Science.gov

Sample records for polarization resolved measurements

  1. Polarization resolved measurements with the new EUV ellipsometer of PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, Victor; Fischer, Andreas; Laubis, Christian; Stadelhoff, Christian; Scholze, Frank; Ullrich, Albrecht

    2015-03-01

    After having developed metrology with synchrotron radiation at the storage rings BESSY I and BESSY II for more than 25 years, particularly also for the characterization of EUV optical components and detectors, PTB extended its capabilities for EUV metrology with respect to polarization resolved measurements, particularly in the spectral region around 13.5 nm. With the development of larger numerical aperture optics for EUV and advanced illumination concepts for lithographic imaging, the polarization performance of the optical elements and EUV photomasks with respect to high-NA EUV imaging becomes ever more important. At PTB, we use monochromatized bending magnet radiation for the characterization of the optical elements because of the superior temporal stability and rapid tuneability of the wavelength. Thus the polarization of the radiation is almost linear, depending on the vertical beamline acceptance angle, and cannot be manipulated. Therefore, we decided to equip the soft X-ray beamline which delivers particularly well collimated and highly linearly polarized radiation with a sample manipulator which allows freely setting the orientation of the plane of deflection. Thus we are able to characterize samples in any orientation with respect to the linear polarized direction. We additionally can add a linear polarization analyzer working with a rotatable Brewster reflector to analyze the state of polarization of the reflected beam. We present first results on the polarization properties of EUV multilayer mirrors close to the Brewster angle where polarization selectivity up to s104 is predicted from model calculations. We also present polarization resolved measurements of the EUV diffraction of absorber line patterns at EUV photomasks.

  2. Depth-resolved measurements with elliptically polarized reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Maria J.; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of elliptical polarized reflectance spectroscopy (EPRS) to detect spectroscopic alterations in tissue mimicking phantoms and in biological tissue in situ is demonstrated. It is shown that there is a linear relationship between light penetration depth and ellipticity. This dependence is used to demonstrate the feasibility of a depth-resolved spectroscopic imaging using EPRS. The advantages and drawbacks of EPRS in evaluation of biological tissue are analyzed and discussed. PMID:27446712

  3. Ultrasensitive time-resolved linear dichroism spectral measurements using near-crossed linear polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Diping; Shapiro, Daniel B.; Esquerra, Raymond M.; Kliger, David S.

    1994-07-01

    A simple and sensitive technique is introduced to measure time-resolved linear dichroism of spectral transitions. This technique uses the fact that a linear dichroic sample rotates the polarization plane of linearly polarized light. The theoretical basis of the technique is presented using Mueller calculus and a detailed signal analysis is given to account for the effects of various optical imperfections. The results of this analysis are confirmed with the application of the technique to the time-resolved linear dichroism of bacteriorhodopsin in membrane patches (purple membrane) during its photocycle. These experimental results demonstrate the sentivity of the technique.

  4. Time-resolved nonlinear polarization spectroscopy for measuring transient absorption and refraction in isotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranenko, Victor B.; Bazhenov, Vladimir Y.; Kulikovskaya, Olga A.

    1995-11-01

    A novel time-resolved nonlinear spectroscopic technique is described, which is based on stroboscopic registration of optical polarization transformation taking place at a vector incoherent two-wave mixing interaction in a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. It allows an accurate measuring of the dynamics of excitation and relaxation for real and imaginary parts of complex nonlinearity tensor components. The technique is demonstrated for measuring the light-induced change of transient absorption (delta) (alpha) e(t), (delta) (alpha) o(t) and refraction (delta) ne(t), (delta) no(t) for bacteriorhodopsin- based film pumped by linearly polarized laser pulses.

  5. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ɛ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  6. Wavelength resolved polarized elastic scatter measurements from micron-sized single particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Czege, Jozsef; Eversole, Jay D.

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate correlations of polarimetric angular scattering patterns from individual aerosol particles with the particles' physical structure and composition. Such signature patterns may be able to provide particle classification capability, such as, for example, discrimination between man-made and naturally occurring aerosols. If successful, this effort could improve current detection methods for biological warfare (BW) agent aerosols. So far, we have demonstrated an experimental arrangement to measure polarization-state resolved, multi-angle, scattering intensities from single aerosol particles on-the-fly. Our novel approach is a radical departure from conventional polarimetric measurement methods, and a key factor is the use of a multiple-order retarder to prepare different polarization states, depending on the wavelength of the incident light. This novel experimental technique uses a supercontinuum light source, an array of optical fibers, an imaging spectrometer and an EMCCD camera to simultaneously acquire wavelength and angle dependent particle light scattering data as a two-dimensional snapshot. Mueller matrix elements were initially measured from individual particles held in an optical trap (at 405 nm). Since particles can be stably trapped for long periods (hours), we were able to change the optical configuration to acquire multiple Mueller matrix element measurements on a single particle. We have computationally modeled these measurements at specific angles, and the comparison with experimental measurements shows good agreement. Similar measurements have also been made on slowly falling particles, and our current efforts are focused on improving experimental technique sufficiently to make such measurements on flowing particles.

  7. Theoretical, numerical and experimental study of geometrical parameters that affect anisotropy measurements in polarization-resolved SHG microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teulon, Claire; Gusachenko, Ivan; Latour, Gaël; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2015-04-01

    Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (P-SHG) microscopy is an efficient imaging modality for in situ observation of biopolymers structure in tissues, providing information about their mean in-plane orientation and their molecular structure and 3D distribution. Nevertheless, P-SHG signal build-up in a strongly focused regime is not throroughly understood yet, preventing reliable and reproducible measurements. In this study, theoretical analysis, vectorial numerical simulations and experiments are performed to understand how geometrical parameters, such as excitation and collection numerical apertures and detection direction, affect P-SHG imaging in homogeneous collagen tissues. A good agreement is obtained in tendon and cornea, showing that detection geometry significantly affects the SHG anisotropy measurements, but not the measurements of collagen in-plane orientation. PMID:25968762

  8. Angular-resolved XANES measurements of the polar and azimuthal orientation of alkanethiols on InP(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerulla, D.; Mayer, D.; Hallmeier, K. H.; Chassé, T.

    1999-09-01

    This Letter describes investigations of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure of adsorbed hexadecanethiol monolayers on InP(110). The angular (azimuthal and polar)-resolved measurements reveal the substrate-dependent tilt-angle of the alkyl C-C backbone (about 34° from normal). A unique feature observed on these monolayers is the nearly complete alignment of the alkyl chains with respect to the azimuthal orientation. We suggest that this adsorbate system represents the case of a single-domain organic monolayer. We interpret this behaviour, which deviates strongly from the well-known thiol films on gold, silver or copper, in terms of structural constraints and dangling-bond-induced pre-orientation of the alkanethiol chains.

  9. Polarized time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of m-plane AlGaN/GaN MQWs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales, Daniel; Gil, B.; Bretagnon, T.; Zhang, F.; Okur, S.; Monavarian, M.; Izioumskaia, N.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.; Leach, J. H.

    2014-03-01

    The optical properties of GaN/Al0.15Ga0.85N multiple quantum wells grown on m-plane oriented substrate are studied in 8K-300K temperature range. The optical spectra reveal strong in-plane optical anisotropies as predicted by group theory. Polarized time resolved temperature-dependent photoluminescence experiments are performed providing access to the relative contributions of the non-radiative and radiative recombination processes. We deduce the variation of the radiative decay time with temperature in the two polarizations.

  10. Femtosecond resolved solvation dynamics in polar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlow, Michael A.; Jarzeba, Włodzimierz; Kang, Tai Jong; Barbara, Paul F.

    1989-01-01

    The transient solvation of a polar fluorescent probe has been studied by the time resolved Stokes shift technique with roughly five times shorter time resolution than previously reported. New shorter time components in the solvation relaxation function C(t) have been discovered for methanol, propionitrile, and propylene carbonate; the C(t) function for acetonitrile is singly exponential within the limitations of the instrument. The observed C(t) has been compared to theoretical calculations using the dielectric continuum (DC) model for each solvent, with non-Debye expressions for the solvent dielectric response. For methanol the DC model predictions agree closely with experiment. For the polar aprotic solvents propylene carbonate and propionitrile, the shape of the experimental decay is different from the DC predictions, but the average decay times <τs> are closer to the DC predictions than previously reported. The comparison of theory and experiment is clearly limited by the inconsistencies and limited frequency range of the dielectric relaxation data found in the literature. The dynamic solvation measurements have also been compared to predictions of the mean spherical approximation as applied to solvation dynamics, which appear to give slower solvation rates than are observed experimentally.

  11. Time-resolved circularly polarized protein phosphorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Schauerte, J A; Steel, D G; Gafni, A

    1992-01-01

    The existence of circular polarization in room-temperature protein phosphorescence is demonstrated, and time-resolved circularly polarized phosphorescence (TR-CPP) is used to characterize unique tryptophan environments in multitryptophan proteins. Circularly polarized luminescence studies provide information regarding the excited state chirality of a lumiphore which can be used to extract sensitive structural information. It is shown by time resolving the circular polarization that it is possible to correlate the excited state chirality with unique decay components in a multiexponential phosphorescence decay profile. The present study presents a concurrent analysis of room-temperature time-resolved phosphorescence and TR-CPP of bacterial glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase as well as those of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase. Only one of the two tryptophan residues per subunit of dimeric alcohol dehydrogenase is believed to phosphorescence, while the dimeric glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase has eight tryptophan residues per subunit and shows a corresponding complexity in its phosphorescence decay profile. The anisotropy factor [g(em) = delta I/(Itotal/2); delta I = Ileft circular-Iright circular] for alcohol dehydrogenase is time independent, suggesting a unique excited state chirality. The phosphorescence decay of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase can be well fitted with four exponential terms of 4, 23, 76, and 142 msec, and the TR-CPP of this enzyme shows a strong time dependence that can be resolved into four individual time-independent anisotropy factors of -4.0, -2.1, +6.5, and +6.9 (x10(-3)), each respectively associated with one of the four lifetime components. These results demonstrate how the use of TR-CPP can facilitate the study of proteins with multiple lumiphores. PMID:1438204

  12. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Eclipsing Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2005-09-01

    No changes have been made since the last annual progress report was submitted in conjunction with a unilateral NCX. Dr. Barrett was affected by an STScI Reduction in Force (RIF). He is now employed by the Johns Hopkins University and plans to continue his research there. No expenses have been charged to this grant, however the FUSE data for the eclipsing polar V1432 Aql has been received and processed using CALFWSE v3.0.6. The resulting summed spectrum has been used for a preliminary analysis of the interstellar absorption towards V1432 Aql. We find a hydrogen column density of less than 1.5e21 cm^-2. We have used this result in the paper "X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar" to fix the hydrogen column density in the soft (<0.5 keV) X-ray band when analyzing the XMM-Newton spectra of this polar. This has enabled us to find an accurate temperature for the blackbody component of 88+/-2 eV, which is significantly higher than that of other polars (20 - 40 eV). We hope to complete our analysis of the phase-resolved emission line spectra of V1432 Aql and to prepare the results for publication in a refereed journal. We hope to begin work on this star within the next few months.

  13. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Eclipsing Polars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2005-01-01

    No changes have been made since the last annual progress report was submitted in conjunction with a unilateral NCX. Dr. Barrett was affected by an STScI Reduction in Force (RIF). He is now employed by the Johns Hopkins University and plans to continue his research there. No expenses have been charged to this grant, however the FUSE data for the eclipsing polar V1432 Aql has been received and processed using CALFWSE v3.0.6. The resulting summed spectrum has been used for a preliminary analysis of the interstellar absorption towards V1432 Aql. We find a hydrogen column density of less than 1.5e21 cm^-2. We have used this result in the paper "X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar" to fix the hydrogen column density in the soft (<0.5 keV) X-ray band when analyzing the XMM-Newton spectra of this polar. This has enabled us to find an accurate temperature for the blackbody component of 88+/-2 eV, which is significantly higher than that of other polars (20 - 40 eV). We hope to complete our analysis of the phase-resolved emission line spectra of V1432 Aql and to prepare the results for publication in a refereed journal. We hope to begin work on this star within the next few months.

  14. Phase-resolved cyclotron spectroscopy of polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Ryan

    In this thesis we use phase-resolved cyclotron spectroscopy to study polars. Polars are a subset of cataclysmic variables where the primary WD is highly magnetic. In this case, the accretion flow is constrained along the magnetic field lines and eventually deposited on the WD, where the accreting material interacts with the atmosphere, forming a standing hydrodynamic shock at a location termed the accretion region, and emitting cyclotron radiation. Due to its field strength, cyclotron radiation from polars falls at either UV, optical or NIR wavelengths. While a substantial amount of optical cyclotron spectra have been published on polars, the NIR remains relatively unstudied. In this thesis, we present NIR spectroscopy for fifteen polars. Additionally, while a single cyclotron spectrum is needed to constrain the shock parameters, phase- resolved spectroscopy allows for a more in-depth analysis of the shock structure and the geometry of the accretion region. Of the fifteen polars observed, eight yielded spectra of adequate quality to be modeled in this manner: EF Eri, EQ Cet, AN UMa, VV Pup, AM Her, ST LMi, MR Ser, and MQ Dra. Initially, we used the industry standard "Constant Lambda (CL)" code to model each object. The code is fast, but produces only globally averaged values of the salient shock parameters: B - the magnetic field strength, kT - the plasma temperature, logL - the "size parameter" of the accretion column, and TH- the viewing angle between the observer and the magnetic field. For each object we present CL models for our NIR phase-resolved cyclotron spectra. Subsequently, we use a more advanced "Structured-Shock" code built by Fischer & Beuermann (2001)("F&B") to remodel three objects: EQ Cet, MQ Dra, and EF Eri. The F&B code allows for input of more physical parameters and most importantly does ray tracing through a simulated one-dimensional accretion column. To determine the outgoing spectrum, temperature and velocity profiles are needed to

  15. Polarization resolved angular optical scattering of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, B.; Pan, Y.; Wang, C.; Videen, G.; Cao, Hui

    2014-05-01

    Real-time detection and identification of bio-aerosol particles are crucial for the protection against chemical and biological agents. The strong elastic light scattering properties of airborne particles provides a natural means for rapid, non-invasive aerosol characterization. Recent theoretical predictions suggested that variations in the polarization dependent angular scattering cross section could provide an efficient means of classifying different airborne particles. In particular, the polarization dependent scattering cross section of aggregate particles is expected to depend on the shape of the primary particles. In order to experimentally validate this prediction, we built a high throughput, sampling system, capable of measuring the polarization resolved angular scattering cross section of individual aerosol particles flowing through an interrogating volume with a single shot of laser pulse. We calibrated the system by comparing the polarization dependent scattering cross section of individual polystyrene spheres with that predicted by Mie theory. We then used the system to study different particles types: Polystyrene aggregates composed 500 nm spheres and Bacillus subtilis (BG, Anthrax simulant) spores composed of elongated 500 nm × 1000 nm cylinder-line particles. We found that the polarization resolved scattering cross section depends on the shape of the constituent elements of the aggregates. This work indicates that the polarization resolved scattering cross section could be used for rapid discrimination between different bio-aerosol particles.

  16. Development of a polarization resolved spectroscopic diagnostic for measurements of the magnetic field in the Caltech coaxial magnetized plasma jet experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikama, Taiichi; Bellan, Paul M.

    2011-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field strength in current-carrying magnetically confined plasmas are necessary for understanding the underlying physics governing the dynamical behavior. Such a measurement would be particularly useful in the Caltech coaxial magnetized plasma gun, an experiment used for fundamental studies relevant to spheromak formation, astrophysical jet formation/propagation, solar coronal physics, and the general behavior of twisted magnetic flux tubes that intercept a boundary. In order to measure the field strength in the Caltech experiment, a non-perturbing spectroscopic method is being implemented to observe the Zeeman splitting in the emission spectra. The method is based on polarization-resolving spectroscopy of the Zeeman-split σ components, a technique previously used in both solar and laboratory plasmas. We have designed and constructed an optical system that can simultaneously detect left- and right-circularly polarized emission with both high throughput and small extinction ratio. The system will be used on the 489.5 nm NII line, chosen because of its simple Zeeman structure and minimal Stark broadening.

  17. Detection of a poorly resolved airplane using SWIR polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Laura M.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Chenault, David B.

    2016-05-01

    Polarization can be used to detect manmade objects on the ground and in the air, as it provides additional information beyond intensity and color. Skylight can be strongly polarized, so the detection of airplanes in flight requires careful consideration of the skylight degree and angle of polarization (DoLP, AoP). In this study, we detect poorly resolved airplanes (>= 4 pixels on target) in flight during daytime partly cloudy and smoky conditions in Bozeman, Montana. We used a Polaris Sensor Technologies SWIR-MWIR rotating imaging polarimeter to measure the polarization signatures of airplanes and the surrounding skylight from 1.5 to 1.8 μm in the short-wave infrared (SWIR). An airplane flying in a clear region of partly cloudy sky was found to be 69% polarized at an elevation angle of 13° with respect to the horizon and the surrounding skylight was 4-8% polarized (maximum skylight DoLP was found to be 7-14% at an elevation angle of 50°). As the airplane increased in altitude, the DoLP for both airplane and surrounding sky pixels increased as the airplane neared the band of maximum sky polarization. We also observed that an airplane can be less polarized than its surrounding skylight when there is heavy smoke present. In such a case, the airplane was 30-38% polarized at an elevation angle of 17°, while the surrounding skylight was approximately 40% polarized (maximum skylight DoLP was 40-55% at an elevation angle of 34°). In both situations the airplane was most consistently observed in DoLP images rather than S0 or AoP images. In this paper, we describe the results in detail and discuss how this phenomenology could detect barely resolved aircrafts.

  18. Polarization-resolved imaging of an ensemble of waveguide modes.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, D N; Ramachandran, S

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate polarization-sensitive measurement of the modal content of waveguides by generalizing the classic rotating wave-plate-based polarimeter to wide-field optical low-coherence interferometry. The spatial phases of the modes are retrieved with principal component analysis. By applying this polarization-sensitive cross-correlation (C2) imaging technique to the characterization of a few-mode fiber, we reveal that different modes experience distinct bend-induced birefringence in optical fibers. This polarization-resolved C2 imaging is well suited for analyzing the impact of polarization on wave propagation in high-power fiber lasers as well as in mode-division-multiplexed communications systems. PMID:22859088

  19. Resolving polarized stellar features thanks to polarimetric interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselet-Perraut, Karine; Chesneau, Olivier; Vakili, Farrokh; Mourard, Denis; Janel, Sebastien; Lavaud, Laurent; Crocherie, Axel

    2003-02-01

    Polarimetry is a powerful means for detecting and constraining various physical phenomena, such as scattering processes or magnetic fields, occuring in a large panel of stellar objects: extended atmospheres of hot stars, CP stars, Young Stellar Objects, Active Galaxy Nuclei, ... However, the lack of angular resolution is generally a strong handicap to drastically constrain the physical parameters and the geometry of the polarizing phenomena because of the cancelling of the polarized signal. In fact, even if stellar features are strongly polarized, the (spectro-)polarimetric signal integrated over the stellar surface rarely exceeds few percents. Coupling polarimetric and interferometric devices allows to resolve these local polarized structures and thus to constrain complex patchy stellar surfaces and/or environments such as disk topology in T Tauri stars, hot stars radiative winds or oscillations in Be star envelopes. In this article, we explain how interfero-polarimetric observables, basically the contrast and the position of the interference fringe patterns versus polarization (and even versus wavelength) are powerful to address the above scientific drivers and we emphasize on the key point of instrumental and data calibrations: since interferometric measurements are differential ones between 2 or more beams, this strongly relaxes the calibration requirements for the fringe phase observable. Prospects induced by the operation of the optical aperture synthesis arrays are also discussed.

  20. A Polarization Control System for Intensity-Resolved Guided Mode Resonance Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sheng-Fu; Chang, Fu-Chen; Chen, Zhi-Heng; Wang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Chen, Wen-Yih; Chang, Jenq-Yang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a polarization-control setup for intensity-resolved guided mode resonance sensors is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation data based on rigorous coupled wave approach calculations. The proposed intensity-resolved measurement setup transfers polarization ellipses, which are produced from guided mode resonance to a linear polarization state under a buffer solution condition, and then suppresses the signals to dark using a polarization-control set. Hence, any changes in the refractive index results in an increase in the intensity signals. Furthermore, no wavelength-resolved or angular-resolved measurement is needed in this scheme. According to the experimental results, a wide linear detection range of 0.014 refractive index units is achieved and the limit of detection is 1.62E-4 RIU. PMID:24625743

  1. Forward versus backward polarization-resolved SHG imaging of collagen structure in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teulon, Claire; Gusachenko, Ivan; Latour, Gaël.; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-03-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) is a powerful technique to observe fibrillar collagen without any staining and with a good contrast. More information about the molecular structure of collagen fibrils in tissues and their 3D distribution can be gained with polarization-resolved SHG imaging. Nevertheless, strong focusing is required for effective imaging and light propagation in tissues is complex and not thoroughly understood yet, preventing accurate and reproducible measurements. Theoretical analysis, vectorial numerical simulations and experiments were implemented to understand how the SHG signal builds up and how geometrical parameters affect polarization-resolved measurements in homogeneous collagen-rich tissues.

  2. Spin polarized energy-resolved photoemission from Ni(111) using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudat, W.; Kisker, E.; Kuhlmann, E.; Campagna, M.

    1981-03-01

    We report on the first energy-resolved (retarding field mode) spin polarized photoemission measurement from a Ni(111) single crystal using synchrotron radiation from the ACO storage ring at LURE(ORSAY) It is shown that exchange effects can be detected for electron states well below the Fermi energy and that spin polarized, constant-initial-state spectroscopy of ferromagnets using synchrotron radiation is feasible.

  3. Information Content Analysis for the Multi-Viewing, Multi-Channel, Multi-Polarization Imaging (3MI) Instrument : Toward Retrieval of Vertically Resolved Cloud Properties from Passive Only Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedi, J.; Merlin, G.; Labonnote, L.; Cornet, C.; Ferlay, N.; Desmons, M.; Dubuisson, P.; Parol, F.; Davis, A. B.; Marbach, T.

    2014-12-01

    efforts to obtain vertically resolved information on cloud properties from 3MI passive measurements only. In particular the synergy of multiangle polarization measurements at 443 and 865 nm with Oxygen A-band differential absorption information to retrieve cloud geometrical thickness will be discussed.

  4. Spatially resolved hard X-ray polarization in solar flares: effects of Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, N. L. S.; Kontar, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Aims: We study the polarization of hard X-ray (HXR) sources in the solar atmosphere, including Compton backscattering of photons in the photosphere (the albedo effect) and the spatial distribution of polarization across the source. Methods: HXR photon polarization and spectra produced via electron-ion bremsstrahlung emission are calculated from various electron distributions typical for solar flares. Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption are then modelled using Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in the photosphere to study the observed (primary and albedo) sources. Polarization maps across HXR sources (primary and albedo components) for each of the modelled electron distributions are calculated at various source locations from the solar centre to the limb. Results: We show that Compton scattering produces a distinct polarization variation across the albedo patch at peak albedo energies of 20-50 keV for all anisotropies modelled. The results show that there are distinct spatial polarization changes in both the radial and perpendicular to radial directions across the extent of the HXR source at a given disk location. In the radial direction, the polarization magnitude and direction at specific positions along the HXR source will either increase or decrease with increased photon distribution directivity towards the photosphere. We also show how high electron cutoff energies influence the direction of polarization at above ~100 keV. Conclusions: Spatially resolved HXR polarization measurements can provide important information about the directivity and energetics of the electron distribution. Our results indicate the preferred angular resolution of polarization measurements required to distinguish between the scattered and primary components. We also show how spatially resolved polarization measurements could be used to probe the emission pattern of an HXR source, using both the magnitude and the direction of the polarization.

  5. Nonselective and polarization effects in time-resolved optogalvanic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhechev, D.; Steflekova, V.

    2016-02-01

    Three interfering effects in optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy are identified in a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) - OG detector. The laser beam is found to generate two nonselective processes, namely photoelectron emission (PE) from the cathode surface with a sub-breakdown bias applied, and nonresonant space ionization. The convolution of these galvanic contributions was determined experimentally as an instrumental function and a deconvolution procedure to determine the actual OG signal was developed. Specific plasma conductance is detected dependent on the polarization of the laser beam irradiating. Linearly/circularly polarized light beam is found to induce OG signals differ in amplitude (and their shape parameters in the time-resolved OG signals (TROGS)). The phenomena coherence and specific conductance are found to be in causal relationship. The additional conductance due to coherent states of atoms manifests itself as an intrinsic instrumental property of OG detector.

  6. Sensitivity of VIIRS Polarization Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The design of an optical system typically involves a sensitivity analysis where the various lens parameters, such as lens spacing and curvatures, to name two parameters, are (slightly) varied to see what, if any, effect this has on the performance and to establish manufacturing tolerances. A sinular analysis was performed for the VIIRS instruments polarization measurements to see how real world departures from perfectly linearly polarized light entering VIIRS effects the polarization measurement. The methodology and a few of the results of this polarization sensitivity analysis are presented and applied to the construction of a single polarizer which will cover the VIIRS VIS/NIR spectral range. Keywords: VIIRS, polarization, ray, trace; polarizers, Bolder Vision, MOXTEK

  7. Four-parameter model for polarization-resolved rough-surface BRDF.

    PubMed

    Renhorn, Ingmar G E; Hallberg, Tomas; Bergström, David; Boreman, Glenn D

    2011-01-17

    A modeling procedure is demonstrated, which allows representation of polarization-resolved BRDF data using only four parameters: the real and imaginary parts of an effective refractive index with an added parameter taking grazing incidence absorption into account and an angular-scattering parameter determined from the BRDF measurement of a chosen angle of incidence, preferably close to normal incidence. These parameters allow accurate predictions of s- and p-polarized BRDF for a painted rough surface, over three decades of variation in BRDF magnitude. To characterize any particular surface of interest, the measurements required to determine these four parameters are the directional hemispherical reflectance (DHR) for s- and p-polarized input radiation and the BRDF at a selected angle of incidence. The DHR data describes the angular and polarization dependence, as well as providing the overall normalization constraint. The resulting model conserves energy and fulfills the reciprocity criteria. PMID:21263641

  8. Fluorescence polarization spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence kinetics of native cancerous and normal rat kidney tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Tata, D B; Foresti, M; Cordero, J; Tomashefsky, P; Alfano, M A; Alfano, R R

    1986-01-01

    Steady state fluorescence polarization spectra and time-resolved emission decay kinetics have been measured in vitro from malignant and normal rat kidney tissue. The degrees of polarization and emission lifetimes from the cancerous and normal systems are different. The spectroscopic differences are attributed to environmental transformations local to the native flavin and porphyrin fluorophors' binding sites. PMID:3489490

  9. Numerical simulation of polarization-resolved second-harmonic microscopy in birefringent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusachenko, Ivan; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2013-11-01

    Polarization-resolved second-harmonic microscopy has recently emerged as a valuable technique for in situ imaging of collagen structure in tissues. Nevertheless, collagen-rich tissues such as tendon, ligament, skin dermis, bone, cornea, or artery exhibit a heterogeneous and anisotropic architecture that results in complex optical properties. While experimental evidence of polarization distortions has been reported in various tissues, the physics of second-harmonic imaging within such tissues is not fully understood yet. In this work, we performed numerical simulations of polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation in a strongly focused regime within a birefringent tissue. We show that vectorial components due to strong focusing have a rather small effect on the measurement of the second-harmonic tensorial response, while birefringence and optical dispersion may affect these measurements dramatically. We show indeed that a difference in the focal field distribution for ordinary and extraordinary waves results in different phase-matching conditions, which strongly affects the relative efficacy of second-harmonic generation for different polarizations. These results are of great interest for extracting reliable quantitative parameters from second-harmonic images.

  10. Polarization Measurements with Compton Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyuz, A.; O'Neill, T. J.; Bhattacharya, D.; Dixon, D. D.; Tumer, T. O.; White, R. S.; Zych, A. D.

    1994-12-01

    The response of the Tracking and Imaging Gamma-Ray Experiment (TIGRE) instrument to polarized celestial gamma rays above 300 keV is presented. TIGRE uses multilayers of silicon strip detectors both as a gamma-ray converter and to track Compton recoil electrons and positron-electron pairs up to 100 MeV. For Compton events, the direction and energy of the Compton scattered gamma ray are measured with arrays of small CsI(Tl)-photodiode detectors. A small balloon prototype instrument is being constructed that has a high absolute detection efficiency of 10% and a sensitivity of 100 milliCrabs for an exposure of 12 hours. The prototype's sensitivity to polarized gamma radiation has been calculated with the MCNP detector simulation code which was modified to include the polarization dependence of the Klein-Nishina formula. Polarized events and unpolarized source events with background are combined to simulate an observation of the Crab Nebula and pulsar. TIGRE's polarization modulation factor varies from 0.17 to 0.42 depending on the energy and Compton scatter angle cuts that are used. With 12 hours of observation on the Crab, polarized gamma radiation can be detected down to the level of about 10%. Potential celestial sources of polarized gamma-ray emission will be discussed.

  11. Linear Polarization Measurements of Chromospheric Emission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Keller, C. U.

    2003-01-01

    We have used the Zurich Imaging Stokes Polarimeter (ZIMPOL I) with the McMath-Pierce 1.5 m main telescope on Kitt Peak to obtain linear polarization measurements of the off-limb chromosphere with a sensitivity better than 1 x 10(exp -5). We found that the off-disk observations require a combination of good seeing (to show the emission lines) and a clean heliostat (to avoid contamination by scattered light from the Sun's disk). When these conditions were met, we obtained the following principal results: 1. Sometimes self-reversed emission lines of neutral and singly ionized metals showed linear polarization caused by the transverse Zeeman effect or by instrumental cross talk from the longitudinal Zeeman effect in chromospheric magnetic fields. Otherwise, these lines tended to depolarize the scattered continuum radiation by amounts that ranged up to 0.2%. 2. Lines previously known to show scattering polarization just inside the limb (such as the Na I lambda5889 D2 and the He I lambda5876 D3 lines) showed even more polarization above the Sun's limb, with values approaching 0.7%. 3. The O I triplet at lambda7772, lambda7774, and lambda7775 showed a range of polarizations. The lambda7775 line, whose maximum intrinsic polarizability, P(sub max), is less than 1%, revealed mainly Zeeman contributions from chromospheric magnetic fields. However, the more sensitive lambda7772 (P(sub max) = 19%) and lambda7774 (P(sub max) = 29%) lines had relatively strong scattering polarizations of approximately 0.3% in addition to their Zeeman polarizations. At times of good seeing, the polarization spectra resolve into fine structures that seem to be chromospheric spicules.

  12. Analysis of cloud polarization measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J. E.; Coffeen, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The polarization of sunlight reflected by various cloud types was measured in the near-infrared with a polarimeter flown aboard the NASA Convair 990. The data reduction has been completed and detailed comparisons have been made between the observations and theoretical computations. The analysis presented shows that the polarization in the near-infrared can be used on a routine basis to reliably yield the cloud particle phase (water or ice) and the average particle size in the top part of water clouds (usually within + or - 25%). In some cases the polarization also yields the cloud optical thickness (or a lower limit) and a measure of the width of the particle size distribution in the top of the water clouds.

  13. HERMES measurements of {lambda} polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Rith, Klaus

    2007-06-13

    The HERMES experiment at DESY has measured the transfer of polarization from longitudinally polarized 27.6 GeV positrons to {lambda} hyperons produced in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from unpolarized gas targets internal to the electron/positron ring of the HERA collider. The longitudinal spin transfer coefficient is found to be D{sub LL'}{sup {lambda}} = 0.11 {+-} 0.10 (stat) {+-} 0.03 (syst) at an average fractional energy carried by the {lambda} hyperon = 0.45.

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence polarization spectroscopy of visible and near infrared dyes in picosecond dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes absorb and emit light within the range from 700 to 900 nm have several benefits in biological studies for one- and/or two-photon excitation for deeper penetration of tissues. These molecules undergo vibrational and rotational motion in the relaxation of the excited electronic states, Due to the less than ideal anisotropy behavior of NIR dyes stemming from the fluorophores elongated structures and short fluorescence lifetime in picosecond range, no significant efforts have been made to recognize the theory of these dyes in time-resolved polarization dynamics. In this study, the depolarization of the fluorescence due to emission from rotational deactivation in solution will be measured with the excitation of a linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulse and a streak camera. The theory, experiment and application of the ultrafast fluorescence polarization dynamics and anisotropy are illustrated with examples of two of the most important medical based dyes. One is NIR dye, namely Indocyanine Green (ICG) and is compared with Fluorescein which is in visible range with much longer lifetime. A set of first-order linear differential equations was developed to model fluorescence polarization dynamics of NIR dye in picosecond range. Using this model, the important parameters of ultrafast polarization spectroscopy were identified: risetime, initial time, fluorescence lifetime, and rotation times.

  15. Polarization lidar for shallow water depth measurement.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Steven; Thayer, Jeffrey P; Hayman, Matthew

    2010-12-20

    A bathymetric, polarization lidar system transmitting at 532 nm and using a single photomultiplier tube is employed for applications of shallow water depth measurement. The technique exploits polarization attributes of the probed water body to isolate surface and floor returns, enabling constant fraction detection schemes to determine depth. The minimum resolvable water depth is no longer dictated by the system's laser or detector pulse width and can achieve better than 1 order of magnitude improvement over current water depth determination techniques. In laboratory tests, an Nd:YAG microchip laser coupled with polarization optics, a photomultiplier tube, a constant fraction discriminator, and a time-to-digital converter are used to target various water depths with an ice floor to simulate a glacial meltpond. Measurement of 1 cm water depths with an uncertainty of ±3 mm are demonstrated using the technique. This novel approach enables new approaches to designing laser bathymetry systems for shallow depth determination from remote platforms while not compromising deep water depth measurement. PMID:21173834

  16. A LACK OF RESOLVED NEAR-INFRARED POLARIZATION ACROSS THE FACE OF M51

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, Dan P. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2012-12-20

    The galaxy M51 was observed using the Mimir instrument on the Perkins Telescope to constrain the resolved H-band (1.6 {mu}m) polarization across the galaxy. These observations place an upper limit of P{sub H} < 0.05% on the H-band polarization across the face of M51, at 0.6 arcsec pixel sampling. Even with smoothing to coarser angular resolutions, to reduce polarization uncertainty, the H-band polarization remains undetected. The polarization upper limit at H band, when combined with previous resolved optical polarimetry, rules out a Serkowski-like polarization dependence on wavelength. Other polarization mechanisms cannot account for the observed polarization ratio (P{sub H}/P{sub VRI} {approx}< 0.05) across the face of M51.

  17. Measuring Gravitation Using Polarization Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    A proposed method of measuring gravitational acceleration would involve the application of polarization spectroscopy to an ultracold, vertically moving cloud of atoms (an atomic fountain). A related proposed method involving measurements of absorption of light pulses like those used in conventional atomic interferometry would yield an estimate of the number of atoms participating in the interferometric interaction. The basis of the first-mentioned proposed method is that the rotation of polarization of light is affected by the acceleration of atoms along the path of propagation of the light. The rotation of polarization is associated with a phase shift: When an atom moving in a laboratory reference interacts with an electromagnetic wave, the energy levels of the atom are Doppler-shifted, relative to where they would be if the atom were stationary. The Doppler shift gives rise to changes in the detuning of the light from the corresponding atomic transitions. This detuning, in turn, causes the electromagnetic wave to undergo a phase shift that can be measured by conventional means. One would infer the gravitational acceleration and/or the gradient of the gravitational acceleration from the phase measurements.

  18. Polarization-resolved SHG microscopy of rat-tail tendon with controlled mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusachenko, I.; Goulam Houssen, Y.; Tran, V.; Allain, J.-M.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2013-06-01

    We combined polarization-resolved SHG microscopy with mechanical assays in rat-tail-tendon and measured collagen remodeling upon controlled stretching. This approach aimed to analyze the relationship between macroscopic response and sub-micrometer scale organization of collagen fibrils. We observed a straightening of the crimps followed by a sliding of the fibrils with increasing stretching of the tendon fascicles. Polarization resolution of the SHG images provided complementary information about the orientation dispersion of collagen fibrils within the focal volume and enabled monitoring of collagen remodeling at the sub-micrometer scale. Our approach can be readily generalized to other tissues and should bring new valuable information about biomechanics of microstructured tissues.

  19. Time Resolved Deposition Measurements in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; H. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore; J. Hogan; W.R. Wampler; the NSTX team

    2004-08-03

    Time-resolved measurements of deposition in current tokamaks are crucial to gain a predictive understanding of deposition with a view to mitigating tritium retention and deposition on diagnostic mirrors expected in next-step devices. Two quartz crystal microbalances have been installed on NSTX at a location 0.77m outside the last closed flux surface. This configuration mimics a typical diagnostic window or mirror. The deposits were analyzed ex-situ and found to be dominantly carbon, oxygen, and deuterium. A rear facing quartz crystal recorded deposition of lower sticking probability molecules at 10% of the rate of the front facing one. Time resolved measurements over a 4-week period with 497 discharges, recorded 29.2 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of deposition, however surprisingly, 15.9 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of material loss occurred at 7 discharges. The net deposited mass of 13.3 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} matched the mass of 13.5 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} measured independently by ion beam analysis. Monte Carlo modeling suggests that transient processes are likely to dominate the deposition.

  20. Polar Dunes Resolved by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Gridded Topography and Pulse Widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) polar data have been refined to the extent that many features poorly imaged by Viking Orbiters are now resolved in densely gridded altimetry. Individual linear polar dunes with spacings of 0.5 km or more can be seen as well as sparsely distributed and partially mantled dunes. The refined altimetry will enable measurements of the extent and possibly volume of the north polar ergs. MOLA pulse widths have been recalibrated using inflight data, and a robust algorithm applied to solve for the surface optical impulse response. It shows the surface root-mean-square (RMS) roughness at the 75-m-diameter MOLA footprint scale, together with a geological map. While the roughness is of vital interest for landing site safety studies, a variety of geomorphological studies may also be performed. Pulse widths corrected for regional slope clearly delineate the extent of the polar dunes. The MOLA PEDR profile data have now been re-released in their entirety (Version L). The final Mission Experiment Gridded Data Records (MEGDR's) are now provided at up to 128 pixels per degree globally. Densities as high as 512 pixels per degree are available in a polar stereographic projection. A large computational effort has been expended in improving the accuracy of the MOLA altimetry themselves, both in improved orbital modeling and in after-the-fact adjustment of tracks to improve their registration at crossovers. The current release adopts the IAU2000 rotation model and cartographic frame recommended by the Mars Cartography Working Group. Adoption of the current standard will allow registration of images and profiles globally with an uncertainty of less than 100 m. The MOLA detector is still operational and is currently collecting radiometric data at 1064 nm. Seasonal images of the reflectivity of the polar caps can be generated with a resolution of about 300 m per pixel.

  1. Frequency resolving power measured by rippled noise.

    PubMed

    Supin AYa; Popov, V V; Milekhina, O N; Tarakanov, M B

    1994-07-01

    Frequency resolving power (FRP) was measured in normal humans using rippled noise with a phase-reversal test. The principle of the test was to find the highest ripple density at which an interchange of mutual peak and trough position (the phase reversal) in the rippled spectrum is detectable. In the frequency range below 0.5 kHz FRP was found to be about 21 ripples per kHz when tested by both broad-band and narrow-band rippled noise. In the frequency range above 2 kHz, FRP measured by the narrow-band rippled noise was 22 to 23 relative units (relation of the noise central frequency to the ripple frequency spacing). PMID:7961175

  2. a Measurement of Tau Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Arthur Michael

    At ALEPH, polarized tau pairs are produced in e^+e^- annihilations at the Z peak. The polarization depends on the tau production angle and is measured by spin analyzing tau decays in the modes tauto{rm e}nu |nu, tautomunu |nu, tautopinu, tautorhonu and tauto{rm a}_1nu . This leads to a measurement of the Z couplings to taus and electrons, {cal A} _tau and {cal A }_{rm e}, where {cal A}_{l} = 2g_sp {V}{l}g_sp{A}{l }/(g_sp{V}{l}^2 + g_sp{A}{l}^2). The values obtained using the 1992 data are { cal A}_tau = 0.129 +/- 0.016 +/- 0.010 and {cal A} _{rm e} = 0.136 +/- 0.022 +/- 0.007, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Assuming electron-tau universality leads to {cal A}_{ rm e-tau} = 0.131 +/- 0.013 +/- 0.006. This result has been combined with the published ALEPH result for the 1990 and 1991 data for a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle sin ^2 theta_sp{W}{ rm eff} = 0.2334 +/- 0.0014.

  3. Polarization and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of excitons in MoSe2 monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Palleau, E.; Amand, T.; Tongay, S.; Marie, X.; Urbaszek, B.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate valley exciton dynamics in MoSe2 monolayers in polarization- and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy at 4 K. Following circularly polarized laser excitation, we record a low circular polarization degree of the PL of typically ≤5%. This is about 10 times lower than the polarization induced under comparable conditions in MoS2 and WSe2 monolayers. The evolution of the exciton polarization as a function of excitation laser energy and power is monitored in PL excitation experiments. Fast PL emission times are recorded for both the neutral exciton of ≤3 ps and for the charged exciton (trion) of 12 ps.

  4. Time-resolved scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frömter, Robert; Kloodt, Fabian; Rößler, Stefan; Frauen, Axel; Staeck, Philipp; Cavicchia, Demetrio R.; Bocklage, Lars; Röbisch, Volker; Quandt, Eckhard; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of investigating periodically driven magnetization dynamics in a scanning electron microscope with polarization analysis based on spin-polarized low-energy electron diffraction. With the present setup, analyzing the time structure of the scattering events, we obtain a temporal resolution of 700 ps, which is demonstrated by means of imaging the field-driven 100 MHz gyration of the vortex in a soft-magnetic FeCoSiB square. Owing to the efficient intrinsic timing scheme, high-quality movies, giving two components of the magnetization simultaneously, can be recorded on the time scale of hours.

  5. Conversion of sunflower multiband radiometer polarization measurements to polarization parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, Larry L.

    1995-01-01

    The data processing analysis and conversion of polarization measurements to polarization parameters from the Sunflower multiband radiometer is presented in this final report. Included is: (1) the actual data analysis; (2) the comparison of the averaging techniques and the percent polarization derived from the original and averaged I, Q, U parameters; (3) the polarizer angles used in conversion; (4) the Matlab files; (5) the relative ground size, field of view location, and view zenith angles, and (6) the summary of all the sky data for all dates.

  6. Nanosecond Time-Resolved Polarization Spectroscopies: Tools for Probing Protein Reaction Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eefei; Goldbeck, Robert A.; Kliger, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Polarization methods, introduced in the 1800’s, offered one of the earliest ways to examine protein structure. Since then, many other structure-sensitive probes have been developed, but circular dichroism (CD) remains a powerful technique because of its versatility and the specificity of protein structural information that can be explored. With improvements in time-resolution, from millisecond to picosecond CD measurements, it has proven to be an important tool for studying the mechanism of folding and function in many biomolecules. For example, nanosecond time-resolved CD (TRCD) studies of the sub-microsecond events of reduced cytochrome c folding have provided direct experimental evidence of kinetic heterogeneity, which is an inherent property of the diffusional nature of early folding dynamics on the energy landscape. In addition, TRCD has been applied to the study of many biochemical processes, such as ligand rebinding in hemoglobin and myoglobin and signaling state formation in photoactive yellow protein and prototropin 1 LOV2. The basic approach to TRCD has also been extended to include a repertoire of nanosecond polarization spectroscopies: optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), magnetic CD and ORD, and linear dichroism. This article will discuss the details of the polarization methods used in this laboratory, as well as the coupling of timeresolved ORD with the temperature-jump trigger so that protein folding can be studied in a larger number of proteins. PMID:20438842

  7. Spectrally resolved motional Stark effect measurements on ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, R.; Dinklage, A.; Wolf, R.; Fischer, R.; Hobirk, J.; Löbhard, T.; Mlynek, A.; Reich, M.; Sawyer, L.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade

    2013-11-15

    A spectrally resolved Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic has been installed at ASDEX Upgrade. The MSE data have been fitted by a forward model providing access to information about the magnetic field in the plasma interior [R. Reimer, A. Dinklage, J. Geiger et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 50, 731–735 (2010)]. The forward model for the beam emission spectra comprises also the fast ion D{sub α} signal [W. W. Heidbrink and G. J. Sadler, Nucl. Fusion 34, 535–615 (1994)] and the smearing on the CCD-chip. The calculated magnetic field data as well as the revealed (dia)magnetic effects are consistent with the results from equilibrium reconstruction solver. Measurements of the direction of the magnetic field are affected by unknown and varying polarization effects in the observation.

  8. RESOLVE for Lunar Polar Ice/Volatile Characterization Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, G. B.; Larson, W. E.; Quinn, J. W.; Colaprete, A.; Picard, M.; Boucher, D.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since data from the neutron spectrometer instrument on the Lunar Prospector mission indicated the possibility of significant concentrations of hydrogen at the lunar poles, speculation on the form and concentration of the hydrogen has been debated. The recent impact of the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) along with thermal, topographic, neutron spectrometry, and radar frequency data obtained from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) have provided more information suggesting significant amounts of water/ice and other volatiles may be available in the top 1 to 2 meters of regolith at the lunar poles. The next step in understanding what resources are available at the lunar poles is to perform a mission to obtain ground truth. data. To meet this need, the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) along with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) have been working on a prototype payload known as the Regolith & Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction experiment, or RESOLVE.

  9. Polarization Measurements in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Noble, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the VUV polarization testing of the NSSTC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) optics. SUMI is being developed for a sounding rocket payload to prove the feasibility of making magnetic field measurements in the transition region. This paper will cover the polarization properties of the VUV calibration polarizers, the instrumental polarization of the VUV chamber, SUMI's toroidal varied-line-space gratings and the SUMI polarimeter.

  10. Polarization measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; West, E. A.; Noble, M.

    2005-08-01

    This paper will describe the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) polarization testing of the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) optics. SUMI is being develop for a sounding rocket payload to prove the feasibility of making magnetic field measurements in the transition region. This paper will cover the polarization properties of the VUV calibration polarizers, the instrumental polarization of the VUV chamber, SUMI's toroidal varied-line-space gratings and the SUMI polarimeter.

  11. TIME-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE POLAR EU CANCRI IN THE OPEN CLUSTER MESSIER 67

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kurtis A.; Howell, Steve B.; Bellini, Andrea; Rubin, Kate H. R.; Bolte, Michael E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov E-mail: psmith@as.arizona.edu E-mail: rubin@mpia.de

    2013-05-15

    We present time-resolved spectroscopic and polarimetric observations of the AM Her system EU Cnc. EU Cnc is located near the core of the old open cluster Messier 67; new proper motion measurements indicate that EU Cnc is indeed a member of the star cluster, and this system therefore is useful to constrain the formation and evolution of magnetic cataclysmic variables. The spectra exhibit two-component emission features with independent radial velocity variations as well as time-variable cyclotron emission indicating a magnetic field strength of 41 MG. The period of the radial velocity and cyclotron hump variations are consistent with the previously known photometric period, and the spectroscopic flux variations are consistent in amplitude with previous photometric amplitude measurements. The secondary star is also detected in the spectrum. We also present polarimetric imaging measurements of EU Cnc that show a clear detection of polarization, and the degree of polarization drops below our detection threshold at phases when the cyclotron emission features are fading or not evident. The combined data are all consistent with the interpretation that EU Cnc is a low-state polar in the cluster Messier 67. The mass function of the system gives an estimate of the accretor mass of M{sub WD} {>=} 0.68 M{sub Sun} with M{sub WD} Almost-Equal-To 0.83 M{sub Sun} for an average inclination. We are thus able to place a lower limit on the progenitor mass of the accreting white dwarf of {>=}1.43 M{sub Sun }.

  12. Prospecting for Polar Volatiles: Results from the Resolve Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, Richard C.; Colarprete, Anthony; Deans, Matthew C.; Heldman, Jennifer; Sanders, Gerald B.; Larson, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Both the Moon and Mercury evidently host ice and other volatile compounds in cold traps at the planets poles. Determining the form, spatial distribution, and abundance of these volatiles at the lunar poles can help us understand how and when they were delivered and emplaced. This bears directly on the delivery of water and prebiotic compounds to the inner planets over the solar system s history, and also informs plans for utilizing the volatiles as resources for sustained human exploration as well as the commercial development of space. Temperature models and orbital data suggest near-surface volatile concentrations may exist at polar locations not strictly in permanent shadow. Remote operation of a robotic lunar rover mission for the 7-10 days of available sunlight would permit key questions to be answered. But such a short, quick-tempo mission has unique challenges and requires a new concept of operations. Both science and rover operations decisionmaking must be done in real time, requiring immediate situational awareness, data analysis, and decision support tools.

  13. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of High Field Polars (FUSE 00)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The following work has been accomplished: 1) The emission lines of O VI1 and He II were used to produce Doppler tomograms of the plasma emission. 2) An improved interstellar absorption model is being developed for the CIAO spectral fitting program, Sherpa. Use of the earlier version of this model showed it to be inadequate for its purpose. Once this model is working, we intend to complete our analysis of V884 Her and those of other FUSE programs. In addition to the above work, this grant has helped support the following related work: 1) The publication of the paper "Periodicities in the X-ray intensity variations of TV Columbae: an Intermediate Polar" by Rana, V. R., Singh, K. P., Schlegel, E. M., & Barrett, P. 2004, AJ, 126,489, and 2) FUSE data of a possible nova-like variable Ret 1 has been analyzed and shown to contain a hot (37000 deg) white dwarf (WD 0334-6400). The FUV spectrum shows strong absorption lines of C III.

  14. The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer: Science from Circular Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, Eric; Ade, P.; Benford, D. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Chuss, D. T.; Dotson, J. L.; Eimer, J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Halpern, M.; Hinshaw, G. F.; Irwin, K.; Jhabvala, C.; Johnson, B.; Kogut, A. J.; Lazear, J.; Mirel, P.; Moseley, S. H.; Staguhn, J.; Tucker, C. E.; Weston, A.; Wollack, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) is a balloon-borne CMB polarimeter designed to constrain the B-mode signature of cosmological inflation. Sequential one-day flights from Northern- and Southern- Hemisphere sites will yield maps of Stokes I, Q, U and V at 200, 270, 350 and 600 GHz over 85% of the sky. The full optical path is cooled to 1.5 K by liquid helium in the ARCADE bucket dewar, and a variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) at the front of the optics modulates the polarization response. Independent Q and U cameras each have two 32x40 Transition Edge Sensor array receivers. In addition to its primary inflationary science goal, PIPER will also measure the circular (Stokes V) polarization to a depth similar to that of the primary linear polarization. The circular polarization has received relatively little attention in large-area surveys, with constraints from the 1980’s and recent results by the Milan Polarimeter. Astrophysical circular polarization is generally tied to the presence of magnetic fields, either in relativistic plasmas or Zeeman splitting of resonances. These effects are thought to be undetectable at PIPER's frequencies and resolution, despite the depth. The expectation of a null result makes the deep Stokes V map a good cross-check for experimental systematics. More fundamentally, the fact that the sky is expected to be dark in Stokes V makes it a sector sensitive to processes such as Lorentz-violating terms in the standard model or magnetic fields in the CMB era.

  15. Polarization resolved near-IR imaging of sound and carious dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Cynthia L.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    A thorough understanding of how polarized near-IR light is reflected from and transmitted through sound and carious dental hard tissues is important for the development of optical imaging devices. New optical imaging tools employing non-ionizing radiation are needed for the detection and assessment of dental caries. In this investigation, an automated system was developed to collect images for the full 16-element Mueller Matrix. The polarized light was controlled by linear polarizers and liquid crystal retarders and the 36 images were acquired as the polarized near-IR light is reflected from the occlusal surface or transmitted through thin sections of extracted human whole teeth. Previous near-IR imaging studies suggest that polarization imaging can be exploited to obtain higher contrast images of early dental caries due to the rapid depolarization of incident polarized light by the highly scattering areas of decay. In this study, the reflectance from tooth occlusal surfaces with demineralization and transmitted light through tooth thin sections with caries lesions were investigated. Major differences in the Mueller matrix elements were observed in both sound and demineralized enamel. This study suggests that polarization resolved optical imaging can be exploited to obtain higher contrast images of dental decay.

  16. Stokes vector based polarization resolved second harmonic microscopy of starch granules.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Qiu, Jianjun; Foreman, Matthew R; Romero, Carlos Macías; Török, Peter; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-04-01

    We report on the measurement and analysis of the polarization state of second harmonic signals generated by starch granules, using a four-channel photon counting based Stokes-polarimeter. Various polarization parameters, such as the degree of polarization (DOP), the degree of linear polarization (DOLP), the degree of circular polarization (DOCP), and anisotropy are extracted from the 2D second harmonic Stokes images of starch granules. The concentric shell structure of a starch granule forms a natural photonic crystal structure. By integration over all the solid angle, it will allow very similar SHG quantum efficiency regardless of the angle or the states of incident polarization. Given type I phase matching and the concentric shell structure of a starch granule, one can easily infer the polarization states of the input beam from the resulting SH micrograph. PMID:23577289

  17. Stokes vector based polarization resolved second harmonic microscopy of starch granules

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Qiu, Jianjun; Foreman, Matthew R.; Romero, Carlos Macías; Török, Peter; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-01-01

    We report on the measurement and analysis of the polarization state of second harmonic signals generated by starch granules, using a four-channel photon counting based Stokes-polarimeter. Various polarization parameters, such as the degree of polarization (DOP), the degree of linear polarization (DOLP), the degree of circular polarization (DOCP), and anisotropy are extracted from the 2D second harmonic Stokes images of starch granules. The concentric shell structure of a starch granule forms a natural photonic crystal structure. By integration over all the solid angle, it will allow very similar SHG quantum efficiency regardless of the angle or the states of incident polarization. Given type I phase matching and the concentric shell structure of a starch granule, one can easily infer the polarization states of the input beam from the resulting SH micrograph. PMID:23577289

  18. Measurement of Λ polarization from Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajlatouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Aleppo, M.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Ragusa, F.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The polarization of Λ baryons from Z decays is studied with the ALEPH apparatus. Evidence of longitudinal polarization of s quarks from Z decay is observed for the first time. The measured longitudinal Λ polarization is PLΛ = -0.32 ± 0.07 for z = {p}/{p beam} > 0.3 . This agrees with the prediction of -0.39 ± 0.08 from the standard model and the constituent quark model, where the error is due to uncertainties in the mechanism for Λ production. The observed Λ polarization is diluted with respect to the primary s quark polarization by Λ baryons without a primary s quark. Measurements of the Λ forward-backward asymmetry and of the correlation between back-to-back Λ overlineΛ pairs are used to check this dilution. In addition the transverse Λ polarization is measured. An indication of transverse polarization, more than two standard deviations away from zero, is found along the normal to the plane defined by the thrust axis and the Λ direction.

  19. Phase-resolved Spectroscopy of the Intermediate Polars -- TV Col and V1223 Sgr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, K.

    The cataclysmic variables called intermediate polars are characterized by magnetic fields that rip material from an accretion disk and funnel it to a WD that is not phase-locked to the binary period of the system. This is a proposal to use FUSE to conduct a time-resolved spectroscopic study to dissect the emission of two long-period intermediate polars, V1223 Sgr and TV Col, with very different inclination angles. These, along with the short-period high-inclination IP EX Hya (already observed with FUSE), comprise the only IPs with accurate distances derived from HST astrometry. We will isolate emission from the photosphere of the WD, the magnetically dominated accretion curtain, and the accretion stream. Having characterized the emission sources, we will explore the physical conditions in these same regions, and develop an integrated picture of these two intermediate polars.

  20. Polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation microscopy as a method to visualize protein-crystal domains

    SciTech Connect

    DeWalt, Emma L.; Begue, Victoria J.; Ronau, Judith A.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Das, Chittaranjan; Simpson, Garth J.

    2013-01-01

    Polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation microscopy is applied to the identification of multiple crystalline domains within protein-crystal samples. Polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation (PR-SHG) microscopy is described and applied to identify the presence of multiple crystallographic domains within protein-crystal conglomerates, which was confirmed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) of PR-SHG images resulted in principal component 2 (PC2) images with areas of contrasting negative and positive values for conglomerated crystals and PC2 images exhibiting uniformly positive or uniformly negative values for single crystals. Qualitative assessment of PC2 images allowed the identification of domains of different internal ordering within protein-crystal samples as well as differentiation between multi-domain conglomerated crystals and single crystals. PR-SHG assessments of crystalline domains were in good agreement with spatially resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements. These results have implications for improving the productive throughput of protein structure determination through early identification of multi-domain crystals.

  1. Infrared polarization measurements of Io in 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, W.M.; Goguen, J.D.; Nagata, T.; Ellis, H.B. Jr.; Werner, M.

    1988-09-01

    New polarization measurements of Io were made with two different polarimeters at 3.8 and 4.8 microns. The measurements, at phase angles of about 2 deg, detect the polarization of reflected sunlight at both wavelengths. Only upper limits can be determined for the volcanic activity in 1986, but these limits show that there has been a remarkable decrease in activity, particularly of the Loki volcano, at these short wavelengths. The 1984 data (Goguen and Sinton (1985) are reanalyzed with the new model, which includes polarization of reflected sunlight. The large amount of thermal emission from the Loki volcano in 1984 produced a polarization that was dominant over that of reflected sunlight. 29 references.

  2. Polarization Measurements on SUMI's TVLS Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, K.; West, E. A.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of toroidal variable-line-space (TVLS) gratings for the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI), currently being developed at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC). SUMI is a spectro-polarimeter designed to measure magnetic fields in the solar chromosphere by observing two UV emission lines sensitive to magnetic fields, the CIY line at 155nm and the MgII line at 280nm. The instrument uses a pair of TVLS gratings, to observe both linear polarizations simultaneously. Efficiency measurements were done on bare aluminum gratings and aluminum/MgF2 coated gratings, at both linear polarizations.

  3. Layer-resolved spin polarization in Sb overlayers on NiMnSb

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, R.; Komesu, T.; Borca, C. N.; Jeong, H.-K.; Dowben, P. A.; Ristoiu, D.; Nozi {grave e}res, J. P.

    2001-06-01

    The magnetism of antimony overlayers on a ferromagnetic substrate is investigated by spin-polarized inverse photoemission and explained in terms of a spin-dependent envelope-function approximation (SDEFA). The atomic structure of the films, which were deposited by sputtering Sb onto a NiMnSb(001) substrate, is characterized by a unique combination of three features: (i) NiMnSb is a highly spin-polarized semi-Heusler alloy predicted to be halfmetallic, (ii) antimony is a semimetal, exhibiting a band structure reminiscent of indirect-gap semiconductors, and (iii) the small lattice mismatch ensures a well-controlled interface. Combined x-ray absorption spectroscopy and spin-polarized inverse photoemission yield a layer-resolved spin polarization decaying on a length scale of the order of 1 nm. The unusual range of the spin polarization in the paramagnetic overlayer is explained by considering the alloy{endash}antimony interface as a spin-dependent perturbation potential and taking into account the low effective masses of the Sb conduction electrons (only about 0.1 for both electrons and holes). {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Polarization Measurements in Neutral Pion Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    C. Jones; Krishni Wijesooriya; B. Fox; Andrei Afanasev; Moscov Amaryan; Konrad Aniol; Stephen Becher; Kamal Benslama; Louis Bimbot; Peter Bosted; Edward Brash; John Calarco; Zhengwei Chai; C. Chang; Ting Chang; Jian-Ping Chen; Seonho Choi; Eugene Chudakov; Steve Churchwell; Domenick Crovelli; Sonja Dieterich; Scott Dumalski; Dipangkar Dutta; Martin Epstein; Kevin Fissum; Salvatore Frullani; Haiyan Gao; Juncai Gao; Franco Garibaldi; Olivier Gayou; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Charles Glashausser; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; Ole Hansen; Roy Holt; Jordan Hovdebo; Garth Huber; Kees de Jager; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; Jim Kelly; Edward Kinney; Edgar Kooijman; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Michael Kuss; John LeRose; Meme Liang; Richard Lindgren; Nilanga Liyanage; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; Pete Markowitz; Kathy McCormick; Dave Meekins; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Joe Mitchell; Ludyvine Morand; Charles Perdrisat

    2002-09-26

    We present measurements of the recoil proton polarization for the {sup 1}H(gamma-vector,p-vector)pi{sup 0} reaction for theta{sub c.m.}{sup pi} = 60{sup o}-135{sup o} and for photon energies up to 4.1 GeV. These are the first data in this reaction for polarization transfer with circularly polarized photons. Various theoretical models are compared with the results. No evidence for hadron helicity conservation is observed. Models that employ factorization are not favored. It appears from the strong angular dependence of the induced polarization at photon energies of 2.5 and 3.1 GeV that a relatively high spin resonance or background amplitude might exist in this energy region.

  5. Probing Momentum-Resolved Orbital Polarization at the Oxide Interfaces with SW-ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arab, Arian; Nemsak, Slavomir; Conti, Giuseppina; Strocov, Vladimir; Huijben, Mark; Minar, Jan; Fadley, Charles; Gray, Alexander

    Interface electronic structure is critical to the functional properties of strongly-correlated multilayer systems such as the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/SrTiO3 heterostucture, a promising candidate for a magnetic tunnel junction. Recently it was demonstrated that for periodic superlattice samples controllable depth selectivity in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) can be accomplished by setting up an x-ray standing-wave (SW) field in the sample and translating it vertically along the surface normal by varying x-ray incidence angle. Here, by varying polarization of the incident x-rays we add orbital sensitivity to SW-ARPES, thus allowing us to distinguish momentum-resolved electronic dispersions for the electronic states of different symmetries (e.g. x2-y2 and 3z2-r2) . Distinctly different momentum-resolved orbital polarization maps are obtained for the bulk-like and interface-like Mn 3d electronic states. The results are compared to state-of-the-art first-principles calculations. Future directions and applications are discussed.

  6. Polarization measurement of laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, Natascha; Engels, Ralf; Engin, Ilhan; Greven, Patrick; Holler, Astrid; Lehrach, Andreas; Maier, Rudolf; Büscher, Markus; Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald; Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam

    2014-02-15

    We report on the successful use of a laser-driven few-MeV proton source to measure the differential cross section of a hadronic scattering reaction as well as on the measurement and simulation study of polarization observables of the laser-accelerated charged particle beams. These investigations were carried out with thin foil targets, illuminated by 100 TW laser pulses at the Arcturus laser facility; the polarization measurement is based on the spin dependence of hadronic proton scattering off nuclei in a Silicon target. We find proton beam polarizations consistent with zero magnitude which indicates that for these particular laser-target parameters the particle spins are not aligned by the strong magnetic fields inside the laser-generated plasmas.

  7. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentefour, El H.; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams ‘proton imaging field’ are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons.

  8. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement.

    PubMed

    Bentefour, El H; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-21

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams 'proton imaging field' are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons. PMID:27435446

  9. POLRADS: polarization radiance distribution measurement system.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kenneth J; Souaidia, Nordine

    2010-09-13

    While the upwelling radiance distribution in the ocean can be highly polarized, there are few measurements of this parameter in the open ocean. To obtain the polarized in-water upwelling spectral radiance distribution data we have developed the POLRADS instrument. This instrument is based on the NuRADS radiance distribution camera systems in which linear polarizer's have been installed. By combining simultaneous images from three NuRADS instruments, three Stokes parameters (I, Q, U) for the water leaving radiance can be obtained for all upwelling angles simultaneously. This system measures the Stokes parameters Q/I and U/I with a 0.05-0.06 uncertainty and I with a 7-10% uncertainty. PMID:20940862

  10. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of two-color XUV–NIR ionization with polarization control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düsterer, S.; Hartmann, G.; Babies, F.; Beckmann, A.; Brenner, G.; Buck, J.; Costello, J.; Dammann, L.; De Fanis, A.; Geßler, P.; Glaser, L.; Ilchen, M.; Johnsson, P.; Kazansky, A. K.; Kelly, T. J.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Nosik, V. L.; Sazhina, I. P.; Scholz, F.; Seltmann, J.; Sotoudi, H.; Viefhaus, J.; Kabachnik, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    Electron emission caused by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation in the presence of a strong near infrared (NIR) field leads to multiphoton interactions that depend on several parameters. Here, a comprehensive study of the influence of the angle between the polarization directions of the NIR and XUV fields on the two-color angle-resolved photoelectron spectra of He and Ne is presented. The resulting photoelectron angular distribution strongly depends on the orientation of the NIR polarization plane with respect to that of the XUV field. The prevailing influence of the intense NIR field over the angular emission characteristics for He(1s) and Ne(2p) ionization lines is shown. The underlying processes are modeled in the frame of the strong field approximation (SFA) which shows very consistent agreement with the experiment reaffirming the power of the SFA for multicolor-multiphoton ionization in this regime.

  11. New Measurements of CMB Polarization with SPTpol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Jason; SPTpol Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    All-sky surveys of the primary temperature anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) are now cosmic variance limited on large to intermediate scales. To place tighter constraints on cosmology from CMB primary anisotropies we turn to measurements of CMB polarization. Not only is polarization another probe of ΛCDM cosmology, but secondary anisotropies are expected to have low polarized emission, which opens more of the so-called CMB damping tail to cosmological study. In this talk, we present new 150 GHz measurements of the CMB E-mode polarization auto-power and temperature-E-mode cross-power spectra from a 500 deg2 patch of sky observed with the SPTpol instrument, the second-generation receiver installed on the South Pole Telescope. Over a range of spherical harmonic multipoles 50 ≤ l < 10000 we detect 9 acoustic peaks in the E-mode spectrum. With these spectra we constrain ΛCDM cosmology independently from temperature-only measurements, and present new joint constraints with the Planck temperature auto-power spectrum. The CMB is also gravitationally lensed by large-scale structure. We use our high-fidelity map of E-mode polarization, in conjunction with SPTpol maps of B-mode polarization and temperature, to map the lensing potential of the CMB and measure its corresponding power spectrum. Finally, the CMB lensing potential can be combined with our E-mode map to estimate lensing B modes present in our field, which can be delensed to improve constraints on primordial B modes and the energy scale of inflation through the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r.

  12. Time-Resolved Plasma Density and Magnetic Field Measurements in a Pulsed Plasma Deflagration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebner, Keith; Cappelli, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of electron density and azimuthal magnetic field strength within a coaxial electromagnetic plasma accelerator operating in a pulsed deflagration mode are presented. Density measurements are performed via an optical interferometer of the Michelson type, while the Faraday rotation of the polarization plane of the same beam is measured in order to provide the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the direction of beam propagation. Experimental data is compared to magnetohydrodynamic simulation results and prior lower fidelity experimental results. Measurements were carried out over a wide range of operating conditions in order to validate the theoretical models describing the physics of the deflagration acceleration mechanism.

  13. Electronic Structure of the Topological Insulator Bi2Se3 Using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy: Evidence for a Nearly Full Surface Spin Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Z Pan; E Vescovo; A Fedorov; D Gardner; Y Lee; S Chu; G Gu; T Valla

    2011-12-31

    We performed high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure and the spin texture on the surface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, a model TI. By tuning the photon energy, we found that the topological surface state is well separated from the bulk states in the vicinity of k{sub z} = Z plane of the bulk Brillouin zone. The spin-resolved measurements in that region indicate a very high degree of spin polarization of the surface state, {approx}0.75, much higher than previously reported. Our results demonstrate that the topological surface state on Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is highly spin polarized and that the dominant factors limiting the polarization are mainly extrinsic.

  14. Electronic Structure of the Topological Insulator Bi2Se3 Using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy: Evidence for a Nearly Full Surface Spin Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Z.H.; Vescovo, E.; Fedorov, A.V.; Gardner, D.; Lee, Y.S.; Chu, S.; Gu, G.D.; Valla, T.

    2011-06-22

    We performed high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure and the spin texture on the surface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, a model TI. By tuning the photon energy, we found that the topological surface state is well separated from the bulk states in the vicinity of k{sub z} = Z plane of the bulk Brillouin zone. The spin-resolved measurements in that region indicate a very high degree of spin polarization of the surface state, {approx}0.75, much higher than previously reported. Our results demonstrate that the topological surface state on Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is highly spin polarized and that the dominant factors limiting the polarization are mainly extrinsic.

  15. Data Analysis And Polarization Measurements With GEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohmayer, Tod

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS) mission was selected by NASA for flight in 2014. GEMS will make the first sensitive survey of X-ray polarization across a wide range of source classes including black hole and neutron star binaries, AGN of different types, rotation and accretion-powered pulsars, magnetars, shell supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. GEMS employs grazing-incidence foil mirrors and novel time-projection chamber (TPC) polarimeters leveraging the photoelectric effect. The GEMS detectors image the charge tracks of photoelectrons produced by 2 - 10 keV X-rays. The initial direction of the photoelectron is determined by the linear polarization of the photon. We present an overview of the data analysis challenges and methods for GEMS, including procedures for producing optimally filtered images of the charge tracks and estimating their initial directions. We illustrate our methods using laboratory measurements of polarized and unpolarized X-rays with flight-like detectors as well as from simulated tracks. We also present detailed simulations exploring the statistics of polarization measurements appropriate for GEMS, and make comparisons with previous work.

  16. Nature of dark energy and polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainini, R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Bonometto, S. A.

    2003-11-01

    High sensitivity polarization measures, on wide angular scales, together with data on anisotropy, can be used to fix DE parameters. In this paper, first of all, we aim to determine the sensitivity needed to provide significant limits. Our analysis puts in evidence that there is a class of DE models that polarization measures can possibly exclude soon. This class includes models with DE due to a Ratra-Peebles (RP) potential. Using a likelihood analysis, we show that it is possible to distinguish RP models from ΛCDM and other dynamical DE models, already with the sensitivity of experiments like SPOrt or WMAP, thanks to their negative TE correlation at low- l, when the optical depth τ is sufficiently large. On the contrary, fixing the energy scale Λ for RP potentials or distinguishing between ΛCDM and other DE potentials requires a much lower pixel noise, that no planned polarization experiment will achieve. While reviewing this paper after the referee report, the first-year WMAP data were released. WMAP finds large positive anisotropy-polarization correlations at low l; this apparently excludes DE models with RP potentials.

  17. Optical diagnosis and characterization of dental caries with polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Hsu, Stephen Chin-Ying; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-04-01

    We report the utility of a rapid polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique developed for optical diagnosis and characterization of dental caries in the tooth. Hyperspectral SRS images (512 × 512 pixels) of the tooth covering both the fingerprint (800-1800 cm(-1)) and high-wavenumber (2800-3600 cm(-1)) regions can be acquired within 15 minutes, which is at least 10(3) faster in imaging speed than confocal Raman mapping. Hyperspectral SRS imaging uncovers the biochemical distributions and variations across the carious enamel in the tooth. SRS imaging shows that compared to the sound enamel, the mineral content in the body of lesion decreases by 55%; while increasing up to 110% in the surface zone, indicating the formation of a hyper-mineralized layer due to the remineralization process. Further polarized SRS imaging shows that the depolarization ratios of hydroxyapatite crystals (ν 1-PO4 (3-) of SRS at 959 cm(-1)) of the tooth in the sound enamel, translucent zone, body of lesion and the surface zone are 0.035 ± 0.01, 0.052 ± 0.02, 0.314 ± 0.1, 0.038 ± 0.02, respectively, providing a new diagnostic criterion for discriminating carious lesions from sound enamel in the teeth. This work demonstrates for the first time that the polarization-resolved hyperspectral SRS imaging technique can be used for quantitatively determining tooth mineralization levels and discriminating carious lesions from sound enamel in a rapid fashion, proving its promising potential of early detection and diagnosis of dental caries without labeling. PMID:27446654

  18. Optical diagnosis and characterization of dental caries with polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Hsu, Stephen Chin-Ying; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    We report the utility of a rapid polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique developed for optical diagnosis and characterization of dental caries in the tooth. Hyperspectral SRS images (512 × 512 pixels) of the tooth covering both the fingerprint (800-1800 cm−1) and high-wavenumber (2800-3600 cm−1) regions can be acquired within 15 minutes, which is at least 103 faster in imaging speed than confocal Raman mapping. Hyperspectral SRS imaging uncovers the biochemical distributions and variations across the carious enamel in the tooth. SRS imaging shows that compared to the sound enamel, the mineral content in the body of lesion decreases by 55%; while increasing up to 110% in the surface zone, indicating the formation of a hyper-mineralized layer due to the remineralization process. Further polarized SRS imaging shows that the depolarization ratios of hydroxyapatite crystals (ν1-PO43- of SRS at 959 cm−1) of the tooth in the sound enamel, translucent zone, body of lesion and the surface zone are 0.035 ± 0.01, 0.052 ± 0.02, 0.314 ± 0.1, 0.038 ± 0.02, respectively, providing a new diagnostic criterion for discriminating carious lesions from sound enamel in the teeth. This work demonstrates for the first time that the polarization-resolved hyperspectral SRS imaging technique can be used for quantitatively determining tooth mineralization levels and discriminating carious lesions from sound enamel in a rapid fashion, proving its promising potential of early detection and diagnosis of dental caries without labeling. PMID:27446654

  19. GRB Polarization Measurements with CGRO/COMPTEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Mark L.; Collmar, Werner

    2016-04-01

    We have embarked on a program to analyze CGRO/COMPTEL data in search for evidence of polarization in both transient sources and in brighter steady sources. We are pursuing this work because of the heightened interest in high energy polarimetry, the recognition that some high energy sources may be highly polarized (thus improving our chances of a making useful measurements), and the ready availability of modern computing resources that provide the ability to carry out more comprehensive simulations in support of the analysis. The only significant work done to date with regards to COMPTEL polarimetry was published almost 20 years ago and used a simplified mass model of COMPTEL for simulating the instrument response. Estimates of the minimum detectable polarization (MDP) near 1 MeV included 30% for a two-week observation of the Crab, as low as 10% for bright GRBs, and as low as 10% for bright solar flares. The data analysis performed at the time led to inconclusive results and suggested some unknown systematic error. We contend that a self-consistent analysis will be feasible with high fidelity simulations, simulations that were not easily generated 20 years ago. Our analysis utilizes the latest GEANT4 simulation tools in conjunction with a high-fidelity mass model of the COMPTEL instrument, and incorporate updated analysis tools originally developed by the COMPTEL collaboration. Given the nine years of COMPTEL data, we expect that this work will likely add to our understanding of the polarization properties of transient sources, such as GRBs and solar flares, as well as brighter steady sources, such as the Crab and Cyg X-1. Here we present results from simulations of the COMPTEL polarization response and examine prospects for studying GRB polarization.

  20. Spatially resolved scatter measurement of diffractive micromirror arrays.

    PubMed

    Sicker, Cornelius; Heber, Jörg; Berndt, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Spatial light modulators (SLMs) support flexible system concepts in modern optics and especially phase-only SLMs such as micromirror arrays (MMAs) appear attractive for many applications. In order to achieve a precise phase modulation, which is crucial for optical performance, careful characterization and calibration of SLM devices is required. We examine an intensity-based measurement concept, which promises distinct advantages by means of a spatially resolved scatter measurement that is combined with the MMA's diffractive principle. Measurements yield quantitative results, which are consistent with measurements of micromirror roughness components, by white-light interferometry. They reveal relative scatter as low as 10-4, which corresponds to contrast ratios up to 10,000. The potential of the technique to resolve phase changes in the subnanometer range is experimentally demonstrated. PMID:27411205

  1. Fiber orientation measurement using polarization imaging.

    PubMed

    Lechocinski, N; Breugnot, S

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new technique to determine the orientation of hair fiber, a key parameter in the evaluation of visual appearance of hair. Using polarization imaging and image analysis tools, we are able to measure the orientation of hair fiber for each pixel in the image. A theoretical analysis of the optical set-up is presented. Experimental data on a single fiber, hair tress, and complete head are given. Application to shampoo and conditioner is also demonstrated. PMID:21635838

  2. Time-Resolved Rayleigh Scattering Measurements in Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2008-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded gas flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultipler tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. Mean and rms velocity and temperature fluctuation measurements in both an electrically-heated jet facility with a 10-mm diameter nozzle and also in a hydrogen-combustor heated jet facility with a 50.8-mm diameter nozzle at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented.

  3. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  4. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, Chiranjit; Steinkamp, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated cw laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes.

  5. Polarization-resolved spectroscopy imaging of grain boundaries and optical excitations in crystalline organic thin films

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Z.; Rawat, N.; Cour, I.; Manning, L.; Headrick, R. L.; Furis, M.

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of optical properties of organic crystalline semiconductors thin films is challenging due to submicron grain sizes and the presence of numerous structural defects, disorder and grain boundaries. Here we report on the results of combined linear dichroism (LD)/ polarization-resolved photoluminescence (PL) scanning microscopy experiments that simultaneously probe the excitonic radiative recombination and the molecular ordering in solution-processed metal-free phthalocyanine crystalline thin films with macroscopic grain sizes. LD/PL images reveal the relative orientation of the singlet exciton transition dipoles at the grain boundaries and the presence of a localized electronic state that acts like a barrier for exciton diffusion across the grain boundary. We also show how this energy barrier can be entirely eliminated through the optimization of deposition parameters that results in films with large grain sizes and small-angle boundaries. These studies open an avenue for exploring the influence of long-range order on exciton diffusion and carrier transport. PMID:26365682

  6. Polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation imaging for liver fibrosis assessment without labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Pan, Shiying; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-10-01

    We apply the polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation (PR-SHG) microscopy to investigate the changes of collagen typings (type I vs type III) and collagen fibril orientations of liver tissue in bile-duct-ligation (BDL) rat models. The PR-SHG results show that the second-order susceptibility tensor ratios (χ31/χ15 and χ33/χ15) of collagen fibers increase with liver fibrotic progression after BDL surgery, reflecting an increase of the type III collagen component with the severity of liver fibrosis; and the square root of the collagen type III to type I ratio linearly correlates (R2 = 0.98) with histopathological scores. Furthermore, the collagen fibril orientations become more random with liver fibrosis transformation as compared to normal liver tissue. This work demonstrates that PR-SHG microscopy has the potential for label-free diagnosis and characterization of liver fibrosis based on quantitative analysis of collagen typings and fibril orientations.

  7. Polarization bispectrum for measuring primordial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2013-11-01

    We examine the potential of polarization bispectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) to constrain primordial magnetic fields (PMFs). We compute all possible bispectra between temperature and polarization anisotropies sourced by PMFs and show that they are weakly correlated with well-known local-type and secondary ISW-lensing bispectra. From a Fisher analysis it is found that, owing to E-mode bispectra, in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment the expected uncertainty in the amplitude of magnetized bispectra is 80% improved in comparison with an analysis in terms of temperature auto-bispectrum alone. In the Planck or the proposed PRISM experiment cases, we will be able to measure PMFs with strength 2.6 or 2.2 nG. PMFs also generate bispectra involving B-mode polarization, due to tensor-mode dependence. We also find that the B-mode bispectrum can reduce the uncertainty more drastically and hence PMFs comparable to or less than 1 nG may be measured in a PRISM-like experiment.

  8. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendy, Robert F.

    2015-12-01

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  9. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    SciTech Connect

    Melendy, Robert F.

    2015-12-28

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  10. Development of a compact electron ion coincidence analyzer using a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer and a miniature polar-angle-resolved time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer with four concentric anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Eiichi; Nambu, Akira; Mase, Kazuhiko; Isari, Kouji; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Mori, Masanobu; Okudaira, Koji K.; Ueno, Nobuo

    2009-04-15

    A compact electron ion coincidence (EICO) analyzer that uses a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer and a miniature polar-angle-resolved time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer with four concentric anodes was developed for surface science and surface analysis. The apparatus is especially useful in the study of ion desorption stimulated by an Auger process because information on the mass, yield, desorption polar angle, and kinetic energy of ions can be obtained for the selected core-ionization-final-states or the selected Auger-final-states. The analyzer can be used also for analysis of the configuration of specific surface molecules because the desorption polar angles reflect the direction of surface bonds. The EICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring polar-angle-resolved-ion yield spectra and coincidence spectra of Auger-electron and polar-angle-resolved H{sup +} from condensed water.

  11. Resolving and measuring diffusion in complex interfaces: Exploring new capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.

    2015-09-01

    This exploratory LDRD targeted the use of a new high resolution spectroscopic diffusion capabilities developed at Sandia to resolve transport processes at interfaces in heterogeneous polymer materials. In particular, the combination of high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion experiments were used to directly explore interface diffusion within heterogeneous polymer composites, including measuring diffusion for individual chemical species in multi-component mixtures. Several different types of heterogeneous polymer systems were studied using these HRMAS NMR diffusion capabilities to probe the resolution limitations, determine the spatial length scales involved, and explore the general applicability to specific heterogeneous systems. The investigations pursued included a) the direct measurement of the diffusion for poly(dimethyl siloxane) polymer (PDMS) on nano-porous materials, b) measurement of penetrant diffusion in additive manufactures (3D printed) processed PDMS composites, and c) the measurement of diffusion in swollen polymers/penetrant mixtures within nano-confined aluminum oxide membranes. The NMR diffusion results obtained were encouraging and allowed for an improved understanding of diffusion and transport processes at the molecular level, while at the same time demonstrating that the spatial heterogeneity that can be resolved using HRMAS NMR PFG diffusion experiment must be larger than ~μm length scales, expect for polymer transport within nanoporous carbons where additional chemical resolution improves the resolvable heterogeneous length scale to hundreds of nm.

  12. Information processing in parallel through directionally resolved molecular polarization components in coherent multidimensional spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Tian-Min; Fresch, Barbara; Levine, R. D.; Remacle, F.

    2015-08-01

    We propose that information processing can be implemented by measuring the directional components of the macroscopic polarization of an ensemble of molecules subject to a sequence of laser pulses. We describe the logic operation theoretically and demonstrate it by simulations. The measurement of integrated stimulated emission in different phase matching spatial directions provides a logic decomposition of a function that is the discrete analog of an integral transform. The logic operation is reversible and all the possible outputs are computed in parallel for all sets of possible multivalued inputs. The number of logic variables of the function is the number of laser pulses used in sequence. The logic function that is computed depends on the chosen chromophoric molecular complex and on its interactions with the solvent and on the two time intervals between the three pulses and the pulse strengths and polarizations. The outputs are the homodyne detected values of the polarization components that are measured in the allowed phase matching macroscopic directions, kl, k l = ∑ i l i k i where ki is the propagation direction of the ith pulse and {li} is a set of integers that encodes the multivalued inputs. Parallelism is inherently implemented because all the partial polarizations that define the outputs are processed simultaneously. The outputs, which are read directly on the macroscopic level, can be multivalued because the high dynamical range of partial polarization measurements by nonlinear coherent spectroscopy allows for fine binning of the signals. The outputs are uniquely related to the inputs so that the logic is reversible.

  13. Performance of orbital neutron instruments for spatially resolved hydrogen measurements of airless planetary bodies.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David J; Elphic, Richard C; Feldman, William C; Funsten, Herbert O; Prettyman, Thomas H

    2010-03-01

    Orbital neutron spectroscopy has become a standard technique for measuring planetary surface compositions from orbit. While this technique has led to important discoveries, such as the deposits of hydrogen at the Moon and Mars, a limitation is its poor spatial resolution. For omni-directional neutron sensors, spatial resolutions are 1-1.5 times the spacecraft's altitude above the planetary surface (or 40-600 km for typical orbital altitudes). Neutron sensors with enhanced spatial resolution have been proposed, and one with a collimated field of view is scheduled to fly on a mission to measure lunar polar hydrogen. No quantitative studies or analyses have been published that evaluate in detail the detection and sensitivity limits of spatially resolved neutron measurements. Here, we describe two complementary techniques for evaluating the hydrogen sensitivity of spatially resolved neutron sensors: an analytic, closed-form expression that has been validated with Lunar Prospector neutron data, and a three-dimensional modeling technique. The analytic technique, called the Spatially resolved Neutron Analytic Sensitivity Approximation (SNASA), provides a straightforward method to evaluate spatially resolved neutron data from existing instruments as well as to plan for future mission scenarios. We conclude that the existing detector--the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND)--scheduled to launch on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter will have hydrogen sensitivities that are over an order of magnitude poorer than previously estimated. We further conclude that a sensor with a geometric factor of approximately 100 cm(2) Sr (compared to the LEND geometric factor of approximately 10.9 cm(2) Sr) could make substantially improved measurements of the lunar polar hydrogen spatial distribution. PMID:20298147

  14. Performance of Orbital Neutron Instruments for Spatially Resolved Hydrogen Measurements of Airless Planetary Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Elphic, Richard C.; Feldman, William C.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Orbital neutron spectroscopy has become a standard technique for measuring planetary surface compositions from orbit. While this technique has led to important discoveries, such as the deposits of hydrogen at the Moon and Mars, a limitation is its poor spatial resolution. For omni-directional neutron sensors, spatial resolutions are 1–1.5 times the spacecraft's altitude above the planetary surface (or 40–600 km for typical orbital altitudes). Neutron sensors with enhanced spatial resolution have been proposed, and one with a collimated field of view is scheduled to fly on a mission to measure lunar polar hydrogen. No quantitative studies or analyses have been published that evaluate in detail the detection and sensitivity limits of spatially resolved neutron measurements. Here, we describe two complementary techniques for evaluating the hydrogen sensitivity of spatially resolved neutron sensors: an analytic, closed-form expression that has been validated with Lunar Prospector neutron data, and a three-dimensional modeling technique. The analytic technique, called the Spatially resolved Neutron Analytic Sensitivity Approximation (SNASA), provides a straightforward method to evaluate spatially resolved neutron data from existing instruments as well as to plan for future mission scenarios. We conclude that the existing detector—the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND)—scheduled to launch on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter will have hydrogen sensitivities that are over an order of magnitude poorer than previously estimated. We further conclude that a sensor with a geometric factor of ∼ 100 cm2 Sr (compared to the LEND geometric factor of ∼ 10.9 cm2 Sr) could make substantially improved measurements of the lunar polar hydrogen spatial distribution. Key Words: Planetary instrumentation—Planetary science—Moon—Spacecraft experiments—Hydrogen. Astrobiology 10, 183–200. PMID:20298147

  15. Moisture-insensitive optical fingerprint scanner based on polarization resolved in-finger scattered light.

    PubMed

    Back, Seon-Woo; Lee, Yong-Geon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Son, Geun-Sik

    2016-08-22

    A moisture-insensitive optical fingerprint scanner (FPS) that is based on polarization resolved in-finger light is proposed and realized. Incident visible light, which is selectively fed to a fingerprint sample via a polarization beam splitter (PBS), is deemed to be partially scattered backward by tissues associated with the skin of the finger. The backscattered light is mostly index-guided in the ridge comprising the fingerprint, which has a higher refractive index, and is drastically dispersed in the valley, which is typically filled with water or air and so has a lower index. However, when light reflects directly off the surface of the finger skin, it fundamentally prevents the scanned image from being determined. The proposed FPS produces bright and dark intensity patterns that are alternately created on the surface of the PBS and correspond to the ridges and valleys, respectively. Thus, this method can especially distinguish between a fake synthetic fingerprint and a genuine fingerprint due to its use of in-finger scattered light. The scanner has been rigorously designed by carrying out ray-optic simulations depending on the wavelength, with tissue-induced scattering taken into account. The device was constructed by incorporating a wire-grid type PBS in conjunction with visible LED sources, including blue, green and red. The scanner adopting a blue LED, which exhibits the strongest light scattering, resulted in the best fingerprint image, enabling enhanced fidelity under the wet and dry situations. Finally, a fake synthetic fingerprint could be successfully discriminated. PMID:27557199

  16. Acceptance Effects in the Hyperons Global Polarization Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Selyuzhenkov, Ilya

    2006-11-17

    The possible sources of systematic uncertainties in the hyperons global polarization measurement are discussed. The equation with detector acceptance effects taken into account is provided. Contribution of the hyperons directed flow into the hyperons global polarization measurement is shown. The systematic uncertainties of the {lambda} hyperons global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions with the STAR detector at RHIC are calculated.

  17. A new approach to highly resolved measurements of turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, J.; Hölling, A.; Peinke, J.; Bhiladvala, R.; Hölling, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present the design and principle of a new anemometer, namely the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-LCA), which has been developed for highly resolved flow speed measurements of two components (2d) under laboratory conditions. We will explain the working principle and demonstrate the sensor’s performance by means of comparison measurements of wake turbulence with a commercial X-wire. In the past we have shown that the 2d-LCA is capable of being applied in liquid and particle-laden domains, but we also believe that other challenging areas of operation such as near-wall flows can become accessible.

  18. Time-resolved measurement of quadrupole wakefields in corrugated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chao; Fu, Feichao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Shi, Libin; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhen; Xiang, Dao

    2016-02-01

    Corrugated structures have recently been widely used for manipulating electron beam longitudinal phase space and for producing THz radiation. Here we report on time-resolved measurements of the quadrupole wakefields in planar corrugated structures. It is shown that while the time-dependent quadrupole wakefield produced by a planar corrugated structure causes significant growth in beam transverse emittance, it can be effectively canceled with a second corrugated structure with orthogonal orientation. The strengths of the time-dependent quadrupole wakefields for various corrugated structure gaps are also measured and found to be in good agreement with theories. Our work should forward the applications of corrugated structures in many accelerator based scientific facilities.

  19. Spatially resolved concentration measurements based on backscatter absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze; Sanders, Scott T.; Robinson, Michael A.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of spatially resolved measurements of gas properties using direct absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with backscattered signals. We report a 1-D distribution of H2O mole fraction with a spatial resolution of 5 mm. The peak and average discrepancy between the measured and expected mole fraction are 21.1 and 8.0 %, respectively. The demonstration experiment is related to a diesel aftertreatment system; a selective catalytic reduction brick made of cordierite is used. The brick causes volume scattering interference; advanced baseline fitting based on a genetic algorithm is used to reduce the effects of this interference by a factor of 2.3.

  20. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research.

  1. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research. PMID:27250457

  2. Dynamic piezoresponse force microscopy: Spatially resolved probing of polarization dynamics in time and voltage domains

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Ehara, Y; Wada, A.; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Griggio, Flavio; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-01-01

    An approach for probing dynamic phenomena during hysteresis loop measurements in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is developed. Dynamic PFM (D-PFM) necessitates development of 5-dimensional (5D) data acquisition protocols and associated methods for analysis and visualization of multidimensional data. Using a combination of multivariate statistical analysis and phenomenological fitting, we explore dynamic behavior during polarization switching in model ferroelectric films with dense ferroelastic domain structures and in ferroelectric capacitors. In polydomain films, multivariate analysis of the switching data suggests that ferroelectric and ferroelastic components can be decoupled and time dynamics can be explored. In capacitors, a strong correlation between polarization dynamics and microstructure is observed. The future potential of D-PFM for probing time-dependent hysteretic phenomena in ferroelectrics and ionic systems is discussed.

  3. Orientational Ordering of Carotenoids in Myelin Membranes Resolved by Polarized Raman Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kutuzov, Nikolay P.; Brazhe, Alexey R.; Maksimov, Georgy V.; Dracheva, Olga E.; Lyaskovskiy, Vladimir L.; Bulygin, Fedor V.; Rubin, Andrey B.

    2014-01-01

    We study orientational ordering of membrane compounds in the myelinated nerve fiber by means of polarized Raman microspectroscopy. The theory of orientational distribution functions was adapted to live-cell measurements. The obtained orientational distribution functions of carotenoids and lipid acyl chain clearly indicated a predominantly radial-like orientation in membranes of the myelin. Two-dimensional Raman images, made under optimal polarization of incident laser beam, corroborated the proposed carotenoid orientation within the bilayer. Experimental data suggested the tilted orientation of both carotenoid polyenic and lipid acyl chains. The values of maximum tilt angles were similar, with possible implication of carotenoid-induced ordering effect on lipid acyl chains, and hence change of myelin membrane properties. This study stages carotenoids of the nerve as possible mediators of excitation and leverages underlying activity-dependent membrane reordering. PMID:25140424

  4. Structure of polarization-resolved conoscopic patterns of planar oriented liquid crystal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, A. D. Vovk, R. G.

    2010-05-15

    The geometry of distributions of the polarization of light in conoscopic patterns of planar oriented nematic and cholesteric liquid crystal (LC) cells is described in terms of the polarization singularities including C-points (points of circular polarization) and L lines (lines of linear polarization). Conditions for the formation of polarization singularities (C-points) in an ensemble of conoscopic patterns parametrized by the polarization azimuth and ellipticity of the incident light wave have been studied. A characteristic feature of these conditions is selectivity with respect to the polarization parameters of the incident light wave. The polarization azimuth and ellipticity are determining parameters for nematic and cholesteric LC cells, respectively.

  5. Spatially resolved heat release rate measurements in turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ayoola, B.O.; Kaminski, C.F.; Balachandran, R.; Mastorakos, E.; Frank, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Heat release rate is a fundamental property of great importance for the theoretical and experimental elucidation of unsteady flame behaviors such as combustion noise, combustion instabilities, and pulsed combustion. Investigations of such thermoacoustic interactions require a reliable indicator of heat release rate capable of resolving spatial structures in turbulent flames. Traditionally, heat release rate has been estimated via OH or CH radical chemiluminescence; however, chemiluminescence suffers from being a line-of-sight technique with limited capability for resolving small-scale structures. In this paper, we report spatially resolved two-dimensional measurements of a quantity closely related to heat release rate. The diagnostic technique uses simultaneous OH and CH{sub 2}O planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), and the pixel-by-pixel product of the OH and CH{sub 2}O PLIF signals has previously been shown to correlate well with local heat release rates. Results from this diagnostic technique, which we refer to as heat release rate imaging (HR imaging), are compared with traditional OH chemiluminescence measurements in several flames. Studies were performed in lean premixed ethylene flames stabilized between opposed jets and with a bluff body. Correlations between bulk strain rates and local heat release rates were obtained and the effects of curvature on heat release rate were investigated. The results show that the heat release rate tends to increase with increasing negative curvature for the flames investigated for which Lewis numbers are greater than unity. This correlation becomes more pronounced as the flame gets closer to global extinction.

  6. Time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism study of ultrafast demagnetization in a CoPd ferromagnetic film excited by circularly polarized laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Flores, Víctor; Arabski, Jacek; Stamm, Christian; Halté, Valérie; Pontius, Niko; Beaurepaire, Eric; Boeglin, Christine

    2012-07-01

    The magnetization dynamics of CoPd films excited by circularly polarized ultrashort laser pulses is studied by time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In those films the ultrafast dynamics measured at the Co-L3 edge is strongly sensitive to the orbital magnetic moment Lz. The amount of angular momentum transferred by the circularly polarized ultrashort laser pulses to the ferromagnetic films is evaluated to ±0.1 ℏ/atom, which is above the detection limit of the experiment. Despite this, no polarization-dependent difference on the magnetization dynamics could be evidenced. These results are explained by ultrafast electronic relaxation mechanisms of the transferred angular momentum, faster than ˜100 fs. This experiment sets the methodology as well as an upper time limit for determination of angular momentum relaxation processes.

  7. Seasonal and solar-cycle variations of DP-type polar magnetic fields resolved via EOF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Robert; Freeman, Mervyn; Wild, James; Dorrian, Gareth; Gjerloev, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    We describe our application of the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) method to characterise and separate contributions to the variability of the Earth's external magnetic field (EMF) in the northern polar region, using ground magnetometer measurements. The EOF method analyses the spatio-temporal co-variance of the data to decompose it into dynamically distinct modes (each mode is a pair of spatial and temporal basis vectors). Briefly, the benefits of this analysis method are firstly that a small number of the modes can cumulatively represent most of the variance of the original data, and secondly that the basis vectors are defined by the data. Hence, the structure of the EMF is resolved compactly without a priori assumptions, in contrast to other decomposition methods such as Fourier and spherical harmonic expansions. We present the modes from 11 years (1997 - 2008) of magnetic vector data at 5 minutes resolution, recently collated by the SuperMAG archive of observatory and variometer data. Despite the sparse and irregular station distribution, a complete spatial morphology of the EMF is achieved using a self-consistent iterative infill method. Using a comparison of the temporal behaviour of the modes alongside independent measures of solar-terrestrial coupling, we demonstrate that the leading three modes describe the well-known Disturbance-Polar currents types 2 and 1 (DP2, DP1) and the system of cusp currents (DPY). These three modes account for the majority of the variance of the data - other modes describe the spatial motions of these current systems. The variation in the DP2, DP1 and DPY currents throughout the last solar cycle is presented, and the utility of this database of magnetic perturbations (to which further analysis methods can be applied) is highlighted.

  8. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  9. Polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for label-free biomolecular imaging of the tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    We report the development and implementation of a rapid polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy technique for label-free biomolecular imaging of the tooth. The hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed covers both fingerprint (800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber (2800-3600 cm-1) regions for tooth Raman imaging without fluorescence background interference with an imaging speed of <0.3 s per frame of 512 × 512 pixels (˜1 μs per pixel), that is, >106 faster than confocal Raman imaging. Significant differences of hyperspectral SRS spectra among different tooth locations (e.g., dentin, enamel, and dentin-enamel junction) are observed, revealing the biochemical distribution differences across the tooth. Further polarization-resolved SRS imaging shows different polarization dependences related to the molecular orientation differences of various tooth locations. This work demonstrates the potential of polarization-resolved hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed in rapidly characterizing biochemical structures and compositions as well as biomolecule organizations/orientations of the tooth without labeling.

  10. Improving the measurement performance of angle-resolved scattermetry by use of pupil optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Zhang, Qingyun; Lu, Hailiang; Duan, Lifeng; Li, Xiaoping

    2012-03-01

    As feature sizes decrease, requirements on critical dimension uniformity have become very strict. To monitor variations in lithography process and perform advanced process control it is important to establish a fast and accurate measurement technique for characterizing critical dimension, sidewall angle and height of the resist profile. Various techniques for feature measurement such as CD-SEM, AFM, FE-SEM, and scatterometry have been developed. Among these techniques, scatterometry has both high accuracy and a non-deconstructive measurement modality. It thus provides advantages of low-cost, high throughput, and robustness. Angle-resolved scatterometry has already been shown to provide in-line feedback information necessary for tight process control. In present paper, we introduce a novel angle-resolved scatterometer with pupil optimization. The intensity distribution of the incident light in the pupil plane is optimized considering the feature and the image sensor response properties, which improve the measurement performance of the scatterometer. A first order analysis of measurement sensitivity at different polarization conditions is carried out on resist-coated wafers with 45nm and 22nm features using Rigorous Coupled- Wave analysis (RCWA). Based on the criteria defined as the sum of the absolute difference of the relative intensity values between the nominal and varied conditions in the pupil, the sensitivity of the new technique and traditional scatterometer is compared. Simulation results show that, for 45nm feature, the sensitivity in s and p-polarization is increased by 400% and 300% respectively. While for 22nm feature, the sensitivity is increased by 200% and 130%. Reproducibility of measurement is also analyzed on 45nm and 22nm features using a Monte Carlo method and models for detector noise. Comparison of reproducibility for CD, sidewall angle, and resist height measurement is demonstrated.

  11. Optimization of polarizer angles for measurements of the degree and angle of linear polarization for linear polarizer-based polarimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Run-Qiu; Wang, Xia; Jin, Wei-Qi; Liang, Jian-An

    2015-10-01

    Linear polarizer-based polarimeters that measure the degree of linear polarization (DoLP) and the angle of polarization (AoP) were considered in this study. Variances of DoLP and AoP of the region of interest (ROI) to be measured were analyzed using a statistical method. To simplify the calculation, only additive noise and shot noise were considered. Optimized combinations of the polarizers that can minimize the variances of DoLP and AoP were determined by investigating the variances of different polarizer combinations. Several regularities were found when analyzing the data obtained from the optimized combinations. Some variables in the combinations are inversely proportional to the cube or square root of the signal-to-noise ratio of the output signals from sensors without polarizer filtering, and these variables are functions of the DoLP of the ROI to be measured.

  12. Measurements of Hygroscopicity- and Size-Resolved Sea Spray Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B.; Dawson, K. W.; Royalty, T. M.; Reed, R. E.; Petters, M.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a central role in many environmental processes by influencing the Earth's radiative balance, tropospheric chemistry, clouds, biogeochemical cycles, and visibility as well as adversely impacting human health. Based on their origin, atmospheric aerosols can be defined as anthropogenic or natural. Recent studies have shown that a large fraction of uncertainty in the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosols is related to uncertainty in natural—background—aerosols. Marine aerosols are of particular interest due to the abundance of oceans covering the Earth's surface. Despite their importance, limited information is currently available for size- and composition-resolved marine aerosol emission fluxes. Our group has designed and built an instrument for measuring the size- and hygroscopicity-resolved sea spray aerosol fluxes. The instrument was first deployed during spring 2015 at the end of the 560 m pier of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility in Duck, NC. Measurements include 200 nm-sized diameter growth factor (hygroscopicity) distributions, sea spray particle flux measurements, and total sub-micron sized aerosol concentration. Ancillary ocean data includes salinity, pH, sea surface temperature, dissolved oxygen content, and relative fluorescence (proxy for [Chl-a]). Hygroscopicity distribution measurements show two broad peaks, one indicative of organics and sulfates and another suggestive of sea salt. The fraction of 200 nm-sized salt particles having hygroscopicity similar to that of sea-spray aerosol contributes up to ~24% of the distribution on days with high-speed onshore winds and up to ~3% on calm days with winds blowing from the continent. However, the total concentration of sea-spray-like particles originating from offshore versus onshore winds was relatively similar. Changes in the relative contribution of sea-salt to number concentration were caused by a concomitant changes in total aerosol concentration

  13. Polarization measurements in the Vacuum Ultraviolet using SUMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the VUV polarization testing of the NSSTC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) optics. SUMI is being developed for a sounding rocket payload to prove the feasibility of making magnetic field measurements in the transition region. This paper will cover the polarization testing of the SUMI optics and the instrumental polarization of the VUV test facility.

  14. Measuring the continuum polarization with ESPaDOnS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, A.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Martioli, E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Our goal is to test the feasibility of obtaining accurate measurements of the continuum polarization from high-resolution spectra using the spectropolarimetric mode of ESPaDOnS. Methods: We used the new pipeline OPERA to reduce recent and archived ESPaDOnS data. Several polarization standard stars and science objects were tested for the linear mode. In addition, the circular mode was tested using several objects from the archive with expected null polarization. Synthetic broad-band polarization was computed from the ESPaDOnS continuum polarization spectra and compared with published values (when available) to quantify the accuracy of the instrument. Results: The continuum linear polarization measured by ESPaDOnS is consistent with broad-band polarimetry measurements available in the literature. The accuracy in the degree of linear polarization is around 0.2-0.3% considering the full sample. The accuracy in polarization position angle using the most polarized objects is better than 5°. Consistent with this, the instrumental polarization computed for the circular continuum polarization is also between 0.2-0.3%. Our results suggest that measurements of the continuum polarization using ESPaDOnS are viable and can be used to study many astrophysical objects. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  15. Measurement of the degree of polarization of the spectra from laser produced recombining Al plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Dong-Eon

    2002-07-01

    Using a polarization-resolved UV-visible spectrometer, the degree of polarization of the spectra from laser produced Al plasmas was measured. The polarization resolution was achieved by using either a dichroic polarizer or a calcite crystal. The degree of polarization of Al III 4s(2)S(1/2)-4p(2)P(o)(3/2) transition at 569.66 nm was measured at different positions from a target surface. The degree of polarization was observed to be 2.1+/-0.13% at a distance of 220 microm from the target and decreased as the distance from the target increased, vanishing at a distance of about 1.3 mm from the target. To avoid the possible error due to the shot-to-shot variation of the line intensity, a calcite crystal was used to simultaneously observe the two polarization components, obtaining a similar result. The electron temperature of about 3 eV and the density of 2 x 10(17) cm(-3) measured spectroscopically indicates that the plasma was in the recombining phase. This is a report on the observation of the polarization of a transition in a laser-produced recombining Al plasma. PMID:12241524

  16. In-vivo depth-resolved birefringence measurements of the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cense, Barry; Chen, Teresa; Park, Boris H.; Pierce, Mark C.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2002-06-01

    Glaucoma causes irreversible damage to nerves in the retinal nerve fiber layer. A technique that could measure both the condition and thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) would be very useful for the early detection and treatment of glaucoma. Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) is a modality that measures the depth resolved optical birefringence of biological tissue. Since damage to the nerve fiber layer could decrease its birefringence, PS-OCT has the potential to enhance specificity in determining RNFL thickness and integrity in OCT images. In order to measure the RNFL birefringence on humans in vivo, a fiber-based PS-OCT set-up was built with which quasi real time images of the human retina were made. Preliminary measurements on a healthy retina show that the birefringence of the RNFL around the optic nerve head was equal to 34+/- 3 degree(s)/100 micrometers . In conclusion, to our knowledge, we present the first depth resolved birefringence measurements of the human RNFL in vivo.

  17. Highly polarized emission in spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of alpha-Fe(001)/GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, James; Yu, Sung Woo; Morton, Simon; Waddill, George; Thompson, Jamie; Neal, James; Spangenberg, Matthais; Shen, T.H.

    2009-05-19

    Highly spin-polarized sources of electrons, Integrated into device design, remain of great interest to the spintronic and magneto-electronic device community Here, the growth of Fe upon GaAs(001) has been studied with photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), including Spin Resolved PES. Despite evidence of atomic level disorder such as intermixing, an over-layer with the spectroscopic signature of alpha-Fe(001), with a bcc real space ordering, Is obtained The results will be discussed in light of the possibility of using such films as a spin-polarized source in device applications.

  18. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  19. Spatially and temporally resolved temperature measurement in laser media.

    PubMed

    Körner, Jörg; Yue, Fangxin; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte C

    2016-06-01

    A technique to measure the spatially resolved temperature distribution in a laser medium is presented. It is based on the temperature dependence of the absorption cross section close to the zero-phonon line of the active medium. Since other materials in the beam path exhibit a high (and constant) transmission at this wavelength, the method can easily be applied in realistic amplifier setups. The method was successfully tested on three different samples, which were pumped by a pulsed laser diode with up to 150 W average power: side-cooled Yb:YAG and Yb:fluoride-phosphate glass at room temperature and face-cooled Yb:CaF2 at 120 K. PMID:27244405

  20. Time-resolved temperature measurements in hypervelocity dust impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, A.; Drake, K.; Mocker, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Munsat, T.; Horanyi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present time-resolved temperature measurements of the debris cloud generated by hypervelocity dust impact. Micron- and submicron-sized iron grains were accelerated to speeds of 1-32 km/s using the 3 MV electrostatic dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, and impacted on a tungsten target. The resulting light flashes were analyzed by an array of photomultiplier tubes equipped with narrowband interference filters to determine the blackbody temperature and radiant power of the impact-generated cloud as a function of time. We find time-averaged temperatures in the range of 2500-5000 K, increasing with velocity over the range studied; initial temperatures up to approximately twice the time averaged temperature persisting on short timescales (<1μs) compared to the 20μs duration of the flash; and that the temperature falls in a manner consistent with radiative cooling.

  1. Polarization Measurements in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Sarty; Andrei Afanasev; Arunava Saha; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Brendan Fox; C. Chang; Cathleen Jones; Charles Glashausser; Charles Perdrisat; Cornelis De Jager; Cornelis de Jager; D. Crovelli; Daniel Simon; David Meekins; Demetrius Margaziotis; Dipangkar Dutta; Edgar Kooijman; Edward Brash; Edward Kinney; Elaine Schulte; Eugene Chudakov; Feng Xiong; Franco Garibaldi; Garth Huber; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Guido Urciuoli; Haiyan Gao; James Kelly; Javier Gomez; Jens-Ole Hansen; Jian-Ping Chen; John Calarco; John LeRose; Jordan Hovdebo; Joseph Mitchell; Juncai Gao; Kamal Benslama; Kathy McCormick; Kevin Fissum; Konrad Aniol; Krishni Wijesooriya; Louis Bimbot; Ludyvine Morand; Luminita Todor; Marat Rvachev; Mark Jones; Martin Epstein; Meihua Liang; Michael Kuss; Moskov Amarian; Nilanga Liyanage; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Olivier Gayou; Paul Ulmer; Pete Markowitz; Peter Bosted; R. Holt; Riad Suleiman; Richard Lindgren; Rikki Roche; Robert Michaels; Roman Pomatsalyuk; Ronald Gilman; Ronald Ransome; Salvatore Frullani; Scott Dumalski; Seonho Choi; Sergey Malov; Sonja Dieterich; Steffen Strauch; Stephen Becher; Steve Churchwell; Ting Chang; Viktor Gorbenko; Vina Punjabi; Xiaodong Jiang; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Zhengwei Chai; Wang Xu

    2001-04-01

    We present measurements of the recoil proton polarization for the d(polarized y, polarized p)n reaction at thetac.m. = 90 degrees for photon energies up to 2.4 GeV. These are the first data in this reaction for polarization transfer with circularly polarized photons. The induced polarization py vanishes above 1 GeV, contrary to meson-baryon model expectations, in which resonances lead to large polarizations. However, the polarization transfer Cx does not vanish above 1 GeV, inconsistent with hadron helicity conservation. Thus, we show that the scaling behavior observed in the d(y,p)n cross sections is not a result of perturbative QCD. These data should provide important tests of new nonperturbative calculations in the intermediate energy regime.

  2. Space-time resolved measurements of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Borodziuk, S.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Dudzak, R.; Dostal, J.; Krousky, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Hrebicek, J.; Medrik, T.; Golasowski, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Demchenko, N. N.; Korneev, Ph.; Kalal, M.; Renner, O.; Smid, M.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2015-10-15

    The first space-time resolved spontaneous magnetic field (SMF) measurements realized on Prague Asterix Laser System are presented. The SMF was generated as a result of single laser beam (1.315 μm) interaction with massive planar targets made of materials with various atomic numbers (plastic and Cu). Measured SMF confirmed azimuthal geometry and their maximum amplitude reached the value of 10 MG at the laser energy of 250 J for both target materials. It was demonstrated that spatial distributions of these fields are associated with the character of the ablative plasma expansion which clearly depends on the target material. To measure the SMF, the Faraday effect was employed causing rotation of the vector of polarization of the linearly polarized diagnostic beam. The rotation angle was determined together with the phase shift using a novel design of a two-channel polaro-interferometer. To obtain sufficiently high temporal resolution, the polaro-interferometer was irradiated by Ti:Sa laser pulse with the wavelength of 808 nm and the pulse duration of 40 fs. The results of measurements were compared with theoretical analysis.

  3. Space-time resolved measurements of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarczyk, T.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Dudzak, R.; Chodukowski, T.; Dostal, J.; Demchenko, N. N.; Korneev, Ph.; Kalinowska, Z.; Kalal, M.; Renner, O.; Smid, M.; Borodziuk, S.; Krousky, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Hrebicek, J.; Medrik, T.; Golasowski, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2015-10-01

    The first space-time resolved spontaneous magnetic field (SMF) measurements realized on Prague Asterix Laser System are presented. The SMF was generated as a result of single laser beam (1.315 μm) interaction with massive planar targets made of materials with various atomic numbers (plastic and Cu). Measured SMF confirmed azimuthal geometry and their maximum amplitude reached the value of 10 MG at the laser energy of 250 J for both target materials. It was demonstrated that spatial distributions of these fields are associated with the character of the ablative plasma expansion which clearly depends on the target material. To measure the SMF, the Faraday effect was employed causing rotation of the vector of polarization of the linearly polarized diagnostic beam. The rotation angle was determined together with the phase shift using a novel design of a two-channel polaro-interferometer. To obtain sufficiently high temporal resolution, the polaro-interferometer was irradiated by Ti:Sa laser pulse with the wavelength of 808 nm and the pulse duration of 40 fs. The results of measurements were compared with theoretical analysis.

  4. RESOLVED MEASUREMENTS OF X{sub CO} IN NGC 6946

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Koda, Jin; Mooney, Thomas; Towers, Sarah; Momose, Rieko; Fukuhara, Masayuki; Egusa, Fumi; Kennicutt, Robert; Kuno, Nario; Carty, Misty; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Scoville, Nick

    2012-01-01

    We present the largest sample to date of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a substantial spiral galaxy other than the Milky Way. We map the distribution of molecular gas with high resolution and image fidelity within the central 5 kpc of the spiral galaxy NGC 6946 in the {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) transition. By combining observations from the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m single dish telescope and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy interferometer, we are able to obtain high image fidelity and accurate measurements of L{sub CO} compared with previous purely interferometric studies. We resolve individual GMCs, measure their luminosities and virial masses, and derive X{sub CO}-the conversion factor from CO measurements to H{sub 2} masses-within individual clouds. On average, we find that X{sub CO} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, which is consistent within our uncertainties with previously derived Galactic values as well as the value we derive for Galactic GMCs above our mass sensitivity limit. The properties of our GMCs are largely consistent with the trends observed for molecular clouds detected in the Milky Way disk, with the exception of six clouds detected within {approx}400 pc of the center of NGC 6946, which exhibit larger velocity dispersions for a given size and luminosity, as has also been observed at the Galactic center.

  5. Measurement of complex ultrashort laser pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lina

    This thesis contains three components of research: a detailed study of the performance of Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) for measuring complex ultrashort laser pulses, a new method for measuring the arbitrary polarization state of an ultrashort laser pulse using Tomographic Ultrafast Retrieval of Transverse Light E-fields (TURTLE) technique, and new approach for measuring two complex pulses simultaneously using PG blind FROG. In recent decades, many techniques for measuring the full intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses have been proposed. These techniques include: Spectral Interferometry (SI)[1], Temporal Analysis by Dispersing a Pair of Light E-Field (TADPOLE)[2], Spectral Phase Interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER)[3], and Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG)[4]. Each technique is actually a class of techniques that includes different variations on the original idea, such as SEA-SPIDER[5], ZAP SPIDER[6] are two variations of SPIDER. But most of these techniques for measuring ultrashort laser pulses either do not yield the complete time-dependent intensity and phase (e.g., autocorrelation), can at best only measure simple pulses (e.g., SPIDER), or need well characterized reference pulse. In this thesis, we compare the performance of three versions of FROG: second-harmonic-generation (SHG) FROG, polarization-gate (PG) FROG, and cross-correlation FROG (XFROG), the last of which requires a well-characterized reference pulse. We found that the XFROG algorithm converged in all cases and required only one initial guess. The PG FROG algorithm converged for 99% of the moderately complex pulses that we tried, and for over 95% of the most complex pulses (TBP ˜ 100). And the SHG FROG algorithm converged for 95% of the pulses that we tried and for over 80% of the most complex pulses. After some analysis, we found that noise filtering and adding more sampling points to the FROG trace solved the non-converging problems and we

  6. Time- and polarization-resolved cellular autofluorescence towards quantitative biochemistry on living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfveby, John; TImerman, Randi; Soto Velasquez, Monica P.; Wickramasinghe, Dhanushka W. P. M.; Bartusek, Jillian; Heikal, Ahmed A.

    2014-09-01

    Native coenzymes such as the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide play pivotal roles in energy metabolism and a myriad of biochemical reactions in living cells/tissues. These coenzymes are naturally fluorescent and, therefore, have the potential to serve as intrinsic biomarkers for mitochondrial activities, programmed cell death (apoptosis), oxidative stress, aging, and neurodegenerative disease. In this contribution, we employ two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and time-resolved anisotropy imaging of intracellular NADH for quantitative, non-invasive biochemistry on living cells in response to hydrogenperoxide- induced oxidative stress. In contrast with steady-state one-photon, UV-excited autofluorescence, two-photon FLIM is sensitive to both molecular conformation and stimuli-induced changes in the local environment in living cells with minimum photodamage and inherently enhanced spatial resolution. On the other hand, time-resolved, two-photon anisotropy imaging of cellular autofluorescence allows for quantitative assessment of binding state and environmental restrictions on the tumbling mobility of intrinsic NADH. Our measurements reveal that free and enzyme-bound NADH exist at equilibrium, with a dominant autofluorescence contribution of the bound fraction in living cells. Parallel studies on NADH-enzyme binding in controlled environments serve as a point of reference in analyzing autofluorescence in living cells. These autofluorescence-based approaches complement the conventional analytical biochemistry methods that require the destruction of cells/tissues, while serving as an important step towards establishing intracellular NADH as a natural biomarker for monitoring changes in energy metabolism and redox state of living cells in response to environmental hazards.

  7. Response Surface Methods For Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatially-resolved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/- 30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-lightweight, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center. Photogrammetry is used to simultaneously measure the shape of the antenna at approximately 500 discrete spatial locations. RSM allows an analytic model to be developed that describes the shape of the majority of the antenna with an uncertainty of 0.4 mm, with 95% confidence. This model would allow a quantitative comparison between the actual shape of the antenna and the original design shape. Accurately determining this shape also allows confident interpolation between the measured points. Such a model could, for example, be used for ray tracing of radio-frequency waves up to 95 GHz. to predict the performance of the antenna.

  8. Theory of coherent polarization anisotropy in time-resolved two-photon ionization of isolated molecules. Effects of Coriolis couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S.; Nomura, Y.; Fujimura, Y.

    1987-09-01

    Effects of vibration-rotation (Coriolis) couplings on the coherent polarization anisotropy are theoretically studied in a time-resolved two-photon ionization of a symmetric top molecule. This polarization anisotropy originates from a coherent excitation of the resonant rovibronic molecular eigenstates (rovibronic coherence) whose zeroth order states are mixed through the Coriolis coupling. Expressions for the time-dependent degree of polarization after the coherent excitation of the rovibronic states produced by the Coriolis coupling are derived as a function of the delay time in the pump-probe two-photon ionization. Model calculations of the time-dependent degree of polarization as well as the probabilities of the two-photon ionization are performed to demonstrate the Coriolis coupling effects in the low excess energy regions of the resonant intermediate state. It is shown that oscillatory behaviors in the time-dependent degree of polarization should be observed as a result of the creation of the rovibronic coherence. It is demonstrated that oscillations of the degree of polarization involve both contribution of the purely rotational J-coherence and that of the rovibronic coherence in the resonant manifold when the rotational branches are coherently excited and the characteristic rotation-vibration interaction energy is larger than a typical free rotational energy under jet-cooled condition.

  9. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-08-18

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. {bar P}), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g.

    ).

  10. Sea Butterfly Swimming: Time-resolved Tomographic PIV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David; Zheng, Lingxiao; Mittal, Rajat; Webster, Donald; Yen, Jeannette

    2011-11-01

    The planktonic sea butterfly Limacina helicina swims by flapping its flexible, wing-like parapodia. The appendage stroke kinematics of this shell-bearing pteropod are three-dimensional and likely contain elements of both drag-based (rowing) and lift-based (flapping) propulsion. Unsteady lift-generating mechanisms such as clap-and-fling may also be present. Upstroke and downstroke motions both propel the animal upward and roll it forwards and backwards, resulting in a sawtooth trajectory. We present time-resolved, tomographic PIV measurements of flow generated by free-swimming pteropods (Limacina helicina) moving upwards with average swimming speeds of 5 - 17 mm/s. The pteropods beat their appendages with a stroke frequency of 4 - 5 Hz. With a size range of 1 - 2 mm, the animals filmed in this study operate in a viscous environment with a Reynolds number of 5 to 20. The volumetric flow measurements provide insight into the three dimensional nature of the flow and into the relative importance of drag- and lift-based propulsion at this low Reynolds number. Preliminary results from Navier-Stokes simulations of the flow associated with the swimming of this organism will also be presented.

  11. The linear polarization of Southern bright stars measured at the parts-per-million level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, Daniel V.; Bailey, Jeremy; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Bott, Kimberly; Lucas, P. W.; Hough, J. H.; Marshall, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    We report observations of the linear polarization of a sample of 50 nearby Southern bright stars measured to a median sensitivity of ˜4.4 × 10-6. We find larger polarizations and more highly polarized stars than in the previous PlanetPol survey of Northern bright stars. This is attributed to a dustier interstellar medium in the mid-plane of the Galaxy, together with a population containing more B-type stars leading to more intrinsically polarized stars, as well as using a wavelength more sensitive to intrinsic polarization in late-type giants. Significant polarization had been identified for only six stars in the survey group previously, whereas we are now able to deduce intrinsic polarigenic mechanisms for more than 20. The four most highly polarized stars in the sample are the four classical Be stars (α Eri, α Col, η Cen and α Ara). For the three of these objects resolved by interferometry, the position angles are consistent with the orientation of the circumstellar disc determined. We find significant intrinsic polarization in most B stars in the sample; amongst these are a number of close binaries and an unusual binary debris disc system. However, these circumstances do not account for the high polarizations of all the B stars in the sample and other polarigenic mechanisms are explored. Intrinsic polarization is also apparent in several late-type giants which can be attributed to either close, hot circumstellar dust or bright spots in the photosphere of these stars. Aside from a handful of notable debris disc systems, the majority of A-K type stars show polarization levels consistent with interstellar polarization.

  12. Temporally and spatially resolved photoluminescence investigation of (112{sup ¯}2) semi-polar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells grown on nanorod templates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Smith, R.; Athanasiou, M.; Yu, X.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-29

    By means of time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and confocal PL measurements, temporally and spatially resolved optical properties have been investigated on a number of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structures with a wide range of indium content alloys from 13% to 35% on (112{sup ¯}2) semi-polar GaN with high crystal quality, obtained through overgrowth on nanorod templates. With increasing indium content, the radiative recombination lifetime initially increases as expected, but decreases if the indium content further increases to 35%, corresponding to emission in the green spectral region. The reduced radiative recombination lifetime leads to enhanced optical performance for the high indium content MQWs as a result of strong exciton localization, which is different from the behaviour of c-plane InGaN/GaN MQWs, where quantum confined Stark effect plays a dominating role in emission process.

  13. Measurement of ocular counterrolling /OCR/ by polarized light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, R. V.; Lichtenberg, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    The assessment of the activation of the otolith gravitoinertial sensors in the vestibular system of the inner ear may be accomplished by observing the occular counterrolling (OCR) movements which rotate the eyes about the line of sight. A method is presented for the continuous measurement of OCR by means of polarized light, a system of polarizers, and a contact lens. A polarized hard contact lens is placed between two soft lenses before application to the eye, and the measured phase difference between the incident rotating polarized light and the reflected light from this lens provides readings uncontaminated by other eye movement modes.

  14. Proton Form Factor Measurements Using Polarization Method: Beyond Born Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Pentchev, Lubomir

    2008-10-13

    Significant theoretical and experimental efforts have been made over the past 7 years aiming to explain the discrepancy between the proton form factor ratio data obtained at JLab using the polarization method and the previous Rosenbluth measurements. Preliminary results from the first high precision polarization experiment dedicated to study effects beyond Born approximation will be presented. The ratio of the transferred polarization components and, separately, the longitudinal polarization in ep elastic scattering have been measured at a fixed Q{sup 2} of 2.5 GeV{sup 2} over a wide kinematic range. The two quantities impose constraints on the real part of the ep elastic amplitudes.

  15. POLARIZED HYDROGEN JET TARGET FOR MEASUREMENT OF RHIC PROTON BEAM POLARIZATION.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; WISE,T.; CHAPMAN,M.; GRAHAM,D.; KPONOU,A.; MAHLER,G.; MENG,W.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.

    2005-01-28

    The performance and unique features of the RHIC polarized jet target and our solutions to the important design constraints imposed on the jet by the RHIC environment are described. The target polarization and thickness were measured to be 0.924 {+-} 2% and 1.3 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 12} atoms/cm{sup 2} respectively.

  16. Polarization Property Measurement of the Long Undulator Radiation Using Cr/C Multilayer Polarization Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niibe, Masahito; Mukai, Mikihito; Kimura, Hiroaki; Shoji, Yoshihiko

    2004-05-01

    A rotating analyzer ellipsometry (RAE) system was developed with Cr/C multilayers that function as polarization elements for photon energy range of 110 - 280 eV. Polarization properties of a planar undulator change axisymmetrically in off-axial manner, and the second harmonic is more remarkable for the change. By using the RAE system, the polarization property of the second harmonic radiation from the NewSUBARU long undulator at the energy of 180 eV was examined. The degree of linear polarization of the on-axis radiation was over 0.996. The spatial distribution of the polarization azimuth was measured and was in fair agreement with the theoretical calculation. A peculiar behavior of the polarization property near the radiation peak of the second harmonic was observed by changing the height of the undulator gap.

  17. Polarization Property Measurement of the Long Undulator Radiation Using Cr/C Multilayer Polarization Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Niibe, Masahito; Mukai, Mikihito; Shoji, Yoshihiko; Kimura, Hiroaki

    2004-05-12

    A rotating analyzer ellipsometry (RAE) system was developed with Cr/C multilayers that function as polarization elements for photon energy range of 110 - 280 eV. Polarization properties of a planar undulator change axisymmetrically in off-axial manner, and the second harmonic is more remarkable for the change. By using the RAE system, the polarization property of the second harmonic radiation from the NewSUBARU long undulator at the energy of 180 eV was examined. The degree of linear polarization of the on-axis radiation was over 0.996. The spatial distribution of the polarization azimuth was measured and was in fair agreement with the theoretical calculation. A peculiar behavior of the polarization property near the radiation peak of the second harmonic was observed by changing the height of the undulator gap.

  18. Quantum measurement and uncertainty relations in photon polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edamatsu, Keiichi

    2016-07-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies have given raise to new aspects in quantum measurements and error-disturbance uncertainty relations. After a brief review of these issues, we present an experimental test of the error-disturbance uncertainty relations in photon polarization measurements. Using a generalized, strength-variable measurement of a single photon polarization state, we experimentally evaluate the error and disturbance in the measurement process and demonstrate the validity of recently proposed uncertainty relations.

  19. Design of a device for sky light polarization measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Hu, Xiaoping; Lian, Junxiang; Zhang, Lilian; Xian, Zhiwen; Ma, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Sky polarization patterns can be used both as indicators of atmospheric turbidity and as a sun compass for navigation. The objective of this study is to improve the precision of sky light polarization measurements by optimal design of the device used. The central part of the system is composed of a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera; a fish-eye lens and a linear polarizer. Algorithms for estimating parameters of the polarized light based on three images are derived and the optimal alignments of the polarizer are analyzed. The least-squares estimation is introduced for sky light polarization pattern measurement. The polarization patterns of sky light are obtained using the designed system and they follow almost the same patterns of the single-scattering Rayleigh model. Deviations of polarization angles between observation and the theory are analyzed. The largest deviations occur near the sun and anti-sun directions. Ninety percent of the deviations are less than 5° and 40% percent of them are less than 1°. The deviations decrease evidently as the degree of polarization increases. It also shows that the polarization pattern of the cloudy sky is almost identical as in the blue sky. PMID:25196003

  20. [Research on New Type of Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement Technology].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Zhou, Feng; Li, Huan; Zhao, Hai-bo

    2015-10-01

    Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement technology (SMPM) is a new type of polarization modulation technology, with an achromatic /4 retarder, a multiple-order retarder and a polarizer the polarization information of incident light can be encoded into the spectral dimension, sinusoidal which amplitude scales with the degree of the linear polarization and phase scales with the angle of the linear polarization can be acquired directly. With a dedicated algorithm for the modulated spectrum, we can get degree and angle of the linear polarization, spectral information and radiation information of the target. This paper expounds the basic principle of SMPM and concrete implementation scheme is proposed. Demodulation algorithm is designed before experimental platform are set up. Experiment which verified the correctness on the SMPM has carried on. The experimental results show the correctness and feasibility of SMPM. Compared with traditional polarization modulate techniques no moving parts and electronic components are including in this scheme. It's also has the advantages of compact and low mass. We can get all the polarization information through one single measurement rather than get Stokes parameters for further calculations. This study provides a new kind of technological approaches for the development of new space polarization detecting sensor. PMID:26904842

  1. Design of a Device for Sky Light Polarization Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujie; Hu, Xiaoping; Lian, Junxiang; Zhang, Lilian; Xian, Zhiwen; Ma, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Sky polarization patterns can be used both as indicators of atmospheric turbidity and as a sun compass for navigation. The objective of this study is to improve the precision of sky light polarization measurements by optimal design of the device used. The central part of the system is composed of a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera; a fish-eye lens and a linear polarizer. Algorithms for estimating parameters of the polarized light based on three images are derived and the optimal alignments of the polarizer are analyzed. The least-squares estimation is introduced for sky light polarization pattern measurement. The polarization patterns of sky light are obtained using the designed system and they follow almost the same patterns of the single-scattering Rayleigh model. Deviations of polarization angles between observation and the theory are analyzed. The largest deviations occur near the sun and anti-sun directions. Ninety percent of the deviations are less than 5° and 40% percent of them are less than 1°. The deviations decrease evidently as the degree of polarization increases. It also shows that the polarization pattern of the cloudy sky is almost identical as in the blue sky. PMID:25196003

  2. Single-shot diffusion measurement in laser-polarized Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peled, S.; Tseng, C. H.; Sodickson, A. A.; Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.; Cory, D. G.

    1999-01-01

    A single-shot pulsed gradient stimulated echo sequence is introduced to address the challenges of diffusion measurements of laser polarized 3He and 129Xe gas. Laser polarization enhances the NMR sensitivity of these noble gases by >10(3), but creates an unstable, nonthermal polarization that is not readily renewable. A new method is presented which permits parallel acquisition of the several measurements required to determine a diffusive attenuation curve. The NMR characterization of a sample's diffusion behavior can be accomplished in a single measurement, using only a single polarization step. As a demonstration, the diffusion coefficient of a sample of laser-polarized 129Xe gas is measured via this method. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Polarization Measurements in Photoproduction with CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    E. Pasyuk

    2010-05-01

    A significant part of the experimental program in Hall-B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to the studies of the structure of baryons. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), availability of circularly and linearly polarized photon beams and recent addition of polarized targets provides remarkable opportunity for single, double and in some cases triple polarization measurements in photoproduction. An overview of the experiments will be presented.

  4. SAMRAI: a novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the VUV region at UVSOR-II.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shin-Ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Sakai, Masahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Kondo, Naonori; Horigome, Toshio; Hayashi, Kenji; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro; Goto, Tomohiro; Ejima, Takeo; Soda, Kazuo

    2010-05-01

    A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been installed at the UVSOR-II 750 MeV synchrotron light source. The beamline is equipped with a 3 m long APPLE-II type undulator with horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a 10 m Wadsworth type monochromator covering a photon energy range of 6-43 eV, and a 200 mm radius hemispherical photoelectron analyzer with an electron lens of a +/-18 degrees acceptance angle. Due to the low emittance of the UVSOR-II storage ring, the light source is regarded as an entrance slit, and the undulator light is directly led to a grating by two plane mirrors in the monochromator while maintaining a balance between high-energy resolution and high photon flux. The energy resolving power (hnu/Deltahnu) and photon flux of the monochromator are typically 1 x 10(4) and 10(12) photons/s, respectively, with a 100 microm exit slit. The beamline is used for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with an energy resolution of a few meV covering the UV-to-VUV energy range. PMID:20515121

  5. SAMRAI: A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the VUV region at UVSOR-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shin-Ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Sakai, Masahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Kondo, Naonori; Horigome, Toshio; Hayashi, Kenji; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro; Goto, Tomohiro; Ejima, Takeo; Soda, Kazuo

    2010-05-01

    A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been installed at the UVSOR-II 750 MeV synchrotron light source. The beamline is equipped with a 3 m long APPLE-II type undulator with horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a 10 m Wadsworth type monochromator covering a photon energy range of 6-43 eV, and a 200 mm radius hemispherical photoelectron analyzer with an electron lens of a ±18° acceptance angle. Due to the low emittance of the UVSOR-II storage ring, the light source is regarded as an entrance slit, and the undulator light is directly led to a grating by two plane mirrors in the monochromator while maintaining a balance between high-energy resolution and high photon flux. The energy resolving power (hν /Δhν) and photon flux of the monochromator are typically 1×104 and 1012 photons/s, respectively, with a 100 μm exit slit. The beamline is used for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with an energy resolution of a few meV covering the UV-to-VUV energy range.

  6. SAMRAI: A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the VUV region at UVSOR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shin-Ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro; Sakai, Masahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Kondo, Naonori; Horigome, Toshio; Hayashi, Kenji; Goto, Tomohiro; Ejima, Takeo; Soda, Kazuo

    2010-05-15

    A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been installed at the UVSOR-II 750 MeV synchrotron light source. The beamline is equipped with a 3 m long APPLE-II type undulator with horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a 10 m Wadsworth type monochromator covering a photon energy range of 6-43 eV, and a 200 mm radius hemispherical photoelectron analyzer with an electron lens of a {+-}18 deg. acceptance angle. Due to the low emittance of the UVSOR-II storage ring, the light source is regarded as an entrance slit, and the undulator light is directly led to a grating by two plane mirrors in the monochromator while maintaining a balance between high-energy resolution and high photon flux. The energy resolving power (h{nu}/{Delta}h{nu}) and photon flux of the monochromator are typically 1x10{sup 4} and 10{sup 12} photons/s, respectively, with a 100 {mu}m exit slit. The beamline is used for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with an energy resolution of a few meV covering the UV-to-VUV energy range.

  7. State resolved desorption measurements as a probe of surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, A.

    2000-01-01

    Surface reactions which lead directly to gas phase products can be investigated by using state resolved techniques to measure the energy released into the newly formed molecules. This technique has been used extensively to explore oxidation of CO and the dynamics of H 2 recombinative desorption at surfaces, but so far has been applied to few other reactions. Here we review the application of final state measurements and discuss the conditions under which dynamical information can be obtained for Langmuir-Hinshelwood type surface reactions. Combining resonance enhanced multiphoton ionisation with ion time of flight detection allows translational energy distributions to be measured for a wide range of products, with full quantum state resolution. The energy release reflects scattering from a thermally populated transition state, with the recombination dynamics determining how the product state distributions depart from a thermal distribution at the surface temperature. Using the principle of detailed balance the desorption dynamics can be related to the reverse process, dissociative chemisorption. Making the link between adsorption and desorption has two benefits. Firstly, it allows us to discuss quantitatively the influence of surface temperature on the product state distributions formed by surface reactions, allowing us to avoid naive models, which treat the transition state as having a unique, well-defined energy. Secondly, the desorption results can be used to obtain relative sticking probabilities with full quantum state and translational energy resolution, providing a way to determine how internal energy influences dissociation for both hydrogen and for heavy molecules, such as nitrogen. The conditions necessary to apply detailed balance successfully are discussed and the desorption distributions expected for different types of adsorption behaviour illustrated. The recombination/dissociation dynamics of hydrogen are summarised briefly and the energy

  8. Genomic Evidence for Island Population Conversion Resolves Conflicting Theories of Polar Bear Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, James A.; Green, Richard E.; Fulton, Tara L.; Stiller, Mathias; Jay, Flora; Ovsyanikov, Nikita; Salamzade, Rauf; St. John, John; Stirling, Ian; Slatkin, Montgomery; Shapiro, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis, the evolutionary relationship between polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and brown bears (U. arctos) remains unclear. The two most recent comprehensive reports indicate a recent divergence with little subsequent admixture or a much more ancient divergence followed by extensive admixture. At the center of this controversy are the Alaskan ABC Islands brown bears that show evidence of shared ancestry with polar bears. We present an analysis of genome-wide sequence data for seven polar bears, one ABC Islands brown bear, one mainland Alaskan brown bear, and a black bear (U. americanus), plus recently published datasets from other bears. Surprisingly, we find clear evidence for gene flow from polar bears into ABC Islands brown bears but no evidence of gene flow from brown bears into polar bears. Importantly, while polar bears contributed <1% of the autosomal genome of the ABC Islands brown bear, they contributed 6.5% of the X chromosome. The magnitude of sex-biased polar bear ancestry and the clear direction of gene flow suggest a model wherein the enigmatic ABC Island brown bears are the descendants of a polar bear population that was gradually converted into brown bears via male-dominated brown bear admixture. We present a model that reconciles heretofore conflicting genetic observations. We posit that the enigmatic ABC Islands brown bears derive from a population of polar bears likely stranded by the receding ice at the end of the last glacial period. Since then, male brown bear migration onto the island has gradually converted these bears into an admixed population whose phenotype and genotype are principally brown bear, except at mtDNA and X-linked loci. This process of genome erosion and conversion may be a common outcome when climate change or other forces cause a population to become isolated and then overrun by species with which it can hybridize. PMID:23516372

  9. Genomic evidence for island population conversion resolves conflicting theories of polar bear evolution.

    PubMed

    Cahill, James A; Green, Richard E; Fulton, Tara L; Stiller, Mathias; Jay, Flora; Ovsyanikov, Nikita; Salamzade, Rauf; St John, John; Stirling, Ian; Slatkin, Montgomery; Shapiro, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis, the evolutionary relationship between polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and brown bears (U. arctos) remains unclear. The two most recent comprehensive reports indicate a recent divergence with little subsequent admixture or a much more ancient divergence followed by extensive admixture. At the center of this controversy are the Alaskan ABC Islands brown bears that show evidence of shared ancestry with polar bears. We present an analysis of genome-wide sequence data for seven polar bears, one ABC Islands brown bear, one mainland Alaskan brown bear, and a black bear (U. americanus), plus recently published datasets from other bears. Surprisingly, we find clear evidence for gene flow from polar bears into ABC Islands brown bears but no evidence of gene flow from brown bears into polar bears. Importantly, while polar bears contributed <1% of the autosomal genome of the ABC Islands brown bear, they contributed 6.5% of the X chromosome. The magnitude of sex-biased polar bear ancestry and the clear direction of gene flow suggest a model wherein the enigmatic ABC Island brown bears are the descendants of a polar bear population that was gradually converted into brown bears via male-dominated brown bear admixture. We present a model that reconciles heretofore conflicting genetic observations. We posit that the enigmatic ABC Islands brown bears derive from a population of polar bears likely stranded by the receding ice at the end of the last glacial period. Since then, male brown bear migration onto the island has gradually converted these bears into an admixed population whose phenotype and genotype are principally brown bear, except at mtDNA and X-linked loci. This process of genome erosion and conversion may be a common outcome when climate change or other forces cause a population to become isolated and then overrun by species with which it can hybridize. PMID:23516372

  10. NASA's Lunar Polar Ice Prospector, RESOLVE: Mission Rehearsal in Apollo Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Picard, Martin; Quinn, Jacqueline; Sanders, Gerald B.; Colaprete, Anthony; Elphic, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    After the completion of the Apollo Program, space agencies didn't visit the moon for many years. But then in the 90's, the Clementine and Lunar Prospector missions returned and showed evidence of water ice at the poles. Then in 2009 the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite indisputably showed that the Cabeus crater contained water ice and other useful volatiles. Furthermore, instruments aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) show evidence that the water ice may also be present in areas that receive several days of continuous sunlight each month. However, before we can factor this resource into our mission designs, we must understand the distribution and quantity of ice or other volatiles at the poles and whether it can be reasonably harvested for use as propellant or mission consumables. NASA, in partnership with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), has been developing a payload to answer these questions. The payload is named RESOLVE. RESOLVE is on a development path that will deliver a tested flight design by the end of 2014. The team has developed a Design Reference Mission using LRO data that has RESOLVE landing near Cabeus Crater in May of2016. One of the toughest obstacles for RESOLVE's solar powered mission is its tight timeline. RESOLVE must be able to complete its objectives in the 5-7 days of available sunlight. The RESOLVE team must be able to work around obstacles to the mission timeline in real time. They can't afford to take a day off to replan as other planetary missions have done. To insure that this mission can be executed as planned, a prototype version of RESOLVE was developed this year and tested at a lunar analog site on Hawaii, known as Apollo Valley, which was once used to train the Apollo astronauts. The RESOLVE team planned the mission with the same type of orbital imagery that would be available from LRO. The simulation team prepositioned a Lander in Apollo Valley with RESOLVE on top mounted on its CSA rover. Then the mission

  11. Polar Wind Measurements with TIDE/PSI and HYDRA on the Polar Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Y. J.; Horwitz, J. L.; Moore, Thomas E.; Giles, Barbara L.; Chandler, Michael O.; Craven, Paul D.; Chang, S.-W.; Scudder, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) on the POLAR spacecraft has allowed sampling of the three-dimensional ion distributions with excellent energy, angular, and mass resolution. The companion Plasma Source Instrument, when operated, allows sufficient diminution of the electric potential to observe the polar wind at very high altitudes. In this presentation, we will describe the results of polar wind characteristics H+, He+, and 0+ as observed by TIDE at 5000 km and 8 RE altitudes. The relationship of the polar wind parameters with the solar zenith angle and with the day-night distance in the Solar Magnetic coordinate system will also be presented. We will compare these measurements with recent simulations of the photoelectron-driven polar wind using a couple fluid-semikinetic model. In addition, we will compare these polar wind observations with low-energy electrons sampled by the HYDRA experiment on POLAR to examine possible effects of the polar rain and photoelectrons and hopefully explain the large ion outflow velocity variations at POLAR apogee.

  12. Measurements of optical polarization properties in dental tissues and biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María M.

    2011-05-01

    Since biological tissues can have the intrinsic property of altering the polarization of incident light, optical polarization studies are important for a complete characterization. We have measured the polarized light scattered off of different dental tissues and biomaterials for a comparative study of their optical polarization property. The experimental setup was composed by a He-Ne laser, two linear polarizers and a detection system based on a photodiode. The laser beam was passed through one linear polarizer placed in front of the sample, beyond which the second linear polarizer (analyzer) and the photodiode detector were placed. First, the maximum laser-light intensity (reference condition) was attained without the sample in the laser path. Then, the sample was placed between the two polarizers and the polarization shift of the scattered laser light was determined by rotating the analyzer until the reference condition was reached. Two dental-resin composites (nanocomposite and hybrid) and two human dental tissues (enamel and dentine) were analyzed under repeatability conditions at three different locations on the sample: 20 measurements of the shift were taken and the average value and the uncertainty associated were calculated. For the human dentine the average value of the polarization shift found was 7 degrees, with an associated uncertainty of 2 degrees. For the human enamel and both dental-resin composites the average shift values were found to be similar to their corresponding uncertainties (2 degrees). The results suggest that although human dentine has notable polarization properties, dental-resin composites and human enamel do not show significant polarization shifts.

  13. ON THE RELIABILITY OF POLARIZATION ESTIMATION USING ROTATION MEASURE SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Macquart, J.-P.; Ekers, R. D.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.

    2012-05-10

    We benchmark the reliability of the rotation measure (RM) synthesis algorithm using the 1005 Centaurus A field sources of Feain et al. The RM synthesis solutions are compared with estimates of the polarization parameters using traditional methods. This analysis provides verification of the reliability of RM synthesis estimates. We show that estimates of the polarization parameters can be made at lower signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) if the range of RMs is bounded, but reliable estimates of individual sources with unusual RMs require unconstrained solutions and higher S/N. We derive from first principles the statistical properties of the polarization amplitude associated with RM synthesis in the presence of noise. The amplitude distribution depends explicitly on the amplitude of the underlying (intrinsic) polarization signal. Hence, it is necessary to model the underlying polarization signal distribution in order to estimate the reliability and errors in polarization parameter estimates. We introduce a Bayesian method to derive the distribution of intrinsic amplitudes based on the distribution of measured amplitudes. The theoretically derived distribution is compared with the empirical data to provide quantitative estimates of the probability that an RM synthesis solution is correct as a function of S/N. We provide quantitative estimates of the probability that any given RM synthesis solution is correct as a function of measured polarized amplitude and the intrinsic polarization amplitude compared to the noise.

  14. Variations of the polar cap potential measured during magnetospheric substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, D.R.; Kan, J.R.; Akasofu, S.I. )

    1992-04-01

    Measurements of the polar cap potential drop and size have been obtained during magnetospheric substorms. Using double-prove electric field measurements on the DE 2 satellite, 148 measurements have been obtained at random times preceding, during, and after 64 substorms. The polar cap potentials are graphed as a function of the difference between the time of the polar cap measurement and the time of the expansion onset of the corresponding substorm. The ratios of the auroral electrojet (AE) indices and the potential are also determined. The results show that on the average the polar cap potential starts to increase at 1.5 hours before onset. However, on a case-by-case basis there are substantial variations from the average, as polar cap potentials over 1,200 kV were measured as early as 1 hour before substorm onset and values as low as 40 kV were observed during the expansion phase. The size of the polar cap ranged from 23{degree} to 38{degree} invariant latitude at the time of onset, and had an average value of 31{degree}. The AE/{Phi}{sub PC} ratio is nearly constant before and after substorms, but decreases slightly during the substorm growth phase and increases greatly during the expansion phase. This increase is most likely due to a higher conductivity and westward electric field within the electrojet during expansion, which causes AE to increase without a corresponding change in the polar cap potential.

  15. Measuring Microtubule Polarity in Spindles with Second-Harmonic Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Che-Hang; Langowitz, Noah; Wu, Hai-Yin; Farhadifar, Reza; Brugues, Jan; Yoo, Tae Yeon; Needleman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of microtubule polarity, and the interplay between microtubule polarity and protein localization, is thought to be crucial for spindle assembly, anaphase, and cytokinesis, but these phenomena remain poorly understood, in part due to the difficulty of measuring microtubule polarity in spindles. We develop and implement a method to nonperturbatively and quantitatively measure microtubule polarity throughout spindles using a combination of second-harmonic generation and two-photon fluorescence. We validate this method using computer simulations and by comparison to structural data on spindles obtained from electron tomography and laser ablation. This method should provide a powerful tool for studying spindle organization and function, and may be applicable for investigating microtubule polarity in other systems. PMID:24739157

  16. ATOMIC BEAM POLARIZATION MEASUREMENT OF THE RHIC POLARIZED H-JET TARGET.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; NASS,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KPONOU,A.; MAHLER,G.; MENG,W.; RITTER,J.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The RHIC polarized H-Jet measures the polarization of the RHIC proton beam via elastic scattering off a nuclear polarized atomic hydrogen beam. The atomic beam is produced by a dissociator, a beam forming system and sextupole magnets. Nuclear polarization is achieved by exchanging occupation numbers of hyperfine states using high frequency transitions. The polarization was measured using a modified form of a Breit-Rabi polarimeter including focusing magnets and another set of high frequency transitions. The sampling of a large part of the beam and low noise electronics made it possible to measure the polarization to a high degree of accuracy in a very short time period (1 min). Using this system, we measured no depolarization of the atomic beam due to the RF fields of the bunched proton beam. Time-of-Flight measurements were done using a fast chopper and a QMA at the position of the RHIC interaction point to determine the areal density of the atomic beam seen by the RHIC beam.

  17. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-01

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of

  18. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-14

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of

  19. Polarization influence on reflectance measurements in the spatial frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Wiest, J; Bodenschatz, N; Brandes, A; Liemert, A; Kienle, A

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we quantify the influence of crossed polarizers on reflectance measurements in the spatial frequency domain. The use of crossed polarizers is a very common approach for suppression of specular surface reflections. However, measurements are typically evaluated using a non-polarized scalar theory. The consequences of this discrepancy are the focus of our study, and we also quantify the related errors of the derived optical properties. We used polarized Monte Carlo simulations for forward calculation of the reflectance from different samples. The samples' scatterers are assumed to be spherical, allowing for the calculation of the scattering functions by Mie theory. From the forward calculations, the reduced scattering coefficient [Formula: see text] and the absorption coefficient μa were derived by means of a scalar theory, as commonly used. Here, we use the analytical solution of the scalar radiative transfer equation. With this evaluation approach, which does not consider polarization, we found large errors in [Formula: see text] and μa in the range of 25% and above. Furthermore, we investigated the applicability of the use of a reference measurement to reduce these errors as suggested in literature. We found that this method is not able to generally improve the accuracy of measurements in the spatial frequency domain. Our general recommendation is to apply a polarized theory when using crossed polarizers. PMID:26158399

  20. Polarization lidar measurements of honeybees for locating buried landmines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph A.; Seldomridge, Nathan L.; Dunkle, Dustin L.; Nugent, Paul W.; Spangler, Lee H.; Churnside, James H.; Wilson, James W.; Bromenshenk, Jerry J.; Henderson, Colin B.

    2005-08-01

    A polarization-sensitive lidar was used to detect honeybees trained to locate buried landmines by smell. Lidar measurements of bee location agree reasonably well with maps of chemical plume strength and bee density determined by visual and video counts, indicating that the bees are preferentially located near the explosives and that the lidar identifies the locations of higher bee concentration. The co-polarized lidar backscatter signal is more effective than the cross-polarized signal for bee detection. Laboratory measurements show that the depolarization ratio of scattered light is near zero for bee wings and up to approximately thirty percent for bee bodies.

  1. Study of optical clearing in polarization measurements by Monte Carlo simulations with anisotropic tissue-mimicking models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongsheng; Zeng, Nan; Wang, Yunfei; He, Honghui; Tuchin, Valery V; Ma, Hui

    2016-08-01

    We conducted Monte Carlo simulations based on anisotropic sclera-mimicking models to examine the polarization features in Mueller matrix polar decomposition (MMPD) parameters during the refractive index matching process, which is one of the major mechanisms of optical clearing. In a preliminary attempt, by changing the parameters of the models, wavelengths, and detection geometries, we demonstrate how the depolarization coefficient and retardance vary during the refractive index matching process and explain the polarization features using the average value and standard deviation of scattering numbers of the detected photons. We also study the depth-resolved polarization features during the gradual progression of the refractive index matching process. The results above indicate that the refractive index matching process increases the depth of polarization measurements and may lead to higher contrast between tissues of different anisotropies in deeper layers. MMPD-derived polarization parameters can characterize the refractive index matching process qualitatively. PMID:27240298

  2. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z.

    1997-04-01

    Growing interest in utilizing circular polarization prompted the design of bend-magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, covering the 30-1500 eV spectral region, to include vertical aperturing capabilities for optimizing the collection of circular polarization above and below the orbit plane. After commissioning and early use of the beamline, a multilayer polarimeter was used to characterize the polarization state of the beam as a function of vertical aperture position. This report partially summarizes the polarimetry measurements and compares results with theoretical calculations intended to simulate experimental conditions.

  3. Water leaving polarization signal measured from space. Is it possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskozub, Jacek; Freda, Wlodzimierz

    2016-04-01

    Improvements in optical techniques for measuring linear polarization have renewed interest in using them to study ocean waters. However, some questions needed answering. Is there any useful information about ocean water optical properties in the polarization signal? Is it possible to discern it from polarization caused by atmospheric Rayleigh scattering polarization reflected by the sea surface and by the reflection itself? Will the signal be still detectable from the top of the atmosphere? We have recently answered affirmatively to the first question, showing that useful information about in-water single scattering albedo can be derived from the degree of polarization of water leaving radiation [1]. This information, can be combined with reflectance measurements to calculate for example the backscattering ratio of sea water components. Thus, at least in theory, optical remote sensing could be used to get information about the angular distribution of scattering. To answer the second and third questions, we have performed experiments [2] and used Monte Carlo modelling to study the water leaving polarization through a realistic (Cox-Munk distribution) sea surface. The results are promising, at least in some directions (mostly 90 degrees of azimuth angle from the sun blink). We also performed Monte Carlo calculations with a realistic atmosphere with both Rayleigh and aerosol scattering. The (new and unpublished) results show the polarization signal of water leaving can be also discerned from the top of the atmosphere making satellite remote sensing of ocean leaving polarization a realistic possibility. [1] Piskozub J. and Freda W, 2013, Signal of single scattering albedo in water leaving polarization, J. Europ. Opt. Soc.-Rapid, 8, 13055, http://dx.doi.org/10.2971/jeos.2013.13055 [2] Freda W., J. Piskozub, H. Toczek, 2015, Polarization imaging over sea surface - a method for measurements of Stokes components angular distribution, J. Eur. Opt. Soc.-Rapid, 10, 15060

  4. Characterizing the kinetics of suspended cylindrical particles by polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ran; Ou, Xueheng; Ma, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Polarization has promising potential to retrieve the information of the steady samples, such as tissues. However, for the fast changing sample such as the suspended algae in the water, the kinetics of the particles also influence the scattered polarization. The present paper will show our recent results to extract the information about the kinetics of the suspended cylindrical particles by polarization measurements. The sample is the aqueous suspension of the glass fibers stirred by a magnetic stirrer. We measure the scattered polarization of the fibers by use of a simultaneous polarization measurement system and obtain the time series of two orthogonal polarization components. By use of correlation analysis, we obtain the time parameters from the auto-correlation functions of the polarization components, and observe the changes with the stirring speeds. Results show that these time parameters indicate the immigration of the fibers. After discussion, we find that they may further characterize the kinetics, including the translation and rotation, of the glass fibers in the fluid field.

  5. Intrinsic spin polarized electronic structure of CrO{sub 2} epitaxial film revealed by bulk-sensitive spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Sunagawa, Masanori; Kittaka, Tomoko; Terashima, Kensei; Wakita, Takanori; Muraoka, Yuji; Yokoya, Takayoshi

    2015-05-18

    We have performed bulk-sensitive spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in order to clarify the intrinsic spin-resolved electronic states of half-metallic ferromagnet CrO{sub 2}. We used CrO{sub 2} epitaxial films on TiO{sub 2}(100), which shows a peak at 1 eV with a clear Fermi edge, consistent with the bulk-sensitive PES spectrum for CrO{sub 2}. In spin-resolved spectra at 40 K, while the Fermi edge was observed in the spin up (majority spin) state, no states at the Fermi level (E{sub F}) with an energy gap of 0.5 eV below E{sub F} were observed in the spin down (minority spin) state. At 300 K, the gap in the spin down state closes. These results are consistent with resistivity measurements and magnetic hysteresis curves of the fabricated CrO{sub 2} film, constituting spectroscopic evidence for the half-metallicity of CrO{sub 2} at low temperature and reducing the spin polarization at room temperature. We also discuss the electron correlation effects of Cr 3d.

  6. Intrinsic spin polarized electronic structure of CrO2 epitaxial film revealed by bulk-sensitive spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Sunagawa, Masanori; Terashima, Kensei; Kittaka, Tomoko; Wakita, Takanori; Muraoka, Yuji; Yokoya, Takayoshi

    2015-05-01

    We have performed bulk-sensitive spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in order to clarify the intrinsic spin-resolved electronic states of half-metallic ferromagnet CrO2. We used CrO2 epitaxial films on TiO2(100), which shows a peak at 1 eV with a clear Fermi edge, consistent with the bulk-sensitive PES spectrum for CrO2. In spin-resolved spectra at 40 K, while the Fermi edge was observed in the spin up (majority spin) state, no states at the Fermi level (EF) with an energy gap of 0.5 eV below EF were observed in the spin down (minority spin) state. At 300 K, the gap in the spin down state closes. These results are consistent with resistivity measurements and magnetic hysteresis curves of the fabricated CrO2 film, constituting spectroscopic evidence for the half-metallicity of CrO2 at low temperature and reducing the spin polarization at room temperature. We also discuss the electron correlation effects of Cr 3d.

  7. Bias-free procedure for the measurement of the minimum resolvable temperature difference and minimum resolvable contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijl, Piet; Valeton, J. Mathieu

    1999-10-01

    The characterization of electro-optical system performance by means of the standard minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD) or the minimum resolvable contrast (MRC) has a number of serious disadvantages. One of the problems is that they depend on the subjective decision criterion of the observer. We present an improved measurement procedure in which the results are free from observer bias. In an adaptive two-alternative forced-choice procedure, both the standard four-bar pattern and a five-bar reference pattern of the same size and contrast are presented consecutively in random order. The observer decides which of the two presentations contains the four-bar pattern. Misjudgments are made if the bars cannot be resolved or are distorted by sampling. The procedure converges to the contrast at which 75% of the observer responses are correct. The reliability of the responses is tested statistically. Curves cut off near the Nyquist frequency, so that it is not necessary to artificially set a frequency limit for sampling array cameras. The procedure enables better and easier measurement, yields more stable results than the standard procedure, and avoids disputes between different measuring teams. The presented procedure is a `quick fix' solution for some of the problems with the MRTD and MRC, and is recommended as long as bar patterns are used as the stimulus. A new and fundamentally better method to characterize electro-optical system performance, called the triangle orientation discrimination threshold was recently proposed by Bijl and Valeton (1998).

  8. Temporally resolved plasma composition measurements by collective Thomson scattering in TEXTOR (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Stejner, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Meo, F.; Bindslev, H.; Moseev, D.; Buerger, A.; Kantor, M.; Baar, M. de

    2012-10-15

    Fusion plasma composition measurements by collective Thomson scattering (CTS) were demonstrated in recent proof-of-principle measurements in TEXTOR [S. B. Korsholm et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165004 (2011)]. Such measurements rely on the ability to resolve and interpret ion cyclotron structure in CTS spectra. Here, we extend these techniques to enable temporally resolved plasma composition measurements by CTS in TEXTOR, and we discuss the prospect for such measurements with newly installed hardware upgrades for the CTS system on ASDEX Upgrade.

  9. Multiple-view spectrally resolved x-ray imaging observations of polar-direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, R. C.; Johns, H. M.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Nagayama, T.; Hsu, S. C.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Hakel, P.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2014-12-15

    We present spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolved narrow- and broad-band x-ray images of polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on OMEGA. These self-emission images were obtained during the deceleration phase and bang time using several multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging instruments fielded along two or three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight, including equatorial and polar views. The instruments recorded images based on K-shell lines from a titanium tracer located in the shell as well as continuum emission. These observations constitute the first such data obtained for PDD implosions. The image data show features attributed to laser imprinting and zero-order hydrodynamics. Equatorial-view images show a “double bun” structure that is consistent with synthetic images obtained from post-processing 2D and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment. Polar-view images show a pentagonal, petal pattern that correlates with the PDD laser illumination used on OMEGA, thus revealing a 3D aspect of PDD OMEGA implosions not previously observed. Differences are noted with respect to a PDD experiment performed at National Ignition Facility.

  10. Local Polarization Dynamics and Bias-Induced Phase Transitions in Ferroelectric Relaxors: Time-resolved Spectroscopy and Ergodic Gap Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, S. V.; Rodriguez, B.; Nikiforov, M. P.; Balke, N.; Jesse, S.; Ovchinnikov, O. S.; Bokov, A. A.; Ye, Z.-G.

    2009-03-01

    Mesoscopic domain structure and dynamics in PMN-PT solis solutions is studied using spatially resolved time- and voltage spectroscopic imaging modes. For compositions close to the MPB, we observe the formation of classical ferroelectric domains with rough self-affine boundaries. In the ergodic phase (PMN and PMN-10PT), the formation of non-classical labyrinthine domain patterns characterized by a single characteristic length scale is observed. The (a) persistence of these patterns well above Tc and (b) the fact that cannot be switched by tip bias suggest that they can be attributed to the frozen polarization component. Spatial variability of polarization relaxation dynamics in PMN-10PT is studied. Local relaxation attributed to the reorientation of polar nanoregions was found to follow stretched exponential dependence, with β 0.4, much larger than the macroscopic value determined from dielectric spectra (β 0.09). The spatial inhomogeneity of relaxation time distribution with the presence of 100-200 nm ``fast'' and ``slow'' regions is observed. The results are analyzed to map the Vogel-Fulcher temperatures on the nanoscale. The applicability of this technique to map ``ergodic gap'' distribution on the surface is discussed. Research supported by the Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC.

  11. Earth rotation and polar motion - Measurements and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. O.; Eubanks, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Several methods used to measure earth rotation and polar motion are discussed. The development of techniques for combining smoothing, and intercomparing geodetic measurements is described. Emphasis is given to measurements obtained since 1980 using VLBI, lunar laser ranging (LLR) and satellite laser ranging (SLR) techniques. The calculation of atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) excitation functions is outlined, and a comparison of AAM excitation functions with variations in the length of day (LOD) and polar motion data is presented. The geophysical implications of geodetic measurements are addressed.

  12. Radiation measurements from polar and geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1973-01-01

    During the 1960's, radiation budget measurements from satellites have allowed quantitative study of the global energetics of our atmosphere-ocean system. A continuing program is planned, including independent measurement of the solar constant. Thus far, the measurements returned from two basically different types of satellite experiments are in agreement on the long term global scales where they are most comparable. This fact, together with independent estimates of the accuracy of measurement from each system, shows that the energy exchange between earth and space is now measured better than it can be calculated. Examples of application of the radiation budget data were shown. They can be related to the age-old problem of climate change, to the basic question of the thermal forcing of our circulation systems, and to the contemporary problems of local area energetics and computer modeling of the atmosphere.

  13. POLVSM (Polarized Volume Scattering Meter) instrument: an innovative device to measure the directional and polarized scattering properties of hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Chami, Malik; Thirouard, Alexandre; Harmel, Tristan

    2014-10-20

    An innovative instrument dedicated to the multispectral measurements of the directional and polarized scattering properties of the hydrosols, so-called POLVSM, is described. The instrument could be used onboard a ship, as a benchtop instrument, or at laboratory. The originality of the POLVSM concept relies on the use of a double periscopic optical system whose role is (i) to separate the plane containing the light source from the scattering plane containing the sample and the receiver and (ii) to prevent from any specularly reflected light within the sample chamber. As a result, a wide range of scattering angle, namely from 1° to 179°, is covered by the detector. Another originality of the instrument is to measure the Mueller scattering matrix elements, including the degree of polarization. A relevant calibration procedure, which could be of great interest as well for other instruments, is proposed to convert the raw data into physical units. The relative uncertainty in POLVSM data was determined at ± 4.3%. The analysis of measurements of the volume scattering function and degree of polarization performed under controlled conditions for samples dominated either by inorganic hydrosols or phytoplankton monospecific species showed a good consistency with literature, thus confirming the good performance of the POLVSM device. Comparisons of POLVSM data with theoretical calculations showed that Mie theory could reproduce efficiently the measurements of the VSF and degree of polarization for the case of inorganic hydrosols sample, despite the likely non sphericity of these particles as revealed by one of the element of the Mueller matrix. Our results suggested as well that a sophisticated modeling of the heterogeneous internal structure of living cells, or at least, the use of layered sphere models, is needed to correctly predict the directional and polarized effects of phytoplankton on the oceanic radiation. The relevance of performing angularly resolved measurements

  14. Flow cytometry using Brillouin imaging and sensing via time-resolved optical (BISTRO) measurements.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-11-01

    A novel concept of Brillouin imaging and sensing via time-resolved optical (BISTRO) measurements is introduced for flow cytometry applications. The system affords robust, maintenance-free and high-speed elasticity-sensitive measurements. PMID:26347908

  15. Effect of noise on Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We study the effects of noise in Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses. We quantify the measurement accuracy in the presence of additive, muliplicative, and quantization noise, and discuss filtering and pre-processing of the data.

  16. Radiation measurements from polar and geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Kidder, S. Q.; Hillger, D. W.; Ellis, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: (1) cloud effects in climate determination; (2) annual variation in the global heat balance of the earth; (3) the accuracy of precipitation estimates made from passive microwave measurements from satellites; (4) seasonal oceanic precipitation frequencies; (5) determination of mesoscale temperature and moisture fields over land from satellite radiance measurements; and (6) Nimbus 6 scanning microwave spectrometer data evaluation for surface wind and pressure components in tropical storms.

  17. Angular resolved light scattering for discriminating among marine picoplankton: modeling and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Bing; Jaffe, Jules S.; Chachisvilis, Mirianas; Esener, Sadik C.

    2006-12-01

    In order to assess the capability to optically identify small marine microbes, both simulations and experiments of angular resolved light scattering (ARLS) were performed. After calibration with 30-nm vesicles characterized by a nearly constant scattering distribution for vertically polarized light (azimuthal angle=90°), ARLS from suspensions of three types of marine picoplankton (two prokaryotes and one eukaryote) in seawater was measured with a scattering device that consisted of an elliptical mirror, a rotating aperture, and a PMT. Scattered light was recorded with adequate signal-to-noise in the 40-140°. Simulations modeled the cells as prolate spheroids with independently measured dimensions. For the prokaryotes, approximated as homogeneous spheroids, simulations were performed using the RM (Rayleigh-Mie) - I method, a hybrid of the Rayleigh-Debye approximation and the generalized Lorentz-Mie theory. For the picoeukaryote, an extended RM - I method was developed for a coated spheroid with different shell thickness distributions. The picoeukaryote was then modeled as a coated sphere with a spherical core. Good overall agreements were obtained between simulations and experiments. The distinctive scattering patterns of the different species hold promise for an identification system based on ARLS.

  18. Process and apparatus for measuring degree of polarization and angle of major axis of polarized beam of light

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.; Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process are disclosed for calibrating measurements of the phase of the polarization of a polarized beam and the angle of the polarized optical beam's major axis of polarization at a diagnostic point with measurements of the same parameters at a point of interest along the polarized beam path prior to the diagnostic point. The process is carried out by measuring the phase angle of the polarization of the beam and angle of the major axis at the point of interest, using a rotatable polarizer and a detector, and then measuring these parameters again at a diagnostic point where a compensation apparatus, including a partial polarizer, which may comprise a stack of glass plates, is disposed normal to the beam path between a rotatable polarizer and a detector. The partial polarizer is then rotated both normal to the beam path and around the axis of the beam path until the detected phase of the beam polarization equals the phase measured at the point of interest. The rotatable polarizer at the diagnostic point may then be rotated manually to determine the angle of the major axis of the beam and this is compared with the measured angle of the major axis of the beam at the point of interest during calibration. Thereafter, changes in the polarization phase, and in the angle of the major axis, at the point of interest can be monitored by measuring the changes in these same parameters at the diagnostic point.

  19. SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF CIRCULAR DICHROISM AND FLUORESCENCE POLARIZATION ANISOTROPY.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2002-01-19

    Circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy are important tools for characterizing biomolecular systems. Both are used extensively in kinetic experiments involving stopped- or continuous flow systems as well as titrations and steady-state spectroscopy. This paper presents the theory for determining circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy simultaneously, thus insuring the two parameters are recorded under exactly the same conditions and at exactly the same time in kinetic experiments. The approach to measuring circular dichroism is that used in almost all conventional dichrographs. Two arrangements for measuring fluorescence polarization anisotropy are described. One uses a single fluorescence detector and signal processing with a lock-in amplifier that is similar to the measurement of circular dichroism. The second approach uses classic ''T'' format detection optics, and thus can be used with conventional photon-counting detection electronics. Simple extensions permit the simultaneous measurement of the absorption and excitation intensity corrected fluorescence intensity.

  20. Apparatus and method for measuring electrostatic polarization

    DOEpatents

    Hahn, Erwin L.; Clarke, John; Sloater, Tycho; Hilbert, Claude; Heaney, Michael B.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the electric properties of solid matter which provides data for determining the polarizability of the electron distributions contained therein is disclosed. A sample of the solid to be studied is placed between the plates of a capacitor where it acts as a dielectric. The sample is excited by the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with an atomic species contained in the sample. The voltage induced across the capacitor is then measured as a function of time with the aid of a high Q circuit tuned to a frequency related to the frequency of the applied electromagnetic energy.

  1. CIV Polarization Measurements Using a Vacuum Ultraviolet Fabry Perot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) is developing a Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Fabry Perot that will be launched on a sounding rocket for high throughput, high-cadence, extended field of view CIV (155nm) measurements. These measurements will provide (i) Dopplergrams for studies of waves, oscillations, explosive events, and mass motions through the transition region, and, (ii), polarization measurements to study the magnetic field in the transition region. This paper will describe the scientific goals of the instrument, a brief description of the optics and the polarization characteristics of the VUV Fabry Perot.

  2. Polarization and position measurements of Type III bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, S.; Sheridan, K. V.; Dulk, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The positional and polarization characteristics of Type III bursts in the range 24-220 MHz as measured by the Culgoora radioheliograph, spectrograph and spectropolarimeter are reported. The study includes 997 bursts which are of two classes: fundamental-harmonic (F-H) pairs and 'structureless' bursts with no visible F-H structure, and concentrates on the polarization of the bursts and the variation of polarization from centre to limb. The observed centre-to-limb decrease in polarization approximately follows a cosine law. This decrease is not as predicted by simple theory but is consistent with other observations which imply that open field lines from an active region diverge strongly. The observed o-mode polarization of harmonic radiation implies that the wave vectors of Langmuir waves are always parallel, within about 20 deg, to the magnetic field, while the constancy of H polarization with frequency implies that the ratio of gyromagnetic to plasma frequency, the Alfven speed and the plasma beta are constant with height on the open field lines above an active region. Finally, it is inferred that some factor, in addition to the magnetic field strength, controls the polarization of F radiation.

  3. Measurement of Small Optical Polarization Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    When data with and without an optically active sample are acquired simultaneously while one manually rotates the analyser, the graph of the first signal versus the second one is an ellipse whose shape shows the phase shift between the two signals; this shift is twice the optical rotation. There is no need to measure the rotation of the analyser or…

  4. Traceability study of optical fiber degree of polarization (DOP) measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-09-01

    Degree of polarization (DOP) is an important physical quantity for describing the optical polarization effect and is widely applied in optical fiber communication, optical fiber gyro and the related technologies. Currently, the optical polarization degree tester for the purpose of communication uses mainly two kinds of measurement methods: Stokes vector method and extremum method. At present, there isn't a standard to measure the accuracy and consistency of DOP parameter measurement by the devices listed above, affecting seriously the application of DOP parameter measurement in the fields of optical fiber gyro and optical fiber communication. So, it is urgent to table the accurate guarantees to trace the source of quantitative values of the DOP measuring devices and testers. In this paper, the polarization beam combination method is raised to research and manufacture the standard optical fiber light source device with the variable DOP, and an indicated error measurement has been conducted for a DOP meter. A kind of standard optical fiber light source device that uses a single light source to realize the variable DOP is put forward. It is used to provide the accurate and variable optical fiber polarization degree light with a scope of 0~100%. It is used to calibrate the DOP meters and widely applied in the field of national defense and optical communication fields. By using the standard optical power meter, DOP value by which the optical power meter calculates the optical signal can be measured, which will be used ultimately for calibration of the DOP meter. A measurement uncertainty of 0.5% is obtained using the polarization beam combination method.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS Polarization Measurements of OMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Burton, Michael G.; Schultz, A. S. B.

    2006-01-01

    We present 2 micrometer polarization measurements of positions in the BN region of the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) made with NICMOS Camera 2 (0.2" resolution) on Hubble Space Telescope. Our goals are to seek the sources of heating for IRc2, 3, 4, and 7, identify possible young stellar objects (YSOs), and characterize the grain alignment in the dust clouds along the lines-of-sight to the stars. Our results are as follows: BN is approximately 29% polarized by dichroic absorption and appears to be the illuminating source for most of the nebulosity to its north and up to approximately 5" to its south. Although the stars are probably all polarized by dichroic absorption, there are a number of compact, but non-point-source, objects that could be polarized by a combination of both dichroic absorption and local scattering of star light. We identify several candidate YSOs, including an approximately edge-on bipolar YSO 8.7" east of BN, and a deeply-embedded IRc7, all of which are obviously self-luminous at mid-infrared wavelengths and may be YSOs. None of these is a reflection nebula illuminated by a star located near radio source I, as was previously suggested. Other IRc sources are clearly reflection nebulae: IRc3 appears to be illuminated by IRc2-B or a combination of the IRc2 sources, and IRc4 and IRc5 appear to be illuminated by an unseen star in the vicinity of radio source I, or by Star n or IRc2-A. Trends in the magnetic field direction are inferred from the polarization of the 26 stars that are bright enough to be seen as NICMOS point sources. Their polarization ranges from N less than or equal to 1% (all stars with this low polarization are optically visible) to greater than 40%. The most polarized star has a polarization position angle different from its neighbors by approximately 40 degrees, but in agreement with the grain alignment inferred from millimeter polarization measurements of the cold dust cloud in the southern part of OMC-1. The polarization

  6. Automation of Mode Locking in a Nonlinear Polarization Rotation Fiber Laser through Output Polarization Measurements.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Michel; Gagnon, Marc-Daniel; Habel, Joé

    2016-01-01

    When a laser is mode-locked, it emits a train of ultra-short pulses at a repetition rate determined by the laser cavity length. This article outlines a new and inexpensive procedure to force mode locking in a pre-adjusted nonlinear polarization rotation fiber laser. This procedure is based on the detection of a sudden change in the output polarization state when mode locking occurs. This change is used to command the alignment of the intra-cavity polarization controller in order to find mode-locking conditions. More specifically, the value of the first Stokes parameter varies when the angle of the polarization controller is swept and, moreover, it undergoes an abrupt variation when the laser enters the mode-locked state. Monitoring this abrupt variation provides a practical easy-to-detect signal that can be used to command the alignment of the polarization controller and drive the laser towards mode locking. This monitoring is achieved by feeding a small portion of the signal to a polarization analyzer measuring the first Stokes parameter. A sudden change in the read out of this parameter from the analyzer will occur when the laser enters the mode-locked state. At this moment, the required angle of the polarization controller is kept fixed. The alignment is completed. This procedure provides an alternate way to existing automating procedures that use equipment such as an optical spectrum analyzer, an RF spectrum analyzer, a photodiode connected to an electronic pulse-counter or a nonlinear detecting scheme based on two-photon absorption or second harmonic generation. It is suitable for lasers mode locked by nonlinear polarization rotation. It is relatively easy to implement, it requires inexpensive means, especially at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and it lowers the production and operation costs incurred in comparison to the above-mentioned techniques. PMID:26967924

  7. Microsphere-based cantilevers for polarization-resolved and femtosecond SNOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Mora, C. A.; Hartelt, M.; Bayer, D.; Aeschlimann, M.; Ilin, E. A.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present a cantilever-based near-field probe with integrated Mie scattering dielectric SiO2 microsphere (MSDM) for near-field optical imaging as well as femtosecond spectroscopy applications. In contrast to the state-of-the-art transmissive near-field probes, the MSDM reveals a transmission of almost unity known from far-field microscopy configuration. For proper handling, the microsphere is integrated at the apex of a conventional pyramidal aperture tip carried by an atomic force microscopy cantilever. It proved to be mechanically robust during the scanning process even if operating it in the contact mode. The spherical symmetry provides on the one hand a well-defined mechanical contact point with the sample irrespective of its inclination angle to the sample surface. On the other hand, the symmetry of the device preserves the polarization of light proving to be useful for the investigation of the polarization dependent behavior of plasmonic nanostructures. The high transmission combined with low dispersion renders spectroscopic investigations on the femtosecond timescale with a moderate lateral resolution. Second order autocorrelation experiments on a BBO crystal reveals a time resolution well below 100 {fs at } 191 {nm} spatial resolution.

  8. Polarization-resolved simulations of multiple-order rainbows using realistic raindrop shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haußmann, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents selected results of a simulation study of the first five (primary-quinary) rainbow orders based on a realistic, size-dependent shape model for falling raindrops, taking into account that the drops' bottom part is flattened to higher degree than the dome-like top part. Moreover, broad drop size distributions are included in the simulations, as it is one goal of this paper to analyze, whether the predicted amplification and attenuation patterns for higher-order rainbows, as derived from previous simulations with monodisperse drop sizes, will still be pronounced under the conditions of natural rainfall. Secondly, deviations of the multiple rainbow orders' polarization state from the reference case of spherical drops are discussed. It is shown that each rainbow order may contain a small amount of circularly polarized light due to total internal reflections. Thirdly, it is investigated, how the conditions that generate twinned primary rainbows will affect the higher orders. For the simulations, geometric-optic ray tracing of the full Stokes vector as well as an approximate approach using appropriately shifted Debye series data is applied.

  9. Polari, a Fortran IV Program for Measures of Attitudinal Polarization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vegelius, Jan; Edvardsson, Bo

    1976-01-01

    The theoretical background underlying the mathematical development of different measures of the degree of attitudinal polarization applicable to bipolar questions and a Fortran IV computer program that provides a rapid means for calculation of four of those measures are presented. (Author/JKS)

  10. First Steps in Tensor Polarization Measurement using the DMR Lineshape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Dustin

    2016-02-01

    The first steps to investigate the tensor polarization measurement with uncertainty is outlined. The objective is to look into possible measurements of the deuteron alignment given an arbitrary lineshape that was distorted by a modulated RF field of know frequency range with respect to each absorption line.

  11. Probing the 3D structure of cornea-like collagen liquid crystals with polarization-resolved SHG microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teulon, Claire; Tidu, Aurélien; Portier, François; Mosser, Gervaise; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-07-11

    This work aims at characterizing the three-dimensional organization of liquid crystals composed of collagen, in order to determine the physico-chemical conditions leading to highly organized structures found in biological tissues such as cornea. To that end, we use second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, since aligned collagen structures have been shown to exhibit intrinsic SHG signals. We combine polarization-resolved SHG experiments (P-SHG) with the theoretical derivation of the SHG signal of collagen molecules tilted with respect to the focal plane. Our P-SHG images exhibit striated patterns with variable contrast, as expected from our analytical and numerical calculations for plywood-like nematic structures similar to the ones found in the cornea. This study demonstrates the benefits of P-SHG microscopy for in situ characterization of highly organized biopolymers at micrometer scale, and the unique sensitivity of this nonlinear optical technique to the orientation of collagen molecules. PMID:27410876

  12. Measuring the Polarized CMB with ACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staggs, Suzanne

    2016-06-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope is a special-purpose 6m telescope designed for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements at arcminute resolution. We will describe recent results using the second-generation camera called ACTPol. The camera comprises three sets of optics and detectors. Two operate at 150 GHz, and the third is the first multichroic detector array deployed for the CMB. The latter operates at 90 and 150 GHz.

  13. Spectroscopic ellipsometer based on direct measurement of polarization ellipticity

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Lionel R.

    2011-06-20

    A polarizer-sample-Wollaston prism analyzer ellipsometer is described in which the ellipsometric angles {psi} and {Delta} are determined by direct measurement of the elliptically polarized light reflected from the sample. With the Wollaston prism initially set to transmit p- and s-polarized light, the azimuthal angle P of the polarizer is adjusted until the two beams have equal intensity. This condition yields {psi}={+-}P and ensures that the reflected elliptically polarized light has an azimuthal angle of {+-}45 deg. and maximum ellipticity. Rotating the Wollaston prism through 45 deg. and adjusting the analyzer azimuth until the two beams again have equal intensity yields the ellipticity that allows {Delta} to be determined via a simple linear relationship. The errors produced by nonideal components are analyzed. We show that the polarizer dominates these errors but that for most practical purposes, the error in {psi} is negligible and the error in {Delta} may be corrected exactly. A native oxide layer on a silicon substrate was measured at a single wavelength and multiple angles of incidence and spectroscopically at a single angle of incidence. The best fit film thicknesses obtained were in excellent agreement with those determined using a traditional null ellipsometer.

  14. Vacuum ultraviolet spectropolarimeter design for precise polarization measurements.

    PubMed

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Auchère, Frédéric; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Kano, Ryouhei; Tsuneta, Saku; Winebarger, Amy R; Kobayashi, Ken

    2015-03-10

    Precise polarization measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region provide a new means for inferring weak magnetic fields in the upper atmosphere of the Sun and stars. We propose a VUV spectropolarimeter design ideally suited for this purpose. This design is proposed and adopted for the NASA-JAXA chromospheric lyman-alpha spectropolarimeter (CLASP), which will record the linear polarization (Stokes Q and U) of the hydrogen Lyman-α line (121.567 nm) profile. The expected degree of polarization is on the order of 0.1%. Our spectropolarimeter has two optically symmetric channels to simultaneously measure orthogonal linear polarization states with a single concave diffraction grating that serves both as the spectral dispersion element and beam splitter. This design has a minimal number of reflective components with a high VUV throughput. Consequently, these design features allow us to minimize the polarization errors caused by possible time variation of the VUV flux during the polarization modulation and by statistical photon noise. PMID:25968386

  15. Measuring political polarization: Twitter shows the two sides of Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A. J.; Borondo, J.; Losada, J. C.; Benito, R. M.

    2015-03-01

    We say that a population is perfectly polarized when divided in two groups of the same size and opposite opinions. In this paper, we propose a methodology to study and measure the emergence of polarization from social interactions. We begin by proposing a model to estimate opinions in which a minority of influential individuals propagate their opinions through a social network. The result of the model is an opinion probability density function. Next, we propose an index to quantify the extent to which the resulting distribution is polarized. Finally, we apply the proposed methodology to a Twitter conversation about the late Venezuelan president, Hugo Chávez, finding a good agreement between our results and offline data. Hence, we show that our methodology can detect different degrees of polarization, depending on the structure of the network.

  16. Ultrasmall polarization rotation measurements via weak value amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio; Azevedo, Sérgio; Rosas, Alexandre

    2014-06-01

    We propose a framework to analyze weak measurements based on an angular version of the von Neumann measurement scheme, where the coupling between the system and the meter causes rotation of the measuring variable. We also discuss an experimental application of this theory in which measurements of weak optical activity and reflection-induced polarization rotation could be amplified in nearly two orders of magnitude. It can shed a new light on a great variety of physical chemistry, molecular biology and nanotechnology studies.

  17. Primordial gravitational waves measurements and anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-Yu; Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Mingzhe; Li, Hong; Zhang, Xinmin

    2015-12-01

    Searching for the signal of primordial gravitational waves in the B-modes (BB) power spectrum is one of the key scientific aims of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments. However, this could be easily contaminated by several foreground issues, such as the interstellar dust grains and the galactic cyclotron electrons. In this paper we study another mechanism, the cosmic birefringence, which can be introduced by a CPT-violating interaction between CMB photons and an external scalar field. Such kind of interaction could give rise to the rotation of the linear polarization state of CMB photons, and consequently induce the CMB BB power spectrum, which could mimic the signal of primordial gravitational waves at large scales. With the recently released polarization data of BICEP2 and the joint analysis data of BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck, we perform a global fitting analysis on constraining the tensor-to-scalar ratio r by considering the polarization rotation angle [ α (n ˆ)] which can be separated into a background isotropic part [ α bar ] and a small anisotropic part [ Δα (n ˆ)]. Since the data of BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments have already been corrected by using the "self-calibration" method, here we mainly focus on the effects from the anisotropies of CMB polarization rotation angle. We find that including Δα (n ˆ) in the analysis could slightly weaken the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r, when using current CMB polarization measurements. We also simulate the mock CMB data with the BICEP3-like sensitivity. Very interestingly, we find that if the effects of the anisotropic polarization rotation angle could not be taken into account properly in the analysis, the constraints on r will be dramatically biased. This implies that we need to break the degeneracy between the anisotropies of the CMB polarization rotation angle and the CMB primordial tensor perturbations, in order to measure the signal of primordial gravitational

  18. Polarized Structure Functions: Proton/Deuteron Measurements in Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Oscar A. Rondon

    2005-02-01

    The study of the nucleon polarized structure functions has matured beyond the inclusive measurements of the past to the investigation of all eight quark distribution functions in the nucleon. Jefferson Lab's Hall C program of polarized structure functions studies started with a measurement of the proton and deuteron spin structure in the resonances at Q2 {approx} 1.3 [GeV/c]2. This work will be extended for the proton to more than 5 [GeV/c]2 for both DIS and the resonances in the upcoming SANE experiment. SANE will use a novel non-magnetic very large solid angle detector, BETA. Semi-inclusive asymmetries will be measured to determine the flavor composition of the nucleon spin in the recently approved Semi-SANE experiment. The 11 GeV energy upgrade will open new opportunities to study other functions, such as the transversity, Collins and Sievers functions, using vertical polarized targets.

  19. Polarized Structure Functions: Proton/Deuteron Measurements in Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Rondon, Oscar A.

    2005-02-10

    The study of the nucleon polarized structure functions has matured beyond the inclusive measurements of the past to the investigation of all eight quark distribution functions in the nucleon. Jefferson Lab's Hall C program of polarized structure functions studies started with a measurement of the proton and deuteron spin structure in the resonances at Q2 {approx} 1.3 [GeV/c]2. This work will be extended for the proton to more than 5 [GeV/c]2 for both DIS and the resonances in the upcoming SANE experiment. SANE will use a novel non-magnetic very large solid angle detector, BETA. Semi-inclusive asymmetries will be measured to determine the flavor composition of the nucleon spin in the recently approved Semi -- SANE experiment. The 11 GeV energy upgrade will open new opportunities to study other functions, such as the transversity, Collins and Sievers functions, using vertical polarized targets.

  20. Measurement of polarization with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Leitch, E M; Kovac, J M; Pryke, C; Carlstrom, J E; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Dragovan, M; Reddall, B; Sandberg, E S

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation can reveal with remarkable precision the conditions of the Universe when it was approximately 400,000 years old. The three most fundamental properties of the CMB are its frequency spectrum (which determines the temperature), and the fluctuations in both the temperature and polarization across a range of angular scales. The frequency spectrum has been well determined, and considerable progress has been made in measuring the power spectrum of the temperature fluctuations. But despite many efforts to measure the polarization, detection of this property of the CMB has hitherto been beyond the reach of even the most sensitive observations. Here we describe the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI), an array of radio telescopes, which for the past two years has conducted polarization-sensitive observations of the CMB from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station. PMID:12490940

  1. Polarization-resolved resonant fluorescence of a single semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J.; Founta, S.; Hughes, M.; Hopkinson, M.; Ramsay, A. J.; Skolnick, M. S.; Shih, C. K.

    2012-12-01

    We observe the resonantly excited emission of a single self assembled quantum dot (QD) positioned in a planar μ-cavity, free of any background scattering from defects in the surrounding lattice matrix. Making use of this technique, we are able to obtain the second-order correlation function g2(τ) and, therefore, observe its oscillations under strong continuous-wave excitation. By determining that its correlation function is near zero for g2(τ = 0), we are able to verify its status as a single quantum emitter. By altering the input scheme geometry, we are also able to demonstrate further direct control of a single QD's properties by gaining access to and observing emission from both of its polarization states πx and πy by merely tuning the excitation wavelength.

  2. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Maxime; Gillon, Béatrice; Claiser, Nicolas; Gillet, Jean-Michel; Lecomte, Claude; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density) and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed. PMID:25075338

  3. Measurement of the Λb polarization in Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wanke, R.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Thulasidas, M.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Ragusa, F.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The Λb polarization in hadronic Z decays is measured in semileptonic decays from the average energies of the charged lepton and the neutrino. In a data sample of approximately 3 million hadronic Z decays collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP between 1991 and 1994, 462 ± 31 Λb candidates are selected using ( Λπ+)-lepton correlations. From this event sample, the Λb polarization is measured to be PΛ b = -0.23 -0.20+0.24(stat.) -0.07+0.08(syst.).

  4. Analysis of Polder Polarization Measurements During Astex and Eucrex Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Hui; Han, Qingyuan; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1997-01-01

    Polarization is more sensitive than intensity to cloud microstructure such as the particle size and shape, and multiple scattering does not wash out features in polarization as effectively as it does in the intensity. Polarization measurements, particularly in the near IR, are potentially a valuable tool for cloud identification and for studies of the microphysics of clouds. The POLDER instrument is designed to provide wide field of view bidirectional images in polarized light. During the ASTEX-SOFIA campaign on June 12th, 1992, over the Atlantic Ocean (near the Azores Islands), images of homogeneous thick stratocumulus cloud fields were acquired. During the EUCREX'94 (April, 1994) campaign, the POLDER instrument was flying over the region of Brittany (France), taking observations of cirrus clouds. This study involves model studies and data analysis of POLDER observations. Both models and data analysis show that POLDER can be used to detect cloud thermodynamic phases. Model results show that polarized reflection in the Lamda =0.86 micron band is sensitive to cloud droplet sizes but not to cloud optical thickness. Comparison between model and data analysis reveals that cloud droplet sizes during ASTEX are about 5 microns, which agrees very well with the results of in situ measurements (4-5 microns). Knowing the retrieved cloud droplet sizes, the total reflected intensity of the POLDER measurements then can be used to retrieve cloud optical thickness. The close agreement between data analysis and model results during ASTEX also suggests the homogeneity of the cloud layer during that campaign.

  5. Magnetoelectroluminescence of organic heterostructures: Analytical theory and spectrally resolved measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Feilong; Kelley, Megan R.; Crooker, Scott A.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Ruden, P. Paul; Los Alamos National Lab.; Smith, Darryl L.; Los Alamos National Lab.

    2014-12-22

    The effect of a magnetic field on the electroluminescence of organic light emitting devices originates from the hyperfine interaction between the electron/hole polarons and the hydrogen nuclei of the host molecules. In this paper, we present an analytical theory of magnetoelectroluminescence for organic semiconductors. To be specific, we focus on bilayer heterostructure devices. In the case we are considering, light generation at the interface of the donor and acceptor layers results from the formation and recombination of exciplexes. The spin physics is described by a stochastic Liouville equation for the electron/hole spin density matrix. By finding the steady-state analytical solutionmore » using Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory, we explore how the singlet/triplet exciplex ratio is affected by the hyperfine interaction strength and by the external magnetic field. In order to validate the theory, spectrally resolved electroluminescence experiments on BPhen/m-MTDATA devices are analyzed. With increasing emission wavelength, the width of the magnetic field modulation curve of the electroluminescence increases while its depth decreases. Furthermore, these observations are consistent with the model.« less

  6. Magnetoelectroluminescence of organic heterostructures: Analytical theory and spectrally resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Feilong; Kelley, Megan R.; Crooker, Scott A.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Ruden, P. Paul; Smith, Darryl L.

    2014-12-22

    The effect of a magnetic field on the electroluminescence of organic light emitting devices originates from the hyperfine interaction between the electron/hole polarons and the hydrogen nuclei of the host molecules. In this paper, we present an analytical theory of magnetoelectroluminescence for organic semiconductors. To be specific, we focus on bilayer heterostructure devices. In the case we are considering, light generation at the interface of the donor and acceptor layers results from the formation and recombination of exciplexes. The spin physics is described by a stochastic Liouville equation for the electron/hole spin density matrix. By finding the steady-state analytical solution using Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory, we explore how the singlet/triplet exciplex ratio is affected by the hyperfine interaction strength and by the external magnetic field. In order to validate the theory, spectrally resolved electroluminescence experiments on BPhen/m-MTDATA devices are analyzed. With increasing emission wavelength, the width of the magnetic field modulation curve of the electroluminescence increases while its depth decreases. Furthermore, these observations are consistent with the model.

  7. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure.

    PubMed

    Balzovsky, E V; Buyanov, Yu I; Koshelev, V I; Nekrasov, E S

    2016-03-01

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from -40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well. PMID:27036799

  8. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzovsky, E. V.; Buyanov, Yu. I.; Koshelev, V. I.; Nekrasov, E. S.

    2016-03-01

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from -40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well.

  9. Spectral induced polarization measurements on New Zealand sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jospeh, S.; Ingham, M.; Gouws, G.

    2012-12-01

    Because of the dependence of the ac electrical conductivity of granular materials on surface effects related to pore geometry, spectral induced polarization measurements (SIP) have the potential to provide a geophysical technique which can be used to estimate aquifer properties such as hydraulic conductivity. We present the results of laboratory SIP measurements on a variety of sand samples typical of aquifers in the coastal areas of New Zealand and relate these to the measured hydraulic conductivity.

  10. Single-shot dual-polarization holography: measurement of the polarization state of a magnetic sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadad, Davood; Amer, Eynas; Gren, Per; Melander, Emil; Hällstig, Emil; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2015-08-01

    In this paper a single-shot digital holographic set-up with two orthogonally polarized reference beams is proposed to achieve rapid acquisition of Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect images. Principles of the method and the background theory for dynamic state of polarization measurement by use of digital holography are presented. This system has no mechanically moving elements or active elements for polarization control and modulation. An object beam is combined with two reference beams at different off-axis angles and is guided to a detector. Then two complex fields (interference terms) representing two orthogonal polarizations are recorded in a single frame simultaneously. Thereafter the complex fields are numerically reconstructed and carrier frequency calibration is done to remove aberrations introduced in multiplexed digital holographic recordings. From the numerical values of amplitude and phase, a real time quantitative analysis of the polarization state is possible by use of Jones vectors. The technique is demonstrated on a magnetic sample that is a lithographically patterned magnetic microstructure consisting of thin permalloy parallel stripes.

  11. Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lehocka, S.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Kolk, N. Van Der; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; , C. Whitten, Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, J.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zawisza, M.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, A. N.; Zuo, J. X.

    2007-08-01

    The system created in noncentral relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Because of spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could become globally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. We present the results of Λ and Λ¯ hyperon global polarization measurements in Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV performed with the STAR detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The observed global polarization of Λ and Λ¯ hyperons in the STAR acceptance is consistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. The obtained upper limit, |PΛ,Λ¯|⩽0.02, is compared with the theoretical values discussed recently in the literature.

  12. Polarized and spatially resolved Raman scattering from composition-graded wurtzite InGaAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Rho, H.; Lee, E. H.; Song, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    We report Raman scattering from wurtzite single-crystalline InGaAs nanowires (NWs) to probe optical phonon behaviors associated with spatial grading in alloy composition along the NW length. Polarized Raman spectra revealed several optical phonons and their scattering symmetries: (i) InAs-like A 1(LO) and A 1(TO) phonons and (ii) GaAs-like A 1(LO), A 1(TO), and E 2(high) phonons. In addition, strong anisotropic behavior was observed in the Raman tensor elements of the A 1(TO) phonon mode. Interestingly, a spatial mapping of the GaAs-like A 1(TO) phonon along the NW length direction showed a systematic increase in energy from the NW top (~255 cm‑1) to the midpoint (~263 cm‑1), indicating an increase in the Ga mole fraction from about 0.5 to about 0.8. Further toward the NW bottom, the GaAs-like A 1(TO) phonon energy saturated to the peak value at about 264 cm‑1. In the upper half of the NW, the phonon linewidths broadened significantly due to the spatial grading in In/Ga composition along the NW length. When the composition grading was negligible in the bottom half of the NW, the spectral widths were considerably narrowed. The GaAs-like E 2(high) phonon showed similar variations in both energy and spectral width along the NW length.

  13. Polar bear Ursus maritimus hearing measured with auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Paul E; Supin, Alexander Y; Amundin, Mats; Röken, Bengt; Møller, Thorsten; Mooney, T Aran; Taylor, Kristen A; Yuen, Michelle

    2007-04-01

    While there has been recent concern about the effects of sound on marine mammals, including polar bears, there are no data available measuring the hearing of any bear. The in-air hearing of three polar bears was measured using evoked auditory potentials obtained while tone pips were played to three individually anaesthetized bears at the Kolmården Djurpark. Hearing was tested in half-octave steps from 1 to 22.5 kHz. Measurements were not obtainable at 1 kHz and best sensitivity was found in the range from 11.2-22.5 kHz. Considering the tone pips were short and background noise measurements were available, absolute measurements were estimated based on an assumed mammalian integration time of 300 ms. These data show sensitive hearing in the polar bear over a wide frequency range and should cause those concerned with the introduction of anthropogenic noise into the polar bear's environment to operate with caution. PMID:17371910

  14. Some problems in the measurement of the frequency-resolving ability of hearing.

    PubMed

    Supin, A Ya

    2005-10-01

    Despite the detailed development of masking methods for measurement of the frequency selectivity of hearing, these measurements are hardly used for diagnostic purposes because they are time-consuming and because of the uncertain extrapolation of the results to the perception of complex spectral patterns. A method for the direct measurement of the spectral resolving ability of hearing using test signals with rippled spectra is proposed. These measurements showed 1) that the resolving ability of the auditory system in terms of discriminating complex spectra is greater than that suggested by the acuity of auditory frequency filters; 2) that changes in the acuity of frequency auditory filters associated with sound intensity hardly affect the ability to resolve complex spectra; 3) that the effects of interference on frequency-resolving ability do not lead to decreases in the spectral contrast of signals due to superimposition of noise. PMID:16132266

  15. Measuring the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization with SPT-POL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crites, Abigail; SPT-POL Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    A new polarization-sensitive camera, SPT-POL, designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), was deployed on the 10 meter South Pole Telescope in January 2012. The goal of the project is to exploit the high resolution of the telescope (1 arcminute beam) and the high sensitivity afforded by the 1536 detector camera to characterize the B-mode polarization induced by the gravitational lensing of the primordial E-mode CMB polarization, as well as to detect or set an upper limit on the level of the B-mode polarization from inflationary gravitational waves. The lensing B-modes will be used to constrain the sum of the neutrino masses by measuring large scale structure, while the inflationary B-modes are sensitive to the energy scale of inflation. I will discuss the development of the SPT-POL camera including the cryogenic design and the transition edge sensor (TES) detectors as well as the science goals and status of the ongoing of the SPT-POL program.

  16. Polarized radio emission from extensive air showers measured with LOFAR

    SciTech Connect

    Schellart, P.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J.E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J.R.; Krause, M.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J.P.; Veen, S. ter; Thoudam, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present LOFAR measurements of radio emission from extensive air showers. We find that this emission is strongly polarized, with a median degree of polarization of nearly 99%, and that the angle between the polarization direction of the electric field and the Lorentz force acting on the particles, depends on the observer location in the shower plane. This can be understood as a superposition of the radially polarized charge-excess emission mechanism, first proposed by Askaryan and the geomagnetic emission mechanism proposed by Kahn and Lerche. We calculate the relative strengths of both contributions, as quantified by the charge-excess fraction, for 163 individual air showers. We find that the measured charge-excess fraction is higher for air showers arriving from closer to the zenith. Furthermore, the measured charge-excess fraction also increases with increasing observer distance from the air shower symmetry axis. The measured values range from (3.3± 1.0)% for very inclined air showers at 25 m to (20.3± 1.3)% for almost vertical showers at 225 m. Both dependencies are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions.

  17. A One Billion Year Martian Climate Model: The Importance of Seasonally Resolved Polar Caps and the Role of Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. C.; Leovy, C. B.; Quinn, T. R.; Haberle, R. M.; Schaeffer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Wind deflation and deposition are powerful agents of surface change in the present Mars climate regime. Recent studies indicate that, while the distribution of regions of potential deflation (or erosion) and deposition is remarkably insensitive to changes in orbital parameters (obliquity, timing of perihelion passage, etc.), rates of aeolian surface modification may be highly sensitive to these parameters even if the atmospheric mass remains constant. But previous work suggested the atmospheric mass is likely to be sensitive to obliquity, especially if a significant mass of carbon dioxide can be stored in the regolith or deposited in the form of massive polar caps. Deflation and erosion are highly sensitive to surface pressure, so feedback between orbit variations and surface pressure can greatly enhance the sensitivity of aeolian modification rates to orbital parameters. We used statistics derived from a 1 Gyr orbital integration of the spin axis of Mars, coupled with 3D general circulation models (GCMs) at a variety of orbital conditions and pressures, to explore this feedback. We also employed a seasonally resolved 1D energy balance model to illuminate the gross characteristics of the longterm atmospheric evolution, wind erosion and deposition over one billion years. We find that seasonal polar cycles have a critical influence on the ability for the regolith to release CO2 at high obliquities, and find that the atmospheric CO2 actually decreases at high obliquities due to the cooling effect of polar deposits at latitudes where seasonal caps form. At low obliquity, the formation of massive, permanent polar caps depends critically on the values of the frost albedo, A(sub frost), and frost emissivity, E(sub frost). Using our 1D model with values of A(sub frost) = 0.67 and E(sub frost) = 0.55, matched to the NASA Ames GCM results, we find that permanent caps only form at low obliquities (< 10 degrees). Thus, contrary to expectations, the Martian atmospheric pressure

  18. Time resolved density measurements in premixed turbulent flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dandekar, K. V.; Gouldin, F. C.

    1982-01-01

    Premixed, turbulent flames are important in connection with investigations of fundamental, turbulent-reacting-flow processes and the study of practical combustion devices, such as spark ignition engines and premixed, prevaporized gas turbine combustors which burn premixed reactants. The considered investigation is concerned with the application of laser induced Rayleigh scattering to measure the gas density in premixed, methane-air flames. A description is provided of the results of density and velocity measurements in an open, lean, premixed methane-air flame stabilized in grid turbulence of low Reynolds number. It is found that where applicable, Rayleigh scattering can be used to good advantage to measure molecular number density. Mean and rms density results show that the mean flame thickens with axial distance but that the maximum in rms does not change appreciably.

  19. Measuring ultrashort pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Trebino, R.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program is the development of techniques for the measurement of ultrafast events important in gas-phase combustion chemistry. Specifically, goals of this program include the development of fundamental concepts and spectroscopic techniques that will augment the information currently available with ultrafast laser techniques. Of equal importance is the development of technology for ultrafast spectroscopy. For example, methods for the production and measurement of ultrashort pulses at wavelengths important for these studies is an important goal. Because the specific vibrational motion excited in a molecule depends sensitively on the intensity, I(t), and the phase, {psi}(t), of the ultrashort pulse used to excite the motion, it is critical to measure both of these quantities for an individual pulse. Unfortunately, this has remained an unsolved problem for many years. Fortunately, this year, the authors present a technique that achieves this goal.

  20. Temporally resolved plasma composition measurements by collective Thomson scattering in TEXTOR (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stejner, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Bindslev, H.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Meo, F.; Moseev, D.; Bürger, A.; Kantor, M.; de Baar, M.

    2012-10-01

    Fusion plasma composition measurements by collective Thomson scattering (CTS) were demonstrated in recent proof-of-principle measurements in TEXTOR [S. B. Korsholm et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165004 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.165004]. Such measurements rely on the ability to resolve and interpret ion cyclotron structure in CTS spectra. Here, we extend these techniques to enable temporally resolved plasma composition measurements by CTS in TEXTOR, and we discuss the prospect for such measurements with newly installed hardware upgrades for the CTS system on ASDEX Upgrade.

  1. Precise polarization measurements via detection of compton scattered electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tvaskis, Vladas; Dutta, Dipangkar; Gaskell, David J.; Narayan, Amrendra

    2014-01-01

    The Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab aims to make a 4% measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering at very low Q{sup 2} of a longitudinally polarized electron beam off a proton target. One of the dominant experimental systematic uncertainties in Qweak will result from determining the beam polarization. A new Compton polarimeter was installed in the fall of 2010 to provide a non-invasive and continuous monitoring of the electron beam polarization in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The Compton-scattered electrons are detected in four planes of diamond micro-strip detectors. We have achieved the design goals of <1% statistical uncertainty per hour and expect to achieve <1% systematic uncertainty.

  2. Polarization measurements and T violation in exclusive semileptonic B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guo-Hong; Kiers, Ken; Ng, John N.

    1997-11-01

    We provide a general analysis of time reversal invariance violation in the exclusive semileptonic B decays B-->Dlν¯ and B-->D*lν¯. Measurements of the lepton and D* polarizations can be used to search for and identify nonstandard model sources of T violation. Upper limits are placed on the T-odd polarization observables in both the supersymmetric R-parity-conserving and R-parity-breaking theories, as well as in some nonsupersymmetric extensions of the standard model, including multi-Higgs-doublet models, leptoquark models, and left-right symmetric models. It is noted that many of these models allow for large T-violating polarization effects which could be within the reach of the planned B factories.

  3. Roll angle measurement using a polarization scanning reference source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Rastegar, Jahangir; Kankipati, Varun

    2014-06-01

    On board measurement of attitude position, for example roll angle, of autonomous vehicles is critical to the execution of a successful mission. This paper describes a real-time technique, which combines a polarization scanning reference source and a priori knowledge of the scanning pattern. Measurements in an anechoic chamber, as well as, field tests in a busy parking lot, verify the efficacy of the technique, for both line of sight and non-line of sight capability.

  4. On the Statistical Analysis of X-ray Polarization Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T. E.; Kallman, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    In many polarimetry applications, including observations in the X-ray band, the measurement of a polarization signal can be reduced to the detection and quantification of a deviation from uniformity of a distribution of measured angles of the form alpha plus beta cosine (exp 2)(phi - phi(sub 0) (0 (is) less than phi is less than pi). We explore the statistics of such polarization measurements using both Monte Carlo simulations as well as analytic calculations based on the appropriate probability distributions. We derive relations for the number of counts required to reach a given detection level (parameterized by beta the "number of sigma's" of the measurement) appropriate for measuring the modulation amplitude alpha by itself (single interesting parameter case) or jointly with the position angle phi (two interesting parameters case). We show that for the former case when the intrinsic amplitude is equal to the well known minimum detectable polarization (MDP) it is, on average, detected at the 3sigma level. For the latter case, when one requires a joint measurement at the same confidence level, then more counts are needed, by a factor of approximately equal to 2.2, than that required to achieve the MDP level. We find that the position angle uncertainty at 1sigma confidence is well described by the relation sigma(sub pi) equals 28.5(degrees) divided by beta.

  5. ON THE STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF X-RAY POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmayer, T. E.; Kallman, T. R.

    2013-08-20

    In many polarimetry applications, including observations in the X-ray band, the measurement of a polarization signal can be reduced to the detection and quantification of a deviation from uniformity of a distribution of measured angles of the form A + Bcos {sup 2}({phi} - {phi}{sub 0}) (0 < {phi} < {pi}). We explore the statistics of such polarization measurements using Monte Carlo simulations and {chi}{sup 2} fitting methods. We compare our results to those derived using the traditional probability density used to characterize polarization measurements and quantify how they deviate as the intrinsic modulation amplitude grows. We derive relations for the number of counts required to reach a given detection level (parameterized by {beta} the ''number of {sigma}'s'' of the measurement) appropriate for measuring the modulation amplitude a by itself (single interesting parameter case) or jointly with the position angle {phi} (two interesting parameters case). We show that for the former case, when the intrinsic amplitude is equal to the well-known minimum detectable polarization, (MDP) it is, on average, detected at the 3{sigma} level. For the latter case, when one requires a joint measurement at the same confidence level, then more counts are needed than what was required to achieve the MDP level. This additional factor is amplitude-dependent, but is Almost-Equal-To 2.2 for intrinsic amplitudes less than about 20%. It decreases slowly with amplitude and is Almost-Equal-To 1.8 when the amplitude is 50%. We find that the position angle uncertainty at 1{sigma} confidence is well described by the relation {sigma}{sub {phi}} = 28. Degree-Sign 5/{beta}.

  6. Arbitrarily high super-resolving phase measurements at telecommunication wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, Christian; Bjoerk, Gunnar; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2010-06-15

    We present two experiments that achieve phase super-resolution at telecommunication wavelengths. One of the experiments is realized in the space domain and the other is realized in the time domain. Both experiments show high visibility and are performed with standard lasers and single-photon detectors. The first experiment uses six-photon coincidences, whereas the latter experiment needs no coincidence measurements, is easy to perform, and achieves, in principle, arbitrarily high phase super-resolution. Here, we demonstrate a 30-fold increase of the resolution. We stress that neither entanglement nor joint detection is needed in these experiments, which demonstrates that neither is necessary to achieve phase super-resolution.

  7. Time resolved measurements of deposition and dust in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Nishino, N.; Parker, C. V.

    2005-10-01

    Tritium codeposition and dust accumulation will impact the operation of next-step devices such as ITER and measurements in contemporary tokamaks are important to gain a predictive understanding that can help mitigate the associated risk. We will discuss results from three diagnostics that address these issues. Incandescent particles have been observed by fast cameras moving at 10-100 m/s in some NSTX plasmas. The particle trajectories appear to be complex including velocity reversal, and particle breakup. We also have developed a novel electrostatic device to detect dust on remote surfaces[1,2]. Recent laboratory work with ultra-fine 25 µm trace spacing has shown 1 μg/cm2 sensitivity with information on the particle size in the detected waveform. Quartz crystal microbalances have been deployed in NSTX to measure pulse-by-pulse deposition at various locations[3] and observations from the current campaign will be reported. [1] A. Bader et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum., 75, (2004) 370. [2] C. Voinier et al., J. Nucl. Mater. in press (2005) [3] C. H. Skinner et al., J. Nucl. Mater., 337-339 (2005) 129.

  8. In vivo time-resolved autofluorescence measurements on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katika, Kamal M.; Pilon, Laurent; Dipple, Katrina; Levin, Seymour; Blackwell, Jennifer; Berberoglu, Halil

    2006-02-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results obtained from fluorescence lifetime measurements on human skin using time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) techniques. Human skin was exposed to light from a pulsed LED of 700 ps pulse width at a wavelength of 375 nm and fluorescence decays were recorded at four different emission wavelengths (442, 460, 478 and 496 nm) using a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a monochromator. Measurements were carried out on the left and right palms of subjects recruited for the study after obtaining consent using a UCLA IRB approved consent form. The subjects recruited consisted of 18 males and 17 females with different skin complexions and ages ranging from 10 to 70 years. In addition, a set of experiments were also performed on various locations including the palm, the arm and the cheek of a Caucasian subject. The fluorescence decays thus obtained were fit to a three-exponential decay model in all cases and were approximately 0.4, 2.7 and 9.4 ns, respectively. The variations in these lifetimes with location, gender, skin complexion and age are studied. It is speculated that the shorter lifetimes correspond to free and bound NADH while the longer lifetime is due to AGE crosslinks.

  9. Effects of spin diffusion on electron spin relaxation time measured with a time-resolved microscopic photoluminescence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2015-02-07

    We performed measurements at room temperature for a GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well grown on GaAs(110) using a time-resolved microscopic photoluminescence (micro-PL) technique to find what effects spin diffusion had on the measured electron spin relaxation time, τ{sub s}, and developed a method of estimating the spin diffusion coefficient, D{sub s}, using the measured data and the coupled drift-diffusion equations for spin polarized electrons. The spatial nonuniformities of τ{sub s} and the initial degree of electron spin polarization caused by the pump intensity distribution inside the focal spot were taken into account to explain the dependence of τ{sub s} on the measured spot size, i.e., a longer τ{sub s} for a smaller spot size. We estimated D{sub s} as ∼100 cm{sup 2}/s, which is similar to a value reported in the literature. We also provided a qualitative understanding on how spin diffusion lengthens τ{sub s} in micro-PL measurements.

  10. Quantitative spatially resolved measurements of mass transfer through laryngeal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, J V; O'Hare, D; Unwin, P R; Winlove, C P

    1997-11-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) is a scanned probe microscope that uses the response of a mobile ultramicroelectrode (UME) tip to determine the reactivity, topography, and mass transport characteristics of interfaces with high spatial resolution. SECM strategies for measuring the rates of solute diffusion and convection through samples of cartilage, using amperometric UMEs, are outlined. The methods are used to determine the diffusion coefficients of oxygen and ruthenium(III) hexamine [Ru(NH3)6(3+)] in laryngeal cartilage. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in cartilage is found to be approximately 50% of that in aqueous electrolyte solution, assuming a partition coefficient of unity for oxygen between cartilage and aqueous solution. In contrast, diffusion of Ru(NH3)6(3+) within the cartilage sample cannot be detected on the SECM timescale, suggesting a diffusion coefficient at least two orders of magnitude lower than that in solution, given a measured partition coefficient for Ru(NH3)6(3+) between cartilage and aqueous solution, Kp = [Ru(NH3)6(3+)]cartilage/[RU(NH3)6(3+)]solution = 3.4 +/- 0.1. Rates of Ru(NH3)6(3+) osmotically driven convective transport across cartilage samples are imaged at high spatial resolution by monitoring the current response of a scanning UME, with an osmotic pressure of approximately 0.75 atm across the slice. A model is outlined that enables the current response to be related to the local flux. By determining the topography of the sample from the current response with no applied osmotic pressure, local transport rates can be correlated with topographical features of the sample surface, at much higher spatial resolution than has previously been achieved. PMID:9370471

  11. Quantitative spatially resolved measurements of mass transfer through laryngeal cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, J V; O'Hare, D; Unwin, P R; Winlove, C P

    1997-01-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) is a scanned probe microscope that uses the response of a mobile ultramicroelectrode (UME) tip to determine the reactivity, topography, and mass transport characteristics of interfaces with high spatial resolution. SECM strategies for measuring the rates of solute diffusion and convection through samples of cartilage, using amperometric UMEs, are outlined. The methods are used to determine the diffusion coefficients of oxygen and ruthenium(III) hexamine [Ru(NH3)6(3+)] in laryngeal cartilage. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in cartilage is found to be approximately 50% of that in aqueous electrolyte solution, assuming a partition coefficient of unity for oxygen between cartilage and aqueous solution. In contrast, diffusion of Ru(NH3)6(3+) within the cartilage sample cannot be detected on the SECM timescale, suggesting a diffusion coefficient at least two orders of magnitude lower than that in solution, given a measured partition coefficient for Ru(NH3)6(3+) between cartilage and aqueous solution, Kp = [Ru(NH3)6(3+)]cartilage/[RU(NH3)6(3+)]solution = 3.4 +/- 0.1. Rates of Ru(NH3)6(3+) osmotically driven convective transport across cartilage samples are imaged at high spatial resolution by monitoring the current response of a scanning UME, with an osmotic pressure of approximately 0.75 atm across the slice. A model is outlined that enables the current response to be related to the local flux. By determining the topography of the sample from the current response with no applied osmotic pressure, local transport rates can be correlated with topographical features of the sample surface, at much higher spatial resolution than has previously been achieved. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:9370471

  12. Error-measure for anisotropic grid-adaptation in turbulence-resolving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toosi, Siavash; Larsson, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Grid-adaptation requires an error-measure that identifies where the grid should be refined. In the case of turbulence-resolving simulations (DES, LES, DNS), a simple error-measure is the small-scale resolved energy, which scales with both the modeled subgrid-stresses and the numerical truncation errors in many situations. Since this is a scalar measure, it does not carry any information on the anisotropy of the optimal grid-refinement. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new error-measure for turbulence-resolving simulations that is capable of predicting nearly-optimal anisotropic grids. Turbulent channel flow at Reτ ~ 300 is used to assess the performance of the proposed error-measure. The formulation is geometrically general, applicable to any type of unstructured grid.

  13. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  14. Homogeneous time resolved fluorescence assay to measure histamine release.

    PubMed

    Claret, Emmanuel J; Ouled-Diaf, Josy; Seguin, Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Histamine is a biogenic amine synthesized by the enzymatic decarboxylation of histidine. Implication of histamine in allergy is well described but histamine is also found in some specific neurones, functions as a neurotransmitter and regulates sleep/wake cycles, hormonal secretion, cardiovascular control and thermo-regulation. We have developed a TR-FRET histamine assay, based on the competition between sample histamine and allophycocyanine (XL665) labelled histamine for binding to a Europium cryptate (EuK) labelled antibody. As histamine is a small monoamine molecule, high affinity antibodies have been raised against carrier protein conjugated histamine. Therefore, sample histamine needs to be derivatized in the same way as the conjugated histamine, so that the antibody will have a similar affinity for both molecules. This acylation step is performed directly in wells and does not need to be done in separate vials, making handling easier for large numbers of samples. The incubation takes place at room temperature for 3 hours. The assay covers a measurement range of 1.56 to 400 nM and shows an analytical sensitivity of 1.3nM. We have shown that miniaturization of sample and reagents volumes down to 20 micro l does not alter these performances. This histamine release assay provides a particularly well adapted procedure for HTS and secondary screening compared to current heterogeneous methods. PMID:14683484

  15. Marine fluorescence from high spectrally resolved satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanin, Aleksandra; Dinter, Tilman; Rozanov, Vladimir; Noël, Stefan; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.; Bracher, Astrid

    2014-05-01

    When chlorophyll molecules absorb light, most of this energy is transformed into chemical energy in a process of photosynthesis. However, a fraction of the energy absorbed is reemitted as fluorescence. As a result of its relationship to photosynthetic e?ciency, information about chlorophyll fluorescence can be used to assess the physiological state of phytoplankton (Falkowski and Kolber,1995). In-situ measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence are widespread in physiological and ecophysiological studies. When retrieved from space, chlorophyll fluorescence can improve our knowledge of global biogeochemical cycles and phytoplankton productivity (Behrenfeld et al., 2009; Huot et al., 2013) by providing high coverage and periodicity. So far, the only satellite retrieval of sun-induced marine fluorescence, Fluorescence Line Height (FLH), was designed for MODIS (Abbott and Letelier, 1999), and later also applied to the similar sensor MERIS (Gower et al., 2004). However, it could so far not be evaluated on global scale. Here, we present a different approach to observe marine chlorophyll fluorescence, based on the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique (Perner and Platt, 1979) applied to the hyperspectral data from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2). Since fluorescence, as a trans-spectral process, leads to the shift of the wavelength of the radiation, it can be observed in the filling-in of Fraunhofer lines. In our retrieval, we evaluate the filling-in of the Zeeman triplet Fraunhofer line FeI at 684.3 nm, which is located very close to the emission peak of marine fluorescence (~685 nm). In order to conduct the chlorophyll fluorescence retrieval with the DOAS method, we calculated the reference spectra for chlorophyll fluorescence, based on simulations performed with the coupled ocean-atmosphere radiative transfer model SCIATRAN (Rozanov et al., 2014

  16. Functional and shunt states of bacteriorhodopsin resolved by 250 GHz dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Vikram S; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L; Belenky, Marina; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2009-06-01

    Observation and structural studies of reaction intermediates of proteins are challenging because of the mixtures of states usually present at low concentrations. Here, we use a 250 GHz gyrotron (cyclotron resonance maser) and cryogenic temperatures to perform high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments that enhance sensitivity in magic-angle spinning NMR spectra of cryo-trapped photocycle intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) by a factor of approximately 90. Multidimensional spectroscopy of U-(13)C,(15)N-labeled samples resolved coexisting states and allowed chemical shift assignments in the retinylidene chromophore for several intermediates not observed previously. The correlation spectra reveal unexpected heterogeneity in dark-adapted bR, distortion in the K state, and, most importantly, 4 discrete L substates. Thermal relaxation of the mixture of L's showed that 3 of these substates revert to bR(568) and that only the 1 substate with both the strongest counterion and a fully relaxed 13-cis bond is functional. These definitive observations of functional and shunt states in the bR photocycle provide a preview of the mechanistic insights that will be accessible in membrane proteins via sensitivity-enhanced DNP NMR. These observations would have not been possible absent the signal enhancement available from DNP. PMID:19474298

  17. Protein rotational motion in solution measured by polarized fluorescence depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T M; Barisas, B G

    1986-01-01

    A microscope-based system is described for directly measuring protein rotational motion in viscous environments such as cell membranes by polarized fluorescence depletion (PFD). Proteins labeled with fluorophores having a high quantum yield for triplet formation, such as eosin isothiocyanate (EITC), are examined anaerobically in a fluorescence microscope. An acousto-optic modulator generates a several-microsecond pulse of linearly polarized light which produces an orientationally-asymmetric depletion of ground state fluorescence in the sample. When the sample is then probed with light polarized parallel to the excitation pulse, fluorescence recovers over 0-1,000 microseconds as the sum of two exponentials. One exponential corresponds to triplet decay and the other to the rotational relaxation. An exciting pulse perpendicular to the probe beam is then applied. Fluorescence recovery following this pulse is the difference of the same two exponentials. Equations for fluorescence recovery kinetics to be expected in various experimentally significant cases are derived. Least-squares analysis using these equations then permits the triplet lifetime and rotational correlation time to be determined directly from PFD data. Instrumentation for PFD measurements is discussed that permits photobleaching recovery measurements of lateral diffusion coefficients using the same microscope system. With this apparatus, both rotational and translational diffusion coefficients (Dr, Dt) were measured for EITC-labeled bovine serum albumin in glycerol solutions. Values obtained for Dr and Dt are discussed in light of both the PFD models and the experimental system. PMID:3730506

  18. Cluster mass fraction and size distribution determined by fs-time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaoming; Shim, Bonggu; Arefiev, Alexey; Tushentsov, Mikhail; Breizman, Boris; Downer, Mike

    2009-11-01

    Characterization of supersonic gas jets is important for accurate interpretation and control of laser-cluster experiments. While average size and total atomic density can be found by standard Rayleigh scatter and interferometry, cluster mass fraction and size distribution are usually difficult to measure. Here we determine the cluster fraction and the size distribution with fs-time-resolved refractive index and absorption measurements in cluster gas jets after ionization and heating by an intense pump pulse. The fs-time-resolved refractive index measured with frequency domain interferometer (FDI) shows different contributions from monomer plasma and cluster plasma in the time domain, enabling us to determine the cluster fraction. The fs-time-resolved absorption measured by a delayed probe shows the contribution from clusters of various sizes, allowing us to find the size distribution.

  19. Time-Resolved Measurement of Landau-Zener Tunneling in Periodic Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Zenesini, A.; Radogostowicz, J.; Ciampini, D.; Mannella, R.; Arimondo, E.; Lignier, H.; Morsch, O.; Tayebirad, G.; Wimberger, S.

    2009-08-28

    We report time-resolved measurements of Landau-Zener tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in accelerated optical lattices, clearly resolving the steplike time dependence of the band populations. Using different experimental protocols we were able to measure the tunneling probability both in the adiabatic and in the diabatic bases of the system. We also experimentally determine the contribution of the momentum width of the Bose condensates to the temporal width of the tunneling steps and discuss the implications for measuring the jump time in the Landau-Zener problem.

  20. Muon polarization in the MEG experiment: predictions and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, A. M.; Bao, Y.; Baracchini, E.; Bemporad, C.; Berg, F.; Biasotti, M.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavoto, G.; Cei, F.; Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Bari, A. De; Gerone, M. De; D'Onofrio, A.; Dussoni, S.; Fujii, Y.; Galli, L.; Gatti, F.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grassi, M.; Graziosi, A.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Haruyama, T.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hodge, Z.; Ieki, K.; Ignatov, F.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Kang, T. I.; Kettle, P.-R.; Khazin, B. I.; Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N.; Lim, G. M. A.; Mihara, S.; Molzon, W.; Mori, Toshinori; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Nakaura, S.; Nicolò, D.; Nishiguchi, H.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Panareo, M.; Papa, A.; Pepino, A.; Piredda, G.; Pizzigoni, G.; Popov, A.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Ritt, S.; Rossella, M.; Rutar, G.; Sawada, R.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Tassielli, G. F.; Tenchini, F.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venturini, M.; Voena, C.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, K.; You, Z.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-04-01

    The MEG experiment makes use of one of the world's most intense low energy muon beams, in order to search for the lepton flavour violating process μ + → e+ γ . We determined the residual beam polarization at the thin stopping target, by measuring the asymmetry of the angular distribution of Michel decay positrons as a function of energy. The initial muon beam polarization at the production is predicted to be P_{μ } = -1 by the Standard Model (SM) with massless neutrinos. We estimated our residual muon polarization to be P_{μ } = -0.86 ± 0.02 (stat) { }^{+ 0.05}_{-0.06} (syst) at the stopping target, which is consistent with the SM predictions when the depolarizing effects occurring during the muon production, propagation and moderation in the target are taken into account. The knowledge of beam polarization is of fundamental importance in order to model the background of our {μ ^+ → e^+ γ } search induced by the muon radiative decay: μ + → e+ bar{ν }_{μ } ν _e γ.

  1. Wavelength encoded polarization measurements for simultaneous spectral and polarimetric characterization in near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, H. S.; Swami, M. K.; Kushwaha, P. K.; Uppal, A.; Gupta, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    We report a scheme for polarization sensitive near field imaging of nanostructured samples by making use of broadband polarized near field illumination and detection of polarization states of scattered light by a spectrally encoded analyzer. The analyzer comprising a combination of polarizer, a multi-order waveplate and a broadband quarter waveplate allows analysis of the spectrally encoded polarization states of scattered light for characterization of the polarization properties of nano structures from a single image scan. The scheme was validated by measuring the near field polarization parameters of silver nanowires. The approach allows simultaneous measurement of polarization characteristics as well as spectral features of the nano materials.

  2. Ultrashort-pulse measurement using noninstantaneous nonlinearities: Raman effects in frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.; Kohler, B.; Wilson, K.R.

    1995-03-01

    Ultrashort-pulse-characterization techniques generally require instantaneously responding media. We show that this is not the case for frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). We include, as an example, the noninstantaneous Raman response of fused silica, which can cause errors in the retrieved pulse width of as much as 8% for a 25-fs pulse in polarization-gate FROG. We present a modified pulse-retrieval algorithm that deconvolves such slow effects and use it to retrieve pulses of any width. In experiments with 45-fs pulses this algorithm achieved better convergence and yielded a shorter pulse than previous FROG algorithms.

  3. Polarized fluorescence photobleaching recovery for measuring rotational diffusion in solutions and membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Velez, M; Axelrod, D

    1988-01-01

    A variation of fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) suitable for measuring the rate of rotational molecular diffusion in solution and cell membranes is presented in theory and experimental practice for epi-illumination microscopy. In this technique, a brief flash of polarized laser light creates an anisotropic distribution of unbleached fluorophores which relaxes by rotational diffusion, leading to a time-dependent postbleach fluorescence. Polarized FPR (PFPR) is applicable to any time scales from seconds to microseconds. However, at fast (microsecond) time scales, a partial recovery independent of molecular orientation tends to obscure rotational effects. The theory here presents a method for overcoming this reversible photobleaching, and includes explicit results for practical geometries, fast wobble of fluorophores, and arbitrary bleaching depth. This variation of a polarized luminescence "pump-and-probe" technique is compared with prior ones and with "pump-only" time-resolved luminescence anisotropy decay methods. The technique is experimentally verified on small latex beads with a variety of diameters, common fluorophore labels, and solvent viscosities. Preliminary measurements on a protein (acetylcholine receptor) in the membrane of nondeoxygenated cells in live culture (rat myotubes) show a difference in rotational diffusion between clustered and nonclustered receptors. In most experiments, signal averaging, high laser power, and automated sample translation must be employed to achieve adequate statistical accuracy. PMID:3382712

  4. The BESS-Polar Proton & Helium flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hams, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Mitchell, J.W.; Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; Kim, K.C.; Kumazawal, T.; Lee, M.H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Moiseev, A.A.; Meyers, Z.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J.F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E.S.; Shikaze, Y.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Suzuki, J.; Takasugi, Y.; Takeuchi, K.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshimura, K.

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) instrument pro-vides precise measurements of the elemental and isotopic composition of the light Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) component. The ability to determine the charge sign of incident par-ticles enables the instrument to search for GCR antimatter, which is a major objective of the BESS program. Since 1993, the US-Japan BESS collaboration has conducted 11 successful balloon flights, nine northern-latitude flights of 1-day duration and most recently two long-duration balloon flights (8.5 days in 2004 & 24.5 days in 2007/2008), with the BESS-Polar instrument. The BESS-Polar instrument is the current effort of BESS program specifically designed for long-duration, low-geomagnetic cutoff Antarctic flights with significantly increased transparency for incident CR particle allowing to study anti/proton down to 100 MeV and a faster data acquisition enables processing of all CR events without event selection. The first BESS-Polar flight was launched on Dec 13, 2004 from Williams Field, near McMurdo Station in Antarctica. The instrument recorded data for 8.5 days, limited by the cryogenic life time of the superconducting magnet. During this flight the BESS-Polar instrument recorded 0.9 x 109 CR events. In this paper, we present the absolute proton and helium flux for the first BESS-Polar flight as well as the time variation of the fluxes due to solar activity.

  5. Adaptive-optics assisted near-infrared polarization measurements of sources in the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, R. M.; Witzel, G.; Schödel, R.; Eckart, A.; Bremer, M.; Mužić, K.

    2011-10-01

    Context. The Galactic center offers unique opportunities to study stellar and bow-shock polarization effects in a dusty environment. Aims: The goals of this work are to provide near-infrared (NIR) polarimetry of the stellar sources in the central parsec at the resolution of an 8 m telescope for the first time, along with new insights into the nature of the known bright bow-shock sources. Methods: We use adaptive-optics assisted observations obtained at the ESO VLT in the H- and Ks-band, applying both high-precision photometric methods specifically developed for crowded fields and a newly established polarimetric calibration for NACO to produce polarization maps of the central 3'' × 19'', in addition to spatially resolved polarimetry and a flux variability analysis on the extended sources in this region. Results: We find foreground polarization mainly parallel to the Galactic plane, with average values of (4.6 ± 0.6)% at 26° ± 6° (Ks-band) and (9.3 ± 1.3)% at 20° ± 6° (H-band) in the center of the field-of-view (FOV). Farther away from the center, we find higher polarization degrees and steeper polarization angles: (7.5 ± 1.0)% at 11° ± 6° (Ks-band) and (12.1 ± 2.1)% at 13° ± 6° (H-band). pH/pKs peaks at 1.9 ± 0.4, corresponding to a power law index for the wavelength dependency of α = 2.4 ± 0.7. These values also vary over the FOV, with higher values in the center. This is indicative of the influence of local effects on the total polarization, possibly dichroic extinction by Northern Arm dust. The two extended sources IRS 21 and 1W show similar intrinsic polarization degrees of 6.1 resp. 7.8% (Ks) and 6.9 (H, only 1W) at polarization angles coincident with previous NIR and mid-infrared (MIR) findings, both in total and spatially resolved. The spatial polarization pattern of both sources points to scattering on aligned elongated dust grains as the major source of intrinsic polarization, and matches the known orientation of the magnetic field. Our

  6. Superthermal electron distribution measurements from polarized electron cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1988-06-01

    Measurements of the superthermal electron distribution can be made by observing the polarized electron cyclotron emission. The emission is viewed along a constant magnetic field surface. This simplifies the resonance condition and gives a direct correlation between emission frequency and kinetic energy of the emitting electron. A transformation technique is formulated which determines the anisotropy of the distribution and number density of superthermals at each energy measured. The steady-state distribution during lower hybrid current drive and examples of the superthermal dynamics as the runaway conditions is varied are presented for discharges in the PLT tokamak. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Direct Measurement of Leptonic Coupling Asymmetries with Polarized Z Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N. J.; Ash, W. W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K. G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Barakat, M. B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T. L.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Bazarko, A. O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bilei, G. M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bolen, B.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G. R.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W. M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Chou, A.; Church, E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R. F.; Coyne, D. G.; Crawford, G.; D'Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C. J.; Daoudi, M.; de Sangro, R.; dell'Orso, R.; Dervan, P. J.; Dima, M.; Dong, D. N.; Du, P. Y.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Fahey, S.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fernandez, J. P.; Fero, M. J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hart, E. L.; Harton, J. L.; Hasan, A.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasuko, K.; Hedges, S. J.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M. E.; Hughes, E. W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D. J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J. A.; Jiang, Z. Y.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H. J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H. W.; Kim, Y. D.; King, M. E.; King, R.; Kofler, R. R.; Krishna, N. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Labs, J. F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J. A.; Leith, D. W.; Lia, V.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H. L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A. K.; Meadows, B. T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P. M.; Moffeit, K. C.; Moore, T. B.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Narita, S.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Onoprienko, D.; Osborne, L. S.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, C. H.; Park, H.; Pavel, T. J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K. T.; Plano, R. J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Punkar, G. D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reeves, T. W.; Reidy, J.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Rensing, P. E.; Rochester, L. S.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Saxton, O. H.; Schalk, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schumm, B. A.; Schwiening, J.; Sen, S.; Serbo, V. V.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, G.; Sherden, D. J.; Shmakov, K. D.; Simopoulos, C.; Sinev, N. B.; Smith, S. R.; Smy, M. B.; Snyder, J. A.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, H.; Steiner, R.; Strauss, M. G.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Swartz, M.; Szumilo, A.; Takahashi, T.; Taylor, F. E.; Torrence, E.; Trandafir, A. I.; Turk, J. D.; Usher, T.; Va'Vra, J.; Vannini, C.; Vella, E.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdier, R.; Verdini, P. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Wagner, S. R.; Waite, A. P.; Watts, S. J.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weiss, E. R.; Whitaker, J. S.; White, S. L.; Wickens, F. J.; Williams, D. A.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Woods, M.; Word, G. B.; Wyss, J.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamartino, J. M.; Yang, X.; Yashima, J.; Yellin, S. J.; Young, C. C.; Yuta, H.; Zapalac, G.; Zdarko, R. W.; Zhou, J.

    1997-08-01

    We present direct measurements of the Z0-lepton coupling asymmetry parameters Ae, Aμ, and Aτ, based on a data sample of 12 063 leptonic Z0 decays collected by the SLD detector. The Z bosons are produced in collisions of beams of polarized e- with unpolarized e+ at the SLAC Linear Collider. The couplings are extracted from the measurement of the left-right and forward-backward asymmetries for each lepton species. The results are Ae = 0.152+/-0.012\\(stat\\)+/-0.001\\(syst\\), Aμ = 0.102+/-0.034+/-0.002, and Aτ = 0.195+/-0.034+/-0.003.

  8. Probabilistic quantitative precipitation estimation using dual polarization radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S.; Noh, S.; Lee, D.

    2013-12-01

    Weather radars have become a popular tool for meteorological applications such as quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) with high spatiotemporal resolution. Especially, in the last decade, QPE performance has been improved by introduction of polarimetric technology. However, QPEs using dual polarization radar data are still subject to uncertainties resulted in rainfall conversion relationships, combination methods of different parameters, and sampling errors. Deterministic QPE typically based on decision tree method ignores such uncertainties which exacerbate performance in hydrologic flood forecasting. Probabilistic precipitation models provide an alternative framework for QPE to understand temporal and spatial variations of uncertainty. In this study, we propose a probabilistic QPE method from dual polarization radar measurements via data assimilation. The proposed method utilizes QPE ensembles based on different parameters of a polarimetric radar considering uncertainty of conversion equations and rainfall parameters. Ground observations are assimilated with QPE ensembles at each measurement time step. Rejection sampling based on Bayesian filtering is implemented to estimate posterior distribution of QPE and compare multiple models. The strength of the proposed method is that it can improve accuracy of QPE compared to deterministic QPE, identify uncertainty of QPE, and provide sound spatial precipitation fields including error structure, which is essential for hydrological data assimilation to improve flood forecasting. The real experiments are implemented to demonstrate applicability of this method using S-band dual polarization radar located in Mt. Biseul, Korea. The discussion will be focused on analysis of multi-model selection results by Bayesian filtering and comparison of accuracy between deterministic and probabilistic QPE methods.

  9. Measurement of turbulences influence on the laser beam polarization state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latal, Jan; Vitasek, Jan; Hajek, Lukas; Koudelka, Petr; Siska, Petr; Hejduk, Stanislav; Vanderka, Ales; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    This article is dealing with evaluation of air turbulences in uence on the laser beam in the simulation box with regards to change of beam polarization state. For measurement the laser optical source LDM1550 operating at 1550 nm and polarimeter PAX5710 were used. The laser source was placed in front of simulation box that served for generation of stable turbulent environment. The simulation of turbulent environment was generated by high-speed ventilators PMD1212PMB1-A. The thermal turbulences were created by Empire CTH-5000 and Solac TH 8325 heaters. All heaters were placed along the side of simulation box. With the help of polarimeter and detector PAN5710IR3 were then subsequently recorded changes of polarization state of the optical beam with regards to changes of turbulence condition within the box. The results are then discussed and interpreted with the help of statistic methods in the end of the article.

  10. Nondipole Effects in Chiral Systems Measured with Linearly Polarized Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, K. P.; Hemmers, O.; Guillemin, R.; Stolte, W. C.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Lindle, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    With the advent of third-generation synchrotron light sources, it has been demonstrated that higher-order corrections to the dipole approximation are necessary for the description of light-matter interactions in the soft x-ray range. These effects, known as 'nondipole effects', present themselves as asymmetries in the angular distributions of photoelectrons. Chiral molecules, known to have asymmetries in photoelectron angular distributions when exposed to circularly polarized light, have been proposed to demonstrate a chiral-specific nondipole effect when exposed to linearly polarized light. We present the first-ever measurement of nondipole chiral angular distributions for the case of each enantiomer of camphor in the photon energy range 296-343eV.

  11. Super-resolved pure-transverse focal fields with an enhanced energy density through focus of an azimuthally polarized first-order vortex beam.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangping; Venugopalan, Priyamvada; Ren, Haoran; Hong, Minghui; Gu, Min

    2014-10-15

    We report on the experimental demonstration of super-resolved pure-transverse focal fields through focusing an azimuthally polarized first-order vortex (FOV) beam. The optimized confinement of focal fields by creating constructive interference through the superposition of the FOV on an azimuthally polarized beam is observed by both a scanning near-field microscope and a two-photon fluorescence microscope. An enhanced peak intensity of the focal spot by a factor of 1.8 has been observed compared with that of the unmodulated azimuthally polarized beam. The super-resolved and pure-transverse focal fields with a 31% reduced focal area determined by the full-width at half-maximum compared to that of tightly focused circular polarization is experimentally corroborated. This superiority over the circular polarization stands for any numerical aperture greater than 0.4. This technique holds the potential for applications requiring subwavelength resolution and pure-transverse fields such as high-density optical data storage and high-resolution microscopy. PMID:25361130

  12. Measurements of the neutron polarized structure function at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.C.; E-142 Collaboration

    1995-08-01

    Detailed measurements of unpolarized or spin-averaged nucleon structure functions over the past two decades have led to detailed knowledge of the nucleon`s internal momentum distribution. Polarized nucleon structure function measurements, which probe the nucleon`s internal spin distribution, started at SLAC in 1976. E-142 has recently measured the neutron polarized structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) over the range 0.03 {le} {times} {le} 0.6 at an average Q{sup 2} of 2 GeV{sup 2} and found the integral I{sup n} = {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1}g{sub 1}{sup n}(x)dx={minus}0.022{plus_minus}0.011. E-143, which took data recently, has measured g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 1}{sup 4}. Two more experiments (E-154 and E-155) will extend these measurements to lower x and higher Q{sup 2}.

  13. FIRST DIRECT MEASUREMENTS OF TRANSVERSE WAVES IN SOLAR POLAR PLUMES USING SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Thurgood, J. O.; Morton, R. J.; McLaughlin, J. A.

    2014-07-20

    There is intense interest in determining the precise contribution of Alfvénic waves propagating along solar structures to the problems of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Since the launch of SDO/AIA, it has been possible to resolve transverse oscillations in off-limb solar polar plumes and recently McIntosh et al. concluded that such waves are energetic enough to play a role in heating the corona and accelerating the fast solar wind. However, this result is based on comparisons to Monte Carlo simulations and confirmation via direct measurements is still outstanding. Thus, this Letter reports on the first direct measurements of transverse wave motions in solar polar plumes. Over a four hour period, we measure the transverse displacements, periods, and velocity amplitudes of 596 distinct oscillations observed in the 171 Å channel of SDO/AIA. We find a broad range of non-uniformly distributed parameter values which are well described by log-normal distributions with peaks at 234 km, 121 s, and 8 km s{sup –1}, and mean and standard deviations of 407 ± 297 km, 173 ± 118 s, and 14 ± 10 km s{sup –1}. Within standard deviations, our direct measurements are broadly consistent with previous results. However, accounting for the whole of our observed non-uniform parameter distribution we calculate an energy flux of 9-24 W m{sup –2}, which is 4-10 times below the energy requirement for solar wind acceleration. Hence, our results indicate that transverse magnetohydrodynamic waves as resolved by SDO/AIA cannot be the dominant energy source for fast solar wind acceleration in the open-field corona.

  14. Direct measurement of the dielectric polarization properties of DNA.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Ana; Dans, Pablo D; Carrascosa, José L; Orozco, Modesto; Gomila, Gabriel; Fumagalli, Laura

    2014-09-01

    The electric polarizability of DNA, represented by the dielectric constant, is a key intrinsic property that modulates DNA interaction with effector proteins. Surprisingly, it has so far remained unknown owing to the lack of experimental tools able to access it. Here, we experimentally resolved it by detecting the ultraweak polarization forces of DNA inside single T7 bacteriophages particles using electrostatic force microscopy. In contrast to the common assumption of low-polarizable behavior like proteins (εr ∼ 2-4), we found that the DNA dielectric constant is ∼ 8, considerably higher than the value of ∼ 3 found for capsid proteins. State-of-the-art molecular dynamic simulations confirm the experimental findings, which result in sensibly decreased DNA interaction free energy than normally predicted by Poisson-Boltzmann methods. Our findings reveal a property at the basis of DNA structure and functions that is needed for realistic theoretical descriptions, and illustrate the synergetic power of scanning probe microscopy and theoretical computation techniques. PMID:25136104

  15. Direct measurement of the dielectric polarization properties of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Cuervo, Ana; Dans, Pablo D.; Carrascosa, José L.; Orozco, Modesto; Gomila, Gabriel; Fumagalli, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The electric polarizability of DNA, represented by the dielectric constant, is a key intrinsic property that modulates DNA interaction with effector proteins. Surprisingly, it has so far remained unknown owing to the lack of experimental tools able to access it. Here, we experimentally resolved it by detecting the ultraweak polarization forces of DNA inside single T7 bacteriophages particles using electrostatic force microscopy. In contrast to the common assumption of low-polarizable behavior like proteins (εr ∼ 2–4), we found that the DNA dielectric constant is ∼8, considerably higher than the value of ∼3 found for capsid proteins. State-of-the-art molecular dynamic simulations confirm the experimental findings, which result in sensibly decreased DNA interaction free energy than normally predicted by Poisson–Boltzmann methods. Our findings reveal a property at the basis of DNA structure and functions that is needed for realistic theoretical descriptions, and illustrate the synergetic power of scanning probe microscopy and theoretical computation techniques. PMID:25136104

  16. Parameterization of size-resolved dust emission and validation with measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Y.; Ishizuka, M.; Mikami, M.; Leys, J. F.

    2011-04-01

    A critical problem in dust research is to estimate size-resolved dust emission rates. Several dust schemes have been proposed but are yet to be rigorously tested against observed data. In the recent Japan-Australia Dust Experiment (JADE), size-resolved dust fluxes were measured. In this study, the JADE data are used to test a size-resolved dust scheme. Our aim is to examine whether the scheme has the capability to predict size-resolved dust fluxes, what the ranges of the scheme parameters are, and whether the scheme is sensitive to the parameters. The JADE data show that dust emission depends linearly on saltation flux and thus confirm the basic assumption of the scheme. The magnitudes of the scheme parameters are found to be consistent with those reported in earlier studies. The estimated size-resolved dust fluxes are in satisfactory agreement with the measurements, although considerable discrepancies remain and are difficult to rectify without speculative tuning of the scheme input parameters. The discrepancies have been traced back to the uncertainties in the parent soil particle size analyses and in the dust flux observations. Ensemble tests showed both model physics uncertainties and parameter uncertainties. It is proposed that the dust scheme under consideration is not as sensitive as previously suspected and is likely to perform well if the parameters are specified within a reasonably correct range.

  17. A technique for measuring vertically and horizontally polarized microwave brightness temperatures using electronic polarization-basis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, Albin J.

    1992-01-01

    This technique for electronically rotating the polarization basis of an orthogonal-linear polarization radiometer is based on the measurement of the first three feedhorn Stokes parameters, along with the subsequent transformation of this measured Stokes vector into a rotated coordinate frame. The technique requires an accurate measurement of the cross-correlation between the two orthogonal feedhorn modes, for which an innovative polarized calibration load was developed. The experimental portion of this investigation consisted of a proof of concept demonstration of the technique of electronic polarization basis rotation (EPBR) using a ground based 90-GHz dual orthogonal-linear polarization radiometer. Practical calibration algorithms for ground-, aircraft-, and space-based instruments were identified and tested. The theoretical effort consisted of radiative transfer modeling using the planar-stratified numerical model described in Gasiewski and Staelin (1990).

  18. Measurement of W Boson Polarization in Top Quark Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Vickey, Trevor Neil

    2004-11-01

    A measurement of the polarization of the W boson from top quark decay is an excellent test of the V-A form of the charged-current weak interaction in the standard model. Since the longitudinal W boson is intimately related to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism, and the standard model gives a specific prediction for the fraction of longitudinal W bosons from top decays, it is of particular interest for study. This thesis presents a measurement of W boson polarization in top quark decays through an analysis of the cos{theta}* distribution in the lepton-plus-jets channel of t{bar t} candidate events from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement uses an integrated luminosity of {approx} 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF Run II detector, resulting in 31 t{bar t} candidate events with at least one identified b jet. Using a binned likelihood fit to the cos{theta}* distribution from the t{bar t} candidate events found in this sample, the fraction of W bosons with longitudinal polarization is determined to be F{sub 0} = 0.99{sub -0.35}{sup +0.29}(stat.) {+-} 0.19(syst.), F{sub 0} > 0.33 {at} 95% CL. This result is consistent with the standard model prediction, given a top quark mass of 174.3 GeV/c{sup 2}, of F{sub 0} = 0.701 {+-} 0.012.

  19. Time-resolved diffuse spectroscopy measurements using a hybrid Green's function for the radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Emanuel; Foschum, Florian; Kienle, Alwin

    2013-06-01

    Time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy measurements of phantoms at small source-detector separations yield good results for the retrieved coefficients of reduced scattering and absorption when a hybrid Green's function of the radiative transfer equation for semi-infinite media is used.

  20. Spatially-resolved spectroscopic technique for measuring optical properties of food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantification of optical properties is important to understand light interaction with biological materials, and to develop effective optical sensing techniques for property characterization and quality measurement of food products. This chapter reviews spatially-resolved method, with the focus on f...

  1. Angular and spectrally resolved investigations of yeast cells by light scattering microscopy and goniometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Julian; Müller, Dennis; Nothelfer, Steffen; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-07-01

    Spectrally and angular resolved light scattering from yeast cells was studied with a scattering microscope and a goniometer. Different cell models were investigated with help of analytical solutions of Maxwell's equations. It was found that extraction of precise morphological and optical cellular properties from the measured scattering patterns and phase functions requires more sophisticated cell models than standard Mie theory.

  2. Resolving the 180-degree ambiguity in vector magnetic field measurements: The 'minimum' energy solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    I present a robust algorithm that resolves the 180-deg ambiguity in measurements of the solar vector magnetic field. The technique simultaneously minimizes both the divergence of the magnetic field and the electric current density using a simulated annealing algorithm. This results in the field orientation with approximately minimum free energy. The technique is well-founded physically and is simple to implement.

  3. Spectroscopic Technique for Measuring the Texture of Horticultural Products: Spatially Resolved Approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews the latest developments and applications of spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques for measuring the optical properties and texture or firmness of horticultural products. The chapter first provides a brief overview of the theory of light transfer in turbid biological m...

  4. Using Polar Coronal Hole Area Measurements to Determine the Solar Polar Magnetic Field Reversal in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karna, N.; Webber, S.A. Hess; Pesnell, W.D.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of solar polar coronal hole (PCH) areas since the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows how the polar regions have evolved during Solar Cycle 24. We present PCH areas from mid-2010 through 2013 using data from the Atmospheric Imager Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instruments onboard SDO. Our analysis shows that both the northern and southern PCH areas have decreased significantly in size since 2010. Linear fits to the areas derived from the magnetic-field properties indicate that, although the northern hemisphere went through polar-field reversal and reached solar-maximum conditions in mid-2012, the southern hemisphere had not reached solar-maximum conditions in the polar regions by the end of 2013. Our results show that solar-maximum conditions in each hemisphere, as measured by the area of the polar coronal holes and polar magnetic field, will be offset in time.

  5. Measurement of Inner Bremsstrahlung in Polarized Muon Decay with MEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Bai, X.; Baldini, A. M.; Baracchini, E.; Bemporad, C.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavoto, G.; Cei, F.; Cerri, C.; de Bari, A.; De Gerone, M.; Doke, T.; Dussoni, S.; Egger, J.; Fratini, K.; Fujii, Y.; Galli, G.; Gallucci, L.; Gatti, F.; Golden, B.; Grassi, M.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Haruyama, T.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hisamatsu, Y.; Ignatov, F.; Iwamoto, T.; Kettle, P.-R.; Khazin, B. I.; Kiselev, O.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N.; Maki, A.; Mihara, S.; Molzon, W.; Mori, T.; Mzavia, D.; Natori, H.; Nicolò, D.; Nishiguchi, H.; Nishimura, Y.; Ootani, W.; Panareo, M.; Papa, A.; Pazzi, R.; Piredda, G.; Popov, A.; Renga, F.; Ritt, S.; Rossella, M.; Sawada, R.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Suzuki, S.; Tenchini, F.; Topchyan, C.; Uchiyama, Y.; Valle, R.; Voena, C.; Xiao, F.; Yamada, S.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamashita, S.; Yudin, Yu. V.; Zanello, D.

    2014-03-01

    A muon decay accompanied by a photon through the inner Bremmstrahlung process (μ→eννbarγ, radiative muon decay) produces a time-correlated pair of positron and photon which becomes one of the main backgrounds in the search for μ→eγ decay. This channel is also an important probe of timing calibration and cross-check of whole the experiment. We identified a large sample (∼ 13000) of radiative muon decays in MEG data sample. The measured branching ratio in a region of interest in the μ→eγ search is consistent with the standard model prediction. It is also the first measurement of the decay from polarized muons. The precision measurement of this mode enables us to use it as one of the normalization channels of μ→eγ decay successfully reducing its uncertainty to less than 5%.

  6. Exploratory study on a statistical method to analyse time resolved data obtained during nanomaterial exposure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, F.; Njiki-Menga, G.-H.; Witschger, O.

    2013-04-01

    Most of the measurement strategies that are suggested at the international level to assess workplace exposure to nanomaterials rely on devices measuring, in real time, airborne particles concentrations (according different metrics). Since none of the instruments to measure aerosols can distinguish a particle of interest to the background aerosol, the statistical analysis of time resolved data requires special attention. So far, very few approaches have been used for statistical analysis in the literature. This ranges from simple qualitative analysis of graphs to the implementation of more complex statistical models. To date, there is still no consensus on a particular approach and the current period is always looking for an appropriate and robust method. In this context, this exploratory study investigates a statistical method to analyse time resolved data based on a Bayesian probabilistic approach. To investigate and illustrate the use of the this statistical method, particle number concentration data from a workplace study that investigated the potential for exposure via inhalation from cleanout operations by sandpapering of a reactor producing nanocomposite thin films have been used. In this workplace study, the background issue has been addressed through the near-field and far-field approaches and several size integrated and time resolved devices have been used. The analysis of the results presented here focuses only on data obtained with two handheld condensation particle counters. While one was measuring at the source of the released particles, the other one was measuring in parallel far-field. The Bayesian probabilistic approach allows a probabilistic modelling of data series, and the observed task is modelled in the form of probability distributions. The probability distributions issuing from time resolved data obtained at the source can be compared with the probability distributions issuing from the time resolved data obtained far-field, leading in a

  7. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystalsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugh, M. J.; Wu, M.; Jacoby, K. D.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  8. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J. Jacoby, K. D.; Wu, M.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-15

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  9. Measuring the X-ray Resolving Power of Bent Potassium Acid Phthalate Diffraction Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.; Wu, M.; Jacoby, K. D.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a dual goniometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  10. [Some problems in measuring the frequency-resolving power of hearing].

    PubMed

    Supin, A Ia

    2004-08-01

    In spite of detailed elaboration of masking methods of measuring the frequency selectivity of hearing, such measurements actually are not in use for diagnostics purpose because of their time-consumption and ambiguity of extrapolation of the results to perception of complex sound spectrum patterns. A method of direct measuring of spectrum resolving power using rippled-noise test, is suggested. Results of measurements have shown that the actual ability of hearing to discriminate complex sound spectra is higher than that predicted by acuteness of auditory frequency filters: dependence of acuteness of auditory frequency filters on sound level does not influence the ability to discriminate complex spectra; and the influence on interfering noise on the frequency resolving power can not be explained by a decrease of the spectral contrast by the spread of excitation. PMID:15552366

  11. Frequency-resolved noise figure measurements of phase (in)sensitive fiber optical parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Malik, R; Kumpera, A; Lorences-Riesgo, A; Andrekson, P A; Karlsson, M

    2014-11-17

    We measure the frequency-resolved noise figure of fiber optical parametric amplifiers both in phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive modes in the frequency range from 0.03 to 3 GHz. We also measure the variation in noise figure due to the degradation in pump optical signal to noise ratio and also as a function of the input signal powers. Noise figure degradation due to stimulated Brillouin scattering is observed. PMID:25402025

  12. Measuring A{sub b} with polarized beams at SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, T.R.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    We present the first direct measurement of the left-right asymmetry of b-quarks from the decay of Z{sup 0} bosons produced in the annihilation of longitudinally polarized electrons and unpolarized positrons in the SLD at the SLC. Two complementary techniques are presented: (1) Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} decays are tagged using track impact parameters measured with a CCD-based vertex detector with b {minus} {bar b} discrimination provided by momentum-weighted track charge; (2) Semileptonic b-decays are tagged using high (P, P{sub T}) muons and electrons with b {minus} {bar b} discrimination provided by the lepton charge. In our 1993 sample of {approximately}50,000 Z{sup 0} decays having a luminosity-weighted average e{sup {minus}} polarization of (62.6{plus_minus}1.2)%, we find the following preliminary results: A{sub b}(track charge) = 1.01{plus_minus}0.12(stat) {plus_minus}0.14(sys), A{sub b}(muons) = 0.94{plus_minus}0.25(stat){plus_minus}0.11(sys), and A{sub b}(electrons) 0.99{plus_minus}0.27(stat){plus_minus} 0.19(sys).

  13. Passive measurement and interpretation of polarized microwave brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Kunkee, D. B.; Piepmeier, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop satellite-based observational techniques for measuring both oceanic and atmospheric variables using passive polarimetric radiometry. Polarimetric radiometry offers a potential alternative to radar scatterometry in observing global ocean surface wind direction from satellites. Polarimetric radiometry might also provide a means of detecting cell-top ice in convective storms by virtue of the polarizing properties of oriented ice particles, and thus facilitate estimation of the phase of the storm. The project focuses on the development of polarimetric microwave radiometers using digital cross-correlators for obtaining precise measurements of all four Stokes' parameters. As part of the project a unique four-band polarimetric imaging radiometer, the Polar Scanning Radiometer (PSR), is being designed for use on the NASA DC-8 aircraft. In addition to providing an aircraft-based demonstration of digital correlation technology the PSR will significantly enhance the microwave imaging capability of the existing suite of DC-8 instruments. During the first grant year excellent progress has been made in the following areas: (1) demonstrating digital correlation radiometry, (2) fabricating aircraft-qualified correlators for use in the PSR, and (3) modeling observed SSM/I brightness signatures of ocean wind direction.

  14. Polarization aberrations in the solar activity measurements experiments (SAMEX) solar vector magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1989-01-01

    An optical design and polarization analysis of the Air Force/NASA Solar Activity Measurements Experiments solar vector magnetograph optical system is performed. Polarization aberration theory demonstrates that conventional telescope coating designs introduce unacceptably high levels of polarization aberrations into the optical system. Several ultralow polarization mirror and lens coatings designs for this instrument are discussed. Balancing of polarization aberrations at different surfaces is demonstrated.

  15. Deconvolution improves the accuracy and depth sensitivity of time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, Mamadou; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-03-01

    Time-resolved (TR) techniques have the potential to distinguish early- from late-arriving photons. Since light travelling through superficial tissue is detected earlier than photons that penetrate the deeper layers, time-windowing can in principle be used to improve the depth sensitivity of TR measurements. However, TR measurements also contain instrument contributions - referred to as the instrument-response-function (IRF) - which cause temporal broadening of the measured temporal-point-spread-function (TPSF). In this report, we investigate the influence of the IRF on pathlength-resolved absorption changes (Δμa) retrieved from TR measurements using the microscopic Beer-Lambert law (MBLL). TPSFs were acquired on homogeneous and two-layer tissue-mimicking phantoms with varying optical properties. The measured IRF and TPSFs were deconvolved to recover the distribution of time-of-flights (DTOFs) of the detected photons. The microscopic Beer-Lambert law was applied to early and late time-windows of the TPSFs and DTOFs to access the effects of the IRF on pathlength-resolved Δμa. The analysis showed that the late part of the TPSFs contains substantial contributions from early-arriving photons, due to the smearing effects of the IRF, which reduced its sensitivity to absorption changes occurring in deep layers. We also demonstrated that the effects of the IRF can be efficiently eliminated by applying a robust deconvolution technique, thereby improving the accuracy and sensitivity of TR measurements to deep-tissue absorption changes.

  16. Cloud and surface classification using SCIAMACHY polarization measurement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, W. A.; Vountas, M.; Dinter, T.; Burrows, J. P.

    2008-05-01

    A simple scheme has been developed to discriminate surface, sun glint and cloud properties in satellite based spectrometer data utilizing visible and near infrared information. It has been designed for the use with data measured by SCIAMACHY's (SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) Polarization Measurement Devices but the applicability is not strictly limited to this instrument. The scheme is governed by a set of constraints and thresholds developed by using satellite imagery and meteorological data. Classification targets are ice, water and generic clouds, sun glint and surface parameters, such as water, snow/ice, desert and vegetation. The validation is done using MERIS (MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) and meteorological data from METAR (MÉTéorologique Aviation Régulière - a network for the provision of meteorological data for aviation). Qualitative and quantitative validation using MERIS satellite imagery shows good agreement. The comparison with METAR data exhibits very good agreement.

  17. Polar stratospheric clouds as deduced from MLS and CLAES measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ricaud, P.D.; Carr, E.S.; Harwood, R.S.; Lahoz, W.A.

    1995-08-01

    From 30 August 1992 to 3 September 1992 a supersaturated area at 465 K potential temperature ({approximately}50 hPa) is deduced from MLS water vapour measurements over western Antarctica, where high extinction coefficients measured by CLAES indicate Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). These PSCs are attributed partly to the effect of an anticyclone located over South America and partly to localized orographic waves, which raise the isentropes and generate rapid adiabatic cooling. A local minimum in column O{sub 3} ({<=}200DU) is observed in this area, which is believed to be a consequence of the dynamics. Enhanced ClO abundances downstream of the region indicate PSC processing and chlorine activation. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Simultaneous resonant x-ray diffraction measurement of polarization inversion and lattice strain in polycrystalline ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Gorfman, S; Simons, H; Iamsasri, T; Prasertpalichat, S; Cann, D P; Choe, H; Pietsch, U; Watier, Y; Jones, J L

    2016-01-01

    Structure-property relationships in ferroelectrics extend over several length scales from the individual unit cell to the macroscopic device, and with dynamics spanning a broad temporal domain. Characterizing the multi-scale structural origin of electric field-induced polarization reversal and strain in ferroelectrics is an ongoing challenge that so far has obscured its fundamental behaviour. By utilizing small intensity differences between Friedel pairs due to resonant scattering, we demonstrate a time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique for directly and simultaneously measuring both lattice strain and, for the first time, polarization reversal during in-situ electrical perturbation. This technique is demonstrated for BaTiO3-BiZn0.5Ti0.5O3 (BT-BZT) polycrystalline ferroelectrics, a prototypical lead-free piezoelectric with an ambiguous switching mechanism. This combines the benefits of spectroscopic and diffraction-based measurements into a single and robust technique with time resolution down to the ns scale, opening a new door to in-situ structure-property characterization that probes the full extent of the ferroelectric behaviour. PMID:26864859

  19. Simultaneous resonant x-ray diffraction measurement of polarization inversion and lattice strain in polycrystalline ferroelectrics

    PubMed Central

    Gorfman, S.; Simons, H.; Iamsasri, T.; Prasertpalichat, S.; Cann, D. P.; Choe, H.; Pietsch, U.; Watier, Y.; Jones, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Structure-property relationships in ferroelectrics extend over several length scales from the individual unit cell to the macroscopic device, and with dynamics spanning a broad temporal domain. Characterizing the multi-scale structural origin of electric field-induced polarization reversal and strain in ferroelectrics is an ongoing challenge that so far has obscured its fundamental behaviour. By utilizing small intensity differences between Friedel pairs due to resonant scattering, we demonstrate a time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique for directly and simultaneously measuring both lattice strain and, for the first time, polarization reversal during in-situ electrical perturbation. This technique is demonstrated for BaTiO3-BiZn0.5Ti0.5O3 (BT-BZT) polycrystalline ferroelectrics, a prototypical lead-free piezoelectric with an ambiguous switching mechanism. This combines the benefits of spectroscopic and diffraction-based measurements into a single and robust technique with time resolution down to the ns scale, opening a new door to in-situ structure-property characterization that probes the full extent of the ferroelectric behaviour. PMID:26864859

  20. Polar nephelometer for light-scattering measurements of ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Barkey, B; Liou, K N

    2001-02-15

    We report on a small, lightweight polar nephelometer for the measurement of the light-scattering properties of cloud particles, specifically designed for use on a balloonborne platform in cirrus cloud conditions. The instrument consists of 33 fiber-optic light guides positioned in a two-dimensional plane from 5 degrees to 175 degrees that direct the scattered light to photodiode detectors-amplifier units. The system uses an onboard computer and data acquisition card to collect and store the measured signals. The instrument's calibration is tested by measurement of light scattered into a two-dimensional plane from small water droplets generated by an ultrasonic humidifier. Excellent comparisons between the measured water-droplet scattering properties and expectations generated by Mie calculation are shown. The measured scattering properties of ice crystals generated in a cold chamber also compare reasonably well with the theoretical results based on calculations from a unified theory of light scattering by ice crystals that use the particle size distribution measured in the chamber. PMID:18033557

  1. Microlensed dual-fiber probe for depth-resolved fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hae Young; Ryu, Seon Young; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Geon Hee; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Chang, Ki Soo

    2011-07-01

    We propose and demonstrate a compact microlensed dual-fiber probe that has a good collection efficiency and a high depth-resolution ability for fluorescence measurements. The probe is formed with a conventional fusion splicer creating a common focusing lens on two fibers placed side by side. The collection efficiency of the fabricated probe was evaluated by measuring the fluorescence signal of a fresh ginkgo leaf. It was shown experimentally that the proposed probe could effectively collect the fluorescence signal with a six-fold increase compared to that of a general flat-tipped probe. The beam propagation method was used to design a probe with an optimized working distance and an improved resolving depth. It was found that the working distance depends mainly on the radius of curvature of the lens, whereas the resolving depth is determined by the core diameters of the illumination and collection fibers. The depth-resolved ability of probes with working distances of ~100 μm and 300 μm was validated by using a two-layer tissue phantom. The experimental results demonstrate that the microlensed dual-fiber probe has the potential to facilitate depth-resolved fluorescence detection of epithelial tissue.

  2. Towards Measurement of the Time-resolved Heat Release of Protein Conformation Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puchalla, Jason; Adamek, Daniel; Austin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    We present a way to observe time-resolved heat release using a laminar flow diffusional mixer coupled with a highly sensitive infrared camera which measures the temperature change of the solvent. There are significant benefits to the use of laminar flow mixers for time-resolved calorimetry: (1) The thermal signal can be made position and time- stationary to allow for signal integration; (2) Extremely small volumes (nl/s) of sample are required for a measurement; (3) The same mixing environment can be observed spectroscopically to obtain state occupation information; (4) The mixer allows one to do out of equilibrium dynamic studies. The hope is that these measurements will allow us probe the non-equilibrium thermodynamics as a protein moves along a free energy trajectory from one state to another.

  3. Spectrally resolved detection in transient-reflectivity measurements of coherent optical phonons in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kazutaka G.; Ohya, Kazuma; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsuruta, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Hiroya; Uozumi, Shin-ichi; Norimatsu, Katsura; Kitajima, Masahiro; Shikano, Yutaka; Kayanuma, Yosuke

    2016-07-01

    Coherent optical phonons in bulk solid systems play a crucial role in understanding and designing light-matter interactions and can be detected by the transient-reflectivity measurement. In this paper, we demonstrate spectrally resolved detection of coherent optical phonons in diamond from ultrashort infrared pump-probe measurements using optical bandpass filters. We show that this enhances the sensitivity approximately 35 times in measuring the coherent oscillations in the transient reflectivity compared with the commonly used spectrally integrated measurement. To explain this observation, we discuss its mechanism.

  4. Spectrum Resolving Power of Hearing: Measurements, Baselines, and Influence of Maskers

    PubMed Central

    Supin, Alexander Ya.

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary methods of measurement of frequency resolving power in the auditory system are reviewed. Majority of classical methods are based on the frequency-selective masking paradigm and require multi-point measurements (a number of masked thresholds should be measured to obtain a single frequency-tuning estimate). Therefore, they are rarely used for practical needs. As an alternative approach, frequency-selective properties of the auditory system may be investigated using probes with complex frequency spectrum patterns, in particular, rippled noise that is characterized by a spectrum with periodically alternating maxima and minima. The maximal ripple density discriminated by the auditory system is a convenient measure of the spectrum resolving power (SRP). To find the highest resolvable ripple density, a phase-reversal test has been suggested. Using this technique, normal SRP, its dependence on probe center frequency, spectrum contrast, and probe level were measured. The results were not entirely predictable by frequency-tuning data obtained by masking methods. SRP is influenced by maskers, with on- and off-frequency maskers influencing SRP very differently. Dichotic separation of the probe and masker results in almost complete release of SRP from influence of maskers. PMID:26557320

  5. Spectrum Resolving Power of Hearing: Measurements, Baselines, and Influence of Maskers.

    PubMed

    Supin, Alexander Ya

    2011-07-01

    Contemporary methods of measurement of frequency resolving power in the auditory system are reviewed. Majority of classical methods are based on the frequency-selective masking paradigm and require multi-point measurements (a number of masked thresholds should be measured to obtain a single frequency-tuning estimate). Therefore, they are rarely used for practical needs. As an alternative approach, frequency-selective properties of the auditory system may be investigated using probes with complex frequency spectrum patterns, in particular, rippled noise that is characterized by a spectrum with periodically alternating maxima and minima. The maximal ripple density discriminated by the auditory system is a convenient measure of the spectrum resolving power (SRP). To find the highest resolvable ripple density, a phase-reversal test has been suggested. Using this technique, normal SRP, its dependence on probe center frequency, spectrum contrast, and probe level were measured. The results were not entirely predictable by frequency-tuning data obtained by masking methods. SRP is influenced by maskers, with on- and off-frequency maskers influencing SRP very differently. Dichotic separation of the probe and masker results in almost complete release of SRP from influence of maskers. PMID:26557320

  6. Electroweak coupling measurements from polarized Bhabha scattering at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, K.T.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    The cross section for Bhabah scattering (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) with polarized electrons at the center of mass energy of the Z{sup 0} resonance has been measured with the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) during the 1992--1993 runs. The first measurement of the left-right asymmetry in Bhabah scattering (A{sub LR}{sup e+}e{sup {minus}} ({theta})) is presented. From A{sub LR}{sup e+}{sup {minus}} ({Theta}) the effective weak mixing angle is measured to be sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2245{plus_minus}0.0010. When combined with the measurement of A{sub LR}, the effective electron couplings are measured to be v{sub e} = {minus}0.0414{plus_minus}0.0020 and a{sub e} = {minus}0.4977{plus_minus}0.0045.

  7. Studies of 3He polarization losses during NMR and EPR measurment and Polarized 3He target cell lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Peibo

    2014-09-01

    The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but three other kinds of losses are inevitable: losses during Adiabatic Fast Passage (AFP) sweep, losses due to flux change caused by different cell orientation with respect to RF fields and physical losses. Fortunately there is only flux change in NMR measurements. The second part of my work presents the study of cell lifetime improvement. The polarization decreases in a process called relaxation exponentially. The lifetime of a cell is how long it can keep its polarization. The typical lifetime of cells produced in our lab is about 22 hours. With a newly designed vacuum system. The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but

  8. Time-Resolved Optical Measurements of Fuel-Air Mixedness in Windowless High Speed Research Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    1998-01-01

    Fuel distribution measurements in gas turbine combustors are needed from both pollution and fuel-efficiency standpoints. In addition to providing valuable data for performance testing and engine development, measurements of fuel distributions uniquely complement predictive numerical simulations. Although equally important as spatial distribution, the temporal distribution of the fuel is an often overlooked aspect of combustor design and development. This is due partly to the difficulties in applying time-resolved diagnostic techniques to the high-pressure, high-temperature environments inside gas turbine engines. Time-resolved measurements of the fuel-to-air ratio (F/A) can give researchers critical insights into combustor dynamics and acoustics. Beginning in early 1998, a windowless technique that uses fiber-optic, line-of-sight, infrared laser light absorption to measure the time-resolved fluctuations of the F/A (refs. 1 and 2) will be used within the premixer section of a lean-premixed, prevaporized (LPP) combustor in NASA Lewis Research Center's CE-5 facility. The fiber-optic F/A sensor will permit optical access while eliminating the need for film-cooled windows, which perturb the flow. More importantly, the real-time data from the fiber-optic F/A sensor will provide unique information for the active feedback control of combustor dynamics. This will be a prototype for an airborne sensor control system.

  9. Time and Space Resolved Heat Transfer Measurements Under Nucleate Bubbles with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

    2003-01-01

    Investigations into single bubble pool boiling phenomena are often complicated by the difficulties in obtaining time and space resolved information in the bubble region. This usually occurs because the heaters and diagnostics used to measure heat transfer data are often on the order of, or larger than, the bubble characteristic length or region of influence. This has contributed to the development of many different and sometimes contradictory models of pool boiling phenomena and dominant heat transfer mechanisms. Recent investigations by Yaddanapyddi and Kim and Demiray and Kim have obtained time and space resolved heat transfer information at the bubble/heater interface under constant temperature conditions using a novel micro-heater array (10x10 array, each heater 100 microns on a side) that is semi-transparent and doubles as a measurement sensor. By using active feedback to maintain a state of constant temperature at the heater surface, they showed that the area of influence of bubbles generated in FC-72 was much smaller than predicted by standard models and that micro-conduction/micro-convection due to re-wetting dominated heat transfer effects. This study seeks to expand on the previous work by making time and space resolved measurements under bubbles nucleating on a micro-heater array operated under constant heat flux conditions. In the planned investigation, wall temperature measurements made under a single bubble nucleation site will be synchronized with high-speed video to allow analysis of the bubble energy removal from the wall.

  10. High-accuracy time- and space-resolved Stark shift measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.E.; Adams, R.; Carlson, A.L.; Ching, C.H.; Filuk, A.B.; Lake, P.

    1996-07-01

    Stark-shift measurements using emission spectroscopy are a powerful tool for advancing understanding in many plasma physics experiments. The authors use simultaneous 2-D-spatial and time-resolved spectra to study the electric field evolution in the 20 TW Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II ion diode acceleration gap. Fiber optic arrays transport light from the gap to remote streaked spectrographs operated in a multiplexed mode that enables recording time-resolved spectra from eight spatial locations on a single instrument. Design optimization and characterization measurements of the multiplexed spectrograph properties include the astigmatism, resolution, dispersion variation, and sensitivity. A semi-automated line-fitting procedure determines the Stark shift and the related uncertainties. Fields up to 10 MV/cm are measured with an accuracy {+-}2--4%. Detailed tests of the fitting procedure confirm that the wavelength shift uncertainties are accurate to better than {+-}20%. Development of an active spectroscopy probe technique that uses laser-induced fluorescence from an injected atomic beam to obtain 3-D space- and time-resolved measurements of the electric and magnetic fields is in progress.

  11. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10−8 for a distance of 50 m. PMID:26419282

  12. The time resolved measurement of ultrashort terahertz-band electric fields without an ultrashort probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, D. A.; Snedden, E. W.; Jamison, S. P.

    2015-05-01

    The time-resolved detection of ultrashort pulsed THz-band electric field temporal profiles without an ultrashort laser probe is demonstrated. A non-linear interaction between a narrow-bandwidth optical probe and the THz pulse transposes the THz spectral intensity and phase information to the optical region, thereby generating an optical pulse whose temporal electric field envelope replicates the temporal profile of the real THz electric field. This optical envelope is characterised via an autocorrelation based FROG (frequency resolved optical gating) measurement, hence revealing the THz temporal profile. The combination of a narrow-bandwidth, long duration, optical probe, and self-referenced FROG makes the technique inherently immune to timing jitter between the optical probe and THz pulse and may find particular application where the THz field is not initially generated via ultrashort laser methods, such as the measurement of longitudinal electron bunch profiles in particle accelerators.

  13. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-09-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10-8 for a distance of 50 m.

  14. The time resolved measurement of ultrashort terahertz-band electric fields without an ultrashort probe

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D. A. Snedden, E. W.; Jamison, S. P.

    2015-05-04

    The time-resolved detection of ultrashort pulsed THz-band electric field temporal profiles without an ultrashort laser probe is demonstrated. A non-linear interaction between a narrow-bandwidth optical probe and the THz pulse transposes the THz spectral intensity and phase information to the optical region, thereby generating an optical pulse whose temporal electric field envelope replicates the temporal profile of the real THz electric field. This optical envelope is characterised via an autocorrelation based FROG (frequency resolved optical gating) measurement, hence revealing the THz temporal profile. The combination of a narrow-bandwidth, long duration, optical probe, and self-referenced FROG makes the technique inherently immune to timing jitter between the optical probe and THz pulse and may find particular application where the THz field is not initially generated via ultrashort laser methods, such as the measurement of longitudinal electron bunch profiles in particle accelerators.

  15. Time-resolved measurements of the laser burn-through of thin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, J.W.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Gray, D.R.; Toner, W.T.

    1981-11-01

    New time-and-space-resolved measurements of the burn-through of 0.05--0.34 ..mu..m thick plastic foils irradiated with 100 psec, 1.06 ..mu..m laser pulses at approximately 10/sup 16/ Wcm/sup -1/ are presented. Comparison of the time history of the transparency of the foils with analytic and computational models suggests that the targets do not transmit until the density is well below the critical density. Comparison of the space-resolved burn-through measurements with an analytic model suggests that lateral thermal conduction is negligible. It is proposed that ion turbulence may be responsible for the high absorption and low thermal conductivity.

  16. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Steven A; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10(-8) for a distance of 50 m. PMID:26419282

  17. Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev,V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2007-08-02

    The system created in non-central relativisticnucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Dueto spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could becomeglobally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. Wepresent the results of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperon global polarizationmeasurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4 GeV and 200 GeVperformed with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed globalpolarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance isconsistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. Theobtained upper limit, lbar P Lambda, anti-Lambda rbar<= 0.02, iscompared to the theoretical values discussed recently in theliterature.

  18. Nanoscale fluctuations and surface tension measurements in droplets using phase-resolved low-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ru; Kim, Taewoo; Mir, Mustafa; Popescu, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    A common-path interferometer was designed with rapidly tunable broadband swept laser source, which provides quantitative phase measurements of nanometer scale motions with very high sensitivity. With this setup, we are able to detect the thermal fluctuations in liquid droplets hanging at the end of an optical fiber. The measured nanoscale displacement fluctuations of various droplet surfaces were used to extract the surface tension. This newly developed technique proved the feasibility of noninvasive, fast, phase-resolved dynamic light scattering measurement of fluid mechanical properties. PMID:23292390

  19. Time-resolved measurements of Cooper-pair radiative recombination in InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, S. S.; Nakajima, H.; Kumano, H.; Suemune, I.; Irie, H.; Asano, Y.; Akahane, K.; Sasaki, M.; Murayama, A.

    2015-08-21

    We studied InAs quantum dots (QDs) where electron Cooper pairs penetrate from an adjacent niobium (Nb) superconductor with the proximity effect. With time-resolved luminescence measurements at the wavelength around 1550 nm, we observed luminescence enhancement and reduction of luminescence decay time constants at temperature below the superconducting critical temperature (T{sub C}) of Nb. On the basis of these measurements, we propose a method to determine the contribution of Cooper-pair recombination in InAs QDs. We show that the luminescence enhancement measured below T{sub C} is well explained with our theory including Cooper-pair recombination.

  20. Super-resolving angular rotation measurement using binary-outcome homodyne detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Qiao, Tianyuan; Ma, Kun; Zhang, Jiandong; Cen, Longzhu; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-08-01

    There has been much recent interest in high precision angular rotation measurement using photon orbital angular momentum to realize super-resolving angular rotation measurement. It is well known that quantum detection strategies can obtain a quantum-enhanced performance. Here, we prove that binary-outcome homodyne detection method can obtain a narrower signal peak, showing better resolution compared with the existing data processing method. Since the photon loss is unavoidable in the actual non-ideal optical system, this paper further discusses the impact of photon loss on the resolution and sensitivity of angular rotation measurement with binary-outcome homodyne detection method. PMID:27505811

  1. Monochromated, spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopic measurements of gold nanoparticles in the plasmon range.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, B; Riegler, K; Kothleitner, G; Grogger, W; Hofer, F

    2009-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles show optical properties different from bulk material due to resonance phenomena which depend on local structure and geometry. Electron energy-loss spectrometry (EELS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows the spatially resolved measurement of these properties at a resolution of few nanometers. In this work, the first monochromated measurements of gold nanoparticles (spheres, rods and triangles) are presented. Due to the improved energy resolution of about 0.2 eV, surface plasmon excitations at energies below 1 eV could be accurately measured from raw experimental data. PMID:18722779

  2. Frequency-resolved optical-gating measurements of ultrashort pulses using surface third-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Krumbuegel, M.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R.

    1996-09-01

    We demonstrate what is to our knowledge the first frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) technique to measure ultrashort pulses from an unamplified Ti:sapphire laser oscillator without direction-of-time ambiguity. This technique utilizes surface third-harmonic generation as the nonlinear-optical effect and, surprisingly, is the most sensitive third-order FROG geometry yet. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  3. Exciton diffusion lengths of organic semiconductor thin films measured by spectrally resolved photoluminescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Richard R.; Giebink, Noel C.; Belak, Anna A.; Benziger, Jay B.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate spectrally resolved photoluminescence quenching as a means to determine the exciton diffusion length of several archetype organic semiconductors used in thin film devices. We show that aggregation and crystal orientation influence the anisotropy of the diffusion length for vacuum-deposited polycrystalline films. The measurement of the singlet diffusion lengths is found to be in agreement with diffusion by Förster transfer, whereas triplet diffusion occurs primarily via Dexter transfer.

  4. Diagnostics of the efficiency of surface plasmon-polariton excitation by quantum dots via polarization measurements of the output radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kukushkin, V. A.; Baidus, N. V.; Zdoroveishchev, A. V.

    2015-06-15

    It is demonstrated that the efficiency of surface plasmon-polariton excitation at a metal-semiconductor interface by active quantum dots can be determined from measurements of the polarization characteristics of the output radiation. Experimentally, the proposed diagnostic method is based on finding the ratio of the intensities of the output radiation with polarizations orthogonal and parallel to the nanoheterostructure plane for two different distances between the quantum-dot layer and the metal-semiconductor interface. These data are then used to obtain the unknown parameters in the proposed mathematical model which makes it possible to calculate the rate of surface plasmon-polariton excitation by active quantum dots. As a result, this rate can be determined without complicated expensive equipment for fast time-resolved measurements.

  5. Velocity and Temperature Measurement in Supersonic Free Jets Using Spectrally Resolved Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    2004-01-01

    The flow fields of unheated, supersonic free jets from convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles operating at M = 0.99, 1.4, and 1.6 were measured using spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering technique. The axial component of velocity and temperature data as well as density data obtained from a previous experiment are presented in a systematic way with the goal of producing a database useful for validating computational fluid dynamics codes. The Rayleigh scattering process from air molecules provides a fundamental means of measuring flow properties in a non-intrusive, particle free manner. In the spectrally resolved application, laser light scattered by the air molecules is collected and analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The difference between the incident laser frequency and the peak of the Rayleigh spectrum provides a measure of gas velocity. The temperature is measured from the spectral broadening caused by the random thermal motion and density is measured from the total light intensity. The present point measurement technique uses a CW laser, a scanning FPI and photon counting electronics. The 1 mm long probe volume is moved from point to point to survey the flow fields. Additional arrangements were made to remove particles from the main as well as the entrained flow and to isolate FPI from the high sound and vibration levels produced by the supersonic jets. In general, velocity is measured within +/- 10 m/s accuracy and temperature within +/- 10 K accuracy.

  6. Measurement of solar disc polarization in a number of Fraunhofer lines and their adjacent continuum. III - Comparison with independent measurements and with calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiehr, E.

    1981-02-01

    High-sensitivity measurements of resonance line polarization in the Sr(+) 4078, Sr 4607, Ba(+) 4554, Na D2, Mg b, Fe 4063 and Cr 4275 lines of the solar disk are presented in an attempt to resolve discrepancies between previous measurements (Wiehr, 1975, 1978) and the data of Stenflo et al. (1980). The present observations were made with the Locarno polarimeter improved by the insertion of a new KDP crystal having double transmission and double modulation amplitude to increase spectral resolution. The F3 4063.6 line is found to show resonance polarization, whereas Cr 4274.8 requires further observations to establish the possible presence of polarization. The present results for Ba(+) 4554 and Sr 4607 agree with both sets of previous results, however an excess polarization is observed in the blue wing rather than the red for Sr(+) 4087, in agreement with Wiehr (1975); the double reversal found by Stenflo et al. in the Na D2 core has also not been observed. Finally, the center-to-limb variation of the polarization maximum in the blue wings of Ca 4227 and Na D2 given by Wiehr (1975) are shown to yield different damping parameters when fitted to the calculations of Auer et al. (1980) than those deduced from the data of Stenflo et al.

  7. Development of Two-Photon Pump Polarization Spectroscopy Probe Technique Tpp-Psp for Measurements of Atomic Hydrogen .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satija, Aman; Lucht, Robert P.

    2015-06-01

    Atomic hydrogen (H) is a key radical in combustion and plasmas. Accurate knowledge of its concentration can be used to better understand transient phenomenon such as ignition and extinction in combustion environments. Laser induced polarization spectroscopy is a spatially resolved absorption technique which we have adapted for quantitative measurements of H atom. This adaptation is called two-photon pump, polarization spectroscopy probe technique (TPP-PSP) and it has been implemented using two different laser excitation schemes. The first scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-3P levels using a circularly polarized 656-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 656 nm. As a result, the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. The laser beams were created by optical parametric generation followed by multiple pulse dye amplification stages. This resulted in narrow linewidth beams which could be scanned in frequency domain and varied in energy. This allowed us to systematically investigate saturation and Stark effect in 2S-3P transitions with the goal of developing a quantitative H atom measurement technique. The second scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-4P transitions using a circularly polarized 486-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 486 nm. As a result the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. A dye laser was pumped by third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser to create a laser beam

  8. Quantitative C2H2 measurements in sooty flames using mid-infrared polarization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. W.; Li, Z. S.; Li, B.; Alwahabi, Z. T.; Aldén, M.

    2010-10-01

    Quantitative measurements of acetylene (C2H2) molecules as a combustion intermediate species in a series of rich premixed C2H4/air flames were non-intrusively performed, spatially resolved, using mid-infrared polarization spectroscopy (IRPS), by probing its fundamental ro-vibrational transitions. The flat sooty C2H4/air premixed flames with different equivalence ratios varying from 1.25 to 2.50 were produced on a 6 cm diameter porous-plug McKenna type burner at atmospheric pressure, and all measurements were performed at a height of 8.5 mm above the burner surface. IRPS excitation scans in different flame conditions were performed and rotational line-resolved spectra were recorded. Spectral features of acetylene molecules were readily recognized in the spectral ranges selected, with special attention to avoid the spectral interference from the large amount of coexisting hot water and other hydrocarbon molecules. On-line calibration of the optical system was performed in a laminar C2H2/N2 gas flow at ambient conditions. Using the flame temperatures measured by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy in a previous work, C2H2 mole fractions in different flames were evaluated with collision effects and spectral overlap between molecular line and laser source being analyzed and taken into account. C2H2 IRPS signals in two different buffering gases, N2 and CO2, had been investigated in a tube furnace in order to estimate the spectral overlap coefficients and collision effects at different temperatures. The soot-volume fractions (SVF) in the studied flames were measured using a He-Ne laser-extinction method, and no obvious degrading of the IRPS technique due to the sooty environment has been observed in the flame with SVF up to ˜2×10-7. With the increase of flame equivalence ratios not only the SVF but also the C2H2 mole fractions increased.

  9. Time-resolved beam symmetry measurement for VMAT commissioning and quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael P; Greer, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    In volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment delivery perfect beam symmetry is assumed by the planning system. This study aims to test this assump-tion and present a method of measuring time-resolved beam symmetry measure-ment during a VMAT delivery that includes extreme variations of dose rate and gantry speed. The Sun Nuclear IC Profiler in gantry mount was used to measure time-resolved in-plane and cross-plane profiles during plan delivery from which symmetry could be determined. Time-resolved symmetry measurements were performed throughout static field exposures at cardinal gantry angles, conformal arcs with constant dose rate and gantry speed, and during a VMAT test plan with gantry speed and dose rate modulation. Measurements were performed for both clockwise and counterclockwise gantry rotation and across four Varian 21iX lin-acs. The symmetry was found to be generally constant throughout the static field exposures to within 0.3% with an exception on one linac of up to 0.7%. Agreement in symmetry between cardinal angles was always within 1.0% and typically within 0.6%. During conformal arcs the results for clockwise and counterclockwise rotation were in agreement to within 0.3%. Both clockwise and counterclockwise tended to vary in similar manner by up to 0.5% during arc consistent with the cardinal gantry angle static field results. During the VMAT test plan the symmetry generally was in agreement with the conformal arc results. Greater variation in symmetry was observed in the low-dose-rate regions by up to 1.75%. All results were within clinically acceptable levels using the tolerances of NCS Report 24 (2015). PMID:27074485

  10. ICESat's Laser Measurements of Polar Ice, Atmosphere, Ocean, and Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. J.; Schutz, B.; Abdalati, W.; Abshire, J.; Bentley, C.; Brenner, A.; Bufton, J.; Dezio, J.; Hancock, D.; Harding, D.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission will measure changes in elevation of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) of satellites. Time-series of elevation changes will enable determination of the present-day mass balance of the ice sheets, study of associations between observed ice changes and polar climate, and estimation of the present and future contributions of the ice sheets to global sea level rise. Other scientific objectives of ICESat include: global measurements of cloud heights and the vertical structure of clouds and aerosols; precise measurements of land topography and vegetation canopy heights; and measurements of sea ice roughness, sea ice thickness, ocean surface elevations, and surface reflectivity. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on ICESat has a 1064 nm laser channel for surface altimetry and dense cloud heights and a 532 nm lidar channel for the vertical distribution of clouds and aerosols. The accuracy of surface ranging is 10 cm, averaged over 60 m diameter laser footprints spaced at 172 m along-track. The orbital altitude will be around 600 km at an inclination of 94 deg with a 183-day repeat pattern. The onboard GPS receiver will enable radial orbit determinations to better than 5 cm, and star-trackers will enable footprints to be located to 6 m horizontally. The spacecraft attitude will be controlled to point the laser beam to within +/- 35 m of reference surface tracks at high latitudes. ICESat is designed to operate for 3 to 5 years and should be followed by successive missions to measure ice changes for at least 15 years.

  11. Analysis of visual acuity and motion resolvability as measures for optimal visual perception of the workspace.

    PubMed

    Janabi-Sharifi, Farrokh; Vakanski, Aleksandar

    2011-03-01

    For working tasks with high visual demand, ergonomic design of the working stations requires defining criteria for comparative evaluation and analysis of the visual perceptibility in different regions of the workspace. This paper provides kinematic models of visual acuity and motion resolvability as adopted measures of visual perceptibility of the workspace. The proposed models have been examined through two sets of experiments. The first experiment is designed to compare the models outputs with those from experiments. Time measurements of the participants' response to visual events are employed for calculation of the perceptibility measures. The overall comparison results show similar patterns and moderate statistical errors of the measured and kinematically modeled values of the parameters. In the second experiment, the proposed set of visual perceptibility measures are examined for a simulated industrial task of inserting electronic chips into slots of a working table, resembling a fine assembly line of transponders manufacturing. The results from ANOVA tests for the visual acuity and the motion resolvability justify the postures adopted by the participants using visual perceptibility measures for completing the insertion tasks. PMID:20947063

  12. Resolving three-dimensional surface displacements from InSAR measurements: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Li, Z. W.; Ding, X. L.; Zhu, J. J.; Zhang, L.; Sun, Q.

    2014-06-01

    One-dimensional measurement along the Line-Of-Sight (LOS) direction has greatly limited the capability of InSAR technique in the investigation of surface displacements and their dynamics. In recent years, great efforts have been made to resolve complete three-dimensional (3-D) displacements from InSAR measurements. This contribution is intended to provide a systematic review of the progress achieved in this field. Based on an analysis of the InSAR LOS measurements, we first cover two commonly used techniques, i.e., Offset-Tracking and multi-aperture InSAR (MAI), with which the surface displacement in the azimuth direction can be measured together with the LOS displacement. Several methods for mapping 3-D displacements using InSAR measurements are subsequently presented and categorized into three groups: (i) combination of multi-pass LOS and azimuth measurements; (ii) integration of InSAR and GPS data; and (iii) prior information assisted approaches. The strengths and weaknesses of each method are analyzed to show the applicability of each method to specific 3-D displacement mapping cases, in hope to provide a useful guidance in choosing a suitable approach accordingly. Finally, suggestions for resolving the challenging issues and outlook of future research are given.

  13. A split beam method for measuring time-resolved circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Stephan; Buss, Volker

    1997-04-01

    An improvement to the Lewis-Kliger method for measuring transient circular dichroism on the nanosecond time scale is described. The method uses a single-probe beam that is split into two different beams of plane polarized light entering the sample and a retarder from opposite directions in different succession. Rochon polarizers are used as high-quality polarizing beam splitters to select the slow axis component of the emerging elliptical polarized light beams. The intensities of the light beams are determined by an imaging spectrograph coupled to an intensified charge coupled device detector. The split beam method reduces the need for very precise calibration of the central strain plate acting as a retarder and controlling the ellipticity of the probe light. The necessary calculations are simple and can be shown to be equivalent to the formulas derived by Lewis and Kliger. The static CD spectrum of vitamin B12 is presented and compared to a spectrum obtained with a commercial instrument and standard technique. The time resolution of the instrument is demonstrated by observation of photobleaching of carbon monoxy myoglobin from horse heart muscle.

  14. Measuring X-Ray Polarization in the Presence of Systematic Effects: Known Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, Ronald F.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2012-01-01

    The prospects for accomplishing x-ray polarization measurements of astronomical sources have grown in recent years, after a hiatus of more than 37 years. Unfortunately, accompanying this long hiatus has been some confusion over the statistical uncertainties associated with x-ray polarization measurements of these sources. We have initiated a program to perform the detailed calculations that will offer insights into the uncertainties associated with x-ray polarization measurements. Here we describe a mathematical formalism for determining the 1- and 2-parameter errors in the magnitude and position angle of x-ray (linear) polarization in the presence of a (polarized or unpolarized) background. We further review relevant statistics including clearly distinguishing between the Minimum Detectable Polarization (MDP) and the accuracy of a polarization measurement.

  15. Time-resolved wave profile measurements in copper to Megabar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L C; Asay, J R

    1981-01-01

    Many time-resolved techniques have been developed which have greatly aided in the understanding of dynamic material behavior such as the high pressure-dynamic strength of materials. In the paper, time-resolved measurements of copper (at shock-induced high pressures and temperatures) are used to illustrate the capability of using such techniques to investigate high pressure strength. Continuous shock loading and release wave profiles have been made in copper to 93 GPa using velocity interferometric techniques. Fine structure in the release wave profiles from the shocked state indicates an increase in shear strength of copper to 1.5 GPa at 93 GPa from its ambient value of 0.08 GPa.

  16. Time and Space Resolved Heat Flux Measurements During Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

    2005-01-01

    The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work was to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleating bubbles on a constant heat flux surface using a microheater array with 100x 100 square microns resolution, then numerically determine the wall to liquid heat flux. This data was then correlated with high speed (greater than l000Hz) visual recordings of The bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that microlayer evaporation and contact line heat transfer are not major heat transfer mechanisms for bubble growth. The dominant heat transfer mechanism appears to be transient conduction into the liquid as the liquid rewets the wall during the bubble departure process.

  17. Number-resolved master equation approach to quantum measurement and quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-known Landauer-Büttiker scattering theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function technique for mesoscopic transports, an alternative (and very useful) scheme is quantum master equation approach. In this article, we review the particle-number ( n)-resolved master equation ( n-ME) approach and its systematic applications in quantum measurement and quantum transport problems. The n-ME contains rich dynamical information, allowing efficient study of topics such as shot noise and full counting statistics analysis. Moreover, we also review a newly developed master equation approach (and its n-resolved version) under self-consistent Born approximation. The application potential of this new approach is critically examined via its ability to recover the exact results for noninteracting systems under arbitrary voltage and in presence of strong quantum interference, and the challenging non-equilibrium Kondo effect.

  18. Spatial resolved temperature measurement based on absorption spectroscopy using a single tunable diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xilong; Li, Fei; Chen, Lihong; Zhang, Xinyu

    2010-03-01

    A novel method based on wavelength-multiplexed line-of-sight absorption and profile fitting for non-uniform flow field measurement is reported. A wavelength scanning combing laser temperature and current modulation WMS scheme is used to implement the wavelength-multiplexed-profile fitting method. Second harmonic (2f) signal of eight H2O transitions features near 7,170 cm-1 are measured in one period using a single tunable diode laser. Spatial resolved temperature distribution upon a CH4/air premixed flat flame burner is obtained. The result validates the feasibility of strategy for non-uniform flow field diagnostics by means of WMS-2f TDLAS.

  19. Mathematical Relationships Between Two Sets of Laser Anemometer Measurements for Resolving the Total Velocity Vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Albert K.

    1993-01-01

    The mathematical relations between the measured velocity fields for the same compressor rotor flow field resolved by two fringe type laser anemometers at different observational locations are developed in this report. The relations allow the two sets of velocity measurements to be combined to produce a total velocity vector field for the compressor rotor. This report presents the derivation of the mathematical relations, beginning with the specification of the coordinate systems and the velocity projections in those coordinate systems. The vector projections are then transformed into a common coordinate system. The transformed vector coordinates are then combined to determine the total velocity vector. A numerical example showing the solution procedure is included.

  20. Time-Resolved Measurements of Photocarrier Dynamics in TiS3 Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qiannan; Lipatov, Alexey; Wilt, Jamie Samantha; Bellus, Matthew Z; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wu, Judy; Sinitskii, Alexander; Zhao, Hui

    2016-07-20

    We report synthesis and time-resolved transient absorption measurements of TiS3 nanoribbons. TiS3 nanoribbons were fabricated by direct reaction of titanium and sulfur. Dynamics of the photocarriers in these samples were studied by transient absorption measurements. It was found that following ultrafast injection of nonequilibrium and hot photocarriers, the thermalization, energy relaxation, and exciton formation all occur on a subpicosecond time scale. Several key parameters describing the dynamical properties of photocarriers, including their recombination lifetime, diffusion coefficient, mobility, and diffusion length, were deduced. PMID:27362332

  1. Deconvolution method for recovering the photon time-of-flight distribution from time-resolved measurements.

    PubMed

    Diop, Mamadou; St Lawrence, Keith

    2012-06-15

    A nonparametric deconvolution algorithm for recovering the photon time-of-flight distribution (TOFD) from time-resolved (TR) measurements is described. The algorithm combines wavelet denoising and a two-stage deconvolution method based on generalized singular value decomposition and Tikhonov regularization. The efficacy of the algorithm was tested on simulated and experimental TR data and the results show that it can recover the photon TOFD with high fidelity. Combined with the microscopic Beer-Lambert law, the algorithm enables accurate quantification of absorption changes from arbitrary time-of-flight windows, thereby optimizing the depth sensitivity provided by TR measurements. PMID:22739907

  2. The 7BM beamline at the APS: a facility for time-resolved fluid dynamics measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kastengren, Alan; Powell, Christopher F.; Arms, Dohn; Dufresne, Eric M.; Gibson, Harold; Wang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray radiography has been used to probe the internal structure of dense sprays with microsecond time resolution and a spatial resolution of 15 µm even in high-pressure environments. Recently, the 7BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been commissioned to focus on the needs of X-ray spray radiography measurements. The spatial resolution and X-ray intensity at this beamline represent a significant improvement over previous time-resolved X-ray radiography measurements at the APS. PMID:22713903

  3. Method for using polarization gating to measure a scattering sample

    DOEpatents

    Baba, Justin S.

    2015-08-04

    Described herein are systems, devices, and methods facilitating optical characterization of scattering samples. A polarized optical beam can be directed to pass through a sample to be tested. The optical beam exiting the sample can then be analyzed to determine its degree of polarization, from which other properties of the sample can be determined. In some cases, an apparatus can include a source of an optical beam, an input polarizer, a sample, an output polarizer, and a photodetector. In some cases, a signal from a photodetector can be processed through attenuation, variable offset, and variable gain.

  4. Cloud and surface classification using SCIAMACHY polarization measurement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, W. A.; Vountas, M.; Dinter, T.; Burrows, J. P.

    2009-02-01

    A simple scheme has been developed to discriminate surface, sun glint and cloud properties in satellite based spectrometer data utilizing visible and near infrared information. It has been designed for the use with data measured by SCIAMACHY's (SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) Polarization Measurement Devices (PMD) but the applicability is not strictly limited to this instrument. The scheme is governed by a set of constraints and thresholds developed by using satellite imagery and meteorological data. Classification targets are ice, water and generic clouds, sun glint and surface parameters, such as water, land, snow/ice, desert and vegetation. The validation has been done using MERIS (MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) and meteorological data from METAR (MÉTéorologique Aviation Régulière - a network for the provision of meteorological data for aviation). Qualitative validation using MERIS satellite imagery shows good agreement. However, the quantitative agreement is hampered by the heterogeneity of MERIS classifications within each SCIAMACHY PMD ground pixel. The comparison with METAR data shows good agreement. The comparison for sun glint classifications and MERIS results exhibits excellent agreement.

  5. Instrument for spatially resolved simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spethmann, A.; Trottenberg, T.; Kersten, H.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a device for spatially resolved and simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams, especially in beams composed of ions and neutral atoms. The forces are exerted by the impinging beam particles on a plane circular conductive target plate of 20 mm diameter mounted on a pendulum with electromagnetic force compensation. The force measurement in the micronewton range is achieved by electromagnetic compensation by means of static Helmholtz coils and permanent magnets attached to the pendulum. Exemplary measurements are performed in the 1.2 keV beam of a broad beam ion source. The simultaneous measurements of forces and currents onto the same target are compared with each other and with Faraday cup measurements.

  6. Instrument for spatially resolved simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams.

    PubMed

    Spethmann, A; Trottenberg, T; Kersten, H

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a device for spatially resolved and simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams, especially in beams composed of ions and neutral atoms. The forces are exerted by the impinging beam particles on a plane circular conductive target plate of 20 mm diameter mounted on a pendulum with electromagnetic force compensation. The force measurement in the micronewton range is achieved by electromagnetic compensation by means of static Helmholtz coils and permanent magnets attached to the pendulum. Exemplary measurements are performed in the 1.2 keV beam of a broad beam ion source. The simultaneous measurements of forces and currents onto the same target are compared with each other and with Faraday cup measurements. PMID:25638122

  7. Instrument for spatially resolved simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Spethmann, A. Trottenberg, T. Kersten, H.

    2015-01-15

    The article presents a device for spatially resolved and simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams, especially in beams composed of ions and neutral atoms. The forces are exerted by the impinging beam particles on a plane circular conductive target plate of 20 mm diameter mounted on a pendulum with electromagnetic force compensation. The force measurement in the micronewton range is achieved by electromagnetic compensation by means of static Helmholtz coils and permanent magnets attached to the pendulum. Exemplary measurements are performed in the 1.2 keV beam of a broad beam ion source. The simultaneous measurements of forces and currents onto the same target are compared with each other and with Faraday cup measurements.

  8. Boundary-Layer Resolved Measurements of a Three-Dimensional Disturbance Using Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naguib, Ahmed; Wassermann, Florian; Freudenhammer, Daniel; Grundmann, Sven

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) is a modern flow diagnostic technique with unique advantages including the ability to efficiently capture volumetric measurements of velocity fields in complex geometry without the need for optical access. In comparison to Particle Image Velocimetry, MRV is substantially underutilized, and hence MRV's strengths and limitations to address a variety of flow configurations is yet to be demonstrated. Investigated in the present work is the viability of MRV to provide boundary-layer-resolved measurements of a 3D disturbance created by a circular cylindrical element protruding from the wall. These measurements are challenging because of the high spatial resolution requirement over a relatively large measurement volume (100 x 100 x 250 mm3) , the weak cross-stream disturbance velocities (less than 0.1% of the freesteam velocity), and the difficulties associated with the presence of a wall. Data are acquired using a portable water-flow loop with an acrylic test section placed on the bed of an MRI machine. The cylindrical element is mounted through the test-section's side wall where the boundary layer Reynolds number (Re) is 162 based on displacement thickness. Several element heights are investigated, ranging from a fraction of, to a full boundary layer thickness. The results provide an assessment of the ability of MRV to perform boundary-layer-resolved measurements of weak disturbances.

  9. The RHIC p-Carbon CNI Polarimeter Upgrade For The Beam Polarization And Intensity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski, A.; Bazilevski, A.; Bunce, G.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Morozov, B.; Nemesure, S.; Russo, T.; Steski, D.; Sivertz, M.

    2009-08-04

    Proton polarization measurements in the AGS and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at the beam energies 24-250 GeV) are based on proton-carbon and proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region. Polarimeter operation in the scanning mode also gives polarization profile and beam intensity profile (beam emittance) measurements. Bunch by bunch emittance measurement is a very powerful tool for machine setup. Presently, the polarization and beam intensity profile measurements (in both vertical and horizontal planes) are restricted by the long target switching time and possible target destruction during this complicated motion. The RHIC polarimeters were operated near the limit of the counting rate for present silicon strip detectors. The ongoing polarimeter upgrade for the 2009 run will address all these problems. The upgrade should allow significant reduction of the polarization measurement errors by making feasible the complete polarization measurements, which includes polarization profiles in both the horizontal and vertical planes.

  10. A technique for measurement of vector and tensor polarization in solid spin one polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kielhorn, W.F.

    1991-06-01

    Vector and tensor polarizations are explicitly defined and used to characterize the polarization states of spin one polarized targets, and a technique for extracting these polarizations from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data is developed. This technique is independent of assumptions about spin temperature, but assumes the target's crystal structure induces a quadrupole interaction with the spin one particles. Analysis of the NMR signals involves a computer curve fitting algorithm implemented with a fast Fourier transform method which speeds and simplifies curve fitting algorithms used previously. For accurate curve fitting, the NMR electronic circuit must be modeled by the fitting algorithm. Details of a circuit, its model, and data collected from this circuit are given for a solid deuterated ammonia target. 37 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. A comparison of magnetic resonance methods for spatially resolved T2 distribution measurements in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashaee, S.; Marica, F.; Newling, B.; Balcom, B. J.

    2015-05-01

    Naturally occurring porous media are usually characterized by a distribution of pore sizes. If the material is fluid saturated, the 1H magnetic resonance (MR) signal depends on the pore size, the surface relaxivity and the fluid itself. Measurement of the transverse relaxation time T2 is a well-established technique to characterize material samples by means of MR. T2 distribution measurements, including T2 distribution mapping, are widely employed in clinical applications and in petroleum engineering. T2 distribution measurements are the most basic measurement employed to determine the fluid-matrix properties in MR core analysis. Three methods for T2 distribution mapping, namely spin-echo single point imaging (SE-SPI), DANTE-Z Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) and adiabatic inversion CPMG are compared in terms of spatial resolution, minimum observable T2 and sensitivity. Bulk CPMG measurement is considered to be the gold standard for T2 determination. Bulk measurement of uniform samples is compared to the three spatially resolved measurements. SE-SPI is an imaging method, which measures spatially resolved T2s in samples of interest. A variant is introduced in this work that employs pre-equalized magnetic field gradient waveforms and is therefore able to measure shorter T2s than previously reported. DANTE-Z CPMG and adiabatic inversion CPMG are faster, non-imaging, local T2 distribution measurements. The DANTE-Z pulse train and adiabatic inversion pulse are compared in terms of T1 or T2 relaxation time effects during the RF pulse application, minimum pulse duration, requisite RF pulse power, and inversion profile quality. In addition to experimental comparisons, simulation results are presented.

  12. Highly precise and accurate terahertz polarization measurements based on electro-optic sampling with polarization modulation of probe pulses.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Natsuki; Higuchi, Takuya; Kanda, Natsuki; Konishi, Kuniaki; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2014-07-28

    We have developed an electro-optic (EO) sampling method with polarization modulation of probe pulses; this method allows us to measure the direction of a terahertz (THz) electric-field vector with a precision of 0.1 mrad in a data acquisition time of 660 ms using a 14.0-kHz repetition rate pulsed light source. Through combination with a THz time-domain spectroscopy technique, a time-dependent two-dimensional THz electric field was obtained. We used a photoelastic modulator for probe-polarization modulation and a (111)-oriented zincblende crystal as the EO crystal. Using the tilted pulse front excitation method with stable regeneratively amplified pulses, we prepared stable and intense THz pulses and performed pulse-by-pulse analog-to-digital conversion of the signals. These techniques significantly reduced statistical errors and enabled sub-mrad THz polarization measurements. We examined the performance of this method by measuring a wire-grid polarizer as a sample. The present method will open a new frontier of high-precision THz polarization sensitive measurements. PMID:25089412

  13. On the limitations of geomagnetic measures of interplanetary magnetic polarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Rosenberg, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The maximum attainable accuracy in inferring the interplanetary magnetic polarity from polar cap magnetograms is about 88%. This is achieved in practice, when high-latitude polar cap stations are used during local summer months, and the signature in the ground records is strong. An attempt by Svalgaard (1972) to use this effect to infer an index of interplanetary magnetic polarity back to 1926 has not been so successful. Furthermore, some of the properties of the index have changed with time. Prior to 1963, the inferred polarities are strongly dependent on geomagnetic activity, while after this time they are not. Thus, this index should not be used to separate solar-magnetic from solar-activity effects prior to 1963.

  14. Depth-resolved photothermal optical coherence tomography by local optical path length change measurement (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Hong, Young-Joo; Li, En; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-03-01

    Photothermal OCT has been emerged to contrast absorbers in biological tissues. The tissues response to photothermal excitation as change of thermal strain and refractive index. To resolve the depth of absorption agents, the measurements of the local thermal strain change and local refractive index change due to photothermal effect is required. In this study, we developed photothermal OCT for depth-resolved absorption contrast imaging. The phase-resolved OCT can measure the axial strain change and local refractive index change as local optical path length change. A swept-source OCT system is used with a wavelength swept laser at 1310 nm with a scanning rate of 50 kHz. The sensitivity of 110 dB is achieved. At the sample arm, the excitation beam from a fiber-coupled laser diode of 406 nm wavelength is combined with the OCT probe beam co-linearly. The slowly modulated excitation beam around 300 Hz illuminate biological tissues. M-mode scan is applied during one-period modulation duration. The local optical path length change is measured by temporal and axial phase difference. The theoretical prediction of the photothermal response is derived and in good agreement with experimental results. In the case of slow modulation, the delay of photothermal response can be neglected. The local path length changes are averaged over the half period of the excitation modulation, and then demodulated. This method exhibits 3-dB gain in the sensitivity of the local optical path length change measurement over the direct Fourier transform method. In vivo human skin imaging of endogenous absorption agent will be demonstrated.

  15. Two-color-absorption sensor for time-resolved measurements of gasoline concentration and temperature.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Sung Hyun; Porter, Jason M; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K; Montoya, Juan C; Allen, Mark G; Sholes, Kevin R

    2009-11-20

    A midinfrared absorption sensor for crank-angle-resolved in-cylinder measurements of gasoline concentration and gas temperature for spark-ignition internal-combustion engines is reported, and design considerations and validation testing in the controlled environments of a heated cell and shock-heated gases are discussed. Mid-IR laser light was tuned to transitions in the strong absorption bands associated with C-H stretching vibration near 3.4 microm, and time-resolved fuel vapor concentration and gas temperature were determined simultaneously from the absorption at two different wavelengths. These two infrared laser wavelengths were simultaneously produced by difference-frequency generation, which combines a near-IR signal laser with two near-IR pump lasers in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal. Injection current modulation of the pump lasers produced intensity modulation of the mid-IR, which allowed the transmitted signals from the two laser wavelengths to be detected on a single detector and separated by frequency demultiplexing. Injection current modulation produced a wavelength modulation synchronous with the intensity modulation for each of the laser wavelengths, and accurate measurement of the gasoline absorption signal required the effects of wavelength modulation to be considered. Validation experiments were conducted for a single-component hydrocarbon fuel (2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane, commonly known as iso-octane) and a gasoline blend in a heated static cell (300 < or = T < or = 600 K) and behind planar shock waves (600 < T < 1100 K) in a shock tube. With a bandwidth of 10 kHz, the measured fuel concentrations agreed within 5% RMS and the measured temperature agreed within 3% RMS to the known values. The 10 kHz bandwidth is sufficient to resolve 1 crank-angle degree at 1600 RPM. PMID:19935971

  16. Measurement of angle-resolved scattering property of ovarian tissue by use of OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Tianheng; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2013-03-01

    Angle-resolved optical scattering properties of ovarian tissue on different optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging planes were quantitatively measured by fitting the compounded OCT A-lines into a single scattering model. Higher cross correlation value of angle-resolved scattering coefficients between different OCT imaging planes was found in normal ovaries than was present in malignant ovaries. The mean cross correlation coefficient (MCC) was introduced in this pilot study to characterize and differentiate normal and malignant ovaries. A specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 100% were achieved by setting MCC threshold at 0.6 in the limited sample population. The collagen properties such as content, structure and directivity were found to be different within OCT imaging penetration depth between normal and malignant ovarian tissue. The homogeneous three-dimensional collagen fiber network observed in the normal ovary effectively explains the stronger cross correlation of angle-resolved scattering properties on different imaging planes while the heterogeneity observed in the malignant ovary suggests a weaker correlation.

  17. Hybrid plasmonic gap modes in metal film-coupled dimers and their physical origins revealed by polarization resolved dark field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Can; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Lei, Dang Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Plasmonic gap modes sustained by metal film-coupled nanostructures have recently attracted extensive research attention due to flexible control over their spectral response and significantly enhanced field intensities at the particle-film junction. In this work, by adopting an improved dark field spectroscopy methodology - polarization resolved spectral decomposition and colour decoding - we are able to ``visualize'' and distinguish unambiguously the spectral and far field radiation properties of the complex plasmonic gap modes in metal film-coupled nanosphere monomers and dimers. Together with full-wave numerical simulation results, it is found that while the monomer-film system supports two hybridized dipole-like plasmon modes having different oscillating orientations and resonance strengths, the scattering spectrum of the dimer-film system features two additional peaks, one strong yet narrow resonant mode corresponding to a bonding dipolar moment and one hybridized higher order resonant mode, both polarized along the dimer axis. In particular, we demonstrate that the polarization dependent scattering radiation of the film-coupled nanosphere dimer can be used to optically distinguish from monomers and concurrently determine the spatial orientation of the dimer with significantly improved accuracy at the single-particle level, illustrating a simple yet highly sensitive plasmon resonance based nanometrology method.Plasmonic gap modes sustained by metal film-coupled nanostructures have recently attracted extensive research attention due to flexible control over their spectral response and significantly enhanced field intensities at the particle-film junction. In this work, by adopting an improved dark field spectroscopy methodology - polarization resolved spectral decomposition and colour decoding - we are able to ``visualize'' and distinguish unambiguously the spectral and far field radiation properties of the complex plasmonic gap modes in metal film

  18. Range Resolved CO2 Atmospheric Backscattering Measurements Using Fiber Lasers and RZPN Code Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris, J.; Sun, X.

    2011-12-01

    We report the use of a return-to- zero (RZPN) pseudo noise modulation technique for making range resolved measurements of CO2 within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using commercial, off-the-shelf, components. Conventional, range resolved, DIAL measurements require laser pulse widths that are significantly shorter than the desired spatial resolution and necessitate using pulses whose temporal spacing is such that scattered returns from only a single pulse are observed by the receiver at any one time (for the PBL pulse separations must be >~20 microseconds). This imposes significant operational limitations when using currently available fiber lasers because of the resulting low duty cycle (<~0.0005) and consequent low average laser output power. The RZPN modulation technique enables a fiber laser to operate at much higher duty cycles (approaching 0.04) thereby more effectively utilizing the amplifier's output. This increases the counts received by approximately two orders of magnitude. Our approach involves employing two distributed feedback lasers (DFB), each modulated by a different RPZN code, whose outputs are then amplified by a CW fiber amplifier. One laser is tuned to a CO2 absorption line; the other operates offline thereby permitting the simultaneous acquisition of both on and offline signals using independent RZPN codes. This minimizes the impact of atmospheric turbulence on the measurement. The on and offline signals are retrieved by deconvolving the return signal using the appropriate kernels. An assessment of the technique, discussions of measurement precision and error sources as well as preliminary data will be presented.

  19. Simulation modelling of a micro-system for time-resolved fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repich, Marina; Stoppa, David; Rae, Bruce R.; Henderson, Robert K.; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents the simulation modelling of a typical experimental setup for time-resolved fluorescence measurement. The developed model takes into account the setup geometry, characteristics of light source, detector and fluorescent sample as well as the adopted measurement technique. A qualitative verification of the model has been reported before. In this paper, we present a quantitative analysis and verification of the system versatility. For this we conducted time-resolved fluorescence measurements using a two-chip based micro-system, including a blue micro-LED array as a light source and a CMOS SPAD array as a detector. The sample of interest (CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in toluene) in a micro-cavity slide and an excitation filter were placed in the gap between the excitation and detection planes. A time-correlated single photon counting module was used to build fluorescence decay curves. A range of experiments with different excitation light pulse widths and using several setups have been performed. The simulated data are in good agreement with measured results and the model proves to be flexible enough to simulate different light sources and detector quenching/recharging circuits. This model can be used to predict qualitative and quantitative results for specific experimental setups, supporting the explanations of observed effects and allowing the realisation of virtual experiments.

  20. Site-resolved measurement of spin correlations for fermions in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Maxwell; Mazurenko, Anton; Chiu, Christie; Ji, Geoffrey; Greif, Daniel; Greiner, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The recent demonstrations of site-resolved imaging of fermionic atoms in an optical lattice enable local measurements of charge correlations in Fermi lattice systems. Access to local spin correlations, however, has not yet been demonstrated. Measuring spin correlations is of particular interest because in the repulsive 2D Hubbard model, away from half-filling, the interplay of the spin and charge degrees of freedom is expected to give rise to pseudo-gap physics and perhaps d-wave superconductivity, but this doped regime is difficult to describe with current theoretical techniques. In this talk, I describe a new method for locally measuring spin correlations with our Fermi Gas Microscope. We observe nearest-neighbor AFM correlations in a two-component mixture of fermionic lithium atoms in a 2D optical lattice. The ability to measure trap-resolved magnetic correlations will allow us to explore entropy redistribution schemes, and may provide a way to access the low-temperature phases of the Hubbard model using ultracold atoms.

  1. Polarization Transfer Coefficient Measurements in the Deuteron Breakup Reaction HYDROGEN-1(POLARIZED Deuteron, Polarized Proton)x at 2.1 GEV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Naipor Eric

    The polarization of the protons emerging at 0 ^circ from the inclusive deuteron breakup reaction ^1H(vec d,vec p)X was measured using a deuteron beam with kinetic energy of 2.1 GeV. The momentum of the protons was selected by the magnetic spectrometer SPES4 and the polarization was measured with the polarimeter POMME. This experiment was performed at eight different proton momenta. When those momenta are Lorentz transformed to the deuteron rest frame, they corresponded to values from 0.00 to 0.34 GeV/c. The result of the measurements is expressed in terms of polarization transfer coefficient which is defined as the ratio of the measured proton polarization P_{p} to the deuteron beam vector polarization P _{Z}:kappa_{o} = P_{p}/P_{Z}. The values of kappa_{o} decreased from 0.995 to -0.320 across the proton momentum range of this experiment. The trend of kappa_{o} is in general agreement with the expected behavior arising from the D state in the deuteron wave function. The impulse approximation predicts quite well the general shape of kappa_{o}. Multiple scattering and relativistic effect based on different models of reaction mechanism are discussed.

  2. Time-resolved chirp measurement for 100GBaud test systems using an ideal frequency discriminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Regan T.; Shi, Kai; Barry, Liam P.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we present multi-channel chirp measurements of wide-band sources, using a programmable Fourier-domain optical processor (FDOP) as a near-perfect linear frequency discriminator element followed by a fast photodiode and electrical sampling oscilloscope. The electric field of a 10.7 Gbit/s phase-encoded data source and a directly modulated laser diode are simultaneously interrogated with this measurement system. The constellation diagram of the phase-encoded data source is demonstrated, and a comparison with another phase-sensitive measurement technique is performed. Additionally, an extension to this technique is demonstrated in which the time-resolved chirp of a picosecond-duration mode-locked laser diode with a 260 GHz spectral bandwidth is characterised using the FDOP and a high-bandwidth optical sampling oscilloscope. This measurement ensemble has sufficient temporal resolution to characterise random or repetitive data signals up to 100GBaud.

  3. Pulsation-resolved deep tissue dynamics measured with diffusing-wave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Jaillon, Franck; Dietsche, Gregor; Maret, Georg; Gisler, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    We present a technique for measuring transient microscopic dynamics within deep tissue with sub-second temporal resolution, using diffusing-wave spectroscopy with gated single-photon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) combined with standard ungated multi-tau correlators. Using the temporal autocorrelation function of a reference signal allows to correct the temporal intensity autocorrelation function of the sample signal for the distortions induced by the non-constant average photon count rate. We apply this technique to pulsation-synchronized measurements of tissue dynamics in humans. Measurements on the forearm show no dependence on the pulsation phase. In contrast, the decay rate of the DWS signal measured on the wrist over the radial artery shows a pulsation-induced modulation of 60-90% consistent with pulsatile variations of arterial erythrocyte flow velocity. This might make time-resolved DWS interesting as a sensitive and fast method for investigating deep tissue perfusion, e.g. in intensive care.

  4. Atomically-resolved mapping of polarization and electric fields across ferroelectric-oxide interfaces by Z-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hye Jung; Kalinin, Sergei; Morozovska, A. N.; Huijben, Mark; Chu, Ying-Hao; Yu, P; Ramesh, R.; Eliseev, E. A.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Pennycook, Stephen J; Borisevich, Albina Y

    2011-01-01

    Direct atomic displacement mapping at ferroelectric interfaces by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy(STEM) (a-STEM image, b-corresponding displacement profile) is combined with Landau-Ginsburg-Devonshire theory to obtain the complete interface electrostatics in real space, including separate estimates for the polarization and intrinsic interface charge contributions.

  5. Development of Multi-Field of view-Multiple-Scattering-Polarization Lidar : analysis of angular resolved backscattered signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, T.; Okamoto, H.; Sato, K.; Tanaka, K.; Nishizawa, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Matsui, I.; Jin, Y.; Uchiyama, A.; Kudo, R.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a new type of ground-based lidar, Multi-Field of view-Multiple-Scattering-Polarization Lidar (MFMSPL), to analyze multiple scattering contribution due to low-level clouds. One issue of the ground based lidar is the limitation of optical thickness of about 3 due to the strong attenuation in the lidar signals so that only the cloud bottom part can be observed. In order to overcome the problem, we have proposed the MFMSPL that has been designed to observe similar degree of multiple scattering contribution expected from space-borne lidar CALIOP on CALIPSO satellite. The system consists of eight detectors; four telescopes for parallel channels and four for perpendicular channels. The four pairs of telescope have been mounted with four different off-beam angles, ranging from -5 to 35mrad, where the angle is defined as the one between the direction of laser beam and the direction of telescope. Consequently, similar large foot print (100m) as CALIOP can be achieved in the MFMSPL observations when the altitude of clouds is located at about 1km. The use of multi-field of views enables to measure depolarization ratio from optically thick clouds. The outer receivers attached with larger angles generally detect backscattered signals from clouds located at upper altitudes due to the enhanced multiple scattering compared with the inner receiver that detects signals only from cloud bottom portions. Therefore the information of cloud microphysics from optically thicker regions is expected by the MFMSPL observations compared with the conventional lidar with small FOV. The MFMSPL have been continuously operated in Tsukuba, Japan since June 2014.Initial analyses have indicated expected performances from the theoretical estimation by backward Monte-Carlo simulations. The depolarization ratio from deeper part of the clouds detected by the receiver with large off-beam angle showed much larger values than those from the one with small angle. The calibration procedures

  6. Monochromatic heterodyne fiber-optic profile sensor for spatially resolved velocity measurements with frequency division multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Pfister, Thorsten; Buettner, Lars; Shirai, Katsuaki; Czarske, Juergen

    2005-05-01

    Investigating shear flows is important in technical applications as well as in fundamental research. Velocity measurements with high spatial resolution are necessary. Laser Doppler anemometry allows nonintrusive precise measurements, but the spatial resolution is limited by the size of the measurement volume to {approx}50 {mu}m. A new laser Doppler profile sensor is proposed, enabling determination of the velocity profile inside the measurement volume. Two fringe systems with contrary fringe spacing gradients are generated to determine the position as well as the velocity of passing tracer particles. Physically discriminating between the two measuring channels is done by a frequency-division-multiplexing technique with acousto-optic modulators. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and a fiber-optic measuring head were employed, resulting in a portable and flexible sensor. In the center of the measurement volume of {approx}1-mm length, a spatial resolution of {approx}5 {mu}m was obtained. Spatially resolved measurements of the Blasius velocity profile are presented. Small velocities as low as 3 cm/s are measured. The sensor is applied in a wind tunnel to determine the wall shear stress of a boundary layer flow. All measurement results show good agreement with the theoretical prediction.

  7. Time-resolved energy spectrum measurement of a linear induction accelerator with the magnetic analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Yang, Guo-Jun; Chen, Si-Fu; Zhang, Zhuo; Wei, Tao; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    We recently set up a time-resolved optical beam diagnostic system. Using this system, we measured the high current electron beam energy in the accelerator under construction. This paper introduces the principle of the diagnostic system, describes the setup, and shows the results. A bending beam line was designed using an existing magnetic analyzer with a 300 mm-bending radius and a 60° bending angle at hard-edge approximation. Calculations show that the magnitude of the beam energy is about 18 MeV, and the energy spread is within 2%. Our results agree well with the initial estimates deduced from the diode voltage approach.

  8. Time-resolved spectral measurements for the boeing free-electron laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; King, N.S.P.; Wilke, M.D.; Wei, S.P.; Davis, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    A time-resolved optical spectrometer based on the integration of a Jarrell-Ash 1/4-m spectrometer and a streak camera has been used to evaluate the Boeing Burst Mode Oscillator experiment. The system provides information on spectral evolution on both the micropulse (10 ps) and macropulse (50-100..mu..s) time scales. We have measured the micropulse duration, a wavelength shift within a micropulse and the development of a discrete second wavelength during a macropulse. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Time-resolved voltage measurements of Z-pinch radiation sources with a vacuum voltmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, D. P.; Allen, R. J.; Weber, B. V.; Commisso, R. J.; Apruzese, J. P.; Phipps, D. G.; Mosher, D.

    2008-10-15

    A vacuum-voltmeter (VVM) was fielded on the Saturn pulsed power generator during a series of argon gas-puff Z-pinch shots. Time-resolved voltage and separately measured load current are used to determine several dynamic properties as the load implodes, namely, the inductance, L(t), net energy coupled to the load, E{sub coupled}(t), and the load radius, r(t). The VVM is a two-stage voltage divider, designed to operate at voltages up to 2 MV. The VVM is presently being modified to operate at voltages up to 6 MV for eventual use on the Z generator.

  10. Scanning tunneling microscopy for laterally resolved measurements of magnetoresistance through a point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlström, Erik; Bručas, Rimantas; Hanson, Maj

    2006-03-01

    Using a scanning tunneling microscope for point contact measurements, we obtained laterally resolved information of the magnetoresistive properties of nanostructured spin-valve elements. A good correlation is found between magnetization and magnetoresistance curves of single-domain elliptical elements (450nm by 150nm), for magnetic fields applied along their long and short axes. In ring-shaped elements (inner and outer diameters 1.8 and 2.2μm), different magnetoresistance curves are acquired as different points around the ring are probed. The observed switching can be related to the onion state of the rings, and it clearly demonstrates a lateral resolution ⩽100nm.

  11. A Lidar for Making Range Resolved CO2 Measurements within the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; Riris, Haris; Andrews, Arlyn; Krainak, Mike; Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, Jim; Colarco, Amelia; Heaps, William

    2006-01-01

    A ground based differential absorption lidar is under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center to make range resolved measurements of CO2 within the planetary boundary layer. This is a direct detection lidar designed for both photon counting and analog use. Technology being developed for this instrument will be discussed including efforts in fiber lasers, optical parametric amplifiers and both InGaAs and HgCdTe solid-state detectors. The capabilities of this system are investigated and preliminary results presented.

  12. Molecular diffusivity measurement through an alumina membrane using time-resolved fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennard, Raymond; DeSisto, William J.; Mason, Michael D.

    2010-11-01

    We present a simple fluorescence imaging method for measuring the time-resolved concentration of a fluorescent molecule diffusing through an anodic alumina membrane with a pore diameter of 20 nm. From the concentration breakthrough curve, the molecular diffusivity of the fluorophore was extracted. The experimentally determined diffusivity was three orders of magnitude lower than reported bulk values. Due to the relative simplicity and ease of use, this method can be applied to provide fundamental information for biomolecular separations applications. One feature of this method is the high sensitivity at intercellular volumes broadening its application to drug delivery and controlled cell growth.

  13. Laser-polarized xenon-129 magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The development of a method for in vivo perfusion measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Matthew Scot

    2001-07-01

    This thesis presents in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies with laser-polarized 129Xe delivered to living rats by inhalation and transported to tissue via blood flow. The results presented herein include the observation, assignment, and dynamic measurement of 129Xe resonances in the brain and body, the first one- and two-dimensional chemical-shift-resolved images of 129Xe in blood, tissue, and gas in the thorax, and the first images of 129Xe in brain tissue. These results establish that laser-polarized 129Xe can be used as a magnetic resonance tracer in vivo. NMR resonances at 0, 191, 198, and 209 ppm relative to the 129 Xe gas resonance are observed in the rat thorax and assigned to 129Xe in gas, fat, tissue, and blood respectively. Resonances at 189, 192, 195, 198, and 209 ppm are observed in the brain, and the 195 and 209 ppm resonances are assigned to 129Xe in grey matter, and blood, respectively. The design and construction of a laser-polarized 129Xe production and delivery system is described. This system produces liter-volumes of laser- polarized 129Xe by spin-exchange optical- pumping. It represented an order of magnitude increase over previously reported production volumes of polarized 129Xe. At approximately 3-7% polarization, 157 cc-atm of xenon is produced and stored as ice every 5 minutes. This reliable, effective, and simple production method for large volumes of 129Xe can be applied to other areas of research involving the use of laser-polarized noble gases. A model of the in vivo transport of laser polarized 129Xe to tissue under realistic experimental NMR conditions is described. Appropriate control of the NMR parameters is shown to allow tissue perfasion and 129Xe tissue T1 to be extracted from measurement of the steady-state 129Xe tissue signal. In vivo rodent 129Xe NMR results are used to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio of this technique, and an inhaled 30% xenon/70% O2 mixture polarized to 5

  14. Time Resolved Thermal Diffusivity of Seasonal Snow Determined from Inexpensive, Easily-Implemented Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldroyd, H. J.; Higgins, C. W.; Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Parlange, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Thermal diffusivity of snow is an important physical property associated with key hydrological phenomena such as snow melt and heat and water vapor exchange with the atmosphere. These phenomena have broad implications in studies of climate and heat and water budgets on many scales. However, direct measurements of snow thermal diffusivity require coupled point measurements of thermal conductivity and density, which are nonstationary due to snow metamorphism. Furthermore, thermal conductivity measurements are typically obtained with specialized heating probes or plates and snow density measurements require digging snow pits. Therefore, direct measurements are difficult to obtain with high enough temporal resolution such that direct comparisons with atmospheric conditions can be made. This study uses highly resolved (7.5 to 10 cm for depth and 1min for time) temperature measurements from the Plaine Morte glacier in Switzerland as initial and boundary conditions to numerically solve the 1D heat equation and iteratively optimize for thermal diffusivity. The method uses flux boundary conditions to constrain thermal diffusivity such that spuriously high values in thermal diffusivity are eliminated. Additionally, a t-test ensuring statistical significance between solutions of varied thermal diffusivity result in further constraints on thermal diffusivity that eliminate spuriously low values. The results show that time resolved (1 minute) thermal diffusivity can be determined from easily implemented and inexpensive temperature measurements of seasonal snow with good agreement to widely used parameterizations based on snow density. This high time resolution further affords the ability to explore possible turbulence-induced enhancements to heat and mass transfer in the snow.

  15. The Dosepix detector—an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector for spectrometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, A.; Anton, G.; Ballabriga, R.; Bisello, F.; Campbell, M.; Celi, J. C.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Jensch, M.; Kochanski, N.; Llopart, X.; Michel, N.; Mollenhauer, U.; Ritter, I.; Tennert, F.; Wölfel, S.; Wong, W.; Michel, T.

    2015-04-01

    The Dosepix detector is a hybrid photon-counting pixel detector based on ideas of the Medipix and Timepix detector family. 1 mm thick cadmium telluride and 300 μm thick silicon were used as sensor material. The pixel matrix of the Dosepix consists of 16 x 16 square pixels with 12 rows of (200 μm)2 and 4 rows of (55 μm)2 sensitive area for the silicon sensor layer and 16 rows of pixels with 220 μm pixel pitch for CdTe. Besides digital energy integration and photon-counting mode, a novel concept of energy binning is included in the pixel electronics, allowing energy-resolved measurements in 16 energy bins within one acquisition. The possibilities of this detector concept range from applications in personal dosimetry and energy-resolved imaging to quality assurance of medical X-ray sources by analysis of the emitted photon spectrum. In this contribution the Dosepix detector, its response to X-rays as well as spectrum measurements with Si and CdTe sensor layer are presented. Furthermore, a first evaluation was carried out to use the Dosepix detector as a kVp-meter, that means to determine the applied acceleration voltage from measured X-ray tubes spectra.

  16. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology in both research and industrial environments, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid-liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. The observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid-liquid interface in the Al-4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  17. Combining SAXS and DLS for simultaneous measurements and time-resolved monitoring of nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamberger, A.; De Roo, B.; Jacob, D.; Dillemans, L.; Bruegemann, L.; Seo, J. W.; Locquet, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved characterization of nano-particle (NP) synthesis is a promising mean to produce NPs under controlled conditions. Here, an innovative experimental demonstration of a NP characterization tool which combines a laboratory Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) instrument, a new Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) device and a microflow reactor is shown. The complementary SAXS and DLS techniques were designed and optimized to meet the ambitious requirements of time-resolved monitoring of NP suspensions while ongoing synthesis. For this purpose, SAXS instrument performance was enhanced by the implementation and optimization of a unique X-ray metal jet source. In parallel, an innovative DLS fiber remote probe head was developed specifically for in situ measurements. DLS measurements were performed directly inside a 2.0 mm diameter glass capillary located inside the SAXS vacuum sample chamber. The combined SAXS and DLS devices were tested separately on commercially available gold NP suspensions of known size. Furthermore, simultaneous SAXS and DLS measurements were performed during the synthesis of silica NPs.

  18. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; et al

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  19. Spatially-resolved x-ray scattering measurements of a planar blast wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, E. J.; Montgomery, D. S.; Benage, J. F.; Falk, K.; Kuranz, C. C.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.

    2012-10-01

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal is typically measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. An experiment is described in which we used the IXTS to measure the spatial temperature profile of a novel system. A low-density carbon foam was irradiated with intensities on the order of 10^15 W/cm^2, launching a planar blast wave. After a delay of several nanoseconds, x-rays created from irradiation of a nickel foil, scattered at 90 and were recorded by the IXTS. The resulting spatially resolved scattering spectra were analyzed to extract the temperature profile across the blast wave.

  20. Range Resolved CO2 Atmospheric Backscattering Measurements Using Fiber Lasers and RZPN Code Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John

    2011-01-01

    We report the use of a return-to- zero (RZPN) pseudo noise modulation technique for making range resolved measurements of CO2 within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using commercial, off-the-shelf, components. Conventional, range resolved, DIAL measurements require laser pulse widths that are significantly shorter than the desired spatial resolution and necessitate using pulses whose temporal spacing is such that scattered returns from only a single pulse are observed by the receiver at any one time (for the PBL pulse separations must be greater than approximately 20 microseconds). This imposes significant operational limitations when using currently available fiber lasers because of the resulting low duty cycle (less than approximately 0.0005) and consequent low average laser output power. The RZPN modulation technique enables a fiber laser to operate at much higher duty cycles (approaching 0.04) thereby more effectively utilizing the amplifier's output. This increases the counts received by approximately two orders of magnitude. Our approach involves employing two distributed feedback lasers (DFB), each modulated by a different RPZN code, whose outputs are then amplified by a CW fiber amplifier. One laser is tuned to a CO2 absorption line; the other operates offline thereby permitting the simultaneous acquisition of both on and offline signals using independent RZPN codes. This minimizes the impact of atmospheric turbulence on the measurement. The on and offline signals are retrieved by deconvolving the return signal using the appropriate kernels.

  1. Identifiability analysis of rotational diffusion tensor and electronic transition moments measured in time-resolved fluorescence depolarization experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Szubiakowski, Jacek P.

    2014-06-14

    The subject of this paper is studies of the deterministic identifiability of molecular parameters, such as rotational diffusion tensor components and orientation of electronic transition moments, resulting from the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiment. In the most general case considered, a pair of perpendicularly polarized emissions enables the unique determination of all the rotational diffusion tensor's principal components. The influence of the tensor's symmetry and the associated degeneration of its eigenvalues on the identifiability of the electronic transitions moments is systematically investigated. The analysis reveals that independently of the rotational diffusion tensor's symmetry, the transition moments involved in photoselection and emission processes cannot be uniquely identified without a priori information about their mutual orientation or their orientation with respect to the principal axes of the tensor. Moreover, it is shown that increasing the symmetry of the rotational diffusion tensor deteriorates the degree of the transition moments identifiability. To obtain these results analytically, a novel approach to solve bilinear system of equations for Markov parameters is applied. The effect of the additional information, obtained from fluorescence measurements for different molecular mobilities, to improve the identifiability at various levels of analysis is shown. The effectiveness and reliability of the target analysis method for experimental determination of the molecular parameters is also discussed.

  2. Inferring the time resolved core electron temperature from x-ray emission measured by a streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shahab; Patel, Pravesh; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Macphee, Andrew G.; Ma, Tammy; Cerjan, Charlie; Bradley, David K.

    2015-11-01

    The electron temperature (Te) of the hot spot within the core of imploded inertial confinement fusion capsules is an effective indicator of implosion performance. A temporally resolved measurement of Te helps elucidate the mechanisms for hot spot heating and cooling such as alpha-heating and mix. Additionally, comparison with simulations will aid in tuning models to effectively predict implosion performance. The Streaked Polar Instrumentation for Diagnosing Energetic Radiation (SPIDER) is an x-ray streak camera designed to record the x-ray burn history during the stagnation phase. SPIDER accurately reports bang time and burn duration of implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The addition of several filters of specific materials and thicknesses spread across the spatial axis of the streak camera imager allows for a least square fit of the signal through these filters to a bremsstrahlung hot spot model. The fitted parameters of the model are the Te, opacity, and X-ray yield which is valuable for ablator mix estimates. The details of this calculation and results from several shots on NIF are presented.

  3. Velocity Field Measurements of Human Coughing Using Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, T.; Marr, D. R.; Higuchi, H.; Glauser, M. N.

    2003-11-01

    Quantitative fluid mechanics analysis of human coughing has been carried out using new Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TRPIV). The study involves measurement of velocity vector time-histories and velocity profiles. It is focused on the average normal human coughing. Some work in the past on cough mechanics has involved measurement of flow rates, tidal volumes and sub-glottis pressure. However, data of unsteady velocity vector field of the exiting highly time-dependent jets is not available. In this study, human cough waveform data are first acquired in vivo using conventional respiratory instrumentation for various volunteers of different gender/age groups. The representative waveform is then reproduced with a coughing/breathing simulator (with or without a manikin) for TRPIV measurements and analysis. The results of this study would be useful not only for designing of indoor air quality and heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, but also for devising means of protection against infectious diseases.

  4. Protein analysis by time-resolved measurements with an electro-switchable DNA chip

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Andreas; Hampel, Paul A.; Kaiser, Wolfgang; Knezevic, Jelena; Welte, Thomas; Villa, Valentina; Maruyama, Makiko; Svejda, Matej; Jähner, Simone; Fischer, Frank; Strasser, Ralf; Rant, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Measurements in stationary or mobile phases are fundamental principles in protein analysis. Although the immobilization of molecules on solid supports allows for the parallel analysis of interactions, properties like size or shape are usually inferred from the molecular mobility under the influence of external forces. However, as these principles are mutually exclusive, a comprehensive characterization of proteins usually involves a multi-step workflow. Here we show how these measurement modalities can be reconciled by tethering proteins to a surface via dynamically actuated nanolevers. Short DNA strands, which are switched by alternating electric fields, are employed as capture probes to bind target proteins. By swaying the proteins over nanometre amplitudes and comparing their motional dynamics to a theoretical model, the protein diameter can be quantified with Angström accuracy. Alterations in the tertiary protein structure (folding) and conformational changes are readily detected, and even post-translational modifications are revealed by time-resolved molecular dynamics measurements. PMID:23839273

  5. Time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters by means of triple probe.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, A; Ahmad, N; Ahmad, S; Deeba, Farah; Ali, Rafaqat; Hussain, S

    2013-12-01

    Triple Langmuir probe (TLP) diagnostic system with its necessary driving circuit is developed and successfully applies for time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters in the negative glow region of pulsating-dc discharge. This technique allows the instantaneous measurement of electron temperature [T_], electron number density [n_] as well as plasma fluctuations without any voltage or frequency sweep. In TLP configuration two probes are differentially biased and serve as a floating symmetric double probe whereas the third probe is simply floating into plasma to measure floating potential as a function of time and thus incorporates the effect of plasma fluctuations. As an example of the application to time-dependent plasmas, basic plasma parameters such as floating potential, electron temperature, and electron number density in low pressure air discharge are determined as a function of time for different fill pressure. The results demonstrate temporal evolution of plasma parameters and thus plasma generation progression for different fill pressures. PMID:24387429

  6. Quantitative time-resolved measurement of membrane protein-ligand interactions using microcantilever array sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Thomas; Ghatkesar, Murali Krishna; Backmann, Natalija; Grange, Wilfried; Boulanger, Pascale; Letellier, Lucienne; Lang, Hans-Peter; Bietsch, Alex; Gerber, Christoph; Hegner, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Membrane proteins are central to many biological processes, and the interactions between transmembrane protein receptors and their ligands are of fundamental importance in medical research. However, measuring and characterizing these interactions is challenging. Here we report that sensors based on arrays of resonating microcantilevers can measure such interactions under physiological conditions. A protein receptor-the FhuA receptor of Escherichia coli-is crystallized in liposomes, and the proteoliposomes then immobilized on the chemically activated gold-coated surface of the sensor by ink-jet spotting in a humid environment, thus keeping the receptors functional. Quantitative mass-binding measurements of the bacterial virus T5 at subpicomolar concentrations are performed. These experiments demonstrate the potential of resonating microcantilevers for the specific, label-free and time-resolved detection of membrane protein-ligand interactions in a micro-array format.

  7. Spatially resolved sub-Doppler overtone gain measurements on a small-scale supersonic HF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, Charles F.; Hewett, Kevin B.; Manke, Gerald C., II; Truman, C. Randall; Hager, Gordon D.

    2004-05-01

    The small signal gain of a small-scale HF overtone laser was measured using a sub-Doppler tunable diode laser system. Measurements of reactant concentration, flow velocity and gain length were also made. The spatially resolved, two-dimensional small signal gain and temperature maps that were generated show a highly inhomogeneous gain medium indicating the dominant role played by mixing of the H2 and F streams in HF laser performance. The measured gain and temperature data were analyzed with the aid of a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model. The results show that reactant mixing mechanisms have a large effect on the gain averaged over a vertical profile while kinetic rate mechanisms, including reaction rate constants and reactant concentration, have a greater effect on the maximum system gain.

  8. Pulsar polarization measurements and the nonsymmetric gravitational theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisher, Timothy P.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the breakdown of the Einstein equivalence principle in the nonsymmetric gravitational theory (NGT) of Moffat, orthogonally polarized electromagnetic waves can propagate at different velocities in a gravitational field. Moffat has proposed that galactic dark matter, in the form of cosmions, may act as a significant source of gravity in the NGT. We discuss how observations of the highly polarized radiation from distant pulsars could provide significant limits on the strength of the coupling of cosmions in the NGT.

  9. Recent results of gluon and sea quark polarization measurements in polarized proton-proton collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Star Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The STAR experiment at RHIC is carrying out a comprehensive high-energy spin physics program to understand the internal structure and dynamics of the proton in polarized proton-proton collisions at = 200 GeV and = 500/510 GeV. STAR has the capability, with nearly full azimuthal coverage, to reconstruct leptons, hadrons and jets in the mid-rapidity region (|η| < 1). The results for inclusive jet longitudinal double spin asymmetries taken during the 2009 RHIC run indicate the first non-zero gluon contribution (Δg(x,Q2)/g(x,Q2)) to the proton spin for 0.05 < x < 1 (Bjorken-x: momentum fraction of partons). Recent longitudinal single-spin asymmetry measurements of W+/- bosons at = 500/510 GeV in polarized proton-proton collisions provide a direct probe of the polarized anti-u and anti-d quark distributions (Δū(x, Q2), Δbar d(x, Q2)). These results better constrain the polarized gluon and sea quark distributions of the proton in the RHIC sensitive kinematic region. Future measurements with continuing high energy polarized proton-proton run at RHIC and detector upgrade will explore the gluonic contribution to the proton spin in extended range.

  10. Polarization and Color Filtering Applied to Enhance Photogrammetric Measurements of Reflective Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Jeffrey M.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Techniques for enhancing photogrammetric measurement of reflective surfaces by reducing noise were developed utilizing principles of light polarization. Signal selectivity with polarized light was also compared to signal selectivity using chromatic filters. Combining principles of linear cross polarization and color selectivity enhanced signal-to-noise ratios by as much as 800 fold. More typical improvements with combining polarization and color selectivity were about 100 fold. We review polarization-based techniques and present experimental results comparing the performance of traditional retroreflective targeting materials, cornercube targets returning depolarized light, and color selectivity.

  11. Characterizing the micro structure and kinetics of fast changing samples by simultaneous polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ran; He, Honghui; Zeng, Nan; Ma, Hui

    2015-03-01

    Taking accurate measurements of the state of polarization (SOP) is the key for the success of polarization sensitive techniques which can provide rich information on the microstructure of complex scattering media, such as biological tissues. For static or slow varying samples, SOP measurements can be achieved by time-sequential recoding of different polarization components controlled by rotating polarizers and wave plates or temporal modulation devices such as photoelastic modulators or liquid crystal variable retarders. When the sample is moving or changing its status quickly, polarization components recoded at different time may correspond to different SOPs, which can lead to significant errors in the final results. Simultaneous polarization measurements are necessary for probing such dynamic samples. In this paper, using the simultaneously recorded polarization components, we are able to mimic time sequential polarization schemes and evaluate the errors. The results show that the kinetics of the sample will affect the systematic error and an increase in the statistical errors of the measured degree of polarization (DOP). We change the kinetics of samples with different stirring speed, which is indicated by the characteristic time of the auto-correlation function. It is also demonstrated that the simultaneously recorded polarization components reveals additional information on the orientation of fibrous scatterers as well as their translation and rotation kinetics.

  12. Time and Space Resolved Wall Temperature Measurements during Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Kim, Jungho

    2005-01-01

    The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work is to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleate bubbles on a constant heat flux surface. This was performed using a microheater array with 100 micron resolution that allowed effectively simultaneous measurements of surface temperature while supplying a constant dissipative heat flux. This data is then correlated with high speed (> 1000Hz) visual recordings of the bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that a significant source of energy during bubble nucleation and initial growth is the superheated layer around the bubble. Bubble coalescence was not observed to decrease surface temperature as significantly as bubble departure from the surface. Since bubble departure is typically followed by a sharp increase in the heater surface temperature, it is surmised that the departing bubble effectively removes the superheated layer, allowing a high local heat transfer rate with the bulk fluid through transient conduction/micro-convection during rewetting.

  13. Time-Resolved Single-State Measurements of the Electronic Structure of Isochoric Heated Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; Widmann, K; Ao, T; Ping, Y; Hunter, J; Ng, A

    2004-10-22

    Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the non-steady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultra-thin (50 nm) Cu. Single-shot x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy with picosecond time resolution is used in conjunction with optical measurements of the disassembly dynamics that have shown the existence of a metastable liquid phase in fs-laser heated Cu foils persisting 4-5 ps. This metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.1-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500 x 700 {micro}m{sup 2} spot to create heated conditions of 0.07-1.8 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} intensity. Valence band photoemission spectra showing the changing occupancy of the Cu 3d level with heating are presented. These are the first picosecond x-ray laser time-resolved photoemission spectra of laser-heated ultra-thin Cu foil showing changes in electronic structure. The ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials.

  14. Time-resolved measurement technique for pulsed electron beam envelope basing on framing and streaking principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Wang, Yuan; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Huang; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The time-resolved electron beam envelope parameters, including cross sectional distribution and beam centroid position, are very important for the study of beam transmission characteristics in a magnetic field and for verifying the rationality of the magnetic field parameters employed. One kind of high time-resolved beam envelope measurement system has recently been developed, constituted of a high-speed framing camera and a streak camera. It can obtain three panoramic images of the beam and time continuous information along the given beam profile simultaneously. Recently obtained data has proved that several fast vibrations of the beam envelope along the diameter direction occur during the front and the tail parts of the electron beam. The vibration period is several nanoseconds. The effect of magnetic field on the electron beam is also observed and verified. Beam debugging experiments have proved that the existing beam transmission design is reasonable and viable. This beam envelope measurement system will establish a good foundation for beam physics research. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10675104, 11375162)

  15. Implementation and characterization of phase-resolved Doppler optical coherence tomography method for flow velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongchalee, Pornthep; Palawong, Kunakorn; Meemon, Panomsak

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the system implementation and characterization of a Phase-Resolved Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography (PR-DOCT) is presented. The phase-resolved Doppler technique was implemented on a custom built Frequency Domain OCT (FD-OCT) that was recently developed at Suranaree University of Technology. Utilizing Doppler phase changed relation in a complex interference signal caused by moving samples, PR-DOCT can produce visualization and characterization of flow activity such as blood flow in biological samples. Here we report the performance of the implemented PR-DOCT system in term of the Velocity Dynamic Range (VDR), which is defined by the range from the minimum to the maximum detectable axial velocity. The minimum detectable velocity was quantified from a histogram distribution of phase difference between consecutive depth-scan signals when performing Doppler imaging of a stationary mirror. By applying a Gaussian curve fitting to the histogram, the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the fitted curve was measured to represent the detectable minimum flow velocity of the system. The maximum detectable velocity was limited by the phase wrapping of the Doppler signal, which is governed by the acquisition speed of the system. We demonstrate the 3D Doppler imaging and velocity measurement of feed flow phantom using 100% milk pumped through a microfluidic chip by using a syringe pump system.

  16. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W.; Vorberger, J.; Helfrich, J.; Frydrych, S.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Siegenthaler, K.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Wünsch, K.; Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T.; Bagnoud, V.; Blažević, A.; and others

    2015-05-15

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  17. Vacuum-Based Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Measurement System Provides New Capability (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    New measurement capability measures semiconductor minority-carrier lifetimes in conditions that simulate thin-film photovoltaic manufacturing environments. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) scientists have developed a new capability for measuring time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) in controlled environments, including under high vacuum and at elevated temperatures. This system enables the simulation of conditions in a thin-film photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing line. NREL's work in recent years has demonstrated a clear correlation between minority-carrier lifetime and thin-film PV device performance. Hence, the thin-film PV industry-both CIGS and CdTe-has a high level of interest for in-line metrology using NREL's TRPL system. The system, shown below, couples femtosecond laser pulses with optical fibers while avoiding spectral or temporal broadening over a wide range of wavelengths. The optics are designed to collect and couple the TRPL signal into the same fiber used to deliver the laser pulses. The capability is coupled into a high-vacuum chamber that can heat samples to 500 C or higher and expose them to reactive ambients. This tool will allow NREL to partner with industry to evaluate TRPL as a diagnostic at multiple stages of the manufacturing process and determine correlations to final module efficiency. The TRPL system has the potential to significantly improve manufacturing yield and throughput of current thin-film PV manufacturers. NREL developed a time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) system that can operate under high vacuum and at high temperatures. Thin-film PV performance can be better assessed because of its clear correlation with minority-carrier lifetime, which can be measured by NREL's TRPL system. Photovoltaic thin-film makers will be able to measure in-line TRPL at various stages of the manufacturing process, potentially leading to improved yield and throughput.

  18. Executive Summary of the Workshop on Polarization and Beam Energy Measurements at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, B.; Bailey, I.; Bartels, C.; Blair, G.; Brachmann, A.; Clarke, J.; Deacon, L.; Duginov, V.; Ghalumyan, A.; Hartin, A.; Hauptman, J.; Helebrant, C.; Hesselbach, S.; Kafer, D.; List, J.; Lorenzon, W.; Lyapin, A.; Marchesini, I.; Melikian, R.; Monig, K.; Moeit, K.C.; /Bonn U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Royal Holloway, U. of London /SLAC /Daresbury /Dubna, JINR /Yerevan Phys. Inst /Oxford U., JAI /Iowa State U. /Durham U., IPPP /Michigan U. /University Coll. London /Novosibirsk, IYF /Minsk, Inst. Phys. /Oregon U.

    2008-07-25

    This note summarizes the results of the 'Workshop on Polarization and Beam Energy Measurements at the ILC', held at DESY (Zeuthen) April 9-11 2008. The topics for the workshop included (1) physics requirements, (2) polarized sources and low energy polarimetry, (3) BDS polarimeters, (4) BDS energy spectrometers, and (5) physics-based measurements of beam polarization and beam energy from collider data. Discussions focused on the current ILC baseline program as described in the Reference Design Report (RDR), which includes physics runs at beam energies between 100 and 250 GeV, as well as calibration runs on the Z-pole. Electron polarization of P{sub e{sup -}} {approx}> 80% and positron polarization of P{sub e{sup +}} {approx}> 30% are part of the baseline configuration of the machine. Energy and polarization measurements for ILC options beyond the baseline, including Z-pole running and the 1 TeV energy upgrade, were also discussed.

  19. Size-Resolved Volatility and Chemical Composition of Aged European Aerosol Measured During FAME-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, L.; Mohr, C.; Lee, B.; Engelhart, G. J.; Decarlo, P. F.; Prevot, A. S.; Baltensperger, U.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    We present first results on the volatility and chemical composition of aged organic aerosol measured during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment - 2008 (FAME-2008). Finokalia is located in the Southeast of Crete, Greece, and this remote site allows for the measurement of aged European aerosol as it is transported from Central to Southeastern Europe. We measured the volatility of the aerosol at Finokalia as a function of its size by combining several instruments. We used an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of the particles, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) to measure the volume distribution of particles, and a thermodenuder system to induce changes in size and composition via moderate heating of the particles. The largest fraction of the non-refractory material in the aerosol sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organic material and a small contribution from nitrate. Most of the organic aerosol was highly oxidized, even after only a few days of transport over continental Europe. These highly oxidized organics had lower volatility than fresh primary or secondary aerosol measured in the laboratory. Significant changes in air-parcel trajectories and wind direction led to changes in the chemical composition of the sampled aerosol and corresponding changes of the volatility. These results allow the quantification of the effect of atmospheric processing on organic aerosol volatility and can be used as constraints for atmospheric Chemical Transport Models that predict the aerosol volatility.

  20. Polarized Imaging Nephelometer Scattering Measurements from the Winter of 2013 Discover-AQ Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, R.; Martins, J.; Dolgos, G.; Dubovik, O.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    After greenhouse gases, aerosols are thought to have the largest contribution to the total radiative forcing of the atmosphere, but they are frequently cited as the single largest source of uncertainty among all anthropogenic radiative forcing components. Remote sensing allows global measurements of aerosol properties, however validation of these measurements are crucial, and their retrieval algorithms require climatological assumptions that must be first measured in situ. In situ instruments are also needed to supplement remote sensing measurements, which frequently have a relatively low spatial resolution, particularly when assessing surface air quality. The Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) has developed an instrument called the Polarized Imaging NEPHelometer (PI-Neph) to significantly aid in situ particle optical scattering measurements. The PI-Neph is based on a novel polar nephelometer design that uses a high-powered laser and wide field of view optical detection system (CCD camera) to measure the intensity of scattered laser light as a function of scattering angle. This allows for the measurement of scattering coefficient, phase function and polarized phase function over an angular range of 2 to 178 degrees with an angular resolution of less than half of a degree. This simple layout also permits the construction of an instrument that is compact enough to be flown on a variety of airborne platforms. PI-Neph measurements have been validated by a variety of methods since its completion in the fall of 2011. Measurements of mono-disperse polystyrene spheres have yielded results that are in close agreement with Mie theory, while scattering coefficient measurements made in parallel with commercially available integrating nephelometers from TSI have agreed to within 5%. The PI-Neph has successfully participated in several field experiments, most recently completing the January/February portion of

  1. Time-resolved measurements of in-flight ablator performance using streaked x-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Damien; Spears, Brian; Sorce, Chuck; Celliers, Peter; Landen, Otto; Collins, Gilbert; Boehly, Thomas

    2007-11-01

    Determining ablator performance during an implosion is a critical part of the NIF tuning campaign. In particular, it is vital to have an accurate, in-flight measure of the velocity, areal density, and mass of the ablator. We present a new technique which achieves time-resolved measurements of all these parameters in a single, area-backlit, streaked radiograph. This is accomplished by tomographically inverting the radiograph to determine the radial density profile at each time step; scalar quantities such as the average position, thickness, areal density, and mass of the ablator can then be determined simply by taking moments of this density profile. Application of this technique is demonstrated on Cu-doped Be capsule implosions at Omega. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  2. Resolving pressure from DPIV measurements in a dynamically scaled-up vocal fold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Lori; Krane, Michael; Sherman, Erica; Wei, Timothy

    2012-11-01

    This presentation highlights application of control volume analysis to DPIV measurements in a dynamically scaled human vocal fold model. For the first time spatially and temporally resolved pressure field information can be extracted from voice experiments. The vocal fold model was built around a computer driven mechanism that replicates both the transverse vibrations as well as the streamwise rocking of human vocal folds. A range of experiments were conducted corresponding to 50 - 200 Hz life frequencies. Volumetric flow rate and maximum velocity measurements will be presented for several control surfaces in the glottal flow. The direction of the glottal jet (coandă) was noted for each instantaneous oscillation cycle. The pressure forces acting in the glottis were calculated using the streamwise and transverse linear momentum equations and control volume analysis. In addition to serving as a baseline study, data from these experiments provide the comparison for follow on studies of diseased and abnormal vocal fold vibrations. Supported by NIH.

  3. Depth-resolved whole-field displacement measurement using wavelength scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo D.; Zhou, Yanzhou; Huntley, Jonathan M.; Wildman, Ricky D.

    2004-07-01

    We describe a technique for measuring depth-resolved displacement fields within a three-dimensional (3D) scattering medium based on wavelength scanning interferometry. Sequences of two-dimensional interferograms are recorded whilst the wavelength of the laser is tuned at a constant rate. Fourier transformation of the resulting 3D intensity distribution along the time axis reconstructs the scattering potential within the medium, and changes in the 3D phase distribution measured between two separate scans provide one component of the 3D displacement field. The technique is illustrated with a proof-of-principle experiment involving two independently controlled reflecting surfaces. Advantages over the corresponding method based on low-coherence interferometry include a depth range unlimited by mechanical scanning devices, and immunity from fringe contrast reduction when imaging through dispersive media.

  4. Depth-resolved whole-field displacement measurement by wavelength-scanning electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo D.; Huntley, Jonathan M.; Wildman, Ricky D.

    2005-07-01

    We show, for the first time to our knowledge, how wavelength-scanning interferometry can be used to measure depth-resolved displacement fields through semitransparent scattering surfaces. Temporal sequences of speckle interferograms are recorded while the wavelength of the laser is tuned at a constant rate. Fourier transformation of the resultant three-dimensional (3-D) intensity distribution along the time axis reconstructs the scattering potential within the medium, and changes in the 3-D phase distribution measured between two separate scans provide the out-of-plane component of the 3-D displacement field. The principle of the technique is explained in detail and illustrated with a proof-of-principle experiment involving two independently tilted semitransparent scattering surfaces. Results are validated by standard two-beam electronic speckle pattern interferometry.

  5. The MRSt for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.

    2015-11-01

    Information about the time evolution of inertial-confinement-fusion fuel assembly and hot-spot formation can be obtained with the next-generation Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometers for ICF applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and ρR -Ti trajectory during burn. As the peak burn generally occurs before and after peak compression in failed and ignited implosions, respectively, an MRSt measurement of the relative timing of these events will be critical for assessing implosion dynamics. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, LLNL and LLE.

  6. Spatially resolved excitation temperature measurements in a hypersonic flow using the hook method.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, R J; Ebrahim, N A

    1977-05-01

    The extension of the hook method to include spatial resolution of nonuniformities in the test plane as suggested by Huber (1971) and Sandeman (1971) is demonstrated experimentally by measurements of the variation of the integrated line density of ground state sodium in a flame. Experiments are also described in which the variations in the flow of CO(2) in a hypersonic shock tunnel are spatially resolved along the spectrometer slit. The variations in the hook separations of the 425.4-nm Cr1 resonance and the 434.4-nm CrI 1-eV lower state line are simultaneously measured. The chromium exists as an impurity in the hypersonic flow of CO(2) over a cylinder in a shock tunnel. The populations of the levels so obtained have enabled the comparison of the excitation temperature of the Cr 1-eV level with the calculated gas temperature. PMID:20168704

  7. First Mass-resolved Measurement of High-Energy Cosmic-Ray Antiprotons.

    PubMed

    Bergström; Boezio; Carlson; Francke; Grinstein; Khalchukov; Suffert; Hof; Kremer; Menn; Simon; Stephens; Ambriola; Bellotti; Cafagna; Ciacio; Circella; De Marzo C; Finetti; Papini; Piccardi; Spillantini; Bartalucci; Ricci; Casolino; De Pascale MP; Morselli; Picozza; Sparvoli; Bonvicini; Schiavon; Vacchi; Zampa; Mitchell; Ormes; Streitmatter; Bravar; Stochaj

    2000-05-10

    We report new results for the cosmic-ray antiproton-to-proton ratio from 3 to 50 GeV at the top of the atmosphere. These results represent the first measurements, on an event-by-event basis, of mass-resolved antiprotons above 18 GeV. The results were obtained with the NMSU-WIZARD/CAPRICE98 balloon-borne magnet spectrometer equipped with a gas-RICH (Ring-Imaging Cerenkov) counter and a silicon-tungsten imaging calorimeter. The RICH detector was the first ever flown that is capable of identifying charge-one particles at energies above 5 GeV. The spectrometer was flown on 1998 May 28-29 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The measured p&d1;/p ratio is in agreement with a pure secondary interstellar production. PMID:10813676

  8. Spectrally-resolved measurement of concentrated light distributions for Fresnel lens concentrators.

    PubMed

    Besson, P; White, P McVey; Dominguez, C; Voarino, P; Garcia-Linares, P; Lemiti, M; Schriemer, H; Hinzer, K; Baudrit, M

    2016-01-25

    A test method that measures spectrally resolved irradiance distribution for a concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) optical system is presented. In conjunction with electrical I-V curves, it is a means to visualize and characterize the effects of chromatic aberration and nonuniform flux profiles under controllable testing conditions. The indoor characterization test bench, METHOD (Measurement of Electrical, Thermal and Optical Devices), decouples the temperatures of the primary optical element (POE) and the cell allowing their respective effects on optical and electrical performance to be analysed. In varying the temperature of the POE, the effects on electrical efficiency, focal distance, spectral sensitivity, acceptance angle and multi-junction current matching profiles can be quantified. This work presents the calibration procedures to accurately image the spectral irradiance distribution of a CPV system and a study of system behavior over lens temperature. PMID:26832591

  9. Characterization of organic contaminants in porous media using nuclear magnetic resonance and spectral induced polarization measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupert, Y. K.

    2015-12-01

    The remediation and monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts. This laboratory research focuses on combining two innovative geophysical methods: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and spectral induced polarization (SIP) to assess their suitability to characterize and quantify organic contaminants in porous media. Toluene, a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL), and ethoxy-nonafluorobutane, an engineered dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL), have been selected as representative organic contaminants. Low-field NMR relaxation time (T2) measurements and diffusion-relaxation (D-T2) correlation measurements, as well as low frequency SIP measurements (<10 kHz) are performed to quantify the amount of these two organic compounds in the presence of water in three types of porous media (sands, clay, and various sand-clay mixtures). The T2, D-T2, and SIP measurements are made on water, toluene, and the synthetic DNAPL in each porous media to understand the effect of different porous media on the NMR and SIP responses in each fluid. We then plan to make measurements on water-organic mixtures with varied concentrations of organic compounds in each porous medium to resolve the NMR and SIP response of the organic contaminants from that of water and to quantify the amount of organic contaminants. Building a relationship between SIP and NMR signatures from organic contaminants not only provides a fundamental yet important petrophysical relationship, but also builds a framework for continued investigation into how these two methods synergize. This will also provide spatially dense information about organic contaminated natural sediments at scales that will improve the quantitative characterization and remediation of contaminated sites.The remediation and monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts

  10. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography measurements with different phase modulation amplitude when using continuous polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the phase retardance and relative optic-axis orientation of a sample can be calculated without prior knowledge of the actual value of the phase modulation amplitude when using a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system based on continuous polarization modulation (CPM-PS-OCT). We also demonstrate that the sample Jones matrix can be calculated at any values of the phase modulation amplitude in a reasonable range depending on the system effective signal-to-noise ratio. This has fundamental importance for the development of clinical systems by simplifying the polarization modulator drive instrumentation and eliminating its calibration procedure. This was validated on measurements of a three-quarter waveplate and an equine tendon sample by a fiber-based swept-source CPM-PS-OCT system.

  11. Spatially resolved bolometric measurement and electron temperature measurement using diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Koguchi, H.; Shimada, T.; Asai, T.; Yagi, Y.; Hirano, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2004-10-01

    In this article, the measurement system for the total radiation and electron temperature profiles to be installed in a reversed-field pinch machine, toroidal pinch experiment, RX [TPE-RX, R/a=1.72/0.45 m, Ipmeasure the plasma radiation and electron temperature profiles using three sets of diode arrays. Each array can measure radiation along 20 lines of sight and the radial profile of the radiation. One set of the arrays is used for the bolometric measurement in the range from visible light to soft x-ray. Two sets of the arrays are used for the soft-x ray and electron temperature measurements employing a double-filter method. We will use this system to investigate the plasma-wall interaction, radiation loss, and confinement properties in the core plasma region. We will extend the use of this system for tomographic analysis of electron temperature, a concept of which is also presented.

  12. The orientation of eosin-5-maleimide on human erythrocyte band 3 measured by fluorescence polarization microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, S M; Cobb, C E; Beth, A H; Piston, D W

    1996-01-01

    The dominant motional mode for membrane proteins is uniaxial rotational diffusion about the membrane normal axis, and investigations of their rotational dynamics can yield insight into both the oligomeric state of the protein and its interactions with other proteins such as the cytoskeleton. However, results from the spectroscopic methods used to study these dynamics are dependent on the orientation of the probe relative to the axis of motion. We have employed polarized fluorescence confocal microscopy to measure the orientation of eosin-5-maleimide covalently reacted with Lys-430 of human erythrocyte band 3. Steady-state polarized fluorescence images showed distinct intensity patterns, which were fit to an orientation distribution of the eosin absorption and emission dipoles relative to the membrane normal axis. This orientation was found to be unchanged by trypsin treatment, which cleaves band 3 between the integral membrane domain and the cytoskeleton-attached domain. this result suggests that phosphorescence anisotropy changes observed after trypsin treatment are due to a rotational constraint change rather than a reorientation of eosin. By coupling time-resolved prompt fluorescence anisotropy with confocal microscopy, we calculated the expected amplitudes of the e-Dt and e-4Dt terms from the uniaxial rotational diffusion model and found that the e-4Dt term should dominate the anisotropy decay. Delayed fluorescence and phosphorescence anisotropy decays of control and trypsin-treated band 3 in ghosts, analyzed as multiple uniaxially rotating populations using the amplitudes predicted by confocal microscopy, were consistent with three motional species with uniaxial correlation times ranging from 7 microseconds to 1.4 ms. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:8804603

  13. Measuring the scalar and vector polarizabilities of the nucleon using polarized photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Miskimen, R.

    2013-11-07

    The next generation of Compton scattering experiments is underway at Mainz and other laboratories, where the goal is precision measurements of the scalar and vector polarizabilities of the nucleon using polarized photons and polarized targets. Results are presented for the first double polarized Compton scattering experiment utilizing a polarized proton target. Preliminary results are presented for the γ{sub E1E1} spin polarizability. Prospects are discussed for future nucleon polarizability measurements using a high intensity 300 MeV electron machine.

  14. Measurement of the nuclear polarization of hydrogen and deuterium molecules using a Lamb-shift polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Ralf Gorski, Robert; Grigoryev, Kiril; Mikirtychyants, Maxim; Rathmann, Frank; Seyfarth, Hellmut; Ströher, Hans; Weiss, Philipp; Kochenda, Leonid; Kravtsov, Peter; Trofimov, Viktor; Tschernov, Nikolay; Vasilyev, Alexander; Vznuzdaev, Marat; Schieck, Hans Paetz gen.

    2014-10-15

    Lamb-shift polarimeters are used to measure the nuclear polarization of protons and deuterons at energies of a few keV. In combination with an ionizer, the polarization of hydrogen and deuterium atoms was determined after taking into account the loss of polarization during the ionization process. The present work shows that the nuclear polarization of hydrogen or deuterium molecules can be measured as well, by ionizing the molecules and injecting the H{sub 2}{sup +} (or D{sub 2}{sup +}) ions into the Lamb-shift polarimeter.

  15. Measurement of polarization parameters of the targets in synthetic aperture imaging LADAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qian; Sun, Jianfeng; Lu, Wei; Hou, Peipei; Ma, Xiaoping; Lu, Zhiyong; Sun, Zhiwei; Liu, Liren

    2015-09-01

    In Synthetic aperture imaging ladar (SAIL), the polarization state change of the backscattered light will affect the imaging. Polarization state of the reflected field is always determined by the interaction of the light and the materials on the target plane. The Stokes parameters, which can provide the information on both light intensity and polarization state, are the ideal quantities for characterizing the above features. In this paper, a measurement system of the polarization characteristic for the SAIL target materials is designed. The measurement results are expected to be useful in target identification and recognition.

  16. Spatially resolved measurements of mean spin-spin relaxation time constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechifor, Ruben Emanuel; Romanenko, Konstantin; Marica, Florea; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance measurements of the T2 distribution have become very common and they are a powerful way to probe microporous fluid bearing solids. While the structure of the T2 distribution, and changes in the structure, are often very informative, it is common to reduce the T2 distribution to a mean numeric quantity in order to provide a quantitative interpretation of the distribution. Magnetic Resonance Imaging measurements of the T2 distribution have recently been introduced, but they are time consuming, especially for 2 and 3 spatial dimensions. In this paper we explore a direct MRI measurement of the arithmetic mean of 1/T2, characterizing the distribution by using the initial slope of the spatially resolved T2 decay in a CPMG prepared Centric Scan SPRITE experiment. The methodology is explored with a test phantom sample and realistic petroleum reservoir core plug samples. The arithmetic mean of 1/T2 is related to the harmonic mean of T2. The mean obtained from the early decay is explored through measurements of uniform saturated core plug samples and by comparison to other means determined from the complete T2 distribution. Complementary data were obtained using SE-SPI T2 distribution MRI measurements. The utility of the arithmetic mean 1/T2 is explored through measurements of centrifuged core plug samples where the T2 distribution varies spatially. The harmonic mean T2 obtained from the early decay was employed to estimate the irreducible water saturation for core plug samples.

  17. Spatially resolved measurements of mean spin-spin relaxation time constants.

    PubMed

    Nechifor, Ruben Emanuel; Romanenko, Konstantin; Marica, Florea; Balcom, Bruce J

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance measurements of the T2 distribution have become very common and they are a powerful way to probe microporous fluid bearing solids. While the structure of the T2 distribution, and changes in the structure, are often very informative, it is common to reduce the T2 distribution to a mean numeric quantity in order to provide a quantitative interpretation of the distribution. Magnetic Resonance Imaging measurements of the T2 distribution have recently been introduced, but they are time consuming, especially for 2 and 3 spatial dimensions. In this paper we explore a direct MRI measurement of the arithmetic mean of 1/T2, characterizing the distribution by using the initial slope of the spatially resolved T2 decay in a CPMG prepared Centric Scan SPRITE experiment. The methodology is explored with a test phantom sample and realistic petroleum reservoir core plug samples. The arithmetic mean of 1/T2 is related to the harmonic mean of T2. The mean obtained from the early decay is explored through measurements of uniform saturated core plug samples and by comparison to other means determined from the complete T2 distribution. Complementary data were obtained using SE-SPI T2 distribution MRI measurements. The utility of the arithmetic mean 1/T2 is explored through measurements of centrifuged core plug samples where the T2 distribution varies spatially. The harmonic mean T2 obtained from the early decay was employed to estimate the irreducible water saturation for core plug samples. PMID:24361482

  18. Thermal Return Reflection Method for Resolving Emissivity and Temperature in Radiometric Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, Paul P.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2002-11-15

    A radiometric method for resolving the emissivity, e, and temperature, T, in thermal emission measurements is presented. Thermal radiation from a viewed source is split by a beamsplitter between a radiometer and a mirror aligned to return a part of the thermal radiation back to the source. The ratio of the thermal signal with and without a return reflection provides a measurement of the emissivity without need of any other probing sources. The analytical expressions that establish this relationship are derived taking into account waveguide/optic losses and sources between the radiometer and viewed sample. The method is then applied to thermal measurements of several refractory materials at temperatures up to 1150 ?C. A 137 GHz radiometer is used to measure the emissivity and temperature of an alumina brick, an Inconel 690 plate, and two grades of silicon carbide. Reasonable temperature agreement is achieved with an independent thermocouple measurement. However, when the emissivity approaches zero, as in the case of the Inconel plate, radiometric temperature determinations are inaccurate, though an emissivity near zero is correctly measured. This method is expected to be of considerable value to non-contact thermal analysis applications of materials.

  19. The Q/U Imaging Experiment: Polarization Measurements of Radio Sources at 43 and 95 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, K. M.; Araujo, D.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Kusaka, A.; Monsalve, R.; Næss, S. K.; Newburgh, L. B.; Reeves, R.; Ruud, T. M.; Wehus, I. K.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Dickinson, C.; Eriksen, H. K.; Gaier, T.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hasegawa, M.; Hazumi, M.; Miller, A. D.; Radford, S. J. E.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Staggs, S. T.; Tajima, O.; Thompson, K. L.; QUIET Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ˜480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30-40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%-20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  20. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E.; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment.

  1. On the Incorporation of Metallicity Data into Measurements of Star Formation History from Resolved Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2016-07-01

    The combination of spectroscopic stellar metallicities and resolved star color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs) has the potential to constrain the entire star formation history (SFH) of a galaxy better than fitting CMDs alone (as is most common in SFH studies using resolved stellar populations). In this paper, two approaches to incorporating external metallicity information into CMD-fitting techniques are presented. Overall, the joint fitting of metallicity and CMD information can increase the precision of measured age–metallicity relationships (AMRs) and star formation rates by 10% over CMD fitting alone. However, systematics in stellar isochrones and mismatches between spectroscopic and photometric determinations of metallicity can reduce the accuracy of the recovered SFHs. I present a simple mitigation of these systematics that can reduce their amplitude to the level obtained from CMD fitting alone, while ensuring that the AMR is consistent with spectroscopic metallicities. As is the case in CMD-fitting analysis, improved stellar models and calibrations between spectroscopic and photometric metallicities are currently the primary impediment to gains in SFH precision from jointly fitting stellar metallicities and CMDs.

  2. New Instrument for Measuring Size-resolved Submicron Sea Spray Particle Production From Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskhidze, N.; Petters, M. D.; Reed, R. E.; Dawson, K. W.; Phillips, B.; Royalty, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Marine aerosols play an important role in controlling the Earth's radiation balance, cloud formation and microphysical properties, and the chemistry of the marine atmosphere. As aerosol effects on climate are estimated from the difference between model simulations with present-day and with preindustrial aerosol and precursor emissions, accurate knowledge of size- and composition-dependent production flux of sea spray particles is important for correct assessment of the role of anthropogenic aerosols in climate change. One particular knowledge gap in sea spray particle emissions resides in yet uncharacterized contributions of sea spray to the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) budget over the marine boundary layer. The chemical composition of 50 to 200 nm sized sea spray particles, most critical to modeling CCN concentration from size distribution data is often simplified as purely organic, purely sea-salt or mixture of both. The lack of accurate information of the size-dependent production flux of sub-micron sea spray particles prevents the modeling community from resolving discrepancies between model-predicted and measured CCN number concentration in the marine boundary layer. We designed a new system for size-selected sea spray aerosol flux measurement that is composed of a 3D sonic anemometer, two thermodenuders, three differential mobility analyzers, two condensation particle counters, and a CCN counter. The system is designed to operate in both Eddy Covariance (EC) and Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) modes. The system is based on the volatility/humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer technique and is therefore designed to measure the size-resolved turbulent fluxes of sub-micron sized sea-salt particles for a wide range of meteorological, hydrological and ocean chemical/biological conditions. The method and the setup will be presented along with some results from a recent field-deployment of the instrument at the North Carolina coast. This presentation

  3. Study on the measurement system of the target polarization characteristics and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Su; Duan, Jin; Yang, Di; Zhan, Juntong; Wang, Xiaoman; Jiang, Hui-Lin

    2015-10-01

    The polarization imaging detection technology increased the polarization information on the basis of the intensity imaging, which is extensive application in the military and civil and other fields, the research on the polarization characteristics of target is particularly important. The research of the polarization reflection model was introduced in this paper, which describes the scattering vector light energy distribution in reflecting hemisphere polarization characteristics, the target polarization characteristics test system solutions was put forward, by the irradiation light source, measuring turntable and camera, etc, which illuminate light source shall direct light source, with laser light sources and xenon lamp light source, light source can be replaced according to the test need; Hemispherical structure is used in measuring circumarotate placed near its base material sample, equipped with azimuth and pitching rotation mechanism, the manual in order to adjust the azimuth Angle and high Angle observation; Measuring camera pump works, through the different in the way of motor control polaroid polarization test, to ensure the accuracy of measurement and imaging resolution. The test platform has set up by existing laboratory equipment, the laser is 532 nm, line polaroid camera, at the same time also set the sending and receiving optical system. According to the different materials such as wood, metal, plastic, azimuth Angle and zenith Angle in different observation conditions, measurement of target in the polarization scattering properties of different exposure conditions, implementation of hemisphere space pBRDF measurement.

  4. Comparison of models and measurements of angle-resolved scatter from irregular aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, Adam B.; Richardson, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and validated a method for modeling the elastic scattering properties of biological and inert aerosols of irregular shape at near- and mid-wave infrared wavelengths. The method, based on Gaussian random particles, calculates the ensemble-average optical cross section and Mueller scattering matrix, using the measured aerodynamic size distribution and previously-reported refractive index as inputs. The utility of the Gaussian particle model is that it is controlled by only two parameters (σ and Γ) which we have optimized such that the model best reproduces the full angle-resolved Mueller scattering matrices measured at λ=1.55 μm in the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST). The method has been applied to wet-generated singlet biological spore samples, dry-generated biological spore clusters, and kaolin. The scattering computation is performed using the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA), which requires significant computational resources, and is thus implemented on LLGrid, a large parallel grid computer. For the cases presented, the best fit Gaussian particle model is in good qualitative correspondence with microscopy images of the corresponding class of particles. The measured and computed cross sections agree well within a factor of two overall, with certain cases bearing closer correspondence. In particular, the DDA reproduces the shape of the measured scatter function more accurately than Mie predictions. The DDA-computed depolarization factors are also in good agreement with measurement.

  5. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  6. Measurement of the linear polarization of channeling radiation in silicon and diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Rzepka, M.; Buschhorn, G.; Diedrich, E.; Kotthaus, R.; Kufner, W.; Roessl, W.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hoffmann-Stascheck, P.; Genz, H.; Nething, U.; Richter, A.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    1995-07-01

    Utilizing 90{degree} Compton scattering the linear polarization of channeling radiation produced at the superconducting accelerator S-DALINAC with 62 MeV electrons in silicon and diamond has been measured in the energy range between 50 and 400 keV. Planar channeling radiation due to transitions involving transversal bound as well as unbound states is completely linearly polarized perpendicular to the channeling plane. Axial channeling radiation does not show linear polarization.

  7. Measurement of proton polarization in the d(gamma-vector,p-vector)n reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen Strauch; JLAB Hall A Collaboration

    2000-12-12

    Recoil proton polarization was measured in deuteron photodisintegration at 90 deg. {sub cm} for photon energies up to 2.5 GeV. The induced polarization p{sub y} is consistent with zero above 1 GeV, consistent with expectations from quark models and in disagreement with meson-baryon calculations. Polarization transfer observables are non-zero, indicating that hadron helicity is not conserved.

  8. CTS attenuation and cross-polarization measurements at 11.7 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, W. J.; Straiton, A. W.

    1977-01-01

    The results of data obtained 80 days preceding the solar eclipse shutdown of the CTS 11.7 GHz righthand circularly polarized beacon transmitter are presented. Attenuation and cross polarization isolation were measured. It was determined that depolarization presents a serious limitation to satellite system reliability when frequency reuse by polarization diversity is employed. A 27 db isolation margin would reduce reliability below 99.95%. For the same percentage the required fade margin was below 3 db.

  9. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayahsi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  10. Retrieval of aerosol optical thickness over land from airborne polarized measurements in Tianjin and Tangshan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Sun, Xiaobing; Hou, Weizhen; Chen, Cheng; Hong, Jin

    2015-03-01

    New developed sensor was called Atmosphere Multi-angle Polarization Radiometer (AMPR). It provides airborne multi-spectral, multi-angular and polarized measurements. Based on the measurements, a method to retrieve aerosol optical thickness (AOT) was developed. To reduce the ambiguity in retrieval algorithm, the key characteristics of aerosol model over East Asia are constrained. Initial surface reflectance was estimated from measurements at 1640 nm. With iteration the surface polarized reflectance tends to the real value together with AOT. Retrieved cases were selected from measurements in Tianjin. Validation between AOTs from AMPR and CE318 is encouraging. The AOTs along the track shows reasonable temporal and spatial variation.

  11. Plasmon transport in graphene investigated by time-resolved electrical measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kumada, N.; Tanabe, S.; Hibino, H.; Kamata, H.; Hashisaka, M.; Muraki, K.; Fujisawa, T.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmons, which are collective charge oscillations, could provide a means of confining electromagnetic field to nanoscale structures. Recently, plasmonics using graphene have attracted interest, particularly because of the tunable plasmon dispersion, which will be useful for tunable frequency in cavity applications. However, the carrier density dependence of the dispersion is weak (proportional to n1/4) and it is difficult to tune the frequency over orders of magnitude. Here, by exploiting electronic excitation and detection, we carry out time-resolved measurements of a charge pulse travelling in a plasmon mode in graphene corresponding to the gigahertz range. We demonstrate that the plasmon velocity can be changed over two orders of magnitude by applying a magnetic field B and by screening the plasmon electric field with a gate metal; at high B, edge magnetoplasmons, which are plasmons localized at the sample edge, are formed and their velocity depends on B, n and the gate screening effect. PMID:23322051

  12. Time-resolved temperature measurement and numerical simulation of millisecond laser irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zewen; Zhang Hongchao; Shen Zhonghua; Ni Xiaowu

    2013-07-21

    Thermal process of 1064 nm millisecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiated silicon was time-resolved temperature measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer, temperature evolutions of the spot center for wide range of laser energy densities were presented. The waveforms of temperature evolution curves contained much information about phase change, melting, solidification and vaporization. An axisymmetric numerical model was established for millisecond laser heating silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained by using the finite element method. The numerical results of temperature evolutions of the spot center are in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, the axial temperature distributions of the numerical results give a better understanding of the waveforms in the experimental results. The melting threshold, vaporizing threshold, melting duration, and melting depth were better identified by analyzing two kinds of results.

  13. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-11-15

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd{sup 3+} lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho{sup 3+} was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb{sup 3+} to Yb{sup 3+} was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar{sup +} laser, Kr{sup +} laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc.

  14. Time-Resolved AMR measurements of current induced magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittienne, Ph.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Kelly, D.; Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    2001-03-01

    Time-resolved detection of the magnetization switching in static magnetic fields was achieved by pulsing current densities of about 107 A/cm2 in single isolated Nickel nanowires (80nm in diameter, 6000 nm in length, electrodeposited in porous membranes), using a Weathstone bridge of a 1GHz bandwidth. This irreversible transition is found to occur in a time of about 10 ns. The time of switching within the pulse, tsw, is measured as a function of applied field and current. The temperature rise due to Joule heating is deduced from the change in resistance. The entire set of data tsw(H,T) are fitted with a simple activation law, with the energy barrier height as the unique fitting parameter. The results show a strong departure from pure thermal activation indicating a current-induced magnetization reversal.

  15. Method of ultrafast beam rotation for single-shot, time-resolved measurements.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Alex; Lowe, Mary

    2014-09-15

    Ultrafast optical beam rotation is proposed for single-shot, time-resolved measurements. A pump-probe configuration is considered using a diffraction grating and focusing optics to create angular encoding of the time delay between the pump and probe pulses. The characteristic time t(ap) of the grating-lens system is derived as a function of dispersion, NA, and time window T. An analytical equation for time resolution is obtained that incorporates t(ap)laser pulse width, and beam crossing, enabling optimum selection of optical components. For commercial standard gratings with width W≤50 mm, laser λ=800 nm, and NA=.05, a 160 ps time window can be achieved, and t(ap)=23 fs for T=1 ps. PMID:26466272

  16. Angle-resolved scattering and reflectance of extreme-ultraviolet multilayer coatings: measurement and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Sven; Herffurth, Tobias; Trost, Marcus; Duparre, Angela

    2010-03-20

    Roughness-induced light scattering critically affects the performance of optical components, in particular at short wavelengths. We present a stand-alone instrument for angle-resolved scattering and reflectance measurements at 13.5 nm in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral range. The achieved dynamic range allows even the scattering of high-quality EUV mirrors on extremely smooth substrates to be investigated. For Mo/Si multilayers, total scatter losses of several percent have been observed, depending on the substrate qualities as well as on roughening and smoothing effects during coating. Different approximate models for estimating the impact of roughness on scatter losses are discussed and compared with experimental results.

  17. Spatially resolved measurement of high doses in microbeam radiation therapy using samarium doped fluorophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Go; Morrell, Brian; Koughia, Cyril; Kasap, Safa; Edgar, Andy; Varoy, Chris; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean

    2011-09-19

    The measurement of spatially resolved high doses in microbeam radiation therapy has always been a challenging task, where a combination of high dose response and high spatial resolution (microns) is required for synchrotron radiation peaked around 50 keV. The x-ray induced Sm{sup 3+}{yields} Sm{sup 2+} valence conversion in Sm{sup 3+} doped fluorophosphates glasses has been tested for use in x-ray dosimetry for microbeam radiation therapy. The conversion efficiency depends almost linearly on the dose of irradiation up to {approx}5 Gy and saturates at doses exceeding {approx}80 Gy. The conversion shows strong correlation with x-ray induced absorbance of the glass which is related to the formation of phosphorus-oxygen hole centers. When irradiated through a microslit collimator, a good spatial resolution and high ''peak-to-valley'' contrast have been observed by means of confocal photoluminescence microscopy.

  18. Time-resolved K-shell line spectra measurement of z-pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingguo; Zhou, Shaotong; Chen, Guanhua; Huang, Xianbin; Cai, Hongchun; Li, Zeren

    2013-11-01

    A Johann-type crystal spectrometer integrated with x-ray PIN diodes has been developed for measuring the time-resolved K-shell line spectra of the imploding Al wire array. In this spectrometer, the PIN diodes are mounted on the Rowland circle of the cylindrical bent crystal with an appointed position to collect the line emissions from z-pinch plasmas. The spectrometer with four typical channels, which are keyed to the Al ion hydrogen-like (Hα, 0.7171 nm and Hβ, 0.6052 nm) and helium-like (Heα, 0.7757 nm and Heβ, 0.6634 nm) resonance lines is designed and fabricated. Example data from the experiment on the Yang accelerator are shown and the time-dependent electron temperature is determined from the signal ratios of Al ion Hα line to Heα line using the collisional and radiative model.

  19. Resolving the Rotation Measure of the M87 Jet on Kiloparsec Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algaba, J. C.; Asada, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the distribution of Faraday rotation measure (RM) in the M87 jet at arcsecond scales by using archival polarimetric Very Large Array data at 8, 15, 22 and 43 GHz. We resolve the structure of the RM in several knots along the jet for the first time. We derive the power spectrum in the arcsecond-scale jet and find indications that the RM cannot be associated with a turbulent magnetic field with a 3D Kolmogorov spectrum. Our analysis indicates that the RM probed on jet scales has a significant contribution of a Faraday screen associated with the vicinity of the jet, in contrast with that on kiloparsec scales, typically assumed to be disconnected from the jet. Comparison with previous RM analyses suggests that the magnetic fields giving rise to the RMs observed in jet scales have different properties and are well less turbulent than those observed in the lobes.

  20. Turbulent Statistics from Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  1. Turbulent Statistics From Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  2. Time- and spectrally resolved measurements of laser-driven hohlraum radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hessling, T.; Blazevic, A.; Stoehlker, T.; Frank, A.; Kraus, D.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2011-07-15

    At the GSI Helmholtz center for heavy-ion research combined experiments with heavy ions and laser-produced plasmas are investigated. As a preparation to utilize indirectly heated targets, where a converter hohlraum provides thermal radiation to create a more homogeneous plasma, this converter target has to be characterized. In this paper the latest results of these measurements are presented. Small spherical cavities with diameters between 600 and 750 {mu}m were heated with laser energies up to 30 J at 532-nm wavelength. Radiation temperatures could be determined by time-resolved as well as time-integrated diagnostics, and maximum values of up to 35 eV were achieved.

  3. Time- and spectrally resolved measurements of laser-driven hohlraum radiation.

    PubMed

    Hessling, T; Blažević, A; Frank, A; Kraus, D; Roth, M; Schaumann, G; Schumacher, D; Stöhlker, T; Hoffmann, D H H

    2011-07-01

    At the GSI Helmholtz center for heavy-ion research combined experiments with heavy ions and laser-produced plasmas are investigated. As a preparation to utilize indirectly heated targets, where a converter hohlraum provides thermal radiation to create a more homogeneous plasma, this converter target has to be characterized. In this paper the latest results of these measurements are presented. Small spherical cavities with diameters between 600 and 750 μm were heated with laser energies up to 30 J at 532-nm wavelength. Radiation temperatures could be determined by time-resolved as well as time-integrated diagnostics, and maximum values of up to 35 eV were achieved. PMID:21867327

  4. Time-Resolved Microdialysis for In Vivo Neurochemical Measurements and Other Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Kristin N.; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2008-07-01

    Monitoring changes in chemical concentrations over time in complex environments is typically performed using sensors and spectroscopic techniques. Another approach is to couple sampling methods, such as microdialysis, with chromatographic, electrophoretic, or enzymatic assays. Recent advances of such coupling have enabled improvements in temporal resolution, multianalyte capability, and automation. In a sampling and analysis method, the temporal resolution is set by the mass sensitivity of the analytical method, analysis time, and zone dispersion during sampling. Coupling methods with high speed and mass sensitivity to microdialysis sampling help to reduce some of these contributions to yield methods with temporal resolution of seconds. These advances have been primarily used in monitoring neurotransmitters in vivo. This review covers the problems associated with chemical monitoring in the brain, recent advances in using microdialysis for time-resolved in vivo measurements, sample applications, and other potential applications of the technology such as determining reaction kinetics and process monitoring.

  5. Time-resolved measurement of Landau-Zener tunneling in different bases

    SciTech Connect

    Tayebirad, G.; Loerch, N.; Wimberger, S.; Zenesini, A.; Ciampini, D.; Arimondo, E.; Mannella, R.; Morsch, O.

    2010-07-15

    A comprehensive study of the tunneling dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a tilted periodic potential is presented. We report numerical and experimental results on time-resolved measurements of the Landau-Zener tunneling of ultracold atoms introduced by the tilt, which experimentally is realized by accelerating the lattice. The use of different protocols enables us to access the tunneling probability, numerically as well as experimentally, in two different bases, namely, the adiabatic basis and the diabatic basis. The adiabatic basis corresponds to the eigenstates of the lattice, and the diabatic one to the free-particle momentum eigenstates. Our numerical and experimental results are compared with existing two-state Landau-Zener models.

  6. In situ time-resolved measurements of carbon nanotube and nanohorn growth

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, David B; Puretzky, Alexander A; Styers-Barnett, David J; Hu, Hui; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Hongtao; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; Jackson, Jeremy Joseph; Wood, Richard F; Pannala, Sreekanth; Wells, Jack C

    2007-01-01

    Growth mechanisms of carbon nanotubes are investigated and compared for both high- and low-temperature synthesis methods through experiments utilizing time-resolved, in situ imaging and spectros-copy. High-speed videography and pyrometry measured the timeframes for growth for single-wall car-bon nanotubes (SWNTs) and nanohorns (SWNHs) by laser vaporization (LV) at 1150 C, revealing that C can self-assemble at high temperatures preferentially into SWNH structures without catalyst assistance at rates comparable to catalyst-assisted SWNT growth by either laser vaporization or chemical vapor depo-sition (CVD). Laser interferometry and videography reveal the coordinated growth of vertically-aligned nanotube arrays (VANTAs) by CVD at 550-900 C.

  7. Measurement of dynamic variations of polarized light in processed meat due to aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubaker, Hamed M.; Tománek, Pavel; Grmela, Lubomír

    2011-05-01

    The propagation of laser light in biological tissues is of growing importance in many medical and food applications. This problem is seriously studied in live science. The biological tissues consist of cells which dimensions are bigger than wavelength of visible light and display large compositional variations, inhomogeneities, and anisotropic structures. Therefore a Mie scattering of transmitted or backscattered light occurs and different polarization states arise. The changes of polarization state due to the multiple scattering of light in the biological cellular tissues also allow measure the freshness of processed victuals. The transmitted and backscattered laser light exhibits multiple scattering on the thin slice of sample. The phenomenon is different if the cellular tissues are living or dead. In the case of meat, there are temporal and dynamic changes not only as a result of chemical process, but also geometric deformations due to the water evaporation from intracellular and extracellular sites. The polarization measurement shows the changes in polarization orientation due to the muscle orientation and meat aging. Two types of measurements were provided: a) Measurement of polarized light reflected and twice transmitted forward and backward through the biological tissue samples - meat slice attached on sample holder mirror. b) Measurement of polarized light transmitted through the biological tissue sample. The relationship between polarization changes and meat freshness, and a dynamic temporal behavior of polarization states in the aged meat is reported.

  8. A synchronized emissive probe for time-resolved plasma potential measurements of pulsed discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Jason M.; Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Anders, Andre

    2011-09-15

    A pulsed emissive probe technique is presented for measuring the plasma potential of pulsed plasma discharges. The technique provides time-resolved data and features minimal disturbance of the plasma achieved by alternating probe heating with the generation of plasma. Time resolution of about 20 ns is demonstrated for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) plasma of niobium in argon. Spatial resolution of about 1 mm is achieved by using a miniature tungsten filament mounted on a precision translational stage. Repeated measurements for the same discharge conditions show that the standard deviation of the measurements is about 1-2 V, corresponding to 4%-8% of the maximum plasma potential relative to ground. The principle is demonstrated for measurements at a distance of 30 mm from the target, for different radial positions, at an argon pressure of 0.3 Pa, a cathode voltage of -420 V, and a discharge current of about 60 A in the steady-state phase of the HIPIMS pulse.

  9. An optical backscatter probe for time resolved droplet measurements in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosdas, Ilias; Mansour, Michel; Kalfas, Anestis I.; Abhari, Reza S.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of particles in the flow path of turbomachines can result in undesirable engine operation. In order to improve the efficiency of turbomachines and guarantee their safe operation, the flow mechanisms that govern the particles’ need to be studied and associated with the main aerodynamic flow field. This paper describes a newly developed optical backscatter probe for droplet diameter and speed measurements in turbomachines. The miniature probe has a tip diameter of 5 mm and is capable of resolving droplets from 40 to 110 μm in diameter that travel up to 200 m s-1. The calibration of the novel probe is performed with a droplet generator capable of producing monodispersed water droplets. In addition, the probe is calibrated for droplet speed measurements in the same calibration facility. The paper conducts a detailed uncertainty analysis and describes the post processing code. In the final part of this paper the probe is used in an axial turbine with an installed spray generator to perform droplet measurements under two different operating conditions. Measurements have shown that the part load condition results in larger droplet diameters and higher relative droplet speeds. As a consequence higher erosion rates at the rotor leading edge suction side will occur when operating at part load condition.

  10. Practical issues in ultrashort-laser-pulse measurement using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R.

    1996-07-01

    The authors explore several practical experimental issues in measuring ultrashort laser pulses using the technique of frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). They present a simple method for checking the consistency of experimentally measured FROG data with the independently measured spectrum and autocorrelation of the pulse. This method is a powerful way of discovering systematic errors in FROG experiments. They show how to determine the optimum sampling rate for FROG and show that this satisfies the Nyquist criterion for the laser pulse. They explore the low- and high-power limits to FROG and determine that femtojoule operation should be possible, while the effects of self-phase modulation limit the highest signal efficiency in FROG to 1%. They also show quantitatively that the temporal blurring due to a finite-thickness medium in single-shot geometries does not strongly limit the FROG technique. They explore the limiting time-bandwidth values that can be represented on a FROG trace of a given size. Finally, they report on a new measure of the FROG error that improves convergence in the presence of noise.

  11. Spatially resolved spectroscopy for nondestructive quality measurements of Braeburn apples cultivated in sub-fertilization condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Do Trong, Nghia; Erkinbaev, Chyngyz; Nicolaï, Bart; Saeys, Wouter; Tsuta, Mizuki; De Baerdemaeker, Josse

    2013-05-01

    A contact spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) setup based on a fiber-optics probe in the Vis/NIR range (400-1000 nm) was developed, calibrated, and validated for its measurements and optical properties estimation by means of a metamodeling method on a set of liquid optical phantoms. Thirty Braeburn apples cultivated in sub-fertilization condition were harvested and measured before and after shelf-life storage (2 weeks at 18 °C) by the setup and were analyzed for quality attributes (firmness and soluble solids contents (SSC)) by destructive reference methods. Estimated optical properties (absorption and reduced scattering coefficients) acquired from SRS measurements at the beginning and the end of the shelf-life indicated changes in chemical composition of the apples. Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) was employed to construct calibration models relating the estimated optical properties to the reference quality attributes. The constructed PLS models based on the absorption coefficient spectra gave good prediction performance for the quality attributes of the apples in the validation set with correlation coefficients r of 0.901 and r of 0.844, respectively for SSC and firmness. The obtained results clearly show the potential of the SRS measurements for nondestructive quality evaluation of apples.

  12. Circular dichroism measurements at an x-ray free-electron laser with polarization control.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, G; Lindahl, A O; Knie, A; Hartmann, N; Lutman, A A; MacArthur, J P; Shevchuk, I; Buck, J; Galler, A; Glownia, J M; Helml, W; Huang, Z; Kabachnik, N M; Kazansky, A K; Liu, J; Marinelli, A; Mazza, T; Nuhn, H-D; Walter, P; Viefhaus, J; Meyer, M; Moeller, S; Coffee, R N; Ilchen, M

    2016-08-01

    A non-destructive diagnostic method for the characterization of circularly polarized, ultraintense, short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL) light is presented. The recently installed Delta undulator at the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (USA) was used as showcase for this diagnostic scheme. By applying a combined two-color, multi-photon experiment with polarization control, the degree of circular polarization of the Delta undulator has been determined. Towards this goal, an oriented electronic state in the continuum was created by non-resonant ionization of the O2 1s core shell with circularly polarized FEL pulses at hν ≃ 700 eV. An also circularly polarized, highly intense UV laser pulse with hν ≃ 3.1 eV was temporally and spatially overlapped, causing the photoelectrons to redistribute into so-called sidebands that are energetically separated by the photon energy of the UV laser. By determining the circular dichroism of these redistributed electrons using angle resolving electron spectroscopy and modeling the results with the strong-field approximation, this scheme allows to unambiguously determine the absolute degree of circular polarization of any pulsed, ultraintense XUV or X-ray laser source. PMID:27587106

  13. Precision measurement of the nuclear polarization in laser-cooled, optically pumped 37K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenker, B.; Behr, J. A.; Melconian, D.; Anderson, R. M. A.; Anholm, M.; Ashery, D.; Behling, R. S.; Cohen, I.; Craiciu, I.; Donohue, J. M.; Farfan, C.; Friesen, D.; Gorelov, A.; McNeil, J.; Mehlman, M.; Norton, H.; Olchanski, K.; Smale, S.; Thériault, O.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Warner, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We report a measurement of the nuclear polarization of laser-cooled, optically pumped 37K atoms which will allow us to precisely measure angular correlation parameters in the {β }+-decay of the same atoms. These results will be used to test the V ‑ A framework of the weak interaction at high precision. At the Triumf neutral atom trap (Trinat), a magneto-optical trap confines and cools neutral 37K atoms and optical pumping spin-polarizes them. We monitor the nuclear polarization of the same atoms that are decaying in situ by photoionizing a small fraction of the partially polarized atoms and then use the standard optical Bloch equations to model their population distribution. We obtain an average nuclear polarization of \\bar{P}=0.9913+/- 0.0009, which is significantly more precise than previous measurements with this technique. Since our current measurement of the β-asymmetry has 0.2 % statistical uncertainty, the polarization measurement reported here will not limit its overall uncertainty. This result also demonstrates the capability to measure the polarization to \\lt 0.1 % , allowing for a measurement of angular correlation parameters to this level of precision, which would be competitive in searches for new physics.

  14. Instrumentation for time-resolved dynamic and static dichroic measurements of polymers with a near-IR acoustooptic tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweat, Joseph Allen

    1999-11-01

    The optical measurement of the orientational response of chemical functional groups of a polymer as it is subjected to conventional dynamic mechanical analysis can give insight into the rheological behavior of the polymer while under repetitive strain based on the chemical structure. Instrumentation used in the mid infrared has included the use of grating monochromators and interferometers. The use of a multiply modulated optical signal has decreased the level of noise to observe the small amplitude changes (typically >10-3 absorbance units) associated with the repetitive oscillatory strain. The use of digital signal processing to replace phase sensitive detection for demodulation of the optical signal has greatly reduced the spectral collection time. In addition, multiplexing gained with the use of step-scan interferometry in making time resolved measurements has aided in making the procedure more practical. However, instrumental complexity and expense are drawbacks. By incorporating the high throughput, polarized tuned beam, and rapid wavelength switching capability of an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF), a dynamic instrument with integrated centralized control by a single microprocessor has been built. it operates in the near infrared with a rapid dynamic data collection time and requires the use of only a single modulation in the form of the sample oscillatory strain. The near infrared permits thicker samples to reduce sample preparation tune or allows polymers to be tested without pretreatment. The use of Fourier based digital filtering improves the signal to noise ratio of the dynamic differential spectra. The instrument is cost effective and rugged in comparison to step-scan interferometers yet has a rapid data collection rate allowing use in a routine industrial setting. Information from these measurements can aid in determining the rheological properties necessary for the end use functionality of a polymer. Additionally, AOTF instrumentation can be used

  15. Measuring dipolar spin exchanges in ultracold polar KRb molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Steven; Yan, Bo; Gadway, Bryce; Covey, Jacob; Hazzard, Kaden; Rey, Ana Maria; Jin, Deborah; Ye, Jun

    2014-03-01

    By encoding spin in rotational states, we have observed spin exchanges of ultracold polar KRb molecules that are confined in a deep three dimensional optical lattice [Yan et al., Nature 501, 521 (2013)]. The interactions manifest as a density dependent decay of the spin coherence of the system, which is probed via Ramsey spectroscopy. In addition to decaying, there are oscillations in the contrast, with frequency components that are consistent with the dipolar interaction energies. By adding additional pulses, we can suppress pairwise dipolar interactions. We have studied these spin exchanges for two different pairs of rotational states, which differ by a factor of two in interaction strength, and find the decay and oscillations to be roughly twice as fast in the case of stronger interactions. This work lays the foundation for future studies of quantum magnetism with polar molecules in optical lattices. We acknowledge funding from NIST, NSF, DOE, AFOSR-MURI, DARPA, and the NDSEG Graduate Fellowship.

  16. Polarized digital shearography for simultaneous dual shearing directions measurements.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xin; Lee, Cheok Peng; Li, Junrui; Zhang, Boyang; Yang, Lianxiang

    2016-08-01

    The selection of the direction of sensitivity for digital shearography is determined by its shearing direction. As a result, directionally shaped defects could be missed in non-destructive testing using a digital shearography system with only one shearing direction. This paper reports a polarized digital shearography system based on two Mach-Zehnder interferometers, which can create two orthogonal shearing directions and record shearograms in the two orthogonal directions simultaneously. The two shearograms are separated from each other by proper polarization design so that no cross interference occurs. The phase maps of the shearograms are generated by spatial phase shift methods through the introduction of different carrier frequencies in the two orthogonal shearograms and use of the Fourier transform method. This enabled simultaneous dual directional non-destructive testing during continuous loading. Theory derivation, spectrum analysis, and non-destructive testing application results are shown in detail. PMID:27587103

  17. Measurement of the CMB Polarization at 95 GHz from QUIET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buder, Immanuel

    2012-09-01

    (Abridged) Despite the great success of precision cosmology, cosmologists cannot fully explain the initial conditions of the Universe. Inflation, an exponential expansion in the first 10^-36s, is a promising potential explanation. A generic prediction of inflation is odd-parity (B-mode) polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) aimed to limit or detect this polarization. We built a coherent pseudo-correlation microwave polarimeter. An array of mass-produced modules populated the focal plane of a 1.4m telescope. Each module had a sensitivity to polarization of 756muK sqrt{s} with a bandwidth of 10.7+/-1.1 GHz centered at 94.5+/-0.8 GHz; the combined sensitivity was 87+/-7muK sqrt{s}. We incorporated deck rotation, an absorbing ground screen, a new time-stream double-demodulation technique, and optimized optics into the design to reduce instrumental polarization. We observed with this instrument at the Atacama Plateau in Chile between August 2009 and December 2010. We collected 5336.9 hours of CMB observation and 1090 hours of astronomical calibration. This thesis describes the analysis and results of these data. We characterized the instrument using the astronomical calibration data as well as purpose-built artificial sources. We developed noise modeling, filtering, and data selection following a blind-analysis strategy. Central to this strategy was a suite of 32 null tests, each motivated by a possible instrumental problem or systematic effect. We also evaluated the systematic errors in the blind stage of the analysis before the result was known. We then calculated the CMB power spectra using a pseudo-Cl cross-correlation technique that suppressed contamination and made the result insensitive to noise bias.

  18. Study of the mesosphere using wide-field twilight polarization measurements: Early results beyond the polar circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolnikov, O. S.; Kozelov, B. V.

    2016-07-01

    This paper discusses the results of early measurements of temperature and dust in the mesosphere on the basis of wide-field twilight sky polarimetry, which began in 2015 in Apatity (North of Russia, 67.6° N, 33.4° E) using the original entire-sky camera. These measurements have been performed for the first time beyond the Polar Circle in the winter and early spring period. The general polarization properties of the twilight sky and the procedure for identifying single scattering are described. The key results of the study include the Boltzmann temperature values at altitudes higher than 70 km and the conclusion on a weak effect of dust on scattering properties of the mesosphere during this period.

  19. Dielectric properties measurement method in the microwave frequencies range for non-polar/polar liquid mixtures characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Ienciu, M.; Surducan, V.; Limare, A.; Fourel, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a method based on dielectric properties measurements over a large spectrum of frequencies, in the microwave (MW) domain, in order to characterize a liquid mixture. The liquid mixtures consist of non-polar fluids (silicone oil, diesel fuel) and polar additives, in order to increase the specific MW absorption of the mixture for further MW power processing. We have measured the MW specific absorptions for mixtures of silicone oil with 20% and 30% (w/w) isopropanol. In both cases, the mixtures are sufficiently stable over time to allow further studies of thermal convection dynamics initiated by MW heating. For a mixture of diesel fuel with 10% (w/w) alkyl polyglycoside, the main observation was that its MW specific absorption varies over time after the mechanical mixing process.

  20. A Measurement of the Recoil Polarization of Electroproduced {Lambda}(1116)

    SciTech Connect

    Simeon McAleer

    2002-01-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory was used to study the reaction e + p {yields} e{prime} + K{sup +} + {Lambda}(1116) for events where {Lambda}(1116) subsequently decayed via the channel {Lambda}(1116) {yields} p + {pi}{sup -}. Data were taken at incident electron beam energies of 2.5, 4.0, and 4.2 GeV during the 1999 E1C run period. They hyperon production spectra span the Q{sup 2} range from 0.5 to 2.8 GeV{sup 2} and nearly the entire range in the center of mass angles. The proton angular distribution in the {Lambda}(1116) rest frame is used to deduce the recoil polarization of the hyperon, and the W and cos {theta}{sub cm}{sup K+} dependence of the recoil polarization will be presented. The data show sizeable negative polarizations for the {Lambda}(1116) as a function of both cos {theta}{sub cm}{sup K+} and W.

  1. Measurements of VLF polarization and wave normal direction on OGO-F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helliwell, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A major achievement of the F-24 experiment on OGO 6 was a verification of the theory of the polarization of proton whistlers. As predicted, the electron whistler was found to be right-hand polarized and the proton whistler left hand polarized. The transition from right- to left-hand polarization was found to occur very rapidly. Thus it appears that the experimental technique may allow great accuracy in the measurement of the cross-over frequency, a frequency that provides information on the ionic composition of the ionosphere.

  2. Mesosphere light scattering depolarization during the Perseids activity epoch by wide-angle polarization camera measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolnikov, Oleg S.; Maslov, Igor A.

    2014-03-01

    The paper describes the study of scattered radiation field in the mesosphere basing on wide-angle polarization camera (WAPC) measurements of the twilight sky background and single scattering separation procedure. Mid-August observations in 2012 and 2013 show the decrease of single scattering polarization value probably related with Perseids meteor dust moderation in the upper mesosphere. Effect correlates with activity of tiny fraction of Perseids shower. Polarization and temperature analysis allows estimating the altitude of dust layer and character polarization of dust scattering.

  3. Measurement of the correlation between electron spin and photon linear polarization in atomic-field bremsstrahlung.

    PubMed

    Tashenov, S; Bäck, T; Barday, R; Cederwall, B; Enders, J; Khaplanov, A; Poltoratska, Yu; Schässburger, K-U; Surzhykov, A

    2011-10-21

    Atomic-field bremsstrahlung has been studied with a longitudinally polarized electron beam. The correlation between the initial orientation of the electron spin and the angle of photon polarization has been measured at the photon high energy tip region. In the time reversal this corresponds to a so-far unobserved phenomenon of production of longitudinally polarized electrons by photoionization of unpolarized atoms with linearly polarized photons. The results confirm the fully relativistic calculations for radiative recombination and suggest a new method for electron beam polarimetry. PMID:22107514

  4. Measured results of polarization crosstalk cancellation using LMS control. [Least Mean Square

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, C. A.; Rassweiler, G. G.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of wideband decoupling networks for the cancellation of polarization crosstalk in dual-polarized communication links. Measured cancellation performance for an all-electronic IF network and an RF electro-mechanical waveguide network are presented. Each of these networks utilizes LMS-type adaptive control techniques to adjust the cancellation network.

  5. Orbital-phase-resolved Spectroscopy of the Intermediate Polar FO Aqr Using XMM-Newton Observatory Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekön, Y.; Balman, Ş.

    2012-08-01

    We present the orbital-phase-resolved analysis of an archival FO Aqr observation obtained using the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission, European Photon Imaging Camera (pn instrument). We investigate the variation of the spin pulse amplitudes over the orbital period in order to account for the effects of orbital motion on spin modulation. The semi-amplitude variations are in phase with the orbital modulation, changing from (38.0 ± 1.8)% at the orbital maximum to (13.3 ± 3.7)% at the orbital minimum. The spectral parameters also show changes over the orbital period. One of the absorption components increase by a factor of five between the orbital minimum and maximum. We interpret that this absorption arises from the bulge where accretion stream from the secondary impacts the disk. The spectrum extracted from the orbital minima and maxima can be fitted with a warm absorber model yielding values N H = 2.09+0.98 -1.09 × 1022 and 0.56+0.26 -0.15 × 1022 cm-2 and log(ξ) = 0.23+0.37 -0.26 and <0.30 erg cm s-1, respectively, indicating the existence of ionized absorption from the bulge at the impact zone which is spread out on the disk. The absorption due to accretion curtain and/or column which causes the spin modulation can be distinguished from the disk absorption via spectral modeling.

  6. Measuring underwater polarization field from above-water hyperspectral instrumentation for water composition retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmel, T.; Tonizzo, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Gilerson, A.; Chowdhary, J.; Ahmed, S.

    2011-11-01

    Increasing efforts are devoted by the Ocean Color Radiometry community to explore the polarization features of the underwater light field in order to enhance possibilities for retrieving inherent optical properties (IOPs) of coastal waters. New instrumentations and data inversion algorithms are being developed to take into account the supplementary information contained in polarization data. However, estimating the Stokes vector components of the polarized water radiance from above water measurements is a challenging task, mainly because of their small magnitude and the strong contamination by the polarized sky light reflected from the sea surface. In this study, above-water measurements are used to assess the feasibility of such retrievals and their utility for retrieving IOPs. The Long Island Sound Coastal Observational platform (LISCO) near Northport, NY, was established in October 2009 to support satellite data validation. In June 2010, three customized hyperspectral HyperSAS systems (HyperSAS-POL) were added to LISCO platform enabling polarization measurements. A data processing algorithm, which includes vector radiative transfer computations, was developed and used to remove the polarization signal due to sky light reflected from the sea surface (sky glint) and derive the underwater polarization field. The spectral shape of the retrieved underwater degree of polarization was then evaluated against theoretical radiative transfer computations and in situ underwater measurements. The results confirmed the validity of the polarization measurements by the LISCO site, thus validating a continuous time series starting from the beginning of June 2010 to the present which can be used for retrievals of IOPs from polarization measurements.

  7. [Analysis of Polarization Characteristics of Wheat and Maize Crops Using Land-Based Remote Sensing Measurements].

    PubMed

    Sid'ko, A F; Botvich, I Yu; Pisman, T I; Shevyrnogov, A P

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents analysis of a study of the polarized component of the reflectance factor (Rq) and the degree of polarization (P) of wheat and maize crops depending on the wavelength. Registration of polarization characteristics was carried out in the field from the elevated work platform at heights of 10 to 18 m in June and July. Measurements were performed using a double-beam spectrophotometer with a polarized light filter attachment, within the spectral range from 400 to 820-nm. The viewing angle was no greater than 20 degree with respect to the nadir. The reflection spectra of wheat and maize crops obtained using a polarizer adjusted to transmit the maximum and minimum amounts of light (R(max) and R(min)) were studied. Based on these reflection spectra polarization characteristics, which. differ in the visible and infrared spectral region, were determined and analyzed. PMID:26394482

  8. Versatile attosecond beamline in a two-foci configuration for simultaneous time-resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Locher, R.; Lucchini, M. Herrmann, J.; Sabbar, M.; Weger, M.; Ludwig, A.; Gallmann, L.; Keller, U.; Castiglioni, L.; Greif, M.; Hengsberger, M.

    2014-01-15

    We present our attoline which is a versatile attosecond beamline at the Ultrafast Laser Physics Group at ETH Zurich for attosecond spectroscopy in a variety of targets. High-harmonic generation (HHG) in noble gases with an infrared (IR) driving field is employed to generate pulses in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral regime for XUV-IR cross-correlation measurements. The IR pulse driving the HHG and the pulse involved in the measurements are used in a non-collinear set-up that gives independent access to the different beams. Single attosecond pulses are generated with the polarization gating technique and temporally characterized with attosecond streaking. This attoline contains two target chambers that can be operated simultaneously. A toroidal mirror relay-images the focus from the first chamber into the second one. In the first interaction region a dedicated double-target allows for a simple change between photoelectron/photoion measurements with a time-of-flight spectrometer and transient absorption experiments. Any end station can occupy the second interaction chamber. A surface analysis chamber containing a hemispherical electron analyzer was employed to demonstrate successful operation. Simultaneous RABBITT measurements in two argon jets were recorded for this purpose.

  9. Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance measurements in fluorescence yield

    SciTech Connect

    Marcham, M. K.; Keatley, P. S.; Neudert, A.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Shelford, L. R.; van der Laan, G.; Telling, N. D.; Childress, J. R.; Katine, J. A.; Shafer, P.; Arenholz, E.

    2010-10-14

    Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance (XFMR) has been measured in fluorescence yield, extending the application of XFMR to opaque samples on opaque substrates. Magnetization dynamics were excited in a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5) bilayer by means of a continuous wave microwave excitation, while x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra were measured stroboscopically at different points in the precession cycle. By tuning the x-ray energy to the L{sub 3} edges of Ni and Fe, the dependence of the real and imaginary components of the element specific magnetic susceptibility on the strength of an externally applied static bias field was determined. First results from measurements on a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5)/Dy(1) sample confirm that enhanced damping results from the addition of the Dy cap.

  10. A microreactor array for spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity for high-throughput catalysis science

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratyuk, Petro; Gumuslu, Gamze; Shukla, Shantanu; Miller, James B; Morreale, Bryan D; Gellman, Andrew J

    2013-04-01

    We describe a 100 channel microreactor array capable of spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity across the surface of a flat substrate. When used in conjunction with a composition spread alloy film (CSAF, e.g. Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y}) across which component concentrations vary smoothly, such measurements permit high-throughput analysis of catalytic activity and selectivity as a function of catalyst composition. In the reported implementation, the system achieves spatial resolution of 1 mm{sup 2} over a 10×10 mm{sup 2} area. During operation, the reactant gases are delivered at constant flow rate to 100 points of differing composition on the CSAF surface by means of a 100-channel microfluidic device. After coming into contact with the CSAF catalyst surface, the product gas mixture from each of the 100 points is withdrawn separately through a set of 100 isolated channels for analysis using a mass spectrometer. We demonstrate the operation of the device on a Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} CSAF catalyzing the H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange reaction at 333 K. In essentially a single experiment, we measured the catalytic activity over a broad swathe of concentrations from the ternary composition space of the Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} alloy.

  11. Multiplexed measurements by time resolved spectroscopy using colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, U.; Jimenez de Aberasturi, D.; Malinowski, R.; Amin, F.; Parak, W. J.; Heimbrodt, W.

    2014-01-01

    Multiplexed measurements of analytes in parallel is a topical demand in bioanalysis and bioimaging. An interesting alternative to commonly performed spectral multiplexing is lifetime multiplexing. In this Letter, we present a proof of principle of single-color lifetime multiplexing by coupling the same fluorophore to different nanoparticles. The effective lifetime of the fluorophores can be tuned by more than one order of magnitude due to resonance energy transfer from donor states. Measurements have been done on a model systems consisting of ATTO-590 dye molecules linked to either gold particles or to CdSe/ZnS core shell quantum dots. Both systems show the same luminescence spectrum of ATTO-590 dye emission in continuous wave excitation, but can be distinguished by means of time resolved measurements. The dye molecules bound to gold particles exhibit a mono-exponential decay with a lifetime of 4.5 ns, whereas the dye molecules bound to CdSe/ZnS dots show a nonexponential decay with a slow component of about 135 ns due to the energy transfer from the quantum dots. We demonstrate the fundamental possibility to determine the mixing ratio for dyes with equal luminescence spectra but very different transients. This opens up a pathway independent of the standard optical multiplexing with many different fluorophores emitting from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared spectral region.

  12. Multiplexed measurements by time resolved spectroscopy using colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, U.; Jimenez de Aberasturi, D.; Malinowski, R.; Amin, F.; Parak, W. J.; Heimbrodt, W.

    2014-01-27

    Multiplexed measurements of analytes in parallel is a topical demand in bioanalysis and bioimaging. An interesting alternative to commonly performed spectral multiplexing is lifetime multiplexing. In this Letter, we present a proof of principle of single-color lifetime multiplexing by coupling the same fluorophore to different nanoparticles. The effective lifetime of the fluorophores can be tuned by more than one order of magnitude due to resonance energy transfer from donor states. Measurements have been done on a model systems consisting of ATTO-590 dye molecules linked to either gold particles or to CdSe/ZnS core shell quantum dots. Both systems show the same luminescence spectrum of ATTO-590 dye emission in continuous wave excitation, but can be distinguished by means of time resolved measurements. The dye molecules bound to gold particles exhibit a mono-exponential decay with a lifetime of 4.5 ns, whereas the dye molecules bound to CdSe/ZnS dots show a nonexponential decay with a slow component of about 135 ns due to the energy transfer from the quantum dots. We demonstrate the fundamental possibility to determine the mixing ratio for dyes with equal luminescence spectra but very different transients. This opens up a pathway independent of the standard optical multiplexing with many different fluorophores emitting from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared spectral region.

  13. Time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters by means of triple probe

    SciTech Connect

    Qayyum, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Deeba, Farah; Ali, Rafaqat; Hussain, S.

    2013-12-15

    Triple Langmuir probe (TLP) diagnostic system with its necessary driving circuit is developed and successfully applies for time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters in the negative glow region of pulsating-dc discharge. This technique allows the instantaneous measurement of electron temperature [T{sub −}], electron number density [n{sub −}] as well as plasma fluctuations without any voltage or frequency sweep. In TLP configuration two probes are differentially biased and serve as a floating symmetric double probe whereas the third probe is simply floating into plasma to measure floating potential as a function of time and thus incorporates the effect of plasma fluctuations. As an example of the application to time-dependent plasmas, basic plasma parameters such as floating potential, electron temperature, and electron number density in low pressure air discharge are determined as a function of time for different fill pressure. The results demonstrate temporal evolution of plasma parameters and thus plasma generation progression for different fill pressures.

  14. Polarization measurement of Iron L-shell lines on EBIT-I

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Beiersdorfer, P; Robbins, D; Smith, A J; Gu, M F

    2004-03-03

    We report measurements of the line polarization of Ne-like and F-like of iron n=3 to n=2 transitions in the x-ray region. We used the ''two-crystal technique'' developed in previous polarization measurements in our laboratory. Preliminary results from our measurements are presented together with the theoretical calculations using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC). Our calculations show that contributions from cascades play an important role in the polarization calculations of most of the transitions. The uncertainties and difficulties of our experiments are also discussed.

  15. Measurement of Electron Beam Polarization from Unstrained Bulk GaAs via Two Photon Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    J L McCarter, T J Gay, J Hansknecht, M Poelker, M L Stutzman

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes measurements of the beam polarization and quantum efficiency for photoemission using two-photon excitation from unstrained bulk GaAs illuminated with pulsed, high intensity 1560nm laser light. Quantum efficiency is linearly proportional to 1560nm peak laser intensity, which was varied in three independent ways, indicating that the emitted electrons are promoted from the valence to the conduction band via two-photon absorption. Beam polarization was measured using a microMott polarimeter, with a value of 16.8(4)% polarization at 1560nm, which is roughly half the measured value of 33.4(8)% using 778 nm light.

  16. ORBITAL-PHASE-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE INTERMEDIATE POLAR FO AQR USING XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATORY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Pekoen, Y.; Balman, S. E-mail: solen@astroa.physics.metu.edu.tr

    2012-08-15

    We present the orbital-phase-resolved analysis of an archival FO Aqr observation obtained using the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission, European Photon Imaging Camera (pn instrument). We investigate the variation of the spin pulse amplitudes over the orbital period in order to account for the effects of orbital motion on spin modulation. The semi-amplitude variations are in phase with the orbital modulation, changing from (38.0 {+-} 1.8)% at the orbital maximum to (13.3 {+-} 3.7)% at the orbital minimum. The spectral parameters also show changes over the orbital period. One of the absorption components increase by a factor of five between the orbital minimum and maximum. We interpret that this absorption arises from the bulge where accretion stream from the secondary impacts the disk. The spectrum extracted from the orbital minima and maxima can be fitted with a warm absorber model yielding values N{sub H} = 2.09{sup +0.98}{sub -1.09} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} and 0.56{sup +0.26}{sub -0.15} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}; and log({xi}) = 0.23{sup +0.37}{sub -0.26} and <0.30 erg cm s{sup -1}, respectively, indicating the existence of ionized absorption from the bulge at the impact zone which is spread out on the disk. The absorption due to accretion curtain and/or column which causes the spin modulation can be distinguished from the disk absorption via spectral modeling.

  17. Measures of health sciences journal use: a comparison of vendor, link-resolver, and local citation statistics*

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Sandra L.; Blecic, Deborah D.; Martin, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Libraries require efficient and reliable methods to assess journal use. Vendors provide complete counts of articles retrieved from their platforms. However, if a journal is available on multiple platforms, several sets of statistics must be merged. Link-resolver reports merge data from all platforms into one report but only record partial use because users can access library subscriptions from other paths. Citation data are limited to publication use. Vendor, link-resolver, and local citation data were examined to determine correlation. Because link-resolver statistics are easy to obtain, the study library especially wanted to know if they correlate highly with the other measures. Methods: Vendor, link-resolver, and local citation statistics for the study institution were gathered for health sciences journals. Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients were calculated. Results: There was a high positive correlation between all three data sets, with vendor data commonly showing the highest use. However, a small percentage of titles showed anomalous results. Discussion and Conclusions: Link-resolver data correlate well with vendor and citation data, but due to anomalies, low link-resolver data would best be used to suggest titles for further evaluation using vendor data. Citation data may not be needed as it correlates highly with other measures. PMID:23646026

  18. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690cm(-1)) the CO stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c<50μgml(-1)) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c⩾50μgml(-1)) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18cm(-1), indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed. PMID:25498816

  19. Measuring polarization of interstellar dust: a modulator for the PILOT experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salatino, M.; de Bernardis, P.; Iacoangeli, A.; Masi, S.; Pimentão, J.; Bernard, J.-P.

    Precise measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP) require improved knowledge of its foregrounds, in order to remove them from the cosmological signal. Among the foregrounds, the polarization from interstellar dust dominates at frequencies higher than 100 GHz. One way to measure the linear polarization of interstellar dust requires a rotating Half Wave Plate (HWP), at cryogenic temperatures, followed by a fixed polarizer. We present the design of a cryogenic polarization modulator in which the rotation of the cold birefringent crystal is driven by a DC motor running at room temperature, and the control of its position is assured by a system of optical fibers. The modulator is optimized to be implemented in PILOT, a stratospheric balloon which in the near future will study the interstellar medium in two bands around 545 and 1250 GHz. Mechanical, optical and cryogenic tests are also discussed.

  20. Time-resolved double-slit interference pattern measurement with entangled photons

    PubMed Central

    Kolenderski, Piotr; Scarcella, Carmelo; Johnsen, Kelsey D.; Hamel, Deny R.; Holloway, Catherine; Shalm, Lynden K.; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Resch, Kevin J.; Jennewein, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The double-slit experiment strikingly demonstrates the wave-particle duality of quantum objects. In this famous experiment, particles pass one-by-one through a pair of slits and are detected on a distant screen. A distinct wave-like pattern emerges after many discrete particle impacts as if each particle is passing through both slits and interfering with itself. Here we present a temporally- and spatially-resolved measurement of the double-slit interference pattern using single photons. We send single photons through a birefringent double-slit apparatus and use a linear array of single-photon detectors to observe the developing interference pattern. The analysis of the buildup allows us to compare quantum mechanics and the corpuscular model, which aims to explain the mystery of single-particle interference. Finally, we send one photon from an entangled pair through our double-slit setup and show the dependence of the resulting interference pattern on the twin photon's measured state. Our results provide new insight into the dynamics of the buildup process in the double-slit experiment, and can be used as a valuable resource in quantum information applications. PMID:24770360

  1. Time-resolved double-slit interference pattern measurement with entangled photons.

    PubMed

    Kolenderski, Piotr; Scarcella, Carmelo; Johnsen, Kelsey D; Hamel, Deny R; Holloway, Catherine; Shalm, Lynden K; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Resch, Kevin J; Jennewein, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The double-slit experiment strikingly demonstrates the wave-particle duality of quantum objects. In this famous experiment, particles pass one-by-one through a pair of slits and are detected on a distant screen. A distinct wave-like pattern emerges after many discrete particle impacts as if each particle is passing through both slits and interfering with itself. Here we present a temporally- and spatially-resolved measurement of the double-slit interference pattern using single photons. We send single photons through a birefringent double-slit apparatus and use a linear array of single-photon detectors to observe the developing interference pattern. The analysis of the buildup allows us to compare quantum mechanics and the corpuscular model, which aims to explain the mystery of single-particle interference. Finally, we send one photon from an entangled pair through our double-slit setup and show the dependence of the resulting interference pattern on the twin photon's measured state. Our results provide new insight into the dynamics of the buildup process in the double-slit experiment, and can be used as a valuable resource in quantum information applications. PMID:24770360

  2. On the Application of Compressed Sensing to Non-Time-Resolved PIV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Eric; Davis, Timothy; Cattafesta, Louis; Alvi, Farrukh

    2014-11-01

    Temporally resolved, full-field flow measurements are still impractical for most flows of interest. Fortunately, the spectral content of many flows can be described in a low dimensional space. This sparsity has inspired the recent adaptation of compressed sensing into the fluid mechanics community as a method for reconstructing spectral content of sub-Nyquist sampled data (arXiv:1401.7047). We apply this method to the analysis of several example fluid flow data sets, varying in spectral content. These data sets include the measured flow about a high-lift airfoil, an impinging jet, and a zero-net mass-flux (ZNMF) actuator. The Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is applied to the random PIV snapshots and we apply Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) to approximate the discrete Fourier transform of the POD coefficients. Additionally, reconstruction parameters are varied for to examine criteria regarding the probability of a successful reconstruction versus the degree of spectral sparsity. The advantages and restrictions of this method are discussed. This work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientic Research (Grant FA9550-09-1-0257), monitored by Dr. Doug Smith, and the Florida Center for Advanced Aero-Propulsion.

  3. Modified cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor frequency assay by measuring released europium in a time resolved fluorometer.

    PubMed

    Haque, K; Truman, C; Dittmer, I; Laundy, G; Denning-Kendall, P; Hows, J; Feest, T; Bradley, B

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors (CTLpf) can be quantified by using the principle of limiting dilution analysis (LDA). Chromium 51 (51Cr) and europium (Eu) release assays are based on the measurement of marker release after lysis of targets by the effector cells. Although, 51Cr release has been widely used to quantify cell lysis since its introduction, it has several disadvantages such as handling and disposal of radioisotopes as well as health risk to personnel involved performing the assay. This situation has led us to adopt a non-radioactive cytotoxicity assay. After 7 days culture the PHA-stimulated targets are labeled with europium DTPA chelate. Lysis of labeled targets by effectors releases the Eu-DTPA complex in culture medium--a highly fluorescent substance. The amount of fluorescence can be measured in a time resolved fluorometer. We describe here some modifications of the original protocol which include optimising IL-2 requirements, reduction of incubation times, addition of an extra spin before 37 degrees C incubation, readjustment of target cells per volume of labeling buffer and other crucial parameters increasing the specificity and sensitivity of CTLpf assay. We are in agreement with others that the Eu-release assay is specific and reproducible. It can be used for the CTLpf estimation as well as other T cell and non-T cell cytotoxicity assays. PMID:9090438

  4. Spatially resolved measurements of charge carrier lifetimes in CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, C.; Hempel, H.; Buschmann, V.; Siebert, T.; Heisler, C.; Wesch, W.; Ronning, C.

    2013-03-01

    The lifetime of the minority charge carriers in polycrystalline Cadmium Telluride (pc-CdTe) for solar cell applications is a crucial material parameter and has been determined by analysis of the decay curves of the luminescence signal. Both the lateral and the transversal distributions of the carrier lifetime on the surface and in the bulk of pc-CdTe material as well as the respective solar cell characteristics were measured as a function of the deposition technique, the activation treatment, and the incorporation of additional group-V elements. The results are compared to prior studies. It was found that an activation process passivates grain boundaries and increases the carrier lifetime, which is then higher at the pn-junction than at the surface. Furthermore, nitrogen and phosphorus doping of the CdTe absorber material influences the charge carrier lifetime. The results show that the spatial resolved measurement of the carrier lifetime in pc-CdTe gives an important insight to the charge carrier dynamics of the material.

  5. Time-resolved Measurements of ICF Capsule Ablator Properties by Streaked X-Ray Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Damien

    2008-11-01

    Determining the capsule ablator thickness and peak laser or x-ray drive pressure required to optimize fuel compression is a critical part of ensuring ICF ignition on the NIF. If too little ablator is burned off, the implosion velocity will be too low for adequate final compression; if too much ablator is burned off, the fuel will be preheated or the shell will be broken up by growth of hydrodynamic instabilities, again compromising compression. Avoiding such failure modes requires having an accurate, in-flight measure of the implosion velocity, areal density, and remaining mass of the ablator near peak velocity. We present a new technique which achieves simultaneous time-resolved measurements of all these parameters in a single, area-backlit, x-ray streaked radiograph. This is accomplished by tomographic inversion of the radiograph to determine the radial density profile at each time step; scalar quantities such as the average position, areal density, and mass of the ablator can then be calculated by taking moments of this density profile. Details of the successful demonstration of this technique using backlit Cu-doped Be capsule implosions at the Omega facility will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S.Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and in collaboration with Brian Spears, David Braun, Peter Celliers, Gilbert Collins, and Otto Landen at LLNL and Rick Olson at SNL.

  6. Assessment of diesel engine condition using time resolved measurements and signal processing. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.E.

    1996-09-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to access methods of detecting, and localizing faults in a diesel engine. A three cylinder, two stroke Detroit 3-53 engine was heavily instrumented for time resolved measurements. In particular, a 3,600 count per revolution optical encoder was used along with accelerometers mounted on various engine structures, in-cylinder pressure measurements and a variety of steady state sensors, such as exhaust temperatures. A large number of baseline data were taken to establish the statistical characteristics on the signals from the engine. These runs were followed by a series of experiments where the cylinder head assembly bolt torque were varied parametrically. Standard spectral analysis and Joint Time Frequency Analysis (JTFA) were used to identify the fundamental vibration characteristics of the engine. The vibration frequencies were checked for consistency against first order models of the engine assembly and reasonable agreement was found. In addition, a new technique for accessing engine health using time of arrival of encoder signals was investigated.

  7. Correlation of phase resolved current, emission and surface charge measurements in an atmospheric pressure helium jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerling, Torsten; Wild, Robert; Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Wilke, Christian; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Stollenwerk, Lars

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet with two different surfaces (conducting and dielectric) is investigated using a setup with two ring electrodes around a dielectric capillary. For diagnostics, phase resolved ICCD-imaging, current measurements and surface charge measurements are applied. The results show the correlation of plasma dynamics with the deposition of surface charge and electrical current signals. Further, the influence of the distance between surface and jet capillary on the surface charge distribution is presented. A complex discharge dynamic is found with a dielectric barrier discharge between the ring electrodes and back-and-forth bullet propagation outside the capillary. A conducting channel connecting the jet nozzle and the surface is found. This correlates well with the observed charge exchange on the surface. The number of formed channels and the average deposited charge density on the surface is found to be strongly sensitive to the jet distance from the surface. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  8. Spatially resolved two-color diffusion measurements in human skin applied to transdermal liposome penetration.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Kubiak, Jakub; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2013-05-01

    A multiphoton excitation-based fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method, Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), was used to measure the local diffusion coefficients of distinct model fluorescent substances in excised human skin. In combination with structural information obtained by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy imaging, the acquired diffusion information was processed to construct spatially resolved diffusion maps at different depths of the stratum corneum (SC). Experiments using amphiphilic and hydrophilic fluorescently labeled molecules show that their diffusion in SC is very heterogeneous on a microscopic scale. This diffusion-based strategy was further exploited to investigate the integrity of liposomes during transdermal penetration. Specifically, the diffusion of dual-color fluorescently labeled liposomes--containing an amphiphilic fluorophore in the lipid bilayer and a hydrophilic fluorophore encapsulated in the liposome lumen--was measured using cross-correlation RICS. This type of experiment allows discrimination between separate (uncorrelated) and joint (correlated) diffusion of the two different fluorescent probes, giving information about liposome integrity. Independent of the liposome composition (phospholipids or transfersomes), our results show a clear lack of cross-correlation below the skin surface, indicating that the penetration of intact liposomes is highly compromised by the skin barrier. PMID:23223136

  9. Time-resolved subtraction method for measuring optical properties of turbid media.

    PubMed

    Milej, Daniel; Abdalmalak, Androu; Janusek, Dariusz; Diop, Mamadou; Liebert, Adam; St Lawrence, Keith

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy is a noninvasive optical method used primarily to monitor tissue oxygenation due to the absorption properties of hemoglobin. Accurate estimation of hemoglobin concentrations and other light absorbers requires techniques that can separate the effect of absorption from the much greater effect of light scattering. One of the most advanced methods is time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS), which measures the absorption and scattering coefficients of a turbid medium by modeling the recorded distribution time of flight of photons. A challenge with TR-NIRS is that it requires accurate characterization of the dispersion caused by the system. In this study, we present a method for circumventing this problem by applying statistical moment analysis to two time-of-flight distributions measured at separated source-detector distances. Simulations based on analytical models and Monte Carlo code, and tissue-mimicking phantoms, were used to demonstrate its accuracy for source-detector distances typically used in neuroimaging applications. The simplicity of the approach is well suited to real-time applications requiring accurate quantification of the optical properties of a turbid medium. PMID:26974605

  10. Highly resolved measurements of atmospheric turbulence with the new 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeromin, A.; Schaffarczyk, A. P.; Puczylowski, J.; Peinke, J.; Hölling, M.

    2014-12-01

    For the investigation of atmospheric turbulent flows on small scales a new anemometer was developed, the so-called 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-ALCA). It performs highly resolved measurements with a spatial resolution in millimeter range and temporal resolution in kHz range, thus detecting very small turbulent structures. The anemometer is a redesign of the successfully operating 2d-LCA for laboratory application. The new device was designed to withstand hostile operating environments (rain and saline, humid air). In February 2012, the 2d-ALCA was used for the first time in a test field. The device was mounted in about 53 m above ground level on a lattice tower near the German North Sea coast. Wind speed was measured by the 2d-ALCA at 10 kHz sampling rate and by cup anemometers at 1 Hz. The instantaneous wind speed ranged from 8 m/s to 19 m/s at an average turbulence level of about 7 %. Wind field characteristics were analyzed based on cup anemometer as well as 2d-ALCA. The combination of both devices allowed the study of atmospheric turbulence over several magnitudes in turbulent scales.

  11. Time-resolved measurement of pressure evolution in underwater nanosecond discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Ilya; Guaitella, Olivier; Starikovskaia, Svetlana; Rousseau, Antoine

    2012-10-01

    Electrical discharges in water and other dielectric liquids have been extensively studied since almost fifty years, however reliable data on plasma parameters within the propagation phase is still missing. We report on shadowgraphic imaging and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) both with nanosecond time resolution of pulsed nanosecond discharge generated with point to wire electrode configuration. High voltage pulses of 10 kV and 30 ns duration (FWHM) are delivered by commercial pulse generator FPG 10 (FIG GmbH). Sub-millimeter discharge with filamentary structure develops at 50 km/s in axial direction of pin electrode. Using Hugoniot equations maximal discharge pressure at ignition can be obtained from shock wave front velocity. Analytical model of supersonic cavity expansion based on Kirkwood-Bethe approximation gives discharge pressure evolution from experimentally measured discharge channel expansion velocity profile. Thus, the pressure of 5 GPa is measured at the discharge ignition and drops drastically by the end of voltage pulse. Time-resolved OES spectrum shows a strong broadening of atomic Hydrogen (Balmer series) and oxygen (OI 777 nm) lines with almost continuum emission in the region 300-700 nm. Complex Hα and OI 777 profiles are due to combined contribution of Van Der Waals and Stark broadening. Electronic density can be deduced from lorentzian fit of Stark broadening and gives for electronic density 10^24 - 10^25 m-3.

  12. Velocity measurements in a thermoacoustic refrigerator using Time-Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Poignand, Gaelle; Berson, Arganthael; Jondeau, Emmanuel

    2011-11-01

    A standing-wave thermoacoustic refrigerator consists of a stack of plates placed in an acoustic resonator with two heat exchangers located at each end of the stack. The full understanding of the heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers of thermoacoustic systems is a key issue to improve the global efficiency of such devices. The aim of this work is to investigate the generation of vortices near the ends of the stack, which affects heat transfer. The aerodynamic field in the gap between the stack and the heat exchanger is characterized using a time-resolved particle image velocimetry technique. Measurements are performed in a standing-wave refrigerator operating at a frequency of 200 Hz. Instantaneous velocity fields are recorded at a frequency of 3125 Hz (i.e. 15 velocity fields per acoustic period). Measurements show that vortex shedding occurs at high pressure levels, when the nonlinear acoustic regime prevails and they validate previous experiments [Berson & Blanc-Benon, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 2007, 122(4), EL122-127]. The increased viscous dissipation generates additional heating and a loss of efficiency.

  13. Supercontinuum based absorption spectrometer for cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements in a rapid compression machine.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Kleindienst, Stefan; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-06-10

    A broadband supercontinuum (SC) based absorption spectrometer capable of cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements at internal combustion (IC) engine conditions is presented. Three parameters, temperature, pressure and water mole fraction, were extracted from broadband near-infrared H2O absorption spectra, spanning the wavelength-range from 1340 to 1405.5 nm, which exhibits a large number of specific H2O transitions. The spectrometer is based on spatial domain detection and features a near-infrared line scan camera as a detector. Measurements were performed during a compression cycle of a rapid compression machine comprising a pressure and temperature range from 2.5 to 65 bar and 300 to 900 K, respectively. With the new spectrometer, we are for the first time, based on the authors' knowledge, able to perform measurements based on SC radiation over a complete compression and expansion stroke at measurement rates up to 50 kHz. A detailed overview is provided about the best match algorithm between theory and experiments, including parameters from two different spectral databases, namely the Barber-Tennyson database (BT2) and HITRAN2012. The results indicate that spectral broadening effects are not properly described by theory, especially at pressure levels exceeding 20 bar, which culminates in a clear underestimation of the derived pressure data by SC absorption spectroscopy. Nevertheless, temperature can be determined accurately by performing a three-parameter fit based on water mole fraction, temperature, and pressure. In contrast, making use of pressure transducer data as look-up values and varying only temperature and H2O mole fraction to find the best match leads to a clear overestimation of temperature at elevated pressures. PMID:27409013

  14. Development of Neutron Polarization Measurement System for Studying NN interaction in Nuclear Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, J.; Wakasa, T.; Dozono, M.; Fukunaga, T.; Gotanda, S.; Hatanaka, K.; Kanaya, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Miki, K.; Nishio, Y.; Noro, T.; Ohnaka, K.; Sakaguchi, S.; Sakemi, Y.; Sekiguchi, K.; Tamii, A.; Taguchi, T.; Wada, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We have developed the neutron polarization measurement system to perform the first polarization-transfer measurement for the exclusive (p,np) reaction. For the neutron polarization measurement, we have reconstructed the neutron polarimeter NPOL3. The NPOL3 system has been calibrated by using the polarized neutron from the 2H(p→,n→) reaction, and the resulting effective analyzing power is Ay:eff = 0.127. For the exclusive measurement, the Large Acceptance Spectrometer (LAS) has been used for the recoil proton detection. The energy resolution of 6 MeV is achieved for separation energy, which is sufficient to separate the 1s and 1p orbits for light nuclei.

  15. Measurements of the Polarization Properties of Foam Materials Useful for mm-wave Polarimeters Windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, G.; Marchetti, T.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.

    2016-08-01

    We have measured in the W-band, using a custom setup, the absorption and polarization properties in transmission of foam materials (elyfoamⓇ, styrodurⓇ, plastazoteⓇ, and propozoteⓇ) useful for windows of mm-wave photometers and polarimeters. The levels of the induced polarization degree and of the absorption are very small, and difficult to measure accurately. We find induced polarization degrees lower than 0.6 %, and transmissions higher than 97 % for few centimeter thicknesses of our samples. We describe the instrumental setup, the measurements, and the impact of our findings in the design of precision polarimeters for Cosmic Microwave Background measurements. All these materials, with the exception of black plastazoteⓇ, feature transmissions higher than 99 %, and induced polarizations lower than ˜1 % for sample thicknesses around 2-3 cm.

  16. Near-Polar Cratered Cones on Mars: MOLA Measurements and Implications for Volcanic Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.

    1999-03-01

    MOLA topographic cross-sections indicate that martian near-polar cratered cones and pitted domes are geometrically similar to low-relief lava shield volcanoes. Measured geometry parameters suggest that they are not hydromagmatic, and are geologically recent.

  17. Measurements of the Polarization Properties of Foam Materials Useful for mm-wave Polarimeters Windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, G.; Marchetti, T.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.

    2016-04-01

    We have measured in the W-band, using a custom setup, the absorption and polarization properties in transmission of foam materials (elyfoamⓇ, styrodurⓇ, plastazoteⓇ, and propozoteⓇ) useful for windows of mm-wave photometers and polarimeters. The levels of the induced polarization degree and of the absorption are very small, and difficult to measure accurately. We find induced polarization degrees lower than 0.6 %, and transmissions higher than 97 % for few centimeter thicknesses of our samples. We describe the instrumental setup, the measurements, and the impact of our findings in the design of precision polarimeters for Cosmic Microwave Background measurements. All these materials, with the exception of black plastazoteⓇ, feature transmissions higher than 99 %, and induced polarizations lower than ˜1 % for sample thicknesses around 2-3 cm.

  18. Temporally and spatially resolved measurements of multi-megagauss magnetic fields in high intensity laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, A.; Tatarakis, M.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Clark, E. L.; Dangor, A. E.; Evans, R. G.; Norreys, P. A.; Zepf, M.; Krushelnick, K.

    2008-12-15

    We report spatially and temporally resolved measurements of self-generated multi-megagauss magnetic fields produced during ultrahigh intensity laser plasma interactions. Spatially resolved measurements of the magnetic fields show an asymmetry in the distribution of field with respect to the angle of laser incidence. Temporally resolved measurements of the self-generated third harmonic suggest that the strength of the magnetic field is proportional to the square root of laser intensity (i.e., the laser B-field) during the rise of the laser pulse. The experimental results are compared with numerical simulations using a particle-in-cell code which also shows clear asymmetry of the field profile and similar magnetic field growth rates and scalings.

  19. Use of Dual Polarization Radar in Validation of Satellite Precipitation Measurements: Rationale and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Hou, Arthur; Smith, Eric; Bringi, V. N.; Rutledge, S. A.; Gorgucci, E.; Petersen, W. A.; SkofronickJackson, Gail

    2008-01-01

    Dual-polarization weather radars have evolved significantly in the last three decades culminating in the operational deployment by the National Weather Service. In addition to operational applications in the weather service, dual-polarization radars have shown significant potential in contributing to the research fields of ground based remote sensing of rainfall microphysics, study of precipitation evolution and hydrometeor classification. Furthermore the dual-polarization radars have also raised the awareness of radar system aspects such as calibration. Microphysical characterization of precipitation and quantitative precipitation estimation are important applications that are critical in the validation of satellite borne precipitation measurements and also serves as a valuable tool in algorithm development. This paper presents the important role played by dual-polarization radar in validating space borne precipitation measurements. Starting from a historical evolution, the various configurations of dual-polarization radar are presented. Examples of raindrop size distribution retrievals and hydrometeor type classification are discussed. The quantitative precipitation estimation is a product of direct relevance to space borne observations. During the TRMM program substantial advancement was made with ground based polarization radars specially collecting unique observations in the tropics which are noted. The scientific accomplishments of relevance to space borne measurements of precipitation are summarized. The potential of dual-polarization radars and opportunities in the era of global precipitation measurement mission is also discussed.

  20. Measurement of the transport spin polarization of FeV using point-contact Andreev reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, William; Osofsky, Mike; Bussman, Konrad; Parker, David S; Cheng, L

    2013-01-01

    The Fe1 xVx alloy system exhibits the lowest known Gilbert relaxation rate of any ferromagnetic metal or binary alloy with G1 435MHz at x1 427% V. Low relaxation rates are of particular interest in modern spin electronic applications involving spin torque. The transport spin polarization of a series of sputtered epitaxial Fe1 xVx samples was measured using point contact Andreev reflection. Values of the transport spin polarization agree well with those measured for pure Fe and are independent of composition. The results indicate that the substitution of up to 50% of V for Fe does not reduce the spin polarization in the alloy.

  1. Accurate measurement of the electron beam polarization in JLab Hall A using Compton polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    S. Escoffier; P.Y. Bertin; M. Brossard; E. Burtin; C. Cavata; N. Colombel; C.W. de Jager; A. Delbart; D. Lhuillier; F. Marie; J. Mitchell; D. Neyret; T. Pussieux

    2005-05-01

    A major advance in accurate electron beam polarization measurement has been achieved at Jlab Hall A with a Compton polarimeter based on a Fabry-Perot cavity photon beam amplifier. At an electron energy of 4.6 GeV and a beam current of 40 uA, a total relative uncertainty of 1.5% is typically achieved within 40 min of data taking. Under the same conditions monitoring of the polarization is accurate at a level of 1%. These unprecedented results make Compton polarimetry an essential tool for modern parity-violation experiments, which require very accurate electron beam polarization measurements.

  2. Errors in polarization measurements due to static retardation in photoelastic modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Modine, F.A.; Jellison, G.E. Jr. )

    1993-03-01

    A mathematical description of photoelastic polarization modulators is developed for the general case in which the modulator exhibits a static retardation that is not colinear with the dynamic retardation of the modulator. Simplifying approximations are introduced which are appropriate to practical use of the modulators in polarization measurements. Measurement errors due to the modulator static retardation along with procedures for their elimination are described for reflection ellipsometers, linear dichrometers, and polarimeters.

  3. Time-resolved temperature and O atom measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in combustible mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanier, Suzanne; Bowman, Sherrie; Burnette, David; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents results of time-resolved rotational temperature measurements, by pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and absolute O atom number density measurements, by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence. The experiments were conducted in nanosecond pulse discharges in H2-O2-Ar and C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures, initially at room temperature, operated at a high pulse repetition rate of 40 kHz, in a plane-to-plane double dielectric barrier geometry at a pressure of 40 Torr. Intensified charge-coupled device images show that O2-Ar and H2-O2-Ar plasmas remain diffuse and volume-filling during the entire burst. Images taken in C2H4-O2-Ar plasma demonstrate significant discharge filamentation and constriction along the center plane and in the corners of the test section. The experimental results demonstrate high accuracy of pure rotational psec CARS for thermometry measurements at low partial pressures of oxygen in nonequilibrium plasmas. The results are compared with kinetic modeling calculations, using two different H2-O2 chemistry and C2H4-O2 chemistry mechanisms. In H2-O2-Ar mixtures, the kinetic modeling predictions are in fairly good agreement with the data, predicting temperature rise and O atom accumulation in long discharge bursts, up to 450 pulses. The results show that adding hydrogen to the mixture results in an additional temperature rise, due to its partial oxidation by radicals generated in the plasma, essentially without chain branching. In C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures, the model consistently underpredicts both temperature and O atom number density. The most likely reason for the difference between the experimental data and model predictions is discharge filamentation developing when ethylene is added to the O2-Ar mixture, at fairly low temperatures.

  4. Noise sensitivity in frequency-resolved optical-gating measurements of ultrashort pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.; Ladera, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    Frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), a technique for measuring ultrashort laser pulses, involves producing a spectrogram of the pulse and then retrieving the pulse intensity and phase with an iterative algorithm. We study how several types of noise---multiplicative, additive, and quantization---affect pulse retrieval. We define a convergence criterion and find that the algorithm converges to a reasonable pulse field, even in the presence of 10% noise. Specifically, with appropriate filtering, 1% rms retrieval error is achieved for 10% multiplicative noise, 10% additive noise, and as few as 8 bits of resolution. For additive and multiplicative noise the retrieval errors decrease roughly as the square root of the amount of noise. In addition, the background induced in the wings of the pulse by additive noise is equal to the amount of additive noise on the trace. Thus the dynamic range of the measured intensity and phase is limited by a noise floor equal to the amount of additive noise on the trace. We also find that, for best results, a region of zero intensity should surround the nonzero region of the trace. Consequently, in the presence of additive noise, baseline subtraction is important. We also find that Fourier low-pass filtering improves pulse retrieval without introducing significant distortion, especially in high-noise cases. We show that the field errors in the temporal and the spectral domains are equal. Overall, the algorithm performs well because the measured trace contains {ital N}{sup 2} data points for a pulse that has only 2{ital N} degrees of freedom; FROG has built in redundancy. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Optical} {ital Society} {ital of} {ital America}.

  5. Measurement of vascular water transport in human subjects using time-resolved pulsed arterial spin labelling.

    PubMed

    Bibic, Adnan; Knutsson, Linda; Schmidt, Anders; Henningsson, Erik; Månsson, Sven; Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Åkeson, Jonas; Gunther, Matthias; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Wirestam, Ronnie

    2015-08-01

    Most approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) data analysis aim to provide a quantitative measure of the cerebral blood flow (CBF). This study, however, focuses on the measurement of the transfer time of blood water through the capillaries to the parenchyma (referred to as the capillary transfer time, CTT) as an alternative parameter to characterise the haemodynamics of the system. The method employed is based on a non-compartmental model, and no measurements need to be added to a common time-resolved ASL experiment. Brownian motion of labelled spins in a potential was described by a one-dimensional general Langevin equation as the starting point, and as a Fokker-Planck differential equation for the averaged distribution of labelled spins at the end point, which takes into account the effects of flow and dispersion of labelled water by the pseudorandom nature of the microvasculature and the transcapillary permeability. Multi-inversion time (multi-TI) ASL data were acquired in 14 healthy subjects on two occasions in a test-retest design, using a pulsed ASL sequence and three-dimensional gradient and spin echo (3D-GRASE) readout. Based on an error analysis to predict the size of a region of interest (ROI) required to obtain reasonably precise parameter estimates, data were analysed in two relatively large ROIs, i.e. the occipital lobe (OC) and the insular cortex (IC). The average values of CTT in OC were 260 ± 60 ms in the first experiment and 270 ± 60 ms in the second experiment. The corresponding IC values were 460 ± 130 ms and 420 ± 139 ms, respectively. Information related to the water transfer time may be important for diagnostics and follow-up of cerebral conditions or diseases characterised by a disrupted blood-brain barrier or disturbed capillary blood flow. PMID:26147641

  6. Frequency-resolved Raman for transient thermal probing and thermal diffusivity measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyu; Xu, Shen; Hurley, David H; Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-01-01

    A new transient Raman thermal probing technique, frequency-resolved Raman (FR-Raman), is developed for probing the transient thermal response of materials and measuring their thermal diffusivity. The FR-Raman uses an amplitude-modulated square-wave laser for simultaneous material heating and Raman excitation. The evolution profile of Raman properties: intensity, Raman wavenumber, and emission, against frequency are reconstructed and used for fitting to determine the thermal diffusivity. A microscale silicon (Si) cantilever is used to investigate the capacity of this new technique. The thermal diffusivity is determined as 9.57×10-5  m2/s, 11.00×10-5  m2/s, and 9.02×10-5  m2/s via fitting Raman intensity, wavenumber, and total Raman emission, respectively. The results agree well with literature data. The FR-Raman provides a novel way for transient thermal probing with very high temporal resolution and micrometer-scale spatial resolution. PMID:26696163

  7. Time-resolved stereo PIV measurements of shock-boundary layer interaction on a supercritical airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Axel; Klaas, Michael; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2012-03-01

    Time-resolved stereo particle-image velocimetry (TR-SPIV) and unsteady pressure measurements are used to analyze the unsteady flow over a supercritical DRA-2303 airfoil in transonic flow. The dynamic shock wave-boundary layer interaction is one of the most essential features of this unsteady flow causing a distinct oscillation of the flow field. Results from wind-tunnel experiments with a variation of the freestream Mach number at Reynolds numbers ranging from 2.55 to 2.79 × 106 are analyzed regarding the origin and nature of the unsteady shock-boundary layer interaction. Therefore, the TR-SPIV results are analyzed for three buffet flows. One flow exhibits a sinusoidal streamwise oscillation of the shock wave only due to an acoustic feedback loop formed by the shock wave and the trailing-edge noise. The other two buffet flows have been intentionally influenced by an artificial acoustic source installed downstream of the test section to investigate the behavior of the interaction to upstream-propagating disturbances generated by a defined source of noise. The results show that such upstream-propagating disturbances could be identified to be responsible for the upstream displacement of the shock wave and that the feedback loop is formed by a pulsating separation of the boundary layer dependent on the shock position and the sound pressure level at the shock position. Thereby, the pulsation of the separation could be determined to be a reaction to the shock motion and not vice versa.

  8. Frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of ultrashort pulses by using single nanowire.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    The use of ultrashort pulses for fundamental studies and applications has been increasing rapidly in the past decades. Along with the development of ultrashort lasers, exploring new pulse diagnositic approaches with higher signal-to-noise ratio have attracted great scientific and technological interests. In this work, we demonstrate a simple technique of ultrashort pulses characterization with a single semiconductor nanowire. By performing a frequency-resolved optical gating method with a ZnO nanowire coupled to tapered optical microfibers, the phase and amplitude of a pulse series are extracted. The generated signals from the transverse frequency conversion process can be spatially distinguished from the input, so the signal-to-noise ratio is improved and permits lower energy pulses to be identified. Besides, since the nanometer scale of the nonlinear medium provides relaxed phase-matching constraints, a measurement of 300-nm-wide supercontinuum pulses is achieved. This system is highly compatible with standard optical fiber systems, and shows a great potential for applications such as on-chip optical communication. PMID:27609521

  9. Spatially resolved measurements of electron cyclotron resonance ion source beam profile characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2011-03-15

    Simulations predict that the concentric rings and the triangular structures in the profiles of strongly focused ion beams that are found in different experiments should be dominated by ion species with the same or at least similar m/q-ratio. To verify these theoretical predictions we have tuned our ECR ion source to deliver a beam consisting of multiple ion species whose particular m/q-depending focusing ranges from weakly focused to overfocused. We then recorded spatially resolved charge-state distributions of the beam profile at characteristic positions in the plane perpendicular to the beam line. The results validate theoretical predictions and are summarized in this paper. To achieve the required beam profile characteristics we moved the extraction along the beam line to achieve stronger focusing than by only changing the extraction voltage. To fit the regions of interest of the beam profile into the transmission area of the sector magnet, we steered the beam by moving the extraction in the plane perpendicular to the beam axis. The results of both investigations, beam focusing and beam steering by using a 3D-movable extraction, are also reported in this paper. A brief overview of the new beam monitor extensively used during these measurements, the Faraday cup array, is also given.

  10. High-Speed Hopping: Time-Resolved Tomographic PIV Measurements of Water Flea Swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D. W.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2012-11-01

    Daphniids, also known as water fleas, are small, freshwater crustaceans that live in a low-to-intermediate Reynolds number regime. These plankters are equipped with a pair of branched, setae-bearing antennae that they beat to impulsively propel themselves, or ``hop,'' through the water. A typical hop carries the daphniid one body length forward and is followed by a period of sinking. We present time-resolved tomographic PIV measurements of swimming by Daphnia magna. The body kinematics and flow physics of the daphniid hop are quantified. It is shown that the flow generated by each stroking antenna resembles an asymmetric viscous vortex ring. It is proposed that the flow produced by the daphniid hop can be modeled as a double Stokeslet consisting of two impulsively applied point forces separated by the animal width. The flow physics are discussed in the context of other species operating in the same Reynolds number range of 10 to 100: sea butterfly swimming and flight by the smallest flying insects.

  11. Time-Resolved Aluminum Monoxide Emission Measurements in Laser-Induced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, David; Parigger, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Laser-induced plasmas are useful for diagnostic applications in a wide variety of fields. One application is the creation of laser-induced plasmas on the surface of an aluminum sample to simulate an aluminized flame. In this study, aluminum monoxide emissions are measured to characterize the temperature along the laser-induced plasma as a function of time delay following laser-induced optical breakdown. The breakdown event is achieved by focusing 1064 nanometer laser radiation from an Nd:YAG laser onto the surface of an aluminum sample. Light from the plasma is dispersed with the use of a Czerny-Turner spectrograph, and time resolved emission spectra are recorded with an intensified, gated detector. Temperatures are inferred from the diatomic molecular emissions by fitting the experimentally collected to theoretically calculated spectra using a Nelder-Mead algorithm. For computation of synthetic spectra we utilize accurate line strengths for selected AlO molecular bands. Atomic emissions from aluminum are also investigated in our study of laser-induced plasma.

  12. Time-resolved inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurements with individual, monodisperse drop sample introduction.

    PubMed

    Dziewatkoski, M P; Daniels, L B; Olesik, J W

    1996-04-01

    Individual ion clouds, each produced in the ICP from a single drop of sample, were monitored using time-resolved mass spectrometry and optical emission spectrometry simultaneously. The widths of the ion clouds in the plasma as a function of distance from the point of initial desolvated particle vaporization in the ICP were estimated. The Li(+) cloud width (full width at halfmaximum) varied from 85 to 272 μs at 3 and 10 mm from the apparent vaporization point, respectively. The Sr(+) cloud width varied from 97 to 142 μs at 5 and 10 mm from the apparent vaporization point, respectively. The delays between optical and mass spectrometry signals were used to measure gas velocities in the ICP. The velocity data could then be used to convert ion cloud peak widths in time to cloud sizes in the ICP. Li(+) clouds varied from 2.1 to 6.6 mm (full width at half-maximum) and Sr(+) clouds varied from 2.4 to 3.5 mm at the locations specified above. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from experimental data to be 88, 44, and 24 cm(2)/s for Li(+), Mg(+), and Sr(+), respectively. The flight time of ions from the sampling orifice of the mass spectrometer to the detector were mass dependent and varied from 13 to 21 μs for Mg(+) to 93 to 115 μs for Pb(+). PMID:21619140

  13. Frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of ultrashort pulses by using single nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    The use of ultrashort pulses for fundamental studies and applications has been increasing rapidly in the past decades. Along with the development of ultrashort lasers, exploring new pulse diagnositic approaches with higher signal-to-noise ratio have attracted great scientific and technological interests. In this work, we demonstrate a simple technique of ultrashort pulses characterization with a single semiconductor nanowire. By performing a frequency-resolved optical gating method with a ZnO nanowire coupled to tapered optical microfibers, the phase and amplitude of a pulse series are extracted. The generated signals from the transverse frequency conversion process can be spatially distinguished from the input, so the signal-to-noise ratio is improved and permits lower energy pulses to be identified. Besides, since the nanometer scale of the nonlinear medium provides relaxed phase-matching constraints, a measurement of 300-nm-wide supercontinuum pulses is achieved. This system is highly compatible with standard optical fiber systems, and shows a great potential for applications such as on-chip optical communication. PMID:27609521

  14. Resolving meso-scale seabed variability using reflection measurements from an autonomous underwater vehicle.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W; Nielsen, Peter L; Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan

    2012-02-01

    Seabed geoacoustic variability is driven by geological processes that occur over a wide spectrum of space-time scales. While the acoustics community has some understanding of horizontal fine-scale geoacoustic variability, less than O(10(0)) m, and large-scale variability, greater than O(10(3)) m, there is a paucity of data resolving the geoacoustic meso-scale O(10(0)-10(3)) m. Measurements of the meso-scale along an ostensibly "benign" portion of the outer shelf reveal three classes of variability. The first class was expected and is due to horizontal variability of layer thicknesses: this was the only class that could be directly tied to seismic reflection data. The second class is due to rapid changes in layer properties and/or boundaries, occurring over scales of meters to hundreds of meters. The third class was observed as rapid variations of the angle/frequency dependent reflection coefficient within a single observation and is suggestive of variability at scales of meter or less. Though generally assumed to be negligible in acoustic modeling, the second and third classes are indicative of strong horizontal geoacoustic variability within a given layer. The observations give early insight into possible effects of horizontal geoacoustic variability on long-range acoustic propagation and reverberation. PMID:22352482

  15. Spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements of a dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet applicable for soft ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olenici-Craciunescu, S. B.; Müller, S.; Michels, A.; Horvatic, V.; Vadla, C.; Franzke, J.

    2011-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure microplasma ionization source based on a dielectric barrier discharge with a helium plasma cone outside the electrode region has been developed for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and as ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry. It turned out that dielectric barrier discharge ionization could be regarded as a soft ionization technique characterized by only minor fragmentation similar to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI). Mainly protonated molecules were detected. In order to characterize the soft ionization mechanism spatially resolved optical emission spectrometry (OES) measurements were performed on plasma jets burning either in He or in Ar. Besides to spatial intensity distributions of noble gas spectral lines, in both cases a special attention was paid to lines of N 2+ and N 2. The obtained mapping of the plasma jet shows very different number density distributions of relevant excited species. In the case of helium plasma jet, strong N 2+ lines were observed. In contrast to that, the intensities of N 2 lines in Ar were below the present detection limit. The positions of N 2+ and N 2 distribution maxima in helium indicate the regions where the highest efficiency of the water ionization and the protonation process is expected.

  16. Reprint of: The role of delay times in subcycle-resolved probe retardation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reislöhner, Jan; Pfeiffer, Adrian N.

    2016-08-01

    The delay in the nonlinear response of matter to intense laser pulses has been studied since a long time regarding its nuclear contribution. In contrast, the electronic part of the nonlinear response in wide-band-gap dielectrics, which is usually dominant, is not well explored regarding its delay, and previous studies have revealed that the timescale is below 1 fs. Here, the influence of delay times on the recently introduced method of subcycle-resolved probe retardation measurements is investigated using a simulation. In the model assumed, the electronic nonlinearity is divided into the third order Kerr effect and the plasma contribution due to conduction band population in the strong laser field. In the regime of close-to-collinear pump-probe geometries, the probe retardation shows both π- and 2π-oscillations in the pump-probe delay. Sub-femtosecond delay times influence the phase of the oscillations significantly, but it remains difficult to distinguish the influence of the Kerr response from the plasma contribution.

  17. Design of a portable fluorometer capable of time-resolved luminescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoying

    2004-11-01

    A rugged, filter-based fluorometer capable of time-resolved luminescence (TRL) measurements was designed, prototyped and tested for field applications. The instrument operation and data processing were controlled by a laptop computer running a custom LabVIEW program. A xenon flashlamp was used as the light source and a photomultiplier tube (PMT) as the photodetector. A gating technique was implemented to effectively overcome PMT saturation by intense xenon lamp flash so signal integrity was maintained even at very high gains, leading to improved sensitivity and reproducibility. The instrument was tested by TRL using tetracycline as a model analyte; and the signal was digitized at a 2-μs time resolution and a 12-bit amplitude resolution. Its performance was similar to or slightly better than that of a commercial fluorescence spectrophotometer. A 0-300 ppb linear dynamic range (r2 = 0.9996) and a 0.025-ppb limit of detection (LOD) were achieved with a <=5% relative standard deviation.

  18. Neutron measurements with Time-Resolved Event-Counting Optical Radiation (TRECOR) detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandis, M.; Vartsky, D.; Dangendorf, V.; Bromberger, B.; Bar, D.; Goldberg, M. B.; Tittelmeier, K.; Friedman, E.; Czasch, A.; Mardor, I.; Mor, I.; Weierganz, M.

    2012-04-01

    Results are presented from the latest experiment with a new neutron/gamma detector, a Time-Resolved, Event-Counting Optical Radiation (TRECOR) detector. It is composed of a scintillating fiber-screen converter, bending mirror, lens and Event-Counting Image Intensifier (ECII), capable of specifying the position and time-of-flight of each event. TRECOR is designated for a multipurpose integrated system that will detect Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) and explosives in cargo. Explosives are detected by Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography, and SNM by Dual Discrete-Energy gamma-Radiography. Neutrons and gamma-rays are both produced in the 11B(d,n+γ)12C reaction. The two detection modes can be implemented simultaneously in TRECOR, using two adjacent radiation converters that share a common optical readout. In the present experiment the neutron detection mode was studied, using a plastic scintillator converter. The measurements were performed at the PTB cyclotron, using the 9Be(d,n) neutron spectrum obtained from a thick Be-target at Ed ~ 13 MeV\\@. The basic characteristics of this detector were investigated, including the Contrast Transfer Function (CTF), Point Spread Function (PSF) and elemental discrimination capability.

  19. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry for time-resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Blitz, Mark A.; Goddard, Andrew; Ingham, Trevor; Pilling, Michael J.

    2007-03-15

    A time-resolved time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) that can simultaneously monitor multiple species on the millisecond time scale has been constructed. A pulsed photolysis laser is used to initiate reaction, and then via a pinhole the reaction mixture is sampled by the TOF-MS. The ions are created by photoionization via either a discharge lamp or a pulsed laser. Comparison between the two ionization sources showed that the laser is at least an order of magnitude more efficient, based on the time to accumulate the data. Also, unlike the continuous lamp the pulsed laser is not mass limited. Frequency tripling the 355 nm output of a Nd:YAG laser provided a convenient laser ionization source. However, using a dye laser provided an equally intense laser ionization source with the ability to tune the vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) light. To show the versatility of the system the kinetics of the reaction of SO and ClSO radicals with NO{sub 2} were simultaneously measured, and using the dye laser the vuv light was tuned to 114 nm in order to observe H{sub 2}CO being formed from the reaction between CH{sub 3}CO and O{sub 2}.

  20. A polarization measurement method for the quantification of retardation in optic nerve fiber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Yasufumi; Okazaki, Yoshio; Shioiri, Takashi; Iida, Yukio; Kikuta, Hisao; Ohnuma, Kazuhiko

    2008-02-01

    The thickness measurement of the optic nerve fiber layer is one of the most important evaluations for carrying out glaucoma diagnosis. Because the optic nerve fiber layer has birefringence, the thickness can be measured by illuminating eye optics with circular polarized light and analyzing the elliptical rate of the detected polarized light reflected from the optic nerve fiber layer. In this method, the scattering light from the background and the retardation caused by the cornea disturbs the precise measurement. If the Stokes vector expressing the whole state of polarization can be detected, we can eliminate numerically the influence of the background scattering and of the retardation caused by the cornea. Because the retardation process of the eye optics can be represented by a numerical equation using the retardation matrix of each component and also the nonpolarized background scattering light, it can be calculated by using the Stokes vector. We applied a polarization analysis system that can detect the Stokes vector onto the fundus camera. The polarization analysis system is constructed with a CCD area image sensor, a linear polarizing plate, a micro phase plate array, and a circularly polarized light illumination unit. With this simply constructed system, we can calculate the retardation caused only by the optic nerve fiber layer and it can predict the thickness of the optic nerve fiber layer. We report the method and the results graphically showing the retardation of the optic nerve fiber layer without the retardation of the cornea.