Science.gov

Sample records for plunging liquid jet

  1. Distinguishing features of shallow angle plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulations employing an algebraic volume-of-fluid methodology are used to study the air entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent water pool at angles ranging from θ = 10° to θ = 90° measured from the horizontal. Our previous study of shallow angled jets [S. S. Deshpande, M. F. Trujillo, X. Wu, and G. L. Chahine, "Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 34, 1-14 (2012)], 10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2012.01.011 revealed the existence of a clearly discernible frequency of ingestion of large air cavities. This is in contrast with chaotic entrainment of small air pockets reported in the literature in case of steeper or vertically plunging jets. In the present work, the differences are addressed by first quantifying the cavity size and entrained air volumes for different impingement angles. The results support the expected trend - reduction in cavity size (D43) as θ is increased. Time histories of cavity volumes in the vicinity of the impingement region confirm the visual observations pertaining to a near-periodic ingestion of large air volumes for shallow jets (10°, 12°), and also show that such cavities are not formed for steep or vertical jets. Each large cavity (defined as Dc/Dj ≳ 3) exists in close association with a stagnation point flow. A local mass and momentum balance shows that the high stagnation pressure causes a radial redirection of the jet, resulting in a flow that resembles the initial impact of a jet on the pool. In fact, for these large cavities, their speed matches closely Uimpact/2, which coincides with initial cavity propagation for sufficiently high Froude numbers. Furthermore, it is shown that the approximate periodicity of air entrainment scales linearly with Froude number. This finding is confirmed by a number of simulations at θ = 12°. Qualitatively, for steeper jets, such large stagnation

  2. Laminar Plunging Jets - Interfacial Rupture and Inception of Entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Aravind

    Interfacial rupture and entrainment are commonly observed, e.g., air bubbles within a container being filled with water from a faucet. The example involves a liquid jet (density, rho, and viscosity, η) plunging into a receiving pool of liquid. Below a critical liquid-jet velocity, the interface develops a cusp-like shape within the receiving pool. The cusp becomes sharper with increasing liquid-jet velocity, and at a critical velocity ( Vc), the interface between the liquid and the surrounding fluid (density, rho0, and viscosity, η0) ruptures. Interfacial tension (sigma) can no longer preserve the integrity of the interface between the two immiscible fluids, and the plunging jet drags/entrains surrounding fluid into the receiving pool. Subsequently, the entrained fluid breaks up into bubbles within the receiving pool. The focus of this dissertation is the numerical prediction of the critical entrainment inception velocities for laminar plunging jets using the Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) method, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to simulate multi-fluid flows. Canonical to bottle-filling operations in the industry is the plunging-jet configuration -- the liquid jet issues from a nozzle and plunges into a container filled with liquid. Simulations of this configuration require capturing flow phenomena over a large range of length scales (4 orders of magnitude). Results show severe under-prediction of critical entrainment velocities when the maximum resolution is insufficient to capture the sharpening, and eventual rupture, of the interfacial cusp. Higher resolutions resulted in computational meshes with prohibitively large number of cells, and a drastic reduction in time-step values. Experimental results in the literature suggest at least a 100-fold increase in the smallest length scale when the entrained fluid is a liquid instead of air. This narrows the range of length scales in the problem. We exploit the experimental correlation between critical capillary

  3. Numerical Investigation of Vertical Plunging Jet Using a Hybrid Multifluid–VOF Multiphase CFD Solver

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shonibare, Olabanji Y.; Wardle, Kent E.

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid multiphase flow solver has been used to conduct simulations of a vertical plunging liquid jet. This solver combines a multifluid methodology with selective interface sharpening to enable simulation of both the initial jet impingement and the long-time entrained bubble plume phenomena. Models are implemented for variable bubble size capturing and dynamic switching of interface sharpened regions to capture transitions between the initially fully segregated flow types into the dispersed bubbly flow regime. It was found that the solver was able to capture the salient features of the flow phenomena under study and areas for quantitative improvement havemore » been explored and identified. In particular, a population balance approach is employed and detailed calibration of the underlying models with experimental data is required to enable quantitative prediction of bubble size and distribution to capture the transition between segregated and dispersed flow types with greater fidelity.« less

  4. Impact pressures of turbulent high-velocity jets plunging in pools with flat bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manso, P. A.; Bollaert, E. F. R.; Schleiss, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic pressures created by the impact of high-velocity turbulent jets plunging in a water pool with flat bottom were investigated. Pressure fluctuations were sampled at 1 kHz at the jet outlet and at the pool bottom using piezo-resistive pressure transducers, jet velocities of up to 30 m/s and pool depth to jet diameter ratios from 2.8 to 11.4. The high-velocity jets entrain air in the pool in conditions similar to prototype applications at water release structures of dams. The intermittent character of plunge pool flows was investigated for shallow and deep pools, based on high order moments and time correlations. Maximum intermittency was observed for pool depths at 5.6 jet diameters, which approximate the core development length. Wall pressure skewness was shown to allow identifying the zone of influence of downward and upward moving currents.

  5. FIELD MANUAL FOR PLUNGING WATER JET USE IN OIL SPILL CLEANUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of plunging water jets can often make possible the control (and, as a consequence, the cleanup) of spilled oil and other floating pollutants in currents too swift for conventional equipment. This short, illustrated manual provides practical information for field and plann...

  6. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  7. Dynamics of a cylinder plunging into liquid: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hang

    2012-11-01

    The impact of a cylinder on a liquid surface and subsequent events are investigated numerically. The flows are resolved by solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the Cahn-Hilliard equation. Moving contact lines are modeled by a diffuse interface model (Seppecher 1996; Jaqcmin 2000), and contact-angle hysteresis is included (Ding&Spelt 2008). The method is validated by comparison to the experiments by Aristoff and Bush (2009). Our studies focus on the dynamics of the waves induced by the impact and the cavity collapse behind the cylinder. A variety of parameters affect the flow behaviors such as wettability, impact speed, viscosity etc. Their effects on the transition of the flow phenomena are investigated through parametric simulations over relevant ranges of Weber and Reynolds numbers and contact angles. This work is supposed by the 100 Talents Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11172294).

  8. Whipping of electrified liquid jets.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Josefa; Rivero, Javier; Gundabala, Venkata R; Perez-Saborid, Miguel; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-09-23

    We apply an electric field to a moderately conducting liquid surrounded by another coflowing liquid, all inside a glass-based microfluidic device, to study nonaxisymmetric instabilities. We find that the bending of the electrified jet results in a steady-state, helicoidal structure with a constant opening angle. Remarkably, the characteristic phase speed of the helicoidal wave only depends on the charge carried by the jet in the helicoidal region and its stability critically depends on the properties of the coflowing liquid. In fact, the steady-state helical structure becomes chaotic when the longest characteristic time is that of the inner liquid rather than that of the outer coflowing liquid. We also perform a numerical analysis to show that the natural preference of the jet is to adopt the conical helix structure observed experimentally. PMID:25201984

  9. Whipping of electrified liquid jets

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Josefa; Rivero, Javier; Gundabala, Venkata R.; Perez-Saborid, Miguel; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We apply an electric field to a moderately conducting liquid surrounded by another coflowing liquid, all inside a glass-based microfluidic device, to study nonaxisymmetric instabilities. We find that the bending of the electrified jet results in a steady-state, helicoidal structure with a constant opening angle. Remarkably, the characteristic phase speed of the helicoidal wave only depends on the charge carried by the jet in the helicoidal region and its stability critically depends on the properties of the coflowing liquid. In fact, the steady-state helical structure becomes chaotic when the longest characteristic time is that of the inner liquid rather than that of the outer coflowing liquid. We also perform a numerical analysis to show that the natural preference of the jet is to adopt the conical helix structure observed experimentally. PMID:25201984

  10. Transient gas jets into liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jane Ming-Chin

    An experimental investigation of the development of high velocity, impulsively initiated gas jets into liquid was conducted in an effort to understand some of the physical processes that occur for a jet of very light fluid into a dense ambient atmosphere. Four gases, refrigerants 12 and 22, nitrogen, and helium were injected into water at nozzle exit Mach numbers from 1.0 to 2.2.The study showed that a gas jet into water develops in at least three stages: startup, transition, and global steady state. The startup is characterized by bubble growth; the growth rate is well predicted by classical bubble-growth theory. Jet transition is marked by axially directed flow, which penetrates through the startup bubble and which forms a cylindrical protrusion along the axis of symmetry. A combination of strong recirculating flow and liquid entrainment causes the startup bubble to deflate and to lift off and move downstream. In the steady state, instantaneous photographs show small-scale fluctuations of the jet boundary, but time-averaged photographs show the expected conical spreading of the steady jet; the measured spreading angles range from 18-25 degrees.However, the most significant finding of this study is that under some conditions, the gas jet into liquid never reaches the global steady state. Instead, the jet boundary exhibits chugging: large nonlinear oscillations which lead to irregular collapses of the gas column followed by explosive outward bursts of gas. The unsteadiness observed is much more violent than the familiar fluctuations typical of constant-density jets. The length scale of the motion is generally on the order of several jet diameters; the time scale is on the order of the period for bubble collapse.It was found that the amplitude and frequency of chugging are strongly dependent on the ratio of the liquid density to the gas density, the jet Mach number, and the operating pressure ratio. The conditions under which unsteadiness occurs were determined

  11. Disintegration of a Liquid Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haenlein, A

    1932-01-01

    This report presents an experimental determination of the process of disintegration and atomization in its simplest form, and the influence of the physical properties of the liquid to be atomized on the disintegration of the jet. Particular attention was paid to the investigation of the process of atomization.

  12. Dynamics of liquid films and thin jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of liquid films and thin jets as one- and two-dimensional continuums is examined. The equations of motion have led to solutions for the characteristic speeds of wave propagation for the parameters characterizing the shape. The formal analogy with a compressible fluid indicates the possibility of shock wave generation in films and jets and the formal analogy to the theory of threads and membranes leads to the discovery of some new dynamic effects. The theory is illustrated by examples.

  13. Droplet formation for liquid monopropellant jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macken, Nelson A.

    1987-02-01

    The hydrodynamic development of droplets for conditions approximating those in the combustion chamber of regenerative liquid propellant guns has been investigated. The report contains a literature survey and discussion of various breakup mechanisms. Aerodynamic interaction is analyzed using classical stability theory and a formulation applied to anticipated working conditions. The model predicts mass removed and droplet size as a function of time. Results indicate that the jet does break up with almost all liquid atomized. Comparison to a simple burning rate model verifies that the hydrodynamic model is primarily responsible for liquid removal from the intact core. Results conflict with recent inverse gun code predictions which suggest significant liquid accumulation is occurring; i.e., the jet does not fully atomize and subsequently burn. A discussion of possible reasons for this discrepancy is included.

  14. Bouncing and Merging of Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Li, Minglei; Law, Chung K.

    2014-11-01

    Collision of two fluid jets is a technique that is utilized in many industrial applications, such as in rocket engines, to achieve controlled mixing, atomization and sometimes liquid phase reactions. Thus, the dynamics of colliding jets have direct impact on the performance, efficiency and reliability of such applications. In analogy with the dynamics of droplet-droplet collision, in this work we have experimentally demonstrated, for n-alkane hydrocarbons as well as water, that with increasing impact inertia obliquely colliding jets also exhibit the same nonmonotonic responses of merging, bouncing, merging again, and merging followed by disintegration; and that the continuous entrainment of the boundary layer air over the jet surface into the colliding interfacial region leads to two distinguishing features of jet collision, namely: there exists a maximum impact angle beyond which merging is always possible, and that merging is inhibited and then promoted with increasing pressure. These distinct response regimes were mapped and explained on the bases of impact inertia, deformation of the jet surface, viscous loss within the jet interior, and the thickness and pressure build-up within the interfacial region in order to activate the attractive surface van der Waals force to effect merging.

  15. Velocity-modulation atomization of liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A novel atomizer based on high-amplitude velocity atomization has been developed. Presently, the most common methods of atomization can use only the Rayleigh instability of a liquid cylinder and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of a liquid sheet. Our atomizer is capable of atomizing liquid jets by the excitation and destabilization of many other higher-order modes of surface deformation. The potential benefits of this sprayer are more uniform fuel air mixtures, faster fuel-air mixing, extended flow ranges for commercial nozzles, and the reduction of nozzle plugging by producing small drops from large nozzles.

  16. Breakup of Liquid Sheets and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S. P.

    2003-09-01

    This book is an exposition of what we know about the physics underlying the onset of instability in liquid sheets and jets. Wave motion and breakup phenomena subsequent to the onset of instability are also carefully explained. Physical concepts are established through mathematics, accurate numerical analysis and comparison of theory with experiments. Exercises are provided for students new to the subject. Researchers interested in topics ranging from transition to turbulence, hydrodynamic stability or combustion will find this book a useful resource, whether their background lies in engineering, physics, chemistry, biology, medicine or applied mathematics.

  17. Liquid jet pumps for two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, R.G.

    1995-06-01

    Isothermal compression of a bubbly secondary fluid in a mixing-throat and diffuser is described by a one-dimensional flow model of a liquid-jet pump. Friction-loss coefficients used in the four equations may be determined experimentally, or taken from the literature. The model reduces to the liquid-jet gas compressor case if the secondary liquid is zero. Conversely, a zero secondary-gas flow reduces the liquid-jet gas and liquid (LJGL) model to that of the familiar liquid-jet liquid pump. A ``jet loss`` occurs in liquid-jet pumps if the nozzle tip is withdrawn from the entrance plane of the throat, and jet loss is included in the efficiency equations. Comparisons are made with published test data for liquid-jet liquid pumps and for liquid-jet gas compressors. The LJGL model is used to explore jet pump responses to two-phase secondary flows, nozzle-to-throat area ratio, and primary-jet velocity. The results are shown in terms of performance curves versus flow ratios. Predicted peak efficiencies are approximately 50 percent. Under sever operating conditions, LJGL pump performance curves exhibit maximum-flow ratios or cut-offs. Cut-offs occurs when two-phase secondary-flow steams attain sonic values at the entry of the mixing throat. A dimensionless number correlates flow-ratio cut-offs with pump geometry and operating conditions. Throat-entry choking of the secondary flow can be predicted, hence avoided, in designing jet pumps to hand two-phase fluids.

  18. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials [preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S-W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to understand the physics of material removal by jet-machining processes. Experiments were performed to delineate conditions under which liquid jet impacts will cause mass removal and to determine optimum jet-cutting conditions. Theoretical analyses have also been carried out to study the effects of multiple jet-droplet impacts on a target surface as a material deformation mechanism. The calculated target response and spallation behavior following droplet impacts and their physical implications are also discussed.

  19. Bouncing jet: a Newtonian liquid rebounding off a free surface.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Matthew; Jung, Sunghwan; Pang, Yee Kwong; Chuu, Chih-Piao; Swinney, Harry L

    2007-11-01

    We find that a liquid jet can bounce off a bath of the same liquid if the bath is moving horizontally with respect to the jet. Previous observations of jets rebounding off a bath (e.g., the Kaye effect) have been reported only for non-Newtonian fluids, while we observe bouncing jets in a variety of Newtonian fluids, including mineral oil poured by hand. A thin layer of air separates the bouncing jet from the bath, and the relative motion replenishes the film of air. Jets with one or two bounces are stable for a range of viscosity, jet flow rate and velocity, and bath velocity. The bouncing phenomenon exhibits hysteresis and multiple steady states. PMID:18233768

  20. Bouncing jet: A Newtonian liquid rebounding off a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrasher, Matthew; Jung, Sunghwan; Pang, Yee Kwong; Chuu, Chih-Piao; Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-11-01

    We find that a liquid jet can bounce off a bath of the same liquid if the bath is moving horizontally with respect to the jet. Previous observations of jets rebounding off a bath (e.g., the Kaye effect) have been reported only for non-Newtonian fluids, while we observe bouncing jets in a variety of Newtonian fluids, including mineral oil poured by hand. A thin layer of air separates the bouncing jet from the bath, and the relative motion replenishes the film of air. Jets with one or two bounces are stable for a range of viscosity, jet flow rate and velocity, and bath velocity. The bouncing phenomenon exhibits hysteresis and multiple steady states.

  1. Multiphase flow of miscible liquids: jets and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Travis W.; Logia, Alison N.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2015-05-01

    Drops and jets of liquids that are miscible with the surrounding bulk liquid are present in many processes from cleaning surfaces with the aid of liquid soaps to the creation of biocompatible implants for drug delivery. Although the interactions of immiscible drops and jets show similarities to miscible systems, the small, transient interfacial tension associated with miscible systems create distinct outcomes such as intricate droplet shapes and breakup resistant jets. Experiments have been conducted to understand several basic multiphase flow problems involving miscible liquids. Using high-speed imaging of the morphological evolution of the flows, we have been able to show that these processes are controlled by interfacial tensions. Further multiphase flows include investigating miscible jets, which allow the creation of fibers from inelastic materials that are otherwise difficult to process due to capillary breakup. This work shows that stabilization from the diminishing interfacial tensions of the miscible jets allows various elongated morphologies to be formed.

  2. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sang-Wook; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-02-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to gain an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in material removal by fluidjet machining processes. Experiments were performed to determine conditions under which the liquid jet impacting a solid material will cause material removal and also to delineate possible physical mechanisms of mass removal at optimum jet-cutting conditions. We have also carried out numerical simulations of jet-induced surface pressure rises and of the material deformation and spallation behavior due to multiple droplet impacts. Results obtained from the experiments and theoretical calculations and their physical implications are also discussed.

  3. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet for liquid spray treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitić, S.; Philipps, J.; Hofmann, D.

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have been intensively studied in recent years due to growing interest in their use for biomedical applications and surface treatments. Either surfaces can be treated by a plasma jet afterglow for cleaning or activation or a material can be deposited by a reactive gas component activated by plasma. Effects of plasma on liquid have been reported several times where the electron spin trapping method was used for radical detection. Here we propose another method of liquid treatment using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. In the device presented here, liquid was sprayed in droplets from an inner electrode directly into a plasma jet where it was treated and sprayed out by gas flow. Optical end electrical measurements were done for diagnostics of the plasma while electron paramagnetic resonance measurements were used for detection of radicals (\\text{OH},\\text{OOH},\\text{CH} ) produced by plasma treatment of liquids.

  4. Liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction studies in ISTTOK tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, R. B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.; Alekseyv, A.

    2009-06-01

    Liquid metals have been pointed out as a suitable solution to solve problems related to the use of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing, simultaneously, an efficient heat exhaustion process from fusion devices. The most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state temperature range when compared with gallium. To explore further this property, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying liquid gallium jet with the plasma. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with this jet without noticeable discharge degradation and no severe effect on the main plasma parameters or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. Additionally the response of an infrared sensor, intended to measure the jet surface temperature increase during its interaction with the plasma, has been studied. The jet power extraction capability is extrapolated from the heat flux profiles measured in ISTTOK plasmas.

  5. Stability of liquid-nitrogen-jet laser-plasma targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogelqvist, E.; Kördel, M.; Selin, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    Microscopic jets of cryogenic substances such as liquid nitrogen are important regenerative high-density targets for high-repetition rate, high-brightness laser-plasma soft x-ray sources. When operated in vacuum such liquid jets exhibit several non-classical instabilities that negatively influence the x-ray source's spatial and temporal stability, yield, and brightness, parameters that all are important for applications such as water-window microscopy. In the present paper, we investigate liquid-nitrogen jets with a flash-illumination imaging system that allows for a quantitative stability analysis with high spatial and temporal resolution. Direct and indirect consequences of evaporation are identified as the key reasons for the observed instabilities. Operating the jets in an approximately 100 mbar ambient atmosphere counteracts the effects of evaporation and produces highly stable liquid nitrogen jets. For operation in vacuum, which is necessary for the laser plasmas, we improve the stability by introducing an external radiative heating element. The method significantly extends the distance from the nozzle that can be used for liquid-jet laser plasmas, which is of importance for high-average-power applications. Finally, we show that laser-plasma operation with the heating-element-stabilized jet shows improved short-term and long-term temporal stability in its water-window x-ray emission.

  6. Stability of liquid-nitrogen-jet laser-plasma targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelqvist, E. Kördel, M.; Selin, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2015-11-07

    Microscopic jets of cryogenic substances such as liquid nitrogen are important regenerative high-density targets for high-repetition rate, high-brightness laser-plasma soft x-ray sources. When operated in vacuum such liquid jets exhibit several non-classical instabilities that negatively influence the x-ray source's spatial and temporal stability, yield, and brightness, parameters that all are important for applications such as water-window microscopy. In the present paper, we investigate liquid-nitrogen jets with a flash-illumination imaging system that allows for a quantitative stability analysis with high spatial and temporal resolution. Direct and indirect consequences of evaporation are identified as the key reasons for the observed instabilities. Operating the jets in an approximately 100 mbar ambient atmosphere counteracts the effects of evaporation and produces highly stable liquid nitrogen jets. For operation in vacuum, which is necessary for the laser plasmas, we improve the stability by introducing an external radiative heating element. The method significantly extends the distance from the nozzle that can be used for liquid-jet laser plasmas, which is of importance for high-average-power applications. Finally, we show that laser-plasma operation with the heating-element-stabilized jet shows improved short-term and long-term temporal stability in its water-window x-ray emission.

  7. Splattering during turbulent liquid jet impingement on solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhunia, S.K.; Lienhard, J.H. V . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    In turbulent liquid jet impingement, a spray of droplets often breaks off of the liquid layer formed on the target. This splattering of liquid alters the efficiencies of jet impingement heat transfer processes and chemical containment safety devices, and leads to problems of aerosol formation in jet impingement cleaning processes. In this paper, the authors present a more complete study of splattering and improved correlations that extend and supersede the previous reports on this topic. The authors report experimental results on the amount of splattering for jets of water, isopropanol-water solutions, and soap-water mixtures. Jets were produced by straight tube nozzles of diameter 0.8--5.8 mm, with fully developed turbulent pipe-flow upstream of the nozzle exist. These experiments cover Weber numbers between 130--31,000, Reynolds numbers between 2,700--98,000, and nozzle-to-target separations of 0.2 [<=]l/d[<=]125. Splattering of up to 75 percent of the incoming jet liquid is observed. The results show that only the Weber number and l/d affect the fraction of jet liquid splattered. The presence of surfactants does not alter the splattering. A new correlation for the onset condition for splattering is given. In addition, the authors establish the range of applicability of the model of Lienhard et al. and the authors provide a more accurate set of coefficients for their correlation.

  8. Interaction of a Liquid Gallium Jet with ISTTOK Edge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, R. B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.

    2008-04-01

    The use of liquid metals as plasma facing components in tokamaks has recently experienced a renewed interest stimulated by their advantages in the development of a fusion reactor. Liquid metals have been proposed to solve problems related to the erosion and neutronic activation of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing an efficient heat exhaust from fusion devices. Presently the most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state range when compared, for example, with gallium that has essentially better thermal properties and lower vapor pressure. To explore further these properties, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying, fully formed liquid gallium jet with the plasma. The interacting, 2.3 mm diameter, jet is generated by hydrostatic pressure and has a 2.5 m/s flow velocity. The liquid metal injector has been build to allow the positioning of the jet inside the tokamak chamber, within a 13 mm range. This paper presents the first obtained experimental results concerning the liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction. A stable jet has been obtained, which was not noticeably affected by the magnetic field transients. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with the gallium jet without degradation of the discharge or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. This observation is supported by spectroscopic measurements showing that gallium radiation is limited to the region around the jet. Furthermore, the power deposited on the jet has been evaluated at different radial locations and the surface temperature increase estimated.

  9. Cavitating Jet Method and System for Oxygenation of Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Georges L.

    2012-01-01

    Reclamation and re-use of water is critical for space-based life support systems. A number of functions must be performed by any such system including removal of various contaminants and oxygenation. For long-duration space missions, this must be done with a compact, reliable system that requires little or no use of expendables and minimal power. DynaJets cavitating jets can oxidize selected organic compounds with much greater energy efficiency than ultrasonic devices typically used in sonochemistry. The focus of this work was to develop cavitating jets to simultaneously accomplish the functions of oxygenation and removal of contaminants of importance to space-structured water reclamation systems. The innovation is a method to increase the concentration of dissolved oxygen or other gasses in a liquid. It utilizes a particular form of novel cavitating jet operating at low to moderate pressures to achieve a high-efficiency means of transporting and mixing the gas into the liquid. When such a jet is utilized to simultaneously oxygenate the liquid and to oxidize organic compounds within the liquid, such as those in waste water, the rates of contaminant removal are increased. The invention is directed toward an increase in the dissolved gas content of a liquid, in general, and the dissolved oxygen content of a liquid in particular.

  10. Controls on Filling and Evacuation of Sediment in Waterfall Plunge Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingross, J. S.; Lamb, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Many waterfalls are characterized by the presence of deep plunge pools that experience periods of sediment fill and evacuation. These cycles of sediment fill are a first order control on the relative magnitude of lateral versus vertical erosion at the base of waterfalls, as vertical incision requires cover-free plunge pools to expose the bedrock floor, while lateral erosion can occur when pools are partially filled and plunge-pool walls are exposed. Currently, there exists no mechanistic model describing sediment transport through waterfall plunge pools, limiting our ability to predict waterfall retreat. To address this knowledge gap, we performed detailed laboratory experiments measuring plunge-pool sediment transport capacity (Qsc_pool) under varying waterfall and plunge-pool geometries, flow hydraulics, and sediment size. Our experimental plunge-pool sediment transport capacity measurements match well with a mechanistic model we developed which combines existing waterfall jet theory with a modified Rouse profile to predict sediment transport capacity as a function of water discharge and suspended sediment concentration at the plunge-pool lip. Comparing the transport capacity of plunge pools to lower gradient portions of rivers (Qsc_river) shows that, for transport limited conditions, plunge pools fill with sediment under modest water discharges when Qsc_river > Qsc_pool, and empty to bedrock under high discharges when Qsc_pool > Qsc_river. These results are consistent with field observations of sand-filled plunge pools with downstream boulder rims, implying filling and excavation of plunge pools over single-storm timescales. Thus, partial filling of waterfall plunge pools may provide a mechanism to promote lateral undercutting and retreat of waterfalls in homogeneous rock in which plunge-pool vertical incision occurs during brief large floods that expose bedrock, whereas lateral erosion may prevail during smaller events.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of a compound liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.

    1989-10-01

    The magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) stability of a compound nonmiscible fluid jet is discussed. A general eigenvalue relation, for that model which involves the fluid inertia, capillarity and electromagnetic forces, is derived. The model is capillary unstable only for small axisymmetric disturbances and stable for the rest. The magnetic fields interior and exterior to the gas-mantle jet have always a stabilizing influence. The radii ratio of the concentric jets plays an important role in the (instability) stability states and are (decreasing) increasing with increasing magnetic field intensity as the exterior radius is much larger than the interior radius; under some restrictions of the radii ratio and above a certain value of the magnetic field the capillary instability is omitted and completely suppressed and then stability sets in. The latter result is verified analytically and confirmed numerically in the case in which the cylindrical surface of the outer jet is sited at infinity.

  12. Time-resolved proper orthogonal decomposition of liquid jet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienti, Marco; Soteriou, Marios C.

    2009-11-01

    New insight into the mechanism of liquid jet in crossflow atomization is provided by an analysis technique based on proper orthogonal decomposition and spectral analysis. Data are provided in the form of high-speed videos of the jet near field from experiments over a broad range of injection conditions. For each condition, proper orthogonal modes (POMs) are generated and ordered by intensity variation relative to the time average. The feasibility of jet dynamics reduction by truncation of the POM series to the first few modes is then examined as a function of crossflow velocity for laminar and turbulent liquid injection. At conditions where the jet breaks up into large chunks of liquid, the superposition of specific orthogonal modes is observed to track long waves traveling along the liquid column. The temporal coefficients of these modes can be described as a bandpass spectrum that shifts toward higher frequencies as the crossflow velocity is increased. The dynamic correlation of these modes is quantified by their cross-power spectrum density. Based on the frequency and wavelength extracted from the videos, the observed traveling waves are linked to the linearly fastest growing wave of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The gas boundary layer thickness at the gas-liquid shear layer emerges at the end of this study as the dominant length scale of jet dynamics at moderate Weber numbers.

  13. Contraction of an inviscid swirling liquid jet: Comparison with results for a rotating granular jet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P. D.; Kubitschek, J. P.

    2007-11-01

    In honor of the tercentenary of Leonhard Euler, we report a new solution of the Euler equations for the shape of an inviscid rotating liquid jet emanating from a tube of inner radius R0 aligned with gravity. Jet contraction is dependent on the exit swirl parameter χ0 = R0 φ0/U0 where φ0 and U0 are the uniform rotation rate and axial velocity of the liquid at the exit. The results reveal that rotation reduces the rate of jet contraction. In the limit χ0-> 0 one recovers the contraction profile for a non-rotating jet and the limit χ0->∞ gives a jet of constant radius. In contrast, experiments and a kinematic model for a rotating non-cohesive granular jet show that it expands rather than contracts when a certain small angular velocity is exceeded. The blossoming profiles are parabolic in nature. The model predicts a jet of uniform radius for χ0-> 0 and a jet with an initially horizontal trajectory in the limit χ0->∞.

  14. Impinging jet separators for liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    In many liquid metal MHD power, cycles, it is necessary to separate the phases of a high-speed liquid-gas flow. The usual method is to impinge the jet at a glancing angle against a solid surface. These surface separators achieve good separation of the two phases at a cost of a large velocity loss due to friction at the separator surface. This report deals with attempts to greatly reduce the friction loss by impinging two jets against each other. In the crude impinging jet separators tested to date, friction losses were greatly reduced, but the separation of the two phases was found to be much poorer than that achievable with surface separators. Analyses are presented which show many lines of attack (mainly changes in separator geometry) which should yield much better separation for impinging jet separators).

  15. Sediment transport through self-adjusting, bedrock-walled waterfall plunge pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingross, Joel S.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2016-05-01

    Many waterfalls have deep plunge pools that are often partially or fully filled with sediment. Sediment fill may control plunge-pool bedrock erosion rates, partially determine habitat availability for aquatic organisms, and affect sediment routing and debris flow initiation. Currently, there exists no mechanistic model to describe sediment transport through waterfall plunge pools. Here we develop an analytical model to predict steady-state plunge-pool depth and sediment-transport capacity by combining existing jet theory with sediment transport mechanics. Our model predicts plunge-pool sediment-transport capacity increases with increasing river discharge, flow velocity, and waterfall drop height and decreases with increasing plunge-pool depth, radius, and grain size. We tested the model using flume experiments under varying waterfall and plunge-pool geometries, flow hydraulics, and sediment size. The model and experiments show that through morphodynamic feedbacks, plunge pools aggrade to reach shallower equilibrium pool depths in response to increases in imposed sediment supply. Our theory for steady-state pool depth matches the experiments with an R2 value of 0.8, with discrepancies likely due to model simplifications of the hydraulics and sediment transport. Analysis of 75 waterfalls suggests that the water depths in natural plunge pools are strongly influenced by upstream sediment supply, and our model provides a mass-conserving framework to predict sediment and water storage in waterfall plunge pools for sediment routing, habitat assessment, and bedrock erosion modeling.

  16. Experimental investigation of charged liquid jet efflux from a capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhakin, A. I.; Belov, P. A.; Kuz'ko, A. E.

    2013-03-01

    The shapes and electrical characteristics of charged liquid (water, ethanol, glycerol, castor oil) jets emitted from a metal capillary have been experimentally studied depending on the applied high voltage. A map of efflux regimes in the flow velocity-applied voltage coordinates is constructed for water. The effects of medium viscosity, surface tension, and charge relaxation time on the laws of jet efflux are analyzed.

  17. Some Numerical Research of Supersonic Gaseous Jet Injected Into Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L. H.; Hu, J.; Yu, Y.

    2011-09-01

    The article kept the laval nozzle outer radium (D) and nozzle expansion ratio as a constant. Three different underwater gas jets multiphase unsteady flows were simulated using the volume of fluid (VOF) method. It adopted standard κ—ɛ turbulence mode and SIMPLE algorithm to solve the two-phase flow of supersonic gaseous jet injected into liquid. We got the flow structure and the main parameters of the flow field and compared and analyzed the key parameters of three different flow field.

  18. Transverse liquid fuel jet breakup, burning, and ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.

    1990-12-31

    An analytical/numerical study of the breakup, burning, and ignition of liquid fuels injected transversely into a hot air stream is conducted. The non-reacting liquid jet breakup location is determined by the local sonic point criterion first proposed by Schetz, et al. (1980). Two models, one employing analysis of an elliptical jet cross-section and the other employing a two-dimensional blunt body to represent the transverse jet, have been used for sonic point calculations. An auxiliary criterion based on surface tension stability is used as a separate means of determining the breakup location. For the reacting liquid jet problem, a diffusion flame supported by a one-step chemical reaction within the gaseous boundary layer is solved along the ellipse surface in subsonic crossflow. Typical flame structures and concentration profiles have been calculated for various locations along the jet cross-section as a function of upstream Mach numbers. The integrated reaction rate along the jet cross-section is used to predict ignition position, which is found to be situated near the stagnation point. While a multi-step reaction is needed to represent the ignition process more accurately, the present calculation does yield reasonable predictions concerning ignition along a curved surface.

  19. Transverse liquid fuel jet breakup, burning, and ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical/numerical study of the breakup, burning, and ignition of liquid fuels injected transversely into a hot air stream is conducted. The non-reacting liquid jet breakup location is determined by the local sonic point criterion first proposed by Schetz, et al. (1980). Two models, one employing analysis of an elliptical jet cross-section and the other employing a two-dimensional blunt body to represent the transverse jet, have been used for sonic point calculations. An auxiliary criterion based on surface tension stability is used as a separate means of determining the breakup location. For the reacting liquid jet problem, a diffusion flame supported by a one-step chemical reaction within the gaseous boundary layer is solved along the ellipse surface in subsonic crossflow. Typical flame structures and concentration profiles have been calculated for various locations along the jet cross-section as a function of upstream Mach numbers. The integrated reaction rate along the jet cross-section is used to predict ignition position, which is found to be situated near the stagnation point. While a multi-step reaction is needed to represent the ignition process more accurately, the present calculation does yield reasonable predictions concerning ignition along a curved surface.

  20. Modeling of Turbulence Effect on Liquid Jet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, H. P.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that turbulence behaviors within a liquid jet have considerable effect on the atomization process. Such turbulent flow phenomena are encountered in most practical applications of common liquid spray devices. This research aims to model the effects of turbulence occurring inside a cylindrical liquid jet to its atomization process. The two widely used atomization models Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz and the Taylor analogy breakup (TAB) of O'Rourke and Amsden portraying primary liquid jet disintegration and secondary droplet breakup, respectively, are examined. Additional terms are formulated and appropriately implemented into these two models to account for the turbulence effect. Results for the flow conditions examined in this study indicate that the turbulence terms are significant in comparison with other terms in the models. In the primary breakup regime, the turbulent liquid jet tends to break up into large drops while its intact core is slightly shorter than those without turbulence. In contrast, the secondary droplet breakup with the inside liquid turbulence consideration produces smaller drops. Computational results indicate that the proposed models provide predictions that agree reasonably well with available measured data.

  1. On the separation of droplets from a liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-02-01

    The droplet separation from a liquid jet was investigated experimentally. Details of the shape of the thin liquid neck joining the droplet to its parent body were studied in terms of the fluid viscosity and the jet diameter. As the viscosity increased, the neck rapidly elongated creating a long thread. Its final diameter before rupture was approximately one micrometer and seems to be constant within wide range of parameters varied. One or multiple breakups of the micro-thread were observed, which produced micro-satellites, i.e. droplets in a micrometer range. The experimental results only partly confirmed the predictions of Eggers' (Phys. Rev. Lett. 71 (1993) 3458) similarity solution. The predicted shape of the pinch-off region well overlaps the long thread observed for very viscous liquids. However, the final jet diameter, retraction velocity of the thread and presence of multiple breakups differentiate the experimental evidence from the model expectations.

  2. Numerical modeling for primary atomization of liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Chuech, S. G.; Singhal, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    In the proposed numerical model for primary atomization, surface-wave dispersion equations are solved in conjunction with the jet-embedding technique of solving mean flow equations of a liquid jet. Linear and approximate nonlinear models have been considered. In each case, the dispersion equation is solved over the whole wavelength spectrum to predict drop sizes, frequency, and liquid-mass breakup rates without using any empirical constants. The present model has been applied to several low-speed and high-speed jets. For the high-speed case (the LOX/H2 coaxial injector of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Preburner), predicted drop sizes and liquid breakup rates are in good agreement with the results of the CICM code, which have been calibrated against measured data.

  3. On transit time instability in liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabitz, G.; Meier, G.

    1982-01-01

    A basic transit time instability in flows with disturbances of speed is found. It was shown that the mass distribution is established by and large by the described transit time effects. These transit time effects may also be involved for gas jets.

  4. Helical instability of a rotating viscous liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubitschek, J. P.; Weidman, P. D.

    2007-11-01

    Experimental results are presented for a rotating viscous liquid jet showing a clear preference for helical instabilities that evolve from initially planar disturbances at large rotation rates. In the ideal case of a uniformly rotating viscous liquid column with stress-free boundaries in the absence of gravity, the preferred modes of linear temporal instability are theoretically known over the entire physical domain. The relevant physical parameters are L=γ/ρa^3φ^2 and Re = a^2φ/ν, where a is the column radius, φ the uniform angular velocity and ρ, ν, and γ are fluid density, kinematic viscosity and surface tension, respectively. The theoretical results suggest that instability in different regions of L-Re parameter space is dominated by three modes: the axisymmetric mode, n>= 2 planar modes, and the first n = 1 spiral mode. For the rotating viscous liquid jet, experiments reveal that planar disturbances of the same mode numbers (n>= 2) spontaneously arise in the same regions of parameter space predicted by uniformly rotating viscous liquid column theory. However, these planar disturbances do not persist, but instead rapidly evolve into helical instabilities. Although fundamental differences exist between the rotating liquid jet and the uniformly rotating liquid column, some remarkable similarities associated with initial growth rates, disturbances frequencies, and mode transitions between the two systems are found.

  5. Observations of breakup processes of liquid jets using real-time X-ray radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Char, J. M.; Kuo, K. K.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    To unravel the liquid-jet breakup process in the nondilute region, a newly developed system of real-time X-ray radiography, an advanced digital image processor, and a high-speed video camera were used. Based upon recorded X-ray images, the inner structure of a liquid jet during breakup was observed. The jet divergence angle, jet breakup length, and fraction distributions along the axial and transverse directions of the liquid jets were determined in the near-injector region. Both wall- and free-jet tests were conducted to study the effect of wall friction on the jet breakup process.

  6. Two-phase liquid-liquid flows generated by impinging liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaoulidis, Dimitrios; Li, Qi; Angeli, Panagiota

    2015-11-01

    Two-phase flows in intensified small-scale systems find increasing applications in (bio)chemical analysis and synthesis, fuel cells, polymerisation, and separation processes (solvent extraction). Current nuclear spent fuel reprocessing separation technologies have been developed many decades ago and have not taken account recent advances on process intensification which can drive down plant size and economics. In this work, intensified impinging jets will be developed to create dispersions by bringing the two liquid phases into contact through opposing small channels. A systematic set of experiments has been undertaken, to investigate the hydrodynamic characteristics, to develop predictive models, and enable comparisons with other contactors. Drop size distribution and mixing intensity will be investigated for liquid-liquid mixtures as a function of various parameters using high speed imaging and conductivity probes.

  7. Study of liquid jet instability by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lisong; Adamson, Leanne J; Bain, Colin D

    2012-07-01

    The instability of a liquid microjet was used to measure the dynamic surface tension of liquids at the surface ages of ≤1 ms using confocal microscopy. The reflected light from a laser beam at normal incidence to the jet surface is linear in the displacement of the surface near the confocal position, leading to a radial resolution of 4 nm and a dynamic range of 4 μm in the surface position, thus permitting the measurement of amplitude of oscillation at the very early stage of jet instability. For larger oscillations outside the linear region of the confocal response, the swell and neck position of the jet can be located separately and the amplitude of oscillation determined with an accuracy of 0.2 μm. The growth rate of periodically perturbed water and ethanol∕water mixture jets with a 100-μm diameter nozzle and mean velocity of 5.7 m s(-1) has been measured. The dynamic surface tension was determined from the growth rate of the instability with a linear, axisymmetric, constant property model. Synchronisation of the confocal imaging system with the perturbation applied to the jet permitted a detailed study of the temporal evolution of the neck into a ligament and eventually into a satellite drop. PMID:22852668

  8. Study of liquid jet instability by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lisong; Adamson, Leanne J.; Bain, Colin D.

    2012-07-01

    The instability of a liquid microjet was used to measure the dynamic surface tension of liquids at the surface ages of ≤1 ms using confocal microscopy. The reflected light from a laser beam at normal incidence to the jet surface is linear in the displacement of the surface near the confocal position, leading to a radial resolution of 4 nm and a dynamic range of 4 μm in the surface position, thus permitting the measurement of amplitude of oscillation at the very early stage of jet instability. For larger oscillations outside the linear region of the confocal response, the swell and neck position of the jet can be located separately and the amplitude of oscillation determined with an accuracy of 0.2 μm. The growth rate of periodically perturbed water and ethanol/water mixture jets with a 100-μm diameter nozzle and mean velocity of 5.7 m s-1 has been measured. The dynamic surface tension was determined from the growth rate of the instability with a linear, axisymmetric, constant property model. Synchronisation of the confocal imaging system with the perturbation applied to the jet permitted a detailed study of the temporal evolution of the neck into a ligament and eventually into a satellite drop.

  9. Liquid Jet Formation in Laser-Induced Forward Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, C. Frederik

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-write technique capable of printing precise patterns of a wide variety of materials. In this process, a laser pulse is focused through a transparent support and absorbed in a thin donor film, propelling material onto an adjacent acceptor substrate. For fluid materials, this transfer occurs through the formation of a narrow liquid jet, which eventually pinches off due to surface tension. This thesis examines in detail the fluid mechanics of the jet formation process occurring in LIFT. The main focus is on a variant of LIFT known as blister-actuated LIFT (BA-LIFT), in which the laser pulse is absorbed in an ink-coated polymer layer, rapidly deforming it locally into a blister to induce liquid jet formation. The early-time response of a fluid layer to a deforming boundary is analyzed with a domain perturbation method and potential-flow simulations, revealing scalings for energy and momentum transfer to the fluid and providing physical insight on how and why a jet forms in BA-LIFT. The remaining chapters explore more complex applications and modifications of LIFT. One is the possibility of high-repetition rate printing and limits on time delay and separation between pulses imposed by a tilting effect found for adjacent jets. Another examines a focusing effect achieved by perturbing the interface with ring-shaped disturbances. The third contains an experimental study of LIFT using a silver paste as the donor material instead of a Newtonian liquid. The transfer mechanism is significantly different, although with repeated pulses at one location, a focusing effect is again observed. All three of these chapters investigate how perturbations to the interface can strongly influence the jet formation process.

  10. The pressure relaxation of liquid jets after isochoric heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.M.; Schrock, V.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    During isochoric heating by fast neutron irradiation, a high pressure is almost instantaneously built up inside the falling liquid jets in a HYLIFE (ICF) reactor. It has been suggested that the jets will breakup as a consequence of negative pressure occurring during the relaxation. This is important to both the subsequent condensation process and the chamber wall design. In this paper the mechanism of the relaxation of liquid jets after isochoric heating has been studied with both incompressible and compressible models. The transient pressure field predicted is qualitatively similar for both models and reveals a strongly peaked tension in the wake of a rarefaction wave. The pressure then rises monotonically in radius to zero pressure on the boundary. The incompressible approximation greatly over predicts the peak tension, which increases with time as the rarefaction wave moves toward the center of the jet. Since the tension distribution is as a narrow spike rather than uniform, a cylindrical fracture is the most likely mode of failure. The paper also discusses the available methods for estimating liquid tensile strength.

  11. METHOD OF LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION OF BLOOD SURROGATES FOR ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO JET FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A baseline method of liquid?liquid extraction for assessing human exposure to JP-8 jet fuel was established by extracting several representative compounds ranging from very volatile to semi-volatile organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, nonane, decane, undecane, tridec...

  12. Jet-noise reduction through liquid-base foam injection.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Burge, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made of the sound-absorbing properties of liquid-base foams and of their ability to reduce jet noise. Protein, detergent, and polymer foaming agents were used in water solutions. A method of foam generation was developed to permit systematic variation of the foam density. The investigation included measurements of sound-absorption coefficents for both plane normal incidence waves and diffuse sound fields. The intrinsic acoustic properties of foam, e.g., the characteristic impedance and the propagation constant, were also determined. The sound emitted by a 1-in.-diam cold nitrogen jet was measured for subsonic (300 m/sec) and supersonic (422 m/sec) jets, with and without foam injection. Noise reductions up to 10 PNdB were measured.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Stability of a Streaming Gas Core Liquid Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.; Elazab, Samia S.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic instability of a streaming fluid jet (radius R0) ambient with streaming liquid is studied to the axisymmetric (m{=}0) and the non-axisymmetric (m{≥slant}1) disturbances (m is the azimuthal wavenumber). When the surface tension effect is suppressed; the jet is stable to all m{≥slant}0 for all wavelengths. In the absence of the magnetic field; the model is stable to all m{≥slant}1 for all wavelengths and also stable to m{=}0 if the perturbed wavelength is equal to or shorter than 2π R0. While it is unstable only to m{=}0 if the perturbed wavelength is longer than 2π R0. The streaming has a destabilizing effect. If the magnetic fields are sufficiently high, so that the Alfvén wave velocities are greater than the streaming velocities of the two fluids; the jet is stable against all disturbances and vice versa.

  14. Production of jet fuels from coal derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, B.A.; Fox, J.D.; Furlong, M.W.; Masin, J.G.; Sault, L.P.; Tatterson, D.F. . Research and Development Dept.); Fornoff, L.L.; Link, M.A.; Stahlnecker, E.; Torster, K. )

    1988-09-01

    Amoco and Lummus Crest have developed seven cases for upgrading by-product liquids from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels, and in several of the cases, saleable chemicals in addition to jet fuels. The analysis shows that the various grades of jet fuel can be produced from the Great Plains tar oil, but not economically. However, the phenolic and naphtha streams do have the potential to significantly increase (on the order of $10--15 million/year) the net revenues at Great Plains by producing chemicals, especially cresylic acid, cresol, and xylenol. The amount of these chemicals, which can be marketed, is a concern, but profits can be generated even when oxygenated chemical sales are limited to 10 percent of the US market. Another concern is that while commercial processes exist to extract phenolic mixtures, these processes have not been demonstrated with the Great Plains phenolic stream. 9 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Parametric Investigation of Liquid Jets in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2005-01-01

    An axisymmetric phase field model is developed and used to model surface tension forces on liquid jets in microgravity. The previous work in this area is reviewed and a baseline drop tower experiment selected for model comparison. This paper uses the model to parametrically investigate the influence of key parameters on the geysers formed by jets in microgravity. Investigation of the contact angle showed the expected trend of increasing contact angle increasing geyser height. Investigation of the tank radius showed some interesting effects and demonstrated the zone of free surface deformation is quite large. Variation of the surface tension with a laminar jet showed clearly the evolution of free surface shape with Weber number. It predicted a breakthrough Weber number of 1.

  16. Laser-induced jet formation in liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, Frederik; Arnold, Craig

    2014-11-01

    The absorption of a focused laser pulse in a liquid film generates a cavitation bubble on which a narrow jet can form. This is the basis of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), a versatile printing technique that offers an alternative to inkjet printing. We study the influence of the fluid properties and laser pulse energy on jet formation using numerical simulations and time-resolved imaging. At low energies, surface tension causes the jet to retract without transferring a drop, and at high energies, the bubble breaks up into a splashing spray. We explore the parameter space of Weber number, Ohnesorge number, and ratio of film thickness to maximum bubble radius, revealing regions where uniform drops are transferred.

  17. Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Tension in Microgravity Modeled Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquidfree vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, jets must be contained by surface tension forces. Recent NASA experiments in microgravity (Tank Pressure Control Experiment, TPCE, and Vented Tank Pressure Experiment, VTRE) resulted in a wealth of data about jet behavior in microgravity. VTRE was surprising in that, although it contained a complex geometry of baffles and vanes, the limit on liquid inflow was the emergence of a liquid jet from the top of the vane structure. Clearly understanding the restraint of liquid jets by surface tension is key to managing fluids in low gravity. To model this phenomenon, we need a numerical method that can track the fluid motion and the surface tension forces. The fluid motion is modeled with the Navier-Stokes equation formulated for low-speed incompressible flows. The quantities of velocity and pressure are placed on a staggered grid, with velocity being tracked at cell faces and pressure at cell centers. The free surface is tracked via the introduction of a color function that tracks liquid as 1/2 and gas as -1/2. A phase model developed by Jacqmin is used. This model converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly. Previous attempts at this formulation have been criticized for smearing the interface. However, by sharpening the phase

  18. Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels, for maximizing profits, and for profitable production of each of the three jet fuels from the by-product liquids have been developed. Economic analyses of the designs show that jet fuel can be produced from the by-products, but not economically. However, jet fuel production could be subsidized profitably by processing the phenolic and naphtha streams to cresols, phenols, BTX, and other valuable chemical by-products. Uncertainties in the studies are marketability of the chemical by-products, replacement fuel costs, and viable schemes to process the phenol stream, among others. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Helical instability of a rotating viscous liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubitschek, J. P.; Weidman, P. D.

    2007-11-01

    Vertical rotating viscous liquid jet experiments show a clear preference for helical instabilities that evolve from initially planar disturbances at large rotation rates for fixed fluid properties. The laboratory setup for the experiments described herein was chosen as the nearest earth-based equivalent to a uniformly rotating viscous liquid column in the absence of gravity. In the ideal situation with stress-free boundaries, the preferred modes of linear temporal instability are theoretically known over the entire physical domain spanned by the Hocking parameter L =γ/ρa3Ω2 and the rotational Reynolds number Re =a2Ω/ν, where a is the column radius, Ω is its uniform angular velocity, and ρ, ν, and γ are, respectively, the fluid density, kinematic viscosity, and surface tension. The theoretical results show that instability in L-Re parameter space is dominated by three mode types: The axisymmetric mode, the n ≥2 planar modes, and the first n =1 spiral mode. Experiments reveal that, in the L-Re region for which the uniformly rotating liquid column is dominated by planar modes of instability, the rotating liquid jet spontaneously gives rise to planar disturbances of mode n ≥2 that rapidly evolve into helical instabilities. However, these observed instabilities are not the spiral normal modes that exist for n ≥1 as posited in linear stability theory. In spite of obvious fundamental differences between the rotating liquid jet and the uniformly rotating liquid column, some remarkable similarities associated with initial growth rates, angular frequencies, and mode transitions between the two systems are found.

  20. Equilibrium pellet and liquid jet shape under high ablation pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Rosenbluth, M. N.

    1998-05-01

    Owing to the nonspherical nature of the heat deposition in the pellet ablation cloud by energy loss of incident plasma electrons streaming parallel to the uniform magnetic field, a nonuniform pressure distribution develops at the pellet surface. This can lead to deformation of "soft" cryogenic pellets exposed to high temperature and high density magnetized plasmas. The effect of deformation on the burning rate and stability of the condensed phase is evaluated for pellets and liquid jets.

  1. Role of Weber number in the primary breakup of liquid jets in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Madhusudan; Bermejo-Moreno, I.; Desjardins, Olivier; Pitsch, Heinz

    2009-11-01

    Atomization of liquid fuel controls the combustion efficiency and pollutant emissions from internal combustion engines and gas turbines. A liquid jet injected into a crossflow breaks up by developing liquid surface instabilities and deformations due to aerodynamic sources and liquid jet turbulence, among other causes. There is a pressing need to understand the origin and role of these instabilities in the breakup of a liquid jet. These instabilities can be accurately quantified in detailed numerical simulations of liquid jets. A spectrally-refined interface (SRI) tracking scheme for interface transport coupled to an accurate and robust Navier-Stokes/Ghost-fluid method gas-phase solver is employed to perform large-scale detailed numerical simulations of liquid jets in a laminar crossflow. The liquid Weber number controls the tendency of a liquid jet to break up, while the liquid Reynolds number controls the range of length scales in the liquid jet turbulence. The interplay and role of these phenomena in the primary breakup of liquid jets is quantified through a parametric study. Existing models for turbulent primary breakup of liquid jets in crossflow are reviewed based on the numerical results.

  2. Breakup characteristics of a liquid jet in subsonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopala, Yogish

    This thesis describes an experimental investigation of the breakup processes involved in the formation of a spray created by a liquid jet injected into a gaseous crossflow. This work is motivated by the utilization of this method to inject fuel in combustors and afterburners of airplane engines. This study aims to develop a better understanding of the spray breakup processes and to provide better experimental inputs to improve the fidelity of numerical models. A review of the literature in this field identified the fundamental physical processes involved in the breakup of the spray and the dependence of spray properties on operating conditions. The time taken for the liquid column to break up into ligaments and droplets, the primary breakup time and the effect of injector geometry on the spray formation processes and spray properties as the key research areas in which research done so far has been inadequate. Determination of the location where the liquid column broke up was made difficult by the presence of a large number of droplets surrounding it. This study utilizes the liquid jet light guiding technique that enables accurate measurements of this location for a wide range of operating conditions. Prior to this study, the primary breakup time was thought to be a function the density ratio of the liquid and the gas, the diameter of the orifice and the air velocity. This study found that the time to breakup of the liquid column depends on the Reynolds number of the liquid jet. This suggests that the breakup of a turbulent liquid jet is influenced by both the aerodynamic breakup processes and the turbulent breakup processes. Observations of the phenomenon of the liquid jet splitting up into two or more jets were made at some operating conditions with the aid of the new visualization technique. Finally, this thesis investigates the effect of injector geometry on spray characteristics. One injector was a round edged orifice with a length to diameter ratio of 1 and a

  3. Liquid jet breakup regimes at supercritical pressures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Dahms, Rainer Norbert Uwe

    2015-07-23

    Previously, a theory has been presented that explains how discrete vapor–liquid interfaces become diminished at certain high-pressure conditions in a manner that leads to well known qualitative trends observed from imaging in a variety of experiments. Rather than surface tension forces, transport processes can dominate over relevant ranges of conditions. In this paper, this framework is now generalized to treat a wide range of fuel-oxidizer combinations in a manner consistent with theories of capillary flows and extended corresponding states theory. Different flow conditions and species-specific molecular properties are shown to produce distinct variations of interfacial structures and local free molecularmore » paths. These variations are shown to occur over the operating ranges in a variety of propulsion and power systems. Despite these variations, the generalized analysis reveals that the envelope of flow conditions at which the transition from classical sprays to diffusion-dominated mixing occurs exhibits a characteristic shape for all liquid–gas combinations. As a result, for alkane-oxidizer mixtures, it explains that these conditions shift to higher pressure flow conditions with increasing carbon number and demonstrates that, instead of widely assumed classical spray atomization, diffusion-dominated mixing may occur under relevant high-pressure conditions in many modern devices.« less

  4. Liquid jet breakup regimes at supercritical pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Dahms, Rainer Norbert Uwe

    2015-07-23

    Previously, a theory has been presented that explains how discrete vapor–liquid interfaces become diminished at certain high-pressure conditions in a manner that leads to well known qualitative trends observed from imaging in a variety of experiments. Rather than surface tension forces, transport processes can dominate over relevant ranges of conditions. In this paper, this framework is now generalized to treat a wide range of fuel-oxidizer combinations in a manner consistent with theories of capillary flows and extended corresponding states theory. Different flow conditions and species-specific molecular properties are shown to produce distinct variations of interfacial structures and local free molecular paths. These variations are shown to occur over the operating ranges in a variety of propulsion and power systems. Despite these variations, the generalized analysis reveals that the envelope of flow conditions at which the transition from classical sprays to diffusion-dominated mixing occurs exhibits a characteristic shape for all liquid–gas combinations. As a result, for alkane-oxidizer mixtures, it explains that these conditions shift to higher pressure flow conditions with increasing carbon number and demonstrates that, instead of widely assumed classical spray atomization, diffusion-dominated mixing may occur under relevant high-pressure conditions in many modern devices.

  5. An Experimental Study of Droplets Produced by Plunging Breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Dai, D.; Liu, X.; Duncan, J. H.

    2012-11-01

    The production of droplets by breaking water waves greatly affects the heat, mass and momentum transfer between the atmosphere and the sea surface. In this study, the production of droplets by mechanically generated breaking water waves was explored in a wave tank. The breakers were generated from dispersively focused wave packets (average frequency 1.15 Hz) using a programmable wave maker. Two overall wave maker amplitudes were used to create a strong spilling and a strong plunging breaker. The profile histories of the breaking wave crests along the center plane of the tank were measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique, while the droplet diameter distributions and motions were measured at different locations along a horizontal line, which is 1 cm above the maximum height of the wave crest, using a double-pulsed cinematic shadowgraph technique. It is found that droplets are primarily generated when the plunging jet of the wave generates strong turbulence during impact with the wave's front face and when large air bubbles, entrapped during the plunging process, rise to the free surface and pop. The differences between the generation mechanisms in spilling and plunging breakers is highlighted. This work is supported by the Ocean Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation.

  6. Effect of gas mass flux on cryogenic liquid jet breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    A scattered-light scanning instrument developed at NASA Lewis Research Center was used to measure the characteristic drop size of clouds of liquid nitrogen droplets. The instrument was calibrated with suspensions of monosized polystyrene spheres. In this investigation of the mechanism of liquid nitrogen jet disintegration in a high-velocity gas flow, the Sauter mean diameter, D32, was found to vary inversely with the nitrogen gas mass flux raised to the power 1.33. Values of D32 varied from 5 to 25 microns and the mass flux exponent of 1.33 agrees well with theory for liquid jet breakup in high-velocity gas flows. The loss of very small droplets due to the high vaporization rate of liquid nitrogen was avoided by sampling the spray very close to the atomizer, i.e., 1.3 cm downstream of the nozzle orifice. The presence of high velocity and thermal gradients in the gas phase also made sampling of the particles difficult. As a result, it was necessary to correct the measurements for background noise produced by both highly turbulent gas flows and thermally induced density gradients in the gas phase.

  7. Spray measurements of aerothermodynamic effect on disintegrating liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to determine the effect of atomizing gas mass flux and temperature on liquid jet breakup in sonic velocity gas flow. Characteristic drop size data were obtained by using the following atomizing gases: nitrogen, argon, and helium to breakup water jets in high velocity gas flow. A scattered light scanning instrument developed at Lewis Research Center was used to measure Sauter mean diameter (SMD). The three gases gave a molecular weight range of 4 to 40 and atomizing gas mass flux and temperature were varied from 6 to 50 g/sq cm and 275-400 K, respectively. The ratio of liquid jet diameter to SMD, D(sub 0)/D(sub 32), was correlated with aerodynamic and liquid-surface force ratios, i.e., the product of the Weber and Reynolds number, We Re, the gas to liquid density ratio, rho(sub g)/rho(sub 1) g and also the molecular scale dimensionless group, rho(sub 1)(Vm exp 3)/ mu(sub 1) g, to give the following expression: D(sub 0)/D(sub 32) = 0.90 x 10(exp -8) x (We Re rho sub g/rho sub 1)exp 0.44 x (rho sub 1 Vm exp 3/mu sub 1 g)exp 0.67 where We Re = ((rho sub g)exp 2(D sub 0)exp 2(V sub C)exp3))/ mu sub 1 sigma, mu sub 1 is liquid viscosity, sigma is surface tension, V sub C is the acoustic gas velocity, V sub m is the RMS velocity of gas molecules, and g is the acceleration of gas molecules due to gravity. Good agreement was obtained with atomization theory for liquid-jet breakup in the regime of aerodynamic stripping. Also, due to its low molecular weight and high acoustic velocity, helium was considerably more effective than nitrogen or argon in producing small-droplet sprays with values of D(sub 32) on the order of 5 microns.

  8. Spray Characterization of Gas-to-Liquid Synthetic Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza

    2011-11-01

    In the recent years, development of alternative jet fuels is gaining importance owing to the demand for cleaner combustion. In addition to having energy density that matches those of conventional fuels, alternate jet fuels need to possess vital qualities such as rapid atomization and vaporization, quick re-ignition at high altitude, less emission, and poses ease of handling. The fuel preparatory steps (atomization and vaporization) and mixing in a combustion chamber play a crucial role on the subsequent combustion and emission characteristics. Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) synthetic jet fuel obtained from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has grabbed the global attention due to its cleaner combustion characteristics as a result of the absence of aromatics and sulphur. As a part of an on-going joint effort between Texas A&M at Qatar (TAMUQ), Rolls-Royce (UK), and German Aerospace Laboratory (DLR), a spray characterization experimental facility is set up at TAMUQ to study the spray characteristics of GTL fuel and highlights the influence of change in fuel composition on the spray characteristics. In this work, spray characteristics such as droplet size, velocity, and distribution of different GTL fuel blends is investigated and compared with the spray characteristics of conventional JetA1 fuel. Supported by Qatar Science and Technology Park, QSTP.

  9. Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Amoco and Lummus Crest are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. In addition to the maximum jet fuel schemes, conceptual designs have also been formulated for maximizing profits from refining of the Great Plains by-products. Conceptual processing schemes for profitable production of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X have been developed, as has a maximum profit'' case. All four of these additional cases have now been transferred to Lummus for design and integration studies. Development of these schemes required the use of linear programming technology. This technology includes not only conventional refining processes which have been adapted for use with coal-derived liquids (e.g. hydrotreating, hydrocracking), but also processes which may be uniquely suited to the Great Plains by-products such as cresylic acid extraction, hydordealkylation, and needle coking. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Initial instability of round liquid jet at subcritical and supercritical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2016-07-01

    In the present experimental work, the behavior of laminar liquid jet in its own vapor as well as supercritical fluid environment is conducted. Also the study of liquid jet injection into nitrogen (N2) environment is carried out at supercritical conditions. It is expected that the injected liquid jet would undergo thermodynamic transition to the chamber condition and this would alter the behavior of the injected jet. Moreover at such conditions there is a strong dependence between thermodynamic and fluid dynamic processes. Thus the thermodynamic transition has its effect on the initial instability as well as the breakup nature of the injected liquid jet. In the present study, the interfacial disturbance wavelength, breakup characteristics, and mixing behavior are analysed for the fluoroketone liquid jet that is injected into N2 environment as well as into its own vapor at subcritical to supercritical conditions. It is observed that at subcritical chamber conditions, the injected liquid jet exhibits classical liquid jet characteristics with Rayleigh breakup at lower Weber number and Taylor breakup at higher Weber number for both N2 and its own environment. At supercritical chamber conditions with its own environment, the injected liquid jet undergoes sudden thermodynamic transition to chamber conditions and single phase mixing characteristics is observed. However, the supercritical chamber conditions with N2 as ambient fluid does not have significant effect on the thermodynamic transition of the injected liquid jet.

  11. Functionalization of carbon nanowalls by plasma jet in liquid treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, Maria D.; Vizireanu, Sorin; Stoica, Silviu D.; Ionita, Mariana; Pandele, Andreea M.; Cucu, Ana; Stamatin, Ioan; Nistor, Leona C.; Dinescu, Gheorghe

    2016-02-01

    Submerged in liquid plasma treatment is a new approach for nanomaterials functionalization. This paper presents a surfactant free method for functionalization of graphene nano-platelets derived from carbon nanowalls through plasma jet treatment of their water suspensions. The untreated and under-liquid plasma treated suspensions were characterized in terms of their UV-Vis absorption, zeta-size, zeta-potential, pH, and conductivity. Investigation of dried material revealed that the graphene nano-sheets morphology and structure have been preserved, showing also new oxygen functional groups bonded to the carbon network after in liquid plasma treatment. The results demonstrate the efficiency of this technique in changing the properties of carbon nanowalls suspensions and also in getting functionalized multilayered graphene sheets.

  12. Nanoscale Liquid Jets Shape New Line of Business

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Just as a pistol shrimp stuns its prey by quickly closing its oversized claw to shoot out a shock-inducing, high-velocity jet of water, NanoMatrix, Inc., is sending shockwaves throughout the nanotechnology world with a revolutionary, small-scale fabrication process that uses powerful liquid jets to cut and shape objects. Emanuel Barros, a former project engineer at NASA s Ames Research Center, set out to form the Santa Cruz, California-based NanoMatrix firm and materialize the micro/nano cutting process partially inspired by the water-spewing crustacean. Early on in his 6-year NASA career, Barros led the development of re-flown flight hardware for an award-winning Spacelab project called NeuroLab. This project, the sixteenth and final Spacelab mission, focused on a series of experiments to determine the effects of microgravity on the development of the mammalian nervous system.

  13. Modeling of Turbulence Effects on Liquid Jet Atomization and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations and physical modeling studies have indicated that turbulence behaviors within a liquid jet have considerable effects on the atomization process. This study aims to model the turbulence effect in the atomization process of a cylindrical liquid jet. Two widely used models, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz (blob model) and the Taylor-Analogy-Breakup (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O Rourke et al, are further extended to include turbulence effects. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic scales and the initial flow conditions. For the secondary breakup, an additional turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. The drop size formed from this breakup regime is estimated based on the energy balance before and after the breakup occurrence. This paper describes theoretical development of the current models, called "T-blob" and "T-TAB", for primary and secondary breakup respectivety. Several assessment studies are also presented in this paper.

  14. Acoustic excitation of liquid fuel droplets and coaxial jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Juan Ignacio

    This experimental study focuses on two important problems relevant to acoustic coupling with condensed phase transport processes, with special relevance to liquid rocket engine and airbreathing engine combustion instabilities. The first part of this dissertation describes droplet combustion characteristics of various fuels during exposure to external acoustical perturbations. Methanol, ethanol, a liquid synthetic fuel derived from coal gasification via the Fischer-Tropsch process, and a blend of aviation fuel and the synthetic fuel are used. During acoustic excitation, the droplet is situated at or near a pressure node condition, where the droplet experiences the largest velocity perturbations, and at or near a pressure antinode condition, where the droplet is exposed to minimal velocity fluctuations. For unforced conditions, the values of the droplet burning rate constant K of the different fuels are consistent with data in the literature. The location of the droplet with respect to a pressure node or antinode also has a measurable effect on droplet burning rates, which are different for different fuels and in some cases are as high as 28% above the unforced burning rate value. Estimates of flame extinction due to acoustic forcing for different fuels are also obtained. The second part of this work consists of an experimental study on coaxial jet behavior under non-reactive, cryogenic conditions, with direct applications to flow mixing and unstable behavior characterization in liquid rocket engines. These experiments, conducted with nitrogen, span a range of outer to inner jet momentum flux ratios from 0.013 to 23, and explore subcritical, nearcritical and supercritical pressure conditions, with and without acoustic excitation, for two injector geometries. Acoustic forcing at 3 kHz is utilized to maximize the pressure fluctuations within the chamber acting on the jet, reaching maximum values of 4% of the mean chamber pressure. The effect of the magnitude and phase

  15. Impinging jet spray formation using non-Newtonian liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Neil S.

    Over the past two decades there has been a heightened interest in implementing gelled propellants for rocket propulsion, especially for hypergolic bi-propellants such as monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer (NTO). Due to the very high level of toxicity of hypergolic liquid rocket propellants, increasing safety is an important area of need for continued space exploration and defense operations. Gelled propellants provide an attractive solution to meeting the requirements for safety, while also potentially improving performance. A gelling agent can be added to liquid propellants exhibiting Newtonian behavior to transform the liquid into a non-Newtonian fluid with some solid-like behavior, i.e. a gel. Non-Newtonian jet impingement is very different from its Newtonian counterpart in terms of fluid flow, atomization, and combustion. This is due to the added agents changing physical properties such as the bulk rheology (viscosity) and interfacial rheology (surface tension). Spray characterization of jet impingement with Newtonian liquids has been studied extensively in existing literature. However, there is a scarcity in literature of studies that consider the spray characterization of jet impingement with gelled propellants. This is a rather critical void since a major tradeoff of utilizing gelled propellants is the difficulty with atomization due to the increased effective viscosity. However, this difficulty can be overcome by using gels that exhibit shear-thinning behavior---viscosity decreases with increasing strain rate. Shear-thinning fluids are ideal because they have the distinct advantage of only flowing easily upon pressure. Thereby, greatly reducing the amount of propellant that could be accidentally leaked during both critical functions such as liftoff or engagement in the battlefield and regular tasks like refilling propellant tanks. This experimental work seeks to help resolve the scarcity in existing literature by providing drop size

  16. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur; McClure, John; Avila, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Torque and plunge force during the initial plunge phase in Friction Stir Welding were measured for a 0.5 inch diameter pin entering a 2219 aluminum alloy plate. Weld structures were preserved for metallographic observation by making emergency stops at various plunge depths. The plunging pin tool is seen to be surrounded by a very fine grained layer of recrystallized metal extending substantially below the bottom of the pin, implying a shear interface in the metal below and not at the tool-metal interface. Torque and plunge force during the initial plunge phase in Friction Stir Welding are calculated from a straight forward model based on a concept to plastic flow in the vicinity of the plunging tool compatible with structural observations. The concept: a disk of weld metal seized to and rotating with the bottom of the pin is squeezed out laterally by the plunge force and extruded upwards in a hollow cylinder around the tool. As the shear surface separating rotating disk from stationary weld metal engulfs fresh metal, the fresh metal is subjected to severe shear deformation, which results in its recrystallization. Encouraging agreement between computations and measured torque and plunge force is obtained.

  17. Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, C.L.

    1990-06-01

    Samples of jet fuel (JP-4, JP-8, JP-8X) produced from the liquid by-products of the gasification of lignite coal from the Great Plains Gasification Plant were analyzed to determine the quantity and type of organo-oxygen compounds present. Results were compared to similar fuel samples produced from petroleum. Large quantities of oxygen compounds were found in the coal-derived liquids and were removed in the refining process. Trace quantities of organo-oxygenate compounds were suspected to be present in the refined fuels. Compounds were identified and quantified as part of an effort to determine the effect of these compounds in fuel instability. Results of the analysis showed trace levels of phenols, naphthols, benzofurans, hexanol, and hydrogenated naphthols were present in levels below 100 ppM. 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Liquid Jet Atomization Including Turbulence Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Chen, C. P.; Balasubramanyam, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes numerical implementation of a newly developed hybrid model, T-blob/T-TAB, into an existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program for primary and secondary breakup simulation of liquid jet atomization. This model extend two widely used models, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz (blob model) and the Taylor-Analogy-Breakup (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O'Rourke and Amsden to include turbulence effects. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic scales and the initial flow conditions. For the secondary breakup, an additional turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. Several assessment studies are presented and the results indicate that the existing KH and TAB models tend to under-predict the product drop size and spray angle, while the current model provides superior results when compared with the measured data.

  19. Atmospheric pressure plasma jets interacting with liquid covered tissue: touching and not-touching the liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Tian, Wei; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-11-01

    In the use of atmospheric pressure plasma jets in biological applications, the plasma-produced charged and neutral species in the plume of the jet often interact with a thin layer of liquid covering the tissue being treated. The plasma-produced reactivity must then penetrate through the liquid layer to reach the tissue. In this computational investigation, a plasma jet created by a single discharge pulse at three different voltages was directed onto a 200 µm water layer covering tissue followed by a 10 s afterglow. The magnitude of the voltage and its pulse length determined if the ionization wave producing the plasma plume reached the surface of the liquid. When the ionization wave touches the surface, significantly more charged species were created in the water layer with H3O+aq, O3-aq, and O2-aq being the dominant terminal species. More aqueous OHaq, H2O2aq, and O3aq were also formed when the plasma plume touches the surface. The single pulse examined here corresponds to a low repetition rate plasma jet where reactive species would be blown out of the volume between pulses and there is not recirculation of flow or turbulence. For these conditions, NxOy species do not accumulate in the volume. As a result, aqueous nitrites, nitrates, and peroxynitrite, and the HNO3aq and HOONOaq, which trace their origin to solvated NxOy, have low densities.

  20. Impulsive plunging wave breaking downstream of a bump in a shallow water flume—Part I: Experimental observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Donghoon; Ghosh, Surajeet; Reins, George; Koo, Bonguk; Wang, Zhaoyuan; Stern, Frederick

    2012-07-01

    The plunging wave-breaking process for impulsive flow over a bump in a shallow water flume is described, which is relevant to ship hydrodynamics albeit for an idealized geometry since it includes the effects of wave-body interactions and the wave breaking direction is opposite to the mean flow. This paper consists of two parts, which deal with experimental measurements and numerical simulations, respectively. In Part I, ensemble-averaged measurements are conducted, including the overall flume flow, 2-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) center-plane velocities, turbulence inside the breaking wave, and bottom pressures under the breaking wave. A series of individual plunging wave-breaking tests were conducted, which all followed a similar time line consisting of startup, steep wave formation, plunging wave breaking, and chaotic wave breaking swept downstream time phases. The plunging wave breaking process consists of four repeated plunging events each with three [jet impact (plunge), oblique splash and vertical jet] sub-events, which were identified first using a complementary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study. Video images with red dye display the plunging wave breaking events and sub-events. The wave profile at maximum height, first plunge, bump and wave breaking vortex and entrapped air tube trajectories, entrapped air tube diameters, kinetic, potential, and total energy are analyzed. Similarities and differences are discussed with the previous deep water or sloping beach experimental and computational studies. The numerical simulations using the exact experimental initial and boundary conditions are presented in Part II of this paper.

  1. Korteweg-de Vries solitons on electrified liquid jets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiming; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T; Vanden-Broeck, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    The propagation of axisymmetric waves on the surface of a liquid jet under the action of a radial electric field is considered. The jet is assumed to be inviscid and perfectly conducting, and a field is set up by placing the jet concentrically inside a perfectly cylindrical tube whose wall is maintained at a constant potential. A nontrivial interaction arises between the hydrodynamics and the electric field in the annulus, resulting in the formation of electrocapillary waves. The main objective of the present study is to describe nonlinear aspects of such axisymmetric waves in the weakly nonlinear regime, which is valid for long waves relative to the undisturbed jet radius. This is found to be possible if two conditions hold: the outer electrode radius is not too small, and the applied electric field is sufficiently strong. Under these conditions long waves are shown to be dispersive and a weakly nonlinear theory can be developed to describe the evolution of the disturbances. The canonical system that arises is the Kortweg-de Vries equation with coefficients that vary as the electric field and the electrode radius are varied. Interestingly, the coefficient of the highest-order third derivative term does not change sign and remains strictly positive, whereas the coefficient α of the nonlinear term can change sign for certain values of the parameters. This finding implies that solitary electrocapillary waves are possible; there are waves of elevation for α>0 and of depression for α<0. Regions in parameter space are identified where such waves are found. PMID:26172797

  2. Korteweg-de Vries solitons on electrified liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.; Vanden-Broeck, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    The propagation of axisymmetric waves on the surface of a liquid jet under the action of a radial electric field is considered. The jet is assumed to be inviscid and perfectly conducting, and a field is set up by placing the jet concentrically inside a perfectly cylindrical tube whose wall is maintained at a constant potential. A nontrivial interaction arises between the hydrodynamics and the electric field in the annulus, resulting in the formation of electrocapillary waves. The main objective of the present study is to describe nonlinear aspects of such axisymmetric waves in the weakly nonlinear regime, which is valid for long waves relative to the undisturbed jet radius. This is found to be possible if two conditions hold: the outer electrode radius is not too small, and the applied electric field is sufficiently strong. Under these conditions long waves are shown to be dispersive and a weakly nonlinear theory can be developed to describe the evolution of the disturbances. The canonical system that arises is the Kortweg-de Vries equation with coefficients that vary as the electric field and the electrode radius are varied. Interestingly, the coefficient of the highest-order third derivative term does not change sign and remains strictly positive, whereas the coefficient α of the nonlinear term can change sign for certain values of the parameters. This finding implies that solitary electrocapillary waves are possible; there are waves of elevation for α >0 and of depression for α <0 . Regions in parameter space are identified where such waves are found.

  3. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to understand the physics of material removal by jet-machining processes. Experiments were performed to delineate conditions under which liquid jet impacts will cause mass removal, and to determine optimum jet-cutting conditions. Theoretical analyses have also been carried out to study the effects of multiple jet-droplet impacts on a target surface as a material deformation mechanism. The calculated target response and spallation behavior following droplet impacts and their physical implications are also discussed.

  4. A liquid jet setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex liquids at free-electron laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, I.; Walther, M.; Lehmkühler, F.; Wochner, P.; Valerio, J.; Mager, R.; Schroer, M. A.; Lee, S.; Roseker, W.; Jain, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Hartmann, R.; Huth, M.; Strüder, L.; Sprung, M.; Robert, A.; Fuoss, P. H.; Stephenson, G. B.; Grübel, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex fluids using a liquid jet. The setup supports Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS/WAXS) geometries. The jet is formed by a gas-dynamic virtual nozzle (GDVN) allowing for diameters ranging between 1 μm and 20 μm at a jet length of several hundred μm. To control jet properties such as jet length, diameter, or flow rate, the instrument is equipped with several diagnostic tools. Three microscopes are installed to quantify jet dimensions and stability in situ. The setup has been used at several beamlines performing both SAXS and WAXS experiments. As a typical example we show an experiment on a colloidal dispersion in a liquid jet at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser.

  5. A liquid jet setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex liquids at free-electron laser sources.

    PubMed

    Steinke, I; Walther, M; Lehmkühler, F; Wochner, P; Valerio, J; Mager, R; Schroer, M A; Lee, S; Roseker, W; Jain, A; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Hartmann, R; Huth, M; Strüder, L; Sprung, M; Robert, A; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Grübel, G

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex fluids using a liquid jet. The setup supports Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS/WAXS) geometries. The jet is formed by a gas-dynamic virtual nozzle (GDVN) allowing for diameters ranging between 1 μm and 20 μm at a jet length of several hundred μm. To control jet properties such as jet length, diameter, or flow rate, the instrument is equipped with several diagnostic tools. Three microscopes are installed to quantify jet dimensions and stability in situ. The setup has been used at several beamlines performing both SAXS and WAXS experiments. As a typical example we show an experiment on a colloidal dispersion in a liquid jet at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser. PMID:27370468

  6. The Bouncing Jet: A Newtonian Liquid Rebounding off a Free Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrasher, Matthew; Jung, Sunghwan; Pang, Yee Kwong; Chuu, Chih-Piao; Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-10-01

    We find that a liquid jet can bounce off a bath of the same liquid if the bath is moving horizontally with respect to the jet. Previous observations of jets rebounding off a bath (e.g. Kaye effect) have been reported only for non-Newtonian fluids, while we observe bouncing jets in a variety of Newtonian fluids, including mineral oil poured by hand. A thin layer of air separates the bouncing jet from the bath, and the relative motion replenishes the film of air. Jets with one or two bounces are stable for a range of viscosity, jet flow rate and velocity, and bath velocity. The bouncing jet phenomenon can be observed in many household fluids using only minimal equipment, making it accessible as a classroom demonstration and a science project.

  7. Effect of nozzle length-to-diameter ratio on atomization of turbulent liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osta, Anu Ranjan

    Breakup of liquid jets is of considerable interest motivated by its applicability in combustion and propulsion systems (CI and SI engines), and agricultural fertilizer/pesticide sprays, among others. Almost all of the practical liquid injectors introduce some degree of turbulence in the liquid jet leaving the injector passage and an intriguing question is the relative importance of the liquid turbulence, cavitation, and the aerodynamic forces in the breakup processes of fuel injectors. A better design of liquid fuel injector would reduce pollutants and increase the efficiency of liquid fuel combustion processes. An experimental study to investigate the effect of nozzle length to diameter ratio on the surface properties of turbulent liquid jets in gaseous crossflow and still air was carried out. Straight cavitation-free nozzles with length/diameter ratios of 10, 20 and 40 were used to generate turbulent liquid jets in gaseous crossflow. The present study was limited to small Ohnesorge number liquid jets (Oh < 0.01) injected in crossflow within the shear breakup regime (WeG > 110). The diagnostics consisted of pulsed shadowgraphy, pulsed digital holographic microscopy and x-ray diagnostics. The x-ray tests were conducted at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) facility of Argonne National Laboratory. The test matrix was designed to maintain the same aerodynamic forces in order to isolate the effects of jet turbulence on the breakup process. The measurements included liquid jet surface properties, breakup location of the liquid column as a whole, the breakup regime transitions, bubble size inside the jet and seeding particle displacement inside the jet structures. The results include the jet surface characteristics, the liquid column breakup lengths, bubble growth, and phenomenological analysis to explain the observed results. It is observed that for a jet breakup in crossflow the injector passage length does play a role in determining the breakup length as well as

  8. Development of a liquid jet model for implementation in a 3-dimensional Eularian analysis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschman, Francis X., III

    The ability to model the thermal behavior of a nuclear reactor is of utmost importance to the reactor designer. Condensation is an important phenomenon when modeling a reactor system's response to a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA). Condensation is even more important with the use of passive safety systems which rely on condensation heat transfer for long term cooling. The increasing use of condensation heat transfer, including condensation on jets of water, in safety systems puts added pressure to correctly model this phenomenon with thermal-hydraulic system and sub-channel analysis codes. In this work, a stand alone module with which to simulate condensation on a liquid jet was developed and then implemented within a reactor vessel analysis code to improve that code's handling of jet condensation. It is shown that the developed liquid jet model vastly improves the ability of COBRA-TF to model condensation on turbulent liquid jets. The stand alone jet model and the coupled liquid jet COBRA-TF have been compared to experimental data. Jet condensation heat transfer experiments by Celata et al. with a variety of jet diameters, velocities, and subcooling were utilized to evaluate the models. A sensitivity study on the effects of noncondensables on jet condensation was also carried out using the stand alone jet model.

  9. Photoionization of Sodium Salt Solutions in a Liquid Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Grieves, G. A.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Herring-Captain, J.; Olanrewaju, B.; Aleksandrov, A.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2008-06-05

    A liquid microjet was employed to examine the gas/liquid interface of aqueous sodium halide (Na+X-, X=Cl, Br, I) salt solutions. Laser excitation at 193 nm produced and removed cations of the form H+(H2O)n and Na+(H2O)m from liquid jet surfaces containing either NaCl, NaBr or NaI. The protonated water cluster yield varied inversely with increasing salt concentration, while the solvated sodium ion cluster yield varied by anion type. The distribution of H+(H2O)n at low salt concentration is identical to that observed from low-energy electron irradiated amorphous ice and the production of these clusters can be accounted for using a localized ionization/Coulomb expulsion model. Production of Na+(H2O)m is not accounted for by this model but requires ionization of solvation shell waters and a contact ion/Coulomb expulsion mechanism. The reduced yields of Na+(H2O)m from high concentration (10-2 and 10-1 M) NaBr and NaI solutions indicate a propensity for Br- and I- at the solution surfaces and interfaces. This is supported by the observation of multiphoton induced production and desorption of Br+ and I+ from the 10-2 and 10-1 M solution surfaces.

  10. Practical Electrode System for EHD Liquid Jet Generation and Properties of Liquid Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanaoka, Ryoichi; Hosodani, Naoki; Takahashi, Ichiro; Takata, Shinzo; Fukami, Tadashi

    The coaxial cone to rod electrode system was devised to generate a powerful electrohydrodynamic (EHD) liquid jet and the performance as a liquid pump was investigated using an isothermal weakly conducting liquid, HFC43-10. When a positive dc voltage was applied to the rod electrode, the liquid spouted forcibly from the glass tube outlet installed in the top of grounded conical electrode. The properties of liquid jet: pumping pressure, flow velocity and flow pattern were examined for the electrode systems with various cone angles (θ =40°∼90°) of the conical electrode. The potential distribution in the electrode gap and the conduction current also were measured as a function of applied voltage. In this paper, it is shown that the pumping pressure is almost independent of the cone angle of electrode systems as well as the flow velocity, but is raised effectively by a partial insulating coating of rod electrode surface and the current is reduced by a coating. The potential distribution in the gap revealed the existence of heterocharge layer in the vicinity of the electrode surfaces. It is considered that the EHD pumping in this study is attributed to a space charge layer with single ionic polarity near the rod electrode, which is formed by a non-uniform electric field.

  11. Effect of gravity on capillary instability of liquid jets.

    PubMed

    Amini, Ghobad; Ihme, Matthias; Dolatabadi, Ali

    2013-05-01

    The effect of gravity on the onset and growth rate of capillary instabilities in viscous liquid jets is studied. To this end, a spatial linear stability analysis of Cosserat's equations is performed using a multiscale expansion technique. A dispersion relation and expressions for the perturbation amplitude are derived to evaluate the growth rate of the most unstable axisymmetric disturbance mode. Modeling results are compared with classical results in the limit of zero Bond number, confirming the validity of this approach. Expressions for the critical Weber number, demarcating the transition between convective and absolute instability are derived as functions of capillary and Bond numbers. Parametric investigations for a range of relevant operating conditions (characterized by capillary, Weber, and Bond numbers) are performed to examine the jet breakup and the perturbation growth rate. In addition to the physical insight that is obtained from this investigation, the results that are presented in this work could also be of relevance as test cases for the algorithmic development and the verification of high-fidelity multiphase simulation codes. PMID:23767630

  12. Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design in the later phases of the contract. Experimental work to date has shown that the tar oil stream requires substantially more severe processing than the preliminary design estimates indicated. A new design basis is now being tested and samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X are in production, based on that new, more severe processing scheme. Six barrels of tar oil have been hydrotreated according to the first step of the processing scheme and will be used to produce barrel quantities of JP-8. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Amoco and Lummus-Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design in the later phases of the contract. Samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels have been manufactured from the Great Plains tar oil. Larger samples of JP-8 are nearly completed. Specification of a design basis for profitable production of JP-8 is under way. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Amoco and Lummus-Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design. Samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels have been manufactured from the Great Plains tar oil. Larger samples of JP-8 have also been produced and shipped to the US Air Force for further testing. Lummus-Crest Inc. is now completing a preliminary process design for the profitable production of JP-8 and has made recommendations for a production run to produce larger quantities of JP-8. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Normal Impingement of a Circular Liquid Jet onto a Screen in a Weightless Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, E. P.

    1976-01-01

    The normal impingement of a circular liquid jet onto a fine-mesh screen in a weightless environment was investigated. Equations were developed to predict the velocity of the emerging jet on the downstream side of the screen as a function of screen and liquid parameters and of the velocity of the impinging jet. Additionally, the stability of the emerging jet was found to be Weber number dependent. In general, excepting at high velocities, the screen behaved much as a baffle, deflecting the major portion of the impinging flow.

  16. Thinning and rupture of liquid films by moving slot jets.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Christian W J; Zeegers, Jos C H; Darhuber, Anton A

    2013-12-23

    We present systematic experiments of the rupture and dewetting of thin films of a nonvolatile polar liquid on partially wetting substrates due to a moving slot jet, which impinges at normal incidence. The relative motion was provided by a custom-built spin coater with a bidirectionally accessible axis of rotation that enabled us to measure film thickness profiles in situ as a function of substrate velocity using dual-wavelength interference microscopy. On partially wetting polymeric substrates, dry spots form in liquid films with a residual thickness well below 1 μm. We measured the density of dry spots as well as the density and size distribution of the residual droplets as a function of film thickness. In a certain parameter range, the droplet distributions exhibit pronounced anisotropy due to the effect of long-range shear stresses on the dewetting rim instability. We find robust power-law scaling relations over a large range of film thicknesses and a striking similarity to literature data obtained with ultrathin polymer melt layers on silicon substrates. PMID:24299431

  17. Measurement of intact-core length of atomizing liquid jets by image deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Roger; Burch, Robert; Kuo, Kenneth; Cheung, Fan-Bill

    1993-11-01

    The investigation of liquid jet breakup and spray development is critical to the understanding of combustion phenomena in liquid propellant rocket engines. Much work has been done to characterize low-speed liquid jet breakup and dilute sprays, but atomizing jets and dense sprays have yielded few quantitative measurements due to their high liquid load fractions and hence their optical opacity. Focus was on a characteristic of the primary breakup process of round liquid jets, namely the length of the intact-liquid core. The specific application considered is that of shear-coaxial-type rocket engine injectors in which liquid oxygen is injected through the center post while high velocity gaseous hydrogen is injected through a concentric annulus, providing a shear force to the liquid jet surface. Real-time x ray radiography, capable of imaging through the dense two-phase region surrounding the liquid core, is used to make the measurements. The intact-liquid-core length data were obtained and interpreted using two conceptually different methods to illustrate the effects of chamber pressure, gas-to-liquid momentum ratio, and cavitation.

  18. Measurement of intact-core length of atomizing liquid jets by image deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Roger; Burch, Robert; Kuo, Kenneth; Cheung, Fan-Bill

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of liquid jet breakup and spray development is critical to the understanding of combustion phenomena in liquid propellant rocket engines. Much work has been done to characterize low-speed liquid jet breakup and dilute sprays, but atomizing jets and dense sprays have yielded few quantitative measurements due to their high liquid load fractions and hence their optical opacity. Focus was on a characteristic of the primary breakup process of round liquid jets, namely the length of the intact-liquid core. The specific application considered is that of shear-coaxial-type rocket engine injectors in which liquid oxygen is injected through the center post while high velocity gaseous hydrogen is injected through a concentric annulus, providing a shear force to the liquid jet surface. Real-time x ray radiography, capable of imaging through the dense two-phase region surrounding the liquid core, is used to make the measurements. The intact-liquid-core length data were obtained and interpreted using two conceptually different methods to illustrate the effects of chamber pressure, gas-to-liquid momentum ratio, and cavitation.

  19. Red Giant Plunging Through Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (left panel) shows the 'bow shock' of a dying star named R Hydrae, or R Hya, in the constellation Hydra.

    Bow shocks are formed where the stellar wind from a star are pushed into a bow shape (illustration, right panel) as the star plunges through the gas and dust between stars. Our own Sun has a bow shock, but prior to this image one had never been observed around this particular class of red giant star.

    R Hya moves through space at approximately 50 kilometers per second. As it does so, it discharges dust and gas into space. Because the star is relatively cool, that ejecta quickly assumes a solid state and collides with the interstellar medium. The resulting dusty nebula is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected using an infrared telescope. This bow shock is 16,295 astronomical units from the star to the apex and 6,188 astronomical units thick (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The mass of the bow shock is about 400 times the mass of the Earth.

    The false-color Spitzer image shows infrared emissions at 70 microns. Brighter colors represent greater intensities of infrared light at that wavelength. The location of the star itself is drawn onto the picture in the black 'unobserved' region in the center.

  20. A new device for generating thin jets of highly-viscous liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuki, Hajime; Oi, Yuto; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Thin liquid jets are applied to various devices, such as ink-jet printers. However, it is challenging to generate liquid jets of highly-viscous liquids (~ 1,000 cSt) using existing methods. To overcome this challenge, we invent a highly-viscous liquid-jet generator. This device has simple structure as follows: a wettable-thin tube is inserted into a liquid filled container. We keep the liquid level inside a thin tube deeper than that outside of the tube. When an impulsive force acts on the bottom of the container, a thin jet is generated. The jet is up to 20 times faster than the initial velocity given by the impulsive force. We successfully generate jets with a wide range of viscosity (1-1,000 cSt). We also propose the physical model based on pressure-impulse approach to rationalize its mechanism. Inside the thin tube, a gradient of pressure impulse is much larger than that outside of the tube. We verify the performance of our device experimentally. We find that the proposed model can describe all experimental results in this research. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26709007.

  1. Removal of metals and ceramics by combined effects of micro liquid jet and laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Daehwan; Seo, Changho; Kim, Dongsik

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we analyze a hybrid laser/liquid jet micromachining process for several metals and ceramics based on the optical breakdown of a microdroplet. In the process, materials are removed by the combined effects of a laser pulse and a high-speed pulsed microjet ejected from the microdroplet. The opto-hydrodynamic phenomena occurring during this process and the interaction of the laser/liquid jet with various materials, including copper, aluminum, stainless steel, alumina, and boron nitride, are investigated experimentally. The results show that the laser/liquid jet can remove the materials with substantially increased removal rates and reduced thermal side effects compared with the conventional pulsed laser ablation process. Visualization of the process reveals that the materials are partially ablated and melted by the laser pulse during the early stage of the process and that the molten material is subsequently eliminated by the hydrodynamic impact of the liquid jet.

  2. Analysis of heat transfer for a normally impinging liquid-metal slot jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1973-01-01

    A two-dimensional liquid-metal slot jet that is impinging normally against a uniformly heated flat plate is analyzed. The distributions of wall temperature and heat-transfer coefficient are obtained as functions of position along the plate. The liquid-metal assumptions are made that the jet is inviscid and that molecular condition is dominating heat diffusion. The solution is obtained by mapping the jet flow region into a potential plane where it occupies a strip of uniform width. The energy equation is transformed into potential coordinates, and an exact solution obtained in the strip region. Conformal mapping is then used to transform the solution into the physical plane.

  3. On the spatial stability of a liquid jet in the presence of vapor cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lü, Ming; Ning, Zhi Lu, Mei; Yan, Kai; Fu, Juan; Sun, Chunhua

    2013-11-15

    A dispersion equation describing the effect of temperature differences on the stability of three-dimensional cylindrical liquid jets in the presence of vapor cavities is presented by the use of linear stability analysis. The mathematical model and its solving method are verified by comparing them with the data in the literature, and then the effect of temperature differences between jet and surrounding gas on the spatial stability of liquid jet is investigated. Some conclusions can be drawn from the results of this investigation: (1) the temperature difference destabilizes the liquid jet when the jet liquid is cooler than the surrounding gas, (2) the smallest atomized droplet without taking into account the effect of temperature differences is significantly larger than that when the effect of temperature differences is taken into account, (3) the effect of temperature differences on the stability of liquid jet has little relationship with azimuthal wave modes, (4) cavitation destabilizes the liquid jet when the value of the bubble volume fraction is not greater than 0.1 (0 ≤ α ≤ 0.1), and the temperature difference can weaken this effect of cavitation on the stability of liquid jet, and (5) cavitation is responsible for generating smaller droplets, the effect of cavitation on the critical wave number with and without taking into account the effect of temperature differences is quite different, and temperature difference is likely to fully restrain the effect of cavitation on the critical wave number; however, cavitation is again responsible for generating smaller droplets despite the effect of temperature differences when the bubble volume fraction α = 0.1. These findings may explain some observations of practical atomizer performance.

  4. Experimental study on gas-liquid flow characteristics of submerged air jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, S. J.; Liu, J. T.; Miao, T. C.; Wu, D. Z.

    2016-05-01

    The gas-liquid flow structure and interfacial behavior of submerged air jets were investigated experimentally using high speed digital video camera and image processing techniques. The jet pressure ratio varied from 1.8 to 4.8 in the experiment. And results from different jet nozzles were processed and compared. Statistical characteristics of the jet diameters along the axial distance were obtained and analyzed. Time series analysis was implemented to study the interface unsteadiness by calculating the gas-liquid interface deviation. The results showed that the jet diameters increase first linearly then nonlinearly and its growth rate decreases along the axial distance. The reason for the divergence between the result of this experiment and those done by other researchers was analyzed. Comparing the results of different pressure ratios and nozzle diameters, we found that larger jet pressure ratios have larger jet diameters and nozzle diameters nearly have no bearing on the distribution of dimensionless jet diameters. The interface unsteadiness in low and high pressure ratios exhibited totally distinct properties. And a minimum unsteady value was found along the axis of the air jets.

  5. Impulsive plunging wave breaking downstream of a bump in a shallow water flume—Part II: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bonguk; Wang, Zhaoyuan; Yang, Jianming; Stern, Frederick

    2012-07-01

    Part II of this two-part paper presents the simulation results of the plunging wave-breaking generated by impulsive flow over a submerged bump fixed in a shallow water flume using the exact experimental initial and boundary conditions provided in Part I of this study. The overall plunging wave breaking process is described with major wave breaking events identified: jet plunge, oblique splash and vertical jet. These major events repeat up to four times before entering the chaotic breaking phase. The plunging wave breaking process of the simulations shows a similar time line as the experiments consisting of startup, steep wave formation, plunging wave, and chaotic wave breaking swept downstream time phases. Wave breaking profile, air entrainment, velocity, vorticity, flume bottom pressure, and energy are analyzed and compared with the experimental results. The simulations qualitatively predict all four time phases, all four plunging events and their sub-events. The wave profile and location at the maximum height is very close to the experiment results. The flume flow and velocity demonstrate the same flow trend as the experiments but with reduced velocity magnitudes. The simulations show similar bottom pressure to the experiments but with large oscillations, and the post-breaking water elevations are larger as compared to the experimental results.

  6. Deformation, wave phenomena, and breakup outcomes of round nonturbulent liquid jets in uniform gaseous crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chee-Loon

    Scope and method of study. An experimental and computational research is performed to study the deformation and breakup of round nonturbulent liquid jets in uniform gaseous crossflow. Pulsed photography and shadow graphy in conjunction with high-speed imaging were used to study the wave phenomena and the droplets properties/transport dynamics of a nonturbulent liquid jet injected into a uniform crossflow within the bag breakup regime. The computational study extended the previous two-dimensional study by adding the third dimension, allowing the wave properties to be modeled. The computational simulation employed the Volume of Fluid (VOF) formulation of FLUENT, and was run on a 3-processors parallel Linux cluster and P4 desktops. The validated, time-accurate, CFD simulation analyzes the surface properties of the liquid jets within the column, bag, and shear breakup regimes by considering the effects of surface tension, liquid viscosity, and crossflow Weber number at large liquid/gas density ratios (>500) and small Ohnesorge numbers (<0.1). Findings and conclusions. Present experimental results show that the column waves along the liquid jet are attributed to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and the nodes layout per bag affected the breakup mechanisms of the bags. Three distinctive sizes of droplets were produced in the bag breakup regime. The size of bag-droplets normalized by the nozzle exit diameter was constant. The different trajectories for bag- and node-droplets suggested that separation of bag- and node-droplets is possible. The computational results included jet deformations, jet cross-sectional area, jet velocity, wake velocity defect, wake width, and wavelengths of column and surface waves. Present computational results yielded a similarity solution for the inner wake region. In bag breakup, the lower pressure along the sides of the jet pulled the liquid away from both the upwind and downwind surfaces of the liquid cross-section. In shear breakup, the

  7. Equilibrium configurations of a jet of an ideally conducting liquid in an external nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubarev, N. M.; Zubareva, O. V.

    2016-06-01

    Possible equilibrium configurations of the free surface of a jet of an ideally conducting liquid placed in a nonuniform magnetic field are considered. The magnetic field is generated by two thin wires that are parallel to the jet and bear oppositely directed currents. Equilibrium is due to a balance between capillary and magnetic forces. For the plane symmetric case, when the jet deforms only in the plane of its cross section, two one-parameter families of exact solutions to the problem are derived using the method of conformal mapping. According to these solutions, a jet with an initially circular cross section deforms up to splitting into two separate jets. A criterion for jet splitting is derived by analyzing approximate two-parameter solutions.

  8. Analytical description of the breakup of liquid jets in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1993-01-01

    A viscous or inviscid cylindrical jet with surface tension in a vacuum tends to pinch due to the mechanism of capillary instability. Similarity solutions are constructed which describe this phenomenon as a critical time is encountered, for two physically distinct cases: inviscid jets governed by the Euler equations and highly viscous jets governed by the Stokes equations. In both cases the only assumption imposed is that at the time of pinching the jet shape has a radial length scale which is smaller than the axial length scale. For the inviscid case, we show that our solution corresponds exactly to one member of the one-parameter family of solutions obtained from slender jet theories and the shape of the jet is locally concave at breakup. For highly viscous jets our theory predicts local shapes which are monotonic increasing or decreasing indicating the formation of a mother drop connected to the jet by a thin fluid tube. This qualitative behavior is in complete agreement with both direct numerical simulations and experimental observations.

  9. High-order azimuthal instabilities on a cylindrical liquid jet driven by temporal and spatial perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1998-09-01

    A method has been developed to drive a cylindrical liquid jet unstable for deformations with axial wavelengths shorter than the circumference of the jet and azimuthal mode numbers greater than 0. The benefit of this method is that a cylindrical liquid jet can be broken into a spray with an average diameter smaller than the diameter of the initial jet. The higher-order instabilities were created by establishing initial conditions for the jet in space and time at the nozzle. An electromechanical transducer creates the applied temporal initial condition which is a sinusoidally varying velocity perturbation added to the steady velocity of the jet. The amplitude of the velocity perturbation can be as large as the jet's steady velocity and the energy in the applied velocity perturbation drives the instability. The spatial perturbation is created by placing perturbations in the circumference of the nozzle. As the velocity perturbation travels on the jet, its leading edge steepens and the trailing edge broadens in a manner analogous to the steepening of a pressure pulse in a compressible gas. If the driven velocity perturbation is sufficiently large, a shock or jump forms on the leading edge of the velocity pulse and the jet may break up into higher-order modes. A theoretical analysis of the breakup process, based on an adaptation of compressible fluid shock theory, is used to derive a fundamental lower bound on the spray's Sauter mean diameter as a function of the velocity perturbation amplitude. Techniques for approaching the theoretical minimum spray diameter by using the higher-order modes to atomize liquid jets are discussed.

  10. Liquid jet breakup and subsequent droplet dynamics under normal gravity and in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suñol, Francesc; González-Cinca, Ricard

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental study on the characteristics of liquid jets in different configurations. We consider jets injected perpendicular to gravity, jets injected parallel to gravity, and jets injected in a microgravity environment. We study the role played by gravity in the jet breakup length and in the dynamics of the droplets generated after breakup. We analyze droplets obtained in the dripping and jetting regimes, focusing the study on their size, trajectory, oscillation, and rotation. The particularities of the considered injection configurations are analyzed. In normal gravity conditions, in the dripping and jetting regimes, the breakup length increases with the Weber number. The transition between these regimes occurs at Wecr ≈ 3.2. Droplets are notably larger in the dripping regime than in the jetting one. In the latter case, droplet mean size decreases as the liquid flow rate is increased. In microgravity conditions, droplet trajectories form a conical shape due to droplet bouncing after collision. When a collision takes place, coalescence tends to occur at low modified Weber numbers (Wem < 2) while bouncing is observed at higher values (Wem > 2). The surface of a droplet oscillates after bouncing or coalescence events, following a damped oscillator behavior. The observed oscillation frequency agrees with theoretical predictions.

  11. Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Task 1 of the work, in which processes to produce each of the three jet fuels, JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X, were designed, has been completed. The formal Task 1 report should issue next quarter. Task 2 work was initiated this quarter. In Task 2, process conditions for producing jet fuel from the Great Plains tar oil stream will be verified and samples of each of the three jet fuels will be produced. Experimental work shows that the hydrotreating conditions specified in Task 1 will not convert sufficient aromatics in the tar oil to produce jet fuel. Alternative schemes have been proposed and are being tested in the laboratories at Amoco Research Center. The simplest of these schemes, in which the heavy ends from the hydrotreater are recycled to extinction, was tested and proved infeasible. A second stage, fixed bed hydrotreater will be added to the process along with the expanded bed, first-stage hydrotreater and the hydrocracker specified in the Task 1 design. Future work will include additional experiments to specify the best process configuration and production of samples of each of the three grades of jet fuel. 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Disintegration of planar liquid film impacted by two-dimensional gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehring, C.; Sirignano, W. A.

    2003-05-01

    The distortion and break-up of a thin planar liquid film impacted by two gas jets while discharging from a twin-fluid atomizer is studied numerically. The gas momentum vector has components normal and parallel to the liquid stream. Viscosity and compressibility are neglected in both the liquid phase and the gas phase. The reduced-dimension (lubrication) approximation is employed to describe the nonlinear distortion and breakup of the thin film. The gas-phase dynamics are modelled by using a boundary-element-method formulation. For the considered parameter range and for a given energy expenditure, direct modulation of liquid-phase velocities at the nozzle exit is found to be more effective in causing film rupture than indirect modulation via adjacent impacting gas jets. In the former case, dilational film modulation results in shorter breakup lengths than sinuous modulation. On the other hand, for gas-jet modulated films, sinuous mode forcing is more effective than dilational forcing for the same energy input. Co-flowing gas streams significantly alter wavelengths and amplitudes of film disturbances generated by direct film modulation. Large ratios of gas-jet momentum to liquid-film momentum result in "immediate" film rupture in response to the dynamics of the impacting gas jets, whereas for lower ratios films disintegration occurs further downstream after continuous growth of the initial disturbances. Film distortion is characterized by the formation of fluid blobs or long band-like films depending on Weber number values and density ratio.

  13. Experimental investigation on structures and velocity of liquid jets in a supersonic crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhen-guo Wu, Liyin; Li, Qinglian; Li, Chun

    2014-09-29

    Particle image velocimetry was applied in the study focusing on the structure and velocity of water jets injected into a Ma = 2.1 crossflow. The instantaneous structures of the jet, including surface waves in the near-injector region and vortices in the far-field, were visualized clearly. Spray velocity increases rapidly to 66% of the mainstream velocity in the region of x/d < 15, owing to the strong gas-liquid interaction near the orifice. By contrast, the velocity grows slowly in the far-field region, where the liquid inside the spray is accelerated mainly by the continuous driven force provided by the mainstream with the gas-liquid shear. The injection and atomization of liquid jet in a supersonic crossflow serves as a foundation of scramjet combustion process, by affecting the combustion efficiency and some other performances. With various forces acting on the liquid jet (Mashayek et al. [AIAA J. 46, 2674–2686 (2008)] and Wang et al. [AIAA J. 50, 1360–1366 (2012)]), the atomization process involves very complex flow physics. These physical processes include strong vortical structures, small-scale wave formation, stripping of small droplets from the jet surface, formations of ligaments, and droplets with a wide range of sizes.

  14. Profiles of flow discharged from vertical rotating pipes: A contrast between inviscid liquid and granular jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P. D.; Kubitschek, J. P.; Medina, A.

    2008-11-01

    The stability of viscous rotating liquid columns and their application to rotating viscous liquid jets aligned under gravity is reviewed. Experiments on stable viscous fluid flow discharged from rotating vertical pipes exhibit very weak contraction. We present an elementary liquid jet analysis to understand this phenomenon. Indeed, our inviscid model of a slender rotating inviscid liquid jet shows that rotation suppresses contraction. Next we study the comparable problem for granular flow. Our model for noncohesive granular flow emanating from a vertical pipe rotating about its central axis, valid for sufficiently large rotation rate, shows that the granular profiles blossom rather than contract. The profiles of both the liquid and granular jets depend on the same dimensionless parameters—an exit Froude number Fr0 and an exit swirl parameter χ0. The limitations of both models are discussed. Experimental data for granular jet profiles compare well with the collision-free granular flow model in its range of applicability. A criterion for the rotation rate at which particles adjacent to the inner wall of the rotating pipe cease to flow is also given and compared to experiment.

  15. Taking the Plunge off the Ivory Tower.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauzerall, Jorgette

    1997-01-01

    Relates the experiences of a white academic teaching in a black rural state college--a plunge into the world of black experience which shocked the academic. States that everything was different--students' names, their manner of dress, their reaction to the O.J. Simpson verdict. Finds that leaving the ivory tower was not easy, but the job exceeded…

  16. Liquid jet impingement normal to a disk in zero gravity. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the free surface shapes of circular liquid jets impinging normal to sharp-edged disks under both normal and zero gravity conditions. An order of magnitude analysis was conducted indicating regions where viscous forces were not significant when computing free surface shapes. The demarcation between the viscous and inviscid region was found to depend upon the flow Reynolds number and the ratio between the jet and disk radius.

  17. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-two jet and diesel fuel samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by a fluorescent indicator adsorption analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Two methods of rapid high performance liquid chromatography were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  18. Plunge location of sediment driven hyperpycnal river discharges considering bottom friction, lateral entrainment, and particle settling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, K. B.; Bhattacharya, J.

    2012-12-01

    River discharges with very high sediment loads have the potential to develop into plunging hyperpycnal flows that transition from a river jet to a turbidity current at some location basinward of the river mouth due to the density difference between the turbid river and the receiving water body. However, even if the bulk density of the turbid river is greater than that of the receiving lake or ocean, some distance is needed for the forward inertia of the river to dissipate so that the downward gravitational pull can cause the system to collapse into a subaqueous turbidity current. This collapsing at the plunge point has been found to occur when the densimetric Froude number decreases to a value between 0.3 < Frd < 0.7 (Fang and Stefan 2000, Parker and Toniolo 2007, Dai and Garcia 2010, Lamb et al. 2010). In 2D channel flow analysis at the plunge point, this has led to the concept of a two-fold criterion for plunging. The first is simply for the need of high enough suspended sediment concentration to overcome the density difference between the river fluid and the fluid of the receiving water. The second is the need for sufficiently deep water to reduce the densimetric Froude below the critical value for plunging, which leads to dependence of plunging on the receiving water basin topography (Lamb et al. 2010). In this analysis, we expand on past work by solving a system of ODE river jet equations to account for bottom friction, lateral entrainment of ambient fluid, and particle settling between the river mouth and the plunge location. Typical entrainment and bottom friction coefficients are used and the model is tested against the laboratory density current data of Fang and Stefan (1991). A suite of conditions is solved with variable river discharge velocity, aspect ratio, suspended sediment concentration, and particle size; a range of salinity values and bottom slopes are used for the receiving water body. The plunge location is then expressed as a function of the

  19. Effect of liquid droplets on turbulence structure in a round gaseous jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mostafa, A. M.; Elghobashi, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    A proposed two equation turbulence model for incompressible dilute two phase flows was validated and extended for steady incompressible two phase flow including phase change. The model was tested for the flow of a turbulent axisymmetric gaseous jet laden with multisize evaporating liquid droplets. Predicted results include distributions of the mean velocity; volume fractions of different phases concentration of the evaporated material in the carrier phase; turbulence intensity and shear stress of the carrier phase; droplet diameter distribution; and the jet spreading rate. Results are analyzed based on a qualitative comparison with the corresponding single phase jet flow.

  20. Transverse liquid fuel jet breakup, burning, and ignition. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hsi-Shang

    1990-01-01

    An analytical study of the breakup, burning, and ignition of liquid fuels injected transversely into a hot air stream is conducted. The non-reacting liquid jet breakup location is determined by the local sonic point criterion. Two models, one employing analysis of an elliptical jet cross-section and the other employing a two-dimensional blunt body to represent the transverse jet, were used for sonic point calculations. An auxiliary criterion based on surface tension stability is used as a separate means of determining the breakup location. For the reacting liquid jet problem, a diffusion flame supported by a one-step chemical reaction within the gaseous boundary layer is solved along the ellipse surface in subsonic cross flow. Typical flame structures and concentration profiles were calculated for various locations along the jet cross-section as a function of upstream Mach numbers. The integration reaction rate along the jet cross-section is used to predict ignition position, which is found to be situated near the stagnation point. While a multi-step reaction is needed to represent the ignition process more accurately, the present calculation does yield reasonable predictions concerning ignition along a curved surface.

  1. Numerical simulation of liquid-layer breakup on a moving wall due to an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Taejong; Moon, Hojoon; You, Donghyun; Kim, Dokyun; Ovsyannikov, Andrey

    2014-11-01

    Jet wiping, which is a hydrodynamic method for controlling the liquid film thickness in coating processes, is constrained by a rather violent film instability called splashing. The instability is characterized by the ejection of droplets from the runback flow and results in an explosion of the film. The splashing phenomenon degrades the final coating quality. In the present research, a volume-of-fluid (VOF)-based method, which is developed at Cascade Technologies, is employed to simulate the air-liquid multiphase flow dynamics. The present numerical method is based on an unstructured-grid unsplit geometric VOF scheme and guarantees strict conservation of mass of two-phase flow, The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements such as the liquid-film thickness before and after the jet wiping, wall pressure and shear stress distributions. The trajectories of liquid droplets due to the fluid motion entrained by the gas-jet operation, are also qualitatively compared with experimental visualization. Physical phenomena observed during the liquid-layer breakup due to an impinging jet is characterized in order to develop ideas for controlling the liquid-layer instability and resulting splash generation and propagation. Supported by the Grant NRF-2012R1A1A2003699, the Brain Korea 21+ program, POSCO, and 2014 CTR Summer Program.

  2. Absolute And Convective Instability and Splitting of a Liquid Jet at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.

    2001-01-01

    The objective is to establish a definitive role of the capillary, viscous, and inertial forces at a liquid-gas interface in the absence of gravity by using the fluid dynamics problem of the stability of a liquid jet as a vehicle. The objective is achieved by reexamining known theories and new theories that can be verified completely only in microgravity. The experiments performed in the microgravity facility at NASA Glenn Research Center enable the verification of the theory with experimental data. Of particular interest are (1) to capture for the first time the image of absolute instability, (2) to elucidate the fundamental difference in the physical mechanism of the drop and spray formation from a liquid jet, and (3) to find the origin of the newly discovered phenomenon of jet splitting on earth and in space.

  3. Theoretical modeling of optimal focusing conditions using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in liquid jets.

    PubMed

    Yaroshchyk, Pavel; Morrison, Richard J S; Body, Doug; Chadwick, Bruce L

    2004-11-01

    Optimal conditions are determined for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in liquid jets by investigating laser de-focusing and laser energy variation in aqueous liquid jets containing dilute levels of calcium chloride. It has been found that the atomic emission shows a strong correlation with both laser pulse energy and focal position. The data cannot be rationalized on the basis of electron density or ionization temperature changes alone, but rather it requires the additional consideration of the volume of the liquid sample interacting with the laser and that portion of the volume which is above the threshold energy for plasma formation. A moving breakdown model has been applied to the plasma formation in the jet to calculate the amount of sample ablated with sufficient energy for plasma formation, which models well the observed results and allows prediction of optimal focusing conditions for a given laser energy. PMID:18070410

  4. Method for analyzing the gas jet impinging on a liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordasov, M. M.; Savenkov, A. P.; Chechetov, K. E.

    2016-05-01

    The impingement of a gas jet on a liquid surface in the stable-state regime is analyzed theoretically. We consider the case of the perpendicular jet action. It is found that for describing analytically the processes occurring in this case, it is necessary to employ the balance equation for forces at the interface and not the balance equation for pressures at the lowest point of cavity, which was used in most available publications. Recommendations for experimental studies of a gas jet impinging on a liquid surface are formulated. We report on the results of experiments confirming the correctness of our theoretical analysis and making it possible to determine the empirical value of the shape factor. The experiments were carried out with air and epoxy resin. The cavity formed on the liquid surface had radius R 0 = 1-8 mm and depth h = 0.2-12.5 mm.

  5. Deformation and dewetting of thin liquid films induced by moving gas jets.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Christian W J; Zeegers, Jos C H; Darhuber, Anton A

    2013-10-01

    We study the deformation of thin liquid films subjected to impinging air-jets that are moving with respect to the substrate. The height profile and shape of the deformed liquid film is evaluated experimentally and numerically for different jet Reynolds numbers and translation speeds, for different liquids and substrate materials. Experiments and numerical results are in good agreement. On partially wetting substrates film rupture occurs. We imaged the appearance of dry spots and emergence of droplet patterns by high-speed, dual-wavelength interference microscopy. We systematically evaluated the resulting average droplet size and droplet density as a function of the experimental conditions. We show that within experimental accuracy the distribution of dry spots is dependent only on the residual film thickness and is not directly influenced by the shear stress and pressure gradients of the air-jet, nor by the speed of the substrate. PMID:23866198

  6. X-ray grating interferometry with a liquid-metal-jet source

    SciTech Connect

    Thüring, T.; Rutishauser, S.; Stampanoni, M.; Zhou, T.; Lundström, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.; David, C.

    2013-08-26

    A liquid-metal-jet X-ray tube is used in an X-ray phase-contrast microscope based on a Talbot type grating interferometer. With a focal spot size in the range of a few microns and a photon flux of ∼10{sup 12} photons/s×sr, the brightness of such a source is approximately one order of magnitude higher than for a conventional microfocus source. For comparison, a standard microfocus source was used with the same grating interferometer, showing significantly increased visibility for the liquid-metal-jet arrangement. Together with the increased flux, this results in improved signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Visualization of high speed liquid jet impaction on a moving surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuchen; Green, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Two apparatuses for examining liquid jet impingement on a high-speed moving surface are described: an air cannon device (for examining surface speeds between 0 and 25 m/sec) and a spinning disk device (for examining surface speeds between 15 and 100 m/sec). The air cannon linear traverse is a pneumatic energy-powered system that is designed to accelerate a metal rail surface mounted on top of a wooden projectile. A pressurized cylinder fitted with a solenoid valve rapidly releases pressurized air into the barrel, forcing the projectile down the cannon barrel. The projectile travels beneath a spray nozzle, which impinges a liquid jet onto its metal upper surface, and the projectile then hits a stopping mechanism. A camera records the jet impingement, and a pressure transducer records the spray nozzle backpressure. The spinning disk set-up consists of a steel disk that reaches speeds of 500 to 3,000 rpm via a variable frequency drive (VFD) motor. A spray system similar to that of the air cannon generates a liquid jet that impinges onto the spinning disc, and cameras placed at several optical access points record the jet impingement. Video recordings of jet impingement processes are recorded and examined to determine whether the outcome of impingement is splash, splatter, or deposition. The apparatuses are the first that involve the high speed impingement of low-Reynolds-number liquid jets on high speed moving surfaces. In addition to its rail industry applications, the described technique may be used for technical and industrial purposes such as steelmaking and may be relevant to high-speed 3D printing. PMID:25938331

  8. On the Unsteady Breakup of a Liquid Jet by a Coaxial Gas Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Christopher M.; Lasheras, Juan; Hopfinger, Emil

    2000-11-01

    The breakup and atomization of a liquid jet by a high-momentum coaxial gas stream is investigated experimentally for unsteady flow of the central liquid. The unsteady flow is characterized by the impulsive start-up and stopping of the liquid jet by means of a square wave function. Phase-Doppler particle sizing methods and laser attenuation measurements are employed to characterize the flow field during these transient periods, with conditional measurements made on the phase of the injection pulse. Spray properties such as the liquid intact length, the critical turbulent breakup distance, droplet size distributions, and the concentration field are measured. Physical models are considered for the dependence of these quantities on various flow properties including the gas-to-liquid dynamic pressure ratio, the turbulent dissipation rate, the mass flux ratio, and nozzle dimensions. In all the cases investigated here, the atomization regime based on the aerodynamic Weber number and the liquid jet Reynolds number is characterized by 'fibre-type' breakup of the liquid.

  9. Analysis of Column Instability Modes in Liquid Jet in Crossflow Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Sina; Arienti, Marco; Soteriou, Marios; Herrmann, Marcus

    2010-11-01

    Atomizing liquids by injecting them into crossflows is a common approach to generate fuel sprays in gas turbines and augmentors. The mechanisms by which the liquid jet initially breaks up, however, are not well understood. To analyze the instability mechanism of the liquid column, we perform proper orthogonal decomposition of side view images extracted from detailed simulations of the near injector primary atomization region. This analysis shows a single dominant wavelength with the associated interface corrugation traveling downstream with the jet. Using consistent temporal averaging of the simulation data we extract mean interface geometries and boundary layer velocity profiles. These are used to calculate the most unstable wavelength of the shear layer instability following the procedure of Boeck & Zaleski (2005). The theoretical wavelengths are comparable to those extracted from the simulation data. In addition to shear layer instability we analyze Rayleigh-Taylor as a potential instability mechanism of the liquid column.

  10. Experimental investigation of the breakup of a round liquid jet in a shock-induced crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olles, Joseph; Guildenbecher, Daniel; Wagner, Justin; Demauro, Edward; Farias, Paul; Grasser, Thomas; Sojka, Paul

    2015-11-01

    The breakup of a round water jet due to a step change in the convective air velocity following a 1D air-shock was experimentally investigated. Variations of this experiment have been conducted in the past, however here quantitative results on the breakup sizes and trajectories are shown. A shock tube was utilized to create the jet breakup, and the primary shape of the liquid and secondary droplet sizes were recorded optically. Through the use of digital in-line holography (DIH), the sizes, 3D position, and 3C velocities of secondary droplets were measured at kHz rates. Care was taken to ensure that the jet was kept round throughout the shock tube test section (absent of Plateau-Rayleigh instability). While the liquid jet geometry and velocity was kept constant, various gas-phase velocities allowed for the investigation of multiple breakup morphologies, as a function of the crossflow Weber number. The typical breakup regimes are seen; bag, multimode, and sheet-thinning. With high temporal and spatial resolution, interfacial and liquid column instabilities are seen in the jet breakup.

  11. Hydrodynamic characteristics and geometric properties of plunging and spilling breakers over impermeable slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagan Chella, Mayilvahanan; Bihs, Hans; Myrhaug, Dag; Muskulus, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The two-phase flow CFD model REEF3D has been used for modeling waves breaking over a sloping seabed for a spilling and a plunging breaker. This model is based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the level set method (LSM) for the free surface and k-ω model for turbulence. First, the characteristics and geometric properties of plunging breaking waves with different offshore wave steepnesses over slopes are examined and discussed. The study further explores the hydrodynamic characteristics of spilling and plunging breakers in terms of the wave height evolution and attenuation, horizontal and vertical velocity, free surface profile evolution, and the geometric properties during the development of the breaking process. The numerical results show a good agreement with experimental data in terms of free surface elevation, horizontal and vertical velocity, wave envelope and turbulent intensity for the spilling and plunging breakers. Results of numerical simulations describing the physical flow characteristics such as the formation of the forward overturning water jet, air pocket, splash-up, and the secondary wave during the breaking process are presented for both cases. For both cases, the physical flow process is found to have similar flow features, but the breaking process occurs at significantly different scales.

  12. Application of underwater shock wave and laser-induced liquid jet to neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, T.; Nakagawa, A.; Hirano, T.; Sato, J.; Kato, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, K.

    2006-03-01

    Paper deals with applications of underwater shock waves to medicine. A historical development of underwater shock wave generation by using pulsed Ho:YAG laser beam irradiation in water is briefly described and an overview is given regarding potential applications of shock waves to neuro-surgery. The laser beam irradiation in a liquid-filled catheter produces water vapor bubble and shock waves intermittently produces micro-liquid jets in a controlled fashion from the exit of the catheter. Correlations between shock dynamics and bubble dynamics are emphasized. To optimize the jet motion, results of basic parametric studies are briefly presented. The liquid jet discharged from the catheter exit has an impulse high enough to clearly exhibit effectiveness for various medical purposes. In liquid jets we observed reasonably strong shock waves and hence invented a compact shock generator aiming to apply to microsurgery. We applied it to a rat's bone window and developed an effective method of brain protection against shock loading. The insertion of Gore-Tex® sheet is found to attenuate shock waves drastically even for very short stand off distance and its physical mechanism is clarified. The laser-induced liquid jet (LILJ) is successfully applied to soft tissue dissection. Animal experiments were performed and results of histological observations are presented in details. Results of animal experiments revealed that LILJ can sharply dissect soft tissue with a minimum amount of liquid consumption, while blood vessels larger than 0.2 mm in diameter are preserved. Shock waves and LILJ have a potential to be indispensable tools in neuro-surgery.

  13. Production of jet fuels from coal derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, M.; Fox, J.; Masin, J.

    1989-06-01

    Amoco Oil Company has conducted bench- and pilot plant-scale experiments to produce jet fuels from the tar oil from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant in Beulah, North Dakota. Experiments show that the hydroprocessing conditions recommended in Task 1 are not severe enough to saturate the aromatics in the tar oil to meet jet fuel specifications. Alternatives were investigated. Jet fuel specifications can be achieved when the tar oil is: hydrotreated in an expanded-bed hydrotreater to lower aromatics and heteroatom content; the effluent is then hydrotreated in a second, fixed bed hydrotreater; and, finally, the 550{degree}F boiling fraction from the two hydrotreaters is hydrocracked to extinction. The process was verified by pilot-plant production of 2 barrels of JP-8 turbine fuel, which met all but the flash point specification for JP-8. In addition, small samples of JP-4, JP-8, and high-density fuel were produced as a part of Task 2. 13 figs., 21 tabs.

  14. A 24 keV liquid-metal-jet x-ray source for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, D. H.; Takman, P. A. C.; Lundstroem, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.

    2011-12-15

    We present a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-indium/gallium-jet anode. The 30-70 W electron beam is magnetically focused onto the jet, producing a circular 7-13 {mu}m full width half maximum x-ray spot. The measured spectral brightness at the 24.2 keV In K{sub {alpha}} line is 3 x 10{sup 9} photons/(s x mm{sup 2}x mrad{sup 2}x 0.1% BW) at 30 W electron-beam power. The high photon energy compared to existing liquid-metal-jet sources increases the penetration depth and allows imaging of thicker samples. The applicability of the source in the biomedical field is demonstrated by high-resolution imaging of a mammography phantom and a phase-contrast angiography phantom.

  15. A two-phase model for subcooled and superheated liquid jets

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidhar, R.; Jersey, G.R.; Krambeck, F.J.; Sundaresan, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a two-phase jet model for predicting the liquid rainout (capture) and composition of subcooled and superheated HF/additive pressurized liquid releases. The parent droplets of the release mixture constitute the fist phase. The second phase can in general be a vapor-liquid fog. The drops are not in equilibrium with the fog phase with which they exchange mass and energy. The fog at any location is assumed to be in local equilibrium. Correlations are developed for predicting the initial drop size for hydrodynamic breakup of jets. Applications are discussed in this paper for HF/additive mixtures. The fog phase calculations account for HF oligomerization and HF-water complex formation in the vapor phase and equilibrium between the liquid and vapor in the fog. The model incorporates jet trajectory calculations and hence can predict the amount of liquid rained out (liquid capture) and the capture distance. The HF captures predicted by the model for various release conditions are in agreement with small and large scale release experiments.

  16. A new technology for revascularization of cerebral embolism using liquid jet impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Uenohara, Hiroshi

    1997-12-01

    Revascularization time is the dominant factor in the treatment of acute cerebral embolism. In this paper we describe a rapid revascularization therapy using liquid jets generated by the interaction of gas bubbles with shock waves, which impact on the thrombi. The interaction of a shock wave with a gas bubble attached to an artificial thrombus which was inserted into a tube model of a cerebral artery was investigated. The shock wave was generated by detonating a microexplosive pellet. The overpressure of the shock wave was (n = 7) and (n = 3). The initial air bubble radii were varied from 0.87 mm to 2.18 mm. The subsequent collapse of the bubble was photographed using a high-speed framing camera, and the liquid jet penetrating into the artificial thrombus was visualized using x-ray photography. The penetration depth of the liquid jet increased with increasing bubble size. There was an optimal separation distance between the bubble and the shock wave source to obtain the maximum penetration depth. Liquid jets have the potential to penetrate through thrombi in as little as a few microseconds, and with very efficient ablation.

  17. On the transfer of energy to an unstable liquid jet in a coflowing compressible airstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hsi-Shang; Kelly, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    The transfer of energy from a compressible airstream to a coflowing unstable liquid jet via the pressure perturbation at the interface is studied as the Mach number varies continuously from subsonic to supersonic values. The 'lift' component of the pressure perturbation has been demonstrated to predominate up to slightly supersonic free-stream Mach numbers, after which the 'drag' component predominates.

  18. First Results of the Testing of the Liquid Gallium Jet Limiter Concept for ISTTOK

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, R. B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Borba, D.; Carvalho, B.; Varandas, C.

    2006-12-04

    The use of liquid metals as plasma facing components in tokamaks has recently experienced a renewed interest stimulated by their advantages to the development of a fusion reactor. Liquid metals have been proposed to solve problems related to the erosion and neutronic activation of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing an efficient heat exhaustion from fusion devices. Presently the most promising materials are Lithium and Gallium. ISTTOK, a small size tokamak, will be used to test the behavior of a liquid Gallium jet in the vacuum chamber and its influence on the plasma. This paper presents a description of the conceived setup as well as experimental results. The liquid Gallium jet is generated by hydrostatic pressure and injected in a radial position close to a moveable stainless steel limiter. Both the jet and the limiter positions are variable allowing for a controlled exposure of the liquid Gallium to the edge plasma. The main components of the Gallium loop are a MHD pump, the liquid metal injector and a filtering system. The MHD pump is of the induction type, based on rotating permanent magnets. The injector is build from a stainless steel pipe ended by a shaping nozzle. A setup has been developed to introduce oxide-free Gallium inside the loop's main supply tank. Raw liquid metal is placed inside a chamber heated and degassed under high vacuum while clean Gallium is extracted from the main body of the liquefied metal. Prior to installation on the tokamak, the experimental rig has been implemented using a Pyrex tube as test chamber to investigate the stability of the Gallium jet and its break-up length for several nozzle sizes. Results are presented in this paper. This rig was also useful to assess the behavior of the overall implemented apparatus.

  19. Traction Drive Inverter Cooling with Submerged Liquid Jet Impingement on Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Narumanchi, S.; Moreno, G.

    2014-09-01

    Jet impingement is one means to improve thermal management for power electronics in electric-drive traction vehicles. Jet impingement on microfin-enhanced surfaces further augments heat transfer and thermal performance. A channel flow heat exchanger from a commercial inverter was characterized as a baseline system for comparison with two new prototype designs using liquid jet impingement on plain and microfinned enhanced surfaces. The submerged jets can target areas with the highest heat flux to provide local cooling, such as areas under insulated-gate bipolar transistors and diode devices. Low power experiments, where four diodes were powered, dissipated 105 W of heat and were used to validate computational fluid dynamics modeling of the baseline and prototype designs. Experiments and modeling used typical automotive flow rates using water-ethylene glycol as a coolant (50%-50% by volume). The computational fluid dynamics model was used to predict full inverter power heat dissipation. The channel flow and jet impingement configurations were tested at full inverter power of 40 to 100 kW (output power) on a dynamometer, translating to an approximate heat dissipation of 1 to 2 kW. With jet impingement, the cold plate material is not critical for the thermal pathway. A high-temperature plastic was used that could eventually be injection molded or formed, with the jets formed from a basic aluminum plate with orifices acting as nozzles. Long-term reliability of the jet nozzles and impingement on enhanced surfaces was examined. For jet impingement on microfinned surfaces, thermal performance increased 17%. Along with a weight reduction of approximately 3 kg, the specific power (kW/kg) increased by 36%, with an increase in power density (kW/L) of 12% compared with the baseline channel flow configuration.

  20. Experimental investigation of inclined liquid water jet flow onto vertically located superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali; Karabay, Hasan; Yiğit, K. Süleyman; Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yıldırım

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the behaviour of an inclined water jet, which is impinged onto hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces, has been investigated experimentally. Water jet was impinged with different inclination angles (15°-45°) onto five different hydrophobic surfaces made of rough polymer, which were held vertically. The water contact angles on these surfaces were measured as 102°, 112°, 123°, 145° and 167° showing that the last surface was superhydrophobic. Two different nozzles with 1.75 and 4 mm in diameters were used to create the water jet. Water jet velocity was within the range of 0.5-5 m/s, thus the Weber number varied from 5 to 650 and Reynolds number from 500 to 8,000 during the experiments. Hydrophobic surfaces reflected the liquid jet depending on the surface contact angle, jet inclination angle and the Weber number. The variation of the reflection angle with the Weber number showed a maximum value for a constant jet angle. The maximum value of the reflection angle was nearly equal to half of the jet angle. It was determined that the viscous drag decreases as the contact angle of the hydrophobic surface increases. The drag force on the wall is reduced dramatically with superhydrophobic surfaces. The amount of reduction of the average shear stress on the wall was about 40%, when the contact angle of the surface was increased from 145° to 167°. The area of the spreading water layer decreased as the contact angle of the surface increased and as the jet inclination angle, Weber number and Reynolds number decreased.

  1. Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, M.; Fox, J.; Masin, J. . Research and Development Dept.); Stahlnecker, E.; Schreiber, G.; Klein, R. )

    1989-12-01

    A preliminary design for the production of JP-8 jet fuel and other salable products from the Great Plains by-products is given. The design incorporates experimental results from Tasks 2 and 3 with the scoping design from Task 1. The experimental results demonstrated the need for more severe hydrotreating conditions to convert the tar oil to jet fuel than was estimated in Task 1. As a result, capital costs for the revised design are significantly higher and the plant is less profitable than estimated in the Task 1 work. The increase in capital costs is offset somewhat by a higher phenol value in the current market. Refined estimates for the cost of an aromatics recovery unit preclude its economical construction in the new estimate, consequently the revised product slate includes no BTX. Recommendations are given for a 10,000 barrel production run. No commercial domestic facility exists which can provide suitable expanded-bed hydrotreating facilities for a production run of this size. However, an alternative approach using hot filtration and dilute fixed-bed hydrocracking followed by product fractionation and extinctive hydrotreating of the heavy products is recommended. Commercial domestic facilities which might reasonably accommodate this scheme are listed. 6 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Droplet impact on deep liquid pools: Rayleigh jet to formation of secondary droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Orozco, Eduardo; Davanlou, Ashkan; Choudhury, Pretam K.; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2015-11-01

    The impact of droplets on a deep pool has applications in cleaning up oil spills, spray cooling, painting, inkjet printing, and forensic analysis, relying on the changes in properties such as viscosity, interfacial tension, and density. Despite the exhaustive research on different aspects of droplet impact, it is not clear how liquid properties can affect the instabilities leading to Rayleigh jet breakup and number of daughter drops formed after its pinch-off. In this article, through systematic experiments we investigate the droplet impact phenomena by varying viscosity and surface tension of liquids as well as impact speeds. Further, using numerical simulations, we show that Rayleigh-Plateau instability is influenced by these parameters, and capillary time scale is the appropriate scale to normalize the breakup time. Based on Ohnesorge number (Oh) and impact Weber number (We), a regime map for no breakup, Rayleigh jet breakup, and crown splash is suggested. Interestingly, crown splash is observed to occur at all Ohnesorge numbers; however, at high Oh, a large portion of kinetic energy is dissipated, and thus the Rayleigh jet is suppressed regardless of high impact velocity. The normalized required time for the Rayleigh jet to reach its peak varies linearly with the critical height of the jet.

  3. Droplet impact on deep liquid pools: Rayleigh jet to formation of secondary droplets.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Orozco, Eduardo; Davanlou, Ashkan; Choudhury, Pretam K; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2015-11-01

    The impact of droplets on a deep pool has applications in cleaning up oil spills, spray cooling, painting, inkjet printing, and forensic analysis, relying on the changes in properties such as viscosity, interfacial tension, and density. Despite the exhaustive research on different aspects of droplet impact, it is not clear how liquid properties can affect the instabilities leading to Rayleigh jet breakup and number of daughter drops formed after its pinch-off. In this article, through systematic experiments we investigate the droplet impact phenomena by varying viscosity and surface tension of liquids as well as impact speeds. Further, using numerical simulations, we show that Rayleigh-Plateau instability is influenced by these parameters, and capillary time scale is the appropriate scale to normalize the breakup time. Based on Ohnesorge number (Oh) and impact Weber number (We), a regime map for no breakup, Rayleigh jet breakup, and crown splash is suggested. Interestingly, crown splash is observed to occur at all Ohnesorge numbers; however, at high Oh, a large portion of kinetic energy is dissipated, and thus the Rayleigh jet is suppressed regardless of high impact velocity. The normalized required time for the Rayleigh jet to reach its peak varies linearly with the critical height of the jet. PMID:26651794

  4. Intensification of liquid jet atomization through injection into the exit channel of the atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gel'Fand, B. E.; Dranovskii, M. L.; Novikov, A. G.; Pikalov, V. P.

    The injection of a gas jet into the liquid flow at the exit of an atomizer nozzle, directly before the liquid is discharged into the ambient atmosphere, was investigated experimentally as a possible method of improving the quality of atomization. The atomizer used in the experiments had transparent side walls and a nozzle of rectangular (2 x 4 mm) cross section; the relative length of the nozzle was 1.5-1.6. It is shown that gas injection not only improves the quality of atomization but also makes it possible to lower the liquid supply pressure and to increase the atomizer nozzle diameter.

  5. Heat transfer from a liquid bath due to an impinging gas jet: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, F.; Farouk, B.; Mutharasan, R.

    1995-12-31

    An impinging gasjet on a liquid surface is found in many industrial processes such as electric arc furnace steel-making and welding. Fundamental understanding of the interaction of a gas or plasmajet impinging on a liquid pool can provide important insights into process behavior resulting in improved efficiency. A numerical model is developed for solving both the impinging gas jet and the liquid pool temperature and flow fields along with the deformed interface shape for the above processing operation. Using curvilinear coordinates, the Navier-Stokes equations of each phase are solved separately and then coupled via continuity of static pressure, shear stress, temperature and heat flux at the interface.

  6. Determination of Cavity Dimensions Induced by Impingement of Gas Jets onto a Liquid Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingming; Li, Qiang; Kuang, Shibo; Zou, Zongshu

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical study on the cavity profile induced by the impingement of top-blown multiple gas jets onto a water or oil/water bath. The depth and diameter of the cavity were measured with respect to the lance height, gas flow rate, jets inclination angle, and oil volume. The experimental results show that the cavity depth increases with the increase of gas flow rate or oil thickness but the decrease of lance height or jets inclination angle. The cavity diameter is much less affected by gas flow rate compared to other variables. Then, the importance of the surface tension in the modeling of the cavity was theoretically identified. It was found that in the cratering process, the effect of the liquid surface tension on the cavity depth could be remarkably significant for a basic oxygen furnace (BOF) cold model but negligible for a real BOF steelmaking system. An improved theoretical model was hence proposed and validated using the experimental data obtained from both the single- or two-layer liquid baths. The new model includes not only the explicit consideration of the liquid surface tension but also that of the energy utilization efficiency of the jets impinging kinetic energy contributed to the cratering process.

  7. Transferring jet engine diagnostic and control technology to liquid propellant rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, J.F.; Hagar, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for developing a diagnostic and control system for a current, operational jet engine. A description is given of each development stage, the system components and the technologies which could be transferred to liquid propellant rocket engines. Finally, the operational impact is described in terms of cost and maintenance based on actual jet engine experience. Efforts are continuing to develop new diagnostic techniques under IR D for application on the advanced technical fighter. Already improved techniques and application methods are becoming available. This technology is being evaluated and may also be transferred to rocket engine diagnostic and control system development.

  8. Boiling-up of liquid nitrogen jet in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakoryakov, V. E.; Tsoi, A. N.; Mezentsev, I. V.; Meleshkin, A. V.

    2014-06-01

    The hydrodynamic processes occurring at injection of cryogenic liquid into water pool were studied experimentally. Processes accompanying the phase transitions were registered. Data testify the developing pressure burst with an amplitude sufficient for possible formation of gas hydrates when methane is injected as a cryogenic fluid.

  9. Influence of Turbulence on the Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquidfree vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, surface tension forces must contain jets. To model this phenomenon, a numerical method that tracks the fluid motion and the surface tension forces is required. Jacqmin has developed a phase model that converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly away. Previous attempts at this formulation were criticized for smearing the interface. This can be overcome by sharpening the phase function, double gridding the fluid function, and using a higher order solution for the fluid function. The solution of this equation can be rewritten as two coupled Poisson equations that also include the velocity. After the code was implemented in axisymmetric form and verified by several test cases at the NASA Glenn Research Center, the drop tower runs of Aydelott were modeled. Work last year with a laminar model was found to overpredict Aydelott's results, except at the lowest Reynolds number conditions of 400. This year, a simple turbulence model was implemented by adding a turbulent viscosity based on the mixing-length hypothesis and empirical measurements of previous works. Predictions made after this change was implemented have been much closer to experimentally observed flow patterns and geyser heights. Two model runs is shown. The first, without any turbulence correction

  10. Self-organization of jets in electrospinning from free liquid surface: A generalized approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, David; Sarkar, Arindam; Pokorny, Pavel

    2008-04-01

    Electrospinning has enabled creation of excellent materials for a great number of applications. Previously, it was based on less productive capillary spinners. The present study is based on recent efforts to elevate electrospinning technology to an industrial level by simultaneously provoking innumerable polymeric jets from a sufficiently large liquid surface to increase productivity. Particularly, it deals with electrospinning from free surface of conductive liquids and validates a formulated hypothesis that explains self-organization of jets on one-dimensional free liquid surfaces in terms of electrohydrodynamic instability of surface waves. Here, it is shown how the hypothesis, based on a profound analysis of a dispersion law, explains that above a certain critical value of applied electric field intensity/field strength the system starts to be self-organized in mesocopic scale due to the mechanism of the "fastest forming instability." The mechanism plays a key role in selecting a particular wave with a characteristic wavelength whose amplitude boundlessly grows faster than the others. The fastest growing stationary wave, according to the hypothesis, marks the onset of electrospinning from a free liquid surface with its jets originating from the wave crests. Singularity of this approach lies in predicting critical values of the phenomenon, viz., critical field strength and corresponding critical interjet distance. The critical field strength, will, thereafter, be used in defining a unique dimensionless electrospinning number. It will, subsequently, be shown how the critical interjet distance, i.e., the maximal distance between the neighboring jets, simply depends on the capillary length. The capillary length represents a latent characteristic spatial scale of the system. The theory also predicts interjet distance for field strengths above the critical value. The said prediction is universally applicable for all conductive liquids if it is expressed in terms of

  11. Liquid jet breakup and atomization in rocket chambers under dense spray conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Kenneth K.; Cheung, Fan-Bill; Woodward, Roger D.; Garner, Kenneth N.

    1991-01-01

    Two advanced diagnostic techniques were established and employed in this project. The first technique involves the use of a real-time x ray radiography system along with a high-speed CCD Xybion camera and an advanced digital image processor to investigate the breakup processes of the liquid core. The focus of this part of the project is to determine the inner structure of the liquid jet and via thin sheets of laser light, with the scatters light being photographed by a Xybion electronic camera synchronized to the laser pulse. This technique, which is capable of recording the breakup event occurring within 25 nano-seconds, enables us to freeze the motions of the jet and liquid droplets. The focus of this part of the project is to determine the outer structure of the liquid jet and to discover the configuration of the surface waves, the spray pattern, and the droplet size distribution in the non-dilute region. Results obtained by these two advanced diagnostic techniques will provide the much needed database for model development and accurate prediction of engine performance. The present work also represents a breakthrough in the area of advanced diagnostics of dense sprays.

  12. Direct numerical simulation of ignition in turbulent n-heptane liquid-fuel spray jets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Rutland, C.J.

    2007-06-15

    Direct numerical simulation was used for fundamental studies of the ignition of turbulent n-heptane liquid-fuel spray jets. A chemistry mechanism with 33 species and 64 reactions was adopted to describe the chemical reactions. The Eulerian method is employed to solve the carrier-gas flow field and the Lagrangian method is used to track the liquid-fuel droplets. Two-way coupling interaction is considered through the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between the carrier-gas fluid and the liquid-fuel spray. The initial carrier-gas temperature was 1500 K. Six cases were simulated with different droplet radii (from 10 to 30 {mu}m) and two initial velocities (100 and 150 m/s). From the simulations, it was found that evaporative cooling and turbulence mixing play important roles in the ignition of liquid-fuel spray jets. Ignition first occurs at the edges of the jets where the fuel mixture is lean, and the scalar dissipation rate and the vorticity magnitude are very low. For smaller droplets, ignition occurs later than for larger droplets due to increased evaporative cooling. Higher initial droplet velocity enhances turbulence mixing and evaporative cooling. For smaller droplets, higher initial droplet velocity causes the ignition to occur earlier, whereas for larger droplets, higher initial droplet velocity delays the ignition time. (author)

  13. Vehicle-scale investigation of a fluorine jet-pump liquid hydrogen tank pressurization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.; Kendle, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical and experimental program was performed to evaluate the performance of a fluorine-hydrogen jet-pump injector for main tank injection (MTI) pressurization of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank. The injector performance during pressurization and LH2 expulsion was determined by a series of seven tests of a full-scale injector and MTI pressure control system in a 28.3 cu m (1000 cu ft) flight-weight LH2 tank. Although the injector did not effectively jet-pump LH2 continuously, it showed improved pressurization performance compared to straight-pipe injectors tested under the same conditions in a previous program. The MTI computer code was modified to allow performance prediction for the jet-pump injector.

  14. Dynamics of Pinch-Off in Immiscible Liquid/Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, E. K.; Webster, D. R.; Lowengrub, J. S.

    1997-11-01

    The behavior of glycerine/water jets flowing into a nearly immiscible ambient of Dow Corning 200 fluid is investigated using laser induced fluorescence flow visualization and particle image velocimetry. Clear images are obtained by matching the index of refraction in the glycerine/water solution with the index of refraction in the surrounding Dow Corning fluid. Jet Reynolds numbers are on the order of 100. The pinch-off of the jet column into droplets can be made repeatable by periodic forcing, and several pinch-off modes are examined. These modes are produced by varying the forcing frequency and amplitude, fluid viscosity ratio, and jet Reynolds number. The details of the pinch-off, including local variations in concentration near the transition location and the associated velocity fields will be discussed. The experimental results will be compared with numerical simulations that allow limited chemical mixing across the finite-thickness interface.

  15. Plunging ranula: an unusual multilocular presentation.

    PubMed

    Mabongo, M; Buch, B; Ngwenya, S P

    2014-10-01

    A 32-year-old male patient who was HIV positive presented at the Wits Oral Health Centre complaining of a large swelling of the left submandibular region of three years' duration. The swelling was nontender, soft and doughy on palpation and appeared to be crossing the midline. Bilateral submandibular and submental lymphadenopathy was present. Intraorally the lesion caused considerable elevation of the floor of the mouth and impaired the flow of saliva. Fluid from the lesion was aspirated and the patient sent for MRI examination. These images revealed a multilocular cystic lesion causing disruption of the mylohyold muscle. The aspirate consisted of a thick, bloody fluid which tested positive for salivary amylase. A provisional diagnosis of plunging ranula was made. The multilocular nature of the lesion seen on MRI prompted a more extensive surgical approach in order to prevent recurrence. Consequently the sublingual gland was removed via an intraoral approach while the multilocular cyst was dissected by means of a submandibular approach in order to effect complete removal. Microscopic examination of the submitted specimen confirmed the clinical diagnosis of a plunging ranula. PMID:26571925

  16. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The many advantages of Friction Stir Welding have led to a relatively rapid acceptance in the often conservative welding community. Because the process is so different from traditional fusion welding, with which most investigators are most familiar, there remain many aspects of FSW for which there is no clear consensus. For example, the well known onion rings seen in transverse sections have been variously interpreted as grain size variations, variation in density of second phase particles and parts of the carousel of material rotating with the pin that have been shed from the carousel. Using Orientation Imaging Microscopy, Schneider has recently noted that the onion rings have a different orientation (and hence etch differently) than the surrounding material, and this orientation is consistent with slip plane orientations at the edge of the carousel. Likewise, the forces and torque exerted by the FSW tool on the work piece largely remain unaccounted for. Although these forces are routinely measured by investigators with commercial instrumented welders, they are rarely reported or even qualitatively analyzed. This paper will introduce a model based on a carousel or disk of material that rotates with the tool to estimate the torque and plunge force required to plunge a tool into the work piece. A stationary tool is modeled rather than the moving tool because effects such as thermal transients and metallurgical changes in the sample (primarily aging in aluminum) can be more easily accounted for. It is believed, however, that with some modifications the model should be applicable to a moving tool also.

  17. Atomization of a small-diameter liquid jet by a high-speed gas stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Christopher Michael

    The situation of a small-diameter liquid jet exposed to a large-diameter high-speed gas jet is investigated experimentally. Flow visualization and particle-sizing techniques are employed to examine both the initial breakup process and subsequent secondary atomization of the liquid. It is shown that nearly all of the breakup takes place in the near-field and that the bulk of the atomization is completed within the potential cone of the gas jet. The resultant drop size depends primarily on the gas velocity and to a weaker extent on the liquid mass flux. It is argued that the mechanism of primary atomization is similar to that of a liquid drop suddenly exposed to a high-speed gas stream. A phenomenological breakup model is proposed for the initial droplet size, based on the accelerative destabilization of the liquid jet surface by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Measurements of droplet sizes and surface wavelengths are shown to be in good agreement with the model predictions. The downstream evolution of the droplet-size distribution is also investigated, with consideration given to several secondary mechanisms including turbulent breakup, droplet-droplet collisions, and droplet acceleration. It is argued that the relative acceleration of droplets of different size classes, and energetic collisions between droplets, are together responsible for the experimentally observed variation of the mean drop size with downstream distance from the injection plane in the far-field of the spray. The feasibility of coaxial liquid-gas injection for pulse detonation engine (PDE) applications is additionally considered. The performance of coaxial atomizers under transient operating conditions appropriate to PDEs is analyzed along with the capability of this injection scheme to produce sufficiently small droplet sizes within restricted flow regimes. The ability to tailor the radial distributions of both the liquid mass flux and droplet sizes through the addition of swirl to the coaxial

  18. Investigation on cone jetting regimes of liquid droplets subjected to pyroelectric fields induced by laser blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennari, Oriella; Battista, Luigi; Silva, Benjamin; Grilli, Simonetta; Miccio, Lisa; Vespini, Veronica; Coppola, Sara; Orlando, Pierangelo; Aprin, Laurent; Slangen, Pierre; Ferraro, Pietro

    2015-02-01

    Electrical conductivity and viscosity play a major role in the tip jetting behaviour of liquids subjected to electrohydrodynamic (EHD) forces, thus influencing significantly the printing performance. Recently, we developed a nozzle- and electrode-free pyro-EHD system as a versatile alternative to conventional EHD configurations and we demonstrated different applications, including inkjet printing and three-dimensional lithography. However, only dielectric fluids have been used in all of those applications. Here, we present an experimental characterization of the pyro-EHD jetting regimes, induced by laser blasts, of sessile drops in case of dielectric and conductive liquids in order to extend the applicability of the system to a wider variety of fields including biochemistry and biotechnology where conductive aqueous solutions are typically used.

  19. Rupture of thin liquid films induced by impinging air-jets.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Christian W J; Zeegers, Jos C H; Kruis, Geerit C F L; Riepen, Michel; Darhuber, Anton A

    2012-07-01

    Thin liquid films on partially wetting substrates are subjected to laminar axisymmetric air-jets impinging at normal incidence. We measured the time at which film rupture occurs and dewetting commences as a function of diameter and Reynolds number of the air-jet. We developed numerical models for the air flow as well as the height evolution of the thin liquid film. The experimental results were compared with numerical simulations based on the lubrication approximation and a phenomenological expression for the disjoining pressure. We achieved quantitative agreement for the rupture times. We found that the film thickness profiles were highly sensitive to the presence of minute quantities of surface-active contaminants. PMID:22671425

  20. Agreement between experimental and theoretical effects of nitrogen gas flowrate on liquid jet atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    Two-phase flows were investigated by using high velocity nitrogen gas streams to atomize small-diameter liquid jets. Tests were conducted primarily in the acceleration-wave regime for liquid jet atomization, where it was found that the loss of droplets due to vaporization had a marked effect on drop size measurements. In addition, four identically designed two-fluid atomizers were fabricated and tested for similarity of spray profiles. A scattered-light scanner was used to measure a characteristic drop diameter, which was correlated with nitrogen gas flowrate. The exponent of 1.33 for nitrogen gas flowrate is identical to that predicted by atomization theory for liquid jet breakup in the acceleration-wave regime. This is higher than the value of 1.2 which was previously obtained at a sampling distance of 4.4 cm downstream of the atomizer. The difference is attributed to the fact that drop-size measurements obtained at a 2.2 cm sampling distance are less effected by vaporization and dispersion of small droplets and therefore should give better agreement with atomization theory. Profiles of characteristic drop diameters were also obtained by making at least five line-of-sight measurements across the spray at several horizontal positions above and below the center line of the spray.

  1. Vortex Interactions on Plunging Airfoil and Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslam Panah, Azar; Buchholz, James

    2012-11-01

    The development of robust qualitative and quantitative models for the vorticity fields generated by oscillating foils and wings can provide a framework in which to understand flow interactions within groups of unsteady lifting bodies (e.g. shoals of birds, fish, MAV's), and inform low-order aerodynamic models. In the present experimental study, the flow fields generated by a plunging flat-plate airfoil and finite-aspect-ratio wing are characterized in terms of vortex topology, and circulation at Re=10,000. Strouhal numbers (St=fA/U) between 0.1 and 0.6 are investigated for plunge amplitudes of ho/c = 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4, resulting in reduced frequencies (k= π fc/U) between 0.39 and 4.71. For the nominally two-dimensional airfoil, the number of discrete vortex structures shed from the trailing edge, and the trajectory of the leading edge vortex (LEV) and its interaction with trailing edge vortex (TEV) are found to be primarily governed by k; however, for St >0.4, the role of St on these phenomena increases. Likewise, circulation of the TEV exhibits a dependence on k; however, the circulation of the LEV depends primarily on St. The growth and ultimate strength of the LEV depends strongly on its interaction with the body; in particular, with a region of opposite-sign vorticity generated on the surface of the body due to the influence of the LEV. In the finite-aspect-ratio case, spanwise flow is also a significant factor. The roles of these phenomena on vortex evolution and strength will be discussed in detail.

  2. An Experimental Study of the Droplets Produced by a Plunging Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Liu, X.; Duncan, J. H.

    2011-11-01

    The dynamics of droplets generated by plunging breakers are experimentally studied in a wave tank that is 12 m long and 1.22 m wide with a water depth of 0.91 m. Breakers with various breaking intensity are generated from a packet of dispersively focused waves with average frequency of 1.15 Hz by varying the amplitude of wave maker motion. The sizes and motions of droplets at various positions relative the wave crest are measured with a cinematic shadowgraph technique, while the profile histories of the breaking wave crest along the center plane of the tank are simultaneously measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique. Droplets are primarily created when strong turbulence is generated after the plunging jet impacts with the front face of the wave and when large air bubbles, entrapped during the plunging process, rise to the free surface and pop. The diameters and velocities of the droplets across one horizontal plane at an elevation just above the wave crest height are measured. The surface roughnesses of the breaking waves are estimated from the measured wave crest profile histories. The correlation between the flux of droplets and the surface roughness is investigated. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Division of Ocean Sciences, Grant OCE0751853.

  3. Thrust Enhancement of Flapping Wings in Tandem and Biplane Configurations by Pure Plunging Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, S. Banu; Sahin, Mehmet; Unal, M. Fevzi

    2012-11-01

    The propulsion performance of flapping NACA0012 airfoils undergoing harmonic plunging motion in tandem and biplane wing configurations is investigated numerically. An unstructured finite volume solver based on Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is utilized in order to solve the incompressible unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. Four different tandem and four different biplane wing combinations are considered. Various instantaneous and time-averaged aerodynamic parameters including lift and drag coefficients, vorticity contours and streamlines are calculated for each case and compared with each other. As a reference the single wing case corresponding to the deflected jet phenomenon in Jones and Platzer (Exp. Fluids 46:799-810, 2009) is also studied. In these simulations, the Reynolds number is chosen as 252, the reduced frequency of plunging motion (k = 2 πf /U∞) is 12.3 and the plunge amplitude non-dimensionalized with respect to chord is 0.12. The solutions of the single wing case indicate dependence on the location of start-up vortices. Meanwhile the multiple wing configurations indicate that the highest thrust enhancement is obtained in one of the biplane cases where the two wings closely moving towards each other namely biplane asynchronous-closer case.

  4. Time-resolved simulations and experiments of liquid jet break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienti, Marco; Soteriou, Marios; Sussman, Mark

    2008-11-01

    High-speed, high-resolution experimental visualization of the break-up of a liquid jet by a gaseous cross-flow has recently become possible due to advances in video camera technology. These visualizations can now be contrasted to high fidelity CFD simulations which are also just becoming possible due to continuing growth of computational capabilities. Such a contrast is expected to go beyond traditional comparisons of time-averaged quantities and focuses on dynamics. For example, comparisons of the characteristic break-up frequency and of the spatial instantaneous features of the jet may serve as validation of the computational model and to yield insight into the physics of the dynamic interplay between the disturbances induced by the injection device and Kelvin-Helmholtz / Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the interface. A state-of-the-art second-order coupled Level Set and Volume Of Fluid method (CLSVOF) that can capture liquid-gas interface dynamics is used for the study. High-speed videos of non-turbulent liquid injection in laminar crossflow are used to validate the time- and grid-converged capability of the code to capture upwind wave structures caused by the centrifugal acceleration of the deflected liquid. The extension to increasing air crossflow is also discussed with focus on the column break-up mechanism.

  5. Self-assembling array of magnetoelectrostatic jets from the surface of a superparamagnetic ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    King, Lyon B; Meyer, Edmond; Hopkins, Mark A; Hawkett, Brian S; Jain, Nirmesh

    2014-12-01

    Electrospray is a versatile technology used, for example, to ionize biomolecules for mass spectrometry, create nanofibers and nanowires, and propel spacecraft in orbit. Traditionally, electrospray is achieved via microfabricated capillary needle electrodes that are used to create the fluid jets. Here we report on multiple parallel jetting instabilities realized through the application of simultaneous electric and magnetic fields to the surface of a superparamagnetic electrically conducting ionic liquid with no needle electrodes. The ionic liquid ferrofluid is synthesized by suspending magnetic nanoparticles in a room-temperature molten salt carrier liquid. Two ILFFs are reported: one based on ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and the other based on EMIM-NTf2. The ILFFs display an electrical conductivity of 0.63 S/m and a relative magnetic permeability as high as 10. When coincident electric and magnetic fields are applied to these liquids, the result is a self-assembling array of emitters that are composed entirely of the colloidal fluid. An analysis of the magnetic surface stress induced on the ILFF shows that the electric field required for transition to spray can be reduced by as much as 4.5 × 10(7) V/m compared to purely electrostatic spray. Ferrofluid mode studies in nonuniform magnetic fields show that it is feasible to realize arrays with up to 16 emitters/mm(2). PMID:25372842

  6. Interaction of DC Microhollow Cathode Discharge Plasma Micro Jet with Liquid Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weidong; Lopez, Jose; Becker, Kurt

    2008-10-01

    There have been different approaches in studying the interaction between plasma and liquid, such as sustained plasmas in contact with liquids and pulsed electric discharge in liquids. Recently, we have discovered that stable plasma can be sustained within a gas cavity maintained inside liquid media. A prototype device with key dimensions in sub-millimeter range were operated successfully in de-ionized water and turbo molecular pump oil with ambient air, pure nitrogen or pure oxygen used as the operating gas. Hydrogen Peroxide production in de-ionized water with ambient air as the working gas is estimated to be about 80 mg/L after 15 minutes plasma jet-water interaction while energy consumption is only about 8-10 W. With the radicals readily generated and directly introduced into the liquid media, it could lead to applications such as in-liquid bio-waste treatment, bio-rich liquid modification, in-situ monitoring/sensing, and filtration of by-products from VOC treatment by plasma.

  7. Two-Dimensional Optical Measurement of Waves on Liquid Lithium Jet Simulating IFMIF Target Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kazuhiro Itoh; Hiroyuki Koterazawa; Taro Itoh; Yutaka Kukita; Hiroo Kondo; Nobuo Yamaoka; Hiroshi Horiike; Mizuho Ida; Hideo Nakamura; Hiroo Nakamura; Takeo Muroga

    2006-07-01

    Waves on a liquid-lithium jet flow, simulating a proposed high-energy beam target design, have been measured using an optical technique based on specular reflection of a single laser beam on the jet surface. The stream-wise and spanwise fluctuations of the local free-surface slope were least-square fitted with a sinusoidal curve to makeup the signals lost due to the constriction in the optical arrangement. The waveform was estimated with an assumption that wave phase speed can be calculated using the dispersion relation for linear capillary-gravity waves. The direction of propagation on the jet surface was also evaluated so that the wave amplitudes, calculated by integral of slope angle signal, agree consistently in stream-wise and spanwise direction. These measurements and analyses show that the waves at the measurement location for a jet velocity of 1.2 m/s can best be represented by oblique waves with an inclination of 1.23 rad, a wavelength of 3.8 mm and a wave amplitude of about 0.05 mm. (authors)

  8. New approach of a traditional analysis for predicting near-exit jet liquid instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Guillermo; Collicott, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Traditional linear instability theory for round liquid jets requires an exit-plane velocity profile be assumed so as to derive the characteristic growth rates and wavelengths of instabilities. This requires solving an eigenvalue problem for the Rayleigh Equation. In this new approach, a hyperbolic tangent velocity profile is assumed at the exit-plane of a round jet and a comparison is made with a hyperbolic secant profile. Temporal and Spatial Stability Analysis (TSA and SSA respectively) are the employed analytical tools to compare results of predicted most-unstable wavelengths from the given analytical velocity profiles and from previous experimental work. The local relevance of the velocity profile in the near-exit region of a liquid jet and the validity of an inviscid formulation through the Rayleigh equation are discussed as well. A comparison of numerical accuracy is made between two different mathematical approaches for the hyperbolic tangent profile with and without the Ricatti transformation. Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness of the boundary layer at the exit plane non-dimensionalizes the problem and, the Re range, based on measurements by Portillo in 2011, is 185 to 600. Wavelength measurements are taken from Portillo's experiment. School of Mechanical Engineering at Universidad del Valle, supported by a grant from Fulbright and Colciencias. Ph.D. student at the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics Purdue University.

  9. Small-animal tomography with a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, D. H.; Lundström, U.; Westermark, U.; Takman, P. A. C.; Burvall, A.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray tomography of small animals is an important tool for medical research. For high-resolution x-ray imaging of few-cm-thick samples such as, e.g., mice, high-brightness x-ray sources with energies in the few-10-keV range are required. In this paper we perform the first small-animal imaging and tomography experiments using liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray sources. This type of source shows promise to increase the brightness of microfocus x-ray systems, but present sources are typically optimized for an energy of 9 keV. Here we describe the details of a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact laboratory microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-In/Ga-jet anode. The source normally operates with 40 W of electron-beam power focused onto the metal jet, producing a 7×7 μm2 FWHM x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is 4 × 109 photons / ( s × mm2 × mrad2 × 0.1%BW) at the 24.2 keV In Kα line. We use the new In/Ga source and an existing Ga/In/Sn source for high-resolution imaging and tomography of mice.

  10. Charge and energy transferred from a plasma jet to liquid and dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussard, M. Dang Van Sung; Foucher, E.; Rousseau, A.

    2015-10-01

    A key parameter in using plasma jets for biomedical applications is the transferred energy to the living tissues. The objective of this paper is to understand which parameters control the energy transfer from the plasma jet to a liquid or a dielectric surface. The plasma jet is flown with helium and ignited by a 600 Hz ac high voltage (up to 15 kV). Capacitors are connected to two measurement electrodes placed in the plasma source region, and under the sample. Charge and energy transferred are estimated by plotting Lissajous cycles; the number of bullets and the charge probability density function are also calculated. It is shown that the applied voltage and the gap (distance between the end of the tube and the sample) have a dramatic influence on the energy deposition on the sample as well as on the charge probability density function. Surprisingly, both gap distance and voltage have very little influence on the number of bullets reaching the sample per cycle. It is also shown that the conductivity of the liquid sample has almost no influence on the energy deposition and charge probability density function.

  11. Liquid and gelled sprays for mixing hypergolic propellants using an impinging jet injection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mark D.

    The characteristics of sprays produced by liquid rocket injectors are important in understanding rocket engine ignition and performance. The includes, but is not limited to, drop size distribution, spray density, drop velocity, oscillations in the spray, uniformity of mixing between propellants, and the spatial distribution of drops. Hypergolic ignition and the associated ignition delay times are also important features in rocket engines, providing high reliability and simplicity of the ignition event. The ignition delay time is closely related to the level and speed of mixing between a hypergolic fuel and oxidizer, which makes the injection method and conditions crucial in determining the ignition performance. Although mixing and ignition of liquid hypergolic propellants has been studied for many years, the processes for injection, mixing, and ignition of gelled hypergolic propellants are less understood. Gelled propellants are currently under investigation for use in rocket injectors to combine the advantages of solid and liquid propellants, although not without their own difficulties. A review of hypergolic ignition has been conducted for selected propellants, and methods for achieving ignition have been established. This research is focused on ignition using the liquid drop-on-drop method, as well as the doublet impinging jet injector. The events leading up to ignition, known as pre-ignition stage are discussed. An understanding of desirable ignition and combustion performance requires a study of the effects of injection, temperature, and ambient pressure conditions. A review of unlike-doublet impinging jet injection mixing has also been conducted. This includes mixing factors in reactive and non-reactive sprays. Important mixing factors include jet momentum, jet diameter and length, impingement angle, mass distribution, and injector configuration. An impinging jet injection system is presented using an electro-mechanically driven piston for injecting liquid

  12. Direct numerical simulations of temporally developing turbulent reacting liquid-fueled jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashank, Shashank; Pitsch, Heinz

    2012-11-01

    Liquid fueled engines are ubiquitous in the transportation industry because liquid fuel minimizes the weight and volume of propulsion systems. The combustion that occurs in these engines is an inherently multi-physics process, involving fuel evaporation, reaction kinetics, and high levels of turbulence. A desire for high fidelity data that explains complex interaction between different physical mechanisms motivates the consideration of direct numerical simulation (DNS) as an investigation tool. In this study three-dimensional DNS of a reacting n-heptane liquid fueled temporal jet have been performed to study auto-ignition and subsequent burning in conditions that are representative of a diesel engine environment. In these simulations the continuous phase is described using an Eulerian representation whereas Lagrangian particle tracking is used to model the dispersed phase. The results of this study will demonstrate the importance of unsteady effects, and of accounting for the interaction between different modes of combustion, when simulating spray combustion.

  13. Liquid helium inertial jet for comparative study of classical and quantum turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Duri, D.; Charvin, P.; Rousset, B.; Poncet, J.-M.; Diribarne, P.

    2011-11-15

    We present a new cryogenic wind tunnel facility developed to study the high Reynolds number developed classical or quantum turbulence in liquid {sup 4}He. A stable inertial round jet flow with a Reynolds number of 4 x 10{sup 6} can be sustained in both He I and He II down to a minimum temperature of 1.7 K. The circuit can be pressurized up to 3.5 x 10{sup 5} Pa. The system has been designed to exploit the self-similar properties of the jet far field in order to adapt to the spatial resolution of the existing probes. Multiple and complementary sensors can be simultaneously installed to obtain spatial and time resolved measurements. The technical difficulties and design details are described and the system performance is presented.

  14. Jet Pump for Liquid Helium Circulation Through the Fast Cycling Magnets of Nuclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, Nikolay; Emelianov, Nikita; Mitrofanova, Julia; Nikiforov, Dmitry

    Nuclotron is the first fast cycling superconducting synchrotron intended for the acceleration of high-energy nuclei and heavy ions. Its cryogenic system includes two helium refrigerators with a total capacity of 4000 W at 4.5 K. The 251.5 m long accelerator ring consists of 144 superconducting dipole and quadruple magnets. The magnets connected in parallel are refrigerated by a two-phase flow of boiling helium. In order to increase liquid helium flow directed to the superconducting magnets, jet pumps are used. We explain theoretical and experimental results that allow one to determinate main technical specifications and optimal geometric dimensions of the jet pumps. The experience of using this device and corresponding flow diagrams are described.

  15. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Results are given for the analysis of some jet and diesel fuel samples which were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Thirty-two samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were obtained. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by fluorescent indicator adsorption (FIA) analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Recently, rapid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been proposed for hydrocarbon group type analysis, with some suggestion for their use as a replacement of the FIA technique. Two of these methods were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  16. Photoelectron spectroscopy of liquid water, some alcohols, and pure nonane in free micro jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubel, Manfred; Steiner, Björn; Toennies, J. Peter

    1997-06-01

    The recently developed technique of accessing volatile liquids in a high vacuum environment by using a very thin liquid jet is implemented to carry out the first measurements of photoelectron spectra of pure liquid water, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and benzyl alcohol as well as of liquid n-nonane. The apparatus, which consists of a commercial hemispherical (10 cm mean radius) electron analyzer and a hollow cathode discharge He I light source is described in detail and the problems of the sampling of the photoelectrons in such an environment are discussed. For water and most of the alcohols up to six different electronic bands could be resolved. The spectra of 1-butanol and n-nonane show two weakly discernable peaks from which the threshold ionization potential could be determined. A deconvolution of the photoelectron spectra is used to extract ionization potentials of individual molecular bands of molecules near the surface of the liquid and shifts of the order of 1 eV compared to the gas phase are observed. A molecular orientation for water molecules at the surface of liquid water is inferred from a comparison of the relative band strengths with the gas phase. Similar effects are also observed for some of the alcohols. The results are discussed in terms of a simple "Born-solvation" model.

  17. Identification of the biologically active liquid chemistry induced by a nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Wende, Kristian; Williams, Paul; Dalluge, Joe; Gaens, Wouter Van; Aboubakr, Hamada; Bischof, John; von Woedtke, Thomas; Goyal, Sagar M; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Bogaerts, Annemie; Masur, Kai; Bruggeman, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of interaction of cold nonequilibrium plasma jets with mammalian cells in physiologic liquid is reported. The major biological active species produced by an argon RF plasma jet responsible for cell viability reduction are analyzed by experimental results obtained through physical, biological, and chemical diagnostics. This is complemented with chemical kinetics modeling of the plasma source to assess the dominant reactive gas phase species. Different plasma chemistries are obtained by changing the feed gas composition of the cold argon based RF plasma jet from argon, humidified argon (0.27%), to argon/oxygen (1%) and argon/air (1%) at constant power. A minimal consensus physiologic liquid was used, providing isotonic and isohydric conditions and nutrients but is devoid of scavengers or serum constituents. While argon and humidified argon plasma led to the creation of hydrogen peroxide dominated action on the mammalian cells, argon-oxygen and argon-air plasma created a very different biological action and was characterized by trace amounts of hydrogen peroxide only. In particular, for the argon-oxygen (1%), the authors observed a strong negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation and metabolism. This effect was distance dependent and showed a half life time of 30 min in a scavenger free physiologic buffer. Neither catalase and mannitol nor superoxide dismutase could rescue the cell proliferation rate. The strong distance dependency of the effect as well as the low water solubility rules out a major role for ozone and singlet oxygen but suggests a dominant role of atomic oxygen. Experimental results suggest that O reacts with chloride, yielding Cl2(-) or ClO(-). These chlorine species have a limited lifetime under physiologic conditions and therefore show a strong time dependent biological activity. The outcomes are compared with an argon MHz plasma jet (kinpen) to assess the differences between these (at least seemingly) similar plasma sources

  18. Experimental Investigation of Jet Impingement Heat Transfer Using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Brian Paul

    1997-01-01

    Jet impingement cooling of a hypersonic airfoil leading edge is experimentally investigated using thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCS) to measure surface temperature. The experiment uses computer data acquisition with digital imaging of the TLCs to determine heat transfer coefficients during a transient experiment. The data reduction relies on analysis of a coupled transient conduction - convection heat transfer problem that characterizes the experiment. The recovery temperature of the jet is accounted for by running two experiments with different heating rates, thereby generating a second equation that is used to solve for the recovery temperature. The resulting solution requires a complicated numerical iteration that is handled by a computer. Because the computational data reduction method is complex, special attention is paid to error assessment. The error analysis considers random and systematic errors generated by the instrumentation along with errors generated by the approximate nature of the numerical methods. Results of the error analysis show that the experimentally determined heat transfer coefficients are accurate to within 15%. The error analysis also shows that the recovery temperature data may be in error by more than 50%. The results show that the recovery temperature data is only reliable when the recovery temperature of the jet is greater than 5 C, i.e. the jet velocity is in excess of 100 m/s. Parameters that were investigated include nozzle width, distance from the nozzle exit to the airfoil surface, and jet velocity. Heat transfer data is presented in graphical and tabular forms. An engineering analysis of hypersonic airfoil leading edge cooling is performed using the results from these experiments. Several suggestions for the improvement of the experimental technique are discussed.

  19. Temporal instability of coflowing liquid-gas jets under an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangbin; Luo, Xisheng; Si, Ting; Xu, Ronald X.

    2014-05-01

    Temporal instability of an electrified liquid jet in the core of a high-speed gas stream is studied to better understand the electro-flow focusing (EFF) technique. Two types of physical models with and without viscosities of fluids are considered. One utilizes uniform basic flow and an axial electric field, while the other one considers both the axial and radial electric fields and employs appropriate velocity profiles based on the pipe flow for inner liquid and the error function for outer gas stream. Both models demonstrate that the axisymmetric instability and the helical instability are two most unstable modes in the EFF problem. The significance of free charge initially imposed on the interface is highlighted and the effects of surface tension and liquid viscosity on the jet instability are also studied. It is shown that the increase of free charge density can definitely promote both the axisymmetric and helical instabilities and the transition between them arises for sufficiently large free charge densities when the axial electric field intensity increases. Finally, the EFF experiments are carried out to compare with theoretical predictions in the temporal instability analysis and a good agreement between them is achieved.

  20. Bubble and liquid flow characteristics in a cylindrical bath during swirl motion of bubbling jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Manabu; Kondoh, Tsuneo; Uemura, Tomomasa; Yamamoto, Fujio; Morita, Zen-Ichiro

    1994-02-01

    Gas injection into a cylindrical bath through a centric bottom nozzle causes a swirl motion like rotary sloshing. Conditions indicating the initiation and cessation of the swirl motion have been made clear by many researchers. So far, the effect of the swirl motion on transport phenomena in the bath is not clear yet. The present study was made to clarify the bubble characteristics (void fraction, bubble frequency) and liquid flow characteristics (mean velocity, turbulence intensity, Reynolds shear stress) during swirl motion of bubbling jet. These two characteristics were investigated using an electro-resistivity probe and a two-dimensional LDV, respectively.

  1. A closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet for ultrafast spectroscopy of liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picchiotti, Alessandra; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2015-09-01

    We describe the design and provide the results of the full characterization of a closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet system. The jet has excellent optical quality with a wide range of liquids spanning from alcohol to water based solutions, including phosphate buffers used for biological samples. The thickness of the jet film varies depending on the flow rate between 90 μm and 370 μm. The liquid film is very stable, and its thickness varies only by 0.76% under optimal conditions. Measured transmitted signal reveals a long term optical stability (hours) with a RMS of 0.8%, less than the overall noise of the spectroscopy setup used in our experiments. The closed loop nature of the overall jet design has been optimized for the study of precious biological samples, in limited volumes, to remove window contributions from spectroscopic observables. This feature is particularly important for femtosecond studies in the UV range.

  2. Black hole binary inspiral: Analysis of the plunge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard H.; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Khanna, Gaurav

    2016-02-01

    Binary black hole coalescence has its peak of gravitational-wave generation during the "plunge," the transition from quasicircular early motion to late quasinormal ringing (QNR). Although advances in numerical relativity have provided plunge waveforms, there is still no intuitive or phenomenological understanding of plunge comparable to that of the early and late stages. Here we make progress in developing such understanding by relying on insights of the linear mathematics of the particle perturbation model for the extreme mass limit. Our analysis, based on the Fourier-domain Green function, and a simple initial model, point to the crucial role played by the kinematics near the "light ring" (the circular photon orbit) in determining the plunge radiation and the excitation of QNR. That insight is then shown to successfully explain results obtained for particle motion in a Schwarzschild background.

  3. Liquid phase products and solid deposit formation from thermally stressed model jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. S.; Bittker, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between solid deposit formation and liquid degradation product concentration was studied for the high temperature (400 C) stressing of three hydrocarbon model fuels. A Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester was used to simulate actual engine fuel system conditions. The effects of fuel type, dissolved oxygen concentration, and hot surface contact time (reaction time) were studied. Effects of reaction time and removal of dissolved oxygen on deposit formation were found to be different for n-dodecane and for 2-ethylnaphthalene. When ten percent tetralin is added to n-dodecane to give a simpler model of an actual jet fuel, the tetralin inhibits both the deposit formation and the degradation of n-dodecane. For 2-ethylnaphthalene primary product analyses indicate a possible self-inhibition at long reaction times of the secondary reactions which form the deposit precursors. The mechanism of the primary breakdown of these fuels is suggested and the primary products which participate in these precursor-forming reactions are identified. Some implications of the results to the thermal degradation of real jet fuels are given.

  4. Exhaust emissions from a premixing, prevaporizing flame tube using liquid jet A fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Papathakos, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and unburned hydrocarbons were measured in a burner where liquid Jet A fuel was sprayed into the heated air stream and vaporized upstream of a perforated plate flameholder. The burner was tested at inlet air temperatures at 640, 800, and 833 K, an inlet pressure of 5.6 X 100,000 N/m squared, a reference velocity of 25 m/sec, and equivalence ratios from lean blowout to 0.7. Nitrogen oxide levels of below 1.0 g NO2/kg fuel were obtained at combustion efficiencies greater than 99 percent. The measured emission levels for the liquid fuel agreed well with previously reported premixed gaseous propane data and agreed with well stirred reactor predictions. Autoignition of the premixed fuel air mixture was a problem at inlet temperatures above 650 K with 104 msec premixing time.

  5. Sun-plunging Comets and Cometary Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. C.; Carlson, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    During 2011, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) made the first ever direct observations of sun-grazing comet destruction in the inner solar atmosphere. On July 6, the nucleus material of Comet C/2011 N3 (SOHO) (perihelion distance q~1.14R_sun) was observed to vaporize, decelerate and radiate, with total nucleus destruction over a path length ~ R_sun through the lower corona (density n ~ 10^8/cm^3). On Dec. 16, the much more massive Comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy), with similar q~1.17 R_sun), was seen vaporizing until it vanished behind the solar limb then re-emerging in a much diminished state. A range of current work on these data is being presented by others in this AGU session. These two 'sun-skimming' comets had q in the low corona. There, mass loss is dominated by insolation-driven sublimation, so the physics of their destruction is largely similar to those with q>> R_sun. However, Brown et al. (Astron. Astrophys. 535, A71, 2011) showed that mass loss and destruction is completely different for 'sun-plunging' comets with qn*= 2.5x10^11/cm^3, increasing exponentially with depth on scale height H~100-500 km). Consequently sun-plunger mass loss and destruction is dominated by ablation and by ram-pressure-driven explosion. The very large cometary kinetic energy (2x10^27 erg x (M/10^12) for mass M g) and its highly localized deposition in time (<10 s) and space (<6000 km ~ 10") should produce signatures somewhat like solar magnetic flares. Such 'cometary flare' events should offer wholly new ways to probe properties both of comets (e.g. element abundances) and of the low solar atmosphere (e.g magnetic fields). Super-flares produced by very large sun-plungers could have serious terrestrial consequences. We will present and discuss results of our current work on sun-plunging comets and explosive cometary flares, including

  6. A computer model for liquid jet atomization in rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Lee, J. G.; Krishnan, A.; Yang, H. Q.; Ibrahim, E.; Chuech, S.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1991-12-01

    The process of atomization has been used as an efficient means of burning liquid fuels in rocket engines, gas turbine engines, internal combustion engines, and industrial furnaces. Despite its widespread application, this complex hydrodynamic phenomenon has not been well understood, and predictive models for this process are still in their infancy. The difficulty in simulating the atomization process arises from the relatively large number of parameters that influence it, including the details of the injector geometry, liquid and gas turbulence, and the operating conditions. In this study, numerical models are developed from first principles, to quantify factors influencing atomization. For example, the surface wave dynamics theory is used for modeling the primary atomization and the droplet energy conservation principle is applied for modeling the secondary atomization. The use of empirical correlations has been minimized by shifting the analyses to fundamental levels. During applications of these models, parametric studies are performed to understand and correlate the influence of relevant parameters on the atomization process. The predictions of these models are compared with existing experimental data. The main tasks of this study were the following: development of a primary atomization model; development of a secondary atomization model; development of a model for impinging jets; development of a model for swirling jets; and coupling of the primary atomization model with a CFD code.

  7. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Siddhartha; Kumar, Aloke

    2014-11-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re << 1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this work, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such ``viscous liquid'' state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions. Overall our manuscript provides a biophysical basis for understanding the evolution of biofilm streamers in creeping flows.

  8. On the absence of asymmetric wakes for periodically plunging finite wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, D. E.; Cleaver, D. J.; Gursul, I.; Wang, Z.

    2014-07-01

    It has previously been shown that, at high Strouhal numbers, oscillating airfoils can produce deflected jets that can create very high lift-coefficients for otherwise symmetric scenarios. These deflected jets form through pairing of the trailing-edge vortices to create asymmetric vortex couples that self-propel at an angle to the freestream, resulting in an asymmetric flow field and non-zero lift. In this paper results are presented that indicate these high-lift deflected jets cannot form for finite wings. Instead of the straight vortex tubes that pair and convect at an angle to the freestream observed for effectively infinite wings, finite wings exhibit vortex tubes that break into two branches near the tip forming double helix structures. One branch connects with the last vortex; one branch connects with the next vortex. This creates a long "daisy chain" of interconnected trailing edge vortices forming a long series of vortex loops. These symmetric flow fields are shown to persist for finite wings even to Strouhal numbers more than twice those required to produce asymmetric wakes on plunging airfoils. Two contributing reasons are discussed for why deflected jets are not observed. First the tip vortex creates three-dimensionality that discourages vortex coupling. Second, the symmetry of the circulation of the interconnected vortex loops, which has been confirmed by the experiments, is a natural consequence of the vortex topology. Therefore, the asymmetry in trailing edge vortex strength previously observed as characteristic of deflected jets cannot be supported for finite wings.

  9. Experimental and numerical investigations of the impingement of an oblique liquid jet onto a superhydrophobic surface: energy transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali

    2016-02-01

    This study presents the theory of impinging an oblique liquid jet onto a vertical superhydrophobic surface based on both experimental and numerical results. A Brassica oleracea leaf with a 160° apparent contact angle was used for the superhydrophobic surface. Distilled water was sent onto the vertical superhydrophobic surface in the range of 1750-3050 Reynolds number, with an inclination angle of 20°-40°, using a circular glass tube with a 1.75 mm inner diameter. The impinging liquid jet spread onto the surface governed by the inertia of the liquid and then reflected off the superhydrophobic surface due to the surface energy of the spreading liquid. Two different energy approaches, which have time-scale and per-unit length, were performed to determine transformation of the energy. The kinetic energy of the impinging liquid jet was transformed into the surface energy with an increasing interfacial surface area between the liquid and air during spreading. Afterwards, this surface energy of the spreading liquid was transformed into the reflection kinetic energy.

  10. OPTIMIZED DETERMINATION OF TRACE JET FUEL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN BLOOD USING IN-FIELD LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION WITH SUBSEQUENT LABORATORY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC-MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS AND ON-COLUMN LARGE VOLUME INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A practical and sensitive method to assess volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from JP-8 jet fuel in human whole blood was developed by modifying previously established liquid-liquid extraction procedures, optimizing extraction times, solvent volume, specific sample processing te...

  11. The penetration of a soft solid by a liquid jet, with application to the administration of a needle-free injection.

    PubMed

    Shergold, Oliver A; Fleck, Norman A; King, Toby S

    2006-01-01

    Liquid jet injections have been performed on human skin in vivo and silicone rubber using Intraject needle-free injectors. The discharge characteristics of the liquid jet were measured using a custom-built test instrument. The experiments reveal that a high-speed liquid jet penetrates a soft solid by the formation and opening of a planar crack. The fluid stagnation pressure required for skin penetration decreases with increasing diameter of the liquid jet. These findings are consistent with the slow-speed penetration of a soft solid by a sharp-tipped punch. It is demonstrated that the Shergold-Fleck sharp-tipped punch penetration model [Shergold, O.A., Fleck, N.A., 2004. Mechanisms of deep penetration of soft solids. Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 460, 3037-3058.] gives adequate predictions for the pressure required to penetrate a soft solid by a high-speed liquid jet. PMID:16277987

  12. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets

    PubMed Central

    Das, Siddhartha; Kumar, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re ≪ 1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this work, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such “viscous liquid” state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions. Overall our manuscript provides a biophysical basis for understanding the evolution of biofilm streamers in creeping flows. PMID:25410423

  13. Absolute and convective instability of a viscous liquid jet surrounded by a viscous gas in a vertical pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Lian, Z. W.

    1993-01-01

    The absolute and convective instability of a viscous liquid jet emanating into a viscous gas in a vertical pipe is analyzed in a parameter space spanned by the Reynolds number, the Froude number, the Weber number, the viscosity ratio, the density ratio, and the diameter ratio. The numerical results of the analysis are used to demonstrate that reduction in gravity tends to enhance the Rayleigh mode of convective instability which leads to the breakup of a liquid jet into drops of diameters comparable with the jet diameter. On the contrary, the Taylor mode of convective instability that leads to atomization is retarded at reduced gravity. The Rayleigh mode becomes absolutely unstable when the Reynolds number exceeds a critical value for a given set of the rest of the relevant parameters. The domain of absolute instability is significantly enlarged when the effect of gas viscosity is not neglected.

  14. Effect of liquid droplets on turbulence in a round gaseous jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mostafa, A. A.; Elghobashi, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is to develop a two-equation turbulence model for dilute vaporizing sprays or in general for dispersed two-phase flows including the effects of phase changes. The model that accounts for the interaction between the two phases is based on rigorously derived equations for turbulence kinetic energy (K) and its dissipation rate epsilon of the carrier phase using the momentum equation of that phase. Closure is achieved by modeling the turbulent correlations, up to third order, in the equations of the mean motion, concentration of the vapor in the carrier phase, and the kinetic energy of turbulence and its dissipation rate for the carrier phase. The governing equations are presented in both the exact and the modeled formes. The governing equations are solved numerically using a finite-difference procedure to test the presented model for the flow of a turbulent axisymmetric gaseous jet laden with either evaporating liquid droplets or solid particles. The predictions include the distribution of the mean velocity, volume fractions of the different phases, concentration of the evaporated material in the carrier phase, turbulence intensity and shear stress of the carrier phase, droplet diameter distribution, and the jet spreading rate. The predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Optimization of liquid jet system for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skočovská, Katarína; Novotný, Jan; Prochazka, David; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    A complex optimization of geometrical and temporal parameters of a jet system (developed in Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) laboratory of Brno University of Technology) for direct elemental analysis of samples in a liquid state of matter using LIBS was carried out. First, the peristaltic pump was synchronized with the flashlamp of the ablation laser, which reduced variation of the ablated sample amount. Also, the fluctuation of the laser ray angle incident on the jet surface was diminished. Such synchronization reduced signal standard deviations and thus increased repeatability of the measurements. Then, laser energy and distance of the focusing lens from the sample were optimized. The gate delay time and the gate width were optimized for single pulse (SP) experiments; the gate delay time and the inter-pulse delay were optimized for the use of double pulse (DP) variant. Results were assessed according to the highest signal to noise ratios and the lowest relative standard deviations of the signal. The sensitivity of the single pulse and the double pulse LIBS for the detection of heavy metals traces, copper (Cu i at 324.754 nm) and lead (Pb i at 405.781 nm), in aqueous solution of copper (ii) sulfate and lead (ii) acetate, was estimated in terms of limits of detection (LODs). As a result, sensitivity improvement of DP LIBS system was observed, the LOD of Cu obtained with DP was calculated 40% lower than LOD gained from SP technique.

  16. Terminal Liquid Mass Fractions and Terminal Mean Droplet Sizes in He Free-Jet Expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Knuth, E. L.; Kornilov, O.; Toennies, J. P.

    2011-05-20

    The terminal liquid mass fraction in He free-jet expansions is deduced from time-of-flight measurements using conservation of energy. Both the present results and results from prior measurements are correlated using a scaling parameter which was used previously for correlating droplet size as a function of source conditions. Deduced values of the mass fraction range from 0.047 to 0.42. The terminal mean droplet size is determined using a novel technique based on a size-dependent attenuation of the beam droplets when impacted by electrons. The determined sizes are in agreement with sizes obtained previously by crossing the droplet beam with an atomic beam, confirming the suitability of the present technique, which is relatively simple in comparison with crossing the droplet beam with an atomic beam. Measured values of the terminal velocity of the droplets are compared with values calculated for a model in which real-fluid properties are used for the enthalpy in the source but conversion of heat of condensation into energy of directed motion is neglected. The deviations from perfect-gas behavior in free-jet expansions are shown to be due to real-fluid properties and condensation.

  17. Optimization of liquid jet system for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Skočovská, Katarína; Novotný, Jan; Prochazka, David; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    A complex optimization of geometrical and temporal parameters of a jet system (developed in Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) laboratory of Brno University of Technology) for direct elemental analysis of samples in a liquid state of matter using LIBS was carried out. First, the peristaltic pump was synchronized with the flashlamp of the ablation laser, which reduced variation of the ablated sample amount. Also, the fluctuation of the laser ray angle incident on the jet surface was diminished. Such synchronization reduced signal standard deviations and thus increased repeatability of the measurements. Then, laser energy and distance of the focusing lens from the sample were optimized. The gate delay time and the gate width were optimized for single pulse (SP) experiments; the gate delay time and the inter-pulse delay were optimized for the use of double pulse (DP) variant. Results were assessed according to the highest signal to noise ratios and the lowest relative standard deviations of the signal. The sensitivity of the single pulse and the double pulse LIBS for the detection of heavy metals traces, copper (Cu i at 324.754 nm) and lead (Pb i at 405.781 nm), in aqueous solution of copper (ii) sulfate and lead (ii) acetate, was estimated in terms of limits of detection (LODs). As a result, sensitivity improvement of DP LIBS system was observed, the LOD of Cu obtained with DP was calculated 40% lower than LOD gained from SP technique. PMID:27131663

  18. Modeling the Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Jacqmim, David A.

    2001-01-01

    An axisymmetric phase field model is developed and used to model surface tension forces on liquid jets in microgravity. The previous work in this area is reviewed and a baseline drop tower experiment selected 'for model comparison. A mathematical model is developed which includes a free surface. a symmetric centerline and wall boundaries with given contact angles. The model is solved numerically with a compact fourth order stencil on a equally spaced axisymmetric grid. After grid convergence studies, a grid is selected and all drop tower tests modeled. Agreement was assessed by comparing predicted and measured free surface rise. Trend wise agreement is good but agreement in magnitude is only fair. Suspected sources of disagreement are suspected to be lack of a turbulence model and the existence of slosh baffles in the experiment which were not included in the model.

  19. Effect of X-ray spot size on liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Giorgia; Goel, Alok; Kleibert, Armin; Brown, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    A 30 µm pinhole is introduced in the intermediate focus of the SIM beamline at the Swiss Light Source to improve the spot size at the second downstream focus, which is used here for liquid jet X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. The 30 µm pinhole reduces the beam dimensions from 250 (v) × 100 (h) µm to 75 × 45 µm for a vertical exit slit of 100 µm. The smaller X-ray spot results in a substantial decrease in the gas-phase contribution of the spectra from 40% down to 20% and will help to simplify the interpretation and peak assignments of future experiments. PMID:26524318

  20. Liquid jet impingement normal to a disk in zero gravity. Ph.D. Thesis Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The free surface shapes of circular liquid jets impinging normal to sharp-edged disks in zero gravity are determined. Zero gravity drop tower experiments yielded three distinct flow patterns that were classified in terms of the relative effects of surface tension and inertial forces. An order of magnitude analysis was conducted that indicated regions where viscous forces were not significant in the computation of free surface shapes. The free surface analysis was simplified by transforming the governing potential flow equations and boundary conditions into the inverse plane, where the stream function and velocity potential became the coordinates. The resulting nonlinear equations were solved by standard finite difference methods, and comparisons were made with the experimental data for the inertia dominated regime.

  1. EROSIVE WEAR OF DUCTILE METALS BY A PARTICLE-LADEN HIGH-VELOCITY LIQUID-JET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Simon Ka-Keung; Humphrey, Joseph A.C.; Levy, Alan

    1980-12-01

    A liquid-solid particle jet impingement flow apparatus is described and experimental measurements are reported for the accelerated erosion of copper, aluminum and mild steel sheet metal by coal suspensions in kerosene and alumina and silicon carbide suspensions in water. Slurry velocities of up to 130 ft/sec (40 m/sec) and impingement angles ranging from 15 degrees to 90 degrees were investigated. The maximum particle concentration used was 40% by weight. For high velocity the results of this study show two erosion maxima arising at impingement angles of 90 degrees and 40 degrees respectively~ whereas in corresponding gas-solid particle investigations maximum erosion occurs at approximately 20 degrees. In the study both particle concentration and composition were varied. A polynomial regression technique was used to calculate empirical and semi-theoretical correlation constants.

  2. Deposition of micron liquid droplets on wall in impinging turbulent air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Nink, Jacob; Merati, Parviz; Tian, Tian; Li, Yong; Shieh, Tom

    2010-06-01

    The fluid mechanics of the deposition of micron liquid (olive oil) droplets on a glass wall in an impinging turbulent air jet is studied experimentally. The spatial patterns of droplets deposited on a wall are measured by using luminescent oil visualization technique, and the statistical data of deposited droplets are obtained through microscopic imagery. Two distinct rings of droplets deposited on a wall are found, and the mechanisms of the formation of the inner and outer rings are investigated based on global diagnostics of velocity and skin friction fields. In particular, the intriguing effects of turbulence, including large-scale coherent vortices and small-scale random turbulence, on micron droplet deposition on a wall and coalescence in the air are explored.

  3. Atomization and Dispersion of a Liquid Jet Injected Into a Crossflow of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seay, J. E.; Samuelson, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, environmental regulations have become more stringent, requiring lower emissions of mainly nitrogen oxides (NOx), as well as carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbons (UHC). These regulations have forced the gas turbine industry to examine non-conventional combustion strategies, such as the lean burn approach. The reasoning behind operating under lean conditions is to maintain the temperature of combustion near and below temperatures required for the formation of thermal nitric oxide (NO). To be successful, however, the lean processes require careful preparation of the fuel/air mixture to preclude formation of either locally rich reaction zones, which may give rise to NO formation, or locally lean reaction zones, which may give rise to inefficient fuel processing. As a result fuel preparation is crucial to the development and success of new aeroengine combustor technologies. A key element of the fuel preparation process is the fuel nozzle. As nozzle technologies have developed, airblast atomization has been adopted for both industrial and aircraft gas turbine applications. However, the majority of the work to date has focused on prefilming nozzles, which despite their complexity and high cost have become an industry standard for conventional combustion strategies. It is likely that the new strategies required to meet future emissions goals will utilize novel fuel injector approaches, such as radial injection. This thesis proposes and demonstrates an experiment to examine, on a mechanistic level (i.e., the physics of the action), the processes associated with the atomization, evaporation, and dispersion of a liquid jet introduced, from a radial, plain-jet airblast injector, into a crossflow of air. This understanding requires the knowledge not only of what factors influence atomization, but also the underlying mechanism associated with liquid breakup and dispersion. The experimental data acquired identify conditions and geometries for improved

  4. Ultraviolet vision and foraging in dip and plunge diving birds.

    PubMed

    Håstad, Olle; Ernstdotter, Emma; Odeen, Anders

    2005-09-22

    Many fishes are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and display UV markings during courtship. As UV scatters more than longer wavelengths of light, these signals are only effective at short distances, reducing the risk of detection by swimming predators. Such underwater scattering will be insignificant for dip and plunge diving birds, which prey on fishes just below the water surface. One could therefore expect to find adaptations in the eyes of dip and plunge diving birds that tune colour reception to UV signals. We used a molecular method to survey the colour vision tuning of five families of dip or plunge divers and compared the results with those from sister taxa of other foraging methods. We found evidence of extended UV vision only in gulls (Laridae). Based on available evidence, it is more probable that this trait is associated with their terrestrial foraging habits rather than piscivory. PMID:17148194

  5. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Friedman, M; Hazenshprung, N; Mardor, I; Nagler, A; Shimel, G; Tessler, M; Silverman, I

    2013-12-01

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm(3)) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the (7)Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ~200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm(2) and volume power density of ~2 MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 1-2 mA) at SARAF. PMID:24387433

  6. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfon, S.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Paul, M.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Feinberg, G.; Friedman, M.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Tessler, M.; Silverman, I.

    2013-12-01

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm3) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the 7Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ˜200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm2 and volume power density of ˜2 MW/cm3 at a lithium flow of ˜4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 1-2 mA) at SARAF.

  7. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Silverman, I.; Paul, M.; Friedman, M.; Tessler, M.

    2013-12-15

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm{sup 3}) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ∼200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm{sup 2} and volume power density of ∼2 MW/cm{sup 3} at a lithium flow of ∼4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91–2.5 MeV, 1–2 mA) at SARAF.

  8. A ballistic compressor-based experiment for the visualization of liquid propellant jet combustion above 100 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, A.; Kooker, D. E.

    This paper describes the components and operation of an experimental setup for the visualization of liquid propellant (LP) jet combustion at pressures above 100 MPa. The apparatus consists of an in-line ballistic compressor and LP injector. The ballistic compressor, based on a modified 76 mm gun, provides high-pressure (ca. 55 MPa) clear hot gas for the jet ignition. A piston (projectile) is fired toward a test chamber beyond the barrel's end, and its rebound is arrested in a transition section that seals the test chamber to the barrel. The LP jet is injected once the piston is restrained, and combustion of the jet further elevates the pressure. At a preset pressure, a disc in the piston ruptures and the combustion gas vents sonically into the barrel. If a monopropellant is used, the jet injection-combustion process then resembles liquid rocket combustion but at very high pressures (ca. 140 MPa). This paper discusses the ballistics of the compression and compares experimental results to those predicted by a numerical model of the apparatus. Experimentally, a pressure of 70 MPa was achieved upon a 12.5 volumetric compression factor by firing a 10 kg piston into 1.04 MPa argon using a charge of 75 g of small-grain M1 propellant.

  9. Dynamical properties of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets and their applications to plasma processing in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Katsuhisa; Satoshi, Ikawa; Furusho, Hitoshi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2007-11-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets are discussed with the emphasis on their physics and applications. Plume-like plasmas, which may be called plasma jets, have been generated in a discharge system consisting of a dielectric/metal tube (through which He gas flows at the atmospheric pressure) and a single electrode attached to the tube, to which low-frequency, high-voltage pulses (˜10kV, ˜10kHz) are applied. With visible light images taken by a high-speed ICCD camera, it has been confirmed that the plasma jet consists of a series of small ``plasma bullets'' that are emitted intermittently from the powered electrode in sync with the positive voltage pulses. The observed ``plasma bullet'' may be interpreted as a fast moving ionization front. The plasma jets are energetic enough to generate highly reactive charge-neutral radicals but their gas temperatures remain low. Therefore the plasma jets are ideal for processing of liquid based materials at low temperatures and some examples of process applications, such as reduction of cations, polymerization of liquid monomers, and sterilization, will be also presented.

  10. A Water Model Study of Impinging Gas Jets on Liquid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ho Yong; Irons, Gordon A.

    2012-04-01

    Water modeling experiments were designed to observe the deformation of a liquid surface by impinging the gas jet. Video images were taken and processed in a systematic way. The important surface cavity parameters, such as depth, width, and their frequency of oscillation, were obtained. The relation between surface depression depth and the supplied gas momentum were consistent with previous findings and were extended to higher flow rates. The surface instability and the onset of splashing were observed and interpreted with the Blowing number. The wave behaviors were described qualitatively with a combination of photographic evidence and power spectral density analysis to extract the characteristic wave numbers for each gas flow rate. The analysis of the time series of the surface variables showed a connection to the attenuation of turbulence gas pressure fluctuation and the surface deformation by the gas impingement. Bath velocities were measured with a particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. To quantify the transfer of kinetic energy from the gas to the liquid, an energy transfer index was defined and calculated with the PIV data. The index was insensitive to gas flow rate but increased with cavity width. The momentum transfer across the interface was also analyzed, and a similar cavity width dependence was found. A correlation between the cavity shape and momentum transfer was proposed.

  11. Non-thermal processes on ice and liquid micro-jet surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Babajide O.

    The primary focus of this research is to investigate non-thermal processes occurring on ice surfaces and the photo-ejection of ions from liquid surfaces. Processes at the air-water/ice interface are known to play a very important role in the release of reactive halogen species with atmospheric aerosols serving as catalysts. The ability to make different types of ice with various morphologies, hence, different adsorption and surface properties in vacuum, provide a useful way to probe the catalytic effect of ice in atmospheric reactions. Also, the use of the liquid jet technique provides the rare opportunity to probe liquid samples at the interface; hitherto impossible to investigate with traditional surface science techniques. In Chapter 2, the effect of ice morphology on the release of reactive halogen species from photodissociation of adsorbed organic halides on ice will be presented. Quantum state resolved measurements of neutral atomic iodine from the photon irradiation of submonolayer coverages of methyl iodide adsorbed on low temperature water ice were conducted. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of methyl iodide adsorbed on ice were performed to provide information on the effect of ice morphology on the adsorption of submonolayer methyl iodide. The interaction and autoionization of HCl on low-temperature (80{140 K) water ice surfaces has been studied using low-energy (5-250 eV) electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). A detailed ESD study of the interactions of low concentrations of HCl with low-temperature porous amorphous solid water (PASW), amorphous solid water (ASW) and crystalline ice (CI) surfaces will be presented in Chapter 3. The ESD cation yields from HCl adsorbed on ice, as well as the coverage dependence, kinetic energy distributions and TPD measurements were all monitored. Probing liquid surface using traditional surface science technique is usually difficult because of the problem of

  12. Characterization and Scaling of Vortex Shedding from a Plunging Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslam Panah, Azar; Buchholz, James

    2011-11-01

    Leading-edge and trailing-edge vortices (LEV and TEV) are investigated for a plunging flat plate airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of 10,000 while varying plunge amplitude and Strouhal number. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry is used to examine the strength and dynamics of shed vortices. Vortex strength, timing, pinch-off and trajectory are examined. By tracking the development of both the LEV and TEV in phase-locked measurements throughout the cycle and extracting the respective vortex circulation, the dimensionless circulation of both the LEV and TEV at each phase in the cycle could be determined. Guided by theoretical considerations for vorticity generation and aerodynamic theory, we will discuss the role of kinematic parameters on vortex shedding and the applicability of a scaling factor for the circulation of the shed vortex structures. Whereas a scaling parameter based on plate kinematics effectively collapses the circulation values of the shed leading-edge vortices with variation in Strouhal number, plunge amplitude, and angle of attack, it is found that the strength of the trailing-edge structures vary little with variation in plunge amplitude and angle of attack. This work is supported by AFOSR under award number FA9550-11-1-0019 monitored by Dr. Doug Smith.

  13. Experimental observations of the breakup of multiple metal jets in a volatile liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Marciniak, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    A postulated severe loss of coolant accident in a nuclear reactor can lead to significant core damage due to residual heat generation. Subsequently, melted core materials (i.e.; corium) could migrate downward and impinge upon the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). During this relocation, the complexity of the reactor structure could segregate the molten corium into various flow paths. A perforated flow plate could readily provide the mechanism to segregate the molten corium. The resulting small (a few cm) diameter melt streams, driven by gravity, could then penetrate the remaining coolant in the RPV and cause any of the following events: impingement of the high temperature melt streams on the lower head could breach the RPV; re-agglomeration of the corium melt on the lower head could influence the coolability of the debris bed; {open_quotes}pre-mixing{close_quotes} of the melt streams with the coolant could lead to a vapor explosion; or, sufficient quenching of the melt streams by the coolant could produce a stabilized debris bed. An overview of the thermo-science issues related to core-melt accidents is presented by Theofanous. Thus, insight into the melt stream breakup mechanisms (i.e.; interfacial conditions, fragmentation, and geometric spacing) during the melt-coolant interactions is necessary to evaluate the plausibility, and characteristics, of these events. Molten Fuel Stream Breakup Simulation (MFSBS) experiments have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory in which simulant materials were used to determine a `boiling` jet breakup length correlation and to visualize the melt fragmentation mechanisms during the penetration of a single molten metal jet into a volatile liquid. The goal was to characterize the hydrodynamics of the corium-water interactions in a postulated core melt accident. The present experiment closely follows the procedures of the MFSBS.

  14. Multi-fluid Dynamics for Supersonic Jet-and-Crossflows and Liquid Plug Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ezeldin A.

    Multi-fluid dynamics simulations require appropriate numerical treatments based on the main flow characteristics, such as flow speed, turbulence, thermodynamic state, and time and length scales. In this thesis, two distinct problems are investigated: supersonic jet and crossflow interactions; and liquid plug propagation and rupture in an airway. Gaseous non-reactive ethylene jet and air crossflow simulation represents essential physics for fuel injection in SCRAMJET engines. The regime is highly unsteady, involving shocks, turbulent mixing, and large-scale vortical structures. An eddy-viscosity-based multi-scale turbulence model is proposed to resolve turbulent structures consistent with grid resolution and turbulence length scales. Predictions of the time-averaged fuel concentration from the multi-scale model is improved over Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models originally derived from stationary flow. The response to the multi-scale model alone is, however, limited, in cases where the vortical structures are small and scattered thus requiring prohibitively expensive grids in order to resolve the flow field accurately. Statistical information related to turbulent fluctuations is utilized to estimate an effective turbulent Schmidt number, which is shown to be highly varying in space. Accordingly, an adaptive turbulent Schmidt number approach is proposed, by allowing the resolved field to adaptively influence the value of turbulent Schmidt number in the multi-scale turbulence model. The proposed model estimates a time-averaged turbulent Schmidt number adapted to the computed flowfield, instead of the constant value common to the eddy-viscosity-based Navier-Stokes models. This approach is assessed using a grid-refinement study for the normal injection case, and tested with 30 degree injection, showing improved results over the constant turbulent Schmidt model both in mean and variance of fuel concentration predictions. For the incompressible liquid plug propagation

  15. A closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet for ultrafast spectroscopy of liquid samples.

    PubMed

    Picchiotti, Alessandra; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2015-09-01

    We describe the design and provide the results of the full characterization of a closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet system. The jet has excellent optical quality with a wide range of liquids spanning from alcohol to water based solutions, including phosphate buffers used for biological samples. The thickness of the jet film varies depending on the flow rate between 90 μm and 370 μm. The liquid film is very stable, and its thickness varies only by 0.76% under optimal conditions. Measured transmitted signal reveals a long term optical stability (hours) with a RMS of 0.8%, less than the overall noise of the spectroscopy setup used in our experiments. The closed loop nature of the overall jet design has been optimized for the study of precious biological samples, in limited volumes, to remove window contributions from spectroscopic observables. This feature is particularly important for femtosecond studies in the UV range. PMID:26429427

  16. Effects of gas flow on oxidation reaction in liquid induced by He/O{sub 2} plasma-jet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-07-28

    We present here analysis of oxidation reaction in liquid by a plasma-jet irradiation under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. To estimate the total amount of oxidation reaction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in liquid, we employ a KI-starch solution system, where the absorbance of the KI-starch solution near 600 nm behaves linear to the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. The laminar flow with higher gas velocity induces an increase in the ROS distribution area on the liquid surface, which results in a large amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. However, a much faster gas flow conversely results in a reduction in the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid under the following two conditions: first condition is that the turbulence flow is triggered in a gas flow channel at a high Reynolds number of gas flow, which leads to a marked change of the spatial distribution of the ROS concentration in gas phase. Second condition is that the dimpled liquid surface is formed by strong gas flow, which prevents the ROS from being transported in radial direction along the liquid surface.

  17. Effects of gas flow on oxidation reaction in liquid induced by He/O2 plasma-jet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Shiratani, Masaharu; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    We present here analysis of oxidation reaction in liquid by a plasma-jet irradiation under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. To estimate the total amount of oxidation reaction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in liquid, we employ a KI-starch solution system, where the absorbance of the KI-starch solution near 600 nm behaves linear to the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. The laminar flow with higher gas velocity induces an increase in the ROS distribution area on the liquid surface, which results in a large amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. However, a much faster gas flow conversely results in a reduction in the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid under the following two conditions: first condition is that the turbulence flow is triggered in a gas flow channel at a high Reynolds number of gas flow, which leads to a marked change of the spatial distribution of the ROS concentration in gas phase. Second condition is that the dimpled liquid surface is formed by strong gas flow, which prevents the ROS from being transported in radial direction along the liquid surface.

  18. Image analysis of jet structure on electrospinning from free liquid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, Jiri Linka, Ales Tunak, Maros; Lukas, David

    2014-06-16

    The work analyses intra-jet distances during electrospinning from a free surface of water based poly(vinyl alcohol) solution confined by two thin metallic plates employed as a spinning electrode. A unique computer vision system and digital image processing were designed in order to track position of every polymer jet. Here, we show that jet position data are in good compliance with theoretically predicted intra-jet distances by linear stability analysis. Jet density is a critical parameter of electrospinning technology, since it determines the process efficiency and homogeneity of produced nanofibrous layer. Achievements made in this research could be used as essential approach to study jetting from two-dimensional spinning electrodes, or as fundamentals for further development of control system related to Nanospider{sup ™} technology.

  19. Underlying principle of efficient propulsion in flexible plunging foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao-Jue; He, Guo-Wei; Zhang, Xing

    2014-12-01

    Passive flexibility was found to enhance propulsive efficiency in swimming animals. In this study, we numerically investigate the roles of structural resonance and hydrodynamic wake resonance in optimizing efficiency of a flexible plunging foil. The results indicates that (1) optimal efficiency is not necessarily achieved when the driving frequency matches the structural eigenfrequency; (2) optimal efficiency always occurs when the driving frequency matches the wake resonant frequency of the time averaged velocity profile. Thus, the underlying principle of efficient propulsion in flexible plunging foil is the hydrodynamic wake resonance, rather than the structural resonance. In addition, we also found that whether the efficiency can be optimized at the structural resonant point depends on the strength of the leading edge vortex relative to that of the trailing edge vortex. The result of this work provides new insights into the role of passive flexibility in flapping-based propulsion.

  20. Computer simulation of mobilization and mixing of kaolin with submerged liquid jets in 25,000-gallon horizontal cylindrical tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Mahoney, L.A.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents and analyzes results of computer model simulation of mobilization and mixing of kaolin using the TEMPEST code. The simulations are conducted in a horizontal cylindrical geometry replicating a 95 m{sup 3} (25,000 gal) test tank at ORNL, which is scaled to approximate Melton Valley Storage tanks, which are 190 m{sup 3} (50,000 gal). Mobilization and mixing is accomplished by two submerged liquid jets. Two configurations are simulated, one with the jets located at the center of the tank lengthwise and one with the jets located 1/4 tank length from one end. Computer simulations of both jet and suction configurations are performed. Total flow rates of 50, 100, and 200 gpm are modeled, corresponding to jet velocities of 1.52, 3.05, 6.10 m/s (5, 10, 20 ft/s). Calculations were performed to a time of 2 h for the center jet location and to a little over 1 h for the quarter jet location. This report presents computer and fluid properties model basis, preliminary numerical testing, and results. The results are presented in form of flow field and sludge layer contours. Degree of mobilization is presented as fraction of initial sludge layer remaining as a function of time. For the center jet location at 200 gpm, the sludge layer is completely mobilized in just over 1 h. For 100 gpm flow, about 5% of the sludge layer remains after 2 h. For 50 gpm flow, nearly 40% of the initial sludge layer remains after 2 h. For the quarter jets at 200 gpm, about 10% of the initial sludge layer remains after 1 h. For 100 gpm, about 40% of the sludge layer remains after 1 h. The boundary of the sludge layer is defined as 98% max packing for the particles. Mixing time estimates for these cases range from between 9.4 h and 16.2 h. A more critical evaluation and comparison of predictions and the test results is needed.

  1. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  2. Transitions in the vortex wake behind the plunging profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, Tomasz; Kudela, Henryk

    2014-12-01

    In this study we investigate numerically the vortex wake formation behind the profile performing simple harmonic motion known in the literature as plunging. This research was inspired by the flapping motion which is appropriate for birds, insects and fishes. We assume the two dimensional model of flow. Depending on the parameters such as plunging amplitude, frequency and the Reynolds number, we demonstrate many different types of vortex street behind the profile. It is well known that the type of vortex wake determines the hydrodynamic forces acting on the profile. Dependences of the plunging amplitude, the Strouhal number and various topology vortices are established by constructing the phase transition diagram. The areas in the diagram related to the drag, thrust, and lift force generation are captured. We notice also the areas where the vorticity field is disordered. The disordered vorticity field does not allow maintenance of the periodic forces on the profile. An increase in the Reynolds number leads to the transition of the vortex wake behind the profile. The transition is caused by the phenomenon of boundary layer eruption. Further increase of the Reynolds number causes the vortex street related to the generation of the lift force to vanish.

  3. Splash jet and slamming generated by a rotating flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S. Y.; Sun, S. L.; Ren, H. L.; Wu, G. X.

    2015-09-01

    The hydrodynamic problem of slamming generated by a rotating flap, commonly known as Oyster in the wave energy sector, plunging into water, is analysed based on the incompressible velocity potential theory. The problem is solved through the boundary element method in the time domain. Two typical case studies are undertaken. One is the flap plunging into calm water and the other into an incoming wave. The splash jet formed during the flap plunging is included in the simulation. When the jet meets the main flow, it is treated through the domain decomposition method without taking account the secondary impact, which is similar to the mathematical method of Riemann's second sheet in the complex plane. The problem is solved in each non-overlapping subdomain, and the velocity and pressure continuity condition is imposed on the interface of the subdomains. Detailed results for the flap plunging into water with different velocities or accelerations are provided. The gravity and wave effects are also investigated.

  4. Application of Proper Orthogonal Decomposition to the morphological analysis of confined co-axial jets of immiscible liquids with comparable densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampous, Georgios; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2014-11-01

    The development of a round liquid jet under the influence of a confined coaxial flow of an immiscible liquid of comparable density (central to annular flow density ratio of 8:10) was investigated in the vicinity of the nozzle exit. Two flow regimes were considered; one where the annular flow is faster than the central jet, so the central liquid jet is accelerated and one where the annular flow is slower, so the central liquid jet is decelerated. The central jet was visualised by high speed photography. Three modes of jet development were identified and classified in terms of the Reynolds number, Re, of the central jet which was in the range of 525 < Re < 2725, a modified definition of the Weber number, We, which allows the distinction between accelerating and deceleration flows and was in the range of -22 < We < 67 and the annular to central Momentum Ratio, MR, of the two streams which was in the range of 3.6 < MR < 91. By processing the time resolved jet images using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD), it was possible to reduce the description of jet morphology to a small number of spatial modes, which isolated the most significant morphologies of the jet development. In this way, the temporal and spatial characteristics of the instabilities on the interface were clearly identified which highlights the advantages of POD over direct observation of the images. Relationships between the flow parameters and the interfacial waves were established. The wavelength of the interfacial instability was found to depend on the velocity of the fastest moving stream, which is contrary to findings for fluids with large density differences.

  5. Effects of irradiation distance on supply of reactive oxygen species to the bottom of a Petri dish filled with liquid by an atmospheric O2/He plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Kusumegi, Shota; Kudo, Akihiro; Sakanoshita, Tomohiro; Tsurumaru, Takuya; Sato, Akihiro; Uchida, Giichiro; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-05-01

    The impact of irradiation distances on plasma jet-induced specific effects on the supply of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to the bottom of a Petri dish filled with liquid was investigated using a KI-starch gel reagent that can be employed as a ROS indicator even in water. O3 exposure experiments without plasma irradiation were also performed to elucidate the specific effects of the plasma jet. Relative concentrations of ROS transported to the bottom were evaluated using absorbance measurements. The results indicated that ROS supply to the bottom is markedly enhanced by the plasma jet irradiation at shorter irradiation distances, whereas similar results could not be obtained for the O3 exposure. In these cases, the liquid mixing in the depth direction was also enhanced by the plasma jet irradiation only, and the supply of reactive atomic oxygen to the liquid surface was markedly increased as well.

  6. Breakup of metal jets penetrating a volatile liquid. Final report, October 1, 1991--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.P.

    1995-07-01

    In a loss of coolant accident, the core may become uncovered, causing the fuel pins to melt. The molten fuel would pour onto the plenum and collect on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. The RPV internal structure includes one or more perforated plates in the lower plenum which would divide the molten fuel into small diameter streams or jets, which would break up as they penetrate the coolant in the lower plenum. The breakup of these jets would occur in two phases, each dominated by a distinct fragmentation mechanism. As a fuel jet first penetrates the coolant, a stagnation flow develops at its leading edge, causing the column to spread radially and eject molten fuel into the coolant. The jet fluid in the column is fragmented by pressure fluctuations due to the jet/ambient fluid relative motion, so that a steady jet is reduced to a field of falling drops below a critical depth called the breakup length. The present work includes analyses yielding simple correlations for jet breakup length and jet leading edge penetration.

  7. One-dimensional nonlinear instability study of a slightly viscoelastic, perfectly conducting liquid jet under a radial electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Yin, Xie-Yuan; Yin, Xie-Zhen

    2016-05-01

    A one-dimensional electrified viscoelastic model is built to study the nonlinear behavior of a slightly viscoelastic, perfectly conducting liquid jet under a radial electric field. The equations are solved numerically using an implicit finite difference scheme together with a boundary element method. The electrified viscoelastic jet is found to evolve into a beads-on-string structure in the presence of the radial electric field. Although the radial electric field greatly enhances the linear instability of the jet, its influence on the decay of the filament thickness is limited during the nonlinear evolution of the jet. On the other hand, the radial electric field induces axial non-uniformity of the first normal stress difference within the filament. The first normal stress difference in the center region of the filament may be greatly decreased by the radial electric field. The regions with/without satellite droplets are illuminated on the χ (the electrical Bond number)-k (the dimensionless wave number) plane. Satellite droplets may be formed for larger wave numbers at larger radial electric fields.

  8. Fluid dynamics and convective heat transfer in impinging jets through implementation of a high resolution liquid crystal technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Wiedner, B.; Camci, C.

    1993-01-01

    A combined convective heat transfer and fluid dynamics investigation in a turbulent round jet impinging on a flat surface is presented. The experimental study uses a high resolution liquid crystal technique for the determination of the convective heat transfer coefficients on the impingement plate. The heat transfer experiments are performed using a transient heat transfer method. The mean flow and the character of turbulent flow in the free jet is presented through five hole probe and hot wire measurements, respectively. The flow field character of the region near the impingement plate plays an important role in the amount of convective heat transfer. Detailed surveys obtained from five hole probe and hot wire measurements are provided. An extensive validation of the liquid crystal based heat transfer method against a conventional technique is also presented. After a complete documentation of the mean and turbulent flow field, the convective heat transfer coefficient distributions on the impingement plate are presented. The near wall of the impingement plate and the free jet region is treated separately. The current heat transfer distributions are compared to other studies available from the literature. The present paper contains complete sets of information on the three dimensional mean flow, turbulent velocity fluctuations, and convective heat transfer to the plate. The experiments also prove that the present nonintrusive heat transfer method is highly effective in obtaining high resolution heat transfer maps with a heat transfer coefficient uncertainty of 5.7 percent.

  9. Visco Jet Joule-Thomson Device Characterization Tests in Liquid Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Joule-Thomson (J-T) devices have been identified as critical components for Thermodynamic Vent Systems (TVS) planned for future space exploration missions. Lee Visco Jets (The Lee Company) (Ref. 4) are one type of J-T device that may be used for LCH4 propellant systems. Visco Jets have been previously tested and characterized in LN2 and LH2 (Refs. 6 and 7), but have not been characterized in LOX or LCH4. Previous Visco Jet tests with LH2 resulted in clogging of the Visco Jet orifice under certain conditions. It has been postulated that this clogging was due to the presence of neon impurities in the LH2 that solidified in the orifices. Visco Jets therefore require testing in LCH4 to verify that they will not clog under normal operating conditions. This report describes a series of tests that were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to determine if Visco Jets would clog under normal operating conditions with LCH4 propellant. Test results from this program indicate that no decrease in flow rate was observed for the Visco Jets tested, and that current equation used for predicting flow rate appears to under-predict actual flow at high Lohm ratings.

  10. Characterization of extreme ultraviolet light-emitting plasmas from a laser-excited fluorine containing liquid polymer jet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, B.; Assmann, J.; Faubel, M.; Gäbel, K.; Kranzusch, S.; Lugovoj, E.; Mann, K.; Missalla, T.; Peth, Ch.

    2004-06-01

    The operation of a liquid polymer jet laser-plasma target and the characterization of the absolute x-ray emission in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength window from 9-19 nm is reported. The target is a liquid polymer (perfluoro-polyether) that is exposed to pulsed and focused laser light at 532 nm in the form of a thin, liquid microjet (d=40 to 160 μm) in vacuum. The spectral brightness of the source in the 13 nm range is relatively high because a large fraction of radiative energy is emitted in one single line only, which is assigned to be the 2p-3d FVII doublet at 12.8 nm, with a laser energy conversion efficiency of 0.45% (2π sr, 2% bandwidth) in our initial experiment. A further increase of the relative emission has been found in the wavelength range between 7 and 17 nm when the jet diameter was increased from 40 to 160 μm. The two-dimensional spatial profile of the source plasma (d=40 to 50 μm) has been analyzed with a pinhole camera.

  11. Condensation enhancement on a pool surface caused by a submerged liquid jet

    SciTech Connect

    Shumway, R.W.

    1997-05-01

    One advanced nuclear reactor design has a residual heat removal (RHR) pipe connected to the bottom of a steam generator outlet plenum. The water in the plenum can become thermally stratified during postulated loss of coolant accidents. Cold water injected through the RHR pipe has the potential effect of increasing the steam condensation on the pool surface due to the stirring action of the jet. The amount of increase depends on a number of factors, including the jet velocity and the pool height above the jet injection point. Prediction of steam condensation rates, before and after the jet breaks the pool surface, is the topic of this paper. Data and correlations exist for pre surface breakthrough and a method has been developed for post breakthrough. The models have been incorporated into the reactor safety analysis computer software known as RELAP5. Comparisons of predictions against data are presented.

  12. Advanced Liquid Cooling for a Traction Drive Inverter Using Jet Impingement and Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S. K.; Narumanchi, S.; Mihalic, M.; Moreno, G.; Bennion, K.; Jeffers, J.

    2014-08-01

    Jet impingement on plain and micro-finned enhanced surfaces was compared to a traditional channel flow configuration. The jets provide localized cooling to areas heated by the insulated-gate bipolar transistor and diode devices. Enhanced microfinned surfaces increase surface area and thermal performance. Using lighter materials and designing the fluid path to manage pressure losses increases overall performance while reducing weight, volume, and cost. Powering four diodes in the center power module of the inverter and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to characterize the baseline as well as jet-impingement-based heat exchangers. CFD modeling showed the thermal performance improvements should hold for a fully powered inverter. Increased thermal performance was observed for the jet-impingement configurations when tested at full inverter power (40 to 100 kW output power) on a dynamometer. The reliability of the jets and enhanced surfaces over time was also investigated. Experimentally, the junction-to- coolant thermal resistance was reduced by up to 12.5% for jet impingement on enhanced surfaces s compared to the baseline channel flow configuration. Base plate-to-coolant (convective) resistance was reduced by up to 37.0% for the jet-based configuration compared to the baseline, suggesting that while improvements to the cooling side reduce overall resistance, reducing the passive stack resistance may contribute to lowering overall junction-to-coolant resistance. Full inverter power testing showed reduced thermal resistance from the middle of the module baseplate to coolant of up to 16.5%. Between the improvement in thermal performance and pumping power, the coefficient of performance improved by up to 13% for the jet-based configuration.

  13. A study of liquid boric oxide particle growth rates in a gas stream from a simulated jet engine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setze, Paul C

    1957-01-01

    It was experimentally determined that the liquid boric oxide particles leaving a jet engine combustor, burning a boron-containing fuel, will have diameters of 1.0 x 10(exp -5) to 2.0 x 10(exp -5) centimeter. For this size range the particle heat-transfer and drag coefficients are essentially infinite. The results may be applied to any boron-containing fuel. Equations are developed that enable the calculation of the particle size-time history. A study of boric oxide deposition mechanisms is included, and suggestions for decreading deposition rates given.

  14. Flow structure and vorticity transport on a plunging wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslam Panah, Azar

    The structure and dynamics of the flow field created by a plunging flat plate airfoil are investigated at a chord Reynolds number of 10,000 while varying plunge amplitude and Strouhal number. Digital particle image velocimetry measurements are used to characterize the shedding patterns and the interactions between the leading and trailing edge vortex structures (LEV and TEV), resulting in the development of a wake classification system based on the nature and timing of interactions between the leading- and trailing-edge vortices. The convection speed of the LEV and its resulting interaction with the TEV is primarily dependent on reduced frequency; however, at Strouhal numbers above approximately 0.4, a significant influence of Strouhal number (or plunge amplitude) is observed in which LEV convection is retarded, and the contribution of the LEV to the wake is diminished. It is shown that this effect is caused by an enhanced interaction between the LEV and the airfoil surface, due to a significant increase in the strength of the vortices in this Strouhal number range, for all plunge amplitudes investigated. Comparison with low-Reynolds-number studies of plunging airfoil aerodynamics reveals a high degree of consistency and suggests applicability of the classification system beyond the range examined in the present work. Some important differences are also observed. The three-dimensional flow field was characterized for a plunging two-dimensional flat-plate airfoil using three-dimensional reconstructions of planar PIV data. Whereas the phase-averaged description of the flow field shows the secondary vortex penetrating the leading-edge shear layer to terminate LEV formation on the airfoil, time-resolved, instantaneous PIV measurements show a continuous and growing entrainment of secondary vorticity into the shear layer and LEV. A planar control volume analysis on the airfoil indicated that the generation of secondary vorticity produced approximately one half the

  15. Experimental investigation of 2D flexible plunging hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ruijun; Mitchell, Robert; Shu, Fangjun

    2012-11-01

    It is believed that both birds and insects benefit from their wing flexibility during the flapping flight. One of the possible benefits is higher lift force generation capability than that of rigid wing models. Both experimental and computational work has discovered that the leading edge vortex (LEV) plays an important role in this advantage of high lift force generating efficiency. In the present work, flow physics related to high lift-generating flexible wings are investigated experimentally. Both flexible and rigid hydrofoils (NACA0012) were actively plunged in glycerol-water solution with various amplitude, frequency and Reynolds number combinations. Phase-locked Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to investigate the generation and evolution of the LEVs. Lift and drag forces during plunging were also measured to uncover the relationship between the force response and the surrounding flow field development. The overall results were also compared between flexible and rigid hydrofoils to provide qualitative data for validation of computational work. Supported by Army High Performance Computing Center.

  16. Lagrangian observations of acceleration and bubble dynamics in plunging breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canals, Miguel; Amador, Andre

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the three-dimensional structure of plunging waves is one of the most difficult problems in fundamental fluid dynamics. In this presentation we provide an analysis of field data collected in breaking waves using novel Lagrangian drifters with a diameter of 5-10 cm and equipped with miniature HD cameras and inertial measurement units. These drifters were deployed, using a personal watercraft, into the breaking region of waves ranging from 1-5 meters in height. We analyze in detail the time series of particle acceleration and rotation and how these quantities relate to the imagery captured by the camera aboard the drifters. This data represents the first dedicated study of the three-dimensional particle dynamics of plunging breakers. Going beyond the basic statistical analysis of the acceleration data, we make an attempt at characterizing the intensity of the wave breaking process using the bubble size and characteristics obtained from the HD video images. We also attempt to relate the spectral statistics of acceleration and particle rotation to existing Lagrangian turbulence models in the hopes of obtaining estimates of the kinetic energy dissipation in breaking waves, while taking into account the unsteady and heterogeneous nature of the turbulent flow.

  17. Generation of capillary instabilities by external disturbances in a liquid jet. Ph.D. Thesis - State Univ. of N.Y.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leib, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    The receptivity problem in a circular liquid jet is considered. A time harmonic axial pressure gradient is imposed on the steady, parallel flow of a jet of liquid emerging from a circular duct. Using a technique developed in plasma physics a casual solution to the forced problem is obtained over certain ranges of Weber number for a number of mean velocity profiles. This solution contains a term which grows exponentially in the downstream direction and can be identified with a capillary instability wave. Hence, it is found that the externally imposed disturbances can indeed trigger instability waves in a liquid jet. The amplitude of the instability wave generated relative to the amplitude of the forcing is computed numerically for a number of cases.

  18. Unconditional jetting.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M

    2008-08-01

    Capillary jetting of a fluid dispersed into another immiscible phase is usually limited by a critical capillary number, a function of the Reynolds number and the fluid property ratios. Critical conditions are set when the minimum spreading velocity of small perturbations v_{-};{*} along the jet (marginal stability velocity) is zero. Here we identify and describe parametric regions of high technological relevance, where v_{-};{*}>0 and the jet flow is always supercritical independently of the dispersed liquid flow rate; within these relatively broad regions, the jet does not undergo the usual dripping-jetting transition, so that either the jet can be made arbitrarily thin (yielding droplets of any imaginably small size), or the issuing flow rate can be made arbitrarily small. In this work, we provide illustrative analytical studies of asymptotic cases for both negligible and dominant inertia forces. In this latter case, requiring a nonzero jet surface velocity, axisymmetric perturbation waves "surf" downstream for all given wave numbers, while the liquid bulk can remain static. In the former case (implying small Reynolds flow) we found that the jet profile small slope is limited by a critical value; different published experiments support our predictions. PMID:18850933

  19. Similarity between the primary and secondary air-assisted liquid jet breakup mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Im, Kyoung-Su; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2008-04-18

    We report an ultrafast synchrotron x-ray phase-contrast imaging study of the primary breakup mechanism of a coaxial air-assisted water jet. There exist great similarities between the primary (jet) and the secondary (drop) breakup, and in the primary breakup on different length scales. A transition from a ligament- to a membrane-mediated breakup is identified around an effective Weber number We' approximately 13. This observation reveals the critical role an effective Weber number plays in determining the atomization process and strongly supports the cascade breakup model. PMID:18518113

  20. Stretched Inertial Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Seon, Thomas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Liquid jets often arise as short-lived bursting liquid flows. Cavitation or impact-driven jets, bursting champagne bubbles, shaped-charge jets, ballistospores or drop-on-demand inkjet printing are a few examples where liquid jets are suddenly released. The trademark of all these discharge jets is the property of being stretched, due to the quenching injection. the present theoretical and experimental investigation, the structure of the jet flow field will be unraveled experimentally for a few emblematic occurrences of discharge jets. Though the injection markedly depends on each flow configuration, the jet velocity field will be shown to be systematically and rapidly attracted to the universal stretching flow z/t. The emergence of this inertial attractor actually only relies on simple kinematic ingredients, and as such is fairly generic. The universality of the jet velocity structure will be discussed.

  1. Evaluation of fatty acid oxidation by reactive oxygen species induced in liquids using atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Atsushi; Fukui, Satoshi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2015-10-01

    We investigated fatty acid oxidation by atmospheric-pressure nonthermal helium plasma using linoleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid, together with evaluating active species induced in liquids. If the ambient gas contains oxygen, direct plasma such as plasma jets coming into contact with the liquid surface supplies various active species, such as singlet oxygen, ozone, and superoxide anion radicals, to the liquid. The direct plasma easily oxidizes linoleic acid, indicating that fatty acid oxidation will occur in the direct plasma. In contrast, afterglow flow, where the plasma is terminated in a glass tube and does not touch the surface of the liquid sample, supplies mainly superoxide anion radicals. The fact that there was no clear observation of linoleic acid oxidation using the afterglow reveals that it may not affect lipids, even in an atmosphere containing oxygen. The afterglow flow can potentially be used for the sterilization of aqueous solutions using the reduced pH method, in medical and dental applications, because it provides bactericidal activity in the aqueous solution despite containing a smaller amount of active species.

  2. Liquid Fuel Emulsion Jet-in-Crossflow Penetration and Dispersion Under High Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Guillermo Andres

    The current work focuses on the jet-in-crossflow penetration and dispersion behavior of water-in-oil emulsions in a high pressure environment. Both fuel injection strategies of using a water-in-oil emulsion and a jet-in-crossflow have demonstrated unique benefits in improving gas turbine performance from an emissions and efficiency standpoint. A jet-in-crossflow is very practical for use in gas turbine engines, rocket propulsion, and aircraft engines since it utilizes already available crossflow air to atomize fuel. Injecting water into a combustion chamber in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion allows for pollutant emissions reduction while reducing efficiency loses that may result from using a separate water or steam injection circuit. Dispersion effects on oil droplets are expected, therefore investigating the distribution of both oil and water droplets in the crossflow is an objective in this work. Understanding the synchronization and injection behavior of the two strategies is of key interest due to their combined benefits. A water-to-oil ratio and an ambient pressure parameter are developed for emulsion jet-in-crossflow trajectories. To this end, a total of 24 emulsion jet-in-crossflow tests were performed with varying ambient pressures of 2-8 atm and momentum flux ratios of 50, 85, and 120. Sobel edge filtering was applied to each averaged image obtained from a high speed video of each test case. Averaged and filtered images were used to resolve top and bottom edges of the trajectory in addition to the overall peak intensity up to 40 mm downstream of the injection point. An optimized correlation was established and found to differ from literature based correlations obtained under atmospheric pressure conditions. Overall it was found that additional parameters were not necessary for the top edge and peak intensity correlations, but a need for a unique emulsion bottom edge and width trajectory correlation was recognized. In addition to investigating emulsion

  3. Effects of the electrical parameters and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in liquids exposed to atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Eun Jeong; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet was fabricated and studied for plasma-liquid interactions. The plasma jet consists of a quartz-covered pin electrode and outer quartz tube with a tapered nozzle. Using the current-voltage (I-V) and optical emission characteristics of the plasma jet, the plasma density and the speed of the plume were investigated. The optical emission spectra clearly indicated the excited NO, O, OH, N2, and N2+ in the plasma plumes. Then the plasma jets were applied to the deionized water. We investigated the effects of the operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse frequency, and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in the gas and liquid phases. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were obtained at the plasma-liquid surface and inside the plasma-treated liquids using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and chemical probe method. The nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the plasmas and liquids.

  4. Experimental study of flow field around a plunging flexible hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Alarcon, Leonardo; Yang, Tao; Shu, Fangjun; Wei, Mingjun

    2011-11-01

    Recent developments in micro air vehicles (MAVs) have led to the improvement of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations capable of simulating flexible flapping wing phenomena. For validation of these simulations, an experimental methodology is applied to characterize the flow physics involved with an immersed flexible flapping hydrofoil. Using a one-degree of freedom crank-shaft system, a silicone hydrofoil was actuated to flap under various kinematic conditions. The hydrofoil was subject to active plunging and passive pitching motion in both water and aqueous glycerin solutions. Phase-locked particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were obtained around the flapping hydrofoil. These measurements, along with force measurements using a six-axis load cell, are used to compare the results with those of the numerical simulations. By comparing the hydrofoil deformation, vortex evolution and force generation, good agreements between CFD and experimental results were observed. Supported by Army High Performance Computing Research Center.

  5. Flow structure and performance of a flexible plunging airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkala, James Marcus

    An investigation was performed with the intent of characterizing the effect of flexibility on a plunging airfoil, over a parameter space applicable to birds and flapping MAVs. The kinematics of the motion was determined using of a high speed camera, and the deformations and strains involved in the motion were examined. The vortex dynamics associated with the plunging motion were mapped out using particle image velocimetry (PIV), and categorized according to the behavior of the leading edge vortex (LEV). The development and shedding process of the LEVs was also studied, along with their flow trajectories. Results of the flexible airfoils were compared to similar cases performed with a rigid airfoil, so as to determine the effects caused by flexibility. Aerodynamic loads of the airfoils were also measured using a force sensor, and the recorded thrust, lift and power coefficients were analyzed for dependencies, as was the overall propulsive efficiency. Thrust and power coefficients were found to scale with the Strouhal number defined by the trialing edge amplitude, causing the data of the flexible airfoils to collapse down to a single curve. The lift coefficient was likewise found to scale with trailing edge Strouhal number; however, its data tended to collapse down to a linear relationship. On the other hand, the wake classification and the propulsive efficiency were more successfully scaled by the reduced frequency of the motion. The circulation of the LEV was determined in each case and the resulting data was scaled using a parameter developed for this specific study, which provided significant collapse of the data throughout the entire parameter space tested.

  6. Liquid mixing enhanced by pulse width modulation in a Y-shaped jet configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qingfeng; Zhong, Shan

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, mixing between two fluid streams, which are injected into a planar mixing channel via a Y-shaped confluence section at the same volume flow rate, is studied experimentally. The injection of the two fluid streams is controlled by two separate solenoid valves, which are operated with a phase difference of 180°, using pulse width modulation. The experiments are conducted using water at a mean Reynolds number between 83 and 250, a range of pulsation frequencies and two duty cycles (25 and 50%). Both particle-image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence technique are used to visualize the flow patterns and to quantify the mixing degree in the mixing channel. This experiment shows that the pulsation of each jet produces vortical structures, which promotes mixing via vortex entrainment and vortex breakup, and at the same time the mixing is also greatly enhanced by sequential segmentation produced by a 180° out-of-phase pulsation of the two jets. This mixing enhancement method is effective at a Reynolds number greater than 125 with a mixing degree of 0.9 being achieved. For the Reynolds numbers studied in the present experiments, an optimal frequency exists, which corresponds to a Strouhal number in the range of 0.5-2. Furthermore, at a given mean Reynolds number a lower duty cycle is found to produce a better mixing due to the resultant higher instantaneous Reynolds number in the jet flow. It is also found that pulsation of only one jet can produce a similar mixing effect.

  7. Conjugate heat transfer from a heated disk to a thin liquid film formed by a controlled impinging jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, A.; Thomas, S.; Rahman, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and numerical study of the heat transfer from a heated horizontal disk to a thin film of liquid is described. The liquid was delivered to the disk by a collar arrangement such that the film thickness and radial velocity were known at the outer radius of the collar. This method of delivery is termed as a controlled impinging jet. Flow visualization tests were performed and heat transfer data were collected along the radius of the disk for different volumetric flow rates and inlet temperatures in the supercritical and subcritical regions. The heat transfer coefficient was found to increase with flow rate when both supercritical and subcritical regions were present on the heated surface. A numerical simulation of this free surface problem was performed, which included the effects of conjugate heat transfer within the heated disk and the liquid. The numerical predictions agree with the experimental results and show that conjugate heat transfer has a significant effect on the local wail temperature and heat transfer coefficient.

  8. Modified Design of Hydroturbine Wicket Gates to Include Liquid Control Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Bryan; Cimbala, John; Wouden, Alex

    2013-11-01

    With the ever-increasing penetration of alternative electricity generation, it is becoming more common to operate hydroturbines under off-design conditions in order to maintain stability in the electric power grid. Improving the off-design performance of these turbines is therefore of significant importance. As the runner blades of a Francis hydroturbine pass though the wakes created by the upstream guide vanes (wicket gates and stay vanes), they experience significant changes in the instantaneous values of absolute velocity, flow angle, and pressure. The concept of adding water jets to the trailing edge of the guide vanes is proposed as a method for reducing the dynamic load on the hydroturbine runner blades, as well as modifying the flow angle of the water entering the runner to improve turbine efficiency during off-design operation. In order to add water jets that are capable of turning the flow, a modified beveled trailing edge design is presented. Computational experiments show that a +/-5° change in swirl angle is achievable with the new design, as well as up to 4% improvement in turbine efficiency during off-design operation. This correlates to an overall improvement in machine efficiency of up to 2%, when the losses through the jet channels are taken into account. Funding for this work was provided by the DOD, through the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship, and the DOE, through the Penn State Hydropower Research Grant.

  9. Scaling-up a liquid water jet laser plasma source to high average power for extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Ulrich; Stiel, Holger; Will, Ingo; Wieland, Marek; Wilhein, Thomas; Nickles, Peter V.; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2001-08-01

    In this article we describe a laser plasma source for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) based on a liquid water jet target. Although jet targets are known for some time now, no attempts have been made to prove the functionality of the target under conditions similar to an EUVL production-line facility, that means illumination with high average power laser systems (in the multi-kW regime) at repetition rates in the kHz region. Such systems are currently under development. We used the MBI-burst laser to simulate these extreme illumination conditions. We examined the hydrodynamic stability of the target as a function of the laser repetition rate at different average laser powers (0.6kW and 5kW per burst). Additionally, the dependence of the conversion efficiency on pulse duration in the range from 30ps to 3ns was investigated. From our results one can conclude parameters for future design of driver lasers for EUVL systems.

  10. A Needleless Liquid Jet Injection Delivery Method for Cardiac Gene Therapy: A Comparative Evaluation Versus Standard Routes of Delivery Reveals Enhanced Therapeutic Retention and Cardiac Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fargnoli, AS; Katz, MG; Williams, RD; Margulies, KB; Bridges, CR

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluates needleless liquid jet method and compares it with three common experimental methods: (1) Intramuscular injection (IM) (2) Left ventricular intracavitary infusion (LVIC) (3) LV intracavitary infusion with aortic and pulmonary occlusion (LVIC-OCCL). Methods and Results Two protocols were executed. First, [n=24 rats], retention of dye was evaluated 10 minutes after delivery in an acute model. The acute study revealed the following: significantly higher dye retention (expressed as % myocardial cross section area) in the left ventricle in both the Liquid Jet [52±4] % and LVIC-OCCL [58±3] % groups p<0.05 compared with IM [31±8] % and LVIC [35±4] %. In the second, [n=16 rats], each animal received AAV.EGFP at a single dose with terminal 6 week endpoint. In the second phase with AAV.EGFP at 6 weeks post-delivery, a similar trend was found with Liquid Jet [54±5] % and LVIC-OCCL [60±8] % featuring more LV expression as compared with IM [30±9] % and LVIC [23±9] %. The IM and LVIC-OCCL cross sections revealed myocardial fibrosis. Conclusions With more detailed development in future model studies, needleless liquid jet delivery offers a promising strategy to improve direct myocardial delivery. PMID:25315468

  11. Combustion of liquid fuel in the counter-swirled jets of a gas turbine plant annular combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumanovskii, A. G.; Semichastnyi, N. N.; Sokolov, K. Iu.

    1986-03-01

    Tests were carried out on an annular combustion chamber rig with a stabilizer of the type used in the GTN-25 gas turbine plant to determine the feasibility of burning a liquid fuel (diesel fuel, GOST 4749-73) in a combustion chamber of this type. Very high performance was obtained for a number of important characteristics of the microflame combustion process in counterswirled jets where all the air was supplied through the front unit of the chamber. However, the tests did not make it possible to solve some of the problems which arise when operating under full-scale conditions, such as the required high combustion efficiency under variable operating conditions of a gas turbine plant; elimination of soot formation at the walls of the stabilizer and the internal surfaces of the pipes supplying fuel to the atomizers; and a decrease in smoking under conditions of excess air factor.

  12. High fidelity simulation and analysis of liquid jet atomization in a gaseous crossflow at intermediate Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Soteriou, Marios C.

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in numerical methods coupled with the substantial enhancements in computing power and the advent of high performance computing have presented first principle, high fidelity simulation as a viable tool in the prediction and analysis of spray atomization processes. The credibility and potential impact of such simulations, however, has been hampered by the relative absence of detailed validation against experimental evidence. The numerical stability and accuracy challenges arising from the need to simulate the high liquid-gas density ratio across the sharp interfaces encountered in these flows are key reasons for this. In this work we challenge this status quo by presenting a numerical model able to deal with these challenges, employing it in simulations of liquid jet in crossflow atomization and performing extensive validation of its results against a carefully executed experiment with detailed measurements in the atomization region. We then proceed to the detailed analysis of the flow physics. The computational model employs the coupled level set and volume of fluid approach to directly capture the spatiotemporal evolution of the liquid-gas interface and the sharp-interface ghost fluid method to stably handle high liquid-air density ratio. Adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian droplet models are shown to be viable options for computational cost reduction. Moreover, high performance computing is leveraged to manage the computational cost. The experiment selected for validation eliminates the impact of inlet liquid and gas turbulence and focuses on the impact of the crossflow aerodynamic forces on the atomization physics. Validation is demonstrated by comparing column surface wavelengths, deformation, breakup locations, column trajectories and droplet sizes, velocities, and mass rates for a range of intermediate Weber numbers. Analysis of the physics is performed in terms of the instability and breakup characteristics and the features of downstream

  13. The Penetration Behavior of an Annular Gas-Solid Jet Impinging on a Liquid Bath: Comparison with a Conventional Circular Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung Sil; Dyussekenov, Nurzhan; Sohn, H. Y.

    2010-02-01

    The top-blow injection technique of a gas-solid mixture through a circular lance is used in the Mitsubishi Continuous Smelting Process. One of the inherent problems associated with this injection is the severe erosion of the hearth refractory below the lances. A new configuration of the lance to form an annular gas-solid jet rather than a circular jet was designed in the laboratory scale. With this new configuration, solid particles leave the lance at a much lower velocity than the gas, and the penetration behavior of the jet is significantly different than with the circular lance in which the solid particles leave the lance at the same high velocity as the gas. The results of cold model tests using an air-sand jet issuing from a circular lance and an annular lance into a water bath showed that the penetration of the annular jet is much less sensitive to the variations in particle feed rate as well as gas velocity than that of the circular jet. Correlation equations for the penetration depth for both circular and annular jets show agreement among the experimentally obtained values.

  14. Microbial Inactivation in the Liquid Phase Induced by Multigas Plasma Jet

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Toshihiro; Uehara, Kodai; Sasaki, Yota; Hidekazu, Miyahara; Matsumura, Yuriko; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Ito, Norihiko; Kohno, Masahiro; Azuma, Takeshi; Okino, Akitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Various gas atmospheric nonthermal plasmas were generated using a multigas plasma jet to treat microbial suspensions. Results indicated that carbon dioxide and nitrogen plasma had high sterilization effects. Carbon dioxide plasma, which generated the greatest amount of singlet oxygen than other gas plasmas, killed general bacteria and some fungi. On the other hand, nitrogen plasma, which generated the largest amount of OH radical, killed ≥6 log of 11 species of microorganisms, including general bacteria, fungi, acid-fast bacteria, spores, and viruses in 1–15 min. To identify reactive species responsible for bacterial inactivation, antioxidants were added to bacterial suspensions, which revealed that singlet oxygen and OH radicals had greatest inactivation effects. PMID:26173107

  15. Unsteady Aerodynamics on a Pitching Plunging Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Adam; Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2010-11-01

    Biology has shown that natural fliers utilize unsteady flow mechanisms to enhance their lift characteristics in low Reynolds number flight regimes. This study will investigate the interaction between the leading edge vortices (LEVs) and tip vortices over a low aspect ratio flat plate being subjected to a pitch-plunge kinematic motion. Previous studies have shown the creation of stable vortices off the leading edge at the three quarter span location between times 0.25 and 0.50 in the kinematic motion. This study furthers previous knowledge by mapping the flow field around these vortex cores. This will allow for an understanding into the interaction of the LEV with tip vortices and how the LEVs convect downstream. Specifically we look to validate the interactions between these vortex systems leading to enhanced lift as has been demonstrated in very low Reynolds number numerical simulations. A combination of two dimensional and stereo Particle Image Velocimetery (PIV) is used to measure the flow field around the flat plate at various spanwise and chordwise locations. The PIV measurements are triggered by the dynamic motion rig allowing for phase averaging at key locations throughout the motion cycle.

  16. Temporal analysis of acoustic emission from a plunged granular bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Daisuke; Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2015-10-01

    The statistical property of acoustic emission (AE) events from a plunged granular bed is analyzed by means of actual-time and natural-time analyses. These temporal analysis methods allow us to investigate the details of AE events that follow a power-law distribution. In the actual-time analysis, the calm-time distribution, and the decay of the event-occurrence density after the largest event (i.e., the Omori-Utsu law) are measured. Although the former always shows a power-law form, the latter does not always obey a power law. Markovianity of the event-occurrence process is also verified using a scaling law by assuming that both of them exhibit power laws. We find that the effective shear strain rate is a key parameter to classify the emergence rate of power-law nature and Markovianity in granular AE events. For the natural-time analysis, the existence of self-organized critical states is revealed by calculating the variance of natural time χk, where k th natural time of N events is defined as χk=k /N . In addition, the energy difference distribution can be fitted by a q -Gaussian form, which is also consistent with the criticality of the system.

  17. Thickness-varying flexible plunging fins swim more efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanda; Yeh, Peter; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We use three dimensional computer simulations to probe the hydrodynamics of oscillating flexible fins with varying thickness. The fin is modeled as an elastic rectangular plate with the thickest section at the leading edge, decreasing linearly until the trailing edge. The plate is modeled as infinitely thin, and we assume that the thickest part of the fin is much smaller compared to its other length scales. Therefore, we simulate the swimmer as two dimensional plate and introduce the effect of the thickness gradient by including an appropriate mass gradient and stiffness gradient along the length of the plate. The flexible fin is actuated by a plunging motion at its leading edge. We evaluate the performance of the swimmer by measuring the steady state thrust, free swimming velocity, input power, and swimming economy as a function of driving frequency and the magnitude of the thickness gradient. We find a wideband frequency range in which the swimming economy is increased as compared to a uniformly thick swimmer. These findings may shed insight into some of the physical mechanisms that allow fish to have high swimming efficiency.

  18. Featured Image: A Galaxy Plunges Into a Cluster Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    The galaxy that takes up most of the frame in this stunning image (click for the full view!) is NGC 1427A. This is a dwarf irregular galaxy (unlike the fortuitously-located background spiral galaxy in the lower right corner of the image), and its currently in the process of plunging into the center of the Fornax galaxy cluster. Marcelo Mora (Pontifical Catholic University of Chile) and collaborators have analyzed observations of this galaxy made by both the Very Large Telescope in Chile and the Hubble Advanced Camera for Surveys, which produced the image shown here as a color composite in three channels. The team worked to characterize the clusters of star formation within NGC 1427A identifiable in the image as bright knots within the galaxy and determine how the interactions of this galaxy with its cluster environment affect the star formation within it. For more information and the original image, see the paper below.Citation:Marcelo D. Mora et al 2015 AJ 150 93. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/93

  19. Ultrastructure of skeletal muscle fibers studied by a plunge quick freezing method: myofilament lengths.

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, H; Popp, D; Ouyang, G; Huxley, H E

    1994-01-01

    We have set up a system to rapidly freeze muscle fibers during contraction to investigate by electron microscopy the ultrastructure of active muscles. Glycerinated fiber bundles of rabbit psoas muscles were frozen in conditions of rigor, relaxation, isometric contraction, and active shortening. Freezing was carried out by plunging the bundles into liquid ethane. The frozen bundles were then freeze-substituted, plastic-embedded, and sectioned for electron microscopic observation. X-ray diffraction patterns of the embedded bundles and optical diffraction patterns of the micrographs resemble the x-ray diffraction patterns of unfixed muscles, showing the ability of the method to preserve the muscle ultrastructure. In the optical diffraction patterns layer lines up to 1/5.9 nm-1 were observed. Using this method we have investigated the myofilament lengths and concluded that there are no major changes in length in either the actin or the myosin filaments under any of the conditions explored. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:7918996

  20. Flashing liquid jets and two-phase droplet dispersion I. Experiments for derivation of droplet atomisation correlations.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Vincent; Bowen, Phil; Witlox, Henk

    2007-04-11

    The large-scale release of a liquid contained at upstream conditions above its local atmospheric boiling point is a scenario often given consideration in process industry risk analysis. Current-hazard quantification software often employs simplistic equilibrium two-phase approaches. Scaled water experiments have been carried out measuring droplet velocity and droplet size distributions for a range of exit orifice aspect ratios (L/d) and conditions representing low to high superheat. 2D Phase-Doppler Anemometry has been utilised to characterise droplet kinematics and spray quality. Droplet size correlations have been developed for non-flashing, the transition between non-flashing and flashing, and fully flashing jets. Using high-speed shadowography, transition between regimes is defined in terms of criteria identified in the external flow structure. An overview companion paper provides a wider overview of the problem and reports implementation of these correlations into consequence models and subsequent validation. The fluid utilised throughout is water, hence droplet correlations are developed in non-dimensional form to allow extrapolation to other fluids through similarity scaling, although verification of model performance for other fluids is required in future studies. Data is reduced via non-dimensionalisation in terms of the Weber number and Jakob number, essentially representing the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of the system, respectively. A droplet-size distribution correlation has also been developed, conveniently presented as a volume undersize distribution based on the Rosin-Rammler distribution. Separate correlations are provided for sub-cooled mechanical break-up and fully flashing jets. This form of correlation facilitates rapid estimates of likely mass rainout quantities, as well as full distribution information for more rigorous two-phase thermodynamic modelling in the future. PMID:16956721

  1. Experimental study on instantaneous thrust and lift of two plunging wings in tandem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wu Qi; Jia, Bo Bo; Xi, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Two tandem wings undergoing a two-dimensional sinusoidal plunging motion are studied in a low Reynolds number water tunnel. The influence of the phase angle and leading-edge vortex (LEV) on the peak value of the instantaneous thrust and lift is studied. The instantaneous lift and thrust are measured by a force sensor; the velocity and vorticity fields are captured by digital particle image velocimetry. For the forewing, noticeable differences at various phase angles are found in the peak value of the instantaneous lift and thrust rather than in their minimum value. The LEV of the hindwing increased the maximum effective angle of attack of the forewing and enhanced the jet-like flow behind the forewing, which accounts for the increase in peak value. For the hindwing, the phase angle determines the sign of the forewing-shed LEV when the hindwing encounters this LEV. If the forewing-shed LEV before the leading edge of the hindwing has the opposite sense of rotation as the LEV of the hindwing, the velocity of the flow on the windward side of the hindwing increases, resulting in high instantaneous thrust and lift. If the two LEVs have the same sense of rotation, the forewing-shed LEV hinders the growth of the hindwing LEV because of the small effective angle of attack, leading to low instantaneous thrust and lift. Non-circulatory forces on the wings are calculated according to a potential flow model. Results show that the non-circulatory force has important effects on the peak value and symmetry of the instantaneous lift and thrust curves.

  2. Three dimensional ink-jet printing of biomaterials using ionic liquids and co-solvents.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Deshani H A T; Kuek, SzeLee; Hasanaj, Denis; He, Yinfeng; Tuck, Christopher; Croft, Anna K; Wildman, Ricky D

    2016-08-15

    1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2C1Im][OAc]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C4C1Im][OAc]) have been used as solvents for the dissolution and ink-jet printing of cellulose from 1.0 to 4.8 wt%, mixed with the co-solvents 1-butanol and DMSO. 1-Butanol and DMSO were used as rheological modifiers to ensure consistent printing, with DMSO in the range of 41-47 wt% producing samples within the printable range of a DIMATIX print-head used (printability parameter < 10) at 55 °C, whilst maintaining cellulose solubility. Regeneration of cellulose from printed samples using water was demonstrated, with the resulting structural changes to the cellulose sample assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and white light interferometry (WLI). These results indicate the potential of biorenewable materials to be used in the 3D additive manufacture process to generate single-component and composite materials. PMID:27231729

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic oscillation of a gas jet of zero inertia dispersed in a resistive liquid with energy conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical oscillation and instability of a gas cylinder of zero inertia immersed in a resistive liquid is developed for symmetric perturbations. In the absence of the magnetic field the conservation of energy is employed to study the problem for all symmetric and asymmetric perturbations. In the latter it is found that the temporal amplification is much lower than that of the full fluid jet. The model is capillary stable for all short and long wavelengths in the asymmetric perturbation while in the symmetric disturbances it is stabilizing or not according to whether the perturbed wavelength is shorter than the gas-cylinder circumference or not. The resistivity is stabilizing or destabilizing according to restrictions. The electromagnetic body force is stabilizing for all wavelengths in the rotationally-symmetric disturbances. The Lorentz body force for high magnetic-field intensity could be suppressing the destabilizing character of the present model. This may be due to the fact that the acting magnetic field is uniform and that the fluid is considered to be incompressible.

  4. Effect of exhaust gas recirculation on emissions from a flame-tube combustor using Liquid Jet A fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Tacina, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of uncooled exhaust gas recirculation as an inert diluent on emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO + NO2) and on combustion efficiency were investigated. Ratios of recirculated combustion products to inlet airflow were varied from 10 to 80 percent by using an inlet air ejector nozzle. Liquid Jet A fuel was used. The flame-tube combustor was 10.2 cm in diameter. It was operated with and without a flameholder present. The combustor pressure was maintained constant at 0.5 MPa. The equivalence ratio was varied from 0.3 to 1.0. The inlet air temperature was varied from 590 to 800 K, and the reference velocity from 10 to 30 m/sec. Increasing the percent recirculation from 10 to 25 had the following effects: (1) the peak NOx emission was decreased by 37 percent, from 8 to 5 g NO2/kg fuel, at an inlet air temperature of 590 K and a reference velocity of 15 m/sec; (2) the combustion efficiency was increased, particularly at the higher equivalence ratios; and (3) for a high combustion efficiency of greater than 99.5 percent, the range of operation of the combustor was nearly doubled in terms of equivalence ratio. Increasing the recirculation from 25 to 50 percent did not change the emissions significantly.

  5. Isotope effect on hydrated electron relaxation dynamics studied with time-resolved liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-05-01

    The excited state relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron in H2O and D2O are investigated using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy in a liquid microjet. The data show that the initial excited state decays on a time scale of 75 ± 12 fs in H2O and 102 ± 8 fs in D2O, followed by slower relaxation on time scales of 400 ± 70 fs and 390 ± 70 fs that are isotopically invariant within the precision of our measurements. Based on the time evolution of the transient signals, the faster and slower time constants are assigned to p → s internal conversion (IC) of the hydrated electron and relaxation on the ground electronic state, respectively. This assignment is consistent with the non-adiabatic mechanism for relaxation of the hydrated electron and yields an isotope effect of 1.4 ± 0.2 for IC of the hydrated electron.

  6. Low Reynolds Number Biofilm Streamers Form as Highly Viscous Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aloke; Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Das, Siddhartha

    2014-11-01

    There are recent experimental investigations that suggest that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re << 1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms may deform into filamentous structures termed as streamers. Streamer formation time-scales usually far exceed reported rheological relaxation time scales for biofilms. Here we propose a theory that hypothesizes that streamers form due to the viscous response of the viscoelastic biofilms. The theoretical model is based on a stability analysis and can accurately explain hitherto unresolved issues, such as extremely large time needed for appearance of streamers and exponential growth of streamer dimensions after it has formed. We also provide results from our own initial experiments that indicate towards the validity of this ``liquid-state'' hypothesis.

  7. Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 6. Preliminary analysis of upgrading alternatives for the Great Plains liquid by-production streams. Interim report, March 1987-February 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, B.A.; Fox, J.D.; Furlong, M.W.; Masin, J.G.; Sault, L.P.

    1988-09-01

    Amoco and Lummus Crest have developed seven cases for upgrading by-product liquids from the Great Plains Coal Gasification plant to jet fuels, and in several of the cases, saleable chemicals in addition to jet fuels. The analysis shows that the various grades of jet fuel can be produced from the Great Plains tar oil, but not economically. However the phenolic and naptha streams do have the potential to significantly increase (on the order of $10-15 million/year) the net revenues at Great Plains by producing chemicals, especially cresylic acid, cresol, and xylenol. The amount of these chemicals, which can be marketed, is a concern, but profits can be generated even when oxygenated chemical sales are limited to 10% of the U.S. market. Another concern is that while commercial processes exist to extract phenolic mixtures, these processes have not been demonstrated with the Great Plains phenolic stream.

  8. On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Cherne, F. J.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Andrews, M. J.; Karkhanis, V.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2015-11-09

    Other work employed Richtmyer-Meshkov theory to describe the development of spikes and bubblesfrom shocked sinusoidal surfaces. Here, we discuss the effects of machining different two-dimensional shaped grooves in copper and examine the resulting flow of the material after being shocked into liquid on release. For these simulations, a high performance molecular dynamics code, SPaSM, was used with machined grooves of kh 0 = 1 and kh 0 = 1/8, where 2h 0 is the peak-to-valley height of the perturbation with wavelength λ, and k = 2π/λ. The surface morphologies studied include a Chevron, a Fly-Cut, a Square-Wave, and a Gaussian. Furthermore, we describe extensions to an existing ejecta source model that better captures the mass ejected from these surfaces. We also investigate the same profiles at length scales of order 1 cm for an idealized fluid equation of state using the FLASH continuum hydrodynamics code. Our findings indicate that the resulting mass can be scaled by the missing area of a sinusoidal curve with an effective wavelength, λeff , that has the same missing area. Finally, our extended ejecta mass formula works well for all the shapes considered and captures the corresponding time evolution and total mass.

  9. On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cherne, F. J.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Andrews, M. J.; Karkhanis, V.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2015-11-09

    Other work employed Richtmyer-Meshkov theory to describe the development of spikes and bubblesfrom shocked sinusoidal surfaces. Here, we discuss the effects of machining different two-dimensional shaped grooves in copper and examine the resulting flow of the material after being shocked into liquid on release. For these simulations, a high performance molecular dynamics code, SPaSM, was used with machined grooves of kh 0 = 1 and kh 0 = 1/8, where 2h 0 is the peak-to-valley height of the perturbation with wavelength λ, and k = 2π/λ. The surface morphologies studied include a Chevron, a Fly-Cut, a Square-Wave, and a Gaussian.more » Furthermore, we describe extensions to an existing ejecta source model that better captures the mass ejected from these surfaces. We also investigate the same profiles at length scales of order 1 cm for an idealized fluid equation of state using the FLASH continuum hydrodynamics code. Our findings indicate that the resulting mass can be scaled by the missing area of a sinusoidal curve with an effective wavelength, λeff , that has the same missing area. Finally, our extended ejecta mass formula works well for all the shapes considered and captures the corresponding time evolution and total mass.« less

  10. On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherne, F. J.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Andrews, M. J.; Karkhanis, V.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2015-11-01

    Previous work employed Richtmyer-Meshkov theory to describe the development of spikes and bubbles from shocked sinusoidal surfaces. Here, we discuss the effects of machining different two-dimensional shaped grooves in copper and examine the resulting flow of the material after being shocked into liquid on release. For these simulations, a high performance molecular dynamics code, SPaSM, was used with machined grooves of kh0 = 1 and kh0 = 1/8, where 2h0 is the peak-to-valley height of the perturbation with wavelength λ, and k = 2π/λ. The surface morphologies studied include a Chevron, a Fly-Cut, a Square-Wave, and a Gaussian. We describe extensions to an existing ejecta source model that better captures the mass ejected from these surfaces. We also investigate the same profiles at length scales of order 1 cm for an idealized fluid equation of state using the FLASH continuum hydrodynamics code. Our findings indicate that the resulting mass can be scaled by the missing area of a sinusoidal curve with an effective wavelength, λeff, that has the same missing area. Our extended ejecta mass formula works well for all the shapes considered and captures the corresponding time evolution and total mass.

  11. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: High-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Lundstroem, Ulf; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. Methods: The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga/In/Sn alloy and the other an In/Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with {approx}7 {mu}m x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. Results: High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 {mu}m bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. Conclusions: This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  12. Hydro-physical processes at the plunge point: an analysis using satellite and in situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assireu, A. T.; Alcântara, E.; Novo, E. M. L. M.; Roland, F.; Pacheco, F. S.; Stech, J. L.; Lorenzzetti, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    The plunge point is the main mixing point between river and epilimnetic reservoir water. Plunge point monitoring is essential for understanding the behavior of density currents and their implications for reservoir. The use of satellite imagery products from different sensors (Landsat TM band 6 thermal signatures and visible channels) for the characterization of the river-reservoir transition zone is presented in this study. It is demonstrated the feasibility of using Landsat TM band imagery to discern the subsurface river plumes and the plunge point. The spatial variability of the plunge point evident in the hydrologic data illustrates the advantages of synoptic satellite measurements over in situ point measurements alone to detect the river-reservoir transition zone. During the dry season, when the river-reservoir water temperature differences vanish and the river circulation is characterized by interflow-overflow, the river water inserts into the upper layers of the reservoir, affecting water quality. The results indicate a good agreement between hydrologic and satellite data and that the joint use of thermal and visible channel data for the operational monitoring of a plunge point is feasible. The deduced information about the density current from this study could potentially be assimilated into numerical models and hence be of significant interest for environmental and climatological research.

  13. Development of liquid-lithium film jet-flow for the target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reactions for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Miura, Kuniaki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Aritomi, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    A feasibility study on liquid lithium target in the form of a flowing film was performed to evaluate its potential use as a neutron generation target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction in BNCT. The target is a windowless-type flowing film on a concave wall. Its configuration was adapted for a proton beam which is 30mm in diameter and with energy and current of up to 3MeV and 20mA, respectively. The flowing film of liquid lithium was 0.6mm in thickness, 50mm in width and 50mm in length. The shapes of the nozzle and concave back wall, which create a stable flowing film jet, were decided based on water experiments. A lithium hydrodynamic experiment was performed to observe the stability of liquid lithium flow behavior. The flowing film of liquid lithium was found to be feasible at temperatures below the liquid lithium boiling saturation of 342°C at the surface pressure of 1×10(-3)Pa. Using a proto-type liquid lithium-circulating loop for BNCT, the stability of the film flow was confirmed for velocities up to 30m/s at 220°C and 250°C in vacuum at a pressure lower than 10(-3) Pa. It is expected that for practical use, a flowing liquid lithium target of a windowless type can solve the problem of radiation damage and target cooling. PMID:24412425

  14. Design and Testing of an Automated System using Thermochromatic Liquid Crystals to Determine Local Heat Transfer Coefficients for an Impinging Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Benjamin

    1995-01-01

    Using thermochromatic liquid crystal to measure surface temperature, an automated transient method with time-varying free-stream temperature is developed to determine local heat transfer coefficients. By allowing the free-stream temperature to vary with time, the need for complicated mechanical components to achieve a step temperature change is eliminated, and by using the thermochromatic liquid crystals as temperature indicators, the labor intensive task of installing many thermocouples is omitted. Bias associated with human perception of the transition of the thermochromatic liquid crystal is eliminated by using a high speed digital camera and a computer. The method is validated by comparisons with results obtained by the steady-state method for a circular Jet impinging on a flat plate. Several factors affecting the accuracy of the method are evaluated.

  15. Generation of thrust and lift with airfoils in plunging and pitching motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriche, M.; Flores, O.; García-Villalba, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present fully resolved Direct Numerical Simulations of 2D flow over a moving airfoil, using an in-house code that solves the Navier-Stokes equations of the incompressible flow with an Immersed Boundary Method. A combination of sinusoidal plunging and pitching motions is imposed to the airfoil. Starting from a thrust producing case (Reynolds number, Re = 1000, reduced frequency, k = 1.41, plunging amplitude h0/c = 1, pitching amplitude θ0 = 30°, phase shift phi = 90°), we increase the mean pitching angle (in order to produce lift) and vary the phase shift between pitching and plunging (to optimize the direction and magnitude of the net force on the airfoil). These cases are discussed in terms of their lift coefficient, thrust coefficient and propulsive efficiency.

  16. Impact of a viscoelastic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Néel, Baptiste; Limat, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting onto a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We observe that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break: close to the wall, the jet cross-section is faceted and radial steady liquid films (membranes) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of membranes increases with increasing viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. A mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, is presented that explains these dependences. The large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and suspended (Savart) sheets, will also be discussed.

  17. CFD based investigation on the impact acceleration when a gannet impacts with water during plunge diving.

    PubMed

    Wang, T M; Yang, X B; Liang, J H; Yao, G C; Zhao, W D

    2013-09-01

    Plunge diving is the most commonly used feeding method of a gannet, which can make the gannet transit from air to water rapidly and successfully. A large impact acceleration can be generated due to the air-to-water transition. However, the impact acceleration experienced by the gannet during plunge diving has not been studied. In this paper, this issue is investigated by using the CFD method. The effect of the dropping height and the water-entry inclination angle on the impact acceleration is considered. The results reveal that the impact acceleration along the longitudinal body axis increases with either of the two parameters. The peak time decreases with the dropping height. A quadratic relation is found between the peak impact acceleration and the initial water-entry velocity. According to the computation, when the dropping height is 30 m (most of gannets plunge from about this height), the peak impact acceleration can reach about 23 times the gravitational acceleration, which will exert a considerable force on the gannet body. Furthermore, the pressure distribution of different water-entry inclination angles indicates that the large pressure asymmetry caused by a small oblique angle may lead to a large impact acceleration in the direction perpendicular to the longitudinal body axis and cause damage to the neck of the gannet, which partly explains the reason why a gannet performing a high plunge diving in nature enters water with a large oblique angle from the perspective of impact mechanics. The investigation on the plunge-diving behavior in this paper will inspire and promote the development of a biomimetic amphibious robot that transits from air to water with the plunge-diving mode. PMID:23851321

  18. Mathematical Modeling And Design Optimization Of Plunge Shaving Cutter For Gears With Tooth Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shinn-Liang; Liu, Jia-Hung

    2009-10-01

    Gears are the most important components in transmission systems. Modifications of gear teeth can accommodate errors and deformations encountered in the manufacture, assembly, and operation of gear pairs. For plunge shaving gears with tooth modifications, the design criteria of cutter clearance manufactured by protuberance hob cutter is investigated. With this novel design, the cutter has better strength and stiffness to keep the shaved gear profile stable. With the analytical descriptions of crowned gear and hence plunge shaving cutter have been constructed so that the grinding wheel can be optimized to minimized the topographic error. Efficiency is greatly improved by avoiding the traditional trial and error method.

  19. Large Plunging Ranula Presenting as Isolated Neck Swelling: Steps in Diagnosis and Surgical Steps in Management

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Neelima A.; Patil, Pankaj; Chapi, Mouneshkumar Devendrappa

    2015-01-01

    Ranula is a salivary gland cyst which typically present as localized superficial swelling over the floor of mouth. Complex or plunging ranulas develop when the mucus extravasation extends through or around the mylohyoid muscle, deeper into the neck, and present with neck lump along with or without swelling over floor of mouth. We report a case of large plunging ranula presenting as an isolated large neck mass in a 38-year-old female patient. The steps in diagnosis and surgical steps in management of the pathology are systematically described. PMID:26266141

  20. Large Plunging Ranula Presenting as Isolated Neck Swelling: Steps in Diagnosis and Surgical Steps in Management.

    PubMed

    Nilesh, Kumar; Malik, Neelima A; Patil, Pankaj; Chapi, Mouneshkumar Devendrappa

    2015-06-01

    Ranula is a salivary gland cyst which typically present as localized superficial swelling over the floor of mouth. Complex or plunging ranulas develop when the mucus extravasation extends through or around the mylohyoid muscle, deeper into the neck, and present with neck lump along with or without swelling over floor of mouth. We report a case of large plunging ranula presenting as an isolated large neck mass in a 38-year-old female patient. The steps in diagnosis and surgical steps in management of the pathology are systematically described. PMID:26266141

  1. Too Fast, Too Furious: A Galaxy's Fatal Plunge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Trailing 200,000-light-year-long streamers of seething gas, a galaxy that was once like our Milky Way is being shredded as it plunges at 4.5 million miles per hour through the heart of a distant cluster of galaxies. In this unusually violent collision with ambient cluster gas, the galaxy is stripped down to its skeletal spiral arms as it is eviscerated of fresh hydrogen for making new stars. The galaxy's untimely demise is offering new clues to solving the mystery of what happens to spiral galaxies in a violent universe. Views of the early universe show that spiral galaxies were once much more abundant in rich clusters of galaxies. But they seem to have been vanishing over cosmic time. Where have these "missing bodies" gone? Astronomers are using a wide range of telescopes and analysis techniques to conduct a "CSI" or Crime Scene Investigator-style look at what is happening to this galaxy inside its cluster's rough neighborhood. "It's a clear case of galaxy assault and battery," says William Keel of the University of Alabama. "This is the first time we have a full suite of results from such disparate techniques showing the crime being committed, and the modus operandi." Keel and colleagues are laying out the "forensic evidence" of the galaxy's late life, in a series of presentations today in Atlanta, Ga., at the 203rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society. Astronomers have assembled the evidence by combining a variety of diagnostic observations from telescopes analyzing the galaxy's appearance in X-ray, optical, and radio light. Parallel observations at different wavelengths trace how stars, gas, and dust are being tossed around and torn from the fragile galaxy, called C153. Though such "distressed" galaxies have been seen before, this one's demise is unusually swift and violent. The galaxy belongs to a cluster of galaxies that slammed into another cluster about 100 million years ago. This galaxy took the brunt of the beating as it fell along a trajectory

  2. Testing models for obliquely plunging lineations in transpression: a natural example and theoretical discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeck, Dyanna M.; Hudleston, Peter J.

    2003-06-01

    Theory predicts that stretching lineations in an ideal vertical transpressional zone should be either vertical or horizontal. Many field descriptions of transpressional zones, however, indicate a range of lineation orientations between these extremes. Several theoretical models have been developed to explain such departures from expected lineation orientation, and we discuss these in the context of a field example from the Archean Superior Province in the North American craton. Existing models are insufficient to explain obliquely plunging lineations in this example because: (1) obliquely plunging lineations cannot be accounted for by shear zone boundary effects imposed by a no-slip condition, (2) foliations and lineations vary independently, (3) the vorticity-normal section is subhorizontal, limiting possibilities for inclined simple shear, (4) high vorticity is needed for finite strains and lineations to match previously proposed triclinic models, but vorticity is relatively low, and (5) juxtaposed east and west plunging lineations are unlikely in the previously proposed triclinic models. Because existing theoretical models are not applicable to our field example, we contemplate a new model to explain obliquely plunging lineations within quasi homogeneous transpression.

  3. A comprehensive Two-Fluid Model for Cavitation and Primary Atomization Modelling of liquid jets - Application to a large marine Diesel injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habchi, Chawki; Bohbot, Julien; Schmid, Andreas; Herrmann, Kai

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive two-fluid model is suggested in order to compute the in-nozzle cavitating flow and the primary atomization of liquid jets, simultaneously. This model has been applied to the computation of a typical large marine Diesel injector. The numerical results have shown a strong correlation between the in-nozzle cavitating flow and the ensuing spray orientation and atomization. Indeed, the results have confirmed the existence of an off-axis liquid core. This asymmetry is likely to be at the origin of the spray deviation observed experimentally. In addition, the primary atomization begins very close to the orifice exit as in the experiments, and the smallest droplets are generated due to cavitation pocket shape oscillations located at the same side, inside the orifice.

  4. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, H.; Hammer, M. U.; Reuter, S.; Bussiahn, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. von

    2015-12-15

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100–400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10–200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH{sub 2}O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup •−}) and hydroxyl radicals ({sup •}OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  5. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Hammer, M. U.; Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100-400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10-200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH2O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O2•-) and hydroxyl radicals (•OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  6. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  7. Verifying Nd-Tool Quality Using Plunge Cuts And Micro-Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullner, Dieter

    1986-11-01

    In micromachining of aspherical surfaces the diamond tools are used in a zone extending over a certain segment. This zone is minimized in the spherical generator type machine, but it must be found and located by knowing edge quality over the entire length. Our method of verifying edge sharpness over the entire tool radius as well as the circularity (form) consists in viewing with a micro-interferometer a plunge cut trace produced in the real tool-workpiece configuration. This allows to set a partially defective tool for optimum machining conditions. One can also set for best cutting depth, because certain tool damages on the rear phase become effective only with deeper cuts. This will be illustrated. The micro-interferometer plunge cut inspection allows to detect material vibration, chatter and crossflow of material.

  8. The manipulation of trailing-edge vortices for an airfoil in plunging motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prangemeier, T.; Rival, D.; Tropea, C.

    2010-02-01

    Trailing-edge vortex manipulation has been investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV) for an airfoil undergoing harmonic plunging superimposed with a pitching motion near the bottom of the stroke. The so-called quick-pitch motion has been evaluated through a comparison with a benchmark pure-sinusoidal plunge motion for Re=30000 and k=0.25. It has been shown that the trailing-edge vortex circulation can be reduced by more than 60% for all quick-pitch cases. The reduction in trailing-edge vortex circulation has been achieved without diminishing the strength of the leading-edge vortex, thus maintaining the lift augmentation achieved through dynamic stall. The improvement over the benchmark case is then confirmed through a statistical analysis. Finally, an analysis of the flow separation over the airfoil shows that the various quick-pitch motions facilitate earlier flow reattachment at the bottom of the stroke.

  9. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 3 Plunge Depth of a 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA water landing simulations. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 3 featured a composite tank head that was tested at a range of heights to verify the ability to predict structural failure of composites. To support planning for Phase 3, a test series was conducted with an aluminum tank head dropped from heights of 2, 6, 10, and 12 feet to verify that the test article would not impact the bottom of the test pool. This report focuses on the comparisons of the measured plunge depths to LS-DYNA predictions. The results for the tank head model demonstrated the following. 1. LS-DYNA provides accurate predictions for peak accelerations. 2. LS-DYNA consistently under-predicts plunge depth. An allowance of at least 20% should be added to the LS-DYNA predictions. 3. The LS-DYNA predictions for plunge depth are relatively insensitive to the fluid-structure coupling stiffness.

  10. Surf-generated noise signatures: A comparison of plunging and spilling breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Means, Steven L.; Heitmeyer, Richard M.

    2002-08-01

    Range-time-frequency distributions of surf-generated noise were measured within the surf zone during the SandyDuck'97 experiment at Duck, NC. A 24-phone, 138-m, bottom-mounted, linear array located along a line perpendicular to the shore at a depth of 1 to 3 m recorded the surf-generated noise. Concurrent video measurements of the location, size, and time-evolution of the individual breaking waves directly above the array were made from a nearby 43-m tower. Source level spectra are obtained by using a modified fast field program to account for water column and geoacoustic propagation from the distributed source region to an individual hydrophone. The length, location, and orientation of the leading edge of breakers are tracked in time from rectified video images. It is observed that the source levels from spilling breakers are lower (approx5-10 dB) than those produced by plunging breakers that occurred during the same time period. Plunging breakers generated time-frequency signatures with a sharp onset while spilling breakers' signatures had a gradual low-frequency precursor. Range-time signatures of plunging breakers indicate a burst of acoustic energy while spilling breakers' signatures depict sound being generated over a longer time period with the source region moving with the breaking surface wave.

  11. Pool-Type Fishways: Two Different Morpho-Ecological Cyprinid Species Facing Plunging and Streaming Flows

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Paulo; Santos, José M.; Katopodis, Christos; Pinheiro, António; Ferreira, Maria T.

    2013-01-01

    Fish are particularly sensitive to connectivity loss as their ability to reach spawning grounds is seriously affected. The most common way to circumvent a barrier to longitudinal connectivity, and to mitigate its impacts, is to implement a fish passage device. However, these structures are often non-effective for species with different morphological and ecological characteristics so there is a need to determine optimum dimensioning values and hydraulic parameters. The aim of this work is to study the behaviour and performance of two species with different ecological characteristics (Iberian barbel Luciobarbus bocagei–bottom oriented, and Iberian chub Squalius pyrenaicus–water column) in a full-scale experimental pool-type fishway that offers two different flow regimes–plunging and streaming. Results showed that both species passed through the surface notch more readily during streaming flow than during plunging flow. The surface oriented species used the surface notch more readily in streaming flow, and both species were more successful in moving upstream in streaming flow than in plunging flow. Streaming flow enhances upstream movement of both species, and seems the most suitable for fishways in river systems where a wide range of fish morpho-ecological traits are found. PMID:23741465

  12. The method of assessment of the grinding wheel cutting ability in the plunge grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadolny, Krzysztof

    2012-09-01

    This article presents the method of comparative assessment of the grinding wheel cutting ability in the plunge grinding kinematics. A new method has been developed to facilitate multicriterial assessment of the working conditions of the abrasive grains and the bond bridges, as well as the wear mechanisms of the GWAS, which occur during the grinding process, with simultaneous limitation of the workshop tests range. The work hereby describes the methodology of assessment of the grinding wheel cutting ability in a short grinding test that lasts for 3 seconds, for example, with a specially shaped grinding wheel, in plunge grinding. The grinding wheel macrogeometry modification applied in the developed method consists in forming a cone or a few zones of various diameters on its surface in the dressing cut. It presents an exemplary application of two variants of the method in the internal cylindrical plunge grinding, in 100Cr6 steel. Grinding wheels with microcrystalline corundum grains and ceramic bond underwent assessment. Analysis of the registered machining results showed greater efficacy of the method of cutting using a grinding wheel with zones of various diameters. The method allows for comparative tests upon different grinding wheels, with various grinding parameters and different machined materials.

  13. Measurement and analysis of internal stress distributions created in gelatin simulated-brain tissue by a pulsed laser-induced liquid jet.

    PubMed

    Kato, T; Arafune, T; Washio, T; Nakagawa, A; Ogawa, Y; Tominaga, T; Sakuma, I; Kobayashi, E

    2014-01-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery is currently employed to treat complex lesions beyond the sella turcica; however, the procedure can be limited by difficulties encountered in dealing with small blood vessels, deep and narrow working spaces, and awkward working angles. To overcome these problems, we have developed a pulsed laser-induced liquid jet system that can dissect tumor tissue while preserving fine blood vessels within deep and narrow working spaces. We have previously evaluated the utility and safety of this procedure. However, the effects of the pulsejet after being injected into the brain are not yet well understood. Especially, the behavior of the stress distribution created by the jet is important because it has recently been reported that high acoustic pressures can affect the brain. In this study, we measured internal stress distributions in a gelatin simulated-brain using photoelasticity experiments. We used a high-speed camera with an image sensor on which an array of micropolarizers was attached to measure the stresses and the shear wave created when the pulsejet enters the simulated brain. PMID:25570972

  14. X-ray grating interferometry for 9.25 keV design energy at a liquid-metal-jet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balles, A.; Fella, Ch.; Dittmann, J.; Wiest, W.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a grating interferometer setup with a liquid-metal-jet source and a high resolution detector. It will be shown that this source is suitable for interferometer setups as it delivers a sufficient spatial coherence that makes a source grating unnecessary. This is confirmed twice by the results of an interferometer setup and a single grating setup, respectively. Both show comparable information on the samples. Furthermore, it was possible to measure the Talbot effect due to the self-built high resolution detector with an effective pixel size of 0.67 µm and due to the coherence of the source, thanks to a small spot size of a few microns. The information on the absorption of a nylon fiber is observed to include inline phase contrast effects. The dark-field signal of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is not quite well understood because of its inhomogeneity.

  15. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  16. Analysis of a Free Surface Film from a Controlled Liquid Impinging Jet over a Rotating Disk Including Conjugate Effects, with and without Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Subramanian (Technical Monitor); Rice, Jeremy; Faghri, Amir; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the liquid film characteristics and the accompanying heat transfer of a free surface controlled liquid impinging jet onto a rotating disk are presented. The computations were run on a two-dimensional axi-symmetric Eulerian mesh while the free surface was calculated with the volume of fluid method. Flow rates between 3 and 15 1pm with rotational speeds between 50 and 200 rpm are analyzed. The effects of inlet temperature on the film thickness and heat transfer are characterized as well as evaporative effects. The conjugate heating effect is modeled, and was found to effect the heat transfer results the most at both the inner and outer edges of the heated surface. The heat transfer was enhanced with both increasing flow rate and increasing rotational speeds. When evaporative effects were modeled, the evaporation was found to increase the heat transfer at the lower flow rates the most because of a fully developed thermal field that was achieved. The evaporative effects did not significantly enhance the heat transfer at the higher flow rates.

  17. Flash evaporation from turbulent water jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Penney, T.

    1983-02-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of flash evaporation from turbulent planar and axisymmetric water jets are reported. In the range of jet thicknesses tested, for planar jets, due to shattering, evaporation is found to be nearly independent of the jet thickness. Evaporation from the planar jets was found to be dependent on the initial level of turbulence in the water supply manifold. An approximate analysis to model the evaporation process based on the physical phenomena and experimental observations is outlined. Comparisons between the experimental data and analytical predictions of the liquid temperature variation along the jet are included. Use of screens in the water jet are shown to be effective for enhancing evaporation.

  18. Plunge basins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An outlet works is a combination of structures and equipment required for the safe operation and control of water released from a reservoir to serve various purposes like regulating stream flow and water quality; releasing floodwater; and/or providing irrigation, municipal, or industrial water. Out...

  19. Viscoelasticity Breaks the Symmetry of Impacting Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, H.; Néel, B.; Limat, L.

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting on a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We report that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break; close to the wall, the jet cross section becomes faceted and radial steady liquid films (wings) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of wings increases with increasing the viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. We propose a mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet shape, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, and explain these dependencies. We also discuss the large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and of suspended (Savart) sheets.

  20. Evaluation of the sensitivity and response of IR thermography from a transparent heater under liquid jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, H. D.; Rohlfs, W.; Al-Sibai, F.; Kneer, R.

    2012-11-01

    The feasibility of a visible/IR transparent heater and its suitability for IR thermography is experimentally examined. The most common transparent conductive coating, Indium Tin Oxide (ITO), is quite reflective and its optical properties depend on thickness and manufacturing process. Therefore, the optical properties of several thicknesses and types of ITO, coated on an IR window (BaF2), are examined. A highly transparent Cadmium Oxide (CdO) coating on a ZnS window, also examined, is found to be unusable. Transmissivity is found to increase with a decrease in coating thickness, and total emittance is relatively low. A thick ITO coating was examined for IR thermography in the challenging test case of submerged water jet impingement, where temperature differences were characteristically small and distributed. The measurements under steady state conditions were found to agree well with the literature, and the method was validated. Comparison of two IR cameras did not show the LWIR low-temperature advantage, up to the maximal acquisition rate examined, 1.3KHz. Rather the MWIR camera had a stronger signal to noise ratio, due to the higher emissivity of the heater in this range. The transient response of the transparent heater showed no time-delay, though the substrate dampens the thermal response significantly. Therefore, only qualitative transient measurements are shown for the case of pulsating free-surface jet impingement, showing that the motion of the hydraulic jump coincides with thermal measurements. From these results, recommendations are made for coating/window combination in IR thermography.

  1. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  2. Higher-Order Spectral Analysis of a Nonlinear Pitch and Plunge Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Strganac, Thomas W.; Hajj, Muhammad R.

    2005-01-01

    Simulated aeroelastic responses of a nonlinear pitch and plunge apparatus are analyzed using various statistical signal processing techniques including higher-order spectral methods. A MATLAB version of the Nonlinear Aeroelastic Testbed Apparatus (NATA) at the Texas A&M University is used to generate various aeroelastic response data including limit cycle oscillations (LCO). Traditional and higher-order spectral (HOS) methods are applied to the simulated aeroelastic responses. Higher-order spectral methods are used to identify critical signatures that indicate the transition from linear to nonlinear (LCO) aeroelastic behavior.

  3. Finite element analysis and computer graphics visualization of flow around pitching and plunging airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.; Ecer, A.

    1973-01-01

    A general computational method for analyzing unsteady flow around pitching and plunging airfoils was developed. The finite element method was applied in developing an efficient numerical procedure for the solution of equations describing the flow around airfoils. The numerical results were employed in conjunction with computer graphics techniques to produce visualization of the flow. The investigation involved mathematical model studies of flow in two phases: (1) analysis of a potential flow formulation and (2) analysis of an incompressible, unsteady, viscous flow from Navier-Stokes equations.

  4. Analytical and computational investigations of airfoils undergoing high-frequency sinusoidal pitch and plunge motions at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Gregory Z.

    Current interests in Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) technologies call for the development of aerodynamic-design tools that will aid in the design of more efficient platforms that will also have adequate stability and control for flight in gusty environments. Influenced largely by nature MAVs tend to be very small, have low flight speeds, and utilize flapping motions for propulsion. For these reasons the focus is, specifically, on high-frequency motions at low Reynolds numbers. Toward the goal of developing design tools, it is of interest to explore the use of elementary flow solutions for simple motions such as pitch and plunge oscillations to predict aerodynamic performance for more complex motions. In the early part of this research, a validation effort was undertaken. Computations from the current effort were compared with experiments conducted in a parallel, collaborative effort at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). A set of pure-pitch and pure-plunge sinusoidal oscillations of the SD7003 airfoil were examined. Phase-averaged measurements using particle image velocimetry in a water tunnel were compared with computations using two flow solvers: (i) an incompressible Navier-Stokes Immersed Boundary Method and (ii) an unsteady compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver. The motions were at a reduced frequency of k = 3.93, and pitch-angle amplitudes were chosen such that a kinematic equivalence in amplitudes of effective angle of attack (from plunge) was obtained. Plunge cases showed good qualitative agreement between computation and experiment, but in the pitch cases, the wake vorticity in the experiment was substantially different from that predicted by both computations. Further, equivalence between the pure-pitch and pure-plunge motions was not attained through matching effective angle of attack. With the failure of pitch/plunge equivalence using equivalent amplitudes of effective angle of attack, the effort shifted to include pitch-rate and

  5. Average size and size distribution of large droplets produced in a free-jet expansion of a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, E. L.; Henne, U.

    1999-02-01

    The experimental parameters and fluid properties affecting the average size N¯ and the size distribution P(N) of droplets formed by fragmentation of a liquid after expansion into a vacuum are investigated. The mean droplet size is found to be a function of the surface tension of the liquid, the nozzle diameter, and a characteristic flow speed. The size distribution is found to be a linear exponential distribution; measurements deviate from this distribution at small sizes if a factor which is a function of the cluster size is included in the measuring process. Good agreement with measured distributions of both positive and negative droplet ions formed from neutral 4He droplets by electron impact is found. The strong dependence of mean droplet size on source-orifice diameter found in the present analysis indicates that earlier correlations of droplet size with specific entropy in the source were useful at best only for a fixed nozzle size.

  6. Inside the hydro-physics processes at the plunge point location: an analysis by satellite and in situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assireu, A. T.; Alcântara, E.; Novo, E. M. L. M.; Roland, F.; Pacheco, F. S.; Stech, J. L.; Lorenzzetti, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    The plunge point locates the main point of mixing between river and the epilimnion reservoir water. The plunge point monitoring is essential to understand how it will be the behavior of density currents and its implications for reservoir. The applicability of satellite imagery products from different sensors (Landsat TM band 6 thermal signatures and visible channel) for characterization of the river-reservoir transition zone is presented in this study. We demonstrate the feasibility of the Landsat TM band imagery to discern the subsurface river plumes and the plunge point. The spatial variability of the plunge point evident in the hydrologic data illustrates the advantages of synoptic satellite measurements over in situ point measurements alone to detect the river-reservoir transition zone. It is indicated that the river flowing as underflow contributes to the thermal stability of the water column during wet season (summer-autumn). During the dry season, when the river-reservoir water temperature differences vanish and the river circulation is characterized by interflow-overflow, the river water inserts into the reservoir upper layers, affecting water quality. The results indicate good agreement between hydrologic and satellite data and that the jointly use of thermal and visible channel, operational monitoring of plunge point is feasible. The deduced information about the density current from this product could potentially be assimilated for numerical modeling and hence be of significant interest for environmental and climatological research.

  7. On the effect of mantle conductivity on the super-rotating jets near the liquid core surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizerski, K. A.; Bajer, K.

    2007-03-01

    We consider hydromagnetic Couette flows in planar and spherical geometries with strong magnetic field (large Hartmann number, M≫1). The highly conducting bottom boundary is in steady motion that drives the flow. The top boundary is stationary and is either a highly conducting thin shell or a weakly conducting thick mantle. The magnetic field, B+b, is a combination of the strong, force-free background B and a perturbation b induced by the flow. This perturbation generates strong streamwise electromagnetic stress inside the fluid which, in some regions, forms a jet moving faster than the driving boundary. The super-velocity, in the spherical geometry called super-rotation, is particularly prominent in the region where the 'grazing' line of B has a point of tangent contact with the top boundary and where the Hartmann layer is singular. This is a consequence of topological discontinuity across that special field line. We explain why the magnitude of super-rotation already present when the top wall is insulating [Dormy, E., Jault, D., Soward, A.M., 2002. A super-rotating shear layer in magnetohydrodynamic spherical Couette flow. J. Fluid Mech. 452, 263-291], considerably increases when that wall is even slightly conducting. The asymptotic theory is valid when either the thickness of the top wall is small, δ˜M-1 and its conductivity is high, ɛ˜1 or when δ˜1 and ɛ˜M-1. The theory predicts the super-velocity enhancement of the order of δM in the first case and ɛM in the second case. We also numerically solve the planar problem outside the asymptotic regime, for ɛ=1 and δ=1, and find that with the particular B that we chose the peak super-velocity scales like M0.33. This scaling is different from M0.6 found in spherical geometry [Hollerbach, R., Skinner, S., 2001. Instabilities of magnetically induced shear layers and jets. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 457, 785-802].

  8. Membrane damage and active but nonculturable state in liquid cultures of Escherichia coli treated with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Dolezalova, Eva; Lukes, Petr

    2015-06-01

    Electrical discharge plasmas can efficiently inactivate various microorganisms. Inactivation mechanisms caused by plasma, however, are not fully understood because of the complexity of both the plasma and biological systems. We investigated plasma-induced inactivation of Escherichia coli in water and mechanisms by which plasma affects bacterial cell membrane integrity. Atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet generated at ambient air in direct contact with bacterial suspension was used as a plasma source. We determined significantly lower counts of E. coli after treatment by plasma when they were assayed using a conventional cultivation technique than using a fluorescence-based LIVE/DEAD staining method, which indicated that bacteria may have entered the viable-but-nonculturable state (VBNC). We did not achieve resuscitation of these non-culturable cells, however, we detected their metabolic activity through the analysis of cellular mRNA, which suggests that cells may have been rather in the active-but-nonculturable state (ABNC). We hypothesize that peroxidation of cell membrane lipids by the reactive species produced by plasma was an important pathway of bacterial inactivation. Amount of malondialdehyde and membrane permeability of E. coli to propidium iodide increased with increasing bacterial inactivation by plasma. Membrane damage was also demonstrated by detection of free DNA in plasma-treated water. PMID:25212700

  9. Effects of kinematics on aerodynamic periodicity for a periodically plunging airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianghao; Wang, Dou; Zhang, Yanlai

    2015-12-01

    In conventional Micro-Air-Vehicle design inspired by insects, the periodical motion of flapping airfoil usually leads to generation of a periodical aerodynamic force. However, recent studies indicate that time courses of aerodynamic force and flow structure of a flapping airfoil may be non-periodical even though the airfoil undergoes a periodical motion. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics analysis is employed to investigate the effects of some dimensionless variables, such as Reynolds number, plunging amplitude, advance ratio, and angle of attack, on the periodicity of the flow around a flapping airfoil. The governing equations in an inertial frame of reference are solved to obtain unsteady flow structure and aerodynamic behaviors of the airfoil. It is found in the results that the periodicity of the flow and aerodynamics is greatly dependent on Reynolds number and plunging amplitude. Under given conditions, the product of these two variables may be utilized as a criterion parameter to judge whether the time course of the flow is periodical or not. In addition, a new mechanism that accounts for the non-periodical flow is revealed to explain the flow of airfoil with pre-stall angle of attack.

  10. Sublingual-plunging ranula as a complication of supraomohyoid neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Eva-Maria; Vasilios, Banikas; Maria, Lazaridou; Styliani, Papaemmanouil; Konstantinos, Antoniades

    2011-01-01

    Ranulas are rare cystic lesions resulting from damage or rupture of one or more of the ducts of the sublingual gland, that lead to mucus extravasation or dilatation of the gland's duct. Extravasation cysts are more common than retention cysts. We present a case of a 45-year-old male with a squamous cell carcinoma of the ventral surface of the tongue that was treated with excision of the oral lesion and bilateral supraomohyoid neck dissection without supplementary radiotherapy. A left myocutaneous platysma flap was raised for defect closure. Ten months postoperatively he presented complaining of swelling of the right submandibular region. The diagnosis, based on his medical anamnesis and the CT imaging, was a sublingual-plunging ranula. It is postulated that the ranula resulted from damage to the ducts of the sublingual gland during selective neck dissection. One year postoperatively there are no signs of recurrence either of the ranula or of the cancer. We suggest that sublingual gland excision and intraoral cyst marsupialization is a logical treatment for sublingual-plunging ranulas. PMID:22096692

  11. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of dynamics of plunge and pitch of 3D flexible wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dewei; Shyy, Wei

    2008-11-01

    The method of lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulation has been used to simulate fluid structures and motion of a flexible insect wing in a 3D space. In the method, a beam has been discretized into a chain of rigid segments. Each segment is connected through ball and socket joints at its ends. One segment may be bent and twisted with its neighboring segment. A constraint force is applied to each joint to ensure the solid structure moving as a whole flexible elastic body.We have demonstrated that the LB method is suitable for modeling of aerodynamics of insects flight at low Reynolds numbers. First, a simulation of plunging and pitching of a rigid wing is performed at Re=75 in a 2D space and the results of lift forces and flow structures are in excellent agreement with the previous results. Second, plunging and pitching of a flexible wing in span-wise direction is simulated at Re=136 in a 3D space. We found that when twisting elasticity is large enough the twisting angle could be controlled at a level of smaller than 0.2 degree. It is shown that as bending and twisting elasticity is large enough, the motion of flexible wing approaches that of a rigid membrane wing. The simulation results show that the optimization of flexibility in span-wise direction will benefit thrust and an intermediate level is favorable. The results are consistent with experimental finding.

  12. Feedback control of a pitching and plunging airfoil via direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Scott; Brunton, Steven; Rowley, Clarence

    2012-11-01

    Feedback control is implemented in direct numerical simulations at a Reynolds number of 100 to allow a two-dimensional flat plate airfoil to track desired lift profiles using pitching and plunging motions. Robust controllers are designed using both classical models (Theodorsen) and empirical reduced-order models identified from direct numerical simulations. We investigate the capabilities of a variety of controllers for plunging motion and for pitching about different pitch axis locations. Effective control is achieved across a wide range of angles of attack, despite strongly nonlinear flow physics. The forces caused by rapid airfoil motion may be utilized to achieve high lift coefficients for short periods of time. It is also possible to track periodic lift profiles with average lift coefficients that are significantly greater than those achieved by a steady airfoil. The enhanced lift that arises at certain frequencies appears to be caused by favorable interaction of wake vortices. The ability of the controllers to reject gust disturbances and attenuate sensor noise is also investigated, which is relevant for the implementation of such controllers in an experimental setting. This work is supported by AFOSR grant FA9550-12-1-0075.

  13. Energy Exchange during Plunge/Surge Motions of a 2D Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerstens, Wesley; Choi, Jeesoon; Colonius, Tim; Williams, David

    2011-11-01

    The rate of energy transfer between an NACA-0006 wing and an unsteady flow is examined at pre-stall and post-stall conditions using numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments. The plunge and surge motions simulate the fluctuating vertical (wz) and longitudinal (wx) velocity components of a wind gust. In a steady flow the wing loses energy to the flow through the drag power term, but in an unsteady flow the wing may gain energy from the fluctuating lift power and fluctuating drag power terms. The net energy transfer averaged over the period of oscillation depends on the phase angle between the plunge and surge motions. The largest increase of energy occurs when wx and wz are in-phase. When the fluctuations are large enough, then it is possible for the net energy gain to be positive. The numerical simulations conducted at Reynolds numbers near the critical value for vortex shedding show qualitative agreement with the experiments. The simulations highlight the role of vortex shedding in determining the optimal frequency and phase for energy extraction from the gust. Support of the AFOSR through grant FA9550-09-1-0189 managed by Dr. Douglas Smith is gratefully acknnowledged.

  14. Coal liquefaction to increase jet fuel production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Processing concept that increases supply of jet fuel has been developed as part of study on methods for converting coal to hydrogen, methane, and jet fuel. Concept takes advantage of high aromatic content of coal-derived liquids to make high-octane gasoline, instead of destroying aromatics to make jet fuel.

  15. 5-20 keV laser-induced x-ray generation at 1 kHz from a liquid-jet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, R. J.; Mercer, I. P.; Fettweis, M.; Barnett, C. J.; Klug, D. R.; Porter, Lord G.; Clark, I.; Jackson, S.; Matousek, P.; Parker, A. W.; Towrie, M.

    1998-09-01

    We report ultrashort pulse, 1 kHz repetition rate x-ray generation in the 5-20 keV spectral region, induced by the interaction of laser radiation with copper nitrate solution and ethylene glycol liquid-jet targets. The characteristics of the copper nitrate source are relevant for application to time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies as well as for spectroscopic x-ray absorption studies. The x-ray sources were operated uninterrupted for in excess of 5 h with no detectable buildup of debris on the associated optics. The x-ray flux generated by both sources is estimated to be of the order of 106photons s-1 sr-1 in the 5-20 keV region. The spectra have been measured with both a PIN photodiode, and with transmission measurements taken using aluminum filters. We find that the plasma emission has a broadband component attributed to bremsstrahlung emission, with the bulk of the x-ray emission emitted from the chamber lying between 5 and 20 keV for both sources. The copper nitrate emission, however, delivers a dominant emission peak at 9 keV, attributed to the characteristic K emission of copper.

  16. Optimization of laser parameters for the maximum efficiency in the generation of water-window radiation using a liquid nitrogen jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Ahn, B.; Lee, D.; Kim, J.; Kim, D.

    2006-04-01

    A laser-produced plasma is a suitable compact x-ray source that can be of broad band or quasimonochromatic with a proper choice of material and filter. To address the maximum conversion efficiency for an efficient, quasimonochromatic source at 2.88 nm (N >VI1s2-1s2p transition) using liquid nitrogen jet for soft x-ray microscopy, the radiation characteristics such as absolute intensity, spectra, and angular distribution have been investigated for different laser pulse durations (picosecond and femtosecond pulses) and laser energies The comparison of conversion efficiencies between picosecond [120 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM)] and femtosecond (40-500fs FWHM) lasers indicates that the picosecond laser would provide better conversion efficiency, which is 1.6% at 2×1013W /cm2. The investigation shows that the laser intensity for the maximum conversion efficiency scales as Im∝1/τα, where α =0.9±0.15. This empirical formula is useful to choose the laser parameters properly for a given pulse width.

  17. Optimization of anaerobic co-digestion of olive mill wastewater and liquid poultry manure in batch condition and semi-continuous jet-loop reactor.

    PubMed

    Khoufi, Sonia; Louhichi, Assawer; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-04-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of olive mill wastewater (OMW) with liquid poultry manure (LPM) was investigated in a jet-loop reactor (JLR) as a new approach for upgrading the efficiency of bioprocess. Optimum proportion of LPM was evaluated by determining biochemical methane potential. Methane yields were compared by applying one way ANOVA method followed by post hoc Tukey's test with a 0.05 significance level. Results demonstrated that the addition of LPM at proportion of 10% and 30% (v/v) improved methane yield of OMW digestion but differences between these mixtures and raw OMW are not significant. JLR results confirmed that the proportion 30% LPM gives the optimum condition for excellent stability of digester. Methane production was significantly high until an organic loading rate of 9.5 gCOD/L reactor/day. Overall; this study indicates the technical feasibility and effectiveness of using JLR as one-stage anaerobic system for the co-digestion of OMW and LPM. PMID:25682225

  18. Determination of guanine and adenine by high-performance liquid chromatography with a self-fabricated wall-jet/thin-layer electrochemical detector at a glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yaping; Yan, Hongling; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-03-01

    A sensitive wall-jet/thin-layer amperometric electrochemical detector (ECD) coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for simultaneous determination of guanine (G) and adenine (A). The analytes were detected at a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and the HPLC-ECD calibration curves showed good linearity (R(2)>0.997) under optimized conditions. Limits of detection for G and A are 0.6 nM and 1.4 nM (S/N=3), respectively, which are lower than those obtained with an UV-vis detector and a commercial electrochemical detector. We have successfully applied this HPLC-ECD to assess the contents of G and A in hydrochloric acid-digested calf thymus double-stranded DNA. In addition, we compared in detail the analysis of G and A by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and by the HPLC-ECD system on both bare GCE and electroreduced graphene oxide (ERGO) modified GCE. We found that the adsorption of G and A on the electrode surfaces can vary their anodic CV peaks and the competitive adsorption of G and A on the limited sites of the electrode surfaces can cause crosstalk effects on their anodic CV peak signals, but the HPLC-ECD system is insensitive to such electrode-adsorption and can give more reliable analytical results. PMID:25618679

  19. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  20. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  1. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  2. Self-propelled swimming of a flexible plunging foil near a solid wall.

    PubMed

    Dai, Longzhen; He, Guowei; Zhang, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the influences of a solid wall on the self-propelled swimming of a flexible plunging foil. It is found that the presence of a solid wall enhances the cruising speed, with the cost of increasing input power. Rigid foil can achieve high percentage increase in cruising speed when swimming near a solid wall, but the propulsive efficiency may be reduced. Foils with some flexibility can enjoy the enhancements in both cruising speed and propulsive efficiency. Another advantage of the flexible foils in near-wall swimming is that smaller averaged lateral forces are produced. The effects of wall confinement on the wake structure and the vortex dynamics are also studied in this paper. The results obtained in this study shed some light on the unsteady wall effect experienced by aquatic animals and also inform the design of bio-mimetic underwater vehicles which are capable of exploiting the wall effect. PMID:27377880

  3. Numerical investigation of the vertical plunging force of a spherical intruder into a prefluidized granular bed.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Padding, J T; Kuipers, J A M

    2014-12-01

    The plunging of a large intruder sphere into a prefluidized granular bed with various constant velocities and various sphere diameters is investigated using a state-of-the-art hybrid discrete particle and immersed boundary method, in which both the gas-induced drag force and the contact force exerted on the intruder can be investigated separately. We investigate low velocities, where velocity dependent effects first begin to appear. The results show a concave-to-convex dependence of the plunging force as a function of intruder depth. In the concave region the force fits to a power law with an exponent around 1.3, which is in good agreement with existing experimental observations. Our simulation results further show that the force exerted on the frontal hemisphere of the intruder is dominant. At larger intruder velocities, friction with the granular medium causes a velocity-dependent drag force. As long as the granular particles have not yet closed the gap behind the intruder, this drag force is independent of the actual intruder depth. In this regime, the drag force experienced by intruders of different diameter moving at different velocities all fall onto a single master curve if plotted against the Reynolds number, using a single value for the effective viscosity of the granular medium. This master curve corresponds well to the Schiller-Naumann correlation for the drag force between a sphere and a Newtonian fluid. After the gap behind the intruder has closed, the drag force increases not only with velocity but also with depth. We attribute this to the effect of increasing hydrostatic particle pressure in the granular medium, leading to an increase in effective viscosity. PMID:25615081

  4. Experimental study of pitching and plunging airfoils at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Yeon Sik; Bernal, Luis P.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of the unsteady flow structure and force time history of pitching and plunging SD7003 and flat plate airfoils at low Reynolds numbers are presented. The airfoils were pitched and plunged in the effective angle of attack range of 2.4°-13.6° (shallow-stall kinematics) and -6° to 22° (deep-stall kinematics). The shallow-stall kinematics results for the SD7003 airfoil show attached flow and laminar-to-turbulent transition at low effective angle of attack during the down stroke motion, while the flat plate model exhibits leading edge separation. Strong Re-number effects were found for the SD7003 airfoil which produced approximately 25 % increase in the peak lift coefficient at Re = 10,000 compared to higher Re flows. The flat plate airfoil showed reduced Re effects due to leading edge separation at the sharper leading edge, and the measured peak lift coefficient was higher than that predicted by unsteady potential flow theory. The deep-stall kinematics resulted in leading edge separation that led to formation of a large leading edge vortex (LEV) and a small trailing edge vortex (TEV) for both airfoils. The measured peak lift coefficient was significantly higher (~50 %) than that for the shallow-stall kinematics. The effect of airfoil shape on lift force was greater than the Re effect. Turbulence statistics were measured as a function of phase using ensemble averages. The results show anisotropic turbulence for the LEV and isotropic turbulence for the TEV. Comparison of unsteady potential flow theory with the experimental data showed better agreement by using the quasi-steady approximation, or setting C( k) = 1 in Theodorsen theory, for leading edge-separated flows.

  5. Visual accommodation and active pursuit of prey underwater in a plunge-diving bird: the Australasian gannet.

    PubMed

    Machovsky-Capuska, Gabriel E; Howland, Howard C; Raubenheimer, David; Vaughn-Hirshorn, Robin; Würsig, Bernd; Hauber, Mark E; Katzir, Gadi

    2012-10-22

    Australasian gannets (Morus serrator), like many other seabird species, locate pelagic prey from the air and perform rapid plunge dives for their capture. Prey are captured underwater either in the momentum (M) phase of the dive while descending through the water column, or the wing flapping (WF) phase while moving, using the wings for propulsion. Detection of prey from the air is clearly visually guided, but it remains unknown whether plunge diving birds also use vision in the underwater phase of the dive. Here we address the question of whether gannets are capable of visually accommodating in the transition from aerial to aquatic vision, and analyse underwater video footage for evidence that gannets use vision in the aquatic phases of hunting. Photokeratometry and infrared video photorefraction revealed that, immediately upon submergence of the head, gannet eyes accommodate and overcome the loss of greater than 45 D (dioptres) of corneal refractive power which occurs in the transition between air and water. Analyses of underwater video showed the highest prey capture rates during WF phase when gannets actively pursue individual fish, a behaviour that very likely involves visual guidance, following the transition after the plunge dive's M phase. This is to our knowledge the first demonstration of the capacity for visual accommodation underwater in a plunge diving bird while capturing submerged prey detected from the air. PMID:22874749

  6. Cosmic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, R.D.; Begelman, M.C.; Rees, M.J.

    1982-05-01

    Observations with radio telescopes have revealed that the center of many galaxies is a place of violent activity. This activity is often manifested in the production of cosmic jets. Each jet is a narrow stream of plasma that appears to squirt out of the center of a galaxy emitting radiowaves as it does so. New techniques in radio astronomy have shown how common jets are in the universe. These jets take on many different forms. The discovery of radio jets has helped in the understanding of the double structure of the majority of extragalactic radio sources. The morphology of some jets and explanations of how jets are fueled are discussed. There are many difficulties plaguing the investigation of jets. Some of these difficulties are (1) it is not known how much power the jets are radiating, (2) it is hard to tell whether a jet delieated by radio emission is identical to the region where ionized gas is flowing, and (3) what makes them. (SC)

  7. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  8. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  9. Test Cases for Flutter of the Benchmark Models Rectangular Wings on the Pitch and Plunge Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    The supercritical airfoil was chosen as a relatively modem airfoil for comparison. The BOO12 model was tested first. Three different types of flutter instability boundaries were encountered, a classical flutter boundary, a transonic stall flutter boundary at angle of attack, and a plunge instability near M = 0.9 and for zero angle of attack. This test was made in air and was Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) Test 468. The BSCW model (for Benchmark SuperCritical Wing) was tested next as TDT Test 470. It was tested using both with air and a heavy gas, R-12, as a test medium. The effect of a transition strip on flutter was evaluated in air. The B64AOlO model was subsequently tested as TDT Test 493. Some further analysis of the experimental data for the BOO12 wing is presented. Transonic calculations using the parameters for the BOO12 wing in a two-dimensional typical section flutter analysis are given. These data are supplemented with data from the Benchmark Active Controls Technology model (BACT) given and in the next chapter of this document. The BACT model was of the same planform and airfoil as the BOO12 model, but with spoilers and a trailing edge control. It was tested in the heavy gas R-12, and was instrumented mostly at the 60 per cent span. The flutter data obtained on PAPA and the static aerodynamic test cases from BACT serve as additional data for the BOO12 model. All three types of flutter are included in the BACT Test Cases. In this report several test cases are selected to illustrate trends for a variety of different conditions with emphasis on transonic flutter. Cases are selected for classical and stall flutter for the BSCW model, for classical and plunge for the B64AOlO model, and for classical flutter for the BOO12 model. Test Cases are also presented for BSCW for static angles of attack. Only the mean pressures and the real and imaginary parts of the first harmonic of the pressures are included in the data for the test cases, but digitized time

  10. Vortex diode jet

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-05-17

    A fluid transfer system is described that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other. 10 figures.

  11. Potential slab deformation and plunge prior to the Tohoku, Iquique and Maule earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchon, Michel; Marsan, David; Durand, Virginie; Campillo, Michel; Perfettini, Hugo; Madariaga, Raul; Gardonio, Blandine

    2016-05-01

    Megathrust earthquakes rupture hundreds of kilometres of the shallow plate interface in subduction zones, typically at depths of less than 50 km. Intense foreshock activity preceded the 2011 Mw 9 Tohoku-oki (Japan) and 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique (Chile) megathrust earthquakes. This pre-earthquake activity was thought to be generated by slow slip in the seismogenic zone before rupture, but where this slow slip originated and how it spread rapidly over long distances are unknown. Here we analyse seismic activity deep in the subduction zone before the Tohoku-oki and Iquique ruptures, as well as before the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake in Chile. We find that, before each of these megathrust earthquakes, shallow seismicity occurred synchronously with bursts of seismic activity deep (~100 km) in the subducting slab. The extensional mechanism of these deep shocks suggests that the slab was stretched at depth. We therefore propose that, before these megathrust quakes, the slab might have started to plunge into the mantle below part of the future rupture zone. We speculate that synchronization between deep and shallow seismicity may have marked the nucleation phase for these three giant earthquakes.

  12. Turbulent flow field and air entrainment in laboratory plunging breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Byoungjoon; Chang, Kuang-An; Huang, Zhi-Cheng; Lim, Ho-Joon

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents laboratory measurements of turbulent flow fields and void fraction in deep-water plunging breaking waves using imaging and optical fiber techniques. Bubble-size distributions are also determined based on combined measurements of velocity and bubble residence time. The most excited mode of the local intermittency measure of the turbulent flow and its corresponding length scale are obtained using a wavelet-based method and found to correlate with the swirling strength and vorticity. Concentrated vortical structures with high intermittency are observed near the lower boundaries of the aerated rollers where the velocity shear is high; the length scale of the deduced eddies ranges from 0.05 to 0.15 times the wave height. The number of bubbles with a chord length less than 2 mm demonstrates good correlation with the swirling strength. The power-law scaling and the Hinze scale of the bubbles determined from the bubble chord length distribution compare favorably with existing measurements. The turbulent dissipation rate, accounting for void fraction, is estimated using mixture theory. When void fraction is not considered, the turbulent dissipation rate is underestimated by more than 70% in the initial impinging and the first splash-up roller. A significant discrepancy of approximately 67% between the total energy dissipation rate and the turbulence dissipation rate is found. Of this uncounted dissipation, 23% is caused by bubble-induced dissipation.

  13. Volumetric measurements and simulations of the vortex structures generated by low aspect ratio plunging wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, D. E.; Wang, Z.; Gursul, I.; Visbal, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    Volumetric three-component velocimetry measurements have been performed on low aspect ratio wings undergoing a small amplitude pure plunging motion. This study focuses on the vortex flows generated by rectangular and elliptical wings set to a fixed geometric angle of attack of α = 20°. An investigation into the effect of Strouhal number illustrates the highly three-dimensional nature of the leading edge vortex as well as its inherent ability to improve lift performance. Computational simulations show good agreement with experimental results, both demonstrating the complex interaction between leading, trailing, and tip vortices generated in each cycle. The leading edge vortex, in particular, may deform significantly throughout the cycle, in some cases developing strong spanwise undulations. These are at least both Strouhal number and planform dependent. One or two arch-type vortical structures may develop, depending on the aspect ratio and Strouhal number. At sufficiently high Strouhal numbers, a tip vortex ring may also develop, propelling itself away from the wing in the spanwise direction due to self-induced velocity.

  14. Experimental study of the boundary layer over an airfoil in plunging motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzabadi, F. Rasi; Soltani, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    This is an experimental study on the boundary layer over an airfoil under steady and unsteady conditions. It specifically deals with the effect of plunging oscillation on the laminar/turbulent characteristics of the boundary layer. The wind tunnel measurements involved surfacemounted hot-film sensors and boundary-layer rake. The experiments were conducted at Reynolds numbers of 0.42×106 to 0.84 × 106 and the reduced frequency was varied from 0.01 to 0.11. The results of the quasi-wall-shear stress as well as the boundary layer velocity profiles provided important information about the state of the boundary layer over the suction surface of the airfoil in both static and dynamic cases. For the static tests, boundary layer transition occurred through a laminar separation bubble. By increasing the angle of attack, disturbances and the transition location moved toward the leading edge. For the dynamic tests, earlier transition occurred with increasing rather than decreasing effective angle of attack. The mean angle of attack and the oscillating parameters significantly affected the state of the boundary layer. By increasing the reduced frequency, the boundary layer transition was promoted to the upstroke portion of the equivalent angle of attack, but the quasi skin friction coefficient was decreased.

  15. Is there a clinical benefit with a smooth compensator design compared with a plunged compensator design for passive scattered protons?

    SciTech Connect

    Tabibian, Art A.; Powers, Adam; Dolormente, Keith; Oommen, Sneha; Tiwari, Akhil; Palmer, Matt; Zhu, Xiaorong R.; Li, Heng; Sahoo, Narayan; Wisdom, Paul; Velasco, Kyle; Erhart, Kevin; Stanley, Henry; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc T.

    2015-04-01

    In proton therapy, passive scattered proton plans use compensators to conform the dose to the distal surface of the planning volume. These devices are custom made from acrylic or wax for each treatment field using either a plunge-drilled or smooth-milled compensator design. The purpose of this study was to investigate if there is a clinical benefit of generating passive scattered proton radiation treatment plans with the smooth compensator design. We generated 4 plans with different techniques using the smooth compensators. We chose 5 sites and 5 patients for each site for the range of dosimetric effects to show adequate sample. The plans were compared and evaluated using multicriteria (MCA) plan quality metrics for plan assessment and comparison using the Quality Reports [EMR] technology by Canis Lupus LLC. The average absolute difference for dosimetric metrics from the plunged-depth plan ranged from −4.7 to +3.0 and the average absolute performance results ranged from −6.6% to +3%. The manually edited smooth compensator plan yielded the best dosimetric metric, +3.0, and performance, + 3.0% compared to the plunged-depth plan. It was also superior to the other smooth compensator plans. Our results indicate that there are multiple approaches to achieve plans with smooth compensators similar to the plunged-depth plans. The smooth compensators with manual compensator edits yielded equal or better target coverage and normal tissue (NT) doses compared with the other smooth compensator techniques. Further studies are under investigation to evaluate the robustness of the smooth compensator design.

  16. Is there a clinical benefit with a smooth compensator design compared with a plunged compensator design for passive scattered protons?

    PubMed

    Tabibian, Art A; Powers, Adam; Dolormente, Keith; Oommen, Sneha; Tiwari, Akhil; Palmer, Matt; Zhu, Xiaorong R; Li, Heng; Sahoo, Narayan; Wisdom, Paul; Velasco, Kyle; Erhart, Kevin; Stanley, Henry; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc T

    2015-01-01

    In proton therapy, passive scattered proton plans use compensators to conform the dose to the distal surface of the planning volume. These devices are custom made from acrylic or wax for each treatment field using either a plunge-drilled or smooth-milled compensator design. The purpose of this study was to investigate if there is a clinical benefit of generating passive scattered proton radiation treatment plans with the smooth compensator design. We generated 4 plans with different techniques using the smooth compensators. We chose 5 sites and 5 patients for each site for the range of dosimetric effects to show adequate sample. The plans were compared and evaluated using multicriteria (MCA) plan quality metrics for plan assessment and comparison using the Quality Reports [EMR] technology by Canis Lupus LLC. The average absolute difference for dosimetric metrics from the plunged-depth plan ranged from -4.7 to +3.0 and the average absolute performance results ranged from -6.6% to +3%. The manually edited smooth compensator plan yielded the best dosimetric metric, +3.0, and performance, + 3.0% compared to the plunged-depth plan. It was also superior to the other smooth compensator plans. Our results indicate that there are multiple approaches to achieve plans with smooth compensators similar to the plunged-depth plans. The smooth compensators with manual compensator edits yielded equal or better target coverage and normal tissue (NT) doses compared with the other smooth compensator techniques. Further studies are under investigation to evaluate the robustness of the smooth compensator design. PMID:25263491

  17. Jet dynamics after cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, Jose Manuel; Gekle, Stephan; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef

    2008-11-01

    It has been recently shown -Gekle, Gordillo, van der Meer and Lohse, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2008 (submitted)- that the liquid velocity field after cavity collapse can be analytically described as a superposition of a discontinuous line of sinks plus a concentrated point sink. This theory is able to quantitatively predict the axial and radial positions of the base of the high speed jets ejected. Nevertheless, the flow field within the fast sharp pointed jets shooting up and downwards cannot be predicted using this simplified description. Instead, we will show that downstream of a small region with a size of the order of the jet base, in which the liquid is accelerated upwards, liquid velocity and jet shape can be described by a simple unidirectional model in remarkable agreement with simulations. Up to first order, fluid particles conserve their velocities but we also show that, no matter how large the local Weber number at pinch-off is, capillarity ends up playing a role in the breakup of the ejected liquid jets.

  18. The Direct Numerical Simulation of the Deflected Wake Phenomenon around a Plunging NACA0012 Airfoil at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Mehmet; Yucel, Saliha Banu; Unal, Mehmet Fevzi

    2015-11-01

    The deflected wake phenomenon reported by Jones and Platzer (2009) is investigated in detail using direct numerical simulations around a NACA0012 airfoil undergoing harmonic plunging motion. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation based on an unstructured side-centered finite volume method is utilized in order to solve the incompressible unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The Reynolds number is chosen to be 252 and the reduced frequency of plunging motion (k = 2 πfc /U∞) and the plunge amplitude non-dimensionalized with respect to chord are set to 12 . 3 and 0 . 12 , respectively, as in the experimental study of Jones and Platzer (2009). The present numerical simulations reveal a highly persistent transient effect and it takes two orders of magnitude larger duration than the heave period to reach the time-periodic state. In addition, the three-dimensional simulation reveals that the flow field is highly three-dimensional around the leading edge. The calculation reproduces the deflected wake and shows a very good agreement with the experimental wake pattern. The instantaneous vorticity contours, Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) fields and particle traces are presented along with the aerodynamic parameters including the lift and thrust coefficients.

  19. Strong transient effects of the flow around a harmonically plunging NACA0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, S. Banu; Sahin, Mehmet; Unal, M. Fevzi

    2015-12-01

    The flow pattern around a NACA0012 airfoil undergoing harmonic plunging motion corresponding to the deflected wake phenomenon reported by Jones and Platzer (Exp Fluids 46:799-810, 2009) is investigated in detail using direct numerical simulations. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation based on an unstructured side-centered finite volume method is utilized in order to solve the incompressible unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The Reynolds number is chosen to be 252, and the reduced frequency of plunging motion ( k = 2π fc/ U ∞) and the plunge amplitude non-dimensionalized with respect to chord are set to be 12.3 and 0.12, respectively, as in the experimental study of Jones and Platzer (2009). The present numerical simulations reveal a highly persistent transient effect, and it takes two orders of magnitude larger duration than the heave period to reach the time-periodic state. In addition, the three-dimensional simulation reveals that the flow field is three-dimensional for the parameters used herein. The calculation reproduces the deflected wake and shows a good agreement with the experimental wake pattern. The instantaneous vorticity contours, finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields and particle traces are presented along with the aerodynamic parameters including the lift and thrust coefficients.

  20. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in cylindrical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter cylindrical tanks in weightlessness. A convex hemispherically ended tank and two Centaur liquid-hydrogen-tank models were used for the study. Four distinct liquid flow patterns were observed to be a function of the tank geometry, the liquid-jet velocity, the volume of liquid in the tank, and the location of the tube from which the liquid jet exited.

  1. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in spherical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audelott, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter spherical containers in weightlessness. Complete liquid circulation flow patterns were easily established in containers that were less than half full of liquid, while for higher liquid fill conditions, vapor was drawn into the inlet of the simulated mixer unit. Increasing the liquid-jet or lowering the position at which the liquid jet entered the container caused increasing turbulence and bubble formation.

  2. Jet impact on a soap film.

    PubMed

    Kirstetter, Geoffroy; Raufaste, Christophe; Celestini, Franck

    2012-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the impact of a liquid jet on a soap film. We observe that the jet never breaks the film and that two qualitatively different steady regimes may occur. The first one is a refractionlike behavior obtained at small incidence angles when the jet crosses the film and is deflected by the film-jet interaction. For larger incidence angles, the jet is absorbed by the film, giving rise to a new class of flows in which the jet undulates along the film with a characteristic wavelength. Besides its fundamental interest, this paper presents a different way to guide a micrometric flow of liquid in the inertial regime and to probe foam stability submitted to violent perturbations at the soap film scale. PMID:23031009

  3. Jet impact on a soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, Geoffroy; Raufaste, Christophe; Celestini, Franck

    2012-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the impact of a liquid jet on a soap film. We observe that the jet never breaks the film and that two qualitatively different steady regimes may occur. The first one is a refractionlike behavior obtained at small incidence angles when the jet crosses the film and is deflected by the film-jet interaction. For larger incidence angles, the jet is absorbed by the film, giving rise to a new class of flows in which the jet undulates along the film with a characteristic wavelength. Besides its fundamental interest, this paper presents a different way to guide a micrometric flow of liquid in the inertial regime and to probe foam stability submitted to violent perturbations at the soap film scale.

  4. The Penetration Behavior of an Annular Gas-Solid Jet Impinging on a Liquid Bath: The Effects of the Density and Size of Solid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. S.; Sohn, H. Y.

    2012-08-01

    Top-blow injection of a gas-solid jet through a circular lance is used in the Mitsubishi Continuous Smelting Process. One problem associated with this injection is the severe erosion of the hearth refractory below the lances. A new configuration of the lance to form an annular gas-solid jet rather than the circular jet was designed in this laboratory. With this new configuration, the solid particles fed through the center tube leave the lance at a much lower velocity than the gas, and the penetration behavior of the jet is significantly different from that with a circular lance where the solid particles leave the lance at the same high velocity as the gas. In previous cold-model investigations in this laboratory, the effects of the gas velocity, particle feed rate, lance height of the annular lance, and the cross-sectional area of the gas jet were studied and compared with the circular lance. This study examined the effect of the density and size of the solid particles on the penetration behavior of the annular gas-solid jet, which yielded some unexpected results. The variation in the penetration depth with the density of the solid particles at the same mass feed rate was opposite for the circular lance and the annular lance. In the case of the circular lance, the penetration depth became shallower as the density of the solid particles increased; on the contrary, for the annular lance, the penetration depth became deeper with the increasing density of particles. However, at the same volumetric feed rate of the particles, the density effect was small for the circular lance, but for the annular lance, the jets with higher density particles penetrated more deeply. The variation in the penetration depth with the particle diameter was also different for the circular and the annular lances. With the circular lance, the penetration depth became deeper as the particle size decreased for all the feed rates, but with the annular lance, the effect of the particle size was

  5. The flow structure in the near field of jets and its effect on cavitation inception, and, Implementation of ferroelectric liquid crystal and birefringent crystal for image shifting in particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Shridhar

    1999-10-01

    Cavitation experiments performed in the near field of a 50-mm diameter (D) jet at ReD = 5 × 105, showed inception in the form of inclined ``cylindrical'' bubbles at axial distances (x/D) less than 0.55, with indices of 2.5. On tripping the boundary layer, cavitation inception occurred at x/D ~ 2, as distorted ``spherical'' bubbles with inception indices of 1.7. To investigate these substantial differences, the near field of the jet was measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Data on the primary flow, the strength distribution of the ``streamwise''vortices and the velocity profiles within the initial boundary layers were obtained. The untripped case showed a direct transition to three-dimensional flow in the near field (x/D < 0.7) even before rolling up to distinct vortex rings. Strong ``streamwise'' vortices with strengths up to 25% of the jet velocity times the characteristic wavelength were seen. Cavitation inception occurred in the core of these vortices. In contrast, in the tripped jet the vortex sheet rolled up to the familiar Kelvin- Helmholtz vortex rings with weak secondary vortices. Using the measured nuclei distribution, strengths and straining of the ``streamwise'' structures, the rates of cavitation events were estimated. The estimated results match very well with the measured cavitation rates. Also, the Reynolds stresses in the near field of the jet show similar trends and magnitudes to those of Browand & Latigo (1979) and Bell & Mehta (1990) for a plane shear layer. In the second part of this essay we discuss the implementation of electro-optical image shifting to resolve directional ambiguity in PIV measurements. The technique uses a ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) as an electro-optic half wave plate and a birefringent crystal (calcite) as the shifter. The system can be used with non-polarized light sources and fluorescent particles. The minimum shifting time is approximately 100μs. This compact electrooptical device usually is

  6. Unsteady Aerodynamic Testing Using the Dynamic Plunge Pitch and Roll Model Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutze, Frederick H.; Fan, Yigang

    1999-01-01

    A final report on the DyPPiR tests that were run are presented. Essentially it consists of two parts, a description of the data reduction techniques and the results. The data reduction techniques include three methods that were considered: 1) signal processing of wind on - wind off data; 2) using wind on data in conjunction with accelerometer measurements; and 3) using a dynamic model of the sting to predict the sting oscillations and determining the aerodynamic inputs using an optimization process. After trying all three, we ended up using method 1, mainly because of its simplicity and our confidence in its accuracy. The results section consists of time history plots of the input variables (angle of attack, roll angle, and/or plunge position) and the corresponding time histories of the output variables, C(sub L), C(sub D), C(sub m), C(sub l), C(sub m), C(sub n). Also included are some phase plots of one or more of the output variable vs. an input variable. Typically of interest are pitch moment coefficient vs. angle of attack for an oscillatory motion where the hysteresis loops can be observed. These plots are useful to determine the "more interesting" cases. Samples of the data as it appears on the disk are presented at the end of the report. The last maneuver, a rolling pull up, is indicative of the unique capabilities of the DyPPiR, allowing combinations of motions to be exercised at the same time.

  7. Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 12. Preliminary process design and cost estimate and production-run recommendation. Final report, March-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, M.; Fox, J.; Masin, J.; Stahlnecker, E.; Schreiber, G.

    1989-12-01

    A preliminary design for the production of JP-8 jet fuel and other salable products from the Great Plains by-products is given. The design incorporates experimental results from Tasks 2 and 3 with the scoping design from Task 1. The experimental results demonstrated the need for more severe hydrotreating conditions to convert the tar oil to jet fuel than was estimated in Task 1. As a result, capital costs for the revised design are significantly higher and the plant is less profitable than estimated in the Task 1 work. The increase in capital costs is offset somewhat by a higher phenol value in the current market.

  8. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  9. Destruction regimes of Sun-skimming and Sun-plunging comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J.; Carlson, R.; Toner, M.

    2014-07-01

    We establish and model destruction regimes for close sun-grazers, i.e. comets of small enough perihelia (q ≤ a few R_⊙) and large enough mass (M_o ≥ 10^{13} g) to reach the inner solar corona or below. These can be divided into sun-skimming and sun-plunging according to whether their M_o,q values confine them to atmospheric densities n ≤ 10^{14}cm^{-3} where mass loss is dominated by insolative sublimation, or let them reach n≥ 10^{14}cm^{-3} where hydrodynamic interactions with the dense chromosphere take over (bow-shock-heated ablative mass loss, ram pressure pancaking and deceleration). Being rare, no sun-plungers have yet been detected but they are of potentially great interest. Recent years have seen the first direct monitoring of three sun-skimmers in the low corona by SDO at EUV wavelengths. Both sun-plungers and sun-skimmers offer novel diagnostics of both cometary and solar conditions. We show that, due to their much higher speeds than planetary impacts, sun-plungers are likely dominated by pancaking and ablative mass-loss, rather than deceleration, even for quite inefficient bow-shock heat transfer, but we obtain solutions for ablation- and deceleration-dominated, and for intermediate, cases. All involve rapid local deposition of nucleus kinetic energy and momentum within a few 100 km near the photosphere. This occurs at atmospheric density n_{peak}(cm^{-3})≈3×10^{16}(Xμ_{-2}^3M_{15})^{1/2} for incident mass M_o=10^{15}M_{15} g, incident angle θ = cos^{-1}(10^{-2}μ_{-2}) to the vertical, and parameter X ranges from 0.001 up to 1. Break-up into Y fragments reduces n_{peak} by a factor ≈ Y^{-1/3}. This deposition will drive hot rising 'airburst' plumes and internal helioseismic waves similar to magnetic flare effects. In the normal ablation-dominated case (small X) the hot airburst will exhibit essentially cometary abundances (metallicity Gt; solar). Though sun-skimmer nuclei are vaporized by 5800 K (≈ 0.6 eV/photon) photospheric

  10. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, Loren L.

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  11. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  12. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  13. A novel needleless liquid jet injection methodology for improving direct cardiac gene delivery: An optimization of parameters, AAV mediated therapy and investigation of host responses in ischemic heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargnoli, Anthony Samuel

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with 22 million new patients diagnosed annually. Essentially, all present therapies have significant cost burden to the healthcare system, yet fail to increase survival rates. One key employed strategy is the genetic reprogramming of cells to increase contractility via gene therapy, which has advanced to Phase IIb Clinical Trials for advanced heart failure patients. It has been argued that the most significant barrier preventing FDA approval are resolving problems with safe, efficient myocardial delivery, whereby direct injection in the infarct and remote tissue areas is not clinically feasible. Here, we aim to: (1) Improve direct cardiac gene delivery through the development of a novel liquid jet device approach (2) Compare the new method against traditional IM injection with two different vector constructions and evaluate outcome (3) Evaluate the host response resulting from both modes of direct cardiac injection, then advance a drug/gene combination with controlled release nanoparticle formulations.

  14. Absolute instability of a viscous hollow jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M.

    2007-02-01

    An investigation of the spatiotemporal stability of hollow jets in unbounded coflowing liquids, using a general dispersion relation previously derived, shows them to be absolutely unstable for all physical values of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. The roots of the symmetry breakdown with respect to the liquid jet case, and the validity of asymptotic models are here studied in detail. Asymptotic analyses for low and high Reynolds numbers are provided, showing that old and well-established limiting dispersion relations [J. W. S. Rayleigh, The Theory of Sound (Dover, New York, 1945); S. Chandrasekhar, Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability (Dover, New York, 1961)] should be used with caution. In the creeping flow limit, the analysis shows that, if the hollow jet is filled with any finite density and viscosity fluid, a steady jet could be made arbitrarily small (compatible with the continuum hypothesis) if the coflowing liquid moves faster than a critical velocity.

  15. Modeling sediment deposition from marine outfall jets.

    PubMed

    Terfous, Abdelali; Chiban, Samia; Ghenaim, Abdellah

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional model to study the sediment deposition from marine outfall jets. The introduced unidirectional coupling (fluid-sediment) is an appropriate choice in the case of low-concentrated particle-laden jets such as municipal wastewater discharge, where the concentration of particles is small enough and does not affect the hydrodynamic development of the jet in the nearfield. The sedimentation model takes advantage of the preferential concentration phenomenon. The deposition criterion states that the deposition of sediments begins when the vertical component of the entrainment velocity becomes smaller than the settling velocity. Once the deposition process begins, it is controlled by the settling velocity, entrainment velocity, volume flux, and sediment concentration. The deposition along the jet trajectory is expressed by an ordinary differential equation coupled with the liquid phase equations. Experiments of Lane-Serff and Moran [Sedimentation from Buoyant jets. J Hyd Eng. 2005;131(3):166-174], Cuthbertson and Davies [Deposition from particle-laden, round, turbulent, horizontal, buoyant jets in stationary and coflowing receiving fluids. J Hydr Eng. 2008;134(4):390-402], and Lee [Mixing of horizontal sediment laden jets [dissertation]. Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong; 2010], chosen from bibliography, are used to validate the model. These experiments cover the cases of horizontal and inclined buoyant jets in stationary ambient, horizontal buoyant jets in co-flow current and nonbuoyant horizontal jets in stationary ambient. Good agreement between the experiments and the obtained simulations is revealed. PMID:26732467

  16. Helium jet dispersion to atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Hasna J.

    On the event of loss of vacuum guard of superinsulated helium dewar, high rate of heat transfer into the tank occurs. The rapid boiling of liquid helium causes the burst disk to rupture at four atmospheres and consequently the helium passes to the atmosphere through vent lines. The gaseous helium forms a vertical buoyant jet as it exits the vent line into a stagnant environment. Characterization of the gaseous jet is achieved by detailed analysis of the axial and radial dependence of the flow parameters.

  17. Jets in air-jet family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navia, C. E.; Sawayanagi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The A-jet families on Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiments were analyzed by the study of jets which are reconstructed by a grouping procedure. It is demonstrated that large-E sub J R sub J events are characterized by small number of jets and two-jet like asymmetric shape, binocular events and the other type. This type has a larger number of jets and more symmetrical shape in the P sub t plane.

  18. Production of cell-enclosing hollow-core agarose microcapsules via jetting in water-immiscible liquid paraffin and formation of embryoid body-like spherical tissues from mouse ES cells enclosed within these microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Kawakami, Koei

    2008-01-01

    We developed agarose microcapsules with a single hollow core templated by alginate microparticles using a jet-technique. We extruded an agarose aqueous solution containing suspended alginate microparticles into a coflowing stream of liquid paraffin and controlled the diameter of the agarose microparticles by changing the flow rate of the liquid paraffin. Subsequent degradation of the inner alginate microparticles using alginate lyase resulted in the hollow-core structure. We successfully obtained agarose microcapsules with 20-50 microm of agarose gel layer thickness and hollow cores ranging in diameter from ca. 50 to 450 microm. Using alginate microparticles of ca. 150 microm in diameter and enclosing feline kidney cells, we were able to create cell-enclosing agarose microcapsules with a hollow core of ca. 150 microm in diameter. The cells in these microcapsules grew much faster than those in alginate microparticles. In addition, we enclosed mouse embryonic stem cells in agarose microcapsules. The embryonic stem cells began to self-aggregate in the core just after encapsulation, and subsequently grew and formed embryoid body-like spherical tissues in the hollow core of the microcapsules. These results show that our novel microcapsule production technique and the resultant microcapsules have potential for tissue engineering, cell therapy and biopharmaceutical applications. PMID:17705234

  19. Marine Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The marine turbine pump pictured is the Jacuzzi 12YJ, a jet propulsion system for pleasure or commercial boating. Its development was aided by a NASA computer program made available by the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia. The manufacturer, Jacuzzi Brothers, Incorporated, Little Rock, Arkansas, used COSMIC'S Computer Program for Predicting Turbopump Inducer Loading, which enabled substantial savings in development time and money through reduction of repetitive testing.

  20. The effect of turbulence on the stability of liquid jets and the resulting droplet size distributions. Fourth quarterly technical report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, A.; Chigier, N.

    1993-12-31

    In this progress report the authors report on progress in making experimental measurements to describe the rheological properties of non-Newtonian fluids. Non-Newtonian liquids exhibit a non linear relationship between the shear stress and the shear rate. A typical time-dependent rheological phenomenon is thixotropy. Thixotropic fluids show a limited decrease in the shear viscosity of the fluid with time under a suddenly applied constant stress. Thixotropic fluids also show a hysteresis loop and a decaying stress on the shear stress-shear rate plot. Here the authors are using a power law model to describe the behavior of such non-Newtonian liquids.

  1. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  2. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  3. AC electrified jets in a flow-focusing device: Jet length scaling.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Elena; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Alzaga-Gimeno, Javier; Tan, Say Hwa; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Ramos, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We use a microfluidic flow-focusing device with integrated electrodes for controlling the production of water-in-oil drops. In a previous work, we reported that very long jets can be formed upon application of AC fields. We now study in detail the appearance of the long jets as a function of the electrical parameters, i.e., water conductivity, signal frequency, and voltage amplitude. For intermediate frequencies, we find a threshold voltage above which the jet length rapidly increases. Interestingly, this abrupt transition vanishes for high frequencies of the signal and the jet length grows smoothly with voltage. For frequencies below a threshold value, we previously reported a transition from a well-behaved uniform jet to highly unstable liquid structures in which axisymmetry is lost rather abruptly. These liquid filaments eventually break into droplets of different sizes. In this work, we characterize this transition with a diagram as a function of voltage and liquid conductivity. The electrical response of the long jets was studied via a distributed element circuit model. The model allows us to estimate the electric potential at the tip of the jet revealing that, for any combination of the electrical parameters, the breakup of the jet occurs at a critical value of this potential. We show that this voltage is around 550 V for our device geometry and choice of flow rates. PMID:27375826

  4. U.S., non-U.S. outlays to rise in `98, but oil price plunge clouds spending outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, R.J.

    1998-03-23

    Capital spending by oil and gas companies in and outside the US will rise in 1998, but that forecast may be jeopardized by the continuing plunge in oil prices. For operations in the US, oil and gas company capital spending is expected to move up in 1998 for the fourth year in a row. If the money is spent, it will be the highest industry investment level since 1985. Strong oil and gas prices and increased volumes have boosted company cash flow and profits the last few years, fueling increased spending. However, the near-term outlook has now been clouded by economic turmoil in a number of Asian countries and the recent collapse of oil prices. The paper discusses oil and gas prices, US upstream spending, US non-exploration and production spending, capital spending in Canada, and spending outside US and Canada.

  5. Influence of heat transfer on the aerodynamic performance of a plunging and pitching NACA0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, Denis F.; Alighanbari, Hekmat; Breitsamter, Christian

    2013-02-01

    The unsteady low Reynolds number aerodynamics phenomena around flapping wings are addressed in several investigations. Elsewhere, airfoils at higher Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers have been treated quite comprehensively in the literature. It is duly noted that the influence of heat transfer phenomena on the aerodynamic performance of flapping wings configurations is not well studied. The objective of the present study is to investigate the effect of heat transfer upon the aerodynamic performance of a pitching and plunging NACA0012 airfoil in the low Reynolds number flow regime with particular emphasis upon the airfoil's lift and drag coefficients. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a finite volume method. To consider the variation of fluid properties with temperature, the values of dynamic viscosity and thermal diffusivity are evaluated with Sutherland's formula and the Eucken model, respectively. Instantaneous and mean lift and drag coefficients are calculated for several temperature differences between the airfoil surface and freestream within the range 0-100 K. Simulations are performed for a prescribed airfoil motion schedule and flow parameters. It is learnt that the aerodynamic performance in terms of the lift CL and drag CD behavior is strongly dependent upon the heat transfer rate from the airfoil to the flow field. In the plunging case, the mean value of CD tends to increase, whereas the amplitude of CL tends to decrease with increasing temperature difference. In the pitching case, on the other hand, the mean value and the amplitude of both CD and CL decrease. A spectral analysis of CD and CL in the pitching case shows that the amplitudes of both CD and CL decrease with increasing surface temperature, whereas the harmonic frequencies are not affected.

  6. Conical singularities inside cone-jet electrosprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Alvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2007-11-01

    In coaxial jet electrosprays inside liquid baths, a conductive liquid forms a cone-jet electrospray in a bath containing a dielectric liquid. An additional dielectric liquid is injected inside the Taylor cone forming a liquid meniscus. In certain circumstances, however, we have observed that the dielectric menisci present extremely sharp tips, without mass emission, that can be stabilized and made completely steady. In this presentation we will first explore the parametrical range of liquid properties, mainly viscosities and surface tensions, under which these sharp tips take place. Secondly, we have developed a simple analytical model for the very complex electro-hydrodynamical flow, which predicts the angle of the tip as a function of the liquid properties. Therefore, we are able to compare it with the results of the experiments. When the liquid meniscus is slowly fed, the cusped interface turns into a spout which flows coated by the conducting liquid forming the electrified coaxial jet which has been successfully employed for the production of double emulsions (Marin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 014502, 2007).

  7. Plunging Ranulas Revisited: A CT Study with Emphasis on a Defect of the Mylohyoid Muscle as the Primary Route of Lesion Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Hee Young; Jeong, Han Sin; Kim, Yi-Kyung; Cha, Jihoon; Kim, Sung Tae

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to clarify the pathogenesis of plunging ranulas in regard of the pathway of lesion propagation using CT scans. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed CT scans of 41 patients with plunging ranula. We divided plunging ranulas into two types: type 1 was defined as those directly passing through a defect of the mylohyoid muscle with the presence (type 1A) or absence (type 1B) of the tail sign and type 2 as those through the traditional posterior route along the free edge of the mylohyoid muscle. Images were also analyzed for the extent of the lesion in respect to the spaces involved. As for type 1 lesions, we recorded the location of the defect of the mylohyoid muscle and the position of the sublingual gland in relation to the defect. Results CT scans demonstrated type 1 lesion in 36 (88%), including type 1A in 14 and type 1B in 22, and type 2 lesion in 5 (12%). Irrespective of the type, the submandibular space was seen to be involved in all cases either alone or in combination with one or more adjacent spaces. Of the 36 patients with type 1 lesions, the anterior one-third was the most common location of the defect of the mylohyoid muscle, seen in 22 patients. The sublingual gland partially herniated in 30 patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that the majority of plunging ranulas take an anterior shortcut through a defect of the mylohyoid muscle. PMID:26957912

  8. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) stimulation of jet breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) excitation of liquid jets offers an alternative to piezoelectric excitation without the complex frequency response caused by piezoelectric and mechanical resonances. In an EHD exciter, an electrode near the nozzle applies an alternating Coulomb force to the jet surface, generating a disturbance which grows until a drop breaks off downstream. This interaction is modelled quite well by a linear, long wave model of the jet together with a cylindrical electric field. The breakup length, measured on a 33 micrometer jet, agrees quite well with that predicted by the theory, and increases with the square of the applied voltage, as expected. In addition, the frequency response is very smooth, with pronounced nulls occurring only at frequencies related to the time which the jet spends inside the exciter.

  9. Spray formation processes of impinging jet injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Ryan, H. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    A study examining impinging liquid jets has been underway to determine physical mechanisms responsible for combustion instabilities in liquid bi-propellant rocket engines. Primary atomization has been identified as an important process. Measurements of atomization length, wave structure, and drop size and velocity distribution were made under various ambient conditions. Test parameters included geometric effects and flow effects. It was observed that pre-impingement jet conditions, specifically whether they were laminar or turbulent, had the major effect on primary atomization. Comparison of the measurements with results from a two dimensional linear aerodynamic stability model of a thinning, viscous sheet were made. Measured turbulent impinging jet characteristics were contrary to model predictions; the structure of waves generated near the point of jet impingement were dependent primarily on jet diameter and independent of jet velocity. It has been postulated that these impact waves are related to pressure and momentum fluctuations near the impingement region and control the eventual disintegration of the liquid sheet into ligaments. Examination of the temporal characteristics of primary atomization (ligament shedding frequency) strongly suggests that the periodic nature of primary atomization is a key process in combustion instability.

  10. Rich phenomenology encountered when two jets collide in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suñol, Francesc; Gonzalez-Cinca, Ricard

    The collision between two impinging liquid jets has been experimentally studied in the low gravity environment provided by the ZARM drop tower. The effects of impact angle and liquid flow rate on the collision between like-doublet jets have been considered. Tests were carried out with distilled water injected through nozzles with an internal diameter of 0.7 mm into a test cell. Impact angle varied between 10(°) and 180(°) (frontal collision), while the liquid flow rate ranged between 20 ml/min and 80 ml/min for each nozzle. Such a large parameter range allowed us to observe different phenomena resulting from the jets collision: oscillating droplets attached to the nozzles, a non-uniform spatial distribution of bouncing droplets, coalescing droplets generating a single central droplet, coalescing jets, bouncing jets, liquid chains and liquid sheets. A map of the different patterns observed has been obtained. We present results on the structure of the jets after collision, the breakup length and the size of the generated droplet. The resulting structure of impinging jets highly depends on the Reynolds and Weber numbers, and the proper alignment of the colliding jets.

  11. AEA Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-01

    AEA's Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer was developed to mix and maintain the suspension of solids and to blend process liquids. The mixer can be used to combine a tank's available supernate with the sludge into a slurry that is suitable for pumping. The system uses jet nozzles in the tank coupled to a charge vessel. Then, a jet pump creates a partial vacuum in the charge vessel allowing it to be filled with waste. Next, air pressure is applied to the charge vessel, forcing sludge back into the tank and mixing it with the liquid waste. When the liquid waste contains 10% solids, a batch is pumped out of the tank.

  12. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  13. Numerical and experimental study of rotating jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwon; Che, Zhizhao; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir

    2015-11-01

    Rotating jets are investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. The experiments are performed on a rotating jet rig and the effects of a range of parameters controlling the liquid jet are investigated, e.g. jet flow rate, rotation speed, jet diameter, etc. Different regimes of the jet morphology are identified, and the dependence on several dimensionless numbers is studied, e.g. Reynolds number, Weber number, etc. The breakup process of droplets is visualized through high speed imaging. Full three-dimensional direct numerical simulations are performed using BLUE, a massively parallel two-phase flow code. The novel interface algorithms in BLUE track the gas-liquid interface through a wide dynamic range including ligament formation, break up and rupture. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  14. Corporate Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, GA, used a version of a NASA program called WIBCO to design a wing for the Gulfstream IV (G-IV) which will help to reduce transonic drag (created by shock waves that develop as an airplane approaches the speed of sound). The G-IV cruises at 88 percent of the speed of sound, and holds the international record in its class for round-the-world flight. They also used the STANS5 and Profile programs in the design. They will use the NASA program GASP to help determine the gross weight, range, speed, payload and optimum wing area of an intercontinental supersonic business jet being developed in cooperation with Sukhoi Design Bureau, a Soviet organization.

  15. [Development of a novel liquid injection system].

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Lv, Yong-Gui

    2009-11-01

    A liquid jet injector employs compressed gas or spring to produce a high-velocity stream to deliver liquid drug into human body through skin. There are many clinical jet injection products available, none of which is domestic. A new liquid jet injector is designed based on a comprehensive analysis of the current products. The injector consists of an ejector, trigger and a re-positioning mechanism. The jets characteristics of sample injector are tested, and the results show that the maximum exit pressure is above 15 MPa, a threshold value for penetrating into the skin. PMID:20352911

  16. Characterization of an impinging jet into porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Alhani, Salwan; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    In this work, characteristic behavior of a liquid jet into porous hydrophobic / hydrophilic particle media is investigated. In porous media, the capillary effect becomes significant, especially when the jet Reynolds Number is low. To analyze the cavity creation phenomena, the effect of jet's diameter, speed and acceleration as well as particles' size are carefully studied. Such knowledge of fluid behavior will provide guidance for medicine injection process. This work is supported by Caltech GALCIT STEM program.

  17. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  18. Supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulov, V. G.

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of the current state of research in the gas dynamics of jet flows. In particular, attention is given to free supersonic jets and to the interaction of supersonic jets with one another and with obstacles under stationary and nonstationary flow conditions. Papers are presented on a method for calculating a weakly anisotropic supersonic turbulent jet in a subsonic slipstream; composite supersonic jets; the principal gas-dynamic characteristics of the processes occurring in gas-jet-driven shock-wave generators; and the construction of models for supersonic jet flows. For individual items see A84-16902 to A84-16918

  19. "Waveguidability" of idealized jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manola, Iris; Selten, Frank; Vries, Hylke; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2013-09-01

    It is known that strong zonal jets can act as waveguides for Rossby waves. In this study we use the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data to analyze the connection between jets and zonal waves at timescales beyond 10 days. Moreover, a barotropic model is used to systematically study the ability of idealized jets to trap Rossby wave energy ("waveguidability") as a function of jet strength, jet width, and jet location. In general, strongest waveguidability is found for narrow, fast jets. In addition, when the stationary wave number is integer, a resonant response is found through constructive interference. In Austral summer, the Southern Hemispheric jet is closest to the idealized jets considered and it is for this season that similar jet-zonal wave relationships are identified in the ECMWF reanalysis data.

  20. Correlations of whitecap coverage and gas transfer velocity with microwave brightness temperature for plunging and spilling breaking waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qin; Monahan, E.C.; Asher, W.E.

    1995-07-01

    Bubbles and bubble plumes generated by wind-induced breaking waves significantly enhance the gas exchange across the interface between the ocean and atmosphere under high-wind conditions. Whitcaps, or active spilling wave crests, are the sea-surface manifestation of the bubbles and bubble plumes in the subsurface mixed layer, and the fractional area of the sea surface covered by which has been proposed to correlate linearly with the air-sea gas transfer velocity. The presence of whitecaps substantially increases the microwave brightness temperature of the sea surface. It could be possible to estimate the whitecap coverage from the sea-surface microwave brightness temperature would also be very helpful in developing a remote-sensing model for predicting air-sea gas transfer velocities from microwave brightness temperatures. As a part of an air-water gas exchange experiment conducted in an outdoor surf pool, measurements were made that were designed to investigate the correlation between whitecap coverage and microwave brightness temperature. A mechanical wave maker was located at the deep end of the pool and the generated waves propagate and break towards the shallow end of the pool. Two wave patterns characteristic of plunging and spilling breaking waves at four wave heights from 0.3 m to 1.2 m were produced.

  1. Successful nasal intubation with a laryngeal nerve monitoring tube using bronchoscopy in a patient with plunging goiter: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The appropriate positioning of nerve integrity monitoring during thyroid surgery is of relevance. In this case report we describe our experience with accurate placement of a nerve integrity monitoring endotracheal tube, obtained by fiberoptic control, in a patient with expected difficult airway management. Case presentation We report the case of a 70-year-old obese woman scheduled for elective total thyroidectomy due to plunging intrathoracic goiter. The preoperative indirect laryngoscopy pointed out a massive bombè of the hypopharyngeal wall to the right and right vocal cord paralysis. The epiglottis was oedematous and the glottis could not be identified. On physical examination, the tongue was large and a Mallampati’s score of 3 was determined. Hence, due to an expected difficult airway management, a nasal intubation with an electromyographic nerve integrity monitoring endotracheal tube trough fiberoptic bronchoscopy was successfully performed. Conclusion Our experience suggests that nasal intubation can be safely performed by using a nerve integrity monitoring tube with the help of fiberoptic bronchoscopy. PMID:24229430

  2. Simulations of dynamics of plunge and pitch of a three-dimensional flexible wing in a low Reynolds number flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dewei; Liu, Yingming; Shyy, Wei; Aono, Hikaru

    2010-09-01

    The lattice Boltzmann flexible particle method (LBFPM) is used to simulate fluid-structure interaction and motion of a flexible wing in a three-dimensional space. In the method, a beam with rectangular cross section has been discretized into a chain of rigid segments. The segments are connected through ball and socket joints at their ends and may be bent and twisted. Deformation of flexible structure is treated with a linear elasticity model through bending and twisting. It is demonstrated that the flexible particle method (FPM) can approximate the nonlinear Euler-Bernoulli beam equation without resorting to a nonlinear elasticity model. Simulations of plunge and pitch of flexible wing at Reynolds number Re=136 are conducted in hovering condition by using the LBFPM. It is found that both lift and drag forces increase first, then decrease dramatically as the bending rigidity in spanwise direction decreases and that the lift and drag forces are sensitive to rigidity in a certain range. It is shown that the downwash flows induced by wing tip and trailing vortices in wake area are larger for a flexible wing than for a rigid wing, lead to a smaller effective angle of attack, and result in a larger lift force.

  3. Analysis of the aerodynamic interaction between two plunging plates in tandem at low Reynolds number for maximum propulsive efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Casanova, Joaquin; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2015-11-01

    The thrust generated by two heaving plates in tandem is analysed for two particular sets of configurations of interest in forward flight: a plunging leading plate with the trailing plate at rest, and the two plates heaving with the same frequency and amplitude, but varying the phase difference. The thrust efficiency of the leading plate is augmented in relation to a single plate heaving with the same frequency and amplitude in most cases. In the first configuration, we characterize the range of nondimensional heaving frequencies and amplitudes of the leading plate for which the stationary trailing plate contributes positively to the global thrust. The maximum global thrust efficiency, reached for an advance ratio slightly less than unity and a reduced frequency close to 5, is about the same as the maximum efficiency for an isolated plate. But for low frequencies the tandem configuration with the trailing plate at rest is more thrust efficient than the isolated plate. In the second configuration, we find that the maximum thrust efficiency is reached for a phase lag of 180o (counterstroking), particularly for an advance ratio unity and a reduced frequency 4.4, and it is practically the same as in the other configuration and that for a single plate. Supported by the Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad of Spain Grant no. DPI2013-40479-P.

  4. Assessment of external heat transfer coefficient during oocyte vitrification in liquid and slush nitrogen using numerical simulations to determine cooling rates.

    PubMed

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-01-01

    In oocyte vitrification, plunging directly into liquid nitrogen favor film boiling and strong nitrogen vaporization. A survey of literature values of heat transfer coefficients (h) for film boiling of small metal objects with different geometries plunged in liquid nitrogen revealed values between 125 to 1000 W per per square m per K. These h values were used in a numerical simulation of cooling rates of two oocyte vitrification devices (open-pulled straw and Cryotop), plunged in liquid and slush nitrogen conditions. Heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was considered a linear mathematical problem and was solved using the finite element method applying the variational formulation. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate the cooling process of the systems. Predicted cooling rates for OPS and Cryotop when cooled at -196 degree C (liquid nitrogen) or -207 degree C (average for slush nitrogen) for heat transfer coefficients estimated to be representative of film boiling, indicated lowering the cooling temperature produces only a maximum 10 percent increase in cooling rates; confirming the main benefit of plunging in slush over liquid nitrogen does not arise from their temperature difference. Numerical simulations also demonstrated that a hypothetical four-fold increase in the cooling rate of vitrification devices when plunging in slush nitrogen would be explained by an increase in heat transfer coefficient. This improvement in heat transfer (i.e., high cooling rates) in slush nitrogen is attributed to less or null film boiling when a sample is placed in slush (mixture of liquid and solid nitrogen) because it first melts the solid nitrogen before causing the liquid to boil and form a film. PMID:22434120

  5. Visualization of supersonic diesel fuel jets using a shadowgraph technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianthong, Kulachate; Behnia, Masud; Milton, Brian E.

    2001-04-01

    High-speed liquid jets have been widely used to cut or penetrate material. It has been recently conjectured that the characteristics of high-speed fuel jets may also be of benefit to engines requiring direct fuel injection into the combustion chamber. Important factors are combustion efficiency and emission control enhancement for better atomization. Fundamental studies of very high velocity liquid jets are therefore very important. The characteristics and behavior of supersonic liquid jets have been studied with the aid of a shadowgraph technique. The high-speed liquid jet (in the supersonic range) is generated by the use of a vertical, single stage powder gun. The performance of the launcher and its relation to the jet exit velocity, with a range of nozzle shapes, has been examined. This paper presents the visual evidence of supersonic diesel fuel jets (velocity around 2000 m/s) investigated by the shadowgraph method. An Argon jet has been used as a light source. With a rise time of 0.07 microseconds, light duration of 0.2 microseconds and the use of high speed Polaroid film, the shadowgraph method can effectively capture the hypersonic diesel fuel jet and its strong leading edge shock waves. This provides a clearer picture of each stage of the generation of hypersonic diesel fuel jets and makes the study of supersonic diesel fuel jet characteristics and the potential for auto-ignition possible. Also, in the experiment, a pressure relief section has been used to minimize the compressed air or blast wave ahead of the projectile. However, the benefit of using a pressure relief section in the design is not clearly known. To investigate this effect, additional experiments have been performed with the use of the shadowgraph method, showing the projectile leaving and traveling inside the nozzle at a velocity around 1100 m/s.

  6. A determination of the external forces required to move the benchmark active controls testing model in pure plunge and pure pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dcruz, Jonathan

    1993-01-01

    In view of the strong need for a well-documented set of experimental data which is suitable for the validation and/or calibration of modern Computational Fluid Dynamics codes, the Benchmark Models Program was initiated by the Structural Dynamics Division of the NASA Langley Research Center. One of the models in the program, the Benchmark Active Controls Testing Model, consists of a rigid wing of rectangular planform with a NACA 0012 profile and three control surfaces (a trailing-edge control surface, a lower-surface spoiler, and an upper-surface spoiler). The model is affixed to a flexible mount system which allows only plunging and/or pitching motion. An approximate analytical determination of the forces required to move this model, with its control surfaces fixed, in pure plunge and pure pitch at a number of test conditions is included. This provides a good indication of the type of actuator system required to generate the aerodynamic data resulting from pure plunging and pure pitching motion, in which much interest was expressed. The analysis makes use of previously obtained numerical results.

  7. Zero gravity liquid mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Bruce, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus for mixing liquids under conditions of zero gravity is disclosed. The apparatus is comprised of a closed reservoir for the liquids, with a means for maintaining a positive pressure on the liquids in the reservoir. A valved liquid supply line is connected to the reservoir for supplying the reservoir with the liquids to be mixed in the reservoir. The portion of the reservoir containing the liquids to be mixed is in communication with a pump which alternately causes a portion of the liquids to flow out of the pump and into the reservoir to mix the liquids. The fluids in the reservoir are in communication through a conduit with the pump which alternately causes a portion of the fluids to flow out of the pump and into the sphere. The conduit connecting the pump and sphere may contain a nozzle or other jet-forming structure such as a venturi for further mixing the fluids.

  8. Project HyBuJET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Tom; Collet, Bill; Igar, Karyn; Kendall, Dewayne; Miklosovic, Dave; Reuss, Robyn; Ringer, Mark; Scheidt, Tony

    1990-01-01

    A conceptual Hypersonic Business Jet (HyBuJet) was examined. The main areas of concentration include: aerodynamics, propulsion, stability and control, mission profile, and atmospheric heating. In order to optimize for cruise conditions, a waverider configuration was chosen for the high lift drag ratio and low wave drag. The leading edge and lower surface of a waverider was mapped out from a known flow field and optimized for cruising at Mach 6 and at high altitudes. The shockwave generated by a waverider remains attached along the entire leading edge, allowing for a larger compression along the lower surface. Three turbofan ramjets were chosen as the propulsion of the aircraft due to the combination of good subsonic performance along with high speed propulsive capabilities. A combination of liquid silicon convective cooling for the leading edges with a highly radiative outer skin material was chosen to reduce the atmospheric heating to acceptable level.

  9. Experimental and theoretical study of fluid-structure interactions in plunging hydrofoils and gravity-driven falling plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ruijun

    Two typical unsteady fluid-structure interaction problems have been investigated in the present study. One of them was about actively plunged flexible hydrofoil; the other was about gravity-driven falling plates in water. Real-time velocity field and dynamic response on the moving objects were measured to study these unsteady and highly nonlinear problems. For a long time, scientists have believed that bird and insect flight benefits greatly from the flexibility and morphing facility of their wings via flapping motion. A significant advantage flexible wing models have over quasi-steady rigid wing models is a much higher lift generation capability. Both experimental and computational studies have shown that the leading and trailing edge vortexes (LEV and TEV) play a major role in the efficient generation of such unconventionally high lift force. In this study, two NACA0012 miniature hydrofoils, one flexible and the other rigid, were actively plunged at various frequencies in a viscous glycerol-water solution to study the influence of flexibility. Two-dimensional, phase-locked particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to investigate the temporal and spacial development of LEVs and TEVs. Simultaneous measurements of lift and thrust forces were recorded to reveal the relationship between hydrodynamic force and the evolution of the surrounding flow field. Results from the flexible hydrofoil were compared to those from the rigid one in order to quantitatively analyze the effects of flexibility. The second problem focused on fluid-structure interaction of gravity driven falling plates. Falling leaves and paper cards in air has drawn plenty of research interest in the past decades to investigate the interaction between the fluid flow and the falling object. In this research, time-resolved PIV were employed to experimentally visualize the flow field evolution around the gravity-driven falling plates. The plates were made of different materials with

  10. Laser ablation of liquid surface in air induced by laser irradiation through liquid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro; Nakahara, Motonao

    2010-10-01

    The pulse laser ablation of a liquid surface in air when induced by laser irradiation through a liquid medium has been experimentally investigated. A supersonic liquid jet is observed at the liquid-air interface. The liquid surface layer is driven by a plasma plume that is produced by laser ablation at the layer, resulting in a liquid jet. This phenomenon occurs only when an Nd:YAG laser pulse (wavelength: 1064 nm) is focused from the liquid onto air at a low fluence of 20 J/cm2. In this case, as Fresnel’s law shows, the incident and reflected electric fields near the liquid surface layer are superposed constructively. In contrast, when the incident laser is focused from air onto the liquid, a liquid jet is produced only at an extremely high fluence, several times larger than that in the former case. The similarities and differences in the liquid jets and atomization processes are studied for several liquid samples, including water, ethanol, and vacuum oil. The laser ablation of the liquid surface is found to depend on the incident laser energy and laser fluence. A pulse laser light source and high-resolution film are required to observe the detailed structure of a liquid jet.

  11. Continuous-wave laser generated jets for needle free applications.

    PubMed

    Berrospe-Rodriguez, Carla; Visser, Claas Willem; Schlautmann, Stefan; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben; Fernandez Rivas, David

    2016-01-01

    We designed and built a microfluidic device for the generation of liquid jets produced by thermocavitation. A continuous wave (CW) laser was focused inside a micro-chamber filled with a light-absorbing solution to create a rapidly expanding vapor bubble. The chamber is connected to a micro-channel which focuses and ejects the liquid jet through the exit. The bubble growth and the jet velocity were measured as a function of the devices geometry (channel diameter D and chamber width A). The fastest jets were those for relatively large chamber size with respect to the channel diameter. Elongated and focused jets up to 29 m/s for a channel diameter of [Formula: see text] and chamber size of [Formula: see text] were obtained. The proposed CW laser-based device is potentially a compact option for a practical and commercially feasible needle-free injector. PMID:26858816

  12. Risk factors of jet fuel combustion products.

    PubMed

    Tesseraux, Irene

    2004-04-01

    Air travel is increasing and airports are being newly built or enlarged. Concern is rising about the exposure to toxic combustion products in the population living in the vicinity of large airports. Jet fuels are well characterized regarding their physical and chemical properties. Health effects of fuel vapors and liquid fuel are described after occupational exposure and in animal studies. Rather less is known about combustion products of jet fuels and exposure to those. Aircraft emissions vary with the engine type, the engine load and the fuel. Among jet aircrafts there are differences between civil and military jet engines and their fuels. Combustion of jet fuel results in CO2, H2O, CO, C, NOx, particles and a great number of organic compounds. Among the emitted hydrocarbons (HCs), no compound (indicator) characteristic for jet engines could be detected so far. Jet engines do not seem to be a source of halogenated compounds or heavy metals. They contain, however, various toxicologically relevant compounds including carcinogenic substances. A comparison between organic compounds in the emissions of jet engines and diesel vehicle engines revealed no major differences in the composition. Risk factors of jet engine fuel exhaust can only be named in context of exposure data. Using available monitoring data, the possibilities and limitations for a risk assessment approach for the population living around large airports are presented. The analysis of such data shows that there is an impact on the air quality of the adjacent communities, but this impact does not result in levels higher than those in a typical urban environment. PMID:15093276

  13. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The presentation highlights jet-noise research conducted in the Subsonic Fixed Wing, Supersonics, and Environmentally Responsible Aviation Projects in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program at NASA. The research efforts discussed include NASA's updated Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP2), acoustic-analogy-based prediction tools, jet-surface-interaction studies, plasma-actuator investigations, N+2 Supersonics Validation studies, rectangular-jet experiments, twin-jet experiments, and Hybrid Wind Body (HWB) activities.

  14. CALCULATIONS FOR A MERCURY JET TARGET IN A SOLENOID MAGNET CAPTURE SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    GALLARDO, J.; KAHN, S.; PALMER, R.B.; THIEBERGER, P.; WEGGEL, R.J.; MCDONALD, K.

    2001-06-18

    A mercury jet is being considered as the production target for a muon storage ring facility to produce an intense neutrino beam. A 20 T solenoid magnet that captures pions for muon production surrounds the mercury target. As the liquid metal jet enters or exits the field eddy currents are induced. We calculate the effects that a liquid metal jet experiences in entering and exiting the magnetic field for the magnetic configuration considered in the Neutrino Factory Feasibility Study II.

  15. Prewhirl Jet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, S. Y.; Jensen, M.; Jackson, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    Simple accurate model of centrifugal or rocket engine pumps provides information necessary to design inducer backflow deflector, backflow eliminator and prewhirl jet in jet mixing zones. Jet design based on this model shows improvement in inducer suction performance and reduced cavitation damage.

  16. High speed liquid impact onto wetted solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, H.H.; Field, J.E.; Pickles, C.S.J. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-06-01

    The mechanics of impact by a high-speed liquid jet onto a solid surface covered by a liquid layer is described. After the liquid jet contacts the liquid layer, a shock wave is generated, which moves toward the solid surface. The shock wave is followed by the liquid jet penetrating through the layer. The influence of the liquid layer on the side jetting and stress waves is studied. Damage sites on soda-lime glass, PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) and aluminium show the role of shear failure and cracking and provide evidence for analyzing the impact pressure on the wetted solids and the spatial pressure distribution. The liquid layer reduces the high edge impact pressures, which occur on dry targets. On wetted targets, the pressure is distributed more uniformly. Despite the cushioning effect of liquid layers, in some cases, a liquid can enhance material damage during impact due to penetration and stressing of surface cracks.

  17. Theoretical and experimental study on underwater jet characteristics from a submerged combustion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, R.; Qin, X. H.; Wu, D. Z.; Wang, H. W.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an exhaust noise underwater is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The effects of high temperature and gas-water two-phase on underwater jet noise are analyzed. Results show that, higher exhaust gas temperatures generate louder jet noise underwater, including radiated noise from the tube orifice and bubble noise after detachment from orifice. But gas temperature has little effect on air-air jet noise. Another conclusion from experimental results is that injecting water into air-air jet system can effectively reduce jet noise but has less effect on air-water jet system. Turbulent dynamic noise, generated by air-air interaction, is the main noise source for air-air jet, but turbulent dynamic noise can be ignored in air-water jet considering gas-liquid density difference.And water droplet injected into air reduces the turbulent kinetic energy of the gas, therefor reduces the turbulent dynamic noise in air-air jet system.

  18. Vietnam plunges ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.T.

    1995-07-01

    Vietnam is moving fast. Facing the need to double its installed power generation capacity by the year 2000, Vietnam is pursuing a range of development alternatives to add an estimated 3,000 MW of new power plants. As part of the country`s progress toward a market economy, Vietnam has relaxed its rules regarding investment in power plants. The country enacted a new electricity law early in 1995, paving the way for private participation in the power sector.

  19. Taking the Plunge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Stanley

    1987-01-01

    Describes why lake hikes practiced at Girl Scout Camp Bonnie Brae (Massachusetts) are an ideal camp activity to teach aquatic ecology and engage the senses. Discusses program benefits: camper/counselor interaction, personal and group challenge, and conflict resolution. (NEC)

  20. The Middle School Plunge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Martin; Schwerdt, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Policymakers nationwide continue to wrestle with a basic question: At what grade level should students move to a new school? In the most common grade configuration in American school districts, public school students make two school transitions, entering a middle school in grade 6 or 7 and a high school in grade 9. This pattern reflects the…

  1. Fluid jet electric discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Howard A.

    2006-04-25

    A fluid jet or filament source and a pair of coaxial high voltage electrodes, in combination, comprise an electrical discharge system to produce radiation and, in particular, EUV radiation. The fluid jet source is composed of at least two serially connected reservoirs, a first reservoir into which a fluid, that can be either a liquid or a gas, can be fed at some pressure higher than atmospheric and a second reservoir maintained at a lower pressure than the first. The fluid is allowed to expand through an aperture into a high vacuum region between a pair of coaxial electrodes. This second expansion produces a narrow well-directed fluid jet whose size is dependent on the size and configuration of the apertures and the pressure used in the reservoir. At some time during the flow of the fluid filament, a high voltage pulse is applied to the electrodes to excite the fluid to form a plasma which provides the desired radiation; the wavelength of the radiation being determined by the composition of the fluid.

  2. Jet Boost Pumps For The Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Sen Y.

    1991-01-01

    Brief report proposes use of jet boost pumps in conjunction with main pumps supplying liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen to main engine of Space Shuttle. Main part of pump has no moving parts. Benefits include increased reliability, simplified ducts, and decreased weight.

  3. Aeroacoustics of hot jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, K.

    2004-10-01

    A systematic study has been undertaken to quantify the effect of jet temperature on the noise radiated by subsonic jets. Nozzles of different diameters were tested to uncover the effects of Reynolds number. All the tests were carried out at Boeing's Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility, with simultaneous measurement of thrust and noise. It is concluded that the change in spectral shape at high jet temperatures, normally attributed to the contribution from dipoles, is due to Reynolds number effects and not dipoles. This effect has not been identified before. A critical value of the Reynolds number that would need to be maintained to avoid the effects associated with low Reynolds number has been estimated to be {˜}400 000. It is well-known that large-scale structures are the dominant generators of noise in the peak radiation direction for high-speed jets. Experimental evidence is presented that shows the spectral shape at angles close to the jet axis from unheated low subsonic jets to be the same as from heated supersonic jets. A possible mechanism for the observed trend is proposed. When a subsonic jet is heated with the Mach number held constant, there is a broadening of the angular sector in which peak radiation occurs. Furthermore, there is a broadening of the spectral peak. Similar trends have been observed at supersonic Mach numbers. The spectral shapes in the forward quadrant and in the near-normal angles from unheated and heated subsonic jets also conform to the universal shape obtained from supersonic jet data. Just as for unheated jets, the peak frequency at angles close to the jet axis is independent of jet velocity as long as the acoustic Mach number is less than unity. The extensive database generated in the current test programme is intended to provide test cases with high-quality data that could be used for the evaluation of theoretical/semi-theoretical jet noise prediction methodologies.

  4. Theory of laminar viscous jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, O. G.; Korovkin, V. N.; Sokovishin, Iu. A.

    Results of recent theoretical studies of laminar jet flows of a viscous incompressible fluid are reviewed. In particular, attention is given to plane, fan-shaped, axisymmetric, and swirling jet flows; jet flows behind bodies; and slipstream jet flows. The discussion also covers dissipation of mechanical energy in jet flows, jet flows with a zero excess momentum, and asymptotic series expansions in the theory of jet flows.

  5. Partitioning of Aromatic Constituents into Water from Jet Fuels.

    PubMed

    Tien, Chien-Jung; Shu, Youn-Yuen; Ciou, Shih-Rong; Chen, Colin S

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive study of the most commonly used jet fuels (i.e., Jet A-1 and JP-8) was performed to properly assess potential contamination of the subsurface environment from a leaking underground storage tank occurred in an airport. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the concentration ranges of the major components in the water-soluble fraction of jet fuels and to estimate the jet fuel-water partition coefficients (K fw) for target compounds using partitioning experiments and a polyparameter linear free-energy relationship (PP-LFER) approach. The average molecular weight of Jet A-1 and JP-8 was estimated to be 161 and 147 g/mole, respectively. The density of Jet A-1 and JP-8 was measured to be 786 and 780 g/L, respectively. The distribution of nonpolar target compounds between the fuel and water phases was described using a two-phase liquid-liquid equilibrium model. Models were derived using Raoult's law convention for the activity coefficients and the liquid solubility. The observed inverse, log-log linear dependence of the K fw values on the aqueous solubility were well predicted by assuming jet fuel to be an ideal solvent mixture. The experimental partition coefficients were generally well reproduced by PP-LFER. PMID:25840956

  6. Large-eddy simulation of cavitating nozzle and jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örley, F.; Trummler, T.; Hickel, S.; Mihatsch, M. S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present implicit large-eddy simulations (LES) to study the primary breakup of cavitating liquid jets. The considered configuration, which consists of a rectangular nozzle geometry, adopts the setup of a reference experiment for validation. The setup is a generic reproduction of a scaled-up automotive fuel injector. Modelling of all components (i.e. gas, liquid, and vapor) is based on a barotropic two-fluid two-phase model and employs a homogenous mixture approach. The cavitating liquid model assumes thermodynamic- equilibrium. Compressibility of all phases is considered in order to capture pressure wave dynamics of collapse events. Since development of cavitation significantly affects jet break-up characteristics, we study three different operating points. We identify three main mechanisms which induce primary jet break-up: amplification of turbulent fluctuations, gas entrainment, and collapse events near the liquid-gas interface.

  7. Separation of gas from liquid in a two-phase flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, L. G.; Elliott, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    Separation system causes jets which leave two-phase nozzles to impinge on each other, so that liquid from jets tends to coalesce in center of combined jet streams while gas phase is forced to outer periphery. Thus, because liquid coalescence is achieved without resort to separation with solid surfaces, cycle efficiency is improved.

  8. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  9. Jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.; Ducao, A. S.; Trimmer, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of an arterial heat pipe with a capillary driven jet pump. The jet pump generates a suction which pumps vapor and noncondensible gas from the artery. The suction also forces liquid into the artery and maintains it in a primed condition. A theoretical model was developed which predicts the existence of two stable ranges. Up to a certain tilt the artery will prime by itself once a heat load is applied to the heat pipe. At higher tilts, the jet pump can maintain the artery in a primed condition but self-priming is not possible. A prototype heat pipe was tested which self-primed up to a tilt of 1.9 cm, with a heat load of 500 watts. The heat pipe continued to prime reliably when operated as a VCHP, i.e., after a large amount of noncondensible gas was introduced.

  10. Cavitating vortex generation by a submerged jet

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, G. V.; Filippov, A. N.

    2006-05-15

    The surface geometry of a cavitating vortex is determined in the limit of inviscid incompressible flow. The limit surface is an ovaloid of revolution with an axis ratio of 5: 3. It is shown that a cavitating vortex ring cannot develop if the cavitation number is lower than a certain critical value. Experiments conducted at various liquid pressures and several jet exit velocities confirm the existence of a critical cavitation number close to 3. At cavitation numbers higher than the critical one, the cavitating vortex ring does not develop. At substantially lower cavitation numbers (k {<=} 0.1), an elongated asymmetric cavitation bubble is generated, with an axial reentrant jet whose length can exceed the initial jet length by several times. This flow structure is called an asymmetric cavitating vortex, even though steady motion of this structure has not been observed.

  11. Instability of Rotating Vertical Viscous Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, Neil; Badr, Sarah; Morris, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    We have studied experimentally and theoretically the instability of a jet of viscous fluid (corn syrup) ejected downward from a nozzle that rotates about a vertical axis with an angular velocity Ω. For small values of Ω, the jet behaves in a way similar to that of normal (Ω = 0) liquid rope coiling. Above a critical value of Ω, however, a bifurcation occurs to a whirling spiral state in which the jet is strongly deflected from the vertical almost immediately after its exit from the nozzle. Experiments conducted for Ω increasing and decreasing show that the transition between the undeflected and spiral states is hysteretic. We will report results of a linear stability analysis of the undeflected state as a function of the dimensionless parameters that characterize the system, and will compare the results with our experimental measurements.

  12. Jets from young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John

    2007-10-01

    Most stars produce spectacular jets during their formation. There are thousands of young stars within 500 pc of the Sun and many power jets. Thus protostellar jets may be the most common type of collimated astrophysical outflow. Shocks powered by outflows excite many emission lines, exhibit a rich variety of structure, and motions with velocities ranging from 50 to over 500 km s-1. Due to their relative proximity, proper motions and structural changes can be observed in less than a year. I review the general properties of protostellar jets, summarize some results from recent narrow-band imaging surveys of entire clouds, discuss irradiated jets, and end with some comments concerning outflows from high-mass young stellar objects. Protostellar outflows are ideal laboratories for the exploration of the jet physics.

  13. Relativistic Jets in Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqun; Woosley, S. E.; MacFadyen, A. I.

    2003-04-01

    We examine the propagation of two-dimensional relativistic jets through the stellar progenitor in the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the jet is collimated by its passage. Moreover, interaction of the jet with the star causes mixing that sporadically decelerates the jet, leading to a highly variable Lorentz factor. The jet that finally emerges has a moderate Lorentz factor, but a very large internal energy loading. In a second series of calculations we follow the emergence of such enegy-loaded jets from the star. For the initial conditions chosen, conversion of the remaining internal energy gives a terminal Lorentz factor of approximately 150. Implications of our calculations for GRB light curves, the luminosity-variability relation, and the GRB-supernova association are discussed.

  14. What ignites optical jets?

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Jester

    2002-12-23

    The properties of radio galaxies and quasars with and without optical or X-ray jets are compared. The majority of jets from which high-frequency emission has been detected so far (13 with optical emission, 11 with X-rays, 13 with both) are associated with the most powerful radio sources at any given redshift. It is found that optical/X-ray jet sources are more strongly beamed than the average population of extragalactic radio sources. This suggests that the detection or non-detection of optical emission from jets has so far been dominated by surface brightness selection effects, not by jet physics. It implies that optical jets are much more common than is currently appreciated.

  15. Jet-mixing of initially stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stuart; Markides, Christos; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    Low pipeline velocities in the oil-and-gas industry generally lead to liquid-liquid flows stratifying due to density differences. Pipeline stratified flows inherently have no single point for sub-sampling and phase slip leads to in situ phase fractions differing from input volume fractions. Establishing representative or average properties and phase fractions is therefore difficult for industry. This leads to sampling errors through measurement uncertainty. In-line mixing overcomes liquid-liquid stratification, establishing a liquid-liquid dispersion that minimises slip between phases. Here, we use jets-in-crossflow (JICF) as a means of mixing. We present results of CFD simulations using the volume-of- fluid method that demonstrate the breakup of stratification as a result of the application of JICF. A number of simple jet configurations are described, and their effectiveness in generating dispersions is compared. We also present preliminary experimental results based on the use of a matched-refractive-index method, laser-induced fluorescence, particle-tracking- and particle-image-velocimetry. Funding from Cameron for Ph.D. studentship (SW) gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Contact Angle Influence on Geysering Jets in Microgravity Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquid-free vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, surface tension forces must be used to contain jets. To model this phenomenon, a numerical method that tracks the fluid motion and the surface tension forces is required. Jacqmin has developed a phase model that converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly away. Previous attempts at this formulation were criticized for smearing the interface. This can be overcome by sharpening the phase function, double gridding the fluid function, and using a higher-order solution for the fluid function. The solution of this equation can be rewritten as two coupled Poisson equations that also include the velocity.

  17. On the Evolution of Vorticity in Pulsating Jets in Crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortelezzi, Luca; Karagozian, Ann R.

    1999-11-01

    Significant alteration of the mixing characteristics of jets in crossflow may be achieved when the jet is pulsed in the case of liquids(Johari, et al., AIAA J., 37:7, pp. 2195-2203, 1999) or acoustically driven in the case of gases(Kelso, et al., JFM, 306, pp. 111-144, 1996). The three-dimensional vortex element simulations performed here focus on exploring the vorticity evolution associated with such jets and the role of vorticity in producing experimentally observed increases in jet spreading and penetration during excitation. Alternative modes of temporal jet excitation are examined, including sinusoidal and square wave variation in jet velocity for a variety of input frequencies, amplitudes, and duty cycles. It is seen that these jet forcing parameters control vortex bending, tilting, and reconnection which in turn are responsible for the overall jet structure as well as enhanced jet mixing and penetration.

  18. Refrigerated hydrogen gas jet for the Fermilab antiproton accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Allspach, D.H.; Kendziora, C.L.; Marinelli, M.

    1995-07-01

    A hydrogen gas jet has been built for use at Fermilab for the study of charmonium spectroscopy in proton-antiproton annihilations. The hydrogen gas jet is part of an upgrade to a previous experiment which ran in the Fermilab 1990-1991 fixed target program utilizing a jet cooled to 80 K with liquid nitrogen. The jet delivers a defined stream of hydrogen gas which travels through a series of vacuum chambers and then intersects the circulating antiproton beam. The goal of the upgrade is to provide a hydrogen gas stream at least twice as dense as used for the earlier experiment to increase the interaction rate and allow an improved study of rare processes. This is achieved by cooling the stream to below 30 K using a Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. The jet apparatus is designed to allow motion in the plane perpendicular to the gas stream as well as angular positioning at the jet nozzle to provide a means of optimizing the interaction rate. Two skimmers located in the vacuum chambers are used to define the gas stream dimensions. The jet target vacuum chambers require constant pumping with turbomolecular pumps. The vacuum space around the jet is designed to have a large system pumping speed so that the chamber pressure can be maintained below an absolute pressure of 1 Pa. The jet will operate in the next fixed target run at Fermilab. Details of the design and test results are discussed.

  19. Properties of gluon jets

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, K.

    1986-09-01

    The properties of gluon jets are reviewed from an experimental point of view. The measured characteristics are compared to theoretical expectations. Although neither data nor models for the gluon jets are in the mature stage, there are remarkable agreements and also intriguing disagreements between experiment and theory. Since much interesting data have begun to emerge from various experiments and the properties of gluon jets are deeply rooted in the basic structure of non-Abelian gauge theory, the study of gluon jets casts further light on our understanding of QCD. Finally, the future prospects are discussed.

  20. Perspectives on jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    Jet noise is a byproduct of turbulence. Until recently turbulence was assumed to be known statistically, and jet noise was computed therefrom. As a result of new findings though on the behavior of vortices and instability waves, a more integrated view of the problem has been accepted lately. After presenting a simple view of jet noise, the paper attempts to resolve the apparent differences between Lighthill's and Lilley's interpretations of mean-flow shear, and examines a number of ad hoc approaches to jet noise suppression.

  1. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Computer modeling of jet mixing in INEL waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, P.A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the feasibility of using submerged jet mixing pumps to mobilize and suspend settled sludge materials in INEL High Level Radioactive Waste Tanks. Scenarios include removing the heel (a shallow liquid and sludge layer remaining after tank emptying processes) and mobilizing and suspending solids in full or partially full tanks. The approach used was to (1) briefly review jet mixing theory, (2) review erosion literature in order to identify and estimate important sludge characterization parameters (3) perform computer modeling of submerged liquid mixing jets in INEL tank geometries, (4) develop analytical models from which pump operating conditions and mixing times can be estimated, and (5) analyze model results to determine overall feasibility of using jet mixing pumps and make design recommendations.

  3. Liquid film target impingement scrubber

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Coleman, Charles F.

    1977-03-15

    An improved liquid film impingement scrubber is provided wherein particulates suspended in a gas are removed by jetting the particle-containing gas onto a relatively small thin liquid layer impingement target surface. The impingement target is in the form of a porous material which allows a suitable contacting liquid from a pressurized chamber to exude therethrough to form a thin liquid film target surface. The gas-supported particles collected by impingement of the gas on the target are continuously removed and flushed from the system by the liquid flow through each of a number of pores in the target.

  4. Biphasic nanoparticles made by electrified jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahann, Joerg

    2005-03-01

    Nano-colloids have recently attracted intense attention due to unique properties that are distinctly different from bulk solid-state materials; including unique magnetic, electronic, optical, chemical, and biological characteristics. The vision that these nano-objects could essentially act as functional components in novel device generations, which ``magically'' assemble following a master blueprint void any human manipulation, has resulted in a new ``gold rush'' in materials science. These concepts have results in the synthesis of a multitude of nano-objects, such as nano-wires, nano-rods, nano-disks, or nano-prisms.^ Recently, nano-particles with anisotropic materials distributions (biphasic nano-particles) moved in the focus of research. Our approach differs fundamentally from the above-mentioned methods in that it takes advantage of electrified polymer jets to create anisotropic materials distributions in nano-objects. jetting is a process to generate liquid jets by use of electrostatic forces. It is well-known that high electrical potentials (typically several thousand volts) applied between the jetting liquids that are fed through a capillary and a collecting substrate will induce jetting of a charged liquid. The differences in the final morphologies from similar processes are mainly determined by the properties of the jetting liquids and the process parameters. transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and scanning laser confocal microscopy, we demonstrate the applicability of the process to control size, shape, and materials distribution at the nanoscale. The resulting anisotropic nanoparticles may have potential applications for targeted drug delivery or as electro-rehological fluids. a) F. M. Van der Kooij, K. Kassapidou and H. N. W. Lekkerkerker, Liquid crystal phase transitions in suspensions of polydisperse plate-like particles, Nature 406, 868 (2000); b) C. A. Mirkin, R. L. Letsinger, R. C. Mucic and J. J. Storhoff, A DNA

  5. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  6. Rapid leak detection with liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Ruppe, E. P.

    1978-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum lines are detected by applying liquid-crystal coating, warming suspected area, and observing color change due to differential cooling by leak jet. Technique is used on inside or outside walls of vacuum-jacketed lines.

  7. Interaction between jets during laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Patrascioiu, A.; Florian, C.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.; Hennig, G.; Delaporte, P.

    2014-07-07

    Simultaneous two-beam laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) was carried out for various inter-beam separations, analyzing both the resulting printing outcomes and the corresponding liquid transfer dynamics. In a first experiment, droplets of an aqueous solution were printed onto a substrate at different inter-beam distances, which proved that a significant departure from the single-beam LIFT dynamics takes places at specific separations. In the second experiment, time-resolved imaging analysis revealed the existence of significant jet-jet interactions at those separations; such interactions proceed through a dynamics that results in remarkable jet deflection for which a possible onset mechanism is proposed.

  8. Break-up and atomization of a round water jet by a high-speed annular air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasheras, J. C.; Villermaux, E.; Hopfinger, E. J.

    1998-02-01

    The near- and far-field break-up and atomization of a water jet by a high-speed annular air jet are examined by means of high-speed flow visualizations and phase Doppler particle sizing techniques. Visualization of the jet's near field and measurements of the frequencies associated with the gas liquid interfacial instabilities are used to study the underlying physical mechanisms involved in the primary break-up of the water jet. This process is shown to consist of the stripping of water sheets, or ligaments, which subsequently break into smaller lumps or drops. An entrainment model of the near-field stripping of the liquid is proposed, and shown to describe the measured liquid shedding frequencies. This simplified model explains qualitatively the dependence of the shedding frequency on the air/water momentum ratio in both initially laminar and turbulent water jets. The role of the secondary liquid break-up in the far-field atomization of the water jet is also investigated, and an attempt is made to apply the classical concepts of local isotropy to explain qualitatively the measurement of the far-field droplet size distribution and its dependence on the water to air mass and momentum ratios. Models accounting for the effect of the local turbulent dissipation rate in the gas on both the break-up and coalescence of the droplets are developed and compared with the measurements of the variation of the droplet size along the jet's centreline. The total flux of kinetic energy supplied by the gas per unit total mass of the spray jet was found to be the primary parameter determining the secondary break-up and coalescence of the droplets in the far field.

  9. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  10. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  11. Multiple jet study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Kors, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Test data is presented which allows determination of jet penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets into a ducted subsonic heated mainstream flow. Jet-to-mainstream momentum flux ratios ranged from 6 to 60. Temperature profile data is presented at various duct locations up to 24 orifice diameters downstream of the plane of jet injection. Except for two configurations, all geometries investigated had a single row of constant diameter orifices located transverse to the main flow direction. Orifice size and spacing between orifices were varied. Both of these were found to have a significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. The best mixing of the hot and cold streams was achieved with duct height.

  12. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  13. Directional transport of impinging capillary jet on wettability engineered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Impingement of capillary jet on a surface is important for applications like heat transfer, or for liquid manipulation in bio-microfluidic devices. Using wettability engineered surfaces, we demonstrate pump-less and directional transport of capillary jet on a flat surface. Spatial contrast of surface energy and a wedge-shape geometry of the wettability confined track on the substrate facilitate formation of instantaneous spherical bulges upon jet impingement; these bulges are further transported along the superhydrophilic tracks due to Laplace pressure gradient. Critical condition warranted for formation of liquid bulge along the varying width of the superhydrophilic track is calculated analytically and verified experimentally. The work throws light on novel fluid phenomena of unidirectional jet impingement on wettability confined surfaces and provides a platform for innovative liquid manipulation technique for further application. By varying the geometry and wettability contrast on the surface, one can achieve volume flow rates of ~ O(100 μL/sec) and directionally guided transport of the jet liquid, pumplessly at speeds of ~ O(10cm/sec).

  14. Electrohydrodynamics of a Cone-Jet Flow at a High Relative Permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbotin, A. V.; Semenov, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    We have proposed a new solution of the electrohydrodynamic equations describing a novel cone-jet flow structure formed at a conductive liquid meniscus in an electric field. Focusing on the liquids characterized by a high relative permittivity and using the slender body approximation, the cone-jet transition profiles and their characteristic radii are predicted in relation to the material parameters. The stable value of the cone angle is obtained using the Onsager's principle of maximum entropy production. Three different regimes of the cone-jet flow behavior are identified depending on the relative importance of capillary, viscous and inertial stress contributions. The presented complete analytical solutions for the cone-jet transition zone and the far jet region yield several different laws of algebraic decrease for the radius, surface charge, and electric field of the jet.

  15. Numerical simulation of electrospray in the cone-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Herrada, M A; López-Herrera, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M; Vega, E J; Montanero, J M; Popinet, S

    2012-08-01

    We present a robust and computationally efficient numerical scheme for simulating steady electrohydrodynamic atomization processes (electrospray). The main simplification assumed in this scheme is that all the free electrical charges are distributed over the interface. A comparison of the results with those calculated with a volume-of-fluid method showed that the numerical scheme presented here accurately describes the flow pattern within the entire liquid domain. Experiments were performed to partially validate the numerical predictions. The simulations reproduced accurately the experimental shape of the liquid cone jet, providing correct values of the emitted electric current even for configurations very close to the cone-jet stability limit. PMID:23005852

  16. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  17. Comparison of heat transfer in liquid and slush nitrogen by numerical simulation of cooling rates for French straws used for sperm cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Sansinena, M; Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-05-01

    Slush nitrogen (SN(2)) is a mixture of solid nitrogen and liquid nitrogen, with an average temperature of -207 °C. To investigate whether plunging a French plastic straw (commonly used for sperm cryopreservation) in SN(2) substantially increases cooling rates with respect to liquid nitrogen (LN(2)), a numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was used to predict cooling rates. Calculations performed using heat transfer coefficients in the range of film boiling confirmed the main benefit of plunging a straw in slush over LN(2) did not arise from their temperature difference (-207 vs. -196 °C), but rather from an increase in the external heat transfer coefficient. Numerical simulations using high heat transfer (h) coefficients (assumed to prevail in SN(2)) suggested that plunging in SN(2) would increase cooling rates of French straw. This increase of cooling rates was attributed to a less or null film boiling responsible for low heat transfer coefficients in liquid nitrogen when the straw is placed in the solid-liquid mixture or slush. In addition, predicted cooling rates of French straws in SN(2) tended to level-off for high h values, suggesting heat transfer was dictated by heat conduction within the liquid filled plastic straw. PMID:22225685

  18. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  19. Cryo-electron tomography of plunge-frozen whole bacteria and vitreous sections to analyze the recently described bacterial cytoplasmic structure, the Stack.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Lidia; Martínez, Gema; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Mercadé, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) of plunge-frozen whole bacteria and vitreous sections (CETOVIS) were used to revise and expand the structural knowledge of the "Stack", a recently described cytoplasmic structure in the Antarctic bacterium Pseudomonas deceptionensis M1(T). The advantages of both techniques can be complementarily combined to obtain more reliable insights into cells and their components with three-dimensional imaging at different resolutions. Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) and CET of frozen-hydrated P. deceptionensis M1(T) cells confirmed that Stacks are found at different locations within the cell cytoplasm, in variable number, separately or grouped together, very close to the plasma membrane (PM) and oriented at different angles (from 35° to 90°) to the PM, thus establishing that they were not artifacts of the previous sample preparation methods. CET of plunge-frozen whole bacteria and vitreous sections verified that each Stack consisted of a pile of oval disc-like subunits, each disc being surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane and separated from each other by a constant distance with a mean value of 5.2±1.3nm. FM4-64 staining and confocal microscopy corroborated the lipid nature of the membrane of the Stacked discs. Stacks did not appear to be invaginations of the PM because no continuity between both membranes was visible when whole bacteria were analyzed. We are still far from deciphering the function of these new structures, but a first experimental attempt links the Stacks with a given phase of the cell replication process. PMID:25617813

  20. Calibrated single-plunge bipolar electrode array for mapping myocardial vector fields in three dimensions during high-voltage transthoracic defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Deale, O C; Ng, K T; Kim-Van Housen, E J; Lerman, B B

    2001-08-01

    Mapping of the myocardial scalar electric potential during defibrillation is normally performed with unipolar electrodes connected to voltage dividers and a global potential reference. Unfortunately, vector potential gradients that are calculated from these data tend to exhibit a high sensitivity to measurement errors. This paper presents a calibrated single-plunge bipolar electrode array (EA) that avoids the error sensitivity of unipolar electrodes. The EA is triaxial, uses a local potential reference, and simultaneously measures all three components of the myocardial electric field vector. An electrode spacing of approximately 500 microm allows the EA to be direct-coupled to high-input-impedance, isolated, differential amplifiers and eliminates the need for voltage dividers. Calibration is performed with an electrolytic tank in which an accurately measured, uniform electric field is produced. For each EA, unique calibration matrices are determined which transform potential difference readings from the EA to orthogonal components of the electric field vector. Elements of the matrices are evaluated by least squares multiple regression analysis of data recorded during rotation of the electric field. The design of the electrolytic tank and electrode holder allows the electric field vector to be rotated globally with respect to the electrode axes. The calibration technique corrects for both field perturbation by the plunge electrode body and deviations from orthogonality of the electrode axes. A unique feature of this technique is that it eliminates the need for mechanical measurement of the electrode spacing. During calibration, only angular settings and voltages are recorded. For this study, ten EAs were calibrated and their root-mean-square (rms) errors evaluated. The mean of the vector magnitude rms errors over the set of ten EAs was 0.40% and the standard deviation 0.07%. Calibrated EAs were also tested for multisite mapping in four dogs during high

  1. Optimized Parameters for a Mercury Jet Target

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X.; Kirk, H.

    2010-12-01

    A study of target parameters for a high-power, liquid mercury jet target system for a neutrino factory or muon collider is presented. Using the MARS code, we simulate particle production initiated by incoming protons with kinetic energies between 2 and 100 GeV. For each proton beam energy, we maximize production by varying the geometric parameters of the target: the mercury jet radius, the incoming proton beam angle, and the crossing angle between the mercury jet and the proton beam. The number of muons surviving through an ionization cooling channel is determined as a function of the proton beam energy. We optimize the mercury jet target parameters: the mercury jet radius, the incoming proton beam angle and the crossing angle between the mercury jet and the proton beam for each proton beam energy. The optimized target radius varies from about 0.4 cm to 0.6 cm as the proton beam energy increases. The optimized beam angle varies from 75 mrad to 120 mrad. The optimized crossing angle is near 20 mrad for energies above 5 GeV. These values differ from earlier choices of 67 mrad for the beam angle and 33 mrad for the crossing angle. These new choices for the beam parameters increase the meson production by about 20% compared to the earlier parameters. Our study demonstrates that the maximum meson production efficiency per unit proton beam power occurs when the proton kinetic energy is in the range of 5-15 GeV. Finally, the dependence on energy of the number of muons at the end of the cooling channel is nearly identical to the dependence on energy of the meson production 50 m from the target. This demonstrates that the target parameters can be optimized without the additional step of running the distribution through a code such as ICOOL that simulates the bunching, phase rotation, and cooling.

  2. Experimental Study on Thermal Interaction of Ethanol Jets in High Temperature Fluorinert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Rongyuan; Takahashi, Minoru

    As a fundamental study for the direct contact heat exchange which was employed for in-vessel heat exchange in the Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water small fast reactor (PBWFR) and for the steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident in lead alloy-cooled fast reactor (LFR), ethanol jet was injected into high temperature fluorinert (FC-3283) as a simulation experiment in order to investigate the jet boiling phenomena just after volatile water contacting with the high temperature continuous lead alloy liquid. Two series of tests (no-boiling and boiling) were initiated to evaluate the ethanol vapor volume which generated around the ethanol jet. From synchronized temperature measurement around ethanol jet, the overview of the boiling behavior showed that jet boiling occurred at bottom part of jet first and developed to the upper part within very narrow area around jet.

  3. A novel calorimeter trigger concept: The jet trigger of the H1 experiment at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Bob; Dubak-Behrendt, Ana; Kiesling, Christian; Reisert, Burkard; Aktas, Adil; Antunovic, Biljana; Bracinik, Juraj; Braquet, Charles; Brettel, Horst; Dulny, Barbara; Fent, Jürgen; Fras, Markus; Fröchtenicht, Walter; Haberer, Werner; Hoffmann, Dirk; Modjesch, Miriam; Placakyte, Ringaile; Schörner-Sadenius, Thomas; Wassatsch, Andreas; Zimmermann, Jens

    2011-06-01

    We report on a novel trigger for the liquid argon calorimeter which was installed in the H1 Experiment at HERA. This trigger, called the "Jet Trigger", was running at level 1 and implemented a real-time cluster algorithm. Within only 800 ns, the Jet Trigger algorithm found local energy maxima in the calorimeter, summed their immediate neighbors, sorted the resulting jets by energy, and applied topological conditions for the final level 1 trigger decision. The Jet Trigger was in operation from the year 2006 until the end of the HERA running in the summer of 2007. With the Jet Trigger it was possible to substantially reduce the thresholds for triggering on electrons and jets, giving access to a largely extended phase space for physical observables which could not have been reached in H1 before. The concepts of the Jet Trigger may be an interesting upgrade option for the LHC experiments.

  4. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  5. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... your internal clock before you travel. While in flight: DO NOT sleep unless it matches the bedtime ... decrease jet lag. If you will be in flight during the bedtime of your destination, take some ...

  6. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  7. Jets in hadronic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on the properties of jets in hadronic reactions are reviewed and compared with theoretical expectations. Jets are clearly established as the dominant process for high E/sub T/ events in hadronic reactions. The cross section and the other properties of these events are in qualitative and even semiquantitative agreement with expectations based on perturbative QCD. However, we can not yet make precise tests of QCD, primarily because there are substantial uncertainties in the theoretical calculations. 45 references. (WHK)

  8. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  9. Temporal instability analysis of inviscid compound jets falling under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsin, Muhammad; Uddin, Jamal; Decent, Stephen P.; Afzaal, Muhammad F.

    2013-01-01

    Compound liquid jets can be used in a variety of industrial applications ranging from capsule production in pharmaceutics to enhance printing methods in ink-jet printing. An appreciation of how instability along compound jets can lead to breakup and droplet formation is thus critical in many fields in science and engineering. In this paper, we perform a theoretical analysis to examine the instability of an axisymmetric inviscid compound liquid jet which falls vertically under the influence of gravity. We use a long-wavelength, slender-jet asymptotic expansion to reduce the governing equations of the problem into a set of one-dimensional partial differential equations, which describe the evolution of the leading-order axial velocity of the jet as well as the radii of both the inner and the outer interfaces. We first determine the steady-state solutions of the one-dimensional model equations and then we perform a linear temporal instability analysis to obtain a dispersion relation, which gives us useful information about the maximum growth rate and the maximum wavenumber of the imposed wave-like disturbance. We use our results to estimate the location and qualitative nature of breakup and then compare our results with numerical simulations.

  10. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  11. Morphology of water electrosprays in the simple-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Agostinho, L L F; Tamminga, G; Yurteri, C U; Brouwer, S P; Fuchs, E C; Marijnissen, J C M

    2012-12-01

    Experiments were conducted in order to study and characterize electrohydrodynamic atomization in the simple-jet mode for inviscid liquids. The operational window of this mode regarding the electric potential and liquid flow rate is presented. From the data it could be concluded that this mode can be divided by the characteristics of its breakup mechanism and that these characteristics are a function of the liquid Weber number and the electric Bond number for a given setup. Additionally we were also able to calculate the average charge per droplet and define the average size of primary and satellite droplets. The dispersion of the spray was also studied regarding its relation to the liquid Weber number and to the electric Bond number. We conclude that simple-jet mode electrosprays are a good option for applications which require monodisperse micrometer droplets with high throughput. PMID:23368048

  12. Radiation Resistances of Dielectric Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.; Somoano, Robert B.

    1987-01-01

    Report presents data on effects of ionizing radiation on dielectric liquids for high-energy-density, pulsed-power capacitors. Based on Jet Propulsion Laboratory test results, search of NASA and Department of Energy computer files, survey of open literature, and contacts with manufacturers and suppliers. Covers 22 organic liquids, although detailed data found for only one compound, polydimethyl siloxane. Generic data on effects of radiation on compounds with similar chemical structures provided where data on specific compounds lacking.

  13. Method and apparatus for water jet drilling of rock

    DOEpatents

    Summers, David A.; Mazurkiewicz, Marian; Bushnell, Dwight J.; Blaine, James

    1978-01-01

    Rock drilling method and apparatus utilizing high pressure water jets for drilling holes of relatively small diameter at speeds significantly greater than that attainable with existing drilling tools. Greatly increased drilling rates are attained due to jet nozzle geometry and speed of rotation. The jet nozzle design has two orifices, one pointing axially ahead in the direction of travel and the second inclined at an angle of approximately 30.degree. from the axis. The two orifices have diameters in the ratio of approximately 1:2. Liquid jet velocities in excess of 1,000 ft/sec are used, and the nozzle is rotated at speeds up to 1,000 rpm and higher.

  14. Unsteady jet in designing innovative drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Mazur, Paul; Cosse, Julia; Rider, Stephanie; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    Micro-needle injections, a promising pain-free drug delivery method, is constrained by its limited penetration depth. This deficiency can be overcome by implementing fast unsteady jet that can penetrate sub-dermally. The development of a faster liquid jet would increase the penetration depth and delivery volume of micro-needles. In this preliminary work, the nonlinear transient behavior of an elastic tube balloon in providing fast discharge is analyzed. A physical model that combines the Mooney Rivlin Material model and Young-Lapalce's Law was developed and used to investigate the fast discharging dynamic phenomenon. A proof of concept prototype was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of a simple thumb-sized delivery system to generate liquid jet with desired speed in the range of 5-10 m/s. This work is supported by ZCUBE Corporation.

  15. Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Y.

    1991-01-01

    A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

  16. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  17. Evaporation Of Clusters Of Drops In A Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents theoretical study of evaporation of clusters of liquid drops injected with gas jet flowing into hot ambient gas. One in series of studies of various aspects of behavior of sprays. Simplified mathematical models used to extract qualitative information on trends in interactions.

  18. Large Eddy Simulation of jets laden with evaporating drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    LES of a circular jet laden with evaporating liquid drops are conducted to assess computational-drop modeling and three different SGS-flux models: the Scale Similarity model (SSC), using a constant coefficient calibrated on a temporal mixing layer DNS database, and dynamic-coefficient Gradient and Smagorinsky models.

  19. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  20. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  1. Jet penetration in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Glenn, L.A.; Kusubov, A.

    1991-05-01

    We describe a phenomenological model which accounts for the mechanical response of glass to intense impulsive loading. An important aspect of this response is the dilatancy accompanying fracture. We have also conducted a number of experiments with 38.1-mm diameter precision shaped charges to establish the performance against various targets and to allow evaluation of our model. At 3 charge diameters standoff, the data indicate that both virgin and damaged glass offer better (Bernoulli-scaled) resistance to penetration than either of 4340 steel, or 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Time-resolved measurements indicate two distinct phases of jet penetration in glass: An initial hydrodynamic phase, and a second phase characterized by a slower penetration velocity. Our calculations show that at early time, a crater is formed around the jet and only the tip of the undisturbed jet interacts with the glass. At late time the glass has collapsed on the jet and degraded penetration continues via a disturbed and fragmented jet.

  2. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  3. Two-valued breakup length of a water jet issuing from a finite-length nozzle under normal gravity.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Akira; Kawanabe, Sho; Suzuki, Sousuke; Osaka, Jun

    2011-09-01

    Laboratory experiments are conducted in which water is issued vertically downward from a finite-length nozzle at a constant speed using a piston. The results of these experiments indicate that the breakup length of the liquid jet is two-valued at Weber numbers greater than unity but less than a certain value, which depends on the nozzle length-to-radius ratio and the Bond number. In addition to a long breakup length, which is consistent with the conventional observation, another shorter breakup length is realized at the same jet issue speed. Each experimental run for a specific jet issue speed begins from the start of liquid issue so that each run is independent of the other runs. Transition between the two breakup lengths seldom occurs in each run. Which of the two breakup lengths occurs is determined at the start of liquid issue, when the capillary wave produced by the liquid jet tip contraction easily reaches the nozzle exit. Unlike the conventional belief, which is based on the Plateau-Rayleigh instability theory, this experimental evidence demonstrates that liquid jet disintegration occurs in a deterministic manner. The previously proposed self-destabilizing mechanism of a liquid jet in microgravity, in which the origin of the unstable wave responsible for the breakups is attributed to the formation of an upstream propagating capillary wave at every breakup, is extended to explore the physics underlying the observed liquid jet disintegration behaviors. PMID:22060494

  4. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  5. Numerical simulation of operation processes in the combustion chamber and gas generator of oxygen-methane liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, G. P.; Larionov, A. A.; Sidlerov, D. A.; Yanchilin, L. A.

    2009-09-01

    The results of numerical simulations of processes in gas generators and combustion chambers operating on oxygen and methane are presented. Specific features of mixing, evaporation, and combustion of propellants have been investigated. The degree of combustion completeness in chambers with three types of injectors - coaxial-jet gas-liquid, liquid-liquid monopropellant, and bipropellant impinging-jets injectors - has been estimated.

  6. Supersonic Air Flow due to Solid-Liquid Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekle, Stephan; Peters, Ivo R.; Gordillo, José Manuel; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    A solid object impacting on liquid creates a liquid jet due to the collapse of the impact cavity. Using visualization experiments with smoke particles and multiscale simulations, we show that in addition, a high-speed air jet is pushed out of the cavity. Despite an impact velocity of only 1m/s, this air jet attains supersonic speeds already when the cavity is slightly larger than 1 mm in diameter. The structure of the air flow closely resembles that of compressible flow through a nozzle—with the key difference that here the “nozzle” is a liquid cavity shrinking rapidly in time.

  7. Aeroacoustic Experiments with Twin Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    While the noise produced by a single jet is azimuthally symmetric, multiple jets produce azimuthally varying far-field noise. The ability of one jet to shield another reduces the noise radiated in the plane of the jets, while often increasing the noise radiated out of the plane containing the jets. The present study investigates the shielding potential of twin jet configurations over subsonic and over-expanded supersonic jet conditions with simulated forward flight. The experiments were conducted with 2 in. throat diameter nozzles at four jet spacings from 2.6d to 5.5d in center-to-center distance, where d is the nozzle throat diameter. The current study found a maximum of 3 dB reduction in overall sound pressure level relative to two incoherent jets in the peak jet noise direction in the plane containing the jets. However, an increase of 3 dB was found perpendicular to the plane containing the jets. In the sideline direction, shielding is observed for all jet spacings in this study.

  8. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. PMID:24679258

  9. JetStar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    In this photo of the C-140 JetStar on the Dryden Ramp, a subscale propeller has been fitted to the upper fuselage of the aircraft. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility, in co-operation with the Lewis Research Center, investigated the acoustic characteristics of a series of subscale advanced design propellors in the early eighties. These propellors were designed to rotate at a tip speed faster than the speed of sound. They are, in effect, a 'swept back wing' version of a propellor. The tests were conducted on Dryden's C-140 Jetstar, seen here on the ramp at Dryden in Edwards, California. The JetStar was modified with the installation of an air turbine drive system. The drive motor, with a 24 inch test propellor, was mounted in a pylon atop the JetStar. The JetStar was equipped with an array of 28 microphones flush-mounted in the fuselage of the aircraft beneath the propellor. Microphones mounted on the wings and on accompanying chase aircraft provided far-field acoustic data. In the 1960s, the same JetStar was equipped with an electronic variable stability flight control system. Called then a General Purpose Airborne Simulator (GPAS), the aircraft could duplicate the flight characteristics of a wide variety of advanced aircraft and was used for supersonic transport and general aviation research and as a training and support system for Space Shuttle Approach and Landing Tests at Dryden in 1977. In 1985, the JetStar's wings were modified with suction and spray devices in a laminar (smooth) air flow program to study ways of improving the flow of air over the wings of airliners. The program also studied ways of reducing the collection of ice and insects on airliner wings.

  10. Experimental study of elliptical jet from supercritical to subcritical conditions using planar laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2015-03-15

    The study of fluid jet dynamics at supercritical conditions involves strong coupling between fluid dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena. Beyond the critical point, the liquid-vapor coexistence ceases to exist, and the fluid exists as a single phase known as supercritical fluid with its properties that are entirely different from liquids and gases. At the critical point, the liquids do not possess surface tension and latent heat of evaporation. Around the critical point, the fluid undergoes large changes in density and possesses thermodynamic anomaly like enhancement in thermal conductivity and specific heat. In the present work, the transition of the supercritical and near-critical elliptical jet into subcritical as well as supercritical environment is investigated experimentally with nitrogen and helium as the surrounding environment. Under atmospheric condition, a liquid jet injected from the elliptical orifice exhibits axis switching phenomena. As the injection temperature increases, the axis switching length also increases. Beyond the critical temperature, the axis switching is not observed. The investigation also revealed that pressure plays a major role in determining the thermodynamic transition of the elliptical jet only for the case of supercritical jet injected into subcritical chamber conditions. At larger pressures, the supercritical jet undergoes disintegration and formation of droplets in the subcritical environment is observed. However, for supercritical jet injection into supercritical environment, the gas-gas like mixing behavior is observed.

  11. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  12. Astrophysical jet experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, C. D.; Loupias, B.; Waugh, J.; Barroso, P.; Bouquet, S.; Brambrink, E.; Dono, S.; Falize, E.; Howe, J.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Kodama, R.; Koenig, M.; Michaut, C.; Myers, S.; Nazarov, W.; Notley, M. M.; Oya, A.; Pikuz, S.; Rabec le Gloahec, M.; Sakawa, Y.; Spindloe, C.; Streeter, M.; Wilson, L. A.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, three different experimental configurations designed to study jet propagation physics are presented. Each configuration uses a different target design: conical dimples in solid surfaces, hollow cones filled with foam and angled thin foils. When irradiated with a laser, these targets result in the launching of a plasma jet, the properties of which can be controlled by judicious choices of the target and laser parameters. Experimental results from these targets are shown, and the physics which may be studied with each of these targets is briefly discussed.

  13. On magnetohydrodynamic solitons in jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear solitary wave propagation in a compressible magnetic beam model of an extragalactic radio jet is examined and shown to lead to solitons of the Benjamin-Ono type. A number of similarities between such magnetic beam models of jets and models of solar photospheric flux tubes are pointed out and exploited. A single soliton has the appearance of a symmetric bulge on the jet which propagates faster than the jet's flow.

  14. Explosive fragmentation of liquids in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, A.; Longbottom, A.; Frost, D. L.; Loiseau, J.; Goroshin, S.; Petel, O.

    2016-07-01

    Rapid acceleration of a spherical shell of liquid following central detonation of a high explosive causes the liquid to form fine jets that are similar in appearance to the particle jets that are formed during explosive dispersal of a packed layer of solid particles. Of particular interest is determining the dependence of the scale of the jet-like structures on the physical parameters of the system, including the fluid properties (e.g., density, viscosity, and surface tension) and the ratio of the mass of the liquid to that of the explosive. The present paper presents computational results from a multi-material hydrocode describing the dynamics of the explosive dispersal process. The computations are used to track the overall features of the early stages of dispersal of the liquid layer, including the wave dynamics, and motion of the spall and accretion layers. The results are compared with new experimental results of spherical charges surrounded by a variety of different fluids, including water, glycerol, ethanol, and vegetable oil, which together encompass a significant range of fluid properties. The results show that the number of jet structures is not sensitive to the fluid properties, but primarily dependent on the mass ratio. Above a certain mass ratio of liquid fill-to-explosive burster (F / B), the number of jets is approximately constant and consistent with an empirical model based on the maximum thickness of the accretion layer. For small values of F / B, the number of liquid jets is reduced, in contrast with explosive powder dispersal, where small F / B yields a larger number of particle jets. A hypothetical explanation of these features based on the nucleation of cavitation is explored numerically.

  15. Air admixture to exhaust jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, Eugen

    1953-01-01

    The problem of thrust increase by air admixture to exhaust jets of rockets, turbojet, ram- and pulse-jet engines is investigated theoretically. The optimum ratio of mixing chamber pressure to ambient pressure and speed range for thrust increase due to air admixture is determined for each type of jet engine.

  16. Metal and polymer melt jet formation by the high-power laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoh, Jack J.; Gojani, Ardian B.

    2010-02-01

    The laser-induced metal and polymer melt jets are studied experimentally. Two classes of physical phenomena of interest are: first, the process of explosive phase change of laser induced surface ablation and second, the hydrodynamic jetting of liquid melts ejected from a beamed spot. We focus on the dynamic link between these two distinct physical phenomena in a framework of forming and patterning of metallic and polymer jets using a high-power Nd:YAG laser. The microexplosion of ablative spot on a target first forms a pocket of hot liquid melt and then it is followed by a sudden volume change of gas-liquid mixture leading to a pressure-induced spray jet ejection into surrounding medium.

  17. The physics of jets

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, W.

    1987-09-01

    Recent data on the fragmentation of quarks and gluons is discussed in the context of phenomenological models of parton fragmentation. Emphasis is placed on the experimental evidence for parton showers as compared to a fixed order QCD treatment, on new data on inclusive hadron production and on detailed studies of baryon production in jets.

  18. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  19. Jet Screech Noise Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2003-01-01

    The near-field screech-tone noise of a typical underexpanded circular jet issuing from a sonic nozzle is simulated numerically. The self-sustained feedback loop is automatically established in the simulation. The computed shock-cell structure, acoustic wave length, screech tone frequencies, and sound pressure levels in the near field are in good agreement with existing experimental results.

  20. Spectroscopy with Supersonic Jets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Anne R.; Chandler, Dean W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a new technique that enables spectroscopists to study gas phase molecules at temperatures below 1 K, without traditional cryogenic apparatus. This technique uses supersonic jets as samples for gas molecular spectroscopy. Highlighted are points in the theory of supersonic flow which are important for applications in molecular…

  1. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  2. Multi-jets formation using laser forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biver, Emeric; Rapp, Ludovic; Alloncle, Anne-Patricia; Delaporte, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of multi-jets formation in liquid films has been investigated using the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique. This technique allows the deposition of micrometer-sized droplets with a high spatial resolution from a donor substrate to a receiver substrate. The donor was a silver nanoparticles ink-coated substrate. The interaction of the laser pulse with the donor ink layer generates an expanding bubble in the liquid which propels a jet towards the receiver. Silver lines have already been printed by depositing overlapping droplets in a “low speed” process. In order to increase the throughput, it is necessary to decrease the time between the depositions of two droplets. By scanning the beam of a high repetition rate UV picosecond laser (343 nm; 30 ps; 500 kHz) with a galvanometric mirror, successive pulses are focused on the silver nanoparticles ink-coated donor substrate. The shape and dynamics of single jets and adjacent jets have been investigated by means of a time-resolved imaging technique. By varying the distance between the laser spots, different behaviours were observed and compared to the printed droplets. A spacing of 25 μm between laser spots was found to generate both stable jets and well-controlled, reproducible droplets at high speed.

  3. Dynamics of relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, Hélène; Mutel, Robert L.

    1998-12-01

    We discuss the structure and relativistic kinematics that develop in three spatial dimensions when a moderately hot, supersonic jet propagates into a denser background medium and encounters resistance from an oblique magnetic field. Our simulations incorporate relativistic MHD in a four-dimensional spacetime and clearly show that (a) relatively weak, oblique fields (at 1/16 of the equipartition value) have only a negligible influence on the propagating jet and they are passively pushed away by the relativistically moving head; (b) oblique fields in equipartition with the ambient plasma provide more resistance and cause bending at the jet head, but the magnitude of this deflection and the associated backflow are small compared to those identified by previous studies. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently during the simulations. The effect is analogous to pushing Japanese "noren" or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend and twist in 3-D space. Applied to relativistic extragalactic jets from blazars, the new results are encouraging since superluminal outflows exhibit bending near their sources and their environments are profoundly magnetized - but observations do not provide support for irregular kinematics such as large-scale vortical motions and pronounced reverse flows near the points of origin.

  4. Nozzle and needle during high viscosity adhesive jetting based on piezoelectric jet dispensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Song; Jiang, Hai; Li, Minjiao; Liu, Jianfang; Gu, Shoudong; Jiao, Xiaoyang; Liu, Xiaolun

    2015-10-01

    A piezoelectric impinging jet valve is used as a study object to investigate the effect of the ball needle in the existing impinging jet and nozzle structure of the valve on the performance of the jet. First, FLUENT software is used under different ball needle and nozzle structural parameters to simulate the pressure distribution that the ball needle and nozzle in the pressure cavity form when the ball needle hits the nozzle, by arranging the structure model of the ball needle and impact valve nozzle. The piezoelectric impact injection valve and the experiment test system are then designed. Test results show that the ball needle and nozzle structural parameters are closely related to the injection performance of the impact valve. Under certain conditions, a greater needle radius corresponds to a smaller nozzle aperture and taper. Moreover, high-viscosity liquid jetting is easily achieved. By using a ball needle with a radius of 1.5 mm, a taper angle of 60°, and a nozzle diameter of 0.1 mm, we can realize the industrial viscosity of 58 000 cps in glue spray, and the injection plastic fluid volume is 0.62 μl.

  5. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Riva, M.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-21

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.

  6. Enhanced heat sink with geometry induced wall-jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Mahamudul; Tikadar, Amitav; Bari, Fazlul; Morshed, A. K. M. M.

    2016-07-01

    Mini-channels embedded in solid matrix have already proven to be a very efficient way of electronic cooling. Traditional mini-channel heat sinks consist of single layer of parallel channels. Although mini-channel heat sink can achieve very high heat flux, its pumping requirement for circulating liquid through the channel increase very sharply as the flow velocity increases. The pumping requirements of the heat sink can be reduced by increasing its performance. In this paper a novel approach to increase the thermal performance of the mini-channel heat sink is proposed through geometry induced wall jet which is a passive technique. Geometric irregularities along the channel length causes abrupt pressure change between the channels which causes cross flow through the interconnections thus one channel faces suction and other channel jet action. This suction and jet action disrupts boundary layer causing enhanced heat transfer performance. A CFD model has been developed using commercially available software package FLUENT to evaluate the technique. A parametric study of the velocities and the effect of the position of the wall-jets have been performed. Significant reduction in thermal resistance has been observed for wall-jets, it is also observed that this reduction in thermal resistance is dependent on the position and shape of the wall jet.

  7. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Riva, M.; Syme, B.; JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-01

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.

  8. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  9. Studies of turbulent round jets through experimentation, simulation, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keedy, Ryan

    This thesis studies the physics of the turbulent round jet. In particular, it focuses on three different problems that have the turbulent round jet as their base flow. The first part of this thesis examines a compressible turbulent round jet at its sonic condition. We investigate the shearing effect such a jet has when impinging on a solid surface that is perpendicular to the flow direction. We report on experiments to evaluate the jet's ability to remove different types of explosive particles from a glass surface. Theoretical analysis revealed trends and enabled modeling to improve the predictability of particle removal for various jet conditions. The second part of thesis aims at developing a non-intrusive measurement technique for free-shear turbulent flows in nature. Most turbulent jet investigations in the literature, both in the laboratory and in the field, required specialized intrusive instrumentation and/or complex optical setups. There are many situations in naturally-occurring flows where the environment may prove too hostile or remote for existing instrumentation. We have developed a methodology for analyzing video of the exterior of a naturally-occurring flow and calculating the flow velocity. We found that the presence of viscosity gradients affects the velocity analysis. While these effects produce consistent, predictable changes, we became interested in the mechanism by which the viscosity gradients affect the mixing and development of the turbulent round jet. We conducted a stability analysis of the axisymmetric jet when a viscosity gradient is present. Finally, the third problem addressed in this thesis is the growth of liquid droplets by condensation in a turbulent round jet. A vapor-saturated turbulent jet issues into a cold, dry environment. The resulting mixing produces highly inhomogeneous regions of supersaturation, where droplets grow and evaporate. Non-linear interactions between the droplet growth rate and the supersaturation field make

  10. Acoustic characteristics of twin jets.

    PubMed

    He, F; Zhang, X W

    2002-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the acoustic characteristics of underexpanded supersonic twin jets in different azimuthal measurement planes. Compared with two independent jets, the twin jets produced additional noise due to the enhanced mixing and entrainment. The larger pressure ratio for switching from the axisymmetric mode to the helical mode led to lower noise levels at 90 degrees than for two independent jets. For pressure ratios greater than 5.00, the noise reduction was due to cessation of screeching of the twin jets while screeching of a single jet was still detected. The apparent shielding phenomenon was measured for the screech helical mode. The screech tone intensities were attenuated largely due to the shielding effects. The noise reductions due to shielding were obtained over a wide range of pressure ratios relative to the sum of two independent jets. PMID:12243185

  11. Pileup subtraction for jet shapes.

    PubMed

    Soyez, Gregory; Salam, Gavin P; Kim, Ji-Hun; Dutta, Souvik; Cacciari, Matteo

    2013-04-19

    Jets in high energy hadronic collisions often contain the fingerprints of the particles that produced them. Those fingerprints, and thus the nature of the particles that produced the jets, can be read off with the help of quantities known as jet shapes. Jet shapes are, however, severely affected by pileup, the accumulation in the detector of the residues of the many simultaneous collisions taking place in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We introduce a method to correct for pileup effects in jet shapes. Relative to earlier, limited approaches, the key advance resides in its full generality, achieved through a numerical determination, for each jet, of a given shape's susceptibility to pileup. The method rescues the possibility of using jet shapes in the high pileup environment of current and future LHC running, as we show with examples of quark-gluon discrimination and top tagging. PMID:23679594

  12. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  13. JET: a Journey to Enceladus and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, C.; Altwegg, K.; Brown, R. H.; Hand, K.; Soderblom, J. M.; Tortora, P.

    2010-12-01

    As revealed by the Cassini Huygens mission, Enceladus and Titan represent two critical end-members in our understanding of planet/moon formation. Enceladus is a small icy world with active jets of water erupting from its surface that might be connected to a subsurface water ocean. High-resolution mass spectra of Enceladus’ jets and plume can differentiate between the various elements and molecules suggested by the recent observations. High-resolution thermal mapping of the tiger stripe fractures will constrain models of tidal dissipation. Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is the only satellite with a dense atmosphere and the only object besides Earth with liquid on its surface. A world rich with organics, Titan has a methane cycle thought to be comparable in atmospheric and geologic processes to Earth’s water cycle. High-resolution images of the Titan surface will bare evidence on the processes that are shaping and have shaped Titan at seasonal, Milankovitch, and geologic time scales. Direct sampling of Titan's upper atmosphere will provide clues on the processes involved in the cycling of organic on Titan. JET will be launched to Saturn in 2016 and will observe these two moons close to autumnal equinox, an opportunity not afforded again until 2054.

  14. JET: A Journey To Enceladus And Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Altwegg, K.; Brown, R. H.; Hand, K.; Soderblom, J.; JET Team

    2010-10-01

    As revealed by the Cassini Huygens mission, Enceladus and Titan represent two critical end-members in our understanding of planet/moon formation. Enceladus is a small icy world with active jets of water erupting from its surface that might be connected to a subsurface water ocean. High resolution mass spectra of Enceladus’ jets and plume can differentiate between the various elements and molecules suggested by the recent Cassini observations. High-resolution thermal mapping of the tiger stripe fractures will constrain models of tidal dissipation. Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is the only satellite with a dense atmosphere and the only object besides Earth with liquid on its surface. A world rich with organics, Titan also has a methane cycle thought to be comparable in atmospheric and geological processes to Earth's water cycle. High-resolution images of the Titan surface will bare evidence on the processes that are shaping and have shaped Titan at seasonal, Milankovitch and geological time scales. Direct sampling of Titan's upper atmosphere will provide clues on the processes involved in the cycling of organic material on Titan. JET will be launched to Saturn in 2016 and will observe these two moons close to autumnal equinox, an opportunity not afforded again until 2054

  15. Peak pool boiling heat flux in viscous liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    The stability of a gas jet in a surrounding viscous liquid is studied. An expression is developed for the critical velocity at which the jet becomes unstable in a returning viscous liquid. The stability analysis is made to correspond with the geometrical configuration of gas jets and liquid columns similar to those observed near the peak pool boiling heat flux. The critical velocity of the gas jet is then used to obtain the functional form of the peak heat flux on flat plates and cylindrical heaters. The expressions are compared with original observations of the peak heat flux in very viscous liquids on flat plate, and cylindrical, heaters at both earth-normal, and elevated, gravities.

  16. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botton, V. Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  17. Photographic copy of photograph, aerial view looking down at Jet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, aerial view looking down at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Edwards Test Station complex in 1961, with north toward the top of the view. Dd test station has been added to Test Stand 'D,' liquid nitrogen storage facility E-63 has been built, as well as several adjuncts to Test Stand 'C' behind earth barriers, such as oxidizer facility at 4263/E-64 and hydrogen tank at 4264/E-65. (JPL negative no. 384-3003-A, 12 December 1961) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. Turbulence Statistics of a Buoyant Jet in a Stratified Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleney, Amy Brooke

    Using non-intrusive optical diagnostics, turbulence statistics for a round, incompressible, buoyant, and vertical jet discharging freely into a stably linear stratified environment is studied and compared to a reference case of a neutrally buoyant jet in a uniform environment. This is part of a validation campaign for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Buoyancy forces are known to significantly affect the jet evolution in a stratified environment. Despite their ubiquity in numerous natural and man-made flows, available data in these jets are limited, which constrain our understanding of the underlying physical processes. In particular, there is a dearth of velocity field data, which makes it challenging to validate numerical codes, currently used for modeling these important flows. Herein, jet near- and far-field behaviors are obtained with a combination of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and multi-scale time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) for Reynolds number up to 20,000. Deploying non-intrusive optical diagnostics in a variable density environment is challenging in liquids. The refractive index is strongly affected by the density, which introduces optical aberrations and occlusions that prevent the resolution of the flow. One solution consists of using index matched fluids with different densities. Here a pair of water solutions - isopropanol and NaCl - are identified that satisfy these requirements. In fact, they provide a density difference up to 5%, which is the largest reported for such fluid pairs. Additionally, by design, the kinematic viscosities of the solutions are identical. This greatly simplifies the analysis and subsequent simulations of the data. The spectral and temperature dependence of the solutions are fully characterized. In the near-field, shear layer roll-up is analyzed and characterized as a function of initial velocity profile. In the far-field, turbulence statistics are reported for two different scales, one

  19. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  20. JetStar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Dryden C-140 JetStar during testing of advanced propfan designs. Dryden conducted flight research in 1981-1982 on several designs. The technology was developed under the direction of the Lewis Research Center (today the Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH) under the Advanced Turboprop Program. Under that program, Langley Research Center in Virginia oversaw work on accoustics and noise reduction. These efforts were intended to develop a high-speed and fuel-efficient turboprop system. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility (later the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA), in co-operation with the Lewis Research Center, investigated the acoustic characteristics of a series of subscale advanced design propellors in the early eighties. These propellors were designed to rotate at a tip speed faster than the speed of sound. They are, in effect, a 'swept back wing' version of a propellor. The tests were conducted on Dryden's C-140 Jetstar, seen here on a research flight over the Mojave desert. The JetStar was modified with the installation of an air turbine drive system. The drive motor, with a 24 inch test propellor, was mounted in a pylon atop the JetStar. The JetStar was equipped with an array of 28 microphones flush-mounted in the fuselage of the aircraft beneath the propellor. Microphones mounted on the wings and on accompanying chase aircraft provided far-field acoustic data. In the 1960s, the same JetStar was equipped with an electronic variable stability flight control system. Called the General Purpose Airborne Simulator (GPAS), the aircraft could duplicate the flight characteristics of a wide variety of advanced aircraft and was used for supersonic transport and general aviation research and as a training and support system for Space Shuttle Approach and Landing Tests at Dryden in 1977. In 1985, the JetStar's wings were modified with suction and spray devices in a laminar (smooth) air flow program to study ways of improving the flow of air over the