factors remain largely unknown. Here, we report mutations in the X-chromosome PTCHD1 (patched-related) gene, in seven families with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in three families with intellectual disability (ID). A 167 Kb microdeletion spanning exon 1 was found in two brothers, one with ASD the other with learning disability and ASD features, and a 90 Kb microdeletion spanning the entire gene was found in three males with ID in a second family. In 900 ASD and 208 ID male probands we identified seven different missense changes in eight probands, all male and inherited from unaffected mothers, and not found in controls. Two of the ASD individuals with missense changes also carried a de novo deletion at another ASD-susceptibility locus (DPYD and DPP6), suggesting complex genetic contributions. In additional males with ASD, we identified deletions in the 5’ flanking region of PTCHD1 disrupting a complex non-coding RNA and potential regulatory elements; equivalent changes were not found in male control individuals (p=1.2 ×10-5). Systematic screening at PTCHD1 and 5’-flanking regions, suggests involvement of this locus in ~1% of ASD and ID individuals. PMID:20844286

  11. Infectious delivery and expression of a 135 kb human FRDA genomic DNA locus complements Friedreich's ataxia deficiency in human cells.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Sebastian, Silvia; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Diaz-Nido, Javier; Lim, Filip; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2007-02-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive ataxia, affecting 1-2 in 50,000 Caucasians, and there is currently no effective cure or treatment. FA results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial protein frataxin brought about by a repeat expansion in intron 1 of the FRDA gene. The main areas affected are the central nervous system (particularly the spinocerebellar system) and cardiac tissue. Therapies aimed at alleviating the neurological degeneration have proved unsuccessful to date. Here, we describe the construction and delivery of high capacity herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors expressing the entire 80 kb FRDA genomic locus, driven by the endogenous FRDA promoter and including all introns and flanking regulatory sequences within a 135 kb genomic DNA insert. FA patient primary fibroblasts deficient in frataxin protein and exhibiting sensitivity to oxidative stress were transduced at high efficiency by FRDA genomic locus vectors. Following vector transduction, expression of FRDA protein by immunofluorescence was shown. Finally, functional complementation studies demonstrated restoration of the wild-type cellular phenotype in response to oxidative stress in transduced FA patient cells. These results suggest the potential of the infectious bacterial artificial chromosome-FRDA vectors for gene therapy of FA. PMID:17235301

  12. High-resolution mapping of the X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    PubMed Central

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Browne, D.; Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Becker, H. W.; Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S.; Davies, K. P.; Clarke, A.; Thomas, N. S. T.

    1992-01-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. We have extended our previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009–.075. Multipoint analyses gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci could be inferred from a human/rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosities of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that cosegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXS732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. PMID:1357963

  13. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    PubMed

    Gambón-Deza, F; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Magadán-Mompó, S

    2009-08-01

    Immunoglobulins loci in mammals are well known to be organized within a translocon, however their origin remains unresolved. Four of the five classes of immunoglobulins described in humans and rodents (immunoglobulins M, G, E and A-IgM, IgG, IgE and IgA) were found in marsupials and monotremes (immunoglobulin D-IgD was not found) thus showing that the genomic structure of antibodies in mammals has remained constant since its origin. We have recently described the genomic organization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in reptiles (IGHM, IGHD and IGHY). These data and the characterization of the IGH locus in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), allow us to elucidate the changes that took place in this genomic region during evolution from reptile to mammal. Thus, by using available genome data, we were able to detect that platypus IGH locus contains reptilian and mammalian genes. Besides having an IGHD that is very similar to the one in reptiles and an IGHY, they also present the mammal specific antibody genes IGHG and IGHE, in addition to IGHA. We also detected a pseudogene that originated by recombination between the IGHD and the IGHM (similar to the IGHD2 found in Eublepharis macularius). The analysis of the IGH locus in platypus shows that IGHY was duplicated, firstly by evolving into IGHE and then into IGHG. The IGHA of the platypus has a complex origin, and probably arose by a process of recombination between the IGHM and the IGHY. We detected about 44 VH genes (25 were already described), most of which comprise a single group. When we compared these VH genes with those described in Anolis carolinensis, we find that there is an evolutionary relationship between the VH genes of platypus and the reptilian Group III genes. These results suggest that a fast VH turnover took place in platypus and this gave rise to a family with a high VH gene number and the disappearance of the earlier VH families. PMID:19505725

  14. Analysis of the ABCA4 genomic locus in Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Zernant, Jana; Xie, Yajing Angela; Ayuso, Carmen; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel-Angel; Simonelli, Francesca; Testa, Francesco; Gorin, Michael B; Strom, Samuel P; Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Boone, Philip M; Yuan, Bo; Ayyagari, Radha; Nagy, Peter L; Tsang, Stephen H; Gouras, Peter; Collison, Frederick T; Lupski, James R; Fishman, Gerald A; Allikmets, Rando

    2014-12-20

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1, MIM 248200) is caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene. Complete sequencing of ABCA4 in STGD patients identifies compound heterozygous or homozygous disease-associated alleles in 65-70% of patients and only one mutation in 15-20% of patients. This study was designed to find the missing disease-causing ABCA4 variation by a combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS), array-Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH) screening, familial segregation and in silico analyses. The entire 140 kb ABCA4 genomic locus was sequenced in 114 STGD patients with one known ABCA4 exonic mutation revealing, on average, 200 intronic variants per sample. Filtering of these data resulted in 141 candidates for new mutations. Two variants were detected in four samples, two in three samples, and 20 variants in two samples, the remaining 117 new variants were detected only once. Multimodal analysis suggested 12 new likely pathogenic intronic ABCA4 variants, some of which were specific to (isolated) ethnic groups. No copy number variation (large deletions and insertions) was detected in any patient suggesting that it is a very rare event in the ABCA4 locus. Many variants were excluded since they were not conserved in non-human primates, were frequent in African populations and, therefore, represented ancestral, and not disease-associated, variants. The sequence variability in the ABCA4 locus is extensive and the non-coding sequences do not harbor frequent mutations in STGD patients of European-American descent. Defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires exceptionally well characterized large cohorts and extensive analyses by a combination of various approaches. PMID:25082829

  15. A large duplication involving the IHH locus mimics acrocallosal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel-Apak, Memnune; Bögershausen, Nina; Pawlik, Barbara; Li, Yun; Apak, Selcuk; Uyguner, Oya; Milz, Esther; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Karaman, Birsen; Gülgören, Ayan; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz; Nürnberg, Peter; Kayserili, Hülya; Wollnik, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling is a major determinant of various processes during embryonic development and has a pivotal role in embryonic skeletal development. A specific spatial and temporal expression of Ihh within the developing limb buds is essential for accurate digit outgrowth and correct digit number. Although missense mutations in IHH cause brachydactyly type A1, small tandem duplications involving the IHH locus have recently been described in patients with mild syndactyly and craniosynostosis. In contrast, a ∼600-kb deletion 5′ of IHH in the doublefoot mouse mutant (Dbf) leads to severe polydactyly without craniosynostosis, but with craniofacial dysmorphism. We now present a patient resembling acrocallosal syndrome (ACS) with extensive polysyndactyly of the hands and feet, craniofacial abnormalities including macrocephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, dysplastic and low-set ears, severe hypertelorism and profound psychomotor delay. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array copy number analysis identified a ∼900-kb duplication of the IHH locus, which was confirmed by an independent quantitative method. A fetus from a second pregnancy of the mother by a different spouse showed similar craniofacial and limb malformations and the same duplication of the IHH-locus. We defined the exact breakpoints and showed that the duplications are identical tandem duplications in both sibs. No copy number changes were observed in the healthy mother. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a human phenotype similar to the Dbf mutant and strikingly overlapping with ACS that is caused by a copy number variation involving the IHH locus on chromosome 2q35. PMID:22234151

  16. Excess polymorphism at the Adh locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, M E; Aguadé, M

    1986-09-01

    The evolutionary history of a region of DNA encompassing the Adh locus is studied by comparing patterns of variation in Drosophila melanogaster and its sibling species, D. simulans. An unexpectedly high level of silent polymorphism in the Adh coding region relative to the 5' and 3' flanking regions in D. melanogaster is revealed by a populational survey of restriction polymorphism using a four-cutter filter hybridization technique as well as by direct sequence comparisons. In both of these studies, a region of the Adh gene encompassing the three coding exons exhibits a frequency of polymorphism equal to that of a 4-kb 5' flanking region. In contrast, an interspecific sequence comparison shows a two-fold higher level of divergence in the 5' flanking sequence compared to the structural locus. Analysis of the patterns of variation suggest an excess of polymorphism within the D. melanogaster Adh locus, rather than lack of polymorphism in the 5' flanking region. An approach is outlined for testing neutral theory predictions about patterns of variation within and between species. This approach indicates that the observed patterns of variation are incompatible with an infinite site neutral model. PMID:3021568

  17. Fine mapping the TAGAP risk locus in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, R; Stahl, E A; Kurreeman, F A S; Gregersen, P K; Siminovitch, K A; Worthington, J; Padyukov, L; Raychaudhuri, S; Plenge, R M

    2011-06-01

    A common allele at the TAGAP gene locus demonstrates a suggestive, but not conclusive association with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To fine map the locus, we conducted comprehensive imputation of CEU HapMap single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 5,500 RA cases and 22,621 controls (all of European ancestry). After controlling for population stratification with principal components analysis, the strongest signal of association was to an imputed SNP, rs212389 (P=3.9 × 10(-8), odds ratio=0.87). This SNP remained highly significant upon conditioning on the previous RA risk variant (rs394581, P=2.2 × 10(-5)) or on a SNP previously associated with celiac disease and type I diabetes (rs1738074, P=1.7 × 10(-4)). Our study has refined the TAGAP signal of association to a single haplotype in RA, and in doing so provides conclusive statistical evidence that the TAGAP locus is associated with RA risk. Our study also underscores the utility of comprehensive imputation in large GWAS data sets to fine map disease risk alleles. PMID:21390051

  18. Culture, serotonin receptor polymorphism and locus of attention

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, David K.; Taylor, Shelley E.; Sasaki, Joni Y.; Chu, Thai Q.; Ryu, Chorong; Suh, Eunkook M.; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The present research examined the interaction between genes and culture as potential determinants of individuals’ locus of attention. As the serotonin (5-HT) system has been associated with attentional focus and the ability to adapt to changes in reinforcement, we examined the serotonin 1A receptor polymorphism (5-HTR1A). Koreans and European Americans were genotyped and reported their chronic locus of attention. There was a significant interaction between 5-HTR1A genotype and culture in the locus of attention. Koreans reported attending to the field more than European Americans, and this cultural difference was moderated by 5-HTR1A. There was a linear pattern such that those homozygous for the G allele, which is associated with reduced ability to adapt to changes in reinforcement, more strongly endorsed the culturally reinforced mode of thinking than those homozygous for the C allele, with those heterozygous in the middle. Our findings suggest that the same genetic predisposition can result in divergent psychological outcomes, depending on an individual’s cultural context. PMID:19736291

  19. Genetic analysis of the claret locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, W.; Nelson, C.R.; Szauter, P. )

    1989-11-01

    The claret (ca) locus of Drosophila melanogaster comprises two separately mutable domains, one responsible for eye color and one responsible for proper disjunction of chromosomes in meiosis and early cleavage divisions. Previously isolated alleles are of three types: (1) alleles of the claret (ca) type that affect eye color only, (2) alleles of the claret-nondisjunctional (ca{sup nd}) type that affect eye color and chromosome behavior, and (3) a meiotic mutation, non-claret disjunctional (ncd), that affects chromosome behavior only. In order to investigate the genetic structure of the claret locus, the authors have isolated 19 radiation-induced alleles of claret on the basis of the eye color phenotype. Two of these 19 new alleles are of the ca{sup nd} type, while 17 are of the ca type, demonstrating that the two domains do not often act as a single target for mutagenesis. This suggests that the two separately mutable functions are likely to be encoded by separate or overlapping genes rather than by a single gene. One of the new alleles of the ca{sup nd} type is a chromosome rearrangement with a breakpoint at the position of the claret locus. If this breakpoint is the cause of the mutant phenotype and there are no other mutations associated with the rearrangement, the two functions must be encoded by overlapping genes.

  20. Allelic Imbalance in Regulation of ANRIL through Chromatin Interaction at 9p21 Endometriosis Risk Locus

    PubMed Central

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Gurumurthy, Aishwarya; Hayano, Takahide; Ahmadloo, Somayeh; Omer, Waleed H; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Akihito; Kurose, Keisuke; Enomoto, Takayuki; Akira, Shigeo; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with human complex disorders. However, functional characterization of the disease-associated SNPs remains a formidable challenge. Here we explored regulatory mechanism of a SNP on chromosome 9p21 associated with endometriosis by leveraging “allele-specific” functional genomic approaches. By re-sequencing 1.29 Mb of 9p21 region and scrutinizing DNase-seq data from the ENCODE project, we prioritized rs17761446 as a candidate functional variant that was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the original GWAS SNP (rs10965235) and located on DNase I hypersensitive site. Chromosome conformation capture followed by high-throughput sequencing revealed that the protective G allele of rs17761446 exerted stronger chromatin interaction with ANRIL promoter. We demonstrated that the protective allele exhibited preferential binding affinities to TCF7L2 and EP300 by bioinformatics and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses. ChIP assays for histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation and RNA polymerase II reinforced the enhancer activity of the SNP site. The allele specific expression analysis for eutopic endometrial tissues and endometrial carcinoma cell lines showed that rs17761446 was a cis-regulatory variant where G allele was associated with increased ANRIL expression. Our work illuminates the allelic imbalances in a series of transcriptional regulation from factor binding to gene expression mediated by chromatin interaction underlie the molecular mechanism of 9p21 endometriosis risk locus. Functional genomics on common disease will unlock functional aspect of genotype-phenotype correlations in the post-GWAS stage. PMID:27055116

  1. Allelic Imbalance in Regulation of ANRIL through Chromatin Interaction at 9p21 Endometriosis Risk Locus.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Gurumurthy, Aishwarya; Hayano, Takahide; Ahmadloo, Somayeh; Omer, Waleed H; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Akihito; Kurose, Keisuke; Enomoto, Takayuki; Akira, Shigeo; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2016-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with human complex disorders. However, functional characterization of the disease-associated SNPs remains a formidable challenge. Here we explored regulatory mechanism of a SNP on chromosome 9p21 associated with endometriosis by leveraging "allele-specific" functional genomic approaches. By re-sequencing 1.29 Mb of 9p21 region and scrutinizing DNase-seq data from the ENCODE project, we prioritized rs17761446 as a candidate functional variant that was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the original GWAS SNP (rs10965235) and located on DNase I hypersensitive site. Chromosome conformation capture followed by high-throughput sequencing revealed that the protective G allele of rs17761446 exerted stronger chromatin interaction with ANRIL promoter. We demonstrated that the protective allele exhibited preferential binding affinities to TCF7L2 and EP300 by bioinformatics and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses. ChIP assays for histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation and RNA polymerase II reinforced the enhancer activity of the SNP site. The allele specific expression analysis for eutopic endometrial tissues and endometrial carcinoma cell lines showed that rs17761446 was a cis-regulatory variant where G allele was associated with increased ANRIL expression. Our work illuminates the allelic imbalances in a series of transcriptional regulation from factor binding to gene expression mediated by chromatin interaction underlie the molecular mechanism of 9p21 endometriosis risk locus. Functional genomics on common disease will unlock functional aspect of genotype-phenotype correlations in the post-GWAS stage. PMID:27055116

  2. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Six Recessive Viable Alleles of the Mouse Agouti Locus

    PubMed Central

    Hustad, C. M.; Perry, W. L.; Siracusa, L. D.; Rasberry, C.; Cobb, L.; Cattanach, B. M.; Kovatch, R.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1995-01-01

    The agouti locus on mouse chromosome 2 encodes a secreted cysteine-rich protein of 131 amino acids that acts as a molecular switch to instruct the melanocyte to make either yellow pigment (phaeomelanin) or black pigment (eumelanin). Mutations that up-regulate agouti expression are dominant to those causing decreased expression and result in yellow coat color. Other associated effects are obesity, diabetes, and increased susceptibility to tumors. To try to define important functional domains of the agouti protein, we have analyzed the molecular defects present in a series of recessive viable agouti mutations. In total, six alleles (a(mJ), a(u), a(da), a(16H), a(18H), a(e)) were examined at both the RNA and DNA level. Two of the alleles, a(16H) and a(e), result from mutations in the agouti coding region. Four alleles (a(mJ), a(u), a(18H), and a(da)) appear to represent regulatory mutations that down-regulate agouti expression. Interestingly, one of these mutations, a(18H), also appears to cause an immunological defect in the homozygous condition. This immunological defect is somewhat analogous to that observed in motheaten (me) mutant mice. Short and long-range restriction enzyme analyses of homozygous a(18H) DNA are consistent with the hypothesis that a(18H) results from a paracentric inversion where one end of the inversion maps in the 5' regulatory region of agouti and the other end in or near a gene that is required for normal immunological function. Cloning the breakpoints of this putative inversion should allow us to identify the gene that confers this interesting immunological disorder. PMID:7635290

  3. Regulatory aspects on nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Vanessa; Conniot, João; Matos, Ana I; Peres, Carina; Zupancic, Eva; Moura, Liane; Silva, Liana C; Florindo, Helena F; Gaspar, Rogério S

    2015-12-18

    Nanomedicines have been in the forefront of pharmaceutical research in the last decades, creating new challenges for research community, industry, and regulators. There is a strong demand for the fast development of scientific and technological tools to address unmet medical needs, thus improving human health care and life quality. Tremendous advances in the biomaterials and nanotechnology fields have prompted their use as promising tools to overcome important drawbacks, mostly associated to the non-specific effects of conventional therapeutic approaches. However, the wide range of application of nanomedicines demands a profound knowledge and characterization of these complex products. Their properties need to be extensively understood to avoid unpredicted effects on patients, such as potential immune reactivity. Research policy and alliances have been bringing together scientists, regulators, industry, and, more frequently in recent years, patient representatives and patient advocacy institutions. In order to successfully enhance the development of new technologies, improved strategies for research-based corporate organizations, more integrated research tools dealing with appropriate translational requirements aiming at clinical development, and proactive regulatory policies are essential in the near future. This review focuses on the most important aspects currently recognized as key factors for the regulation of nanomedicines, discussing the efforts under development by industry and regulatory agencies to promote their translation into the market. Regulatory Science aspects driving a faster and safer development of nanomedicines will be a central issue for the next years. PMID:26260323

  4. Pleiotropic effects of a Yersinia enterocolitica ompR mutation on adherent-invasive abilities and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Raczkowska, Adrianna; Skorek, Karolina; Brzóstkowska, Marta; Lasińska, Anna; Brzostek, Katarzyna

    2011-08-01

    The OmpR regulator positively influences flagella synthesis and negatively regulates invasin expression in Yersinia enterocolitica. To determine the physiological consequences of this inverse regulation, we analyzed the effect of the ompR mutation on the ability of Y. enterocolitica Ye9 (serotype O9, biotype 2) to adhere to and invade human epithelial HEp-2 cells and to form biofilms. Cell culture assays with ompR, flhDC and inv mutant strains, which vary in their motility and invasin expression, confirmed the important contribution of flagella to the adherent-invasive abilities of Y. enterocolitica Ye9. However, the loss of motility in the ompR strain was apparently not responsible for its low adhesion ability. When the nonmotile phenotype of the ompR mutant was artificially eliminated, an elevated level of invasion, exceeding that of the wild-type strain, was observed. Confocal laser microscopy demonstrated a decrease in the biofilm formation ability of the ompR strain that was only partially correlated with its loss of motility. These data provide evidence that OmpR promotes biofilm formation in this particular strain of Y. enterocolitica, although additional OmpR-dependent factors are also required. In addition, our findings suggest that OmpR-dependent regulation of biofilm formation could be an additional aspect of OmpR regulatory function. PMID:21575043

  5. RpiRc Is a Pleiotropic Effector of Virulence Determinant Synthesis and Attenuates Pathogenicity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Gaupp, Rosmarie; Wirf, Jessica; Wonnenberg, B; Biegel, Tanja; Eisenbeis, J; Graham, J; Herrmann, M; Lee, C Y; Beisswenger, C; Wolz, C; Tschernig, T; Bischoff, M; Somerville, G A

    2016-07-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, metabolism is intimately linked with virulence determinant biosynthesis, and several metabolite-responsive regulators have been reported to mediate this linkage. S. aureus possesses at least three members of the RpiR family of transcriptional regulators. Of the three RpiR homologs, RpiRc is a potential regulator of the pentose phosphate pathway, which also regulates RNAIII levels. RNAIII is the regulatory RNA of the agr quorum-sensing system that controls virulence determinant synthesis. The effect of RpiRc on RNAIII likely involves other regulators, as the regulators that bind the RNAIII promoter have been intensely studied. To determine which regulators might bridge the gap between RpiRc and RNAIII, sarA, sigB, mgrA, and acnA mutations were introduced into an rpiRc mutant background, and the effects on RNAIII were determined. Additionally, phenotypic and genotypic differences were examined in the single and double mutant strains, and the virulence of select strains was examined using two different murine infection models. The data suggest that RpiRc affects RNAIII transcription and the synthesis of virulence determinants in concert with σ(B), SarA, and the bacterial metabolic status to negatively affect virulence. PMID:27113358

  6. Integrated multi-omics analyses reveal the pleiotropic nature of the control of gene expression by Puf3p

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Christopher J.; Costello, Joseph L.; Talavera, David; Rowe, William; Castelli, Lydia M.; Sims, Paul F. G.; Grant, Christopher M.; Ashe, Mark P.; Hubbard, Simon J.; Pavitt, Graham D.

    2015-01-01

    The PUF family of RNA-binding proteins regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Puf3p is characterised as binding nuclear-encoded mRNAs specifying mitochondrial proteins. Extensive studies of its regulation of COX17 demonstrate its role in mRNA decay. Using integrated genome-wide approaches we define an expanded set of Puf3p target mRNAs and quantitatively assessed the global impact of loss of PUF3 on gene expression using mRNA and polysome profiling and quantitative proteomics. In agreement with prior studies, our sequencing of affinity-purified Puf3-TAP associated mRNAs (RIP-seq) identified mRNAs encoding mitochondrially-targeted proteins. Additionally, we also found 720  new mRNA targets that predominantly encode proteins that enter the nucleus. Comparing transcript levels in wild-type and puf3∆ cells revealed that only a small fraction of mRNA levels alter, suggesting Puf3p determines mRNA stability for only a limited subset of its target mRNAs. Finally, proteomic and translatomic studies suggest that loss of Puf3p has widespread, but modest, impact on mRNA translation. Taken together our integrated multi-omics data point to multiple classes of Puf3p targets, which display coherent post-transcriptional regulatory properties and suggest Puf3p plays a broad, but nuanced, role in the fine-tuning of gene expression. PMID:26493364

  7. Pleiotropic effects of juvenile hormone in ant queens and the escape from the reproduction-immunocompetence trade-off.

    PubMed

    Pamminger, Tobias; Treanor, David; Hughes, William O H

    2016-01-13

    The ubiquitous trade-off between survival and costly reproduction is one of the most fundamental constraints governing life-history evolution. In numerous animals, gonadotropic hormones antagonistically suppressing immunocompetence cause this trade-off. The queens of many social insects defy the reproduction-survival trade-off, achieving both an extraordinarily long life and high reproductive output, but how they achieve this is unknown. Here we show experimentally, by integrating quantification of gene expression, physiology and behaviour, that the long-lived queens of the ant Lasius niger have escaped the reproduction-immunocompetence trade-off by decoupling the effects of a key endocrine regulator of fertility and immunocompetence in solitary insects, juvenile hormone (JH). This modification of the regulatory architecture enables queens to sustain a high reproductive output without elevated JH titres and suppressed immunocompetence, providing an escape from the reproduction-immunocompetence trade-off that may contribute to the extraordinary lifespan of many social insect queens. PMID:26763704

  8. Analysis of long-range interactions in primary human cells identifies cooperative CFTR regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, Stéphanie; Berlivet, Soizik; Ka, Chandran; Gac, Gérald Le; Dostie, Josée; Férec, Claude

    2016-01-01

    A mechanism by which control DNA elements regulate transcription over large linear genomic distances is by achieving close physical proximity with genes, and looping of the intervening chromatin paths. Alterations of such regulatory ‘chromatin looping’ systems are likely to play a critical role in human genetic disease at large. Here, we studied the spatial organization of a ≈790 kb locus encompassing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Dysregulation of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis, which is the most common lethal genetic disorder in Caucasian populations. CFTR is a relatively large gene of 189 kb with a rather complex tissue-specific and temporal expression profile. We used chromatin conformation at the CFTR locus to identify new DNA sequences that regulate its transcription. By comparing 5C chromatin interaction maps of the CFTR locus in expressing and non-expressing human primary cells, we identified several new contact points between the CFTR promoter and its surroundings, in addition to regions featuring previously described regulatory elements. We demonstrate that two of these novel interacting regions cooperatively increase CFTR expression, and suggest that the new enhancer elements located on either side of the gene are brought together through chromatin looping via CTCF. PMID:26615198

  9. Subcellular localization and immunological detection of proteins encoded by the vir locus of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Stibitz, S; Yang, M S

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the central regulatory locus vir of Bordetella pertussis predicts that three gene products, BvgA, BvgB, and BvgC, are encoded. Features of the predicted primary structures of these proteins and their homology to other two-component systems suggest that BvgA is located in the cytoplasm, BvgB is located in the periplasm, and BvgC spans the inner membrane. We have used gene fusions to the phoA and lacZ genes of Escherichia coli to investigate the subcellular localization and membrane topology of these proteins. PhoA fusion proteins were also purified and used to raise antibodies that allowed visualization of the vir-encoded polypeptides by Western immunoblotting. Our results have largely confirmed the predictions of the DNA sequence, with the exception that BvgB and BvgC were found to constitute one larger protein that was homologous to the sensor class of two-component systems. We propose that this protein be named BvgS (for sensor) and that its gene be named bvgS. Images PMID:2066330

  10. Glutamate signaling proteins and tyrosine hydroxylase in the locus coeruleus of alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Karolewicz, Beata; Johnson, Laurel; Szebeni, Katalin; Stockmeier, Craig A.; Ordway, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    It has been postulated that alcoholism is associated with abnormalities in glutamatergic neurotransmission. This study examined the density of glutamate NMDA receptor subunits and its associated proteins in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) in deceased alcoholic subjects. Our previous research indicated that the NMDA receptor in the human LC is composed of obligatory NR1 and regulatory NR2C subunits. At synapses, NMDA receptors are stabilized through interactions with postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95). PSD-95 provides structural and functional coupling of the NMDA receptor with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), an intracellular mediator of NMDA receptor activation. LC tissue was obtained from 10 alcohol-dependent subjects and 8 psychiatrically healthy controls. Concentrations of NR1 and NR2C subunits, as well as PSD-95 and nNOS, were measured using Western blotting. In addition we have examined tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of norepinephrine. The amount of NR1 was lower in the rostral (−30%) and middle (−41%)portions of the LC of alcoholics as compared to control subjects. No differences in the amounts of NR2C, PSD-95, nNOS and TH were detected comparing alcoholic to control subjects. Lower levels of NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor in the LC implicates altered glutamate-norepinephrine interactions in alcoholism. PMID:17481661

  11. Truncated pStat5B is associated with the Idd4 locus in NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Davoodi-Semiromi, Abdoreza . E-mail: semiromi@pathology.ufl.edu; McDuffie, Marcia; Litherland, Sally; Clare-Salzler, Michael

    2007-05-11

    We investigate JAK-STAT5 activation and its relationship to full-length Stat5B (FL-Stat5) and constitutive phosphorylated carboxy-truncated Stat5B (ct-pStat5) in four different strains of mouse. Our electrophoresis mobility shift assays data indicate constitutive phosphorylation of full-length-Stat5 (p < 0.001) and DNA binding in NOD but not in B6 mice. Our data suggest that the relative ratio of FL-Stat5: ct-Stat5 in NOD is 5- to 8-fold lower (p < 0.0001) when compared with normal B6 mice. Additionally, EMSAs data from B6.NOD/c11 suggest contribution of Idd4 susceptibility locus on chromosome 11 in constitutive phosphorylation of Stat5 in NOD mice. The presence of ct-pStat5 in regulatory T cells of NOD mice suggests this form of Stat5 is associated with impaired function of Tregs in NOD mouse. In agreement with our previous report the JAK-Stat5B defective pathway in NOD mice along with other defective factors is associated with the pathogenesis of autoimmune type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

  12. Complementation Analyses for 45 Mutations Encompassing the Pink-Eyed Dilution (P) Locus of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Russell, L. B.; Montgomery, C. S.; Cacheiro, NLA.; Johnson, D. K.

    1995-01-01

    The homozygous and heterozygous phenotypes are described and characterized for 45 new pink-eyed dilution (p) locus mutations, most of them radiation-induced, that affect survival at various stages of mouse development. Cytogenetically detectable aberrations were found in three of the new p mutations (large deletion, inversion, translocation), with band 7C involved in each case. The complementation map developed from the study of 810 types of compound heterozygotes identifies five functional units: jls and jlm (two distinct juvenile-fitness functions, the latter associated with neuromuscular defects), pl-1 and pl-2 (associated with early-postimplantation and preimplantation death, respectively), and nl [neonatal lethality associated with cleft palate (the frequency of rare ``escapers'' from this defect varied with the genotype)]. Orientation of these units relative to genetic markers is as follows: centromere, Gas-2, pl-1, jls, jlm p, nl (equatable to cp1 = Gabrb3); pl-2 probably resides in the c-deletion complex. pl-1 does not mask preimplantation lethals between Gas2 and p; and no genes affecting survival are located between p and cp1. The alleles specifying mottling or darker pigment (generically, p(m) and p(x), respectively) probably do not represent deletions of p-coding sequences but could be small rearrangements involving proximal regulatory elements. PMID:8601493

  13. Impact of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RD1-locus on human primary dendritic cell immune functions.

    PubMed

    Etna, Marilena P; Giacomini, Elena; Pardini, Manuela; Severa, Martina; Bottai, Daria; Cruciani, Melania; Rizzo, Fabiana; Calogero, Raffaele; Brosch, Roland; Coccia, Eliana M

    2015-01-01

    Modern strategies to develop vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) aim to improve the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine or to attenuate the virulence of Mtb vaccine candidates. In the present study, the impact of wild type or mutated region of difference 1 (RD1) variants on the immunogenicity of Mtb and BCG recombinants was investigated in human primary dendritic cells (DC). A comparative analysis of transcriptome, signalling pathway activation, maturation, apoptosis, cytokine production and capacity to promote Th1 responses demonstrated that DC sense quantitative and qualitative differences in the expression of RD1-encoded factors--ESAT6 and CFP10--within BCG or Mtb backgrounds. Expansion of IFN-γ producing T cells was promoted by BCG::RD1-challenged DC, as compared to their BCG-infected counterparts. Although Mtb recombinants acted as a strong Th-1 promoting stimulus, even with RD1 deletion, the attenuated Mtb strain carrying a C-terminus truncated ESAT-6 elicited a robust Th1 promoting phenotype in DC. Collectively, these studies indicate a necessary but not sufficient role for the RD1 locus in promoting DC immune-regulatory functions. Additional mycobacterial factors are likely required to endow DC with a high Th1 polarizing capacity, a desirable attribute for a successful control of Mtb infection. PMID:26602835

  14. Impact of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RD1-locus on human primary dendritic cell immune functions

    PubMed Central

    Etna, Marilena P.; Giacomini, Elena; Pardini, Manuela; Severa, Martina; Bottai, Daria; Cruciani, Melania; Rizzo, Fabiana; Calogero, Raffaele; Brosch, Roland; Coccia, Eliana M.

    2015-01-01

    Modern strategies to develop vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) aim to improve the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine or to attenuate the virulence of Mtb vaccine candidates. In the present study, the impact of wild type or mutated region of difference 1 (RD1) variants on the immunogenicity of Mtb and BCG recombinants was investigated in human primary dendritic cells (DC). A comparative analysis of transcriptome, signalling pathway activation, maturation, apoptosis, cytokine production and capacity to promote Th1 responses demonstrated that DC sense quantitative and qualitative differences in the expression of RD1-encoded factors—ESAT6 and CFP10—within BCG or Mtb backgrounds. Expansion of IFN-γ producing T cells was promoted by BCG::RD1-challenged DC, as compared to their BCG-infected counterparts. Although Mtb recombinants acted as a strong Th-1 promoting stimulus, even with RD1 deletion, the attenuated Mtb strain carrying a C-terminus truncated ESAT-6 elicited a robust Th1 promoting phenotype in DC. Collectively, these studies indicate a necessary but not sufficient role for the RD1 locus in promoting DC immune-regulatory functions. Additional mycobacterial factors are likely required to endow DC with a high Th1 polarizing capacity, a desirable attribute for a successful control of Mtb infection. PMID:26602835

  15. Fine scale mapping of the breast cancer 16q12 locus.

    PubMed

    Udler, Miriam S; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Meyer, Kerstin; Struewing, Jeffrey; Maranian, Melanie; Kwon, Erika M; Zhang, Jinghui; Tyrer, Jonathan; Karlins, Eric; Platte, Radka; Kalmyrzaev, Bolot; Dicks, Ed; Field, Helen; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Prathalingam, Radhika; Teschendorff, Andrew; McArthur, Stewart; Doody, David R; Luben, Robert; Caldas, Carlos; Bernstein, Leslie; Kolonel, Laurence K; Henderson, Brian E; Wu, Anna H; Le Marchand, Loic; Ursin, Giske; Press, Michael F; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yang, Show-Lin; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Malone, Kathleen E; Haiman, Christopher A; Pharoah, Paul D; Ponder, Bruce A J; Ostrander, Elaine A; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M

    2010-06-15

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified a breast cancer susceptibility locus on 16q12 with an unknown biological basis. We used a set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to generate a fine-scale map and narrowed the region of association to a 133 kb DNA segment containing the largely uncharacterized hypothetical gene LOC643714, a short intergenic region and the 5' end of TOX3. Re-sequencing this segment in European subjects identified 293 common polymorphisms, including a set of 26 highly correlated candidate causal variants. By evaluation of these SNPs in five breast cancer case-control studies involving more than 23 000 subjects from populations of European and Southeast Asian ancestry, all but 14 variants could be excluded at odds of <1:100. Most of the remaining variants lie in the intergenic region, which exhibits evolutionary conservation and open chromatin conformation, consistent with a regulatory function. African-American case-control studies exhibit a different pattern of association suggestive of an additional causative variant. PMID:20332101

  16. Nonclassical Regulation of Transcription: Interchromosomal Interactions at the Malic enzyme Locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Thomas E.; Merritt, Thomas J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of transcription can be a complex process in which many cis- and trans-interactions determine the final pattern of expression. Among these interactions are trans-interactions mediated by the pairing of homologous chromosomes. These trans-effects are wide ranging, affecting gene regulation in many species and creating complex possibilities in gene regulation. Here we describe a novel case of trans-interaction between alleles of the Malic enzyme (Men) locus in Drosophila melanogaster that results in allele-specific, non-additive gene expression. Using both empirical biochemical and predictive bioinformatic approaches, we show that the regulatory elements of one allele are capable of interacting in trans with, and modifying the expression of, the second allele. Furthermore, we show that nonlocal factors—different genetic backgrounds—are capable of significant interactions with individual Men alleles, suggesting that these trans-effects can be modified by both locally and distantly acting elements. In sum, these results emphasize the complexity of gene regulation and the need to understand both small- and large-scale interactions as more complete models of the role of trans-interactions in gene regulation are developed. PMID:21900270

  17. Taspase1-dependent TFIIA cleavage coordinates head morphogenesis by limiting Cdkn2a locus transcription

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Shugaku; Sasagawa, Satoru; Oyama, Toshinao; Searleman, Adam C.; Westergard, Todd D.; Cheng, Emily H.; Hsieh, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Head morphogenesis requires complex signal relays to enable precisely coordinated proliferation, migration, and patterning. Here, we demonstrate that, during mouse head formation, taspase1-mediated (TASP1-mediated) cleavage of the general transcription factor TFIIA ensures proper coordination of rapid cell proliferation and morphogenesis by maintaining limited transcription of the negative cell cycle regulators p16Ink4a and p19Arf from the Cdkn2a locus. In mice, loss of TASP1 function led to catastrophic craniofacial malformations that were associated with inadequate cell proliferation. Compound deficiency of Cdkn2a, especially p16Ink4a deficiency, markedly reduced the craniofacial anomalies of TASP1-deficent mice. Furthermore, evaluation of mice expressing noncleavable TASP1 targets revealed that TFIIA is the principal TASP1 substrate that orchestrates craniofacial morphogenesis. ChIP analyses determined that noncleaved TFIIA accumulates at the p16Ink4a and p19Arf promoters to drive transcription of these negative regulators. In summary, our study elucidates a regulatory circuit comprising proteolysis, transcription, and proliferation that is pivotal for construction of the mammalian head. PMID:25664857

  18. Complementation analyses for 45 mutations encompassing the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.; Montgomery, C.S.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Johnson, D.K.

    1995-12-01

    The homozygous and heterozygous phenotypes are described and characterized for 45 new pink-eyed dilution (p) locus mutations, most of them radiation-induced, that affect survival at various stages of mouse development. Cytogenetically detectable aberrations were found in three of the new p mutations (large deletion, inversion, translocation), with band 7C involved in each case. The complementation map developed from the study of 810 types of compound heterozygotes identifies five functional units: jls and jlm (two distinct juvenile-fitness functions, the latter associated with neuromuscular defects), pl-1 and pl-2 (associated with early-postimplantation and preimplantation death, respectively), and nl [neonatal lethality associated with cleft palate (the frequency of rare {open_quotes}escapers{close_quotes} from this defect varied with the genotype)]. Orientation of these units relative to genetic markers is as follows: centromere, Gas-2, pl-1, jls, jlm p, nl (equatable to cp1= Gabrb3); pl-2 probably resides in the c-deletion complex. pl-1 does not mask preimplantation lethals between Gas2 and p; and no genes affecting survival are located between p and cp1. The alleles specifying mottling or darker pigment (generically, p{sup m} and p{sup x}, respectively) probably do not represent deletions of p-coding sequences but could be small rearrangements involving proximal regulatory elements. 43 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Evidence of selection at the ramosa1 locus during maize domestication.

    PubMed

    Sigmon, Brandi; Vollbrecht, Erik

    2010-04-01

    Modern maize was domesticated from Zea mays parviglumis, a teosinte, about 9000 years ago in Mexico. Genes thought to have been selected upon during the domestication of crops are commonly known as domestication loci. The ramosa1 (ra1) gene encodes a putative transcription factor that controls branching architecture in the maize tassel and ear. Previous work demonstrated reduced nucleotide diversity in a segment of the ra1 gene in a survey of modern maize inbreds, indicating that positive selection occurred at some point in time since maize diverged from its common ancestor with the sister species Tripsacum dactyloides and prompting the hypothesis that ra1 may be a domestication gene. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined ear phenotypes resulting from minor changes in ra1 activity and sampled nucleotide diversity of ra1 across the phylogenetic spectrum between tripsacum and maize, including a broad panel of teosintes and unimproved maize landraces. Weak mutant alleles of ra1 showed subtle effects in the ear, including crooked rows of kernels due to the occasional formation of extra spikelets, correlating a plausible, selected trait with subtle variations in gene activity. Nucleotide diversity was significantly reduced for maize landraces but not for teosintes, and statistical tests implied directional selection on ra1 consistent with the hypothesis that ra1 is a domestication locus. In maize landraces, a noncoding 3'-segment contained almost no genetic diversity and 5'-flanking diversity was greatly reduced, suggesting that a regulatory element may have been a target of selection. PMID:20196812

  20. Securities and Exchange Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... [Securities and Exchange Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] Part XXIII Securities and Exchange Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (SEC) SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION 17 CFR Ch. II Regulatory Flexibility Agenda AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Semiannual regulatory...

  1. The Cross-Linking Agent Hexamethylphosphoramide Predominantly Induces Intra-Locus and Multi-Locus Deletions in Postmeiotic Germ Cells of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Aguirrezabalaga, I.; Nivard, MJM.; Comendador, M. A.; Vogel, E. W.

    1995-01-01

    The nature of DNA sequence changes induced by the cross-linking agent hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA) within and in the vicinity of the vermilion locus of Drosophila melanogaster that produce a vermilion mutant phenotype was analyzed after exposure of postmeiotic male germ cells. Mutagenized males were mated to either females wild-type (exr(+)) for nucleotide excision repair (NER) or to females having a deficiency (exr(-)) for NER. Rearrangements, mostly deletions, represented by far the most frequent type of mutational events induced by HMPA that are detected as vermilion mutations. In the exr(+) group, all but one (a double substitution) of 21 mutants characterized were large sequence changes: we found 5 intra-locus deletions, 3 intra-locus deletions associated with insertions and 12 multi-locus deletions. When taken together, deletions and deletion/insertion mutations represent 96% of the HMPA-induced DNA modifications obtained under proficient repair conditions. Of the 10 mutants obtained from crosses with exr(-) females, 6 intra-locus and 2 multi-locus deletions were found, as opposed to just 1 point mutation and 1 double substitution. The ``hypomutability effect'' observed with exr(-) genotypes in relation to the wild type seems to be caused by a decrease in the frequency of multi-locus deletions in the former group. The results suggest that the NER system is involved in the generation of multi-locus deletions, whereas intra-locus deletions appear to be formed through a postreplication slipped-misrepair pathway. It is concluded that an eukaryotic in vivo system with no limitations for the recovery of multi-locus deletions, such as vermilion, should be used for the analysis of DNA damage induced by cross-linking agents. PMID:7713422

  2. METTL21C is a potential pleiotropic gene for osteoporosis and sarcopenia acting through the modulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Mo, Chenglin; Abreu, Eduardo; Kiel, Douglas P; Bonewald, Lynda F; Brotto, Marco; Karasik, David

    2014-07-01

    Sarcopenia and osteoporosis are important public health problems that occur concurrently. A bivariate genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified METTL21c as a suggestive pleiotropic gene for both bone and muscle. The METTL21 family of proteins methylates chaperones involved in the etiology of both myopathy and inclusion body myositis with Paget's disease. To validate these GWAS results, Mettl21c mRNA expression was reduced with siRNA in a mouse myogenic C2C12 cell line and the mouse osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4. At day 3, as C2C12 myoblasts start to differentiate into myotubes, a significant reduction in the number of myocytes aligning/organizing for fusion was observed in the siRNA-treated cells. At day 5, both fewer and smaller myotubes were observed in the siRNA-treated cells as confirmed by histomorphometric analyses and immunostaining with myosin heavy chain (MHC) antibody, which only stains myocytes/myotubes but not myoblasts. Intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) measurements of the siRNA-treated myotubes showed a decrease in maximal amplitude peak response to caffeine, suggesting that less Ca(2+) is available for release due to the partial silencing of Mettl21c, correlating with impaired myogenesis. In siRNA-treated MLO-Y4 cells, 48 hours after treatment with dexamethasone there was a significant increase in cell death, suggesting a role of Mettl21c in osteocyte survival. To investigate the molecular signaling machinery induced by the partial silencing of Mettl21c, we used a real-time PCR gene array to monitor the activity of 10 signaling pathways. We discovered that Mettl21c knockdown modulated only the NF-κB signaling pathway (ie, Birc3, Ccl5, and Tnf). These results suggest that Mettl21c might exert its bone-muscle pleiotropic function via the regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, which is critical for bone and muscle homeostasis. These studies also provide rationale for cellular and molecular validation of GWAS, and warrant additional in vitro

  3. METTL21C is a potential pleiotropic gene for osteoporosis and sarcopenia acting through the modulation of the NFκB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Chenglin; Abreu, Eduardo; Kiel, Douglas P.; Bonewald, Lynda F.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia and osteoporosis are important public health problems that occur concurrently. A bivariate genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified METTL21c as a suggestive pleiotropic gene for both bone and muscle. METTL21 family of proteins methylates chaperones involved in the etiology of both Inclusion Body Myositis with Paget's disease. To validate these GWAS results, Mettl21c mRNA expression was reduced with siRNA in a mouse myogenic C2C12 cell line and the mouse osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4. At day 3, as C2C12 myoblasts start to differentiate into myotubes, a significant reduction in the number of myocytes aligning/organizing for fusion was observed in the siRNA-treated cells. At day 5, both fewer and smaller myotubes were observed in the siRNA-treated cells as confirmed by histomorphometric analyses and immunostaining with Myosin Heavy Chain (MHC) antibody, which only stains myocytes/myotubes but not myoblasts. Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) measurements of the siRNA-treated myotubes showed a decrease in maximal amplitude peak response to caffeine suggesting that less Ca2+ is available for release due to the partial silencing of Mettl21c, correlating with impaired myogenesis. In siRNA-treated MLO-Y4 cells, 48 hours after treatment with dexamethasone, there was a significant increase in cell death, suggesting a role of Mettl21c in osteocyte survival. To investigate the molecular signaling machinery induced by the partial silencing of Mettl21c, we monitored with a real-time PCR gene array the activity of 10 signaling pathways. We discovered that Mettl21c knockdown modulated only the NFκB signaling pathway (i.e., Birc3, Ccl5 and Tnf). These results suggest that Mettl21c might exert its bone-muscle pleiotropic function via the regulation of the NFκB signaling pathway, which is critical for bone and muscle homeostasis. These studies also provide rationale for cellular and molecular validation of GWAS, and warrant additional in vitro and in vivo studies to

  4. Identification of novel craniofacial regulatory domains located far upstream of SOX9 and disrupted in Pierre Robin sequence

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Christopher T.; Attanasio, Catia; Bhatia, Shipra; Benko, Sabina; Ansari, Morad; Tan, Tiong Y.; Munnich, Arnold; Pennacchio, Len A.; Abadie, Véronique; Temple, I. Karen; Goldenberg, Alice; van Heyningen, Veronica; Amiel, Jeanne; FitzPatrick, David; Kleinjan, Dirk A.; Visel, Axel; Lyonnet, Stanislas

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the coding sequence of SOX9 cause campomelic dysplasia (CD), a disorder of skeletal development associated with 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSDs). Translocations, deletions and duplications within a ~2 Mb region upstream of SOX9 can recapitulate the CD-DSD phenotype fully or partially, suggesting the existence of an unusually large cis-regulatory control region. Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is a craniofacial disorder that is frequently an endophenotype of CD and a locus for isolated PRS at ~1.2-1.5 Mb upstream of SOX9 has been previously reported. The craniofacial regulatory potential within this locus, and within the greater genomic domain surrounding SOX9, remains poorly defined. We report two novel deletions upstream of SOX9 in families with PRS, allowing refinement of the regions harbouring candidate craniofacial regulatory elements. In parallel, ChIP-Seq for p300 binding sites in mouse craniofacial tissue led to the identification of several novel craniofacial enhancers at the SOX9 locus, which were validated in transgenic reporter mice and zebrafish. Notably, some of the functionally validated elements fall within the PRS deletions. These studies suggest that multiple non-coding elements contribute to the craniofacial regulation of SOX9 expression, and that their disruption results in PRS. PMID:24934569

  5. Genetic dissection of the pre-eclampsia susceptibility locus on chromosome 2q22 reveals shared novel risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew P; Brennecke, Shaun P; East, Christine E; Dyer, Thomas D; Roten, Linda T; Proffitt, J Michael; Melton, Phillip E; Fenstad, Mona H; Aalto-Viljakainen, Tia; Mäkikallio, Kaarin; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Laivuori, Hannele; Austgulen, Rigmor; Blangero, John; Moses, Eric K

    2013-07-01

    Pre-eclampsia is an idiopathic pregnancy disorder promoting morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. Delivery of the fetus is the only means to resolve severe symptoms. Women with pre-eclamptic pregnancies demonstrate increased risk for later life cardiovascular disease (CVD) and good evidence suggests these two syndromes share several risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms. To elucidate the genetic architecture of pre-eclampsia we have dissected our chromosome 2q22 susceptibility locus in an extended Australian and New Zealand familial cohort. Positional candidate genes were prioritized for exon-centric sequencing using bioinformatics, SNPing, transcriptional profiling and QTL-walking. In total, we interrogated 1598 variants from 52 genes. Four independent SNP associations satisfied our gene-centric multiple testing correction criteria: a missense LCT SNP (rs2322659, P = 0.0027), a synonymous LRP1B SNP (rs35821928, P = 0.0001), an UTR-3 RND3 SNP (rs115015150, P = 0.0024) and a missense GCA SNP (rs17783344, P = 0.0020). We replicated the LCT SNP association (P = 0.02) and observed a borderline association for the GCA SNP (P = 0.07) in an independent Australian case-control population. The LRP1B and RND3 SNP associations were not replicated in this same Australian singleton cohort. Moreover, these four SNP associations could not be replicated in two additional case-control populations from Norway and Finland. These four SNPs, however, exhibit pleiotropic effects with several quantitative CVD-related traits. Our results underscore the genetic complexity of pre-eclampsia and present novel empirical evidence of possible shared genetic mechanisms underlying both pre-eclampsia and other CVD-related risk factors. PMID:23420841

  6. A Trans-Acting Regulatory Gene That Inversely Affects the Expression of the White, Brown and Scarlet Loci in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Rabinow, L.; Nguyen-Huynh, A. T.; Birchler, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    A trans-acting regulatory gene, Inr-a, that alters the level of expression of the white eye color locus as an inverse function of the number of its functional copies is described. Several independent lines of evidence demonstrate that this regulatory gene interacts with white via the promoter sequences. Among these are the observations that the inverse regulatory effect is conferred to the Adh gene when fused to the white promoter and that cis-regulatory mutants of white fail to respond. The phenotypic response to Inr-a is found in all tissues in which white is expressed, and mutants of the regulator exhibit a recessive lethality during larval periods. Increased white messenger RNA levels in pupal stages are found in Inr-a/+ individuals versus +/+ and a coordinate response is observed for mRNA levels from the brown and scarlet loci. All are structurally related and participate in pigment deposition. These experiments demonstrate that a single regulatory gene can exert an inverse effect on a target structural locus, a situation postulated from segmental aneuploid studies of gene expression and dosage compensation. PMID:1743487

  7. The core to regulatory reform

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, J.W. Jr.

    1993-06-15

    Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Orders 436, 500, and 636, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Public Utility Holding Company Act reform, and the 1992 Energy Policy Act all can have significant effects on an LDC's operations. Such changes in an LDC's environments must be balanced by changes within the utility, its marketplace, and its state regulatory environment. The question is where to start. For Columbia Gas Distribution Cos., based in Columbus, OH, the new operating foundation begins with each employee. Internal strength is critical in designing initiatives that meet the needs of the marketplace and are well-received by regulators. Employees must understand not only the regulatory environment in which the LDC operates, but also how their work contributes to a positive regulatory relationship. To achieve this, Columbia initiated the COntinuing Regulatory Education program, or CORE, in 1991. CORE is a regulatory-focused, information-initiative program coordinated by Columbia's Regulatory Policy, Planning, and Government Affairs Department. The CORE programs can take many forms, such as emerging issue discussions, dialogues with regulators and key parties, updates on regulatory fillings, regulatory policy meetings, and formal training classes. The speakers and discussion facilitators can range from human resource department trainers to senior officers, from regulatory department staff members to external experts, or from state commissioners to executives from other LDCs. The goals of CORE initiatives are to: Support a professional level of regulatory expertise through employee participation in well-developed regulatory programs presented by credible experts. Encourage a constructive state regulatory environment founded on communication and cooperation. CORE achieves these goals via five program levels: introductory basics, advanced learning, professional expertise, crossfunctional dialogues, and external idea exchanges.

  8. Locus of control, television viewing, and eating disorder symptomatology in young females.

    PubMed

    Fouts, Gregory; Vaughan, Kimberley

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of locus of control and television watching (number of hours of television watched per week) on eating disorder symptomatology in girls between the ages 10-17 years. A 2 x 2 factorial design was employed in which girls were identified either as (a) being higher or lower viewers of television, and (b) having either an external or internal locus of control. Girls with an external locus of control had significantly greater eating disorder symptomatology than those with an internal locus of control. For girls watching higher amounts of television, those having an external locus of control had significantly greater eating disorder symptomatology than those having an internal locus of control. PMID:12128041

  9. Toxicogenomics in regulatory ecotoxicology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ankley, Gerald T.; Daston, George P.; Degitz, Sigmund J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Hoke, Robert A.; Kennedy, Sean W.; Miracle, Ann L.; Perkins, Edward J.; Snape, Jason; Tillitt, Donald E.; Tyler, Charles R.; Versteeg, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we have witnessed an explosion of different genomic approaches that, through a combination of advanced biological, instrumental, and bioinformatic techniques, can yield a previously unparalleled amount of data concerning the molecular and biochemical status of organisms. Fueled partially by large, well-publicized efforts such as the Human Genome Project, genomic research has become a rapidly growing topical area in multiple biological disciplines. Since 1999, when the term “toxicogenomics” was coined to describe the application of genomics to toxicology (1), a rapid increase in publications on the topic has occurred (Figure 1). The potential utility of toxicogenomics in toxicological research and regulatory activities has been the subject of scientific discussions and, as with any new technology, has evoked a wide range of opinion (2–6). VIEWPOINT © 2006 american chemical Society july 1, 2006 / EnvironmEntal SciEncE & tEchnology n 4055 The purpose of this feature article is to consider the roles of toxicogenomics in the field of regulatory ecotoxicology, explore current limitations in the science and practice of genomics, and propose possible avenues to approach and resolve some of the major challenges. A significant amount of input to our analysis came from a workshop sponsored by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) in Pellston, Mich., in September 2005. A complete list of names and affiliations of the experts participating in that workshop is provided online in Table 1 of the Supporting Information for this paper.

  10. The immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus hs3b and hs4 3' enhancers are dispensable for VDJ assembly and somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Morvan, Caroline Le; Pinaud, Eric; Decourt, Catherine; Cuvillier, Armelle; Cogné, Michel

    2003-08-15

    The more distal enhancers of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain 3' regulatory region, hs3b and hs4, were recently demonstrated as master control elements of germline transcription and class switch recombination to most immunoglobulin constant genes. In addition, they were shown to enhance the accumulation of somatic mutations on linked transgenes. Since somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination are tightly linked processes, their common dependency on the endogenous locus 3' enhancers could be an attractive hypothesis. VDJ structure and somatic hypermutation were analyzed in B cells from mice carrying either a heterozygous or a homozygous deletion of these enhancers. We find that hs3b and hs4 are dispensable both for VDJ assembly and for the occurrence of mutations at a physiologic frequency in the endogenous locus. In addition, we show that cells functionally expressing the immunoglobulin M (IgM) class B-cell receptor encoded by an hs3b/hs4-deficient locus were fully able to enter germinal centers, undergo affinity maturation, and yield specific antibody responses in homozygous mutant mice, where IgG1 antibodies compensated for the defect in other IgG isotypes. By contrast, analysis of Peyer patches from heterozygous animals showed that peanut agglutinin (PNAhigh) B cells functionally expressing the hs3b/hs4-deficient allele were dramatically outclassed by B cells expressing the wild-type locus and normally switching to IgA. This study thus also highlights the role of germinal centers in the competition between B cells for affinity maturation and suggests that membrane IgA may promote recruitment in an activated B-cell compartment, or proliferation of activated B cells, more efficiently than IgM in Peyer patches. PMID:12714490

  11. The barley Frost resistance-H2 locus.

    PubMed

    Pasquariello, Marianna; Barabaschi, Delfina; Himmelbach, Axel; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Ariyadasa, Ruvini; Stein, Nils; Gandolfi, Francesco; Tenedini, Elena; Bernardis, Isabella; Tagliafico, Enrico; Pecchioni, Nicola; Francia, Enrico

    2014-03-01

    Frost resistance-H2 (Fr-H2) is a major QTL affecting freezing tolerance in barley, yet its molecular basis is still not clearly understood. To gain a better insight into the structural characterization of the locus, a high-resolution linkage map developed from the Nure × Tremois cross was initially implemented to map 13 loci which divided the 0.602 cM total genetic distance into ten recombination segments. A PCR-based screening was then applied to identify positive bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from two genomic libraries of the reference genotype Morex. Twenty-six overlapping BACs from the integrated physical-genetic map were 454 sequenced. Reads assembled in contigs were subsequently ordered, aligned and manually curated in 42 scaffolds. In a total of 1.47 Mbp, 58 protein-coding sequences were identified, 33 of which classified according to similarity with sequences in public databases. As three complete barley C-repeat Binding Factors (HvCBF) genes were newly identified, the locus contained13 full-length HvCBFs, four Related to AP2 Triticeae (RAPT) genes, and at least five CBF pseudogenes. The final overall assembly of Fr-H2 includes more than 90 % of target region: all genes were identified along the locus, and a general survey of Repetitive Elements obtained. We believe that this gold-standard sequence for the Morex Fr-H2 will be a useful genomic tool for structural and evolutionary comparisons with Fr-H2 in winter-hardy cultivars along with Fr-2 of other Triticeae crops. PMID:24442711

  12. Bundle-forming pilus locus of Aeromonas veronii bv. Sobria.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Nahal; Yang, Qin; Barnett, Timothy C; Tabei, S Mohammed B; Kirov, Sylvia M; Shaw, Jonathan G

    2012-04-01

    Little is known about the colonization mechanisms of Aeromonas spp. Previous work has suggested that the type IV bundle-forming pilus (Bfp) is an aeromonad intestinal colonization factor. This study provides the first genetic characterization of this structure. To define the role of Bfp in Aeromonas veronii bv. Sobria adherence, a 22-kb locus encoding the bundle-forming pilus was isolated; this contained 17 pilus-related genes similar to the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) of Vibrio cholerae. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) demonstrated that the locus had two major transcriptional units, mshI to mshF and mshB to mshQ. Transcriptional fusion experiments demonstrated the presence of two strong promoters upstream of mshI and mshB. The locus encoded four putative prepilin proteins, one of which (MshA) corresponded to the N-terminal sequence of the previously isolated major pilin protein. All the pilin genes were inactivated, mutation of each minor or major pilin gene greatly reduced the bacterium's ability to adhere and form biofilms, and complementation of each mutant in trans rescued this phenotype. Mutation of the major pilin MshA and MshB, a minor pilin, resulted in their loss. The position of the mshH gene is conserved within a number of bacteria, and we have shown it is not transcriptionally linked to the other msh genes; moreover, its mutation did not have a dramatic effect on either adhesion or biofilm formation. We conclude that the bundle-forming pilus is required for A. veronii bv. Sobria adherence and biofilm formation; furthermore, both the major and minor pilin proteins are essential for this process. PMID:22311923

  13. Locus minimization in breed prediction using artificial neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Iquebal, M A; Ansari, M S; Sarika; Dixit, S P; Verma, N K; Aggarwal, R A K; Jayakumar, S; Rai, A; Kumar, D

    2014-12-01

    Molecular markers, viz. microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms, have revolutionized breed identification through the use of small samples of biological tissue or germplasm, such as blood, carcass samples, embryos, ova and semen, that show no evident phenotype. Classical tools of molecular data analysis for breed identification have limitations, such as the unavailability of referral breed data, causing increased cost of collection each time, compromised computational accuracy and complexity of the methodology used. We report here the successful use of an artificial neural network (ANN) in background to decrease the cost of genotyping by locus minimization. The webserver is freely accessible (http://nabg.iasri.res.in/bisgoat) to the research community. We demonstrate that the machine learning (ANN) approach for breed identification is capable of multifold advantages such as locus minimization, leading to a drastic reduction in cost, and web availability of reference breed data, alleviating the need for repeated genotyping each time one investigates the identity of an unknown breed. To develop this model web implementation based on ANN, we used 51,850 samples of allelic data of microsatellite-marker-based DNA fingerprinting on 25 loci covering 22 registered goat breeds of India for training. Minimizing loci to up to nine loci through the use of a multilayer perceptron model, we achieved 96.63% training accuracy. This server can be an indispensable tool for identification of existing breeds and new synthetic commercial breeds, leading to protection of intellectual property in case of sovereignty and bio-piracy disputes. This server can be widely used as a model for cost reduction by locus minimization for various other flora and fauna in terms of variety, breed and/or line identification, especially in conservation and improvement programs. PMID:25183434

  14. Genetic Locus for Streptolysin S Production by Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Nizet, Victor; Beall, Bernard; Bast, Darrin J.; Datta, Vivekananda; Kilburn, Laurie; Low, Donald E.; De Azavedo, Joyce C. S.

    2000-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that causes pharyngitis and invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Streptolysin S (SLS) is the cytolytic factor that creates the zone of beta-hemolysis surrounding GAS colonies grown on blood agar. We recently reported the discovery of a potential genetic determinant involved in SLS production, sagA, encoding a small peptide of 53 amino acids (S. D. Betschel, S. M. Borgia, N. L. Barg, D. E. Low, and J. C. De Azavedo, Infect. Immun. 66:1671–1679, 1998). Using transposon mutagenesis, chromosomal walking steps, and data from the GAS genome sequencing project (www.genome.ou.edu/strep.html), we have now identified a contiguous nine-gene locus (sagA to sagI) involved in SLS production. The sag locus is conserved among GAS strains regardless of M protein type. Targeted plasmid integrational mutagenesis of each gene in the sag operon resulted in an SLS-negative phenotype. Targeted integrations (i) upstream of the sagA promoter and (ii) downstream of a terminator sequence after sagI did not affect SLS production, establishing the functional boundaries of the operon. A rho-independent terminator sequence between sagA and sagB appears to regulate the amount of sagA transcript produced versus transcript for the entire operon. Reintroduction of the nine-gene sag locus on a plasmid vector restored SLS activity to the nonhemolytic sagA knockout mutant. Finally, heterologous expression of the intact sag operon conferred the SLS beta-hemolytic phenotype to the nonhemolytic Lactococcus lactis. We conclude that gene products of the GAS sag operon are both necessary and sufficient for SLS production. Sequence homologies of sag operon gene products suggest that SLS is related to the bacteriocin family of microbial toxins. PMID:10858242

  15. Bundle-Forming Pilus Locus of Aeromonas veronii bv. Sobria

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Nahal; Yang, Qin; Barnett, Timothy C.; Tabei, S. Mohammed B.; Kirov, Sylvia M.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the colonization mechanisms of Aeromonas spp. Previous work has suggested that the type IV bundle-forming pilus (Bfp) is an aeromonad intestinal colonization factor. This study provides the first genetic characterization of this structure. To define the role of Bfp in Aeromonas veronii bv. Sobria adherence, a 22-kb locus encoding the bundle-forming pilus was isolated; this contained 17 pilus-related genes similar to the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) of Vibrio cholerae. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) demonstrated that the locus had two major transcriptional units, mshI to mshF and mshB to mshQ. Transcriptional fusion experiments demonstrated the presence of two strong promoters upstream of mshI and mshB. The locus encoded four putative prepilin proteins, one of which (MshA) corresponded to the N-terminal sequence of the previously isolated major pilin protein. All the pilin genes were inactivated, mutation of each minor or major pilin gene greatly reduced the bacterium's ability to adhere and form biofilms, and complementation of each mutant in trans rescued this phenotype. Mutation of the major pilin MshA and MshB, a minor pilin, resulted in their loss. The position of the mshH gene is conserved within a number of bacteria, and we have shown it is not transcriptionally linked to the other msh genes; moreover, its mutation did not have a dramatic effect on either adhesion or biofilm formation. We conclude that the bundle-forming pilus is required for A. veronii bv. Sobria adherence and biofilm formation; furthermore, both the major and minor pilin proteins are essential for this process. PMID:22311923

  16. Developmental expression of the white locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Fjose, A.; Polito, L. C.; Weber, U.; Gehring, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    We have isolated several cDNA clones of the white locus which are derived from embryonic and pupal transcripts of Drosophila melanogaster. The cDNA sequences map within ˜7.5 kb (coordinates −3.0 to +4.6) of the genomic DNA and correspond mainly to sequences within the distal region of the gene (coordinates −0.2 to −3.0). A major RNA species of 2.6 kb was detected on Northerns of poly(A)+ RNA isolated from all developmental stages. The total accumulation of this transcript peaks in the mature third instar larva to a level of 0.003% which is about ten times higher than that observed in embryos. The spatial distribution of white locus transcripts was determined by in situ hybridization to tissue sections. In embryos, hybridization signals are restricted to the cells of the developing Malpighian tubules and the signal strength corresponds with ˜50 transcripts per cell. Before the termination of the third instar stage, hybridization signals are also detected at a comparable level in the eye antennal disks. At the same stage, a third site of labeling is observed over a small cluster of cells which seems to be associated with the larval photoreceptor organs. Thus, white locus expression is largely restricted to tissues which are known to be involved in the biosynthesis of eye pigments and these different cell types act in a temporally autonomous manner with respect to the induction of the white gene during development. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:16453550

  17. Evidence for a fourth locus in Usher syndrome type I.

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, S; Larget-Piet, D; Rozet, J M; Bonneau, D; Mathieu, M; Der Kaloustian, V; Munnich, A; Kaplan, J

    1996-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I (US1) is an autosomal recessive condition in which three different genes have been already localised (USH1A, USH1B, and USH1C on chromosomes 14q32, 11q13, and 11p15 respectively). The genetic heterogeneity of US1 has been confirmed in a previous study by linkage analysis of 20 French pedigrees. Here, we report the genetic exclusion of the three previously reported loci in two large multiplex families of Moroccan and Pakistani origin, suggesting the existence of at least a fourth locus in Usher syndrome type I. PMID:8825055

  18. Platinum coat color locus in the deer mouse.

    PubMed

    Dodson, K M; Dawson, W D; Van Ooteghem, S O; Cushing, B S; Haigh, G R

    1987-01-01

    Platinum coat color in the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, is an autosomal recessive trait marking a locus, pt, distinct from silver (si), albino (c), blonde (bl), brown (b), and agouti (a). Platinum deer mice are conspicuously pale, with light ears and tail stripe. The pewter trait is allelic with and phenotypically identical to platinum, and represents an independent recurrence of this mutant. The rate of recoveries of coat color mutations from wild deer mice is consistent with available data for recurring mutation rates balanced by strong selection against the recessive phenotype. PMID:3611714

  19. Pressure sore survey. Part 3: Locus of control.

    PubMed

    Maylor, M; Torrance, C

    1999-03-01

    This is the third in a three-part article which investigates the prevalence, knowledge and attitudes to pressure sores in one NHS trust. This study describes the methodology used in choosing and developing attitude scales to explore whether there are any relationships between the locus of control and pressure sore prevention. Factors to do with attitude and the value associated with pressure sore prevention have a central role. Attitudes and beliefs affect what we do and may contribute to pressure sore development. PMID:10362985

  20. Loss of Cln3 Function in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum Causes Pleiotropic Effects That Are Rescued by Human CLN3

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of inherited, severe neurodegenerative disorders also known as Batten disease. Juvenile NCL (JNCL) is caused by recessive loss-of-function mutations in CLN3, which encodes a transmembrane protein that regulates endocytic pathway trafficking, though its primary function is not yet known. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is increasingly utilized for neurological disease research and is particularly suited for investigation of protein function in trafficking. Therefore, here we establish new overexpression and knockout Dictyostelium cell lines for JNCL research. Dictyostelium Cln3 fused to GFP localized to the contractile vacuole system and to compartments of the endocytic pathway. cln3− cells displayed increased rates of proliferation and an associated reduction in the extracellular levels and cleavage of the autocrine proliferation repressor, AprA. Mid- and late development of cln3− cells was precocious and cln3− slugs displayed increased migration. Expression of either Dictyostelium Cln3 or human CLN3 in cln3− cells suppressed the precocious development and aberrant slug migration, which were also suppressed by calcium chelation. Taken together, our results show that Cln3 is a pleiotropic protein that negatively regulates proliferation and development in Dictyostelium. This new model system, which allows for the study of Cln3 function in both single cells and a multicellular organism, together with the observation that expression of human CLN3 restores abnormalities in Dictyostelium cln3− cells, strongly supports the use of this new model for JNCL research. PMID:25330233

  1. Loss of Cln3 function in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum causes pleiotropic effects that are rescued by human CLN3.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert J; Myre, Michael A; Cotman, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of inherited, severe neurodegenerative disorders also known as Batten disease. Juvenile NCL (JNCL) is caused by recessive loss-of-function mutations in CLN3, which encodes a transmembrane protein that regulates endocytic pathway trafficking, though its primary function is not yet known. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is increasingly utilized for neurological disease research and is particularly suited for investigation of protein function in trafficking. Therefore, here we establish new overexpression and knockout Dictyostelium cell lines for JNCL research. Dictyostelium Cln3 fused to GFP localized to the contractile vacuole system and to compartments of the endocytic pathway. cln3- cells displayed increased rates of proliferation and an associated reduction in the extracellular levels and cleavage of the autocrine proliferation repressor, AprA. Mid- and late development of cln3- cells was precocious and cln3- slugs displayed increased migration. Expression of either Dictyostelium Cln3 or human CLN3 in cln3- cells suppressed the precocious development and aberrant slug migration, which were also suppressed by calcium chelation. Taken together, our results show that Cln3 is a pleiotropic protein that negatively regulates proliferation and development in Dictyostelium. This new model system, which allows for the study of Cln3 function in both single cells and a multicellular organism, together with the observation that expression of human CLN3 restores abnormalities in Dictyostelium cln3- cells, strongly supports the use of this new model for JNCL research. PMID:25330233

  2. Dominant and pleiotropic effects of a GAI gene in wheat results from a lack of interaction between DELLA and GID1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Kong, Xiuying; Wan, Jianmin; Liu, Xueying; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Zhou, Ronghua; Zhao, Guangyao; Jing, Ruilian; Fu, Xiangdong; Jia, Jizeng

    2011-12-01

    Dominance, semidominance, and recessiveness are important modes of Mendelian inheritance. The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) regulates many plant growth and developmental processes. The previously cloned semidominant GA-insensitive (GAI) genes Reduced height1 (Rht1) and Rht2 in wheat (Triticum aestivum) were the basis of the Green Revolution. However, no completely dominant GAI gene has been cloned. Here, we report the molecular characterization of Rht-B1c, a dominant GAI allele in wheat that confers more extreme characteristics than its incompletely dominant alleles. Rht-B1c is caused by a terminal repeat retrotransposons in miniature insertion in the DELLA domain. Yeast two-hybrid assays showed that Rht-B1c protein fails to interact with GA-INSENSITIVE DWARF1 (GID1), thereby blocking GA responses and resulting in extreme dwarfism and pleiotropic effects. By contrast, Rht-B1b protein only reduces interaction with GID1. Furthermore, we analyzed its functions using near-isogenic lines and examined its molecular mechanisms in transgenic rice. These results indicated that the affinity between GID1 and DELLA proteins is key to regulation of the stability of DELLA proteins, and differential interactions determine dominant and semidominant gene responses to GA. PMID:22010107

  3. Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 RpoN (Sigma 54) Is a Pleiotropic Regulator of Growth, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Motility, Biofilm Formation and Toxin Production

    PubMed Central

    Hayrapetyan, Hasmik; Tempelaars, Marcel; Nierop Groot, Masja; Abee, Tjakko

    2015-01-01

    Sigma 54 is a transcriptional regulator predicted to play a role in physical interaction of bacteria with their environment, including virulence and biofilm formation. In order to study the role of Sigma 54 in Bacillus cereus, a comparative transcriptome and phenotypic study was performed using B. cereus ATCC 14579 WT, a markerless rpoN deletion mutant, and its complemented strain. The mutant was impaired in many different cellular functions including low temperature and anaerobic growth, carbohydrate metabolism, sporulation and toxin production. Additionally, the mutant showed lack of motility and biofilm formation at air-liquid interphase, and this correlated with absence of flagella, as flagella staining showed only WT and complemented strain to be highly flagellated. Comparative transcriptome analysis of cells harvested at selected time points during growth in aerated and static conditions in BHI revealed large differences in gene expression associated with loss of phenotypes, including significant down regulation of genes in the mutant encoding enzymes involved in degradation of branched chain amino acids, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, flagella synthesis and virulence factors. Our study provides evidence for a pleiotropic role of Sigma 54 in B. cereus supporting its adaptive response and survival in a range of conditions and environments. PMID:26241851

  4. Virus-induced gene silencing of the RPC5-like subunit of RNA polymerase III caused pleiotropic effects in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Nemchinov, Lev G; Boutanaev, Alexander M; Postnikova, Olga A

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, RNA polymerase III is highly conserved and transcribes housekeeping genes such as ribosomal 5S rRNA, tRNA and other small RNAs. The RPC5-like subunit is one of the 17 subunits forming RNAPIII and its exact functional roles in the transcription are poorly understood. In this work, we report that virus-induced gene silencing of transcripts encoding a putative RPC5-like subunit of the RNA Polymerase III in a model species Nicotiana benthamiana had pleiotropic effects, including but not limited to severe dwarfing appearance, chlorosis, nearly complete reduction of internodes and abnormal leaf shape. Using transcriptomic analysis, we identified genes and pathways affected by RPC5 silencing and thus presumably related to the cellular roles of the subunit as well as to the downstream cascade of reactions in response to partial loss of RNA Polymerase III function. Our results suggest that silencing of the RPC5L in N. benthamiana disrupted not only functions commonly associated with the core RNA Polymerase III transcripts, but also more diverse cellular processes, including responses to stress. We believe this is the first demonstration that activity of the RPC5 subunit is critical for proper functionality of RNA Polymerase III and normal plant development. PMID:27282827

  5. The Arabidopsis PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE8/ABCG36 ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Modulates Sensitivity to the Auxin Precursor Indole-3-Butyric Acid[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Strader, Lucia C.; Bartel, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    Plants have developed numerous mechanisms to store hormones in inactive but readily available states, enabling rapid responses to environmental changes. The phytohormone auxin has a number of storage precursors, including indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), which is apparently shortened to active indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in peroxisomes by a process similar to fatty acid β-oxidation. Whereas metabolism of auxin precursors is beginning to be understood, the biological significance of the various precursors is virtually unknown. We identified an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant that specifically restores IBA, but not IAA, responsiveness to auxin signaling mutants. This mutant is defective in PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE8 (PDR8)/PENETRATION3/ABCG36, a plasma membrane–localized ATP binding cassette transporter that has established roles in pathogen responses and cadmium transport. We found that pdr8 mutants display defects in efflux of the auxin precursor IBA and developmental defects in root hair and cotyledon expansion that reveal previously unknown roles for IBA-derived IAA in plant growth and development. Our results are consistent with the possibility that limiting accumulation of the IAA precursor IBA via PDR8-promoted efflux contributes to auxin homeostasis. PMID:19648296

  6. A Member of the PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE Family of ATP Binding Cassette Transporters Is Required for the Formation of a Functional Cuticle in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Bessire, Michael; Borel, Sandra; Fabre, Guillaume; Carraça, Luis; Efremova, Nadia; Yephremov, Alexander; Cao, Yan; Jetter, Reinhard; Jacquat, Anne-Claude; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Nawrath, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Although the multilayered structure of the plant cuticle was discovered many years ago, the molecular basis of its formation and the functional relevance of the layers are not understood. Here, we present the permeable cuticle1 (pec1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which displays features associated with a highly permeable cuticle in several organs. In pec1 flowers, typical cutin monomers, such as ω-hydroxylated fatty acids and 10,16-dihydroxypalmitate, are reduced to 40% of wild-type levels and are accompanied by the appearance of lipidic inclusions within the epidermal cell. The cuticular layer of the cell wall, rather than the cuticle proper, is structurally altered in pec1 petals. Therefore, a significant role for the formation of the diffusion barrier in petals can be attributed to this layer. Thus, pec1 defines a new class of mutants. The phenotypes of the pec1 mutant are caused by the knockout of ATP BINDING CASSETTEG32 (ABCG32), an ABC transporter from the PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE family that is localized at the plasma membrane of epidermal cells in a polar manner toward the surface of the organs. Our results suggest that ABCG32 is involved in the formation of the cuticular layer of the cell wall, most likely by exporting particular cutin precursors from the epidermal cell. PMID:21628525

  7. The beneficial pleiotropic effects of tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) within the vasculature: A review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Forde, Hannah; Harper, Emma; Davenport, Colin; Rochfort, Keith D; Wallace, Robert; Murphy, Ronan P; Smith, Diarmuid; Cummins, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a type II transmembrane protein that belongs to the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) cytokine superfamily. TRAIL is expressed by numerous cell types including vascular cells, immune cells and adipocytes. Although originally thought to induce apoptosis in malignant or transformed cells only, it is now known that TRAIL can bind up to 5 distinct receptors to activate complex signalling pathways, and is capable of exerting pleiotropic effects in non-transformed cells. In this respect, a number of clinical and animal studies point to the potential vasoprotective influence of TRAIL, with TRAIL deficiency being linked to accelerated atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. Moreover, exogenous TRAIL administration has been shown to exhibit anti-atherosclerotic activity in-vivo. In-vitro studies on TRAIL in this context have yielded conflicting results however, with evidence of both pro-atherogenic and vasoprotective effects ascribed to TRAIL. Notwithstanding these various studies, mechanistic information on the precise nature of TRAIL-mediated injury/protection within the vasculature, as well as the identity of the downstream molecular/cellular targets of TRAIL, is still quite limited. In this review, we will summarize our current knowledge of TRAIL regulation, signalling mechanisms, and its apparent involvement in CVD pathogenesis as a prelude to examining the existing evidence for TRAIL-mediated vasoprotection. To this end, extensive in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies will be reviewed and critical findings highlighted. PMID:26878368

  8. Pleiotropic effect of sigE over-expression on cell morphology, photosynthesis and hydrogen production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sato, Mayuko; Tanaka, Kan; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2013-11-01

    Over-expression of sigE, a gene encoding an RNA polymerase sigma factor in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, is known to activate sugar catabolism and bioplastic production. In this study, we investigated the effects of sigE over-expression on cell morphology, photosynthesis and hydrogen production in this cyanobacterium. Transmission electron and scanning probe microscopic analyses revealed that sigE over-expression increased the cell size, possibly as a result of aberrant cell division. Over-expression of sigE reduced respiration and photosynthesis activities via changes in gene expression and chlorophyll fluorescence. Hydrogen production under micro-oxic conditions is enhanced in sigE over-expressing cells. Despite these pleiotropic phenotypes, the sigE over-expressing strain showed normal cell viability under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. These results provide insights into the inter-relationship among metabolism, cell morphology, photosynthesis and hydrogen production in this unicellular cyanobacterium. PMID:23941239

  9. Virus-induced gene silencing of the RPC5-like subunit of RNA polymerase III caused pleiotropic effects in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Nemchinov, Lev G.; Boutanaev, Alexander M.; Postnikova, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, RNA polymerase III is highly conserved and transcribes housekeeping genes such as ribosomal 5S rRNA, tRNA and other small RNAs. The RPC5-like subunit is one of the 17 subunits forming RNAPIII and its exact functional roles in the transcription are poorly understood. In this work, we report that virus-induced gene silencing of transcripts encoding a putative RPC5-like subunit of the RNA Polymerase III in a model species Nicotiana benthamiana had pleiotropic effects, including but not limited to severe dwarfing appearance, chlorosis, nearly complete reduction of internodes and abnormal leaf shape. Using transcriptomic analysis, we identified genes and pathways affected by RPC5 silencing and thus presumably related to the cellular roles of the subunit as well as to the downstream cascade of reactions in response to partial loss of RNA Polymerase III function. Our results suggest that silencing of the RPC5L in N. benthamiana disrupted not only functions commonly associated with the core RNA Polymerase III transcripts, but also more diverse cellular processes, including responses to stress. We believe this is the first demonstration that activity of the RPC5 subunit is critical for proper functionality of RNA Polymerase III and normal plant development. PMID:27282827

  10. Ectopic expression of EbFIE from apomictic Eulaliopsis binata in rice results in pleiotropic phenotypes likely due to interaction with OsCLF.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; Zhang, Dongliang; Liu, Yaqin; Ouyang, Yidan; Li, Jiajia; Hu, Chungen; Yao, Jialing

    2015-05-01

    FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE) is a core component of PcG complexes and functions in plant phase transition and seed generation. However, understanding in its function of apomictic monocot plants remains blank. Here an FIE homology EbFIE, has been isolated from apomictic Graminae species Eulaliopsis binata. EbFIE shares higher homology to OsFIE2 than OsFIE1, and has been classified into the monocot FIE2 clade. In addition, the broad expression pattern of EbFIE is also similar to OsFIE2. While, ectopic expression of EbFIE in rice resulted in pleiotropic phenotypes similar to that of OsFIE1 over-expressing plants. Meanwhile, EbFIE could bind OsCLF in vitro as OsFIE1 but different with OsFIE2. Molecular models comparison indicated that both EbFIE and OsFIE1 had a smaller E(z) protein binding groove than OsFIE2. Further site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that single amino acid substitution of I194F in OsFIE2 could improve its OsCLF binding capacity. Taken together, our results suggested that EbFIE was a conserved FIE homolog belonging to monocot FIE2 clade, but due to the similarity in protein conformation with FIE1, EbFIE might play a broad role in vegetative and reproductive development regulation by interaction with CLF homolog. PMID:25804812

  11. The disease-linked Glu-26-Lys mutant version of Coronin 1A exhibits pleiotropic and pathway-specific signaling defects

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Virginia; Robles-Valero, Javier; Barreira, María; Bustelo, Xosé R.

    2015-01-01

    Coronin 1A (Coro1A) is involved in cytoskeletal and signaling events, including the regulation of Rac1 GTPase– and myosin II–dependent pathways. Mutations that generate truncated or unstable Coro1A proteins cause immunodeficiencies in both humans and rodents. However, in the case of the peripheral T-cell–deficient (Ptcd) mouse strain, the immunodeficiency is caused by a Glu-26-Lys mutation that targets a surface-exposed residue unlikely to affect the intramolecular architecture and stability of the protein. Here we report that this mutation induces pleiotropic effects in Coro1A protein, including the exacerbation of Coro1A-dependent actin-binding and -bundling activities; the formation of large meshworks of Coro1AE26K-decorated filaments endowed with unusual organizational, functional, and staining properties; and the elimination of Coro1A functions associated with both Rac1 and myosin II signaling. By contrast, it does not affect the ability of Coro1A to stimulate the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NF-AT). Coro1AE26K is not a dominant-negative mutant, indicating that its pathological effects are derived from the inability to rescue the complete loss of the wild-type counterpart in cells. These results indicate that Coro1AE26K behaves as either a recessive gain-of-function or loss-of-function mutant protein, depending on signaling context and presence of the wild-type counterpart in cells. PMID:26108624

  12. Pleiotropic Effects of DCDC2 and DYX1C1 Genes on Language and Mathematics Traits in Nuclear Families of Developmental Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Mascheretti, Sara; Riva, Valentina; Cattaneo, Francesca; Rigoletto, Catia; Rusconi, Marianna; Gruen, Jeffrey R.; Giorda, Roberto; Lazazzera, Claudio; Molteni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence indicates that developmental problems in oral language and mathematics can predate or co-occur with developmental dyslexia (DD). Substantial genetic correlations have been found between language, mathematics and reading traits, independent of the method of sampling. We tested for association of variants of two DD susceptibility genes, DCDC2 and DYX1C1, in nuclear families ascertained through a proband with DD using concurrent measurements of language and mathematics in both probands and siblings by the Quantitative Transmission Disequilibrium Test. Evidence for significant associations was found between DCDC2 and ‘Numerical Facts’ (p value = 0.02, with 85 informative families, genetic effect = 0.57) and between ‘Mental Calculation’ and DYX1C1 markers −3GA (p value = 0.05, with 40 informative families, genetic effect = −0.67) and 1249GT (p value = 0.02, with 49 informative families, genetic effect = −0.65). No statistically significant associations were found between DCDC2 or DYX1C1 and language phenotypes. Both DCDC2 and DYX1C1 DD susceptibility genes appear to have a pleiotropic role on mathematics but not language phenotypes. PMID:21046216

  13. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE.

    PubMed

    Zahodne, Laura B; Meyer, Oanh L; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L; Willis, Sherry L; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L; Rebok, George W; Parisi, Jeanine M

    2015-09-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. PMID:26237116

  14. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Zahodne, Laura B.; Meyer, Oanh L.; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L.; Willis, Sherry L.; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L.; Rebok, George W.; Parisi, Jeanine M.

    2015-01-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. PMID:26237116

  15. Effect of induced elation and depression on internal-external locus of control.

    PubMed

    Natale, M

    1978-11-01

    This study tested the notion that depression is associated with external locus of control and elation is related to internal locus of control. Temporary mood states (depression, elation, neutral) were produced by means of Velten's auto-suggestion technique. Fifteen female undergraduates were assigned to each mood condition, and locus of control scores were obtained both before and after the mood induction procedure. Pre-post changes were as predicted: elation caused an increased sense of internality, and depression caused an increased sense of externality. Neutral mood induction did not alter locus of control. PMID:722649

  16. Japanese pharmaceutical and regulatory environment.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Ryoichi; Rafizadeh-Kabe, Jean-David

    2002-12-01

    Drastic regulatory changes in Japan since 1997 have had a considerable impact on the way new medicines are developed. The regulatory authority itself has been transformed. Clinical trials are now performed according to international guidelines. Clinical data generated in one area are acceptable in the rest of the world in some cases through a bridging process that is viewed as only temporary. The future of drug development lies in multinational clinical trials and simultaneous submission to the major regulatory authorities. PMID:22034129

  17. Thorough investigation of a canine autoinflammatory disease (AID) confirms one main risk locus and suggests a modifier locus for amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Mia; Tintle, Linda; Kierczak, Marcin; Perloski, Michele; Tonomura, Noriko; Lundquist, Andrew; Murén, Eva; Fels, Max; Tengvall, Katarina; Pielberg, Gerli; Dufaure de Citres, Caroline; Dorso, Laetitia; Abadie, Jérôme; Hanson, Jeanette; Thomas, Anne; Leegwater, Peter; Hedhammar, Åke; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Meadows, Jennifer R S

    2013-01-01

    Autoinflammatory disease (AID) manifests from the dysregulation of the innate immune system and is characterised by systemic and persistent inflammation. Clinical heterogeneity leads to patients presenting with one or a spectrum of phenotypic signs, leading to difficult diagnoses in the absence of a clear genetic cause. We used separate genome-wide SNP analyses to investigate five signs of AID (recurrent fever, arthritis, breed specific secondary dermatitis, otitis and systemic reactive amyloidosis) in a canine comparative model, the pure bred Chinese Shar-Pei. Analysis of 255 DNA samples revealed a shared locus on chromosome 13 spanning two peaks of association. A three-marker haplotype based on the most significant SNP (p<2.6×10(-8)) from each analysis showed that one haplotypic pair (H13-11) was present in the majority of AID individuals, implicating this as a shared risk factor for all phenotypes. We also noted that a genetic signature (F ST) distinguishing the phenotypic extremes of the breed specific Chinese Shar-Pei thick and wrinkled skin, flanked the chromosome 13 AID locus; suggesting that breed development and differentiation has played a parallel role in the genetics of breed fitness. Intriguingly, a potential modifier locus for amyloidosis was revealed on chromosome 14, and an investigation of candidate genes from both this and the chromosome 13 regions revealed significant (p<0.05) renal differential expression in four genes previously implicated in kidney or immune health (AOAH, ELMO1, HAS2 and IL6). These results illustrate that phenotypic heterogeneity need not be a reflection of genetic heterogeneity, and that genetic modifiers of disease could be masked if syndromes were not first considered as individual clinical signs and then as a sum of their component parts. PMID:24130694

  18. Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Carl

    2006-07-11

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and Development: This area

  19. The discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, Mitf

    PubMed Central

    Arnheiter, Heinz

    2010-01-01

    Summary The history of the discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, now called Mitf, is a testament to the triumph of serendipity. Although the first microphthalmia mutation was discovered among the descendants of a mouse that was irradiated for the purpose of mutagenesis, the mutation most likely was not radiation-induced but occurred spontaneously in one of the parents of a later breeding. Although Mitf might eventually have been identified by other molecular genetic techniques, it was first cloned from a chance transgene insertion at the microphthalmia locus. And although Mitf was found to encode a member of a well-known transcription factor family, its analysis might still be in its infancy had Mitf not turned out to be of crucial importance for the physiology and pathology of many distinct organs, including eye, ear, immune system, bone, and skin, and in particular for melanoma. In fact, near seven decades of Mitf research have led to many insights about development, function, degeneration, and malignancies of a number of specific cell types, and it is hoped that these insights will one day lead to therapies benefitting those afflicted with diseases originating in these cell types. PMID:20807369

  20. Rapid publication: Clinical and locus heterogeneity in brachydactyly type C

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, N.H.; Gunay-Aygun, M.; Polinkovsky, A.

    1997-01-31

    Brachydactyly type C is characterized by shortness of the second and fifth middle phalanges and the first metacarpal. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, and is noted for its widely variable clinical phenotype both within and between families. In most families involvement is limited to the hands. However, in some families additional skeletal and nonskeletal findings have been reported. We report on 12 affected members from a 5 generation kindred that segregates a brachydactyly type C phenotype. All affected individuals had shortness principally affecting the second and fifth phalanges and first metacarpal. However, the metacarpal-phalangeal profile indicated that other digital elements were short as well. In addition, one affected individual had a bilateral Madelung deformity, but none had foot involvement. No other non-skeletal findings cosegregated with brachydactyly in this family. Recently, a gene for brachydactyly type C has been localized to 12q24. This was done by studying a large kindred first reported by Haws [1963], which manifests both hand and foot anomalies. Here we present linkage data which excludes the 12q24 locus in our kindred, indicating locus heterogeneity as one explanation for the interfamilial variability described in brachydactyly type C. 33 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.