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Sample records for plp gene causing

  1. PLP1 gene analysis in 88 patients with leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Montero, P; Muñoz-Calero, M; Vallespín, E; Campistol, J; Martorell, L; Ruiz-Falcó, M J; Santana, A; Pons, R; Dinopoulos, A; Sierra, C; Nevado, J; Molano, J

    2013-12-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is caused in most cases by either duplications or point mutations in the PLP1 gene. This disease, a dysmyelinating disorder affecting mainly the central nervous system, has a wide clinical spectrum and its causing mutations act through different molecular mechanisms. Eighty-eight male patients with leukodystrophy were studied. PLP1 gene analysis was performed by the Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification technique and DNA sequencing, and, in duplicated cases of PLP1, gene dosage was completed by using array-CGH. We have identified 21 patients with mutations in the PLP1 gene, including duplications, short and large deletions and several point mutations in our cohort. A customized array-CGH at the Xq22.2 area identified several complex rearrangements within the PLP1 gene region. Mutations found in the PLP1 gene are the cause of PMD in around 20% of the patients in this series. PMID:23347225

  2. Prenatal diagnosis by FISH in a family with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease caused by duplication of PLP gene.

    PubMed

    Woodward, K; Palmer, R; Rao, K; Malcolm, S

    1999-03-01

    A diagnosis of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (MIM 312080) was made in a young boy. No mutation in the coding region of the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene had been found. The boy's maternal aunt came for prenatal diagnosis when 16+ weeks pregnant and carrying a male fetus. Samples were tested for duplication of the PLP gene, by interphase FISH, in lymphocyte preparations from the proband, his aunt and an amniotic fluid cell preparation from the fetus. The proband was found to carry the duplication, thus confirming the diagnosis of Pelizaeus Merzbacher disease, but neither the aunt nor the fetus carried a duplication. PMID:10210128

  3. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    PubMed Central

    Kevelam, Sietske H; Taube, Jennifer R; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L; Bertini, Enrico; Sperle, Karen; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Travaglini, Lorena; Sistermans, Erik A; Bernard, Geneviève; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Østergaard, John R; Friederich, Richard L; Fawzi Elsaid, Mahmoud; Schieving, Jolanda H; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Orcesi, Simona; Steenweg, Marjan E; van Berkel, Carola G M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Abbink, Truus E M; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Hobson, Grace M; Wolf, Nicole I

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic etiology of the X-linked disorder “Hypomyelination of Early Myelinating Structures” (HEMS). Methods We included 16 patients from 10 families diagnosed with HEMS by brain MRI criteria. Exome sequencing was used to search for causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients’ fibroblasts and an immortalized immature oligodendrocyte cell line after transfection with mutant minigene splicing constructs. Results All patients had unusual hemizygous mutations of PLP1 located in exon 3B (one deletion, one missense and two silent), which is spliced out in isoform DM20, or in intron 3 (five mutations). The deletion led to truncation of PLP1, but not DM20. Four mutations were predicted to affect PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing by creating exonic splicing silencer motifs or new splice donor sites or by affecting the local RNA structure of the PLP1 splice donor site. Four deep intronic mutations were predicted to destabilize a long-distance interaction structure in the secondary PLP1 RNA fragment involved in regulating PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing. Splicing studies in fibroblasts and transfected cells confirmed a decreased PLP1/DM20 ratio. Interpretation Brain structures that normally myelinate early are poorly myelinated in HEMS, while they are the best myelinated structures in Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease, also caused by PLP1 alterations. Our data extend the phenotypic spectrum of PLP1-related disorders indicating that normal PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing is essential for early myelination and support the need to include intron 3 in diagnostic sequencing. PMID:26125040

  4. CNS myelination and PLP gene dosage.

    PubMed

    Woodward, K; Malcolm, S

    2001-08-01

    The phenomenon of gene dosage effects demonstrates that the mechanisms of some genetic diseases are best recognised at the genomic level. Classical gene mutation screening approaches utilising PCR are unsuccessful in unravelling the basis of disease because the gene sequence is unaltered and only the copy number is different. Techniques for detecting DNA dosage are required. Examples of haploinsufficiency and gene deletions are well documented, but increased gene dosage is also an important genetic mechanism in disorders involving myelin proteins in the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we review the dosage effects and mutations of the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene that causes Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) and spastic paraplegia Type 2 (SPG2) disorders of CNS myelination. Similarities are drawn with the peripheral neuropathies Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 1 (CMT1A) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) that are also caused by dosage effects and mutations in a single myelin protein gene (peripheral myelin protein 22, PMP-22). We compare the different mutational mechanisms in man and analogous mouse models that suggest a function for PLP beyond its structural role in myelin. We focus on the increased dosage of the PLP gene that is the major cause of PMD and results from a submicroscopic duplication of Xq22. Other clinical phenotypes may arise from gene dosage imbalance with the potential effect of submicroscopic duplications and deletions of the genome being underestimated. Genome sequencing may identify intrinsic structural properties of the DNA with greater susceptibility to these rearrangements and thereby reflect structural changes in the genome. PMID:11535114

  5. Mutation of the proteolipid protein gene PLP in a human X chromosome-linked myelin disorder.

    PubMed

    Hudson, L D; Puckett, C; Berndt, J; Chan, J; Gencic, S

    1989-10-01

    Myelin is a highly specialized membrane unique to the nervous system that ensheaths axons to permit the rapid saltatory conduction of impulses. The elaboration of a compact myelin sheath is disrupted in a diverse spectrum of human disorders, many of which are of unknown etiology. The X chromosome-linked human disorder Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous group of disorders that demonstrate a striking failure of oligodendrocyte differentiation. This disease appears pathologically and genetically to be similar to the disorder seen in the dysmyelinating mouse mutant jimpy, which has a point mutation in the gene encoding an abundant myelin protein, proteolipid protein (PLP). We report that the molecular defect in one Pelizaeus-Merzbacher family is likewise a point mutation in the PLP gene. A single T----C transition results in the substitution of a charged amino acid residue, arginine, for tryptophan in one of the four extremely hydrophobic domains of the PLP protein. The identification of a mutation in this Pelizaeus-Merzbacher family should facilitate the molecular classification and diagnosis of these X chromosome-linked human dysmyelinating disorders. PMID:2479017

  6. Further evidence for a fourth gene causing X-linked pure spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Starling, A; Rocco, P; Cambi, F; Hobson, G M; Passos Bueno, M R; Zatz, M

    2002-08-01

    X-linked hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) present with two distinct phenotypes: pure and complicated. The pure form is characterized by slowly progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs, whereas the complicated forms have additional features (optic neuropathy, retinopathy, extrapyramidal disturbance, dementia, epilepsy, ataxia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and deafness). Three X-linked loci have been identified for the complicated HSP, while mutations in the proteolipid gene (PLP) (locus SPG2) were implicated in both pure and complicated forms. The absence of identified mutations in the PLP gene in families with both complicated and pure HSP, linked to the SPG2 locus, suggests the existence of another gene in close proximity. We had previously reported a large pedigree with an X-linked form of pure HSP affecting 24 males [Zatz et al., 1976: J Med Genet 13:217-222]. Here, we present the results of linkage analysis in 19 members of this Brazilian family with markers in or near the PLP locus. Positive LOD scores were obtained with markers at the PLP locus (Zmax = 2.41 at Theta = 0); however, no mutation was found in the coding region of PLP, the intron-exon boundaries, or part of the promoter region. The possibility of a duplication of the PLP gene was also excluded. These results suggest either that there is another X-linked gene in close proximity to the PLP gene or that a novel mutation in the noncoding regions of the PLP gene may cause the disease in this family. PMID:12210342

  7. Reduced response of splenocytes after mitogen-stimulation in the prion protein (PrP) gene-deficient mouse: PrPLP/Doppel production and cerebral degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chi-Kyeong; Hirose, Yuko; Sakudo, Akikazu; Takeyama, Natsumi; Kang, Chung-Boo; Taniuchi, Yojiro; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Sakaguchi, Suehiro; Onodera, Takashi . E-mail: aonoder@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-06-29

    Splenocytes of wild-type (Prnp {sup +/+}) and prion protein gene-deficient (Prnp {sup -/-}) mice were treated with various activation stimuli such as T cell mitogen concanavalin A (ConA), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) + ionomycin (Io), or B cell mitogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) expression was enhanced following ConA stimulation, but not PMA + Io or LPS in Prnp {sup +/+} splenocytes. Rikn Prnp {sup -/-} splenocytes elicited lower cell proliferations than Prnp {sup +/+} or Zrch I Prnp {sup -/-} splenocytes after LPS stimulation and showed sporadic nerve cells in the cerebral cortex and deeper structure. Around the degenerated nerve cells, mild vacuolation in the neuropil was observed. This neural alteration correlated well to the suppressed response of B cells in the spleen. The finding that discrete lesions within the central nervous systems induced marked modulation of immune function probably indicates the existence of a delicately balanced neural-endocrine network by PrP{sup C} and PrPLP/Doppel.

  8. Identification and co-localization of perforin-like (TgPLP1) protein in Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoites.

    PubMed

    Shan, Dan; Qian, Weifeng; Liu, Jing; Liu, Renqiang; Liu, Qun

    2015-06-01

    For the first time, we show here that perforin-like (TgPLP1) is expressed in bradyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii. An immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed that TgPLP1 is expressed in T. gondii-encysted and in vitro-induced bradyzoites, TgPLP1 is distributed in micronemes in a manner similar to its distribution in tachyzoites. To shed light on the function of TgPLP1 in bradyzoites, quantitative PCR revealed that the expression level of TgPLP1 gene decreased over time during differentiation into bradyzoites in vitro. This finding suggests that TgPLP1 may play a role in the rupture of tissue cysts or the maintenance of cyst structure, although the exact function of this gene in the bradyzoites is still unknown. PMID:25746893

  9. Control of human PLP1 expression through transcriptional regulatory elements and alternatively spliced exons in intron 1.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Hamdan; Kockara, Neriman T; Jolly, Lee Ann; Haun, Shirley; Wight, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Although the myelin proteolipid protein gene (PLP1) encodes the most abundant protein in central nervous system (CNS) myelin, not much is known about the mechanisms that govern expression of the human gene (hPLP1). Much more is known about the processes that regulate Plp1 gene expression in rodents. From studies with Plp1-lacZ transgenic mice, it was determined that the first intron of mouse Plp1 (mPlp1) is required to attain high levels of expression in brain, concurrent with the active myelination period. Other studies have suggested that within mPlp1 intron 1 (>8 kb) lie several regions with enhancer-like activity. To test whether these sequences (and possibly others) in hPLP1 intron 1 are functional, deletion-transfection analysis was performed with hPLP1-lacZ constructs that contain various portions of the intron, or lack it altogether. Results presented here demonstrate the importance of hPLP1 intron 1 in achieving maximal levels of expression in the immortalized oligodendroglial cell line, Oli-neu. Deletion analysis indicates that the intron contains multiple positive regulatory elements which are active in Oli-neu cells. Some of these elements appear to be functionally conserved between human and mouse, while others are not. Furthermore, our studies demonstrate that multiple splice variants can be formed due to inclusion of extra (supplementary) exons from what is classically thought of as hPLP1 intron 1. Thus, splicing of these novel exons (which are not recognized as such in mPlp1 due to lack of conserved splice sites) must utilize factors common to both human and mouse since Oli-neu cells are of mouse origin. PMID:25694552

  10. Further genotype-phenotype correlation emerging from two families with PLP1 exon 4 skipping.

    PubMed

    Biancheri, Roberta; Grossi, Serena; Regis, Stefano; Rossi, Andrea; Corsolini, Fabio; Rossi, Daniela Paola; Cavalli, Pietro; Severino, Mariasavina; Filocamo, Mirella

    2014-03-01

    Proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1) gene-related disorders due to mutations in the PLP1 include a wide spectrum of X-linked disorders ranging from severe connatal Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) to spastic paraplegia 2 (SPG2). Duplications, deletions or point mutations in coding and noncoding regions of the PLP1 gene may occur. We report the clinical, neuroradiologic and molecular findings in six patients from two unrelated families. The affected males showed severe mental retardation, spastic tetraparesis, inability of walking and pes cavus at onset in early infancy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hypomyelination and brain atrophy. Nystagmus was never observed. The affected females showed adult-onset progressive spastic paraparesis leading to wheel-chair dependency and subtle white matter changes on brain MRI. Molecular studies in the two families identified two different intronic mutations, the novel c.622+2T>C and the known c.622+1G>A, leading to the skipping of PLP1-exon 4. The clinical presentation of the affected males did not consistently fit in any of the PLP1-related disorder subtypes (i.e., connatal or classic PMD, SPG2 and 'PLP1 null syndrome'), and in addition, the carrier females were symptomatic despite the severe clinical picture of their respective probands. This study provides new insight into the genotype-phenotype correlations of patients with PLP1 splice-site mutations. PMID:23711321

  11. Loss of MiR-664 Expression Enhances Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma Proliferation by Upregulating PLP2

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhenhua; Jian, Sun; Peng, Xuebiao; Liu, Yimin; Wang, Jianyu; Zheng, Li; Ou, Chengshan; Wang, Yinghui; Zeng, Weixia; Zhou, Meijuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Proteolipid protein 2 (PLP2) has been shown to be upregulated in several cancers, including breast cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, osteosarcoma, and melanoma. PLP2 specifically binds to phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase to activate the protein kinase B pathway to enhance cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion in melanoma cells. Therefore, we speculated that PLP2 exhibits oncogenic potential. However, the regulatory mechanisms of PLP2 in cancer cells remain unclear. Herein, we found that microRNA (miR)-664 expression was significantly downregulated in cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) cells and tissues compared with normal human melanocytes and benign melanocytic naevi. MiR-664 expression level was significantly correlated with patient survival. Ectopic expression of miR-664 reduced CMM cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, whereas the inhibition of miR-664 induced these effects. Furthermore, inhibition of miR-664 in CMM cells resulted in modulation of their entry into the G1/S transitional phase, which was caused by downregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P21 and upregulation of the cell-cycle regulator cyclin D1. Moreover, we demonstrated that miR-664 downregulated PLP2 expression by directly targeting the PLP2 untranslated region. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-664 may play an important role in suppressing proliferation of CMM cells and present a novel mechanism of miR-mediated direct suppression of PLP2 expression in cancer cells. PMID:26287415

  12. Molecular characterization and structural instability of the industrially important composite metabolic plasmid pLP712.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Udo; Overweg, Karin; Jeanson, Sophie; Gasson, Mike; Shearman, Claire

    2012-12-01

    The widely used plasmid-free Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 was derived from the industrial dairy starter strain NCDO712. This strain carries a 55.39 kb plasmid encoding genes for lactose catabolism and a serine proteinase involved in casein degradation. We report the DNA sequencing and annotation of pLP712, which revealed additional metabolic genes, including peptidase F, d-lactate dehydrogenase and α-keto acid dehydrogenase (E3 complex). Comparison of pLP712 with other large lactococcal lactose and/or proteinase plasmids from L. lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 (pSK11L, pSK11P) and the plant strain L. lactis NCDO1867 (pGdh442) revealed their close relationship. The plasmid appears to have evolved through a series of genetic events as a composite of pGdh442, pSK11L and pSK11P. We describe in detail a scenario by which the metabolic genes relevant to the growth of its host in a milk environment have been unified on one replicon, reflecting the evolution of L. lactis as it changed its biological niche from plants to dairy environments. The extensive structural instability of pLP712 allows easy isolation of derivative plasmids lacking genes for casein degradation and/or lactose catabolism. Plasmid pLP712 is transferable by transduction and conjugation, and both of these processes result in significant molecular rearrangements. We report the detailed molecular analysis of insertion sequence element-mediated genetic rearrangements within pLP712 and several different mechanisms, including homologous recombination and adjacent deletion. Analysis of the integration of the lactose operon into the chromosome highlights the fluidity of the MG1363 integration hotspot and the potential for frequent movement of genes between plasmids and chromosomes in Lactococcus. PMID:23023974

  13. Paracoccidioides lutzii Plp43 Is an Active Glucanase with Partial Antigenic Identity with P. brasiliensis gp43

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Natanael P.; Vallejo, Milene C.; Conceição, Palloma M.; Camargo, Zoilo P.; Hahn, Rosane; Puccia, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). P. brasiliensis main diagnostic antigen is glycoprotein gp43, and its peptide sequence is 81% identical with a P. lutzii ortholog here called Plp43. P. lutzii (“Pb01-like”) apparently predominates in Midwestern/Northern Brazil, where high percentages of false-negative reactions using P. brasiliensis antigens have recently been reported. The aim of this work was to produce recombinant Plp43 to study its antigenic identity with gp43. Methodology We expressed rPlp43 as a secreted major component in Pichia pastoris and studied its reactivity in immunoblot with PCM patients' sera from Southwestern and Midwestern Brazil. Principal Findings We showed that rPlp43 is not glycosylated and bears glucanase activity. The protein did not react with anti-gp43 monoclonal antibodies in immunoblot, suggesting absence of the corresponding gp43 epitopes. Nevertheless, common epitope(s) might exist, considering that gp43-positive PCM sera recognized rPlp43 in immunoblot, while gp43-negative sera (33 out of 51) from patients resident in Midwestern Brazil were also rPlp43-negative. Two genotyped P. lutzii were from patients with gp43-negative sera, suggesting that non-reactive sera are from patients infected with this species. Conclusion Our data suggest that gp43 and Plp43 bear one or only a few common epitopes and that gp43 cannot be used in diagnosis of PCM patients infected with P. lutzii probably because Plp43 is poorly expressed during infection. PMID:25166744

  14. A critical role for the cholesterol-associated proteolipids PLP and M6B in myelination of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Werner, Hauke B; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Strenzke, Nicola; Saher, Gesine; Tenzer, Stefan; Ohno-Iwashita, Yoshiko; De Monasterio-Schrader, Patricia; Möbius, Wiebke; Moser, Tobias; Griffiths, Ian R; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2013-04-01

    The formation of central nervous system myelin by oligodendrocytes requires sterol synthesis and is associated with a significant enrichment of cholesterol in the myelin membrane. However, it is unknown how oligodendrocytes concentrate cholesterol above the level found in nonmyelin membranes. Here, we demonstrate a critical role for proteolipids in cholesterol accumulation. Mice lacking the most abundant myelin protein, proteolipid protein (PLP), are fully myelinated, but PLP-deficient myelin exhibits a reduced cholesterol content. We therefore hypothesized that "high cholesterol" is not essential in the myelin sheath itself but is required for an earlier step of myelin biogenesis that is fully compensated for in the absence of PLP. We also found that a PLP-homolog, glycoprotein M6B, is a myelin component of low abundance. By targeting the Gpm6b-gene and crossbreeding, we found that single-mutant mice lacking either PLP or M6B are fully myelinated, while double mutants remain severely hypomyelinated, with enhanced neurodegeneration and premature death. As both PLP and M6B bind membrane cholesterol and associate with the same cholesterol-rich oligodendroglial membrane microdomains, we suggest a model in which proteolipids facilitate myelination by sequestering cholesterol. While either proteolipid can maintain a threshold level of cholesterol in the secretory pathway that allows myelin biogenesis, lack of both proteolipids results in a severe molecular imbalance of prospective myelin membrane. However, M6B is not efficiently sorted into mature myelin, in which it is 200-fold less abundant than PLP. Thus, only PLP contributes to the high cholesterol content of myelin by association and co-transport. PMID:23322581

  15. Haploid Genetic Screens Identify an Essential Role for PLP2 in the Downregulation of Novel Plasma Membrane Targets by Viral E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Timms, Richard T.; Duncan, Lidia M.; Tchasovnikarova, Iva A.; Antrobus, Robin; Smith, Duncan L.; Dougan, Gordon; Weekes, Michael P.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus gene products K3 and K5 are viral ubiquitin E3 ligases which downregulate MHC-I and additional cell surface immunoreceptors. To identify novel cellular genes required for K5 function we performed a forward genetic screen in near-haploid human KBM7 cells. The screen identified proteolipid protein 2 (PLP2), a MARVEL domain protein of unknown function, as essential for K5 activity. Genetic loss of PLP2 traps the viral ligase in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is unable to ubiquitinate and degrade its substrates. Subsequent analysis of the plasma membrane proteome of K5-expressing KBM7 cells in the presence and absence of PLP2 revealed a wide range of novel K5 targets, all of which required PLP2 for their K5-mediated downregulation. This work ascribes a critical function to PLP2 for viral ligase activity and underlines the power of non-lethal haploid genetic screens in human cells to identify the genes involved in pathogen manipulation of the host immune system. PMID:24278019

  16. 13 CFR 120.452 - What are the requirements of PLP loan processing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the requirements of PLP loan processing? 120.452 Section 120.452 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Lenders Preferred Lenders Program (plp) § 120.452 What are the requirements of PLP loan processing? (a) Subparts A and B of this...

  17. [The Research Advances of the Pathomechanism of Phantom Limb Pain (PLP)].

    PubMed

    Jin, Qing-Qing; Tang, Dan-Dan; Peng, Wei-Wei; Hu, Li

    2015-10-01

    Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a hallucination that the patient feels the existence off the limb after its loss and experiences somewhat pain of the missing limb. Such a pain normally appears in the distal end of the missing limb. Currently, the pathomechanism of PLP is still unclear, and the clinical research of PLP mainly relies on the subjective report of the patients and the psychophysical measurements. In this paper, we discuss extensively the pathomechanism of PLP, and summarize comprehensively the advanced methods for studying the pathomechanism of PLP. In short, the paper could deepen our understanding of the pathomechanism of PLP, and could serve as an effective instruction basis for researchers and doctors to diagnose and treat the PLP. PMID:26904856

  18. miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 and promotes cell proliferation and invasion in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hong; Miao, Mei-hua; Ji, Xue-qiang; Xue, Jun; Shao, Xue-jun

    2015-04-03

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in leukaemia, particularly T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL), has remained elusive. Here, we identified miR-664 and its predicted target gene PLP2 were differentially expressed in T-ALL using bioinformatics methods. In T-ALL cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-664, while miR-664 inhibitor could significantly inhibited the proliferation. Moreover, migration and invasion assay showed that overexpression of miR-664 could significantly promoted the migration and invasion of T-ALL cells, whereas miR-664 inhibitor could reduce cell migration and invasion. luciferase assays confirmed that miR-664 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of PLP2, and western blotting showed that miR-664 suppressed the expression of PLP2 at the protein levels. This study indicated that miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 and promotes proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cell lines. Thus, miR-664 may represent a potential therapeutic target for T-ALL intervention. - Highlights: • miR-664 mimics promote the proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cells. • miR-664 inhibitors inhibit the proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cells. • miR-664 targets 3′ UTR of PLP2 in T-ALL cells. • miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 in T-ALL cells.

  19. A chimeric protein comprising the immunogenic domains of Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin and outer membrane protein PlpE induces antibodies against leukotoxin and PlpE.

    PubMed

    Batra, Sai Arun; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Donofrio, Gaetano; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is a very important pathogen of pneumonia in ruminants. Bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are highly susceptible to M. haemolytica-caused pneumonia which has significantly contributed to the drastic decline of bighorn sheep population in North America. Pneumonia outbreaks in wild BHS can cause mortality as high as 90%. Leukotoxin is the critical virulence factor of M. haemolytica. In a 'proof of concept' study, an experimental vaccine containing leukotoxin and surface antigens of M. haemolytica developed by us induced 100% protection of BHS, but required multiple booster injections. Vaccination of wild BHS is difficult. But they can be vaccinated at the time of transplantation into a new habitat. Administration of booster doses, however, is impossible. Therefore, a vaccine that does not require booster doses is necessary to immunize BHS against M. haemolytica pneumonia. Herpesviruses are ideal vectors for development of such a vaccine because of their ability to undergo latency with subsequent reactivation. As the first step towards developing a herpesvirus-vectored vaccine, we constructed a chimeric protein comprising the leukotoxin-neutralizing epitopes and the immuno-dominant epitopes of the outer membrane protein PlpE. The chimeric protein was efficiently expressed in primary BHS lung cells. The immunogenicity of the chimeric protein was evaluated in mice before inoculating BHS. Mice immunized with the chimeric protein developed antibodies against M. haemolytica leukotoxin and PlpE. More importantly, the anti-leukotoxin antibodies effectively neutralized leukotoxin-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, these results represent the successful completion of the first step towards developing a herpesvirus-vectored vaccine for controlling M. haemolytica pneumonia in BHS, and possibly other ruminants. PMID:27269790

  20. Myelin-associated glycoprotein gene mutation causes Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease-like disorder.

    PubMed

    Lossos, Alexander; Elazar, Nimrod; Lerer, Israela; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Fellig, Yakov; Glick, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Bat-El; Azulay, Haim; Dotan, Shlomo; Goldberg, Sharon; Gomori, John M; Ponger, Penina; Newman, J P; Marreed, Hodaifah; Steck, Andreas J; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Mor, Nofar; Harel, Michal; Geiger, Tamar; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Meiner, Vardiella; Peles, Elior

    2015-09-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease is an X-linked hypomyelinating leukodystrophy caused by mutations or rearrangements in PLP1. It presents in infancy with nystagmus, jerky head movements, hypotonia and developmental delay evolving into spastic tetraplegia with optic atrophy and variable movement disorders. A clinically similar phenotype caused by recessive mutations in GJC2 is known as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. Both genes encode proteins associated with myelin. We describe three siblings of a consanguineous family manifesting the typical infantile-onset Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease-like phenotype slowly evolving into a form of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia with mental retardation, dysarthria, optic atrophy and peripheral neuropathy in adulthood. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy were consistent with a demyelinating leukodystrophy. Using genetic linkage and exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense c.399C>G; p.S133R mutation in MAG. This gene, previously associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia, encodes myelin-associated glycoprotein, which is involved in myelin maintenance and glia-axon interaction. This mutation is predicted to destabilize the protein and affect its tertiary structure. Examination of the sural nerve biopsy sample obtained in childhood in the oldest sibling revealed complete absence of myelin-associated glycoprotein accompanied by ill-formed onion-bulb structures and a relatively thin myelin sheath of the affected axons. Immunofluorescence, cell surface labelling, biochemical analysis and mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies in a variety of cell types demonstrated a devastating effect of the mutation on post-translational processing, steady state expression and subcellular localization of myelin-associated glycoprotein. In contrast to the wild-type protein, the p.S133R mutant was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and was subjected to endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation by the

  1. Expression of proteolipid protein gene in spinal cord stem cells and early oligodendrocyte progenitor cells is dispensable for normal cell migration and myelination.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Danielle E; Saul, Katherine E; Culp, Cecilia M; Vesely, Elisa M; Macklin, Wendy B

    2014-01-22

    Plp1 gene expression occurs very early in development, well before the onset of myelination, creating a conundrum with regard to the function of myelin proteolipid protein (PLP), one of the major proteins in compact myelin. Using PLP-EGFP mice to investigate Plp1 promoter activity, we found that, at very early time points, PLP-EGFP was expressed in Sox2+ undifferentiated precursors in the spinal cord ventricular zone (VZ), as well as in the progenitors of both neuronal and glial lineages. As development progressed, most PLP-EGFP-expressing cells gave rise to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). The expression of PLP-EGFP in the spinal cord was quite dynamic during development. PLP-EGFP was highly expressed as cells delaminated from the VZ. Expression was downregulated as cells moved laterally through the cord, and then robustly upregulated as OPCs differentiated into mature myelinating oligodendrocytes. The presence of PLP-EGFP expression in OPCs raises the question of its role in this migratory population. We crossed PLP-EGFP reporter mice into a Plp1-null background to investigate the role of PLP in early OPC development. In the absence of PLP, normal numbers of OPCs were generated and their distribution throughout the spinal cord was unaffected. However, the orientation and length of OPC processes during migration was abnormal in Plp1-null mice, suggesting that PLP plays a role either in the structural integrity of OPC processes or in their response to extracellular cues that orient process outgrowth. PMID:24453324

  2. The proteolipid protein gene: Double, double, . . . and trouble

    SciTech Connect

    Hodes, M.E.; Dlouhy, S.R.

    1996-07-01

    That more of a good thing may be too much has been apparent at least since the discovery that Down syndrome is caused by three copies of chromosome 21 instead of the normal two. Duplications of myelin genes also lead to trouble. An extra dose of PMP22, the gene for a protein of peripheral nervous system myelin, causes Charcot-Marie Tooth type 1A disease (CMT1A). Increased dosage of the proteolipid protein gene, PLP, which encodes the chief protein of CNS myelin, can cause Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). The work of Inoue et al. is of particular importance because they found the duplication in four of five families with {open_quotes}classical{close_quotes} PMD, whereas other changes in PLP, such as missense mutations, are found in no more than one in four or five patients with the disease. 27 refs.

  3. Interaction of PLP with GFP-MAL2 in the human oligodendroglial cell line HOG.

    PubMed

    Bello-Morales, Raquel; Pérez-Hernández, Marta; Rejas, María Teresa; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Alcina, Antonio; López-Guerrero, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The velocity of the nerve impulse conduction of vertebrates relies on the myelin sheath, an electrically insulating layer that surrounds axons in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, enabling saltatory conduction of the action potential. Oligodendrocytes are the myelin-producing glial cells in the central nervous system. A deeper understanding of the molecular basis of myelination and, specifically, of the transport of myelin proteins, will contribute to the search of the aetiology of many dysmyelinating and demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis. Recent investigations suggest that proteolipid protein (PLP), the major myelin protein, could reach myelin sheath by an indirect transport pathway, that is, a transcytotic route via the plasma membrane of the cell body. If PLP transport relies on a transcytotic process, it is reasonable to consider that this myelin protein could be associated with MAL2, a raft protein essential for transcytosis. In this study, carried out with the human oligodendrocytic cell line HOG, we show that PLP colocalized with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-MAL2 after internalization from the plasma membrane. In addition, both immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assays, indicated the existence of an interaction between GFP-MAL2 and PLP. Finally, ultrastructural studies demonstrated colocalization of GFP-MAL2 and PLP in vesicles and tubulovesicular structures. Taken together, these results prove for the first time the interaction of PLP and MAL2 in oligodendrocytic cells, supporting the transcytotic model of PLP transport previously suggested. PMID:21573057

  4. Involvement of Peripheral Nerves in the Transgenic PLP-α-Syn Model of Multiple System Atrophy: Extending the Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kuzdas-Wood, Daniela; Irschick, Regina; Theurl, Markus; Malsch, Philipp; Mair, Norbert; Mantinger, Christine; Wanschitz, Julia; Klimaschewski, Lars; Poewe, Werner; Stefanova, Nadia; Wenning, Gregor K.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a fatal, rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease with (oligodendro-)glial cytoplasmic α-synuclein (α-syn) inclusions (GCIs). Peripheral neuropathies have been reported in up to 40% of MSA patients, the cause remaining unclear. In a transgenic MSA mouse model featuring GCI-like inclusion pathology based on PLP-promoter driven overexpression of human α-syn in oligodendroglia motor and non-motor deficits are associated with MSA-like neurodegeneration. Since α-syn is also expressed in Schwann cells we aimed to investigate whether peripheral nerves are anatomically and functionally affected in the PLP-α-syn MSA mouse model. Results To this end, heat/cold as well as mechanical sensitivity tests were performed. Furthermore, in vivo and ex vivo nerve conduction and the G-ratios of the sciatic nerve were analyzed, and thermosensitive ion channel mRNA expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was assessed. The presence of human α-syn in Schwann cells was associated with subtle behavioral impairments. The G-ratio of the sciatic nerve, the conduction velocity of myelinated and unmyelinated primary afferents and the expression of thermosensitive ion channels in the sensory neurons, however, were similar to wildtype mice. Conclusion Our results suggest that the PNS appears to be affected by Schwann cell α-syn deposits in the PLP-α-syn MSA mouse model. However, there was no consistent evidence for functional PNS perturbations resulting from such α-syn aggregates suggesting a more central cause of the observed behavioral abnormalities. Nonetheless, our results do not exclude a causal role of α-syn in the pathogenesis of MSA associated peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26496712

  5. Pyridoxal 5ꞌ-phosphate-responsive epilepsy with novel mutations in the PNPO gene: a case report.

    PubMed

    Veeravigrom, M; Damrongphol, P; Ittiwut, R; Ittiwut, C; Suphapeetiporn, K; Shotelersuk, V

    2015-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-responsive epilepsy is a rare autosomal recessive epileptic disorder caused by deficiency of pyridox(am)-ne 5'-phosphate oxidase (PNPO). Neonatal onset seizures in PLP responsive epilepsy are usually resistant to common anticonvulsants and pyridoxine, but respond to PLP. Various PNPO mutations are associated with this disorder. In this report, we have described a case of a female baby with neonatal onset seizures responding to PLP. Exome sequencing revealed that the patient was compound heterozygous for pathogenic mutations [c.546+1G>A (IVS5+1 G>A) and c.620delG (p.G207VfsX215)] in the PNPO gene. The c.546+1G>A was inherited from the mother while the c.620delG was inherited from the father. Both mutations were absent in 122 unrelated Thai controls. The results of this study indicated the presence of two newly identified mutations in this Thai patient with PLP-responsive epilepsy for the first time, expanding the mutational spectrum of PNPO. PMID:26535729

  6. The PLP cofactor: Lessons from studies on model reactions

    PubMed Central

    Richard, John P.; Amyes, Tina L.; Crugeiras, Juan; Rios, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Experimental probes of the acidity of weak carbon acids have been developed and used to determine the carbon acid pKas of glycine, glycine derivatives and iminium ion adducts of glycine to the carbonyl group, including 5′-deoxypyridoxal (DPL). The high reactivity of the DPL-stabilized glycyl carbanion towards nucleophilic addition to both DPL and the glycine-DPL iminium ion favors the formation of Claisen condensation products at enzyme active sites. The formation of the iminium ion between glycine and DPL is accompanied by a 12-unit decrease in the pKa of 29 for glycine. The complicated effects of formation of glycine iminium ions to DPL and other aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes and ketones on carbon acid pKa are discussed. These data provide insight into the contribution of the individual pyridine ring substituents to the catalytic efficiency of DPL It is suggested that the 5′-phosphodianion group of PLP may play an important role in enzymatic catalysis of carbon deprotonation by providing up to 12 kcal/mol of binding energy that is utilized to stabilize the transition state for the enzymatic reaction. PMID:21182991

  7. MAL Is a Regulator of the Recruitment of Myelin Protein PLP to Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Bijlard, Marjolein; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Klunder, Bert; Nomden, Anita; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2016-01-01

    In oligodendrocytes (OLGs), an indirect, transcytotic pathway is mediating transport of de novo synthesized PLP, a major myelin specific protein, from the apical-like plasma membrane to the specialized basolateral-like myelin membrane to prevent its premature compaction. MAL is a well-known regulator of polarized trafficking in epithelial cells, and given its presence in OLGs it was therefore of interest to investigate whether MAL played a similar role in PLP transport in OLGs, taking into account its timely expression in these cells. Our data revealed that premature expression of mCherry-MAL in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells interfered with terminal OLG differentiation, although myelin membrane formation per se was not impaired. In fact, also PLP transport to myelin membranes via the cell body plasma membrane was unaffected. However, the typical shift of PLP from TX-100-insoluble membrane domains to CHAPS-resistant, but TX-100-soluble membrane domains, seen in the absence of MAL expression, is substantially reduced upon expression of the MAL protein. Interestingly, not only in vitro, but also in developing brain a strongly diminished shift from TX-100 resistant to TX-100 soluble domains was observed. Consistently, the MAL-expression mediated annihilation of the typical membrane microdomain shift of PLP is also reflected by a loss of the characteristic surface expression profile of conformation-sensitive anti-PLP antibodies. Hence, these findings suggest that MAL is not involved in vesicular PLP trafficking to either the plasma membrane and/or the myelin membrane as such. Rather, we propose that MAL may regulate PLP’s distribution into distinct membrane microdomains that allow for lateral diffusion of PLP, directly from the plasma membrane to the myelin membrane once the myelin sheath has been assembled. PMID:27171274

  8. Gene expression variability in clonal populations: Causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Roberfroid, Stefanie; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steenackers, Hans

    2016-11-01

    During the last decade it has been shown that among cell variation in gene expression plays an important role within clonal populations. Here, we provide an overview of the different mechanisms contributing to gene expression variability in clonal populations. These are ranging from inherent variations in the biochemical process of gene expression itself, such as intrinsic noise, extrinsic noise and bistability to individual responses to variations in the local micro-environment, a phenomenon called phenotypic plasticity. Also genotypic variations caused by clonal evolution and phase variation can contribute to gene expression variability. Consequently, gene expression studies need to take these fluctuations in expression into account. However, frequently used techniques for expression quantification, such as microarrays, RNA sequencing, quantitative PCR and gene reporter fusions classically determine the population average of gene expression. Here, we discuss how these techniques can be adapted towards single cell analysis by integration with single cell isolation, RNA amplification and microscopy. Alternatively more qualitative selection-based techniques, such as mutant screenings, in vivo expression technology (IVET) and recombination-based IVET (RIVET) can be applied for detection of genes expressed only within a subpopulation. Finally, differential fluorescence induction (DFI), a protocol specially designed for single cell expression is discussed. PMID:26731119

  9. Credibility Analysis of Putative Disease-Causing Genes Using Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Olubunmi; Powell, John F.; Andersen, Peter M.; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic studies are challenging in many complex diseases, particularly those with limited diagnostic certainty, low prevalence or of old age. The result is that genes may be reported as disease-causing with varying levels of evidence, and in some cases, the data may be so limited as to be indistinguishable from chance findings. When there are large numbers of such genes, an objective method for ranking the evidence is useful. Using the neurodegenerative and complex disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as a model, and the disease-specific database ALSoD, the objective is to develop a method using publicly available data to generate a credibility score for putative disease-causing genes. Methods Genes with at least one publication suggesting involvement in adult onset familial ALS were collated following an exhaustive literature search. SQL was used to generate a score by extracting information from the publications and combined with a pathogenicity analysis using bioinformatics tools. The resulting score allowed us to rank genes in order of credibility. To validate the method, we compared the objective ranking with a rank generated by ALS genetics experts. Spearman's Rho was used to compare rankings generated by the different methods. Results The automated method ranked ALS genes in the following order: SOD1, TARDBP, FUS, ANG, SPG11, NEFH, OPTN, ALS2, SETX, FIG4, VAPB, DCTN1, TAF15, VCP, DAO. This compared very well to the ranking of ALS genetics experts, with Spearman's Rho of 0.69 (P = 0.009). Conclusion We have presented an automated method for scoring the level of evidence for a gene being disease-causing. In developing the method we have used the model disease ALS, but it could equally be applied to any disease in which there is genotypic uncertainty. PMID:23755159

  10. Single Gene and Syndromic Causes of Obesity: Illustrative Examples.

    PubMed

    Butler, Merlin G

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem in westernized societies, particularly in the United States where it has reached epidemic proportions in both adults and children. The prevalence of childhood obesity has doubled in the past 30 years. The causation is complex with multiple sources, including an obesity promoting environment with plentiful highly dense food sources and overall decreased physical activity noted for much of the general population, but genetic factors clearly play a role. Advances in genetic technology using candidate gene approaches, genome-wide association studies, structural and expression microarrays, and next generation sequencing have led to the discovery of hundreds of genes recognized as contributing to obesity. Polygenic and monogenic causes of obesity are now recognized including dozens of examples of syndromic obesity with Prader-Willi syndrome, as a classical example and recognized as the most common known cause of life-threatening obesity. Genetic factors playing a role in the causation of obesity will be discussed along with the growing evidence of single genes and the continuum between monogenic and polygenic obesity. The clinical and genetic aspects of four classical but rare obesity-related syndromes (ie, Prader-Willi, Alström, fragile X, and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy) will be described and illustrated in this review of single gene and syndromic causes of obesity. PMID:27288824

  11. Episodic and electrical nervous system disorders caused by nonchannel genes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsien-yang; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptáček, Louis J

    2015-01-01

    As noted in the separate introduction to this special topic section, episodic and electrical disorders can appear quite different clinically and yet share many overlapping features, including attack precipitants, therapeutic responses, natural history, and the types of genes that cause many of the genetic forms (i.e., ion channel genes). Thus, as we mapped and attempted to clone genes causing other episodic disorders, ion channels were always outstanding candidates when they mapped to the critical region of linkage in such a family. However, some of these disorders do not result from mutations in channels. This realization has opened up large and exciting new areas for the pathogenesis of these disorders. In some cases, the mutations occur in genes of unknown function or without understanding of molecular pathogenesis. Recently, emerging insights into a fascinating group of episodic movement disorders, the paroxysmal dyskinesias, and study of the causative genes and proteins are leading to the emerging concept of episodic electric disorders resulting from synaptic dysfunction. Much work remains to be done, but the field is evolving rapidly. As it does, we have come to realize that the molecular pathogenesis of electrical and episodic disorders is more complex than a scenario in which such disorders are simply due to mutations in the primary determinants of membrane excitability (channels). PMID:25340963

  12. Mutations in the pericentrin (PCNT) gene cause primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Anita; Thiel, Christian T; Schindler, Detlev; Wick, Ursula; Crow, Yanick J; Ekici, Arif B; van Essen, Anthonie J; Goecke, Timm O; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H; Zweier, Christiane; Brunner, Han G; Becker, Kristin; Curry, Cynthia J; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dörfler, Arnd; Kinning, Esther; Megarbane, André; Meinecke, Peter; Semple, Robert K; Spranger, Stephanie; Toutain, Annick; Trembath, Richard C; Voss, Egbert; Wilson, Louise; Hennekam, Raoul; de Zegher, Francis; Dörr, Helmuth-Günther; Reis, André

    2008-02-01

    Fundamental processes influencing human growth can be revealed by studying extreme short stature. Using genetic linkage analysis, we find that biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the centrosomal pericentrin (PCNT) gene on chromosome 21q22.3 cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) in 25 patients. Adults with this rare inherited condition have an average height of 100 centimeters and a brain size comparable to that of a 3-month-old baby, but are of near-normal intelligence. Absence of PCNT results in disorganized mitotic spindles and missegregation of chromosomes. Mutations in related genes are known to cause primary microcephaly (MCPH1, CDK5RAP2, ASPM, and CENPJ). PMID:18174396

  13. Gene Tree Discordance Causes Apparent Substitution Rate Variation.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Fábio K; Hahn, Matthew W

    2016-07-01

    Substitution rates are known to be variable among genes, chromosomes, species, and lineages due to multifarious biological processes. Here, we consider another source of substitution rate variation due to a technical bias associated with gene tree discordance. Discordance has been found to be rampant in genome-wide data sets, often due to incomplete lineage sorting (ILS). This apparent substitution rate variation is caused when substitutions that occur on discordant gene trees are analyzed in the context of a single, fixed species tree. Such substitutions have to be resolved by proposing multiple substitutions on the species tree, and we therefore refer to this phenomenon as Substitutions Produced by ILS (SPILS). We use simulations to demonstrate that SPILS has a larger effect with increasing levels of ILS, and on trees with larger numbers of taxa. Specific branches of the species trees are consistently, but erroneously, inferred to be longer or shorter, and we show that these branches can be predicted based on discordant tree topologies. Moreover, we observe that fixing a species tree topology when performing tests of positive selection increases the false positive rate, particularly for genes whose discordant topologies are most affected by SPILS. Finally, we use data from multiple Drosophila species to show that SPILS can be detected in nature. Although the effects of SPILS are modest per gene, it has the potential to affect substitution rate variation whenever high levels of ILS are present, particularly in rapid radiations. The problems outlined here have implications for character mapping of any type of trait, and for any biological process that causes discordance. We discuss possible solutions to these problems, and areas in which they are likely to have caused faulty inferences of convergence and accelerated evolution. PMID:26927960

  14. Parkin gene causing benign autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Nisipeanu, P; Inzelberg, R; Abo Mouch, S; Carasso, R L; Blumen, S C; Zhang, J; Matsumine, H; Hattori, N; Mizuno, Y

    2001-06-12

    Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP) is an early-onset parkinsonism caused by exonic deletions or point mutations in the parkingene. The relationship between the type of the genetic defect and the clinical presentation, the response to therapy, and the evolution have not been yet determined. The authors describe a single-basepair deletion at nucleotide 202 in exon 2 of the parkin gene in a kindred with a benign clinical course. PMID:11402119

  15. [Genes and obesity: a cause and effect relationship].

    PubMed

    González Jiménez, Emilio

    2011-11-01

    The International Task Force on Obesity (IOTF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have defined obesity as a 21st century epidemic. In countries with economies in transition and even in some urban areas in developing countries, progressive increase in obesity has been reported to be an emerging problem in recent years. Its causes include lifestyle changing, particularly consumption of high-calorie food, as well as an increasingly sedentary lifestyle. However, the genetic origin of obesity is well known and currently proven. Obesity usually results from interaction of certain gene polymorphisms with environment. Moreover, only a small number of cases of obesity (5%) result from mutations in specific genes (monogenic obesity), causing in some cases Mendelian syndromes with a very low incidence in the population. One hundred and thirty genes related to obesity have been reported, some of which are involved in coding of peptide transmitting hunger and satiety signals, while others are involved in adipocyte growth and differentiation processes, and still others are involved in regulation of energy expenditure. In addition, obesity is a chronic inflammatory state. In this regard, altered expression of genes related to insulin metabolism and adipose tissue inflammation is a basic process which may explain the etiology of obesity. PMID:21917535

  16. Mutation in the cystatin C gene causes hereditary brain hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Palsdottir, A; Abrahamson, M; Thorsteinsson, L; Arnason, A; Olafsson, I; Grubb, A; Jensson, O

    1989-01-01

    Hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy (HCCAA) is an autosomal dominant disorder leading to massive brain hemorrhage and death in young adults (Jensson et al., 1987). A variant of a potent inhibitor of cysteine proteinases, cystatin C (Barrett et al., 1984), is deposited as amyloid fibrils in the cerebral arteries of the patients (Ghiso et al., 1986). We have used the full length cystatin C cDNA probe (Abrahamson et al., 1987) to demonstrate a mutation in the codon for leucine at position 68, which abolishes an Alu I restriction site in cystatin C gene of the HCCAA patients. The Alu I marker has been used to show that this mutation is transmitted only in the affected members in all eight families investigated, proving that the mutated cystatin C gene causes HCCAA. This DNA marker will be useful for the diagnosis of HCCAA in patients, asymptomatic affected individuals and also for pre-natal diagnosis. HCCAA is the first human disorder known to be caused by an abnormal gene for a cysteine proteinase inhibitor. PMID:2602420

  17. Comparative wavelet, PLP, and LPC speech recognition techniques on the Hindi speech digits database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A. N.; Shrotriya, M. C.; Sharan, S. N.

    2010-02-01

    In view of the growing use of automatic speech recognition in the modern society, we study various alternative representations of the speech signal that have the potential to contribute to the improvement of the recognition performance. In this paper wavelet based features using different wavelets are used for Hindi digits recognition. The recognition performance of these features has been compared with Linear Prediction Coefficients (LPC) and Perceptual Linear Prediction (PLP) features. All features have been tested using Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based classifier for speaker independent Hindi digits recognition. The recognition performance of PLP features is11.3% better than LPC features. The recognition performance with db10 features has shown a further improvement of 12.55% over PLP features. The recognition performance with db10 is best among all wavelet based features.

  18. The Major Myelin-Resident Protein PLP Is Transported to Myelin Membranes via a Transcytotic Mechanism: Involvement of Sulfatide

    PubMed Central

    Ozgen, Hande; Klunder, Bert; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Nomden, Anita; Plat, Annechien; Trifilieff, Elisabeth; de Vries, Hans; Hoekstra, Dick

    2014-01-01

    Myelin membranes are sheet-like extensions of oligodendrocytes that can be considered membrane domains distinct from the cell's plasma membrane. Consistent with the polarized nature of oligodendrocytes, we demonstrate that transcytotic transport of the major myelin-resident protein proteolipid protein (PLP) is a key element in the mechanism of myelin assembly. Upon biosynthesis, PLP traffics to myelin membranes via syntaxin 3-mediated docking at the apical-surface-like cell body plasma membrane, which is followed by subsequent internalization and transport to the basolateral-surface-like myelin sheet. Pulse-chase experiments, in conjunction with surface biotinylation and organelle fractionation, reveal that following biosynthesis, PLP is transported to the cell body surface in Triton X-100 (TX-100)-resistant microdomains. At the plasma membrane, PLP transiently resides within these microdomains and its lateral dissipation is followed by segregation into 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS)-resistant domains, internalization, and subsequent transport toward the myelin membrane. Sulfatide triggers PLP's reallocation from TX-100- into CHAPS-resistant membrane domains, while inhibition of sulfatide biosynthesis inhibits transcytotic PLP transport. Taking these findings together, we propose a model in which PLP transport to the myelin membrane proceeds via a transcytotic mechanism mediated by sulfatide and characterized by a conformational alteration and dynamic, i.e., transient, partitioning of PLP into distinct membrane microdomains involved in biosynthetic and transcytotic transport. PMID:25368380

  19. Parents and Teachers Working Together To Support Third Grade Achievement: Parents as Learning Partners (PLP) Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, Denise D.

    On the assumption that students are more successful if their parents participate at school and encourage education and learning at home, the Los Angeles Metropolitan Project granted funds to 29 Los Angeles schools for the Parents as Learning Partners (PLP) Project. This initiative focuses on three primary areas in which parents and teachers can…

  20. Crystal structures capture three states in the catalytic cycle of a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) synthase.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amber Marie; Brown, William Clay; Harms, Etti; Smith, Janet L

    2015-02-27

    PLP synthase (PLPS) is a remarkable single-enzyme biosynthetic pathway that produces pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) from glutamine, ribose 5-phosphate, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The intact enzyme includes 12 synthase and 12 glutaminase subunits. PLP synthesis occurs in the synthase active site by a complicated mechanism involving at least two covalent intermediates at a catalytic lysine. The first intermediate forms with ribose 5-phosphate. The glutaminase subunit is a glutamine amidotransferase that hydrolyzes glutamine and channels ammonia to the synthase active site. Ammonia attack on the first covalent intermediate forms the second intermediate. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate reacts with the second intermediate to form PLP. To investigate the mechanism of the synthase subunit, crystal structures were obtained for three intermediate states of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus intact PLPS or its synthase subunit. The structures capture the synthase active site at three distinct steps in its complicated catalytic cycle, provide insights into the elusive mechanism, and illustrate the coordinated motions within the synthase subunit that separate the catalytic states. In the intact PLPS with a Michaelis-like intermediate in the glutaminase active site, the first covalent intermediate of the synthase is fully sequestered within the enzyme by the ordering of a generally disordered 20-residue C-terminal tail. Following addition of ammonia, the synthase active site opens and admits the Lys-149 side chain, which participates in formation of the second intermediate and PLP. Roles are identified for conserved Asp-24 in the formation of the first intermediate and for conserved Arg-147 in the conversion of the first to the second intermediate. PMID:25568319

  1. The Drosophila Pericentrin-like-protein (PLP) cooperates with Cnn to maintain the integrity of the outer PCM

    PubMed Central

    Richens, Jennifer H.; Barros, Teresa P.; Lucas, Eliana P.; Peel, Nina; Pinto, David Miguel Susano; Wainman, Alan; Raff, Jordan W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Centrosomes comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by a matrix of pericentriolar material (PCM). In vertebrate cells, Pericentrin plays an important part in mitotic PCM assembly, but the Drosophila Pericentrin-like protein (PLP) appears to have a more minor role in mitotic fly cells. Here we investigate the function of PLP during the rapid mitotic cycles of the early Drosophila embryo. Unexpectedly, we find that PLP is specifically enriched in the outer-most regions of the PCM, where it largely co-localizes with the PCM scaffold protein Cnn. In the absence of PLP the outer PCM appears to be structurally weakened, and it rapidly disperses along the centrosomal microtubules (MTs). As a result, centrosomal MTs are subtly disorganized in embryos lacking PLP, although mitosis is largely unperturbed and these embryos develop and hatch at near-normal rates. Y2H analysis reveals that PLP can potentially form multiple interactions with itself and with the PCM recruiting proteins Asl, Spd-2 and Cnn. A deletion analysis suggests that PLP participates in a complex network of interactions that ultimately help to strengthen the PCM. PMID:26157019

  2. The Drosophila Pericentrin-like-protein (PLP) cooperates with Cnn to maintain the integrity of the outer PCM.

    PubMed

    Richens, Jennifer H; Barros, Teresa P; Lucas, Eliana P; Peel, Nina; Pinto, David Miguel Susano; Wainman, Alan; Raff, Jordan W

    2015-01-01

    Centrosomes comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by a matrix of pericentriolar material (PCM). In vertebrate cells, Pericentrin plays an important part in mitotic PCM assembly, but the Drosophila Pericentrin-like protein (PLP) appears to have a more minor role in mitotic fly cells. Here we investigate the function of PLP during the rapid mitotic cycles of the early Drosophila embryo. Unexpectedly, we find that PLP is specifically enriched in the outer-most regions of the PCM, where it largely co-localizes with the PCM scaffold protein Cnn. In the absence of PLP the outer PCM appears to be structurally weakened, and it rapidly disperses along the centrosomal microtubules (MTs). As a result, centrosomal MTs are subtly disorganized in embryos lacking PLP, although mitosis is largely unperturbed and these embryos develop and hatch at near-normal rates. Y2H analysis reveals that PLP can potentially form multiple interactions with itself and with the PCM recruiting proteins Asl, Spd-2 and Cnn. A deletion analysis suggests that PLP participates in a complex network of interactions that ultimately help to strengthen the PCM. PMID:26157019

  3. Myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) as a marker antigen of central nervous system contaminations for routine food control.

    PubMed

    Villmann, Carmen; Sandmeier, Barbara; Seeber, Silke; Hannappel, Ewald; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Becker, Cord-Michael

    2007-08-22

    Spreading transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) have been widely attributed to transmission by ingestion of mammalian central nervous system (CNS) tissue. Reliable exclusion of this epidemiological important route of transmission relies on an effective surveillance of food contamination. Here, myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) is identified as a specific and largely heat-resistant marker for detection of food contaminations by CNS tissue. PLP is a component of oligodendritic glial sheaths of neuronal processes that is specifically expressed in the CNS. A highly selective polyclonal antibody was developed directed against an epitope present in the full-length PLP protein, but absent from the developmentally regulated splice variant DM-20. In combination with a hydrophobic extraction of PLP from tissue samples, the antibody reliably detected PLP from spinal cord, cerebellum, and cortex of different mammalian species. Consistent with earlier reports on PLP expression, no cross-reactivity was observed with peripheral nerve or extraneural tissue, except for a very faint signal obtained with heart. When applied to an artificial CNS contamination present in sausages, the antibody reliably detected a low concentration (1%) of the contaminant. Application of heat, as used during conventional sausage manufacturing, led to a predominant alteration of arginine residues in the PLP protein and a partial loss of immunoreactivity. In contrast, a stretch of hydrophilic amino acids(112-122) proved to be heat-resistant, preserving the immunogenicity of this PLP epitope during heating. Taken together, the excellent CNS specificity of PLP immunodetection and the presence of a heat-resistant epitope have permitted the development of a highly sensitive immunoassay for CNS contamination in routine food control. PMID:17629299

  4. Increased level of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) in the CSF of a patient with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease due to mutation in the GJA12 gene.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Stefano; Burlina, Alberto B; Salviati, Leonardo; Trevisson, Eva; Toldo, Irene; Laverda, Anna Maria; Burlina, Alessandro P

    2008-07-01

    Autosomal recessive Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease 1 (PMLD1) is a hypomyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) with virtually identical phenotype to Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). PMLD1 is caused by mutations in GJA12 gene, PMD is due to mutations in PLP1 gene. Elevated levels of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), the most abundant peptide neuromodulator in the human brain, have been recently reported in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) of patients with PMD. Using capillary electrophoresis, we analyzed for the first time, the CSF from a girl with PMLD1 and detected high concentrations of NAAG. This finding confirms the hypothesis that NAAG may be involved in myelination-related processes and can be considered as a useful diagnostic marker not only for patients with the PLP1 related disorder, but also in those with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher like hypomyelinating disease due to other defined genetic causes, such as PMLD1. PMID:17881259

  5. Differences in PLP-Dependent Cysteinyl Processing Lead to Diverse S-Functionalization of Lincosamide Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Zhao, Qunfei; Zhang, Qinglin; Liu, Wen

    2016-05-25

    Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent proteins constitute one of the largest and most important families of enzymes in living organisms. These proteins participate in numerous biochemical processes, many of which have not been characterized, and transform substrates containing an amino group through various reactions that share aldimine as a common intermediate. Herein, we report that the PLP-dependent enzymes CcbF and LmbF, which are highly related in phylogenesis, process cysteine S-conjugated intermediates in different ways and associate with individual downstream enzyme(s) toward distinct S-functionalization of the lincosamide antibiotics celesticetin and lincomycin A. CcbF catalyzes an unusual conversion that involves decarboxylation-coupled oxidative deamination of the cysteinyl group during the formation of a two-carbon alcohol linker, whereas LmbF is responsible for β-elimination, followed by S-methylation to produce a methylmercapto group. The two tailoring routes are variable and exchangeable with each other, allowing for in vitro combinatorial biosynthesis of a number of hybrid lincosamide antibiotics, including the natural product Bu-2545. These findings demonstrate the wide diversity of PLP chemistry in enzymatic catalysis and its promising applicability in creation of new molecules. PMID:27171737

  6. Single-Gene Causes of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Vivante, Asaf; Kohl, Stefan; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Dworschak, Gabriel C.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) cover a wide range of structural malformations that result from defects in the morphogenesis of the kidney and/or urinary tract. These anomalies account for about 40–50% of children with chronic kidney disease worldwide. Knowledge from genetically modified mouse models suggests that single gene mutations in renal developmental genes may lead to CAKUT in humans. However, until recently only a handful of CAKUT-causing genes were reported, most of them in familial syndromic cases. Recent findings suggest that CAKUT may arise from mutations in a multitude of different single gene causes. We focus here on single gene causes of CAKUT and their developmental origin. Currently more than 20 monogenic CAKUT-causing genes have been identified. High-throughput sequencing techniques make it likely that additional CAKUT-causing genes will be identified in the near future. PMID:24398540

  7. Treatment of phantom limb pain (PLP) based on augmented reality and gaming controlled by myoelectric pattern recognition: a case study of a chronic PLP patient.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Catalan, Max; Sander, Nichlas; Kristoffersen, Morten B; Håkansson, Bo; Brånemark, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    A variety of treatments have been historically used to alleviate phantom limb pain (PLP) with varying efficacy. Recently, virtual reality (VR) has been employed as a more sophisticated mirror therapy. Despite the advantages of VR over a conventional mirror, this approach has retained the use of the contralateral limb and is therefore restricted to unilateral amputees. Moreover, this strategy disregards the actual effort made by the patient to produce phantom motions. In this work, we investigate a treatment in which the virtual limb responds directly to myoelectric activity at the stump, while the illusion of a restored limb is enhanced through augmented reality (AR). Further, phantom motions are facilitated and encouraged through gaming. The proposed set of technologies was administered to a chronic PLP patient who has shown resistance to a variety of treatments (including mirror therapy) for 48 years. Individual and simultaneous phantom movements were predicted using myoelectric pattern recognition and were then used as input for VR and AR environments, as well as for a racing game. The sustained level of pain reported by the patient was gradually reduced to complete pain-free periods. The phantom posture initially reported as a strongly closed fist was gradually relaxed, interestingly resembling the neutral posture displayed by the virtual limb. The patient acquired the ability to freely move his phantom limb, and a telescopic effect was observed where the position of the phantom hand was restored to the anatomically correct distance. More importantly, the effect of the interventions was positively and noticeably perceived by the patient and his relatives. Despite the limitation of a single case study, the successful results of the proposed system in a patient for whom other medical and non-medical treatments have been ineffective justifies and motivates further investigation in a wider study. PMID:24616655

  8. Treatment of phantom limb pain (PLP) based on augmented reality and gaming controlled by myoelectric pattern recognition: a case study of a chronic PLP patient

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Catalan, Max; Sander, Nichlas; Kristoffersen, Morten B.; Håkansson, Bo; Brånemark, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    A variety of treatments have been historically used to alleviate phantom limb pain (PLP) with varying efficacy. Recently, virtual reality (VR) has been employed as a more sophisticated mirror therapy. Despite the advantages of VR over a conventional mirror, this approach has retained the use of the contralateral limb and is therefore restricted to unilateral amputees. Moreover, this strategy disregards the actual effort made by the patient to produce phantom motions. In this work, we investigate a treatment in which the virtual limb responds directly to myoelectric activity at the stump, while the illusion of a restored limb is enhanced through augmented reality (AR). Further, phantom motions are facilitated and encouraged through gaming. The proposed set of technologies was administered to a chronic PLP patient who has shown resistance to a variety of treatments (including mirror therapy) for 48 years. Individual and simultaneous phantom movements were predicted using myoelectric pattern recognition and were then used as input for VR and AR environments, as well as for a racing game. The sustained level of pain reported by the patient was gradually reduced to complete pain-free periods. The phantom posture initially reported as a strongly closed fist was gradually relaxed, interestingly resembling the neutral posture displayed by the virtual limb. The patient acquired the ability to freely move his phantom limb, and a telescopic effect was observed where the position of the phantom hand was restored to the anatomically correct distance. More importantly, the effect of the interventions was positively and noticeably perceived by the patient and his relatives. Despite the limitation of a single case study, the successful results of the proposed system in a patient for whom other medical and non-medical treatments have been ineffective justifies and motivates further investigation in a wider study. PMID:24616655

  9. Impaired PLP-dependent metabolism in brain samples from Huntington disease patients and transgenic R6/1 mice.

    PubMed

    Sorolla, M Alba; Rodríguez-Colman, María José; Vall-Llaura, Núria; Vived, Celia; Fernández-Nogales, Marta; Lucas, José J; Ferrer, Isidre; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress has been described as important to Huntington disease (HD) progression. In a previous HD study, we identified several carbonylated proteins, including pyridoxal kinase and antiquitin, both of which are involved in the metabolism of pyridoxal 5´-phosphate (PLP), the active form of vitamin B6. In the present study, pyridoxal kinase levels were quantified and showed to be decreased both in HD patients and a R6/1 mouse model, compared to control samples. A metabolomic analysis was used to analyze metabolites in brain samples of HD patients and R6/1 mice, compared to control samples using mass spectrometry. This technique allowed detection of increased concentrations of pyridoxal, the substrate of pyridoxal kinase. In addition, PLP, the product of the reaction, was decreased in striatum from R6/1 mice. Furthermore, glutamate and cystathionine, both substrates of PLP-dependent enzymes were increased in HD. This reinforces the hypothesis that PLP synthesis is impaired, and could explain some alterations observed in the disease. Together, these results identify PLP as a potential therapeutic agent. PMID:26666246

  10. A subfamily of PLP-dependent enzymes specialized in handling terminal amines.

    PubMed

    Schiroli, Davide; Peracchi, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    The present review focuses on a subfamily of pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes, belonging to the broader fold-type I structural group and whose archetypes can be considered ornithine δ-transaminase and γ-aminobutyrate transaminase. These proteins were originally christened "subgroup-II aminotransferases" (AT-II) but are very often referred to as "class-III aminotransferases". As names suggest, the subgroup includes mainly transaminases, with just a few interesting exceptions. However, at variance with most other PLP-dependent enzymes, catalysts in this subfamily seem specialized at utilizing substrates whose amino function is not adjacent to a carboxylate group. AT-II enzymes are widespread in biology and play mostly catabolic roles. Furthermore, today several transaminases in this group are being used as bioorganic tools for the asymmetric synthesis of chiral amines. We present an overview of the biochemical and structural features of these enzymes, illustrating how they are distinctive and how they compare with those of the other fold-type I enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. PMID:25770684

  11. Complex Genomic Rearrangements at the PLP1 Locus Include Triplication and Quadruplication

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christine R.; Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Banser, Linda; Gambin, Tomasz; Stubbolo, Danielle; Yuan, Bo; Sperle, Karen; McCahan, Suzanne M.; Henneke, Marco; Seeman, Pavel; Hobson, Grace M.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Inverted repeats (IRs) can facilitate structural variation as crucibles of genomic rearrangement. Complex duplication—inverted triplication—duplication (DUP-TRP/INV-DUP) rearrangements that contain breakpoint junctions within IRs have been recently associated with both MECP2 duplication syndrome (MIM#300260) and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD, MIM#312080). We investigated 17 unrelated PMD subjects with copy number gains at the PLP1 locus including triplication and quadruplication of specific genomic intervals—16/17 were found to have a DUP-TRP/INV-DUP rearrangement product. An IR distal to PLP1 facilitates DUP-TRP/INV-DUP formation as well as an inversion structural variation found frequently amongst normal individuals. We show that a homology—or homeology—driven replicative mechanism of DNA repair can apparently mediate template switches within stretches of microhomology. Moreover, we provide evidence that quadruplication and potentially higher order amplification of a genomic interval can occur in a manner consistent with rolling circle amplification as predicted by the microhomology-mediated break induced replication (MMBIR) model. PMID:25749076

  12. Interphase centrosome organization by the PLP-Cnn scaffold is required for centrosome function

    PubMed Central

    Lerit, Dorothy A.; Jordan, Holly A.; Poulton, John S.; Fagerstrom, Carey J.; Galletta, Brian J.; Peifer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Pericentriolar material (PCM) mediates the microtubule (MT) nucleation and anchoring activity of centrosomes. A scaffold organized by Centrosomin (Cnn) serves to ensure proper PCM architecture and functional changes in centrosome activity with each cell cycle. Here, we investigate the mechanisms that spatially restrict and temporally coordinate centrosome scaffold formation. Focusing on the mitotic-to-interphase transition in Drosophila melanogaster embryos, we show that the elaboration of the interphase Cnn scaffold defines a major structural rearrangement of the centrosome. We identify an unprecedented role for Pericentrin-like protein (PLP), which localizes to the tips of extended Cnn flares, to maintain robust interphase centrosome activity and promote the formation of interphase MT asters required for normal nuclear spacing, centrosome segregation, and compartmentalization of the syncytial embryo. Our data reveal that Cnn and PLP directly interact at two defined sites to coordinate the cell cycle–dependent rearrangement and scaffolding activity of the centrosome to permit normal centrosome organization, cell division, and embryonic viability. PMID:26150390

  13. Complex genomic rearrangements at the PLP1 locus include triplication and quadruplication.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christine R; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Banser, Linda; Gambin, Tomasz; Stubbolo, Danielle; Yuan, Bo; Sperle, Karen; McCahan, Suzanne M; Henneke, Marco; Seeman, Pavel; Garbern, James Y; Hobson, Grace M; Lupski, James R

    2015-03-01

    Inverted repeats (IRs) can facilitate structural variation as crucibles of genomic rearrangement. Complex duplication-inverted triplication-duplication (DUP-TRP/INV-DUP) rearrangements that contain breakpoint junctions within IRs have been recently associated with both MECP2 duplication syndrome (MIM#300260) and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD, MIM#312080). We investigated 17 unrelated PMD subjects with copy number gains at the PLP1 locus including triplication and quadruplication of specific genomic intervals-16/17 were found to have a DUP-TRP/INV-DUP rearrangement product. An IR distal to PLP1 facilitates DUP-TRP/INV-DUP formation as well as an inversion structural variation found frequently amongst normal individuals. We show that a homology-or homeology-driven replicative mechanism of DNA repair can apparently mediate template switches within stretches of microhomology. Moreover, we provide evidence that quadruplication and potentially higher order amplification of a genomic interval can occur in a manner consistent with rolling circle amplification as predicted by the microhomology-mediated break induced replication (MMBIR) model. PMID:25749076

  14. Interphase centrosome organization by the PLP-Cnn scaffold is required for centrosome function.

    PubMed

    Lerit, Dorothy A; Jordan, Holly A; Poulton, John S; Fagerstrom, Carey J; Galletta, Brian J; Peifer, Mark; Rusan, Nasser M

    2015-07-01

    Pericentriolar material (PCM) mediates the microtubule (MT) nucleation and anchoring activity of centrosomes. A scaffold organized by Centrosomin (Cnn) serves to ensure proper PCM architecture and functional changes in centrosome activity with each cell cycle. Here, we investigate the mechanisms that spatially restrict and temporally coordinate centrosome scaffold formation. Focusing on the mitotic-to-interphase transition in Drosophila melanogaster embryos, we show that the elaboration of the interphase Cnn scaffold defines a major structural rearrangement of the centrosome. We identify an unprecedented role for Pericentrin-like protein (PLP), which localizes to the tips of extended Cnn flares, to maintain robust interphase centrosome activity and promote the formation of interphase MT asters required for normal nuclear spacing, centrosome segregation, and compartmentalization of the syncytial embryo. Our data reveal that Cnn and PLP directly interact at two defined sites to coordinate the cell cycle-dependent rearrangement and scaffolding activity of the centrosome to permit normal centrosome organization, cell division, and embryonic viability. PMID:26150390

  15. Compound heterozygous mutations of the TNXB gene cause primary myopathy.

    PubMed

    Pénisson-Besnier, Isabelle; Allamand, Valérie; Beurrier, Philippe; Martin, Ludovic; Schalkwijk, Joost; van Vlijmen-Willems, Ivonne; Gartioux, Corine; Malfait, Fransiska; Syx, Delfien; Macchi, Laurent; Marcorelles, Pascale; Arbeille, Brigitte; Croué, Anne; De Paepe, Anne; Dubas, Frédéric

    2013-08-01

    Complete deficiency of the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-X (TNX) leads to recessive forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, clinically characterized by hyperextensible skin, easy bruising and joint hypermobility. Clinical and pathological studies, immunoassay, and molecular analyses were combined to study a patient suffering from progressive muscle weakness. Clinical features included axial and proximal limb muscle weakness, subclinical heart involvement, minimal skin hyperextensibility, no joint abnormalities, and a history of easy bruising. Skeletal muscle biopsy disclosed striking muscle consistency and the abnormal presence of myotendinous junctions in the muscle belly. TNX immunostaining was markedly reduced in muscle and skin, and serum TNX levels were undetectable. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified: a previously reported 30kb deletion and a non-synonymous novel missense mutation in the TNXB gene. This study identifies a TNX-deficient patient presenting with a primary muscle disorder, thus expanding the phenotypic spectrum of TNX-related abnormalities. Biopsy findings provide evidence that TNX deficiency leads to muscle softness and to mislocalization of myotendinous junctions. PMID:23768946

  16. Genetic syndromes caused by mutations in epigenetic genes.

    PubMed

    Berdasco, María; Esteller, Manel

    2013-04-01

    The orchestrated organization of epigenetic factors that control chromatin dynamism, including DNA methylation, histone marks, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and chromatin-remodeling proteins, is essential for the proper function of tissue homeostasis, cell identity and development. Indeed, deregulation of epigenetic profiles has been described in several human pathologies, including complex diseases (such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases), metabolic pathologies (type 2 diabetes and obesity) and imprinting disorders. Over the last decade it has become increasingly clear that mutations of genes involved in epigenetic mechanism, such as DNA methyltransferases, methyl-binding domain proteins, histone deacetylases, histone methylases and members of the SWI/SNF family of chromatin remodelers are linked to human disorders, including Immunodeficiency Centromeric instability Facial syndrome 1, Rett syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, Sotos syndrome or alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked syndrome, among others. As new members of the epigenetic machinery are described, the number of human syndromes associated with epigenetic alterations increases. As recent examples, mutations of histone demethylases and members of the non-coding RNA machinery have recently been associated with Kabuki syndrome, Claes-Jensen X-linked mental retardation syndrome and Goiter syndrome. In this review, we describe the variety of germline mutations of epigenetic modifiers that are known to be associated with human disorders, and discuss the therapeutic potential of epigenetic drugs as palliative care strategies in the treatment of such disorders. PMID:23370504

  17. Myelin-reactive antibodies mediate the pathology of MBP-PLP fusion protein MP4-induced EAE.

    PubMed

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Pauly, Robert; Rottlaender, Andrea; Rodi, Michael; Gruppe, Traugott L; Addicks, Klaus; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V

    2011-07-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is frequently used for studies of multiple sclerosis (MS). Because in most EAE models T cells mediate the pathology in the absence of B cells/autoantibodies, the notion has evolved that also MS may be a primarily T cell-mediated disease. We have previously introduced MBP-PLP fusion protein (MP4)-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice. Here we show that the disease in this model is antibody-dependent. Immunization of B cell-deficient mice did not induce EAE. When such B cell-deficient mice were, however, injected with MBP/PLP-specific antibodies in addition to the immunization with MP4, they developed disease of a severity and course that was similar to the wild-type mice. The deposition of antibodies in demyelinated lesions provided further evidence for the contribution of MBP/PLP-specific antibodies to CNS lesion formation. Based upon these data we suggest a two-stage model for the involvement of MBP/PLP-specific antibodies in autoimmune CNS pathology. PMID:21489887

  18. Plasma Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) in the United States population: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2004

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    No large-scale, population-based study has considered the descriptive epidemiology of vitamin B6 status using the biological marker, plasma pyridoxal 5’ - phosphate (PLP). Consequently, how vitamin B6 status varies with basic demographic and lifestyle factors is unclear. We sought to examine the epi...

  19. Mechanism of Substrate Recognition And PLP-Induced Conformational Changes in II-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase From Arabidopsis Thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, N.; Clay, M.D.; Belkum, M.J.van; Cherney, M.M.; Vederas, J.C.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-26

    LL-Diaminopimelate aminotransferase (LL-DAP-AT), a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme in the lysine biosynthetic pathways of plants and Chlamydia, is a potential target for the development of herbicides or antibiotics. This homodimeric enzyme converts L-tetrahydrodipicolinic acid (THDP) directly to LL-DAP using L-glutamate as the source of the amino group. Earlier, we described the 3D structures of native and malate-bound LL-DAP-AT from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtDAP-AT). Seven additional crystal structures of AtDAP-AT and its variants are reported here as part of an investigation into the mechanism of substrate recognition and catalysis. Two structures are of AtDAP-AT with reduced external aldimine analogues: N-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)-L-glutamate (PLP-Glu) and N-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)- LL-Diaminopimelate (PLP-DAP) bound in the active site. Surprisingly, they reveal that both L-glutamate and LL-DAP are recognized in a very similar fashion by the same sets of amino acid residues; both molecules adopt twisted V-shaped conformations. With both substrates, the {alpha}-carboxylates are bound in a salt bridge with Arg404, whereas the distal carboxylates are recognized via hydrogen bonds to the well-conserved side chains of Tyr37, Tyr125 and Lys129. The distal C{sup {var_epsilon}} amino group of LL-DAP is specifically recognized by several non-covalent interactions with residues from the other subunit (Asn309*, Tyr94*, Gly95*, and Glu97* (Amino acid designators followed by an asterisk (*) indicate that the residues originate in the other subunit of the dimer)) and by three bound water molecules. Two catalytically inactive variants of AtDAP-AT were created via site-directed mutagenesis of the active site lysine (K270N and K270Q). The structures of these variants permitted the observation of the unreduced external aldimines of PLP with L-glutamate and with LL-DAP in the active site, and revealed differences in the torsion angle about the PLP-substrate bond. Lastly, an apo

  20. Identification of candidate cancer-causing genes in mouse brain tumors by retroviral tagging

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Fredrik K.; Brodd, Josefin; Eklöf, Charlotta; Ferletta, Maria; Hesselager, Göran; Tiger, Carl-Fredrik; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt

    2004-01-01

    Murine retroviruses may cause malignant tumors in mice by insertional mutagenesis of host genes. The use of retroviral tagging as a means of identifying cancer-causing genes has, however, almost entirely been restricted to hematopoietic tumors. The aim of this study was to develop a system allowing for the retroviral tagging of candidate genes in malignant brain tumors. Mouse gliomas were induced by a recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus encoding platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain. The underlying idea was that tumors evolve through a combination of PDGF-mediated autocrine growth stimulation and insertional mutagenesis of genes that cooperate with PDGF in gliomagenesis. Common insertion sites (loci that were tagged in more than one tumor) were identified by cloning and sequencing retroviral flanking segments, followed by blast searches of mouse genome databases. A number of candidate brain tumor loci (Btls) were identified. Several of these Btls correspond to known tumor-causing genes; these findings strongly support the underlying idea of our experimental approach. Other Btls harbor genes with a hitherto unproven role in transformation or oncogenesis. Our findings indicate that retroviral tagging with a growth factor-encoding virus may be a powerful means of identifying candidate tumor-causing genes in nonhematopoietic tumors. PMID:15273287

  1. Identification of candidate cancer-causing genes in mouse brain tumors by retroviral tagging.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Fredrik K; Brodd, Josefin; Eklöf, Charlotta; Ferletta, Maria; Hesselager, Göran; Tiger, Carl-Fredrik; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt

    2004-08-01

    Murine retroviruses may cause malignant tumors in mice by insertional mutagenesis of host genes. The use of retroviral tagging as a means of identifying cancer-causing genes has, however, almost entirely been restricted to hematopoietic tumors. The aim of this study was to develop a system allowing for the retroviral tagging of candidate genes in malignant brain tumors. Mouse gliomas were induced by a recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus encoding platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain. The underlying idea was that tumors evolve through a combination of PDGF-mediated autocrine growth stimulation and insertional mutagenesis of genes that cooperate with PDGF in gliomagenesis. Common insertion sites (loci that were tagged in more than one tumor) were identified by cloning and sequencing retroviral flanking segments, followed by blast searches of mouse genome databases. A number of candidate brain tumor loci (Btls) were identified. Several of these Btls correspond to known tumor-causing genes; these findings strongly support the underlying idea of our experimental approach. Other Btls harbor genes with a hitherto unproven role in transformation or oncogenesis. Our findings indicate that retroviral tagging with a growth factor-encoding virus may be a powerful means of identifying candidate tumor-causing genes in nonhematopoietic tumors. PMID:15273287

  2. Crystal Structures Capture Three States in the Catalytic Cycle of a Pyridoxal Phosphate (PLP) Synthase*♦

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amber Marie; Brown, William Clay; Harms, Etti; Smith, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    PLP synthase (PLPS) is a remarkable single-enzyme biosynthetic pathway that produces pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) from glutamine, ribose 5-phosphate, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The intact enzyme includes 12 synthase and 12 glutaminase subunits. PLP synthesis occurs in the synthase active site by a complicated mechanism involving at least two covalent intermediates at a catalytic lysine. The first intermediate forms with ribose 5-phosphate. The glutaminase subunit is a glutamine amidotransferase that hydrolyzes glutamine and channels ammonia to the synthase active site. Ammonia attack on the first covalent intermediate forms the second intermediate. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate reacts with the second intermediate to form PLP. To investigate the mechanism of the synthase subunit, crystal structures were obtained for three intermediate states of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus intact PLPS or its synthase subunit. The structures capture the synthase active site at three distinct steps in its complicated catalytic cycle, provide insights into the elusive mechanism, and illustrate the coordinated motions within the synthase subunit that separate the catalytic states. In the intact PLPS with a Michaelis-like intermediate in the glutaminase active site, the first covalent intermediate of the synthase is fully sequestered within the enzyme by the ordering of a generally disordered 20-residue C-terminal tail. Following addition of ammonia, the synthase active site opens and admits the Lys-149 side chain, which participates in formation of the second intermediate and PLP. Roles are identified for conserved Asp-24 in the formation of the first intermediate and for conserved Arg-147 in the conversion of the first to the second intermediate. PMID:25568319

  3. Gene Therapy to Rescue Retinal Degeneration Caused by Mutations in Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Rossmiller, Brian P.; Ryals, Renee C.; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy has proven safe and at least partially successful in clinical trials and in numerous animal models. Gene therapy requires characterization of the progression of the disease and understanding of its genetic cause. Testing gene therapies usually requires an animal model that recapitulates the key features of the human disease, though photoreceptors and cells of the retinal pigment epithelium produced from patient-derived stem cells may provide an alternative test system for retinal gene therapy. Gene therapy also requires a delivery system that introduces the therapeutic gene to the correct cell type and does not cause unintended damage to the tissue. Current systems being tested in the eye are nanoparticles, pseudotyped lentiviruses, and adeno-associated virus (AAV) of various serotypes. Here, we describe the techniques of AAV vector design as well as the in vivo and ex vivo tests necessary for assessing the efficacy of retinal gene therapy to treat retinal degeneration caused by mutations in the rhodopsin gene. PMID:25697537

  4. A novel nonsense mutation in the WFS1 gene causes the Wolfram syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noorian, Shahab; Savad, Shahram; Mohammadi, Davood Shah

    2016-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, which is mostly caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. The WFS1 gene product, which is called wolframin, is thought to regulate the function of endoplasmic reticulum. The endoplasmic reticulum has a critical role in protein folding and material transportation within the cell or to the surface of the cell. Identification of new mutations in WFS1 gene will unravel the molecular pathology of WS. The aim of this case report study is to describe a novel mutation in exon 4 of the WFS1 gene (c.330C>A) in a 9-year-old boy with WS. PMID:26943604

  5. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  6. In vivo acylation of proteolipid protein and DM-20 in myelin and myelin subfractions of developing rat brain: immunoblot identification of acylated PLP and DM-20

    SciTech Connect

    Garwood, M.M.; Gilbert, W.R.; Agrawal, H.C.

    1983-05-01

    The acylation of proteolipid protein (PLP) was examined in myelin and myelin subfractions from rat brain during the active period of myelination. Proteolipid protein and DM-20 in myelin and myelin subfractions were readily acylated in developing rat brain 22 hours after intracerebral injection of (/sup 3/H)palmitic acid. No differences in the relative specific activity of PLP in myelin from 9-, 15-, and 30-day-old rat brains was observed; however, the relative specific activity of PLP in the heavy myelin subfraction tended to be higher than that in the light myelin subfraction. The acylation of PLP was confirmed by fluorography of immuno-stained cellulose nitrate sheets, clearly establishing that the acylated protein is in fact the oligodendroglial cell- and myelin-specific protein, PLP. Since PLP is acylated in the 9-day-old animal, when little compact myelin is present, it is possible that the acylation of PLP is a prerequisite for the incorporation of this protein into the myelin membrane.

  7. HGCS: an online tool for prioritizing disease-causing gene variants by biological distance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying the genotypes underlying human disease phenotypes is a fundamental step in human genetics and medicine. High-throughput genomic technologies provide thousands of genetic variants per individual. The causal genes of a specific phenotype are usually expected to be functionally close to each other. According to this hypothesis, candidate genes are picked from high-throughput data on the basis of their biological proximity to core genesgenes already known to be responsible for the phenotype. There is currently no effective gene-centric online interface for this purpose. Results We describe here the human gene connectome server (HGCS), a powerful, easy-to-use interactive online tool enabling researchers to prioritize any list of genes according to their biological proximity to core genes associated with the phenotype of interest. We also make available an updated and extended version for all human gene-specific connectomes. The HGCS is freely available to noncommercial users from: http://hgc.rockefeller.edu/. Conclusions The HGCS should help investigators from diverse fields to identify new disease-causing candidate genes more effectively, via a user-friendly online interface. PMID:24694260

  8. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  9. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-31

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  10. Identification of a gene causing human cytochrome c oxidase deficiency by integrative genomics.

    PubMed

    Mootha, Vamsi K; Lepage, Pierre; Miller, Kathleen; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Reich, Michael; Hjerrild, Majbrit; Delmonte, Terrye; Villeneuve, Amelie; Sladek, Robert; Xu, Fenghao; Mitchell, Grant A; Morin, Charles; Mann, Matthias; Hudson, Thomas J; Robinson, Brian; Rioux, John D; Lander, Eric S

    2003-01-21

    Identifying the genes responsible for human diseases requires combining information about gene position with clues about biological function. The recent availability of whole-genome data sets of RNA and protein expression provides powerful new sources of functional insight. Here we illustrate how such data sets can expedite disease-gene discovery, by using them to identify the gene causing Leigh syndrome, French-Canadian type (LSFC, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man no. 220111), a human cytochrome c oxidase deficiency that maps to chromosome 2p16-21. Using four public RNA expression data sets, we assigned to all human genes a "score" reflecting their similarity in RNA-expression profiles to known mitochondrial genes. Using a large survey of organellar proteomics, we similarly classified human genes according to the likelihood of their protein product being associated with the mitochondrion. By intersecting this information with the relevant genomic region, we identified a single clear candidate gene, LRPPRC. Resequencing identified two mutations on two independent haplotypes, providing definitive genetic proof that LRPPRC indeed causes LSFC. LRPPRC encodes an mRNA-binding protein likely involved with mtDNA transcript processing, suggesting an additional mechanism of mitochondrial pathophysiology. Similar strategies to integrate diverse genomic information can be applied likewise to other disease pathways and will become increasingly powerful with the growing wealth of diverse, functional genomics data. PMID:12529507

  11. An essential cell cycle regulation gene causes hybrid inviability in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis, Nitin; Baker, EmilyClare P.; Cooper, Jacob C.; Frizzell, Kimberly A.; Hsieh, Emily; de la Cruz, Aida Flor A.; Shendure, Jay; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Malik, Harmit S.

    2015-01-01

    Speciation, the process by which new biological species arise, involves the evolution of reproductive barriers such as hybrid sterility or inviability between populations. However, identifying hybrid incompatibility genes remains a key obstacle in understanding the molecular basis of reproductive isolation. We devised a genomic screen, which identified a cell cycle regulation gene as the cause of male inviability in hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Ablation of the D. simulans allele of this gene is sufficient to rescue the adult viability of hybrid males. This dominantly acting cell cycle regulator causes mitotic arrest and, thereby, inviability of male hybrid larvae. Our genomic method provides a facile means to accelerate the identification of hybrid incompatibility genes in other model and non-model systems. PMID:26680200

  12. An essential cell cycle regulation gene causes hybrid inviability in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Nitin; Baker, EmilyClare P; Cooper, Jacob C; Frizzell, Kimberly A; Hsieh, Emily; de la Cruz, Aida Flor A; Shendure, Jay; Kitzman, Jacob O; Malik, Harmit S

    2015-12-18

    Speciation, the process by which new biological species arise, involves the evolution of reproductive barriers, such as hybrid sterility or inviability between populations. However, identifying hybrid incompatibility genes remains a key obstacle in understanding the molecular basis of reproductive isolation. We devised a genomic screen, which identified a cell cycle-regulation gene as the cause of male inviability in hybrids resulting from a cross between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Ablation of the D. simulans allele of this gene is sufficient to rescue the adult viability of hybrid males. This dominantly acting cell cycle regulator causes mitotic arrest and, thereby, inviability of male hybrid larvae. Our genomic method provides a facile means to accelerate the identification of hybrid incompatibility genes in other model and nonmodel systems. PMID:26680200

  13. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Campbell, Ian M.; Baggett, Brett C.; Soens, Zachry T.; Rao, Mitchell M.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles. PMID:23685542

  14. Have gene knockouts caused evolutionary reversals in the mammalian first arch?

    PubMed

    Smith, K K; Schneider, R A

    1998-03-01

    Many recent gene knockout experiments cause anatomical changes to the jaw region of mice that several investigators claim are evolutionary reversals. Here we evaluate these mutant phenotypes and the assertions of atavism. We argue that following the knockout of Hoxa-2, Dlx-2, MHox, Otx2, and RAR genes, ectopic cartilages arise as secondary consequences of disruptions in normal processes of cell specification, migration, or differentiation. These disruptions cause an excess of mesenchyme to accumulate in a region through which skeletal progenitor cells usually migrate, and at a site of condensation that is normally present in mammals but that is too small to chondrify. We find little evidence that these genes, when disrupted, cause a reversion to any primitive condition and although changes in their expression may have played a role in the evolution of the mammalian jaw, their function during morphogenesis is not sufficiently understood to confirm such hypotheses. PMID:9631652

  15. dBRWD3 Regulates Tissue Overgrowth and Ectopic Gene Expression Caused by Polycomb Group Mutations.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsueh-Tzu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kwei-Yan; Shih, Zong-Siou; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hsieh, Paul-Chen; Kuo, Kuan-Lin; Huang, Kuo-How; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Ya-Wen; Chan, Shih-Peng; Lee, Hsiu-Hsiang; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai

    2016-09-01

    To maintain a particular cell fate, a unique set of genes should be expressed while another set is repressed. One way to repress gene expression is through Polycomb group (PcG) proteins that compact chromatin into a silent configuration. In addition to cell fate maintenance, PcG proteins also maintain normal cell physiology, for example cell cycle. In the absence of PcG, ectopic activation of the PcG-repressed genes leads to developmental defects and malignant tumors. Little is known about the molecular nature of ectopic gene expression; especially what differentiates expression of a given gene in the orthotopic tissue (orthotopic expression) and the ectopic expression of the same gene due to PcG mutations. Here we present that ectopic gene expression in PcG mutant cells specifically requires dBRWD3, a negative regulator of HIRA/Yemanuclein (YEM)-mediated histone variant H3.3 deposition. dBRWD3 mutations suppress both the ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth in PcG mutants through a YEM-dependent mechanism. Our findings identified dBRWD3 as a critical regulator that is uniquely required for ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth caused by PcG mutations. PMID:27588417

  16. Candidate gene associated with a mutation causing recessive polycystic kidney disease in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, J.H.; Lee-Tischler, M.J.; Kwon, H.Y.; Schrick, J.J. ); Avner, E.D.; Sweeney, W.E. ); Godfrey, V.L.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Woychik, R.P. ); Wilkinson, J.E. )

    1994-05-27

    A line of transgenic mice was generated that contains an insertional mutation causing a phenotype similar to human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Homozygotes displayed a complex phenotype that included bilateral polycystic kidneys and an unusual liver lesion. The mutant locus was cloned and characterized through use of the transgene as a molecular marker. Additionally, a candidate polycystic kidney disease (PKD) gene was identified whose structure and expression are directly associated with the mutant locus. A complementary DNA derived from this gene predicted a peptide containing a motif that was originally identified in several genes involved in cell cycle control.

  17. Comprehensive Detection of Genes Causing a Phenotype Using Phenotype Sequencing and Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marc; Gronenberg, Luisa; Liao, James; Lee, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Discovering all the genetic causes of a phenotype is an important goal in functional genomics. We combine an experimental design for detecting independent genetic causes of a phenotype with a high-throughput sequencing analysis that maximizes sensitivity for comprehensively identifying them. Testing this approach on a set of 24 mutant strains generated for a metabolic phenotype with many known genetic causes, we show that this pathway-based phenotype sequencing analysis greatly improves sensitivity of detection compared with previous methods, and reveals a wide range of pathways that can cause this phenotype. We demonstrate our approach on a metabolic re-engineering phenotype, the PEP/OAA metabolic node in E. coli, which is crucial to a substantial number of metabolic pathways and under renewed interest for biofuel research. Out of 2157 mutations in these strains, pathway-phenoseq discriminated just five gene groups (12 genes) as statistically significant causes of the phenotype. Experimentally, these five gene groups, and the next two high-scoring pathway-phenoseq groups, either have a clear connection to the PEP metabolite level or offer an alternative path of producing oxaloacetate (OAA), and thus clearly explain the phenotype. These high-scoring gene groups also show strong evidence of positive selection pressure, compared with strictly neutral selection in the rest of the genome. PMID:24586303

  18. Histone Deacetylase 11 Regulates Oligodendrocyte-Specific Gene Expression and Cell Development in OL-1 Oligodendroglia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hedi; Hu, Qichen; D’Ercole, A. Joseph; Ye, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro studies indicate a correlation between reduced acetylation of histone core proteins and oligodendrocyte development. The nature of these histone modifications and the mechanisms mediating them remain undefined. To address these issues we utilized OL-1 cells, a rat non-transformed oligodendrocyte cell line, and primary oligodendrocyte cultures. We found that the acetylated histone H3 at lysine 9 and lysine 14 (H3K9/K14ac) is reduced in both the myelin basic protein (MBP) and proteolipid protein (PLP) genes of maturing oligodendroglial OL-1 cells, and furthermore, this temporally correlates with increases in MBP, PLP, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) 11 expression. Disruption of developmentally-regulated histone H3 deacetylation within the MBP and PLP genes by the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A blunts MBP and PLP expression. With its increased expression, interaction of HDAC 11 with acetylated histone H3 and recruitment of HDAC 11 to the MBP and PLP genes markedly increases in maturing OL-1 cells. Moreover, suppressing HDAC 11 expression with small interfering RNA significantly: 1) increases H3K9/K14ac globally and within the MBP and PLP genes, 2) decreases MBP and PLP mRNA expression, and 3) blunts the morphological changes associated with oligodendrocyte development. Our data strongly support a specific role for HDAC 11 in histone deacetylation and in turn the regulation of oligodendrocyte-specific protein gene expression and oligodendrocyte development. PMID:18627006

  19. Nemaline myopathy caused by mutations in the nebulin gene may present as a distal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Karcagi, Veronika; Pouget, Jean; Franques, Jerôme; Pellissier, Jean François; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; von der Hagen, Maja; Huebner, Angela; Schoser, Benedikt; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2011-08-01

    Mutations in the nebulin gene are the main cause of autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy, with clinical presentations ranging from mild to severe disease. We have previously reported a nonspecific distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene in six Finnish patients from four different families. Here we describe three non-Finnish patients in two unrelated families with distal nemaline myopathy caused by four different compound heterozygous nebulin mutations, only one of which is a missense mutation. One of the mutations has previously been identified in one family with the severe form of nemaline myopathy. We conclude that nemaline myopathy and distal myopathy caused by nebulin mutations form a clinical and histological continuum. Nemaline myopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with an early-onset predominantly distal myopathy. PMID:21724397

  20. The quest for genes causing complex traits in ocular medicine: successes, interpretations, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Sudha K

    2007-01-01

    Gene mapping and positional cloning have gained acceptance as state-of-the-art methods to identify molecules that cause common complex diseases. However, the use of specialized technology, varying study designs, and misconceptions about the role of novel findings in genetics has led to confusion among basic scientists and health care professionals alike regarding the importance of these findings in molecular diagnostics and individualized medicine. To alleviate this confusion, the successes achieved in the past few years in mapping of genes for complex traits such as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma are interpreted in the context of the appropriate population biology framework. The current article veers away from propagating the overly simplistic belief of a linear relationship between a specific gene and age-related macular degeneration, particularly one that equates possession of a specific risk allele as the only precursor to end-stage disease. Ascribing predictive properties to a single gene without consideration of its network partners, timing of action, or environmental correlates argues for a static view of gene action. Modern viewpoints of the mechanisms of action of a gene are contextual and encompass more cohesive frameworks, ranging from the developmental timing of action, to the genomic and environmental milieu. In this regard, gene mapping studies that have been so immensely successful in the gene detection phase of a study provide biased perspectives on the importance of these genes and the corresponding risk alleles in the general population because of their limited sample size and constrained design. To move the field of gene-based diagnosis forward, it will be necessary to conduct additional cohort and longitudinal studies using the original gene finding studies as a knowledge base to develop predictive models. In summary, while we have achieved great successes in finding genes for complex traits, the application of these findings to

  1. Solvent effects on acrylate kp in organic media?-A systematic PLP-SEC study.

    PubMed

    Haehnel, Alexander P; Wenn, Benjamin; Kockler, Katrin; Bantle, Tobias; Misske, Andrea M; Fleischhaker, Friederike; Junkers, Thomas; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    The Arrhenius parameters of the propagation rate coefficient, kp , are determined employing high-frequency pulsed laser polymerization-size exclusion chromatography (PLP-SEC) for the homologous series of five linear alkyl acrylates (i.e., methyl acrylate (MA), butyl acrylate (BA), dodecyl acrylate (DA), stearyl acrylate (SA), and behenyl acrylate (BeA)) in 1 m solution in butyl acetate (BuAc) as well as in toluene. The comparison of the obtained kp values with the literature known values for bulk demonstrates that no significant solvent influence neither in BuAc nor in toluene on the propagation reaction compared to bulk is detectable. Concomitantly, the kp values in toluene and in BuAc solution display a similar increase with increasing number of C-atoms in the ester side chain as was previously reported for the bulk systems. These findings are in clear contrast to earlier studies, which report a decrease of kp with increasing ester side chain length in toluene. The additional investigation of the longest and shortest ester side chain acrylate (i.e., BeA and MA) over the entire experimentally available concentration range at one temperature (i.e., 50 °C) does not reveal any general concentration dependence and all observed differences in the kp are within the experimental error. PMID:25363291

  2. Dysregulation of gene expression as a cause of Cockayne syndrome neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuming; Chakravarty, Probir; Ranes, Michael; Kelly, Gavin; Brooks, Philip J; Neilan, Edward; Stewart, Aengus; Schiavo, Giampietro; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2014-10-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a multisystem disorder with severe neurological symptoms. The majority of CS patients carry mutations in Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), best known for its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. Indeed, because various repair pathways are compromised in patient cells, CS is widely considered a genome instability syndrome. Here, we investigate the connection between the neuropathology of CS and dysregulation of gene expression. Transcriptome analysis of human fibroblasts revealed that even in the absence of DNA damage, CSB affects the expression of thousands of genes, many of which are neuronal genes. CSB is present in a significant subset of these genes, suggesting that regulation is direct, at the level of transcription. Importantly, reprogramming of CS fibroblasts to neuron-like cells is defective unless an exogenous CSB gene is introduced. Moreover, neuroblastoma cells from which CSB is depleted show defects in gene expression programs required for neuronal differentiation, and fail to differentiate and extend neurites. Likewise, neuron-like cells cannot be maintained without CSB. Finally, a number of disease symptoms may be explained by marked gene expression changes in the brain of patients with CS. Together, these data point to dysregulation of gene regulatory networks as a cause of the neurological symptoms in CS. PMID:25249633

  3. Dysregulation of gene expression as a cause of Cockayne syndrome neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuming; Chakravarty, Probir; Ranes, Michael; Kelly, Gavin; Brooks, Philip J.; Neilan, Edward; Stewart, Aengus; Schiavo, Giampietro; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2014-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a multisystem disorder with severe neurological symptoms. The majority of CS patients carry mutations in Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), best known for its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. Indeed, because various repair pathways are compromised in patient cells, CS is widely considered a genome instability syndrome. Here, we investigate the connection between the neuropathology of CS and dysregulation of gene expression. Transcriptome analysis of human fibroblasts revealed that even in the absence of DNA damage, CSB affects the expression of thousands of genes, many of which are neuronal genes. CSB is present in a significant subset of these genes, suggesting that regulation is direct, at the level of transcription. Importantly, reprogramming of CS fibroblasts to neuron-like cells is defective unless an exogenous CSB gene is introduced. Moreover, neuroblastoma cells from which CSB is depleted show defects in gene expression programs required for neuronal differentiation, and fail to differentiate and extend neurites. Likewise, neuron-like cells cannot be maintained without CSB. Finally, a number of disease symptoms may be explained by marked gene expression changes in the brain of patients with CS. Together, these data point to dysregulation of gene regulatory networks as a cause of the neurological symptoms in CS. PMID:25249633

  4. Gene amplification as a cause of inherited thyroxine-binding globulin excess in two Japanese families

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yuichi; Miura, Yoshitaka; Saito, Hidehiko

    1995-12-01

    T{sub 4}-binding globulin (TBG) is the major thyroid hormone transport protein in man. Inherited abnormalities in the level of serum TBG have been classified as partial deficiency, complete deficiency, and excess. Sequencing analysis of the TBG gene, located on Xq21-22, has uncovered the molecular defects causing partial and complete deficiency. However, the mechanism leading to inherited TBG excess remains unknown. In this study, two Japanese families, F-A and F-T, with inherited TBG excess were analyzed. Serum TBG levels in hemizygous males were 58 and 44 {mu}g/mL, 3- and 2-fold the normal value, respectively. The molecule had normal properties in terms of heat stability and isoelectric focussing pattern. The sequence of the coding region and the promoter activity of the TBG gene were also indistinguishable between hemizygotes and normal subjects. The gene dosage of TBG relative to that of {beta}-globin, which is located on chromosome 11, and Duchenne muscular dystropy, which is located on Xp, was evaluated by coamplification of these target genes using polymerase chain reaction and subsequent quantitation by HPLC. The TBG/{beta}-globin ratios of the affected male and female of F-A were 3.13 and 4.13 times, respectively, that in the normal males. The TBG/Duchenne muscular dystrophy ratios were 2.92 and 2.09 times the normal value, respectively. These results are compatible with three copies of TBG gene on the affected X-chromosome. Similarly, a 2-fold increase in gene dosage was demonstrated in the affected hemizygote of F-T. A 3-fold tandem amplification of the TBG gene was shown by in situ hybridization of prometaphase and interphase chromosomes from the affected male with a biotinylated genomic TBG probe, confirming the gene dosage results. Gene amplification of TBG is the cause of inherited TBG excess in these two families. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Structure of the PLP-Form of the Human Kynurenine Aminotransferase II in a Novel Spacegroup at 1.83 Å Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Alireza; Sun, Guanchen; Harrop, Stephen J.; Hanrahan, Jane R.; Church, W. Bret

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT-II) is a 47 kDa pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, active as a homodimer, which catalyses the transamination of the amino acids kynurenine (KYN) and 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) in the tryptophan pathway, and is responsible for producing metabolites that lead to kynurenic acid (KYNA), which is implicated in several neurological diseases such as schizophrenia. In order to fully describe the role of KAT-II in the pathobiology of schizophrenia and other brain disorders, the crystal structure of full-length PLP-form hKAT-II was determined at 1.83 Å resolution, the highest available. The electron density of the active site reveals an aldimine linkage between PLP and Lys263, as well as the active site residues, which characterize the fold-type I PLP-dependent enzymes. PMID:27023527

  6. Muscular dystrophy with marked Dysferlin deficiency is consistently caused by primary dysferlin gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cacciottolo, Mafalda; Numitone, Gelsomina; Aurino, Stefania; Caserta, Imma Rosaria; Fanin, Marina; Politano, Luisa; Minetti, Carlo; Ricci, Enzo; Piluso, Giulio; Angelini, Corrado; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Dysferlin is a 237-kDa transmembrane protein involved in calcium-mediated sarcolemma resealing. Dysferlin gene mutations cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2B, Miyoshi myopathy (MM) and distal myopathy of the anterior tibialis. Considering that a secondary Dysferlin reduction has also been described in other myopathies, our original goal was to identify cases with a Dysferlin deficiency without dysferlin gene mutations. The dysferlin gene is huge, composed of 55 exons that span 233 140 bp of genomic DNA. We performed a thorough mutation analysis in 65 LGMD/MM patients with ≤20% Dysferlin. The screening was exhaustive, as we sequenced both genomic DNA and cDNA. When required, we used other methods, including real-time PCR, long PCR and array CGH. In all patients, we were able to recognize the primary involvement of the dysferlin gene. We identified 38 novel mutation types. Some of these, such as a dysferlin gene duplication, could have been missed by conventional screening strategies. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay was evident in six cases, in three of which both alleles were only detectable in the genomic DNA but not in the mRNA. Among a wide spectrum of novel gene defects, we found the first example of a ‘nonstop' mutation causing a dysferlinopathy. This study presents the first direct and conclusive evidence that an amount of Dysferlin ≤20% is pathogenic and always caused by primary dysferlin gene mutations. This demonstrates the high specificity of a marked reduction of Dysferlin on western blot and the value of a comprehensive molecular approach for LGMD2B/MM diagnosis. PMID:21522182

  7. Schizophrenia: A Pathogenetic Autoimmune Disease Caused by Viruses and Pathogens and Dependent on Genes

    PubMed Central

    Carter, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Many genes have been implicated in schizophrenia as have viral prenatal or adult infections and toxoplasmosis or Lyme disease. Several autoantigens also target key pathology-related proteins. These factors are interrelated. Susceptibility genes encode for proteins homologous to those of the pathogens while the autoantigens are homologous to pathogens' proteins, suggesting that the risk-promoting effects of genes and risk factors are conditional upon each other, and dependent upon protein matching between pathogen and susceptibility gene products. Pathogens' proteins may act as dummy ligands, decoy receptors, or via interactome interference. Many such proteins are immunogenic suggesting that antibody mediated knockdown of multiple schizophrenia gene products could contribute to the disease, explaining the immune activation in the brain and lymphocytes in schizophrenia, and the preponderance of immune-related gene variants in the schizophrenia genome. Schizophrenia may thus be a “pathogenetic” autoimmune disorder, caused by pathogens, genes, and the immune system acting together, and perhaps preventable by pathogen elimination, or curable by the removal of culpable antibodies and antigens. PMID:22567321

  8. A mutation in arylsulfatase B gene causes mucopolysuccharidosis VI in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kunieda, T.; Ikadai, H.; Desnick, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    Mucopolysuccharidosis (MPS) type VI comprises a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by the deficiency of arylsulfatase B (ARSB) and subsequent lysosomal storage of glucosaminoglycans. We have identified a mutant rat strain that has remarkable similarites to human MPS VI. Recently, we have localized the autosomal recessive gene for the mutant phenotype on rat chromosome 2 by linkage analysis. The rat chromosome 2 is syntenic with the human and mouse chromosomes on which ARSB genes were assigned. Thus the mutant rats were expected to have a mutation in the ARSB gene. A normal rat liver cDNA library was screened using the cat ARSB cDNA as a probe, and clones which cover almost all of the complete ARSB open reading frame were isolated. The nucleotide sequence and amino acid sequence of the rat ARSB sequence showed 80% and 85% similarities with the human ARSB gene, respectively. The ARSB gene was assigned to rat chromosome 2 by using a rat-mouse hybrid cell panel, confirming the linkage analysis. Based on the nucleotide sequence of the normal rat ARSB gene, RT-PCR using liver RNA of the mutant rat was carried out to isolate the cDNA of the mutant rat ARSB gene. By sequencing several independent clones, the cDNA of the mutant rat was found to have a one base insertion at nucleotide 507, resulting in a frameshift mutation in the coding region of the rat ARSB gene, which introduces a stop codon in position 258 of the putative ARSB polypeptide. All affected MPS VI rats were homozygous for the mutant allele, while all phenotypically normal rats were heterozygous or homozygous for the wild type allele, indicating a perfect correspondence between the MPS VI phenotype and the genotype of the mutation. We conclude that the mutation in the ARSB gene is responsible for MPS VI in the rat, and that the mutant rat is an excellent model for study of human MPS VI pathogenesis and treatment.

  9. Mutations in the Gene That Encodes the F-Actin Binding Protein Anillin Cause FSGS

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Gentzon; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Hanke, Nils; Tossidou, Irini; Burchette, James; Wu, Guanghong; Homstad, Alison; Sparks, Matthew A.; Gomez, Jose; Jiang, Ruiji; Alonso, Andrea; Lavin, Peter; Conlon, Peter; Korstanje, Ron; Stander, M. Christine; Shamsan, Ghaidan; Barua, Moumita; Spurney, Robert; Singhal, Pravin C.; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Haller, Hermann; Howell, David; Pollak, Martin R.; Shaw, Andrey S.; Schiffer, Mario; Winn, Michelle P.

    2014-01-01

    FSGS is characterized by segmental scarring of the glomerulus and is a leading cause of kidney failure. Identification of genes causing FSGS has improved our understanding of disease mechanisms and points to defects in the glomerular epithelial cell, the podocyte, as a major factor in disease pathogenesis. Using a combination of genome-wide linkage studies and whole-exome sequencing in a kindred with familial FSGS, we identified a missense mutation R431C in anillin (ANLN), an F-actin binding cell cycle gene, as a cause of FSGS. We screened 250 additional families with FSGS and found another variant, G618C, that segregates with disease in a second family with FSGS. We demonstrate upregulation of anillin in podocytes in kidney biopsy specimens from individuals with FSGS and kidney samples from a murine model of HIV-1–associated nephropathy. Overexpression of R431C mutant ANLN in immortalized human podocytes results in enhanced podocyte motility. The mutant anillin displays reduced binding to the slit diaphragm–associated scaffold protein CD2AP. Knockdown of the ANLN gene in zebrafish morphants caused a loss of glomerular filtration barrier integrity, podocyte foot process effacement, and an edematous phenotype. Collectively, these findings suggest that anillin is important in maintaining the integrity of the podocyte actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24676636

  10. An atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes FMRI gene

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, F.; Zonana, J.; Gunter, K.; Peterson, K.L.; Magenis, R.E., Popovich, B.W.

    1995-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation and results from the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR1 gene. In the vast majority of cases, this is caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG repeat in the first exon of the FMR1 gene. We describe here a phenotypically atypical case of fragile X syndrome, caused by a deletion that includes the entire FMR1 gene and {ge}9.0 Mb of flanking DNA. The proband, RK, was a 6-year-old mentally retarded male with obesity and anal atresia. A diagnosis of fragile X syndrome was established by the failure of RK`s DNA to hybridize to a 558-bp PstI-XhoI fragment (pfxa3) specific for the 5{prime}-end of the FMR1 gene. The analysis of flanking markers in the interval from Xq26.3-q28 indicated a deletion extending from between 160-500 kb distal and 9.0 Mb proximal to the FMR1 gene. High-resolution chromosome banding confirmed a deletion with breakpoints in Xq26.3 and Xq27.3. This deletion was maternally transmitted and arose as a new mutation on the grandpaternal X chromosome. The maternal transmission of the deletion was confirmed by FISH using a 34-kb cosmid (c31.4) containing most of the FMR1 gene. These results indicated that RK carried a deletion of the FMR1 region with the most proximal breakpoint described to date. This patient`s unusual clinical presentation may indicate the presence of genes located in the deleted interval proximal to the FMR1 locus that are able to modify the fragile X syndrome phenotype. 36 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Congenital Heart Defects Are Rarely Caused by Mutations in Cardiac and Smooth Muscle Actin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Khodyuchenko, Tatiana; Zlotina, Anna; Pervunina, Tatiana; Zverev, Dmitry; Malashicheva, Anna; Kostareva, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background. Congenital heart defects (CHDs) often have genetic background due to missense mutations in cardiomyocyte-specific genes. For example, cardiac actin was shown to be involved in pathogenesis of cardiac septum defects and smooth muscle actin in pathogenesis of aortic aneurysm in combination with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). In the present study, we further searched for mutations in human α-cardiac actin (ACTC1) and smooth muscle α-actin (ACTA2) genes as a possible cause of atrial septum defect type II (ASDII) and PDA. Findings. Total genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 86 individuals with ASDs and 100 individuals with PDA. Coding exons and flanking intron regions of ACTC1 (NM_005159.4) and ACTA2 (NM_001613) were amplified by PCR with specific primers designed according to the corresponding gene reference sequences. PCR fragments were directly sequenced and analyzed. Sequence analysis of ACTC1 and ACTA2 did not identify any nucleotide changes that altered the coding sense of the genes. In ACTC1 gene, we were able to detect one previously described nucleotide polymorphism (rs2307493) resulting in a synonymous substitution. The frequency of this SNP was similar in the study and control group, thus excluding it from the possible disease-associated variants. Conclusions. Our results confirmed that the mutations in ACTC1 gene are rare (at least <1%) cause of ASDII. Mutations in ACTA2 gene were not detected in patients with PDA, thus being excluded from the list of frequent PDA-associated genetic defects. PMID:25861618

  12. Exonic rearrangements in the known Parkinson's disease-causing genes are a rare cause of the disease in South African patients.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Celia; Carr, Jonathan; Glanzmann, Brigitte; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-04-21

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the midbrain. To date, a number of PD-causing genes have been found, including SNCA, LRRK2, VPS35, PARK2, PINK1, DJ-1, ATP13A2, and most recently CHCHD2. Mutations in these genes range from point mutations to larger exonic rearrangements including deletions and duplications. This study aimed to detect possible copy number variation (CNV) in the known PD-causing genes in a cohort of South African patients with PD. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis was performed on a total of 210 South African PD patients, and possible CNVs were verified using quantitative real time PCR. No homozygous or compound heterozygous exon rearrangements in the genes analysed were found in the patient group. A heterozygous PARK2 exon 4 deletion was found in a sporadic patient with an age at onset of 51 years. Sanger sequencing did not reveal any additional mutations in PARK2 in this patient. Combining our results with that of previous studies in a South African cohort, the frequency of exonic rearrangements in the known PD-causing genes is only 1.8% (8/439 patients). In conclusion, CNV in the known PD-causing genes are a rare cause of PD in a South African cohort, and there may be as yet unknown genetic causes of PD that are specific to patients of African ethnicity. PMID:27001088

  13. TET-mediated oxidation of methylcytosine causes TDG or NEIL glycosylase dependent gene reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Udo; Bauer, Christina; Siegl, Michael; Rottach, Andrea; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of hydroxymethyl-, formyl- and carboxylcytosine, generated through oxidation of methylcytosine by TET dioxygenases, raised the question how these modifications contribute to epigenetic regulation. As they are subjected to complex regulation in vivo, we dissected links to gene expression with in vitro modified reporter constructs. We used an Oct4 promoter-driven reporter gene and demonstrated that in vitro methylation causes gene silencing while subsequent oxidation with purified catalytic domain of TET1 leads to gene reactivation. To identify proteins involved in this pathway we screened for TET interacting factors and identified TDG, PARP1, XRCC1 and LIG3 that are involved in base-excision repair. Knockout and rescue experiments demonstrated that gene reactivation depended on the glycosylase TDG, but not MBD4, while NEIL1, 2 and 3 could partially rescue the loss of TDG. These results clearly show that oxidation of methylcytosine by TET dioxygenases and subsequent removal by TDG or NEIL glycosylases and the BER pathway results in reactivation of epigenetically silenced genes. PMID:24948610

  14. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection causes modulation of inflammatory and immune response genes in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anuj; Bhattacharya, Bhaskar; Puri, Raj K; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2008-01-01

    Background Neurovirulent Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) causes lethal encephalitis in equines and is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. VEEV is highly infectious when transmitted by aerosol and has been developed as a bio-warfare agent, making it an important pathogen to study from a military and civilian standpoint. Molecular mechanisms of VEE pathogenesis are poorly understood. To study these, the gene expression profile of VEEV infected mouse brains was investigated. Changes in gene expression were correlated with histological changes in the brain. In addition, a molecular framework of changes in gene expression associated with progression of the disease was studied. Results Our results demonstrate that genes related to important immune pathways such as antigen presentation, inflammation, apoptosis and response to virus (Cxcl10, CxCl11, Ccl5, Ifr7, Ifi27 Oas1b, Fcerg1,Mif, Clusterin and MHC class II) were upregulated as a result of virus infection. The number of over-expressed genes (>1.5-fold level) increased as the disease progressed (from 197, 296, 400, to 1086 at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours post infection, respectively). Conclusion Identification of differentially expressed genes in brain will help in the understanding of VEEV-induced pathogenesis and selection of biomarkers for diagnosis and targeted therapy of VEEV-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:18558011

  15. Whole exome sequencing unravels disease-causing genes in consanguineous families in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Fahiminiya, S; Almuriekhi, M; Nawaz, Z; Staffa, A; Lepage, P; Ali, R; Hashim, L; Schwartzentruber, J; Abu Khadija, K; Zaineddin, S; Gamal, H; Majewski, J; Ben-Omran, T

    2014-08-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has greatly facilitated the identification of causal mutations for diverse human genetic disorders. We applied WES as a molecular diagnostic tool to identify disease-causing genes in consanguineous families in Qatar. Seventeen consanguineous families with diverse disorders were recruited. Initial mutation screening of known genes related to the clinical diagnoses did not reveal the causative mutations. Using WES approach, we identified the definitive disease-causing mutations in four families: (i) a novel nonsense homozygous (c.1034C>G) in PHKG2 causing glycogen storage disease type 9C (GSD9C) in a male with initial diagnosis of GSD3; (ii) a novel homozygous 1-bp deletion (c.915del) in NSUN2 in a male proband with Noonan-like syndrome; (iii) a homozygous SNV (c.1598C>G) in exon 11 of IDUA causing Hurler syndrome in a female proband with unknown clinical diagnosis; (iv) a de novo known splicing mutation (c.1645+1G>A) in PHEX in a female proband with initial diagnosis of autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets. Applying WES as a diagnostic tool led to the unambiguous identification of disease-causing mutations in phenotypically complex disorders or correction of the initial clinical diagnosis in ˜25% of our cases. PMID:24102521

  16. A familial case of congenital hypothyroidism caused by a homozygous mutation of the thyrotropin receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Bretones, P; Duprez, L; Parma, J; David, M; Vassart, G; Rodien, P

    2001-10-01

    Most of the time congenital hypothyroidism appears as a sporadic disease. In addition to the rare defects in hormonosynthesis associated with goiters, the causes of congenital hypothyroidism include agenesis and ectopy of the thyroid gland. The study of some familial cases has allowed the identification of a few genes responsible for congenital hypothyroidism. We report here a familial case of congenital hypothyroidism, transmitted as a recessive trait, and caused by a homozygous mutation in the thyrotropin receptor (TSH-R). The initial diagnosis of thyroid agenesis, based on the absence of tracer uptake on scintiscan, was incorrect, because ultrasound examination identified severely hypoplastic thyroid tissue in the cervical region. PMID:11716047

  17. Novel splicing mutation in the ASXL3 gene causing Bainbridge-Ropers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hori, Ikumi; Miya, Fuyuki; Ohashi, Kei; Negishi, Yutaka; Hattori, Ayako; Ando, Naoki; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Yamasaki, Mami; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Saitoh, Shinji

    2016-07-01

    Bainbridge-Ropers syndrome (BRPS) is characterized by severe developmental delay, feeding problems, short stature, characteristic facal appearance including arched eyebrows and anteverted nares, and ulnar deviation of the hands. BRPS is caused by a heterozygous mutation in the additional sex combs-like 3 (ASXL3) gene. We describe a patient with severe developmental delay, feeding problems, short stature, autism, and sleep disturbance with a heterozygous de novo splicing mutation in the ASXL3 gene. Reported disease-causing mutations in ASXL3 are located mostly in the first half of exon 11, analogous to ASXL1 mutations of which result in Bohring-Opitz syndrome (BOS). Our findings suggest that the expression of the truncated ASXL3 protein, including ASXN and ASXH domains, give rise to BRPS, which is distinct from but overlaps with BOS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27075689

  18. ISPD gene mutations are a common cause of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Cirak, Sebahattin; Foley, Aileen Reghan; Herrmann, Ralf; Willer, Tobias; Yau, Shu; Stevens, Elizabeth; Torelli, Silvia; Brodd, Lina; Kamynina, Alisa; Vondracek, Petr; Roper, Helen; Longman, Cheryl; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Marrosu, Gianni; Nürnberg, Peter; Michele, Daniel E.; Plagnol, Vincent; Hurles, Matt; Moore, Steven A.; Sewry, Caroline A.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Voit, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Dystroglycanopathies are a clinically and genetically diverse group of recessively inherited conditions ranging from the most severe of the congenital muscular dystrophies, Walker–Warburg syndrome, to mild forms of adult-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Their hallmark is a reduction in the functional glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, which can be detected in muscle biopsies. An important part of this glycosylation is a unique O-mannosylation, essential for the interaction of α-dystroglycan with extracellular matrix proteins such as laminin-α2. Mutations in eight genes coding for proteins in the glycosylation pathway are responsible for ∼50% of dystroglycanopathy cases. Despite multiple efforts using traditional positional cloning, the causative genes for unsolved dystroglycanopathy cases have escaped discovery for several years. In a recent collaborative study, we discovered that loss-of-function recessive mutations in a novel gene, called isoprenoid synthase domain containing (ISPD), are a relatively common cause of Walker–Warburg syndrome. In this article, we report the involvement of the ISPD gene in milder dystroglycanopathy phenotypes ranging from congenital muscular dystrophy to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and identified allelic ISPD variants in nine cases belonging to seven families. In two ambulant cases, there was evidence of structural brain involvement, whereas in seven, the clinical manifestation was restricted to a dystrophic skeletal muscle phenotype. Although the function of ISPD in mammals is not yet known, mutations in this gene clearly lead to a reduction in the functional glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, which not only causes the severe Walker–Warburg syndrome but is also a common cause of the milder forms of dystroglycanopathy. PMID:23288328

  19. Alpharetroviral Vectors: From a Cancer-Causing Agent to a Useful Tool for Human Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suerth, Julia D.; Labenski, Verena; Schambach, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy using integrating retroviral vectors has proven its effectiveness in several clinical trials for the treatment of inherited diseases and cancer. However, vector-mediated adverse events related to insertional mutagenesis were also observed, emphasizing the need for safer therapeutic vectors. Paradoxically, alpharetroviruses, originally discovered as cancer-causing agents, have a more random and potentially safer integration pattern compared to gammaretro- and lentiviruses. In this review, we provide a short overview of the history of alpharetroviruses and explain how they can be converted into state-of-the-art gene delivery tools with improved safety features. We discuss development of alpharetroviral vectors in compliance with regulatory requirements for clinical translation, and provide an outlook on possible future gene therapy applications. Taken together, this review is a broad overview of alpharetroviral vectors spanning the bridge from their parental virus discovery to their potential applicability in clinical settings. PMID:25490763

  20. Alterations to the remote control of Shh gene expression cause congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert E; Lettice, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Multi-species conserved non-coding elements occur in the vertebrate genome and are clustered in the vicinity of developmentally regulated genes. Many are known to act as cis-regulators of transcription and may reside at long distances from the genes they regulate. However, the relationship of conserved sequence to encoded regulatory information and indeed, the mechanism by which these contribute to long-range transcriptional regulation is not well understood. The ZRS, a highly conserved cis-regulator, is a paradigm for such long-range gene regulation. The ZRS acts over approximately 1 Mb to control spatio-temporal expression of Shh in the limb bud and mutations within it result in a number of limb abnormalities, including polydactyly, tibial hypoplasia and syndactyly. We describe the activity of this developmental regulator and discuss a number of mechanisms by which regulatory mutations in this enhancer function to cause congenital abnormalities. PMID:23650631

  1. Mutations in the FUS/TLS gene on chromosome 16 cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, T J; Bosco, D A; Leclerc, A L; Tamrazian, E; Vanderburg, C R; Russ, C; Davis, A; Gilchrist, J; Kasarskis, E J; Munsat, T; Valdmanis, P; Rouleau, G A; Hosler, B A; Cortelli, P; de Jong, P J; Yoshinaga, Y; Haines, J L; Pericak-Vance, M A; Yan, J; Ticozzi, N; Siddique, T; McKenna-Yasek, D; Sapp, P C; Horvitz, H R; Landers, J E; Brown, R H

    2009-02-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal degenerative motor neuron disorder. Ten percent of cases are inherited; most involve unidentified genes. We report here 13 mutations in the fused in sarcoma/translated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS) gene on chromosome 16 that were specific for familial ALS. The FUS/TLS protein binds to RNA, functions in diverse processes, and is normally located predominantly in the nucleus. In contrast, the mutant forms of FUS/TLS accumulated in the cytoplasm of neurons, a pathology that is similar to that of the gene TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP43), whose mutations also cause ALS. Neuronal cytoplasmic protein aggregation and defective RNA metabolism thus appear to be common pathogenic mechanisms involved in ALS and possibly in other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19251627

  2. Alterations to the remote control of Shh gene expression cause congenital abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert E.; Lettice, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-species conserved non-coding elements occur in the vertebrate genome and are clustered in the vicinity of developmentally regulated genes. Many are known to act as cis-regulators of transcription and may reside at long distances from the genes they regulate. However, the relationship of conserved sequence to encoded regulatory information and indeed, the mechanism by which these contribute to long-range transcriptional regulation is not well understood. The ZRS, a highly conserved cis-regulator, is a paradigm for such long-range gene regulation. The ZRS acts over approximately 1 Mb to control spatio-temporal expression of Shh in the limb bud and mutations within it result in a number of limb abnormalities, including polydactyly, tibial hypoplasia and syndactyly. We describe the activity of this developmental regulator and discuss a number of mechanisms by which regulatory mutations in this enhancer function to cause congenital abnormalities. PMID:23650631

  3. Absence of functional TolC protein causes increased stress response gene expression in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The TolC protein from Sinorhizobium meliloti has previously been demonstrated to be required for establishing successful biological nitrogen fixation symbiosis with Medicago sativa. It is also needed in protein and exopolysaccharide secretion and for protection against osmotic and oxidative stresses. Here, the transcriptional profile of free-living S. meliloti 1021 tolC mutant is described as a step toward understanding its role in the physiology of the cell. Results Comparison of tolC mutant and wild-type strains transcriptomes showed 1177 genes with significantly increased expression while 325 had significantly decreased expression levels. The genes with an increased expression suggest the activation of a cytoplasmic and extracytoplasmic stress responses possibly mediated by the sigma factor RpoH1 and protein homologues of the CpxRA two-component regulatory system of Enterobacteria, respectively. Stress conditions are probably caused by perturbation of the cell envelope. Consistent with gene expression data, biochemical analysis indicates that the tolC mutant suffers from oxidative stress. This is illustrated by the elevated enzyme activity levels detected for catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase. The observed increase in the expression of genes encoding products involved in central metabolism and transporters for nutrient uptake suggests a higher metabolic rate of the tolC mutant. We also demonstrated increased swarming motility in the tolC mutant strain. Absence of functional TolC caused decreased expression mainly of genes encoding products involved in nitrogen metabolism and transport. Conclusion This work shows how a mutation in the outer membrane protein TolC, common to many bacterial transport systems, affects expression of a large number of genes that act in concert to restore cell homeostasis. This finding further underlines the fundamental role of this protein in Sinorhizobium meliloti biology. PMID:20573193

  4. Establishing Precise Evolutionary History of a Gene Improves Predicting Disease Causing Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are likely benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, while inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and moreover are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods We identified major events in NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism’s fitness. Results Removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. Conclusion The results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well. PMID:26890452

  5. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy caused by a mutation in the GATOR1 complex gene NPRL3.

    PubMed

    Korenke, Georg-Christoph; Eggert, Marlene; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in NPRL3, one of three genes that encode proteins of the mTORC1-regulating GATOR1 complex, have recently been reported to cause cortical dysplasia with focal epilepsy. We have now analyzed a multiplex epilepsy family by whole exome sequencing and identified a frameshift mutation (NM_001077350.2; c.1522delG; p.E508Rfs*46) within exon 13 of NPRL3. This truncating mutation causes an epilepsy phenotype characterized by early childhood onset of mainly nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The penetrance in our family was low (three affected out of six mutation carriers), compared to families with either ion channel- or DEPDC5-associated familial nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The absence of apparent structural brain abnormalities suggests that mutations in NPRL3 are not necessarily associated with focal cortical dysplasia but might be able to cause epilepsy by different, yet unknown pathomechanisms. PMID:26786403

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of apo, holo, and inactivator bound GABA-at reveal the role of active site residues in PLP dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gökcan, Hatice; Monard, Gerald; Sungur Konuklar, F Aylin

    2016-07-01

    The pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP) cofactor is a significant organic molecule in medicinal chemistry. It is often found covalently bound to lysine residues in proteins to form PLP dependent enzymes. An example of this family of PLP dependent enzymes is γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT) which is responsible for the degradation of the neurotransmitter GABA. Its inhibition or inactivation can be used to prevent the reduction of GABA concentration in brain which is the source of several neurological disorders. As a test case for PLP dependent enzymes, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of GABA-AT to reveal the roles of the protein residues and its cofactor. Three different states have been considered: the apoenzyme, the holoenzyme, and the inactive state obtained after the suicide inhibition by vigabatrin. Different protonation states have also been considered for PLP and two key active site residues: Asp298 and His190. Together, 24 independent molecular dynamics trajectories have been simulated for a cumulative total of 2.88 µs. Our results indicate that, unlike in aqueous solution, the PLP pyridine moiety is protonated in GABA-AT. This is a consequence of a pKa shift triggered by a strong charge-charge interaction with an ionic "diad" formed by Asp298 and His190 that would help the activation of the first half-reaction of the catalytic mechanism in GABA-AT: the conversion of PLP to free pyridoxamine phosphate (PMP). In addition, our MD simulations exhibit additional strong hydrogen bond networks between the protein and PLP: the phosphate group is held in place by the donation of at least three hydrogen bonds while the carbonyl oxygen of the pyridine ring interacts with Gln301; Phe181 forms a π-π stacking interaction with the pyridine ring and works as a gate keeper with the assistance of Val300. All these interactions are hypothesized to help maintain free PMP in place inside the protein active site to facilitate the second half

  7. Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by a Novel Frameshift in the BAG3 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo-Arlandi, Javier; Allegue, Catarina; Iglesias, Anna; Mangas, Alipio; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy, a major cause of chronic heart failure and cardiac transplantation, is characterized by left ventricular or biventricular heart dilatation. In nearly 50% of cases the pathology is inherited, and more than 60 genes have been reported as disease-causing. However, in 30% of familial cases the mutation remains unidentified even after comprehensive genetic analysis. This study clinically and genetically assessed a large Spanish family affected by dilated cardiomyopathy to search for novel variations. Methods and Results Our study included a total of 100 family members. Clinical assessment was performed in alive, and genetic analysis was also performed in alive and 1 deceased relative. Genetic screening included resequencing of 55 genes associated with sudden cardiac death, and Sanger sequencing of main disease-associated genes. Genetic analysis identified a frame-shift variation in BAG3 (p.H243Tfr*64) in 32 patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation identified substantial heterogeneity in disease expression. Of 32 genetic carriers (one deceased), 21 relatives were clinically affected, and 10 were asymptomatic. Seventeen of the symptomatic genetic carriers exhibited proto-diastolic septal knock by echocardiographic assessment. Conclusions We report p.H243Tfr*64_BAG3 as a novel pathogenic variation responsible for familial dilated cardiomyopathy. This variation correlates with a more severe phenotype of the disease, mainly in younger individuals. Genetic analysis in families, even asymptomatic individuals, enables early identification of individuals at risk and allows implementation of preventive measures. PMID:27391596

  8. Missense mutations in the perforin (PRF1) gene as a cause of hereditary cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Mohammed S; Gilmour, Kimberly C; House, Imran G; Layton, Mark; Panoskaltsis, Nicki; Sohal, Mamta; Trapani, Joseph A; Voskoboinik, Ilia

    2016-07-01

    Perforin, a pore-forming toxin released from secretory granules of NK cells and CTLs, is essential for their cytotoxic activity against infected or cancerous target cells. Bi-allelic loss-of-function mutations in the perforin gene are invariably associated with a fatal immunoregulatory disorder, familial haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 2 (FHL2), in infants. More recently, it has also been recognized that partial loss of perforin function can cause disease in later life, including delayed onset FHL2 and haematological malignancies. Herein, we report a family in which a wide range of systemic inflammatory and neoplastic manifestations have occurred across three generations. We found that disease was linked to two missense perforin gene mutations (encoding A91V, R410W) that cause protein misfolding and partial loss of activity. These cases link the partial loss of perforin function with some solid tumors that are known to be controlled by the immune system, as well as haematological cancers. Our findings also demonstrate that perforin gene mutations can contribute to hereditary cancer predisposition. PMID:27622035

  9. Mutations in the Proenteropeptidase Gene Are the Molecular Cause of Congenital Enteropeptidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Andreas; Maier, Esther M.; Bück, Cornelius; Mayerhofer, Peter U.; Kappler, Matthias; Haworth, James C.; Moroz, Stanley P.; Hadorn, Hans-Beat; Sadler, J. Evan; Roscher, Adelbert A.

    2002-01-01

    Enteropeptidase (enterokinase [E.C.3.4.21.9]) is a serine protease of the intestinal brush border in the proximal small intestine. It activates the pancreatic proenzyme trypsinogen, which, in turn, releases active digestive enzymes from their inactive pancreatic precursors. Congenital enteropeptidase deficiency is a rare recessively inherited disorder leading, in affected infants, to severe failure to thrive. The genomic structure of the proenteropeptidase gene (25 exons, total gene size 88 kb) was characterized in order to perform DNA sequencing in three clinically and biochemically proved patients with congenital enteropeptidase deficiency who were from two families. We found compound heterozygosity for nonsense mutations (S712X/R857X) in two affected siblings and found compound heterozygosity for a nonsense mutation (Q261X) and a frameshift mutation (FsQ902) in the third patient. In accordance with the biochemical findings, all four defective alleles identified are predicted null alleles leading to a gene product not containing the active site of the enzyme. These data provide first evidence that proenteropeptidase-gene mutations are the primary cause of congenital enteropeptidase deficiency. PMID:11719902

  10. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  11. Lifespan extension and elevated hsp gene expression in Drosophila caused by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanmei; Sun, Hui; Lu, Jun; Li, Xiaoxue; Chen, Xia; Tao, Dan; Huang, Weifeng; Huang, Baiqu

    2005-02-01

    The heat shock proteins (Hsps) play a positive role in lifespan determination, and histone acetylation has been shown to be involved in transcription of hsp genes in Drosophila. To further determine if hsp22 and hsp70 expression is correlated with lifespan, and if histone acetylation participates in this process, RNA levels for hsp22 and hsp70 were analyzed throughout the lifespan in the long-lived and short-lived iso-female lines. The results showed that hsp22 and hsp70 RNA levels were higher in long-lived line than in short-lived line and that the long-lived flies responded more rapidly to heat but were more tolerant to high temperature. Moreover, we investigated the influences of histone acetylation modification on longevity and on hsp gene expression by using histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors TSA and BuA. The results demonstrated that both inhibitors were able to extend the lifespan and promote hsp22 and hsp70 expression. However, the optimal concentrations of these inhibitors, and probably the mechanisms of their actions, vary with the genetic background. In addition, we showed that HDAC inhibitors caused the hyperacetylation of core histone H3, implicating the involvement of chromatin modulation in hsp gene transcription. These data suggested a close correlation among histone acetylation, hsp gene expression and longevity in D. melanogaster. PMID:15695762

  12. Distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene.

    PubMed

    Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kalimo, Hannu; Paetau, Anders; Nuutinen, Elina; Hackman, Peter; Sewry, Caroline; Pelin, Katarina; Udd, Bjarne

    2007-06-01

    We describe a novel, recessively inherited distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene (NEB), in which other combinations of mutations are known to cause nemaline (rod) myopathy (NM). Two different missense mutations were identified in homozygous form in seven Finnish patients from four unrelated families with childhood or adult-onset foot drop. Both mutations, when combined in compound heterozygous form with more disruptive mutations in NEB, are known to cause NM. Hitherto, no patients with NM have been found to have two missense mutations in NEB. Muscle weakness predominantly affected ankle dorsiflexors, finger extensors and neck flexors, a distribution different both from the patterns of weakness seen in NM caused by NEB mutations, and those of the known recessively inherited distal myopathies. Singleton cases need to be distinguished from the Laing type of distal myopathy. Histologically, this myopathy differs from NM in that nemaline bodies were not detectable with routine light microscopy, and they were inconspicuous or absent even with electron microscopy. Rimmed vacuoles, commonly seen in other distal myopathies, were not a feature. We conclude that homozygous missense mutations in NEB cause a novel distal myopathy, predominantly involving lower leg extensor muscles, finger extensors and neck flexors. PMID:17525139

  13. Mutations in the lipase-H gene causing autosomal recessive hypotrichosis and woolly hair.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Sabba; Jan, Abid; Muhammad, Dost; Ahmad, Farooq; Mir, Hina; Younus, Muhammad; Ali, Ghazanfar; Ayub, Muhammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim

    2015-08-01

    Hypotrichosis is characterised by sparse scalp hair, sparse to absent eyebrows and eyelashes, or absence of hair from other parts of the body. In few cases, the condition is associated with tightly curled woolly scalp hair. The present study searched for disease-causing sequence variants in the genes in four Pakistani lineal consanguineous families exhibiting features of hypotrichosis or woolly hair. A haplotype analysis established links in all four families to the LIPH gene located on chromosome 3q27.2. Subsequently, sequencing LIPH identified a novel non-sense mutation (c.328C>T; p.Arg110*) in one and a previously reported 2-bp deletion mutation (c.659_660delTA, p.Ile220ArgfsX29) in three other families. PMID:24628704

  14. A cancer-causing gene is positively correlated with male aggression in Xiphophorus cortezi

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, André A.

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of seemingly maladaptive genes in organisms challenges evolutionary biological thought. In Xiphophorus fishes, certain melanin patterns form malignant melanomas due to a cancer-causing gene (Xiphophorus melanoma receptor kinase; Xmrk), which arose several millions years ago from unequal meiotic recombination. Xiphophorus melanomas are male biased and induced by androgens however male behavior and Xmrk genotype has not been investigated. This study found that male X. cortezi with the spotted caudal (Sc) pattern, from which melanomas originate, displayed increased aggression in mirror image trials. Furthermore, Xmrk males (regardless of Sc phenotype) bit and performed more agonistic displays than Xmrk deficient males. Male aggressive response decreased when males viewed their Sc image as compared to their non-Sc image. Collectively, these results indicate that Xmrk males experience a competitive advantage over wild-type males and that intrasexual selection could be an important component in the evolutionary maintenance of this oncogene within Xiphophorus. PMID:20021547

  15. New mutations in MAPT gene causing frontotemporal lobar degeneration: biochemical and structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giacomina; Bastone, Antonio; Piccoli, Elena; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Morbin, Michela; Uggetti, Andrea; Giaccone, Giorgio; Sperber, Sarah; Beeg, Marten; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-04-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) can be sporadic or familial. The genes encoding the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and progranulin (GRN) are the most relevant genes so far known causing the hereditary forms. Following genetic screening of patients affected by FTLD, we identified 2 new MAPT mutations, P364S and G366R, the former in a sporadic case. In the study we report the clinical and genetic features of the patients carrying these mutations, and the functional effects of the mutations, analyzed in vitro in order to investigate their pathogenic character. Both mutations resulted in reduced ability of tau to promote microtubule polymerization; the P364S protein variant also showed a high propensity to aggregate into filaments. These results suggest a high probability that these mutations are pathogenic. Our findings highlight the importance of genetic analysis also in sporadic forms of FTLD, and the role of in vitro studies to evaluate the pathologic features of new mutations. PMID:21943955

  16. Mutations in the BRWD3 Gene Cause X-Linked Mental Retardation Associated with Macrocephaly

    PubMed Central

    Field, Michael ; Tarpey, Patrick S. ; Smith, Raffaella ; Edkins, Sarah ; O’Meara, Sarah ; Stevens, Claire ; Tofts, Calli ; Teague, Jon ; Butler, Adam ; Dicks, Ed ; Barthorpe, Syd ; Buck, Gemma ; Cole, Jennifer ; Gray, Kristian ; Halliday, Kelly ; Hills, Katy ; Jenkinson, Andrew ; Jones, David ; Menzies, Andrew ; Mironenko, Tatiana ; Perry, Janet ; Raine, Keiran ; Richardson, David ; Shepherd, Rebecca ; Small, Alexandra ; Varian, Jennifer ; West, Sofie ; Widaa, Sara ; Mallya, Uma ; Wooster, Richard ; Moon, Jenny ; Luo, Ying ; Hughes, Helen ; Shaw, Marie ; Friend, Kathryn L. ; Corbett, Mark ; Turner, Gillian ; Partington, Michael ; Mulley, John ; Bobrow, Martin ; Schwartz, Charles ; Stevenson, Roger ; Gecz, Jozef ; Stratton, Michael R. ; Andrew Futreal, P. ; Lucy Raymond, F. 

    2007-01-01

    In the course of systematic screening of the X-chromosome coding sequences in 250 families with nonsyndromic X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), two families were identified with truncating mutations in BRWD3, a gene encoding a bromodomain and WD-repeat domain–containing protein. In both families, the mutation segregates with the phenotype in affected males. Affected males have macrocephaly with a prominent forehead, large cupped ears, and mild-to-moderate intellectual disability. No truncating variants were found in 520 control X chromosomes. BRWD3 is therefore a new gene implicated in the etiology of XLMR associated with macrocephaly and may cause disease by altering intracellular signaling pathways affecting cellular proliferation. PMID:17668385

  17. Deletion of the meq gene significantly decreases immunosuppression in chickens caused by pathogenic marek's disease virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Marek's disease virus (MDV) causes an acute lymphoproliferative disease in chickens, resulting in immunosuppression, which is considered to be an integral aspect of the pathogenesis of Marek's disease (MD). A recent study showed that deletion of the Meq gene resulted in loss of transformation of T-cells in chickens and a Meq-null virus, rMd5ΔMeq, could provide protection superior to CVI988/Rispens. Results In the present study, to investigate whether the Meq-null virus could be a safe vaccine candidate, we constructed a Meq deletion strain, GX0101ΔMeq, by deleting both copies of the Meq gene from a pathogenic MDV, GX0101 strain, which was isolated in China. Pathogenesis experiments showed that the GX0101ΔMeq virus was fully attenuated in specific pathogen-free chickens because none of the infected chickens developed Marek's disease-associated lymphomas. The study also evaluated the effects of GX0101ΔMeq on the immune system in chickens after infection with GX0101ΔMeq virus. Immune system variables, including relative lymphoid organ weight, blood lymphocytes and antibody production following vaccination against AIV and NDV were used to assess the immune status of chickens. Experimental infection with GX0101ΔMeq showed that deletion of the Meq gene significantly decreased immunosuppression in chickens caused by pathogenic MDV. Conclusion These findings suggested that the Meq gene played an important role not only in tumor formation but also in inducing immunosuppressive effects in MDV-infected chickens. PMID:21205328

  18. Anomalies of the TCF2 gene are the main cause of fetal bilateral hyperechogenic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Decramer, Stéphane; Parant, Olivier; Beaufils, Sandrine; Clauin, Séverine; Guillou, Cécile; Kessler, Sylvie; Aziza, Jacqueline; Bandin, Flavio; Schanstra, Joost P; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine

    2007-03-01

    Prenatal discovery of fetal bilateral hyperechogenic kidneys is very stressful for pregnant women and their family, and accurate diagnosis of the cause of the moderate forms of this pathology is very difficult. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1beta that is encoded by the TCF2 gene is involved in the embryonic development of the kidneys. Sixty-two pregnancies with fetal bilateral hyperechogenic kidneys including 25 fetuses with inaccurate diagnosis were studied. TCF2 gene anomalies were detected in 18 (29%) of these 62 patients, and 15 of these 18 patients presented a complete heterozygous deletion of the TCF2 gene. Family screening revealed de novo TCF2 anomalies in more than half of the patients. TCF2 anomalies were associated with normal amniotic fluid volume and normal-sized kidneys between -2 and +2 SD in all patients except for two sisters. Antenatal cysts were detected in 11 of 18 patients, unilaterally in eight of 11. After birth, cysts appeared during the first year (17 of 18), and in patients with antenatal cysts, the number increased and developed bilaterally with decreased renal growth. In these 18 patients, the GFR decreased with longer follow-up and was lower in patients with solitary functioning dysplastic kidney. Heterozygous deletion of the TCF2 gene is an important cause of fetal hyperechogenic kidneys in this study and showed to be linked with early disease expression. The renal phenotype and the postnatal evolution were extremely variable and need a prospective long-term follow-up. Extrarenal manifestations are frequent in TCF2-linked pathologies. Therefore, prenatal counseling and follow-up should be multidisciplinary. PMID:17267738

  19. Phenotype Sequencing: Identifying the Genes That Cause a Phenotype Directly from Pooled Sequencing of Independent Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marc A.; Chen, Zugen; Toy, Traci; Machado, Iara M. P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Liao, James C.; Lee, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and phenotype screening provide a powerful method for dissecting microbial functions, but their results can be laborious to analyze experimentally. Each mutant strain may contain 50–100 random mutations, necessitating extensive functional experiments to determine which one causes the selected phenotype. To solve this problem, we propose a “Phenotype Sequencing” approach in which genes causing the phenotype can be identified directly from sequencing of multiple independent mutants. We developed a new computational analysis method showing that 1. causal genes can be identified with high probability from even a modest number of mutant genomes; 2. costs can be cut many-fold compared with a conventional genome sequencing approach via an optimized strategy of library-pooling (multiple strains per library) and tag-pooling (multiple tagged libraries per sequencing lane). We have performed extensive validation experiments on a set of E. coli mutants with increased isobutanol biofuel tolerance. We generated a range of sequencing experiments varying from 3 to 32 mutant strains, with pooling on 1 to 3 sequencing lanes. Our statistical analysis of these data (4099 mutations from 32 mutant genomes) successfully identified 3 genes (acrB, marC, acrA) that have been independently validated as causing this experimental phenotype. It must be emphasized that our approach reduces mutant sequencing costs enormously. Whereas a conventional genome sequencing experiment would have cost $7,200 in reagents alone, our Phenotype Sequencing design yielded the same information value for only $1200. In fact, our smallest experiments reliably identified acrB and marC at a cost of only $110–$340. PMID:21364744

  20. [Juvenile haemochromatosis caused by a homozygous Gly320Val mutation in the haemojuvelin gene].

    PubMed

    Berg, Line Brunemark; Milman, Nils Thorm; Friis-Hansen, Lennart; Jensen, Peter-Diedrich Mathias; Fründ, Torben

    2013-04-15

    Juvenile haemochromatosis caused by a homozygous Gly320Val mutation in the haemojuvelin (HJV) gene was diagnosed in a 12-year-old Danish girl and her 10-year-old sister. Both appeared healthy without clinical or biochemical signs of organ damage. They had iron overload (plasma transferrin saturation 81 and 80%, plasma ferritin 3,671 and 1,356 microgram/l, liver iron content of 375 and 361 micromol/g dry weight, normal myocardial iron content. Their parents were both HJV heterozygous with normal iron status. The girls began phlebotomy treatment with favourable effect. PMID:23651750

  1. Large exonic deletions in POLR3B gene cause POLR3-related leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Mariana; Thiffault, Isabelle; Guerrero, Kether; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Tran, Luan T; Benko, William; van der Knaap, Marjo S; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L; Wolf, Nicole I; Bernard, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    POLR3-related (or 4H) leukodystrophy is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in POLR3A or POLR3B and is characterized by neurological and non-neurological features. In a small proportion of patients, no mutation in either gene or only one mutation is found. Analysis of the POLR3B cDNA revealed a large deletion of exons 21-22 in one case and of exons 26-27 in another case. These are the first reports of long deletions causing POLR3-related leukodystrophy, suggesting that deletions and duplications in POLR3A or POLR3B should be investigated in patients with a compatible phenotype, especially if one pathogenic variant has been identified. PMID:26045207

  2. Mapping a gene causing cerebral cavernous malformation to 7q11.2-q21.

    PubMed Central

    Günel, M; Awad, I A; Anson, J; Lifton, R P

    1995-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation is a common disease of the brain vasculature of unknown cause characterized by dilated thin-walled sinusoidal vessels (caverns); these lesions cause varying clinical presentations which include headache, seizure, and hemorrhagic stroke. This disorder is frequently familial, with autosomal dominant inheritance. Using a general linkage approach in two extended cavernous malformation kindreds, we have identified linkage of this trait to chromosome 7q11.2-q21. Multipoint linkage analysis yields a peak logarithm of odds (lod) score of 6.88 with zero recombination with locus D7S669 and localizes the gene to a 7-cM region in the interval between loci ELN and D7S802. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7604043

  3. Hypomorphic mutation in mouse Nppc gene causes retarded bone growth due to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Takehito Kondo, Eri; Yasoda, Akihiro; Inamoto, Masataka; Kiyosu, Chiyo; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2008-11-07

    Long bone abnormality (lbab/lbab) is a spontaneous mutant mouse characterized by dwarfism with shorter long bones. A missense mutation was reported in the Nppc gene, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but it has not been confirmed whether this mutation is responsible for the dwarf phenotype. To verify that the mutation causes the dwarfism of lbab/lbab mice, we first investigated the effect of CNP in lbab/lbab mice. By transgenic rescue with chondrocyte-specific expression of CNP, the dwarf phenotype in lbab/lbab mice was completely compensated. Next, we revealed that CNP derived from the lbab allele retained only slight activity to induce cGMP production through its receptor. Histological analysis showed that both proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes in the growth plate of lbab/lbab mice were markedly reduced. Our results demonstrate that lbab/lbab mice have a hypomorphic mutation in the Nppc gene that is responsible for dwarfism caused by impaired endochondral ossification.

  4. c.376G>A mutation in WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome without deafness.

    PubMed

    Safarpour Lima, Behnam; Ghaedi, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Jamshidi, Javad; Khorrami, Mehdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sohrabifar, Nasim; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Hesami, Omid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Alehabib, Elham; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein; Emamalizadeh, Babak

    2016-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is one of the rare autosomal recessive, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Several other features are observed in patients including deafness, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. A gene called WFS1 is identified on chromosome 4p, responsible for Wolfram syndrome. We investigated a family consisted of parents and 8 children, which 5 of them have been diagnosed for Wolfram syndrome. WFS1 gene in all family members was sequenced for causative mutations. A mutation (c.376G>A, p.A126T) was found in all affected members in homozygous state and in both parents in heterozygous state. The bioinformatics analysis showed the deleterious effects of this nucleotide change on the structure and function of the protein product. As all of the patients in the family showed the homozygote mutation, and parents were both heterozygote, this mutation is probably the cause of the disease. We identified this mutation in homozygous state for the first time as Wolfram syndrome causation. We also showed that this mutation probably doesn't cause deafness in affected individuals. PMID:26773575

  5. Prognostic implications of novel beta cardiac myosin heavy chain gene mutations that cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Anan, R; Greve, G; Thierfelder, L; Watkins, H; McKenna, W J; Solomon, S; Vecchio, C; Shono, H; Nakao, S; Tanaka, H

    1994-01-01

    Three novel beta cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene missense mutations, Phe513Cys, Gly716Arg, and Arg719Trp, which cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) are described. One mutation in exon 15 (Phe513Cys) does not alter the charge of the encoded amino acid, and affected family members have a near normal life expectancy. The Gly716Arg mutation (exon 19; charge change of +1) causes FHC in three family members, one of whom underwent transplantation for heart failure. The Arg719Trp mutation (exon 19; charge change of -1) was found in four unrelated FHC families with a high incidence of premature death and an average life expectancy in affected individuals of 38 yr. A comparable high frequency of disease-related deaths in four families with the Arg719Trp mutation suggests that this specific gene defect directly accounts for the observed malignant phenotype. Further, the significantly different life expectancies associated with the Arg719Trp vs. Phe513Cys mutation (P < 0.001) support the hypothesis that mutations which alter the charge of the encoded amino acid affect survival more significantly than those that produce a conservative amino acid change. Images PMID:8282798

  6. Loss-of-function mutations in the IL-21 receptor gene cause a primary immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kotlarz, Daniel; Ziętara, Natalia; Uzel, Gulbu; Weidemann, Thomas; Braun, Christian J.; Diestelhorst, Jana; Krawitz, Peter M.; Robinson, Peter N.; Hecht, Jochen; Puchałka, Jacek; Gertz, E. Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Lawrence, Monica G.; Kardava, Lela; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Baumann, Ulrich; Pfister, Eva-Doreen; Hanson, Eric P.; Schambach, Axel; Jacobs, Roland; Kreipe, Hans; Moir, Susan; Milner, Joshua D.; Schwille, Petra; Mundlos, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) represent exquisite models for studying mechanisms of human host defense. In this study, we report on two unrelated kindreds, with two patients each, who had cryptosporidial infections associated with chronic cholangitis and liver disease. Using exome and candidate gene sequencing, we identified two distinct homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the interleukin-21 receptor gene (IL21R; c.G602T, p.Arg201Leu and c.240_245delCTGCCA, p.C81_H82del). The IL-21RArg201Leu mutation causes aberrant trafficking of the IL-21R to the plasma membrane, abrogates IL-21 ligand binding, and leads to defective phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), STAT3, and STAT5. We observed impaired IL-21–induced proliferation and immunoglobulin class-switching in B cells, cytokine production in T cells, and NK cell cytotoxicity. Our study indicates that human IL-21R deficiency causes an immunodeficiency and highlights the need for early diagnosis and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in affected children. PMID:23440042

  7. The Drosophila slamdance gene: a mutation in an aminopeptidase can cause seizure, paralysis and neuronal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, HaiGuang; Tan, Jeff; Reynolds, Elaine; Kuebler, Daniel; Faulhaber, Sally; Tanouye, Mark

    2002-01-01

    We report here the characterization of slamdance (sda), a Drosophila melanogaster "bang-sensitive" (BS) paralytic mutant. This mutant exhibits hyperactive behavior and paralysis following a mechanical "bang" or electrical shock. Electrophysiological analyses have shown that this mutant is much more prone to seizure episodes than normal flies because it has a drastically lowered seizure threshold. Through genetic mapping, molecular cloning, and RNA interference, we have demonstrated that the sda phenotype can be attributed to a mutation in the Drosophila homolog of the human aminopeptidase N (APN) gene. Furthermore, using mRNA in situ hybridization and LacZ staining, we have found that the sda gene is expressed specifically in the central nervous system at particular developmental stages. Together, these results suggest that the bang sensitivity in sda mutants is caused by a defective APN gene that somehow increases seizure susceptibility. Finally, by using the sda mutation as a sensitized background, we have been able to identify a rich variety of sda enhancers and other independent BS mutations. PMID:12454073

  8. Sporadic congenital nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism caused by P639S mutation in thyrotropin receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Agretti, Patrizia; De Marco, Giuseppina; Biagioni, Martina; Iannilli, Antonio; Marigliano, Marco; Pinchera, Aldo; Vitti, Paolo; Cherubini, Valentino; Tonacchera, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    Germline mutations of thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) gene determining a constitutive activation of the receptor were identified as a molecular cause of familial or sporadic congenital nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism (OMIM: 609152) (Nat Genet 7:396-401, 1994; N Engl J Med 332:150-154, 1995; Acta Endocrinol (Copenh) 100:512-518, 1982). We report the case of an Italian child subjected to the first clinical investigation at 24 months for an increased growth velocity; biochemical investigation showed high FT4 and FT3 serum values and undetectable thyrotropin in the absence of anti-thyroid antibodies; the thyroid gland was normal at ultrasound examination. Treatment with methimazole was started at the age of 30 months when her growth velocity was high and the bone age was advanced. DNA was extracted from her parents', brother's, and the patient's blood. Exons 9 and 10 of the TSHR gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to direct sequencing. In proband, a heterozygous substitution of cytosine to thymine determining a proline to serine change at position 639 (P639S) of the TSHR was detected while the parents and brothers of the propositus, all euthyroid, showed only the wild-type sequence of the TSHR gene. This mutation was previously described as somatic in patients affected by hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules and as germline in a single Chinese family affected by thyrotoxicosis and mitral valve prolapse. This constitutively activating mutation is able to activate both the cyclic AMP and the inositol phosphate metabolic pathways when expressed in a heterologous system. In conclusion, we describe the first case of sporadic congenital nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism caused by de novo germinal P639S mutation of TSHR. PMID:22371259

  9. A partial gene deletion of SLC45A2 causes oculocutaneous albinism in Doberman pinscher dogs.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Paige A; Gornik, Kara R; Ramsey, David T; Dubielzig, Richard R; Venta, Patrick J; Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Bartoe, Joshua T

    2014-01-01

    The first white Doberman pinscher (WDP) dog was registered by the American Kennel Club in 1976. The novelty of the white coat color resulted in extensive line breeding of this dog and her offspring. The WDP phenotype closely resembles human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and clinicians noticed a seemingly high prevalence of pigmented masses on these dogs. This study had three specific aims: (1) produce a detailed description of the ocular phenotype of WDPs, (2) objectively determine if an increased prevalence of ocular and cutaneous melanocytic tumors was present in WDPs, and (3) determine if a genetic mutation in any of the genes known to cause human OCA is causal for the WDP phenotype. WDPs have a consistent ocular phenotype of photophobia, hypopigmented adnexal structures, blue irides with a tan periphery and hypopigmented retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. WDPs have a higher prevalence of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms compared with control standard color Doberman pinschers (SDPs); cutaneous tumors were noted in 12/20 WDP (<5 years of age: 4/12; >5 years of age: 8/8) and 1/20 SDPs (p<0.00001). Using exclusion analysis, four OCA causative genes were investigated for their association with WDP phenotype; TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2. SLC45A2 was found to be linked to the phenotype and gene sequencing revealed a 4,081 base pair deletion resulting in loss of the terminus of exon seven of SLC45A2 (chr4∶77,062,968-77,067,051). This mutation is highly likely to be the cause of the WDP phenotype and is supported by a lack of detectable SLC45A2 transcript levels by reverse transcriptase PCR. The WDP provides a valuable model for studying OCA4 visual disturbances and melanocytic neoplasms in a large animal model. PMID:24647637

  10. A Partial Gene Deletion of SLC45A2 Causes Oculocutaneous Albinism in Doberman Pinscher Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Paige A.; Gornik, Kara R.; Ramsey, David T.; Dubielzig, Richard R.; Venta, Patrick J.; Petersen-Jones, Simon M.; Bartoe, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    The first white Doberman pinscher (WDP) dog was registered by the American Kennel Club in 1976. The novelty of the white coat color resulted in extensive line breeding of this dog and her offspring. The WDP phenotype closely resembles human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and clinicians noticed a seemingly high prevalence of pigmented masses on these dogs. This study had three specific aims: (1) produce a detailed description of the ocular phenotype of WDPs, (2) objectively determine if an increased prevalence of ocular and cutaneous melanocytic tumors was present in WDPs, and (3) determine if a genetic mutation in any of the genes known to cause human OCA is causal for the WDP phenotype. WDPs have a consistent ocular phenotype of photophobia, hypopigmented adnexal structures, blue irides with a tan periphery and hypopigmented retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. WDPs have a higher prevalence of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms compared with control standard color Doberman pinschers (SDPs); cutaneous tumors were noted in 12/20 WDP (<5 years of age: 4/12; >5 years of age: 8/8) and 1/20 SDPs (p<0.00001). Using exclusion analysis, four OCA causative genes were investigated for their association with WDP phenotype; TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2. SLC45A2 was found to be linked to the phenotype and gene sequencing revealed a 4,081 base pair deletion resulting in loss of the terminus of exon seven of SLC45A2 (chr4∶77,062,968–77,067,051). This mutation is highly likely to be the cause of the WDP phenotype and is supported by a lack of detectable SLC45A2 transcript levels by reverse transcriptase PCR. The WDP provides a valuable model for studying OCA4 visual disturbances and melanocytic neoplasms in a large animal model. PMID:24647637

  11. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Jennifer N; Damrau, Christine; Paudyal, Anju; Bogani, Debora; Wells, Sara; Greene, Nicholas D E; Stanier, Philip; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2(Lp), Scrib(Crc) and Celsr1(Crsh) mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1(Crsh);Vangl2(Lp);Scrib(Crc) triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas Scrib(Crc) is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1(Crsh) and Vangl2(Lp) homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic

  12. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Damrau, Christine; Paudyal, Anju; Bogani, Debora; Wells, Sara; Greene, Nicholas D. E.; Stanier, Philip; Copp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2Lp, ScribCrc and Celsr1Crsh mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1Crsh;Vangl2Lp;ScribCrc triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas ScribCrc is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1Crsh and Vangl2Lp homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic interactions are

  13. Altered GPM6A/M6 dosage impairs cognition and causes phenotypes responsive to cholesterol in human and Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gregor, Anne; Kramer, Jamie M; van der Voet, Monique; Schanze, Ina; Uebe, Steffen; Donders, Rogier; Reis, André; Schenck, Annette; Zweier, Christiane

    2014-12-01

    Glycoprotein M6A (GPM6A) is a neuronal transmembrane protein of the PLP/DM20 (proteolipid protein) family that associates with cholesterol-rich lipid rafts and promotes filopodia formation. We identified a de novo duplication of the GPM6A gene in a patient with learning disability and behavioral anomalies. Expression analysis in blood lymphocytes showed increased GPM6A levels. An increase of patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells carrying membrane protrusions supports a functional effect of this duplication. To study the consequences of GPM6A dosage alterations in an intact nervous system, we employed Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism. We found that knockdown of Drosophila M6, the sole member of the PLP family in flies, in the wing, and whole organism causes malformation and lethality, respectively. These phenotypes as well as the protrusions of patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells with increased GPM6A levels can be alleviated by cholesterol supplementation. Notably, overexpression as well as loss of M6 in neurons specifically compromises long-term memory in the courtship conditioning paradigm. Our findings thus indicate a critical role of correct GPM6A/M6 levels for cognitive function and support a role of the GPM6A duplication for the patient's phenotype. Together with other recent findings, this study highlights compromised cholesterol homeostasis as a recurrent feature in cognitive phenotypes. PMID:25224183

  14. Cap disease caused by heterozygous deletion of the beta-tropomyosin gene TPM2.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; de Jonghe, Peter; Marttila, Minttu; Laing, Nigel G; Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2007-06-01

    "Cap myopathy" or "cap disease" is a congenital myopathy characterised by cap-like structures at the periphery of muscle fibres, consisting of disarranged thin filaments with enlarged Z discs. Here we report a deletion in the beta-tropomyosin (TPM2) gene causing cap disease in a 36-year-old male patient with congenital muscle weakness, myopathic facies and respiratory insufficiency. The mutation identified in this patient is an in-frame deletion (c.415_417delGAG) of one codon in exon 4 of TPM2 removing a single glutamate residue (p.Glu139del) from the beta-tropomyosin protein. This is expected to disrupt the seven-amino acid repeat essential for making a coiled coil, and thus to impair tropomyosin-actin interaction. Missense mutations in TPM2 have previously been found to cause rare cases of nemaline myopathy and distal arthrogryposis. This mutation is one not previously described and the first genetic cause identified for cap disease. PMID:17434307

  15. Time Delayed Causal Gene Regulatory Network Inference with Hidden Common Causes

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Leung-Yau; Wong, Man-Leung; Lee, Kin-Hong; Leung, Kwong-Sak

    2015-01-01

    Inferring the gene regulatory network (GRN) is crucial to understanding the working of the cell. Many computational methods attempt to infer the GRN from time series expression data, instead of through expensive and time-consuming experiments. However, existing methods make the convenient but unrealistic assumption of causal sufficiency, i.e. all the relevant factors in the causal network have been observed and there are no unobserved common cause. In principle, in the real world, it is impossible to be certain that all relevant factors or common causes have been observed, because some factors may not have been conceived of, and therefore are impossible to measure. In view of this, we have developed a novel algorithm named HCC-CLINDE to infer an GRN from time series data allowing the presence of hidden common cause(s). We assume there is a sparse causal graph (possibly with cycles) of interest, where the variables are continuous and each causal link has a delay (possibly more than one time step). A small but unknown number of variables are not observed. Each unobserved variable has only observed variables as children and parents, with at least two children, and the children are not linked to each other. Since it is difficult to obtain very long time series, our algorithm is also capable of utilizing multiple short time series, which is more realistic. To our knowledge, our algorithm is far less restrictive than previous works. We have performed extensive experiments using synthetic data on GRNs of size up to 100, with up to 10 hidden nodes. The results show that our algorithm can adequately recover the true causal GRN and is robust to slight deviation from Gaussian distribution in the error terms. We have also demonstrated the potential of our algorithm on small YEASTRACT subnetworks using limited real data. PMID:26394325

  16. Improving palm oil quality through identification and mapping of the lipase gene causing oil deterioration.

    PubMed

    Morcillo, F; Cros, D; Billotte, N; Ngando-Ebongue, G-F; Domonhédo, H; Pizot, M; Cuéllar, T; Espéout, S; Dhouib, R; Bourgis, F; Claverol, S; Tranbarger, T J; Nouy, B; Arondel, V

    2013-01-01

    The oil palm fruit mesocarp contains high lipase activity that increases free fatty acids and necessitates post-harvest inactivation by heat treatment of fruit bunches. Even before heat treatment the mesocarp lipase activity causes consequential oil losses and requires costly measures to limit free fatty acids quantities. Here we demonstrate that elite low-lipase lines yield oil with substantially less free fatty acids than standard genotypes, allowing more flexibility for post-harvest fruit processing and extended ripening for increased yields. We identify the lipase and its gene cosegregates with the low-/high-lipase trait, providing breeders a marker to rapidly identify potent elite genitors and introgress the trait into major cultivars. Overall, economic gains brought by wide adoption of this material could represent up to one billion dollars per year. Expected benefits concern all planters but are likely to be highest for African smallholders who would be more able to produce oil that meets international quality standards. PMID:23857501

  17. Partial Gene Deletions of PMP22 Causing Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Mi; Kim, Yoonjung; Lee, Sang Guk; Yang, Jin-Young

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal neuropathy that is commonly caused by a reciprocal 1.5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, at the site of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Other patients with similar phenotypes have been shown to harbor point mutations or small deletions, although there is some clinical variation across these patients. In this report, we describe a case of HNPP with copy number changes in exon or promoter regions of PMP22. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis revealed an exon 1b deletion in the patient, who had been diagnosed with HNPP in the first decade of life using molecular analysis. PMID:25506001

  18. Partial Gene Deletions of PMP22 Causing Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun-Mi; Hong, Bo Young; Kim, Yoonjung; Lee, Sang Guk; Yang, Jin-Young; Kim, Juwon; Lee, Kyung-A

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal neuropathy that is commonly caused by a reciprocal 1.5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, at the site of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Other patients with similar phenotypes have been shown to harbor point mutations or small deletions, although there is some clinical variation across these patients. In this report, we describe a case of HNPP with copy number changes in exon or promoter regions of PMP22. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis revealed an exon 1b deletion in the patient, who had been diagnosed with HNPP in the first decade of life using molecular analysis. PMID:25506001

  19. A human CCT5 gene mutation causing distal neuropathy impairs hexadecamer assembly in an archaeal model

    PubMed Central

    Min, Wonki; Angileri, Francesca; Luo, Haibin; Lauria, Antonino; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Almerico, Anna Maria; Cappello, Francesco; de Macario, Everly Conway; Lednev, Igor K.; Macario, Alberto J. L.; Robb, Frank T.

    2014-01-01

    Chaperonins mediate protein folding in a cavity formed by multisubunit rings. The human CCT has eight non-identical subunits and the His147Arg mutation in one subunit, CCT5, causes neuropathy. Knowledge is scarce on the impact of this and other mutations upon the chaperone's structure and functions. To make progress, experimental models must be developed. We used an archaeal mutant homolog and demonstrated that the His147Arg mutant has impaired oligomeric assembly, ATPase activity, and defective protein homeostasis functions. These results establish for the first time that a human chaperonin gene defect can be reproduced and studied at the molecular level with an archaeal homolog. The major advantage of the system, consisting of rings with eight identical subunits, is that it amplifies the effects of a mutation as compared with the human counterpart, in which just one subunit per ring is defective. Therefore, the slight deficit of a non-lethal mutation can be detected and characterized. PMID:25345891

  20. A novel mutation in the EDAR gene causes severe autosomal recessive hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Henningsen, Emil; Svendsen, Mathias Tiedemann; Lildballe, Dorte Launholt; Jensen, Peter Kjestrup Axel

    2014-08-01

    We report on a 2-year-old girl presenting with a severe form of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED). The patient presented with hypotrichosis, anodontia, hypohidrosis, frontal bossing, prominent lips and ears, dry, pale skin, and dermatitis. The patient had chronic rhinitis with malodorous nasal discharge. The girl was the second born child of first-cousin immigrants from Northern Iraq. A novel homozygous mutation (c.84delC) in the EDAR gene was identified. This mutation most likely causes a frameshift in the protein product (p.S29fs*74). This results in abolition of all ectodysplasin-mediated NF-kB signalling. This complete loss-of-function mutation likely accounts for the severe clinical abnormalities in ectodermal structures in the described patient. PMID:24764207

  1. De Novo Mutations in Synaptic Transmission Genes Including DNM1 Cause Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Appenzeller, Silke; Balling, Rudi; Barisic, Nina; Baulac, Stéphanie; Caglayan, Hande; Craiu, Dana; De Jonghe, Peter; Depienne, Christel; Dimova, Petia; Djémié, Tania; Gormley, Padhraig; Guerrini, Renzo; Helbig, Ingo; Hjalgrim, Helle; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Jähn, Johanna; Klein, Karl Martin; Koeleman, Bobby; Komarek, Vladimir; Krause, Roland; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes R.; Lerche, Holger; Linnankivi, Tarja; Marini, Carla; May, Patrick; Møller, Rikke S.; Muhle, Hiltrud; Pal, Deb; Palotie, Aarno; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Robbiano, Angela; Roelens, Filip; Rosenow, Felix; Selmer, Kaja; Serratosa, Jose M.; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Stephani, Ulrich; Sterbova, Katalin; Striano, Pasquale; Suls, Arvid; Talvik, Tiina; von Spiczak, Sarah; Weber, Yvonne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Zara, Federico; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K.; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Amron, Dina; Bautista, Jocelyn F.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bluvstein, Judith; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P.; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B.; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B.; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haas, Kevin; Haut, Sheryl R.; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L.; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Kossoff, Eric H.; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; McGuire, Shannon M.; Motika, Paul V.; Novotny, Edward J.; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M.; Parent, Jack; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Sadleir, Lynette; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Shellhaas, Renée A.; Sherr, Elliott; Shih, Jerry J.; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C.; Sullivan, Joe; Thio, Liu Lin; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P.G.; Von Allmen, Gretchen K.; Weisenberg, Judith L.; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R.; Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E.; Epstein, Michael P.; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B.; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L.; Johnson, Michael R.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Marson, Anthony G.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; O’Brien, Terence J.; Ottman, Ruth; Petrou, Stephen; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sherr, Elliott

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that epileptic encephalopathies are genetically highly heterogeneous, underscoring the need for large cohorts of well-characterized individuals to further define the genetic landscape. Through a collaboration between two consortia (EuroEPINOMICS and Epi4K/EPGP), we analyzed exome-sequencing data of 356 trios with the “classical” epileptic encephalopathies, infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome, including 264 trios previously analyzed by the Epi4K/EPGP consortium. In this expanded cohort, we find 429 de novo mutations, including de novo mutations in DNM1 in five individuals and de novo mutations in GABBR2, FASN, and RYR3 in two individuals each. Unlike previous studies, this cohort is sufficiently large to show a significant excess of de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy probands compared to the general population using a likelihood analysis (p = 8.2 × 10−4), supporting a prominent role for de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies. We bring statistical evidence that mutations in DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathy, find suggestive evidence for a role of three additional genes, and show that at least 12% of analyzed individuals have an identifiable causal de novo mutation. Strikingly, 75% of mutations in these probands are predicted to disrupt a protein involved in regulating synaptic transmission, and there is a significant enrichment of de novo mutations in genes in this pathway in the entire cohort as well. These findings emphasize an important role for synaptic dysregulation in epileptic encephalopathies, above and beyond that caused by ion channel dysfunction. PMID:25262651

  2. Spontaneous Pancreatitis Caused by Tissue-Specific Gene Ablation of Hhex in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Mark J.; McKenna, Lindsay B.; Zhang, Jia; Reichert, Maximilian; Bakir, Basil; Buza, Elizabeth L.; Furth, Emma E.; Bogue, Clifford W.; Rustgi, Anil K.; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Perturbations in pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion cause chronic pancreatitis. The physiologic mechanism of ductal secretion is known, but its transcriptional control is not. We determine the role of the transcription factor hematopoietically expressed homeobox protein (Hhex) in ductal secretion and pancreatitis. METHODS We derived mice with pancreas-specific, Cremediated Hhex gene ablation to determine the requirement of Hhex in the pancreatic duct in early life and in adult stages. Histologic and immunostaining analyses were used to detect the presence of pathology. Pancreatic primary ductal cells were isolated to discover differentially expressed transcripts upon acute Hhex ablation on a cell autonomous level. RESULTS Hhex protein was detected throughout the embryonic and adult ductal trees. Ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors resulted in postnatal ductal ectasia associated with acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, a progressive phenotype that ultimately resulted in chronic pancreatitis. Hhex ablation in adult mice, however, did not cause any detectable pathology. Ductal ectasia in young mice did not result from perturbation of expression of Hnf6, Hnf1β, or the primary cilia genes. RNA-seq analysis of Hhex-ablated pancreatic primary ductal cells showed mRNA levels of the G-protein coupled receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 3 (Npr3), implicated in paracrine signaling, up-regulated by 4.70-fold. CONCLUSIONS Although Hhex is dispensable for ductal cell function in the adult, ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors results in pancreatitis. Our data highlight the critical role of Hhex in maintaining ductal homeostasis in early life and support ductal hypersecretion as a novel etiology of pediatric chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26740970

  3. Familial glucocorticoid resistance caused by a splice site deletion in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, M.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Encio, I.J.; Stratakis, C.A.; Hurley, D.M.; Accili, D.; Chrousos, G.P. Erasmus Univ. of Rotterdam )

    1993-03-01

    The clinical syndrome of generalized, compensated glucocorticoid resistance is characterized by increased cortisol secretion without clinical evidence of hyper- or hypocortisolism, and manifestations of androgen and/or mineralocorticoid excess. This condition results from partial failure of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to modulate transcription of its target genes. The authors studied the molecular mechanisms of this syndrome in a Dutch kindred, whose affected members had hypercortisolism and approximately half of normal GRs, and whose proband was a young woman with manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify and sequence each of the nine exons of the GR gene [alpha], along with their 5[prime]- and 3[prime]-flanking regions, the authors identified a 4-base deletion at the 3[prime]-boundary of exon 6 in one GR allele ([Delta][sub 4]), which removed a donor splice site in all three affected members studied. In contrast, the sequence of exon 6 in the two unaffected siblings was normal. A single nucleotide substitution causing an amino acid substitution in the amino terminal domain of the GR (asparagine to serine, codon 363) was also discovered in exon 2 of the other allele (G[sub 1220]) in the proband, in one of her affected brothers and in her unaffected sister. This deletion in the glucocorticoid receptor gene was associated with the expression of only one allele and a decrease of GR protein by 50% in affected members of this glucocorticoid resistant family. The mutation identified in exon 2 did not segregate with the disease and appears to be of no functional significance. The presence of the null allele was apparently compensated for by increased cortisol production at the expense of concurrent hyperandrogenism. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Point mutations throughout the GLI3 gene cause Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalff-Suske, M; Wild, A; Topp, J; Wessling, M; Jacobsen, E M; Bornholdt, D; Engel, H; Heuer, H; Aalfs, C M; Ausems, M G; Barone, R; Herzog, A; Heutink, P; Homfray, T; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; König, R; Kunze, J; Meinecke, P; Müller, D; Rizzo, R; Strenge, S; Superti-Furga, A; Grzeschik, K H

    1999-09-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, characterized by craniofacial and limb anomalies (GCPS; MIM 175700), previously has been demonstrated to be associated with translocations as well as point mutations affecting one allele of the zinc finger gene GLI3. In addition to GCPS, Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS; MIM 146510) and post-axial polydactyly type A (PAP-A; MIM 174200), two other disorders of human development, are caused by GLI3 mutations. In order to gain more insight into the mutational spectrum associated with a single phenotype, we report here the extension of the GLI3 mutation analysis to 24 new GCPS cases. We report the identification of 15 novel mutations present in one of the patient's GLI3 alleles. The mutations map throughout the coding gene regions. The majority are truncating mutations (nine of 15) that engender prematurely terminated protein products mostly but not exclusively N-terminally to or within the central region encoding the DNA-binding domain. Two missense and two splicing mutations mapping within the zinc finger motifs presumably also interfere with DNA binding. The five mutations identified within the protein regions C-terminal to the zinc fingers putatively affect additional functional properties of GLI3. In cell transfection experiments using fusions of the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4 to different segments of GLI3, transactivating capacity was assigned to two adjacent independent domains (TA(1)and TA(2)) in the C-terminal third of GLI3. Since these are the only functional domains affected by three C-terminally truncating mutations, we postulate that GCPS may be due either to haploinsufficiency resulting from the complete loss of one gene copy or to functional haploinsufficiency related to compromised properties of this transcription factor such as DNA binding and transactivation. PMID:10441342

  5. A compound heterozygous mutation in HADHB gene causes an axonal Charcot-Marie-tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous disorder of the peripheral nervous system. So far, mutations in hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase/3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase/enoyl-CoA hydratase (trifunctional protein), beta subunit (HADHB) gene exhibit three distinctive phenotypes: severe neonatal presentation with cardiomyopathy, hepatic form with recurrent hypoketotic hypoglycemia, and later-onset axonal sensory neuropathy with episodic myoglobinuria. Methods To identify the causative and characterize clinical features of a Korean family with motor and sensory neuropathies, whole exome study (WES), histopathologic study of distal sural nerve, and lower limb MRIs were performed. Results WES revealed that a compound heterozygous mutation in HADHB is the causative of the present patients. The patients exhibited an early-onset axonal sensorimotor neuropathy without episodic myoglobinuria, and showed typical clinical and electrophysiological features of CMT including predominant distal muscle weakness and atrophy. Histopathologic findings of sural nerve were compatible with an axonal CMT neuropathy. Furthermore, they didn’t exhibit any other symptoms of the previously reported HADHB patients. Conclusions These data implicate that mutation in HADHB gene can also cause early-onset axonal CMT instead of typical manifestations in mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) deficiency. Therefore, this study is the first report of a new subtype of autosomal recessive axonal CMT by a compound heterozygous mutation in HADHB, and will expand the clinical and genetic spectrum of HADHB. PMID:24314034

  6. Disruption of Slc52a3 gene causes neonatal lethality with riboflavin deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Yamanishi, Kaori; Yao, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Imai, Satoshi; Omura, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Yano, Ikuko; Masuda, Satohiro; Inui, Ken-Ichi; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of riboflavin should be maintained by transporters. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated basic information about riboflavin transporter RFVT3 encoded by SLC52A3 gene. However, the contribution of RFVT3 to the maintenance of riboflavin homeostasis and the significance in vivo remain unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological role of RFVT3 using Slc52a3 knockout (Slc52a3-/-) mice. Most Slc52a3-/- mice died with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia within 48 hr after birth. The plasma and tissue riboflavin concentrations in Slc52a3-/- mice at postnatal day 0 were dramatically lower than those in wild-type (WT) littermates. Slc52a3-/- fetuses showed a lower capacity of placental riboflavin transport compared with WT fetuses. Riboflavin supplement during pregnancy and after birth reduced neonatal death and metabolic disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first report to indicate that Rfvt3 contributes to placental riboflavin transport, and that disruption of Slc52a3 gene caused neonatal mortality with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia owing to riboflavin deficiency. PMID:27272163

  7. Disruption of Slc52a3 gene causes neonatal lethality with riboflavin deficiency in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Yamanishi, Kaori; Yao, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Imai, Satoshi; Omura, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Yano, Ikuko; Masuda, Satohiro; Inui, Ken-ichi; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of riboflavin should be maintained by transporters. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated basic information about riboflavin transporter RFVT3 encoded by SLC52A3 gene. However, the contribution of RFVT3 to the maintenance of riboflavin homeostasis and the significance in vivo remain unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological role of RFVT3 using Slc52a3 knockout (Slc52a3−/−) mice. Most Slc52a3−/− mice died with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia within 48 hr after birth. The plasma and tissue riboflavin concentrations in Slc52a3−/− mice at postnatal day 0 were dramatically lower than those in wild-type (WT) littermates. Slc52a3−/− fetuses showed a lower capacity of placental riboflavin transport compared with WT fetuses. Riboflavin supplement during pregnancy and after birth reduced neonatal death and metabolic disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first report to indicate that Rfvt3 contributes to placental riboflavin transport, and that disruption of Slc52a3 gene caused neonatal mortality with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia owing to riboflavin deficiency. PMID:27272163

  8. An inactivating mutation in the SOD 1 gene causes familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pramatarova, A.; Rouleau, G.A.; Goto, J.

    1994-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by highly selective death of large motor neurons in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The familial form of ALS (FALS) accounts for approximately 10% of the cases and is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. Recently the defective gene causing chromosome 21-linked FALS was shown to be the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD 1). However, the precise mechanism of neurotoxicity seen in FALS with SOD 1 mutations is still unknown. Until now all SOD 1 mutations reported were single base pair substitutions (missense). We have identified a nonsense mutation in exon 5 of the SOD 1 gene in a FALS kindred. This two base pair deletion provokes a frameshift and a predicted premature truncation of the protein. The region affected has a very important structural and functional role: it contains part of the active loop and is involved in dimer contact. We would predict that the loss of these structures would impair the functioning of the enzyme.

  9. Novel mutational mechanism in the thyroglobulin gene: imperfect DNA inversion as a cause for hereditary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Citterio, Cintia E; Rossetti, Liliana C; Souchon, Pierre F; Morales, Cecilia; Thouvard-Viprey, Mathilde; Salmon-Musial, Anne S; Mauran, Pierre L A; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Rivolta, Carina M; De Brasi, Carlos D; Targovnik, Héctor M

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to perform genetic analysis in three brothers of Turkish origin born from consanguineus parents and affected by congenital hypothyroidism, goiter and low levels of serum TG. The combination of sequencing of DNA, PCR mapping, quantitative real-time PCR, inverse-PCR (I-PCR), multiplex PCR and bioinformatics analysis were used in order to detect TG mutations. We demonstrated that the three affected siblings are homozygous for a DNA inversion of 16,962bp in the TG gene associated with two deleted regions at both sides of the inversion limits. The inversion region includes the first 9bp of exon 48, 1015bp of intron 47, 191bp of exon 47, 1523bp of intron 46, 135bp of exon 46 and the last 14,089bp of intron 45. The proximal deletion corresponds to 27bp of TG intron 45, while the distal deletion spans the last 230bp of TG exon 48 and the first 588bp of intergenic region downstream TG end. The parents were heterozygous carriers of the complex rearrangement. In conclusion, a novel large imperfect DNA inversion within the TG gene was identified by the strategy of I-PCR. This aberration was not detectable by normal sequencing of the exons and exon/intron boundaries. Remarkably, the finding represents the first description of a TG deficiency disease caused by a DNA inversion. PMID:23933148

  10. A novel homozygous ISPD gene mutation causing phenotype variability in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Baranello, Giovanni; Saredi, Simona; Sansanelli, Serena; Savadori, Paolo; Canioni, Eleonora; Chiapparini, Luisa; Balestri, Paolo; Malandrini, Alessandro; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Morandi, Lucia; Mora, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Within the group of muscular dystrophies, dystroglycanopathies represent an important subgroup of recessively inherited disorders. Their severity varies from the relatively mild forms of adult-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), to the severe congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) with cerebral and ocular involvement. We describe 2 consanguineous children of Pakistani origin, carrying a new homozygous missense mutation c.367G>A (p.Gly123Arg) in the ISPD gene. Mutations in this gene have been recently reported as a common cause of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Patient 1 is an 8-year-old female with an intermediate phenotype between CMD and early LGMD; patient 2 is a 20-month-old male and second cousin of patient 1, showing a CMD phenotype. Cognitive development, brain MRI, eye examination, electrocardiogram and echocardiogram were normal in both patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the co-occurrence of both a CMD/early LGMD intermediate phenotype and a CMD within the same family carrying a homozygous ISPD mutation. PMID:25444434

  11. Deletions in the VPS13B (COH1) gene as a cause of Cohen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Balikova, I; Lehesjoki, A-E; de Ravel, T J L; Thienpont, B; Chandler, K E; Clayton-Smith, J; Träskelin, A-L; Fryns, J-P; Vermeesch, J R

    2009-09-01

    Cohen syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by mental retardation, facial dysmorphism, microcephaly, retinal dystrophy, truncal obesity, joint laxity and intermittent neutropenia. Mutations in the VPS13B (COH1) gene underlie Cohen syndrome. In approximately 70% of the patients mutations in the gene are identified on both alleles, while in about 30% only a mutation in a single allele or no mutant allele is detected. The VPS13B locus was recently added to the growing list of benign copy number variants. We hypothesized that patients with unexplained Cohen syndrome would harbour deletions affecting the VPS13B locus. We screened 35 patients from 26 families with targeted array CGH and identified 7 copy number alterations: 2 homozygous and 5 heterozygous deletions. Our results show that deletions are an important cause of Cohen syndrome and screening for copy number alterations of VPS13B should be an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of these patients. These findings have important consequences for the diagnosis of patients with genetic disorders in general since, as we highlight, rare benign copy number variants can underly autosomal recessive disorders and lead to disease in homozygous state or in compound heterozygosity with another mutation. PMID:19533689

  12. Mutations in the Profilin 1 Gene Cause Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chi-Hong; Fallini, Claudia; Ticozzi, Nicola; Keagle, Pamela J.; Sapp, Peter C.; Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Lowe, Patrick; Koppers, Max; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Baron, Desiree M.; Kost, Jason E.; Gonzalez-Perez, Paloma; Fox, Andrew D.; Adams, Jenni; Taroni, Franco; Tiloca, Cinzia; Leclerc, Ashley Lyn; Chafe, Shawn C.; Mangroo, Dev; Moore, Melissa J.; Zitzewitz, Jill A.; Xu, Zuo-Shang; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Glass, Jonathan D.; Siciliano, Gabriele; Cirulli, Elizabeth T.; Goldstein, David B.; Salachas, Francois; Meininger, Vincent; Rossoll, Wilfried; Ratti, Antonia; Gellera, Cinzia; Bosco, Daryl A.; Bassell, Gary J.; Silani, Vincenzo; Drory, Vivian E.; Brown, Robert H.; Landers, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder resulting from motor neuron death. Approximately 10% of cases are familial (FALS), typically with a dominant inheritance mode. Despite numerous advances in recent years1-9, nearly 50% of FALS cases have unknown genetic etiology. Here we show that mutations within the profilin 1 (PFN1) gene can cause FALS. PFN1 is critical for monomeric (G)-actin conversion to filamentous (F)-actin. Exome sequencing of two large ALS families revealed different mutations within the PFN1 gene. Additional sequence analysis identified 4 mutations in 7 out of 274 FALS cases. Cells expressing PFN1 mutants contain ubiquitinated, insoluble aggregates that in many cases contain the ALS-associated protein TDP-43. PFN1 mutants also display decreased bound actin levels and can inhibit axon outgrowth. Furthermore, primary motor neurons expressing mutant PFN1 display smaller growth cones with a reduced F-/G-actin ratio. These observations further document that cytoskeletal pathway alterations contribute to ALS pathogenesis. PMID:22801503

  13. De Novo Truncating FUS Gene Mutation as a Cause of Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Kocerha, Jannet; Finch, NiCole; Crook, Richard; Baker, Matt; Desaro, Pamela; Johnston, Amelia; Rutherford, Nicola; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Kennelly, Kathleen; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Graff-Radford, Neill; Boylan, Kevin; Rademakers, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding fused in sarcoma (FUS) were recently identified as a novel cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), emphasizing the genetic heterogeneity of ALS. We sequenced the genes encoding superoxide dismutase (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TARDBP) and FUS in 99 sporadic and 17 familial ALS patients ascertained at Mayo Clinic. We identified two novel mutations in FUS in two out of 99 (2.0%) sporadic ALS patients and established the de novo occurrence of one FUS mutation. In familial patients, we identified three (17.6%) SOD1 mutations, while FUS and TARDBP mutations were excluded. The de novo FUS mutation (g.10747A>G; IVS13-2A>G) affects the splice-acceptor site of FUS intron 13 and was shown to induce skipping of FUS exon 14 leading to the C-terminal truncation of FUS (p.G466VfsX14). Subcellular localization studies showed a dramatic increase in the cytoplasmic localization of FUS and a reduction of normal nuclear expression in cells transfected with truncated compared to wild-type FUS. We further identified a novel in-frame insertion/deletion mutation in FUS exon 12 (p.S402 P411delinsGGGG) which is predicted to expand a conserved poly-glycine motif. Our findings extend the mutation spectrum in FUS leading to ALS and describe the first de novo mutation in FUS. PMID:20232451

  14. Reversal of gene dysregulation in cultured cytotrophoblasts reveals possible causes of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Gormley, Matthew J.; Hunkapiller, Nathan M.; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Stolyarov, Yana; Feng, Victoria; Nishida, Masakazu; Drake, Penelope M.; Bianco, Katherine; Wang, Fei; McMaster, Michael T.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    During human pregnancy, a subset of placental cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) differentiates into cells that aggressively invade the uterus and its vasculature, anchoring the progeny and rerouting maternal blood to the placenta. In preeclampsia (PE), CTB invasion is limited, reducing placental perfusion and/or creating intermittent flow. This syndrome, affecting 4%–8% of pregnancies, entails maternal vascular alterations (e.g., high blood pressure, proteinuria, and edema) and, in some patients, fetal growth restriction. The only cure is removal of the faulty placenta, i.e., delivery. Previously, we showed that defective CTB differentiation contributes to the placental component of PE, but the causes were unknown. Here, we cultured CTBs isolated from PE and control placentas for 48 hours, enabling differentiation and invasion. In various severe forms of PE, transcriptomics revealed common aberrations in CTB gene expression immediately after isolation, including upregulation of SEMA3B, which resolved in culture. The addition of SEMA3B to normal CTBs inhibited invasion and recreated aspects of the PE phenotype. Additionally, SEMA3B downregulated VEGF signaling through the PI3K/AKT and GSK3 pathways, effects that were observed in PE CTBs. We propose that, in severe PE, the in vivo environment dysregulates CTB gene expression; the autocrine actions of the upregulated molecules (including SEMA3B) impair CTB differentiation, invasion and signaling; and patient-specific factors determine the signs. PMID:23934129

  15. Natural courtship song variation caused by an intronic retroelement in an ion channel gene.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yun; Berrocal, Augusto; Morita, Tomoko; Longden, Kit D; Stern, David L

    2016-08-18

    Animal species display enormous variation for innate behaviours, but little is known about how this diversity arose. Here, using an unbiased genetic approach, we map a courtship song difference between wild isolates of Drosophila simulans and Drosophila mauritiana to a 966 base pair region within the slowpoke (slo) locus, which encodes a calcium-activated potassium channel. Using the reciprocal hemizygosity test, we confirm that slo is the causal locus and resolve the causal mutation to the evolutionarily recent insertion of a retroelement in a slo intron within D. simulans. Targeted deletion of this retroelement reverts the song phenotype and alters slo splicing. Like many ion channel genes, slo is expressed widely in the nervous system and influences a variety of behaviours; slo-null males sing little song with severely disrupted features. By contrast, the natural variant of slo alters a specific component of courtship song, illustrating that regulatory evolution of a highly pleiotropic ion channel gene can cause modular changes in behaviour. PMID:27509856

  16. Homozygous Disruption of the Tip60 Gene Causes Early Embryonic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yaofei; Fisher, Joseph B.; Koprowski, Stacy; McAllister, Donna; Kim, Min-Su; Lough, John

    2009-01-01

    Tat-interactive protein 60 (Tip60) is a member of the MYST family, proteins in which are related by an atypical histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain. Although Tip60 has been implicated in cellular activities including DNA repair, apoptosis and transcriptional regulation, its function during embryonic development is unknown. We ablated the Tip60 gene (Htatip) from the mouse by replacing exons 1–9 with a neomycin resistance cassette. Development and reproduction of wild-type and heterozygous animals was normal. However, homozygous ablation of the Tip60 gene caused embryolethality near the blastocyst stage of development, as evidenced by inability of cells in Tip60-null blastocysts to hatch and survive in culture. Monitoring cell proliferation and death by detecting EdU-substituted DNA and TUNEL labeling revealed suppression of cell proliferation concomitant with increased cell death as Tip60-null cells attempted to hatch from blastocysts. These findings indicate that Tip60 is essential for cellular survival during the blastocyst-gastrula transition of embryogenesis. PMID:19842187

  17. Nature and frequency of mutations in the argininosuccinate synthetase gene that cause classical citrullinemia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Kakinoki, H; Fukushige, T; Shaheen, N; Terazono, H; Saheki, T

    1995-10-01

    Citrullinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a genetic deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). So far 20 mutations in ASS mRNA have been identified in human classical citrullinemia, including 14 single base changes causing missense mutations in the coding sequence of the enzyme, 4 mutations associated with an absence of exons 5, 6, 7, or 13 in mRNA, 1 mutation with a deletion of the first 7 bases in exon 16 (which is caused by abnormal splicing), and 1 mutation with an insertion of 37 bases between the exon 15 and 16 regions in mRNA. In order to identify the abnormality in the ASS gene causing the exon 7 and 13 deletion mutations and the 37-base insertion mutation between exons 15 and 16 in mRNA, and to establish a DNA diagnostic test, we isolated and sequenced the genomic DNA surrounding each exon. The absence of exon 7 or 13 in ASS mRNA resulted from abnormal splicing caused by a single base change in the intron region: IVS-6(-2) (a transition of A to G at the second nucleotide position within the 3' splice cleavage site of intron 6) and IVS-13(+5) (a transition of G to A at the fifth nucleotide position within the 5' splice cleavage site of intron 13), respectively. The IVS-6(-2) mutation resulted in the creation of an MspI restriction site. DNA diagnostic analysis of 33 Japanese alleles with classical citrullinemia showed that 19 alleles had the IVS-6(-2) mutation (over 50% of the mutated alleles in Japanese patients). It was thus confirmed that one mutation is predominant in Japan. This differs from the situation in the USA where there is far greater heterogeneity. The insertion mutation in mRNA on the other hand resulted from abnormal splicing caused by a 13-bp deletion at the splice-junction between exon 15 and intron 15. The deletion had a short direct repeat (CTCAGG) at the breakpoint junction and presumably resulted from slipped mispairing. PMID:7557970

  18. Recurring dominant-negative mutations in the AVP-NPII gene cause neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Repaske, D.R.; Phillips, J.A.; Krishnamani, M.R.S.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a familial form of arginine vasopressin (or antidiuretic hormone) deficiency that is usually manifest in early childhood with polyuria, polydipsia and an antidiuretic response to exogenous vasopressin or its analogs. The phenotype is postulated to arise from gliosis and depletion of the magnocellular neurons that produce vasopressin in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. ADNDI is caused by heterozygosity for a variety of mutations in the AVP-NPII gene which encodes vasopressin, its carrier protein (NPII) and a glycoprotein (copeptin) of unknown function. These mutations include: (1) Ala 19{r_arrow}Thr (G279A) in AVP`s signal peptide, (2) Gly 17{r_arrow}Val (G1740T), (3) Pro 24{r_arrow}Leu (C1761T), (4) Gly 57{r_arrow}Ser (G1859A) and (5) del Glu 47({delta}AGG 1824-26), all of which occur in NPII. In characterizing the AVP-NPII mutations in five non-related ADNDI kindreds, we have detected two kindreds having mutation 1 (G279A), two having mutation 3 (C1761T) and one having mutation 4 (G1859A) without any other allelic changes being detected. Two of these recurring mutations (G279A and G1859A) are transitions that occur at CpG dinucleotides while the third (C1761T) does not. Interestingly, families with the same mutations differed in their ethnicity or in their affected AVP-NPII allele`s associated haplotype of closely linked DNA polymorphisms. Our data indicated that at least three of five known AVP-NPII mutations causing ADNDI tend to recur but the mechanisms by which these dominant-negative mutations cause variable or progressive expression of the ADNDI phenotype remain unclear.

  19. Adaptation of respiratory chain biogenesis to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by SURF1 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Kovářová, Nikola; Cížková Vrbacká, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Stránecký, Viktor; Pronicka, Ewa; Kmoch, Stanislav; Houštěk, Josef

    2012-07-01

    The loss of Surf1 protein leads to a severe COX deficiency manifested as a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, the Leigh syndrome (LS(COX)). Surf1 appears to be involved in the early step of COX assembly but its function remains unknown. The aim of the study was to find out how SURF1 gene mutations influence expression of OXPHOS and other pro-mitochondrial genes and to further characterize the altered COX assembly. Analysis of fibroblast cell lines from 9 patients with SURF1 mutations revealed a 70% decrease of the COX complex content to be associated with 32-54% upregulation of respiratory chain complexes I, III and V and accumulation of Cox5a subunit. Whole genome expression profiling showed a general decrease of transcriptional activity in LS(COX) cells and indicated that the adaptive changes in OXPHOS complexes are due to a posttranscriptional compensatory mechanism. Electrophoretic and WB analysis showed that in mitochondria of LS(COX) cells compared to controls, the assembled COX is present entirely in a supercomplex form, as I-III₂-IV supercomplex but not as larger supercomplexes. The lack of COX also caused an accumulation of I-III₂ supercomplex. The accumulated Cox5a was mainly present as a free subunit. We have found out that the major COX assembly subcomplexes accumulated due to SURF1 mutations range in size between approximately 85-140kDa. In addition to the originally proposed S2 intermediate they might also represent Cox1-containing complexes lacking other COX subunits. Unlike the assembled COX, subcomplexes are unable to associate with complexes I and III. PMID:22465034

  20. Mutation in the Monocarboxylate Transporter 12 Gene Affects Guanidinoacetate Excretion but Does Not Cause Glucosuria.

    PubMed

    Dhayat, Nasser; Simonin, Alexandre; Anderegg, Manuel; Pathare, Ganesh; Lüscher, Benjamin P; Deisl, Christine; Albano, Giuseppe; Mordasini, David; Hediger, Matthias A; Surbek, Daniel V; Vogt, Bruno; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Fuster, Daniel G

    2016-05-01

    A heterozygous mutation (c.643C>A; p.Q215X) in the monocarboxylate transporter 12-encoding gene MCT12 (also known as SLC16A12) that mediates creatine transport was recently identified as the cause of a syndrome with juvenile cataracts, microcornea, and glucosuria in a single family. Whereas the MCT12 mutation cosegregated with the eye phenotype, poor correlation with the glucosuria phenotype did not support a pathogenic role of the mutation in the kidney. Here, we examined MCT12 in the kidney and found that it resides on basolateral membranes of proximal tubules. Patients with MCT12 mutation exhibited reduced plasma levels and increased fractional excretion of guanidinoacetate, but normal creatine levels, suggesting that MCT12 may function as a guanidinoacetate transporter in vivo However, functional studies in Xenopus oocytes revealed that MCT12 transports creatine but not its precursor, guanidinoacetate. Genetic analysis revealed a separate, undescribed heterozygous mutation (c.265G>A; p.A89T) in the sodium/glucose cotransporter 2-encoding gene SGLT2 (also known as SLC5A2) in the family that segregated with the renal glucosuria phenotype. When overexpressed in HEK293 cells, the mutant SGLT2 transporter did not efficiently translocate to the plasma membrane, and displayed greatly reduced transport activity. In summary, our data indicate that MCT12 functions as a basolateral exit pathway for creatine in the proximal tubule. Heterozygous mutation of MCT12 affects systemic levels and renal handling of guanidinoacetate, possibly through an indirect mechanism. Furthermore, our data reveal a digenic syndrome in the index family, with simultaneous MCT12 and SGLT2 mutation. Thus, glucosuria is not part of the MCT12 mutation syndrome. PMID:26376857

  1. Nemaline myopathy caused by mutations in the muscle alpha-skeletal-actin gene.

    PubMed

    Ilkovski, B; Cooper, S T; Nowak, K; Ryan, M M; Yang, N; Schnell, C; Durling, H J; Roddick, L G; Wilkinson, I; Kornberg, A J; Collins, K J; Wallace, G; Gunning, P; Hardeman, E C; Laing, N G; North, K N

    2001-06-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by muscle weakness and the presence of nemaline bodies (rods) in skeletal muscle. Disease-causing mutations have been reported in five genes, each encoding a protein component of the sarcomeric thin filament. Recently, we identified mutations in the muscle alpha-skeletal-actin gene (ACTA1) in a subset of patients with NM. In the present study, we evaluated a new series of 35 patients with NM. We identified five novel missense mutations in ACTA1, which suggested that mutations in muscle alpha-skeletal actin account for the disease in approximately 15% of patients with NM. The mutations appeared de novo and represent new dominant mutations. One proband subsequently had two affected children, a result consistent with autosomal dominant transmission. The seven patients exhibited marked clinical variability, ranging from severe congenital-onset weakness, with death from respiratory failure during the 1st year of life, to a mild childhood-onset myopathy, with survival into adulthood. There was marked variation in both age at onset and clinical severity in the three affected members of one family. Common pathological features included abnormal fiber type differentiation, glycogen accumulation, myofibrillar disruption, and "whorling" of actin thin filaments. The percentage of fibers with rods did not correlate with clinical severity; however, the severe, lethal phenotype was associated with both severe, generalized disorganization of sarcomeric structure and abnormal localization of sarcomeric actin. The marked variability, in clinical phenotype, among patients with different mutations in ACTA1 suggests that both the site of the mutation and the nature of the amino acid change have differential effects on thin-filament formation and protein-protein interactions. The intrafamilial variability suggests that alpha-actin genotype is not the sole determinant of phenotype. PMID:11333380

  2. Efficient In Silico Identification of a Common Insertion in the MAK Gene which Causes Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bujakowska, Kinga M.; White, Joseph; Place, Emily; Consugar, Mark; Comander, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Background Next generation sequencing (NGS) offers a rapid and comprehensive method of screening for mutations associated with retinitis pigmentosa and related disorders. However, certain sequence alterations such as large insertions or deletions may remain undetected using standard NGS pipelines. One such mutation is a recently-identified Alu insertion into the Male Germ Cell-Associated Kinase (MAK) gene, which is missed by standard NGS-based variant callers. Here, we developed an in silico method of searching NGS raw sequence reads to detect this mutation, without the need to recalculate sequence alignments or to screen every sample by PCR. Methods The Linux program grep was used to search for a 23 bp “probe” sequence containing the known junction sequence of the insert. A corresponding search was performed with the wildtype sequence. The matching reads were counted and further compared to the known sequences of the full wildtype and mutant genomic loci. (See https://github.com/MEEIBioinformaticsCenter/grepsearch.) Results In a test sample set consisting of eleven previously published homozygous mutants, detection of the MAK-Alu insertion was validated with 100% sensitivity and specificity. As a discovery cohort, raw NGS reads from 1,847 samples (including custom and whole exome selective capture) were searched in ~1 hour on a local computer cluster, yielding an additional five samples with MAK-Alu insertions and solving two previously unsolved pedigrees. Of these, one patient was homozygous for the insertion, one compound heterozygous with a missense change on the other allele (c. 46G>A; p.Gly16Arg), and three were heterozygous carriers. Conclusions Using the MAK-Alu grep program proved to be a rapid and effective method of finding a known, disease-causing Alu insertion in a large cohort of patients with NGS data. This simple approach avoids wet-lab assays or computationally expensive algorithms, and could also be used for other known disease-causing

  3. Pilin-gene phase variation of Moraxella bovis is caused by an inversion of the pilin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Marrs, C F; Ruehl, W W; Schoolnik, G K; Falkow, S

    1988-01-01

    Moraxella bovis Epp63 can express either of two different pilin proteins, called alpha and beta. We have previously cloned and sequenced the beta-pilin gene and now report that DNAs isolated from bacteria expressing alpha pilin have hybridization patterns consistently different from those of bacteria expressing beta pilin. The phase variation between alpha- and beta-pilin gene expression appears to be associated with an inversion of about 2 kilobases of DNA, whose endpoints occur within the coding region of the expressed pilin gene. Comparisons of the beta-pilin gene sequence with those of well-studied bacterial inversion systems revealed a stretch of 58% sequence similarity (21 of 36 base pairs) between the left inverted repeat of the Salmonella typhimurium flagellar hin control region and the amino-terminal portion of the beta-pilin gene. Images PMID:2898471

  4. The Drosophila melanogaster hybrid male rescue gene causes inviability in male and female species hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Barbash, D A; Roote, J; Ashburner, M

    2000-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster mutation Hmr rescues inviable hybrid sons from the cross of D. melanogaster females to males of its sibling species D. mauritiana, D. simulans, and D. sechellia. We have extended previous observations that hybrid daughters from this cross are poorly viable at high temperatures and have shown that this female lethality is suppressed by Hmr and the rescue mutations In(1)AB and D. simulans Lhr. Deficiencies defined here as Hmr(-) also suppressed lethality, demonstrating that reducing Hmr(+) activity can rescue otherwise inviable hybrids. An Hmr(+) duplication had the opposite effect of reducing the viability of female and sibling X-male hybrid progeny. Similar dose-dependent viability effects of Hmr were observed in the reciprocal cross of D. simulans females to D. melanogaster males. Finally, Lhr and Hmr(+) were shown to have mutually antagonistic effects on hybrid viability. These data suggest a model where the interaction of sibling species Lhr(+) and D. melanogaster Hmr(+) causes lethality in both sexes of species hybrids and in both directions of crossing. Our results further suggest that a twofold difference in Hmr(+) dosage accounts in part for the differential viability of male and female hybrid progeny, but also that additional, unidentified genes must be invoked to account for the invariant lethality of hybrid sons of D. melanogaster mothers. Implications of our findings for understanding Haldane's rule-the observation that hybrid breakdown is often specific to the heterogametic sex-are also discussed. PMID:10747067

  5. A Novel Splice-Site Mutation in the GJB2 Gene Causing Mild Postlingual Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, Marta; del Castillo, Francisco J.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Francisco J.; Garrido, Gema; Villamar, Manuela; Calderón, Manuela; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A.; Moreno, Felipe; del Castillo, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The DFNB1 subtype of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, caused by mutations affecting the GJB2 (connection-26) gene, is highly prevalent in most populations worldwide. DFNB1 hearing impairment is mostly severe or profound and usually appears before the acquisition of speech (prelingual onset), though a small number of hypomorphic missense mutations result in mild or moderate deafness of postlingual onset. We identified a novel GJB2 splice-site mutation, c. -22-2A>C, in three siblings with mild postlingual hearing impairment that were compound heterozygous for c. -22-2A>C and c.35delG. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments performed on total RNA extracted from saliva samples from one of these siblings confirmed that c. -22-2A>C abolished the acceptor splice site of the single GJB2 intron, resulting in the absence of normally processed transcripts from this allele. However, we did isolate transcripts from the c. -22-2A>C allele that keep an intact GJB2 coding region and that were generated by use of an alternative acceptor splice site previously unknown. The residual expression of wild-type connection-26 encoded by these transcripts probably underlies the mild severity and late onset of the hearing impairment of these subjects. PMID:24039984

  6. A missense mutation in the beta-2 integrin gene (ITGB2) causes canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kijas, J M; Bauer, T R; Gäfvert, S; Marklund, S; Trowald-Wigh, G; Johannisson, A; Hedhammar, A; Binns, M; Juneja, R K; Hickstein, D D; Andersson, L

    1999-10-01

    Canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) is a fatal immunodeficiency disease found in Irish setters. The clinical manifestations of CLAD are very similar to LAD in humans and BLAD in cattle, which are both caused by mutations in ITGB2 encoding the leukocyte integrin beta-2 subunit (CD18). Sequence analysis of the ITGB2 coding sequence from a CLAD dog and a healthy control revealed a single missense mutation, Cys36Ser. This cysteine residue is conserved among all beta integrins, and the mutation most likely disrupts a disulfide bond. The mutation showed a complete association with CLAD in Irish setters and was not found in a sample of dogs from other breeds. The causative nature of this mutation was confirmed by transduction experiments using retroviral vectors and human LAD EBV B-cells. The normal canine CD18 formed heterodimers with the human CD11 subunit, whereas gene transfer of the mutant CD18 resulted in very low levels of CD11/CD18 expression. The identification of the causative mutation for CLAD now makes it possible to identify carrier animals with a simple diagnostic DNA test, and it forms the basis for using CLAD as a large animal model for the development and evaluation of clinical treatments for human LAD. PMID:10512685

  7. Human CalDAG-GEFI gene (RASGRP2) mutation affects platelet function and causes severe bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Canault, Matthias; Ghalloussi, Dorsaf; Grosdidier, Charlotte; Guinier, Marie; Perret, Claire; Chelghoum, Nadjim; Germain, Marine; Raslova, Hana; Peiretti, Franck; Morange, Pierre E.; Saut, Noemie; Pillois, Xavier; Nurden, Alan T.; Cambien, François; Pierres, Anne; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Tregouet, David-Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The nature of an inherited platelet disorder was investigated in three siblings affected by severe bleeding. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified the culprit mutation (cG742T) in the RAS guanyl-releasing protein-2 (RASGRP2) gene coding for calcium- and DAG-regulated guanine exchange factor-1 (CalDAG-GEFI). Platelets from individuals carrying the mutation present a reduced ability to activate Rap1 and to perform proper αIIbβ3 integrin inside-out signaling. Expression of CalDAG-GEFI mutant in HEK293T cells abolished Rap1 activation upon stimulation. Nevertheless, the PKC- and ADP-dependent pathways allow residual platelet activation in the absence of functional CalDAG-GEFI. The mutation impairs the platelet’s ability to form thrombi under flow and spread normally as a consequence of reduced Rac1 GTP-binding. Functional deficiencies were confined to platelets and megakaryocytes with no leukocyte alteration. This contrasts with the phenotype seen in type III leukocyte adhesion deficiency caused by the absence of kindlin-3. Heterozygous did not suffer from bleeding and have normal platelet aggregation; however, their platelets mimicked homozygous ones by failing to undergo normal adhesion under flow and spreading. Rescue experiments on cultured patient megakaryocytes corrected the functional deficiency after transfection with wild-type RASGRP2. Remarkably, the presence of a single normal allele is sufficient to prevent bleeding, making CalDAG-GEFI a novel and potentially safe therapeutic target to prevent thrombosis. PMID:24958846

  8. Refined mapping of the gene causing familial mediterranean fever, by linkage and homozygosity studies

    PubMed Central

    Aksentijevich, Ivona; Pras, Elon; Gruberg, Luis; Shen, Yang; Holman, Katherine; Helling, Sharon; Prosen, Leandrea; Sutherland, Grant R.; Richards, Robert I.; Ramsburg, Mark; Dean, Michael; Pras, Mordechai; Amos, Christopher I.; Kastner, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by attacks of fever and serosal inflammation; the biochemical basis is unknown. We recently reported linkage of the gene causing FMF (designated “MEF”) to two markers on chromosome 16p. To map MEF more precisely, we have now tested nine 16p markers. Two-point and multipoint linkage analysis, as well as a study of recombinant haplotypes, placed MEF between D16S94 and D16S80, a genetic interval of about 9 cM. We also examined rates of homozygosity for markers in this region, among offspring of consanguineous marriages. For eight of nine markers, the rate of homozygosity among 26 affected inbred individuals was higher than that among their 20 unaffected sibs. Localizing MEF more precisely on the basis of homozygosity rates alone would be difficult, for two reasons: First, the high FMF carrier frequency increases the chance that inbred offspring could have the disease without being homozygous by descent at MEF. Second, several of the markers in this region are relatively nonpolymorphic, with a high rate of homozygosity, regardless of their chromosomal location. PMID:8328461

  9. Successful subthalamic stimulation in genetic Parkinson's disease caused by duplication of the α-synuclein gene.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Angelo; Pilleri, Manuela; Padoan, Angelo; Landi, Andrea; Ferla, Salvatore; Biundo, Roberta; D'Avella, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    The α-synuclein gene (SNCA) multiplication causes autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Particularly triplication, but also duplication, of the SNCA is associated with early-onset rapidly progressing parkinsonism with increased risk of cognitive impairment. There is no report about the effect and safety of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in carriers of this mutation and, in general, data in patients with genetic parkinsonism are scarce. We report a one-year prospective follow-up of subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS in a 46-year old female carrier of SNCA duplication who developed PD at the age of 41 years, and rapidly showed disabling motor fluctuations and dyskinesias refractory to pharmacological strategies. One year after surgery there was a clinically relevant improvement in motor features with a reduction of 64% in UPDRS III in "off medication" and a complete abolition of peak dose dyskinesias. Patient did not report procedure-related adverse events following STN-DBS except for stimulation-induced right foot dystonia relieved by modulating stimulation parameters. Postoperative cognitive testing showed a decline in executive functions, mostly verbal fluency and attention shifting, compared with presurgical assessment. STN-DBS is safe and effective in patients with SNCA duplication showing a clinical pattern similar to idiopathic PD. Our case suggests that clinical phenotype rather genotype is the main predictor for DBS outcome. PMID:21761143

  10. Early-Onset Severe Encephalopathy with Epilepsy: The BRAT1 Gene Should Be Added to the List of Causes.

    PubMed

    van de Pol, Laura A; Wolf, Nicole I; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M; Stam, Cornelie J; Weiss, Janneke M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Kevelam, Sietske H; Bugiani, Mariana; van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; van der Knaap, Marjo S

    2015-12-01

    A variety of pathologies can underlie early-onset severe encephalopathy with epilepsy. To aid the diagnostic process in such patients we present an overview of causes, including the rapidly expanding list of genes involved. When no explanation is found, whole-exome sequencing (WES) can be used in an attempt to identify gene defects in patients suspected to suffer from a genetic form. We describe three siblings, born to consanguineous parents, with a lethal severe epileptic encephalopathy with early-infantile onset, including their magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography and, in one case, neuropathological findings. Using WES a homozygous frameshift mutation in the BRAT1 gene, c.638dup p.(Val214Glyfs*189), was identified. We present our cases in the context of all published cases with mutations in the BRAT1 gene and conclude that BRAT1 should be added to the growing list of genes related to early-onset severe encephalopathy with epilepsy. PMID:26535877

  11. Mutations in 12 known dominant disease-causing genes clarify many congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Daw-Yang; Dworschak, Gabriel C.; Kohl, Stefan; Saisawat, Pawaree; Vivante, Asaf; Hilger, Alina C.; Reutter, Heiko M.; Soliman, Neveen A.; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Kehinde, Elijah O.; Tasic, Velibor; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for approximately half of children with chronic kidney disease. CAKUT can be caused by monogenic mutations, however, data are lacking on their frequency. Genetic diagnosis has been hampered by genetic heterogeneity and lack of genotype-phenotype correlation. To determine the percentage of cases with CAKUT that can be explained by mutations in known CAKUT genes, we analyzed the coding exons of the 17 known dominant CAKUT-causing genes in a cohort of 749 individuals from 650 families with CAKUT. The most common phenotypes in this CAKUT cohort were 288 with vesicoureteral reflux, 120 with renal hypodysplasia and 90 with unilateral renal agenesis. We identified 37 different heterozygous mutations (33 novel) in 12 of the 17 known genes in 47 patients from 41 of the 650 families (6.3%). These mutations include (number of families): BMP7 (1), CDC5L (1), CHD1L (5), EYA1 (3), GATA3 (2), HNF1B (6), PAX2 (5), RET (3), ROBO2 (4), SALL1 (9), SIX2 (1), and SIX5 (1). Furthermore, several mutations previously reported to be disease-causing are most likely benign variants. Thus, in a large cohort over 6% of families with isolated CAKUT are caused by a mutation in 12 of 17 dominant CAKUT genes. Our report represents one of the most in-depth diagnostic studies of monogenic causes of isolated CAKUT in children. PMID:24429398

  12. Mitochondrially-targeted expression of a cytoplasmic male sterility-associated orf220 gene causes male sterility in Brassica juncea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The novel chimeric open reading frame (orf) resulting from the rearrangement of a mitochondrial genome is generally thought to be a causal factor in the occurrence of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS). Both positive and negative correlations have been found between CMS-associated orfs and the occurrence of CMS when CMS-associated orfs were expressed and targeted at mitochondria. Some orfs cause male sterility or semi-sterility, while some do not. Little is currently known about how mitochondrial factor regulates the expression of the nuclear genes involved in male sterility. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological function of a candidate CMS-associated orf220 gene, newly isolated from cytoplasmic male-sterile stem mustard, and show how mitochondrial retrograde regulated nuclear gene expression is related to male sterility. Results It was shown that the ORF220 protein can be guided to the mitochondria using the mitochondrial-targeting sequence of the β subunit of F1-ATPase (atp2-1). Transgenic stem mustard plants expressed the chimeric gene containing the orf220 gene and a mitochondrial-targeting sequence of the β subunit of F1-ATPase (atp2-1). Transgenic plants were male-sterile, most being unable to produce pollen while some could only produce non-vigorous pollen. The transgenic stem mustard plants also showed aberrant floral development identical to that observed in the CMS stem mustard phenotype. Results obtained from oligooarray analysis showed that some genes related to mitochondrial energy metabolism were down-regulated, indicating a weakening of mitochondrial function in transgenic stem mustard. Some genes related to pollen development were shown to be down-regulated in transgenic stem mustard and the expression of some transcription factor genes was also altered. Conclusion The work presented furthers our understanding of how the mitochondrially-targeted expression of CMS-associated orf220 gene causes male sterility through

  13. Application of biclustering of gene expression data and gene set enrichment analysis methods to identify potentially disease causing nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Halappanavar, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: The presence of diverse types of nanomaterials (NMs) in commerce is growing at an exponential pace. As a result, human exposure to these materials in the environment is inevitable, necessitating the need for rapid and reliable toxicity testing methods to accurately assess the potential hazards associated with NMs. In this study, we applied biclustering and gene set enrichment analysis methods to derive essential features of altered lung transcriptome following exposure to NMs that are associated with lung-specific diseases. Several datasets from public microarray repositories describing pulmonary diseases in mouse models following exposure to a variety of substances were examined and functionally related biclusters of genes showing similar expression profiles were identified. The identified biclusters were then used to conduct a gene set enrichment analysis on pulmonary gene expression profiles derived from mice exposed to nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2), carbon black (CB) or carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to determine the disease significance of these data-driven gene sets. Results: Biclusters representing inflammation (chemokine activity), DNA binding, cell cycle, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and fibrosis processes were identified. All of the NM studies were significant with respect to the bicluster related to chemokine activity (DAVID; FDR p-value = 0.032). The bicluster related to pulmonary fibrosis was enriched in studies where toxicity induced by CNT and CB studies was investigated, suggesting the potential for these materials to induce lung fibrosis. The pro-fibrogenic potential of CNTs is well established. Although CB has not been shown to induce fibrosis, it induces stronger inflammatory, oxidative stress and DNA damage responses than nano-TiO2 particles. Conclusion: The results of the analysis correctly identified all NMs to be inflammogenic and only CB and CNTs as potentially fibrogenic. In addition to identifying several

  14. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene that cause glycogen storage disease type 1a

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Lei, K.J.; Shelly, L.L.

    1994-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type la (von Gierke disease) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. The disease presents with clinical manifestations of severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, growth retardation, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperuricemia. We have succeeded in isolating a murine G6Pase cDNA from a normal mouse liver cDNA library by differentially screening method. We then isolated the human G6Pase cDNA and gene. To date, we have characterized the G6Pase genes of twelve GSD type la patients and uncovered a total of six different mutations. The mutations are comprised of R83C (an Arg at codon 83 to a Cys), Q347X (a Gly at codon 347 to a stop codon), 459insTA (a two basepair insertion at nucleotide 459 yielding a truncated G6Pase of 129 residues), R295C (an Arg at codon 295 to a Cys), G222R (a Gly at codon 222 to an Arg) and {delta}F327 (a codon deletion for Phe-327 at nucleotides 1058 to 1060). The relative incidences of these mutations are 37.5% (R83C), 33.3% (Q347X), 16.6% (459insTA), 4.2% (G222R), 4.2% (R295C) and 4.2% ({delta}F327). Site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression assays demonstrated that the R83C, Q347X, R295C, and {delta}F327 mutations abolished whereas the G222R mutation greatly reduced G6Pase activity. We further characterized the structure-function requirements of amino acids 83, 222, and 295 in G6Pase catalysis. The identification of mutations in GSD type la patients has unequivocally established the molecular basis of the type la disorder. Knowledge of the mutations may be applied to prenatal diagnosis and opens the way for developing and evaluating new therapeutic approaches.

  15. Mutations in the MORC2 gene cause axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Teresa; Lupo, Vincenzo; Martínez-Rubio, Dolores; Sancho, Paula; Sivera, Rafael; Chumillas, María J; García-Romero, Mar; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Muelas, Nuria; Dopazo, Joaquín; Vílchez, Juan J; Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a complex disorder with wide genetic heterogeneity. Here we present a new axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease form, associated with the gene microrchidia family CW-type zinc finger 2 (MORC2). Whole-exome sequencing in a family with autosomal dominant segregation identified the novel MORC2 p.R190W change in four patients. Further mutational screening in our axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease clinical series detected two additional sporadic cases, one patient who also carried the same MORC2 p.R190W mutation and another patient that harboured a MORC2 p.S25L mutation. Genetic and in silico studies strongly supported the pathogenicity of these sequence variants. The phenotype was variable and included patients with congenital or infantile onset, as well as others whose symptoms started in the second decade. The patients with early onset developed a spinal muscular atrophy-like picture, whereas in the later onset cases, the initial symptoms were cramps, distal weakness and sensory impairment. Weakness and atrophy progressed in a random and asymmetric fashion and involved limb girdle muscles, leading to a severe incapacity in adulthood. Sensory loss was always prominent and proportional to disease severity. Electrophysiological studies were consistent with an asymmetric axonal motor and sensory neuropathy, while fasciculations and myokymia were recorded rather frequently by needle electromyography. Sural nerve biopsy revealed pronounced multifocal depletion of myelinated fibres with some regenerative clusters and occasional small onion bulbs. Morc2 is expressed in both axons and Schwann cells of mouse peripheral nerve. Different roles in biological processes have been described for MORC2. As the silencing of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease genes have been associated with DNA damage response, it is tempting to speculate that a deregulation of this pathway may be linked to the axonal degeneration observed in MORC2 neuropathy, thus adding a

  16. Developmental Deltamethrin Exposure Causes Persistent Changes in Dopaminergic Gene Expression, Neurochemistry, and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kung, Tiffany S; Richardson, Jason R; Cooper, Keith R; White, Lori A

    2015-08-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used insecticides that are considered to pose little risk to human health. However, there is an increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. We used the zebrafish model to test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to low doses of the pyrethroid deltamethrin results in persistent alterations in dopaminergic gene expression, neurochemistry, and locomotor activity. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25-0.50 μg/l), at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the embryonic period [3-72 h postfertilization (hpf)], after which transferred to fresh water until the larval stage (2-weeks postfertilization). Deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased transcript levels of the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor (drd1) and increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase at 72 hpf. The reduction in drd1 transcripts persisted to the larval stage and was associated with decreased D2 dopamine receptor transcripts. Larval fish, exposed developmentally to deltamethrin, had increased levels of homovanillic acid, a DA metabolite. Since the DA system is involved in locomotor activity, we measured the swim activity of larval fish following a transition to darkness. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin significantly increased larval swim activity which was attenuated by concomitant knockdown of the DA transporter. Acute exposure to methylphenidate, a DA transporter inhibitor, increased swim activity in control larva, while reducing swim activity in larva developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin causes locomotor deficits in larval zebrafish, which is likely mediated by dopaminergic dysfunction. This highlights the need to understand the persistent effects of low-dose neurotoxicant exposure during development. PMID:25912032

  17. Developmental Deltamethrin Exposure Causes Persistent Changes in Dopaminergic Gene Expression, Neurochemistry, and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Tiffany S.; Richardson, Jason R.; Cooper, Keith R.; White, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used insecticides that are considered to pose little risk to human health. However, there is an increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. We used the zebrafish model to test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to low doses of the pyrethroid deltamethrin results in persistent alterations in dopaminergic gene expression, neurochemistry, and locomotor activity. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25–0.50 μg/l), at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the embryonic period [3–72 h postfertilization (hpf)], after which transferred to fresh water until the larval stage (2-weeks postfertilization). Deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased transcript levels of the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor (drd1) and increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase at 72 hpf. The reduction in drd1 transcripts persisted to the larval stage and was associated with decreased D2 dopamine receptor transcripts. Larval fish, exposed developmentally to deltamethrin, had increased levels of homovanillic acid, a DA metabolite. Since the DA system is involved in locomotor activity, we measured the swim activity of larval fish following a transition to darkness. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin significantly increased larval swim activity which was attenuated by concomitant knockdown of the DA transporter. Acute exposure to methylphenidate, a DA transporter inhibitor, increased swim activity in control larva, while reducing swim activity in larva developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin causes locomotor deficits in larval zebrafish, which is likely mediated by dopaminergic dysfunction. This highlights the need to understand the persistent effects of low-dose neurotoxicant exposure during development. PMID:25912032

  18. Gene expression patterns in transgenic mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in myosin regulatory light chain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenrui; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Zhiqun; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Narasimhan, Giri; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2016-07-01

    Using microarray and bioinformatics, we examined the gene expression profiles in transgenic mouse hearts expressing mutations in the myosin regulatory light chain shown to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We focused on two malignant RLC-mutations, Arginine 58→Glutamine (R58Q) and Aspartic Acid 166 → Valine (D166V), and one benign, Lysine 104 → Glutamic Acid (K104E)-mutation. Datasets of differentially expressed genes for each of three mutants were compared to those observed in wild-type (WT) hearts. The changes in the mutant vs. WT samples were shown as fold-change (FC), with stringency FC ≥ 2. Based on the gene profiles, we have identified the major signaling pathways that underlie the R58Q-, D166V- and K104E-HCM phenotypes. The correlations between different genotypes were also studied using network-based algorithms. Genes with strong correlations were clustered into one group and the central gene networks were identified for each HCM mutant. The overall gene expression patterns in all mutants were distinct from the WT profiles. Both malignant mutations shared certain classes of genes that were up or downregulated, but most similarities were noted between D166V and K104E mice, with R58Q hearts showing a distinct gene expression pattern. Our data suggest that all three HCM mice lead to cardiomyopathy in a mutation-specific manner and thus develop HCM through diverse mechanisms. PMID:26906074

  19. Decreased Expression of a Gene Caused by a T-DNA Insertion in an Adjacent Gene in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Kentaro; Kawabayashi, Takenori; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    ALADIN is a component of the nuclear pore complex in higher eukaryotes. An Arabidopsis knockout line that had a T-DNA insertion in the ALADIN gene was defective in plant growth and thylakoid development and had reduced photosynthetic activity resulting from lower chlorophyll accumulation. The mutation appeared to decrease the level of chloroplast RuBisCO subunits and PSBA and PGL35 proteins. Unexpectedly, the T-DNA insertion in the ALADIN gene decreased the expression of the neighboring gene PSRP5, which functions in translation in chloroplasts. The mutant phenotype was rescued by expressing PSRP5, but not by expressing ALADIN. The abnormal phenotypes were also detected in an artificial microRNA (amiRNA)-mediated PSRPS5 knockdown, but not in an amiRNA-mediated ALADIN knockdown line. Thus, users of T-DNA insertions should be aware that a T-DNA insertion in one gene can have effects on the expression of neighboring genes. PMID:26828726

  20. Polyhydramnios and cerebellar atrophy: a prenatal presentation of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy caused by mutations in the FBXL4 gene.

    PubMed

    van Rij, Maartje C; Jansen, Fenna A R; Hellebrekers, Debby M E I; Onkenhout, W; Smeets, Hubert J M; Hendrickx, Alexandra T; Gottschalk, Ralph W H; Steggerda, Sylke J; Peeters-Scholte, Cacha M P C D; Haak, Monique C; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2016-04-01

    Severe recessive mitochondrial myopathy caused by FBXL4 gene mutations may present prenatally with polyhydramnios and cerebellar hypoplasia. Characteristic dysmorphic features are: high and arched eyebrows, triangular face, a slight upslant of palpebral fissures, and a prominent pointed chin. Metabolic investigations invariably show increased serum lactate and pyruvate levels. PMID:27099744

  1. NK cells are intrinsically functional in pigs with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by spontaneous mutations in the Artemis gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in a line of Yorkshire pigs at Iowa State University. These SCID pigs lack B-cells and T-cells, but possess Natural Killer (NK) cells. This SCID phenotype is caused by recessive mutations in the Artemis gene. Interestingly, two human tumor c...

  2. Not All SCID Pigs Are Created Equally: Two Independent Mutations in the Artemis Gene Cause SCID in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Waide, Emily H; Dekkers, Jack C M; Ross, Jason W; Rowland, Raymond R R; Wyatt, Carol R; Ewen, Catherine L; Evans, Alyssa B; Thekkoot, Dinesh M; Boddicker, Nicholas J; Serão, Nick V L; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Tuggle, Christopher K

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in >30 genes are known to result in impairment of the adaptive immune system, causing a group of disorders collectively known as SCID. SCID disorders are split into groups based on their presence and/or functionality of B, T, and NK cells. Piglets from a line of Yorkshire pigs at Iowa State University were shown to be affected by T(-)B(-)NK(+) SCID, representing, to our knowledge, the first example of naturally occurring SCID in pigs. In this study, we present evidence for two spontaneous mutations as the molecular basis for this SCID phenotype. Flow cytometry analysis of thymocytes showed an increased frequency of immature T cells in SCID pigs. Fibroblasts from these pigs were more sensitive to ionizing radiation than non-SCID piglets, eliminating the RAG1 and RAG2 genes. Genetic and molecular analyses showed that two mutations were present in the Artemis gene, which in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state cause the immunodeficient phenotype. Rescue of SCID fibroblast radiosensitivity by human Artemis protein demonstrated that the identified Artemis mutations are the direct cause of this cellular phenotype. The work presented in the present study reveals two mutations in the Artemis gene that cause T(-)B(-)NK(+) SCID in pigs. The SCID pig can be an important biomedical model, but these mutations would be undesirable in commercial pig populations. The identified mutations and associated genetic tests can be used to address both of these issues. PMID:26320255

  3. DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED GENES IN RESPONSES TO LATE LEAF SPOT DISEASE CAUSED BY CERCOSPORIDIUM PERSONATUM IN PEANUT USING MICROARRAY ANALYSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Late leaf spot disease caused by Cercosporidium personatum is one of the most destructive foliar diseases of peanut worldwide. This research was to identify resistance genes in response to leaf spot disease using miccroarray and real-time PCR. To identify transcripts involved in disease resistance, ...

  4. New splicing mutation in the choline kinase beta (CHKB) gene causing a muscular dystrophy detected by whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jorge; Negrão, Luís; Fineza, Isabel; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Fortuna, Ana Maria; Gonçalves, Ana Rita; Froufe, Hugo; Egas, Conceição; Santos, Rosário; Sousa, Mário

    2015-06-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a group of hereditary muscle disorders that include two particularly heterogeneous subgroups: limb-girdle MD and congenital MD, linked to 52 different genes (seven common to both subgroups). Massive parallel sequencing technology may avoid the usual stepwise gene-by-gene analysis. We report the whole-exome sequencing (WES) analysis of a patient with childhood-onset progressive MD, also presenting mental retardation and dilated cardiomyopathy. Conventional sequencing had excluded eight candidate genes. WES of the trio (patient and parents) was performed using the ion proton sequencing system. Data analysis resorted to filtering steps using the GEMINI software revealed a novel silent variant in the choline kinase beta (CHKB) gene. Inspection of sequence alignments ultimately identified the causal variant (CHKB:c.1031+3G>C). This splice site mutation was confirmed using Sanger sequencing and its effect was further evaluated with gene expression analysis. On reassessment of the muscle biopsy, typical abnormal mitochondrial oxidative changes were observed. Mutations in CHKB have been shown to cause phosphatidylcholine deficiency in myofibers, causing a rare form of CMD (only 21 patients reported). Notwithstanding interpretative difficulties that need to be overcome before the integration of WES in the diagnostic workflow, this work corroborates its utility in solving cases from highly heterogeneous groups of diseases, in which conventional diagnostic approaches fail to provide a definitive diagnosis. PMID:25740612

  5. Genetic basis of endocrine disease 4: The spectrum of mutations in the androgen receptor gene that causes androgen resistance

    SciTech Connect

    McPhaul, M.J.; Marcelli, M.; Zoppi, S.; Griffin, J.E.; Wilson, J.D. )

    1993-01-01

    Mutations in the androgen receptor gene cause phenotypic abnormalities of male sexual development that range from a female phenotype (complete testicular feminization) to that of undervirilized or infertile men. Using the tools of molecular biology, the authors have analyzed androgen receptor gene mutations in 31 unrelated subjects with androgen resistance syndromes. Most of the defects are due to nucleotide changes that cause premature termination codons or single amino acid substitutions within the open reading frame encoding the androgen receptor, and the majority of these substitutions are localized in three regions of the androgen receptor: the DNA-binding domain and two segments of the androgen-binding domain. Less frequently, partial or complete gene deletions have been identified. Functional studies and immunoblot assays of the androgen receptors in patients with androgen resistance indicate that in most cases the phenotypic abnormalities are the result of impairment of receptor function or decreases in receptor abundance or both. 34 refs., 2 figs.

  6. A new missense mutation in the BCKDHB gene causes the classic form of maple syrup urine disease (MSUD).

    PubMed

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Goodarzi, Hamedreza; Fardaei, Majid

    2015-05-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by mutations in the BCKDHA, BCKDHB, DBT and DLD genes, which encode the E1α, E1β, E2 and E3 subunits of the branched chain α ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, respectively. This complex is involved in the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids. In this study, we analyzed the DNA sequences of BCKDHA and BCKDHB genes in an infant who suffered from MSUD and died at the age of 6 months. We found a new missense mutation in exon 5 of BCKDHB gene (c.508C>T). The heterozygosity of the parents for the mentioned nucleotide change was confirmed by direct sequence analysis of the corresponding segment. Another missense mutation has been found in the same codon previously and shown by in silico analyses to be deleterious. This report provides further evidence that this amino acid change can cause classic MSUD. PMID:25381949

  7. The Crystal Structure of D-Threonine Aldolase from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans Provides Insight into a Metal Ion Assisted PLP-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Michael K.; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Steinkellner, Georg; Riegler-Berket, Lina; Mink, Daniel; van Assema, Friso; Schürmann, Martin; Gruber, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Threonine aldolases catalyze the pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent cleavage of threonine into glycine and acetaldehyde and play a major role in the degradation of this amino acid. In nature, L- as well as D-specific enzymes have been identified, but the exact physiological function of D-threonine aldolases (DTAs) is still largely unknown. Both types of enantio-complementary enzymes have a considerable potential in biocatalysis for the stereospecific synthesis of various β-hydroxy amino acids, which are valuable building blocks for the production of pharmaceuticals. While several structures of L-threonine aldolases (LTAs) have already been determined, no structure of a DTA is available to date. Here, we report on the determination of the crystal structure of the DTA from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans (AxDTA) at 1.5 Å resolution. Our results underline the close relationship of DTAs and alanine racemases and allow the identification of a metal binding site close to the PLP-cofactor in the active site of the enzyme which is consistent with the previous observation that divalent cations are essential for DTA activity. Modeling of AxDTA substrate complexes provides a rationale for this metal dependence and indicates that binding of the β-hydroxy group of the substrate to the metal ion very likely activates this group and facilitates its deprotonation by His193. An equivalent involvement of a metal ion has been implicated in the mechanism of a serine dehydratase, which harbors a metal ion binding site in the vicinity of the PLP cofactor at the same position as in DTA. The structure of AxDTA is completely different to available structures of LTAs. The enantio-complementarity of DTAs and LTAs can be explained by an approximate mirror symmetry of crucial active site residues relative to the PLP-cofactor. PMID:25884707

  8. Differential patterns of spinal cord pathology induced by MP4, MOG peptide 35-55, and PLP peptide 178-191 in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Gruppe, Traugott L; Laurentius, Laura-Maria; Kirch, Christiane; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V; Addicks, Klaus

    2011-06-01

    In this study we demonstrate that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by the MBP-PLP fusion protein MP4, MOG peptide 35-55, or PLP peptide 178-191 in C57BL/6 mice, respectively, displays distinct features of CNS pathology. Major differences between the three models resided in (i) the region-/tract-specificity and disseminated nature of spinal cord degeneration, (ii) the extent and kinetics of demyelination, and (iii) the involvement of motoneurons in the disease. In contrast, axonal damage was present in all models and to a similar extent, proposing this feature as a possible morphological correlate for the comparable chronic clinical course of the disease induced by the three antigens. The data suggest that the antigen targeted in autoimmune encephalomyelitis is crucial to the induction of differential histopathological disease manifestations. The use of MP4-, MOG:35-55-, and PLP:178-191-induced EAE on the C57BL/6 background can be a valuable tool when it comes to reproducing and studying the structural-morphological diversity of multiple sclerosis. PMID:21569091

  9. 4′-CyanoPLP presents better prospect for the experimental detection of elusive cyclic intermediate radical in the reaction of lysine 5,6-aminomutase

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Amarendra Nath; Ke, Shyue-Chu

    2015-02-06

    Graphical abstract: The results of our calculations suggest that the reaction of 4′-cyanoPLP with lysine 5,6-aminomutase offers better prospect for the experimental detection of elusive cyclic azacyclopropylcarbinyl radical, which is proposed to be a key intermediate in the reaction of pyridoxal-5′-phosphate dependent radical aminomutases. - Highlights: • 4′-CyanoI{sup ·} is the lowest energy radical intermediate in the reaction of 5,6-LAM. • 4′-CyanoPLP offers good prospect for the experimental observation of elusive I{sup ·}. • The calculated HFCCs would help to characterize 4′-cyanoI{sup ·} by EPR. - Abstract: The results of our calculations suggest that the reaction of 4′-cyanoPLP with lysine 5,6-aminomutase offers better prospect for the experimental detection of elusive cyclic azacyclopropylcarbinyl radical (I{sup ·}), which is proposed to be a key intermediate in the reaction of pyridoxal-5′-phosphate dependent radical aminomutases. We have calculated the corresponding hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) for {sup 14}N and {sup 13}C of cyano group using several basis sets to help the characterization of 4′-cyanoI{sup ·}.

  10. Biased Gene Conversion in Rhizobium etli Is Caused by Preferential Double-Strand Breaks on One of the Recombining Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez-Cuna, Fares Osam; Castellanos, Mildred

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gene conversion, the nonreciprocal transfer of information during homologous recombination, is the main process that maintains identity between members of multigene families. Gene conversion in the nitrogenase (nifH) multigene family of Rhizobium etli was analyzed by using a two-plasmid system, where each plasmid carried a copy of nifH. One of the nifH copies was modified, creating restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) spaced along the gene. Once the modified plasmid was introduced into R. etli, selection was done for cointegration with a resident plasmid lacking the RFLPs. Most of the cointegrate molecules harbor gene conversion events, biased toward a gain of RFLPs. This bias may be explained under the double-strand break repair model by proposing that the nifH gene lacking the RFLPs suffers a DNA double-strand break, so the incoming plasmid functions as a template for repairing the homolog on the resident plasmid. To support this proposal, we cloned an SceI site into the nifH homolog that had the RFLPs used for scoring gene conversion. In vivo expression of the meganuclease I-SceI allowed the generation of a double-strand break on this homolog. Upon introduction of this modified plasmid into an R. etli strain lacking I-SceI, biased gene conversion still favored the retention of markers on the incoming plasmid. In contrast, when the recipient strain ectopically expressed I-SceI, a dramatic reversal in gene conversion bias was seen, favoring the preservation of resident sequences. These results show that biased gene conversion is caused by preferential double-strand breaks on one of the recombining homologs. IMPORTANCE In this work, we analyzed gene conversion by using a system that entails horizontal gene transfer followed by homologous recombination in the recipient cell. Most gene conversion events are biased toward the acquisition of the incoming sequences, ranging in size from 120 bp to 800 bp. This bias is due to preferential cutting of

  11. Hypervalinemia and hyperleucine-isoleucinemia caused by mutations in the branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, X L; Li, C J; Xing, Y; Yang, Y H; Jia, J P

    2015-09-01

    Valine, leucine, and isoleucine are essential branched chain amino acids (BCAAs). When BCAA metabolism is genetically impaired in human, serum levels of BCAA and/or their metabolites rise considerably, causing severe neurological dysfunction. The first step in BCAA catabolism is catalyzed by branched chain aminotransferase (BCAT). Hypervalinemia and hyperleucine-isoleucinemia caused by BCAT gene mutation in human have not been reported previously. A 25-year-old man presented with headache complaints and mild memory impairment for about six years. Brain MRI showed symmetric white matter abnormal signals. Metabolic studies revealed remarkably elevated plasma valine and leucine concentrations. Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) diagnosis was not supported since all genes for the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKD) gene were normal. Interestingly, two heterogeneous BCAT2 gene mutations were found in the patient, including c.509G > A (p.Arg170Gln) and c.790G > A (p.Glu264Lys). In addition, c.509G > A (p.Arg170Gln) and c.790G > A (p.Glu264Lys) were found in his father and mother, respectively, suggesting an autosomal recessive disorder. BCAT2 functional studies demonstrated that the two BCAT2 gene mutations resulted in decreased BCAT2 enzyme activity. After treatment with vitamin B6, the levels of BCAA, especially valine were remarkably decreased and brain MRI lesions were improved. These findings suggest a new type of branched chain amino acid metabolism disorder. This rare case provides great insight into the further understanding of BCAA metabolism and its defect in human. BCAT2 gene mutations can cause hypervalinemia and hyperleucine-isoleucinemia, which are associated with brain white matter lesions. PMID:25653144

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in obesity-related genes and all-cause and cause-specific mortality: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gallicchio, Lisa; Chang, Howard H; Christo, Dana K; Thuita, Lucy; Huang, Han Yao; Strickland, Paul; Ruczinski, Ingo; Clipp, Sandra; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the associations between 16 specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 8 obesity-related genes and overall and cause-specific mortality. We also examined the associations between the SNPs and body mass index (BMI) and change in BMI over time. Methods Data were analyzed from 9,919 individuals who participated in two large community-based cohort studies conducted in Washington County, Maryland in 1974 (CLUE I) and 1989 (CLUE II). DNA from blood collected in 1989 was genotyped for 16 SNPs in 8 obesity-related genes: monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), paraoxonase 1 and 2 (PON1 and PON2), leptin receptor (LEPR), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ and -δ (PPARG and PPARD). Data on height and weight in 1989 (CLUE II baseline) and at age 21 were collected from participants at the time of blood collection. All participants were followed from 1989 to the date of death or the end of follow-up in 2005. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to obtain the relative risk (RR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each SNP and mortality outcomes. Results The results showed no patterns of association for the selected SNPs and the all-cause and cause-specific mortality outcomes, although statistically significant associations (p < 0.05) were observed between PPARG rs4684847 and all-cause mortality (CC: reference; CT: RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.89, 1.11; TT: RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.39, 0.93) and cancer-related mortality (CC: reference; CT: RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.82, 1.25; TT: RR 0.22, 95% CI 0.06, 0.90) and TNFα rs1799964 and cancer-related mortality (TT: reference; CT: RR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03, 1.47; CC: RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.54, 1.28). Additional analyses showed significant associations between SNPs in LEPR with BMI (rs1137101) and change in BMI over time (rs1045895 and rs1137101). Conclusion Findings from this cohort study suggest that the selected SNPs are not

  13. Gene Activation in Eukaryotes: Are Nuclear Acidic Proteins the Cause or the Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    1974-01-01

    Nuclear acidic proteins have been implicated in the positive control of gene transcription in eukaryotes. This hypothesis was examined in greater detail by analysis of these proteins during experimental gene activation by a technique for fractionating nuclei into chromatin and the ribonucleoprotein particles that contain heterogeneous nuclear RNA. When synthesis of rat-liver heterogeneous nuclear RNA was stimulated by administration of hydrocortisone, there was a parallel increase in the labeling of acidic proteins in ribonucleoprotein particles. However, there was no detectable effect on the labeling of either acidic chromatin proteins or histones. Thus, the nuclear acidic proteins that respond to the hormone are concerned with a post-transcriptional event, namely the assembly and processing of ribonucleoprotein particles that contain heterogeneous RNA, rather than with direct gene activation. Increases in synthesis of “chromatin” acidic proteins during gene activation observed by others may reflect the presence of these ribonucleoprotein particles in crude chromatin preparations. Images PMID:4522777

  14. Deletion of the Aconitase Gene in Corynebacterium glutamicum Causes Strong Selection Pressure for Secondary Mutations Inactivating Citrate Synthase▿†

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Meike; Mustafi, Nurije; Krug, Andreas; Bott, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The aconitase gene acn of Corynebacterium glutamicum is regulated by four transcriptional regulators, indicating that the synthesis of this enzyme is carefully controlled. To understand the causes for this elaborate regulation, the properties of the Δacn-1 deletion mutant were analyzed in detail. The mutant was glutamate auxotrophic in glucose minimal medium, showed a strong growth defect, and secreted large amounts of acetate. None of these phenotypes could be complemented by plasmid-encoded aconitase, suggesting the presence of a secondary mutation. In fact, a point mutation within the gltA gene encoding citrate synthase was identified that caused the instability of the protein and an almost complete lack of its enzymatic activity. Subsequently, 27 further, independent Δacn clones were isolated, and 15 of them were found to contain distinct mutations in gltA, causing the loss of citrate synthase activity. A similar result was observed for mutants lacking the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene icd. In this case, 8 of 24 Δicd clones contained additional mutations in gltA. Indirect evidence was obtained that elevated intracellular citrate concentrations could be the cause of this selection pressure. Accordingly, the careful control of aconitase synthesis might have evolved due to the necessity to avoid inhibitory cytoplasmic citrate levels on the one hand and to prevent the excessive synthesis of an oxygen-sensitive protein requiring both iron and sulfur on the other hand. PMID:21984793

  15. Aucsia Gene Silencing Causes Parthenocarpic Fruit Development in Tomato[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Molesini, Barbara; Pandolfini, Tiziana; Rotino, Giuseppe Leonardo; Dani, Valeria; Spena, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    In angiosperms, auxin phytohormones play a crucial regulatory role in fruit initiation. The expression of auxin biosynthesis genes in ovules and placenta results in uncoupling of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit development from fertilization with production of parthenocarpic fruits. We have identified two newly described genes, named Aucsia genes, which are differentially expressed in auxin-synthesis (DefH9-iaaM) parthenocarpic tomato flower buds. The two tomato Aucsia genes encode 53-amino-acid-long peptides. We show, by RNA interference-mediated gene suppression, that Aucsia genes are involved in both reproductive and vegetative plant development. Aucsia-silenced tomato plants exhibited auxin-related phenotypes such as parthenocarpic fruit development, leaf fusions, and reflexed leaves. Auxin-induced rhizogenesis in cotyledon explants and polar auxin transport in roots were reduced in Aucsia-silenced plants compared with wild-type plants. In addition, Aucsia-silenced plants showed an increased sensitivity to 1-naphthylphthalamic acid, an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. We further prove that total indole-3-acetic acid content was increased in preanthesis Aucsia-silenced flower buds. Thus, the data presented demonstrate that Aucsia genes encode a novel family of plant peptides that control fruit initiation and affect other auxin-related biological processes in tomato. Aucsia homologous genes are present in both chlorophytes and streptophytes, and the encoded peptides are distinguished by a 16-amino-acid-long (PYSGXSTLALVARXSA) AUCSIA motif, a lysine-rich carboxyl-terminal region, and a conserved tyrosine-based endocytic sorting motif. PMID:18987210

  16. Taproot promoters cause tissue specific gene expression within the storage root of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Oltmanns, Heiko; Kloos, Dorothee U; Briess, Waltraud; Pflugmacher, Maike; Stahl, Dietmar J; Hehl, Reinhard

    2006-08-01

    The storage root (taproot) of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) originates from hypocotyl and primary root and contains many different tissues such as central xylem, primary and secondary cambium, secondary xylem and phloem, and parenchyma. It was the aim of this work to characterize the promoters of three taproot-expressed genes with respect to their tissue specificity. To investigate this, promoters for the genes Tlp, His1-r, and Mll were cloned from sugar beet, linked to reporter genes and transformed into sugar beet and tobacco. Reporter gene expression analysis in transgenic sugar beet plants revealed that all three promoters are active in the storage root. Expression in storage root tissues is either restricted to the vascular zone (Tlp, His1-r) or is observed in the whole organ (Mll). The Mll gene is highly organ specific throughout different developmental stages of the sugar beet. In tobacco, the Tlp and Mll promoters drive reporter gene expression preferentially in hypocotyl and roots. The properties of the Mll promoter may be advantageous for the modification of sucrose metabolism in storage roots. PMID:16482437

  17. Transcriptional regulation of PRPF31 gene expression by MSR1 repeat elements causes incomplete penetrance in retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Anna M.; Shah, Amna Z.; Venturini, Giulia; Krishna, Abhay; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rivolta, Carlo; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2016-01-01

    PRPF31-associated retinitis pigmentosa presents a fascinating enigma: some mutation carriers are blind, while others are asymptomatic. We identify the major molecular cause of this incomplete penetrance through three cardinal features: (1) there is population variation in the number (3 or 4) of a minisatellite repeat element (MSR1) adjacent to the PRPF31 core promoter; (2) in vitro, 3-copies of the MSR1 element can repress gene transcription by 50 to 115-fold; (3) the higher-expressing 4-copy allele is not observed among symptomatic PRPF31 mutation carriers and correlates with the rate of asymptomatic carriers in different populations. Thus, a linked transcriptional modifier decreases PRPF31 gene expression that leads to haploinsufficiency. This result, taken with other identified risk alleles, allows precise genetic counseling for the first time. We also demonstrate that across the human genome, the presence of MSR1 repeats in the promoters or first introns of genes is associated with greater population variability in gene expression indicating that copy number variation of MSR1s is a generic controller of gene expression and promises to provide new insights into our understanding of gene expression regulation. PMID:26781568

  18. Transcriptional regulation of PRPF31 gene expression by MSR1 repeat elements causes incomplete penetrance in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Rose, Anna M; Shah, Amna Z; Venturini, Giulia; Krishna, Abhay; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rivolta, Carlo; Bhattacharya, Shomi S

    2016-01-01

    PRPF31-associated retinitis pigmentosa presents a fascinating enigma: some mutation carriers are blind, while others are asymptomatic. We identify the major molecular cause of this incomplete penetrance through three cardinal features: (1) there is population variation in the number (3 or 4) of a minisatellite repeat element (MSR1) adjacent to the PRPF31 core promoter; (2) in vitro, 3-copies of the MSR1 element can repress gene transcription by 50 to 115-fold; (3) the higher-expressing 4-copy allele is not observed among symptomatic PRPF31 mutation carriers and correlates with the rate of asymptomatic carriers in different populations. Thus, a linked transcriptional modifier decreases PRPF31 gene expression that leads to haploinsufficiency. This result, taken with other identified risk alleles, allows precise genetic counseling for the first time. We also demonstrate that across the human genome, the presence of MSR1 repeats in the promoters or first introns of genes is associated with greater population variability in gene expression indicating that copy number variation of MSR1s is a generic controller of gene expression and promises to provide new insights into our understanding of gene expression regulation. PMID:26781568

  19. Identification of two rare and novel large deletions in ITGB4 gene causing epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia.

    PubMed

    Mencía, Ángeles; García, Marta; García, Eva; Llames, Sara; Charlesworth, Alexandra; de Lucas, Raúl; Vicente, Asunción; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Coto, Pablo; Costa, Marta; Vera, Ángel; López-Pestaña, Arantxa; Murillas, Rodolfo; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Jorcano, José Luis; Conti, Claudio J; Escámez Toledano, María José; Del Río Nechaevsky, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease with a variable prognosis from lethal to very mild. EB-PA is classified into Simplex form (EBS-PA: OMIM #612138) and Junctional form (JEB-PA: OMIM #226730), and it is caused by mutations in ITGA6, ITGB4 and PLEC genes. We report the analysis of six patients with EB-PA, including two dizygotic twins. Skin immunofluorescence epitope mapping was performed followed by PCR and direct sequencing of the ITGB4 gene. Two of the patients presented with non-lethal EB-PA associated with missense ITGB4 gene mutations. For the other four, early postnatal demise was associated with complete lack of β4 integrin due to a variety of ITGB4 novel mutations (2 large deletions, 1 splice-site mutation and 3 missense mutations). One of the deletions spanned 278 bp, being one of the largest reported to date for this gene. Remarkably, we also found for the first time a founder effect for one novel mutation in the ITGB4 gene. We have identified 6 novel mutations in the ITGB4 gene to be added to the mutation database. Our results reveal genotype-phenotype correlations that contribute to the molecular understanding of this heterogeneous disease, a pivotal issue for prognosis and for the development of novel evidence-based therapeutic options for EB management. PMID:26739954

  20. Familial interstitial Xq27.3q28 duplication encompassing the FMR1 gene but not the MECP2 gene causes a new syndromic mental retardation condition

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Marlène; Malan, Valérie; Boissel, Sarah; Toutain, Annick; Royer, Ghislaine; Gobin, Stéphanie; Morichon-Delvallez, Nicole; Turleau, Catherine; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Munnich, Arnold; Vekemans, Michel; Colleaux, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    X-linked mental retardation is a common disorder that accounts for 5–10% of cases of mental retardation in males. Fragile X syndrome is the most common form resulting from a loss of expression of the FMR1 gene. On the other hand, partial duplication of the long arm of the X chromosome is uncommon. It leads to functional disomy of the corresponding genes and has been reported in several cases of mental retardation in males. In this study, we report on the clinical and genetic characterization of a new X-linked mental retardation syndrome characterized by short stature, hypogonadism and facial dysmorphism, and show that this syndrome is caused by a small Xq27.3q28 interstitial duplication encompassing the FMR1 gene. This family broadens the phenotypic spectrum of FMR1 anomalies in an unexpected manner, and we suggest that this condition may represent the fragile X syndrome «contre-type». PMID:19844254

  1. Deletion of the Bacillus subtilis isocitrate dehydrogenase gene causes a block at stage I of sporulation.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, S; Levin, P A; Matsuno, K; Grossman, A D; Sonenshein, A L

    1997-01-01

    A Bacillus subtilis mutant with a deletion of citC, the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase, the third enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid branch of the Krebs cycle, had a greatly reduced ability to sporulate. Analysis of expression of lacZ fusions to various sporulation gene promoters revealed that in the citC mutant development is probably blocked between stage 0 and stage II. That is, genes expressed very early in sporulation, under the direct control of the Spo0A transcription factor, were induced normally in the citC mutant. However, genes expressed after asymmetric septation (stage II) in wild-type cells were not induced in the citC mutant. Analysis of cell morphology by thin-section electron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the mutant formed axial chromosomal filaments and accumulated rings of FtsZ protein at potential polar division sites but failed to form asymmetric division septa, indicating that sporulation is blocked at stage I. The growth and sporulation defects of the B. subtilis citC mutant were fully overcome by introduction and expression of the Escherichia coli icd gene, encoding an isocitrate dehydrogenase similar to the enzyme from B. subtilis. PMID:9244258

  2. Variations in oxygen concentration cause differential antioxidant response and expression of related genes in Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Garza-López, Paul Misael; Suárez-Vergel, Gerardo; Hamdan-Partida, Aida; Loera, Octavio

    2015-04-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana is widely used in pest biocontrol strategies. We evaluated both the antioxidant response mediated by compatible solutes, trehalose or mannitol, and the expression of related genes using oxygen pulses at three oxygen concentrations in solid state culture (SSC): normal atmosphere (21% O2), low oxygen (16% O2) and enriched oxygen (26% O2). Trehalose concentration decreased 75% after atmospheric modifications in the cultures, whereas mannitol synthesis was three-fold higher under the 16% O2 pulses relative to normal atmosphere (100 and 30 μg mannitol mg(-1) biomass, respectively). Confirming this result, expression of the mpd gene, coding for mannitol-1-P dehydrogenase (MPD), increased up to 1.4 times after O2 pulses. The expression of the bbrgs1 gene, encoding a regulatory G protein related to conidiation, was analysed to explain previously reported differences in conidial production. Surprisingly, expression of bbrgs1 decreased after atmospheric modification. Finally, principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that 83.39% of the variability in the data could be explained by two components. This analysis corroborated the positive correlation between mannitol concentration and mpd gene expression, as well as the negative correlation between conidial production and bbrgs1 gene expression. This study contributes to understanding of antioxidant and molecular response of B. bassiana induced under oxidant conditions. PMID:25813512

  3. Familial Dysalbuminemic Hyperthyroxinemia in a Japanese Man Caused by a Point Albumin Gene Mutation (R218P)

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Katsumi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Fukazawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia (FDH) is a familial autosomal dominant disease caused by mutation in the albumin gene that produces a condition of euthyroid hyperthyroxinemia. In patients with FDH, serum-free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations as measured by several commercial methods are often falsely increased with normal thyrotropin (TSH). Therefore, several diagnostic steps are needed to differentiate TSH-secreting tumor or generalized resistance to thyroid hormone from FDH. We herein report a case of a Japanese man born in Aomori prefecture, with FDH caused by a mutant albumin gene (R218P). We found that a large number of FDH patients reported in Japan to date might have been born in Aomori prefecture and have shown the R218P mutation. In conclusion, FDH needs to be considered among the differential diagnoses in Japanese patients born in Aomori prefecture and showing normal TSH levels and elevated FT4 levels. PMID:27081329

  4. Familial Dysalbuminemic Hyperthyroxinemia in a Japanese Man Caused by a Point Albumin Gene Mutation (R218P).

    PubMed

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Katsumi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Fukazawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia (FDH) is a familial autosomal dominant disease caused by mutation in the albumin gene that produces a condition of euthyroid hyperthyroxinemia. In patients with FDH, serum-free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations as measured by several commercial methods are often falsely increased with normal thyrotropin (TSH). Therefore, several diagnostic steps are needed to differentiate TSH-secreting tumor or generalized resistance to thyroid hormone from FDH. We herein report a case of a Japanese man born in Aomori prefecture, with FDH caused by a mutant albumin gene (R218P). We found that a large number of FDH patients reported in Japan to date might have been born in Aomori prefecture and have shown the R218P mutation. In conclusion, FDH needs to be considered among the differential diagnoses in Japanese patients born in Aomori prefecture and showing normal TSH levels and elevated FT4 levels. PMID:27081329

  5. An atypical Dent's disease phenotype caused by co-inheritance of mutations at CLCN5 and OCRL genes.

    PubMed

    Addis, Maria; Meloni, Cristiana; Tosetto, Enrica; Ceol, Monica; Cristofaro, Rosalba; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Vercelloni, Paolo; Del Prete, Dorella; Marra, Giuseppina; Anglani, Franca

    2013-06-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubulopathy caused by mutations mainly affecting the CLCN5 gene. Defects in the OCRL gene, which is usually mutated in patients with Lowe syndrome, have been shown to lead to a Dent-like phenotype called Dent disease 2. However, about 20% of patients with Dent's disease carry no CLCN5/OCRL mutations. The disease's genetic heterogeneity is accompanied by interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity. We report on a case of Dent's disease with a very unusual phenotype (dysmorphic features, ocular abnormalities, growth delay, rickets, mild mental retardation) in which a digenic inheritance was discovered. Two different, novel disease-causing mutations were detected, both inherited from the patient's healthy mother, that is a truncating mutation in the CLCN5 gene (A249fs*20) and a donor splice-site alteration in the OCRL gene (c.388+3A>G). The mRNA analysis of the patient's leukocytes revealed an aberrantly spliced OCRL mRNA caused by in-frame exon 6 skipping, leading to a shorter protein, but keeping intact the central inositol 5-phosphatase domain and the C-terminal side of the ASH-RhoGAP domain. Only wild-type mRNA was observed in the mother's leukocytes due to a completely skewed X inactivation. Our results are the first to reveal the effect of an epistatic second modifier in Dent's disease too, which can modulate its expressivity. We surmise that the severe Dent disease 2 phenotype of our patient might be due to an addictive interaction of the mutations at two different genes. PMID:23047739

  6. Changes of a continuous character caused by gene flow. A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznajd-Weron, Katarzyna; Pȩkalski, Andrzej

    We introduce a model of a large, sexual, population in which partners for reproduction are chosen randomly, without any bias. This large population is composed of two groups of local populations living in different environments and being in contact. We propose a dynamic equation describing, like the existing one for the allele frequency, the temporal changes of a continuous character due to gene flow, i.e. the transfer of the allels resulting from migration of individuals between the populations, and natural selection. We show that the gene flow can be described by the linear term in the proposed equation and the natural selection by the nonlinear term. Additional killing rule introduces a random factor into our model. We discuss the role of both factors (gene flow and selection) on the structure of the population, i.e. spatial distribution of the considered character and the resulting from it existence of hybrid zones. We use the standard Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. [Calpain-3 gene defect causing limb gird muscular dystrophy in a Hungarian family].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Rita; Walter, Maggie C; Lochmüller, Hanns; Hübner, Angela; Karcagi, Veronika; Pikó, Henriett; Timár, László; Komoly, Sámuel

    2005-01-20

    Limb gird muscular dystrophies (LGMD2) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary diseases with autosomal recessive trait, characterized by progressive atrophy and weakness predominantly in the proximal limb muscles. The authors present clinical, histological, immunohistochemical and immunoblot results of two sisters suffering from so far unclassified autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Haplotype analysis for genes possibly involved in autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies was performed in the genetically informative family. All of the results pointed to a molecular genetic defect of the calpain-3 (CAPN3) gene. Direct sequencing of the CAPN3 gene revealed compound heterozygous state for two mutations previously described in association with limb girdle muscular dystrophy, proving pathogenicity. The authors would like to emphasize the importance of the above described combined strategy in diagnosing limb girdle muscular dystrophies. PMID:15884399

  8. Body fat distribution in women with familial partial lipodystrophy caused by mutation in the lamin A/C gene

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Luciana Z.; Foss-Freitas, Maria C.; Júnior Montenegro, Renan M.; Foss, Milton C.

    2012-01-01

    Familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), Dunnigan variety, is an autosomal dominant disorder caused due to missense mutations in the lamin A/C (LMNA) gene encoding nuclear lamina proteins. Patients with FPLD are predisposed to metabolic complications of insulin resistance such as diabetes. We sought to evaluate and compare body fat distribution with dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry in women with and without FPLD and identify densitometric, clinical and metabolic features. PMID:22276265

  9. A novel mutation in ornithine transcarbamylase gene causing mild intermittent hyperammonemia

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Sarar; Hamad, Muddathir H.; Kondkar, Altaf A.; Abu-Amero, Khaled K.

    2015-01-01

    We report a 3-year-old Saudi boy with recurrent episodes of vomiting, poor feeding, and altered mental status accompanied by an intermittent mild hyperammonemia, and a large elevation of urinary orotic acid. Sanger sequencing of the ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) gene revealed a novel hemizygous deletion at the fourth nucleotide of intron 4 (c.386+4delT) in the proband and his asymptomatic mother. This novel mutation in the OTC gene is responsible for the late-onset phenotype of OTC deficiency. PMID:26446336

  10. Multiple evolutionary origins of the fungus causing Panama disease of banana: concordant evidence from nuclear and mitochondrial gene genealogies.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, K; Kistler, H C; Cigelnik, E; Ploetz, R C

    1998-03-01

    Panama disease of banana, caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense, is a serious constraint both to the commercial production of banana and cultivation for subsistence agriculture. Previous work has indicated that F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense consists of several clonal lineages that may be genetically distant. In this study we tested whether lineages of the Panama disease pathogen have a monophyletic origin by comparing DNA sequences of nuclear and mitochondrial genes. DNA sequences were obtained for translation elongation factor 1alpha and the mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA genes for F. oxysporum strains from banana, pathogenic strains from other hosts and putatively nonpathogenic isolates of F. oxysporum. Cladograms for the two genes were highly concordant and a partition-homogeneity test indicated the two datasets could be combined. The tree inferred from the combined dataset resolved five lineages corresponding to "F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense" with a large dichotomy between two taxa represented by strains most commonly isolated from bananas with Panama disease. The results also demonstrate that the latter two taxa have significantly different chromosome numbers. F. oxysporum isolates collected as nonpathogenic or pathogenic to other hosts that have very similar or identical elongation factor 1alpha and mitochondrial small subunit genotypes as banana pathogens were shown to cause little or no disease on banana. Taken together, these results indicate Panama disease of banana is caused by fungi with independent evolutionary origins. PMID:9482835

  11. High Frequency of Pulmonary Hypertension-Causing Gene Mutation in Chinese Patients with Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Qunying; Liu, Zhihong; Zhao, Zhihui; Luo, Qin; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is unknown. Histopathologic studies revealed that pulmonary vasculature lesions similar to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) existed in CTEPH patients as well. It’s well-known that genetic predisposition plays an important role in the mechanism of PAH. So we hypothesized that PAH-causing gene mutation might exist in some CTEPH patients and act as a background to facilitate the development of CTEPH. In this study, we analyzed 7 PAH-causing genes including BMPR2, ACVRL1, ENG, SMAD9, CAV1, KCNK3, and CBLN2 in 49 CTEPH patients and 17 patients recovered from pulmonary embolism (PE) but without pulmonary hypertension(PH). The results showed that the nonsynonymous mutation rate in CTEPH patients is significantly higher than that in PE without PH patients (25 out of 49 (51%) CTEPH patients vs. 3 out of 17 PE without PH patients (18%); p = 0.022). Four CTEPH patients had the same point mutation in ACVRL1 exon 10 (c.1450C>G), a mutation approved to be associated with PH in a previous study. In addition, we identified two CTEPH associated SNPs (rs3739817 and rs55805125). Our results suggest that PAH-causing gene mutation might play an important role in the development of CTEPH. PMID:26820968

  12. A mutation in the rice chalcone isomerase gene causes the golden hull and internode 1 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hong, Lilan; Qian, Qian; Tang, Ding; Wang, Kejian; Li, Ming; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2012-07-01

    The biosynthesis of flavonoids, important secondary plant metabolites, has been investigated extensively, but few mutants of genes in this pathway have been identified in rice (Oryza sativa). The rice gold hull and internode (gh) mutants exhibit a reddish-brown pigmentation in the hull and internode and their phenotype has long been used as a morphological marker trait for breeding and genetic study. Here, we characterized that the gh1 mutant was a mutant of the rice chalcone isomerase gene (OsCHI). The result showed that gh1 had a Dasheng retrotransposon inserted in the 5′ UTR of the OsCHI gene, which resulted in the complete loss of OsCHI expression. gh1 exhibited golden pigmentation in hulls and internodes once the panicles were exposed to light. The total flavonoid content in gh1 hulls was increased threefold compared to wild type. Consistent with the gh1 phenotype, OsCHI transcripts were expressed in most tissues of rice and most abundantly in internodes. It was also expressed at high levels in panicles before heading, distributed mainly in lemmas and paleae, but its expression decreased substantially after the panicles emerged from the sheath. OsCHI encodes a protein functionally and structurally conserved to chalcone isomerases in other species. Our findings demonstrated that the OsCHI gene was indispensable for flux of the flavonoid pathway in rice. PMID:22286805

  13. Childhood trauma as a cause of psychosis: linking genes, psychology, and biology.

    PubMed

    van Winkel, Ruud; van Nierop, Martine; Myin-Germeys, Inez; van Os, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have provided robust evidence for an association between childhood trauma (CT) and psychosis. Meta-analyses have quantified the association, pointing to odds ratios in the order of around 3, and prospective studies have shown that reverse causation is unlikely to explain the association. However, more work is needed to address the possibility of a gene-environment correlation, that is, whether genetic risk for psychosis predicts exposure to CT. Nevertheless, multiple studies have convincingly shown that the association between CT and psychosis remains strong and significant when controlling for genetic risk, in agreement with a possible causal association. In addition, several studies have shown plausible psychological and neurobiological mechanisms linking adverse experiences to psychosis, including induction of social defeat and reduced self-value, sensitization of the mesolimbic dopamine system, changes in the stress and immune system, and concomitant changes in stress-related brain structures, such as the hippocampus and the amygdala, findings that should be integrated, however, in more complex models of vulnerability. It is currently unclear whether genetic vulnerability plays a role in conferring the mental consequences of adversity, and which genes are likely to be involved. The current, limited evidence points to genes that are not specifically involved in psychosis but more generally in regulating mood (serotonin transporter gene), neuroplasticity (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), and the stress-response system (FKBP5), in line with a general effect of CT on a range of mental disorders, rather than suggesting specificity for psychosis. PMID:23327756

  14. A novel whole exon deletion in WWOX gene causes early epilepsy, intellectual disability and optic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ben-Salem, Salma; Al-Shamsi, Aisha M; John, Anne; Ali, Bassam R; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have implicated the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase encoding gene (WWOX) in a severe form of autosomal recessive neurological disorder. This condition showed an overlapping spectrum of clinical features including spinocerebellar ataxia associated with generalized seizures and delayed psychomotor development to growth retardation, spasticity, and microcephaly. We evaluated a child from a consanguineous Emirati family that presented at birth with growth retardation, microcephaly, epileptic seizures, and later developed spasticity and delayed psychomotor development. Screening for deletions and duplications using whole-chromosomal microarray analysis identified a novel homozygous microdeletion encompassing exon 5 of the WWOX gene. Analysis of parental DNA indicated that this deletion was inherited from both parents and lies within a large region of homozygosity. Sanger sequencing of the cDNA showed that the deletion resulted in exon 5 skipping leading to a frame-shift and creating a premature stop codon at amino acid position 212. Quantification of mRNA revealed striking low level of WWOX expression in the child and moderate level of expression in the mother compared to a healthy control. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first homozygous germline structural variation in WWOX gene resulting in truncated transcripts that were presumably subject to NMD pathway. Our findings extend the clinical and genetic spectrum of WWOX mutations and support a crucial role of this gene in neurological development. PMID:25403906

  15. Generation and analysis of knock-in mice carrying pseudohypoaldosteronism type II-causing mutations in the cullin 3 gene.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yuya; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sohara, Eisei; Mori, Takayasu; Inoue, Yuichi; Isobe, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Eriko; Ohta, Akihito; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is a hereditary hypertensive disease caused by mutations in four different genes: with-no-lysine kinases (WNK) 1 and 4, Kelch-like family member 3 (KLHL3), and cullin 3 (Cul3). Cul3 and KLHL3 form an E3 ligase complex that ubiquitinates and reduces the expression level of WNK4. PHAII-causing mutations in WNK4 and KLHL3 impair WNK4 ubiquitination. However, the molecular pathogenesis of PHAII caused by Cul3 mutations is unclear. In cultured cells and human leukocytes, PHAII-causing Cul3 mutations result in the skipping of exon 9, producing mutant Cul3 protein lacking 57 amino acids. However, whether this phenomenon occurs in the kidneys and is responsible for the pathogenesis of PHAII in vivo is unknown. We generated knock-in mice carrying a mutation in the C-terminus of intron 8 of Cul3, c.1207-1G>A, which corresponds to a PHAII-causing mutation in the human Cul3 gene. Heterozygous Cul3(G(-1)A/+) knock-in mice did not exhibit PHAII phenotypes, and the skipping of exon 9 was not evident in their kidneys. However, the level of Cul3 mRNA expression in the kidneys of heterozygous knock-in mice was approximately half that of wild-type mice. Furthermore, homozygous knock-in mice were nonviable. It suggested that the mutant allele behaved like a knockout allele and did not produce Cul3 mRNA lacking exon 9. A reduction in Cul3 expression alone was not sufficient to develop PHAII in the knock-in mice. Our findings highlighted the pathogenic role of mutant Cul3 protein and provided insight to explain why PHAII-causing mutations in Cul3 cause kidney-predominant PHAII phenotypes. PMID:26490675

  16. Two different forms of lethal chondrodysplasias caused by COL2A1 gene mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Winterpacht, A.; Hilbert, K.; Schwarze, U.

    1994-09-01

    Two bone dysplasia families seem to be due to mutations in the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1): the so-called spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC) group with achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, SEDC, osteoarthrosis and the Stickler-Kniest pattern that include different forms of Kniest and Stickler dysplasia. Both groups comprise a clinical spectrum ranging from lethal to mild. COL2A1-mutations have been identified in lethal forms of the SEDC family but not in lethal forms of the Stickler/Kniest group. We now report a COL2A-1 mutation in an additional case of hypochondrogenesis (patient S) and in a lethal case of Kniest dysplasia (patient B). We amplified all 54 exons of the COL2A1 gene in both patients and screened the PCR products for mutations by SSCP analysis and sequencing. In patient B, we identified an 18 bp deletion in exon 34 which removes 6 amino acids from the mature protein. In patient S, we were able to identify a two base pair exchange (GG to AT) in exon 31, which leads to the very unusual conversion of Gly to Ile. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a Gly to Ile conversion in the COL2A1 gene, and the first report of a COL2A1 gene mutation in a lethal form of Kniest dysplasia. On the basis of the known COL2A1 gene mutations and the genotype-phenotype correlations established so far, we provide molecular data (an in frame deletion in patient B and a Gly conversion in patient S) that support their clinical classification as Kniest dysplasia and hypochondrogenesis, respectively.

  17. The FoxO3 gene and cause-specific mortality.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Bradley J; Tranah, Gregory J; Chen, Randi; Morris, Brian J; Masaki, Kamal H; He, Qimei; Willcox, D Craig; Allsopp, Richard C; Moisyadi, Stefan; Poon, Leonard W; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Newman, Anne B; Harris, Tamara B; Cummings, Steven R; Liu, Yongmei; Parimi, Neeta; Evans, Daniel S; Davy, Phil; Gerschenson, Mariana; Donlon, Timothy A

    2016-08-01

    The G allele of the FOXO3 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2802292 exhibits a consistently replicated genetic association with longevity in multiple populations worldwide. The aims of this study were to quantify the mortality risk for the longevity-associated genotype and to discover the particular cause(s) of death associated with this allele in older Americans of diverse ancestry. It involved a 17-year prospective cohort study of 3584 older American men of Japanese ancestry from the Honolulu Heart Program cohort, followed by a 17-year prospective replication study of 1595 white and 1056 black elderly individuals from the Health Aging and Body Composition cohort. The relation between FOXO3 genotype and cause-specific mortality was ascertained for major causes of death including coronary heart disease (CHD), cancer, and stroke. Age-adjusted and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and cause-specific mortality. We found G allele carriers had a combined (Japanese, white, and black populations) risk reduction of 10% for total (all-cause) mortality (HR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.84-0.95; P = 0.001). This effect size was consistent across populations and mostly contributed by 26% lower risk for CHD death (HR = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64-0.86; P = 0.00004). No other causes of death made a significant contribution to the survival advantage for G allele carriers. In conclusion, at older age, there is a large risk reduction in mortality for G allele carriers, mostly due to lower CHD mortality. The findings support further research on FOXO3 and FoxO3 protein as potential targets for therapeutic intervention in aging-related diseases, particularly cardiovascular disease. PMID:27071935

  18. A stop-gain in the laminin, alpha 3 gene causes recessive junctional epidermolysis bullosa in Belgian Blue cattle.

    PubMed

    Sartelet, Arnaud; Harland, Chad; Tamma, Nico; Karim, Latifa; Bayrou, Calixte; Li, Wanbo; Ahariz, Naima; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Charlier, Carole

    2015-10-01

    Four newborn purebred Belgian Blue calves presenting a severe form of epidermolysis bullosa were recently referred to our heredo-surveillance platform. SNP array genotyping followed by autozygosity mapping located the causative gene in a 8.3-Mb interval on bovine chromosome 24. Combining information from (i) whole-genome sequencing of an affected calf, (ii) transcriptomic data from a panel of tissues and (iii) a list of functionally ranked positional candidates pinpointed a private G to A nucleotide substitution in the LAMA3 gene that creates a premature stop codon (p.Arg2609*) in exon 60, truncating 22% of the corresponding protein. The LAMA3 gene encodes the alpha 3 subunit of the heterotrimeric laminin-332, a key constituent of the lamina lucida that is part of the skin basement membrane connecting epidermis and dermis layers. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in this gene are known to cause severe junctional epidermolysis bullosa in human, mice, horse, sheep and dog. Overall, our data strongly support the causality of the identified gene and mutation. PMID:26370913

  19. Screening and analysis of genes expressed upon infection of broad bean with Clover yellow vein virus causing lethal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Kenji S; Kitazawa, Hiroaki; Atsumi, Go; Choi, Sun Hee; Suzuki, Yuji; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) causes lethal systemic necrosis in legumes, including broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum). To identify host genes involved in necrotic symptom expression after ClYVV infection, we screened cDNA fragments in which expression was changed in advance of necrotic symptom expression in broad bean (V. faba cv. Wase) using the differential display technique and secondarily with Northern blot analysis. Expression changes were confirmed in 20 genes, and the six that exhibited the most change were analyzed further. These six genes included a gene that encodes a putative nitrate-induced NOI protein (VfNOI), and another was homologous to an Arabidopsis gene that encodes a glycine- and proline-rich protein GPRP (VfGPRP). We recently reported that necrotic symptom development in ClYVV-infected pea is associated with expression of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins and requires SA-dependent host responses. Interestingly, VfNOI and VfGPRP expression was correlated with that of the putative SA-dependent PR proteins in ClYVV-infected broad bean. However, broad bean infected with a recombinant ClYVV expressing the VfGPRP protein showed weaker symptoms and less viral multiplication than that infected with ClYVV expressing the GFP protein. These results imply that VfGPRP plays a role in defense against ClYVV rather than in necrotic symptom expression. PMID:21767375

  20. A newly described mutation of the CLCN7 gene causes neuropathic autosomal recessive osteopetrosis in an Arab family.

    PubMed

    Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Dabbagh, Amal A; Edrees, Alaa Y

    2012-01-01

    Neurologic manifestations in osteopetrosis are usually secondary to sclerosis of the skull bones. However, a rare neuropathic subtype of osteopetrosis exists that resembles neurodegenerative storage disorders. Unlike other forms of osteopetrosis, this latter form does not respond to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Preliminary studies suggest that this neuropathic form is more likely to be caused by mutations in the CLCN7 gene in an autosomal recessive manner. This study provides further evidence for this phenotype-genotype correlation by presenting a previously unreported mutation in the CLCN7 gene in a Yemeni family with the neuropathic form. This is also the first study of any mutation in patients with osteopetrosis of Arabic ethnicity. As literature review suggests that this type may be more common in Arabs, cascade genetic screening of early onset of autosomal recessive-osteopetrosis in patients of Arabic ancestry may preferably start with the CLCN7 gene rather than the TCIRG gene as is routinely done in clinical laboratories. Identifying a mutation in the CLCN7 gene in a patient with early onset of autosomal recessive-osteopetrosis may also guide therapeutic decisions including the option of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:21946807

  1. A novel mutation in the RPE65 gene causing Leber congenital amaurosis and its transcriptional expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mo, Guoyan; Ding, Qin; Chen, Zhongshan; Li, Yunbo; Yan, Ming; Bu, Lijing; Song, Yanping; Yin, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65 kDa protein is an isomerase encoded by the RPE65 gene (MIM 180069) that is responsible for an essential enzymatic step required for the function of the visual cycle. Mutations in the RPE65 gene cause not only subtype II of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) but also early-onset severe retinal dystrophy (EOSRD). This study aims to investigate a Chinese case diagnosed as EOSRD and to characterize the polymorphisms of the RPE65 gene. A seven-year-old girl with clinical symptoms of EOSRD and her parents were recruited into this study. Ophthalmologic examinations, including best-corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp, Optical coherence tomography (OCT), and fundus examination with dilated pupils, were performed to determine the clinical characteristics of the whole family. We amplified and sequenced the entire coding region and adjacent intronic sequences of the coding regions of the RPE65 gene for the whole family to explore the possible mutation. Our results demonstrate that the patient exhibited the typical clinically features of EOSRD. Her bilateral decimal visual acuity was 0.3 and 0.4 in the left and right eyes, respectively. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to assess the retinal stratification for the whole family. All together, we identified four mutations within the RPE65 gene (c.1056G>A, c.1243+2T>A, c.1338+20A>C and c.1590C>A) in the patient. Among the four mutations, c.1056G>A and c.1338+20A>C had been reported previously and another two were found for the first time in this study. Her mother also carried the novel mutation (c.1243+2T>A). Either a single or a compound heterozygous or a homozygous one mutation is expected to cause EOSRD because mutations of RPE65 gene usually cause an autosomal recessive disease. Therefore, we speculate that the c.1590C>A mutation together with the c.1243+2T>A mutation may cause the patient's phenotype. PMID:25383945

  2. A Novel Mutation in the RPE65 Gene Causing Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Its Transcriptional Expression In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Guoyan; Ding, Qin; Chen, Zhongshan; Li, Yunbo; Yan, Ming; Bu, Lijing; Song, Yanping; Yin, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65 kDa protein is an isomerase encoded by the RPE65 gene (MIM 180069) that is responsible for an essential enzymatic step required for the function of the visual cycle. Mutations in the RPE65 gene cause not only subtype II of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) but also early-onset severe retinal dystrophy (EOSRD). This study aims to investigate a Chinese case diagnosed as EOSRD and to characterize the polymorphisms of the RPE65 gene. A seven-year-old girl with clinical symptoms of EOSRD and her parents were recruited into this study. Ophthalmologic examinations, including best-corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp, Optical coherence tomography (OCT), and fundus examination with dilated pupils, were performed to determine the clinical characteristics of the whole family. We amplified and sequenced the entire coding region and adjacent intronic sequences of the coding regions of the RPE65 gene for the whole family to explore the possible mutation. Our results demonstrate that the patient exhibited the typical clinically features of EOSRD. Her bilateral decimal visual acuity was 0.3 and 0.4 in the left and right eyes, respectively. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to assess the retinal stratification for the whole family. All together, we identified four mutations within the RPE65 gene (c.1056G>A, c.1243+2T>A, c.1338+20A>C and c.1590C>A) in the patient. Among the four mutations, c.1056G>A and c.1338+20A>C had been reported previously and another two were found for the first time in this study. Her mother also carried the novel mutation (c.1243+2T>A). Either a single or a compound heterozygous or a homozygous one mutation is expected to cause EOSRD because mutations of RPE65 gene usually cause an autosomal recessive disease. Therefore, we speculate that the c.1590C>A mutation together with the c.1243+2T>A mutation may cause the patient’s phenotype. PMID:25383945

  3. Common Variants at Putative Regulatory Sites of the Tissue Nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Influence Circulating Pyridoxal 5′-Phosphate Concentration in Healthy Adults123

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Tonia C; Pangilinan, Faith; Molloy, Anne M; Fan, Ruzong; Wang, Yifan; Shane, Barry; Gibney, Eileen R; Midttun, Øivind; Ueland, Per M; Cropp, Cheryl D; Kim, Yoonhee; Wilson, Alexander F; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Brody, Lawrence C; Mills, James L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitamin B-6 interconversion enzymes are important for supplying pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP), the co-enzyme form, to tissues. Variants in the genes for these enzymes [tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (ALPL), pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate oxidase, pyridoxal kinase, and pyridoxal phosphatase] could affect enzyme function and vitamin B-6 status. Objectives: We tested whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes influence vitamin B-6 status markers [plasma PLP, pyridoxal (PL), and 4-pyridoxic acid (PA)], and explored potential functional effects of the SNPs. Methods: Study subjects were young, healthy adults from Ireland (n = 2345). We measured plasma PLP, PL, and PA with liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry and genotyped 66 tag SNPs in the 4 genes. We tested for associations with single SNPs in candidate genes and also performed genome-wide association study (GWAS) and gene-based analyses. Results: Seventeen SNPs in ALPL were associated with altered plasma PLP in candidate gene analyses (P < 1.89 × 10−4). In the GWAS, 5 additional ALPL SNPs were associated with altered plasma PLP (P < 5.0 × 10−8). Gene-based analyses that used the functional linear model β-spline (P = 4.04 × 10−15) and Fourier spline (P = 5.87 × 10−15) methods also showed associations between ALPL and altered plasma PLP. No SNPs in other genes were associated with plasma PLP. The association of the minor CC genotype of 1 ALPL SNP, rs1256341, with reduced ALPL expression in the HapMap Northern European ancestry population is consistent with the positive association between the CC genotype and plasma PLP in our study (P = 0.008). No SNP was associated with altered plasma PL or PA. Conclusions: In healthy adults, common variants in ALPL influence plasma PLP concentration, the most frequently used biomarker for vitamin B-6 status. Whether these associations are indicative of functional changes in vitamin B-6 status requires more investigation

  4. Permanent Neonatal Diabetes Caused by Creation of an Ectopic Splice Site within the INS Gene

    PubMed Central

    Gastaldo, Elena; Harries, Lorna W.; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Castaño, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic etiology in a patient who presented with permanent neonatal diabetes at 2 months of age. Methodology/Principal Findings Regulatory elements and coding exons 2 and 3 of the INS gene were amplified and sequenced from genomic and complementary DNA samples. A novel heterozygous INS mutation within the terminal intron of the gene was identified in the proband and her affected father. This mutation introduces an ectopic splice site leading to the insertion of 29 nucleotides from the intronic sequence into the mature mRNA, which results in a longer and abnormal transcript. Conclusions/Significance This study highlights the importance of routinely sequencing the exon-intron boundaries and the need to carry out additional studies to confirm the pathogenicity of any identified intronic genetic variants. PMID:22235272

  5. Frameshift Sequence Variants in the Human Lipase-H Gene Causing Hypotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Sabba; Shah, Sayed Hajan; Jan, Abid; Younus, Muhammad; Ahmad, Farooq; Ayub, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Hypotrichosis is a condition of abnormal hair pattern characterized by sparse to absent hair on different parts of the body, including the scalp. The condition is often characterized by tightly curled woolly hairs, discoloration of hair, and development of multiple keratin filled cysts or papules on the body. Sequence analysis of the lipase H (LIPH) gene, mapped on chromosome 3q27.3, led to the identification of a novel frameshift deletion variant (c.932delC, p.Pro311Leufs*3) in one family and previously reported 2-bp deletion (c.659_660delTA) in five other families, inherited hypotrichosis, and woolly hair in an autosomal recessive pattern. The study further extends the body of evidence that sequence variants in the LIPH gene result in hypotrichosis and woolly hair phenotype. PMID:26645693

  6. FBN1: The disease-causing gene for Marfan syndrome and other genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Lynn Y; Keene, Douglas R; Renard, Marjolijn; De Backer, Julie

    2016-10-10

    FBN1 encodes the gene for fibrillin-1, a structural macromolecule that polymerizes into microfibrils. Fibrillin microfibrils are morphologically distinctive fibrils, present in all connective tissues and assembled into tissue-specific architectural frameworks. FBN1 is the causative gene for Marfan syndrome, an inherited disorder of connective tissue whose major features include tall stature and arachnodactyly, ectopia lentis, and thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. More than one thousand individual mutations in FBN1 are associated with Marfan syndrome, making genotype-phenotype correlations difficult. Moreover, mutations in specific regions of FBN1 can result in the opposite features of short stature and brachydactyly characteristic of Weill-Marchesani syndrome and other acromelic dysplasias. How can mutations in one molecule result in disparate clinical syndromes? Current concepts of the fibrillinopathies require an appreciation of tissue-specific fibrillin microfibril microenvironments and the collaborative relationship between the structures of fibrillin microfibril networks and biological functions such as regulation of growth factor signaling. PMID:27437668

  7. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with recessive trait caused by mutation in KLC4 gene.

    PubMed

    Bayrakli, Fatih; Poyrazoglu, Hatice Gamze; Yuksel, Sirin; Yakicier, Cengiz; Erguner, Bekir; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil; Yuceturk, Betul; Ozer, Bugra; Doganay, Selim; Tanrikulu, Bahattin; Seker, Askin; Akbulut, Fatih; Ozen, Ali; Per, Huseyin; Kumandas, Sefer; Altuner Torun, Yasemin; Bayri, Yasar; Sakar, Mustafa; Dagcinar, Adnan; Ziyal, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    We report an association between a new causative gene and spastic paraplegia, which is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. Clinical phenotyping of one consanguineous family followed by combined homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing analysis. Three patients from the same family shared common features of progressive complicated spastic paraplegia. They shared a single homozygous stretch area on chromosome 6. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation (c.853_871del19) in the gene coding the kinesin light chain 4 protein (KLC4). Meanwhile, the unaffected parents and two siblings were heterozygous and one sibling was homozygous wild type. The 19 bp deletion in exon 6 generates a stop codon and thus a truncated messenger RNA and protein. The association of a KLC4 mutation with spastic paraplegia identifies a new locus for the disease. PMID:26423925

  8. Mutation of the Erwinia amylovora argD gene causes arginine auxotrophy, nonpathogenicity in apples, and reduced virulence in pears.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laura S; Lehman, Brian L; Peter, Kari A; McNellis, Timothy W

    2014-11-01

    Fire blight is caused by Erwinia amylovora and is the most destructive bacterial disease of apples and pears worldwide. In this study, we found that E. amylovora argD(1000)::Tn5, an argD Tn5 transposon mutant that has the Tn5 transposon inserted after nucleotide 999 in the argD gene-coding region, was an arginine auxotroph that did not cause fire blight in apple and had reduced virulence in immature pear fruits. The E. amylovora argD gene encodes a predicted N-acetylornithine aminotransferase enzyme, which is involved in the production of the amino acid arginine. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type argD gene complemented both the nonpathogenic and the arginine auxotrophic phenotypes of the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant. However, even when mixed with virulent E. amylovora cells and inoculated onto immature apple fruit, the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant still failed to grow, while the virulent strain grew and caused disease. Furthermore, the pCR2.1-argD complementation plasmid was stably maintained in the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant growing in host tissues without any antibiotic selection. Therefore, the pCR2.1-argD complementation plasmid could be useful for the expression of genes, markers, and reporters in E. amylovora growing in planta, without concern about losing the plasmid over time. The ArgD protein cannot be considered an E. amylovora virulence factor because the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant was auxotrophic and had a primary metabolism defect. Nevertheless, these results are informative about the parasitic nature of the fire blight disease interaction, since they indicate that E. amylovora cannot obtain sufficient arginine from apple and pear fruit tissues or from apple vegetative tissues, either at the beginning of the infection process or after the infection has progressed to an advanced state. PMID:25172854

  9. Combination of Thrombophilic Gene Polymorphisms as a Cause of Increased the Risk of Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Torabi, Raheleh; Zarei, Saeed; Zeraati, Hojjat; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Hadavi, Reza; Shiraz, Elham Savadi; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Background Recurrent pregnancy loss is (RPL) a heterogeneous condition. While the role of acquired thrombophilia has been accepted as an etiology for RPL, the contribution of specific inherited thrombophilic gene polymorphisms to the disorder has been remained controversial. Methods One hundred women with a history of two or more consecutive abortions and 100 women with at least two live births and no miscarriages were included in the study and evaluated for the presence of 11 thrombophilic gene polymorphisms (Factor V LEIDEN, Factor V 4070 A/G, Factor V 5279 A/G, Factor XIII 103 G/T, Factor XIII 614 A/T, Factor XIII 1694 C/T, PAI-1 -675 4G/5G, ITGB3 1565 T/C, β-Fibrinogen -455G/A, MTHFR 677 C/T, MTHFR 1298 A/C) using PCR-RFLP technique. The data were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney test and logistic regression model. Results There was no relation between factor XIII 103G/T gene polymorphism with increased risk of RPL. However, the other 10 gene polymorphisms were found to be associated with increased/decreased risk of RPL. Multiple logistic regression model for analyzing the simultaneous effects of these polymorphisms on the risk of RPL showed that six of these 11 polymorphisms (Factor V 1691G/A, Factor V 5279A/G, Factor XIII 614A/T, β-Fibrinogen -455G/A, ITGB3 1565T/C, and MTHFR 1298A/ C) were associated with RPL. Conclusion It is possible to calculate the risk of abortion in a patient with RPL by determining only six of the 10 polymorphisms that are individually associated with RPL. PMID:23926530

  10. Haploinsufficiency of BMP4 gene may be the underlying cause of Frías syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, María Luisa; Bermejo-Sánchez, Eva; Fernández, Belén; MacDonald, Alexandra; Fernández-Toral, Joaquín; Martínez-Frías, María Luisa

    2014-02-01

    In 2005, we reported on a family as having Frías syndrome (OMIM: 609640), with four affected members displaying a pattern of congenital defects nearly identical to those observed in a mother and son described by Frias [Frías et al. (1975). Birth Defects Orig Artic Ser 11:30-33]. These defects included growth deficiency, facial anomalies, and hand and foot alterations. We had the opportunity to study this family again due to the birth of another affected girl, who presented with similar facial characteristics to those of her elder half-sister and the rest of affected relatives, which consisted of mild exophthalmia, bilateral palpebral ptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures, and hypertelorism. We performed array-CGH, which identified an identical interstitial deletion of chromosome 14q22.1-q22.3 in the mother and two daughters. The deletion is 4.06 Mb in length and includes the BMP4 gene, a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family of secreted proteins. A review of the literature showed that deletions or mutations of this gene underlie congenital defects affecting brain, eye, teeth, and digit development. Although the clinical manifestations of the current family correlate with the defects observed in patients having either 14q22-q23 deletions or mutations of BMP4, they show a milder phenotype. In order to understand the clinical variability, we evaluated the already known functional characteristics of the BMP gene members. This gene family plays an important role during early embryogenesis, and the complex synergistic functions and redundancies of the BMPs led us to conclude that haploinsufficiency of BMP4 is likely to be responsible for the clinical expression of Frías syndrome. PMID:24311462

  11. Mullerian Duct Cyst Causing Bladder Outlet Obstruction in a Patient with HNF-1β Gene Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Honore, Matthew; Fowler, Ross; Kiosoglous, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male was referred to a tertiary hospital for a possible prostatic abscess. The patient went into acute urinary retention. Transurethral drainage was performed. MRI pelvis three days post-operatively identified the prostatic cystic structure as a müllerian duct cyst. Several other phenotypical features were noted on examination as well as findings on investigations. From these diagnosis of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF-1β) gene deletion was made. PMID:27390584

  12. First missense mutation in the SOST gene causing sclerosteosis by loss of sclerostin function.

    PubMed

    Piters, Elke; Culha, Cavit; Moester, Martiene; Van Bezooijen, Rutger; Adriaensen, Dirk; Mueller, Thomas; Weidauer, Stella; Jennes, Karen; de Freitas, Fenna; Löwik, Clemens; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Van Hul, Wim; Papapoulos, Socrates

    2010-07-01

    Sclerosteosis is a rare bone dysplasia characterized by greatly increased bone mass, especially of the long bones and the skull. Patients are tall, show facial asymmetry and often have syndactyly. Clinical complications are due to entrapment of cranial nerves. The disease is thought to be due to loss-of-function mutations in the SOST gene. The SOST gene product, sclerostin, is secreted by osteocytes and transported to the bone surface where it inhibits osteoblastic bone formation by antagonizing Wnt signaling. In a small Turkish family with sclerosteosis, we identified a missense mutation (c.499T>C; p.Cys167Arg) in exon 2 of the SOST gene. This type of mutation has not been previously reported and using different functional approaches, we show that it has a devastating effect on the biological function of sclerostin. The affected cysteine is the last cysteine residue of the cystine-knot motif and loss of this residue leads to retention of the mutant protein in the ER, possibly as a consequence of impaired folding. Together with a significant reduced ability to bind to LRP5 and inhibit Wnt signaling, the p.Cys167Arg mutation leads to a complete loss of function of sclerostin and thus to the characteristic sclerosteosis phenotype. PMID:20583295

  13. A case report: Autosomal recessive microcephaly caused by a novel mutation in MCPH1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Fardaei, Majid; Gholami, Milad; Miryounesi, Mohammad

    2015-10-15

    Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH-MIM 251200) is distinguished by congenital decrease in occipito-frontal head circumference (OFC) of at least 2 standard deviations (SD) below population average in addition to non-progressive mental retardation, without any prominent neurological disorder. Mutations in MCPH1, which encodes the protein microcephalin have been detected in this disorder. Here we report a consanguineous Iranian family with 2 children affected with microcephaly. Despite the severe mental retardation observed in the male patient, the female patient had normal intelligent with no delay in motor milestones or speech. A novel splice-acceptor site homozygous mutation has been detected in intron 4 of MCPH1 gene (c.322-2A>T) which results in an RNA processing defect with a 15-nucleotide deletion in exon 5 of the mRNA transcript (r.322_336del15, p.R108_Q112del5). This novel mutation has resulted in different phenotypes in affected male and female patients of this family. The sex-specific variations in gene regulation during brain development may partially explain such difference in phenotypes probably in addition to other mechanisms such as modifier genes. PMID:26192461

  14. Mfsd14a (Hiat1) gene disruption causes globozoospermia and infertility in male mice.

    PubMed

    Doran, Joanne; Walters, Cara; Kyle, Victoria; Wooding, Peter; Hammett-Burke, Rebecca; Colledge, William Henry

    2016-07-01

    The Mfsd14a gene, previously called Hiat1, encodes a transmembrane protein of unknown function with homology to the solute carrier protein family. To study the function of the MFSD14A protein, mutant mice (Mus musculus, strain 129S6Sv/Ev) were generated with the Mfsd14a gene disrupted with a LacZ reporter gene. Homozygous mutant mice are viable and healthy, but males are sterile due to a 100-fold reduction in the number of spermatozoa in the vas deferens. Male mice have adequate levels of testosterone and show normal copulatory behaviour. The few spermatozoa that are formed show rounded head defects similar to those found in humans with globozoospermia. Spermatogenesis proceeds normally up to the round spermatid stage, but the subsequent structural changes associated with spermiogenesis are severely disrupted with failure of acrosome formation, sperm head condensation and mitochondrial localization to the mid-piece of the sperm. Staining for β-galactosidase activity as a surrogate for Mfsd14a expression indicates expression in Sertoli cells, suggesting that MFSD14A may transport a solute from the bloodstream that is required for spermiogenesis. PMID:27107036

  15. Gain of Virulence Caused by Loss of a Gene in Murine Cytomegalovirus‡

    PubMed Central

    Bubić, Ivan; Wagner, Markus; Krmpotić, Astrid; Saulig, Tanja; Kim, Sungjin; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Jonjić, Stipan; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    2004-01-01

    Mouse strains are either resistant or susceptible to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Resistance is determined by the Cmv1r (Ly49h) gene, which encodes the Ly49H NK cell activation receptor. The protein encoded by the m157 gene of MCMV has been defined as a ligand for Ly49H. To find out whether the m157 protein is the only Ly49H ligand encoded by MCMV, we constructed the m157 deletion mutant and a revertant virus. Viruses were tested for susceptibility to NK cell control in Ly49H+ and Ly49H− mouse strains. Deletion of the m157 gene abolished the viral activation of Ly49H+ NK cells, resulting in higher virus virulence in vivo. Thus, in the absence of m157, Ly49H+ mice react like susceptible strains. 129/SvJ mice lack the Ly49H activation NK cell receptor but express the inhibitory Ly49I NK cell receptor that binds to the m157 protein. The Δm157 inhibitory phenotype was weak because MCMV encodes a number of proteins that mediate NK inhibition, whose contribution could be shown by another mutant. PMID:15220428

  16. Integrative subcellular proteomic analysis allows accurate prediction of human disease-causing genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Yiyun; Bajaj, Amol Onkar; Eblimit, Aiden; Xu, Mingchu; Soens, Zachry T; Wang, Feng; Ge, Zhongqi; Jung, Sung Yun; He, Feng; Li, Yumei; Wensel, Theodore G; Qin, Jun; Chen, Rui

    2016-05-01

    Proteomic profiling on subcellular fractions provides invaluable information regarding both protein abundance and subcellular localization. When integrated with other data sets, it can greatly enhance our ability to predict gene function genome-wide. In this study, we performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis on the light-sensing compartment of photoreceptors called the outer segment (OS). By comparing with the protein profile obtained from the retina tissue depleted of OS, an enrichment score for each protein is calculated to quantify protein subcellular localization, and 84% accuracy is achieved compared with experimental data. By integrating the protein OS enrichment score, the protein abundance, and the retina transcriptome, the probability of a gene playing an essential function in photoreceptor cells is derived with high specificity and sensitivity. As a result, a list of genes that will likely result in human retinal disease when mutated was identified and validated by previous literature and/or animal model studies. Therefore, this new methodology demonstrates the synergy of combining subcellular fractionation proteomics with other omics data sets and is generally applicable to other tissues and diseases. PMID:26912414

  17. Deletion of Indian hedgehog gene causes dominant semi-lethal Creeper trait in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sihua; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Yanyun; Yi, Guoqiang; Li, Junying; Lian, Ling; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Jiao, Rengang; Gong, Yu; Hou, Zhuocheng; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The Creeper trait, a classical monogenic phenotype of chicken, is controlled by a dominant semi-lethal gene. This trait has been widely cited in the genetics and molecular biology textbooks for illustrating autosomal dominant semi-lethal inheritance over decades. However, the genetic basis of the Creeper trait remains unknown. Here we have utilized ultra-deep sequencing and extensive analysis for targeting causative mutation controlling the Creeper trait. Our results indicated that the deletion of Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene was only found in the whole-genome sequencing data of lethal embryos and Creeper chickens. Large scale segregation analysis demonstrated that the deletion of IHH was fully linked with early embryonic death and the Creeper trait. Expression analysis showed a much lower expression of IHH in Creeper than wild-type chickens. We therefore suggest the deletion of IHH to be the causative mutation for the Creeper trait in chicken. Our findings unravel the genetic basis of the longstanding Creeper phenotype mystery in chicken as the same gene also underlies bone dysplasia in human and mouse, and thus highlight the significance of IHH in animal development and human haploinsufficiency disorders. PMID:27439785

  18. Mutations in DDR2 gene cause SMED with short limbs and abnormal calcifications.

    PubMed

    Bargal, Ruth; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Le Merrer, Martine; Sosna, Jacob; Melki, Judith; Zangen, David H; Smithson, Sarah F; Borochowitz, Zvi; Belostotsky, Ruth; Raas-Rothschild, Annick

    2009-01-01

    The spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia [SMED] short limb-hand type [SMED-SL] is a rare autosomal-recessive disease, first reported by Borochowitz et al. in 1993.(1) Since then, 14 affected patients have been reported.(2-5) We diagnosed 6 patients from 5 different consanguineous Arab Muslim families from the Jerusalem area with SMED-SL. Additionally, we studied two patients from Algerian and Pakistani ancestry and the parents of the first Jewish patients reported.(1) Using a homozygosity mapping strategy, we located a candidate region on chromosome 1q23 spanning 2.4 Mb. The position of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene within the candidate region and the similarity of the ddr2 knockout mouse to the SMED patients' phenotype prompted us to study this gene(6). We identified three missense mutations c.2254 C > T [R752C], c. 2177 T > G [I726R], c.2138C > T [T713I] and one splice site mutation [IVS17+1g > a] in the conserved sequence encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the DDR2 gene. The results of this study will permit an accurate early prenatal diagnosis and carrier screening for families at risk. PMID:19110212

  19. Deletion of Indian hedgehog gene causes dominant semi-lethal Creeper trait in chicken.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sihua; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Yanyun; Yi, Guoqiang; Li, Junying; Lian, Ling; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Jiao, Rengang; Gong, Yu; Hou, Zhuocheng; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The Creeper trait, a classical monogenic phenotype of chicken, is controlled by a dominant semi-lethal gene. This trait has been widely cited in the genetics and molecular biology textbooks for illustrating autosomal dominant semi-lethal inheritance over decades. However, the genetic basis of the Creeper trait remains unknown. Here we have utilized ultra-deep sequencing and extensive analysis for targeting causative mutation controlling the Creeper trait. Our results indicated that the deletion of Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene was only found in the whole-genome sequencing data of lethal embryos and Creeper chickens. Large scale segregation analysis demonstrated that the deletion of IHH was fully linked with early embryonic death and the Creeper trait. Expression analysis showed a much lower expression of IHH in Creeper than wild-type chickens. We therefore suggest the deletion of IHH to be the causative mutation for the Creeper trait in chicken. Our findings unravel the genetic basis of the longstanding Creeper phenotype mystery in chicken as the same gene also underlies bone dysplasia in human and mouse, and thus highlight the significance of IHH in animal development and human haploinsufficiency disorders. PMID:27439785

  20. Thyroid peroxidase gene mutations causing congenital hypothyroidism in three Turkish families.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Mehmet Nuri; Uslu, Abdi Burak; Onenli-Mungan, Neslihan; Yuksel, Bilgin; Pohlenz, Joachim; Topaloglu, Ali Kemal

    2009-11-01

    In Turkey congenital hypothyroidism (CH) occurs with a prevalence of one in 2,736 newborns while the worldwide incidence is one in 3,000-4,000 newborns. 85-90% of these cases are due to dysgenesis of the thyroid gland, whereas defects in thyroid hormone synthesis account for 10-15%. The majority of patients with dyshormonogenesis have a defect in thyroid peroxidase (TPO). To date, more than 60 different mutations have been described in the TPO gene, mostly single nucleotide substitutions. Five children from three consanguineous families were diagnosed with CH on the basis of clinical symptoms and signs--goiter, macroglossia and prolonged jaundice at newborn age. Two different mutations in the TPO gene were identified. Affected children in families I and II had a nonsense mutation in exon 10 (R540X). Genotyping of polymorphic markers within the TPO gene revealed that these families shared a common haplotype, suggesting a founder effect. In the third family, a novel mutation (G319R) in exon 8 was identified. PMID:20101889

  1. Nuclear gene mutations as the cause of mitochondrial complex III deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Zeviani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Complex III (CIII) deficiency is one of the least common oxidative phosphorylation defects associated to mitochondrial disease. CIII constitutes the center of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, as well as a crossroad for several other metabolic pathways. For more than 10 years, of all the potential candidate genes encoding structural subunits and assembly factors, only three were known to be associated to CIII defects in human pathology. Thus, leaving many of these cases unresolved. These first identified genes were MT-CYB, the only CIII subunit encoded in the mitochondrial DNA; BCS1L, encoding an assembly factor, and UQCRB, a nuclear-encoded structural subunit. Nowadays, thanks to the fast progress that has taken place in the last 3–4 years, pathological changes in seven more genes are known to be associated to these conditions. This review will focus on the strategies that have permitted the latest discovery of mutations in factors that are necessary for a correct CIII assembly and activity, in relation with their function. In addition, new data further establishing the molecular role of LYRM7/MZM1L as a chaperone involved in CIII biogenesis are provided. PMID:25914718

  2. Hydrolethalus syndrome is caused by a missense mutation in a novel gene HYLS1.

    PubMed

    Mee, Lisa; Honkala, Heli; Kopra, Outi; Vesa, Jouni; Finnilä, Saara; Visapää, Ilona; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Jackson, George R; Salonen, Riitta; Kestilä, Marjo; Peltonen, Leena

    2005-06-01

    Hydrolethalus syndrome (HLS) is an autosomal recessive lethal malformation syndrome characterized by multiple developmental defects of fetus. We have earlier mapped and restricted the HLS region to a critical 1 cM interval on 11q23-25. The linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype analyses of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers helped to further restrict the HLS locus to 476 kb between genes PKNOX2 and DDX25. An HLS associated mutation was identified in a novel regional transcript (GenBank accession no. FLJ32915), referred to here as the HYLS1 gene. The identified A to G transition results in a D211G change in the 299 amino acid polypeptide with unknown function. The HYLS1 gene shows alternative splicing and the transcript is found in multiple tissues during fetal development. In situ hybridization shows spatial and temporal distributions of transcripts in good agreement with the tissue phenotype of HLS patients. Immunostaining of in vitro expressed polypeptides from wild-type (WT) cDNA revealed cytoplasmic staining, whereas mutant polypeptides became localized in distinct nuclear structures, implying a disturbed cellular localization of the mutant protein. The Drosophila melanogaster model confirmed these findings and provides evidence for the significance of the mutation both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15843405

  3. XLID-Causing Mutations and Associated Genes Challenged in Light of Data From Large-Scale Human Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Piton, Amélie; Redin, Claire; Mandel, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Because of the unbalanced sex ratio (1.3–1.4 to 1) observed in intellectual disability (ID) and the identification of large ID-affected families showing X-linked segregation, much attention has been focused on the genetics of X-linked ID (XLID). Mutations causing monogenic XLID have now been reported in over 100 genes, most of which are commonly included in XLID diagnostic gene panels. Nonetheless, the boundary between true mutations and rare non-disease-causing variants often remains elusive. The sequencing of a large number of control X chromosomes, required for avoiding false-positive results, was not systematically possible in the past. Such information is now available thanks to large-scale sequencing projects such as the National Heart, Lung, and Blood (NHLBI) Exome Sequencing Project, which provides variation information on 10,563 X chromosomes from the general population. We used this NHLBI cohort to systematically reassess the implication of 106 genes proposed to be involved in monogenic forms of XLID. We particularly question the implication in XLID of ten of them (AGTR2, MAGT1, ZNF674, SRPX2, ATP6AP2, ARHGEF6, NXF5, ZCCHC12, ZNF41, and ZNF81), in which truncating variants or previously published mutations are observed at a relatively high frequency within this cohort. We also highlight 15 other genes (CCDC22, CLIC2, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, HCFC1, IGBP1, KIAA2022, KLF8, MAOA, NAA10, NLGN3, RPL10, SHROOM4, ZDHHC15, and ZNF261) for which replication studies are warranted. We propose that similar reassessment of reported mutations (and genes) with the use of data from large-scale human exome sequencing would be relevant for a wide range of other genetic diseases. PMID:23871722

  4. Expression of kenaf mitochondrial chimeric genes HM184 causes male sterility in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanhong; Liao, Xiaofang; Huang, Zhipeng; Chen, Peng; Zhou, Bujin; Liu, Dongmei; Kong, Xiangjun; Zhou, Ruiyang

    2015-08-01

    Chimeric genes resulting from the rearrangement of a mitochondrial genome were generally thought to be a causal factor in the occurrence of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS). In the study, earlier we reported that identifying a 47 bp deletion at 3'- flanking of atp9 that was linked to male sterile cytoplasm in kenaf. The truncated fragment was fused with atp9, a mitochondrial transit signal (MTS) and/or GFP, comprised two chimeric genes MTS-HM184-GFP and MTS-HM184. The plant expression vector pBI121 containing chimeric genes were then introduced to tobacco plants by Agrobacterium-mediated T-DNA transformation. The result showed that certain transgenic plants were male sterility or semi-sterility, while some were not. The expression analysis further demonstrated that higher level of expression were showed in the sterility plants, while no expression or less expression in fertility plants, the levels of expression of semi-sterility were in between. And the sterile plant (containing MTS-HM184-GFP) had abnormal anther produced malformed/shriveled pollen grains stained negative that failed to germinate (0%), the corresponding fruits was shrunken, the semi-sterile plants having normal anther shape produced about 10-50% normal pollen grains, the corresponding fruits were not full, and the germination rate was 58%. Meanwhile these transgenic plants which altered on fertility were further analyzed in phenotype. As a result, the metamorphosis leaves were observed in the seedling stage, the plant height of transgenic plants was shorter than wild type. The growth duration of transgenic tobacco was delayed 30-45 days compared to the wild type. The copy numbers of target genes of transgenic tobacco were analyzed using the real-time quantitative method. The results showed that these transgenic plants targeting-expression in mitochondrial containing MTS-HM184-GFP had 1 copy and 2 copies, the other two plants containing MTS-HM184 both had 3 copies, but 0 copy in wild type. In

  5. Genetic Disruption of SOD1 Gene Causes Glucose Intolerance and Impairs β-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Salmon, Adam B.; Aguayo-Mazzucato, Cristina; Li, Mengyao; Balas, Bogdan; Guardado-Mendoza, Rodolfo; Giaccari, Andrea; Reddick, Robert L.; Reyna, Sara M.; Weir, Gordon; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Van Remmen, Holly; Musi, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, it is not clear whether oxidative damage is a cause or a consequence of the metabolic abnormalities present in diabetic subjects. The goal of this study was to determine whether inducing oxidative damage through genetic ablation of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) leads to abnormalities in glucose homeostasis. We studied SOD1-null mice and wild-type (WT) littermates. Glucose tolerance was evaluated with intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests. Peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity was quantitated with the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. β-Cell function was determined with the hyperglycemic clamp and morphometric analysis of pancreatic islets. Genetic ablation of SOD1 caused glucose intolerance, which was associated with reduced in vivo β-cell insulin secretion and decreased β-cell volume. Peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity were not significantly altered in SOD1-null mice. High-fat diet caused glucose intolerance in WT mice but did not further worsen the glucose intolerance observed in standard chow–fed SOD1-null mice. Our findings suggest that oxidative stress per se does not play a major role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and demonstrate that oxidative stress caused by SOD1 ablation leads to glucose intolerance secondary to β-cell dysfunction. PMID:24009256

  6. Hartnup disorder is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the neutral amino acid transporter SLC6A19.

    PubMed

    Seow, Heng F; Bröer, Stefan; Bröer, Angelika; Bailey, Charles G; Potter, Simon J; Cavanaugh, Juleen A; Rasko, John E J

    2004-09-01

    Hartnup disorder (OMIM 234500) is an autosomal recessive abnormality of renal and gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport noted for its clinical variability. We localized a gene causing Hartnup disorder to chromosome 5p15.33 and cloned a new gene, SLC6A19, in this region. SLC6A19 is a sodium-dependent and chloride-independent neutral amino acid transporter, expressed predominately in kidney and intestine, with properties of system B(0). We identified six mutations in SLC6A19 that cosegregated with disease in the predicted recessive manner, with most affected individuals being compound heterozygotes. The disease-causing mutations that we tested reduced neutral amino acid transport function in vitro. Population frequencies for the most common mutated SLC6A19 alleles are 0.007 for 517G --> A and 0.001 for 718C --> T. Our findings indicate that SLC6A19 is the long-sought gene that is mutated in Hartnup disorder; its identification provides the opportunity to examine the inconsistent multisystemic features of this disorder. PMID:15286788

  7. Inactivation of the UGPase1 gene causes genic male sterility and endosperm chalkiness in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Mi-Ok; Ham, Tae-Ho; Ji, Hyeon-So; Choi, Min-Seon; Jiang, Wenzhu; Chu, Sang-Ho; Piao, Rihua; Chin, Joong-Hyoun; Kim, Jung-A; Park, Bong Soo; Seo, Hak Soo; Jwa, Nam-Soo; McCouch, Susan; Koh, Hee-Jong

    2008-01-01

    A rice genic male-sterility gene ms-h is recessive and has a pleiotropic effect on the chalky endosperm. After fine mapping, nucleotide sequencing analysis of the ms-h gene revealed a single nucleotide substitution at the 3′-splice junction of the 14th intron of the UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase 1 (UGPase1; EC2.7.7.9) gene, which causes the expression of two mature transcripts with abnormal sizes caused by the aberrant splicing. An in vitro functional assay showed that both proteins encoded by the two abnormal transcripts have no UGPase activity. The suppression of UGPase by the introduction of a UGPase1-RNAi construct in wild-type plants nearly eliminated seed set because of the male defect, with developmental retardation similar to the ms-h mutant phenotype, whereas overexpression of UGPase1 in ms-h mutant plants restored male fertility and the transformants produced T1 seeds that segregated into normal and chalky endosperms. In addition, both phenotypes were co-segregated with the UGPase1 transgene in segregating T1 plants, which demonstrates that UGPase1 has functional roles in both male sterility and the development of a chalky endosperm. Our results suggest that UGPase1 plays a key role in pollen development as well as seed carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:18182026

  8. Hypotrichosis and juvenile macular dystrophy caused by CDH3 mutation: A candidate disease for retinal gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mandeep S.; Broadgate, Suzanne; Mathur, Ranjana; Holt, Richard; Halford, Stephanie; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes childhood visual impairment. HJMD is caused by mutations in CDH3 which encodes cadherin-3, a protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells that may have a key role in intercellular adhesion. We present a case of HJMD and analyse its phenotypic and molecular characteristics to assess the potential for retinal gene therapy as a means of preventing severe visual loss in this condition. Longitudinal in vivo imaging of the retina showed the relative anatomical preservation of the macula, which suggested the presence of a therapeutic window for gene augmentation therapy to preserve visual acuity. The coding sequence of CDH3 fits within the packaging limit of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors that have been shown to be safe in clinical trials and can efficiently target RPE cells. This report expands the number of reported cases of HJMD and highlights the phenotypic characteristics to consider when selecting candidates for retinal gene therapy. PMID:27157923

  9. Hypotrichosis and juvenile macular dystrophy caused by CDH3 mutation: A candidate disease for retinal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mandeep S; Broadgate, Suzanne; Mathur, Ranjana; Holt, Richard; Halford, Stephanie; MacLaren, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes childhood visual impairment. HJMD is caused by mutations in CDH3 which encodes cadherin-3, a protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells that may have a key role in intercellular adhesion. We present a case of HJMD and analyse its phenotypic and molecular characteristics to assess the potential for retinal gene therapy as a means of preventing severe visual loss in this condition. Longitudinal in vivo imaging of the retina showed the relative anatomical preservation of the macula, which suggested the presence of a therapeutic window for gene augmentation therapy to preserve visual acuity. The coding sequence of CDH3 fits within the packaging limit of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors that have been shown to be safe in clinical trials and can efficiently target RPE cells. This report expands the number of reported cases of HJMD and highlights the phenotypic characteristics to consider when selecting candidates for retinal gene therapy. PMID:27157923

  10. Maternal uniparental isodisomy and heterodisomy on chromosome 6 encompassing a CUL7 gene mutation causing 3M syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Okamoto, N; Kosaki, K; Yorifuji, T; Shimokawa, O; Mishima, H; Yoshiura, K-i; Harada, N

    2011-11-01

    We report a case of segmental uniparental maternal hetero- and isodisomy involving the whole of chromosome 6 (mat-hUPD6 and mat-iUPD6) and a cullin 7 (CUL7) gene mutation in a Japanese patient with 3M syndrome. 3M syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation that was recently reported to involve mutations in the CUL7 or obscurin-like 1 (OBSL1) genes. We encountered a patient with severe growth retardation, an inverted triangular gloomy face, an inverted triangle-shaped head, slender long bones, inguinal hernia, hydrocele testis, mild ventricular enlargement, and mild mental retardation. Sequence analysis of the CUL7 gene of the patient revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.2975G>C. Genotype analysis using a single nucleotide polymorphism array revealed two mat-hUPD and two mat-iUPD regions involving the whole of chromosome 6 and encompassing CUL7. 3M syndrome caused by complete paternal iUPD of chromosome 6 involving a CUL7 mutation has been reported, but there have been no reports describing 3M syndrome with maternal UPD of chromosome 6. Our results represent a combination of iUPDs and hUPDs from maternal chromosome 6 involving a CUL7 mutation causing 3M syndrome. PMID:21166787