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Sample records for point-defect migration energy

  1. Point defects and ion migration in PbFCl

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M.S. )

    1990-04-01

    Atomistic simulation techniques have been applied to PbFCl in order to calculate the energetics of defect formation and ion transport mechanisms in the undoped material. Schottky-like disorder is computed to be the dominant ionic defect. The activation energies for a variety of anion vacancy migration mechanisms are calculated and found to be in good agreement with experiment.

  2. Point defects in semiconductors: Microscopic identification, metastable properties, defect migration, and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanvechten, James A.; Wager, John F.

    1988-04-01

    Fundamental progress is made in the identification of point defect complexes in semiconductors (particularly EL2 and ELO in GaAs), the elucidation of the mechanisms by which they migrate (particularly re vacancy nearest neighbor hopping in compound semiconductors and recombination enhanced migration of vacancies in Si), and the development of an efficient means to simulate their detailed, and very complicated, diffusion and inter-reaction on a microcomputer using an innovative (and evidently unique) Monte Carlo method. Some effort has also recently gone into the elucidation of the temperature dependence of band off sets at heterojunctions, particularly GaAs-AlAs and HgTe-CdTe.

  3. Energy barriers for point-defect reactions in 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Swaminathan, Narasimhan; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2013-08-01

    Energy barriers of the key annealing reactions of neutral and charged point defects in SiC are calculated with ab initio density functional theory methods. In order to effectively search for the lowest energy migration paths the preliminary path is first established based on ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. The energy barrier of each hop is then calculated via climbing image nudged elastic band methods for paths guided by the AIMD simulations. The final paths and barriers are determined by comparing different pathways. The annealing reactions have important implications in understanding the amorphization, recovery, and other aspects of the radiation response of SiC. The results are compared with the literature data and experimental results on SiC recovery and amorphization. We propose that the C interstitial and Si antisite annealing reaction may provide a critical barrier that governs both the recovery stage III and amorphization processes.

  4. Long range lateral migration of intrinsic point defects in n-type 4H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Loevlie, L. S.; Vines, L.; Svensson, B. G.

    2012-05-15

    The lateral distributions of intrinsic point defects in n-type (0001) 4H-SiC have been investigated following room temperature irradiation with a focused beam of 10 keV protons. Laterally resolved deep level transient spectroscopy measurements reveal that the well-known and prominent Z{sub 1/2} and S{sub 1/2} centers display lateral diffusion lenghts on the order of 1 mm with negligible (if any) motion parallel to the direction of the c-axis. The migration occurs only in the presence of excess charge carriers generated during the proton irradiation, and no further motion takes place even under subsequent optical excitation of high intensity. Assuming one-dimensional geometry, an effective defect diffusivity in excess of 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2}/s is deduced by numerical modelling of the experimental data, corresponding to an energy barrier for migration of {approx}0.2 eV. Possible mechanisms for the rapid migration, invoking charge carrier recombination as a necessary condition, are discussed, and especially, an association with the glide of partial dislocations along the (0001) basal plane is scrutinized in some detail.

  5. Migration of point defects and a defect pair in zinc oxide using the dimer method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Dong, Mingdong; Liu, Bo

    2012-09-24

    The migration mechanism and the minimum energy path of vacancies, interstitials and an interstitial-vacancy pair in zinc oxide have been studied by the dimer method. The in-plane and out-of-plane migrations of zinc and oxygen vacancies are found to be anisotropic. The kick-out mechanism is energetically preferred to zinc and oxygen interstitials that can easily migrate through the ZnO crystal lattice. In addition, the migration process of an interstitial-vacancy pair as a complex of an octahedral oxygen interstitial and a zinc vacancy is dominated by an oxygen interstitial/zinc vacancy successive migration. The energy barriers indicate that the existence of oxygen interstitial in the defect pair can promote the mobility of zinc vacancy, whereas the migration of oxygen interstitial is slowed down due to the presence of zinc vacancy. In the end, we show a possible migration path of the interstitial-vacancy pair that can be dissociated through a set of displacement movements.

  6. Migration mechanisms and diffusion barriers of carbon and native point defects in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrtsos, Alexandros; Matsubara, Masahiko; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-06-01

    Carbon related defects are readily incorporated in GaN due to its abundance during growth both with MBE and MOCVD techniques. Employing first-principles calculations, we compute the migration barriers of carbon interstitials and we discuss possible relevant mechanisms of diffusion in the wurtzite GaN crystal. In addition, we calculate the migration barriers for the diffusion of the native defects of the crystal, i.e., gallium and nitrogen interstitials and vacancies. The minimum energy path and the migration barriers of these defects are obtained using the nudged elastic band method with the climbing image modification. In addition, the dimer method is used to independently determine the results. The results yield a quantitative description of carbon diffusion in GaN allowing for the determination of the most preferable migration paths.

  7. Formation, migration, and clustering of point defects in CuInSe2 from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikkonen, L. E.; Ganchenkova, M. G.; Seitsonen, A. P.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2014-08-01

    The electronic properties of high-efficiency CuInSe2 (CIS)-based solar cells are affected by the microstructural features of the absorber layer, such as point defect types and their distribution. Recently, there has been controversy over whether some of the typical point defects in CIS—VCu, VSe, InCu, CuIn—can form stable complexes in the material. In this work, we demonstrate that the presence of defect complexes during device operational time can be justified by taking into account the thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces acting behind defect microstructure formation. Our conclusions are backed up by thorough state-of-the-art calculations of defect interaction potentials as well as the activation barriers surrounding the complexes. Defect complexes such as InCu-2VCu, InCu-CuIn, and VSe-VCu are shown to be stable against thermal dissociation at device operating temperatures, but can anneal out within tens of minutes at temperatures higher than 150-200 °C (VCu-related complexes) or 400 °C (antisite pair). Our results suggest that the presence of these complexes can be controlled via growth temperatures, which provides a mechanism for tuning the electronic activity of defects and the device altogether.

  8. Vibration energy harvesting using a phononic crystal with point defect states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hangyuan; Tian, Xiaoyong; Wang, Michael Yu; Li, Dichen

    2013-01-01

    A vibration energy harvesting generator was studied in the present research using point-defect phononic crystal with piezoelectric material. By removing a rod from a perfect phononic crystal, a resonant cavity was formed. The elastic waves in the range of gap frequencies were all forbidden in any direction, while the waves with resonant frequency were localized and enhanced in the resonant cavity. The collected vibration energy was converted into electric energy by putting a polyvinylidene fluoride film in the middle of the defect. This structure can be used to simultaneously realize both vibration damping and broad-distributed vibration energy harvesting.

  9. Structure and energy of point defects in TiC: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weiwei; Ehteshami, Hossein; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.

    2015-04-01

    We employ first-principles calculations to study the atomic and electronic structure of various point defects such as vacancies, interstitials, and antisites in the stoichiometric as well as slightly off-stoichiometric Ti1 -cCc (including both C-poor and C-rich compositions, 0.49 ≤c ≤0.51 ). The atomic structure analysis has revealed that both interstitial and antisite defects can exist in split conformations involving dumbbells. To characterize the electronic structure changes caused by a defect, we introduce differential density of states (dDOS) defined as a local perturbation of the density of states (DOS) on the defect site and its surrounding relative to the perfect TiC. This definition allows us to identify the DOS peaks characteristic of the studied defects in several conformations. So far, characteristic defect states have been discussed only in connection with carbon vacancies. Here, in particular, we have identified dDOS peaks of carbon interstitials and dumbbells, which can be used for experimental detection of such defects in TiC. The formation energies of point defects in TiC are derived in the framework of a grand-canonical formalism. Among the considered defects, carbon vacancies and interstitials are shown to have, respectively, the lowest and the second-lowest formation energies. Their formation energetics are consistent with the thermodynamic data on the phase stability of nonstoichiometric TiC. A cluster type of point defect is found to be next in energy, a titanium [100] dumbbell terminated by two carbon vacancies.

  10. A study on density functional theory of the effect of pressure on the formation and migration enthalpies of intrinsic point defects in growing single crystal Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueoka, Koji; Kamiyama, Eiji; Kariyazaki, Hiroaki

    2012-05-01

    In 1982, Voronkov presented a model describing point defect behavior during the growth of single crystal Si from a melt and derived an expression to predict if the crystal was vacancy- or self-interstitial-rich. Recently, Vanhellemont claimed that one should take into account the impact of compressive stress introduced by the thermal gradient at the melt/solid interface by considering the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the formation enthalpy of the intrinsic point defects. To evaluate the impact of thermal stress more correctly, the pressure dependence of both the formation enthalpy (Hf) and the migration enthalpy (Hm) of the intrinsic point defects should be taken into account. Furthermore, growing single crystal Si is not under hydrostatic pressure but almost free of external pressure (generally in Ar gas under reduced pressure). In the present paper, the dependence of Hf and Hm on the pressure P, or in other words, the pressure dependence of the formation energy (Ef) and the relaxation volume (vf), is quantified by density functional theory calculations. Although a large number of ab initio calculations of the properties of intrinsic point defects have been published during the last years, calculations for Si crystals under pressure are rather scarce. For vacancies V, the reported pressure dependences of HfV are inconsistent. In the present study, by using 216-atom supercells with a sufficient cut-off energy and mesh of k-points, the neutral I and V are found to have nearly constant formation energies EfI and EfV for pressures up to 1 GPa. For the relaxation volume, vfI is almost constant while vfV decreases linearly with increasing pressure P. In case of the hydrostatic pressure Ph, the calculated formation enthalpy HfI and migration enthalpy HmI at the [110] dumbbell site are given by HfI = 3.425 - 0.057 × Ph (eV) and HmI = 0.981 - 0.039 × Ph (eV), respectively, with Ph given in GPa. The calculated HfV and HmV dependencies on Ph given by HfV = 3.543 - 0

  11. Charged Point Defects in the Flatland: Accurate Formation Energy Calculations in Two-Dimensional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Berseneva, Natalia; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2014-07-01

    Impurities and defects frequently govern materials properties, with the most prominent example being the doping of bulk semiconductors where a minute amount of foreign atoms can be responsible for the operation of the electronic devices. Several computational schemes based on a supercell approach have been developed to get insights into types and equilibrium concentrations of point defects, which successfully work in bulk materials. Here, we show that many of these schemes cannot directly be applied to two-dimensional (2D) systems, as formation energies of charged point defects are dominated by large spurious electrostatic interactions between defects in inhomogeneous environments. We suggest two approaches that solve this problem and give accurate formation energies of charged defects in 2D systems in the dilute limit. Our methods, which are applicable to all kinds of charged defects in any 2D system, are benchmarked for impurities in technologically important h-BN and MoS2 2D materials, and they are found to perform equally well for substitutional and adatom impurities.

  12. Role of defect coordination environment on point defects formation energies in Ni-Al intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennessen, Emrys; Rondinelli, James

    We present a relationship among the point defect formation energies and the bond strengths, lengths, and local coordination environment for Ni-Al intermetallic alloys based on density functional calculations, including Ni3Al, Ni5Al3, NiAl,Ni3Al4, Ni2Al3 and NiAl3. We find the energetic stability of vacancy and anti-site defects for the entire family can be attributed primarily to changes in interactions among first nearest neighbors, owing to spatially localized charge density reconstructions in the vicinity of the defect site. We also compare our interpretation of the local coordination environment with a DFT-based cluster expansion and discuss the performance of each approach in predicting defect stability in the Ni-Al system.

  13. Evolution of point defect clusters in pure iron under low-energy He+ irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, K.; Imamura, R.; Ohota, K.; Ono, K.

    2001-05-01

    The formation process of point defect clusters in high-purity (99.999%) iron as a typical bcc metal under the irradiation with low-energy (5 keV)He+ is studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Using conventional TEM techniques, clusters induced by the irradiation are determined to be interstitial-type dislocation loops (I loops) at temperatures ranging from 85 to 770 K and cavities from 300 to 770 K. Most of the I loops are determined to lie on {100} planes, and their Burgers vector are determined to be a[100]. The temporal variation in the volume density of I loops is measured by stereomicroscopy at several temperatures. The volume density of I loops is about two orders of magnitude higher in comparison with the case of high-energy electron irradiation at the same dpa rate; hence, it is deduced that helium atoms have an effect enhancing the nucleation of I loops. The depth distribution of the loop densities becomes broad above around 235 K at which vacancies become thermally mobile, and the dependence of loop formation on He+ beam flux is weak. From these results, it is suggested that helium-vacancy complexes act as trapping sites of self-interstitial atoms and I-loop nucleation is enhanced.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of point defect production in cementite and Cr23C6 inclusions in α-iron: Effects of recoil energy and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, K. O. E.

    2016-06-01

    The number of point defects formed in spherical cementite and Cr23C6 inclusions embedded into ferrite (α-iron) has been studied and compared against cascades in pure versions of these materials (only ferrite, Fe3C, or Cr23C6 in a cell). Recoil energies between 100 eV and 3 keV and temperatures between 400 K and 1000 K were used. The overall tendency is that the number of point defects — such as antisites, vacancy and interstitials — increases with recoil energy and temperature. The radial distributions of defects indicate that the interface between inclusions and the host tend to amplify and restrict the defect formation to the inclusions themselves, when compared to cascades in pure ferrite and pure carbide cells.

  15. Point defects and the binding energies of boron near defect sites in Ni{sub 3}Al: A first-principles investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C.L.; Painter, G.S.

    1997-02-01

    First-principles local-density-functional calculations have been used to investigate the equilibrium point defect structure and boron-defect interactions in Ni{sub 3}Al. The dominant point defect types in off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 3}Al are substitutional antisite defects on both sublattices. The boron binding energy is dependent on lattice coordination; it is strongest near vacancy sites with a nearest-neighbor nickel coordination number of about four (instead of six as in the defect-free interstitial site) and with no aluminum atom nearest-neighbors. This suggests that boron tends to segregate to open defect sites and to enhance cohesion through the formation of localized Ni-B covalent bonds. Comparison of the binding energies of boron and carbon in Ni{sub 3}Al shows that boron has a stronger tendency to segregate to open sites than carbon.

  16. Increment of the collective pinning energy in Na1 - xCa x Fe2As2 single crystals with random point defects introduced by proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberkorn, N.; Kim, Jeehoon; Maiorov, B.; Usov, I.; Chen, G. F.; Yu, W.; Civale, L.

    2014-09-01

    We study the influence of random point defects introduced by 3 MeV proton irradiation (doses 1 × 1016 and 2 × 1016 cm2) on the vortex dynamics of Na x Ca1 - xFe2As2 (x = 0.5 and x = 0.75) single crystals. Our results indicate that the irradiation produces an enhancement of the critical current density and a reduction of the creep rate in vortex relaxation. The plateau in the temperature dependence of vortex creep rate initially present in as-grown single crystals disappears after irradiation. This fact can be associated with a large increment of the collective pinning energy (from <100 to 350-400 K). On the other hand, Maley analysis indicates that after irradiation both samples present a glassy exponent μ close to the one expected in the so-called large bundle regime (μ ≈ 7/9) for random point defects.

  17. Unraveling energy conversion modeling in the intrinsic persistent upconverted luminescence of solids: a study of native point defects in antiferromagnetic Er2O3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bolong

    2016-05-11

    We investigated the mechanism of the intrinsic persistent luminescence of Er2O3 in the A-type lattice based on first-principles calculations. We found that the native point defects were engaged in mutual subtle interactions in the form of chemical reactions between different charge states. The release of energy related to lattice distortion facilitates the conversion of energy for electrons to be transported between the valence band and the trap levels or even between the deep trap levels so as to generate persistent luminescence. The defect transitions that take place along the zero-phonon line release energy to enable optical transitions, with the exact amount of negative effective correlation energy determined by the lattice distortions. Our calculations on the thermodynamic transition levels confirm that both the visible and NIR experimentally observed intrinsic persistent luminescence (phosphor or afterglow) are related to the thermodynamic transition levels of oxygen-related defects, and the thermodynamic transition levels within different charge states for these defects are independent of the chemical potentials of the given species. Lattice distortion defects such as anion Frenkel (a-Fr) pair defects play an important role in transporting O-related defects between different lattice sites. To obtain red persistent luminescence that matches the biological therapeutic window, it is suggested to increase the electron transition levels between high-coordinated O vacancies and related metastable a-Fr defects; a close-packed core-shell structure is required to quench low-coordinated O-related defects so as to reduce the green band luminescence. We further established a conversed chain reaction (CCR) model to interpret the energy conversion process of persistent luminescence in terms of the inter-reactions of native point defects between different charge states. It is advantageous to use the study of defect levels combined with formation energies to suggest limits

  18. Displacement Threshold Energy and Recovery in an Al-Ti Nanolayered System with Intrinsic Point Defect Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Gerboth, Matthew D.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Henager, Charles H.

    2014-01-07

    A method is established and validated using molecular dynamics (MD) to determine the displacement threshold energies as Ed in nanolayered, multilayered systems of dissimilar metals. The method is applied to specifically oriented nanolayered films of Al-Ti where the crystal structure and interface orientations are varied in atomic models and Ed is calculated. Methods for defect detection are developed and discussed based on prior research in the literature and based on specific crystallographic directions available in the nanolayered systems. These are compared and contrasted to similar calculations in corresponding bulk materials, including fcc Al, fcc Ti, hcp Al, and hcp Ti. In all cases, the calculated Ed in the multilayers are intermediate to the corresponding bulk values but exhibit some important directionality. In the nanolayer, defect detection demonstrated systematic differences in the behavior of Ed in each layer. Importantly, collision cascade damage exhibits significant defect partitioning within the Al and Ti layers that is hypothesized to be an intrinsic property of dissimilar nanolayered systems. This type of partitioning could be partly responsible for observed asymmetric radiation damage responses in many multilayered systems. In addition, a pseudo-random direction was introduced to approximate the average Ed without performing numerous simulations with random directions.

  19. Point defects in yttria-stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellberg, C. Stephen; Bernstein, Noam; Erwin, Steven C.

    The densification that occurs during sintering of certain ceramics has been observed to occur more rapidly and at lower temperatures when a weak external electric field is applied.1 We compute the formation energies of point defects in yttria-stabilized zirconia using first principles density functional theory. We examine interstitials, vacancies, and vacancy complexes including Schottky defects in a Y2Zr14O31 computational cell, which corresponds to approximately 7 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia. We relate our results to recent experimental work on electric-field-assisted sintering in yttria-stabilized zirconia, showing how how the expansion of lattice constants observed in diffraction measurements results from increasing defect densities.

  20. Influence of point defects on grain boundary motion.

    SciTech Connect

    Foiles, Stephen Martin

    2010-09-01

    This work addresses the influence of point defects, in particular vacancies, on the motion of grain boundaries. If there is a non-equilibrium concentration of point defects in the vicinity of an interface, such as due to displacement cascades in a radiation environment, motion of the interface to sweep up the defects will lower the energy and provide a driving force for interface motion. Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to examine the process for the case of excess vacancy concentrations in the vicinity of two grain boundaries. It is observed that the efficacy of the presence of the point defects in inducing boundary motion depends on the balance of the mobility of the defects with the mobility of the interfaces. In addition, the extent to which grain boundaries are ideal sinks for vacancies is evaluated by considering the energy of boundaries before and after vacancy absorption.

  1. Correlated recombination and annealing of point defects in dilute and concentrated Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentyev, D.; Castin, N.; Ortiz, C. J.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we present a comprehensive combined modelling approach to study the annealing of lattice defects in dilute and concentrated metallic alloys. The developed approach consists in the combination of molecular dynamics, atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) and mean field rate theory methods, linked at appropriate time and space scales. For the first time, the AKMC tool has been designed to model the evolution of point defects (both vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) in random concentrated alloys, taking into account the influence of lattice distortion on the local migration energy barrier due to the mutual interaction of point defects and solutes. Good accuracy and outstanding speed of calculations has been achieved by introducing the artificial neural network regression as an engine of the AKMC applied to calculate migration barriers for mobile defects. The developed method was applied to study correlated recombination in bcc Fe and random Fe-Cr alloys, aiming at the reproduction of a set of experimental studies after electron irradiation. The obtained results agree well with the available experimental data, implying that the developed modelling procedure correctly captures the undergoing physical process.

  2. Point Defect Concentrations in Metastable Fe-C Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Först, Clemens J.; Slycke, Jan; van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Yip, Sidney

    2006-05-01

    Point defect species and concentrations in metastable Fe-C alloys are determined using density functional theory and a constrained free-energy functional. Carbon interstitials dominate unless iron vacancies are in significant excess, whereas excess carbon causes greatly enhanced vacancy concentration. Our predictions are amenable to experimental verification; they provide a baseline for rationalizing complex microstructures known in hardened and tempered steels, and by extension other technological materials created by or subjected to extreme environments.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations for point defects in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Point defects in silicon have been studied extensively for many years. Nevertheless the mechanism for self diffusion in Si is still debated. Direct experimental measurements of the selfdiffusion in silicon are complicated by the lack of suitable isotopes. Formation energies are either obtained from theory or indirectly through the analysis of dopant and metal diffusion experiments. Density functional calculations predict formation energies ranging from 3 to 5 eV depending on the approximations used for the exchange-correlation functional [1]. Analysis of dopant and metal diffusion experiments result in similar broad range of diffusion activation energies of 4.95 [2], 4.68 [3], 2.4 eV [4]. Assuming a migration energy barrier of 0.1-0.3 eV [5], the resulting experimental interstitial formation energies range from 2.1 - 4.9 eV. To answer the question of the formation energy of Si interstitials we resort to a many-body description of the wave functions using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) techniques. Previous QMC calculations resulted in formation energies for the interstitials of around 5 eV [1,6]. We present a careful analysis of all the controlled and uncontrolled approximations that affect the defect formation energies in variational and diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. We find that more accurate trial wave functions for QMC using improved Jastrow expansions and most importantly a backflow transformation for the electron coordinates significantly improve the wave functions. Using zero-variance extrapolation, we predict interstitial formation energies in good agreement with hybrid DFT functionals [1] and recent GW calculations [7]. [4pt] [1] E. R. Batista, J. Heyd, R. G. Hennig, B. P. Uberuaga, R. L. Martin, G. E. Scuseria, C. J. Umrigar, and J. W. Wilkins. Phys. Rev. B 74, 121102(R) (2006).[0pt] [2] H. Bracht, E. E. Haller, and R. Clark-Phelps, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 393 (1998). [0pt] [3] A. Ural, P. B. Griffin, and J. D. Plummer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 3454 (1999). [0pt

  4. Point Defect Characterization in CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Gul,R.; Li, Z.; Bolotnikov, A.; Keeter, K.; Rodriguez, R.; James, R.

    2009-03-24

    Measurements of the defect levels and performance testing of CdZnTe detectors were performed by means of Current Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (I-DLTS), Transient Charge Technique (TCT), Current versus Voltage measurements (I-V), and gamma-ray spectroscopy. CdZnTe crystals were acquired from different commercial vendors and characterized for their point defects. I-DLTS studies included measurements of defect parameters such as energy levels in the band gap, carrier capture cross sections, and defect densities. The induced current due to laser-generated carriers was measured using TCT. The data were used to determine the transport properties of the detectors under study. A good correlation was found between the point defects in the detectors and their performance.

  5. Impact of point defects on III-nitride tunnel devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramaratne, Darshana; Lyons, John; van de Walle, Chris G.

    Heterostructures using GaN and InGaN are being pursued in designs of tunnel field-effect-transistors (TFETs) to enable low-power switching devices. Point defects and impurities in these heterostructures can adversely affect the performance of these devices through Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) and Trap-Assisted-Tunneling (TAT) processes. Using first-principles calculations based on a hybrid functional, we calculate the thermodynamic and charge-state switching levels as well as nonradiative recombination rates of point defects and impurities in GaN and InGaN. Gallium vacancies and their complexes, in particular, are found to be potentially detrimental centers. We then investigate how these defects can contribute to SRH and TAT processes in a nitride TFET device. This work was supported by the Center for Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST), one of the six SRC STARnet Centers, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  6. Energetics and electronic structure of UAl4 with point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniznik, L.; Alonso, P. R.; Gargano, P. H.; Rubiolo, G. H.

    2015-11-01

    UAl4 ideal and defect structures were studied within the framework of the Density Functional Theory. The structural and magnetic ordering of UAl4 in paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, and antiferromagnetic states have been investigated, within the collinear and non-collinear spin approximation, using the GGA model, as embedded in the program package VASP. An antiferromagnetic (0 1 bar 1) layer structure with spins aligned to the [010] direction was found to be energetically preferred. The analysis of density of states and bonding charge density point out that the bonding mechanism consists primarily of band mixing between the U 5f and Al 3p states. Supercells were built from UAl4 unit cells with the established magnetic structure. For those supercells we calculated the energy of formation of vacancies and antisite defects taking into account the existence of three distinct aluminum sites. Point defect formation energies, local lattice relaxations, as well as the defect induced magnetic ordering and electronic density redistribution, are discussed. It is shown that antiferromagnetism is locally broken. Al antisites and U antisites in Al 4e Wyckoff positions are the constitutional point defects in Al-rich and U-rich oI20 UAl4, respectively. In this way we have presented here the first set of data which makes it possible to discuss and quantify the point defects concentrations in the experimental composition range for existence of this uranium aluminide.

  7. Point defects in epitaxial silicene on Ag(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongsheng; Feng, Haifeng; Du, Yi; Chen, Jian; Wu, Kehui; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-06-01

    Silicene, a counterpart of graphene, has achieved rapid development due to its exotic electronic properties and excellent compatibility with the mature silicon-based semiconductor technology. Its low room-temperature mobility of ∼100 cm2 V‑1 s‑1, however, inhibits device applications such as in field-effect transistors. Generally, defects and grain boundaries would act as scattering centers and thus reduce the carrier mobility. In this paper, the morphologies of various point defects in epitaxial silicene on Ag(111) surfaces have been systematically investigated using first-principles calculations combined with experimental scanning tunneling microscope (STM) observations. The STM signatures for various defects in epitaxial silicene on Ag(111) surface are identified. In particular, the formation energies of point defects in Ag(111)-supported silicene sheets show an interesting dependence on the superstructures, which, in turn, may have implications for controlling the defect density during the synthesis of silicene. Through estimating the concentrations of various point defects in different silicene superstructures, the mystery of the defective appearance of \\sqrt{13}× \\sqrt{13} and 2\\sqrt{3}× 2\\sqrt{3} silicene in experiments is revealed, and 4 × 4 silicene sheet is thought to be the most suitable structure for future device applications.

  8. Native point defects in GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Kujala, J.; Segercrantz, N.; Tuomisto, F.; Slotte, J.

    2014-10-14

    We have applied positron annihilation spectroscopy to study native point defects in Te-doped n-type and nominally undoped p-type GaSb single crystals. The results show that the dominant vacancy defect trapping positrons in bulk GaSb is the gallium monovacancy. The temperature dependence of the average positron lifetime in both p- and n-type GaSb indicates that negative ion type defects with no associated open volume compete with the Ga vacancies. Based on comparison with theoretical predictions, these negative ions are identified as Ga antisites. The concentrations of these negatively charged defects exceed the Ga vacancy concentrations nearly by an order of magnitude. We conclude that the Ga antisite is the native defect responsible for p-type conductivity in GaSb single crystals.

  9. Photosensitive Point Defects in Optical Glasses: Science and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, B.G. Jr.; Simmons-Potter, K.

    1999-07-28

    The understanding and manipulation of the point defect structure in oxide glasses have been critical to the enhanced performance and reliability of optical-fiber-based, photosensitive photonic devices that currently found widespread application in telecommunications and remote sensing technologies. We provide a brief review of past research investigating photosensitive mechanisms in germanosilicate glasses, the primary material system used in telecommunications fibers. This discussion motivates an overview of ongoing work within our laboratories to migrate photosensitive glass technologies to a planar format for integrated photonic applications. Using reactive-atmosphere, RF-magnetron sputtering, we have demonstrated control of glass defect structure during synthesis, thereby controlling both the material photosensitivity (i. e. dispersion and magnitude of the refractive index change) and its environmental stability.

  10. Point Defects Creation by Swift Heavy Ion Irradiation Induced Low Energy Electrons in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-y} through Dissociative Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, R.; Mishra, N. C.; John, J.; Behera, D.; Kanjilal, D.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2008-10-23

    Our in-situ temperature dependent resistance studies in a set of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-y}(YBCO) thin films irradiated with 200 MeV Ag ions at 79 K show that in addition to amorphized latent tracks, a large concentration of point defects are created by the secondary electrons emitted radially from the ion path. Detailed calculation of the energetics indicates that in the YBCO matrix, these secondary electrons cannot create defect by direct elastic knock-on process. We propose an inelastic interaction of the secondary electrons with the YBCO matrix, which results into defect creation by a process similar to dissociative recombination. Our study shows that accumulation of point defects during irradiation is accompanied by self-organization of point defect into clustering and phase segregation.

  11. Elastic interaction of point defects in cubic and hexagonal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.; Telyatnik, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    The elastic interaction of two point defects in cubic and hexagonal structures has been considered. On the basis of the exact expression for the tensor Green's function of the elastic field obtained by the Lifschitz-Rozentsveig for a hexagonal medium, an exact formula for the interaction energy of two point defects has been obtained. The solution is represented as a function of the angle of their relative position on the example of semiconductors such as III-nitrides and α-SiC. For the cubic medium, the solution is found on the basis of the Lifschitz-Rozentsveig Green's tensors corrected by Ostapchuk, in the weak-anisotropy approximation. It is proven that the calculation of the interaction energy by the original Lifschitz-Rozentsveig Green's tensor leads to the opposite sign of the energy. On the example of the silicon crystal, the approximate solution is compared with the numerical solution, which is represented as an approximation by a series of spherical harmonics. The range of applicability of the continual approach is estimated by the quantum mechanical calculation of the lattice Green's function.

  12. Density functional calculations of point defects in InAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan; Schultz, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Standard semilocal density functionals do not generate a gap in the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues for InAs, a semiconductor with an experimental gap of 0.4 eV. Without a theoretical band gap, it becomes difficult to identify, specify, and characterize pure localized states of point defects with energy levels within the experimental band gap. The bulk band gap problem can be alleviated with screened hybrid density functionals, such as the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) functional, that open the generalized Kohn-Sham eigenvalue gap of InAs to near the experimental value. However, even without a Kohn-Sham gap, the local moment countercharge (LMCC) method [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 246401 (2006)] is able to predict charge transition energy levels of localized defect states, using standard semi-local functionals. We present an LMCC-based study of standard point defects in InAs using semilocal density functionals and compare the results to HSE-based calculations to assess the validity of LMCC calculations in this situation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Field-Induced Point Defect Redistribution in Metal Oxides: Mesoscopic Length Scale Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moballegh, Ali

    The spatial redistribution of charged point defects under direct-current (DC) biasing can have significant implications for electroceramic device performance and lifetime. The transport behavior of point defects is regulated by the boundary conditions of the electrodes, which can block electronic charge and/or ion transfer across the interface to varying degrees. When the electrodes are impermeable to mass transport, there will be an accumulation of point defects in the near-electrode region that can lead to significant modifications in the local electronic carrier concentrations. Such defect redistribution is responsible for the long-term increases in leakage current in many capacitor devices via modification of the interface Schottky barrier at the reverse-biased cathode. While this leakage current enhancement is detrimental in capacitor devices, the phenomenon of lattice defect migration can be utilized to form novel functional behaviors, such as resistive switching in metal-oxides via modulation of the Schottky barrier or formation of nonstoichiometric filaments oriented along the applied field direction. The present work aims to understand the phenomenon of defect redistribution as a function of the initial defect chemistry state and electrode boundary conditions under the degradation process, using single-crystal rutile TiO 2 as a model material. Experiments are performed as a function of degradation voltage and crystallographic orientation since the self-diffusion coefficients of oxygen vacancies and titanium interstitials are known to be highly anisotropic in rutile. Rutile single crystals are equilibrated at specific oxygen partial pressures and temperatures to define the initial defect chemistry state. Platinum electrodes, which form Schottky contacts and are largely impermeable to oxygen transfer, are deposited on opposite faces of the crystal. The samples are then subjected to up to 200 V/cm electric field at 200¢ªC while the leakage current is

  14. Theoretical investigation of thermodynamic stability and mobility of the intrinsic point defects in Ti3AC2 (A = Si, Al).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiemin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jingyang; Zhou, Yanchun

    2015-04-14

    Nano-laminated Ti3AC2 (A = Si, Al) are highlighted as nuclear materials for a generation IV (GIV) reactor because they show high tolerance to radiation damage and remain crystalline under irradiation of high fluence heavy ions. In this paper, the energetics of formation and migration of intrinsic point defects are predicted by density functional theory calculations. We find that the space near the A atomic plane acts as a point defect sink and can accommodate lattice disorder. The migration energy barriers of Si/Al vacancy and TiSi anti-site defects along the atomic plane A are in the range of 0.3 to 0.9 eV, indicating their high mobility and the fast recovery of Si/Al Frenkel defects and Ti-A antisite pairs after irradiation. This layered structure induced large disorder accommodation and fast defect recovery must play an important role in the micro-structural response of Ti3AC2 to irradiation. PMID:25749398

  15. Autonomous basin climbing method with sampling of multiple transition pathways: application to anisotropic diffusion of point defects in hcp Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Yip, Sidney; Yildiz, Bilge

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents an extension of the autonomous basin climbing (ABC) method, an atomistic activation-relaxation technique for sampling transition-state pathways. The extended algorithm (ABC-E) allows the sampling of multiple transition pathways from a given minimum, with the additional feature of identifying the pathways in the order of increasing activation barriers, thereby prioritizing them according to their importance in the kinetics. Combined with on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo calculations, the method is applied to simulate the anisotropic diffusion of point defects in hcp Zr. Multiple migration mechanisms are identified for both the interstitials and vacancies, and benchmarked against results from other methods in the literature. The self-interstitial atom (SIA) diffusion kinetics shows a maximum anisotropy at intermediate temperatures (400~700 K), a non-monotonic behavior that we explain to originate from the stabilities and migration mechanisms associated with different SIA sites. The accuracy of the ABC-E calculations is validated, in part, by the existing results in the literature for point defect diffusion in hcp Zr, and by benchmarking against analytical results on a hypothetical rough-energy landscape. Lastly, sampling prioritization and computational efficiency are demonstrated through a direct comparison between the ABC-E and the activation relaxation technique.

  16. Thermal stability of irradiation-induced point defects in cubic silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Jeremie; Esnouf, Stephane; Petite, Guillaume; Costantini, Jean-Marc

    2009-10-15

    This work aims specifically at studying the evolution of point defects induced by electron irradiation in the cubic polytype of SiC (3C-SiC) at temperatures ranging from 10 to 1450 K by means of photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. We identified a first annealing stage between 200 and 245 K, which probably results from migration of interstitials in the carbon sublattice. Moreover, we confirmed the high thermal stability of defect-related PL signals up to about 1100 K and calculated the activation energies associated with their annihilation. Finally, we studied the effect of a high temperature treatment at 1400 K on the D{sub I} center PL intensity in a single-crystal sample irradiated by electrons below the threshold displacement energy of the silicon sublattice. This allows checking the relevance of recent defect models based upon the migration of atoms in the carbon sublattice during the irradiation process. We conclude that the D{sub I} center does not involve the silicon vacancy and could be assigned to an isolated silicon antisite Si{sub C}.

  17. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A. M.; Mosca, H. O.

    2014-11-01

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure.

  18. A first principles investigation of point defects in monolayer, few-layer, and bulk WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wun-Fan; Fang, Changming; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Huis, Marijn A.; Soft Condensed Matter Team

    We present the results of a systematic study of physics of point defects in 2D WS2 materials conducted by means of density functional theory. First, we investigate the physics of point defects in monolayer (ML) WS2. Second, we examine the impact of point defects on the physical properties of multi-layer defective WS2 as a function of slab thickness. The studied point defects are: monovacancies, interstitials and anti-sites, and the considered physical properties include local geometry, defect formation energy, electronic structure and magnetism. Van der Waals interaction, spin-polarization and spin-orbit coupling effects are also incorporated in the calculations to ensure accurate results. In a ML WS2, we predict that IS is the most favorable defect inside WS2 having a low formation energy of 1.21 eV. WS and WS2 anti-sites result in a total magnetic moment of 2 μB. By studying ML, few-layer (up to 4 layers), and bulk WS2 slabs we find that, all point defects cause only localized perturbation, thus have little influence on the thickness-dependent evolution of the physical properties. The depth-dependence of the defect formation energy is also found: VS prefers to stay on the surface, while VW prefers the slab center. This work is supported by the Dutch Science Foundation NWO, VIDI Grant (Grant Nr. 723.012.006).

  19. Hydrogen interactions with intrinsic point defects in hydrogen permeation barrier of α-Al₂O₃: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guikai; Lu, Yongjie; Wang, Xiaolin

    2014-09-01

    It is crucial to understand hydrogen interactions with intrinsic point defects in the hydrogen permeation barrier (HPB) of α-Al2O3, finding underlying reasons for the not-so-low H-permeability of the barrier, and thereby produce samples with tailored defects for optimal performance. Using density functional theory (DFT), the formation energies of intrinsic point defects in an α-Al2O3 lattice, including extrinsic H-related defects (H(i), V(Al)-H complex, HO(i) and H(O)), in all possible charged states, are first calculated under HPB working conditions, to determine the dominant basic defect species for hydrogen. We find that the stable forms of H-related defects in α-Al2O3 are charged H interstitials (H(i)(q), where q is the charge state of the defect) and hydrogenation of the bulk V(Al)(3-) ([V(Al)(3-)-H(+)](q)), under hydrogen-rich conditions. As the system reaches equilibrium, H in α-Al2O3 is mainly present in the H(i)(+) state, and preferentially exists in the form of [V(Al)(3-)-H(+)] and H(O)(+). Migration processes of the dominant defects are further investigated, predicting that H(i)(+) is the predominant diffusion species in α-Al2O3. [V(Al)(3-)-H(+)](2-) and H(O)(+) can release trapped hydrogen during high temperature annealing, contributing to the H-transport in α-Al2O3. The formation energy is much higher than the migration energy for H(i)(+), suggesting that the migration of H(i)(+) is the bottleneck for creating low enough H-permeation in α-Al2O3, and corresponding strategies for optimum H-suppressing performance for an α-Al2O3 HPB are proposed. PMID:25026027

  20. Half-Integer Point Defects in the Q-Tensor Theory of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fratta, G.; Robbins, J. M.; Slastikov, V.; Zarnescu, A.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate prototypical profiles of point defects in two-dimensional liquid crystals within the framework of Landau-de Gennes theory. Using boundary conditions characteristic of defects of index k/2, we find a critical point of the Landau-de Gennes energy that is characterised by a system of ordinary differential equations. In the deep nematic regime, b^2 small, we prove that this critical point is the unique global minimiser of the Landau-de Gennes energy. For the case b^2=0, we investigate in greater detail the regime of vanishing elastic constant L → 0, where we obtain three explicit point defect profiles, including the global minimiser.

  1. Interaction of intrinsic point defects with dislocation stress fields in hcp zirconium crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, V. M. Chulkin, D. A.; Sivak, A. B.

    2010-01-15

    The crystallographic, energetic, and kinetic characteristics of intrinsic point defects (vacancy-self-interstitial atom) in stable, metastable, and saddle configurations in hcp zirconium crystal have been calculated by the molecular-statics method. The spatial dependences of the interaction energies of intrinsic point defects and stress fields of rectilinear dislocations with Burgers vectors of 1/3[112 bar 0], 1/3 [112 bar 3], and [0001] have been found within the anisotropic linear theory of elasticity. The most likely trajectories of intrinsic point defects in dislocation stress fields (trajectories with minimum energy barriers for motion) have been constructed. Such trajectories result in dislocation only for the interaction of self-interstitial atoms with an edge dislocation that has a Burgers vector of 1/3 [112 bar 3].

  2. A point defect model for nickel electrode structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyselle, Patricia L.; Karjala, Philip J.; Cornilsen, Bahne C.

    1986-01-01

    The Raman spectra for nickel electrode active mass indicate a single formula-unit crystallographic unit cell of the layered NiOOH-type. Empirical stoichiometric formulas require that extensive point defects, cation dopants and nickel vacancies, be incorporated on nickel sites. Structural differences between the alpha/gamma and beta/beta cycles, and the influence of cobalt addition on the structure will be discussed in terms of the point defect model. Other empirical data supporting the point defect model will be considered.

  3. Influence of point defects on grain boundary diffusion in oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Stubican, V.S.

    1991-03-15

    The influence of point defects on grain boundary diffusion of Co ions in NiO was studied using polycrystalline films and bicrystals. Grain boundary diffusion was studied at 750 C at oxygen partial pressure. Two diffusion regions were found. At low oxygen pressures, extrinsic diffusion was observed. Above oxygen pressure of 10{sup {minus}7}, influence of intrinsic point defects was detected. It was determined that grain boundary diffusion was > 3 orders of magnitude faster than volume diffusion. However, it seems that grain boundary diffusion is influenced by the point defects in a similar way as the volume diffusion. 4 figs.

  4. First-principles study of point defects in an fcc Fe-10Ni-20Cr model alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piochaud, J. B.; Klaver, T. P. C.; Adjanor, G.; Olsson, P.; Domain, C.; Becquart, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the local environment on vacancy and self-interstitial formation energies has been investigated in a face-centered-cubic (fcc) Fe-10Ni-20Cr model alloy by analyzing an extensive set of first-principle calculations based on density functional theory. Chemical disorder has been considered by designing special quasirandom structures and four different collinear magnetic structures have been investigated in order to determine a relevant reference state to perform point defect calculations at 0 K. Two different convergence methods have also been used to characterize the importance of the method on the results. Although our fcc Fe-10Ni-20Cr would be better represented in terms of applications by the paramagnetic state, we found that the antiferromagnetic single-layer magnetic structure was the most stable at 0 K and we chose it as a reference state to determine the point defect properties. Point defects have been introduced in this reference state, i.e., vacancies and Fe-Fe, Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr, Cr-Cr, Ni-Ni, and Ni-Cr dumbbell interstitials oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the single layer antiferromagnetic planes. Each point defect studied was introduced at different lattice sites to consider a sufficient variety of local environments and analyze its influence on the formation energy values. We have estimated the point defect formation energies with linear regressions using variables which describe the local environment surrounding the point defects. The number and the position of Ni and Cr first nearest neighbors to the point defects were found to drive the evolution of the formation energies. In particular, Ni is found to decrease and Cr to increase the vacancy formation energy of the model alloy, while the opposite trends are found for the dumbbell interstitials. This study suggested that, to a first approximation, the first nearest atoms to point defects can provide reliable estimates of point defect formation energies.

  5. Phase-operation for conduction electron by atomic-scale scattering via single point-defect

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Katsumi Yaginuma, Shin; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2014-03-17

    In order to propose a phase-operation technique for conduction electrons in solid, we have investigated, using scanning tunneling microscopy, an atomic-scale electron-scattering phenomenon on a 2D subband state formed in Si. Particularly, we have noticed a single surface point-defect around which a standing-wave pattern created, and a dispersion of scattering phase-shifts by the defect-potential against electron-energy has been measured. The behavior is well-explained with appropriate scattering parameters: the potential height and radius. This result experimentally proves that the atomic-scale potential scattering via the point defect enables phase-operation for conduction electrons.

  6. Effect of point defects and disorder on structural phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Toulouse, J.

    1997-06-01

    Since the beginning in 1986, the object of this project has been Structural Phase Transitions (SPT) in real as opposed to ideal materials. The first stage of the study has been centered around the role of Point Defects in SPT`s. Our intent was to use the previous knowledge we had acquired in the study of point defects in non-transforming insulators and apply it to the study of point defects in insulators undergoing phase transitions. In non-transforming insulators, point defects, in low concentrations, marginally affect the bulk properties of the host. It is nevertheless possible by resonance or relaxation methods to study the point defects themselves via their local motion. In transforming solids, however, close to a phase transition, atomic motions become correlated over very large distances; there, even point defects far removed from one another can undergo correlated motions which may strongly affect the transition behavior of the host. Near a structural transition, the elastic properties win be most strongly affected so as to either raise or decrease the transition temperature, prevent the transition from taking place altogether, or simply modify its nature and the microstructure or domain structure of the resulting phase. One of the well known practical examples is calcium-stabilized zirconia in which the high temperature cubic phase is stabilized at room temperature with greatly improved mechanical properties.

  7. Point defects in the NiAl(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Lerch, D; Dössel, K; Hammer, L; Müller, S

    2009-04-01

    The stability of various point defects in NiAl(100) has been investigated by first-principles calculations. For Al-rich surfaces, Ni vacancies within the first Al layer are energetically most favourable. For Ni-rich surfaces, so-called double defects, consisting of both Ni-antisite atom in the first Al layer and a Ni vacancy within the second Ni layer, form the configuration of lowest energy, superior to singular Ni antisites. An additional and significant energy gain is found in both cases by mutual lateral interaction of the defects, when they are arranged in the diagonal direction. Respective [Formula: see text] ordered configurations were found as the most stable structures. A 50:50 mixture of both defect types turns out to be even lower in energy than the ideal Al-terminated NiAl(100) surface, proving the latter to be metastable only. This is in line with the often reported inability in experiments to prepare ideal NiAl(100) surfaces. PMID:21817482

  8. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-01

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion paths and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. This study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

  9. Vibrational contributions to the stability of point defects in bcc iron: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, G.; Schäublin, R.

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the modes of vibration of the self-interstitial atoms and the vacancy in bcc iron and to estimate how the vibrational properties can affect the stability of these defects. The phonon density of states of the vacancy and the self-interstitials have been calculated within the quasi harmonic approximation using density functional theory calculations. It was observed that self-interstitial atoms have several localized high frequency modes of vibration related to the stretching of the dumbbell bond, but also soft modes favoring their migration. From the phonon density of states, the vibrational contributions to the free energy have been estimated for finite temperatures. Results are compared to previous work performed by others using empirical potentials. We found a rather large formation entropy for the vacancy, SVf = 4.08 kB. Our results show that the vibrational entropy can have a significant influence on the formation of the point defects even at moderate temperature. Possible consequences on the mobility of these defects are also discussed.

  10. Role of silicon surface in the removal of point defects in ultra-shallow junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Sultan, A.; Banerjee, S.; List, S.; Rodder, M.

    1996-12-31

    The role of the Si surface in the annihilation of point defects has been studied for ultra-shallow p{sup +}/n junctions. The dopant and defect distributions for low energy implants lie within a few hundred Angstroms of the surface. The proximity of the Si surface has been shown to help in the efficient removal of point defects for the shallower junctions. A 5 keV, 1{times}10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} BF{sub 2} implant and a 30 keV, 3.3{times}10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} BF{sub 2} implant were estimated to create comparable damage at different depths. After identical anneals, the higher energy implant sample showed end-of-range dislocation loops in cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis, while the low energy sample, for which the point defect distribution was closer to the surface, was defect-free. This is attributed to the role of the Si surface as an efficient sink for the removal of point defects.

  11. Point Defects in Nematic Gels: The Case for Hedgehogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolbow, John; Fried, Eliot; Shen, Amy Q.

    2005-07-01

    We address the question of whether a nematic gel is capable of sustaining a radially-symmetric point defect (or, hedgehog). We consider the special case of a gel cross-linked in a state where the mesogens are randomly aligned, and study the behavior of a spherical specimen with boundary subjected to a uniform radial displacement. For simplicity, we allow only for distortions in which the chain conformation is uniaxial with constant chain anisotropy and, thus, is determined by a unit director field. Further, we use the particular free-energy density function arising from the neo-classical molecular-statistical description of nematic gels. We find that the potential energy of the specimen is a nonconvex function of the boundary displacement and chain anisotropy. In particular, whenever the displacement of the specimen boundary involves a relative radial expansion in excess of 0.35, which is reasonably mild for gel-like substances, the theory predicts an energetic preference for states involving a hedgehog at the center of the specimen. Under such conditions, states in which the chain anisotropy is either oblate or prolate have total free-energy less than that of an isotropic comparison state. However, the oblate alternative always provides the global minimum of the total free-energy. The Cauchy stress associated with an energetically-preferred hedgehog is found to vanish in a relatively large region surrounding the hedgehog. The radial component of Cauchy stress is tensile and exhibits a non-monotonic character with a peak value an order of magnitude less than what would be observed in a specimen consisting of a comparable isotropic gel. The hoop component of Cauchy stress is also non-monotonic, but, as opposed to being purely tensile, goes between a tensile maximum to a compressive minimum at the specimen boundary.

  12. Point defect weakened thermal contraction in monolayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zha, Xian-Hu; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Lin, Zijing

    2014-08-14

    We investigate the thermal expansion behaviors of monolayer graphene and three configurations of graphene with point defects, namely the replacement of one carbon atom with a boron or nitrogen atom, or of two neighboring carbon atoms by boron-nitrogen atoms, based on calculations using first-principles density functional theory. It is found that the thermal contraction of monolayer graphene is significantly decreased by point defects. Moreover, the corresponding temperature for negative linear thermal expansion coefficient with the maximum absolute value is reduced. The cause is determined to be point defects that enhance the mechanical strength of graphene and then reduce the amplitude and phonon frequency of the out-of-plane acoustic vibration mode. Such defect weakening of graphene thermal contraction will be useful in nanotechnology to diminish the mismatching or strain between the graphene and its substrate.

  13. Study of Near-Neighbor Structure of Point Defects in α-FE by Displacement Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Lu; Liu, Wei; Wu, Xuebang; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.; Huang, Qun-Ying; Wu, Y. C.

    2012-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the primary damage formation in α-Fe by collision cascades in the recoil energy range 0.5-20 keV. Two near-neighbor analysis methods including the near-neighbor defect density (NPDD) analysis and cluster analysis were introduced to characterize the spatial aggregation of point defects and the morphologies of clusters, respectively. It is found that the NPDD of self-interstitial atom (SIA) and the number of Frenkel pairs show a similar variation trend, while the NPDD of vacancy exhibits a peak at shorter time than that of SIA. Furthermore, we find that the clusters of point defects exist mostly in the form of chainlike structure in the course and the end of cascades, but the proportion of chainlike clusters decreases with increasing the number of point defects included in one cluster. Therefore, the present methods are found to be effective to characterize the aggregation and the near-neighbor structure of point defects by displacement cascades at any time.

  14. Identifying radiation induced point defect in SiC nanowires: computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uu, Ming

    SiC nanowires (NWs) are expected to possess higher radiation tolerance compared to their crystalline counterpart due to their efficiency in eliminating point defects generated by the radiations. In this study, we will develop a computational modeling scheme to identify the radiation induced point defects in SiC NWs. A preliminary study on the hexagonal 2H-SiC NWs has demonstrated that the point defects on the surface of the SiC NWs only create local distortions and will not cause the destruction of the entire structure of the SiC NWs. It is also found that the local strain created by the antisite, the C-vacancy, and the Si-interstitial defects induces a few impurity states inside the energy gap, while defects such as the Si-vacancy and C-interstitial defects tend to produce a small tail at the top of the valence band. These observations suggest that the electronic properties of the SiC NWs will not be affected to any great extent by these types of points defects on the surface of the SiC NWs, and therefore the SiC NWs are expected to be tolerant or resistant responding to these types of radiation effect.

  15. Point defects in Cd(Zn)Te and TlBr: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lordi, Vincenzo

    2013-09-01

    The effects of various crystal defects on the performances of CdTe, CdZnxTe (CZT), and TlBr for room-temperature high-energy radiation detection are examined using first-principles theoretical methods. The predictive, parameter-free, atomistic approaches used provide fundamental understanding of defect properties that are difficult to measure and also allow rapid screening of possibilities for material engineering, such as optimal doping and annealing conditions. Several recent examples from the author's work are reviewed, including: (i) accurate calculations of the thermodynamic and electronic properties of native point defects and point defect complexes in CdTe and CZT; (ii) the effects of Zn alloying on the native point defect properties in CZT; (iii) point defect diffusion and binding leading to Te clustering in Cd(Zn)Te; (iv) the profound effect of native point defects—principally vacancies—on the intrinsic material properties of TlBr, particularly its electronic and ionic conductivity; and (v) a study on doping TlBr to independently control the electronic and ionic conductivity.

  16. Energetics of point defects in {gamma}-TiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, S.; Mohandas, E.; Raghunathan, V.S.

    1996-02-15

    {gamma}TiAl has been receiving a great deal of attention in recent times owing to its industrial importance. This structural intermetallic is a candidate material for high temperature aerospace applications. Therefore, a study of point defect properties is useful in elucidating its physical metallurgy. In this brief communication, the authors discuss the vacancy and antisite defect properties of {gamma}-TiAl.

  17. Point Defects in CdZnTe Crystals Grown by Different Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gul, R.; Bolotnikov, A.; Kim, H.K.; Rodriguez, R.; Keeter, K.; Li, Z.; Gu, G.; and James, R.B.

    2011-02-02

    We studied, by current deep-level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS), point defects in CdZnTe detectors grown by different techniques. We identified 12 different traps with energy levels from 7 meV to 1.1 eV. Although the levels of most of the identified defects were independent of the crystal growth techniques, nevertheless there were some associated differences in the traps energies and densities.

  18. Point Defects in CdZnTe Crystals Grown by Different Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    R Gul; A Bolotnikov; H Kim; R Rodriguez; K Keeter; Z Li; G Gu; R James

    2011-12-31

    We studied, by current deep-level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS), point defects in CdZnTe detectors grown by different techniques. We identified 12 different traps with energy levels from 7 meV to 1.1 eV. Although the levels of most of the identified defects were independent of the crystal growth techniques, nevertheless there were some associated differences in the traps energies and densities.

  19. Role of point defects in optical damage of nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scripsick, Michael P.; Edwards, Gary J.

    1993-07-01

    We have initiated a program at West Virginia University to establish the properties of point defects that are relevant to the optical damage phenomena in KTP, BBO, and LBO crystals. Defects have been characterized using optical absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), and luminescence techniques. Among the defects which have been observed are impurity ions (iron, platinum, hydrogen, etc.), trapped hole centers, and trapped electron centers.

  20. Time scale for point-defect equilibration in nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, Paul C.; Wolf, Dieter; Desai, Tapan; Yamakov, Vesselin

    2008-10-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations of high-temperature annealing are performed on nanostructured materials enabling direct observation of vacancy emission from planar defects (i.e., grain boundaries and free surfaces) to populate the initially vacancy-free grain interiors on a subnanosecond time scale. We demonstrate a universal time-length scale correlation that governs these re-equilibration processes, suggesting that nanostructures are particularly stable against perturbations in their point-defect concentrations, caused for example by particle irradiation or temperature fluctuations.

  1. Energetics of intrinsic point defects in ZrSiO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Pruneda, J.M.; Artacho, Emilio

    2005-03-01

    Using first principles calculations we have studied the formation energies, electron and hole affinities, and electronic levels of intrinsic point defects in zircon. The atomic structures of charged interstitials, vacancies, Frenkel pairs, and antisite defects are obtained. The limit of high concentration of point defects, relevant for the use of this material in nuclear waste immobilization, was studied with a variable lattice relaxation that can simulate the swelling induced by radiation damage. The limit of low concentration of defects is simulated with larger cells and fixed lattice parameters. Using known band offset values at the interface of zircon with silicon, we analyze the foreseeable effect of the defects on the electronic properties of zircon used as gate in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices.

  2. A theoretical study of intrinsic point defects and defect clusters in magnesium aluminate spinel.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, C A; Smith, R; Kenny, S D; Murphy, S T; Grimes, R W; Ball, J A

    2009-07-01

    Point and small cluster defects in magnesium aluminate spinel have been studied from a first principles viewpoint. Typical point defects that occur during collision cascade simulations are cation anti-site defects, which have a small formation energy and are very stable, O and Mg split interstitials and vacancies. Isolated Al interstitials were found to be energetically unfavourable but could occur as part of a split Mg-Al pair or as a three atom-three vacancy Al 'ring' defect, previously observed in collision cascades using empirical potentials. The structure and energetics of the defects were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared to simulations using empirical fixed charge potentials. Each point defect was studied in a variety of supercell sizes in order to ensure convergence. It was found that empirical potential simulations significantly overestimate formation energies, but that the type and relative stability of the defects are well predicted by the empirical potentials both for point defects and small defect clusters. PMID:21828490

  3. A theoretical study of intrinsic point defects and defect clusters in magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, C. A.; Smith, R.; Kenny, S. D.; Murphy, S. T.; Grimes, R. W.; Ball, J. A.

    2009-07-01

    Point and small cluster defects in magnesium aluminate spinel have been studied from a first principles viewpoint. Typical point defects that occur during collision cascade simulations are cation anti-site defects, which have a small formation energy and are very stable, O and Mg split interstitials and vacancies. Isolated Al interstitials were found to be energetically unfavourable but could occur as part of a split Mg-Al pair or as a three atom-three vacancy Al 'ring' defect, previously observed in collision cascades using empirical potentials. The structure and energetics of the defects were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared to simulations using empirical fixed charge potentials. Each point defect was studied in a variety of supercell sizes in order to ensure convergence. It was found that empirical potential simulations significantly overestimate formation energies, but that the type and relative stability of the defects are well predicted by the empirical potentials both for point defects and small defect clusters.

  4. Impact of point defects on electronic structure in Y2Ti2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Haiyan; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J

    2012-01-01

    With many technologies and applications downscaling to nanometer dimensions, the influence of single point defects on electronic structure has shown increasingly profound impact on optical and electrical properties, and advancing fundamental understanding is critical to defect engineering and control of materials properties. In the present study, first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) are carried out to study the effects of Ti point defects on the electronic structure of Y2Ti2O7. In the literature, it has been demonstrated that conventional DFT tends to produce delocalized holes and electrons in defective oxide materials due to insufficient cancellation of the self-interaction energy and underestimation of the band gap, which results in an incorrect description of the electronic structure of the system. In an effort to better understand the accuracy of DFT in describing the behavior of Y2Ti2O7 with point defects, the calculated results obtained from using DFT and DFT+U methods are compared, including the geometrical distortion, the localization of the defect states and the position of the defect levels in the band gap. Using DFT, distorted geometries around the Ti vacancy and interstitial are found, along with localized oxygen holes and Ti electrons, both of which compare well with the DFT+U results, suggesting that the conventional DFT can be used to describe the localization of the Ti defects in Y2Ti2O7. One major difference in the DFT and DFT+U calculations is the energy position of the defect levels, for which DFT+U results in the states positioned deep in the band gap. Since the DFT+U method suffers from the dependence of the results on the empirical parameter U and no experimental results on the energy position of the defect states are available to tune this U value, care must be taken in applying DFT+U to electronic structure calculations of Y2Ti2O7 with point defects. Based on the DFT method, the most preferred charge state

  5. Impact of Point Defects on Electronic Structure in Y₂Ti₂O₇

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2012-06-13

    With many technologies and applications downscaling to nanometer dimensions, the influence of single point defects on electronic structure has shown an increasingly profound impact on optical and electrical properties, and advancing fundamental understanding is critical to defect engineering and control of materials properties. In the present study, first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) are carried out to study the effects of Ti point defects on the electronic structure of Y₂Ti₂O₇. In the literature, it has been demonstrated that conventional DFT tends to produce delocalized holes and electrons in defective oxide materials due to insufficient cancellation of the self-interaction energy and underestimation of the band gap, which results in an incorrect description of the electronic structure of the system. In an effort to better understand the accuracy of DFT in describing the behavior of Y₂Ti₂O₇ with point defects, the calculated results obtained from DFT and DFT+U methods are compared, including the geometrical distortion, the localization of the defect states and the position of the defect levels in the band gap. Using DFT, distorted geometries around the Ti vacancy and interstitial are found, along with localized oxygen holes and Ti electrons, both of which compare well with the DFT+U results, suggesting that the conventional DFT can be used to describe the localization of the Ti defects in Y₂Ti₂O₇. One major difference in the DFT and DFT+U calculations is the energy position of the defect levels, for which DFT+U results in the states positioned deep in the band gap. Since the DFT+U method suffers from the dependence of the results on the empirical parameter U and no experimental results on the energy position of the defect states are available to tune this U value, care must be taken in applying DFT+U to electronic structure calculations of Y₂Ti₂O₇ with point defects. Based on the DFT method, the most

  6. Multiscale modeling of point defects in Si-Ge(001) quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.; Tewary, V. K.

    2007-04-01

    A computationally efficient hybrid Green's function (GF) technique is developed for multiscale modeling of point defects in a trilayer lattice system that links seamlessly the length scales from lattice (subnanometers) to continuum (bulk). The model accounts for the discrete structure of the lattice including nonlinear effects at the atomistic level and full elastic anisotropy at the continuum level. The model is applied to calculate the discrete core structure of point defects (vacancies and substitutional impurities) in Si-Ge(001) quantum wells (QWs) that are of contemporary technological interest. Numerical results are presented for the short range and long range lattice distortions and strains in the lattice caused by the defects and their formation energy and Kanzaki forces that are basic characteristics of the defects. The continuum and the lattice GFs of the material system are used to link the different length scales, which enables us to model the point defects and extended defects such as the quantum well in a unified formalism. Nonlinear effects in the core of the point defects are taken into account by using an iterative scheme. The Tersoff potential is used to set up the lattice structure, compute the unrelaxed forces and force constants in the lattice, and derive the elastic constants required for the continuum GF. It is found that the overall elastic properties of the material and the properties of defects vary considerably when the material is strained from the bulk to the QW state. This change in the defect properties is very significant and can provide a characteristic signature of the defect. For example, in the case of a single vacancy in Ge, the strain reverses the sign of the relaxation volume. It is also found that the defect properties, such as the defect core structures, change abruptly across a Ge/Si interface. The transition occurs over a region extending from two to four lattice constants, depending upon the defect species.

  7. Reversal of helicoidal twist handedness near point defects of confined chiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Paul J.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-05-01

    Handedness of the director twist in cholesteric liquid crystals is commonly assumed to be the same throughout the medium, determined solely by the chirality of constituent molecules or chiral additives, albeit distortions of the ground-state helicoidal configuration often arise due to the effects of confinement and external fields. We directly probe the twist directionality of liquid crystal director structures through experimental three-dimensional imaging and numerical minimization of the elastic free energy and show that spatially localized regions of handedness opposite to that of the chiral liquid crystal ground state can arise in the proximity of twisted-soliton-bound topological point defects. In chiral nematic liquid crystal confined to a film that has a thickness less than the cholesteric pitch and perpendicular surface boundary conditions, twisted solitonic structures embedded in a uniform unwound far-field background with chirality-matched handedness locally relieve confinement-imposed frustration and tend to be accompanied by point defects and smaller geometry-required, energetically costly regions of opposite twist handedness. We also describe a spatially localized structure, dubbed a "twistion," in which a twisted solitonic three-dimensional director configuration is accompanied by four point defects. We discuss how our findings may impinge on the stability of localized particlelike director field configurations in chiral and nonchiral liquid crystals.

  8. Theoretical and positron annihilation study of point defects in intermetallic compound Ni{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Sun; Dongliang Lin

    1994-01-01

    The equilibrium equation of point defects in Ll{sub 2} types of intermetallic compounds was established in a new simple method, which is independent of the chemical potentials. The formation energies of the relevant point defects in Ni{sub 3}Al were calculated by EAM potentials and statical relaxations. The concentration of point defects at 1,000 K as a function of bulk composition and the effect of temperature on them were studied for Ni{sub 3}Al alloy. The results show that the Al-antisites are the constitutional defects in hypostoichiometric Ni{sub 3}Al, and the Ni-antisite defects in hyperstoichiometric Ni{sub 3}Al. The two types of vacancies belong to thermal defects. The positron annihilation technique was also conducted to measure the concentration of vacancies in Ni{sub 3}Al alloys with and without boron. Although vacancies interact with the boron dopant, the changes of vacancy concentration Ni{sub 3}Al alloys can not be considered as the main reason in explaining the effect of stoichiometry on the segregation of boron. The effect of stoichiometry on diffusion in Ni{sub 3}Al alloys was discussed additionally.

  9. Point defect balance in epitaxial GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Segercrantz, N. Slotte, J.; Makkonen, I.; Kujala, J.; Tuomisto, F.; Song, Y.; Wang, S.

    2014-08-25

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy in both conventional and coincidence Doppler broadening mode is used for studying the effect of growth conditions on the point defect balance in GaSb:Bi epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Positron annihilation characteristics in GaSb are also calculated using density functional theory and compared to experimental results. We conclude that while the main positron trapping defect in bulk samples is the Ga antisite, the Ga vacancy is the most prominent trap in the samples grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The results suggest that the p–type conductivity is caused by different defects in GaSb grown with different methods.

  10. Point-defect properties and sputtering events in the {100} surface of Ni3Al I. Surface and point defect properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Wengsheng; Bacon, David J; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2004-01-01

    Constant-area and fully relaxed molecular dynamics methods are employed to study the properties of the surface and point defects at and near {l_brace}001{r_brace} surfaces of bulk and thin-film Ni, Al and Ni{sub 3}Al respectively. The surface tension is larger than the surface energy for all {l_brace}001{r_brace} surfaces considered in the sequence: Al (1005 mJ m{sup -2}) < Ni{sub 3}Al (mixed Ni-Al plane outermost, 1725 mJ m{sup -2}) < Ni{sub 3}Al (all-Ni-atoms plane outermost, 1969 mJ m{sup -2}) < Ni (1993 mJ m{sup -2}). For a surface of bulk Ni{sub 3}Al crystal with a Ni-Al mixed plane outermost, Al atoms stand out by 0.0679 {angstrom} compared with the surface Ni atoms and, for the all-Ni-atoms surface, Al atoms in the second layer stand out by 0.0205 {angstrom} compared with Ni atoms in the same layer. Vacancy formation energies are about half the bulk values in the first layer and reach a maximum in the second layer where the atomic energy is close to the bulk value but the change in embedding energy of neighbouring atoms before and after vacancy formation is greater than that in the bulk. Both the vacancy formation energy and the surface tension suggest that the fourth layer is in a bulk state for all the surfaces. The formation energy of adatoms, antisite defects and point-defect pairs at and near {l_brace}001{r_brace} surfaces of Ni{sub 3}Al are also given.

  11. Collective overcoming of point defects by dislocations in the dynamic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashenko, V. V.

    2014-08-01

    A mechanism of collective overcoming of point defects by dislocations during the over-barrier slip has been proposed. It has been shown that the interaction between dislocations promotes the overcoming of point defects at a high dislocation density.

  12. Influence of point defects on grain boundary mobility in bcc tungsten.

    PubMed

    Borovikov, Valery; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Perez, Danny; Bai, Xian-Ming; Uberuaga, Blas P; Voter, Arthur F

    2013-01-23

    Atomistic computer simulations were performed to study the influence of radiation-induced damage on grain boundary (GB) sliding processes in bcc tungsten (W), the divertor material in the ITER tokamak and the leading candidate for the first wall material in future fusion reactors. In particular, we calculated the average sliding-friction force as a function of the number of point defects introduced into the GB for a number of symmetric tilt GBs. In all cases the average sliding-friction force at fixed shear strain rate depends on the number of point defects introduced into the GB, and in many cases introduction of these defects reduces the average sliding-friction force by roughly an order of magnitude. We have also observed that as the number of interstitials in the GB is varied, the direction of the coupled GB motion sometimes reverses, causing the GB to migrate in the opposite direction under the same applied shear stress. This could be important in the microstructural evolution of polycrystalline W under the harsh radiation environment in a fusion reactor, in which high internal stresses are present and frequent collision cascades generate interstitials and vacancies. PMID:23238084

  13. Stacking faults and lamellar twins with intrinsic point defects in poly-crystalline CdTe analyzed by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buurma, Christopher; Chan, Maria; Pauluaskas, Tadas; Klie, Robert; Sivananthan, Sivalingam; DOE Bridge Project Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Polycrystalline CdTe is a prominent photovoltaic material with proven industry success. To develop the next generation of thin film CdTe solar cells, higher open-circuit voltages and longer minority carrier lifetimes must be achieved. Playing a major role in doping, defect migration, recombination, and current transport are grain boundaries and other extended defects within grains of poly-crystalline CdTe. Commonly observed with STEM in CdTe are twins and stacking faults that extend throughout the entire grain. These twins can appear as lamellar repeating twins, or as single column stacking faults occurring in repetition near that of a Wurtzite structure. In this talk, we will use first principles density functional theory to investigate the thermodynamics and electronic structures such structures observed in STEM. The interaction energetics between adjacent twins and sets of twins are investigated. We will also investigate the likelihood of formation of neutral and charged native point defects in and near these extended defect structures. Binding energies of multiple point defects near such structures are also revealed. Implications towards PV efficiencies are discussed.

  14. Application of ab-initio Methods to Grain Boundaries and Point Defects for Poly-CdTe Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buurma, Christopher

    CdTe is a material well-suited to solar cell applications due to its 1.5 eV direct bandgap and high optical absorption. To meet energy demands, CdTe solar cells must be produced at a low-cost and with high throughput which often demands the use of non-ideal polycrystalline CdTe. As a result of careful process control, current thin-film poly-CdTe cells have been shown to be somewhat defect tolerant with proven industry success. Yet despite this success poly-CdTe cells are still far from their predicted Shockley-Queisser theoretical limits. The next generation cells must demonstrate higher open-circuit voltages, fill factors, and longer minority carrier lifetimes. Playing a major role in doping, defect migration, carrier recombination, and current transport are 2D extended defects both within grains and between grains as grain boundaries (GBs). A further understanding of these defects is needed which exhibit either high symmetry such as the CSL structures or those mixed or random GBs with low symmetry. Their corresponding formation and electronic behavior will be needed to develop methods to mitigate their effects and instead promote higher doping with less minority carrier recombination. Predictions and guidance on electronic and thermodynamic properties can be obtained from model atomic structures within the framework of ab-initio density-functional theory. Bulk point defect formation energies were determined for comparison to calculations of point defects along GB structures. Model atomic structures of GBs can also be created rapidly and over a wide parameter space using the Grain Boundary Genie code developed for this project. Commonly observed low-angle and special coincident grain boundaries structures were created and a subset relaxed to determine their local strain environment and interfacial energy with for comparison to STEM observations. Additionally, a series of random angle or 'mixed' grain boundaries were created and investigated corresponding to

  15. Photoluminescence as a tool for characterizing point defects in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshchikov, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Photoluminescence is one of the most powerful tools used to study optically-active point defects in semiconductors, especially in wide-bandgap materials. Gallium nitride (GaN) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have attracted considerable attention in the last two decades due to their prospects in optoelectronics applications, including blue and ultraviolet light-emitting devices. However, in spite of many years of extensive studies and a great number of publications on photoluminescence from GaN and ZnO, only a few defect-related luminescence bands are reliably identified. Among them are the Zn-related blue band in GaN, Cu-related green band and Li-related orange band in ZnO. Numerous suggestions for the identification of other luminescence bands, such as the yellow band in GaN, or green and yellow bands in ZnO, do not stand up under scrutiny. In these conditions, it is important to classify the defect-related luminescence bands and find their unique characteristics. In this presentation, we will review the origin of the major luminescence bands in GaN and ZnO. Through simulations of the temperature and excitation intensity dependences of photoluminescence and by employing phenomenological models we are able to obtain important characteristics of point defects such as carrier capture cross-sections for defects, concentrations of defects, and their charge states. These models are also used to find the absolute internal quantum efficiency of photoluminescence and obtain information about nonradiative defects. Results from photoluminescence measurements will be compared with results of the first-principle calculations, as well as with the experimental data obtained by other techniques such as positron annihilation spectroscopy, deep-level transient spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry.

  16. Surface-assisted defect engineering of point defects in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorai, Prashun; Ertekin, Elif; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2016-06-01

    Semiconductor surfaces facilitate the injection of highly mobile point defects into the underlying bulk, thereby offering a special means to manipulate bulk defect concentrations. The present work combines diffusion experiments and first-principles calculations for polar ZnO (0001) surface to demonstrate such manipulation. The rate behavior of oxygen interstitial injection varies dramatically between the Zn- and O-terminated ZnO surfaces. A specific injection pathway for the Zn-terminated surface is identified, and activation barrier determined from the first-principles calculations agrees closely with the experimental activation energy of 1.7 eV.

  17. Analysis of an optimization-based atomistic-to-continuum coupling method for point defects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olson, Derek; Shapeev, Alexander V.; Bochev, Pavel B.; Luskin, Mitchell

    2015-11-16

    Here, we formulate and analyze an optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum (AtC) coupling method for problems with point defects. Application of a potential-based atomistic model near the defect core enables accurate simulation of the defect. Away from the core, where site energies become nearly independent of the lattice position, the method switches to a more efficient continuum model. The two models are merged by minimizing the mismatch of their states on an overlap region, subject to the atomistic and continuum force balance equations acting independently in their domains. We prove that the optimization problem is well-posed and establish error estimates.

  18. Impact of point defects on the electronic and transport properties of silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanidou, K.; Houssa, M.; van den Broek, B.; Pourtois, G.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Stesmans, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the impact of various point defects on the structural, electronic and ballistic transport properties of armchair silicene nanoribbons, using the density functional theory and the non equilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of a Stone-Wales defect, an interior/edge vacancy and an edge dangling bond is examined. Our results show that structural imperfections can alter the electronic structure (energy band structure and density of states) of the nanoribbons and can either increase or decrease the ballistic current. The dependence of the transport properties on the position of the defects (sublattice A or B) and on their distance from the contact is also investigated.

  19. Native point defects in CaCu3Ti4O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delugas, P.; Alippi, P.; Raineri, V.

    2010-02-01

    We report first principles computations on native point defects in CCTO. Vacancies present a general high formation energy, their concentration never exceed 1016 cm-3. Oxygen vacancies present stable positive charge states and are thus able to act as donor. Copper vacancies present instead stable negative charge states and are thus potential native acceptors for the material. As to anti-sites, the CuCa defect results to be the energetically favorite in most of the possible conditions, and may reach concentrations as high as 1019 cm-3.

  20. Point Defects in Two-Dimensional Layered Semiconductors: Physics and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Joonki

    Recent advances in material science and semiconductor processing have been achieved largely based on in-depth understanding, efficient management and advanced application of point defects in host semiconductors, thus finding the relevant techniques such as doping and defect engineering as a traditional scientific and technological solution. Meanwhile, two- dimensional (2D) layered semiconductors currently draw tremendous attentions due to industrial needs and their rich physics at the nanoscale; as we approach the end of critical device dimensions in silicon-based technology, ultra-thin semiconductors have the potential as next- generation channel materials, and new physics also emerges at such reduced dimensions where confinement of electrons, phonons, and other quasi-particles is significant. It is therefore rewarding and interesting to understand and redefine the impact of lattice defects by investigating their interactions with energy/charge carriers of the host matter. Potentially, the established understanding will provide unprecedented opportunities for realizing new functionalities and enhancing the performance of energy harvesting and optoelectronic devices. In this thesis, multiple novel 2D layered semiconductors, such as bismuth and transition- metal chalcogenides, are explored. Following an introduction of conventional effects induced by point defects in semiconductors, the related physics of electronically active amphoteric defects is revisited in greater details. This can elucidate the complication of a two-dimensional electron gas coexisting with the topological states on the surface of bismuth chalcogenides, recently suggested as topological insulators. Therefore, native point defects are still one of the keys to understand and exploit topological insulators. In addition to from a fundamental science point of view, the effects of point defects on the integrated thermal-electrical transport, as well as the entropy-transporting process in

  1. Point Defects in Two-Dimensional Layered Semiconductors: Physics and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Joonki

    Recent advances in material science and semiconductor processing have been achieved largely based on in-depth understanding, efficient management and advanced application of point defects in host semiconductors, thus finding the relevant techniques such as doping and defect engineering as a traditional scientific and technological solution. Meanwhile, two- dimensional (2D) layered semiconductors currently draw tremendous attentions due to industrial needs and their rich physics at the nanoscale; as we approach the end of critical device dimensions in silicon-based technology, ultra-thin semiconductors have the potential as next- generation channel materials, and new physics also emerges at such reduced dimensions where confinement of electrons, phonons, and other quasi-particles is significant. It is therefore rewarding and interesting to understand and redefine the impact of lattice defects by investigating their interactions with energy/charge carriers of the host matter. Potentially, the established understanding will provide unprecedented opportunities for realizing new functionalities and enhancing the performance of energy harvesting and optoelectronic devices. In this thesis, multiple novel 2D layered semiconductors, such as bismuth and transition- metal chalcogenides, are explored. Following an introduction of conventional effects induced by point defects in semiconductors, the related physics of electronically active amphoteric defects is revisited in greater details. This can elucidate the complication of a two-dimensional electron gas coexisting with the topological states on the surface of bismuth chalcogenides, recently suggested as topological insulators. Therefore, native point defects are still one of the keys to understand and exploit topological insulators. In addition to from a fundamental science point of view, the effects of point defects on the integrated thermal-electrical transport, as well as the entropy-transporting process in

  2. Point Defects in Binary Laves-Phase Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, P.K.; Liu, C.T.; Pike, L.M.; Zhu, J.H.

    1998-11-30

    Point defect mechanisms in the binary C15 NbCr{sub 2} and NbCo{sub 2}, and C14 NbFe{sub 2} systems on both sides of stoichiometry was studied and clarified by both bulk density and X-ray lattice parameter measurements. It was found that the vacancy concentrations in these systems after quenching from 1000 C are essentially zero. The constitutional defects on both sides of stoichiometry for these systems were found to be of the anti-site type in comparison with the model predictions. However, thermal vacancies exhibiting a maximum at the stoichiometric composition were obtained in NbCr{sub 2} laves phase alloys after quenching from 1400 C. These could be completely eliminated by annealing at 1000 C. Anti-site hardening was found on both sides of stoichiometry for all three Laves phase systems studied. Furthermore, the thermal vacancies in NbCr{sub 2} alloys after quenching from 1400 C were found to soften the Laves phase. The anti-site hardening of the Laves phases is similar to that of the B2 compounds, while the thermal vacancy softening is unique to the Laves phase. Both the anti-site defects and thermal vacancies do not significantly affect the fracture toughness of the Laves phases.

  3. Point Defects in Binary Laves-Phase Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, P.K.; Liu, C.T.; Pike, L.M.; Zhu, J.H.

    1999-01-11

    Point defects in the binary C15 NbCrQ and NbCoz, and C 14 NbFe2 systems on both sides of stoichiometry were studied by both bulk density and X-ray Iattiee parameter measurements. It was found that the vacancy concentrations in these systems after quenching from 1000"C are essentially zero. The constitutional defects on both sides of stoichiometry for these systems were found to be of the anti-site type in comparison with the model predictions. Thermal vacancies exhibiting a maximum at the stoichiometric composition were obtained in NbCr2 Laves phase alloys after quenching from 1400"C. However, there are essentially no thermal vacancies in NbFe2 alloys after quenching from 1300oC. Anti-site hardening was found on both sides of stoichiometry for all the tie Laves phase systems studied, while the thermal vacancies in NbCr2 alloys quenched from 1400'C were found to soften the Laves phase. The anti-site hardening of the Laves phases is similar to that of the B2 compounds and the thermal vacancy softening is unique to the Laves phase. Neither the anti-site defects nor the thermal vacancies affect the fracture toughness of the Laves phases significantly.

  4. Experimental Determination of Metal Fuel Point Defect Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; McCall, S

    2008-06-03

    Nuclear metallic fuels are one of many options for advanced nuclear fuel cycles because they provide dimensional stability, mechanical integrity, thermal efficiency, and irradiation resistance while the associated pyro-processing is technically relevant to concerns about proliferation and diversion of special nuclear materials. In this presentation we will discuss recent success that we have had in studying isochronal annealing of damage cascades in Pu and Pu(Ga) arising from the self-decay of Pu as well as the annealing characteristics of noninteracting point defect populations produced by ion accelerator irradiation. Comparisons of the annealing properties of these two populations of defects arising from very different source terms are enlightening and point to complex defect and mass transport properties in the plutonium specimens which we are only now starting to understand as a result of many follow-on studies. More importantly however, the success of these measurements points the way to obtaining important mass transport parameters for comparison with theoretical predictions or to use directly in existing and future materials modeling of radiation effects in nuclear metallic fuels. The way forward on such measurements and the requisite theory and modeling will be discussed.

  5. Positron spectroscopy of point defects in the skyrmion-lattice compound MnSi

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Markus; Bauer, Andreas; Leitner, Michael; Gigl, Thomas; Anwand, Wolfgang; Butterling, Maik; Wagner, Andreas; Kudejova, Petra; Pfleiderer, Christian; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Outstanding crystalline perfection is a key requirement for the formation of new forms of electronic order in a vast number of widely different materials. Whereas excellent sample quality represents a standard claim in the literature, there are, quite generally, no reliable microscopic probes to establish the nature and concentration of lattice defects such as voids, dislocations and different species of point defects on the level relevant to the length and energy scales inherent to these new forms of order. Here we report an experimental study of the archetypical skyrmion-lattice compound MnSi, where we relate the characteristic types of point defects and their concentration to the magnetic properties by combining different types of positron spectroscopy with ab-initio calculations and bulk measurements. We find that Mn antisite disorder broadens the magnetic phase transitions and lowers their critical temperatures, whereas the skyrmion lattice phase forms for all samples studied underlining the robustness of this topologically non-trivial state. Taken together, this demonstrates the unprecedented sensitivity of positron spectroscopy in studies of new forms of electronic order. PMID:27388948

  6. Estimation of the temperature dependent interaction between uncharged point defects in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiyama, Eiji; Vanhellemont, Jan; Sueoka, Koji

    2015-01-15

    A method is described to estimate the temperature dependent interaction between two uncharged point defects in Si based on DFT calculations. As an illustration, the formation of the uncharged di-vacancy V{sub 2} is discussed, based on the temperature dependent attractive field between both vacancies. For that purpose, all irreducible configurations of two uncharged vacancies are determined, each with their weight given by the number of equivalent configurations. Using a standard 216-atoms supercell, nineteen irreducible configurations of two vacancies are obtained. The binding energies of all these configurations are calculated. Each vacancy is surrounded by several attractive sites for another vacancy. The obtained temperature dependent of total volume of these attractive sites has a radius that is closely related with the capture radius for the formation of a di-vacancy that is used in continuum theory. The presented methodology can in principle also be applied to estimate the capture radius for pair formation of any type of point defects.

  7. Positron spectroscopy of point defects in the skyrmion-lattice compound MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, Markus; Bauer, Andreas; Leitner, Michael; Gigl, Thomas; Anwand, Wolfgang; Butterling, Maik; Wagner, Andreas; Kudejova, Petra; Pfleiderer, Christian; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Outstanding crystalline perfection is a key requirement for the formation of new forms of electronic order in a vast number of widely different materials. Whereas excellent sample quality represents a standard claim in the literature, there are, quite generally, no reliable microscopic probes to establish the nature and concentration of lattice defects such as voids, dislocations and different species of point defects on the level relevant to the length and energy scales inherent to these new forms of order. Here we report an experimental study of the archetypical skyrmion-lattice compound MnSi, where we relate the characteristic types of point defects and their concentration to the magnetic properties by combining different types of positron spectroscopy with ab-initio calculations and bulk measurements. We find that Mn antisite disorder broadens the magnetic phase transitions and lowers their critical temperatures, whereas the skyrmion lattice phase forms for all samples studied underlining the robustness of this topologically non-trivial state. Taken together, this demonstrates the unprecedented sensitivity of positron spectroscopy in studies of new forms of electronic order.

  8. Small polarons and point defects in LaFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhen; Peelaers, Hartwin; van de Walle, Chris G.

    The proton-conductive perovskite-type LaFeO3 is a promising negative-electrode material for Ni/metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries. It has a discharge capacity up to 530 mAhg-1 at 333 K, which is significantly higher than commercialized AB5-type alloys. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of this performance, we have investigated the structural and electronic properties of bulk LaFeO3, as well as the effect of point defects, using hybrid density functional methods. LaFeO3 is antiferromagnetic in the ground state with a band gap of 3.54 eV. Small hole and electron polarons can form through self- or point-defect-assisted trapping. We find that La vacancies and Sr substitutional on La sites are shallow acceptors with the induced holes trapped as small polarons, while O and Fe vacancies are deep defect centers. Hydrogen interstitials behave like shallow donors, with the donor electrons localized on nearby iron sites as electron polarons. With a large trapping energy, these polarons can act as electron or hole traps and affect the electrical performance of LaFeO3 as the negative electrode for Ni-MH batteries. We acknowledge DOE for financial support.

  9. Effect of point defects on the properties of silicene-like BSi3 sheets from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalili, Seifollah; Akhavan, Mojdeh; Schofield, Jeremy

    2016-08-01

    Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the impact of point defects on BSi3 nanosheets. It is shown that the defects have low formation energies and are likely to form in BSi3 sheets. The divacancies with missing Si an B atoms are more probable than those which have two missing Si atoms and the diantisite (BSi)anti is also more probable than (BB)anti. It is found that the structural reconstructions caused by bond rotation in divacancies continuously lower the formation energies. Interestingly, unlike graphene or many other sheets, the presence of point defects does not change the planar structure and metallic behavior of BSi3 and all systems are nonmagnetic. The planar and metallic BSi3 sheets can therefore be used in devices, without any concern about the presence of defects.

  10. Second workshop role of point defects/defect complexes in silicon device fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Abstracts are presented of 24 papers, arranged under the following session/panel headings: defects and impurities in commercial photovoltaic Si substrates, point defects and point defect processes, impurity gettering for Si solar cells, gettering in Si solar cells, and passivation of impurities and defects.

  11. Intrinsic point defects and their interaction with impurities in mono-crystalline zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Bengt G.

    2015-03-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a direct and wide band-gap semiconductor with several attractive features, like an exciton binding energy of ~ 60 meV, for light emitting devices, photovoltaics and spintronics. In the past decade, ZnO has received tremendous attention by the semiconductor physics community and many challenging issues have been addressed, especially the ``native'' n-type conductivity, the role of intrinsic point defects, and the realization of reproducible p-type doping. The latter is, indeed, decisive for a true breakthrough of ZnO-based optoelectronics. In this contribution, recent progress in our understanding of the interaction between intrinsic point defects and impurities in ZnO will be discussed. Aluminum (Al) is often introduced intentionally to accomplish high n-type conductivity since Al on Zn-site (AlZn) acts as a shallow donor. However, AlZn was recently found to react strongly with Zn vacancies (VZn) and the resulting complex (AlZn-VZn) is energetically favorable. The AlZn-VZn complex is a deep acceptor limiting the n-type doping efficiency and this finding is expected to hold in general for complexes between VZn and group-III elements. Further, implantation of self-ions (Zn and O) has been demonstrated to affect radically the balance of intrinsic point defects where an excess of Zn interstitials gives rise to a dramatic depletion of residual Li impurities on Zn-site (LiZn) whilst the opposite holds for an excess of O interstitials. In fact, this behavior appears to be of general validity and Li depletion occurs for a wide variety of implanted elements incorporated into the Zn sub-lattice while Li pile-up occurs for elements residing on O-site. Finally, the most prominent deep-level defect in ZnO, labelled E3, will be shown to involve hydrogen. E3 exists in most ZnO materials, irrespective of the growth method used, and evidence for a center formed by reaction between interstitial hydrogen and primary defects on the Zn sub-lattice will be given.

  12. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway and Migration Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Hu, Wangyu; Gao, Fei; Deng, Huiqiu; Sun, Lixian

    2011-03-02

    Transition state searches have been employed to investigate the migration mechanisms of W clusters on W nanoparticles, and to determine the corresponding migration energies for the possible migration paths of these clusters. The tungsten clusters containing up to four adatoms are found to prefer 2D-compact structures with relatively low binding energies. The effect of interface and vertex regions on the migration behavior of the clusters is significantly strong, as compared to that of nanoparticle size. The migration mechanisms are quite different when the clusters are located at the center of the nanoparticle and near the interface or vertex areas. Near the interfaces and vertex areas, the substrate atoms tend to participate in the migration processes of the clusters, and can join the adatoms to form a larger cluster or lead to the dissociation of a cluster via the exchange mechanism, which results in the adatom crossing the facets. The lowest energy paths are used to be determined the energy barriers for W cluster migrations (from 1- to 4-atoms) on the facets, edges and vertex regions. The calculated energy barriers for the trimers suggest that the concerted migration is more probable than the successive jumping of a single adatom in the clusters. In addition, it of interest to note that the dimer shearing is a dominant migration mechanism for the tetramer, but needs to overcome a relatively higher migration energy than other clusters.

  13. Atomistic simulation of point defects and diffusion in B2 NiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, Y.; Farkas, D.

    1998-08-04

    NiAl is a strongly ordered compound with a large atomic size difference between the components. Due to these features it demonstrates the so-called triple-defect mechanism of compositional disorder with Ni anti-structural atoms in Ni-rich compositions and Ni vacancies in Al-rich compositions. Diffusion mechanisms in triple-defect compounds are more involved than in antisite disorder compounds. Because every Ni atom in the B2 structure is surrounded by Al atoms and vise versa, every nearest-neighbor (NN) jump of a vacancy induces local disorder, which is very unfavorable. The authors therefore have to consider diffusion of Ni and Al along their own sublattices by next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) vacancy jumps. Alternatively, one can think of cycled mechanisms in which the crystal order is destroyed only locally and temporarily, but is totally restored when the diffusion cycle is complete. In this study the authors apply molecular statics simulations to evaluate the energetics of the point defect formation and migration in NiAl by different mechanisms. The goal of their simulations is to predict the mechanisms that are the easiest, thus dominating, at different alloy compositions.

  14. The role of substrate point defects in adhesion of metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarova, S.

    1996-12-31

    As known, nucleation and epitaxial growth of metal films are affected by point defects of substrate surface, F-centers in particular, but their effect on adhesion of thin films has not yet been thoroughly studied. Despite the fact that the point defects are usually taken into account when the adhesion activation by various irradiation treatments is discussed, their role has not been properly revealed. This is due to the difficulties of the accurate control of the type and the density of the point defects in subsurface region as well as to the fact that the radiation treatment of surfaces can produce some changes in the chemical composition and stoichiometry of the surface, in addition to the creation of the point defects. For the purpose of the study of the effect of point defects on the adhesion of thin films, the author approached the problem in a principally different way: the author created point defects in the bulk of the crystals, controlled the type and the bulk density of the defects and then cleaved the crystals in vacuum - in a stream of metal vapors. The fresh, free from contaminants contact of metal film with the crystal surface enriched with point defects was created in this way.

  15. Point defects in CdTexSe1-x crystals grown from a Te-rich solution for applications in detecting radiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gul, R.; Roy, U. N.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Lee, W.; Yang, G.; Burger, A.; James, R. B.; et al

    2015-04-15

    We investigated cadmium telluride selenide (CdTeSe) crystals, newly grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM), for the presence and abundance of point defects. Deep Level Transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS) was used to determine the energies of the traps, their capture cross sections, and densities. The bias across the detectors was varied from (1–30) V. Four types of point defects were identified, ranging from 10 meV to 0.35 eV. Two dominant traps at energies of 0.18 eV and 0.14 eV were studied in depth. Cd vacancies are found at lower concentrations than other point defects present in the material.

  16. Point defects in CdTexSe1-x crystals grown from a Te-rich solution for applications in detecting radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gul, R.; Roy, U. N.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Lee, W.; Yang, G.; Burger, A.; James, R. B.; Cui, Y.

    2015-04-15

    We investigated cadmium telluride selenide (CdTeSe) crystals, newly grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM), for the presence and abundance of point defects. Deep Level Transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS) was used to determine the energies of the traps, their capture cross sections, and densities. The bias across the detectors was varied from (1–30) V. Four types of point defects were identified, ranging from 10 meV to 0.35 eV. Two dominant traps at energies of 0.18 eV and 0.14 eV were studied in depth. Cd vacancies are found at lower concentrations than other point defects present in the material.

  17. Research Update: Point defects in CdTexSe1-x crystals grown from a Te-rich solution for applications in detecting radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, R.; Roy, U. N.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Lee, W.; Yang, G.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.; James, R. B.

    2015-04-01

    We investigated cadmium telluride selenide (CdTeSe) crystals, newly grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM), for the presence and abundance of point defects. Current Deep Level Transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS) was used to determine the energies of the traps, their capture cross sections, and densities. The bias across the detectors was varied from 1 to 30 V. Four types of point defects were identified, ranging from 10 meV to 0.35 eV. Two dominant traps at energies of 0.18 eV and 0.14 eV were studied in depth. Cd vacancies are found at lower concentrations than other point defects present in the material.

  18. PyDII: A python framework for computing equilibrium intrinsic point defect concentrations and extrinsic solute site preferences in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hong; Medasani, Bharat; Chen, Wei; Persson, Kristin A.; Haranczyk, Maciej; Asta, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Point defects play an important role in determining the structural stability and mechanical behavior of intermetallic compounds. To help quantitatively understand the point defect properties in these compounds, we developed PyDII, a Python program that performs thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium intrinsic point defect concentrations and extrinsic solute site preferences in intermetallics. The algorithm implemented in PyDII is built upon a dilute-solution thermodynamic formalism with a set of defect excitation energies calculated from first-principles density-functional theory methods. The analysis module in PyDII enables automated calculations of equilibrium intrinsic antisite and vacancy concentrations as a function of composition and temperature (over ranges where the dilute solution formalism is accurate) and the point defect concentration changes arising from addition of an extrinsic substitutional solute species. To demonstrate the applications of PyDII, we provide examples for intrinsic point defect concentrations in NiAl and Al3 V and site preferences for Ti, Mo and Fe solutes in NiAl.

  19. Theoretical studies of point defects and diffusion in Nb/sub 3/Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.; Diennes, G.; Hatcher, R.; Lazareth, O.

    1983-05-01

    The structure and energetics of several simple point defects in A15 Nb/sub 3/Sn were investigated by means of computer simulations based on a pair-potential model of cohesion. The properties of vacancies on both the Nb and Sn sublattices, as well as those of simple antisite defects, were examined, and estimates were made of the energetics of several types of atom vacancy exchange (''jump'') processes. The results show an unusual structure for the vacancy on the Nb sublattice: the vacancy is ''split'' between two adjacent sites along the Nb chain with an atom midway between them. We find the Sn vacancy (on the Sn sublattice) to be metastable; this vacancy will ''decompose'' by an activated process into a more stable configuration consisting of a Nb atom on a Sn site adjacent to a split Nb-sublattice vacancy. The authors find that the lowest energy grouping of defects compatible with maintaining sublattice sites in the proper three-toone ratio is the antisite defect pair; the lowest energy grouping which contains vacancies is found to consist of Nb-sublattice vacancies and Nb-on-Sn sublattice antisite defects in the ratio of four of the former to one of the latter (quintuple defects). The results also suggest that bulk Sn diffusion is slower than Nb diffusion; this is consistent with the belief that rapid Sn diffusion during Nb/sub 3/Sn layer growth does not occur by bulk but by grain-boundary diffusion.

  20. Theoretical studies of point defects and diffusion in Nb/sub 3/Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.O.; Dienes, G.J.; Lazareth, O.W. Jr.; Hatcher, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The structure and energetics of several simple point defects in A15 Nb/sub 3/Sn were investigated by means of computer simulations based on a pair-potential model of cohesion. The properties of vacancies on both the Nb and Sn sublattices, as well as those of simple antisite defects, were examined, and estimates were made of the energetics of several types of atom-vacancy exchange (jump) processes. The results show an unusual structure for the vacancy on the Nb sublattice: the vacancy is split between two adjacent sites along the Nb chain with an atom midway between them. We find the Sn vacancy (on the Sn sublattice) to be metastable; this vacancy will decompose by an activated process into a more stable configuration consisting of a Nb atom on a Sn site adjacent to a split Nb-sublattice vacancy. We find that the lowest energy grouping of defects compatible with maintaining sublattice sites in the proper three-to-one ratio is the antisite defect pair; the lowest energy grouping which contains vacancies is found to consist of Nb-sublattice vacancies and Nb-on-Sn-sublattice antisite defects in the ratio of four of the former to one of the latter (quintuple defects). Results also suggest that bulk Sn diffusion is slower than Nb diffusion; this is consistent with the belief that rapid Sn diffusion during Nb/sub 3/Sn layer growth does not occur by bulk but by grain-boundary diffusion.

  1. The effect of native point defect thermodynamics on off-stoichiometry in beta-Mg17Al12

    SciTech Connect

    Wolverton, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical strength of Mg-Al-Zn alloys can be affected by a fine spatial dispersion of {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} precipitates in the Mg matrix. In an effort to understand the phase stability and the unusual asymmetric off-stoichiometry observed in {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12}, we have performed a series of first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations of bulk and defect properties of Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12}. Specifically, we consider native point defects (i.e. vacancies and anti-sites) in all four sublattices of Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12}, i.e. 2a, 8c, 24g (Mg) and 24g (Al). The T = 0 K static energies of defect Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} supercells indicate that anti-site defects are energetically favored over vacancies, and the lowest anti-site defect formation energies are in 24g sites for both Al{sub Mg} and Mg{sub Al}. These Al-rich and Mg-rich anti-site defect formation energies are similar in magnitude, and thus do not explain the asymmetric off-stoichiometry of Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12}. We also investigate the effect of atomic vibrations via DFT phonon calculations on native point defect free energies of Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} and combine these entropic contributions with the point defect formation energies to evaluate the thermodynamics of off-stoichiometry in this phase. We find that the formation of the Al{sub Mg} anti-site is not strongly stabilized by vibrational entropy. Thus, we conclude that the observed asymmetry in the off-stoichiometry of the {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase in the Mg-Al phase diagram is not explained by simple native point defect thermodynamics, and must involve a more complicated defect formation mechanism, such as multi-defect clustering.

  2. Deuterium-Hydrogen Interdiffusion in Olivine: Implications for Point Defects and Electrical Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyburczy, J. A.; Du Frane, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge about hydrogen diffusivity in mantle minerals is critical for determining mantle hydrogen distribution, and additionally for understanding point defects. Chemical diffusion of hydrogen in olivine depends on self diffusion and concentration of hydrogen and other point defects, such as small polarons and metal vacancies. In this study we measured hydrogen self diffusion in olivine, and we compare these values to those previously reported for chemical 1-H redox exchange DExch. Deuterium 2-H was interdiffused into hydrogen 1-H saturated single crystals of San Carlos olivine between 750-900 °C at 2 GPa. We measured and fit the resulting 2-H and 1-H profiles to obtain the interdiffusion coefficient DH,[100] = 10^(-5.04+/-1.43)*e(-137+/-31kJ/mol)/(RT) m^2/s. This is ~1 log unit lower than DExch,[100], with similar activation energy Ea,[100]. DH is anisotropic with DH,[001] = 10^(-12.0+/-0.2) m^2/s at 900 °C and 2 GPa; only upper bound estimates for DH,[010] could be determined from our experiments. We use DH,[100] and DExch,[100] to calculate the small polaron diffusion coefficient associated with redox exchange Dh,[100] = 10^-3.90*e(-142kJ/mol)/(RT) m^2/s. Dh,[100] is combined with reported values for DExch,[010] and DExch,[010] to calculate values for DH,[010] and DH,[001] that are consistent with our upper bound estimates. These DH values, both measured and derived, are used with the Nernst-Einstein relation to calculate the electrical conductivity σ by hydrogen in olivine σH. We calculate σH = 10^1.63*e(-126kJ/mol)/(RT) S/m, which is similar in magnitude to the lower range of reported σ measurements. This similarly suggests that hydrogen alone cannot account for high σ anomalies observed at asthenospheric depths (~10^-2 to ~10^-1 S/m). The Ea for hydrogen mobility/diffusion we calculate are higher (~40% for 100 ppmw H2O) than those derived from previous σ measurements. This work supported by NSF EAR 0739050 to J. A. Tyburczy and R. Hervig. The SIMS

  3. Magnetic properties of point defects in proton irradiated diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makgato, T. N.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Ramos, M. A.; García-Hernández, M.; Climent-Font, A.; Zucchiatti, A.; Muñoz-Martin, A.; Shrivastava, S.; Erasmus, R.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties of ultra-pure type-IIa diamond following irradiation with proton beams of ≈1-2 MeV energy. SQUID magnetometry indicate the formation of Curie type paramagnetism according to the Curie law. Raman and Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements show that the primary structural features created by proton irradiation are the centers: GR1, ND1, TR12 and 3H. The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) Monte Carlo simulations together with SQUID observations show a strong correlation between vacancy production, proton fluence and the paramagnetic factor. At an average surface vacancy spacing of ≈1-1.6 nm and bulk (peak) vacancy spacing of ≈0.3-0.5 nm Curie paramagnetism is induced by formation of ND1 centres with an effective magnetic moment μeff~(0.1-0.2)μB. No evidence of long range magnetic ordering is observed in the temperature range 4.2-300 K.

  4. Impact of Mg Content on (Mg,Zn)O Native Point Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Molly; Restrepo, Oscar; Brillson, Leonard; Windl, Wolfgang; Department of Material Science; Engineering Collaboration; Department of Physics Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The two most thermodynamically stable defects in ZnO are oxygen vacancies (VO) and zinc vacancies (VZn) . These native point defects are electrically charged and can contribute to free carrier densities. Experiment shows that Mg addition to ZnO significantly changes native defect densities. To better understand this dramatic decrease in VZn and VO-related defects with increasing Mg content up to x =0.44 and the subsequent increase, we performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations using PAW potentials within PBE using VASP. The results showed to be very sensitive to DFT method used and chemical-potential calculation. For the latter, the literature shows that one can assume that the oxygen chemical potential equals that of the atoms in the oxygen molecules at a given surrounding partial oxygen pressure. However, one can also postulate that the total defect concentrations conserve the stoichiometry, or limiting potentials from elemental equilibrium phases can be used. The experimentally observed dependence helped identify the correct way to reproduce the experimental dependence of formation energy on Mg concentration, which will be discussed in detail in this presentation.

  5. Thermally Activated Point Defect Diffusion in Methylammonium Lead Trihalide: Anisotropic and Ultrahigh Mobility of Iodine.

    PubMed

    Delugas, P; Caddeo, C; Filippetti, A; Mattoni, A

    2016-07-01

    We study the diffusion of point defects in crystalline methylammonium lead halide (MAPI) at finite temperatures by using all-atoms molecular dynamics. We find that, for what concerns intrinsic defects, iodine diffusion is by far the dominant mechanism of ionic transport in MAPI, with diffusivities as high as 7.4 × 10(-7) and 4.3 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) at 300 K and single activation energies of 0.24 and 0.10 eV, for interstitials and vacancies, respectively. The comparison with common covalent and oxide crystals reveals the ultrahigh mobility of defects in MAPI. Though at room temperature the vacancies are about 1 order of magnitude more diffusive, the anisotropic interstitial dynamics increases more rapidly with temperature, and it can be dominant at high temperatures. Present results are fully consistent with the involvement of iodide ions in hysteresis and have implications for improvement of the material quality by better control of defect diffusion. PMID:27237630

  6. Ab initio study of point defects near stacking faults in 3C-SiC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xi, Jianqi; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2016-07-02

    Interactions between point defects and stacking faults in 3C-SiC are studied using an ab initio method based on density functional theory. The results show that the discontinuity of the stacking sequence considerably affects the configurations and behavior of intrinsic defects, especially in the case of silicon interstitials. The existence of an intrinsic stacking fault (missing a C-Si bilayer) shortens the distance between the tetrahedral-center site and its second-nearest-neighboring silicon layer, making the tetrahedral silicon interstitial unstable. Instead of a tetrahedral configuration with four C neighbors, a pyramid-like interstitial structure with a defect state within the band gap becomes a stablemore » configuration. In addition, orientation rotation occurs in the split interstitials that has diverse effects on the energy landscape of silicon and carbon split interstitials in the stacking fault region. Moreover, our analyses of ionic relaxation and electronic structure of vacancies show that the built-in strain field, owing to the existence of the stacking fault, makes the local environment around vacancies more complex than that in the bulk.« less

  7. First-principles study of native point defects in Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L.; Zhou, P.; Zhang, C. X.; He, C. Y.; Hao, G. L.; Sun, L. Z.; Zhong, J. X.

    2013-05-01

    Using first-principles method within the framework of the density functional theory, we study the influence of native point defect on the structural and electronic properties of Bi2Se3. Se vacancy in Bi2Se3 is a double donor, and Bi vacancy is a triple acceptor. Se antisite (SeBi) is always an active donor in the system because its donor level (ɛ(+1/0)) enters into the conduction band. Interestingly, Bi antisite (BiSe1) in Bi2Se3 is an amphoteric dopant, acting as a donor when μe < 0.119 eV (the material is typical p-type) and as an acceptor when μe > 0.251 eV (the material is typical n-type). The formation energies under different growth environments (such as Bi-rich or Se-rich) indicate that under Se-rich condition, SeBi is the most stable native defect independent of electron chemical potential μe. Under Bi-rich condition, Se vacancy is the most stable native defect except for under the growth window as μe > 0.262 eV (the material is typical n-type) and ΔμSe < -0.459 eV (Bi-rich), under such growth window BiSe1 carrying one negative charge is the most stable one.

  8. Investigation of oxygen point defects in cubic ZrO2 by density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Xiao, Haiyan; Zhang, Yanwen; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S; Weber, William J

    2014-01-01

    The energetics of formation and migration of the oxygen vacancy and interstitial in cubic ZrO2 are investigated by density functional theory calculations. In an O-rich environment, the negatively charged oxygen interstitial is the most dominant defect whereas, the positively charged oxygen vacancy is the most dominant defect under O-poor conditions. Oxygen interstitial migration occurs by the interstitialcy and the direct interstitial mechanisms, with calculated migration energy barriers of 2.94 eV and 2.15 eV, respectively. For the oxygen vacancy, diffusion is preferred along the <100> direction, and the calculated energy barriers are 0.26 eV for , 0.27 eV for and 0.54 eV for . These results indicate that oxygen diffusivity is higher through the vacancy-migration mechanism.

  9. Point Defect Based Two Dimensional Modeling of Dislocation Loops and Stress Effects on Dopant Diffusion in Silicon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heemyong

    Dopant diffusion in silicon is studied and modeled on the basis of point defect kinetics associated with ion implantation damage. Point defect parameters are extracted from the modeling of transient enhanced dopant diffusion due to oxidation and low dose implant damage without extended defects. The theory of dopant-defect pairing is found to be crucial in modeling the implantation damage effects, and the effective binding energies for boron-defect and phosphorus-defect pairs are experimentally determined. The extracted parameters provide an important reference for further modeling of diffusion under high dose implantation conditions involving extended defects. Evolution of dislocation loops through their interaction with point defects is modeled in two dimensions by accounting for the pressure around the ensemble of loops as well as loop coalescence and dissolution as observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. Assuming an asymmetric triangular density distribution of periodically oriented circular dislocation loops leads to estimation of the effective pressure and an efficient model for the statistical loop -to-loop interaction. Simulation with the model correctly predicts variation of the number of captured silicon atoms and the radii and densities of the dislocation loops during oxidation in agreement with the TEM data. It also shows significant reduction in oxidation enhanced diffusion of boron in a buried layer in agreement with measured profiles, confirming the role of dislocation loops as an efficient sink for interstitials. A point-defect-based atomistic model for the stress effects on dopant diffusion is developed by accounting for variation in formation enthalpy of dopant-defect pairs due to the hydrostatic pressure. Binding energies and diffusivities of dopant-defect pairs under the pressure are modeled and incorporated into diffusion equations. Boron segregation around dislocation loops in silicon is explained by the pressure

  10. First principles calculation of point defects and mobility degradation in bulk AlSb for radiation detection application

    SciTech Connect

    Lordi, V; Aberg, D; Erhart, P; Wu, K J

    2007-07-30

    The development of high resolution, room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors requires the introduction of materials with increased carrier mobility-lifetime ({mu}{tau}) product, while having a band gap in the 1.4-2.2 eV range. AlSb is a promising material for this application. However, systematic improvements in the material quality are necessary to achieve an adequate {mu}{tau} product. We are using a combination of simulation and experiment to develop a fundamental understanding of the factors which affect detector material quality. First principles calculations are used to study the microscopic mechanisms of mobility degradation from point defects and to calculate the intrinsic limit of mobility from phonon scattering. We use density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the formation energies of native and impurity point defects, to determine their equilibrium concentrations as a function of temperature and charge state. Perturbation theory via the Born approximation is coupled with Boltzmann transport theory to calculate the contribution toward mobility degradation of each type of point defect, using DFT-computed carrier scattering rates. A comparison is made to measured carrier concentrations and mobilities from AlSb crystals grown in our lab. We find our predictions in good quantitative agreement with experiment, allowing optimized annealing conditions to be deduced. A major result is the determination of oxygen impurity as a severe mobility killer, despite the ability of oxygen to compensation dope AlSb and reduce the net carrier concentration. In this case, increased resistivity is not a good indicator of improved material performance, due to the concomitant sharp reduction in {mu}{tau}.

  11. Lithium-ion drifting: Application to the study of point defects in floating-zone silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. T.; Wong, Y. K.; Zulehner, W.

    1997-01-01

    The use of lithium-ion (Li(+)) drifting to study the properties of point defects in p-type Floating-Zone (FZ) silicon crystals is reported. The Li(+) drift technique is used to detect the presence of vacancy-related defects (D defects) in certain p-type FZ silicon crystals. SUPREM-IV modeling suggests that the silicon point defect diffusivities are considerably higher than those commonly accepted, but are in reasonable agreement with values recently proposed. These results demonstrate the utility of Li(+) drifting in the study of silicon point defect properties in p-type FZ crystals. Finally, a straightforward measurement of the Li(+) compensation depth is shown to yield estimates of the vacancy-related defect concentration in p-type FZ crystals.

  12. Effect of Intrinsic Point Defect on the Magnetic Properties of ZnO Nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jiangni; Zhang, Zhiyong; Yin, Tieen

    2013-01-01

    The effect of intrinsic point defect on the magnetic properties of ZnO nanowire is investigated by the first-principles calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated results reveal that the pure ZnO nanowire without intrinsic point defect is nonmagnetic and ZnO nanowire with VO, Zni, Oi, OZn, or ZnO point defect also is nonmagnetic. However, a strong spin splitting phenomenon is observed in ZnO nanowire with VZn defect sitting on the surface site. The Mulliken population analysis reveals that the oxygen atoms which are close to the VZn defect do major contribution to the magnetic moment. Partial density states calculation further suggests that the appearance of the half-metallic ferromagnetism in ZnO nanorod with VZn originates from the hybridization of the O2p states with Zn 3d states. PMID:24396300

  13. Point defect modeling in materials: Coupling ab initio and elasticity approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varvenne, Céline; Bruneval, Fabien; Marinica, Mihai-Cosmin; Clouet, Emmanuel

    2013-10-01

    Modeling point defects at an atomic scale requires careful treatment of the long-range atomic relaxations. This elastic field can strongly affect point defect properties calculated in atomistic simulations because of the finite size of the system under study. This is an important restriction for ab initio methods which are limited to a few hundred atoms. We propose an original approach coupling ab initio calculations and linear elasticity theory to obtain the properties of an isolated point defect for reduced supercell sizes. The reliability and benefit of our approach are demonstrated for three problematic cases: the self-interstitial in zirconium, clusters of self-interstitials in iron, and the neutral vacancy in silicon.

  14. Self-compensation due to point defects in Mg-doped GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, Giacomo; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    Using hybrid density functional theory, we address point defects susceptible to cause charge compensation upon Mg doping of GaN. We determine the free energy of formation of the nitrogen vacancy and of several Mg-related defects. The entropic contribution as a function of temperature is determined within the quasiharmonic approximation. We find that the Mg interstitial shows a noticeably lower free energy of formation than the Mg substitutional to Ga in p -type conditions. Therefore, the Mg impurity is amphoteric behaving like an acceptor when substitutional to Ga and like a double donor when accommodated in an interstitial position. The hybrid-functional results are then linked to experimental observations by solving the charge neutrality equations for semiconductor dominated by impurities. We show that a thermodynamic equilibrium model is unable to account for the experimental hole concentration as a function of Mg doping density, due to nitrogen vacancies and Mg interstitials acting as compensating donors. To explain the experimental result, which includes a dropoff of the hole concentration at high Mg densities, we thus resort to nonequilibrium models. We show that either nitrogen vacancies or Mg interstitials could be at the origin of the self-compensation mechanism. However, only the model based on interstitial Mg donors provides a natural mechanism to account for the sudden appearance of self-compensation. Indeed, the amphoteric nature of the Mg impurity leads to Fermi-level pinning and accounts for the observed dropoff of the hole concentration of GaN samples at high Mg doping. Our work suggests that current limitations in p -type doping of GaN could be overcome by extrinsically controlling the Fermi energy during growth.

  15. Equilibrium Configurations and Energetics of Point Defects in Two-Dimensional Colloidal Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Ling, X. S.

    2001-08-27

    We demonstrate a novel method of introducing point defects (mono- and divacancies) in a confined monolayer colloidal crystal by manipulating individual particles with optical tweezers. Digital video microscopy is used to study defect dynamics in real space and time. We verify the numerical predictions that the stable configurations of the defects have reduced symmetry compared to the triangular lattice and discover that in addition they are characterized by distinct topological arrangements of the particles in the defect core. Surprisingly, point defects are thermally excited into separated dislocations, from which we extract the dislocation pair potential.

  16. The role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. Summary report and papers

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.Y.

    1994-08-01

    This report is the summary of the third workshop on the role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. The workshop was organized: (1) to discuss recent progress in the material quality produced by photovoltaic Si manufacturers, (2) to foster the understanding of point defect issues in Si device processing, (3) to review the effects of inhomogeneities on large- area solar cell performance, (4) to discuss how to improve Si solar cell processing, and (5) to develop a new understanding of gettering, defect passivation, and defect annihilation. Separate abstract were prepared for the individual papers, for the database.

  17. Role of point defects in the photosensitivity of hydrogen-loaded phosphosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, Yu V

    2010-08-03

    It is shown that point defect modifications in hydrogen-loaded phosphosilicate glass (PSG) do not play a central role in determining its photosensitivity. Photochemical reactions that involve a two-step point defect modification and pre-exposure effect are incapable of accounting for photoinduced refractive index changes. It seems likely that a key role in UV-induced refractive index modifications is played by structural changes in the PSG network. Experimental data are presented that demonstrate intricate network rearrangement dynamics during UV exposure of PSG. (fiber optics)

  18. Density functional theory calculations of point defects and hydrogen isotopes in Li4SiO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xiaogang; Zhu, Wenjun; Lu, Tiecheng; Gao, Tao; Shi, Yanli; Yang, Mao; Gong, Yichao; Yu, Xiaohe; Feng, Lan; Wei, Yongkai; Lu, Zhipeng

    2015-10-01

    The Li4SiO4 is a promising breeder material for future fusion reactors. Radiation induced vacancies and hydrogen isotope related impurities are the major types of point defects in this breeder material. In present study, various kinds of vacancies and hydrogen isotopes related point defects in Li4SiO4 are investigated through density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The band gap of Li4SiO4 is determined by UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy experiments. Formation energies of all possible charge states of Li, Si and O vacancies are calculated using DFT methods. Formation energies of possible charge states of hydrogen isotopes substitution for Li and O are also calculated. We found that Li-vacancies will dominate among all vacancies in neutral charge state under radiation conditions and the O, Li, and Si vacancies (VO,VLi,VSi) are stable in charge states +2, -1, -4 for most of the range of Fermi level, respectively. The interstitial hydrogen isotopes (Hi) and substitutional HLi are stable in the charge states +1, 0 for most of the range of Fermi level, respectively. Moreover, substitutional HO are stable in +1 charge states. We also investigated the process of tritium recovery by discussing the interaction between interstitial H and Li-vacancy, O-vacancy, and found that HO + and HLi 0 are the most common H related defects during radiation process.

  19. Structural, thermodynamic, electronic, and magnetic characterization of point defects in amorphous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Nathan L.

    A completely first-principles procedure for the creation of experimentally validated amorphous silicon dioxide structures via a combination of molecular dynamics and density functional theory is presented. Point defects are analyzed within a statistical ensemble of these structures and overcoordinated silicon and oxygen defects are found to have similar formation energies to undercoordinated silicon atoms and oxygen vacancies. The formation of E' centers is found to occur in the absence of oxygen vacancies, and a single oxygen vacancy is found to lead to two isolated E' center precursors. Density functional techniques that properly account for the electrostatics in the presence of periodic boundary conditions are then used to add and remove electrons from each defect and the trapping level distributions are identified. These distributions are the result of the inherent local atomic variability in the amorphous network. The distribution energies are in good agreement with trap spectroscopy experiments where defect contributions are experimentally indistinguishable. This ability to distinguish defect contributions is used to provide a physical explanation of the atomic relaxations which occur upon electron or hole capture. The paramagnetic E'γ and E'β defects are shown to exist in the neutral charge state and are capable of trapping both electrons and holes. Statistical support for the oxygen vacancy originated dimerized model of the positively charged E'δ defect is demonstrated. An overlap of distributions for different defects is also found suggesting the existence of less known trapping mechanisms involving positively charged overcoordinated oxygen defects and overcoordinated silicon floating bond defects. Further, the uncertainty from the model form that results from exchange-correlation functional choice in density functional theory is quantified and found to be much less than the inherent atomic variability in the amorphous network. Extending these amorphous

  20. [Forensic medical evaluation of stab-incised wounds caused by knives with point defects].

    PubMed

    Krupin, K N; Leonov, S V

    2011-01-01

    The present experimental study allowed to characterize specific signs of stab-incised wounds caused by knives with operational point defects. Diagnostic coefficients calculated for these macro- and microscopic features facilitate differential diagnostics of the injuries and make it possible to identify a concrete stabbing/cutting weapon with which the wound was inflicted.. PMID:21866847

  1. Effect of extended strain fields on point defect phonon scattering in thermoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Brenden R; Peng, Haowei; Lopez, Armando; Parilla, Philip A; Lany, Stephan; Toberer, Eric S

    2015-07-15

    The design of thermoelectric materials often involves the integration of point defects (alloying) as a route to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity. Classically, the point defect scattering strength follows from simple considerations such as mass contrast and the presence of induced strain fields (e.g. radius contrast, coordination changes). While the mass contrast can be easily calculated, the associated strain fields induced by defect chemistry are not readily predicted and are poorly understood. In this work, we use classical and first principles calculations to provide insight into the strain field component of phonon scattering from isoelectronic point defects. Our results also integrate experimental measurements on bulk samples of SnSe and associated alloys with S, Te, Ge, Sr and Ba. These efforts highlight that the strength and extent of the resulting strain field depends strongly on defect chemistry. Strain fields can have a profound impact on the local structure. For example, in alloys containing Ba, the strain fields have significant spatial extent (1 nm in diameter) and produce large shifts in the atomic equilibrium positions (up to 0.5 Å). Such chemical complexity suggests that computational assessment of point defects for thermal conductivity depression should be hindered. However, in this work, we present and verify several computational descriptors that correlate well with the experimentally measured strain fields. Furthermore, these descriptors are conceptually transparent and computationally inexpensive, allowing computation to provide a pivotal role in the screening of effective alloys. The further development of point defect engineering could complement or replace nanostructuring when optimizing the thermal conductivity, offering the benefits of thermodynamic stability, and providing more clearly defined defect chemistry. PMID:26145414

  2. Point defect study of CuTi and CuTi sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, J.R.; Lutton, R.T.; Wesley, D.; Wharton, W.R.; Oehrli, M.L.; Herte, M.S.; Sabochick, M.J. ); Lam, N.Q. )

    1991-03-01

    The energies and configurations of interstitials and vacancies in the ordered compounds CuTi and CuTi{sub 2} were determined using atomistic simulation with realistic embedded-atom potentials. The formation energy of an antisite pair was found to be 0.385 and 0.460 eV in CuTi and CuTi{sub 2}, respectively. In both compounds, the creation of a vacancy by the removal of either a Cu or Ti atom resulted in a vacant Cu site, with an adjacent antisite defect in the case of the Ti vacancy. The vacant Cu site in CuTi was found to be very mobile within two adjacent (001) Cu planes, with a migration energy of 0.19 eV, giving rise to two-dimensional migration. The vacancy migration energy across (001) Ti planes, however, was 1.32 eV, which could be lowered to 0.75 or 0.60 eV if one or two Cu antisite defects were initially present in these planes. In CuTi{sub 2}, the vacancy migration energy of 0.92 eV along the (001) Cu plane was significantly higher than in CuTi. The effective vacancy formation energies were calculated to be 1.09 eV and 0.90 eV in CuTi and CuTi{sub 2}, respectively. Interstitials created by inserting either a Cu or Ti atom had complicated configurations in which a Cu {l angle}111{r angle} split interstitial was surrounded by two or three Ti antisite defects. The interstitial formation energy was estimated to be 1.7 eV in CuTi and 1.9 eV in CuTi{sub 2}.

  3. Role of diffusion in excitation energy transfer and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, V.; Mishra, H.

    2007-09-01

    Effect of diffusion on excitation energy transfer and migration in a dye pair sodium fluorescein (donor) and Rhodamine-6G (acceptor) has been studied for different viscosities by both steady state and time domain fluorescence spectroscopic measurements. The donor-donor interaction appears to be weaker as compared to donor-acceptor interaction and thus favors direct Förster-type energy transfer. Interestingly, at low viscosity (water in this case) transfer appears to be controlled by material diffusion/energy migration. Further, acceptor dynamics reveals the fact that direct Förster transfer dominates in viscous media.

  4. Intrinsic point defects and volume swelling in ZrSiO{sub 4} under irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pruneda, J.M.; Archer, T.D.; Artacho, Emilio

    2004-09-01

    The effects of high concentration of point defects in crystalline ZrSiO{sub 4} as originated by exposure to radiation, have been simulated using first principles density functional calculations. Structural relaxation and vibrational studies were performed for a catalog of intrinsic point defects, with different charge states and concentrations. The experimental evidence of a large anisotropic volume swelling in natural and artificially irradiated samples is used to select the subset of defects that give similar lattice swelling for the concentrations studied, namely interstitials of O and Si, and the antisite Zr{sub Si}. Calculated vibrational spectra for the interstitials show additional evidence for the presence of high concentrations of some of these defects in irradiated zircon.

  5. Optical and magnetic resonance characterization of point defects in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the point defects in single crystals of undoped LiNbO3, undoped LiTaO3, and Mg-doped LiNbO3. Optical absorption, electron spin resonance (ESR), and thermal luminescence techniques were used to study the point defects produced by x-irradiation and reduction in these materials. Radiation-induced defects in undoped LiNbO3 and LiTaO3 include a trapped hole center and an electron trapped on either a NbV ion or on a TaV ion. The TaU ion in LiTaO3 was identified by ESR as a self-trapped electron. A different electron trap, assigned to a Mg complex, was observed after x-irradiation in certain Mg-doped LiNbO3 crystals, depending on the Mg-doping level and the stoichiometry.

  6. Numerical simulation of point defect transport in floating-zone silicon single crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T. L.; Jensen, L.; Lüdge, A.; Riemann, H.; Lemke, H.

    2001-08-01

    This work compares simulations of intrinsic point defect transport for a 0.8″ crystal for two different values of the point defect recombination factor, thereafter utilizing the model for two more commercially relevant 4″ crystals, grown with the needle-eye technique. Using this approach to study defect transport in floating-zone configurations is the novelty of this work. The simulation of the thin 0.8″ crystal is compared to the qualitative Voronkov model and DLTS experiments, to give some insights on the applied recombination factors. The work concludes that for large crystals, grown in the vacancy region, the influence of an uncertain recombination factor is not as significant as for smaller crystals grown with a near critical growth parameter.

  7. Influence of high hydrostatic pressure on the vibrational spectrum of an edge dislocation and its dynamic interaction with point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashenko, V. V.; Belykh, N. V.

    2013-03-01

    The slip of a single edge dislocation in an elastic field of point defects chaotically distributed over a crystal with allowance for a high hydrostatic pressure has been studied theoretically. The numerical estimations have demonstrated that hydrostatic compression of some metals and alloys increases the dislocation drag force by point defects in them by several tens of percent.

  8. Theoretical calculations of the electronic and vibrational structure of point defects in ionic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.F.; Wilson, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of the Hartree-Fock one-electron equations for simple point defects in ionic crystals are discussed. The importance of polarization effects due to the diffuse nature of the wavefunctions in the relaxed excited states are emphasized, and the usefulness of an effective mass approximation indicated. Several approaches to the calculation of the electronic structure are discussed and evaluated. The connection between electronic structure calculations and phonon perturbations are pointed out through a brief discussion of localized perturbation theory.

  9. First-principles study of native point defects in LiNi(1/3)Co(1/3)Mn(1/3)O2 and Li2MnO3.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Sik

    2014-08-21

    We have studied native point defects in the layered oxides of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 and Li2MnO3, the promising cathode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries for the application of high lithium capacity, by performing first-principles calculations. Through the calculations of formation energies for native point defects in LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2, it was found that the Ni vacancy and the LiNi antisite are the most dominant defects, which shows a good agreement with previous experiments. Contrary to the previous experimental analysis, however, the NiLi antisite defect is not dominant, even though both Ni and Li ions have a similar ionic radius. In Li2MnO3, the LiMn antisite defect is dominant under the O-rich and Mn-poor condition. In contrast, the MnLi antisite, the Li vacancy in the Li layer, and the oxygen vacancy are dominant at the chemical potential of the boundary in equilibrium with Li2O. To enhance the migration of Li ions for achieving high power, the experimental syntheses of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 under the Ni-rich condition and Li2MnO3 under O-rich and Mn-poor condition were suggested. For Li2MnO3 suffering from poor electronic conductivity, it was found that the electronic conductivity can be increased by p- and n-type extrinsic doping under the O-rich and Mn-poor condition and the chemical potential of the boundary coexisting with Li2O, respectively, without losing the Li ion conductivity. PMID:25001849

  10. Electronic structure and spectral properties of paramagnetic point defects in Si3N4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Erbetta, Davide

    1999-11-01

    The geometric and electronic structure and the optical, vibrational, and magnetic properties of paramagnetic point defects in Si3N4 have been studied by means of ab initio quantum-chemical methods. Using cluster models and gradient-corrected density functional theory or configuration interaction (CI) wave functions, we have studied the N3≡Si• and Si2=N• paramagnetic point defects, also known as K0 and N0 centers, respectively. The computed ground-state properties, in particular the hyperfine coupling constants of N3≡Si• and Si2=N•, the vibrational spectra of the corresponding hydrogenated centers, N3≡Si-H and Si2=N-H, and the valence density of states are correctly described, showing the adequacy of the cluster models used for the study of point defects in silicon nitride. The optical transitions associated with N and K centers have been computed by means of CI calculations. The results are compared with those of the analogous defects in SiO2, the nonbridging oxygen and the E' center, respectively.

  11. Size dependence of vacancy migration energy in ionic nano particles: A potential energy landscape perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niiyama, Tomoaki; Okushima, Teruaki; Ikeda, Kensuke S.; Shimizu, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Size dependence of vacancy migration energy in ionic nano particles is investigated by analysis of potential energy surfaces in potassium chloride clusters. Numerical methods are used to find almost all local minima and transition states for vacancy migration in clusters of different sizes, and reveal characteristic features of energy surface structure. It is shown that migration energy is significantly lower near a cluster surface than near a cluster core, and the mean first-passage time for migration of a vacancy decreases with cluster size. These results are consistent with observations of high diffusion rates in small clusters.

  12. First principles calculations of point defect diffusion in CdS buffer layers: Implications for Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 and Cu2ZnSn(Se,S)4-based thin-film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varley, J. B.; Lordi, V.; He, X.; Rockett, A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate point defects in CdS buffer layers that may arise from intermixing with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) or Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) absorber layers in thin-film photovoltaics (PV). Using hybrid functional calculations, we characterize the migration barriers of Cu, In, Ga, Se, Sn, Zn, Na, and K impurities and assess the activation energies necessary for their diffusion into the bulk of the buffer. We find that Cu, In, and Ga are the most mobile defects in CIGS-derived impurities, with diffusion expected to proceed into the buffer via interstitial-hopping and cadmium vacancy-assisted mechanisms at temperatures ˜400 °C. Cu is predicted to strongly favor migration paths within the basal plane of the wurtzite CdS lattice, which may facilitate defect clustering and ultimately the formation of Cu-rich interfacial phases as observed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic elemental maps in real PV devices. Se, Zn, and Sn defects are found to exhibit much larger activation energies and are not expected to diffuse within the CdS bulk at temperatures compatible with typical PV processing temperatures. Lastly, we find that Na interstitials are expected to exhibit slightly lower activation energies than K interstitials despite having a larger migration barrier. Still, we find both alkali species are expected to diffuse via an interstitially mediated mechanism at slightly higher temperatures than enable In, Ga, and Cu diffusion in the bulk. Our results indicate that processing temperatures in excess of ˜400 °C will lead to more interfacial intermixing with CdS buffer layers in CIGSe devices, and less so for CZTSSe absorbers where only Cu is expected to significantly diffuse into the buffer.

  13. Research Update: Point defects in CdTe{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} crystals grown from a Te-rich solution for applications in detecting radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gul, R.; Roy, U. N.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.; Lee, W.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.

    2015-04-01

    We investigated cadmium telluride selenide (CdTeSe) crystals, newly grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM), for the presence and abundance of point defects. Current Deep Level Transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS) was used to determine the energies of the traps, their capture cross sections, and densities. The bias across the detectors was varied from 1 to 30 V. Four types of point defects were identified, ranging from 10 meV to 0.35 eV. Two dominant traps at energies of 0.18 eV and 0.14 eV were studied in depth. Cd vacancies are found at lower concentrations than other point defects present in the material.

  14. Energy transfer and excitation migration in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Paul A.; Wolak, Mason A.; Cunningham, Paul D.; Melinger, Joseph S.

    2012-09-01

    Energy transfer plays a key role in various applications of organic semiconductors such as electroluminescence, photovoltaics, and sensors. We have carried out a study combining transient and continuous wave (CW) optical spectroscopy with modeling. The fluorescence spectra and dynamics of a functionalized pentacene doped into a fluorescent host (Alq3) were measured and simulated by a Monte Carlo model incorporating distributed dopants and exciton migration. For nonluminescent materials, transient absorption spectroscopy provides insight into excitation migration. Singlet diffusion rates in C60 were determined by probing delayed charge transfer to ZnPc in films with a layered nanostructure.

  15. Influence of point defects on grain boundary diffusion in oxides. [Annual report, July 1, 1990--March 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Stubican, V.S.

    1991-03-15

    The influence of point defects on grain boundary diffusion of Co ions in NiO was studied using polycrystalline films and bicrystals. Grain boundary diffusion was studied at 750 C at oxygen partial pressure. Two diffusion regions were found. At low oxygen pressures, extrinsic diffusion was observed. Above oxygen pressure of 10{sup {minus}7}, influence of intrinsic point defects was detected. It was determined that grain boundary diffusion was > 3 orders of magnitude faster than volume diffusion. However, it seems that grain boundary diffusion is influenced by the point defects in a similar way as the volume diffusion. 4 figs.

  16. Intrinsic "Vacancy Point Defect" Induced Electrochemiluminescence from Coreless Supertetrahedral Chalcogenide Nanocluster.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Lin, Jian; Zhao, Tingbi; Hu, Dandan; Wu, Tao; Liu, Yang

    2016-06-22

    A deep understanding of distinct functional differences of various defects in semiconductor materials is conducive to effectively control and rationally tune defect-induced functionalities. However, such research goals remain a substantial challenge due to great difficulties in identifying the defect types and distinguishing their own roles, especially when various defects coexist in bulk or nanoscale material. Hereby, we subtly selected a molecular-type semiconductor material as structural mode composed of supertetrahedral chalcogenide Cd-In-S nanoclusters (NCs) with intrinsic vacancy point defect at the core site and antisite point defects at the surface of supertetrahedron and successfully established the correlation of those point defects with their own electrochemiluminescence (ECL) behaviors. The multichannel ECL properties were recorded, and the corresponding reaction mechanisms were also proposed. The predominant radiation recombination path of ECL emission peak at 585 nm was significantly distinguished from asymmetrically broad PL emission with a peak at 490 nm. In addition, the ECL performance of the coreless supertetrahedral chalcogenide nanocluster can be modulated by atomically precise doping of monomanganese ion at the core vacant site. A relatively high ECL efficiency of 2.1% was also gained. Actually, this is the first investigation of ECL behavior of semiconductor materials based on supertetrahedral chalcogenide nanocluster in aqueous solution. Current research may open up a new avenue to probe the roles of various different defects with defined composition and position in the NC. The versatile and bright ECL properties of Cd-In-S NC combined with tunable ECL potential and ECL peak suggest that the new kind of NC-based ECL material may hold great promising for its potential applications in electrochemical analysis, sensing, and imaging. PMID:27228563

  17. First-principles study of point defects at a semicoherent interface

    PubMed Central

    Metsanurk, E.; Tamm, A.; Caro, A.; Aabloo, A.; Klintenberg, M.

    2014-01-01

    Most of the atomistic modeling of semicoherent metal-metal interfaces has so far been based on the use of semiempirical interatomic potentials. We show that key conclusions drawn from previous studies are in contradiction with more precise ab-initio calculations. In particular we find that single point defects do not delocalize, but remain compact near the interfacial plane in Cu-Nb multilayers. We give a simple qualitative explanation for this difference on the basis of the well known limited transferability of empirical potentials. PMID:25524061

  18. The effect of point defects on diffusion pathway within α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuraya, Seiji; Takahashi, Keisuke; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2015-05-01

    The diffusion mechanism of point defects within α-Fe with a single vacancy is investigated using the density functional theory. Calculation reveals that H has a slight effect towards Fe diffusion to a vacancy. He has a strong binding with a vacancy; therefore, Fe diffusion is unlikely to happen. The diffusion of C and N from a vacancy has a high barrier. However, Fe diffusion to a vacancy decreases if the C and N diffuse from a vacancy. Thus, the effect of interstitial atoms within α-Fe with a single vacancy towards diffusion and a possible diffusion pathway is discussed.

  19. Structural transformations of stacking fault tetrahedra upon the absorption of point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletaev, G. M.; Starostenkov, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms of the structural modification of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) upon the absorption of point defects have been studied by the method of molecular dynamics. The sequential absorption of vacancies by a perfect SFT is accompanied by the following transformations: (i) the formation of a step on one of the SFT faces, (ii) a change in the step sign upon reaching the middle of the face, (iii) the formation of an SFT with truncated vertex, and (iv) the formation of the perfect SFT. Upon the absorption of interstitial atoms, the stages of SFT transformation follow the reverse order.

  20. Mode confinement in photonic quasicrystal point-defect cavities for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Gennaro, E.; Savo, S.; Andreone, A.; Galdi, V.; Castaldi, G.; Pierro, V.; Masullo, M. Rosaria

    2008-10-01

    In this letter, we present a study of the confinement properties of point-defect resonators in finite-size photonic-bandgap structures composed of aperiodic arrangements of dielectric rods, with special emphasis on their use for the design of cavities for particle accelerators. Specifically, for representative geometries, we study the properties of the fundamental mode (as a function of the filling fraction, structure size, and losses) via two-dimensional and three-dimensional full-wave numerical simulations, as well as microwave measurements at room temperature. Results indicate that for reduced-size structures, aperiodic geometries exhibit superior confinement properties by comparison with periodic ones.

  1. First-principles study of point defects at a semicoherent interface

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Metsanurk, E.; Tamm, A.; Caro, A.; Aabloo, A.; Klintenberg, M.

    2014-12-19

    Most of the atomistic modeling of semicoherent metal-metal interfaces has so far been based on the use of semiempirical interatomic potentials. Here, we show that key conclusions drawn from previous studies are in contradiction with more precise ab-initio calculations. In particular we find that single point defects do not delocalize, but remain compact near the interfacial plane in Cu-Nb multilayers. Lastly, we give a simple qualitative explanation for this difference on the basis of the well known limited transferability of empirical potentials.

  2. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-07-14

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO{sub 2} (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  3. Periodic surface structure bifurcation induced by ultrafast laser generated point defect diffusion in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abere, Michael J.; Torralva, Ben; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2016-04-01

    The formation of high spatial frequency laser induced periodic surface structures (HSFL) with period <0.3 λ in GaAs after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses in air is studied. We have identified a point defect generation mechanism that operates in a specific range of fluences in semiconductors between the band-gap closure and ultrafast-melt thresholds that produces vacancy/interstitial pairs. Stress relaxation, via diffusing defects, forms the 350-400 nm tall and ˜90 nm wide structures through a bifurcation process of lower spatial frequency surface structures. The resulting HSFL are predominately epitaxial single crystals and retain the original GaAs stoichiometry.

  4. Self-regulation mechanism for charged point defects in hybrid halide perovskites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Walsh, Aron; Scanlon, David O.; Chen, Shiyou; Gong, X. G.; Wei, Su -Huai

    2014-12-11

    Hybrid halide perovskites such as methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) exhibit unusually low free-carrier concentrations despite being processed at low-temperatures from solution. We demonstrate, through quantum mechanical calculations, that an origin of this phenomenon is a prevalence of ionic over electronic disorder in stoichiometric materials. Schottky defect formation provides a mechanism to self-regulate the concentration of charge carriers through ionic compensation of charged point defects. The equilibrium charged vacancy concentration is predicted to exceed 0.4 % at room temperature. Furthermore, this behavior, which goes against established defect conventions for inorganic semiconductors, has implications for photovoltaic performance.

  5. [Migration].

    PubMed

    Maccotta, W; Perotti, A; Thebaut, F; Cristofanelli, L; Pittau, F; Sergi, N; Pittau, L; Morelli, A; Morsella, M; Grinover, A P

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of 11 individual articles on aspects of current migration problems affecting developed countries. The geographical focus is on immigration in Europe, with particular reference to Italy, although one paper is concerned with Quebec. The topical focus is on the social problems associated with immigration. The articles are in Italian, with one exception, which is in French. PMID:12343393

  6. Review of Calculations on Point Defect Properties in Delta-Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P. G.; Wolfer, W. G.

    2015-09-08

    The results of theoretical predictions of properties for vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIA) in δ-Pu are presented and reviewed. Three methods have been used for these predictions, namely the modified embedded atom method (MEAM), density functional theory (DFT) with and without spin polarization, and continuum mechanics (CM) models adapted to plutonium. The properties considered are formation and migration energies, and relaxation volumes of vacancies and SIA. Predicted values vary considerably. Nevertheless, all three methods predict that the activation energy for self-diffusion by vacancies is of similar magnitude as the SIA formation energy. Furthermore, the absolute magnitudes of relaxation volumes for vacancies and SIA are also similar, indicating that there exist no large bias for radiation-induced void swelling.

  7. Point defects in YBa2Cu3O7-x studied using positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudy, Michal; Eisterer, M.; Weber, H. W.; Veterníková, J.; Sojak, S.; Slugeň, V.

    2012-07-01

    Fast neutron irradiation is a powerful technique for introducing additional pinning centers into high temperature superconductors. The spherical defects with sizes of a few nanometers are considered to be effective pinning centers, enhancing Jc. Their morphology is well-known and has already been investigated by several authors in great detail. However, only very little is known about the nature and density of smaller and point defects, which are invisible in transmission electron microscopy. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was applied to investigate the nature and the concentration of small point-like defects. In this work, the influence of small point defects, such as vacancies and vacancy clusters, on the superconducting properties of YBa2Cu3O7-x bulks was studied; these were introduced by irradiation in the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Vienna. Jc and Tc measurements were performed prior to and after each irradiation step. The samples were irradiated up to a fast neutron ( > 0.1 MeV) fluence of 6 × 1021 m-2. The two kinds of defects—the large collision cascades and the small point-like defects—contribute to the decrease of Tc as well as to the Jc enhancement in astonishingly similar ways.

  8. Calculation of the High-Temperature Point Defects Structure in Te-Rich CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shujun; Wang, Tao; Liu, Huimin; He, Yihui; Jie, Wanqi

    2016-06-01

    A thermodynamic equilibrium model for CdTe annealed under Te vapor is established, in which possible point defects and a defect reaction existing in undoped and In-doped Te-rich CdTe crystals are taken into consideration. Independent point defects, such as VCd, Cdi, and Tei, as well as defect complexes, namely TeCd-VCd (B complex), {{Te}}_{{Cd}}^{2 + } - {{V}}_{{Cd}}^{2 - } (D complex), {{In}}_{{Cd}}^{ + } - {{V}}_{{Cd}}^{ - } (A-center) and Tei-VCd (TeCd), are discussed based on the defect chemistry theory. More specially, the mass action law and quasi-chemical equations are used to calculate defects concentration and Fermi level in undoped and doped CdTe crystals with different indium concentrations. It is found that the Fermi level is controlled by a {{V}}_{{Cd}}^{2 - } , TeCd, and B/D-complex in undoped crystal. The concentration of VCd drops down in an obvious manner and that of TeCd rises for doped crystal with increasing [In].

  9. Dynamic instability of dislocation motion at high-strain-rate deformation of crystals with high concentration of point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashenko, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    The motion of an ensemble of edge dislocations has been studied under conditions of high-strainrate deformation of a crystal with a high concentration of point defects. The conditions of existence of the region of dynamic instability of dislocation motion have been found. It has been shown that the existence of the region and its boundaries is determined by the proportion of the point defect concentration and the dislocation density.

  10. Point defect properties in hcp and bcc Zr with trace solute Nb revealed by ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, X. K.; Lai, W. S.; Liu, B. X.

    2009-08-01

    The properties of simple point defect (i.e. vacancy, self and foreign interstitial atoms) in the hcp (alpha) and bcc (beta) Zr with trace solute Nb have been studied by ab initio calculations with VASP codes. The calculations indicate that the formation energies of vacancy and substitutional Nb atom are 1.94 eV and 0.68 eV in alpha Zr and 0.36 eV and 0.07 eV in beta Zr, respectively, while the binding energies of the nearest neighbor vacancy-substitutional Nb pair and the nearest neighbor substitutional Nb-Nb pair are 0.09 eV and 0.03 eV in alpha Zr and 2.78 eV and 0.72 eV in beta Zr, respectively. These results suggest that the Nb atoms are more likely to agglomerate and form precipitates in the beta Zr than in the alpha Zr. Thus, the α-Zr-β-Zr-β-Nb transition mechanism through in situ α to β transformation of Zr and the vacancy-assisted Nb diffusion for Nb conglomeration in beta Zr under irradiation is proposed to explain the existence of beta Nb and Zr precipitate mixtures observed in the experiments for the Zr-Nb alloy. In addition, the defect formation energies in bcc Nb are also presented.

  11. Confining energy migration in upconversion nanoparticles towards deep ultraviolet lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian; Jin, Limin; Kong, Wei; Sun, Tianying; Zhang, Wenfei; Liu, Xinhong; Fan, Jun; Yu, Siu Fung; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating particle size is a powerful means of creating unprecedented optical properties in metals and semiconductors. Here we report an insulator system composed of NaYbF4:Tm in which size effect can be harnessed to enhance multiphoton upconversion. Our mechanistic investigations suggest that the phenomenon stems from spatial confinement of energy migration in nanosized structures. We show that confining energy migration constitutes a general and versatile strategy to manipulating multiphoton upconversion, demonstrating an efficient five-photon upconversion emission of Tm3+ in a stoichiometric Yb lattice without suffering from concentration quenching. The high emission intensity is unambiguously substantiated by realizing room-temperature lasing emission at around 311 nm after 980-nm pumping, recording an optical gain two orders of magnitude larger than that of a conventional Yb/Tm-based system operating at 650 nm. Our findings thus highlight the viability of realizing diode-pumped lasing in deep ultraviolet regime for various practical applications.

  12. Hybrid Hamiltonian and Green's Function Approach for Studying Native Point Defect Levels in Semiconductor Compounds and Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Srini; Van Orden, Derek; Yu, Zhi-Gang

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a hybrid method that can be applied to study isolated defects in semiconductor compounds and superlattices. The method is a combination of (1) a long-range tight-binding (TB) Hamiltonian, (2) a first-principles Hamiltonian, and (3) a Green's function (GF) formalism. The calculation of the GF requires accurate energy band structure, wave functions, and defect potentials. The TB Hamiltonian with sp 3 orbitals basis ensures accurate band gaps and band masses while providing the functional form for the wave functions. We calculated the band gaps of InAs/GaSb and InAs/InAsSb strained-layer superlattices and found them to agree well with measurements. The change in potentials caused by native point defects (NPDs) was obtained from a first-principles method using Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms, which also uses sp 3 basis. We describe the method of calculating NPD energy levels in compounds and superlattices, obtain some defect levels in GaAs, InAs, InSb, and GaSb compounds, and provide details of the NPD-level calculations.

  13. Hybrid Hamiltonian and Green's Function Approach for Studying Native Point Defect Levels in Semiconductor Compounds and Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Srini; Van Orden, Derek; Yu, Zhi-Gang

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a hybrid method that can be applied to study isolated defects in semiconductor compounds and superlattices. The method is a combination of (1) a long-range tight-binding (TB) Hamiltonian, (2) a first-principles Hamiltonian, and (3) a Green's function (GF) formalism. The calculation of the GF requires accurate energy band structure, wave functions, and defect potentials. The TB Hamiltonian with sp 3 orbitals basis ensures accurate band gaps and band masses while providing the functional form for the wave functions. We calculated the band gaps of InAs/GaSb and InAs/InAsSb strained-layer superlattices and found them to agree well with measurements. The change in potentials caused by native point defects (NPDs) was obtained from a first-principles method using Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms, which also uses sp 3 basis. We describe the method of calculating NPD energy levels in compounds and superlattices, obtain some defect levels in GaAs, InAs, InSb, and GaSb compounds, and provide details of the NPD-level calculations.

  14. Point defect concentrations and solid solution hardening in NiAl with Fe additions

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, L.M.; Chang, Y.A.; Liu, C.T.

    1997-08-01

    The solid solution hardening behavior exhibited when Fe is added to NiAl is investigated. This is an interesting problem to consider since the ternary Fe additions may choose to occupy either the Ni or the Al sublattice, affecting the hardness at differing rates. Moreover, the addition of Fe may affect the concentrations of other point defects such as vacancies and Ni anti-sites. As a result, unusual effects ranging from rapid hardening to solid solution softening are observed. Alloys with varying amounts of Fe were prepared in Ni-rich (40 at. % Al) and stoichiometric (50 at. % Al) compositions. Vacancy concentrations were measured using lattice parameter and density measurements. The site occupancy of Fe was determined using ALCHEMI. Using these two techniques the site occupancies of all species could be uniquely determined. Significant differences in the defect concentrations as well as the hardening behavior were encountered between the Ni-rich and stoichiometric regimes.

  15. Self-regulation mechanism for charged point defects in hybrid halide perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Aron; Scanlon, David O.; Chen, Shiyou; Gong, X. G.; Wei, Su -Huai

    2014-12-11

    Hybrid halide perovskites such as methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) exhibit unusually low free-carrier concentrations despite being processed at low-temperatures from solution. We demonstrate, through quantum mechanical calculations, that an origin of this phenomenon is a prevalence of ionic over electronic disorder in stoichiometric materials. Schottky defect formation provides a mechanism to self-regulate the concentration of charge carriers through ionic compensation of charged point defects. The equilibrium charged vacancy concentration is predicted to exceed 0.4 % at room temperature. Furthermore, this behavior, which goes against established defect conventions for inorganic semiconductors, has implications for photovoltaic performance.

  16. Atomically resolved structural determination of graphene and its point defects via extrapolation assisted phase retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2015-01-12

    Previously reported crystalline structures obtained by an iterative phase retrieval reconstruction of their diffraction patterns seem to be free from displaying any irregularities or defects in the lattice, which appears to be unrealistic. We demonstrate here that the structure of a nanocrystal including its atomic defects can unambiguously be recovered from its diffraction pattern alone by applying a direct phase retrieval procedure not relying on prior information of the object shape. Individual point defects in the atomic lattice are clearly apparent. Conventional phase retrieval routines assume isotropic scattering. We show that when dealing with electrons, the quantitatively correct transmission function of the sample cannot be retrieved due to anisotropic, strong forward scattering specific to electrons. We summarize the conditions for this phase retrieval method and show that the diffraction pattern can be extrapolated beyond the original record to even reveal formerly not visible Bragg peaks. Such extrapolated wave field pattern leads to enhanced spatial resolution in the reconstruction.

  17. Diffusion of self-point defects in body-centered cubic iron crystal containing dislocations

    SciTech Connect

    Sivak, A. B.; Romanov, V. A.; Chernov, V. M.

    2010-01-15

    The energetic, crystallographic, and diffusion characteristics of self-point defects (SPDs) (vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs)) in body-centered cubic (bcc) iron crystal in the absence of stress fields have been obtained by the molecular statics and molecular dynamics methods. The effect of elastic stress fields of dislocations on the characteristics of SPDs (elastic dipoles) has been calculated by the methods of the anisotropic linear theory of elasticity. The SPD diffusion in the elastic fields of edge and screw dislocations (with Burgers vectors 1/2 <111> and <100>) at 293 K has been studied by the kinetic Monte Carlo method. The values of the SPD sink strength of dislocations of different types are obtained. Dislocations are more effective sinks for SIAs than for vacancies. The difference in the sink strengths for SIAs and vacancies in the case of edge dislocations is larger than the screw dislocations.

  18. Lead monoxide α-PbO: electronic properties and point defect formation.

    PubMed

    Berashevich, J; Semeniuk, O; Rubel, O; Rowlands, J A; Reznik, A

    2013-02-20

    The electronic properties of polycrystalline lead oxide consisting of a network of single-crystalline α-PbO platelets and the formation of native point defects in the α-PbO crystal lattice are studied using first-principles calculations. The results suggest that the polycrystalline nature of α-PbO causes the formation of lattice defects (i.e., oxygen and lead vacancies) in such a high concentration that defect related conductivity becomes the dominant mechanism of charge transport. The neutral O vacancy forms a defect state at 1.03 eV above the valence band which can act as a deep trap for electrons, while the Pb vacancy forms a shallow trap for holes located just 0.1 eV above the valence band. The ionization of O vacancies can account for the experimentally found dark current decay in ITO/PbO/Au structures. PMID:23341469

  19. Synergetic effects of Mn and Si in the interaction with point defects in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakaev, A.; Terentyev, D.; He, X.; Van Neck, D.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of Mn, Si and Cr with a vacancy and self-interstitial defects in BCC Fe has been analyzed using ab initio calculations. While the interaction of the considered solute clusters with a single vacancy is linearly additive, there is a considerable synergetic effect in the case of self-interstitial atoms, found to bind strongly with Mn-Si pairs. The latter therefore act as deep trapping configurations for self-interstitials. At the same time, the presence of the point defects nearby weakly attractive Mn-Si pairs significantly enhances the solute-solute binding. The revealed effects are rationalized on the basis of charge density and local magnetic moment distributions.

  20. WTe 2 surfaces in UHV-STM image formation and analysis of point defect structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, J. A. A.; Sofield, C. J.; Myhra, S.

    1997-05-01

    The layered semi-metallic T d phase of WTe 2 has been examined by STM in UHV. The effects of transient transfer of tip apex atom from/to the surface (W ↔ Te exchange) on the imaging conditions have been observed; the effects demonstrate the inadequacy of the Tersoff-Hamann approximation to the description of the tunnelling process. Two distinctly different point-defect configurations have been observed, assigned tentatively to vacancies in either "top" or "bottom" Te sites. Anomalous image conditions were observed frequently; these have been ascribed to delamination of the structure, and consequential transfer of the tunnelling to a delocalised internal gap, with the image representing the averaged tunnel current during relative displacements of two neighbouring Te planes.

  1. Point defect behavior in B2-type intermetallic compound FeAl

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, T.; Kogachi, M.

    1999-07-01

    Point defect behavior in B2-type FeAl alloys is investigated from a thermodynamic point of view, based on the Bragg-Williams method. The model is developed by taking new defect formation mechanisms, random vacancy distribution (RVD), and antisite atom recovering (ASAR), into consideration, which were proposed based on the current findings in in situ neutron and X-ray diffraction studies for the B2 FeAl. The condition for appearance of the RVD and ASAR states is given. Application of this model to B2 FeAl alloys shows that the RVD-like behavior is reproduced in the Fe-rich composition region and also a rapid increase in vacancy concentration observed in the Al-rich region can be interpreted by the ASAR process by antisite Al atoms.

  2. First-principles calculations for point defects in MAX phases Ti2AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaowen; Yang, Shutong; Wang, Canglong

    2016-04-01

    This paper outlines general physical issues associated with performing computational numerical simulations of primary point defects in MAX phases Ti2AlN. First-principles solutions are possible due to the development of computational resources of software and hardware. The calculation accuracy is a good agreement with the experimental results. As an important application of our simulations, the results could provide a theoretical guidance for future experiments and application of Ti2AlN. For example, the N mono-vacancy is the most difficult to form. On the contrary, the mono-vacancy formation in Ti2AlN is energetically most favorable for the Al atom. The essence of the phenomena is explained by the calculated density of state (DOS).

  3. Point defect stability in gamma irradiated aluminoborosilicate glasses: Influence of Yb3+ doping ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollier, N.; Pukhkaya, V.

    2012-04-01

    Yb-doped aluminoborosilicate were irradiated with gamma rays at 104, 105, 106 and 107 Gy. The thermal stability as well as the recovery at room temperature of paramagnetic point defects such as Boron Oxygen Hole Center (BOHC), peroxy radicals and E‧ center were studied. At first, doping with Yb induced a saturation of the E‧ defect production and more importantly, the E‧ center recovering temperature was decreased by 50 °C. E‧ and BOHC defects both showed a limited stability at room temperature. By doping with Yb the glasses, the fading time of defects and in particular the BOHC defect recovery was modified. The BOHC defect showed moreover a larger sensitivity to photobleaching compared to the E‧ centers.

  4. The role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. Summary report and papers

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.Y.

    1994-08-01

    This report is a summary of a workshop hold on August 24--26, 1992. Session 1 of the conference discussed characteristics of various commercial photovoltaic silicon substrates, the nature of impurities and defects in them, and how they are related to the material growth. Session 2 on point defects reviewed the capabilities of theoretical approaches to determine equilibrium structure of defects in the silicon lattice arising from transitional metal impurities and hydrogen. Session 3 was devoted to a discussion of the surface photovoltaic method for characterizing bulk wafer lifetimes, and to detailed studies on the effectiveness of various gettering operations on reducing the deleterious effects of transition metals. Papers presented at the conference are also included in this summary report.

  5. Use of the point defect model to interpret the iron oxidation kinetics under proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lapuerta, S.; Moncoffre, N.; Jaffrezic, H.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Bererd, N.; Esnouf, C.; Crusset, D.

    2007-03-15

    This article concerns the study of iron corrosion in wet air under mega-electron-volt proton irradiation for different fluxes at room temperature and with a relative humidity fixed to 45%. Oxidized iron sample surfaces are characterized by ion beam analysis (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and elastic recoil detection analysis), for the elemental analysis. The structural and physicochemical characterization is performed using the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. We have also measured the iron oxidation kinetics. Radiation enhanced diffusion and transport processes have been evidenced. The modeling of the experimental data shows that the apparent oxygen diffusion coefficient increases whereas the oxygen transport velocity decreases as function of flux. Finally, the point defect model has been used to determine the electric field value in the samples. Results have shown that the transport process can be attributed to the presence of an electrical potential gradient.

  6. Computational Characterization of Defects in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Spontaneous and Water-Induced Point Defects in ZIF-8.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenyang; Han, Chu; Sholl, David S; Schmidt, J R

    2016-02-01

    Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) are an important class of porous crystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) materials that have attracted widespread attention for applications ranging from gas adsorption and separation to catalysis. Although the bulk crystal structures of MOFs are typically well-characterized, comparatively little is known regarding MOF defect structures. Drawing on analogies with conventional silicon-based zeolites, we utilize computational methods to examine the structure and stability of putative point-defect structures (including vacancies, substitutions, and "dangling" linkers) within the prototypical ZIF-8 structure. Considering both postsynthetic (gas-phase) and synthetic (solution-phase) conditions, we find that several of the defect structures lie low in energy relative to the defect-free parent crystal, with barriers to defect formation that are large but surmountable under relevant temperatures. These results are consistent with prior experimental observations of ZIF stability and reactivity and suggest that defects may play an important role in influencing the long-term stability of MOFs under conditions that include exposure to water vapor and trace contaminants such as acid gases. PMID:26771275

  7. Ab initio study of point defects in PbSe and PbTe: Bulk and nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Wrasse, E. O.; Venezuela, P.; Baierle, R. J.

    2014-11-14

    First principles investigations, within the spin-polarized density functional theory, are performed to study energetic stability and electronic properties of point defects (vacancies and antisites) in PbSe and PbTe: bulk and nanowire (NW). Our results show that the energetic stability of these defects is ruled by relaxation process. These defects have lower formation energies in the nanowire structures as compared to the bulk, being more stable in the surface of the NWs. We also show that in the bulk system only one charge state is stable, otherwise, due to the larger band gaps, more than one charge state may be stable in the NWs. In addition, we have investigated how the presence of intrinsic defects affects the electronic properties of bulk and NW systems. Vacancies give rise to new electronic states near to the edges of the valence and conduction bands while the energetic position of the electronic states from antisites depends on the charge state, being localized inside the band gap or near the edges of the valence or conduction bands. We discuss how these changes in the electronic properties due to intrinsic defects may affect the thermoelectric properties of PbSe and PbTe NWs.

  8. Point Defect Properties of Cd(Zn)Te and TlBr for Room-Temperature Gamma Radiation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lordi, Vincenzo

    2013-03-01

    The effects of various crystal defects in CdTe, Cd1-xZnxTe (CZT), and TlBr are critical for their performance as room-temperature gamma radiation detectors. We use predictive first principles theoretical methods to provide fundamental, atomic scale understanding of the defect properties of these materials to enable design of optimal growth and processing conditions, such as doping, annealing, and stoichiometry. Several recent cases will be reviewed, including (i) accurate calculations of the thermodynamic and electronic properties of native point defects and point defect complexes in CdTe and CZT; (ii) the effects of Zn alloying on the native point defect properties of CZT; (iii) point defect diffusion and binding related to Te clustering in Cd(Zn)Te; (iv) the profound effect of native point defects--principally vacancies--on the intrinsic material properties of TlBr, particularly electronic and ionic conductivity; (v) tailored doping of TlBr to independently control the electronic and ionic conductivity; and (vi) the effects of metal impurities on the electronic properties and device performance of TlBr detectors. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 with support from the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nonproliferation and Verification Research and Development NA-22.

  9. Studies of point-defect interactions in solids using perturbed angular correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Schuhmann, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Vacancy defect production and migration in {sup 111}In doped Au, Pt and Ni following plastic deformation are studied via {sup 111}Cd perturbed {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlations (TDPAC). In all three metals, deformation produces the same defect species as are seen following irradiation. In Au, a particular In-vacancy complex which is probably a trapped divacancy exists in two distinct configurations. Thermal conversion from one configuration to the other occurs near 200K. In Pt, an In-vacancy complex exhibits a strongly temperature dependent electric field gradient, indicating the presence of local resonant modes. In Ni, a relaxed In-trivacancy complex forms via simple, single-step trapping of a migrating trivacancy. Once formed, the In-trivacancy complex in Ni can trap up to four guest H or D atoms. These are bound to the complex with an energy of {approximately}0.5 eV, irrespective of isotopic mass. By monitoring the damping of the TDPAC precession not associated with a bound defect, the author observed release of untrapped interstitial H from the lattice. These experiments give a consistent, microscopic picture of H diffusion and release from Ni. The use of BaF{sub 2} scintillators allows for an eightfold improvement in TDPAC time resolution. This makes possible experiments in systems previously inaccessible due to large precessional frequencies. The author demonstrates the utility of BaF{sub 2} in several examples, including {sup 100}RhNi, {sup 99}TcFe, {sup 101}RuFe, {sup 100}RhCo and {sup 100}RhFe, systems which had not been studied previously due to time resolution limitation. The Larmor frequency for {sup 100}RhFe, 5565 Mrad/s, is the highest frequency ever measured via TDPAC.

  10. Water soluble quantum dot nanoclusters: energy migration in artifical materials.

    PubMed

    Oh, Megan H J; Gentleman, Darcy J; Scholes, Gregory D

    2006-11-21

    Energy migration in self-assembled, water soluble, quantum dot (QD) nanoclusters is reported. These spherical nanoclusters are composed of CdSe QDs bound together by pepsin, a digestive enzyme found in mammals. A structural model for the clusters is suggested, based on scanning transmission electron microscopy, as well as dynamic light scattering and small angle X-ray scattering. Cluster sizes range from 100 to 400 nm in diameter and show a close-packed interior structure. Optical characterization of the absorption and emission spectra of the clusters is reported, finding photoluminescence quantum yields of up to approximately 60% in water for clusters made from core-shell CdSe-ZnS QDs. Clusters prepared from two different size populations of CdSe QD samples (3 and 4 nm in diameter) demonstrate energy migration and trapping. Resonance energy transfer (RET), from small to large dots within the QD-pepsin cluster, is observed by monitoring the quenching of the small donor dot fluorescence along with enhancement of the large acceptor dot fluorescence. PMID:17091158

  11. Point defects and defect-related transport of matter in transition metal-containing orthosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qi

    Point defects and defect-related transport properties of transition metal-containing orthosilicates with the olivine structure are interesting topics but are not yet well understood. At high temperatures, the transport properties of sufficiently pure olivines are governed by point defects. To improve the currently limited understanding of the defect structure and defect-related transport properties of olivine group compounds, the transport of matter in orthosilicates of the type Me2SiO4, with Me = Co and Mn, was experimentally investigated. The cation tracer diffusion of cobalt and manganese in cobalt and manganese orthosilicates, respectively, was studied as a function of crystal orientation, oxygen activity and temperature using high purity, synthetic cobalt and manganese orthosilicate single crystals grown by the floating zone method. Modeling of the observed oxygen activity dependancies of the cation tracer diffusion coefficients and of point defect concentrations was performed based on data obtained from this study in conjunction with other defect-related data reported in literature. The oxygen activity dependence of the diffusion of cobalt in Co 2SiO4 along the three principle orientations at 1300 °C at high oxygen activities is compatible with cobalt vacancies and holes as majority defects. At lower oxygen activities, the oxygen activity dependence of the cobalt tracer diffusion coefficients becomes smaller than at higher oxygen activities, which is most likely related to an increase in concentrations of cobalt interstitials. When using the space group Pbnm for assigning crystal orientations, the ratio found for the cobalt tracer diffusion coefficients at aO2 = 1 is approximately D*Co001 :D*Co010 :D*Co100 = 30:3:1. The oxygen activity dependence of the diffusion of manganese in Mn 2SiO4 along the three principle orientations at 1200 °C is, at high oxygen activities, compatible with manganese vacancies and holes as majority defects. The observed oxygen

  12. First principles studies on the impact of point defects on the phase stability of (AlxCr1-x)2O3 solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, C. M.; Koutná, N.; Ramm, J.; Kolozsvári, S.; Paulitsch, J.; Holec, D.; Mayrhofer, P. H.

    2016-02-01

    Density Functional Theory applying the generalised gradient approximation is used to study the phase stability of (AlxCr1-x)2O3 solid solutions in the context of physical vapour deposition (PVD). Our results show that the energy of formation for the hexagonal α phase is lower than for the metastable cubic γ and B1-like phases-independent of the Al content x. Even though this suggests higher stability of the α phase, its synthesis by physical vapour deposition is difficult for temperatures below 800 °C. Aluminium oxide and Al-rich oxides typically exhibit a multi-phased, cubic-dominated structure. Using a model system of (Al0.69Cr0.31)2O3 which experimentally yields larger fractions of the desired hexagonal α phase, we show that point defects strongly influence the energetic relationships. Since defects and in particular point defects, are unavoidably present in PVD coatings, they are important factors and can strongly influence the stability regions. We explicitly show that defects with low formation energies (e.g. metal Frenkel pairs) are strongly preferred in the cubic phases, hence a reasonable factor contributing to the observed thermodynamically anomalous phase composition.

  13. Oxygen Point Defect Chemistry in Ruddlesden-Popper Oxides (La1-xSrx)2MO4±δ (M = Co, Ni, Cu).

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Shao-Horn, Yang; Morgan, Dane

    2016-05-19

    Stability of oxygen point defects in Ruddlesden-Popper oxides (La1-xSrx)2MO4±δ (M = Co, Ni, Cu) is studied with density functional theory calculations to determine their stable sites, charge states, and energetics as functions of Sr content (x), transition metal (M), and defect concentration (δ). We demonstrate that the dominant O point defects can change between oxide interstitials, peroxide interstitials, and vacancies. In general, increasing x and atomic number of M stabilizes peroxide over oxide interstitials as well as vacancies over both peroxide and oxide interstitials; increasing δ destabilizes both oxide interstitials and vacancies but barely affects peroxide interstitials. We also demonstrate that the O 2p-band center is a powerful descriptor for these materials and correlates linearly with the formation energy of all defects. The trends of formation energy versus x, M, and δ and the correlation with O 2p-band center are explained in terms of oxidation chemistry and electronic structure. PMID:27157124

  14. Confining energy migration in upconversion nanoparticles towards deep ultraviolet lasing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xian; Jin, Limin; Kong, Wei; Sun, Tianying; Zhang, Wenfei; Liu, Xinhong; Fan, Jun; Yu, Siu Fung; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating particle size is a powerful means of creating unprecedented optical properties in metals and semiconductors. Here we report an insulator system composed of NaYbF4:Tm in which size effect can be harnessed to enhance multiphoton upconversion. Our mechanistic investigations suggest that the phenomenon stems from spatial confinement of energy migration in nanosized structures. We show that confining energy migration constitutes a general and versatile strategy to manipulating multiphoton upconversion, demonstrating an efficient five-photon upconversion emission of Tm3+ in a stoichiometric Yb lattice without suffering from concentration quenching. The high emission intensity is unambiguously substantiated by realizing room-temperature lasing emission at around 311 nm after 980-nm pumping, recording an optical gain two orders of magnitude larger than that of a conventional Yb/Tm-based system operating at 650 nm. Our findings thus highlight the viability of realizing diode-pumped lasing in deep ultraviolet regime for various practical applications. PMID:26739352

  15. EPR and ENDOR studies of point defects in lithium tetraborate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Douglas A.

    Lithium tetraborate (Li2B4O7 or LTB) is a promising material for both radiation dosimetry and neutron detection applications. LTB crystals can be grown pure or doped with different impurities including transition-metal and rare-earth ions. Research in this dissertation focuses on undoped LTB crystals and LTB crystals doped with copper and silver. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) are used to characterize point defects in the lithium tetraborate crystals. Thermoluminescence (TL), photoluminescence (PL), photoluminescence excitation (PLE), and optical absorption (OA) are also used. An intrinsic hole trap associated with lithium vacancies is characterized with EPR and ENDOR and its thermal stability is determined using thermoluminescence. A "perturbed" hole trap due to Ag2+ ions is characterized in doped crystals using EPR data alone. This method is tested on a previously studied hole center where both EPR and ENDOR were used. New x-ray induced centers are identified in copper-doped crystals. These include two Cu 2+ hole centers and two Cu0 electron centers. These centers are characterized with EPR and their thermal stability explains TL peaks in glow curves. Finally, a comprehensive study utilizing EPR, OA, PL, and PLE data provide convincing explanations for the absorption and emission features of silver-doped crystals.

  16. Theoretical characterisation of point defects on a MoS2 monolayer by scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    González, C; Biel, B; Dappe, Y J

    2016-03-11

    Different S and Mo vacancies as well as their corresponding antisite defects in a free-standing MoS2 monolayer are analysed by means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) simulations. Our theoretical methodology, based on the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green function formalism within the density functional theory (DFT) approach, is applied to simulate STM images for different voltages and tip heights. Combining the geometrical and electronic effects, all features of the different STM images can be explained, providing a valuable guide for future experiments. Our results confirm previous reports on S atom imaging, but also reveal a strong dependence on the applied bias for vacancies and antisite defects that include extra S atoms. By contrast, when additional Mo atoms cover the S vacancies, the MoS2 gap vanishes and a bias-independent bright protrusion is obtained in the STM image. Finally, we show that the inclusion of these point defects promotes the emergence of reactive dangling bonds that may act as efficient adsorption sites for external adsorbates. PMID:26862020

  17. Intrinsic Point-Defect Balance in Self-Ion-Implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuvonen, Pekka T.; Vines, Lasse; Svensson, Bengt G.; Kuznetsov, Andrej Yu.

    2013-01-01

    The role of excess intrinsic atoms for residual point defect balance has been discriminated by implanting Zn or O ions into Li-containing ZnO and monitoring Li redistribution and electrical resistivity after postimplant anneals. Strongly Li-depleted regions were detected in the Zn-implanted samples at depths beyond the projected range (Rp) upon annealing ≥600°C, correlating with a resistivity decrease. In contrast, similar anneals of the O-implanted samples resulted in Li accumulation at Rp and an increased resistivity. Control samples implanted with Ar or Ne ions, yielding similar defect production as for the Zn or O implants but with no surplus of intrinsic atoms, revealed no Li depletion. Thus, the depletion of Li shows evidence of excess Zn interstitials (ZnI) being released during annealing of the Zn-implanted samples. These ZnI’s convert substitutional Li atoms (LiZn) into highly mobile interstitial ones leading to the strongly Li-depleted regions. In the O-implanted samples, the high resistivity provides evidence of stable OI-related acceptors.

  18. Bright UV Single Photon Emission at Point Defects in h-BN.

    PubMed

    Bourrellier, Romain; Meuret, Sophie; Tararan, Anna; Stéphan, Odile; Kociak, Mathieu; Tizei, Luiz H G; Zobelli, Alberto

    2016-07-13

    To date, quantum sources in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region have been obtained only in semiconductor quantum dots. Color centers in wide bandgap materials may represent a more effective alternative. However, the quest for UV quantum emitters in bulk crystals faces the difficulty of combining an efficient UV excitation/detection optical setup with the capability of addressing individual color centers in potentially highly defective materials. In this work we overcome this limit by employing an original experimental setup coupling cathodoluminescence within a scanning transmission electron microscope to a Hanbury-Brown-Twiss intensity interferometer. We identify a new extremely bright UV single photon emitter (4.1 eV) in hexagonal boron nitride. Hyperspectral cathodoluminescence maps show a high spatial localization of the emission (∼80 nm) and a typical zero-phonon line plus phonon replica spectroscopic signature, indicating a point defect origin, most likely carbon substitutional at nitrogen sites. An additional nonsingle-photon broad emission may appear in the same spectral region, which can be attributed to intrinsic defects related to electron irradiation. PMID:27299915

  19. Stress dependence of optically active diamagnetic point defects in silicon oxynitride.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Hosokawa, Koichiro; Munisso, Maria Chiara; Leto, Andrea; Zhu, Wenliang

    2007-08-30

    The cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum arising from diamagnetic point defects of silicon oxynitride lattice was analyzed to extract quantitative information on local stress fields stored on the surface of a silicon nitride polycrystal. A calibration procedure was preliminarily made to obtain a relationship between CL spectral shift and applied stress, according to the piezo-spectroscopic effect. In this calibration procedure, we used the uniaxial stress field developed in a rectangular bar loaded in a four-point flexural jig. Stress dependence was clearly detected for the most intense spectral band of a doublet arising from diamagnetic ([triple bond]Si-Si[triple bond]) defects, which was located at around 340 nm. The shallow nature of the electron probe enabled the characterization of surface stress fields with sub-micrometer-order spatial resolution. As applications of the PS technique, the CL emission from [triple bond]Si-Si[triple bond] defects was used as a stress probe for visualizing the residual stress fields stored at grain-boundary regions and at the tip of a surface crack propagated in polycrystalline silicon nitride. PMID:17685596

  20. Point defects in lithium triborate (LiB3O5) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scripsick, M. P.; Fang, X. H.; Edwards, G. J.; Halliburton, L. E.; Tyminski, J. K.

    1993-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron-nuclear double resonance, optical absorption, and thermoluminescence have been used to investigate radiation-induced point defects in a single crystal of lithium triborate (LiB3O5). Two prominent defects are observed after irradiation near liquid-nitrogen temperature with 60 kV x rays. A four-line EPR spectrum, with 12.2 G splittings, is assigned to a trapped-hole center, and another four-line EPR spectrum, with 120 G splittings, is assigned to a trapped-electron center. In each case, the nucleus responsible for the observed hyperfine is 11B. The trapped hole is localized on an oxygen ion and has a weak hyperfine interaction with one neighboring boron nucleus, whereas the trapped electron is localized primarily on a boron ion with a correspondingly larger hyperfine interaction. Both defects become thermally unstable near 125 K, and their decay (i.e., recombination) correlates with an intense thermoluminescence peak at this same temperature. An optical absorption peak at 300 nm is produced by the x rays and thermally decays at the same temperatures as the EPR spectra.

  1. A study of void size growth in nonequilibrium stochastic systems of point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, Dmitrii O.; Kharchenko, Vasyl O.; Bashtova, Anna I.

    2016-05-01

    We study properties of voids growth dynamics in a stochastic system of point defects in solids under nonequilibrium conditions (sustained irradiation). It is shown that fluctuations of defect production rate (external noise) increase the critical void radius comparing to a deterministic system. An automodel regime of void size growth in a stochastic system is studied in detail. Considering a homogeneous system, it is found that external noise does not change the universality of the void size distribution function; the mean void size evolves according to classical nucleation theory. The noise increases the mean void size and spreads the void size distribution. Studying dynamics of spatially extended systems it was shown that vacancies remaining in a matrix phase are able to organize into vacancy enriched domains due to an instability caused by an elastic lattice deformation. It is shown that dynamics of voids growth is defined by void sinks strength with void size growth exponent varying from 1/3 up to 1/2.

  2. Effects of extrinsic point defects in phosphorene: B, C, N, O, and F adatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gaoxue E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu Pandey, Ravindra E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu; Karna, Shashi P. E-mail: pandey@mtu.edu

    2015-04-27

    Phosphorene is emerging as a promising 2D semiconducting material with a direct band gap and high carrier mobility. In this paper, we examine the role of the extrinsic point defects including surface adatoms in modifying the electronic properties of phosphorene using density functional theory. The surface adatoms considered are B, C, N, O, and F with a [He] core electronic configuration. Our calculations show that B and C, with electronegativity close to P, prefer to break the sp{sup 3} bonds of phosphorene and reside at the interstitial sites in the 2D lattice by forming sp{sup 2} like bonds with the native atoms. On the other hand, N, O, and F, which are more electronegative than P, prefer the surface sites by attracting the lone pairs of phosphorene. B, N, and F adsorption will also introduce local magnetic moment to the lattice. Moreover, B, C, N, and F adatoms will modify the band gap of phosphorene, yielding metallic transverse tunneling characters. Oxygen does not modify the band gap of phosphorene, and a diode like tunneling behavior is observed. Our results therefore offer a possible route to tailor the electronic and magnetic properties of phosphorene by the adatom functionalization and provide the physical insights of the environmental sensitivity of phosphorene, which will be helpful to experimentalists in evaluating the performance and aging effects of phosphorene-based electronic devices.

  3. Point defects in 4H-SiC epilayers introduced by neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazdra, Pavel; Záhlava, Vít; Vobecký, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Electronic properties of radiation damage produced in 4H-SiC by neutron irradiation and its effect on electrical parameters of Junction Barrier Schottky (JBS) diodes were investigated. 4H-SiC N-epilayers, which formed the low-doped N-base of JBS power diodes, were irradiated with 1 MeV neutrons with fluences ranging from 1.3 × 1013 to 4.0 × 1014 cm-2. Radiation defects were then characterized by capacitance deep-level transient spectroscopy, I-V and C-V measurement. Results show that neutron irradiation introduces different point defects giving rise to acceptor levels lying 0.61/0.69, 0.88, 1.03, 1.08 and 1.55 eV below the SiC conduction band edge. Introduction rates of these centers are ranging from 0.64 to 4.0 cm-1. These defects have a negligible effect on blocking and dynamic characteristics of irradiated diodes. However, the acceptor character of introduced deep levels and their fast introduction deteriorate diode's ON-state resistance already at fluences exceeding 1 × 1014 cm-2.

  4. Remarkable suppression of thermal conductivity by point defects in MoS2 nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongchun; Zhang, Kaiwang; Xie, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    By applying non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the effect of point defects on thermal conductivity of MoS2 nanoribbons, such as sulfur vacancies (VS) and oxygen substitutions to sulfur (SO). It is found that both VS and SO can significantly reduce thermal conductivity of monolayer MoS2 nanoribbons, but the suppression of thermal conductivity by vacancies is stronger than that by substitutions. For armchair MoS2 nanoribbon of 41.1 nm length and 4.4 nm width, when defect density is only 1.5%, the reduction of thermal conductivity at room temperature by VS defects and SO defects is 42.3% and 35.1%, respectively. We perform the vibrational eigenmodes analysis and find that the strong localization of phonons of all modes by defects results in the severe reduction of thermal conductivity of MoS2 nanoribbons. Further spectra analysis reveals that the localized modes are located in the sites of defects and the sites around defects, due to the change of force constant at these sites. Our findings are helpful for understanding and tuning the thermal conductivity of MoS2 nanoribbons by defect engineering.

  5. Control of point defects and space charge in electroluminescent ZnS:Mn thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. S.; Davidson, M. R.; Holloway, P. H.

    2002-12-01

    The mechanisms leading to improved brightness, efficiency, and stability of alternating-current thin-film electroluminescent (ACTFEL) ZnS:Mn phosphors have been studied. Previously we have shown that ex situ codoping of the sputter deposited ZnS:Mn active layer with K and Cl results in a 53% improvement in brightness, a 62% improvement in efficiency, and better 100 h accelerated aging stability. In this work, we demonstrate that these improvements result from a 75% increase in excitation efficiency for conduction electrons, combined with a small decrease in both light outcoupling and nonradiative recombination. Electrical properties data were used to determine that there is a reduced amount of static space charge in the codoped films, resulting in a larger average field, increased excitation efficiency, and increased charge multiplication. The reduced space charge is attributed to the addition of charge compensating zinc vacancy-chlorine complexes and isolated chlorine point defects, which are acceptor and donor defects, respectively, and a reduction of zinc vacancy deep hole traps. It is postulated that higher average fields results in sufficient electron multiplication or donor ionization such that current for EL excitation is limited by the phosphor resistance rather than capacitance or density of interface states. The possibility of using these mechanisms to increase the efficiency of other ACTFEL phosphors is discussed.

  6. Effect of hole doping on the magnetism of point defects in graphene: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yndurain, Felix

    2014-12-01

    Using ab initio methods based on the density functional theory, we study the magnetic properties of different point defects in graphene. We consider separately, atomic hydrogen, atomic fluorine, and single vacancies. The three defects have completely different magnetic properties. A local spin one-half magnetic moment is well defined at a hydrogen impurity, while single fluorine adatoms do not induce a well-defined magnetic moment unless there is a fluorine concentration of at least of a 0.5%. In this case, the induced magnetic moment is of the order of 0.45 μB per defect. This behavior is interpreted as being due to the charge transfer between fluorine and graphene. The case of magnetic moments localized at π electrons near vacancies is different from both previous cases; the size of the induced magnetic moment decreases with the dilution of defects and it is compatible with zero in the isolated vacancy. The effect of hole doping on these magnetic behaviors is studied and compared with the available experimental data. In the three cases, hole doping inhibits the formation of π states magnetic moments.

  7. Electron spin resonance study of point defects in thermal GaAs/GaAs-oxide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, S.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Stesmans, A.

    2012-12-01

    In an attempt to atomically assess interface and oxide-related point defects, a first basic multifrequency low-temperature electron spin resonance study has been carried out on semi-insulating (Fe compensated) GaAs/oxide structures, implying both powders and (100)GaAs/oxide slices, thermally grown in the range Tox=350-615 °C. Various spectra are observed: As for powders, this includes the 4-line EL2 defect spectrum centered at g~2.043 and characterized by the isotropic hyperfine constant Aiso~ 910 G, ascribed to the 75AsGa+ antisite defect. Observed in freshly crushed powder, it substantially increases in density with oxidation, in line with theoretical expectation; A maximum appears reached for at Tox~440 °C. It is not observed in the parent c-GaAs wafer. A second isotropic signal is observed at g~1.937 in powders for Tox in the range 510-615 °C, but only after additional VUV irradiation; it may correspond to As clusters. In bulk (100)GaAs, we observe the 5-branch spectrum of substitutional Fe impurities (spin S=5/2) in GaAs, with inferred crystal field constant a ≈ 360 G, well in line with previous observations. The results are discussed within the framework of advanced theoretical interface and defect models and previous experimental assessment.

  8. Point defect formation in optical materials expos ed to the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. L.; Seifert, N.; Yao, Y.; Albridge, R. G.; Barnes, A. V.; Tolk, N. H.; Strauss, A. M.; Linton, Roger C.; Kamenetzky, R. R.; Vaughn, Jason A.

    1995-01-01

    Point defect formation associated with early stages of optical damage was observed unexpectedly in two, and possibly three, different optical materials subjected to short-duration space exposure. Three calcium fluoride, two lithium fluoride, and three magnesium fluoride samples were flown on Space Shuttle flight STS-46 as part of the Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials - Third Phase experiment. One each of the calcium and magnesium fluoride samples was held at a fixed temperature of 60 C during the space exposure, while the temperatures of the other samples were allowed to vary with the ambient temperature of the shuttle cargo bay. Pre-flight and post-flight optical absorption measurements were performed on all of the samples. With the possible exception of the magnesium fluoride samples, every sample clearly showed the formation of F-centers in that section of the sample that was exposed to the low earth orbit environment. Solar vacuum ultraviolet radiation is the most probable primary cause of the defect formation; however, the resulting surface metallization may be synergistically altered by the atomic oxygen environment.

  9. Theoretical characterisation of point defects on a MoS2 monolayer by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, C.; Biel, B.; Dappe, Y. J.

    2016-03-01

    Different S and Mo vacancies as well as their corresponding antisite defects in a free-standing MoS2 monolayer are analysed by means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) simulations. Our theoretical methodology, based on the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green function formalism within the density functional theory (DFT) approach, is applied to simulate STM images for different voltages and tip heights. Combining the geometrical and electronic effects, all features of the different STM images can be explained, providing a valuable guide for future experiments. Our results confirm previous reports on S atom imaging, but also reveal a strong dependence on the applied bias for vacancies and antisite defects that include extra S atoms. By contrast, when additional Mo atoms cover the S vacancies, the MoS2 gap vanishes and a bias-independent bright protrusion is obtained in the STM image. Finally, we show that the inclusion of these point defects promotes the emergence of reactive dangling bonds that may act as efficient adsorption sites for external adsorbates.

  10. Role of Point Defects on the Reactivity of Reconstructed Anatase Titanium Dioxide (001) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yang; Sun, Huijuan; Tan, Shijing; Feng, Hao; Cheng, Zhengwang; Zhao, Jin; Zhao, Aidi; Wang, Bing; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jinlong; Hou, J. G.

    2013-07-30

    The chemical reactivity of different surfaces of titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been the subject of extensive studies in recent decades. The anatase TiO2(001) and its (1x4) reconstructed surfaces were theoretically considered to be the most reactive and have been heavily pursued by synthetic chemists. However, the lack of direct experimental verification or determination of the active sites on these surfaces has caused controversy and debate. Here we report a systematic study on an anatase TiO2(001)-(1x4) surface by means of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques in combination with first-principles calculations. Two types of intrinsic point defects are identified, among which only the Ti3+ defect site on the reduced surface demonstrates considerable chemical activity. The perfect surface itself can be fully oxidized, but shows no obvious activity. Our findings suggest that the reactivity of the anatase TiO2(001) surface should depend on its reduction status, similar to that of rutile TiO2 surfaces.

  11. Effect of point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2: molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Stanek, Christopher Richard; Andersson, Anders David Ragnar

    2015-07-21

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel is an important materials property that affects fuel performance since it is a key parameter determining the temperature distribution in the fuel, thus governing, e.g., dimensional changes due to thermal expansion, fission gas release rates, etc. [1] The thermal conductivity of UO2 nuclear fuel is also affected by fission gas, fission products, defects, and microstructural features such as grain boundaries. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to determine quantitatively, the effect of irradiation induced point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2, as a function of defect concentrations, for a range of temperatures, 300 – 1500 K. The results will be used to develop enhanced continuum thermal conductivity models for MARMOT and BISON by INL. These models express the thermal conductivity as a function of microstructure state-variables, thus enabling thermal conductivity models with closer connection to the physical state of the fuel [2].

  12. Anticorrelation between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects and the Impact on the Redox Chemistry of TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Yeohoon; Du, Yingge; Garcia, Juan C.; Zhu, Zihua; Wang, Zhitao; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Henderson, Michael A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2015-02-02

    Using combination of STM, DFT and SIMS, we explored the interplay and relative impact of surface vs. subsurface defects on the surface chemistry of rutile TiO2. STM results show that surface O vacancies (VO’s) are virtually absent in the vicinity of positively-charged subsurface point-defects. This observation is consistent with DFT calculations of impact of subsurface defect proximity on VO formation energy. To monitor the influence of such lateral anticorrelation on surface redox chemistry, a test reaction of the dissociative adsorption of O2 is employed, which is observed to be suppressed around them. DFT results attribute this to a perceived absence of the intrinsic (Ti) (and likely extrinsic) interstitials in the nearest subsurface layer beneath “inhibited” areas. We also postulate that the entire nearest subsurface region could be voided of any charged point-defects, whereas prevalent VO’s are largely responsible for mediation of the redox chemistry at reduced TiO2(110) surface.

  13. Research on the tunability of point defect modes in a two-dimensional magneto-elastic phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chunlong; Jin, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Point defect modes in a 2D phononic crystal with giant magnetostrictive material tuned by a magnetic field and compressive stress are investigated theoretically in this study. The 3D magnetostrictive constitutive model proposed by Liu and Zheng (2005 Acta Mech. Sin. 21 278-85) is adopted to develop effective elastic, piezomagnetic, and magnetic permeability constants. The finite element method, in combination with a supercell technique, is then applied to obtain the band structures and transmission spectra of the point defect modes in a 2D phononic crystal composed of Terfenol-D rods of circular cross section embedded in a polymethyl methacrylate matrix with a square lattice. The magnetic field not only enlarges the first band gap (FBG) but also opens up a new band gap of XY modes. New point defect modes are simultaneously trapped in the band gaps. The width of the FBG and the frequencies of the point defects of the Z mode decrease as the magnetic field increases.

  14. Long term simulation of point defect cluster size distributions from atomic displacement cascades in Fe70Cr20Ni10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souidi, A.; Hou, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; De Backer, A.

    2015-06-01

    We have used an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model to simulate the long term evolution of the primary damage in Fe70Cr20Ni10 alloys. The mean number of Frenkel pairs created by different Primary Knocked on Atoms (PKA) was estimated by Molecular Dynamics using a ternary EAM potential developed in the framework of the PERFORM-60 European project. This number was then used to obtain the vacancy-interstitial recombination distance required in the calculation of displacement cascades in the Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) with code MARLOWE (Robinson, 1989). The BCA cascades have been generated in the 10-100 keV range with the MARLOWE code and two different screened Coulomb potentials, namely, the Molière approximation to the Thomas-Fermi potential and the so-called "Universal" potential by Ziegler, Biersack and Littmark (ZBL). These cascades have been used as input to the OKMC code LAKIMOCA (Domain et al., 2004), with a set of parameters for describing the mobility of point defect clusters based on ab initio calculations and experimental data. The cluster size distributions have been estimated for irradiation doses of 0.1 and 1 dpa, and a dose rate of 10-7 dpa/s at 600 K. We demonstrate that, like in the case of BCC iron, cluster size distributions in the long term are independent of the cascade energy and that the recursive cascade model suggested for BCC iron in Souidi et al. (2011) also applies to FCC Fe70Cr20Ni10. The results also show that the influence of the BCA potential is sizeable but the qualitative correspondence in the predicted long term evolution is excellent.

  15. Complex behaviour of vacancy point-defects in SrRuO3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Schraknepper, Henning; Bäumer, Christoph; Dittmann, Regina; De Souza, Roger A

    2015-01-14

    The behaviour of point defects in thin, epitaxial films of the oxide electrode SrRuO3 was probed by means of diffusion measurements. Thin-film SrRuO3 was deposited by means of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on (100) oriented, undoped single crystal SrTiO3 substrates. (16)O/(18)O exchange anneals were employed to probe the behavior of oxygen vacancies. Anneals were performed in the temperature range 850 ≤T/K≤ 1100 at an oxygen partial pressure of pO2 = 500 mbar. Samples were subsequently analyzed by means of Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The measured oxygen isotope penetration profiles comprised, surprisingly, two features. Oxygen tracer diffusion coefficients determined for thin-film SrRuO3 are amongst the lowest measured for nominally undoped perovskite-type oxides. The activation enthalpy of oxygen tracer diffusion was found to be ≈ 2 eV. Diffusion of Ti from the SrTiO3 substrates into the SrRuO3 thin films, probing the cation defects, was also observed in ToF-SIMS profiles; here, too, the diffusion profiles showed two features. The activation enthalpy of titanium diffusion was found to be ΔHDTi≈ 4 eV. We propose a model-cation sublattice equilibration-that accounts for the appearance of two features in both anion and cation diffusion profiles. We suggest that the observed complex behavior arises from the metastable defect structure of PLD thin films and the unusual defect structure of SrRuO3. PMID:25413988

  16. Transition metal solute interactions with point defects in fcc iron from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepburn, D. J.; MacLeod, E.; Ackland, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    We present a comprehensive set of first-principles electronic structure calculations of the properties of substitutional transition metal solutes and point defects in austenite (face-centered cubic, paramagnetic Fe). Clear trends were observed in these quantities across the transition metal series, with solute-defect interactions strongly related to atomic size, and only weakly related to more subtle details of magnetic or electronic structure. Oversized solutes act as strong traps for both vacancy and self-interstitial defects and as nucleation sites for the development of protovoids and small self-interstitial loops. The consequent reduction in defect mobility and net defect concentrations in the matrix explains the observation of reduced swelling and radiation-induced segregation. Our analysis of vacancy-mediated solute diffusion demonstrates that below about 400 K Ni and Co will be dragged by vacancies and their concentrations should be enhanced at defect sinks. Cr and Cu show opposite behavior and are depleted at defect sinks. The stable configuration of some oversized solutes is neither interstitial nor substitutional; rather they occupy two adjacent lattice sites. The diffusion of these solutes proceeds by a novel mechanism, which has important implications for the nucleation and growth of complex oxide nanoparticles contained in oxide dispersion strengthened steels. Interstitial-mediated solute diffusion is negligible for all except the magnetic solutes (Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni). Our results are consistent across several antiferromagnetic states and surprising qualitative similarities with ferromagnetic (body-centered cubic) Fe were observed; this implies that our conclusions will be valid for paramagnetic iron.

  17. Physicochemical characterization of point defects in fluorine doped tin oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    El Akkad, Fikry; Joseph, Sudeep

    2012-07-15

    The physical and chemical properties of spray deposited FTO films are studied using FESEM, x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrical and optical measurements. The results of XRD measurements showed that the films are polycrystalline (grain size 20-50 nm) with Rutile structure and mixed preferred orientation along the (200) and (110) planes. An angular shift of the XRD peaks after F-doping is observed and interpreted as being due to the formation of substitutional fluorine defects (F{sub O}) in presence of high concentration of oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}) that are electrically neutral. The electrical neutrality of oxygen vacancies is supported by the observation that the electron concentration n is two orders of magnitude lower than the V{sub O} concentration calculated from chemical analyses using XPS measurements. It is shown that an agreement between XPS, XRD, and Hall effect results is possible provided that the degree of deviation from stoichiometry is calculated with the assumption that the major part of the bulk carbon content is involved in O-C bonds. High temperature thermal annealing is found to cause an increase in the F{sub O} concentration and a decrease in both n and V{sub O} concentrations with the increase of the annealing temperature. These results could be interpreted in terms of a high temperature chemical exchange reaction between the SnO{sub 2} matrix and a precipitated fluoride phase. In this reaction, fluorine is released to the matrix and Sn is trapped by the fluoride phase, thus creating substitutional fluorine F{sub O} and tin vacancy V{sub Sn} defects. The enthalpy of this reaction is determined to be approximately 2.4 eV while the energy of formation of a V{sub Sn} through the migration of Sn{sub Sn} host atom to the fluoride phase is approximately 0.45 eV.

  18. Dynamics and Structure of Point Defects in Forsterite: ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churakov, S.; Khisina, N.; Urusov, V.; Wirth, R.

    2001-12-01

    -polyhedron vacancies have lower energies then any other associated with M2 and interstitial polyhedrons. For protons associated with vacancies several configurations with small energy difference have been found. These configurations suggest a possible binding of the protons to O1, O2 and O3 sites including the formation of water-like HOH complexes. The MD simulations shows that protons can move easily within the vacant polyhedron to form covalent OH bonds at various oxygen sites. The protons initially located in interstitial positions of fosterite lattice were found to migrate in vacant polyhedra. References [1] Khisina, N.R. & Wirth, R. (2001): Hydrous olivine (Mg,Fe)2-xvxSiO4H2x - a new DHMS phase of variable composition observed as nanometer-size precipitation in mantle olivine. PCM, submitted [2] Hutter J. et al.: CPMD v. 4.0, MPI fuer Festkoerperforschung and IBM Zuerich Research Laboratory 1995-2000 [3] Goedecker S., Teter M. and Hutter J. (1996) Separable dual-space Gaussian pseudopotentials. Phys.Rev. B, 54(3) 1703-1710 [4] Monkhorst H.J. and Pack D. 1975 Special points for Brellouin-zone intagration. Phys. Rev B,13,5188-5192

  19. Modeling H, Na, and K diffusion in plagioclase feldspar by relating point defect parameters to bulk properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baohua; Shan, Shuangming; Wu, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen and alkali ion diffusion in plagioclase feldspars is important to study the evolution of the crust and the kinetics of exsolution and ion-exchange reactions in feldspars. Using the available PVT equation of state of feldspars, we show that the diffusivities of H and alkali in plagioclase feldspars as a function of temperature can be successfully reproduced in terms of the bulk elastic and expansivity data through a thermodynamic model that interconnects point defect parameters with bulk properties. Our calculated diffusion coefficients of H, Na, and K well agree with experimental ones when uncertainties are considered. Additional point defect parameters such as activation enthalpy, activation entropy, and activation volume are also predicted. Furthermore, the electrical conductivity of feldspars inferred from our predicted diffusivities of H, Na, and K through the Nernst-Einstein equation is compared with previous experimental data.

  20. Interplay of point defects, biaxial strain, and thermal conductivity in homoepitaxial SrTiO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedigen, S.; Kramer, T.; Knorr, I.; Nee, N.; Hoffmann, J.; Volkert, C. A.; Jooss, Ch.; Feuchter, M.; Kamlah, M.

    2012-02-06

    Separating out effects of point defects and lattice strain on thermal conductivity is essential for improvement of thermoelectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3}. We study relations between defects generated during deposition, induced lattice strain, and their impact on thermal conductivity {kappa} in homoepitaxial SrTiO{sub 3} films prepared by ion-beam sputtering. Lowering the deposition temperature gives rise to lattice expansion by enhancement of point defect density which increases the hardness of the films. Due to a fully coherent substrate-film interface, the lattice misfit induces a large biaxial strain. However, we can show that the temperature dependence of {kappa} is mainly sensitive on the defect concentration.

  1. Ultrathin Alumina Film Al-Sublattice Structure, Metal Island Nucleation at Terrace Point Defects, and How Hydroxylation Affects Wetting

    SciTech Connect

    Bogicevic, A.; Jennison, D.R.

    1999-08-09

    In this paper, we include for discussion three topics of current interest in metal oxide surface science. Using first principles density functional theory (DFT) [1] calculations, we have investigated: (1) the atomic-scale structure of experimentally-relevant ultrathin alumina films, (2) the role of common point defects in metal island nucleation on oxide terraces, and (3) the growth and morphology of metals on oxide surfaces which have high concentrations of a common impurity.

  2. Ab initio simulations of the structure, energetics and mobility of radiation-induced point defects in bcc Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeira, M. A.; Palacios, S. L.; González, C.; Fernández-Pello, D.; Iglesias, R.

    2016-09-01

    The formation, binding and migration energetics of helium clusters inside a niobium crystal have been analysed via ab initio simulations. The effect of placing several He atoms within an n-vacancy previously formed or as interstitials inside the initial perfect bulk matrix has been studied. DFT-based results show that He atoms prefer to aggregate forming small clusters at n-vacancy sites rather than at interstitial positions in the perfect crystal. The minimum formation energy is found when NHe is equal to the number of vacancies, n. It follows that vacancies act as almost perfect traps for He atoms, as is well known for other metals. The migration barriers of He atoms inside vacancies increase considerably when compared to what happens for vacancies alone. A secondary consequence is that the full set of energies obtained will be highly relevant as an input for new approaches to KMC simulations of defects in Nb.

  3. First-principles point defect models in Zr7Ni10 and Zr2Ni7 binary intermetallic compounds and their implications in nickel-metal hydride batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Diana F.

    Zr-Ni-based alloys as nickel-metal hydride battery anode materials offer low-cost, flexible and tunable battery performance. Zr7Ni 10 is an important secondary phase found in multi-phased AB2 Laves-phase-based metal hydride alloys, and the synergetic effect between the Zr-Ni and the Laves phases allows access to the high hydrogen storage of the Zr-Ni phases despite the lower absorption/desorption kinetics. Zr7Ni10 displays a small solubility window for Zr-rich compositions, while Zr2Ni7, with no solubility window, shows poor capacity with good kinetics. Stability of point defects within the crystal structure allows Zr7Ni10 to maintain the same structure at off-stoichiometric compositions, thus it is theorized that defects may play a role in the difference between the electrochemical behaviors in Zr7Ni10 and Zr2Ni7. Defect models in Zr7Ni10 and Zr2Ni7 compounds computed using a combination of density functional theory and statistical mechanics offer a starting point for understanding the possible roles that point defects have on the performance of Zr-Ni based active negative electrode materials in Ni/MH batteries. Theoretical vacancy and anti-site defect formation energies are calculated and reported for Zr-rich, Ni-rich, and stoichiometric compounds of Zr7Ni 10 and Zr2Ni7, and the implications of the defect models on nickel-metal hydride negative electrode active material design and performance are discussed.

  4. A thermodynamic analysis of native point defect and dopant solubilities in zinc-blende III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Hurle, D. T. J.

    2010-06-15

    A thermodynamic model is used to analyze available experimental data relevant to point defects in the binary zinc-blende III-V compounds (Ga,In)-(P,As,Sb). The important point defects and their complexes in each of the materials are identified and included in the model. Essentially all of the available experimental data on dopant solubility, crystal density, and lattice parameter of melt and solution grown crystals and epilayers are reproduced by the model. It extends an earlier study [Hurle, J. Appl. Phys. 85, 6957 (1999)] devoted solely to GaAs. Values for the enthalpy and entropy of formation of both native and dopant related point defects are obtained by fitting to experimental data. In undoped material, vacancies, and interstitials on the Group V sublattice dominate in the vicinity of the melting point (MP) in both the phosphides and arsenides, whereas, in the antimonides, vacancies on both sublattices dominate. The calculated concentrations of the native point defects are used to construct the solidus curves of all the compounds. The charged native point defect concentrations at the MP in four of the six materials are significantly higher than their intrinsic carrier concentrations. Thus the usually assumed high temperature 'intrinsic' electroneutrality condition for undoped material (n=p) is not valid for these materials. In GaSb, the Ga{sub Sb} antisite defect appears to be grown-in from the melt. This contrasts with the As{sub Ga} defect in GaAs for which the concentration grown-in at the MP is negligibly small. Compensation of donor-doped material by donor-Group III vacancy complexes is shown to exist in all the compounds except InP where Group VI doped crystals are uncompensated and in InSb where there is a lack of experimental data. The annealing effects in n{sup +} GaAs, including lattice superdilation, which were shown in the earlier paper to be due to Group III vacancy undersaturation during cooling, are found to be present also in GaSb and In

  5. Influence of growth temperature on AlGaN multiquantum well point defect incorporation and photoluminescence efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, A.; Allerman, A. A.; Henry, T. A.; Crawford, M. H.

    2011-04-01

    The dependence of (Al)GaN/AlGaN multiquantum well (MQWs) optical efficiency and defect incorporation on the growth temperature (Tg) of the optically active region was investigated. Marked increase in MQW photoluminescence (PL) intensity was observed for increasing Tg. Correspondingly, increasing Tg also significantly reduced point defect incorporation under QW growth conditions, as determined by deep level optical spectroscopy. It is suggested that enhanced MQW PL with increasing Tg resulted from improved nonradiative lifetime through reduced nonradiative defect density in the MQW region.

  6. Equilibrium point defects in intermetallics with the [ital B]2 structure: NiAl and FeAl

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C.L.; Ye, Y.; Yoo, M.H. ); Ho, K.M. )

    1993-09-01

    Equilibrium point defects and their relation to the contrasting mechanical behavior of NiAl and FeAl are investigated. For NiAl, the defect structure is dominated by two types of defects---monovacancies on the Ni sites and substitutional antisite defects on the Al sites. The defect structure of FeAl differs from that of NiAl in the occurrence of antisite defects at the transition-metal sites for Al-rich alloys and the tendency for vacancy clustering. The strong ordering (and brittleness) of NiAl is attributed mainly to the difference in atomic size between constituent atoms.

  7. Point defects in (Mg,Fe)O at high pressures: where does hydrogen dominate over ferric iron?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, K.; Karato, S.

    2007-12-01

    The point defects play an important role in transport processes of minerals including diffusion, electrical conduction and plastic deformation. Point defects caused by ferric iron and/or hydrogen (proton) are dominant defects in most of the iron-bearing minerals including olivine and (Mg,Fe)O. In many upper-mantle minerals such as olivine, the concentration of ferric iron is much smaller than that of hydrogen, and therefore the small amount of hydrogen changes their transport properties dramatically. However, the situation is very different for lower- mantle minerals such as (Mg,Fe)O. In this presentation, we will review the available experimental data on point defects in (Mg,Fe)O and discuss the relative importance of ferric iron and hydrogen at high pressures based on atomic models. The existing low-pressure data indicate that the maximum solubility of ferric iron in (Mg,Fe)O is on the order of 0.1 (atomic fraction in the total iron), which is much higher than that of hydrogen. However, experimental studies by Bolfan-Casanova et al (2002, 2006) indicate that the solubility of ferric iron decreases while that of hydrogen increases with pressure. This suggests that the dominant impurity to generate point defects in (Mg,Fe)O may change from ferric iron to hydrogen at high pressure. Therefore it is important to quantify the pressure dependence of the solubility of ferric iron and hydrogen. We have explored two models of ferric iron- related defects and found that the existing experimental data suggest that ferric iron may occur at two lattice sites: the tetrahedral site as interstitial atoms as well as the octahedral site. The pressure dependence of the solubility of hydrogen in (Mg,Fe)O are also estimated based on the experimental data and defect models. The cross-over of defect solubility likely occurs in the lower mantle, but the exact depth is poorly constrained because of large uncertainties in the hydrogen solubility and the mechanisms of hydrogen dissolution

  8. Preorganized Chromophores Facilitate Triplet Energy Migration, Annihilation and Upconverted Singlet Energy Collection.

    PubMed

    Mahato, Prasenjit; Yanai, Nobuhiro; Sindoro, Melinda; Granick, Steve; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2016-05-25

    Photon upconversion (UC) based on triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) has the potential to enhance significantly photovoltaic and photocatalytic efficiencies by harnessing sub-bandgap photons, but the progress of this field is held back by the chemistry problem of how to preorganize multiple chromophores for efficient UC under weak solar irradiance. Recently, the first maximization of UC quantum yield at solar irradiance was achieved using fast triplet energy migration (TEM) in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with ordered acceptor arrays, but at the same time, a trade-off between fast TEM and high fluorescence efficiency was also found. Here, we provide a solution for this trade-off issue by developing a new strategy, triplet energy migration, annihilation and upconverted singlet energy collection (TEM-UPCON). The porous structure of acceptor-based MOF crystals allows triplet donor molecules to be accommodated without aggregation. The surface of donor-doped MOF nanocrystals is modified with highly fluorescent energy collectors through coordination bond formation. Thanks to the higher fluorescence quantum yield of surface-bound collectors than parent MOFs, the implementation of the energy collector greatly improves the total UC quantum yield. The UC quantum yield maximization behavior at ultralow excitation intensity was retained because the TTA events take place only in the MOF acceptors. The TEM-UPCON concept may be generalized to collectors with various functions and would lead to quantitative harvesting of upconverted energy, which is difficult to achieve in common molecular diffusion-based systems. PMID:27163784

  9. First-principles study of self-interstitial point defects in BCC metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seungwu, Han; Luis, Zepeda-Ruiza; Roberto, Car; David, Srolovitz; Graeme, Ackland

    2002-03-01

    We report a study of the energetics of self-interstitial defects in V and Mo based on plane-wave supercell density functional calculations. We use a 128 atom cubic supercell and 2x2x2 k-point grid for BZ sampling, which we found to be sufficient to obtain accurate results on the basis of a careful convergence study. In our calculations, all the atoms of the supercell are allowed to fully relax in presence of the self-interstitial defect. We find that, both in V and in Mo, the most stable orientation of the self-interstitial is [111]. This is different from predictions based on commonly available empirical potentials. We also find that the [111] self-interstitial can easily migrate along the [111] direction passing through an intermediate crowdion configuration. This [111] pathway is essentially barrierless within density functional theory, consistent with experimental data. Finally, we construct a Finnis-Sinclair type potential that reproduces well the first-principles results. This potential will be useful to model self-interstitial diffusion processes, which play a key role in radiation damage cascade evolution.

  10. Theoretical model of dynamic spin polarization of nuclei coupled to paramagnetic point defects in diamond and silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivády, Viktor; Szász, Krisztián; Falk, Abram L.; Klimov, Paul V.; Christle, David J.; Janzén, Erik; Abrikosov, Igor A.; Awschalom, David D.; Gali, Adam

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear spin polarization (DNP) mediated by paramagnetic point defects in semiconductors is a key resource for both initializing nuclear quantum memories and producing nuclear hyperpolarization. DNP is therefore an important process in the field of quantum-information processing, sensitivity-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance, and nuclear-spin-based spintronics. DNP based on optical pumping of point defects has been demonstrated by using the electron spin of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, and more recently, by using divacancy and related defect spins in hexagonal silicon carbide (SiC). Here, we describe a general model for these optical DNP processes that allows the effects of many microscopic processes to be integrated. Applying this theory, we gain a deeper insight into dynamic nuclear spin polarization and the physics of diamond and SiC defects. Our results are in good agreement with experimental observations and provide a detailed and unified understanding. In particular, our findings show that the defect electron spin coherence times and excited state lifetimes are crucial factors in the entire DNP process.

  11. Native point defects and doping in ZnGeN2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skachkov, Dmitry; Lambrecht, Walter

    A computational study within the framework of density functional theory is presented for native defects and doping in ZnGeN2. We study the three types of vacancies VZn, VGe, VN, cation antisite defects ZnGe, GeZn, and potential n-type (ON, GaZn) and p-type GaGe dopants. The cation antisite defects are found to have significantly lower formation energy than the cation vacancies. The charge neutrality condition pins the Fermi level close to the the crossing of the ZnGe- 1 acceptor with the GeZn2 + donor, and intrinsic p-type doping would result. The VN is found to be a rather deep donor. GeZn is found to behave as a shallow donor. Oxygen impurities are found to strongly prefer the ON subsitutional site and are found to be shallow donors with a very low energy of formation. Energies of formation of GaZn and GaGe are lower than those of the cation antisites. Thus good solubility is expected and these impurities can hence pin the Fermi level at the crossing of the donor GaZn+ 1 with the acceptor GaGe- 1 , and efficient p-type doping should result. Dmitry Skachkov was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences (DOE-BES) under Grant No. ER-46874-SC0008933.

  12. Point defects, impurities, and small hole polarons in GdTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjaalie, L.; Janotti, A.; Krishnaswamy, K.; Van de Walle, C. G.

    2016-03-01

    The electronic structure of native defects and impurities in GdTiO3, a rare-earth titanate Mott insulator, is studied using density functional theory with a hybrid functional. Among native defects, the cation vacancies have the lowest formation energies in oxygen-rich conditions and oxygen vacancies have the lowest formation energy in oxygen-poor conditions. Among the impurities, SrGd,Hi, and CO have low formation energies. A common feature of the native defects and impurities is that they lead to the formation of small hole polarons, which explains the frequent observation of p -type hopping conductivity in the rare-earth titanates. These small hole polarons also lead to optical absorption and act as electron traps in devices.

  13. Computer Simulation of Point Defects in CoO and NiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, S. D. V.; Rao, B. Srinivasa; Babu, S. Jagadeesh; Radhika, N.; Sanyal, S. P.

    2011-07-01

    We present a computer simulation study of effects of three-body interactions (TBI) on Schottky defect properties of some transition metal oxides (TMO). The calculations have been done in the framework of polarizable point ion (PPI) model and using the three-body interaction potential (TBP). The computed cohesive and schottky formation energy are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Atomistic simulation study of the effects of point defects on the inception of plastic deformation in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehinia, Iman

    Atomistic simulations have been used to study the effect of various types of point defects on the mechanical response of FCC single crystals in nanoindentation and uniaxial tests. To study the effect of spatial distribution of defects in nanoindentation testing, various point defects were located in different relative positions to the indenter. When the defect position was close to the regions of high shear stresses the nucleation of dislocations was related to the location of the defect; however homogeneous nucleation of dislocations was also observed for defect-containing crystals. The effect of the point defects was independent of the indenter size, and the applied pressure needed to initiate plasticity, when compared to defect-free crystals, was a reduction of approximately 10%, 20%, 20% and 50% for a single vacancy, di-vacancy, self-interstitial atom and stacking fault tetrahedron (SFT), respectively. The stochastic nature of the pop-in loads was further explored for different orientations using molecular dynamics and complementary nanoindentation experiments on (100), (101) and (111) single crystals of copper and Ni200. The sensitivity of the crystal to the presence of internal structural defects depends strongly on its crystallographic orientation. The simulations suggest that the first event observed experimentally may not correspond to the first plastic deformation event. Anisotropy effects were also studied for various orientations in uniaxial tests in the presence of a centered SFT. Both the normal stresses to the slip plane and the relative values of Schmid factor in compression and tension affect the observed compression/tension yield asymmetry. The reduction in yield stress was found to be larger in compression than in tension for almost all orientations. The simulations suggest that compression is a more reliable experimental tool for studying the effect of structural defects on the mechanical behavior of the FCC crystals, while tension may be more

  15. First-principles study of He point-defects in HCP rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Chen, Ru; Peng, SM; Long, XG; Wu, Z.; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao

    2011-05-01

    He defect properties in Sc, Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er and Lu were studied using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the formation energy of an interstitial He atom is smaller than that of a substitutional He atom in all hcp rare-earth metals considered. Furthermore, the tetrahedral interstitial position is more favorable than an octahedral position for He defects. The results are compared with those from bcc and fcc metals.

  16. Computer simulation of point defects in MnO and FeO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B. Srinivasa; Rani, M. Rekha; Prasad, S. D. V.

    2013-06-01

    In this research work, we present a computer simulation study of effects of three-body interactions (TBI) on Schottky defect properties of some transition metal oxides (TMO). The calculations have been done in the framework of polarizable point ion (PPI) model and using the three-body interaction potential (TBP). The computed cohesive and schottky formation energy are in good agreement with the experimental data and emphasize the significance of TBI.

  17. Point defects, impurities, and small hole polarons in GdTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjaalie, Lars; Janotti, Anderson; Krishnaswamy, Karthik; van de Walle, Chris G.

    GdTiO3(GTO) has become the focus of great interest because of its use in complex-oxide heterostructures that display two-dimensional electron gases with unprecedented high densities. GTO is a Mott insulator, with a band gap arising within the partially filled Ti 3 d band due to strong electron-electron interactions. GTO often displays hole conductivity, likely attributed to defects or impurities, yet the cause of this unintentional conductivity has not yet been explored. We therefore used density functional theory with a hybrid functional to study their electronic structure. Among native defects, the cation vacancies have the lowest formation energies in oxygen-rich conditions, and oxygen vacancies have the lowest formation energy in oxygen-poor conditions. Among the impurities, rGd, Hi and CO have the lowest formation energies. The defects and impurities are intrinsically stable only in a single ``natural'' charge state, to which various numbers of hole polarons can be bound, which explains the frequent observation of p-type hopping conductivity in the rare-earth titanates. These small hole polarons also lead to optical absorption and act as electron traps in devices. Work supported by NSF and by the LEAST Center.

  18. Two distinctive energy migration pathways of monolayer molecules on metal nanoparticle surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiebo; Qian, Huifeng; Chen, Hailong; Zhao, Zhun; Yuan, Kaijun; Chen, Guangxu; Miranda, Andrea; Guo, Xunmin; Chen, Yajing; Zheng, Nanfeng; Wong, Michael S.; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-01-01

    Energy migrations at metal nanomaterial surfaces are fundamentally important to heterogeneous reactions. Here we report two distinctive energy migration pathways of monolayer adsorbate molecules on differently sized metal nanoparticle surfaces investigated with ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy. On a 5 nm platinum particle, within a few picoseconds the vibrational energy of a carbon monoxide adsorbate rapidly dissipates into the particle through electron/hole pair excitations, generating heat that quickly migrates on surface. In contrast, the lack of vibration-electron coupling on approximately 1 nm particles results in vibrational energy migration among adsorbates that occurs on a twenty times slower timescale. Further investigations reveal that the rapid carbon monoxide energy relaxation is also affected by the adsorption sites and the nature of the metal but to a lesser extent. These findings reflect the dependence of electron/vibration coupling on the metallic nature, size and surface site of nanoparticles and its significance in mediating energy relaxations and migrations on nanoparticle surfaces. PMID:26883665

  19. Characterization of point defects in CdTe by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsharkawy, M. R. M.; Kanda, G. S.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.; Keeble, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    Positron lifetime measurements on CdTe 0.15% Zn-doped by weight are presented, trapping to monovacancy defects is observed. At low temperatures, localization at shallow binding energy positron traps dominates. To aid defect identification density functional theory, calculated positron lifetimes and momentum distributions are obtained using relaxed geometry configurations of the monovacancy defects and the Te antisite. These calculations provide evidence that combined positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler spectroscopy measurements have the capability to identify neutral or negative charge states of the monovacancies, the Te antisite, A-centers, and divacancy defects in CdTe.

  20. Native point defects and doping in ZnGeN2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skachkov, Dmitry; Punya Jaroenjittichai, Atchara; Huang, Ling-yi; Lambrecht, Walter R. L.

    2016-04-01

    A computational study within the framework of density functional theory in the local density approximation (LDA) is presented for native defects and doping in ZnGeN2. Gap corrections are taken into account using an LDA+U approach and finite size corrections for charged defects are evaluated in terms of an effective charge model, introduced in this paper. The donor or acceptor characteristics of each of the cation and N vacancies and the two cation antisite defects are determined as well as their energies of formation under different chemical potential conditions. These are then used to determine defect concentrations and Fermi level pinning self-consistently. The cation antisite defects are found to have significantly lower formation energy than the cation vacancies. At a typical growth temperature of 1200 K, the charge neutrality condition pins the Fermi level close to the crossing of the formation energies of the ZnGe-1 acceptor with the GeZn2 + shallow donor. Since this point lies closer to the valence-band maximum (VBM), intrinsic p -type doping would result at the growth temperature and will persist at room temperature if the defect concentrations are frozen in. It is the highest and of order 1016cm-3 for the most Ge-poor condition. On the other hand, for the most Ge-poor condition, it drops to 1013cm-3 at 1200 K and to almost zero at 300 K because then the Fermi level is too close to the middle of the gap. Oxygen impurities are found to strongly prefer the ON substitutional site and are found to be shallow donors with a very low energy of formation. It can only be suppressed by strongly reducing the oxygen partial pressure relative to that of nitrogen. At high temperatures, however, introduction of oxygen will be accompanied by compensating ZnGe-2 acceptors and would lead to negligible net doping. The prospects for Ga base p -type doping are evaluated. While good solubility is expected, site competition between Zn and Ge sites is found to lead to a

  1. Quasi-reversible point defect relaxation in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin films by in situ electrical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Alexander U.; Yeh, Ted C.; Bruce Buchholz, D.; Chang, Robert P. H.; Mason, Thomas O.

    2013-03-01

    Quasi-reversible oxygen exchange/point defect relaxation in an amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin film was monitored by in situ electrical property measurements (conductivity, Seebeck coefficient) at 200 °C subjected to abrupt changes in oxygen partial pressure (pO2). By subtracting the long-term background decay from the conductivity curves, time-independent conductivity values were obtained at each pO2. From these values, a log-log "Brouwer" plot of conductivity vs. pO2 of approximately -1/2 was obtained, which may indicate co-elimination (filling) of neutral and charged oxygen vacancies. This work demonstrates that Brouwer analysis can be applied to the study of defect structure in amorphous oxide thin films.

  2. Kinetically evolving irradiation-induced point defect clusters in UO{sub 2} by molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Millett, Paul C.; Desai, Tapan; Wolf, Dieter; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2009-09-01

    The evolution of irradiation-induced point defects in UO{sub 2} is captured in molecular dynamics simulations. The approach used circumvents their creation during the ballistic phase of a traditional collision-cascade molecular dynamics simulation but rather focuses on their kinetic evolution. The simulations reveal that in the absence of defects on the cation sublattice, the defects initially present on the anion sublattice recombine and annihilate completely during equilibration. However, in the simultaneous presence of defects on both sublattices, Schottky defects are formed, thereby sequestering the oxygen vacancies. The resulting excess oxygen interstitials form cuboctahedral clusters, whose existence has previously been identified experimentally but whose generation mechanism has not been determined. It is concluded that the cation sublattice is primarily responsible for the radiation tolerance or intolerance of the material.

  3. Fourth workshop on the role of point defects/defect complexes in silicon device processing. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, T.; Jastrzebski, L.; Sopori, B.

    1994-07-01

    The 4th Point Defect Workshop was aimed at reviewing recent new understanding of the defect engineering techniques that can improve the performance of solar cells fabricated on low-cost silicon substrates. The theme of the workshop was to identify approaches that can lead to 18% commercial silicon solar cells in the near future. These approaches also define the research tasks for the forthcoming new DOE/NREL silicon materials research program. It was a consensus of the workshop attendees that the goal of 18%-efficient multicrystalline silicon solar cells is right on target, and the payoff for the investment by DOE will manifest itself in the next few years as reduced costs for high-efficiency cell fabrication.

  4. Three-dimensional interaction force and tunneling current spectroscopy of point defects on rutile TiO2(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Mönig, Harry; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Ünverdi, Ã.-zhan; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-02-01

    The extent to which point defects affect the local chemical reactivity and electronic properties of an oxide surface was evaluated with picometer resolution in all three spatial dimensions using simultaneous atomic force/scanning tunneling microscopy measurements performed on the (110) face of rutile TiO2. Oxygen atoms were imaged as protrusions in both data channels, corresponding to a rarely observed imaging mode for this prototypical metal oxide surface. Three-dimensional spectroscopy of interaction forces and tunneling currents was performed on individual surface and subsurface defects as a function of tip-sample distance. An interstitial defect assigned to a subsurface hydrogen atom is found to have a distinct effect on the local density of electronic states on the surface, but no detectable influence on the tip-sample interaction force. Meanwhile, spectroscopic data acquired on an oxygen vacancy highlight the role of the probe tip in chemical reactivity measurements.

  5. Point Defect Distributions in ZnSe Crystals: Effects of Gravity Vector Orientation During Physical Vapor Transport Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Feth, S.; Hirschfeld, D.; Smith, T. M.; Wang, Ling Jun; Volz, M. P.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    ZnSe crystals were grown by the physical vapor transport technique under horizontal and vertical (stabilized and destabilized) configurations. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements were performed on the grown ZnSe samples to map the distributions of [Si], [Fe], [Cu], [Al] and [Li or Na] impurities as well as Zn vacancy, [V (sub Zn)]. Annealings of ZnSe under controlled Zn pressures were studied to correlate the measured photoluminescence emission intensity to the equilibrium Zn partial pressure. In the horizontal grown crystals the segregations of [Si], [Fe], [Al] and [V (sub Zn)] were observed along the gravity vector direction whereas in the vertically stabilized grown crystal the segregation of these point defects was radially symmetrical. No apparent pattern was observed on the measured distributions in the vertically destabilized grown crystal. The observed segregations in the three growth configurations were interpreted based on the possible buoyancy-driven convection in the vapor phase.

  6. Ab initio study of intrinsic, H and He point defects in hcp-Er

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Peng, SM; Long, XG; Gao, Fei; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Zu, Xiaotao T.

    2010-03-01

    Ab initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to determine the properties of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), vacancies, and single H and He atoms in hcp-Er. The results show that the most stable configuration for an SIA is a basal octahedral (BO) configuration, while the octahedral (O), basal split (BS) and crowdion (C) interstitial configurations are less stable, followed by the split <0001> dumbbell and tetrahedral configurations. For both H and He defects, the formation energy of an interstitial atom is less than that of a substitutional atom in hcp-Er. Furthermore, the tetrahedral interstitial position is more stable than an octahedral position for both He and H interstitials. The hybridization of the He and H defects with Er atoms has been used to explain the relative stabilities of these defects in hcp-Er.

  7. Demonstrating Energy Migration in Coupled Oscillators: A Central Concept in the Theory of Unimolecular Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcotte, Ronald E.

    2005-01-01

    This physical chemistry lecture demonstration is designed to aid the understanding of intramolecular energy transfer processes as part of the presentation of the theory of unimolecular reaction rates. Coupled pendulums are used to show the rate of migration of energy between oscillators under resonant and nonresonant conditions with varying…

  8. Paramagnetic point defects in amorphous thin films of SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Poindexter, E.H.; Warren, W.L.

    1994-06-01

    Recent research on point defects in thin films of SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}SN{sub 4} on Si is presented and reviewed. In SiO{sub 2} it is now clear that no one type of E{prime} center is the sole source of radiation-induced positive charge; hydrogenous moieties or other types of E{prime} are proposed. Molecular orbital theory and easy passivation of E{prime} by H{sub 2} suggest that released H might depassivate P{sub b} sites. A charged E{prime}{sub {delta}} center has been seen in Cl-free SIMOX and thermal oxide film, and it is reassigned to an electron delocalized over four O{sub 3}{equivalent_to}Si units around a fifth Si. In Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} a new model for the amphoteric charging of Si{equivalent_to}N{sub 3} moieties is based on local shifts in defect energy with respect to the Fermi level, arising from nonuniform composition; it does not assume negative-U electron correlation. A new defect NN{sub 2}{sup 0} has been identified, with dangling orbital on a 2-coordinated N atom bonded to another N.

  9. Paramagnetic point defects in amorphous thin films of SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}: Updates and additions

    SciTech Connect

    Poindexter, E.H.; Warren, W.L.

    1995-07-01

    Recent research on point defects in thin films of silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, and silicon oxynitride on Si is presented and reviewed. In SiO{sub 2}, it now clear that no one type of E{prime} are proposed. Molecular orbital theory and easy passivation of E{prime} by H{sub 2} suggest that released H might depassivate interface P{sub b} sites. A charged E{prime}{sub {delta}} center has been seen in Cl-free SIMOX (separation by implantation of oxygen) and thermal oxide films, and it is reassigned to an electron delocalized over four O{sub 3}{triple_bond}Si units around a fifth Si. In Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, a new model for the amphoteric charging of {sm_bullet}Si{triple_bond}N{sub 3} moieties is based on local shifts in defect energy with respect to the Fermi level, arising from nonuniform composition; it does not assume negative U electron correlation. A new defect NN{sub 2}{sup 0} has been identified, with dangling orbital on a two-coordinated N atom bonded to another N. Silicon oxynitride defects are briefly presented.

  10. Excitation energy migration in uniaxially oriented polymer films: A comparison between strongly and weakly organized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojarski, P.; Synak, A.; Kułak, L.; Baszanowska, E.; Kubicki, A.; Grajek, H.; Szabelski, M.

    2006-04-01

    The mechanism of multistep excitation energy migration in uniaxially oriented polymer films is discussed for strongly and weakly orientating dyes in poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix. The comparison between both types of systems is based on concentration depolarization of fluorescence, Monte-Carlo simulations and linear dichroism data. It is found that the alignment of transition dipole moments of fluorophores in the ordered matrix relative to the direction of polymer stretching exhibits strong effect on the concentration depolarization of fluorescence. In ordered matrices of flavomononucleotide and rhodamine 6G concentration depolarization of fluorescence remains quite strong, whereas for linear carbocyanines it is very weak despite effective energy migration.

  11. The interaction of point defects with line dislocations in HVEM (high voltage electron microscope) irradiated Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.L.; Jenkins, M.L. . Dept. of Materials); Kirk, M.A. ); English, C.A. . Materials Development Div.)

    1990-05-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the interaction of point defects produced by high voltage electron microscope (HVEM) irradiation with pre-existing dislocations in austenitic Fe-15% 25%Ni-17%Cr alloys, aimed at the determination of the mechanisms of climb of dissociated dislocations. Dislocations were initially characterized at sub-threshold voltages (here 200kV) using the weak-beam technique. These dislocations were then irradiated with 1MeV electrons in the Argonne HVEM before being returned to a lower voltage microscope for post-irradiation characterization. Interstitial climb was seen only at particularly favorable sites, such as pre-existing jogs, whilst vacancies clustered near dislocations, forming stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). Partial separations were also observed to have decreased after irradiation. The post-irradiation configuration was found to depend strongly on both dislocation character and pre-irradiation dislocation configuration. These results, and their relevance to the void swelling problem, are discussed. 52 refs., 8 figs.

  12. All-optical XOR and OR logic gates based on line and point defects in 2-D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Kiyanoosh; Mir, Ali; Chaharmahali, Iman; Goudarzi, Dariush

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we have proposed an all-optical logic gate structure based on line and point defects created in the two dimensional square lattice of silicon rods in air photonic crystals (PhCs). Line defects are embedded in the ГX and ГZ directions of the momentum space. The device has two input and two output ports. It has been shown analytically whether the initial phase difference between the two input beams is π/2, they interfere together constructively or destructively to realize the logical functions. The simulation results show that the device can acts as a XOR and an OR logic gate. It is applicable in the frequency range of 0-0.45 (a/λ), however we set it at (a/λ=) 0.419 for low dispersion condition, correspondingly the lambda is equal to 1.55 μm. The maximum delay time to response to the input signals is about 0.4 ps, hence the speed of the device is about 2.5 THz. Also 6.767 dB is the maximum contrast ratio of the device.

  13. Carbon, oxygen and their interaction with intrinsic point defects in solar silicon ribbon material. Annual report, September 1982-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Goesele, U.; Ast, D.G.

    1983-10-01

    This report first provides some background information on intrinsic point defects, and on carbon and oxygen in silicon in so far as it may be relevant for the efficiency of solar cells fabricated from EFG ribbon material. We discuss the co-precipitation of carbon and oxygen and especially of carbon and silicon self interstitials. A simple model for the electrical activity of carbon-self-interstitial agglomerates is presented. We assume that the self-interstitial content of these agglomerates determines their electrical activity and that both compressive stresses (high self-interstitial content) and tensile stresses (low self-interstitial content) give rise to electrical activity of the agglomerates. The self-interstitial content of these carbon-related agglomerates may be reduced by an appropriate high-temperature treatment and enhanced by a supersaturation of self-interstitials generated during formation of the p-n junction of solar cells. It is suggested that oxygen present in supersaturation in carbon-rich silicon may be induced to form SiO/sub 2/ precipitates by self-interstitials generated during phosphorus diffusion. It is proposed that the SiO/sub 2/-Si interface of the precipates gives rise to a continuum of donor states and that these interface states are responsible for at least part of the light-enhancement effects observed in oxygen containing EFG silicon after phosphorus diffusion.

  14. Carbon, oxygen and their interaction with intrinsic point defects in solar silicon ribbon material: A speculative approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goesele, U.; Ast, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Some background information on intrinsic point defects is provided and on carbon and oxygen in silicon in so far as it may be relevant for the efficiency of solar cells fabricated from EFG ribbon material. The co-precipitation of carbon and oxygen and especially of carbon and silicon self interstitials are discussed. A simple model for the electrical activity of carbon-self-interstitial agglomerates is presented. The self-interstitial content of these agglomerates is assumed to determine their electrical activity and that both compressive stresses (high self-interstitial content) and tensile stresses (low self-interstitial content) give rise to electrical activity of the agglomerates. The self-interstitial content of these carbon-related agglomerates may be reduced by an appropriate high temperature treatment and enhanced by a supersaturation of self-interstitials generated during formation of the p-n junction of solar cells. Oxygen present in supersaturation in carbon-rich silicon may be induced to form SiO, precipitates by self-interstitials generated during phosphorus diffusion. It is proposed that the SiO2-Si interface of the precipates gives rise to a continuum of donor stables and that these interface states are responsible for at least part of the light inhancement effects observed in oxygen containing EFG silicon after phosphorus diffusion.

  15. Identification of point defects responsible for laser-induced ultraviolet absorption in LiB3O5 (LBO) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, W.; Garces, Nelson Y.; Chirila, M. M.; Halliburton, Larry E.

    2003-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been used to identify and characterize point defects in lithium triborate (LiB3O5) crystals grown for nonlinear optical applications. As-grown crystals contain oxygen vacancies and lithium vacancies (as well as trace amounts of transition-metal ions in a few samples). Exposing a crystal to ionizing radiation at 77 K produces "free" electrons and holes. These electrons are trapped at the pre-existing oxygen vacancies and give rise to an EPR signal with a large hyperfine from one 11B nucleus. The corresponding holes become self-trapped on oxygen ions as a result of the significant lattice relaxation of a nearest-neighbor fourfold-bonded boron ion. This gives rise to an EPR signal with a smaller 11B hyperfine pattern due to the oxygen"s threefold bonded boron neighbor. Warming the crystal to approximately 130 K destroys the self-trapped hole centers that were initially formed, and allows a second holelike signal to be observed (which in turn decays between 150 and 200 K). The structure of the second hole center is very similar to the self-trapped hole center and a neighboring lithium vacancy makes this latter center more thermally stable. The EPR spectra from Ni+ and Cu2+ ions are also reported.

  16. Line and Point Defects in MoSe2 Bilayer Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjun; Zheng, Hao; Yang, Fang; Jiao, Lu; Chen, Jinglei; Ho, Wingkin; Gao, Chunlei; Jia, Jinfeng; Xie, Maohai

    2015-06-23

    Bilayer (BL) MoSe2 films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) are studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/S). Similar to monolayer (ML) films, networks of inversion domain boundary (DB) defects are observed both in the top and bottom layers of BL MoSe2, and often they are seen spatially correlated such that one is on top of the other. There are also isolated ones in the bottom layer without companion in the top-layer and are detected by STM/S through quantum tunneling of the defect states through the barrier of the MoSe2 ML. Comparing the DB states in BL MoSe2 with that of ML film reveals some common features as well as differences. Quantum confinement of the defect states is indicated. Point defects in BL MoSe2 are also observed by STM/S, where ionization of the donor defect by the tip-induced electric field is evidenced. These results are of great fundamental interests as well as practical relevance of devices made of MoSe2 ultrathin layers. PMID:26051223

  17. A Heuristic Placement Selection of Live Virtual Machine Migration for Energy-Saving in Cloud Computing Environment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jia; Hu, Liang; Ding, Yan; Xu, Gaochao; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The field of live VM (virtual machine) migration has been a hotspot problem in green cloud computing. Live VM migration problem is divided into two research aspects: live VM migration mechanism and live VM migration policy. In the meanwhile, with the development of energy-aware computing, we have focused on the VM placement selection of live migration, namely live VM migration policy for energy saving. In this paper, a novel heuristic approach PS-ES is presented. Its main idea includes two parts. One is that it combines the PSO (particle swarm optimization) idea with the SA (simulated annealing) idea to achieve an improved PSO-based approach with the better global search's ability. The other one is that it uses the Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics and once again utilizes the SA idea to deal with the data obtained from the improved PSO-based process to get the final solution. And thus the whole approach achieves a long-term optimization for energy saving as it has considered not only the optimization of the current problem scenario but also that of the future problem. The experimental results demonstrate that PS-ES evidently reduces the total incremental energy consumption and better protects the performance of VM running and migrating compared with randomly migrating and optimally migrating. As a result, the proposed PS-ES approach has capabilities to make the result of live VM migration events more high-effective and valuable. PMID:25251339

  18. A heuristic placement selection of live virtual machine migration for energy-saving in cloud computing environment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Hu, Liang; Ding, Yan; Xu, Gaochao; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The field of live VM (virtual machine) migration has been a hotspot problem in green cloud computing. Live VM migration problem is divided into two research aspects: live VM migration mechanism and live VM migration policy. In the meanwhile, with the development of energy-aware computing, we have focused on the VM placement selection of live migration, namely live VM migration policy for energy saving. In this paper, a novel heuristic approach PS-ES is presented. Its main idea includes two parts. One is that it combines the PSO (particle swarm optimization) idea with the SA (simulated annealing) idea to achieve an improved PSO-based approach with the better global search's ability. The other one is that it uses the Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics and once again utilizes the SA idea to deal with the data obtained from the improved PSO-based process to get the final solution. And thus the whole approach achieves a long-term optimization for energy saving as it has considered not only the optimization of the current problem scenario but also that of the future problem. The experimental results demonstrate that PS-ES evidently reduces the total incremental energy consumption and better protects the performance of VM running and migrating compared with randomly migrating and optimally migrating. As a result, the proposed PS-ES approach has capabilities to make the result of live VM migration events more high-effective and valuable. PMID:25251339

  19. Detection of one-dimensional migration of single self-interstitial atoms in tungsten using high-voltage electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Amino, T; Arakawa, K; Mori, H

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour of atomic-size disarrangements of atoms-point defects (self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and vacancies)-often governs the macroscopic properties of crystalline materials. However, the dynamics of SIAs have not been fully uncovered because of their rapid migration. Using a combination of high-voltage transmission electron microscopy and exhaustive kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we determine the dynamics of the rapidly migrating SIAs from the formation process of the nanoscale SIA clusters in tungsten as a typical body-centred cubic (BCC) structure metal under the constant-rate production of both types of point defects with high-energy electron irradiation, which must reflect the dynamics of individual SIAs. We reveal that the migration dimension of SIAs is not three-dimensional (3D) but one-dimensional (1D). This result overturns the long-standing and well-accepted view of SIAs in BCC metals and supports recent results obtained by ab-initio simulations. The SIA dynamics clarified here will be one of the key factors to accurately predict the lifetimes of nuclear fission and fusion materials. PMID:27185352

  20. Detection of one-dimensional migration of single self-interstitial atoms in tungsten using high-voltage electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Amino, T.; Arakawa, K.; Mori, H.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour of atomic-size disarrangements of atoms—point defects (self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and vacancies)—often governs the macroscopic properties of crystalline materials. However, the dynamics of SIAs have not been fully uncovered because of their rapid migration. Using a combination of high-voltage transmission electron microscopy and exhaustive kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we determine the dynamics of the rapidly migrating SIAs from the formation process of the nanoscale SIA clusters in tungsten as a typical body-centred cubic (BCC) structure metal under the constant-rate production of both types of point defects with high-energy electron irradiation, which must reflect the dynamics of individual SIAs. We reveal that the migration dimension of SIAs is not three-dimensional (3D) but one-dimensional (1D). This result overturns the long-standing and well-accepted view of SIAs in BCC metals and supports recent results obtained by ab-initio simulations. The SIA dynamics clarified here will be one of the key factors to accurately predict the lifetimes of nuclear fission and fusion materials. PMID:27185352

  1. Detection of one-dimensional migration of single self-interstitial atoms in tungsten using high-voltage electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amino, T.; Arakawa, K.; Mori, H.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamic behaviour of atomic-size disarrangements of atoms—point defects (self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and vacancies)—often governs the macroscopic properties of crystalline materials. However, the dynamics of SIAs have not been fully uncovered because of their rapid migration. Using a combination of high-voltage transmission electron microscopy and exhaustive kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we determine the dynamics of the rapidly migrating SIAs from the formation process of the nanoscale SIA clusters in tungsten as a typical body-centred cubic (BCC) structure metal under the constant-rate production of both types of point defects with high-energy electron irradiation, which must reflect the dynamics of individual SIAs. We reveal that the migration dimension of SIAs is not three-dimensional (3D) but one-dimensional (1D). This result overturns the long-standing and well-accepted view of SIAs in BCC metals and supports recent results obtained by ab-initio simulations. The SIA dynamics clarified here will be one of the key factors to accurately predict the lifetimes of nuclear fission and fusion materials.

  2. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON LASER PLASMAS: Explosive breeding of point defects as a mechanism for multipulse damage to absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volodin, B. L.; Emel'yanov, Vladimir I.; Shlykov, Yu G.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism based on the concept of an explosive breeding of point defects is outlined for the multipulse damage to semiconductors by short laser pulses. Analytic expressions are derived for the critical temperature, the critical intensity, and the intensity dependence of the critical number of pulses. The theoretical results agree well with experimental data.

  3. Comment on ``Elastic wave propagation in a solid layer with laser-induced point defects'' [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064906 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. A.

    2012-09-01

    Mirzade [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064906 (2011)] developed a linear theory for the propagation of waves in an elastic solid with atomic point defects, and then sought time-harmonic solutions. It is shown that Mirzade's analysis is incomplete: substantial corrections are required.

  4. Current-induced changes of migration energy barriers in graphene and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Obodo, J T; Rungger, I; Sanvito, S; Schwingenschlögl, U

    2016-05-21

    An electron current can move atoms in a nanoscale device with important consequences for the device operation and breakdown. We perform first principles calculations aimed at evaluating the possibility of changing the energy barriers for atom migration in carbon-based systems. In particular, we consider the migration of adatoms and defects in graphene and carbon nanotubes. Although the current-induced forces are large for both the systems, in graphene the force component along the migration path is small and therefore the barrier height is little affected by the current flow. In contrast, the same barrier is significantly reduced in carbon nanotubes as the current increases. Our work also provides a real-system numerical demonstration that current-induced forces within density functional theory are non-conservative. PMID:27127889

  5. Energy Migration Upconversion in Manganese(II)-Doped Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiyan; Liu, Xiaowang; Chevrier, Daniel M; Qin, Xian; Xie, Xiaoji; Song, Shuyan; Zhang, Hongjie; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-11-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of cubic NaGdF4:Yb/Tm@NaGdF4:Mn core-shell structures. By taking advantage of energy transfer through Yb→Tm→Gd→Mn in these core-shell nanoparticles, we have realized upconversion emission of Mn(2+) at room temperature in lanthanide tetrafluoride based host lattices. The upconverted Mn(2+) emission, enabled by trapping the excitation energy through a Gd(3+) lattice, was validated by the observation of a decreased lifetime from 941 to 532 μs in the emission of Gd(3+) at 310 nm ((6)P(7/2)→(8)S(7/2)). This multiphoton upconversion process can be further enhanced under pulsed laser excitation at high power densities. Both experimental and theoretical studies provide evidence for Mn(2+) doping in the lanthanide-based host lattice arising from the formation of F(-) vacancies around Mn(2+) ions to maintain charge neutrality in the shell layer. PMID:26358961

  6. Current-induced changes of migration energy barriers in graphene and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obodo, J. T.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2016-05-01

    An electron current can move atoms in a nanoscale device with important consequences for the device operation and breakdown. We perform first principles calculations aimed at evaluating the possibility of changing the energy barriers for atom migration in carbon-based systems. In particular, we consider the migration of adatoms and defects in graphene and carbon nanotubes. Although the current-induced forces are large for both the systems, in graphene the force component along the migration path is small and therefore the barrier height is little affected by the current flow. In contrast, the same barrier is significantly reduced in carbon nanotubes as the current increases. Our work also provides a real-system numerical demonstration that current-induced forces within density functional theory are non-conservative.An electron current can move atoms in a nanoscale device with important consequences for the device operation and breakdown. We perform first principles calculations aimed at evaluating the possibility of changing the energy barriers for atom migration in carbon-based systems. In particular, we consider the migration of adatoms and defects in graphene and carbon nanotubes. Although the current-induced forces are large for both the systems, in graphene the force component along the migration path is small and therefore the barrier height is little affected by the current flow. In contrast, the same barrier is significantly reduced in carbon nanotubes as the current increases. Our work also provides a real-system numerical demonstration that current-induced forces within density functional theory are non-conservative. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR00534A

  7. Inherent point defects at the thermal higher-Miller index (211)Si/SiO{sub 2} interface

    SciTech Connect

    Iacovo, S.; Stesmans, A.

    2014-12-29

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out on the higher-Miller index (211)Si/SiO{sub 2} interface thermally grown in the temperature range T{sub ox} = 400–1066 °C to assess interface quality in terms of inherently incorporated point defects. This reveals the presence predominantly of two species of a P{sub b}-type interface defect (interfacial Si dangling bond), which, based on pertinent ESR parameters, is typified as P{sub b0}{sup (211)} variant, close to the P{sub b0} center observed in standard (100)Si/SiO{sub 2}—known as utmost detrimental interface trap. T{sub ox} ≳ 750 °C is required to minimize the P{sub b0}{sup (211)} defect density (∼4.2 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}; optimized interface). The data clearly reflect the non-elemental nature of the (211)Si face as an average of (100) and (111) surfaces. It is found that in oxidizing (211)Si at T{sub ox} ≳ 750 °C, the optimum Si/SiO{sub 2} interface quality is retained for the two constituent low-index (100) and (111) faces separately, indicating firm anticipating power for higher-index Si/SiO{sub 2} interfaces in general. It implies that, as a whole, the quality of a thermal higher-index Si/SiO{sub 2} interface can never surmount that of the low-index (100)Si/SiO{sub 2} structure.

  8. Thermocapillary Bubble Migration - An Oseen-Like Analysis of the Energy Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Dill, L. H.

    1992-01-01

    The thermocapillary migration of a bubble in a liquid possessing a temperature gradient is analyzed in the limit of large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. Crespo and Manuel (1983) performed an analysis in this limit wherein energy conduction is completely neglected and obtained the bubble migration velocity using energy dissipation arguments. In the present analysis, performed in a coordinate system moving with the bubble, the velocity field in the convection term in the energy equation is approximated in an Oseen-like manner by replacing it with the velocity field far away from the bubble (i.e., the migration velocity of the bubble). Conduction is retained to satisfy the zero conductive heat flux boundary condition on the bubble surface. An approximate solution has been obtained for the Oseen-like energy equation. The bubble velocity obtained using energy dissipation considerations is in agreement with the result of Crespo and Manuel. The solution shows the thermal boundary layer and wake structure in the vicinity of the bubble. The Oseen-like analysis, however, has inherent limitations, as the flow penetrates the bubble surface. These issues are discussed and the result are compared to those in the literature.

  9. Light Harvesting in Microscale Metal-Organic Frameworks by Energy Migration and Interfacial Electron Transfer Quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Caleb A.; Liu, Demin; Ma, Liqing; Papanikolas, John M.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Lin, Wenbin

    2011-08-24

    Microscale metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) were synthesized from photoactive Ru(II)-bpy building blocks with strong visible light absorption and long-lived triplet metal-to-ligand charge transfer (³MLCT) excited states. These MOFs underwent efficient luminescence quenching in the presence of either oxidative or reductive quenchers. Up to 98% emission quenching was achieved with either an oxidative quencher (1,4-benzoquinone) or a reductive quencher (N,N,N',N'-tetramethylbenzidine), as a result of rapid energy migration over several hundred nanometers followed by efficient electron transfer quenching at the MOF/solution interface. The photoactive MOFs act as an excellent light-harvesting system by combining intraframework energy migration and interfacial electron transfer quenching.

  10. Nonstoichiometry, point defects and magnetic properties in Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6-{delta}} double perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Kircheisen, R.; Toepfer, J.

    2012-01-15

    The phase stability, nonstoichiometry and point defect chemistry of polycrystalline Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6-{delta}} (SFMO) was studied by thermogravimety at 1000, 1100, and 1200 Degree-Sign C. Single-phase SFMO exists between -10.2{<=}log pO{sub 2}{<=}-13.7 at 1200 Degree-Sign C. At lower oxygen partial pressure a mass loss signals reductive decomposition. At higher pO{sub 2} a mass gain indicates oxidative decomposition into SrMoO{sub 4} and SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The nonstoichiometry {delta} at 1000, 1100, and 1200 Degree-Sign C was determined as function of pO{sub 2}. SFMO is almost stoichiometric at the upper phase boundary (e.g. {delta}=0.006 at 1200 Degree-Sign C and log pO{sub 2}=-10.2) and becomes more defective with decreasing oxygen partial pressure (e.g. {delta}=0.085 at 1200 Degree-Sign C and log pO{sub 2}=-13.5). Oxygen vacancies are shown to represent majority defects. From the temperature dependence of the oxygen vacancy concentration the defect formation enthalpy was estimated ({Delta}H{sub OV}=253{+-}8 kJ/mol). Samples of different nonstoichiometry {delta} were prepared by quenching from 1200 Degree-Sign C at various pO{sub 2}. An increase of the unit cell volume with increasing defect concentration {delta} was found. The saturation magnetization is reduced with increasing nonstoichiometry {delta}. This demonstrates that in addition to Fe/Mo site disorder, oxygen nonstoichiometry is another source of reduced magnetization values. - Graphical abstract: Nonstoichiometry {delta} of Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6-{delta}} as function of oxygen partial pressure at 1000, 1100, and 1200 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6-{delta}} is stable at T=1200 Degree-Sign C at low pO{sub 2} only. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nonstoichiometry {delta} measured at 1200, 1100, and 1000 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase of oxygen vacancy concentration with lower pO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduction of magnetization

  11. Correlation of point defects in CdZnTe with charge transport:application to room-temperature x-ray and gamma-ray. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, Nancy C.

    2003-06-25

    The primary goal of this project has been to characterize and identify point defects (e.g., impurities, vacancies, vacancy-impurity complexes, etc.) in CdZnTe and determine the mechanisms by which these defects influence the carrier {mu}{tau}products. Special attention is given to the role of shallow donors, shallow acceptors, and deeper acceptors. There are two experimental focus areas in the project: (1) liquid-helium photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation spectroscopy are used to identify and characterize donors and acceptors and to determine zinc molar fraction; and (2) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and photoinduced EPR experiments are performed at liquid-helium temperature to identify paramagnetic point defects and to determine the concentration of these defects. Results from the two experimental focus areas are correlated with detector performance parameters (e.g., electron and hole {mu}{tau} products), crystal growth conditions, and microstructure analyses.

  12. An efficient algorithm for finding the minimum energy path for cation migration in ionic materials.

    PubMed

    Rong, Ziqin; Kitchaev, Daniil; Canepa, Pieremanuele; Huang, Wenxuan; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-08-21

    The Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) is an established method for finding minimum-energy paths and energy barriers of ion migration in materials, but has been hampered in its general application by its significant computational expense when coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Typically, an NEB calculation is initialized from a linear interpolation of successive intermediate structures (also known as images) between known initial and final states. However, the linear interpolation introduces two problems: (1) slow convergence of the calculation, particularly in cases where the final path exhibits notable curvature; (2) divergence of the NEB calculations if any intermediate image comes too close to a non-diffusing species, causing instabilities in the ensuing calculation. In this work, we propose a new scheme to accelerate NEB calculations through an improved path initialization and associated energy estimation workflow. We demonstrate that for cation migration in an ionic framework, initializing the diffusion path as the minimum energy path through a static potential built upon the DFT charge density reproduces the true NEB path within a 0.2 Å deviation and yields up to a 25% improvement in typical NEB runtimes. Furthermore, we find that the locally relaxed energy barrier derived from this initialization yields a good approximation of the NEB barrier, with errors within 20 meV of the true NEB value, while reducing computational expense by up to a factor of 5. Finally, and of critical importance for the automation of migration path calculations in high-throughput studies, we find that the new approach significantly enhances the stability of the calculation by avoiding unphysical image initialization. Our algorithm promises to enable efficient calculations of diffusion pathways, resolving a long-standing obstacle to the computational screening of intercalation compounds for Li-ion and multivalent batteries. PMID:27544092

  13. Effect of ultrasonic cavitation on the diffusivity of a point defect in the passive film on formed Nb in 0.5 M HCl solution.

    PubMed

    Li, D G

    2015-11-01

    This work primarily focused on the influence of ultrasonic cavitation on the transport property of the point defect in the passive film on formed Nb in 0.5M HCl solution via electrochemical techniques based on the point defect model (PDM). The influence of ultrasonic cavitation on the composition and structure of the passive film was detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The transport property of a point defect in the passive film was characterized by the diffusivity of the point defect (D0). The influences of the ultrasonic cavitation power, passivated time and the distance between horn bottom and sample surface on D0 were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the passive film formed on Nb was an n-type semiconductor with a donor density (ND) ranging from 10(19) cm(-3) to 10(20) cm(-3) in the case of static state, while the order of ND increased one to two times by applying ultrasonic cavitation during film formation. The diffusivity of the point defect (D0) in the passive film formed on Nb at 0.5 V for 1 h in a 0.5 M HCl solution in the static state was calculated to be 9.704×10(-18) cm(2) s(-1), and it increased to 1.255×10(-16) cm(2) s(-1), 7.259×10(-16) cm(2) s(-1) and 7.296×10(-15) cm(2) s(-1) when applying the 180 W, 270 W and 450 W ultrasonic cavitation powers during film formation. D0 increased with the increment of the ultrasonic cavitation power, and decreased with the increased in formation time and distance between the horn bottom and sample surface. AES results showed the film structure and composition were changed by applying the ultrasonic cavitation. XPS results revealed that the passive film was mainly composed of Nb2O5 in the static state, and the low valence Nb-oxide (NbO) appeared in the passive film except Nb2O5 in the case of applying a 270 W ultrasonic cavitation power. PMID:26186848

  14. Surviving utopia: Energy, social capital, and international migration in Ixcan, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Matthew John

    Mounting peasant impoverishment in Guatemala comes face to face with growing ecological impoverishment. Abysmal living standards for Guatemala's majority results from highly skewed land distribution, rapid population growth, and a brutal civil war, which lasted almost four decades and laid waste to many rural communities and fields. In the face of such adversity, Guatemalans migrate to remaining forested frontiers and make longer journeys to North America in search of work. In an attempt to understand and improve natural resource use, especially firewood, I uncover how networks of social relations (social capital) and international migration influence livelihoods in agricultural communities along a forested frontier. I used both qualitative and quantitative methods to gather information about the lives of residents in four agricultural villages in Ixcan, Guatemala. The results from extended fieldwork illustrate how high levels of social capital can benefit the lives of rural residents. I argue that development programs can take advantage of existing high levels of social capital and take measures to create social capital where it is lacking to ensure the successful implementation of development programs. I also discuss firewood management in each community and demonstrate the disjuncture between local firewood use and national energy plans. Finally, I show how migrants and the money they send home from North America radically alter land use and land distribution in this part of rural Guatemala. My study reveals the need to examine the linkages between large-scale international migration, social capital, and the environment in communities that rely on the land for survival.

  15. Using a biocultural approach to examine migration/globalization, diet quality, and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Himmelgreen, David A; Cantor, Allison; Arias, Sara; Romero Daza, Nancy

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the role and impact that globalization and migration (e.g., intra-/intercontinental, urban/rural, and circular) have had on diet patterns, diet quality, and energy balance as reported on in the literature during the last 20 years. Published literature from the fields of anthropology, public health, nutrition, and other disciplines (e.g., economics) was collected and reviewed. In addition, case studies from the authors' own research are presented in order to elaborate on key points and dietary trends identified in the literature. While this review is not intended to be comprehensive, the findings suggest that the effects of migration and globalization on diet quality and energy balance are neither lineal nor direct, and that the role of social and physical environments, culture, social organization, and technology must be taken into account to better understand this relationship. Moreover, concepts such as acculturation and the nutrition transition do not necessarily explain or adequately describe all of the global processes that shape diet quality and energy balance. Theories from nutritional anthropology and critical bio-cultural medical anthropology are used to tease out some of these complex interrelationships. PMID:24463063

  16. Direct energy transfer and migration among Cr ions in the Cr, Nd:GSGG luminescent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Moreno, A. A.; Meneses Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-García, O.; Diaz-Torres, L. A.; Carrillo Romo, F.; Boulon, G.

    2001-02-01

    Two sets of experimental data of the chromium emission, at short and long times, for the non-radiative energy transfer processes in Cr, Nd:GSGG (Gd 3Sc 2Ga 3O 12) are analyzed. In contrast to previous analysis, our modeling allows calculating the whole fluorescent transient, that is, it is not divided into three time regimes, as current models do, nor a cut-off distance is introduced. The observed fast initial decay is due to a sum of multipolar and exchange interactions among dopants while for longer times the migration of energy among Cr ions cannot be neglected. Our analysis is based on solving the corresponding master equations that govern the non-radiative energy transfer processes among dopants. The used free parameters for our calculations are identical to those used in current models and for our analysis the corresponding values were independent of the dopants concentration.

  17. Migration of antimony from PET bottles into beverages: determination of the activation energy of diffusion and migration modelling compared with literature data.

    PubMed

    Welle, F; Franz, R

    2011-01-01

    Plastics bottles made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) are increasingly used for soft drinks, mineral water, juices and beer. In this study a literature review is presented concerning antimony levels found both in PET materials as well as in foods and food simulants. On the other hand, 67 PET samples from the European bottle market were investigated for their residual antimony concentrations. A mean value of 224 ± 32 mg kg(-1) was found, the median was 220 mg kg(-1). Diffusion coefficients for antimony in PET bottle materials were experimentally determined at different temperature between 105 and 150°C. From these data, the activation energy of diffusion for antimony species from the PET bottle wall into beverages and food simulants was calculated. The obtained value of 189 kJ mol(-1) was found to be in good agreement with published data on PET microwave trays (184 kJ mol(-1)). Based on these results, the migration of antimony into beverages was predicted by mathematical migration modelling for different surface/volume ratios and antimony bottle wall concentrations. The results were compared with literature data as well as international legal limits and guidelines values for drinking water and the migration limit set from food packaging legislation. It was concluded that antimony levels in beverages due to migration from PET bottles manufactured according to the state of the art can never reach or exceed the European-specific migration limit of 40 microg kg(-1). Maximum migration levels caused by room-temperature storage even after 3 years will never be essentially higher than 2.5 microg kg(-1) and in any case will be below the European limit of 5 microg kg(-1) for drinking water. The results of this study confirm that the exposure of the consumer by antimony migration from PET bottles into beverages and even into edible oils reaches approximately 1% of the current tolerable daily intake (TDI) established by World Health Organisation (WHO). Having

  18. Artificial light-harvesting arrays: electronic energy migration and trapping on a sphere and between spheres.

    PubMed

    Iehl, Julien; Nierengarten, Jean-François; Harriman, Anthony; Bura, Thomas; Ziessel, Raymond

    2012-01-18

    A sophisticated model of the natural light-harvesting antenna has been devised by decorating a C(60) hexa-adduct with ten yellow and two blue boron dipyrromethene (Bodipy) dyes in such a way that the dyes retain their individuality and assist solubility of the fullerene. Unusually, the fullerene core is a poor electron acceptor and does not enter into light-induced electron-transfer reactions with the appended dyes, but ineffective electronic energy transfer from the excited-state dye to the C(60) residue competes with fluorescence from the yellow dye. Intraparticle electronic energy transfer from yellow to blue dyes can be followed by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and by excitation spectra for isolated C(60) nanoparticles dissolved in dioxane at 293 K and at 77 K. The decorated particles can be loaded into polymer films by spin coating from solution. In the dried film, efficient energy transfer occurs such that photons absorbed by the yellow dye are emitted by the blue dye. Films can also be prepared to contain C(60) nanoparticles loaded with the yellow Bodipy dye but lacking the blue dye and, under these circumstances, electronic energy migration occurs between yellow dyes appended to the same nanoparticle and, at higher loading, to dye molecules on nearby particles. Doping these latter polymer films with the mixed-dye nanoparticle coalesces these multifarious processes in a single system. Thus, long-range energy migration occurs among yellow dyes attached to different particles before trapping at a blue dye. In this respect, the film resembles the natural photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, albeit at much reduced efficacy. The decorated nanoparticles sensitize amorphous silicon photocells. PMID:22148681

  19. Recent emergence of photon upconversion based on triplet energy migration in molecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Nobuhiro; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    An emerging field of triplet energy migration-based photon upconversion (TEM-UC) is reviewed. Highly efficient photon upconversion has been realized in a wide range of chromophore assemblies, such as non-solvent liquids, ionic liquids, amorphous solids, gels, supramolecular assemblies, molecular crystals, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The control over their assembly structures allows for unexpected air-stability and maximum upconversion quantum yield at weak solar irradiance that has never been achieved by the conventional molecular diffusion-based mechanism. The introduction of the "self-assembly" concept offers a new perspective in photon upconversion research and triplet exciton science, which show promise for numerous applications ranging from solar energy conversion to chemical biology. PMID:26947379

  20. Control of point defects in the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 film synthesized at low temperature from a Cu/In2Se3 stacked precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Gwang Sun; Kim, Seungtae; Ko, Young Min; Moon, Sun Hong; Choi, Yong Woo; Ahn, Byung Tae

    2016-07-01

    Low-temperature fabrication of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) film is essential for flexible CIGS solar cells. A large-grained CIGS film was synthesized with a Se-deficient Cu/In,Ga)2Se3 stacked precursor by reacting at 500 °C in a vacuum and was then subsequently annealing in Se environment. The CIGS solar cell with the as-prepared CIGS film had a poor cell performance due to a very low Ga composition at the CIGS surface. The surface Ga composition was controlled to 0.2 by supplying In, Ga, and Se in a temperature range of 350 to 500 °C. From an analysis of the photoluminescence spectra, we found that the point defects, Se vacancy and In-in-Cu antisite, in the CIGS film were greatly reduced by annealing below 450 °C. The short-circuit current was pronouncedly increased in the CIGS cells. The open-circuit voltage depended on both the Ga composition and Cu composition at the CIGS surface. In particular, a low Cu composition at the CIGS surface was essential for the higher performance solar cells. Our results indicated that CIGSs film synthesized at high temperature must be annealed at 350 °C or below to reduce undesirable point defects. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Solute interaction with point defects in α Fe during thermal ageing: A combined ab initio and atomic kinetic Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, E.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2006-06-01

    Solute Cu plays a major role in the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under radiation. In RPV steels and dilute FeCu alloys, characterization techniques such as the tomographic atom probe (TAP), or the small angle neutron scattering (SANS) have revealed the formation of solute rich clusters (with Cu, Ni, Mn and Si) under neutron flux. It is thus very important to characterize the interactions of these solutes with radiation-induced point defects in order to understand the elementary mechanisms behind the formation of these clusters. Ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory have been made in order to build a database used to parameterise an atomic kinetic Monte Carlo model. The interactions of point defects and solute atoms in dilute FeX alloys (X = Cu, Mn, Ni or Si) have been evaluated for different configurations of small solute clusters and solute-vacancy complexes. First results obtained with the kinetic Monte Carlo model will be presented and compared to some experimental observations.

  2. Modulation of contact resistance between metal and graphene by controlling the graphene edge, contact area, and point defects: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Bo; Wen, Yanwei E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn; Gong, Cheng; Cho, Kyeongjae; Chen, Rong; Shan, Bin E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2014-05-14

    A systematic first-principles non-equilibrium Green's function study is conducted on the contact resistance between a series of metals (Au, Ag, Pt, Cu, Ni, and Pd) and graphene in the side contact geometry. Different factors such as the termination of the graphene edge, contact area, and point defect in contacted graphene are investigated. Notable differences are observed in structural configurations and electronic transport characteristics of these metal-graphene contacts, depending on the metal species and aforementioned influencing factors. It is found that the enhanced chemical reactivity of the graphene due to dangling bonds from either the unsaturated graphene edge or point defects strengthens the metal-graphene bonding, leading to a considerable contact resistance reduction for weakly interacting metals Au and Ag. For stronger interacting metals Pt and Cu, a slightly reduced contact resistance is found due to such influencing factors. However, the wetting metals Ni and Pd most strongly hybridize with graphene, exhibiting negligible dependence on the above influencing factors. This study provides guidance for the optimization of metal-graphene contacts at an atomic scale.

  3. Materials for high-power laser applications: Point defects in KTP and ZnGeP2. Final technical report, 1 June 1993-31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Halliburton, L.E.

    1994-09-30

    The operation of devices utilizing nonlinear optical materials such as KTP and ZnGeP2 are limited at high laser power by point defects in the crystal. This project has used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) experimental techniques to identify and characterize the primary point defects in KTP, ZnGeP2, and CdGeAs2 crystals. In KTP, the primary electron trap (i.e., a Ti3+ ion) is associated with the formation of gray tracks. The present investigation has shown that these Ti3+ ions have a significantly different local environment depending on whether the crystal was grown hydrothermally or by the flux technique. Also, in KTP, it is shown that potassium vacancies are the primary hole trapping site at low temperature. The acceptor in as-grown crystals of ZnGeP2 is shown to be a singly ionized zinc vacancy or a zinc ion on a germanium site. Results in CdGeAs2 suggest that the dominant EPR-active defects are either a cation vacancy or a cation antisite.

  4. Dissipation Rate of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in Diel Vertical Migrations: Comparison of ANSYS Fluent Model to Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Cayla; Soloviev, Alexander; Hirons, Amy; Frank, Tamara; Wood, Jon

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that diel vertical migrations of zooplankton may have an impact on ocean mixing, though details are not completely clear. A strong sound scattering layer of zooplankton undergoing diel vertical migrations was observed in Saanich Inlet, British Colombia, Canada by Kunze et al. (2006). In this study, a shipboard 200-kHz echosounder was used to track vertical motion of the sound scattering layer, and microstructure profiles were collected to observe turbulence. An increase of dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy by four to five orders of magnitude was measured during diel vertical migrations of zooplankton in one case (but not observed during other cases). A strong sound scattering layer undergoing diel vertical migration was also observed in the Straits of Florida via a bottom mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler at 244 m isobath. A 3-D non-hydrostatic computational fluid dynamics model with Lagrangian particle injections (a proxy for migrating zooplankton) via a discrete phase model was used to simulate the effect of diel vertical migrations on the turbulence for both Saanich Inlet and the Straits of Florida. The model was initialized with idealized (but based on observation) density and velocity profiles. Particles, with buoyancy adjusted to serve as a proxy for vertically swimming zooplankton, were injected to simulate diel vertical migration cycles. Results of models run with extreme concentrations of particles showed an increase in dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy of approximately five orders of magnitude over background turbulence during migration of particles in both Saanich Inlet and the Straits of Florida cases (though direct relation of the turbulence produced by buoyant particles and swimming organisms isn't straightforward). This increase was quantitatively consistent, with turbulence measurements by Kunze et al. (2006). When 10 times fewer particles were injected into the model, the effect on dissipation

  5. Computer simulation of energy migration in the C-phycocyanin of the blue-green algae Agmenellum Quadruplicatum.

    PubMed

    Demidov, A A; Borisov, A Y

    1993-05-01

    Two methods for simulation of energy migration in the C-phycocyanin fragments of PBS were developed. Both methods are based on the statistical analysis of an excitation behavior in modeling complexes with a limited number (up to hundreds) of chromophores using the Monte-Carlo approach and calculation of migration rates for the system of linear balance equations. Energy migration rates were calculated in the case of C-phycocyanin of the blue-green algae Agmenellum quadruplicatum. The main channels of energy migration were determined in a monomer, trimer, hexamer, and in the rods consisting of 2-4 hexamers. The influence of the "screw" angle between two adjoining trimers of hexamer on the rates of energy migration and on its efficiencies in 1-4 hexamers was also estimated. The analysis was made for the average (random) and real orientation of chromophores in the C-phycocyanin. For both cases the optimal angle values were determined and the one for real C-phycocyanin structure was found to be very close (Deltaø

  6. Fundamental Studies of Charge Migration and Delocalization Relevant to Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Therien

    2012-06-01

    This program aimed to understand the molecular-level principles by which complex chemical systems carry out photochemical charge separation, transport, and storage, and how these insights could impact the design of practical solar energy conversion and storage devices. Towards these goals, this program focused on: (1) carrying out fundamental mechanistic and transient dynamical studies of proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions; (2) characterizing and interrogating via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods novel conjugated materials that feature large charge delocalization lengths; and (3) exploring excitation delocalization and migration, as well as polaron transport properties of meso-scale assemblies that are capable of segregating light-harvesting antennae, nanoscale wire-like conduction elements, and distinct oxidizing and reducing environments.

  7. Point defects diagrams for pure and doped copper oxide Cu{sub 2{+-}{delta}}O in the temperature range of 873-1473 K

    SciTech Connect

    Stoklosa, A.

    2012-10-15

    Point defects diagrams for the Cu{sub 2{+-}{delta}}O, both pure and doped with M{sup 2+} metal ions with all the types of defects in the cation sublattice considered are presented in this work. The calculations of the diagrams were performed by a novel method. The calculations were based on the data from the results of the studies of the deviation from stoichiometry and the electrical conductivity in the temperature range of 873-1473 K. The values of {Delta}G{sup o} of the formation of Frenkel-type defects, of copper vacancies, and of interstitial copper atoms were determined and their temperature dependence. It was shown that character of the dependence of the sum of concentrations of electronic defects ([h{sup Bullet }]+b[e Prime ]) on p{sub O{sub 2}} is fully consistent with its dependence of the electrical conductivity. Their mobility ({mu}{sub e}/{mu}{sub h}=b), vary from 1300 to 30. The dope M{sup 2+} increases the concentration of electrons and shifts the minimum of electrical conductivity toward higher oxygen pressures. - Graphical abstract: This work presents point defects diagrams for the Cu{sub 2{+-}{delta}}O, with all the types of defects in the cation sublattice considered. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The point defects diagrams. Copper oxide Cu{sub 2{+-}{delta}}O, for pure and M{sup 2+} doped. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of {Delta}G{sup o} of the formation of Frenkel-type defects were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of {Delta}G{sup o} of the formation QUOTE QUOTE of singly-ionized copper vacancies were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of {Delta}G{sup o} of the formation of electroneutral copper vacancies were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of {Delta}G{sup o} of the formation and of interstitial copper atoms were determined.

  8. The control of pigment migration in isolated erythrophores of Holocentrus ascensionis (Osbeck). I. Energy requirements.

    PubMed

    Luby, K J; Porter, K R

    1980-08-01

    Erythrophores isolated from the scales of the marine teleost, Holocentrus ascensionis (Osbeck), are capable of rapidly aggregating or dispersing numberous red pigment granules within their cytoplasm by translocating them along radial paths delineated by bundles of radially oriented microtubules. Pigment translocation is accompanied by transformations in the morphology of the cytoplasmic matrix, or microtrabecular lattice (MTL), in which the pigment granules are suspended. It appears that the MTL as a whole contracts toward the cell center during aggregation, carrying the pigment granules inward along with it, and is restructured during dispersion, using the radial microtubules as guides. We examined the energy requirements of pigment migration and the accompanying MTL transformations. Cellular ATP was depleted using the specific metabolic inhibitors 2,4 dinitrophenol, NaCN and oligomycin. All three of these drugs, which inhibit oxidative phosphorylation by different mechanisms, prevent both pigment dispersion and MTL transformation to dispersed morphology, while aggregation is unaffected. Inhibitor-treated cells recover normal pigment movements and MTL morphology when inhibitor is washed out of the cells with fresh medium. Potential energy apparently is stored in the MTL by some ATP-dependent process during dispersion and is converted to kinetic energy during aggregation. The results of this study strengthen the hypothesis that the MTL, working in concert with the radial microtubules, is the vehicle for pigment translocation in the erythrophore system. PMID:7407908

  9. The effect of surface coating on energy migration-mediated upconversion.

    PubMed

    Su, Qianqian; Han, Sanyang; Xie, Xiaoji; Zhu, Haomiao; Chen, Hongyu; Chen, Chih-Kai; Liu, Ru-Shi; Chen, Xueyuan; Wang, Feng; Liu, Xiaogang

    2012-12-26

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles have been the focus of a growing body of investigation because of their promising applications ranging from data storage to biological imaging and drug delivery. Here we present the rational design, synthesis, and characterization of a new class of core-shell upconversion nanoparticles displaying unprecedented optical properties. Specifically, we show that the epitaxial growth of an optically inert NaYF(4) layer around a lanthanide-doped NaGdF(4)@NaGdF(4) core-shell nanoparticle effectively prevents surface quenching of excitation energy. At room temperature, the energy migrates over Gd sublattices and is adequately trapped by the activator ions embedded in host lattices. Importantly, the NaYF(4) shell-coating strategy gives access to tunable upconversion emissions from a variety of activators (Dy(3+), Sm(3+), Tb(3+), and Eu(3+)) doped at very low concentrations (down to 1 mol %). Our mechanistic investigations make possible, for the first time, the realization of efficient emissions from Tb(3+) and Eu(3+) activators that are doped homogeneously with Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) ions. The advances on these luminescent nanomaterials offer exciting opportunities for important biological and energy applications. PMID:23210614

  10. Energy Expenditure and Metabolic Changes of Free-Flying Migrating Northern Bald Ibis.

    PubMed

    Bairlein, Franz; Fritz, Johannes; Scope, Alexandra; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Stanclova, Gabriela; van Dijk, Gertjan; Meijer, Harro A J; Verhulst, Simon; Dittami, John

    2015-01-01

    Many migrating birds undertake extraordinary long flights. How birds are able to perform such endurance flights of over 100-hour durations is still poorly understood. We examined energy expenditure and physiological changes in Northern Bald Ibis Geronticus eremite during natural flights using birds trained to follow an ultra-light aircraft. Because these birds were tame, with foster parents, we were able to bleed them immediately prior to and after each flight. Flight duration was experimentally designed ranging between one and almost four hours continuous flights. Energy expenditure during flight was estimated using doubly-labelled-water while physiological properties were assessed through blood chemistry including plasma metabolites, enzymes, electrolytes, blood gases, and reactive oxygen compounds. Instantaneous energy expenditure decreased with flight duration, and the birds appeared to balance aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, using fat, carbohydrate and protein as fuel. This made flight both economic and tolerable. The observed effects resemble classical exercise adaptations that can limit duration of exercise while reducing energetic output. There were also in-flight benefits that enable power output variation from cruising to manoeuvring. These adaptations share characteristics with physiological processes that have facilitated other athletic feats in nature and might enable the extraordinary long flights of migratory birds as well. PMID:26376193

  11. Energy Expenditure and Metabolic Changes of Free-Flying Migrating Northern Bald Ibis

    PubMed Central

    Bairlein, Franz; Fritz, Johannes; Scope, Alexandra; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Stanclova, Gabriela; van Dijk, Gertjan; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Many migrating birds undertake extraordinary long flights. How birds are able to perform such endurance flights of over 100-hour durations is still poorly understood. We examined energy expenditure and physiological changes in Northern Bald Ibis Geronticus eremite during natural flights using birds trained to follow an ultra-light aircraft. Because these birds were tame, with foster parents, we were able to bleed them immediately prior to and after each flight. Flight duration was experimentally designed ranging between one and almost four hours continuous flights. Energy expenditure during flight was estimated using doubly-labelled-water while physiological properties were assessed through blood chemistry including plasma metabolites, enzymes, electrolytes, blood gases, and reactive oxygen compounds. Instantaneous energy expenditure decreased with flight duration, and the birds appeared to balance aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, using fat, carbohydrate and protein as fuel. This made flight both economic and tolerable. The observed effects resemble classical exercise adaptations that can limit duration of exercise while reducing energetic output. There were also in-flight benefits that enable power output variation from cruising to manoeuvring. These adaptations share characteristics with physiological processes that have facilitated other athletic feats in nature and might enable the extraordinary long flights of migratory birds as well. PMID:26376193

  12. Some notes on hydrogen-related point defects and their role in the isotope exchange and electrical conductivity in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2015-11-01

    Nominally anhydrous minerals such as olivine dissolve hydrogen in a variety of forms including free (or interstitial) proton (Hrad) and two protons trapped at the M-site ((2 H)M×). The strength of chemical bonding between protons and the surrounding atoms are different among different species, and consequently protons belonging to different species likely have different mobility (diffusion coefficients). I discuss the role of diffusion of protons in different species in the isotope exchange and hydrogen-assisted electrical conductivity adding a few notes to the previous work by Karato (2013) including a new way to test the model. I conclude that in the case of isotope exchange, the interaction among these species is strong because diffusion is heterogeneous, whereas there is no strong interaction among different species in electrical conduction where diffusion is homogeneous (in an infinite crystal). Consequently, the slowest diffusing species controls the rate of isotope exchange, whereas the fastest diffusing species controls electrical conductivity leading to a different temperature dependence of activation energy and anisotropy. This model explains the differences in the activation energy and anisotropy between isotope diffusion and electrical conductivity, and predicts that the mechanism of electrical conductivity changes with temperature providing an explanation for most of the discrepancies among different experimental observations at different temperatures except for those by Poe et al. (2010) who reported anomalously high water content dependence and highly anisotropic activation energy. When the results obtained at high temperatures are used, most of the geophysically observed high and highly anisotropic electrical conductivity in the asthenosphere can be explained without invoking partial melting.

  13. Intrinsic point defects and complexes in the quaternary kesterite semiconductor Cu2ZnSnS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shiyou; Yang, Ji-Hui; Gong, X. G.; Walsh, Aron; Wei, Su-Huai

    2010-06-01

    Current knowledge of the intrinsic defect properties of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is limited, which is hindering further improvement of the performance of CZTS-based solar cells. Here, we have performed first-principles calculations for a series of intrinsic defects and defect complexes in CZTS, from which we have the following observations. (i) It is important to control the elemental chemical potentials during crystal growth to avoid the formation of secondary phases such as ZnS, CuS, and Cu2SnS3 . (ii) The intrinsic p -type conductivity is attributed to the CuZn antisite which has a lower formation energy and relatively deeper acceptor level compared to the Cu vacancy. (iii) The low formation energy of many of the acceptor defects will lead to the intrinsic p -type character, i.e., n -type doping is very difficult in this system. (iv) The role of electrically neutral defect complexes is predicted to be important, because they have remarkably low formation energies and electronically passivate deep levels in the band gap. For example, [CuZn-+ZnCu+] , [VCu-+ZnCu+] , and [ZnSn2-+2ZnCu+] may form easily in nonstoichiometric samples. The band alignment between Cu2ZnSnS4 , CuInSe2 and the solar-cell window layer CdS has also been calculated, revealing that a type-II band alignment exists for the CdS/Cu2ZnSnS4 heterojunction. The fundamental differences between CZTS and CuInSe2 for use in thin-film photovoltaics are discussed. The results are expected to be relevant to other I2-II-IV-VI4 semiconductors.

  14. Power-law singularity in the local density of states due to the point defect in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Min; Tang, Jian-Ming; Lin, Hsiu-Hau

    2009-09-01

    Defects in graphene give rise to zero modes that are often related to the sharp peak in the local density of states near the defect site. Here we solved all zero modes induced by a single defect in the finite-size graphene and show that their contributions to the local density of states vanish in the thermodynamic limit. Instead, lots of resonant states emerge at low energies and eventually lead to a power-law singularity in the local density of states. Our findings show that the impurity problem in graphene should be treated as a collective phenomenon rather than a single impurity state.

  15. Photoinduced current transient spectroscopy technique applied to the study of point defects in polycrystalline CdS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    El Akkad, Fikry; Ashour, Habib

    2009-05-01

    CdS thin films of variable thickness (between 160 and 1200 nm) were prepared using rf magnetron sputtering. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the films have hexagonal structure and that the crystallites are preferentially oriented with the <002> axis perpendicular to the substrate surface. The results of electrical conductivity measurements as a function of film thickness and of temperature provide evidence that the conductivity is controlled by a thermally activated mobility in the presence of an intergrain barrier. The room temperature barrier height phi decreases with the increase in film thickness. Values of phi between 0 and 0.25 eV were determined. Photoinduced current transient spectroscopy performed on five samples having different thicknesses showed the presence of 11 traps with activation energies in the range 0.08-1.06 eV; deeper traps being observed on thinner films. By comparison with literature results, seven traps are attributed to native defects and foreign impurities (mainly Cu, Au, and Ag). Four other traps, not previously observed, are attributed to residual defects. The observation that deeper traps are detected in samples with larger barrier heights has been discussed and interpreted in terms of the energy band profile near the grain boundary.

  16. Point Defects and Protonic Conduction in A(3)(B'B"(2))O(9) Perovskite-Type Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yang

    The defect structure and protonic transport properties of a number of rm A_3(B^' Nb_2)O_9 perovskite-type oxides, with A and B^' cations being alkaline earth elements, are investigated. The oxygen vacancies, V_sp{rm o}{ ^ddot}, are generated by nonstoichiometry which replaces a fraction of Nb^{5+ } ions by B^{'2+ } ions. Protons are then incorporated into the structure through the exchange reaction,. rm H_2O + V_sp {rm o}{^ddot} to O_sp{o}{x} + 2H^{.} by annealing the materials in moistened atmosphere. The protons can be removed by high temperature annealing in vacuum or in dry atmospheres. Impedance analysis is employed to extract the bulk electrical conductivity, sigma. The conductivity, sigma_{rm H}, of proton charged samples is more than an order of magnitude higher than samples without protons. Among the compounds studied, the H^+ charged samples of rm Ba_3(Ca_{1+3x }Nb_{2-3x})O_{9-delta } and rm Sr_3(Ca_ {1+3x}Nb_{2-3x})O_{9 -delta} show activation energy, E _{rm H}, of 0.52 ~ 0.55 eV and 0.64 ~ 0.66 eV, respectively, with sigma_ {rm H} comparable to those of the well-studied Nd^{3+}-doped BaCeO_3 and Yb^{3+ }-doped SrCeO_3. Without protons, the materials studied here are oxygen ion conductors with activation energy and conductivity compatible to Y -stablized ZrO_2. The ionic character of the dry samples is stable in a range of P_{o_2} over 18 orders of magnitude. As the number ratio of B site cations, B ^'/Nb, increases from 1/2, 1-1 ordered domains with B^'/Nb ~ 1 are created. The size and volume fraction of 1-1 ordered domains increases as B ^'/Nb approaches unity. The domain regions are rich in B^' and require positive ions, e.g. H^+ and V_sp{o}{2+}, for compensation. Internal friction peaks related to protons are observed in Nd^{3+}-doped BaCeO_3 but not in rm A_3(B^' Nb_2)O_9 compounds. Then pair-wise association of H ^+ or V_sp{o}{2+ } to specific sites in rm A_3(B ^' Nb_2)O_9 should not be considered. All compounds, showing considerable enhancement of

  17. Calculating Effect of Point Defects on Optical Absorption Spectra of III-V Semiconductor Superlattices Based on (8x8) k-dot-p Band Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Danhong; Iurov, Andrii; Gumbs, Godfrey; Cardimona, David; Krishna, Sanjay

    For a superlattice which is composed of layered zinc-blende structure III-V semiconductor materials, its realistic anisotropic band structures around the Gamma-point are calculated by using the (8x8)k-dot-p method with the inclusion of the self-consistent Hartree potential and the spin-orbit coupling. By including the many-body screening effect, the obtained band structures are further employed to calculate the optical absorption coefficient which is associated with the interband electron transitions. As a result of a reduced quasiparticle lifetime due to scattering with point defects in the system, the self-consistent vertex correction to the optical response function is also calculated with the help of the second-order Born approximation.

  18. Nondestructive quantitative mapping of impurities and point defects in thin films: Ga and V{sub Zn} in ZnO:Ga

    SciTech Connect

    Look, David C.; Leedy, Kevin D.; Agresta, Donald L.

    2014-06-16

    Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) films grown by pulsed-laser deposition on quartz and other lattice-mismatched substrates can routinely attain resistivities of 2 × 10{sup −4} Ω·cm and thus compete with Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (ITO) in large-area transparent-electrode applications. Nondestructive, high-resolution (1-mm) maps of thickness d, concentration n, and mobility μ on such films can be obtained automatically from commercial spectroscopic ellipsometers. From n and μ, degenerate-electron scattering theory yields donor N{sub D} and acceptor N{sub A} concentrations at each point. Finally, N{sub D} and N{sub A} can be identified as [Ga] and [V{sub Zn}], respectively, demonstrating high-density mapping of impurities and point defects in a semiconductor thin film.

  19. Understanding Historical Human Migration Patterns and Interbreeding (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Willerslev, Eske [University of Copenhagen

    2013-01-15

    Eske Willerslev from the University of Copenhagen on "Understanding Historical Human Migration Patterns and Interbreeding Using the Ancient Genomes of a Palaeo-Eskimo and an Aboriginal Australian" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  20. Understanding Historical Human Migration Patterns and Interbreeding (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Willerslev, Eske

    2012-03-21

    Eske Willerslev from the University of Copenhagen on "Understanding Historical Human Migration Patterns and Interbreeding Using the Ancient Genomes of a Palaeo-Eskimo and an Aboriginal Australian" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  1. The Effect of VMoS3 Point Defect on the Elastic Properties of Monolayer MoS2 with REBO Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minglin; Wan, Yaling; Tu, Liping; Yang, Yingchao; Lou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Structural defects in monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) have significant influence on the electric, optical, thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties of the material. Among all the types of structural defects of the chemical vapor phase-grown monolayer MoS2, the VMoS3 point defect (a vacancy complex of Mo and three nearby S atoms) is another type of defect preferentially generated by the extended electron irradiation. Here, using the classical molecular dynamics simulation with reactive empirical bond-order (REBO) potential, we first investigate the effect of VMoS3 point defects on the elastic properties of monolayer MoS2 sheets. Under the constrained uniaxial tensile test, the elastic properties of monolayer MoS2 sheets containing VMoS3 vacancies with defect fraction varying from 0.01 to 0.1 are obtained based on the plane anisotropic constitutive relations of the material. It is found that the increase of VMoS3 vacancy concentration leads to the noticeable decrease in the elastic modulus but has a slight effect on Poisson's ratio. The maximum decrease of the elastic modulus is up to 25 %. Increasing the ambient temperature from 10 K to 500 K has trivial influences on the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio for the monolayer MoS2 without defect and with 5 % VMoS3 vacancies. However, an anomalous parabolic relationship between the elastic modulus and the temperature is found in the monolayer MoS2 containing 0.1 % VMoS3 vacancy, bringing a crucial and fundamental issue to the application of monolayer MoS2 with defects.

  2. The Effect of VMoS3 Point Defect on the Elastic Properties of Monolayer MoS2 with REBO Potentials.

    PubMed

    Li, Minglin; Wan, Yaling; Tu, Liping; Yang, Yingchao; Lou, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Structural defects in monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) have significant influence on the electric, optical, thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties of the material. Among all the types of structural defects of the chemical vapor phase-grown monolayer MoS2, the VMoS3 point defect (a vacancy complex of Mo and three nearby S atoms) is another type of defect preferentially generated by the extended electron irradiation. Here, using the classical molecular dynamics simulation with reactive empirical bond-order (REBO) potential, we first investigate the effect of VMoS3 point defects on the elastic properties of monolayer MoS2 sheets. Under the constrained uniaxial tensile test, the elastic properties of monolayer MoS2 sheets containing VMoS3 vacancies with defect fraction varying from 0.01 to 0.1 are obtained based on the plane anisotropic constitutive relations of the material. It is found that the increase of VMoS3 vacancy concentration leads to the noticeable decrease in the elastic modulus but has a slight effect on Poisson's ratio. The maximum decrease of the elastic modulus is up to 25 %. Increasing the ambient temperature from 10 K to 500 K has trivial influences on the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio for the monolayer MoS2 without defect and with 5 % VMoS3 vacancies. However, an anomalous parabolic relationship between the elastic modulus and the temperature is found in the monolayer MoS2 containing 0.1 % VMoS3 vacancy, bringing a crucial and fundamental issue to the application of monolayer MoS2 with defects. PMID:27000023

  3. Electronic and magnetic structure of 3d-transition-metal point defects in silicon calculated from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, F.; Andersen, O. K.; Scheffler, M.

    1990-01-01

    We describe spin-unrestricted self-consistent linear muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) Green-function calculations for Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu transition-metal impurities in crystalline silicon. Both defect sites of tetrahedral symmetry are considered. All possible charge states with their spin multiplicities, magnetization densities, and energy levels are discussed and explained with a simple physical picture. The early transition-metal interstitial and late transition-metal substitutional 3d ions are found to have low spin. This is in conflict with the generally accepted crystal-field model of Ludwig and Woodbury, but not with available experimental data. For the interstitial 3d ions, the calculated deep donor and acceptor levels reproduce all experimentally observed transitions. For substitutional 3d ions, a large number of predictions is offered to be tested by future experimental studies.

  4. Excitation energy migration in yellow fluorescent protein (citrine) layers adsorbed on modified gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoff, Hanis Mohd; Rzeźnicka, Izabela I.; Hoshi, Hirotaka; Kajimoto, Shinji; Horimoto, Noriko Nishizawa; Sogawa, Kazuhiro; Fukumura, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    The nature of functional proteins adsorbed on solid surfaces is interesting from the perspective of developing of bioelectronics and biomaterials. Here we present evidence that citrine (one of yellow fluorescent protein variants) adsorbed on modified gold surfaces would not undergo denaturation and energy transfer among the adsorbed citrine molecules would occur. Gold substrates were chemically modified with 3-mercaptopropionic acid and tert-butyl mercaptan for the preparation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, respectively. A pure solution of citrine was dropped and dried on the modified gold substrates and their surface morphology was studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The obtained STM images showed multilayers of citrine adsorbed on the modified surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, citrine was adsorbed more randomly, formed various non-uniform aggregates, while on hydrophilic surfaces, citrine appeared more aligned and isolated uniform protein clusters were observed. Fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay of these dried citrine layers were also measured using the time correlated single photon counting method. Fluorescence anisotropy of citrine on the hydrophobic surface decayed faster than citrine on the hydrophilic surface. From these results we concluded that fluorescence energy migration occurred faster among citrine molecules which were randomly adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface to compare with the hydrophilic surface.

  5. CL from impurities and point defects in ZnO:Mn nanorods grown by the hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, A.; Herrera, M.

    2013-03-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is used to investigate the nature of defects and impurities generated in ZnO:Mn nanorods grown by the hydrothermal method. The incorporation of Mn in the ZnO nanorods generated an increase in the surface roughness and the formation of an Mn complex-compound of spinel ZnMn2O4. CL measurements acquired at room temperature revealed two emissions at 3.2 and 2.3 eV, associated with the ZnO near-band-edge emission and the luminescence of spinel ZnMn2O4, respectively. CL spectra at 100 K recorded the Mn2+ ion d-d transitions as a broad CL emission, with energies between 2.6 and 3.1 eV. The well-known ZnO yellow emission (2.0 eV) was also present in the samples, recording a relative intensity ratio I2.0/I2.33 that increased when the temperature was dropped at 100 K. A thermal annealing of the samples at 400 °C, in Ar atmosphere, generated strong decreases in the intensity of the defects and Mn-related emissions, recording an intensity ratio Iband-edge/Idefects of about 15. Diffusion of Mn from the ZnO surface to the bulk is proposed to explain this effect.

  6. Point defect processes in neutron irradiated Ni, Fe-15Cr-16Ni and Ti-added modified SUS316SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiki, M.; Yoshiie, T.; Sato, K.; Xu, Q.

    2013-05-01

    The defect structures in Ni, Fe-15Cr-16Ni and Ti-added modified SUS316SS (modified SUS316) were examined after neutron irradiation below 0.3 dpa by the Japan Materials Testing Reactor and Belgian Reactor 2 to compare their defect structural evolution. The growth behaviour of interstitial-type dislocation loops (I-loops), stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) and voids was found to be quite different among these specimens. I-loops developed at lower temperatures in Ni than in Fe-15Cr-16Ni and modified SUS316, and more swelling occurred in Ni than in Fe-15Cr-16Ni. Finally, there were no voids in modified SUS316. These results were analysed in terms of the I-loop energy. A large discrepancy was found between the analytical results and experimental observations for Ni and modified SUS316, which suggests the formation of unfaulted I-loops directly from collision cascades. The growth of SFTs was detected in Fe-15Cr-16Ni and modified SUS316, and can be explained by a change in the dislocation bias of SFTs resulting from the absorption of alloying elements.

  7. Defect diffusion during annealing of low-energy ion-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, P J; Caturla, M-J; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2000-03-08

    We present a new approach for investigating the kinetics of defect migration during annealing of low-energy, ion-implanted silicon, employing a combination of computer simulations and atomic-resolution tunneling microscopy. Using atomically-clean Si(111)-7x7 as a sink for bulk point defects created by 5 keV Xe and Ar irradiation, we observe distinct, temperature-dependent surface arrival rates for vacancies and interstitials. A combination of simulation tools provides a detailed description of the processes that underly the observed temperature-dependence of defect segregation, and the predictions of the simulations agree closely with the experimental observations.

  8. Influence of random point defects introduced by proton irradiation on the flux creep rates and magnetic field dependence of the critical current density J c of co-evaporated GdBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberkorn, N.; Kim, Jeehoon; Suárez, S.; Lee, Jae-Hun; Moon, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    We report the influence of random point defects introduced by 3 MeV proton irradiation (doses of 0.5 × 1016, 1 × 1016, 2 × 1016 and 6 × 1016 cm-2) on the vortex dynamics of co-evaporated 1.3 μm thick, GdBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors. Our results indicate that the inclusion of additional random point defects reduces the low field and enhances the in-field critical current densities J c. The main in-field J c enhancement takes place below 40 K, which is in agreement with the expectations for pinning by random point defects. In addition, our data show a slight though clear increase in flux creep rates as a function of irradiation fluence. Maley analysis indicates that this increment can be associated with a reduction in the exponent μ characterizing the glassy behavior.

  9. Gas Diffusion in Metals: Fundamental Study of Helium-Point Defect Interactions in Iron and Kinetics of Hydrogen Desorption from Zirconium Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang

    The behavior of gaseous foreign species (e.g., helium and hydrogen), which are either generated, adsorbed or implanted within the structural materials (e.g., iron and zirconium) exposed to irradiation environments, is an important and largely unsolved topic, as they intensively interact with the irradiation-induced defects, or bond with the lattice atoms to form new compounds, and impose significant effects on their microstructural and mechanical properties in fission and fusion reactors. This research investigates two cases of gas diffusion in metals (i.e., the helium-point defect interactions in iron and kinetics of hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride) through extensive experimental and modeling studies, with the objective of improving the understanding of helium effects on the microstructures of iron under irradiation and demonstrating the kinetics of hydrogen diffusion and precipitation behavior in zirconium that are crucial to predict cladding failures and hydride fuel performance. The study of helium effects in structural materials aims to develop a self-consistent, experimentally validated model of helium---point defect, defect cluster and intrinsic defects through detailed inter-comparisons between experimental measurements on helium ion implanted iron single crystals and computational models. The combination of thermal helium desorption spectrometry (THDS) experiment with the cluster dynamic model helps to reveal the influence of impurities on the energetics and kinetics of the He-defect interactions and to realize the identification of possible mechanisms governing helium desorption peaks. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is employed to acquire additional information on He-vacancy cluster evolution, which provides an opportunity to validate the model qualitatively. The inclusion of He---self-interstitial clusters extends the cluster dynamic model while MD simulations explore the effects of dislocation loops on helium clustering. In addition, the

  10. US Department of Energy approaches to the assessment of radionuclide migration for the Geologic Repository Program

    SciTech Connect

    Van Luik, A.E.; Apted, M.J.

    1987-09-01

    Potential radionuclide migration in geologic repositories is being addressed. Geohydrologic settings being investigated include unsaturated tuff, saturated basalt, and bedded salt. Several approaches to assessing potential migration are being considered. Mass transfer is prominent among near-field approaches, involving estimation of diffusive transport rates through the engineered barrier system using analytical and finite element methods. For far-field analysis of migration in the geosphere, detailed characterizations of potential repository sites will lead to site-specific models describing radionuclide migration for a variety of postulated release scenarios. Finite-element and finite-difference codes are being used and developed to solve the mathematical equations pertinent to far-field assessments. Computational approaches presently in use generally require distribution coefficients to estimate the retardation of specific radionuclides with respect to the transport rate of water.

  11. Energy Migration Engineering of Bright Rare-Earth Upconversion Nanoparticles for Excitation by Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yeteng; Rostami, Iman; Wang, Zihua; Dai, Hongjie; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2015-11-01

    A novel Nd(3+) -sensitized upconversion nanoparticle (UCNP) that can be excited by near-infrared 740 nm light-emitting diode (LED) lamps with bright upconversion luminescence is designed. Yb(3+) ion distribution is engineered to increase the energy migration efficiency. The benefit of the novel LED-excited UCNPs is demonstrated by imaging of breast cancer cells and enabling an economic handheld semiquantitative visual measurement device. PMID:26393770

  12. Simplified embedding schemes for the quantum-chemical description of neutral and charged point defects in SiO2 and related dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbetta, Davide; Ricci, Davide; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2000-12-01

    Embedding methods specifically designed to treat large molecules with bulky ligands or in polar solvents are used to describe the electronic structure of point defects in the covalently bonded solids SiO2, Si3N4, and Si2N2O. The mechanical relaxation of the lattice around a given defect, in particular an anion vacancy or interstitial, is described using the ONIOM approach where the system is partitioned in two regions, the local defect treated at the gradient corrected DFT level, and the surrounding matrix treated with a semiempirical Hamiltonian. In this way clusters of 100 atoms and more are used to describe a portion of the solid of 10-15 Å of diameter. The long-range lattice polarization induced by a charged defect, a charged oxygen vacancy or a proton bound to O or N atoms, is estimated by means of the isodensity polarized continuum model, IPCM, and compared with the approximate Born's formula. The two simplified embedding schemes provide a simple way to improve cluster models of neutral and charged defects in covalent materials.

  13. First-principles study of intrinsic point defects in ZnO: Role of band structure, volume relaxation, and finite-size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhart, Paul; Albe, Karsten; Klein, Andreas

    2006-05-01

    Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations of intrinsic point defect properties in zinc oxide were performed in order to remedy the influence of finite-size effects and the improper description of the band structure. The generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with empirical self-interaction corrections (GGA+U) was applied to correct for the overestimation of covalency intrinsic to GGA-DFT calculations. Elastic as well as electrostatic image interactions were accounted for by application of extensive finite-size scaling and compensating charge corrections. Size-corrected formation enthalpies and volumes as well as their charge state dependence have been deduced. Our results partly confirm earlier calculations but reveal a larger number of transition levels: (1) For both the zinc interstitial as well as the oxygen vacancy, transition levels are close to the conduction band minimum. (2) The zinc vacancy shows a transition rather close to the valence band maximum and another one near the middle of the calculated band gap. (3) For the oxygen interstitials, transition levels occur both near the valence band maximum and the conduction band minimum.

  14. Point defects along metallic atomic wires on vicinal Si surfaces: Si(5 5 7)-Au and Si(5 5 3)-Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Pil-Gyu; Shin, Jin Sung; Yeom, Han Woong

    2009-08-01

    Point defects on the metallic atomic wires induced by Au adsorbates on vicinal Si surfaces were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS). High-resolution STM images revealed that there exist several different types of defects on the Si(5 5 7)-Au surface, which are categorized by their apparent bias-dependent images and compared to the previous report on Si(5 5 3)-Au [Phys. Rev. B (2007) 205325]. The chemical characteristics of these defects were investigated by monitoring them upon the variation of the Au coverage and the adsorption of water molecules. The chemical origins and the tentative atomic structures of the defects are suggested as Si adatoms (and dimers) in different registries, the Au deficiency on terraces, and water molecules adsorbed dissociatively on step edges, respectively. STS measurements disclosed the electronic property of the majority kinds of defects on both Si(5 5 7)-Au and Si(5 5 3)-Au surfaces. In particular, the dominating water-induced defects on both surfaces induce a substantial band gap of about 0.5 eV in clear contrast to Si adatom-type defects. The conduction channels along the metallic step-edge chains thus must be very susceptible to the contamination through the electronic termination by the water adsorption.

  15. Point defects and p-type conductivity in Zn{sub 1–x}Mn{sub x}GeAs{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kilanski, L.; Podgórni, A.; Dynowska, E.; Dobrowolski, W.

    2014-07-14

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to study point defects in Zn{sub 1–x}Mn{sub x}GeAs{sub 2} crystals with low Mn content 0≤x≤0.042 with disordered zincblende and chalcopyrite structure. The role of negatively charged vacancies and non-open-volume defects is discussed with respect to the high p-type conductivity with carrier concentration 10{sup 19}≤p≤10{sup 21}cm{sup −3} in our samples. Neutral As vacancies, together with negatively charged Zn vacancies and non-open-volume defects with concentrations around 10{sup 16}−10{sup 18}cm{sup −3}, are observed to increase with increasing Mn content in the alloy. The observed concentrations of defects are not sufficient to be responsible for the strong p-type conductivity of our crystals. Therefore, we suggest that other types of defects, such as extended defects, have a strong influence on the conductivity of Zn{sub 1–x}Mn{sub x}GeAs{sub 2} crystals.

  16. New insights on P-related paramagnetic point defects in irradiated phosphate glasses: Impact of glass network type and irradiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Pukhkaya, V.; Ollier, N.; Trompier, F.

    2014-09-28

    P-related paramagnetic point defects were studied in irradiated Yb-doped phosphate glasses by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (X and Q-bands). A strong impact of the glass network type on the defect nature is shown. In all glasses, r-POHC defects formation is in strong correlation with Q{sup 2} tetrahedra amount supporting the structure of r-POHC. Ultra-phosphate glasses contain the larger defect type: Peroxy radicals, P{sub 1}, P{sub 2}, and P{sub 4} defects whose formation is linked to Q{sup 3} tetrahedra presence. In meta-phosphate and poly-phosphate glasses, peroxy radicals appear with r-POHC thermal recovery. In meta-phosphate glasses, a combination of P{sub 1} and P{sub 3} defects was evidenced for the first time, whereas in poly-phosphate glasses, only P{sub 3} defects were identified. Dose effect as well as defect recovery were analyzed.

  17. Direct correlation and strong reduction of native point defects and microwave dielectric loss in air-annealed (Ba,Sr)TiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Z. Q.; Podpirka, A.; Kirchoefer, S. W.; Asel, T. J.; Brillson, L. J.

    2015-05-04

    We report on the native defect and microwave properties of 1 μm thick Ba{sub 0.50}Sr{sub 0.50}TiO{sub 3} (BST) films grown on MgO (100) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (DRCLS) showed high densities of native point defects in as-deposited BST films, causing strong subgap emission between 2.0 eV and 3.0 eV due to mixed cation V{sub C} and oxygen Vo vacancies. Post growth air anneals reduce these defects with 2.2, 2.65, and 3.0 eV V{sub O} and 2.4 eV V{sub C} intensities decreasing with increasing anneal temperature and by nearly two orders of magnitude after 950 °C annealing. These low-defect annealed BST films exhibited high quality microwave properties, including room temperature interdigitated capacitor tunability of 13% under an electric bias of 40 V and tan δ of 0.002 at 10 GHz and 40 V bias. The results provide a feasible route to grow high quality BST films by MBE through post-air annealing guided by DRCLS.

  18. Point defects in hexagonal BN, BC{sub 3} and BC{sub x}N compounds studied by x-ray absorption near-edge structure

    SciTech Connect

    Caretti, Ignacio; Jimenez, Ignacio

    2011-07-15

    The generation of point defects in highly oriented pyrolytic boron nitride (HOPBN) after Ar{sup +} ion bombardment in ultrahigh vacuum and subsequent exposure to air was studied by angle-resolved x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). The pristine HOPBN showed well-oriented boron nitride (BN) basal planes parallel to the surface, with a negligible amount of defects. Amorphization of the BN structure took place after Ar{sup +} sputtering, as indicated by the broadening of the XANES spectra and significant decrease of the characteristic {pi}* states. Following air exposure, the XANES analysis revealed a spontaneous reorganization of the sample structure. The appearance of four new B1s {pi}* excitonic peaks indicates an oxygen decoration process of the nitrogen vacancies created by ion bombardment. A core-level shift model is presented to support this statement. This model is successfully extended to the case of oxygen substitutional defects in hexagonal BC{sub 3} and BC{sub x}N (0 < x < 4) materials, which can be applied to any B-based sp{sup 2}-bonded honeycomb structure.

  19. Direct quantification of energy intake in an apex marine predator suggests physiology is a key driver of migrations

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Rebecca E.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Walli, Andreas; Farwell, Charles; Bograd, Steven J.; Foley, David G.; Castleton, Michael; Block, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis) are highly migratory apex marine predators that inhabit a broad thermal niche. The energy needed for migration must be garnered by foraging, but measuring energy intake in the marine environment is challenging. We quantified the energy intake of Pacific bluefin tuna in the California Current using a laboratory-validated model, the first such measurement in a wild marine predator. Mean daily energy intake was highest off the coast of Baja California, Mexico in summer (mean ± SD, 1034 ± 669 kcal), followed by autumn when Pacific bluefin achieve their northernmost range in waters off northern California (944 ± 579 kcal). Movements were not always consistent with maximizing energy intake: the Pacific bluefin move out of energy rich waters both in late summer and winter, coincident with rising and falling water temperatures, respectively. We hypothesize that temperature-related physiological constraints drive migration and that Pacific bluefin tuna optimize energy intake within a range of optimal aerobic performance. PMID:26601248

  20. Direct quantification of energy intake in an apex marine predator suggests physiology is a key driver of migrations.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Rebecca E; Hazen, Elliott L; Walli, Andreas; Farwell, Charles; Bograd, Steven J; Foley, David G; Castleton, Michael; Block, Barbara A

    2015-09-01

    Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis) are highly migratory apex marine predators that inhabit a broad thermal niche. The energy needed for migration must be garnered by foraging, but measuring energy intake in the marine environment is challenging. We quantified the energy intake of Pacific bluefin tuna in the California Current using a laboratory-validated model, the first such measurement in a wild marine predator. Mean daily energy intake was highest off the coast of Baja California, Mexico in summer (mean ± SD, 1034 ± 669 kcal), followed by autumn when Pacific bluefin achieve their northernmost range in waters off northern California (944 ± 579 kcal). Movements were not always consistent with maximizing energy intake: the Pacific bluefin move out of energy rich waters both in late summer and winter, coincident with rising and falling water temperatures, respectively. We hypothesize that temperature-related physiological constraints drive migration and that Pacific bluefin tuna optimize energy intake within a range of optimal aerobic performance. PMID:26601248

  1. Density functional calculations on structural materials for nuclear energy applications and functional materials for photovoltaic energy applications (abstract only).

    PubMed

    Domain, C; Olsson, P; Becquart, C S; Legris, A; Guillemoles, J F

    2008-02-13

    Ab initio density functional theory calculations are carried out in order to predict the evolution of structural materials under aggressive working conditions such as cases with exposure to corrosion and irradiation, as well as to predict and investigate the properties of functional materials for photovoltaic energy applications. Structural metallic materials used in nuclear facilities are subjected to irradiation which induces the creation of large amounts of point defects. These defects interact with each other as well as with the different elements constituting the alloys, which leads to modifications of the microstructure and the mechanical properties. VASP (Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package) has been used to determine the properties of point defect clusters and also those of extended defects such as dislocations. The resulting quantities, such as interaction energies and migration energies, are used in larger scale simulation methods in order to build predictive tools. For photovoltaic energy applications, ab initio calculations are used in order to search for new semiconductors and possible element substitutions for existing ones in order to improve their efficiency. PMID:21693886

  2. Density functional calculations on structural materials for nuclear energy applications and functional materials for photovoltaic energy applications (abstract only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domain, C.; Olsson, P.; Becquart, C. S.; Legris, A.; Guillemoles, J. F.

    2008-02-01

    Ab initio density functional theory calculations are carried out in order to predict the evolution of structural materials under aggressive working conditions such as cases with exposure to corrosion and irradiation, as well as to predict and investigate the properties of functional materials for photovoltaic energy applications. Structural metallic materials used in nuclear facilities are subjected to irradiation which induces the creation of large amounts of point defects. These defects interact with each other as well as with the different elements constituting the alloys, which leads to modifications of the microstructure and the mechanical properties. VASP (Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package) has been used to determine the properties of point defect clusters and also those of extended defects such as dislocations. The resulting quantities, such as interaction energies and migration energies, are used in larger scale simulation methods in order to build predictive tools. For photovoltaic energy applications, ab initio calculations are used in order to search for new semiconductors and possible element substitutions for existing ones in order to improve their efficiency.

  3. Luminescence and photosensitization properties of ensembles of silicon nanocrystals in terms of an exciton migration model

    SciTech Connect

    Demin, V. A.; Konstantinova, E. A. Kashkarov, P. K.

    2010-11-15

    The relaxation processes that occur in ensembles of coupled silicon nanocrystals are described by a quantitative model that takes into account the energy transfer between them during exciton migration. This model is used to study the formation of singlet oxygen during the photoexcitation of silicon nanocrystals in porous silicon layers under various external conditions. It is experimentally found that, upon fine milling of as-deposited porous silicon films, the photoluminescence decay time increases despite an increase in the concentration of point defects. The photosensitized activity of ensembles of silicon nanocrystals degrades monotonically during their photostimulated oxidation. These experimental results agree completely with the conclusions of the model and are explained by a decrease in the number of exciton migration ways between nanocrystals when the granule size of a porous silicon powder decreases and by an increase in the efficiency of nonradiative recombination during the photostimulated oxidation of the nanocrystals. Our data indicate that nanocrystalline silicon is a promising material for the methods of nontoxic photodynamic therapy of oncological diseases.

  4. Potential Energy Surfaces of Oxygen Vacancies in Rutile TiO2: Configuration Coordinate and Migration Barrier Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazempour, Ali

    2013-09-01

    Applying the screened hybrid functional Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) method, we studied the polaronic degree of freedom of different charged oxygen vacancies Vo in rutile TiO2. The HSE method not only corrects the band gap, but also allows for correct polaron localization. Due to the important role of phonon in oxygen vacancy associated levels in the gap, we calculated configuration coordinate (CC) potential energy surfaces for all charged Vo's. Our calculated CC diagrams with effective impression on host states, show significant improvement of electron-lattice interaction compared to semi(local) DFT methods. The obtained values of stokes shifts for sequential transitions of charged vacancies agree well with experimental evidences which confirm Ti3+ centers are responsible for photoluminescence. In addition, we explored the effect of polaron localization on diffusive mechanism of Vo along most open [001] direction. Calculated values of migration barriers for V o2+ are found to be in quantitative agreement with experimental migration energy [E. Iguchi and K. Yajima, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn.32 (1971) 1415] of 2.4 eV. These results highlight the small polaronic behavior of Vo's and is consistent with studies suggest the polaronic hopping model for electron transport of n-type conductivity in reduced TiO2 [J.-F. Baumard and F. Gervais, Phys. Rev. B15 (1977) 2316-2323].

  5. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measured by spatial photon migration in CdSe-ZnS quantum dots colloidal systems as a function of concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, G.; Monte, A. F. G.; Reis, A. F.; Messias, D. N.

    2014-11-17

    The study of the spatial photon migration as a function of the concentration brings into attention the problem of the energy transfer in quantum dot embedded systems. By measuring the photon propagation and its spatial dependence, it is possible to understand the whole dynamics in a quantum dot system, and also improve their concentration dependence to maximize energy propagation due to radiative and non-radiative processes. In this work, a confocal microscope was adapted to scan the spatial distribution of photoluminescence from CdSe-ZnS core-shell quantum dots in colloidal solutions. The energy migration between the quantum dots was monitored by the direct measurement of the photon diffusion length, according to the diffusion theory. We observed that the photon migration length decreases by increasing the quantum dot concentration, this kind of behavior has been regarded as a signature of Förster resonance energy transfer in the system.

  6. Study on energy transfer and energy migration of Ca2Gd8(SiO4)6O2:Dy3+ phosphor films.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Q; Han, X M; Zhen, C M

    2011-11-01

    Being a kind of rare-earth-metal silicate with oxidapatite structure, Ca2R8(SiO4)6O2 (R = Y, Gd, La) is a promising material doped with rare earth, and widely used as phosphors. In this thesis, Ca2Gd8(SiO4)6O2:Dy3+ films were prepared by the sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and lifetimes were used to characterize the resulting films. AFM study indicated that the phosphor films consisted of 120 nm homogeneous particles. By combining the model of Burshtein for donor-donor migration and the V-F-B model for donor-acceptor energy transfer, the experimental luminescence decay curve of 6P(J) state of Gd3+ was re-simulated. It is found that concentration quenching of Gd3+ can be due to the result of the joint action of donor-donor (Gd3+-Gd3+) energy migration and donor-acceptor (Gd3+-Dy3+) energy transfer. PMID:22413278

  7. A MODEL OF MIGRATION IN THE OHIO RIVER BASIN ENERGY STUDY REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report was prepared as part of the Ohio River Basin Energy Study (ORBES), a multidisciplinary policy research program. It examines the impact of regional energy development scenarios and policies on the internal movements of population and industry within the project study re...

  8. Alkali migration and desorption energies on polycrystalline tungsten at low coverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gładyszewski, Longin

    1990-05-01

    This work concerns research on fluctuations (noises) of the ion thermoemission currents of five alkali metals emitted from the tungsten surface. These noises are generated as a result of adsorbate density fluctuations. Adsorbate density fluctuations cause random changes of the work function, which influence the intensity of the emitted ion current. The methods used made it possible to determine the ion desorption energy and the surface diffusion energy for Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs.

  9. Utilization Probability Map for Migrating Bald Eagles in Northeastern North America: A Tool for Siting Wind Energy Facilities and Other Flight Hazards.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Elizabeth K; Watts, Bryan D; Turrin, Courtney L

    2016-01-01

    Collisions with anthropogenic structures are a significant and well documented source of mortality for avian species worldwide. The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is known to be vulnerable to collision with wind turbines and federal wind energy guidelines include an eagle risk assessment for new projects. To address the need for risk assessment, in this study, we 1) identified areas of northeastern North America utilized by migrating bald eagles, and 2) compared these with high wind-potential areas to identify potential risk of bald eagle collision with wind turbines. We captured and marked 17 resident and migrant bald eagles in the northern Chesapeake Bay between August 2007 and May 2009. We produced utilization distribution (UD) surfaces for 132 individual migration tracks using a dynamic Brownian bridge movement model and combined these to create a population wide UD surface with a 1 km cell size. We found eagle migration movements were concentrated within two main corridors along the Appalachian Mountains and the Atlantic Coast. Of the 3,123 wind turbines ≥100 m in height in the study area, 38% were located in UD 20, and 31% in UD 40. In the United States portion of the study area, commercially viable wind power classes overlapped with only 2% of the UD category 20 (i.e., the areas of highest use by migrating eagles) and 4% of UD category 40. This is encouraging because it suggests that wind energy development can still occur in the study area at sites that are most viable from a wind power perspective and are unlikely to cause significant mortality of migrating eagles. In siting new turbines, wind energy developers should avoid the high-use migration corridors (UD categories 20 & 40) and focus new wind energy projects on lower-risk areas (UD categories 60-100). PMID:27336482

  10. Utilization Probability Map for Migrating Bald Eagles in Northeastern North America: A Tool for Siting Wind Energy Facilities and Other Flight Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Mojica, Elizabeth K.; Watts, Bryan D.; Turrin, Courtney L.

    2016-01-01

    Collisions with anthropogenic structures are a significant and well documented source of mortality for avian species worldwide. The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is known to be vulnerable to collision with wind turbines and federal wind energy guidelines include an eagle risk assessment for new projects. To address the need for risk assessment, in this study, we 1) identified areas of northeastern North America utilized by migrating bald eagles, and 2) compared these with high wind-potential areas to identify potential risk of bald eagle collision with wind turbines. We captured and marked 17 resident and migrant bald eagles in the northern Chesapeake Bay between August 2007 and May 2009. We produced utilization distribution (UD) surfaces for 132 individual migration tracks using a dynamic Brownian bridge movement model and combined these to create a population wide UD surface with a 1 km cell size. We found eagle migration movements were concentrated within two main corridors along the Appalachian Mountains and the Atlantic Coast. Of the 3,123 wind turbines ≥100 m in height in the study area, 38% were located in UD 20, and 31% in UD 40. In the United States portion of the study area, commercially viable wind power classes overlapped with only 2% of the UD category 20 (i.e., the areas of highest use by migrating eagles) and 4% of UD category 40. This is encouraging because it suggests that wind energy development can still occur in the study area at sites that are most viable from a wind power perspective and are unlikely to cause significant mortality of migrating eagles. In siting new turbines, wind energy developers should avoid the high-use migration corridors (UD categories 20 & 40) and focus new wind energy projects on lower-risk areas (UD categories 60–100). PMID:27336482

  11. Cell migration.

    PubMed

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2012-10-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  12. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  13. Short range atomic migration in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauß, F.; Jerliu, B.; Geue, T.; Stahn, J.; Schmidt, H.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon between 400 and 500 °C are presented, which were carried out by neutron reflectometry in combination with 29Si/natSi isotope multilayers. Short range diffusion is detected on a length scale of about 2 nm, while long range diffusion is absent. Diffusivities are in the order of 10-19-10-20 m2/s and decrease with increasing annealing time, reaching an undetectable low value for long annealing times. This behavior is strongly correlated to structural relaxation and can be explained as a result of point defect annihilation. Diffusivities for short annealing times of 60 s follow the Arrhenius law with an activation enthalpy of (0.74 ± 0.21) eV, which is interpreted as the activation enthalpy of Si migration.

  14. The cancer cell 'energy grid': TGF-β1 signaling coordinates metabolism for migration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Deberardinis, Ralph; Boothman, David A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have an increased reliance on lipogenesis, which is required for uncontrolled cell division. We recently reported transcriptional and functional 'reprogramming' of the cellular energy grid, allowing cancer cells to divert metabolism from biosynthesis to bioenergetic pathways and thus supplying enhanced mobility during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β1) (Fig. 1). PMID:27308459

  15. Long-Range Energy Transfer and Singlet-Exciton Migration in Working Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Grayson L.; Nguyen, Carmen; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Rapid industrialization of organic light-emitting devices for flat-panel displays and solid-state lighting makes a deep understanding of device physics more desirable than ever. Developing reliable experimental techniques to measure fundamental physical properties such as exciton diffusion lengths is a vital part of developing device physics. In this paper, we present a study of exciton diffusion and long-range energy transfer in working organic light-emitting devices, and a study of the interplay between these two tangled processes through both experimental probes and simulations. With the inclusion of multiple factors including long-range energy transfer, exciton boundary conditions, and the finite width of the exciton generation zone, we quantify exciton migration based on emission characteristics from rubrene sensing layers placed in working organic light-emitting devices. This comprehensive analysis is found to be essential to accurately measuring exciton diffusion length, and in the present case the measured singlet-exciton diffusion length in the archetype material 4' -bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl is 4.3 ±0.3 nm with a corresponding diffusivity of (2.6 ±0.3 )×10-4 cm2/s .

  16. Photoluminescence studies on energy migration in multilayer organic photovoltaic devices based on ionically self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Raoul; Soman, C.; Brands, Charles; Heflin, James R.; Graupner, Wilhelm; Wang, Hong; Gibson, Harry W.; Marciu, Daniela; Miller, Michael B.

    2001-02-01

    We report the fabrication of thin organic layers and photovoltaic devices made from them. Building thin layers of organic materials via the method of ionically self-assembled monolayers provides control over the layer thickness and composition of multilayer structures on a nanometer scale. This allows to accurately dope a photoluminescent host material with energy or charge accepting guests, changing the emissive character of the pure photoluminescent host film to a predominantly non-emissive, charge generating structure. We show that by varying the concentration of the guest Copper phthalocyanine and C60(OH)2 in poly- (para-phenylene-vinylene) we can measure the energy migration as well as dissociation of the exciton and can determine the lifetime and the diffusion radius of the exciton. Increasing the number of dopands in the host material, the photoluminescence emission spectra shift and decrease in intensity reflecting a decrease in the number of excitons transferring to neighboring chains or conjugation segments. For high dopand concentrations the recombination of excitons only happens on the same chain as the generation. Building a device to achieve the optimal guest/host ratio for optimal exciton dissociation is one important step in the design of high efficiency photovoltaic devices.

  17. Evaluation of energy expenditure in adult spring Chinook salmon migrating upstream in the Columbia River Basin: an assessment based on sequential proximate analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Magie, C.D.

    2006-01-01

    The upstream migration of adult anadromous salmonids in the Columbia River Basin (CRB) has been dramatically altered and fish may be experiencing energetically costly delays at dams. To explore this notion, we estimated the energetic costs of migration and reproduction of Yakima River-bound spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha using a sequential analysis of their proximate composition (i.e., percent water, fat, protein, and ash). Tissues (muscle, viscera, and gonad) were sampled from fish near the start of their migration (Bonneville Dam), at a mid point (Roza Dam, 510 km upstream from Bonneville Dam) and from fresh carcasses on the spawning grounds (about 100 km above Roza Dam). At Bonneville Dam, the energy reserves of these fish were remarkably high, primarily due to the high percentage of fat in the muscle (18-20%; energy content over 11 kJ g-1). The median travel time for fish from Bonneville to Roza Dam was 27 d and ranged from 18 to 42 d. Fish lost from 6 to 17% of their energy density in muscle, depending on travel time. On average, fish taking a relatively long time for migration between dams used from 5 to 8% more energy from the muscle than faster fish. From the time they passed Bonneville Dam to death, these fish, depending on gender, used 95-99% of their muscle and 73-86% of their viscera lipid stores. Also, both sexes used about 32% of their muscular and very little of their visceral protein stores. However, we were unable to relate energy use and reproductive success to migration history. Our results suggest a possible influence of the CRB hydroelectric system on adult salmonid energetics.

  18. Formation and Migration Energies of Interstitials in Silicon Under Strain Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halicioglu, Timur; Barnett, David M.

    1999-01-01

    Simulation calculations are conducted for Si substrates to analyze formation and diffusion energies of interstitials under strain condition using statics methods .based on a Stillinger-Weber type potential function. Defects in the vicinity of the surface region and in the bulk are examined, and the role played by compressive and tensile strains on the energetics of interstitials is investigated. Results indicate that strain alters defect energetics which, in turn, modifies their diffusion characteristics.

  19. The cancer cell ‘energy grid’: TGF-β1 signaling coordinates metabolism for migration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lei; Deberardinis, Ralph; Boothman, David A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have an increased reliance on lipogenesis, which is required for uncontrolled cell division. We recently reported transcriptional and functional ‘reprogramming’ of the cellular energy grid, allowing cancer cells to divert metabolism from biosynthesis to bioenergetic pathways and thus supplying enhanced mobility during epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β1) (Fig. 1). PMID:27308459

  20. Migration of Electronic Energy from Chlorophyll b to Chlorophyll a in Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, R. K.; Szalay, L.; Tombacz, E.

    1972-01-01

    Absorption, emission, and fluorescence excitation spectra of pure solutions of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and chlorophyll b (Chl b) in diethyl ether and of equimolecular mixed solutions of the two pigments, were determined at room temperature as functions of concentration (in the range from 5 × 10-6 M to 4 × 10-3 M) and of wavelength of the exciting light (in the regions 380-465 and 550-650 nm). The efficiency of energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a, derived from these data, was found to depend on the wavelength of exciting light. Furthermore, the transfer efficiency calculated from sensitization of Chl a fluorescence by Chl b was substantially smaller than that calculated from quenching of Chl b fluorescence by Chl a. Both these effects are tentatively explained as evidence of superposition of a “fast” energy transfer (taking place before the Boltzmann distribution of vibrational energy had been reached) upon the “delayed” transfer, which takes place after vibrational equilibration. The first-named mechanism is made possible by overlapping of the absorption bands of the two pigments; the second, by overlapping of the emission band of Chl b and the absorption band of Chl a. The first mechanism can lead to repeated transfer of excitation energy between pigment molecules, the second only to a one-time transfer from the donor to the acceptor. Both mechanisms could be of the same, second-order type, with the transfer rate proportional to r-6. An alternative is for the fast mechanism to be of the first order, with the transfer rate proportional to r-3, but spectroscopic evidence seems to make this alternative less probable. PMID:5037334

  1. One-dimensional fast migration of vacancy clusters in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukawa, Yoshitaka; Zinkle, Steven J

    2007-01-01

    The migration of point defects, e.g. crystal lattice vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), typically occurs through three-dimensional (3-D) random walk. However, when vacancies and SIAs agglomerate with like defects forming clusters, the migration mode may change. Recently, atomic-scale computer simulations using molecular dynamics (MD) codes have reported that nanometer-sized two-dimensional (2-D) clusters of SIAs exhibit one-dimensional (1-D) fast migration1-7. The 1-D migration mode transports the entire cluster containing several tens of SIAs with a mobility comparable to single SIAs3. This anisotropic migration of SIA clusters can have a significant impact on the evolution of a material fs neutron-irradiation damage microstructure, which dominates the material fs lifetime in nuclear reactor environments8-9. This is also proposed to be a key physical mechanism for the self-organization of nanometer-sized sessile vacancy cluster arrays10-13. Given these findings for SIA clusters, a fundamental question is whether the 1-D migration mode is also possible for 2-D clusters of vacancies. Preceding MD results predicted that 1-D migration of vacancy clusters is possible in body-centered cubic (bcc) iron, but not in face-centered cubic (fcc) copper2. Previous experimental studies have reported 1-D migration of SIA clusters14, but there have been no observations of 1-D vacancy cluster migration. Here we present the first experimental transmission electron microscopy (TEM) dynamic observation demonstrating the 1-D migration of vacancy clusters in fcc gold. It was found that the mobility of the vacancy clusters via the 1-D migration is much higher than single vacancies via 3-D random walk and comparable to single SIAs via 3-D random walk. Hence, the mobility of the glissile clusters is not associated with the character of their constituent point defects. Dynamic conversion of a planar vacancy loop into a 3-D stacking fault tetrahedron geometry was also observed.

  2. Theory of point-defects, non-stoichiometry, and solute additions in SmCo{sub 5+x}-Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17{minus}y} and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.O.

    1998-08-01

    There is considerable interest in the possibility of producing Sm-Co-based nanocomposite magnets by rapid solidification and other far-from-equilibrium processing methods. Thermodynamic and kinetic models are quite valuable in understanding and optimizing such methods. This paper describes a method of estimation, utilizing tight-binding-based bond-order interatomic interaction potentials, of the thermodynamic properties of point defects such as vacancies, interstitials, antisite defects, and solute additions in the SmCo{sub 5+x} and Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17{minus}y} phases and related rare-earth-transition metal compounds. Illustrative calculations for point defects in SmCo{sub 5} will be presented. The results suggest a unified model of the thermodynamic properties of the SmCo{sub 5+x}-Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17{minus}y} region of the phase diagram, based on the 1-5 structure and the replacement of Sm by interacting dumb-bell interstitials to form the 2-17 structure; the model is similar in nature to theories of the thermodynamics of metal hydrides.

  3. Theory of point-defects, non-stoichiometry, and solute additions in SmCo{sub 5+x}-Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17{minus}y} and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    WELCH,D.O.

    1998-09-03

    There is considerable interest in the possibility of producing Sm-Co-based nanocomposite magnets by rapid solidification and other far-from-equilibrium processing methods. Thermodynamic and kinetic models are quite valuable in understanding and optimizing such methods. This paper describes a method of estimation, utilizing tight-binding-based bond-order interatomic interaction potentials, of the thermodynamic properties of point defects such as vacancies, interstitials, antisite defects, and solute additions in the SmCo{sub 5+x} and Sm{sub 2}Co {sub 17}-y phases and related rare-earth-transition metal compounds. Illustrative calculations for point defects in SmCo{sub 5} will be presented. The results suggest a unified model of the thermodynamic properties of the SmCo{sub 5+x} -- Sm{sub 2} Co{sub 17{minus}y} region of the phase diagram, based on the 1-5 structure and the replacement of Sm by interacting dumb-bell interstitials to form the 2-17 structure; the model is similar in nature to theories of the thermodynamics of metal hydrides.

  4. Ab initio calculations of self-interstitial interaction and migration with solute atoms in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, E.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2006-12-01

    The embrittlement of pressure vessel steels under radiation has been long ago correlated with the presence of solute Cu. Indeed the atom probe and the small angle neutron scattering, principally, have revealed the formation of Cu clusters under neutron flux in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and dilute FeCu alloys. Other solutes such as Ni, Mn and Si which are also found within the clusters, are now suspected to contribute to the embrittlement. The interactions of these solutes with radiation induced point defects need thus to be characterized properly in order to understand the elementary mechanisms behind the formation of these clusters. We have investigated by ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory the interactions of self-interstitials with solute atoms in dilute FeX alloys (X = Cu, Mn, Ni or Si). Different possible configurations of solute-dumbbell complexes have been studied. Their binding energies are discussed, as well as their relative stability. The migration of dumbbells with a solute atom in their vicinity was also investigated. All these results are compared to some experimental ones obtained on dilute FeX model alloys. Our results indicate that for Mn solute atoms, diffusion via an interstitial mechanism is very likely.

  5. On the interactions of point defects, dopants and light element impurities in silicon as stimulated by 200 kV electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, Nathan Gregory

    The purpose of this research has been the investigation of atomic manipulation in silicon. It has been demonstrated that bulk vacancies and interstitials are created and spatially separated one Frenkel pair at a time during 200 kV electron irradiation of nitrogen-doped silicon. The mechanism by which the nitrogen pair allows Frenkel pair separation is shown to be a combination of the lowering of the energy barrier to a knock-on event combined with a more stable end-state. Anomalous nitrogen diffusion has been observed as a result of low energy ion milling, and the diffusion of nitrogen is studied theoretically, revealing a new, low energy model for N2 pair diffusion. For the first time, 200 kV irradiation has been demonstrated not only to create Frenkel pairs during broad-beam irradiation, but also to allow the formation of extended defects like voids, oxygen precipitates and interstitial complexes. Using electron energy loss spectroscopy combined with first principles simulations, dark and bright areas induced in Z contrast images by 200 kV irradiation are demonstrated to be due to vacancy and self-interstitial complexes, respectively, with N > 2. Finally, the manipulation of dopants in silicon is induced by using the difference in energy transferable from a 200 kV electron to light versus heavy elements (e.g. B vs. Sb). Atomic Force Microscopy is used to demonstrate that n-type regions with a size corresponding to the beam diameter are created in p-type material by short periods of 200 kV e-beam exposure. In this way, a method can be developed to create p-n-p type devices of arbitrary size in codoped silicon using a room temperature process.

  6. Medical migration.

    PubMed

    Loefler, I J

    2001-10-01

    The issue of professional migration, however emotional it may have become, ought not to be regarded in moralizing terms. The history of western medicine is the history of migrating physicians. A doctor who moves from a locality to another to take up a new assignment there cannot be said to have "abandoned his patients". This emotional bond has become the victim of specialization and of depersonalization of medical services and not of medical migration, brain drain or otherwise. The primary reason for medical migration is not financial; the desire to migrate usually begins with the desire to learn. Professionals crave in the first line for professional satisfaction. The migration of medical manpower cannot be stopped with administrative measures and will not be stopped by exhortations and appeals, moralization and condemnations. Brain drain is a global phenomenon and has always been so. A country which loses its professionals, its doctors, should examine the social relationships within the profession and should investigate whether the opportunities for deriving professional satisfaction from everyday work exist or whether these have been thwarted by the hierarchy, conservatism, cronyism and the general lack of comprehension of what good medical care is about. PMID:11593497

  7. [Internal migration].

    PubMed

    Borisovna, L

    1991-06-01

    Very few studies have been conducted that truly permit explanation of internal migration and it repercussions on social and economic structure. It is clear however that a profound knowledge of the determinants and consequences of internal migration will be required as a basis for economic policy decisions that advance the goal of improving the level of living of the population. the basic supposition of most studies of the relationship of population and development is that socioeconomic development conditions demographic dynamics. The process of development in Mexico, which can be characterized by great heterogeneity, consequently produces great regional disparities. At the national level various studies have estimated the volume of internal migration in Mexico, but they have usually been limited to interstate migration because the main source of data, the census, is classified by states. But given the great heterogeneity within states in all the elements related to internal migration, it is clear that studies of internal migration within states are also needed. Such studies are almost nonexistent because of their technical difficulty. National level studies show that interstate migration increased significantly between 1940-80. The proportion of Mexicans living outside their states of birth increased by 558% in those years, compared to the 342% increase in the total Mexican population. Although Puebla has a high rate of increase, migration has kept it below Mexico's national growth rate. Migration between Puebla and other states and within Puebla has led to an increasing unevenness of spatial distribution. Between 1970-80, 57 of Puebla's municipios had growth rates above the state average of 2.8%/year, 6 had growth rates equal to the average, and 129 had growth rates that were below the average but not negative. 25 states with negative growth rates that were considered strongly expulsive. In 1980, 51.7% of the population was concentrated in the 57 municipios

  8. Point defects as a test ground for the local density approximation +U theory: Mn, Fe, and VGa in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volnianska, O.; Zakrzewski, T.; Boguslawski, P.

    2014-09-01

    Electronic structure of the Mn and Fe ions and of the gallium vacancy VGa in GaN was analysed within the GGA + U approach. First, the +U term was treated as a free parameter, and applied to p(N), d(Mn), and d(Fe). The band gap of GaN is reproduced for U(N) ≈ 4 eV. The electronic structure of defect states was found to be more sensitive to the value of U than that of the bulk states. Both the magnitude and the sign of the U-induced energy shifts of levels depend on occupancies, and thus on the defect charge state. The energy shifts also depend on the hybridization between defect and host states, and thus are different for different level symmetries. In the case of VGa, these effects lead to stabilization of spin polarization and the "negative-Ueff" behavior. The values of Us were also calculated using the linear response approach, which gives U(Fe) ≈ U(Mn) ≈ 4 eV. This reproduces well the results of previous hybrid functionals calculations. However, the best agreement with the experimental data is obtained for vanishing or even negative U(Fe) and U(Mn).

  9. Point defects as a test ground for the local density approximation +U theory: Mn, Fe, and V(Ga) in GaN.

    PubMed

    Volnianska, O; Zakrzewski, T; Boguslawski, P

    2014-09-21

    Electronic structure of the Mn and Fe ions and of the gallium vacancy V(Ga) in GaN was analysed within the GGA + U approach. First, the +U term was treated as a free parameter, and applied to p(N), d(Mn), and d(Fe). The band gap of GaN is reproduced for U(N) ≈ 4 eV. The electronic structure of defect states was found to be more sensitive to the value of U than that of the bulk states. Both the magnitude and the sign of the U-induced energy shifts of levels depend on occupancies, and thus on the defect charge state. The energy shifts also depend on the hybridization between defect and host states, and thus are different for different level symmetries. In the case of V(Ga), these effects lead to stabilization of spin polarization and the "negative-U(eff)" behavior. The values of Us were also calculated using the linear response approach, which gives U(Fe) ≈ U(Mn) ≈ 4 eV. This reproduces well the results of previous hybrid functionals calculations. However, the best agreement with the experimental data is obtained for vanishing or even negative U(Fe) and U(Mn). PMID:25240364

  10. Point defects as a test ground for the local density approximation +U theory: Mn, Fe, and V{sub Ga} in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Volnianska, O.; Zakrzewski, T.; Boguslawski, P.

    2014-09-21

    Electronic structure of the Mn and Fe ions and of the gallium vacancy V{sub Ga} in GaN was analysed within the GGA + U approach. First, the +U term was treated as a free parameter, and applied to p(N), d(Mn), and d(Fe). The band gap of GaN is reproduced for U(N) ≈ 4 eV. The electronic structure of defect states was found to be more sensitive to the value of U than that of the bulk states. Both the magnitude and the sign of the U-induced energy shifts of levels depend on occupancies, and thus on the defect charge state. The energy shifts also depend on the hybridization between defect and host states, and thus are different for different level symmetries. In the case of V{sub Ga}, these effects lead to stabilization of spin polarization and the “negative-U{sub eff}” behavior. The values of Us were also calculated using the linear response approach, which gives U(Fe) ≈ U(Mn) ≈ 4 eV. This reproduces well the results of previous hybrid functionals calculations. However, the best agreement with the experimental data is obtained for vanishing or even negative U(Fe) and U(Mn)

  11. Low-resistivity m-plane freestanding GaN substrate with very low point-defect concentrations grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on a GaN seed crystal synthesized by the ammonothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Kazunobu; Tsukada, Yusuke; Furukawa, Erika; Saito, Makoto; Mikawa, Yutaka; Kubo, Shuichi; Ikeda, Hirotaka; Fujito, Kenji; Uedono, Akira; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.

    2015-09-01

    An m-plane freestanding GaN substrate satisfying both low resistivity (ρ = 8.5 × 10-3 Ω·cm) and a low point-defect concentration, being applicable to vertically conducting power-switching devices, was grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on a nearly bowing-free bulk GaN seed wafer synthesized by the ammonothermal method in supercritical ammonia using an acidic mineralizer. Its threading dislocation and basal-plane staking-fault densities were approximately 104 cm-2 and lower than 100 cm-1, respectively. A record-long fast-component photoluminescence lifetime of 2.07 ns at room temperature was obtained for the near-band-edge emission, reflecting a significantly low concentration of nonradiative recombination centers composed of Ga vacancies.

  12. Linear-scaling density-functional simulations of charged point defects in Al2O3 using hierarchical sparse matrix algebra.

    PubMed

    Hine, N D M; Haynes, P D; Mostofi, A A; Payne, M C

    2010-09-21

    We present calculations of formation energies of defects in an ionic solid (Al(2)O(3)) extrapolated to the dilute limit, corresponding to a simulation cell of infinite size. The large-scale calculations required for this extrapolation are enabled by developments in the approach to parallel sparse matrix algebra operations, which are central to linear-scaling density-functional theory calculations. The computational cost of manipulating sparse matrices, whose sizes are determined by the large number of basis functions present, is greatly improved with this new approach. We present details of the sparse algebra scheme implemented in the ONETEP code using hierarchical sparsity patterns, and demonstrate its use in calculations on a wide range of systems, involving thousands of atoms on hundreds to thousands of parallel processes. PMID:20866130

  13. Impact of Mg content on native point defects in Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.56)

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J.; Foster, G. M.; Myer, M.; Mehra, S.; Chauveau, J. M.; Hierro, A.; Windl, W.; Brillson, L. J.

    2015-06-01

    We used depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and surface photovoltage spectroscopy to measure the densities, energy levels, and spatial distributions of zinc/magnesium cation and oxygen vacancies in isostructural, single-phase, non-polar Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O alloys over a wide (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.56) range. Within this wide range, both defect types exhibit strong Mg content-dependent surface segregation and pronounced bulk density minima corresponding to unit cell volume minima, which can inhibit defect formation due to electrostatic repulsion. Mg in ZnO significantly reduces native defect densities and their non-polar surface segregation, both major factors in carrier transport and doping of these oxide semiconductors.

  14. Migration Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, Aurélien

    2015-08-01

    The great variety of the architectures of the extra-solar planetary systems has revealed the fundamental role played by planetary migration: the interactions between the planets and the gaseous disk in which they form leads to a modification of their orbits. Here, I will review the basic processes and the most recent results in this area.Planets up to ~50 Earth masses are prone to so-called type I migration.I will describe the processes at play, namely the Lindblad and corotation torques, and explain how the total torque depends on the planet mass and the local disk structure. Application to realistic disks shows one or two sweet spot(s) for outward migration of planets roughly between 5 and 30 Earth masses around the snowline ; this is confirmed by dedicated 3D numerical simulations. This has strong consequences on the formation of hot Super-Earths or mini-Neptunes.For smaller mass planets, it has been recently proposed that the heating of the neighboring gas by the luminous planet can lead to a positive torque, hence promoting outward migration. On the other hand, if the planet is not a heat source, a cold finger appears, whose resulting torque is negative. Applications of these two recent results should be discussed.Giant planets open gaps in the proto-planetary disk, and then are supposedly subject to type II migration, following the viscous accretion of the disk. This standard picture has been questioned recently, as gas appears to drift through the gap. Although the gap opening process is well understood in 2D for a planet on a fixed orbit, recent results on 3D simulations or migrating planets make the picture more accurate.Our ever better understanding of planet-disk interactions is of crucial importance as the statistics on extra solar systems keep growing and the results of these interactions are now imaged.

  15. North Atlantic Blue and Fin Whales Suspend Their Spring Migration to Forage in Middle Latitudes: Building up Energy Reserves for the Journey?

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Mónica A.; Prieto, Rui; Jonsen, Ian; Baumgartner, Mark F.; Santos, Ricardo S.

    2013-01-01

    The need to balance energy reserves during migration is a critical factor for most long-distance migrants and an important determinant of migratory strategies in birds, insects and land mammals. Large baleen whales migrate annually between foraging and breeding sites, crossing vast ocean areas where food is seldom abundant. How whales respond to the demands and constraints of such long migrations remains unknown. We applied a behaviour discriminating hierarchical state-space model to the satellite tracking data of 12 fin whales and 3 blue whales tagged off the Azores, to investigate their movements, behaviour (transiting and area-restricted search, ARS) and daily activity cycles during the spring migration. Fin and blue whales remained at middle latitudes for prolonged periods, spending most of their time there in ARS behaviour. While near the Azores, fin whale ARS behaviour occurred within a restricted area, with a high degree of overlap among whales. There were noticeable behavioural differences along the migratory pathway of fin whales tracked to higher latitudes: ARS occurred only in the Azores and north of 56°N, whereas in between these areas whales travelled at higher overall speeds while maintaining a nearly direct trajectory. This suggests fin whales may alternate periods of active migration with periods of extended use of specific habitats along the migratory route. ARS behaviour in blue whales occurred over a much wider area as whales slowly progressed northwards. The tracks of these whales terminated still at middle latitudes, before any behavioural switch was detected. Fin whales exhibited behavioural-specific diel rhythms in swimming speed but these varied significantly between geographic areas, possibly due to differences in the day-night cycle across areas. Finally, we show a link between fin whales seen in the Azores and those summering in eastern Greenland-western Iceland along a migratory corridor located in central Atlantic waters. PMID:24116112

  16. North Atlantic blue and fin whales suspend their spring migration to forage in middle latitudes: building up energy reserves for the journey?

    PubMed

    Silva, Mónica A; Prieto, Rui; Jonsen, Ian; Baumgartner, Mark F; Santos, Ricardo S

    2013-01-01

    The need to balance energy reserves during migration is a critical factor for most long-distance migrants and an important determinant of migratory strategies in birds, insects and land mammals. Large baleen whales migrate annually between foraging and breeding sites, crossing vast ocean areas where food is seldom abundant. How whales respond to the demands and constraints of such long migrations remains unknown. We applied a behaviour discriminating hierarchical state-space model to the satellite tracking data of 12 fin whales and 3 blue whales tagged off the Azores, to investigate their movements, behaviour (transiting and area-restricted search, ARS) and daily activity cycles during the spring migration. Fin and blue whales remained at middle latitudes for prolonged periods, spending most of their time there in ARS behaviour. While near the Azores, fin whale ARS behaviour occurred within a restricted area, with a high degree of overlap among whales. There were noticeable behavioural differences along the migratory pathway of fin whales tracked to higher latitudes: ARS occurred only in the Azores and north of 56°N, whereas in between these areas whales travelled at higher overall speeds while maintaining a nearly direct trajectory. This suggests fin whales may alternate periods of active migration with periods of extended use of specific habitats along the migratory route. ARS behaviour in blue whales occurred over a much wider area as whales slowly progressed northwards. The tracks of these whales terminated still at middle latitudes, before any behavioural switch was detected. Fin whales exhibited behavioural-specific diel rhythms in swimming speed but these varied significantly between geographic areas, possibly due to differences in the day-night cycle across areas. Finally, we show a link between fin whales seen in the Azores and those summering in eastern Greenland-western Iceland along a migratory corridor located in central Atlantic waters. PMID:24116112

  17. Monarch Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Brad; Taylor, Orley

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Monarch Watch program that tracks the migration of the monarch butterfly. Presents activities that introduce students to research and international collaboration between students and researchers. Familiarizes students with monarchs, stimulates their interest, and helps them generate questions that can lead to good research projects.…

  18. State transition analysis of spontaneous branch migration of the Holliday junction by photon-based single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kenji; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    Branch migration of Holliday junction (HJ) DNA in solution is a spontaneous conformational change between multiple discrete states. We applied single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurement to three-state branch migration. The photon-based variational Bayes-hidden Markov model (VB-HMM) method was applied to fluorescence signals to reproduce the state transition trajectories and evaluate the transition parameters, such as transition rate. The upper limit of time resolution suggested in simulation was nearly achieved for the state dynamics with relatively small FRET changes, and the distinctions in the populations of different states were successfully retrieved. We also discuss the suitability of the HJ as a standard sample for smFRET dynamics measurements and data analysis. PMID:26687325

  19. Topological Point Defects in Relaxor Ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, Y.; Prokhorenko, S.; Kornev, I.; Bellaiche, L.

    2016-03-01

    First-principles-based effective Hamiltonian simulations are used to reveal the hidden connection between topological defects (hedgehogs and antihedgehogs) and relaxor behavior. Such defects are discovered to predominantly lie at the border of polar nanoregions in both Ba (Zr0.5 Ti0.5 )O3 (BZT) and Pb (Sc0.5 Nb0.5 )O3 (PSN) systems, and the temperature dependency of their density allows us to distinguish between noncanonical (PSN) and canonical (BZT) relaxor behaviors (via the presence or absence of a crossing of a percolation threshold). This density also possesses an inflection point at precisely the temperature for which the dielectric response peaks. Moreover, hedgehogs and antihedgehogs are found to be mobile excitations, and the dynamical nature of their annihilation is demonstrated (using simple hydrodynamical arguments) to follows laws, such as those of Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius, that are characteristic of dipolar relaxation kinetics of relaxor ferroelectrics.

  20. Topological Point Defects in Relaxor Ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Y; Prokhorenko, S; Kornev, I; Bellaiche, L

    2016-03-25

    First-principles-based effective Hamiltonian simulations are used to reveal the hidden connection between topological defects (hedgehogs and antihedgehogs) and relaxor behavior. Such defects are discovered to predominantly lie at the border of polar nanoregions in both Ba(Zr_{0.5}Ti_{0.5})O_{3} (BZT) and Pb(Sc_{0.5}Nb_{0.5})O_{3} (PSN) systems, and the temperature dependency of their density allows us to distinguish between noncanonical (PSN) and canonical (BZT) relaxor behaviors (via the presence or absence of a crossing of a percolation threshold). This density also possesses an inflection point at precisely the temperature for which the dielectric response peaks. Moreover, hedgehogs and antihedgehogs are found to be mobile excitations, and the dynamical nature of their annihilation is demonstrated (using simple hydrodynamical arguments) to follows laws, such as those of Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius, that are characteristic of dipolar relaxation kinetics of relaxor ferroelectrics. PMID:27058101

  1. Interplay of point defects, extended defects, and carrier localization in the efficiency droop of InGaN quantum wells light-emitting diodes investigated using spatially resolved electroluminescence and photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yue; Zhang, Yong Su, Liqin; Liu, Zhiqiang; Wei, Tongbo; Zhang, Jihong; Chen, Zhong

    2014-01-14

    We perform both spatially resolved electroluminescence (SREL) as a function of injection current and spatially resolved photoluminescence (SRPL) as a function of excitation power on InGaN quantum well blue light-emitting diodes to investigate the underlying physics for the phenomenon of the external quantum efficiency (EQE) droop. SREL allows us to study two most commonly observed but distinctly different droop behaviors on a single device, minimizing the ambiguity trying to compare independently fabricated devices. Two representative devices are studied: one with macroscopic scale material non-uniformity, the other being macroscopically uniform, but both with microscopic scale fluctuations. We suggest that the EQE–current curve reflects the interplay of three effects: nonradiative recombination through point defects, carrier localization due to either In composition or well width fluctuation, and nonradiative recombination of the extended defects, which is common to various optoelectronic devices. By comparing SREL and SRPL, two very different excitation/detection modes, we show that individual singular sites exhibiting either particularly strong or weak emission in SRPL do not usually play any significant and direct role in the EQE droop. We introduce a two-level model that can capture the basic physical processes that dictate the EQE–current dependence and describe the whole operating range of the device from 0.01 to 100 A/cm{sup 2}.

  2. Chemo-responsive shape memory effect in shape memory polyurethane triggered by inductive release of mechanical energy storage undergoing copper (II) chloride migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Lu, Chunrui; Huang, Wei Min; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-03-01

    In this study, 10% weight fraction of copper (II) chloride (CuCl2) was embedded into shape memory polyurethane (SMPU) by dissolving it in a solvent mixture of tetrahydrofuran and N,N-dimethyl formamide. It is found that CuCl2 particles migrate; they are released from the polymer in the water-driven shape recovery process of SMPU composites. SMPU composites, after various immersion times in water, were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis. Experimental results support that hydrogen bonding between polyurethane macromolecules and water molecules is the driving force, resulting from the inductive decrease in the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the release of the stored mechanical energy in SMPU is demonstrated by means of tracking the migration of CuCl2 particles via x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy tests. This study focuses on the mechanism of release of the stored mechanical energy of a polymer, which is identified as the driving force for the chemo-responsive shape memory effect and inductive decrease in glass transition temperature of SMPU in response to the water.

  3. Kinetics of nonstationary migration-accelerated energy transfer in a solid body doped with rare-earth and transition-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, N. A.

    2014-05-01

    The kinetics of migration-accelerated energy transfer is studied in systems based on a massive crystal and a sample consisting of spherical nanoparticles up to and including four or five orders of magnitude of the kinetic expulsion depth for the case of donor excitation by a short (τpulse < τ D ) pulse under the action of a multipole mechanism of donor-donor and donor-acceptor energy transfer. The susceptibility of the chosen systems to the implementation of the "jump" mechanism of excitation transfer in them is estimated. It is shown that the nonstationary mechanism of excitation transfer is implemented in the chosen systems based on a sample consisting of nanoparticles.

  4. A Pluridisciplinary Study of the Impact of Future Ice Sheets Instability on Sea Level Rise, Climate Changes, Migrations and Energy Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstein, G.; Defrance, D.; Dumas, C.; Charbit, S.; Gemenne, F.; Vanderlinden, J. P.; Bouneau, S.; David, S.

    2014-12-01

    From paleoclimate data and GCM models simulations, we learnt that, when ice sheets are unstable, they produce large surges of icebergs that cover North Atlantic and produce global climate instability through atmosphere and ocean dynamics. Indeed, these instabilities are associated with a cold (glacial) context. In a warming world, it appears that the two remaining ice sheets (Antarctica and Greenland) are becoming unstable. The probability of abrupt ice sheet changes is therefore to be investigated. In comparison with predicted AR5 sea level rise (SLR) (28 to 82 cm), such a fast melting could add a contribution of 2 to 5 meters, which corresponds to the sea level rise estimate of glacial instability (Heinrich events). The aim of this presentation is to describe consistent sea level and climate simulations. We define 3 scenarios, the sea level rise is produced by the melting of about third of the Greenland, or the disappearance of West Antarctica, or finally a mixture of both ice sheets melting. We first analyze, using IPSL OAGCM, the climatic impact. Indeed, superimposed to direct sea level rise, climate changes has drastic consequences in North Atlantic (Europe and east of North America) due to the thermohaline circulation breakdown. Moreover, when freshwater is injected into North Atlantic, far field effects on the location and amplitude of Asian Monsoon have been shown with its drastic decrease. The second step of this multidisciplinary study is to quantify the impact of the sea level rise and the climatic changes on populations migration, with a focus on Southern Asia with a prospective migration of several hundreds of people. In a third step, we intend to simulate the reorganization of power supply to adapt to the expected new distribution of population, using a quantitative energy model (COSIME). Here, we show the climate response to the 3 investigated climate scenarios and the response in terms of migration, which is huge due to the very large part of the

  5. Migration of dispersive GPR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, M.H.; Oden, C.P.

    2004-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and dielectric and magnetic relaxation phenomena cause electromagnetic propagation to be dispersive in earth materials. Both velocity and attenuation may vary with frequency, depending on the frequency content of the propagating energy and the nature of the relaxation phenomena. A minor amount of velocity dispersion is associated with high attenuation. For this reason, measuring effects of velocity dispersion in ground penetrating radar (GPR) data is difficult. With a dispersive forward model, GPR responses to propagation through materials with known frequency-dependent properties have been created. These responses are used as test data for migration algorithms that have been modified to handle specific aspects of dispersive media. When either Stolt or Gazdag migration methods are modified to correct for just velocity dispersion, the results are little changed from standard migration. For nondispersive propagating wavefield data, like deep seismic, ensuring correct phase summation in a migration algorithm is more important than correctly handling amplitude. However, the results of migrating model responses to dispersive media with modified algorithms indicate that, in this case, correcting for frequency-dependent amplitude loss has a much greater effect on the result than correcting for proper phase summation. A modified migration is only effective when it includes attenuation recovery, performing deconvolution and migration simultaneously.

  6. [[Evolution of Egyptian migration

    PubMed

    Saleh, S A

    1985-01-01

    Changing patterns of Egyptian emigration over the past 30 years are reviewed. Four phases are identified: migration among Arab countries up to 1961, migration to the West for professional advancement, migration for political freedom, and migration to oil-producing countries since 1973 for economic reasons. (SUMMARY IN ENG) PMID:12268794

  7. Correlation between self-diffusion in Si and the migration mechanisms of vacancies and self-interstitials: An atomistic study

    SciTech Connect

    Posselt, Matthias; Gao, Fei; Bracht, Hartmut

    2008-07-01

    The migration of point defects in silicon and the corresponding atomic mobility are investigated by classical molecular dynamics simulations using the Stillinger-Weber potential and the Tersoff potential. In contrast to most of the previous studies both the point defect diffusivity and the self-diffusion coefficient per defect are calculated separately so that the diffusion-correlation factor can be determined. Simulations with both the Stillinger-Weber and the Tersoff potential show that vacancy migration is characterized by the transformation of the tetrahedral vacancy to the split vacancy and vice versa and the diffusion-correlation factor is about 0.5. This value was also derived by the statistical diffusion theory under the assumption of the same migration mechanism. The mechanisms of self-interstitial migration are more complex. The detailed study, including a visual analysis and investigations with the nudged elastic band method, reveals a variety of transformations between different self-interstitial configurations. Molecular dynamics simulations using the Stillinger-Weber potential show, that the self-interstitial migration is dominated by a dumbbell mechanism, whereas the interstitialcy mechanism prevails with the Tersoff potental. The corresponding values of the correlation factor are different, namely 0.59 and 0.69 for the dumbbell and the interstitialcy mechanism, respectively. The latter value is nearly equal to that obtained by the statistical theory which assumes the interstitialcy mechanism. Recent analysis of experimental results demonstrated, that in the framework of state-of-the-art diffusion and reaction models the best interpretation of point defect data can be given by assuming . The comparison with the present atomistic study leads to the conclusion that a dumbbell mechanism governs the self-interstitial migration in Si. Simulations using the Stillinger-Weber potential reveal two dominating migration paths which are characterized by

  8. Efficient, long-range energy migration in Ru(II) polypyridyl derivatized polystyrenes in rigid media. Antennae for artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Cavan N; Brennaman, M Kyle; Papanikolas, John M; Meyer, Thomas J

    2009-05-28

    Results of CW and lifetime emission studies have been used to demonstrate facile intra-strand energy transfer in the derivatized polystyrene polymer [PS-4-CH(2)CH(2)NHC(O)-(Ru(II)(4,4'-(CONEt(2))(2)bpy)(2))(17)(Os(II)(bpy)(2)))(3)](PF(6))(40) in four rigid media: frozen 5:4 (v:v) propionitrile:butyronitrile solutions at 77 K, polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene glycol-dimethacrylate (PEG-DMA) films, and silica xerogel monoliths at room temperature. Continued rapid energy transfer in rigid media is in contrast to electron transfer which is inhibited. This can be explained by energy transfer theory and is due to a decrease in the energy transfer barrier because of the frozen nature of the medium. The abbreviation used for the polymer defines the chemical link to the polystyrene backbone and gives the extent of loading out of 20 available sites. PMID:19440588

  9. Migration history, migration behavior and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Bailey, A J

    1993-01-01

    "A series of proportional hazards models are used to study the relationship between migration history and migration behavior for a sample of young adults from the [U.S.] National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The results support the argument that migration is a selective process. College educated young adults have a greater hazard rate of making an initial migration but a lower hazard rate of re-migration, suggesting they have less need of corrective geographic behavior. Individuals who have moved two or more times are less responsive to national unemployment conditions than first time migrants. Migration is related to the timing of unemployment within a sojourn. The findings suggest that migrant stock is an important determinant of how labor markets function." PMID:12318324

  10. The effect of memory in the stochastic master equation analyzed using the stochastic Liouville equation of motion. Electronic energy migration transfer between reorienting donor-donor, donor-acceptor chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Håkansson, Pär; Westlund, Per-Olof

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the process of energy migration transfer within reorientating chromophores using the stochastic master equation (SME) and the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) of motion. We have found that the SME over-estimates the rate of the energy migration compared to the SLE solution for a case of weakly interacting chromophores. This discrepancy between SME and SLE is caused by a memory effect occurring when fluctuations in the dipole-dipole Hamiltonian ( H( t)) are on the same timescale as the intrinsic fast transverse relaxation rate characterized by (1/ T2). Thus the timescale critical for energy-transfer experiments is T2≈10 -13 s. An extended SME is constructed, accounting for the memory effect of the dipole-dipole Hamiltonian dynamics. The influence of memory on the interpretation of experiments is discussed.

  11. The effect of memory in the stochastic master equation analyzed using the stochastic Liouville equation of motion. Electronic energy migration transfer between reorienting donor-donor, donor-acceptor chromophores.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Pär; Westlund, Per-Olof

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the process of energy migration transfer within reorientating chromophores using the stochastic master equation (SME) and the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) of motion. We have found that the SME over-estimates the rate of the energy migration compared to the SLE solution for a case of weakly interacting chromophores. This discrepancy between SME and SLE is caused by a memory effect occurring when fluctuations in the dipole-dipole Hamiltonian (H(t)) are on the same timescale as the intrinsic fast transverse relaxation rate characterized by (1/T(2)). Thus the timescale critical for energy-transfer experiments is T(2) approximately 10(-13) s. An extended SME is constructed, accounting for the memory effect of the dipole-dipole Hamiltonian dynamics. The influence of memory on the interpretation of experiments is discussed. PMID:15556453

  12. Studies of Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET) and Energy Migration in a Conjugated Polymer System for Fluorescence “Turn-on” Chemosensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Juan; Jones, Wayne E.

    2008-01-01

    A series of poly [p-(phenyleneethynylene)-alt-(thienyleneethynylene)] (PPETE) polymers with variable percent loadings of the N, N, N’-trimethylethylenediamino group on the polymer backbone were synthesized and fully characterized. Photophysical studies show that changes in the loading of the amino group receptor on the backbone do not affect the polymer electronic structure in either the ground or excited states. The fluorescence quantum yields were found to be directly related to the loading of the amino groups and can be modeled by a Stern-Volmer type relationship. Photophysical studies related the total quenching efficiency to the inherent rate of photoinduced electron transfer (PET), the lifetime of the exciton, the rate of excitation energy migration along the polymer backbone and the total loading of the receptor on the polymer. The role of the loading dependence on the application of these polymers as fluorescence “turn-on” sensors for toxic metal cations in dilute solution was also studied. Results showed that the fluorescence enhancement upon binding various cations was maintained even when the amino receptor loading along the polymer backbone was reduced. PMID:16610873

  13. Migration and Socioeconomic Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Franklin D.

    Research among black and white males aged 18 to 54 investigated correlations between migration patterns and occupational attainment and earnings. Results indicated that: (1) the propensity to migrate is related to entrance into, exit from, and laterations in occupational careers; (2) there is a positive association between migration and…

  14. Migration and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gois, William

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to highlight the role of adult education as a tool in addressing labour migration issues, specifically those concerning the protection of migrant workers' rights and the transformation of the impact of migration into positive holistic developmental gains. The view of labour migration as a means to forge the economic…

  15. [The theory of migration].

    PubMed

    Delbruck, C; Raffelhuschen, B

    1993-09-01

    "The present and expected migration flows in Europe require a detailed analysis of determinants and elements of migration decisions. This survey encompasses a view on classical--labor market and demand side oriented--theories, the more recent human capital approach as well as on migration under asymmetric information. Since these theories so far yield an unsatisfactory basis for description and forecasting of multilateral migration flows, a closer look at empirical methods of migration research is taken. Consequently, a description of possible policy oriented applications of the gravity model and the random utility approach, with their descriptive and normative characteristics, is given." (SUMMARY IN ENG) PMID:12319309

  16. Method for reducing energy losses in laser crystals

    DOEpatents

    Atherton, L.J.; DeYoreo, J.J.; Roberts, D.H.

    1992-03-24

    A process for reducing energy losses in crystals is disclosed which comprises: a. heating a crystal to a temperature sufficiently high as to cause dissolution of microscopic inclusions into the crystal, thereby converting said inclusions into point-defects, and b. maintaining said crystal at a given temperature for a period of time sufficient to cause said point-defects to diffuse out of said crystal. Also disclosed are crystals treated by the process, and lasers utilizing the crystals as a source of light. 12 figs.

  17. Method for reducing energy losses in laser crystals

    DOEpatents

    Atherton, L. Jeffrey; DeYoreo, James J.; Roberts, David H.

    1992-01-01

    A process for reducing energy losses in crystals is disclosed which comprises: a. heating a crystal to a temperature sufficiently high as to cause dissolution of microscopic inclusions into the crystal, thereby converting said inclusions into point-defects, and b. maintaining said crystal at a given temperature for a period of time sufficient to cause said point-defects to diffuse out of said crystal. Also disclosed are crystals treated by the process, and lasers utilizing the crystals as a source of light.

  18. Can migration mitigate the effects of ecosystem change? Patterns of dispersal, energy acquisition and allocation in Great Lakes lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rennie, Michael D.; Ebener, Mark P.; Wagner, Tyler

    2012-01-01

    Migration can be a behavioural response to poor or declining home range habitat quality and can occur when the costs of migration are overcome by the benefi ts of encountering higher-quality resources elsewhere. Despite dramatic ecosystem-level changes in the benthic food web of the Laurentian Great Lakes since the colonization of dreissenid mussels, coincident changes in condition and growth rates among benthivorous lake whitefi sh populations have been variable. We hypothesized that this variation could be in part mitigated by differences in migratory habits among populations, where increased migration distance can result in an increased probability of encountering high-quality habitat (relative to the home range). Results from four Great Lakes populations support this hypothesis; relative growth rates increased regularly with migration distance. The population with the largest average migration distance also had the least reduction in size-at-age during a period of signifi cant ecosystem change and among the highest estimated consumption and activity rates. In comparison, the population with the greatest declines in size-at-age was among the least mobile, demonstrating only moderate rates of consumption and activity. The least mobile population of lake whitefi sh was supported by a remnant Diporeia population and has experienced only moderate temporal growth declines. Our study provides evidence for the potential role of migration in mitigating the effects of ecosystem change on lake whitefi sh populations.

  19. Elementary Mechanisms of Shear-Coupled Grain Boundary Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabzadeh, A.; Mompiou, F.; Legros, M.; Combe, N.

    2013-06-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the elementary mechanisms occurring during the shear-coupled grain boundary (GB) migration at low temperature is performed focusing on both the energetic and structural characteristics. The migration of a Σ13(320) GB in a copper bicrystal in response to external shear displacements is simulated using a semiempirical potential. The minimum energy path of the shear-coupled GB migration is computed using the nudge elastic band method. The GB migration occurs through the nucleation and motion of GB steps identified as disconnections. Energy barriers for the GB and disconnection migrations are evaluated.

  20. Elementary mechanisms of shear-coupled grain boundary migration.

    PubMed

    Rajabzadeh, A; Mompiou, F; Legros, M; Combe, N

    2013-06-28

    A detailed theoretical study of the elementary mechanisms occurring during the shear-coupled grain boundary (GB) migration at low temperature is performed focusing on both the energetic and structural characteristics. The migration of a Σ13(320) GB in a copper bicrystal in response to external shear displacements is simulated using a semiempirical potential. The minimum energy path of the shear-coupled GB migration is computed using the nudge elastic band method. The GB migration occurs through the nucleation and motion of GB steps identified as disconnections. Energy barriers for the GB and disconnection migrations are evaluated. PMID:23848899

  1. Structural and magnetic properties of GaMnAs layers with high Mn-content grown by migration-enhanced epitaxy on GaAs(100) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, J.; Mathieu, R.; Svedlindh, P.; Domagała, J. Z.; Bak-Misiuk, J.; Światek, K.; Karlsteen, M.; Kanski, J.; Ilver, L.; Åsklund, H.; Södervall, U.

    2001-05-01

    Ferromagnetic GaMnAs containing up to 10% Mn has been grown by migration-enhanced epitaxy at a substrate temperature of 150 °C. The lattice constant of hypothetical zinc-blende structure MnAs is determined to be 5.90 Å, which deviates somewhat from previously reported values. This deviation is ascribed to growth-condition-dependent density of point defects. Magnetization measurements showed an onset of ferromagnetic ordering around 75 K for the GaMnAs layer with 10% Mn. This means that the trend of falling Curie temperatures with increasing Mn concentrations above 5.3% is broken.

  2. Radon depth migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, S.T. ); Carroll, R.J. )

    1993-02-01

    A depth migration method is presented that used Radon-transformed common-source seismograms as input. It is shown that the Radon depth migration method can be extended to spatially varying velocity depth models by using asymptotic ray theory (ART) to construct wavefield continuation operators. These operators downward continue an incident receiver-array plane wave and an assumed point-source wavefield into the subsurface. The migration velocity model is constrain to have longer characteristic wavelengths than the dominant source wavelength such that the ART approximations for the continuation operators are valid. This method is used successfully to migrate two synthetic data examples: (1) a point diffractor, and (2) a dipping layer and syncline interface model. It is shown that the Radon migration method has a computational advantage over the standard Kirchhoff migration method in that fewer rays are computed in a main memory implementation.

  3. Aquaporins and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, M C; Saadoun, S; Verkman, A S

    2008-07-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) water channels are expressed primarily in cell plasma membranes. In this paper, we review recent evidence that AQPs facilitate cell migration. AQP-dependent cell migration has been found in a variety of cell types in vitro and in mice in vivo. AQP1 deletion reduces endothelial cell migration, limiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. AQP4 deletion slows the migration of reactive astrocytes, impairing glial scarring after brain stab injury. AQP1-expressing tumor cells have enhanced metastatic potential and local infiltration. Impaired cell migration has also been seen in AQP1-deficient proximal tubule epithelial cells, and AQP3-deficient corneal epithelial cells, enterocytes, and skin keratinocytes. The mechanisms by which AQPs enhance cell migration are under investigation. We propose that, as a consequence of actin polymerization/depolymerization and transmembrane ionic fluxes, the cytoplasm adjacent to the leading edge of migrating cells undergoes rapid changes in osmolality. AQPs could thus facilitate osmotic water flow across the plasma membrane in cell protrusions that form during migration. AQP-dependent cell migration has potentially broad implications in angiogenesis, tumor metastasis, wound healing, glial scarring, and other events requiring rapid, directed cell movement. AQP inhibitors may thus have therapeutic potential in modulating these events, such as slowing tumor growth and spread, and reducing glial scarring after injury to allow neuronal regeneration. PMID:17968585

  4. From Immigration to Migration Systems: New Concepts in Migration History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoerder, Dirk

    1999-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of migration systems where two or more societies are connected through migration patterns. Identifies the four major migration systems that populated North America. Reviews the literature in relation to migration systems and discusses autobiographical accounts of migration. Provides an extensive bibliography. (CMK)

  5. Spatially dependent cluster dynamics modeling of microstructure evolution in low energy helium irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faney, T.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    In fusion reactors, plasma facing components (PFC) and in particular the divertor will be irradiated with high fluxes of low energy (˜100 eV) helium and hydrogen ions. Tungsten is one of the leading candidate divertor materials for ITER and DEMO fusion reactors. However, the behavior of tungsten under high dose, coupled helium/hydrogen exposure remains to be fully understood. The PFC response and performance changes are intimately related to microstructural changes, such as the formation of point defect clusters, helium and hydrogen bubbles or dislocation loops. Computational materials modeling has been used to investigate the mechanisms controlling microstructural evolution in tungsten following high dose, high temperature helium exposure. The aim of this study is to understand and predict helium implantation, primary defect production and defect diffusion, helium-defect clustering and interactions below a tungsten surface exposed to low energy helium irradiation. The important defects include interstitial clusters, vacancy clusters, helium interstitials and helium-vacancy clusters. We report results from a one-dimensional, spatially dependent cluster dynamics model based on the continuum reaction-diffusion rate theory to describe the evolution in space and time of all these defects. The key parameter inputs to the model (diffusion coefficients, migration and binding energies, initial defect production) are determined from a combination of atomistic materials modeling and available experimental data.

  6. The Future of Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This book comprises papers delivered at a conference of National Experts on Migration. The principle objective of the conference was twofold: to examine significant trends that will affect the future of migration in countries in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OCED), and to identify the relevant issues that will have to…

  7. Migration to Windows NT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doles, Daniel T.

    In the constantly changing world of technology, migration is not only inevitable but many times necessary for survival, especially when the end result is simplicity for both users and IT support staff. This paper describes the migration at Franklin College (Indiana). It discusses the reasons for selecting Windows NT, the steps taken to complete…

  8. Migration and Environmental Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Lori M.

    2011-01-01

    Losses due to natural hazards (e.g., earthquakes, hurricanes) and technological hazards (e.g., nuclear waste facilities, chemical spills) are both on the rise. One response to hazard-related losses is migration, with this paper offering a review of research examining the association between migration and environmental hazards. Using examples from both developed and developing regional contexts, the overview demonstrates that the association between migration and environmental hazards varies by setting, hazard types, and household characteristics. In many cases, however, results demonstrate that environmental factors play a role in shaping migration decisions, particularly among those most vulnerable. Research also suggests that risk perception acts as a mediating factor. Classic migration theory is reviewed to offer a foundation for examination of these associations. PMID:21886366

  9. Migration of health workers.

    PubMed

    Buchan, James

    2008-01-01

    The discussion and debate stimulated by these papers focused across a range of issues but there were four main areas of questioning: "measuring" and monitoring migration (issues related to comparability, completeness and accuracy of data sets on human resources); the impact of migration of health workers on health systems; the motivations of individual health workers to migrate (the "push" and "pull" factors) and the effect of policies designed either to reduce migration (e.g "self ufficiency") or to stimulate it (e.g active international recruitment). It was recognised that there was a critical need to examine migratory flows within the broader context of all health care labour market dynamics within a country, that increasing migration of health workers was an inevitable consequence of globalisation, and that there was a critical need to improve monitoring so as to better inform policy formulation and policy testing in this area. PMID:18561695

  10. Energy migration of the local excitation at the Eu3+ site in a Eu-O chemical cluster in sol-gel derived SiO2:Eu3+ glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Tomokatsu; Nogami, Masayuki

    2001-09-01

    By using the fluorescence line-narrowing technique, we observed a broad fluorescence band in the vicinity of a resonant line of the 5D0→7F0 transition in an Eu3+-doped SiO2 glass synthesized by a sol-gel process. The comparison with a similar line in an Al2O3-SiO2:Eu3+ sol-gel glass revealed the existence of a chemical cluster of Eu3+ and O2- in the tetrahedral SiO4 network. The broad fluorescence band was attributable to an energy migration among the Eu3+ ions for the site-selectively received excitation energy. Also, based on Yokota-Tanimoto's energy diffusion model, the fluorescence decay curves for the 5D0→7F2 transition were closely correlated with the energy migration and gel-glass transformation. The gel-shrinkage and reduced interatomic distance between Eu3+ ions due to a thermal treatment at higher temperature definitely resulted in a decrease in the associated lifetime of the initial decay.

  11. Nanoclay migration from food packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Echegoyen, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Silvia; Nerín, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    A recent trend is to use nanocomposites materials for food-packaging applications. Different kinds of nanoparticles are incorporated into the polymers to improve their characteristics, and, among them, nanoclay is used to improve their barrier properties to gases. In this work, the results of migration studies with different food simulants (ethanol 10% and acetic acid 3%), temperatures and times (40 ºC for 10 days and 70 ºC for 2 h) from two commercialised LDPE nanocomposite bags are presented. The migration solutions thus obtained were analysed by ICP-MS to evaluate the amount of aluminium which migrated into the solutions both in dissolved form and as a part of nanoparticles. Aluminium migration was observed for both samples with a maximum migration value of 51.65 ng cm(-)(2) for the Aisaika bags and 24.14 ng cm(-)(2) for the Debbie Meyer bags. The presence of spikes working in single-particle mode using ICP-MS indicated that part of this aluminium was present as nanoparticles. The size and morphology of the nanoclay, in both the original material and the migration solutions, was studied by scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (SEM-EDX). In this manner, nanoparticles of different morphologies and sizes were found to migrate into the food simulants. PMID:26751017

  12. Migration of the population.

    PubMed

    Krasinets, E

    1998-03-01

    Two factors influence foreign migration balance of the Russian Federation. The first factor involves the migration process between Russia and former union republics. The influx of population to the Russian Federation from other republics of the former Soviet Union is considered as one of the largest in the world. The average annual migratory growth of Russia during the years 1991-94 as a result of this migration exchange has tripled as compared with 1986-90, with a total of 2.7 million Russians who migrated into Russia. However, from 1996 up to the present time, the number of persons arriving in Russia declined dramatically. Meanwhile, the second factor that determines the country's migration balance is emigration to the far abroad. The most significant trend in determining the development of internal migration in Russia is the outflow of population from northern and eastern regions. The directions of internal and external migratory flows have a large influence on the migration balance in Russia's rural areas. The reduction of migratory flows in rural areas is the direct result of processes in the economic sphere. It confirms the reconstruction of rural-urban migratory exchange. PMID:12294009

  13. Labor migration in Asia.

    PubMed

    Martin, P L

    1991-01-01

    "A recent conference sponsored by the United Nations Center for Regional Development (UNCRD) in Nagoya, Japan examined the growing importance of labor migration for four major Asian labor importers (Japan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Singapore) and five major labor exporters (Bangladesh, Korea, Pakistan, Philippines, and Thailand).... The conference concluded that international labor migration would increase within Asia because the tight labor markets and rising wages which have stimulated Japanese investment in other Asian nations, for example, have not been sufficient to eliminate migration push and pull forces...." PMID:12316776

  14. SUPER-ECCENTRIC MIGRATING JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Socrates, Aristotle; Katz, Boaz; Dong Subo; Tremaine, Scott

    2012-05-10

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e = 0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e > 0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is a-dot {proportional_to}a{sup 1/2} and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/d log a{proportional_to}a{sup 1/2}. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  15. Tetraspanins in Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xupin; Zhang, Jiaping; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins are a superfamily of small transmembrane proteins that are expressed in almost all eukaryotic cells. Through interacting with one another and with other membrane and intracellular proteins, tetraspanins regulate a wide range of proteins such as integrins, cell surface receptors, and signaling molecules, and thereby engage in diverse cellular processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to proliferation and differentiation. In particular, tetraspanins modulate the function of proteins involved in all determining factors of cell migration including cell–cell adhesion, cell–ECM adhesion, cytoskeletal protrusion/contraction, and proteolytic ECM remodeling. We herein provide a brief overview of collective in vitro and in vivo studies of tetraspanins to illustrate their regulatory functions in the migration and trafficking of cancer cells, vascular endothelial cells, skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts), and leukocytes. We also discuss the involvement of tetraspanins in various pathologic and remedial processes that rely on cell migration and their potential value as targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26091149

  16. First principle-based AKMC modelling of the formation and medium-term evolution of point defect and solute-rich clusters in a neutron irradiated complex Fe-CuMnNiSiP alloy representative of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngayam-Happy, R.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2013-09-01

    The formation and medium-term evolution of point defect and solute-rich clusters under neutron irradiation have been modelled in a complex Fe-CuMnNiSiP alloy representative of RPV steels, by means of first principle-based atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The results obtained reproduce most features observed in available experimental studies, highlighting the very good agreement between both series. According to simulation, solute-rich clusters form and develop via an induced segregation mechanism on either the vacancy or interstitial clusters, and these point defect clusters are efficiently generated only in cascade debris and not Frenkel pair flux. The results have revealed the existence of two distinct populations of clusters with different characteristic features. Solute-rich clusters in the first group are bound essentially to interstitial clusters and they are enriched in Mn mostly, but also Ni to a lesser extent. Over the low dose regime, their density increases in the alloy as a result of the accumulation of highly stable interstitial clusters. In the second group, the solute-rich clusters are merged with vacancy clusters, and they contain mostly Cu and Si, but also substantial amount of Mn and Ni. The formation of a sub-population of pure solute clusters has been observed, which results from annihilation of the low stable vacancy clusters on sinks. The results indicate finally that the Mn content in clusters is up to 50%, Cu, Si, and Ni sharing the other half in more or less equivalent amounts. This composition has not demonstrated any noticeable modification with increasing dose over irradiation.

  17. Indonesia's migration transition.

    PubMed

    Hugo, G

    1995-01-01

    This article describes population movements in Indonesia in the context of rapid and marked social and economic change. Foreign investment in Indonesia is increasing, and global mass media is available to many households. Agriculture is being commercialized, and structural shifts are occurring in the economy. Educational levels are increasing, and women's role and status are shifting. Population migration has increased over the decades, both short and long distance, permanent and temporary, legal and illegal, and migration to and between urban areas. This article focuses specifically on rural-to-urban migration and international migration. Population settlements are dense in the agriculturally rich inner areas of Java, Bali, and Madura. Although the rate of growth of the gross domestic product was 6.8% annually during 1969-94, the World Bank ranked Indonesia as a low-income economy in 1992 because of the large population size. Income per capita is US $670. Indonesia is becoming a large exporter of labor to the Middle East, particularly women. The predominance of women as overseas contract workers is changing women's role and status in the family and is controversial due to the cases of mistreatment. Malaysia's high economic growth rate of over 8% per year means an additional 1.3 million foreign workers and technicians are needed. During the 1980s urban growth increased at a very rapid rate. Urban growth tended to occur along corridors and major transportation routes around urban areas. It is posited that most of the urban growth is due to rural-to-urban migration. Data limitations prevent an exact determination of the extent of rural-to-urban migration. More women are estimated to be involved in movements to cities during the 1980s compared to the 1970s. Recruiters and middlemen have played an important role in rural-to-urban migration and international migration. PMID:12347370

  18. True amplitude prestack depth migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Feng

    Reliable analysis of amplitude variation with offset (or with angle) requires accurate amplitudes from prestack migration. In routine seismic data processing, amplitude balancing and automatic gain control are often used to reduce amplitude lateral variations. However, these methods are empirical and lack a solid physical basis; thus, there are uncertainties that might produce erroneous conclusions, and hence cause economic loss. During wavefield propagation, geometrical spreading, intrinsic attenuation, transmission losses and the energy conversion significantly distort the wavefield amplitude. Most current true-amplitude migrations usually compensate only for geometrical spreading. A new prestack depth migration based on the framework of reverse-time migration in the time-space domain was developed in this dissertation with the aim of compensating all of the propagation effects in one integrated algorithm. Geometrical spreading is automatically included because of the use of full two-way wave extrapolation. Viscoelastic wave equations are solved to handle the intrinsic attenuation with a priori quality factor. Transmission losses for both up- and down-going waves are compensated using a two-pass, recursive procedure based on extracting the angle-dependent reflection/transmission coefficients from prestack migration. The losses caused by the conversion of energy from one elastic model to another are accounted for through elastic wave extrapolation; the influence of the S wave velocity contrast on the P wave reflection coefficient is implicitly included by using the Zoeppritz equations to describe the reflection and transmission at an elastic interface. Only smooth background models are assumed to be known. The contrasts/ratios of the model parameters can be estimated by fitting the compensated angle-dependent reflection coefficients obtained from data for multiple sources. This is one useful by-product of the algorithm. Numerical tests on both 2D and 3D scalar

  19. Migration Type III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artymowicz, Pawel

    2004-03-01

    Migration type IIIMigration of objects embedded in disks (and the accompanying eccentricity evolution) is becoming a major theme in planetary system formation.The underlying physics can be distilled into the notion of disk-planet coupling via Lindblad resonances, which launch waves, sometimes spectacular spiral shock waves in gas disks. The wave pattern exchanges angular momentum with the planet. That causes (i) migration, (ii) eccentricity evolution, and (iii) gap opening by sufficiently massive planets.A competing source of disk-planet interaction, the corotationaltorques, are much less conspicuous (corotation does not produce easilydetectable waves, as galaxy observers can attest) and have often been missed in the analysis of planet migration. If spiral waves are like waves at Goleta beach, then the corotation acts more like a stealthy riptide. Corotationalflows lie at the basis of a new, surprisingly rapid, mode of migration (type III),superseding the standard type II migration (with a gap), and revising the speed of type I migration (without a gap). The talk will contain results obtained at KITP, e.g., an analytical derivation of da/dt in type III motion. It will be illustrated by videos of high-resolution numerical simulations obtained with different implementations of the Piecewise Parabolic Method hydrodynamics.

  20. Migration of helium-pair in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J. L.; Geng, W. T.

    2016-09-01

    We have carried out a first-principles density functional theory investigation into the migration of both a single interstitial He and an interstitial He-pair in Fe, Mo, W, Cu, Pd, and Pt. We find the migration trajectories and barriers are determined predominantly by low-energy He-pair configurations which depend mainly on the energy state of a single He in different interstices. The migration barrier for a He-pair in bcc metals is always slightly higher than for a single He. Configurations of a He-pair in fcc metals are very complicated, due to the existence of interstitial sites with nearly identical energy for a single He. The migration barrier for a He-pair is slightly lower than (in Cu), or similar to (in Pd and Pt) a single He. The collective migrations of a He-pair are ensured by strong Hesbnd He interactions with strength-versus-distance forms resembling chemical bonds and can be described with Morse potentials.

  1. Underground radionuclide migration at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Nimz, G.J. ); Thompson, J.L. )

    1992-06-22

    This document reviews results from a number of studies concerning underground migration of radionuclides from nuclear test cavities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Discussed are all cases known to the Department of Energy's Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program where radionuclides have been detected outside of the immediate vicinity of nuclear test cavities that are identifiable as the-source of the nuclides, as well as cases where radionuclides might have been expected and were intentionally sought but not fixed. There are nine locations where source-identifiable radionuclide migration has been detected, one where migration was purposely induced by pumping, and three where migration might be expected but was not found. In five of the nine cases of non-induced migration, the inferred migration mechanism is prompt fracture injection during detonation. In the other four cases, the inferred migration mechanism is water movement. In only a few of the reviewed cases can the actual migration mechanism be stated with confidence, and the attempt has been made to indicate the level of confidence for each case. References are cited where more information may be obtained. As an aid to future study, this document concludes with a brief discussion of the aspects of radionuclide migration that, as the present review indicates, are not yet understood. A course of action is suggested that would produce a better understanding of the phenomenon of radionuclide migration.

  2. Determination of the activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations in plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy by positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Mohammed; Abdel-Rahman, M.; Badawi, Emad A.; Abdel-Rahman, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations of plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime technique. Plastic deformation using a hydraulic press produces mainly dislocations and may produce point defects. The type of defect was studied by isochronal annealing which determines the temperature range of recovery of each type. Only one type of defect (dislocations) was observed for the investigated sample and was found to be recovered within the range 455-700 K. Isothermal annealing by slow cooling was performed through this range and used in determination of the activation enthalpy of migration of dislocations which was found to be 0.26 ± 0.01 eV.

  3. Environmental concerns and international migration.

    PubMed

    Hugo, G

    1996-01-01

    "This article focuses on international migration occurring as a result of environmental changes and processes. It briefly reviews attempts to conceptualize environment-related migration and then considers the extent to which environmental factors have been and may be significant in initiating migration. Following is an examination of migration as an independent variable in the migration-environment relationship. Finally, ethical and policy dimensions are addressed." PMID:12291410

  4. Biometrics and international migration.

    PubMed

    Redpath, Jillyanne

    2007-01-01

    This paper will focus on the impact of the rapid expansion in the use of biometric systems in migration management on the rights of individuals; it seeks to highlight legal issues for consideration in implementing such systems, taking as the starting point that the security interests of the state and the rights of the individual are not, and should not be, mutually exclusive. The first part of this paper briefly describes the type of biometric applications available, how biometric systems function, and those used in migration management. The second part examines the potential offered by biometrics for greater security in migration management, and focuses on developments in the use of biometrics as a result of September 11. The third part discusses the impact of the use of biometrics in the management of migration on the individual's right to privacy and ability to move freely and lawfully. The paper highlights the increasing need for domestic and international frameworks to govern the use of biometric applications in the migration/security context, and proposes a number of issues that such frameworks could address. PMID:17536151

  5. Optimal migration energetics of humpback whales and the implications of disturbance.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Janelle E; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Hipsey, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    Whales migrate long distances and reproduce on a finite store of energy. Budgeting the use of this limited energy reserve is an important factor to ensure survival over the period of migration and to maximize reproductive investment. For some whales, migration routes are closely associated with coastal areas, exposing animals to high levels of human activity. It is currently unclear how various forms of human activity may disturb whales during migration, how this might impact their energy balance and how this could translate into long-term demographic changes. Here, we develop a theoretical bioenergetic model for migrating humpback whales to investigate the optimal migration strategy that minimizes energy use. The average migration velocity was an important driver of the total energy used by a whale, and an optimal velocity of 1.1 m s(-1) was determined. This optimal velocity is comparable to documented observed migration speeds, suggesting that whales migrate at a speed that conserves energy. Furthermore, the amount of resting time during migration was influenced by both transport costs and feeding rates. We simulated hypothetical disturbances to the optimal migration strategy in two ways, by altering average velocity to represent changes in behavioural activity and by increasing total travelled distance to represent displacement along the migration route. In both cases, disturbance increased overall energy use, with implications for the growth potential of calves. PMID:27293686

  6. Optimal migration energetics of humpback whales and the implications of disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Janelle E.; Meeuwig, Jessica J.; Hipsey, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Whales migrate long distances and reproduce on a finite store of energy. Budgeting the use of this limited energy reserve is an important factor to ensure survival over the period of migration and to maximize reproductive investment. For some whales, migration routes are closely associated with coastal areas, exposing animals to high levels of human activity. It is currently unclear how various forms of human activity may disturb whales during migration, how this might impact their energy balance and how this could translate into long-term demographic changes. Here, we develop a theoretical bioenergetic model for migrating humpback whales to investigate the optimal migration strategy that minimizes energy use. The average migration velocity was an important driver of the total energy used by a whale, and an optimal velocity of 1.1 m s−1 was determined. This optimal velocity is comparable to documented observed migration speeds, suggesting that whales migrate at a speed that conserves energy. Furthermore, the amount of resting time during migration was influenced by both transport costs and feeding rates. We simulated hypothetical disturbances to the optimal migration strategy in two ways, by altering average velocity to represent changes in behavioural activity and by increasing total travelled distance to represent displacement along the migration route. In both cases, disturbance increased overall energy use, with implications for the growth potential of calves. PMID:27293686

  7. Synthetic seismic monitoring using reverse-time migration and Kirchhoff migration for CO2 sequestration in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Kim, Y.; Min, D.; Oh, J.; Huh, C.; Kang, S.

    2012-12-01

    vertical CO2 migration at injection point, the reverse time migration yields better images than Kirchhoff migration does. On the other hand, Kirchhoff migration images horizontal CO2 migration clearer than the reverse time migration does. From these results, we can conclude that the reverse-time migration and Kirchhoff migration can complement with each other to describe the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. Acknowledgement This work was financially supported by the Brain Korea 21 project of Energy Systems Engineering, the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine Geological Storage" program funded by the Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs (MLTM) of Korea and the Korea CCS R&D Center (KCRC) grant funded by the Korea government (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology) (No. 2012-0008926).

  8. Migration from Packaging Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulenaer, B. De

    Various chemical compounds can be present in foodstuffs which may induce health problems in humans. The origin of these compounds can be very diverse. Mathematical modeling can sometimes be used to predict the concentration of these chemicals in the food. Particularly for compounds which are produced in the food during, e.g., processing and for compounds which migrate from a food contact material this technique can be very fruitful. For the former type of compounds, classical chemical kinetics can be applied. In this contribution, the modeling of the migration from polymeric food contact materials is considered. This migration phenomenon can be modeled mathematically since the physical processes which govern this process are very well studied and understood. Therefore, initially some of these fundamentals will be discussed in more detail.

  9. [Migration and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Aydinkoc-Tuzcu, Kadriye; Schindler, Karin; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Ludvik, Bernhard; Fasching, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The article deals with the demographic data of migration in Austria and with therapeutic advice concerning drug therapy and diabetes education for patients with migration background. In this context socio-cultural specifics are discussed. These suggestions are seen complementary to the general treatment guidelines of the Austrian Diabetes Association.Especially for the fast months Ramadan there are a lot of informations. The most important point is that the patient care must be highly individualized and the management plan may differ for each patient. PMID:27052237

  10. What's driving migration?

    PubMed

    Kane, H

    1995-01-01

    During the 1990s investment in prevention of international or internal migration declined, and crisis intervention increased. The budgets of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and the UN Development Program remained about the same. The operating assumption is that war, persecution, famine, and environmental and social disintegration are inevitable. Future efforts should be directed to stabilizing populations through investment in sanitation, public health, preventive medicine, land tenure, environmental protection, and literacy. Forces pushing migration are likely to increase in the future. Forces include depletion of natural resources, income disparities, population pressure, and political disruption. The causes of migration are not constant. In the past, migration occurred during conquests, settlement, intermarriage, or religious conversion and was a collective movement. Current migration involves mass movement of individuals and the struggle to survive. There is new pressure to leave poor squatter settlements and the scarcities in land, water, and food. The slave trade between the 1500s and the 1800s linked continents, and only 2-3 million voluntarily crossed national borders. Involuntary migration began in the early 1800s when European feudal systems were in a decline, and people sought freedom. Official refugees, who satisfy the strict 1951 UN definition, increased from 15 million in 1980 to 23 million in 1990 but remained a small proportion of international migrants. Much of the mass movement occurs between developing countries. Migration to developed countries is accompanied by growing intolerance, which is misinformed. China practices a form of "population transfer" in Tibet in order to dilute Tibetan nationalism. Colonization of countries is a new less expensive form of control over territory. Eviction of minorities is another popular strategy in Iraq. Public works projects supported by foreign aid displace millions annually. War and civil conflicts

  11. [Migration, climate and health].

    PubMed

    Tellier, Siri; Carballo, Manuel; Calballo, Manuel

    2009-10-26

    Many tentative connections have been postulated between migration and climate. This article points to rural-urban migration, particularly into low elevation urban slums prone to flooding as an issue needing urgent attention by health professionals. It also notes the no-man's land in which environmental refugees find themselves and the consequences this may have. Finally, it points to the urgent need to reform health systems in both developing and developed countries to adapt to rapidly changing disease patterns and to become more responsive to them. PMID:19857400

  12. [Migration and health].

    PubMed

    Litvinjenko, S

    1997-01-01

    In the last decades of this century we are witnesses of frequent crises in different parts of the world produced by internal disturbance and wars. These crises, together with natural disasters, poverty and hunger, follow the history of mankind often forcing huge population groups to leave their homes. The harmful health consequences are among negative effects of migrations. While stable populations have well-tried routines for maintaining health, migrations mean abandoning such support systems. The increased exposure to harmful factors contributes more to the bad health condition of the migrant population. Setting of newcomers and local people together in the same homes, reduction in food and heating resources, drug shortage as well as importation of new infectious agents, may also endanger health of the native population. These observations have also been confirmed by Yugoslav experience. Depending on the fact whether a migration is elemental or organized i.e. dependent on its place in the large scale between these two extreme endpoints, the size of risk is also dependent on the consequences and degree of their difficulty. Mass health disturbances occur during migrations of the population from war regions, migrations from areas of natural disasters, mass pilgrimage, migrations of seasonal workers and migrations of armies during wars. However, even in these difficult times and conditions, a good organization can contribute to the mitigation of harmful consequences caused by these migrations. For instance, in 1942 there was an epidemic of typhus fever in Bosnia when many refugees crossed the Drina river on the way to Serbia escaping from Ustasha terrorism. At the Serbian side there were checkpoints where the refugees could taka a bath and where their laundry and clothing were depediculated with dry air, and after a two-week quarantine they could continue to Serbian provinces without making new foci of typhus fever. The most vulnerable and numerous group of refugees

  13. Point defect states in Sb-doped germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Neil S. Monmeyran, Corentin; Agarwal, Anuradha; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2015-10-21

    Defect states in n-type Sb-doped germanium were investigated by deep-level transient spectroscopy. Cobalt-60 gamma rays were used to generate isolated vacancies and interstitials which diffuse and react with impurities in the material to form four defect states (E{sub 37}, E{sub 30}, E{sub 22}, and E{sub 21}) in the upper half of the bandgap. Irradiations at 77 K and 300 K as well as isothermal anneals were performed to characterize the relationships between the four observable defects. E{sub 37} is assigned to the Sb donor-vacancy associate (E-center) and is the only vacancy containing defect giving an estimate of 2 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −3} Mrad{sup −1} for the uncorrelated vacancy-interstitial pair introduction rate. The remaining three defect states are interstitial associates and transform among one another. Conversion ratios between E{sub 22}, E{sub 21}, and E{sub 30} indicate that E{sub 22} likely contains two interstitials.

  14. Point defect production and annihilation in neutron-irradiated zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    MacEwen, S.R.; Zee, R.H.; Birtcher, R.C.; Abromeit, C.

    1984-05-01

    High-purity Zr has been irradiated to a dose of 2.2 x 10/sup 21/ n/m/sup 2/ (E < 0.1 MeV) using the pulsed spallation source at IPNS. Electrical resistivity was monitored continuously during irradiation. The saturation resistivity, found from a linear extrapolation of the damage-rate curve between four and five n..cap omega...m. However, comparison with data from the literature shows that the normalized damage-rate curves from five experiments at different temperatures (less than or equal to 77 K) and with different neutron spectra, all fall on the same common curve. A saturation resistivity of 100 n..cap omega...m is found from the high-dose, linear part of this curve. A spontaneous recombination volume in the range 280 to 400 atomic volumes is found using the theory of Dettmann, Leibfried and Schroeder and the saturation resistivity of 100 n..cap omega...m. Post-irradiation annealing has been done up to 300 K using stepped, isochronal anneals. The recovery spectrum is in reasonable agreement with previous work, showing a large peak near 100 K, and two smaller peaks at 160 K and 250 K.

  15. Point defects and band alignment in strontium cerate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Michael; van de Walle, Chris G.

    Strontium cerate (SrCeO3) is a well-known ionic conductor of both hydrogen and oxygen. In applications, it is frequently doped (for instance with yttrium or neodymium) to increase stability and promote diffusion. However, the microscopic effects of doping and native defects are not fully understood. Building on previous computational work in barium cerate (BaCeO3) , we use density functional theory with a hybrid functional to study impurities, electronic structure, and band alignments in these systems. We establish trends that we expect to hold across the perovskite cerates. We also discuss the alignment of the thermodynamic charge-state transition levels of hydrogen, and applications to this class of materials. This work was supported by DOE.

  16. Small polarons and point defects in barium cerate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Michael; Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2015-12-01

    Barium cerate (BaCeO3) is a well-known ionic conductor of both hydrogen and oxygen. In applications, it is frequently doped (for instance with Y) to increase stability and promote diffusion. However, the effects of doping and native defects are not fully understood. Computational studies have been stymied by the nature of the conduction band, which is made up of cerium 4 f states. These states present a challenge to ab initio techniques based on density functional theory within the standard approximations for exchange and correlation. Using a hybrid functional, we investigate the effects of hydrogen impurities and native defects on the electrical and optical properties of BaCeO3. We discuss the tendency of excess electrons or holes to localize in the form of small polarons. We also explore the interactions of polarons with hydrogen impurities and oxygen vacancies, and their impact on luminescence properties.

  17. Scanning tip measurement for identification of point defects.

    PubMed

    Dózsa, László; Molnár, György; Raineri, Vito; Giannazzo, Filippo; Ferencz, János; Lányi, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled iron-silicide nanostructures were prepared by reactive deposition epitaxy of Fe onto silicon. Capacitance-voltage, current-voltage, and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) were used to measure the electrical properties of Au/silicon Schottky junctions. Spreading resistance and scanning probe capacitance microscopy (SCM) were applied to measure local electrical properties. Using a preamplifier the sensitivity of DLTS was increased satisfactorily to measure transients of the scanning tip semiconductor junction. In the Fe-deposited area, Fe-related defects dominate the surface layer in about 0.5 μm depth. These defects deteriorated the Schottky junction characteristic. Outside the Fe-deposited area, Fe-related defect concentration was identified in a thin layer near the surface. The defect transients in this area were measured both in macroscopic Schottky junctions and by scanning tip DLTS and were detected by bias modulation frequency dependence in SCM. PMID:21711635

  18. MEXICAN MIGRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mexican Migration Project is designed to make timely, high-quality data on documented and undocumented Mexican migrants available to researchers and policy analysts. Each year since 1987 the project has administered a semi-structured interview schedule to representative sampl...

  19. Memory T Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qianqian; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a key feature of adaptive immunity. It provides the organism with long-lived and robust protection against infection. In organ transplantation, memory T cells pose a significant threat by causing allograft rejection that is generally resistant to immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, a more thorough understanding of memory T cell biology is needed to improve the survival of transplanted organs without compromising the host’s ability to fight infections. This review will focus on the mechanisms by which memory T cells migrate to the site where their target antigen is present, with particular emphasis on their migration to transplanted organs. First, we will define the known subsets of memory T cells (central, effector, and tissue resident) and their circulation patterns. Second, we will review the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which memory T cells migrate to inflamed and non-inflamed tissues and highlight the emerging paradigm of antigen-driven, trans-endothelial migration. Third, we will discuss the relevance of this knowledge to organ transplantation and the prevention or treatment of allograft rejection. PMID:26483794

  20. Brain Migration Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinokur, Annie

    2006-01-01

    The "brain drain/brain gain" debate has been going on for the past 40 years, with irresolvable theoretical disputes and unenforceable policy recommendations that economists commonly ascribe to the lack of reliable empirical data. The recent report of the World Bank, "International migration, remittances and the brain drain", documents the…

  1. Fall armyworm migration patterns.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), infestations in most of North America arise from annual migrations of populations that overwinter in southern Texas and Florida. Cytochrome Oxidase I haplotype profiles within the fall armyworm corn-strain, the subgroup tha...

  2. Capillary migration of microdisks on curved interfaces.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lu; Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Liu, Iris B; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2015-07-01

    The capillary energy landscape for particles on curved fluid interfaces is strongly influenced by the particle wetting conditions. Contact line pinning has now been widely reported for colloidal particles, but its implications in capillary interactions have not been addressed. Here, we present experiment and analysis for disks with pinned contact lines on curved fluid interfaces. In experiment, we study microdisk migration on a host interface with zero mean curvature; the microdisks have contact lines pinned at their sharp edges and are sufficiently small that gravitational effects are negligible. The disks migrate away from planar regions toward regions of steep curvature with capillary energies inferred from the dissipation along particle trajectories which are linear in the deviatoric curvature. We derive the curvature capillary energy for an interface with arbitrary curvature, and discuss each contribution to the expression. By adsorbing to a curved interface, a particle eliminates a patch of fluid interface and perturbs the surrounding interface shape. Analysis predicts that perfectly smooth, circular disks do not migrate, and that nanometric deviations from a planar circular, contact line, like those around a weakly roughened planar disk, will drive migration with linear dependence on deviatoric curvature, in agreement with experiment. PMID:25618486

  3. Movement ecology of migration in turkey vultures

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, J. T.; Bildstein, K. L.; Bohrer, G.; Winkler, D. W.

    2008-01-01

    We develop individual-based movement ecology models (MEM) to explore turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) migration decisions at both hourly and daily scales. Vulture movements in 10 migration events were recorded with satellite-reporting GPS sensors, and flight behavior was observed visually, aided by on-the-ground VHF radio-tracking. We used the North American Regional Reanalysis dataset to obtain values for wind speed, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), and cloud height and used a digital elevation model for a measure of terrain ruggedness. A turkey vulture fitted with a heart-rate logger during 124 h of flight during 38 contiguous days showed only a small increase in mean heart rate as distance traveled per day increased, which suggests that, unlike flapping, soaring flight does not lead to greatly increased metabolic costs. Data from 10 migrations for 724 hourly segments and 152 daily segments showed that vultures depended heavily upon high levels of TKE in the atmospheric boundary layer to increase flight distances and maintain preferred bearings at both hourly and daily scales. We suggest how the MEM can be extended to other spatial and temporal scales of avian migration. Our success in relating model-derived atmospheric variables to migration indicates the potential of using regional reanalysis data, as here, and potentially other regional, higher-resolution, atmospheric models in predicting changing movement patterns of soaring birds under various scenarios of climate and land use change. PMID:19060195

  4. Method of migrating seismic records

    DOEpatents

    Ober, Curtis C.; Romero, Louis A.; Ghiglia, Dennis C.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

  5. The commercialization of migration.

    PubMed

    Abrera-mangahas, M A

    1989-01-01

    International migration is not new to the Philippines. In the recent outflow of contract workers to the Middle East, there is a shift from individual and family initiated migrations to the more organized, highly commercial variety. While profit-taking intermediaries have played some role in the past, the increase in the number and influence of these intermediaries has altered the story of migration decision-making. In 1975, the signing of the bilateral labor agreement between the governments of Iran and the Philippines signalled the rising demand for Filipino contract workers. From 1970 to 1975, the number of Asian migrant workers in the Gulf countries rose from about 120,000 to 370,000. These figures rose dramatically to 3.3 million in 1985. The growing share of organized and commercialized migration has altered migration decision making. Primarily, intermediaries are able to broaden access to foreign job and high wage opportunities. Commercialization effectively raises the transaction costs for contract migration. Studies on recruitment costs and fees show that self-solicited foreign employment costs less than employment obtained through recruitment agents and intermediaries. The difference in the 2 prices is due, not only to overhead costs of intermediation, but more importantly to the rent exacted by agents from having job information and placement rights. In the Philippines in October 1987 the average placement fee was P8000, greatly exceeding the mandated maximum fee level of P5000. This average is understated because the computation includes the 17% who do not pay any fees. The widespread and popular view of recruitment intermediaries is negative, dominated by images of abuses and victims. Private intermediaries and the government bureaucracy need each other. Intermediaries need government; their consistent demand for incentives and protection is indicative. On the other hand, government expands its supervision of control of overseas employment via the

  6. Forced Migration: Refugee Populations

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Joyceen S.

    2015-01-01

    Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that manifests in various contexts. This article describes the impact of the movement of large numbers of people in several African countries, producing a unique type of migrant—the refugee. We describe issues that refugee movements create on fragile health care systems, situations that precipitate refugee movements, certain human rights violations that are of particular concern such as gender based violence (GBV) and child soldiers, and lastly, implications for nursing practice and policy. We use examples from several countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current literature, as well as the international experience of the authors, this article presents an overview of forced migration and discusses opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

  7. Imaging of cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Dormann, Dirk; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration is an essential process during many phases of development and adult life. Cells can either migrate as individuals or move in the context of tissues. Movement is controlled by internal and external signals, which activate complex signal transduction cascades resulting in highly dynamic and localised remodelling of the cytoskeleton, cell–cell and cell–substrate interactions. To understand these processes, it will be necessary to identify the critical structural cytoskeletal components, their spatio-temporal dynamics as well as those of the signalling pathways that control them. Imaging plays an increasingly important and powerful role in the analysis of these spatio-temporal dynamics. We will highlight a variety of imaging techniques and their use in the investigation of various aspects of cell motility, and illustrate their role in the characterisation of chemotaxis in Dictyostelium and cell movement during gastrulation in chick embryos in more detail. PMID:16900100

  8. Migration and stratification

    PubMed Central

    Jasso, Guillermina

    2011-01-01

    Migration and stratification are increasingly intertwined. One day soon it will be impossible to understand one without the other. Both focus on life chances. Stratification is about differential life chances - who gets what and why - and migration is about improving life chances - getting more of the good things of life. To examine the interconnections of migration and stratification, we address a mix of old and new questions, carrying out analyses newly enabled by a unique new data set on recent legal immigrants to the United States (the New Immigrant Survey). We look at immigrant processing and lost documents, depression due to the visa process, presentation of self, the race-ethnic composition of an immigrant cohort (made possible by the data for the first time since 1961), black immigration from Africa and the Americas, skin-color diversity among couples formed by U.S. citizen sponsors and immigrant spouses, and English fluency among children age 8–12 and their immigrant parents. We find, inter alia, that children of previously illegal parents are especially more likely to be fluent in English, that native-born U.S. citizen women tend to marry darker, that immigrant applicants who go through the visa process while already in the United States are more likely to have their documents lost and to suffer visa depression, and that immigration, by introducing accomplished black immigrants from Africa (notably via the visa lottery), threatens to overturn racial and skin color associations with skill. Our analyses show the mutual embeddedness of migration and stratification in the unfolding of the immigrants' and their children's life chances and the impacts on the stratification structure of the United States. PMID:26321771

  9. Conservation physiology of animal migration.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Robert J; Chapman, Jacqueline M; Souliere, Christopher M; Tudorache, Christian; Wikelski, Martin; Metcalfe, Julian D; Cooke, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from individuals to species), and research is underway to understand mechanisms that control migration and how migration responds to modern challenges. Focusing on behavioural and physiological aspects of migration can help to provide better understanding, management and conservation of migratory populations. Here, we highlight different physiological, behavioural and biomechanical aspects of animal migration that will help us to understand how migratory animals interact with current and future anthropogenic threats. We are in the early stages of a changing planet, and our understanding of how physiology is linked to the persistence of migratory animals is still developing; therefore, we regard the following questions as being central to the conservation physiology of animal migrations. Will climate change influence the energetic costs of migration? Will shifting temperatures change the annual clocks of migrating animals? Will anthropogenic influences have an effect on orientation during migration? Will increased anthropogenic alteration of migration stopover sites/migration corridors affect the stress physiology of migrating animals? Can physiological knowledge be used to identify strategies for facilitating the movement of animals? Our synthesis reveals that given the inherent challenges of migration, additional stressors derived from altered environments (e.g. climate change, physical habitat alteration, light pollution) or interaction with human infrastructure (e.g. wind or hydrokinetic turbines, dams) or activities (e.g. fisheries) could lead to long-term changes to migratory phenotypes. However, uncertainty remains

  10. Conservation physiology of animal migration

    PubMed Central

    Lennox, Robert J.; Chapman, Jacqueline M.; Souliere, Christopher M.; Tudorache, Christian; Wikelski, Martin; Metcalfe, Julian D.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from individuals to species), and research is underway to understand mechanisms that control migration and how migration responds to modern challenges. Focusing on behavioural and physiological aspects of migration can help to provide better understanding, management and conservation of migratory populations. Here, we highlight different physiological, behavioural and biomechanical aspects of animal migration that will help us to understand how migratory animals interact with current and future anthropogenic threats. We are in the early stages of a changing planet, and our understanding of how physiology is linked to the persistence of migratory animals is still developing; therefore, we regard the following questions as being central to the conservation physiology of animal migrations. Will climate change influence the energetic costs of migration? Will shifting temperatures change the annual clocks of migrating animals? Will anthropogenic influences have an effect on orientation during migration? Will increased anthropogenic alteration of migration stopover sites/migration corridors affect the stress physiology of migrating animals? Can physiological knowledge be used to identify strategies for facilitating the movement of animals? Our synthesis reveals that given the inherent challenges of migration, additional stressors derived from altered environments (e.g. climate change, physical habitat alteration, light pollution) or interaction with human infrastructure (e.g. wind or hydrokinetic turbines, dams) or activities (e.g. fisheries) could lead to long-term changes to migratory phenotypes. However, uncertainty remains

  11. Gender and Migration from Albania

    PubMed Central

    STECKLOV, GUY; CARLETTO, CALOGERO; AZZARRI, CARLO; DAVIS, BENJAMIN

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the dynamics and causes of the shift in the gender composition of migration, and more particularly, in women’s access to migration opportunities and decision-making. Our analysis focuses on Albania, a natural laboratory for studying international migration where out-migration was essentially nonexistent from the end of World War II to the end of the 1980s. Interest in the Albanian case is heightened because of the complex layers of inequality existing at the time when migration began: relatively low levels of inequality within the labor market and educational system—a product of the Communist era—while household relations remained heavily steeped in tradition and patriarchy. We use micro-level data from the Albania 2005 Living Standards Measurement Study, including migration histories for family members since migration began. Based on discrete-time hazard models, the analysis shows a dramatic increase in male migration and a gradual and uneven expansion of the female proportion of this international migration. Female migration, which is shown to be strongly associated with education, wealth, and social capital, appears responsive to economic incentives and constraints. Using information on the dependency of female migration to the household demographic structure as well as the sensitivity of female migration to household-level shocks, we show how household-level constraints and incentives affect male and female migration differently. Throughout this period, however, women’s migration behavior appears more directly aligned with household-level factors, and there is little evidence to suggest that increased female migration signals rising behavioral independence among Albanian women. PMID:21308565

  12. Hydrodynamics of pronuclear migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Microtubule (MT) filaments play a key role in many processes involved in cell devision including spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and pronuclear positioning. We present a direct numerical technique to simulate MT dynamics in such processes. Our method includes hydrodynamically mediated interactions between MTs and other cytoskeletal objects, using singularity methods for Stokes flow. Long-ranged many-body hydrodynamic interactions are computed using a highly efficient and scalable fast multipole method, enabling the simulation of thousands of MTs. Our simulation method also takes into account the flexibility of MTs using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory as well as their dynamic instability. Using this technique, we simulate pronuclear migration in single-celled Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Two different positioning mechanisms, based on the interactions of MTs with the motor proteins and the cell cortex, are explored: cytoplasmic pulling and cortical pushing. We find that although the pronuclear complex migrates towards the center of the cell in both models, the generated cytoplasmic flows are fundamentally different. This suggest that cytoplasmic flow visualization during pronuclear migration can be utilized to differentiate between the two mechanisms.

  13. Energy dependence of the mean free path of excess hot electrons in solid xenon in the elastic scattering region

    SciTech Connect

    Plenkiewicz, B.; Plenkiewicz, P.; Jay-Gerin, J.

    1986-04-15

    It has been found recently from the analysis of low-energy electron-transmission experiments that the scattering mean free path lambda of excess hot electrons in solid xenon films oscillates with energy. We show in this paper that in these experiments lambda is predominantly controlled by the combined effect of both acoustical-phonon scattering and scattering by neutral point defects, and that its energy dependence is entirely caused by the changes in electron effective mass with energy.

  14. Planetary migration, accretion, and atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian M.

    This dissertation explores three distinct projects in the field of planetary formation and evolution: type I migration, cessation of mass accretion, and the atmospheric dynamics of hot Jupiters. All three of these projects touch on outstanding or unresolved issues in the field. Each attempts to unify analytic and numerical approaches in order to physically motivate solutions while simultaneously probing areas currently inaccessible to purely analytic approaches. The first section, type I migration, explores the outstanding problem of the rapid inward migration of low mass planets embedded in protoplanetary disks. Analytic estimates of migration predict characteristic timescales that are much shorter then either observed disk lifetimes or theoretical core-accretion formation timescales. If migration is actually as efficient as these analytic estimates predict, planet formation across the observed range of masses and semimajor axis' is difficult. Here I introduce several new formalisms to both allow the disk to adiabatically adjust to the presence of a planet and include the effect of axisymmetric disk self-gravity. I find that these modifications increase migration timescales by approximately 4 times. In addition to these numerical improvements, I present simulations of migration in lower sound-speed regions of the disk on the grounds that self shadowing within the disk could yield substantially cooler gas temperatures then those derived by most irradiated disk models. In such regions the planetary perturbation excites a secondary instability, leading to the formation of vortices. These vortices cause a substantial reduction in the net torque, increasing migration timescales by up to approximately 200 times the analytically predicted rate. The second section addresses the mechanism for shutting off accretion onto giant planets. According to the conventional sequential accretion scenario, giant planets acquire a majority of their gas in a runaway phase. Conventional

  15. Migration of phospholipid vesicles in response to OH(-) stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Atsuji; Sakuma, Yuka; Imai, Masayuki; Oya, Yutaka; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro; Puff, Nicolas; Angelova, Miglena I

    2016-03-21

    We demonstrate migration of phospholipid vesicles in response to a pH gradient. Upon simple micro-injection of a NaOH solution, the vesicles linearly moved to the tip of the micro-pipette and the migration velocity was proportional to the gradient of OH(-) concentration. Vesicle migration was characteristic of OH(-) ions and no migration was observed for monovalent salts or nonionic sucrose solutions. The migration of vesicles is quantitatively described by the surface tension gradient model where the hydrolysis of the phospholipids by NaOH solution decreases the surface tension of the vesicle. The vesicles move toward a direction where the surface energy decreases. Thus the chemical modification of lipids produces a mechanical force to drive vesicles. PMID:26883729

  16. ILO - International Migration Programme.

    PubMed

    Boudraa, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    In a wide International Context characterised not only by the economical development but also by the social, cultural, political and individual development, we witness more and more to a exchange between the developed and the developing countries, which can be translated especially in the migration of the work force. In theory, all countries are either countries of origin either countries of transit or destination, and they are all responsible for the rights of migrant workers by promoting the rights, by monitoring and by preventing the abusive conditions. The process of migration of the workforce can be divided into three stages: the first coincides with the period prior to departure, the second is represented by the aftermath of the departure and the period of stay in the country of destination, the third stage corresponds to the return in the country of origin. The workers must be protected throughout this process by the international organizations that perform the catalytic role of communication and exchange between countries, for the only purpose of protecting the rights of immigrant and/or immigrants workers. The responsibility for the protection of workers is divided among the various players in the International Labour Organisation. Every country has to apply measures according to the international standards regarding workers' rights, standards that guide the various countries in the formulation and implementation of their policies and legislation. These standards are suggested by International Conventions, the ILO Conventions and other international instruments such as the human rights instrument. There has been a big step forward once the ILO Fundamental Conventions and Conventions on Migrant Workers where implemented and this implementation represented the use of the Guidelines "ILO Multilateral Framework on Labour Migration". PMID:22073693

  17. Labour migration from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uner, S

    1988-01-01

    This study is concerned with Turkish labor migration to Western Europe. Earlier and recent patterns of labor migration, characteristics of migrants by occupation, area of destination, and by geographical origins are discussed. Economic and demographic consequences of labor migration are also analyzed. It is estimated that Turkey's population will reach 73 million at the year 2000 with the present growth rate of 2.48% annually. Considering the efforts made to slow down the present high fertility rates and assuming that the decrease in labor force participation during 1970-1980 continues, the author concludes that the labor supply will increase with a growth rate of 2% annually for the next 13-15 years. Thus, the labor supply will reach 26.6 million people in the year 2000 from the 1980 level of 17.8 million. Assuming also that the income/employment elasticity of .25 which was observed throughout the period of 1960-1980 will not change until 2000, the annual growth rate of employment may be estimated as 1.5%. Thus, the number of people employed will reach 20 million in the year 1990 and 23.2 million in the year 2000. 8.8 million people will join the labor market as new entrants between 1980 and 2000. Only 6 million people out of 8.8 million will be employed. Thus, in the year 2000, it is estimated that 2.8 million new unemployed people will be added to the already open unemployment figure 1980 census data give the number of unemployed as .6 million people. Adding the 2.8 million new unemployed to this figure totals 3.4 million unemployed in 2000. The State Planning Organization's estimate of labor surplus for 1980 was 2.5 million people. When 2.8 million unemployed people are added to this figure, the labor surplus for the year 2000 reaches 5.3 million people. PMID:12342136

  18. Physical view on migration modes

    PubMed Central

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Cellular motility is essential for many processes such as embryonic development, wound healing processes, tissue assembly and regeneration, immune cell trafficing and diseases such as cancer. The migration efficiency and the migratory potential depend on the type of migration mode. The previously established migration modes such as epithelial (non-migratory) and mesenchymal (migratory) as well as amoeboid (squeezing motility) relay mainly on phenomenological criteria such as cell morphology and molecular biological criteria such as gene expression. However, the physical view on the migration modes is still not well understood. As the process of malignant cancer progression such as metastasis depends on the migration of single cancer cells and their migration mode, this review focuses on the different migration strategies and discusses which mechanical prerequisites are necessary to perform a special migration mode through a 3-dimensional microenvironment. In particular, this review discusses how cells can distinguish and finally switch between the migration modes and what impact do the physical properties of cells and their microenvironment have on the transition between the novel migration modes such as blebbing and protrusive motility. PMID:26192136

  19. Migration of Asteroidal Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Using the Bulirsh Stoer method of integration, we investigated the migration of dust particles under the gravitational influence of all planets, radiation pressure, Poynting Robertson drag and solar wind drag for equal to 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, and 0.4. For silicate particles such values of correspond to diameters equal to about 40, 9, 4, 2, and 1 microns, respectively [1]. The relative error per integration step was taken to be less than 10sup-8. Initial orbits of the particles were close to the orbits of the first numbered mainbelt asteroids.

  20. [International migrations in Europe].

    PubMed

    Verhaeren, R

    1983-01-01

    Recent international migration trends to and within Europe are analyzed. It is noted that the foreign population of Europe has been growing in size since 1979, despite employment problems and the development of policies designed to reduce immigration and encourage migrants to return home. Reasons for this apparent contradiction are examined. The author concludes that the employment of foreign workers facilitates the regulation of long-term and short-term economic cycles as well as the restructuring of certain sectors of the economy. PMID:12267363

  1. Migration and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Decosas, J; Kane, F; Anarfi, J K; Sodji, K D; Wagner, H U

    1995-09-23

    A successful short-term solution to transmission of AIDS in Western Africa by migrants involves provision of accessible and acceptable basic health and social services to migrants at their destination. The aim is to establish a sense of security and community, which is a health requirement. When migrants are excluded from community life or victimized as carriers of HIV infections, they will be driven by basic survival needs and dysfunctional social organization, which results in the rapid spread of HIV. Closing borders and mass deportation may not be an option. The long-term solution is population policy, environmental protection, and economic development. The focus on mapping the spread of AIDS must shift to a consideration of the migrant social conditions that make them vulnerable to AIDS. The issue of migration and AIDS will be addressed at the First European Conference on Tropical Medicine in October 1995 in Hamburg, Germany. In Uganda, HIV seroprevalence rates ranged from 5.5% among the stable population to 12.4% among internal migrants moving between villages to 16.3% among migrants from other areas. A World Bank project is operating in Western Africa, which traces seasonal male migration from the Cameroon to Liberia, Senegal to Nigeria, and from the Sahel to the coast during dry seasons. National border rules may influence the routes but not the extent of migration. A major destination place is Cote d' Ivoire, which has 25% of total population comprised of migrants from other countries and one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in Western Africa. On plantations prostitutes are brought in. Each prostitute serves about 25 workers. The pattern of sexual mixing contributes to the high HIV rates. Female migration is smaller and usually concentrated in prostitution at place of destination. Illiteracy and poverty drive women migrants into the trade. Their frequent health problems are malaria, pelvic pain, menstrual irregularity, vaginal discharge, and genital

  2. [Obesity, migration and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Chamay-Weber, Catherine; Shehu-Brovina, Shqipe; Narring, Françoise

    2012-06-13

    Weight management interventions during adolescence are challenging. Migration adds complexity to this problem, making migrant families more vulnerable. Teenagers confront families to new values transmitted by the host society: opulence, junk food, video games. Obesity should not be seen as a single issue of calories-excess, but must be considered as being part of a larger problem, which takes into account the context of the familial and societal life of the migrants. The caregivers must have an overall view of the situation to provide appropriate approaches to weight management. PMID:22787729

  3. Defect production and recombination during low-energy ion processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerman, B.K.; Floro, J.A.; Chason, E.; Brice, D.K.; Picraux, S.T.; White, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    Low-energy ion processing produces damaged, microroughened semiconductor surfaces due to the production of point defects. The authors present a study of point defect production and annealing on the Ge(001)-2x1 surface during low-energy inert ion bombardment as a function of ion energy, ion mass and substrate temperature. Ion-induced surface point defect production was quantified experimentally in real time using in situ Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction. The observed surface defect yield decreased abruptly around room temperature as the substrate temperature was increased from 175 K to 475 K. The authors have developed Monte Carlo simulations of defect diffusion to model defect recombination both in the bulk and on the surface. Bulk defect production statistics generated by a binary collision simulator, TRIMRC, were coupled with our bulk diffusion simulator to predict the number of ion-induced surface defects. A comparison between the experimental results and the simulation predictions indicated that defects produced in the bulk may represent a significant contribution to the observed surface defect yield and suggested that TRIMRC may overestimate the depth distribution of the defects. The simulations further indicated that the abrupt drop in the experimental yield with increasing substrate temperature does not arise from bulk defect recombination. The Monte Carlo simulations of surface diffusion (applicable to any crystalline surface) support a defect annealing mechanism (at low ion fluxes) that involves surface recombination of defects generated within a single cascade.

  4. Role of point defects in bipolar fatigue behavior of Bi(Mg1/2Ti1/2)O3 modified (Bi1/2K1/2)TiO3-(Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3 relaxor ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitish; Ansell, Troy Y.; Cann, David P.

    2014-04-01

    Lead-free Bi(Mg1/2Ti1/2)O3-(Bi1/2K1/2)TiO3-(Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3 (BMT-BKT-BNT) ceramics have been shown to exhibit large electromechanical strains under high electric fields along with negligible fatigue under strong electric fields. To investigate the role of point defects on the fatigue characteristics, the composition 5BMT-40BKT-55BNT was doped to incorporate acceptor and donor defects on the A and B sites by adjusting the Bi/Na and Ti/Mg stoichiometries. All samples had pseudo-cubic symmetries based on x-ray diffraction, typical of relaxors. Dielectric measurements showed that the high and low temperature phase transitions were largely unaffected by doping. Acceptor doping resulted in the observation of a typical ferroelectric-like polarization with a remnant polarization and strain hysteresis loops with significant negative strain. Donor-doped compositions exhibited characteristics that were indicative of an ergodic relaxor phase. Fatigue measurements were carried out on all of the compositions. While the A-site acceptor-doped composition showed a small degradation in maximum strain after 106 cycles, the other compositions were essentially fatigue free. Impedance measurements were used to identify the important conduction mechanisms in these compositions. As expected, the presence of defects did not strongly influence the fatigue behavior in donor-doped compositions owing to the nature of their reversible field-induced phase transformation. Even for the acceptor-doped compositions, which had stable domains in the absence of an electric field at room temperature, there was negligible degradation in the maximum strain due to fatigue. This suggests that either the defects introduced through stoichiometric variations do not play a prominent role in fatigue in these systems or it is compensated by factors like decrease in coercive field, an increase in ergodicity, symmetry change, or other factors.

  5. Intermixing at the absorber-buffer layer interface in thin-film solar cells: The electronic effects of point defects in Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(Se,S){sub 4} devices

    SciTech Connect

    Varley, J. B.; Lordi, V.

    2014-08-14

    We investigate point defects in the buffer layers CdS and ZnS that may arise from intermixing with Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} (CIGS) or Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} (CZTS) absorber layers in thin-film photovoltaics. Using hybrid functional calculations, we characterize the electrical and optical behavior of Cu, In, Ga, Se, Sn, Zn, Na, and K impurities in the buffer. We find that In and Ga substituted on the cation site act as shallow donors in CdS and tend to enhance the prevailing n-type conductivity at the interface facilitated by Cd incorporation in CIGS, whereas they are deep donors in ZnS and will be less effective dopants. Substitutional In and Ga can favorably form complexes with cation vacancies (A-centers) which may contribute to the “red kink” effect observed in some CIGS-based devices. For CZTS absorbers, we find that Zn and Sn defects substituting on the buffer cation site are electrically inactive in n-type buffers and will not supplement the donor doping at the interface as in CIGS/CdS or ZnS devices. Sn may also preferentially incorporate on the S site as a deep acceptor in n-type ZnS, which suggests possible concerns with absorber-related interfacial compensation in CZTS devices with ZnS-derived buffers. Cu, Na, and K impurities are found to all have the same qualitative behavior, most favorably acting as compensating acceptors when substituting on the cation site. Our results suggest one beneficial role of K and Na incorporation in CIGS or CZTS devices is the partial passivation of vacancy-related centers in CdS and ZnS buffers, rendering them less effective interfacial hole traps and recombination centers.

  6. Identifying impediments to long-distance mammal migrations.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Renee G; Long, Ryan A; Berger, Joel; Bergen, Scott; Beckmann, Jon P

    2015-02-01

    In much of the world, the persistence of long-distance migrations by mammals is threatened by development. Even where human population density is relatively low, there are roads, fencing, and energy development that present barriers to animal movement. If we are to conserve species that rely on long-distance migration, then it is critical that we identify existing migration impediments. To delineate stopover sites associated with anthropogenic development, we applied Brownian bridge movement models to high-frequency locations of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. We then used resource utilization functions to assess the threats to long-distance migration of pronghorn that were due to fences and highways. Migrating pronghorn avoided dense developments of natural gas fields. Highways with relatively high volumes of traffic and woven-wire sheep fence acted as complete barriers. At crossings with known migration bottlenecks, use of high-quality forage and shrub habitat by pronghorn as they approached the highway was lower than expected based on availability of those resources. In contrast, pronghorn consistently utilized high-quality forage close to the highway at crossings with no known migration bottlenecks. Our findings demonstrate the importance of minimizing development in migration corridors in the future and of mitigating existing pressure on migratory animals by removing barriers, reducing the development footprint, or installing crossing structures. PMID:25158993

  7. Collective cell migration in development

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, Elena

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic development, tissues undergo major rearrangements that lead to germ layer positioning, patterning, and organ morphogenesis. Often these morphogenetic movements are accomplished by the coordinated and cooperative migration of the constituent cells, referred to as collective cell migration. The molecular and biomechanical mechanisms underlying collective migration of developing tissues have been investigated in a variety of models, including border cell migration, tracheal branching, blood vessel sprouting, and the migration of the lateral line primordium, neural crest cells, or head mesendoderm. Here we review recent advances in understanding collective migration in these developmental models, focusing on the interaction between cells and guidance cues presented by the microenvironment and on the role of cell–cell adhesion in mechanical and behavioral coupling of cells within the collective. PMID:26783298

  8. Nuclear Migration During Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Baye, Lisa M.; Link, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we focus on the mechanisms, regulation, and cellular consequences of nuclear migration in the developing retina. In the nervous system, nuclear migration is prominent during both proliferative and post-mitotic phases of development. Interkinetic nuclear migration is the process where the nucleus oscillates from the apical to basal surfaces in proliferative neuroepithelia. Proliferative nuclear movement occurs in step with the cell cycle, with M-phase being confined to the apical surface and G1-, S-, and G2-phases occurring at more basal locations. Later, following cell cycle exit, some neuron precursors migrate by nuclear translocation. In this mode of cellular migration, nuclear movement is the driving force for motility. Following discussion of the key components and important regulators for each of these processes, we present an emerging model where interkinetic nuclear migration functions to distinguish cell fates among retinal neuroepithelia. PMID:17560964

  9. Grain boundary migration: Atomistic simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upmanyu, Moneesh

    Control of microstructural evolution is the goal of much of materials processing. Properties of grain boundaries and associated higher order defects determine fundamental microstructural parameters such as grain size/shape and texture, which in turn control an amalgam of material properties and applications. Microstructural evolution theories are based on certain assumptions, and attempts to experimentally validate them have not been promising, predominantly due to the presence of impurities. In this thesis, classical molecular dynamics simulation techniques are used to investigate boundary kinetics. Validity of the assumptions inherent in the theory of grain boundary migration is first ascertained. The U-shaped half-loop geometry is employed in a two-dimensional (triangular lattice) Lennard-Jones system to observe steady-state, curvature driven boundary migration. The classical linear relation between the migration rate and the driving force is recovered at low driving forces. Three-dimensional, highly parallelized simulations of <111> tilt grain boundaries in aluminum (EAM potentials) also confirm this result. The boundary mobility is found to have an Arrhenius dependence on temperature. However, the extracted activation energies of migration are significantly lower than those extracted in experiments, confirming the presence of impurities in the latter. Structurally similar boundaries are found to exhibit the compensation effect. Both boundary mobility and energy vary non-monotonically with the boundary misorientation, exhibiting maxima and minima for high symmetry (low Sigma) special misorientations, respectively. Using these anisotropic boundary properties in a Potts model reveals that the evolution of two-dimensional random textures is mostly controlled by boundary energy anisotropy, not the mobility anisotropy. Atomistic migration mechanism studies suggest that while single hops across the boundary are frequent, migration occurs primarily due to correlated

  10. Graphene Layer Growth: Collision of Migrating Five-MemberRings

    SciTech Connect

    Whitesides, Russell; Kollias, Alexander C.; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

    2005-12-02

    A reaction pathway is explored in which two cyclopenta groups combine on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. The process is initiated by H addition to a five-membered ring, followed by opening of that ring and the formation of a six-membered ring adjacent to another five-membered ring. The elementary steps of the migration pathway are analyzed using density functional theory to examine the region of the potential energy surface associated with the pathway. The calculations are performed on a substrate modeled by the zigzag edge of tetracene. Based on the obtained energetics, the dynamics of the system are analyzed by solving the energy transfer master equations. The results indicate energetic and reaction-rate similarity between the cyclopenta combination and migration reactions. Also examined in the present study are desorption rates of migrating cyclopenta rings which are found to be comparable to cyclopenta ring migration.

  11. Les questions de migrations internationales (Questions of International Migrations).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samman, Mouna Liliane

    1993-01-01

    Education about international migration should (1) utilize a framework of historical evolution; (2) stress the growing interdependence of nations; (3) emphasize universal moral values and the role of the individual in human rights; and (4) consider the complementary or competing portraits of international migration presented by the media. (DMM)

  12. Migration and women's health.

    PubMed

    Adanu, Richard M K; Johnson, Timothy R B

    2009-08-01

    Women have been migrating at similar rates to men for the past 40 years, and comprised about half of all migrants in 2005. Women and children are most affected by displacement as a result of wars and human trafficking. In some cases, the health of female migrants is improved via integration into better health systems in the host country. More often, however, the health of female migrants is affected negatively. Women are doubly disadvantaged because they are discriminated against as women and as migrants. Female migrants are also highly vulnerable to acts of sexual abuse, rape, and violence. This is especially true for women in refugee camps, whose reproductive health needs are often overlooked. To improve the health of female migrants it is important to develop and implement policies that recognize and insist on the respect of the rights of migrants. PMID:19539929

  13. Chandra Contaminant Migration Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; O'Dell, Steve L.

    2014-01-01

    High volatility cleans OBFs and low volatility produces a high build-up at OBF centers; only a narrow (factor of 2 or less) volatility range produces the observed spatial pattern. Simulations predict less accumulation above outer S-array CCDs; this may explain, in part, gratings/imaging C/MnL discrepancies. Simulations produce a change in center accumulation due solely to DH heater ON/OFF temperature change; but a 2nd contaminant and perhaps a change in source rate is also required. Emissivity E may depend on thickness; another model parameter. Additional physics, e.g., surface migration, is not warranted at this time. At t approx. 14 yrs, model produced 0.22 grams of contaminant, 0.085 grams remaining within ACIS cavity; 7 percent (6mg) on OBFs.

  14. Migration issues important -- Mongolia.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    Migration and urbanization are issues that require increasing attention in Mongolia. Mr. Sodov Sonin, Minister of Health and Social Welfare, stated at the Forum that fertility has declined, but mortality, in particular the mortality of children and mothers, is still too high. In addition, there is a significant gap between the knowledge of and behaviors concerning reproductive health, which is one of the causes of the country's high abortion rates. However, on the positive side, literacy is high among women--70% of the students in Mongolia's higher educational institutions are female and the State recognizes equal rights for women. Moreover, programs that promote health and education, including the National Program on Reproductive Health, are being implemented; but despite all these, Mongolia still lacks the human and financial resources to implement the ICPD Program of Action satisfactorily. The country also needs dramatic changes in mind-set and in terms of capacity building, given its ongoing socioeconomic transition. PMID:12295512

  15. [International migrations in the Middle East and their economic effects].

    PubMed

    Tapinos, G

    1981-10-15

    A general review of migration patterns in the oil-producing countries of the Persian Gulf is presented. The inter-country differences in income, similarities in culture, and world energy demands are identified as the main factors responsible for this migration. The economic effects on countries of origin are considered, with particular reference to the negative impact that the substantial emigration from Yemen has had on that country's development. PMID:12339031

  16. Migration: the trends converge.

    PubMed

    1985-09-01

    Formerly, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the US have served as permanent destinations for immigrants, while Europe's migrants have moved to more northerly countries to work for a time and then returned home. From 1973-1975 Europe's recruitment of foreign workers virtually ended, although family reunion for those immigrants allowed in was encouraged. Problems resulting from this new settlement migration include low paying jobs for immigrant women, high unemployment, and inadequate education for immigrant children. Illegal migrants from Latin America and the Caribbean enter the US and Canada each year while illegal North African immigrants enter Italy, Spain, and Greece. North America, Australia, and Europe have all received political refugees from Asia and Latin America. Increasingly, these foreigners compete in the labor market rather than simply fill jobs the native workers do not want. All the receiving countries have similar policy priorities: 1) more effective ways for controlling and monitoring inflows and checking illegal immigration; 2) encouraging normal living patterns and accepting refugees; and 3) integrating permanent migrants into the host country. Europe's public immigration encouragement prior to the first oil shock, has left some countries with a labor force that is reluctant to return home. It is unlikely that Europe will welcome foreign labor again in this decade, since unemployment among young people and women is high and family reunion programs may still bring in many immigrants. Less immigration pattern change will probably occur in North America, Australia, and New Zealand since these countries' populations are still growing and wages are more flexible. Immigration, regulated by policy, and emigration, determined by market forces, now are working in the same direction and will likely reduce future migration flows. PMID:12267642

  17. DIRECTLY IMAGING TIDALLY POWERED MIGRATING JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Subo; Katz, Boaz; Socrates, Aristotle

    2013-01-10

    Upcoming direct-imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by {approx} Gyr-'old' main-sequence stars, they can be as 'hot' as young Jupiters at {approx}100 Myr, the prime targets of direct-imaging surveys. They are on years-long orbits and presently migrating to 'feed' the 'hot Jupiters'. They are expected from 'high-e' migration mechanisms, in which Jupiters are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink semimajor axis by a factor of {approx}10-100 due to tidal dissipation at close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity L {approx} 100-1000 L{sub Jup}(2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} L{sub Sun }) during a typical {approx} Gyr migration timescale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make them potentially accessible to high-contrast imaging instruments on 10 m class telescopes. {approx}10 such planets are expected to exist around FGK dwarfs within {approx}50 pc. Long-period radial velocity planets are viable candidates, and the highly eccentric planet HD 20782b at maximum angular separation {approx}0.''08 is a promising candidate. Directly imaging these tidally powered Jupiters would enable a direct test of high-e migration mechanisms. Once detected, the luminosity would provide a direct measurement of the migration rate, and together with mass (and possibly radius) estimate, they would serve as a laboratory to study planetary spectral formation and tidal physics.

  18. Cohort Size Effects and Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Franklin D.

    1983-01-01

    Explores whether changes in the size of cohorts entering the labor force affected the propensity within the U.S. labor force to migrate and socioeconomic circumstances of migrants at destination within 1965-76. Suggests that a significant reduction in the volume of migration among members of the baby boom cohort was the primary adjustment…

  19. Merlin's wizardry guides cohesive migration.

    PubMed

    Zoch, Ansgar; Morrison, Helen

    2015-03-01

    Cells often migrate in tightly connected groups with coordinated movement and polarity. The collective migration of epithelial cell sheets is now shown to be mediated by a signalling axis that involves the merlin tumour-suppressor protein, the tight-junction-associated angiomotin-Rich1 complex and the Rac1 small GTPase. PMID:25720961

  20. Africa: Setting for Human Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buuba, Babacar Diop

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of African migrations can help to understand prehistoric, historical, ancient modern and contemporaneous migrations. Movements of populations were and continue to be so intense that, for some analysts, they constitute one of the dominant trends of the history and destiny of the very old continent. African and non-African states, whether…

  1. Migration in asymmetric, random environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael; Wang, Dong

    Migration is a key mechanism for expansion of communities. As a population migrates, it experiences a changing environment. In heterogeneous environments, rapid adaption is key to the evolutionary success of the population. In the case of human migration, environmental heterogeneity is naturally asymmetric in the North-South and East-West directions. We here consider migration in random, asymmetric, modularly correlated environments. Knowledge about the environment determines the fitness of each individual. We find that the speed of migration is proportional to the inverse of environmental change, and in particular we find that North-South migration rates are lower than East-West migration rates. Fast communication within the population of pieces of knowledge between individuals, similar to horizontal gene transfer in genetic systems, can help to spread beneficial knowledge among individuals. We show that increased modularity of the relation between knowledge and fitness enhances the rate of evolution. We investigate the relation between optimal information exchange rate and modularity of the dependence of fitness on knowledge. These results for the dependence of migration rate on heterogeneity, asymmetry, and modularity are consistent with existing archaeological facts.

  2. Current issues in European migration.

    PubMed

    Straubhaar, T; Wolter, A

    1996-01-01

    The authors examine recent migration patterns into and within the European Union. Issues involving asylum and migration policy are discussed, and problems caused by differing naturalization practices in different countries are considered. Skill patterns of migrants and problems in labor markets are also investigated. PMID:12321414

  3. Secondary Migration among the Indochinese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnis, Kathleen

    1981-01-01

    Examines the incidence of secondary migration (movement from the site of initial placement to another location in the U.S.) among Indochinese refugees initially placed in Wisconsin. Discusses characteristics of refugees who moved, comparing them with Americans in general. Suggests ways sponsoring agencies can deal with secondary migration.…

  4. Migration of defect clusters and xenon-vacancy clusters in uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Deng, Huiqiu; Hu, Wangyu; Sun, Xin

    2014-07-01

    The possible transition states, minimum energy paths and migration mechanisms of defect clusters and xenon-vacancy defect clusters in uranium dioxide have been investigated using the dimer and the nudged elastic-band methods. The nearby O atom can easily hop into the oxygen vacancy position by overcoming a small energy barrier, which is much lower than that for the migration of a uranium vacancy. A simulation for a vacancy cluster consisting of two oxygen vacancies reveals that the energy barrier of the divacancy migration tends to decrease with increasing the separation distance of divacancy. For an oxygen interstitial, the migration barrier for the hopping mechanism is almost three times larger than that for the exchange mechanism. Xe moving between two interstitial sites is unlikely a dominant migration mechanism considering the higher energy barrier. A net migration process of a Xe-vacancy pair containing an oxygen vacancy and a xenon interstitial is identified by the NEB method. We expect the oxygen vacancy-assisted migration mechanism to possibly lead to a long distance migration of the Xe interstitials in UO2. The migration of defect clusters involving Xe substitution indicates that Xe atom migrating away from the uranium vacancy site is difficult.

  5. Role of point defects in bipolar fatigue behavior of Bi(Mg{sub 1/2}Ti{sub 1/2})O{sub 3} modified (Bi{sub 1/2}K{sub 1/2})TiO{sub 3}-(Bi{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2})TiO{sub 3} relaxor ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Nitish Ansell, Troy Y.; Cann, David P.

    2014-04-21

    Lead-free Bi(Mg{sub 1/2}Ti{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-(Bi{sub 1/2}K{sub 1/2})TiO{sub 3}-(Bi{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2})TiO{sub 3} (BMT-BKT-BNT) ceramics have been shown to exhibit large electromechanical strains under high electric fields along with negligible fatigue under strong electric fields. To investigate the role of point defects on the fatigue characteristics, the composition 5BMT-40BKT-55BNT was doped to incorporate acceptor and donor defects on the A and B sites by adjusting the Bi/Na and Ti/Mg stoichiometries. All samples had pseudo-cubic symmetries based on x-ray diffraction, typical of relaxors. Dielectric measurements showed that the high and low temperature phase transitions were largely unaffected by doping. Acceptor doping resulted in the observation of a typical ferroelectric-like polarization with a remnant polarization and strain hysteresis loops with significant negative strain. Donor-doped compositions exhibited characteristics that were indicative of an ergodic relaxor phase. Fatigue measurements were carried out on all of the compositions. While the A-site acceptor-doped composition showed a small degradation in maximum strain after 10{sup 6} cycles, the other compositions were essentially fatigue free. Impedance measurements were used to identify the important conduction mechanisms in these compositions. As expected, the presence of defects did not strongly influence the fatigue behavior in donor-doped compositions owing to the nature of their reversible field-induced phase transformation. Even for the acceptor-doped compositions, which had stable domains in the absence of an electric field at room temperature, there was negligible degradation in the maximum strain due to fatigue. This suggests that either the defects introduced through stoichiometric variations do not play a prominent role in fatigue in these systems or it is compensated by factors like decrease in coercive field, an increase in ergodicity, symmetry change, or other factors.

  6. Is feeding behaviour related to glass eel propensity to migrate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau du Colombier, Sarah; Lambert, Patrick; Bardonnet, Agnès

    2008-11-01

    Several studies have shown that eel diadromy is facultative and that migratory divergences may appear during glass eel estuarine migration. The origin of the differences in migratory behaviour among glass eels remains unclear but initial evidence supports the role of individual energetic and thyroidal status. Even if starvation is usually associated with glass eel migration, feeding does seem to occur in some glass eels. The aim of the present study was to investigate feeding behaviour and glass eel growth in relation to the propensity to migrate. Feeding rate and weight gain were higher in fish having a high propensity to migrate (M + fish) than in fish having a low propensity to migrate (M - fish) in fed glass eels, whereas no clear difference in the variation in body weight was observed among unfed fish (controls). M - fish initially had lower percent dry weight than M + fish, which suggests a link between appetite, propensity to migrate, and energy content. We discuss the role played by endocrine signals on these processes. In fish, thyroid hormones contribute to the control of growth and development. In addition, they play a role in flatfish and leptocephalus metamorphosis and appear to be involved in smolt and glass eel migratory behaviour. As such, they represent a good candidate which would promote the propensity to migrate as well as digestive system development. Their role in the hormonal control of food intake however remains vague. The large and sharp decline in glass eel abundances observed since the 1980s could partly be explained by changes in ocean productivity. If so, it could be accompanied by a decrease in glass eel energy stores. The ability to resume feeding in the course of the estuarine crossing would then represent a serious advantage to maintain energy levels compatible with migration.

  7. The World Economy and Contemporary Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Elsa M.

    1979-01-01

    This article discusses international migration as an economic and political concern, comments on recent literature dealing with social aspects of migration, and introduces the articles which follow in this special journal issue dedicated to Caribbean migration to New York. (MC)

  8. Simple rules guide dragonfly migration.

    PubMed

    Wikelski, Martin; Moskowitz, David; Adelman, James S; Cochran, Jim; Wilcove, David S; May, Michael L

    2006-09-22

    Every year billions of butterflies, dragonflies, moths and other insects migrate across continents, and considerable progress has been made in understanding population-level migratory phenomena. However, little is known about destinations and strategies of individual insects. We attached miniaturized radio transmitters (ca 300 mg) to the thoraxes of 14 individual dragonflies (common green darners, Anax junius) and followed them during their autumn migration for up to 12 days, using receiver-equipped Cessna airplanes and ground teams. Green darners exhibited distinct stopover and migration days. On average, they migrated every 2.9+/-0.3 days, and their average net advance was 58+/-11 km in 6.1+/-0.9 days (11.9+/-2.8 km d-1) in a generally southward direction (186+/-52 degrees). They migrated exclusively during the daytime, when wind speeds were less than 25 km h-1, regardless of wind direction, but only after two nights of successively lower temperatures (decrease of 2.1+/-0.6 degrees C in minimum temperature). The migratory patterns and apparent decision rules of green darners are strikingly similar to those proposed for songbirds, and may represent a general migration strategy for long-distance migration of organisms with high self-propelled flight speeds. PMID:17148394

  9. Simple rules guide dragonfly migration

    PubMed Central

    Wikelski, Martin; Moskowitz, David; Adelman, James S; Cochran, Jim; Wilcove, David S; May, Michael L

    2006-01-01

    Every year billions of butterflies, dragonflies, moths and other insects migrate across continents, and considerable progress has been made in understanding population-level migratory phenomena. However, little is known about destinations and strategies of individual insects. We attached miniaturized radio transmitters (ca 300 mg) to the thoraxes of 14 individual dragonflies (common green darners, Anax junius) and followed them during their autumn migration for up to 12 days, using receiver-equipped Cessna airplanes and ground teams. Green darners exhibited distinct stopover and migration days. On average, they migrated every 2.9±0.3 days, and their average net advance was 58±11 km in 6.1±0.9 days (11.9±2.8 km d−1) in a generally southward direction (186±52°). They migrated exclusively during the daytime, when wind speeds were less than 25 km h−1, regardless of wind direction, but only after two nights of successively lower temperatures (decrease of 2.1±0.6 °C in minimum temperature). The migratory patterns and apparent decision rules of green darners are strikingly similar to those proposed for songbirds, and may represent a general migration strategy for long-distance migration of organisms with high self-propelled flight speeds. PMID:17148394

  10. Population commission discusses international migration.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    At the 30th session of the Commission on Population and Development during February 24-28, 1997, international migration was the main topic, with special linkages between migration and development and on gender issues and the family. New and emerging issues were also considered. Members stressed the need for more reliable data on migration, the direction of migrants flows, and the characteristics of migrants. The Commission requested a task force on basic social services to hold a technical symposium of experts on international migration in 1998. Its chair, Dr. Nafis Sadik, said that migration issues should based on the reality of choice not on coercive measures or quotas. Almost half of the migrants globally are women. The Commission was given a new impetus by the International Conference on Population and Development held at Cairo in 1994. Migration pressures intensified in the second half of the 1980s and in the early 1990s, creating areas of concern: the negative impact of short-term migration on working conditions in host countries; migration pressures emanating from climatic change; the protection of migrant women and their children; the right of receiving countries to regulate access to their territory; the adverse consequences of forced migration; the situation of persons whose asylum claims have been rejected; the trafficking in women and children, prostitution and coercive adoption; and the sudden and massive arrival of refugees in need of international protection. The 1998 session of the Commission will feature the theme of health and mortality, with special emphasis on the linkages between health and development and on gender and age. PMID:12292475

  11. Migration of rhenium and osmium interstitials in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzudo, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Hasegawa, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Tungsten is expected to be a promising plasma-facing material for future fusion devices, but radiation-induced precipitation (RIP), which leads the material to hardening, is a concern at their practical use. One of the keys to accurate prediction of the emergence of RIP is migration of solute atoms, rhenium and osmium, that are produced by nuclear transmutation through irradiation. We conduct a series of numerical simulations using an atomic kinetic Monte Carlo method and investigate the migration of these solute atoms in the form of tungsten-rhenium and tungsten-osmium mixed dumbbells, considered to be the most efficient "carriers" of the solute atoms. We find that the low rotation energy barrier of these mixed dumbbells leading to three-dimensional migration greatly influences their diffusivities. The result also suggests that, although these dumbbells have three-dimensional motion, one cannot simply reduce their migration behavior to that of vacancy-like spherical objects.

  12. Space Based Ornithology: On the Wings of Migration and Biophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The study of bird migration on a global scale is one of the compelling and challenging problems of modern biology with major implications for human health and conservation biology. Migration and conservation efforts cross national boundaries and are subject to numerous international agreements and treaties. Space based technology offers new opportunities to shed understanding on the distribution and migration of organisms on the planet and their sensitivity to human disturbances and environmental changes. Migration is an incredibly diverse and complex behavior. A broad outline of space based research must address three fundamental questions: (1) where could birds be, i.e. what is their fundamental niche constrained by their biophysical limits? (2) where do we actually find birds, i.e. what is their realizable niche as modified by local or regional abiotic and biotic factors, and (3) how do they get there (and how do we know?), that is what are their migration patterns and associated mechanisms? Our working hypothesis is that individual organism biophysical models of energy and water balance, driven by satellite measurements of spatio-temporal gradients in climate and habitat, will help us to explain the variability in avian species richness and distribution. Dynamic state variable modeling provides one tool for studying bird migration across multiple scales and can be linked to mechanistic models describing the time and energy budget states of migrating birds. Such models yield an understanding of how a migratory flyway and its component habitats function as a whole and link stop-over ecology with biological conservation and management. Further these models provide an ecological forecasting tool for science and application users to address what are the possible consequences of loss of wetlands, flooding, drought or other natural disasters such as hurricanes on avian biodiversity and bird migration.

  13. NASTRAN migration to UNIX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Gordon C.; Turner, Horace Q.

    1990-01-01

    COSMIC/NASTRAN, as it is supported and maintained by COSMIC, runs on four main-frame computers - CDC, VAX, IBM and UNIVAC. COSMIC/NASTRAN on other computers, such as CRAY, AMDAHL, PRIME, CONVEX, etc., is available commercially from a number of third party organizations. All these computers, with their own one-of-a-kind operating systems, make NASTRAN machine dependent. The job control language (JCL), the file management, and the program execution procedure of these computers are vastly different, although 95 percent of NASTRAN source code was written in standard ANSI FORTRAN 77. The advantage of the UNIX operating system is that it has no machine boundary. UNIX is becoming widely used in many workstations, mini's, super-PC's, and even some main-frame computers. NASTRAN for the UNIX operating system is definitely the way to go in the future, and makes NASTRAN available to a host of computers, big and small. Since 1985, many NASTRAN improvements and enhancements were made to conform to the ANSI FORTRAN 77 standards. A major UNIX migration effort was incorporated into COSMIC NASTRAN 1990 release. As a pioneer work for the UNIX environment, a version of COSMIC 89 NASTRAN was officially released in October 1989 for DEC ULTRIX VAXstation 3100 (with VMS extensions). A COSMIC 90 NASTRAN version for DEC ULTRIX DECstation 3100 (with RISC) is planned for April 1990 release. Both workstations are UNIX based computers. The COSMIC 90 NASTRAN will be made available on a TK50 tape for the DEC ULTRIX workstations. Previously in 1988, an 88 NASTRAN version was tested successfully on a SiliconGraphics workstation.

  14. [Oxyuriasis and prehistoric migrations].

    PubMed

    Araújo, A; Ferreira, L F

    1995-01-01

    Parasite findings in archeological material have made it possible to trace the dispersion of infectious agents and their human hosts in ancient times. These findings allow us to re-examine theories proposed at the beginning of the century concerning transpacific contacts that Asian populations may have had with South America. This has been the case, for example, with hookworm eggs found in archeological material dating up to 7,000 years before present. Because of the increase in scientific production in this area, it has now become necessary to undertake syntheses that assess the state of the art and propose workable paleoepidemological models of the prehistoric dispersion of human parasitoses. Based on findings of Enterobius vermicularis eggs in archeological material in the Americas, the present study is an effort in this direction. Unlike the hookworm, the pinworm does not require a soil cycle in order to be transmitted from one host to another, thereby meaning that its persistence in a given human population does not depend on climatic conditions. Thus, it could have been brought from the old to the new continent, possibly by human migrations across the Bering Strait. This may explain the greater geographical dispersion and dissemination of these findings in North America from 10,000 yrs B.P. till today. In South America, on the other hand, archeological findings have only confirmed existence of Enterobius vermicularis eggs within the Andean region, with findings located specifically in Chile and northern Argentina. Although a large number of samples have been examined, no such eggs have been found in coprolites in Brazil. The paper discusses models that account for the known distribution of this parasitosis in prehistoric populations. PMID:11625244

  15. Intraperitoneal Migration of Epicardial Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    García-Bengochea, José; Caínzos, Miguel; Fernández, Angel L.; Santos, Fernando; Gonzalez, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Intraperitoneal migration of epicardial leads and abdominally placed generators is a potentially serious complication. We report the case of an 83-year-old man who experienced intraperitoneal migration of an epicardial pacing system and consequent small-bowel obstruction. Laparotomy was required in order to free constrictive lead adhesions. The patient's postoperative recovery was satisfactory after the placement of a new pacemaker generator in the abdominal wall. Predisposing factors are analyzed and the literature is reviewed in order to clarify the mechanisms of sequelae associated with the migration of epicardial pacemakers from the abdominal wall. To the best of our knowledge, this is the 1st report of pacemaker migration having caused bowel obstruction that required urgent laparotomy in an adult. PMID:17948093

  16. Neuronal migration and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the six-layered structure of the mammalian cortex via the inside-out pattern of neuronal migration is fundamental to neocortical functions. Extracellular cues such as Reelin induce intracellular signaling cascades through the protein phosphorylation. Migrating neurons also have intrinsic machineries to regulate cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion properties. Protein phosphorylation regulates these processes. Moreover, the balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is modified by extracellular cues. Multipolar-bipolar transition, radial glia-guided locomotion and terminal translocation are critical steps of radial migration of cortical pyramidal neurons. Protein kinases such as Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) involve these steps. In this review, I shall give an overview the roles of protein kinases in neuronal migration. PMID:25628530

  17. Nonequilibrium migration in human history.

    PubMed Central

    Wakeley, J

    1999-01-01

    A nonequilibrium migration model is proposed and applied to genetic data from humans. The model assumes symmetric migration among all possible pairs of demes and that the number of demes is large. With these assumptions it is straightforward to allow for changes in demography, and here a single abrupt change is considered. Under the model this change is identical to a change in the ancestral effective population size and might be caused by changes in deme size, in the number of demes, or in the migration rate. Expressions for the expected numbers of sites segregating at particular frequencies in a multideme sample are derived. A maximum-likelihood analysis of independent polymorphic restriction sites in humans reveals a decrease in effective size. This is consistent with a change in the rates of migration among human subpopulations from ancient low levels to present high ones. PMID:10581291

  18. [International migration: backgrounds and developments].

    PubMed

    De Beer, J

    1997-03-01

    "Net migration [in the Netherlands] has fluctuated strongly during the past decades. In 1983 net migration (including net administrative corrections) was almost zero. In the early 1990s net migration rose to almost 50 thousand per year. In 1994 net migration dropped sharply to a level of 20 thousand, followed by a further decrease in 1995. In 1996 there was a moderate increase. One cause of the strong decline in immigration in the mid-1990s may be the increasingly strict immigration policy. Another explanation of fluctuations in immigration is the business cycle. A regression analysis for the period 1973-1995 shows that there is a negative relationship between immigration of non-Dutch nationals and the unemployment rate in the Netherlands and a positive relationship between emigration and the unemployment rate." (EXCERPT) PMID:12321085

  19. Correctness criteria for process migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Chin; Liu, J. W. S.

    1987-01-01

    Two correctness criteria, the state consistency criterion and the property consistency criterion for process migration are discussed. The state machine approach is used to model the interactions between a user process and its environment. These criteria are defined in terms of the model. The idea of environment view was introduced to distinguish what a user process observes about its environment from what its environment state really is and argue that a consistent view of the environment must be maintained for every migrating process.

  20. Radar studies of bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of bird migration with NASA radars were made at Wallops Island, Va. Simultaneous observations were made at a number of radar sites in the North Atlantic Ocean in an effort to discover what happened to those birds that were observed leaving the coast of North America headed toward Bermuda, the Caribbean and South America. Transatlantic migration, utilizing observations from a large number of radars is discussed. Detailed studies of bird movements at Wallops Island are presented.

  1. Migration of Cr-Vacancy Clusters and Interstitial Cr in Alpha-Fe using the Dimer Method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Hu, Wangyu; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Terentyev, Dimtry; Sun, Xin; Heinisch, Howard L.; Henager, Charles H.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-02-01

    The migration mechanisms and the corresponding activation energies of Cr-vacancy (Cr-V) clusters and Cr interstitials in α-Fe have been investigated using the dimer and the nudged elastic band methods. Dimer searches are employed to find the possible transition states of these defects, and the lowest energy paths are used to determine the energy barriers for migration. A substitutional Cr atom can migrate to a nearest neighbor vacancy through an energy barrier of 0.56 eV, but this simple mechanism alone is unlikely to lead to the long-distance migration of Cr unless there is a supersaturated concentration of vacancies in the system. The Cr-vacancy clusters can lead to long-distance migration of a Cr atom that is accomplished by Fe and Cr atoms successively jumping to nearest neighbor vacancy positions, defined as a self-vacancy-assisted migration mechanism, with the migration energies ranging from 0.64 to 0.89 eV. In addition, a mixed Cr-Fe dumbbell interstitial can easily migrate through Fe lattices, with the migration energy barrier of 0.17, which is lower than that of the Fe-Fe interstitial. The on-site rotation of the Cr-Fe interstitial and Cr atom hopping from one site to another are believed to comprise the dominant migration mechanism. The calculated binding energies of Cr-V clusters are strongly dependent on the size of clusters and the concentration of Cr atoms in clusters.

  2. Thermal migration of bubbles in zero gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaeeli, A.; Tryggvason, G.; Arpaci, V.

    1996-12-31

    Thermocapillary migration of two-dimensional, deformable, interacting bubbles toward an initially flat fluid interface in zero gravity is studied. The full Navier-Stokes equations and the thermal energy equation are solved for the fluids inside and outside the bubbles using a front tracking/finite difference method. The boundaries of the domain are taken to be periodic in the horizontal direction and wall-bounded in the vertical direction. The temperatures of the walls are fixed such that an upward temperature gradient is imposed. Interactions of coalescing bubbles with different initial conditions are investigated.

  3. Modeling negative ion defect migration through the gramicidin A channel.

    PubMed

    Nemukhin, Alexander V; Kaliman, Ilya A; Moskovsky, Alexander A

    2009-08-01

    The results of potential of mean force (PMF) calculations for the distinct stages of proton conduction through the gramicidin A channel, including proton migration, reorientation of the water file and negative ion defect migration, are presented. The negative ion defect migration mechanism was hypothesized in experimental studies but was not considered previously in molecular dynamics simulations. The model system consisted of the peptide chains constructed on the base of the structure PDBID:1JNO, the inner file of nine water molecules and external clusters of water molecules placed at both ends of the channel. Potential energy functions were computed with the CHARMM/PM6/TIP3P parameters. The results obtained for proton migration and water file reorientation are basically consistent with those reported previously by Pómès and Roux (Biophys J 82:2304, 2002) within the similar approach. For the newly considered mechanism of negative ion defect migration from the channel center to the end of the water file we obtain the energy 3.8 kcal mol(-1) which is not considerably different from the activation energy of water reorientation, 5.4 kcal mol(-1). Therefore this mechanism may principally compete for the rate-limiting step in proton conduction in gramicidin. PMID:19198898

  4. Hydrogen migration in polycrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, N.H.; Jackson, W.B.; Walker, J.

    1996-03-01

    Hydrogen migration in solid-state crystallized and low-pressure chemical-vapor-deposited (LPCVD) polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) was investigated by deuterium diffusion experiments. The concentration profiles of deuterium, introduced into the poly-Si samples either from a remote D plasma or from a deuterated amorphous-silicon layer, were measured as a function of time and temperature. At high deuterium concentrations the diffusion was dispersive depending on exposure time. The dispersion is consistent with multiple trapping within a distribution of hopping barriers. The data can be explained by a two-level model used to explain diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The energy difference between the transport level and the deuterium chemical potential was found to be about 1.2{endash}1.3 eV. The shallow levels for hydrogen trapping are about 0.5 eV below the transport level, while the deep levels are about 1.5{endash}1.7 eV below. The hydrogen chemical potential {mu}{sub H} decreases as the temperature increases. At lower concentrations, {mu}{sub H} was found to depend markedly on the method used to prepare the poly-Si, a result due in part to the dependence of crystallite size on the deposition process. Clear evidence for deuterium deep traps was found only in the solid-state crystallized material. The LPCVD-grown poly-Si, with columnar grains extending through the film thickness, displayed little evidence of deep trapping, and exhibited enhanced D diffusion. Many concentration profiles in the columnar LPCVD material indicated complex diffusion behavior, perhaps reflecting spatial variations of trap densities, complex formation, and/or multiple transport paths. Many aspects of the diffusion in poly-Si are consistent with diffusion data obtained in amorphous silicon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Distance and Intrastate College Student Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alm, James; Winters, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Most studies of student migration focus on "interstate" migration of college students, largely because the aggregate data typically used are limited in geographic specificity to states. However, interstate migration is only a small part of the total student migration. Public institutions generally get most of their students from within their…

  6. Rural-Urban Migration in Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, T. Paul

    The rural-urban migration pattern in Colombia during the last 25 years has resulted in a population increase in urban areas from 30 to 52 percent of the total population. This study explores the causes of internal migration. Migration rates are estimated for various groups in the population to clarify who migrates and to where. A model of…

  7. Introduction: Migration Research and Immigration Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lawrence H.

    1992-01-01

    Examines relationships between research in the area of international migration and public policy, tracing the history of migration research since the first publication of "International Migration Review" in 1964. Forces that drive migration are powerful and extremely complex. Gaining insight into them has value beyond its immediate policy impact.…

  8. International migration: a global challenge.

    PubMed

    Martin, P; Widgren, J

    1996-04-01

    Trends in international migration are presented in this multiregional analysis. Seven of the world's wealthiest countries have about 33% of the world's migrant population, but under 16% of the total world population. Population growth in these countries is substantially affected by the migrant population. The migration challenge is external and internal. The external challenge is to balance the need for foreign labor and the commitment to human rights for those migrants seeking economic opportunity and political freedom. The internal challenge is to assure the social adjustment of immigrants and their children and to integrate them into society as citizens and future leaders. Why people cross national borders and how migration flows are likely to evolve over the next decades are explained. This report also presents some ways that countries can manage migration or reduce the pressures which force people to migrate. It is recommended that receiving nations control immigration by accelerating global economic growth and reducing wars and human rights violations. This report examines the impact of immigration on international trade, aid, and direct intervention policies. Although migration is one of the most important international economic issues, it is not coordinated by an international group. The European experience indicates that it is not easy to secure international cooperation on issues that affect national sovereignty. It is suggested that countries desiring control of their borders should remember that most people never cross national borders to live or work in another country, that 50% of the world's migrants move among developing countries, and that countries can shift from being emigration to immigration countries. The author suggests that sustained reductions in migration pressure are a better alternative than the "quick fixes" that may invite the very much feared mass and unpredictable movements. PMID:12320315

  9. Thread Migration in the Presence of Pointers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronk, David; Haines, Matthew; Mehrotra, Piyush

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic migration of lightweight threads supports both data locality and load balancing. However, migrating threads that contain pointers referencing data in both the stack and heap remains an open problem. In this paper we describe a technique by which threads with pointers referencing both stack and non-shared heap data can be migrated such that the pointers remain valid after migration. As a result, threads containing pointers can now be migrated between processors in a homogeneous distributed memory environment.

  10. Seasonal survival probabilities suggest low migration mortality in migrating bats.

    PubMed

    Giavi, Simone; Moretti, Marco; Bontadina, Fabio; Zambelli, Nicola; Schaub, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Migration is adaptive if survival benefits are larger than costs of residency. Many aspects of bat migration ecology such as migratory costs, stopover site use and fidelity are largely unknown. Since many migrating bats are endangered, such information is urgently needed to promote conservation. We selected the migrating Leisler's bat (Nyctalus leisleri) as model species and collected capture-recapture data in southern Switzerland year round during 6 years. We estimated seasonal survival and site fidelity with Cormack-Jolly-Seber models that accounted for the presence of transients fitted with Bayesian methods and assessed differences between sexes and seasons. Activity peaked in autumn and spring, whereas very few individuals were caught during summer. We hypothesize that the study site is a migratory stopover site used during fall and spring migration for most individuals, but there is also evidence for wintering. Additionally, we found strong clues for mating during fall. Summer survival that included two major migratory journeys was identical to winter survival in males and slightly higher in females, suggesting that the migratory journeys did not bear significant costs in terms of survival. Transience probability was in both seasons higher in males than in females. Our results suggest that, similarly to birds, Leisler's bat also use stopover sites during migration with high site fidelity. In contrast to most birds, the stopover site was also used for mating and migratory costs in terms of survival seemed to be low. Transients' analyses highlighted strong individual variation in site use which makes particularly challenging the study and modelling of their populations as well as their conservation. PMID:24454906

  11. Seasonal Survival Probabilities Suggest Low Migration Mortality in Migrating Bats

    PubMed Central

    Giavi, Simone; Moretti, Marco; Bontadina, Fabio; Zambelli, Nicola; Schaub, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Migration is adaptive if survival benefits are larger than costs of residency. Many aspects of bat migration ecology such as migratory costs, stopover site use and fidelity are largely unknown. Since many migrating bats are endangered, such information is urgently needed to promote conservation. We selected the migrating Leisler's bat (Nyctalus leisleri) as model species and collected capture-recapture data in southern Switzerland year round during 6 years. We estimated seasonal survival and site fidelity with Cormack-Jolly-Seber models that accounted for the presence of transients fitted with Bayesian methods and assessed differences between sexes and seasons. Activity peaked in autumn and spring, whereas very few individuals were caught during summer. We hypothesize that the study site is a migratory stopover site used during fall and spring migration for most individuals, but there is also evidence for wintering. Additionally, we found strong clues for mating during fall. Summer survival that included two major migratory journeys was identical to winter survival in males and slightly higher in females, suggesting that the migratory journeys did not bear significant costs in terms of survival. Transience probability was in both seasons higher in males than in females. Our results suggest that, similarly to birds, Leisler's bat also use stopover sites during migration with high site fidelity. In contrast to most birds, the stopover site was also used for mating and migratory costs in terms of survival seemed to be low. Transients' analyses highlighted strong individual variation in site use which makes particularly challenging the study and modelling of their populations as well as their conservation. PMID:24454906

  12. Grand challenges in migration biology.

    PubMed

    Bowlin, Melissa S; Bisson, Isabelle-Anne; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Reichard, Jonathan D; Sapir, Nir; Marra, Peter P; Kunz, Thomas H; Wilcove, David S; Hedenström, Anders; Guglielmo, Christopher G; Åkesson, Susanne; Ramenofsky, Marilyn; Wikelski, Martin

    2010-09-01

    Billions of animals migrate each year. To successfully reach their destination, migrants must have evolved an appropriate genetic program and suitable developmental, morphological, physiological, biomechanical, behavioral, and life-history traits. Moreover, they must interact successfully with biotic and abiotic factors in their environment. Migration therefore provides an excellent model system in which to address several of the "grand challenges" in organismal biology. Previous research on migration, however, has often focused on a single aspect of the phenomenon, largely due to methodological, geographical, or financial constraints. Integrative migration biology asks 'big questions' such as how, when, where, and why animals migrate, which can be answered by examining the process from multiple ecological and evolutionary perspectives, incorporating multifaceted knowledge from various other scientific disciplines, and using new technologies and modeling approaches, all within the context of an annual cycle. Adopting an integrative research strategy will provide a better understanding of the interactions between biological levels of organization, of what role migrants play in disease transmission, and of how to conserve migrants and the habitats upon which they depend. PMID:21558203

  13. Cell Migration in Confined Environments

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a protocol for measuring the speed of human neutrophils migrating through small channels, in conditions of mechanical confinement comparable to those experienced by neutrophils migrating through tissues. In such conditions, we find that neutrophils move persistently, at constant speed for tens of minutes, enabling precise measurements at single cells resolution, for large number of cells. The protocol relies on microfluidic devices with small channels in which a solution of chemoattractant and a suspension of isolated neutrophils are loaded in sequence. The migration of neutrophils can be observed for several hours, starting within minutes after loading the neutrophils in the devices. The protocol is divided into four main steps: the fabrication of the microfluidic devices, the separation of neutrophils from whole blood, the preparation of the assay and cell loading, and the analysis of data. We discuss the practical steps for the implementation of the migration assays in biology labs, the adaptation of the protocols to various cell types, including cancer cells, and the supplementary device features required for precise measurements of directionality and persistence during migration. PMID:24560508

  14. Controlled-aperture wave-equation migration

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Fehler, Michael C.; Sun, H.; Li, Z.

    2003-01-01

    We present a controlled-aperture wave-equation migration method that no1 only can reduce migration artiracts due to limited recording aperlurcs and determine image weights to balance the efl'ects of limited-aperture illumination, but also can improve thc migration accuracy by reducing the slowness perturbations within thc controlled migration regions. The method consists of two steps: migration aperture scan and controlled-aperture migration. Migration apertures for a sparse distribution of shots arc determined using wave-equation migration, and those for the other shots are obtained by interpolation. During the final controlled-aperture niigration step, we can select a reference slowness in c;ontrollecl regions of the slowness model to reduce slowncss perturbations, and consequently increase the accuracy of wave-equation migration inel hods that makc use of reference slownesses. In addition, the computation in the space domain during wavefield downward continuation is needed to be conducted only within the controlled apertures and therefore, the computational cost of controlled-aperture migration step (without including migration aperture scan) is less than the corresponding uncontrolled-aperture migration. Finally, we can use the efficient split-step Fourier approach for migration-aperture scan, then use other, more accurate though more expensive, wave-equation migration methods to perform thc final controlled-apertio.ee migration to produce the most accurate image.

  15. Neurobiology of Monarch Butterfly Migration.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Steven M; Guerra, Patrick A; Merlin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the migration of the eastern North American monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) have revealed mechanisms behind its navigation. The main orientation mechanism uses a time-compensated sun compass during both the migration south and the remigration north. Daylight cues, such as the sun itself and polarized light, are processed through both eyes and integrated through intricate circuitry in the brain's central complex, the presumed site of the sun compass. Monarch circadian clocks have a distinct molecular mechanism, and those that reside in the antennae provide time compensation. Recent evidence shows that migrants can also use a light-dependent inclination magnetic compass for orientation in the absence of directional daylight cues. The monarch genome has been sequenced, and genetic strategies using nuclease-based technologies have been developed to edit specific genes. The monarch butterfly has emerged as a model system to study the neural, molecular, and genetic basis of long-distance animal migration. PMID:26473314

  16. Geometric friction directs cell migration.

    PubMed

    Le Berre, M; Liu, Yan-Jun; Hu, J; Maiuri, Paolo; Bénichou, O; Voituriez, R; Chen, Y; Piel, M

    2013-11-01

    In the absence of environmental cues, a migrating cell performs an isotropic random motion. Recently, the breaking of this isotropy has been observed when cells move in the presence of asymmetric adhesive patterns. However, up to now the mechanisms at work to direct cell migration in such environments remain unknown. Here, we show that a nonadhesive surface with asymmetric microgeometry consisting of dense arrays of tilted micropillars can direct cell motion. Our analysis reveals that most features of cell trajectories, including the bias, can be reproduced by a simple model of active Brownian particle in a ratchet potential, which we suggest originates from a generic elastic interaction of the cell body with the environment. The observed guiding effect, independent of adhesion, is therefore robust and could be used to direct cell migration both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24266490

  17. Migration, refugees, and health risks.

    PubMed

    Carballo, M; Nerukar, A

    2001-01-01

    Migration both voluntary and forced is increasing all over the world. People are moving in larger numbers faster and further than at any other time in history. This is happening at a time when many countries are ill-prepared to deal with a changing demography and when policies and attitudes to population movement and immigration are hardening. The health implications of this are many, and, in some cases, illness and death rates associated with migration are exacerbated by a lack of policies needed to make migration a healthy and socially productive process. From a public health point of view, this is having and will continue to have serious ramifications for the people that move, the family they leave behind, and the communities that host the newcomers. PMID:11485671

  18. Radionuclide migration studies on tonalite

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelttae, P.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Hakanen, M.; Hautojaervi, A.

    1993-12-31

    Migration of water, chloride, sodium, and calcium in tonalite was studied, using dynamic column and static through-diffusion methods. Autoradiography of rocks impregnated with {sup 14}C-methylmethacrylate was introduced in order to determine the spatial porosity distribution, as well as to identify and visualize the migration pathways of non-sorbing radionuclides in tonalite matrix as the mm-cm scale. The migration routes of sorbing radionuclides and the sorptive minerals in tonalite were determined by autoradiographic methods, using {sup 45}Ca as a tracer. Transport of radionuclides was interpreted, using models for hydrodynamic dispersion with diffusion into the rock matrix. In tonalite, porous minerals were distributed homogeneously in matrix and, therefore, retardation capacity of the rock matrix was found to be high.

  19. Families, children, migration and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Haour-Knipe, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Migration is very often a family affair, and often involves children, directly or indirectly. It may give rise to better quality of life for an entire family, or to bitter disappointment, and may also increase vulnerability to HIV and AIDS. This review, carried out for the Joint Learning Initiative on Children and AIDS, links the literature on "migration", on "HIV and AIDS" and on "families". Three themes are sketched: (1) As both HIV prevalence and circular migration increase, former migrant workers affected by AIDS may return to their families for care and support, especially at the end of life, often under crisis conditions. Families thus lose promising members, as well as sources of support. However, very little is known about the children of such migrants. (2) Following patterns of migration established for far different reasons, children may have to relocate to different places, sometimes over long distances, if their AIDS-affected parents can no longer care for them. They face the same adaptation challenges as other children who move, but complicated by loss of parent(s), AIDS stigma, and often poverty. (3) The issue of migrant families living with HIV has been studied to some extent, but mainly in developed countries with a long history of migration, and with little attention paid to the children in such families. Difficulties include involuntary separation from family members, isolation and lack of support, disclosure and planning for children's care should the parent(s) die and differences in treatment access within the same family. Numerous research and policy gaps are defined regarding the three themes, and a call is made for thinking about migration, families and AIDS to go beyond description to include resilience theory, and to go beyond prevention to include care. PMID:22380978

  20. Bubble migration under the combined action of buoyancy and thermocapillarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Randy M.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    The migration of a gas bubble under the combined action of buoyancy and a downward temperature gradient is analyzed. Inertial effects are considered negligible, but allowance is made for convective transport of energy in the model. Results from a numerical solution of the governing equations are presented and discussed.

  1. Chemotaxis during neural crest migration.

    PubMed

    Shellard, Adam; Mayor, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Chemotaxis refers to the directional migration of cells towards external, soluble factors along their gradients. It is a process that is used by many different cell types during development for tissue organisation and the formation of embryonic structures, as well as disease like cancer metastasis. The neural crest (NC) is a multipotent, highly migratory cell population that contribute to a range of tissues. It has been hypothesised that NC migration, at least in part, is reliant on chemotactic signals. This review will explore the current evidence for proposed chemoattractants of NC cells, and outline mechanisms for the chemotactic response of the NC to them. PMID:26820523

  2. On modeling migrating solar tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagan, M. E.; Forbes, J. M.; Vial, F.

    1995-01-01

    Recent updates and extensions to a steady-state two-dimensional linearized model of global-scale atmospheric waves have facilitated improved calculations of those which are subharmonics of a solar day and propagate with the apparent motion of the sun. The model improvements are briefly described and some updated predictions of the migrating solar diurnal component are highlighted. The latter represent the first numerical modeling effort to examining the seasonal variability of the migrating diurnal harmonic as it propagates into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  3. Rural migration in southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mosser, D.; Soden, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    This study reviews the history of migration in two rural counties in Southern Nevada. It is part of a larger study about the impact of a proposed high-level nuclear waste repository on in- and out-migration patterns in the state. The historical record suggests a boom and bust economic cycle has predominated in the region for the past century creating conditions that should be taken into account by decision makers when ascertaining the long-term impacts of the proposed repository.

  4. The migration transition in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, L L

    1996-01-01

    "Exploring the unique experience of migration transition in Malaysia, this paper identifies the turning points in relation to the level and nature of economic and labor market developments in Malaysia. Examining the development dynamics that mark the passage from exporting labor to depending on foreign labor, the paper concludes that such dynamics are influenced not only by economic but also sociocultural, demographic and policy factors. Several lessons from the Malaysian experience are drawn at the end to be utilized by other countries that still have to reach the turning points of the migration transition." PMID:12320775

  5. [International migration in the Americas: intraregional migration grows].

    PubMed

    Zlotnik, H

    1992-01-01

    The principal destinations for intraregional migrants in South America in recent decades have been Argentina, Brazil, and Venezuela, while in North America the U.S. has exerted a growing attraction since 1965. Intraregional migration in Latin America has been irregular and difficult to quantify, and reliable statistics on migratory flows are nonexistent. Census data indicate that most migration to Argentina and Brazil occurred before 1960, while most migration to Venezuela occurred during the 1970s. Between 1960 and 1980, the proportion of migrants from other Latin American countries showed a tendency to increase, despite decreases in the overall level of immigration. The effect of the economic crisis of the 1980s on immigration from Latin American countries will become more apparent as census data for the 1990s become available. Selectivity according to country of origin is an important characteristic of intraregional migration in South America. The U.S. has, however, been the principal destination of Latin American migrants for the past three decades. Between 1965 and 1991 the U.S. granted resident status to more than 7.4 million persons of Latin American and Caribbean origin, and they constituted 47% of immigrants during those years. The great majority of the Latin American immigrants in the U.S. are Mexican. The 3.5 million Mexicans admitted to the U.S. as immigrants between 1965 and 1991 accounted for 22% of all immigrants during this period. PMID:12158068

  6. Individuals' openness to migrate and job mobility.

    PubMed

    Huinink, Johannes; Vidal, Sergi; Kley, Stefanie

    2014-03-01

    In this article we extend the scope of the interdependence between migration and job mobility: We investigate whether an individual's openness to migrate not only increases the probability of migration but also the likelihood to conduct a job search and exhibit job mobility. Using data from a three-wave panel study, which allows the analysis of temporal links between decision-making and subsequent events regarding migration and job mobility, a joint estimation of multiple equations is performed. We show that considering migration as an option for the future, which is our indicator of individuals' openness to migrate, is positively associated with both migration and job mobility. It even increases job mobility independently of whether migration takes place or not. These findings contribute significantly to our body of knowledge about the interdependence of migration and job mobility. Additionally, they enhance our understanding of the mechanisms behind a common selectivity of migrants and job mobile individuals. PMID:24468430

  7. A phase-field simulation study of irregular grain boundary migration during recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moelans, N.; Zhang, Y. B.; Godfrey, A.; Jensen, D. Juul

    2015-08-01

    We present simulation results based on a phase-field model that describes the migration of recrystallization boundaries into spatially varying deformation energy fields. Energy fields with 2-dimensional variations representing 2 sets of dislocation boundaries lying at equal, but opposite, angles to the moving boundary are considered. The simulations show that the shape and overall migration rate of the recrystallization front is considerably affected by spatial variations in the deformation microstructure. It is seen that, depending on characteristics of the variations in the deformation microstructure, highly asymmetrical protrusions and retrusions can develop on the migrating recrystallization front resulting in a migration velocity considerably larger than that expected from standard recrystallization models. It is also seen that, when the wavelength of the variations in a deformation microstructure along the grain boundary is larger than the wavelength of the variations in the direction of migration, parts of the boundary show a stop-and-go type of migration, resulting in a lower overall migration rate. These simulations thus reproduce and explain many of the typical features observed in recrystallization experiments. They give new insights in the way deformation microstructures can affect the migration behavior of recrystallization boundaries and can lead to a stop-and-go type of migration of the recrystallization boundary even in pure materials.

  8. Community Satisfaction, Migration Intentions and Migration: The Case of Nonmetropolitan Utah Within the Context of Rural Revival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Stephen H.; And Others

    A 1975-79 study assessing community satisfaction and migration intentions in 8 nonmetropolitan Utah communities ranging in population from 1,350 to 6,300 had 3 unique characteristics: (1) the use of distance from the community to the closest Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA), per capita sales tax, and energy development status as…

  9. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music…

  10. Nuclear migration events throughout development.

    PubMed

    Bone, Courtney R; Starr, Daniel A

    2016-05-15

    Moving the nucleus to a specific position within the cell is an important event during many cell and developmental processes. Several different molecular mechanisms exist to position nuclei in various cell types. In this Commentary, we review the recent progress made in elucidating mechanisms of nuclear migration in a variety of important developmental models. Genetic approaches to identify mutations that disrupt nuclear migration in yeast, filamentous fungi, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and plants led to the identification of microtubule motors, as well as Sad1p, UNC-84 (SUN) domain and Klarsicht, ANC-1, Syne homology (KASH) domain proteins (LINC complex) that function to connect nuclei to the cytoskeleton. We focus on how these proteins and various mechanisms move nuclei during vertebrate development, including processes related to wound healing of fibroblasts, fertilization, developing myotubes and the developing central nervous system. We also describe how nuclear migration is involved in cells that migrate through constricted spaces. On the basis of these findings, it is becoming increasingly clear that defects in nuclear positioning are associated with human diseases, syndromes and disorders. PMID:27182060

  11. The OECD and International Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    The document focuses on various aspects of the social, economic, and policy implications of migration in Europe based on the actions undertaken by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). A discussion of issues which may remedy the disequilibrium between the relative portions of the factors of production is presented: (1)…

  12. Les questions de migrations internationales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samman, Mouna Liliane

    1993-03-01

    International migrations have growing implications for both countries of origin and countries of destination. In the latter, the presence of foreigners and of members of their families today creates problems of integration, causes argument and brings mounting xenophobia. Paralleling political, economic and social measures taken by public authorities to respond to these difficulties, education needs to assist in defusing the resulting social tensions by preparing the minds of learners and helping to develop new attitudes. In particular, when educational programmes address questions of international migration, these should be treated in the framework of historical evolution so that their real significance and their true temporal and spatial dimensions become apparent. It is also important that the growing interdependence between countries should be made plain, that national history should be placed in its international context, and that the true consequences of these developments should be made clear. In this context, learners need to be acquainted with Human Rights, thereby stressing universal moral values and the role of the individual. Lastly, questions relating to international migration are usually presented in the media in a selective and partial manner, and the young people who take in this information often accept the hasty judgments which are made of situations as proven facts. This is why all teaching about international migration needs to be considered or reconsidered in the light of the complementary or competing actions of the media.

  13. [The questions of international migration].

    PubMed

    Samman, M L

    1993-03-01

    International migrations have growing implications for both countries of destination. In the latter, the presence of foreigners and of members of their families today creates problems of integration, causes argument, and brings mounting xenophobia. Paralleling political, economic, and social measures taken by public authorities to respond to these difficulties, education needs to assist in diffusing the resulting social tensions by preparing the minds of learners and helping to develop new attitudes. In particular, when educational programs address questions of international migration, these should be treated in the framework of historical evolution in order that their real significance and their true temporal and spatial dimensions become apparent. It is also important that the growing interdependence between countries should be made plain, that national history should be placed in its international context, and that the true consequences of these developments should be made clear. In this context, learners need to be acquainted with Human Rights, thereby stressing universal moral values and the role of the individual. Lastly, questions relating to international migration are usually presented in the media in a selective and partial manner, and the young people who take in this information often accept the hasty judgments which are made of situations as proven facts. This is why all teaching about international migration needs to be considered or reconsidered in light of the complementary or competing actions of the media. (author's modified) PMID:12286405

  14. A Discrete Cell Migration Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J; Kruse, Kara L; Ward, Richard C; O'Quinn, Elizabeth; Woerner, Matthew M; Beckerman, Barbara G

    2007-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is a fundamental process in the development of intimal hyperplasia, a precursor to development of cardiovascular disease and a potential response to injury of an arterial wall. Boyden chamber experiments are used to quantify the motion of cell populations in response to a chemoattractant gradient (i.e., cell chemotaxis). We are developing a mathematical model of cell migration within the Boyden chamber, while simultaneously conducting experiments to obtain parameter values for the migration process. In the future, the model and parameters will be used as building blocks for a detailed model of the process that causes intimal hyperplasia. The cell migration model presented in this paper is based on the notion of a cell as a moving sensor that responds to an evolving chemoattractant gradient. We compare the results of our three-dimensional hybrid model with results from a one-dimensional continuum model. Some preliminary experimental data that is being used to refine the model is also presented.

  15. Floodplain heterogeneity and meander migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of horizontal heterogeneity of floodplain soils on rates and patterns of meander migration is analyzed with a Ikeda et al. (1981)-type model for hydrodynamics and bed morphodynamics, coupled with a physically-based bank erosion model according to the approach developed by Motta et al. (20...

  16. Physician Migration: Donor Country Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aluwihare, A. P. R.

    2005-01-01

    Physician migration from the developing to developed region of a country or the world occurs for reasons of financial, social, and job satisfaction. It is an old phenomenon that produces many disadvantages for the donor region or nation. The difficulties include inequities with the provision of health services, financial loss, loss of educated…

  17. [Migrations and labor: sociological perspectives].

    PubMed

    Scida, G

    1996-01-01

    After a brief acknowledgement of the Chicago School's ecological approach and network analysis with respect to migratory processes in general, the author sketches out a sociological approach to the study of labor migration in particular, distinguishing between economic and sociological viewpoints. (ANNOTATION) PMID:12294277

  18. VORTEX MIGRATION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan; Lesur, Geoffroy; Papaloizou, John C. B.

    2010-12-10

    We consider the radial migration of vortices in two-dimensional isothermal gaseous disks. We find that a vortex core, orbiting at the local gas velocity, induces velocity perturbations that propagate away from the vortex as density waves. The resulting spiral wave pattern is reminiscent of an embedded planet. There are two main causes for asymmetries in these wakes: geometrical effects tend to favor the outer wave, while a radial vortensity gradient leads to an asymmetric vortex core, which favors the wave at the side that has the lowest density. In the case of asymmetric waves, which we always find except for a disk of constant pressure, there is a net exchange of angular momentum between the vortex and the surrounding disk, which leads to orbital migration of the vortex. Numerical hydrodynamical simulations show that this migration can be very rapid, on a timescale of a few thousand orbits, for vortices with a size comparable to the scale height of the disk. We discuss the possible effects of vortex migration on planet formation scenarios.

  19. Clocks, cryptochromes and Monarch migrations.

    PubMed

    Kyriacou, Charalambos P

    2009-01-01

    The annual migration of the Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) from eastern North America to central Mexico is one of nature's most inspiring spectacles. Recent studies including one in BMC Biology, have begun to dissect the molecular and neurogenetic basis for this most complex behavior. PMID:19591650

  20. [Agricultural migration has changed face].

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, D

    1991-04-01

    Movements related to colonization of new lands for cultivation or pasturing have constituted the dominant form of migration in the Sahel countries since the colonial period. the relative importance of such movements declined with the development of labor migration, but geographic mobility continues to be an integral part of Sahel life. A principal strategy during crises of agricultural production was the vast movement of population toward new lands, but such movements had little macroeconomic or macrosocial importance given the low population density and technical development of the time; the family subsistence enterprise was merely displaced. The artificial division into separate countries in the colonial era brought some control of migratory movements, and especially those across international borders, but such migrations increased again after independence and especially during the prolonged drought. Rural migration has been encouraged by development of transportation and communication facilities and by progress in controlling endemic diseases such as river blindness and sleeping sickness. Contemporary migration differs fundamentally from agricultural migration of the past. Migration has become, in addition to a survival strategy, a strategy of economic and social advancement. The change of residence is often accompanied by a restructuring of economic activities and substantial increases in the household's resources. Migrants attempt to produce enough for their own consumption, with some left for sale. They may also take on secondary employment, especially in the dry season: sale of firewood, petty trading, artisanal production. Spontaneous population movements seem to benefit the migrants, improving family and national agricultural production and contributing to a better distribution of rural population, but they have a high social and ecological cost and should receive more attention from planners and researchers in the context of the current campaign against